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Sample records for threshold resonant structure

  1. Resonances, cusp effects and a virtual state in e/sup -/-He scattering near the n = 3 thresholds. [Variational methods, resonance, threshold structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesbet, R K [International Business Machines Corp., San Jose, Calif. (USA). Research Lab.

    1978-01-14

    Variational calculations locate and identify resonances and new threshold structures in electron impact excitation of He metastable states, in the region of the 3/sup 3/S and 3/sup 1/S excitation thresholds. A virtual state is found at the 3/sup 3/S threshold.

  2. Resonance phenomena near thresholds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, E.; Mueller, M.; Rotter, I.; Technische Univ. Dresden

    1995-12-01

    The trapping effect is investigated close to the elastic threshold. The nucleus is described as an open quantum mechanical many-body system embedded in the continuum of decay channels. An ensemble of compound nucleus states with both discrete and resonance states is investigated in an energy-dependent formalism. It is shown that the discrete states can trap the resonance ones and also that the discrete states can directly influence the scattering cross section. (orig.)

  3. Threshold enhancement of diphoton resonances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife Bharucha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We revisit a mechanism to enhance the decay width of (pseudo-scalar resonances to photon pairs when the process is mediated by loops of charged fermions produced near threshold. Motivated by the recent LHC data, indicating the presence of an excess in the diphoton spectrum at approximately 750 GeV, we illustrate this threshold enhancement mechanism in the case of a 750 GeV pseudoscalar boson A with a two-photon decay mediated by a charged and uncolored fermion having a mass at the 12MA threshold and a small decay width, <1 MeV. The implications of such a threshold enhancement are discussed in two explicit scenarios: i the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model in which the A state is produced via the top quark mediated gluon fusion process and decays into photons predominantly through loops of charginos with masses close to 12MA and ii a two Higgs doublet model in which A is again produced by gluon fusion but decays into photons through loops of vector-like charged heavy leptons. In both these scenarios, while the mass of the charged fermion has to be adjusted to be extremely close to half of the A resonance mass, the small total widths are naturally obtained if only suppressed three-body decay channels occur. Finally, the implications of some of these scenarios for dark matter are discussed.

  4. Threshold enhancement of diphoton resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Bharucha, Aoife; Goudelis, Andreas

    2016-10-10

    The data collected by the LHC collaborations at an energy of 13 TeV indicates the presence of an excess in the diphoton spectrum that would correspond to a resonance of a 750 GeV mass. The apparently large production cross section is nevertheless very difficult to explain in minimal models. We consider the possibility that the resonance is a pseudoscalar boson $A$ with a two--photon decay mediated by a charged and uncolored fermion having a mass at the $\\frac12 M_A$ threshold and a very small decay width, $\\ll 1$ MeV; one can then generate a large enhancement of the $A\\gamma\\gamma$ amplitude which explains the excess without invoking a large multiplicity of particles propagating in the loop, large electric charges and/or very strong Yukawa couplings. The implications of such a threshold enhancement are discussed in two explicit scenarios: i) the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model in which the $A$ state is produced via the top quark mediated gluon fusion process and decays into photons predominantly through...

  5. Intermediate structure and threshold phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hategan, Cornel

    2004-01-01

    The Intermediate Structure, evidenced through microstructures of the neutron strength function, is reflected in open reaction channels as fluctuations in excitation function of nuclear threshold effects. The intermediate state supporting both neutron strength function and nuclear threshold effect is a micro-giant neutron threshold state. (author)

  6. Resonances above the ionization threshold in positron-hydrogen scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernoghan, A.A.; Walters, H.R.J.; McAlinden, M.T.

    1994-01-01

    Resonances appearing above the ionization threshold in coupled-state calculations of positron-atom scattering are discussed. Calculations in the six state approximation Ps(1s, 2s, 2p) + H(1s, 2s, 2p), which show such resonance structure, are compared with a more extensive 18-state approximation Ps(1s, 2s, 3s, 4s, 2p, 3p, 4p, 3d, 4d) + H(1s, 2s, 3s, 4s, 2p, 3p, 4p, 3d, 4d) in which channels other than 1s, 2s and 2p are represented by pseudostates. The results strongly indicate that the above ionization threshold resonances observed in the six-state approximation, and in other small basis set calculations, are not real. It is suggested that they are a consequence of the neglect, or inadequate representation in other approximations, of ionization channels. In the six-state approximation the positronium component of the system wavefunction attempts to represent the missing ionization channels but in so doing produces unreal resonances above the ionization threshold. More generally it is suggested that, in coupled-state calculations of positron-atom scattering, the atom part of the system wavefunction will try to compensate for defects in the positronium component and vice versa. When the defects are serious, for example, the omission of important ionization channels, unusual spurious behaviour is to be expected. (Author)

  7. Thresholding magnetic resonance images of human brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-mao HU; Wieslaw L NOWINSKI

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, methods are proposed and validated to determine low and high thresholds to segment out gray matter and white matter for MR images of different pulse sequences of human brain. First, a two-dimensional reference image is determined to represent the intensity characteristics of the original three-dimensional data. Then a region of interest of the reference image is determined where brain tissues are present. The non-supervised fuzzy c-means clustering is employed to determine: the threshold for obtaining head mask, the low threshold for T2-weighted and PD-weighted images, and the high threshold for T1-weighted, SPGR and FLAIR images. Supervised range-constrained thresholding is employed to determine the low threshold for T1-weighted, SPGR and FLAIR images. Thresholding based on pairs of boundary pixels is proposed to determine the high threshold for T2- and PD-weighted images. Quantification against public data sets with various noise and inhomogeneity levels shows that the proposed methods can yield segmentation robust to noise and intensity inhomogeneity. Qualitatively the proposed methods work well with real clinical data.

  8. Investigating resonances above and below the threshold in nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Cognata, M., E-mail: lacognata@lns.infn.it [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy); Kiss, G. G. [ATOMKI, Debrecen (Hungary); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Spitaleri, C. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Trippella, O. [Sezione di Perugia - INFN, Perugia (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Resonances in nuclear cross sections dramatically change their trends. Therefore, the presence of unexpected resonances might lead to unpredicted consequences on astrophysics and nuclear physics. In nuclear physics, resonances allow one to study states in the intermediate compound systems, to evaluate their cluster structure, for instance, especially in the energy regions approaching particle decay thresholds. In astrophysics, resonances might lead to changes in the nucleosynthesis flow, determining different isotopic compositions of the nuclear burning ashes. For these reasons, the Trojan Horse method has been modified to investigate resonant reactions. Thanks to this novel approach, for the first time normalization to direct data might be avoided. Moreover, in the case of sub threshold resonances, the Trojan Horse method modified to investigate resonances allows one to deduce the asymptotic normalization coefficient, showing the close connection between the two indirect approaches.

  9. Laser modes and threshold condition i N-mirror resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian; Skettrup, Torben

    1996-01-01

    Two formal methods for finding laser modes and threshold conditions in laser resonators containing as many as N mirrors are presented. The first method is based on an analysis determining the reflectivity and the transmittivity of an N-mirror system with gain. This is an extension of the classical...... 2 × 2 matrix method. The second method is based on self-consistency equations for the system and directly yields the circulating fields of the individual resonators. A set of rules has been proved to allow these fields to be calculated directly by means of inspection. The laser oscillation condition...

  10. Narrow structure in Λd scattering near the Σ threshold (Σ3He states)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, B.F.; Afnan, I.R.

    1991-01-01

    A separable-potential, Faddeev-type calculation of Λ-deuteron scattering near the threshold for Σ production is shown to produce structure (a resonance peak) in the cross section which lies below the Σ threshold for two different YN (ΛN-ΣN coupled-channel) potential models. In one case the ΣNN eigenvalue corresponds to a pole which lies below threshold (bound) and in the second case the poles lies above the threshold

  11. Nucleon structure functions, resonance form factors, and duality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidovsky, V.V.; Struminsky, B.V.

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of nucleon structure functions in the resonance region is explored. For form factors that describe resonance production, expressions are obtained that are dependent on the photon virtuality Q 2 , which have a correct threshold behavior, and which take into account available experimental data on resonance decay. Resonance contributions to nucleon structure functions are calculated. The resulting expressions are used to investigate quark-hadron duality in electron-nucleon scattering by taking the example of the structure function F 2

  12. Resonance contribution to electromagnetic structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowling, A.L. Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The part of the pion and proton electromagnetic structure functions due to direct channel resonances in the virtual Compton amplitude is discussed. After a phenomenological discussion, based on the work of Bloom and Gilman, of resonance production in inelastic electroproduction, the single resonance contribution to the pion and proton structure functions is expressed in terms of transition form factors. Froissart-Gribov representations of the Compton amplitude partial waves are presented and are used to specify the spin dependence of the transition form factors. The dependence of the form factors on momentum transfer and resonance mass is assumed on the basis of the behavior of exclusive resonance electroproduction. The single resonance contributions are summed in the Bjorken limit, and the result exhibits Bjorken scaling. Transverse photons are found to dominate in the Bjorken limit, and the threshold behavior of the resonant part of the structure functions is related to the asymptotic behavior of exclusive form factors at large momentum transfer. The resonant parts of the annihilation structure functions are not in general given by simple analytic continuation in the scaling vari []ble ω' of the electroproduction structure functions. (Diss. Abstr. Int., B)

  13. Development and validation of rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging inflammation thresholds associated with lack of damage progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Joshua F.; Østergaard, Mikkel; Emery, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine thresholds for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) magnetic resonance imaging scores (RAMRIS) associated with a low risk of structural damage progression. Methods MRI of the dominant hand was performed and RAMRIS scores determined at weeks 0, 24, and 52. X-rays were performed and van...

  14. On resonance processes in near threshold excitation of resonance lines of Zn+ ion at electron-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imre, A.I.; Gomonaj, A.N.; Vukstich, V.S.; Nemet, A.N.

    1998-01-01

    The results of spectroscopic investigation of resonances in excitation of near threshold region of separate components of resonance doublet 4p 2 P 1/2,3/2 0 of Zn + ion by electron impact are given in the present work. The physical basis of their production nature is suggested

  15. Double threshold behavior in a resonance-controlled ZnO random laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Niyuki

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We observed unusual lasing characteristics, such as double thresholds and blue-shift of lasing peak, in a resonance-controlled ZnO random laser. From the analysis of lasing threshold carrier density, we found that the lasing at 1st and 2nd thresholds possibly arises from different mechanisms; the lasing at 1st threshold involves exciton recombination, whereas the lasing at 2nd threshold is caused by electron-hole plasma recombination, which is the typical origin of conventional random lasers. These phenomena are very similar to the transition from polariton lasing to photon lasing observed in a well-defined cavity laser.

  16. Above-threshold structure in {sup 244}Cm neutron-induced fission cross section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslov, V.M. [Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Inst., Minsk-Sosny (Belarus)

    1997-03-01

    The quasi-resonance structure appearing above the fission threshold in neutron-induced fission cross section of {sup 244}Cm(n,f) is interpreted. It is shown to be due to excitation of few-quasiparticle states in fissioning {sup 245}Cm and residual {sup 244}Cm nuclides. The estimate of quasiparticle excitation thresholds in fissioning nuclide {sup 245}Cm is consistent with pairing gap and fission barrier parameters. (author)

  17. Photoexcitation by gamma-ray scattering near threshold and giant dipole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakosi, L.; Safar, J.; Veres, A.; Sekine, T.; Kaji, H.; Yoshihara, K.

    1993-01-01

    Photoexcitation of 4.5 h half-life 115m In and 56 min half-life 103m Rh isomers by inelastic gamma-ray scattering near threshold and in the giant dipole resonance region has been reviewed. In disagreement with earlier experimental results available in the literature, but in good agreement with our experiments published recently, present calculations indicate that above the photoneutron emission threshold the isomer excitation drops abruptly and remains orders of magnitude smaller than at the threshold, even around resonance maximum. (author)

  18. Structure of the pygmy dipole resonance in Sn-124

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endres, J.; Savran, D.; Butler, P. A.; Harakeh, M. N.; Harissopulos, S.; Herzberg, R. -D.; Kruecken, R.; Lagoyannis, A.; Litvinova, E.; Pietralla, N.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Popescu, L.; Ring, P.; Scheck, M.; Schlueter, F.; Sonnabend, K.; Stoica, V. I.; Zilges, A.; Wortche, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    Background: In atomic nuclei, a concentration of electric dipole strength around the particle threshold, commonly denoted as pygmy dipole resonance, may have a significant impact on nuclear structure properties and astrophysical scenarios. A clear identification of these states and the structure of

  19. Oscillation thresholds for "striking outwards" reeds coupled to a resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Silva , Fabrice; Kergomard , Jean; Vergez , Christophe

    2007-01-01

    International audience; This paper considers a "striking outwards" reed coupled to a resonator. This expression, due to Helmholtz, is not discussed here : it corresponds to the most common model of a lip-type valve, when the valve is assumed to be a one degree of freedom oscillator. The presented work is an extension of the works done by Wilson and Beavers (1974), Tarnopolsky (2000). The range of the playing frequencies is investigated. The first results are analytical : when no losses are pr...

  20. 16O resonances near the 4α threshold through the 12C(6Li,d) reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Miyake, H.; Duarte, J. L. M.; Rodrigues, C. L.; Souza, M. A.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L. B.; Ukita, G. M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cunsolo, A.; Cavallaro, M.; Agodi, C.; Foti, A.

    2014-02-01

    Background: Resonances around xα thresholds in light nuclei are recognized to be important in basic aspects of nuclear structure. However, there is scarce experimental information associated with them. Purpose: We study the α-clustering phenomenon in resonant states around the 4α threshold (14.44 MeV) in the 16O nucleus. Method: The 12C(6Li,d )16O reaction was investigated with an unprecedented resolution at a bombarding energy of 25.5 MeV by employing the São Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility and the nuclear emulsion technique. Results: Several narrow resonances were populated and the energy resolution of 15 keV allows for the separation of doublet states that were not resolved previously. The upper limits for the resonance widths in this region were extracted. The angular distributions of the absolute differential cross section associated with four natural parity quasibound states are presented and compared to distorted wave Born approximation predictions. Conclusions: Narrow resonances not previously reported in the literature were observed. This indicates that the α-cluster structure information in this region should be revised.

  1. Does the ground-state resonance of 10Li overlap neutron threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVoy, K.W.; Van Isacker, P.

    1994-01-01

    Recent measurements suggest that the ground state of 10 Li is a resonance which may well be wide enough to overlap the (n + 9 Li) threshold. In this context we recall some of the curious properties of resonances located near threshold and entered from a non-decay channel, including their asymmetry and the fact that the peak observed in the cross section occurs at neither the R-matrix nor the S-matrix energy, but rather between the two. Because of these and other complications, it does not seem likely that either the l-value of the resonance or the energy of the corresponding state can accurately be determined form the shape of the resonance peak alone. (authors). 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  2. M series resonant x-ray lines of barium for near threshold electron excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgon, D.V.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of the M series resonant x-ray emission lines of barium for near threshold electron excitation was undertaken with a vacuum double crystal spectrometer equipped with potassium acid phthalate crystals. X-ray continuum isochromats were obtained for barium samples using the double crystal spectrometer as a monochrometer set to pass 532 eV photons. The rotatable anode allowed the samples to be observed by either the double crystal spectrometer or a soft x-ray appearance potential spectrometer, which was used for monitoring the surface of the varium sample for contamination, and to provide a cross-check for the double crystal spectrometer data. Barium M series characteristic x-ray spectra for 2.0 keV electron excitation were obtained for a variety of samples, and it was discovered that the fluorescent and resonant x-ray emission line energies remained virtually the same, regardless of the chemical condition of the sample. The continuum resonance effect was observed for near-threshold energy electron excitation, but it was significantly weaker than the same effect observed previously for lanthanum or cerium. The electron excitation energy and intensity of this effect were strongly dependent on the chemical condition of the barium sample. X-ray continuum isochromats were observed for pure and contaminated barium samples at a photon energy of 532 eV. For pure metallic barium, a peak associated with 4f electronic states was observed at an energy of about 10.2 eV above the Fermi level. When the sample was exposed to 1.5 x 10 4 Langmuir of air, the 4f structure became more sharply peaked, and shifted to an energy of about 12.0 eV above the Fermi level. A continuum isochromat of barium oxide was also observed. Chemical shifts in barium M IV and M V appearance potential spectra are therefore caused soley by shifts in the energy position of the empty 4f electronic states relative to the Fermi level

  3. Low-Threshold Optical Parametric Oscillations in a Whispering Gallery Mode Resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fürst, J. U.; Strekalov, D. V.; Elser, D.

    2010-01-01

    In whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator light is guided by continuous total internal reflection along a curved surface. Fabricating such resonators from an optically nonlinear material one takes advantage of their exceptionally high quality factors and small mode volumes to achieve extremely...... efficient optical frequency conversion. Our analysis of the phase-matching conditions for optical parametric down-conversion (PDC) in a spherical WGM resonator shows their direct relation to the sum rules for photons' angular momenta and predicts a very low parametric oscillation threshold. We realized...... such an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based on naturally phase-matched PDC in lithium niobate. We demonstrated a single-mode, strongly nondegenerate OPO with a threshold of 6.7  μW and linewidth under 10 MHz. This work demonstrates the remarkable capabilities of WGM-based OPOs....

  4. Scattering anomalies in a resonator above the thresholds of the continuous spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarov, S A [St. Petersburg State Politechnical University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-30

    We consider the Dirichlet spectral problem for the Laplace operator in a multi-dimensional domain with a cylindrical outlet to infinity, a Helmholtz resonator. Using asymptotic analysis of the scattering matrix we demonstrate different types of reflection of high-amplitude near-threshold waves. One scattering type or another, unstable or stable with respect to variations of the resonator shapes, is determined by the presence or absence of stabilizing solutions at the threshold frequency, respectively. In a waveguide with two cylindrical outlets to infinity, we discover the effect of almost complete passage of the wave under 'fine tuning' of the resonator. Bibliography: 26 titles.

  5. Threshold resummation of the structure function FL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moch, S.; Vogt, A.

    2009-02-01

    The behaviour of the quark coefficient function for the longitudinal structure function F L in deepinelastic scattering is investigated for large values of the Bjorken variable x. We combine a highly plausible conjecture on the large-x limit of the physical evolution kernel for this quantity with our explicit three-loop results to derive the coefficients of the three leading large-x logarithms, α s n ln 2n-1-k (1-x), k=1,2,3, to all orders in the strong coupling constant α s . Corresponding results are derived for the non-C F part of the gluon coefficient function suppressed by a factor 1-x, and for the analogous subleading (1-x)ln k (1-x) contributions in the quark case. Our results appear to indicate an obstacle for an exponentiation with a higher logarithmic accuracy. (orig.)

  6. A Near-Threshold Shape Resonance in the Valence-Shell Photoabsorption of Linear Alkynes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacovella, U.; Holland, D. M. P.; Boyé-Péronne, S.; Gans, Bérenger; de Oliveira, N.; Ito, K.; Joyeux, D.; Archer, L. E.; Lucchese, R. R.; Xu, Hong; Pratt, S. T.

    2015-12-17

    The room-temperature photoabsorption spectra of a number of linear alkynes with internal triple bonds (e.g., 2-butyne, 2-pentyne, and 2- and 3-hexyne) show similar resonances just above the lowest ionization threshold of the neutral molecules. These features result in a substantial enhancement of the photoabsorption cross sections relative to the cross sections of alkynes with terminal triple bonds (e.g., propyne, 1-butyne, 1-pentyne,...). Based on earlier work on 2-butyne [Xu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 2012, 136, 154303], these features are assigned to excitation from the neutral highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) to a shape resonance with g (l = 4) character and approximate pi symmetry. This generic behavior results from the similarity of the HOMOs in all internal alkynes, as well as the similarity of the corresponding g pi virtual orbital in the continuum. Theoretical calculations of the absorption spectrum above the ionization threshold for the 2- and 3-alkynes show the presence of a shape resonance when the coupling between the two degenerate or nearly degenerate pi channels is included, with a dominant contribution from l = 4. These calculations thus confirm the qualitative arguments for the importance of the l = 4 continuum near threshold for internal alkynes, which should also apply to other linear internal alkynes and alkynyl radicals. The 1-alkynes do not have such high partial waves present in the shape resonance. The lower l partial waves in these systems are consistent with the broader features observed in the corresponding spectra.

  7. 16O resonances near 4α threshold through 12C(6Li,d) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Miyake, H.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L. B.; Duarte, J. L. M.; Rodrigues, C. L.; Faria, P. Neto de; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Foti, A.; Agodi, C.; Cavallaro, M.; Napoli, M. di; Ukita, G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Several narrow alpha resonant 16 O states were detected through the 12 C( 6 Li,d) reaction, in the range of 13.5 to 17.5 MeV of excitation energy. The reaction was measured at a bombarding energy of 25.5 MeV employing the São Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility and the nuclear emulsion technique. Experimental angular distributions associated with natural parity quasi-bound states around the 4α threshold are presented and compared to DWBA predictions. The upper limit for the resonance widths obtained is near the energy resolution (15 keV)

  8. 16O resonances near 4α threshold through 12C (6Li,d ) reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Miyake, H.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L. B.; Duarte, J. L. M.; Rodrigues, C. L.; de Faria, P. Neto; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Foti, A.; Agodi, C.; Cavallaro, M.; di Napoli, M.; Ukita, G. M.

    2014-11-01

    Several narrow alpha resonant 16O states were detected through the 12C (6Li,d ) reaction, in the range of 13.5 to 17.5 MeV of excitation energy. The reaction was measured at a bombarding energy of 25.5 MeV employing the São Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility and the nuclear emulsion technique. Experimental angular distributions associated with natural parity quasi-bound states around the 4α threshold are presented and compared to DWBA predictions. The upper limit for the resonance widths obtained is near the energy resolution (15 keV).

  9. Resonant photoemission at core-level shake-up thresholds: Valence-band satellites in nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerneholm, O.; Andersen, J.N.; Wigren, C.; Nilsson, A.; Nyholm, R.; Ma; Ortensson, N.

    1990-01-01

    Three-hole satellites (3d 7 final-state configuration) in the nickel valence-band photoelectron spectrum have been identified at 13 and 18 eV binding energy with use of synchrotron radiation from the MAX storage ring. The three-hole satellites show resonances at photon energies close to the threshold for excitation of 3p 5 3d 9 core-hole shake-up states. The 13-eV satellite also shows a resonance directly at the 3p threshold. This is interpreted as an interference between the direct three-hole ionization and a shake-up transition in the Auger decay of the 3p hole. This shake-up process is also identified directly in the M 2,3 M 4,5 M 4,5 Auger spectrum

  10. Resonant-enhanced above-threshold ionization of atoms by XUV short laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, V.D. [Departamento de Fisica, FCEyN, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: vladimir@df.uba.ar; Macri, P.A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR), Departamento de Fisica, FCEyN, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, CONICET, Funes 3350, 7600 Mar del Plata (Argentina); Arbo, D.G. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, UBA-CONICET, CC 67 Suc 28 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-01-15

    Above-threshold ionization of atoms by XUV short laser pulses is investigated close to the resonant 1s-2p transitions. Both ab initio TDSE and a theoretical Coulomb-Volkov like theory are used to study the enhancement in the ionization probabilities. Our modified Coulomb-Volkov theory, fully accounting for the important 1s-2p transition is able to explain the spectrum as well as the total ionization cross sections.

  11. Excitation-energy-dependent resonances in x-ray emissions under near-threshold electron excitation of the Ce 3d and 4d levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, M.B.; Baun, W.L.

    1975-01-01

    Soft x-ray appearance potential spectra of the 3d and 4d levels of polycrystalline cerium metal are reported in this paper. Resonant x-ray emissions are observed when the electron-excitation energy sweeps through the ionization energies of the 3d and 4d levels. The resonant x rays excited at the 3d-level onsets are considerably more intense, and are excited at a lower electron-excitation energy than the 3d-series characteristic x rays. In the neighborhood of the 4d-electron thresholds, four line-like structures extend to approx.8 eV below the 4d-electron binding energies, while two broad and more intense structures occur above the 4d onsets, with the largest one reaching a peak intensity at 12 eV above the 4d thresholds. The resonant emissions apparently arise from the decay of threshold-excited states which are bound to the inner vacancy and have core configurations nd 9 4f 3 , (n=3,4). The exchange interaction between the three 4f electrons and the respective d-orbital vacancy spreads the 4d-threshold structures over a 20 eV range of excitation energies and the 3d-threshold structures over a much smaller range

  12. Novel threshold pressure sensors based on nonlinear dynamics of MEMS resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohammad H.; Alsaleem, Fadi M.; Ouakad, Hassen M.

    2018-06-01

    Triggering an alarm in a car for low air-pressure in the tire or tripping an HVAC compressor if the refrigerant pressure is lower than a threshold value are examples for applications where measuring the amount of pressure is not as important as determining if the pressure has exceeded a threshold value for an action to occur. Unfortunately, current technology still relies on analog pressure sensors to perform this functionality by adding a complex interface (extra circuitry, controllers, and/or decision units). In this paper, we demonstrate two new smart tunable-threshold pressure switch concepts that can reduce the complexity of a threshold pressure sensor. The first concept is based on the nonlinear subharmonic resonance of a straight double cantilever microbeam with a proof mass and the other concept is based on the snap-through bi-stability of a clamped-clamped MEMS shallow arch. In both designs, the sensor operation concept is simple. Any actuation performed at a certain pressure lower than a threshold value will activate a nonlinear dynamic behavior (subharmonic resonance or snap-through bi-stability) yielding a large output that would be interpreted as a logic value of ONE, or ON. Once the pressure exceeds the threshold value, the nonlinear response ceases to exist, yielding a small output that would be interpreted as a logic value of ZERO, or OFF. A lumped, single degree of freedom model for the double cantilever beam, that is validated using experimental data, and a continuous beam model for the arch beam, are used to simulate the operation range of the proposed sensors by identifying the relationship between the excitation signal and the critical cut-off pressure.

  13. Threshold and Lennard-Jones resonances and elastic lifetimes in the scattering of atoms from crystalline surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, N.

    1978-01-01

    The GR method for solving the scattering equations of atoms from a hard corrugated surface is applied on accelerated particles above a hard corrugated surface and a hard corrugated surface with an attractive well. The solutions are given for the Rayleigh hypothesis that under the range of corrugation presented in this paper leads to the exact ones. Threshold resonances are studied observing that the appearance and disappearance of beams must be for a general theory with vertical tangent. The structure of the Lennard-Jones resonances given for the model mentioned above. For the first time it is stressed that Lennard-Jones resonances are not observed in metal surfaces in general, and, accordingly, they are unobserved in compact metallic surfaces. This is correlated with the fact that diffraction has not been observed. Both facts are due to the very weak corrugation of the gas-metal interaction potential. According to our results, the Lennard-Jones resonances in metals present greater difficulties to be observed experimentally. It is also noted that the absence of diffraction in compact metal surfaces is because they are almost plane and not because of the Debye-Waller effect. Finally, the lifetimes of the atoms at the crystal surfaces are calculated. These are larger, the smaller the incident energy and the larger the corrugation. But the lifetimes are particularly large at resonance conditions (10 -11 s). (Auth.)

  14. Quantum trajectories in elastic atom-surface scattering: threshold and selective adsorption resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, A S; Miret-Artés, S

    2005-01-01

    The elastic resonant scattering of He atoms off the Cu(117) surface is fully described with the formalism of quantum trajectories provided by Bohmian mechanics. Within this theory of quantum motion, the concept of trapping is widely studied and discussed. Classically, atoms undergo impulsive collisions with the surface, and then the trapped motion takes place covering at least two consecutive unit cells. However, from a Bohmian viewpoint, atom trajectories can smoothly adjust to the equipotential energy surface profile in a sort of sliding motion; thus the trapping process could eventually occur within one single unit cell. In particular, both threshold and selective adsorption resonances are explained by means of this quantum trapping considering different space and time scales. Furthermore, a mapping between each region of the (initial) incoming plane wave and the different parts of the diffraction and resonance patterns can be easily established, an important issue only provided by a quantum trajectory formalism. (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Resonance amplification of the nuclear reaction X(a,b)Y near the a+X channel threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melezhik, V.S.

    1991-01-01

    Deviation of the cross section for the nuclear reaction X(a,b)Y from the Gamow formula due to an interaction additional to the Coulomb one in the entrance channel has been analyzed. It is shown that the reaction cross section has an oscillating structure at low energies. If the maximum of the first oscillation is close to the threshold of the channel a+X, it has a resonance behaviour. The peculiarity of the cross sections leads to the resonance amplification of the rate for a muon-catalyzed fusion reaction ('in flight' fusion) tμ+d→ 4 He+n+μ at the energy =76 eV and may influence the μ-capture rate in a dense mixture of hydrogen isotopes. 26 refs.; 4 figs

  16. Looking inside giant resonance fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev, V.Yu.; Voronov, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Microscopic calculations of the fine structure of giant resonances for spherical nuclei are presented. Excited states are treated by wave function which takes into account coupling of simple one-phonon configurations with more complex ones. Nuclear structure calculations are applied to the description of the γ-decay of resonances into the ground and low-lying excited states. 16 refs.; 4 figs

  17. Above-threshold ionization of atoms by resonant XUV laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, V D [Departamento de Fisica and IFIBA-CONICET, FCEyN, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Arbo, D G [Instituto de AstronomIa y Fisica del Espacio, FCEN-UBA CONICET, CC 67 Suc 28 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Macri, P A, E-mail: vladimir@df.uba.ar [Departamento de Fisica, FCEyN, Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR), Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata-CONICET, Funes 3350, 7600 Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2011-06-28

    Above-threshold ionization of atoms by XUV short laser pulses with frequencies close to the resonant 1s-2p transition is investigated. We present a theory based on a variational expression using trial wavefunctions for the final and the initial states. For the former we use a Coulomb-Volkov wavefunction, and for the latter a close-coupling solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation considering a few bound states. The close-coupling Coulomb-Volkov theory, fully accounting for the important 1s-2p transition, explains the photoelectron spectrum as well as the total ionization cross sections for the resonant case. We also compare the partial wave populations and angular distributions given by the theory with the numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation.

  18. Interactive thresholded volumetry of abdominal fat using breath-hold T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittsack, H.J.; Cohnen, M.; Jung, G.; Moedder, U.; Poll, L.; Kapitza, C.; Heinemann, L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: development of a feasible and reliable method for determining abdominal fat using breath-hold T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: the high image contrast of T1-weighted gradient echo MR sequences makes it possible to differentiate between abdominal fat and non-fat tissue. To obtain a high signal-to-noise ratio, the measurements are usually performed using phased array surface coils. Inhomogeneity of the coil sensitivity leads to inhomogeneity of the image intensities. Therefore, to examine the volume of abdominal fat, an automatic algorithm for intensity correction must be implemented. The analysis of the image histogram results in a threshold to separate fat from other tissue. Automatic segmentation using this threshold results directly in the fat volumes. The separation of intraabdominal and subcutaneous fat is performed by interactive selection in a last step. Results: the described correction of inhomogeneity allows for the segmentation of the images using a global threshold. The use of semiautomatic interactive volumetry makes the analysis more subjective. The variance of volumetry between observers was 4.6%. The mean time for image analysis of a T1-weighted investigation lasted less than 6 minutes. Conclusion: the described method facilitates reliable determination of abdominal fat within a reasonable period of time. Using breath-hold MR sequences, the time of examination is less than 5 minutes per patient. (orig.)

  19. Resonant Electromagnetic Shunt Damping of Flexible Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic transducers convert mechanical energy to electrical energy and vice versa. Effective passive vibration damping of flexible structures can therefore be introduced by shunting with an accurately calibrated resonant electrical network thatcontains a capacitor to create the desired...

  20. Active resonance tuning of stretchable plasmonic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2012-01-01

    Active resonance tuning is highly desired for the applications of plasmonic structures, such as optical switches and surface enhanced Raman substrates. In this paper, we demonstrate the active tunable plasmonic structures, which composed of monolayer arrays of metallic semishells with dielectric...... cores on stretchable elastic substrates. These composite structures support Bragg-type surface plasmon resonances whose frequencies are sensitive to the arrangement of the metallic semishells. Under uniaxial stretching, the lattice symmetry of these plasmonic structures can be reconfigured from...... applications of the stretch-tunable plasmonic structures in sensing, switching, and filtering....

  1. How to detect and visualize extinction thresholds for structured PVA models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hildenbrandt, H.; Grimm, V.

    2006-01-01

    An extinction threshold is a population size below which extinction risk increases to beyond critical values. However, detecting extinction thresholds for structured population models is not straightforward because many different population structures may correspond to the same population size.

  2. Resonant coupling applied to superconducting accelerator structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, James M.; Krawczyk, Frank L.

    2013-01-01

    The concept of resonant coupling and the benefits that accrue from its application is well known in the world of room temperature coupled cavity linacs. Design studies show that it can be applied successfully between sections of conventional elliptical superconducting coupled cavity accelerator structures and internally to structures with spoked cavity resonators. The coupling mechanisms can be designed without creating problems with high field regions or multipactoring. The application of resonant coupling to superconducting accelerators eliminates the need for complex cryogenic mechanical tuners and reduces the time needed to bring a superconducting accelerator into operation.

  3. Resonantly-enhanced two-photon ionization and mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of 2-hydroxypyridine

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, D H; Choi, K W; Choi, Y S; Kim, S K

    2002-01-01

    Mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectra of 2-hydroxypyridines existing as lactims (2-pyridionl) in a molecular beam are obtained via (1+1') two-photon process to give accurate ionization energies of 8.9344 +- 0.0005 and 8.9284 +- 0.0005 eV for 2-pyridinol (2Py-OH) and its deuterated analogue (2Py-OD), respectively. Resonantly-enhanced two-photon ionization spectra of these compounds are also presented to give vibrational structures of their S sub 1 states. Vibrational frequencies of 2Py-OH and 2Py-OD in ionic ground states are accurately determined from MATI spectra taken via various S sub 1 intermediate states, and associated vibrational modes are assigned with the aid of ab initio calculations.

  4. Mode structure of active resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ernst, G.J.; Witteman, W.J.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis is made of the mode structure of lasers when the interaction with the active medium is taken into account. We consider the combined effect of gain and refractive-index variations for arbitrary mirror configurations. Using a dimensionless round-trip matrix for a medium with a quadratic

  5. Effects on Vocal Fold Collision and Phonation Threshold Pressure of Resonance Tube Phonation with Tube End in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enflo, Laura; Sundberg, Johan; Romedahl, Camilla; McAllister, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Resonance tube phonation in water (RTPW) or in air is a voice therapy method successfully used for treatment of several voice pathologies. Its effect on the voice has not been thoroughly studied. This investigation analyzes the effects of RTPW on collision and phonation threshold pressures (CTP and PTP), the lowest subglottal pressure…

  6. Optimal resonant control of flexible structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen; Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    2009-01-01

    When introducing a resonant controller for a particular vibration mode in a structure this mode splits into two. A design principle is developed for resonant control based oil equal damping of these two modes. First the design principle is developed for control of a system with a single degree...... of freedom, and then it is extended to multi-mode structures. A root locus analysis of the controlled single-mode structure identifies the equal modal damping property as a condition oil the linear and Cubic terms of the characteristic equation. Particular solutions for filtered displacement feedback...... and filtered acceleration feedback are developed by combining the root locus analysis with optimal properties of the displacement amplification frequency curve. The results are then extended to multi-mode structures by including a quasi-static representation of the background modes in the equations...

  7. Tunneling and resonant conductance in one-dimensional molecular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozhushner, M.A.; Posvyanskii, V.S.; Oleynik, I.I.

    2005-01-01

    We present a theory of tunneling and resonant transitions in one-dimensional molecular systems which is based on Green's function theory of electron sub-barrier scattering off the structural units (or functional groups) of a molecular chain. We show that the many-electron effects are of paramount importance in electron transport and they are effectively treated using a formalism of sub-barrier scattering operators. The method which calculates the total scattering amplitude of the bridge molecule not only predicts the enhancement of the amplitude of tunneling transitions in course of tunneling electron transfer through onedimensional molecular structures but also allows us to interpret conductance mechanisms by calculating the bound energy spectrum of the tunneling electron, the energies being obtained as poles of the total scattering amplitude of the bridge molecule. We found that the resonant tunneling via bound states of the tunneling electron is the major mechanism of electron conductivity in relatively long organic molecules. The sub-barrier scattering technique naturally includes a description of tunneling in applied electric fields which allows us to calculate I-V curves at finite bias. The developed theory is applied to explain experimental findings such as bridge effect due to tunneling through organic molecules, and threshold versus Ohmic behavior of the conductance due to resonant electron transfer

  8. Nanoimprinted polymer lasers with threshold below 100 W/cm2 using mixed-order distributed feedback resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Tsiminis, Georgios; Kanibolotsky, Alexander L; Skabara, Peter J; Samuel, Ifor D W; Turnbull, Graham A

    2013-06-17

    Organic semiconductor lasers were fabricated by UV-nanoimprint lithography with thresholds as low as 57 W/cm(2) under 4 ns pulsed operation. The nanoimprinted lasers employed mixed-order distributed feedback resonators, with second-order gratings surrounded by first-order gratings, combined with a light-emitting conjugated polymer. They were pumped by InGaN LEDs to produce green-emitting lasers, with thresholds of 208 W/cm(2) (102 nJ/pulse). These hybrid lasers incorporate a scalable UV-nanoimprint lithography process, compatible with high-performance LEDs, therefore we have demonstrated a coherent, compact, low-cost light source.

  9. {sup 16}O resonances near 4α threshold through {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,d) reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Miyake, H.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L. B.; Duarte, J. L. M.; Rodrigues, C. L.; Faria, P. Neto de [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05314-970, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Foti, A.; Agodi, C.; Cavallaro, M. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Napoli, M. di; Ukita, G. M. [Faculdade de Psicologia, Universidade de Santo Amaro, R. Prof. Eneas da Siqueira Neto, 340, CEP 04829-300, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-11-11

    Several narrow alpha resonant {sup 16}O states were detected through the {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,d) reaction, in the range of 13.5 to 17.5 MeV of excitation energy. The reaction was measured at a bombarding energy of 25.5 MeV employing the São Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility and the nuclear emulsion technique. Experimental angular distributions associated with natural parity quasi-bound states around the 4α threshold are presented and compared to DWBA predictions. The upper limit for the resonance widths obtained is near the energy resolution (15 keV)

  10. Fatigue crack growth thresholds measurements in structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstroem, R.; Lidar, P.; Rosborg, B.

    1999-05-01

    Fatigue crack growth thresholds and da/dN-data at low Δk I -values ( 1/2 ) have been determined for type 304 stainless steel, nickel-base weld metal Alloy 182, nickel-base metal Alloy 600, and low-alloy steel in air at ambient temperature and in high-temperature water and steam. The stainless alloys have been tested in water with 0.2 ppm O 2 at 288 deg C and the low-alloy steel in steam at 286 deg C. The fatigue crack growth threshold was defined as the ΔK I -value resulting in a crack growth rate of 10 -7 mm per cycle. The measured fatigue crack growth thresholds (at frequencies from 0.5 to 20 Hz) are quite similar independent of the material and the environment. A relatively inexpensive and time-saving method for measuring fatigue crack growth thresholds, and fatigue crack growth rates at low ΔK I -values, has been used in the tests. The method is a ΔK I -decreasing test with constant K I Max

  11. Fine structures in hearing thresholds and distortion product otoacoustic emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammershøi, Dorte; Ordoñez, Rodrigo Pizarro; Torrente, Marina

    2010-01-01

    Otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) are weak sounds that can be recorded in the external ear. They are generated by the active amplification of the outer hair cells, and are by many believed to reflect the status of the most vulnerable part of the hearing better than ordinary behavioral thresholds. Dist...

  12. Improved protein structure reconstruction using secondary structures, contacts at higher distance thresholds, and non-contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Badri; Cheng, Jianlin

    2017-08-29

    Residue-residue contacts are key features for accurate de novo protein structure prediction. For the optimal utilization of these predicted contacts in folding proteins accurately, it is important to study the challenges of reconstructing protein structures using true contacts. Because contact-guided protein modeling approach is valuable for predicting the folds of proteins that do not have structural templates, it is necessary for reconstruction studies to focus on hard-to-predict protein structures. Using a data set consisting of 496 structural domains released in recent CASP experiments and a dataset of 150 representative protein structures, in this work, we discuss three techniques to improve the reconstruction accuracy using true contacts - adding secondary structures, increasing contact distance thresholds, and adding non-contacts. We find that reconstruction using secondary structures and contacts can deliver accuracy higher than using full contact maps. Similarly, we demonstrate that non-contacts can improve reconstruction accuracy not only when the used non-contacts are true but also when they are predicted. On the dataset consisting of 150 proteins, we find that by simply using low ranked predicted contacts as non-contacts and adding them as additional restraints, can increase the reconstruction accuracy by 5% when the reconstructed models are evaluated using TM-score. Our findings suggest that secondary structures are invaluable companions of contacts for accurate reconstruction. Confirming some earlier findings, we also find that larger distance thresholds are useful for folding many protein structures which cannot be folded using the standard definition of contacts. Our findings also suggest that for more accurate reconstruction using predicted contacts it is useful to predict contacts at higher distance thresholds (beyond 8 Å) and predict non-contacts.

  13. Pedestal bifurcation and resonant field penetration at the threshold of edge-localized mode suppression in the DIII-D Tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazikian, R; Paz-Soldan, C; Callen, J D; deGrassie, J S; Eldon, D; Evans, T E; Ferraro, N M; Grierson, B A; Groebner, R J; Haskey, S R; Hegna, C C; King, J D; Logan, N C; McKee, G R; Moyer, R A; Okabayashi, M; Orlov, D M; Osborne, T H; Park, J-K; Rhodes, T L; Shafer, M W; Snyder, P B; Solomon, W M; Strait, E J; Wade, M R

    2015-03-13

    Rapid bifurcations in the plasma response to slowly varying n=2 magnetic fields are observed as the plasma transitions into and out of edge-localized mode (ELM) suppression. The rapid transition to ELM suppression is characterized by an increase in the toroidal rotation and a reduction in the electron pressure gradient at the top of the pedestal that reduces the perpendicular electron flow there to near zero. These events occur simultaneously with an increase in the inner-wall magnetic response. These observations are consistent with strong resonant field penetration of n=2 fields at the onset of ELM suppression, based on extended MHD simulations using measured plasma profiles. Spontaneous transitions into (and out of) ELM suppression with a static applied n=2 field indicate competing mechanisms of screening and penetration of resonant fields near threshold conditions. Magnetic measurements reveal evidence for the unlocking and rotation of tearinglike structures as the plasma transitions out of ELM suppression.

  14. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deblaere, Karel; Achten, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  15. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deblaere, Karel [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University Hospital, MR Department - 1K12, Ghent (Belgium); Achten, Eric [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-01-15

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  16. Spectral structure of the pygmy dipole resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonchev, A P; Hammond, S L; Kelley, J H; Kwan, E; Lenske, H; Rusev, G; Tornow, W; Tsoneva, N

    2010-02-19

    High-sensitivity studies of E1 and M1 transitions observed in the reaction 138Ba(gamma,gamma{'}) at energies below the one-neutron separation energy have been performed using the nearly monoenergetic and 100% linearly polarized photon beams of the HIgammaS facility. The electric dipole character of the so-called "pygmy" dipole resonance was experimentally verified for excitations from 4.0 to 8.6 MeV. The fine structure of the M1 "spin-flip" mode was observed for the first time in N=82 nuclei.

  17. Threshold states in /sup 26/Al. Pt. 2. Extraction of resonance strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champagne, A E; Howard, A J; Parker, P D [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA). Wright Nuclear Structure Lab.

    1983-06-20

    The total width of the Esub(c.m.)=376 keV resonance in the /sup 25/Mg+p system has been measured using the /sup 25/Mg(p,..gamma..)/sup 26/Al reaction and is found to be 460+-70 eV. From this information, a resonance strength ..omega gamma..=5.7x10/sup 16/ eV is obtained for the astrophysically important 37.2 keV resonance in /sup 26/Al through an R-matrix parameterization of the relative energy dependence of the resonance width. In a similar manner, an upper limit ..omega gamma..<=1.0x10/sup -11/ eV is deduced for a possible resonance at Esub(c.m.)=94.0 keV.

  18. Structured decision making as a conceptual framework to identify thresholds for conservation and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J.; Runge, M.C.; Nichols, J.D.; Lubow, B.C.; Kendall, W.L.

    2009-01-01

    Thresholds and their relevance to conservation have become a major topic of discussion in the ecological literature. Unfortunately, in many cases the lack of a clear conceptual framework for thinking about thresholds may have led to confusion in attempts to apply the concept of thresholds to conservation decisions. Here, we advocate a framework for thinking about thresholds in terms of a structured decision making process. The purpose of this framework is to promote a logical and transparent process for making informed decisions for conservation. Specification of such a framework leads naturally to consideration of definitions and roles of different kinds of thresholds in the process. We distinguish among three categories of thresholds. Ecological thresholds are values of system state variables at which small changes bring about substantial changes in system dynamics. Utility thresholds are components of management objectives (determined by human values) and are values of state or performance variables at which small changes yield substantial changes in the value of the management outcome. Decision thresholds are values of system state variables at which small changes prompt changes in management actions in order to reach specified management objectives. The approach that we present focuses directly on the objectives of management, with an aim to providing decisions that are optimal with respect to those objectives. This approach clearly distinguishes the components of the decision process that are inherently subjective (management objectives, potential management actions) from those that are more objective (system models, estimates of system state). Optimization based on these components then leads to decision matrices specifying optimal actions to be taken at various values of system state variables. Values of state variables separating different actions in such matrices are viewed as decision thresholds. Utility thresholds are included in the objectives

  19. A Novel Compressed Sensing Method for Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Exponential Wavelet Iterative Shrinkage-Thresholding Algorithm with Random Shift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudong Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. It can help improve the hospital throughput to accelerate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scanning. Patients will benefit from less waiting time. Task. In the last decade, various rapid MRI techniques on the basis of compressed sensing (CS were proposed. However, both computation time and reconstruction quality of traditional CS-MRI did not meet the requirement of clinical use. Method. In this study, a novel method was proposed with the name of exponential wavelet iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm with random shift (abbreviated as EWISTARS. It is composed of three successful components: (i exponential wavelet transform, (ii iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm, and (iii random shift. Results. Experimental results validated that, compared to state-of-the-art approaches, EWISTARS obtained the least mean absolute error, the least mean-squared error, and the highest peak signal-to-noise ratio. Conclusion. EWISTARS is superior to state-of-the-art approaches.

  20. A Novel Compressed Sensing Method for Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Exponential Wavelet Iterative Shrinkage-Thresholding Algorithm with Random Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yudong; Yang, Jiquan; Yang, Jianfei; Liu, Aijun; Sun, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Aim. It can help improve the hospital throughput to accelerate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning. Patients will benefit from less waiting time. Task. In the last decade, various rapid MRI techniques on the basis of compressed sensing (CS) were proposed. However, both computation time and reconstruction quality of traditional CS-MRI did not meet the requirement of clinical use. Method. In this study, a novel method was proposed with the name of exponential wavelet iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm with random shift (abbreviated as EWISTARS). It is composed of three successful components: (i) exponential wavelet transform, (ii) iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm, and (iii) random shift. Results. Experimental results validated that, compared to state-of-the-art approaches, EWISTARS obtained the least mean absolute error, the least mean-squared error, and the highest peak signal-to-noise ratio. Conclusion. EWISTARS is superior to state-of-the-art approaches. PMID:27066068

  1. Interaction between resonances through autoionization continua near the 4s-threshold in KrII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demekhin, Ph V; Petrov, I D; Lagutin, B M; Sukhorukov, V L; Vollweiler, F; Klumpp, S; Ehresmann, A; Schartner, K-H; Schmoranzer, H

    2005-01-01

    The interaction between resonances through autoionization continua and the interaction between autoionization continua were investigated theoretically and experimentally for the photoionization process of the 4p- and 4s-shells and for the population of 4p 4 ( 3 P)5s 4 P J , 4p 4 ( 3 P)5s 2 P J and 4p 4 ( 3 P)4d 4 D J satellites of KrII. Cross sections for the satellite production and the angular distribution parameter of the fluorescence radiation were measured by photon-induced fluorescence spectroscopy after excitationx with linearly polarized monochromatized synchrotron radiation at exciting-photon energies between 28.45 eV and 29.95 eV with an exciting-photon energy resolution of 10 meV (FWHM). Measured cross sections are in good agreement with the computed ones. A refined assignment of resonances in the proximity of the 4s 1 4p 6 5p resonance was performed. It was concluded that there is a strong influence of the core rearrangement, of the interaction between resonances through the autoionization continua and of the interaction between autoionization continua, on the investigated processes on the basis of the observed good overall agreement between the computed and measured quantities

  2. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvie, T.P.

    1989-10-01

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed

  3. Alignment dependence in above-threshold ionization of H2+: role of intermediate resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernández, Jorge Fernández; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2009-01-01

    We report a 3D ab initio investigation of the dependence of above-threshold ionization of the H2+ molecule on the orientation of a linearly polarized intense femtosecond laser pulse with respect to the molecular axis. The calculations were performed in the frozen nuclei approximation for the 2Σ+g(1......sσg) ground and the 2Σ+u(2pσu) first excited electronic states, in laser pulses of seven optical cycles (19 fs) with a wavelength of 800 nm and for different intensities. The numerical procedure combines two different techniques, a grid-based split-step method to propagate the wave packet during...... the pulse, and a bound and scattering states B-spline basis set calculation to extract the information from the former. We show that the orientation dependence of the above-threshold ionization spectra is very sensitive to the intensity of the field and to the final electron energy. For some intensities...

  4. Nuclear Fusion Rate Study of a Muonic Molecule via Nuclear Threshold Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, F.; Eskandari, M. R.

    This work follows our previous calculations of the ground state binding energy, size, and the effective nuclear charge of the muonic T3 molecule, using the Born-Oppenheimer adiabatic approximation. In our past articles, we showed that the system possesses two minimum positions, the first one at the muonic distance and the second at the atomic distance. Also, the symmetric planner vibrational model assumed between the two minima and the approximated potential were calculated. Following from the previous studies, we now calculate the fusion rate of the T3 muonic molecule according to the overlap integral of the resonance nuclear compound nucleus and the molecular wave functions.

  5. Doubly excited 1,3Po resonances of helium below the N=2–9 ionisation thresholds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieng, M.; Sakho, I.; Biaye, M.; Wagué, A.

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach is used to evaluate energies of singlet and triplet resonance states of helium below the N=2–9 hydrogenic thresholds. We have combined the variational method with the no-linear parameters of Hylleraas and the β-parameters of screening constant by unit nuclear charge. Comparison with various available theoretical and experimental literature values indicates a good agreement. - Hightlights: • A simple approach, to calculate inter-shell n (K,T) N A1,3 P o states. • The calculations use two methods combined. • A simple expression is used to calculate intershell 1,3 P o states. • Satisfactory agreements between theoretical and experimental literature values up to Z=10

  6. Measurement of elastic modules of structural ceramic by acoustic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Bong Young; Lee Seong Suck; Kim, Young Gil

    1993-01-01

    Elastic moduli of structural ceramic materials, Al 2 O 3 , SiC, Si 3 N 4 , were measured by acoustic resonance method. Young's modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson's ratio were calculated from the torsional and flexural resonant frequencies, densities, and the dimensions of the specimen. The results by acoustic resonance method were compared with the results by ultrasonic method and the differences were less than 4%.

  7. Statistical Modelling of Resonant Cross Section Structure in URR, Model of the Characteristic Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyumdjieva, N.

    2006-01-01

    A statistical model for the resonant cross section structure in the Unresolved Resonance Region has been developed in the framework of the R-matrix formalism in Reich Moore approach with effective accounting of the resonance parameters fluctuations. The model uses only the average resonance parameters and can be effectively applied for analyses of cross sections functional, averaged over many resonances. Those are cross section moments, transmission and self-indication functions measured through thick sample. In this statistical model the resonant cross sections structure is accepted to be periodic and the R-matrix is a function of ε=E/D with period 0≤ε≤N; R nc (ε)=π/2√(S n *S c )1/NΣ(i=1,N)(β in *β ic *ctg[π(ε i - = ε-iS i )/N]; Here S n ,S c ,S i is respectively neutron strength function, strength function for fission or inelastic channel and strength function for radiative capture, N is the number of resonances (ε i ,β i ) that obey the statistic of Porter-Thomas and Wigner's one. The simple case of this statistical model concerns the resonant cross section structure for non-fissile nuclei under the threshold for inelastic scattering - the model of the characteristic function with HARFOR program. In the above model some improvements of calculation of the phases and logarithmic derivatives of neutron channels have been done. In the parameterization we use the free parameter R l ∞ , which accounts the influence of long-distant resonances. The above scheme for statistical modelling of the resonant cross section structure has been applied for evaluation of experimental data for total, capture and inelastic cross sections for 232 Th in the URR (4-150) keV and also the transmission and self-indication functions in (4-175) keV. The set of evaluated average resonance parameters have been obtained. The evaluated average resonance parameters in the URR are consistent with those in the Resolved Resonance Region (CRP for Th-U cycle, Vienna, 2006

  8. Improved switching using Fano resonances in photonic crystal structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuck, Mikkel; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Elesin, Yuriy

    2013-01-01

    difference time domain simulations taking into account the signal bandwidth. The results suggest a significant energy reduction by employing Fano resonances compared to more well established Lorentzian resonance structures. A specific example of a Kerr nonlinearity shows an order of magnitude energy...

  9. Second harmonic generation in resonant optical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenfield, Matt; Moore, Jeremy; Friedmann, Thomas A.; Olsson, Roy H.; Wiwi, Michael; Padilla, Camille; Douglas, James Kenneth; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel

    2018-01-09

    An optical second-harmonic generator (or spontaneous parametric down-converter) includes a microresonator formed of a nonlinear optical medium. The microresonator supports at least two modes that can be phase matched at different frequencies so that light can be converted between them: A first resonant mode having substantially radial polarization and a second resonant mode having substantially vertical polarization. The first and second modes have the same radial order. The thickness of the nonlinear medium is less than one-half the pump wavelength within the medium.

  10. Theory of threshold phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hategan, Cornel

    2002-01-01

    Theory of Threshold Phenomena in Quantum Scattering is developed in terms of Reduced Scattering Matrix. Relationships of different types of threshold anomalies both to nuclear reaction mechanisms and to nuclear reaction models are established. Magnitude of threshold effect is related to spectroscopic factor of zero-energy neutron state. The Theory of Threshold Phenomena, based on Reduced Scattering Matrix, does establish relationships between different types of threshold effects and nuclear reaction mechanisms: the cusp and non-resonant potential scattering, s-wave threshold anomaly and compound nucleus resonant scattering, p-wave anomaly and quasi-resonant scattering. A threshold anomaly related to resonant or quasi resonant scattering is enhanced provided the neutron threshold state has large spectroscopic amplitude. The Theory contains, as limit cases, Cusp Theories and also results of different nuclear reactions models as Charge Exchange, Weak Coupling, Bohr and Hauser-Feshbach models. (author)

  11. High-Q microwave resonators with a photonic crystal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, M.

    2001-08-01

    The localisation of electromagnetic energy at a defect in a photonic crystal is similar to a well known effect employed to construct high-Q microwave resonators: In a whispering gallery (WHG-) mode resonator the high Q-factor is achieved by localisation of the electromagnetic field energy by total reflection inside a disk made of dielectric material. The topic of this work is to demonstrate, that WHG-like modes can exist in an air defect in a photonic crystal that extends over several lattice periods; and that a high-Q microwave resonator can be made, utilizing these resonant modes. In numerical simulations, the transmission properties of a photonic crystal structure with hexagonal lattice symmetry have been investigated with a transfer-matrix-method. The eigenmodes of a defect structure in a photonic crystal have been calculated with a quasi-3d finite element integration technique. Experimental results confirm the simulated transmission properties and show the existence of modes inside the band gap, when a defect is introduced in the crystal. Resonator measurements show that a microwave resonator can be operated with those defect modes. It was found out that the main losses of the resonator were caused by bad microwave properties of the used dielectric material and by metal losses on the top and bottom resonator walls. Furthermore, it turned out that the detection of the photonic crystal defect mode was difficult because of a lack of simulation possibilities and high housing mode density in the resonator. (orig.)

  12. Impact of resonant magnetic perturbations on zonal modes, drift-wave turbulence and the L–H transition threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leconte, M.; Diamond, P.H.; Xu, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We study the effects of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on turbulence, flows and confinement in the framework of resistive drift-wave turbulence. This work was motivated, in parts, by experiments reported at the IAEA 2010 conference (Xu et al 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 062030) which showed a decrease of long-range correlations during the application of RMPs. We derive and apply a zero-dimensional predator–prey model coupling the drift-wave–zonal-mode system (Leconte and Diamond 2012 Phys. Plasmas 19 055903) to the evolution of mean quantities. This model has both density-gradient drive and RMP amplitude as control parameters and predicts a novel type of transport bifurcation in the presence of RMPs. This model allows a description of the full L–H transition evolution with RMPs, including the mean sheared flow evolution. The key results are the following: (i) the L–I and I–H power thresholds both increase with RMP amplitude | b-tilde x |, the relative increase of the L–I threshold scales as ΔP LI ∝| b-tilde x | 2 ν ∗ −2 ρ s −2 , where ν * is edge collisionality and ρ s is the sound gyroradius. (ii) RMPs are predicted to decrease the hysteresis between the forward and back-transition. (iii) Taking into account the mean density evolution, the density profile—sustained by the particle source—has an increased turbulent diffusion compared with the reference case without RMPs which provides one possible explanation for the density pump-out effect. (paper)

  13. Resonant tunneling through double-barrier structures on graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Wei-Yin; Zhu Rui; Deng Wen-Ji; Xiao Yun-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Quantum resonant tunneling behaviors of double-barrier structures on graphene are investigated under the tight-binding approximation. The Klein tunneling and resonant tunneling are demonstrated for the quasiparticles with energy close to the Dirac points. The Klein tunneling vanishes by increasing the height of the potential barriers to more than 300 meV. The Dirac transport properties continuously change to the Schrödinger ones. It is found that the peaks of resonant tunneling approximate to the eigen-levels of graphene nanoribbons under appropriate boundary conditions. A comparison between the zigzag- and armchair-edge barriers is given. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  14. Strange baryonic resonances below the anti KN threshold. Results from p+p reactions at the HADES experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebenson, Johannes Stephan

    2013-04-18

    The present work investigates the vacuum properties of the hyperon resonances {Sigma}(1385){sup +} and {Lambda}(1405). For this purpose, p+p reactions at 3.5 GeV kinetic beam energy were analyzed. By using simulations and a special background method, the Breit-Wigner mass and width of the {Sigma}(1385){sup +} could be determined. Furthermore, its production dynamics were studied in different angular distributions. In this context indications were found that the {Sigma}(1385){sup +} partially stems from the decay of a heavy {Delta}-resonance. The investigation of the {Lambda}(1405) was based on similar analysis methods. After acceptance and efficiency corrections, the spectral shape of the {Lambda}(1405) could be extracted. Here a mass shift of this particle to masses below 1400 MeV/c{sup 2} was found. This might reveal important information about the two pole structure of the {Lambda}(1405) and its influence on the low energy anti KN interaction.

  15. Experimental investigation on the threshold chloride concentration for corrosion initiation in reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byung Hwan Oh; Seung Yup Jang

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion of steel reinforcements in concrete is of great importance in the view of safety and durability of reinforced concrete structures. This study is focused on the corrosion behavior of steel bars induced by internal chlorides in concrete. The main objective of this study is to determine the threshold chloride concentration causing depassivation and active corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete. To examine the threshold concentration of chloride ion, the half-cell potential, the chemical composition of extracted pore solutions of concrete and the extent of corroded area of the specimens were measured. Major test variables include the added amount of chlorides in concrete, type of binder, and water-to-binder ratios. From the present comprehensive test results, the factors influencing threshold chloride concentration are investigated, and the rational ranges of threshold chloride concentration causing active corrosion of steels are proposed. The present study provides the realistic chloride limit for corrosion initiation of reinforced concrete structures, which can be used efficiently in the future technical specification. (authors)

  16. Experimental study on moonpool resonance of offshore floating structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Ho Yang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Offshore floating structures have so-called moonpool in the centre area for the purpose of drilling, installation of subsea structures, recovery of Remotely-Operated Vehicle (ROV and divers. However, this vertical opening has an effect on the operating performance of floating offshore structure in the vicinity of moonpool resonance frequency; piston mode and sloshing mode. Experimental study based on model test was carried out. Moonpool resonance of floating offshore structure on fixed condition and motion free condition were investigated. And, the effect of cofferdam which is representative inner structure inside moonpool was examined. Model test results showed that Molin's theoretical formula can predict moonpool resonance on fixed condition quite accurately. However, motion free condition has higher resonance frequency when it is compared with that of motion fixed. The installation of cofferdam moves resonance frequency to higher region and also generates secondary resonance at lower frequency. Furthermore, it was found that cofferdam was the cause of generating waves in the longitudinal direction when the vessel was in beam sea.

  17. Application of variable threshold intensity to segmentation for white matter hyperintensities in fluid attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byung Il; Han, Ji Won; Oh, San Yeo Wool; Kim, Tae Hui [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neuropsychiatry, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Jae; Lee, Eun Young [Kyungbook National University Chilgok Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Buk-gu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); MacFall, James R. [Duke University Medical Center, Neuropsychiatric Imaging Research Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); Payne, Martha E. [Duke University Medical Center, Neuropsychiatric Imaging Research Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Duke University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Durham, NC (United States); Kim, Jae Hyoung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Woong [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neuropsychiatry, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Natural Sciences, Department of Brain and Cognitive Science, Gwanak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are regions of abnormally high intensity on T2-weighted or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Accurate and reproducible automatic segmentation of WMHs is important since WMHs are often seen in the elderly and are associated with various geriatric and psychiatric disorders. We developed a fully automated monospectral segmentation method for WMHs using FLAIR MRIs. Through this method, we introduce an optimal threshold intensity (I{sub O}) for segmenting WMHs, which varies with WMHs volume (V{sub WMH}), and we establish the I{sub O} -V{sub WMH} relationship. Our method showed accurate validations in volumetric and spatial agreements of automatically segmented WMHs compared with manually segmented WMHs for 32 confirmatory images. Bland-Altman values of volumetric agreement were 0.96 ± 8.311 ml (bias and 95 % confidence interval), and the similarity index of spatial agreement was 0.762 ± 0.127 (mean ± standard deviation). Furthermore, similar validation accuracies were obtained in the images acquired from different scanners. The proposed segmentation method uses only FLAIR MRIs, has the potential to be accurate with images obtained from different scanners, and can be implemented with a fully automated procedure. In our study, validation results were obtained with FLAIR MRIs from only two scanner types. The design of the method may allow its use in large multicenter studies with correct efficiency. (orig.)

  18. Application of variable threshold intensity to segmentation for white matter hyperintensities in fluid attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Byung Il; Han, Ji Won; Oh, San Yeo Wool; Kim, Tae Hui; Lee, Jung Jae; Lee, Eun Young; MacFall, James R.; Payne, Martha E.; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Kim, Ki Woong

    2014-01-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are regions of abnormally high intensity on T2-weighted or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Accurate and reproducible automatic segmentation of WMHs is important since WMHs are often seen in the elderly and are associated with various geriatric and psychiatric disorders. We developed a fully automated monospectral segmentation method for WMHs using FLAIR MRIs. Through this method, we introduce an optimal threshold intensity (I O ) for segmenting WMHs, which varies with WMHs volume (V WMH ), and we establish the I O -V WMH relationship. Our method showed accurate validations in volumetric and spatial agreements of automatically segmented WMHs compared with manually segmented WMHs for 32 confirmatory images. Bland-Altman values of volumetric agreement were 0.96 ± 8.311 ml (bias and 95 % confidence interval), and the similarity index of spatial agreement was 0.762 ± 0.127 (mean ± standard deviation). Furthermore, similar validation accuracies were obtained in the images acquired from different scanners. The proposed segmentation method uses only FLAIR MRIs, has the potential to be accurate with images obtained from different scanners, and can be implemented with a fully automated procedure. In our study, validation results were obtained with FLAIR MRIs from only two scanner types. The design of the method may allow its use in large multicenter studies with correct efficiency. (orig.)

  19. Stochastic generation of explicit pore structures by thresholding Gaussian random fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyman, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jhyman@lanl.gov [Program in Applied Mathematics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0089 (United States); Computational Earth Science, Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES-16), and Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Winter, C. Larrabee, E-mail: winter@email.arizona.edu [Program in Applied Mathematics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0089 (United States); Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0011 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    We provide a description and computational investigation of an efficient method to stochastically generate realistic pore structures. Smolarkiewicz and Winter introduced this specific method in pores resolving simulation of Darcy flows (Smolarkiewicz and Winter, 2010 [1]) without giving a complete formal description or analysis of the method, or indicating how to control the parameterization of the ensemble. We address both issues in this paper. The method consists of two steps. First, a realization of a correlated Gaussian field, or topography, is produced by convolving a prescribed kernel with an initial field of independent, identically distributed random variables. The intrinsic length scales of the kernel determine the correlation structure of the topography. Next, a sample pore space is generated by applying a level threshold to the Gaussian field realization: points are assigned to the void phase or the solid phase depending on whether the topography over them is above or below the threshold. Hence, the topology and geometry of the pore space depend on the form of the kernel and the level threshold. Manipulating these two user prescribed quantities allows good control of pore space observables, in particular the Minkowski functionals. Extensions of the method to generate media with multiple pore structures and preferential flow directions are also discussed. To demonstrate its usefulness, the method is used to generate a pore space with physical and hydrological properties similar to a sample of Berea sandstone. -- Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •An efficient method to stochastically generate realistic pore structures is provided. •Samples are generated by applying a level threshold to a Gaussian field realization. •Two user prescribed quantities determine the topology and geometry of the pore space. •Multiple pore structures and preferential flow directions can be produced. •A pore space based on Berea sandstone is generated.

  20. Fabrication of nanoplate resonating structures via micro-masonry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaswara, A; Legrand, B; Mathieu, F; Nicu, L; Leichle, T; Keum, H; Rhee, S; Kim, S

    2014-01-01

    Advantages of using nanoscale membrane and plate resonators over more common cantilever shapes include higher quality factor (Q factor) for an equivalent mass and better suitability to mass sensing applications in fluid. Unfortunately, the current fabrication methods used to obtain such membranes and plates are limited in terms of materials and thickness range, and can potentially cause stiction. This study presents a new method to fabricate nanoplate resonating structures based on micro-masonry, which is the advanced form of the transfer printing technique. Nanoplate resonators were fabricated by transfer printing 0.34 µm thick square-shaped silicon plates by means of polydimethylsiloxane microtip stamps on top of silicon oxide base structures displaying 20 µm diameter cavities, followed by a thermal annealing step to create a rigid bond. Typical resulting suspended structures display vibration characteristics, i.e. a resonance frequency of a few MHz and Q factors above 10 in air at atmospheric pressure, which are in accordance with theory. Moreover, the presented fabrication method enables the realization of multiple suspended structures in a single step and on the same single base, without mechanical crosstalk between the resonators. This work thus demonstrates the suitability and the advantages of the micro-masonry technique for the fabrication of plate resonators for mass sensing purpose. (paper)

  1. Structural resonance and mode of flutter of hummingbird tail feathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christopher J; Elias, Damian O; Girard, Madeline B; Prum, Richard O

    2013-09-15

    Feathers can produce sound by fluttering in airflow. This flutter is hypothesized to be aeroelastic, arising from the coupling of aerodynamic forces to one or more of the feather's intrinsic structural resonance frequencies. We investigated how mode of flutter varied among a sample of hummingbird tail feathers tested in a wind tunnel. Feather vibration was measured directly at ~100 points across the surface of the feather with a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV), as a function of airspeed, Uair. Most feathers exhibited multiple discrete modes of flutter, which we classified into types including tip, trailing vane and torsional modes. Vibratory behavior within a given mode was usually stable, but changes in independent variables such as airspeed or orientation sometimes caused feathers to abruptly 'jump' from one mode to another. We measured structural resonance frequencies and mode shapes directly by measuring the free response of 64 feathers stimulated with a shaker and recorded with the SLDV. As predicted by the aeroelastic flutter hypothesis, the mode shape (spatial distribution) of flutter corresponded to a bending or torsional structural resonance frequency of the feather. However, the match between structural resonance mode and flutter mode was better for tip or torsional mode shapes, and poorer for trailing vane modes. Often, the 3rd bending structural harmonic matched the expressed mode of flutter, rather than the fundamental. We conclude that flutter occurs when airflow excites one or more structural resonance frequencies of a feather, most akin to a vibrating violin string.

  2. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Velopharyngeal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Youkyung; Kuehn, David P.; Sutton, Bradley P.; Conway, Charles A.; Perry, Jamie L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility of using a 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol for examining velopharyngeal structures. Using collected 3D MRI data, the authors investigated the effect of sex on the midsagittal velopharyngeal structures and the levator veli palatini (levator) muscle configurations. Method: Ten Caucasian…

  3. Threedimensional imaging of organ structures by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, W.; Smolorz, J.; Wellner, U.

    1985-01-01

    A simple method for threedimensional imaging of organ structures is presented. The method is based on a special acquisition mode in a nuclear resonance tomograph, exciting layers of 20 cm thickness at different angulations. The display is done by cinematography (which is usually used in nuclear cardiology) projecting the structures in a rotating movement. (orig.) [de

  4. Optimization of input parameters of supra-threshold stochastic resonance image processing algorithm for the detection of abdomino-pelvic tumors on PET/CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Saroha, Kartik; Patel, C.D.; Bal, C.S.; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Administration of diuretics increases the urine output to clear radioactive urine from kidneys and bladder. Hence post-diuretic pelvic PET/CT scan enhances the probability of detection of abdomino-pelvic tumor. However, it causes discomfort in patients and has some side effects also. Application of supra threshold stochastic resonance (SSR) image processing algorithm on Pre-diuretic PET/CT scan may also increase the probability of detection of these tumors. Amount of noise and threshold are two variable parameters that effect the final image quality. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of these two variable parameters on the detection of abdomen-pelvic tumor

  5. Integration of community structure data reveals observable effects below sediment guideline thresholds in a large estuary

    KAUST Repository

    Tremblay, Louis A.

    2017-04-07

    The sustainable management of estuarine and coastal ecosystems requires robust frameworks due to the presence of multiple physical and chemical stressors. In this study, we assessed whether ecological health decline, based on community structure composition changes along a pollution gradient, occurred at levels below guideline threshold values for copper, zinc and lead. Canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) was used to characterise benthic communities along a metal contamination gradient. The analysis revealed changes in benthic community distribution at levels below the individual guideline values for the three metals. These results suggest that field-based measures of ecological health analysed with multivariate tools can provide additional information to single metal guideline threshold values to monitor large systems exposed to multiple stressors.

  6. Resonant Tunneling in Gated Vertical One- dimensional Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolagunta, V. R.; Janes, D. B.; Melloch, M. R.; Webb, K. J.

    1997-03-01

    Vertical sub-micron transistors incorporating resonant tunneling multiple quantum well heterostructures are interesting in applications for both multi-valued logic devices and the study of quantization effects in vertical quasi- one-, zero- dimensional structures. Earlier we have demonstrated room temperature pinch-off of the resonant peak in sub-micron vertical resonant tunneling transistors structures using a self-aligned sidewall gating technique ( V.R. Kolagunta et. al., Applied Physics Lett., 69), 374(1996). In this paper we present the study of gating effects in vertical multiple quantum well resonant tunneling transistors. Multiple well quasi-1-D sidewall gated transistors with mesa dimensions of L_x=0.5-0.9μm and L_y=10-40μm were fabricated. The quantum heterostructure in these devices consists of two non-symmetric (180 ÅÅi-GaAs wells separated from each other and from the top and bottom n^+ GaAs/contacts region using Al_0.3Ga_0.7As tunneling barriers. Room temperature pinch-off of the multiple resonant peaks similar to that reported in the case of single well devices is observed in these devices^1. Current-voltage characteristics at liquid nitrogen temperatures show splitting of the resonant peaks into sub-bands with increasing negative gate bias indicative of quasi- 1-D confinement. Room-temperature and low-temperature current-voltage measurements shall be presented and discussed.

  7. FDTD method using for electrodynamic simulation of resonator accelerating structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorogushin, M.F.; Svistunov, Yu.A.; Chetverikov, I.O.; Malyshev, V.N.; Malyukhov, M.V.

    2000-01-01

    The finite difference method in the time area (FDTD) makes it possible to model both stationary and nonstationary processes, originating by the beam and field interaction. Possibilities of the method by modeling the fields in the resonant accelerating structures are demonstrated. The possibility of considering the transition processes is important besides the solution of the problem on determination of frequencies and distribution in the space of the resonators oscillations proper types. The program presented makes it possible to obtain practical results for modeling accelerating structures on personal computers [ru

  8. A Nonlinear Transmission Line Model of the Cochlea With Temporal Integration Accounts for Duration Effects in Threshold Fine Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhey, Jesko L.; Mauermann, Manfred; Epp, Bastian

    2017-01-01

    For normal-hearing listeners, auditory pure-tone thresholds in quiet often show quasi periodic fluctuations when measured with a high frequency resolution, referred to as threshold fine structure. Threshold fine structure is dependent on the stimulus duration, with smaller fluctuations for short...... than for long signals. The present study demonstrates how this effect can be captured by a nonlinear and active model of the cochlear in combination with a temporal integration stage. Since this cochlear model also accounts for fine structure and connected level dependent effects, it is superior...

  9. Observations of resonance-like structures for positron-atom scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou, L.

    1993-01-01

    Absolute values of elastic differential cross sections (DCS's) are measured for position (e + ) scattering by argon (8.7-300 eV) krypton (6.7-400 eV) and also neon (13.6-400 eV) using a crossed-beam experimental setup. When the DCS's are plotted at fixed scattering angles of 30 degrees, 60 degrees, 90 degrees and 120 degrees versus energy it has been found that well-defined resonance-like structures are found at an energy of 55-60 eV for argon and at 25 and 200 eV for krypton, with a broader structure found between 100-200 eV for neon. These observed resonance-like structures are unusual because they occur at energies well above the known inelastic thresholds for these atoms. They may represent examples of open-quotes coupled channel shape resonancesclose quotes, first predicted by Higgins and Burke [1] for e + -H scattering in the vicinity of 36 eV (width ∼ 4 eV), which occurs only when both the elastic and positronium formation scattering channels are considered together. A more recent e + -H calculation by Hewitt et al. [2] supports the Higgins and Burke prediction. These predictions and the present observations suggest the existence of a new type of atomic scattering resonance

  10. Observations of resonance-like structures for positron-atom elastic scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou, L.; Kauppila, W.E.; Kwan, C.K.; Stein, T.S.

    1993-01-01

    We have measured absolute values of elastic differential cross sections (DCS's) for positron (e + ) scattering by argon (8.7-300 eV), krypton (6.7-400 eV), and also neon (13.6-400 eV) using a crossed-beam experimental setup. When the DCS's are plotted at fixed scattering angles of 30 degrees, 60 degrees, 90 degrees, and 120 degrees versus energy it has been found that well-defined resonance-like structures were found at an energy of 55-60 eV for argon and at 25 and 200 eV for krypton, with a broader structure found between 100-200 eV for neon. These observed resonance-like structures are unusual because they occur at energies well above the known inelastic thresholds for these atoms. They may represent examples of open-quotes coupled channel shape resonancesclose quotes, first predicted by Higgins and Burke for e + -H scattering in the vicinity of 36 eV (width ∼ 4 eV), which occurs only when both the elastic and positronium formation scattering channels are considered together. A more recent e + -H calculation by Hewitt et al. supports the Higgins and Burke prediction. These predictions and the present observations suggest the existence of a new type of atomic scattering resonance

  11. Structural dependence of threshold displacement energies in rutile, anatase and brookite TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, M., E-mail: marc.robinson@curtin.edu.au [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Marks, N.A. [Discipline of Physics and Astronomy, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Lumpkin, G.R. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2014-09-15

    Systematic molecular dynamics simulations of low energy cascades have been performed to examine how threshold displacement events are effected by changes in crystal structure. Exploiting the structural proximity of the rutile, anatase and brookite polymorphs of TiO{sub 2}, a quantitative examination of defect production has been carried out including detailed defect analysis and the determination of values of the threshold displacement energy (E{sub d}). Across all polymorphs comparable values of E{sub d} are reported for oxygen at around 20 eV, with the value for Ti in rutile (73 ± 2 eV) significantly higher than that in brookite (34 ± 1 eV) and anatase (39 ± 1 eV). Quantifying defect formation probability as a function of Primary Knock-on Atom (PKA) energy, simulations in rutile indicate a consistent reduction in defect formation at energies higher than E{sub d} relative to anatase and brookite. Defect cluster analysis reveals a significant proportion of di-Frenkel pairs in anatase at Ti PKA energies around E{sub d}. These clusters, which are stabilised by the localisation of two Frenkel pairs, are associated with a recombination barrier of approximately 0.19 eV. As such, annihilation is likely under typical experimental conditions which suggests an expected increase in the measured Ti value of E{sub d}. Identical O defect populations produced at the threshold by the O PKA in both rutile and anatase explain the comparable values of E{sub d}. At higher O PKA energies, the commencement of defect production on both sublattices in anatase is observed in contrast to the confinement of defects to the O sublattice in rutile. The overall trends reported are consistent with in-situ irradiation experiments and thermal spike simulations, suggesting the contrasting radiation response of the polymorphs of TiO{sub 2} is apparent during the initial stages of defect production. - Highlights: • Systematic calculation of threshold displacement energies (E{sub d

  12. Multi-threshold white matter structural networks fusion for accurate diagnosis of Tourette syndrome children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hongwei; Liu, Yue; Wang, Shengpei; Li, Zuoyong; Zhang, Jishui; Peng, Yun; He, Huiguang

    2017-03-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood-onset neurobehavioral disorder. To date, TS is still misdiagnosed due to its varied presentation and lacking of obvious clinical symptoms. Therefore, studies of objective imaging biomarkers are of great importance for early TS diagnosis. As tic generation has been linked to disturbed structural networks, and many efforts have been made recently to investigate brain functional or structural networks using machine learning methods, for the purpose of disease diagnosis. However, few studies were related to TS and some drawbacks still existed in them. Therefore, we propose a novel classification framework integrating a multi-threshold strategy and a network fusion scheme to address the preexisting drawbacks. Here we used diffusion MRI probabilistic tractography to construct the structural networks of 44 TS children and 48 healthy children. We ameliorated the similarity network fusion algorithm specially to fuse the multi-threshold structural networks. Graph theoretical analysis was then implemented, and nodal degree, nodal efficiency and nodal betweenness centrality were selected as features. Finally, support vector machine recursive feature extraction (SVM-RFE) algorithm was used for feature selection, and then optimal features are fed into SVM to automatically discriminate TS children from controls. We achieved a high accuracy of 89.13% evaluated by a nested cross validation, demonstrated the superior performance of our framework over other comparison methods. The involved discriminative regions for classification primarily located in the basal ganglia and frontal cortico-cortical networks, all highly related to the pathology of TS. Together, our study may provide potential neuroimaging biomarkers for early-stage TS diagnosis.

  13. Structuring Light to Manipulate Multipolar Resonances for Metamaterial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tanya

    Multipolar electromagnetic phenomena in sub-wavelength resonators are at the heart of metamaterial science and technology. Typically, researchers engineer multipolar light-matter interactions by modifying the size, shape, and composition of the resonators. Here, we instead engineer multipolar interactions by modifying properties of the incident radiation. In this dissertation, we propose a new framework for determining the scattering response of resonators based on properties of the local excitation field. First, we derive an analytical theory to determine the scattering response of spherical nanoparticles under any type of illumination. Using this theory, we demonstrate the ability to drastically manipulate the scattering properties of a spherical nanoparticle by varying the illumination and demonstrate excitation of a longitudinal quadrupole mode that cannot be accessed with conventional illumination. Next, we investigate the response of dielectric dimer structures illuminated by cylindrical vector beams. Using finite-difference time-domain simulations, we demonstrate significant modification of the scattering spectra of dimer antennas and reveal how the illumination condition gives rise to these spectra through manipulation of electric and magnetic mode hybridization. Finally, we present a simple and efficient numerical simulation based on local field principles for extracting the multipolar response of any resonator under illumination by structured light. This dissertation enhances the understanding of fundamental light-matter interactions in metamaterials and lays the foundation for researchers to identify, quantify, and manipulate multipolar light-matter interactions through optical beam engineering.

  14. An unusual π* shape resonance in the near-threshold photoionization of S1 para-difluorobenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellm, Susan M.; Davies, Julia A.; Whiteside, Paul T.; Guo, Jingwei; Powis, Ivan; Reid, Katharine L.

    2005-06-01

    Previously reported dramatic changes in photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) as a function of photoelectron kinetic energy following the ionization of S1p-difluorobenzene are shown to be explained by a shape resonance in the b2g symmetry continuum. The characteristics of this resonance are clearly demonstrated by a theoretical multiple-scattering treatment of the photoionization dynamics. New experimental data are presented which demonstrate an apparent insensitivity of the PADs to both vibrational motion and prepared molecular alignment, however, the calculations suggest that strong alignment effects may nevertheless be recognized in the detail of the comparison with experimental data. The apparent, but unexpected, indifference to vibrational excitation is rationalized by considering the nature of the resonance. The correlation of this shape resonance in the continuum with a virtual π* antibonding orbital is considered. Because this orbital is characteristic of the benzene ring, the existence of similar resonances in related substituted benzenes is discussed.

  15. Clinical feasibility of a myocardial signal intensity threshold-based semi-automated cardiac magnetic resonance segmentation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga-Szemes, Akos; Schoepf, U.J.; Suranyi, Pal; De Cecco, Carlo N.; Fox, Mary A. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Muscogiuri, Giuseppe [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Department of Medical-Surgical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Rome (Italy); Wichmann, Julian L. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Cannao, Paola M. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Milan, Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Milan (Italy); Renker, Matthias [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Kerckhoff Heart and Thorax Center, Bad Nauheim (Germany); Mangold, Stefanie [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Ruzsics, Balazs [Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals, Department of Cardiology, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-15

    To assess the accuracy and efficiency of a threshold-based, semi-automated cardiac MRI segmentation algorithm in comparison with conventional contour-based segmentation and aortic flow measurements. Short-axis cine images of 148 patients (55 ± 18 years, 81 men) were used to evaluate left ventricular (LV) volumes and mass (LVM) using conventional and threshold-based segmentations. Phase-contrast images were used to independently measure stroke volume (SV). LV parameters were evaluated by two independent readers. Evaluation times using the conventional and threshold-based methods were 8.4 ± 1.9 and 4.2 ± 1.3 min, respectively (P < 0.0001). LV parameters measured by the conventional and threshold-based methods, respectively, were end-diastolic volume (EDV) 146 ± 59 and 134 ± 53 ml; end-systolic volume (ESV) 64 ± 47 and 59 ± 46 ml; SV 82 ± 29 and 74 ± 28 ml (flow-based 74 ± 30 ml); ejection fraction (EF) 59 ± 16 and 58 ± 17 %; and LVM 141 ± 55 and 159 ± 58 g. Significant differences between the conventional and threshold-based methods were observed in EDV, ESV, and LVM measurements; SV from threshold-based and flow-based measurements were in agreement (P > 0.05) but were significantly different from conventional analysis (P < 0.05). Excellent inter-observer agreement was observed. Threshold-based LV segmentation provides improved accuracy and faster assessment compared to conventional contour-based methods. (orig.)

  16. Structure and resonances of the e+–He(1s2s 3Se) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Zhenzhong; Han Huili; Shi Tingyun; Mitroy, J

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the geometry and resonances of the e + He( 3 S e ) system in the framework of hyperspherical coordinates. A model potential proposed by us is used to describe the interaction between the out electron with the He + ionic core. The calculated binding energy and expectation distance of the system are in agreement with other calculations. In addition, two resonances below the e + –He(1s3s 3 S e ) threshold and one resonance below the Ps(n=2)–He + threshold are identified. (paper)

  17. Determining the helicity structure of third generation resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papaefstathiou, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    We examine methods that have been proposed for determining the helicity structure of decays of new resonances to third generation quarks and/or leptons. We present analytical and semi-analytical predictions and assess the applicability of the relevant variables in realistic reconstruction scenarios using Monte Carlo-generated events, including the effects of QCD radiation and multiple parton interactions, combinatoric ambiguities and fast detector simulation. (orig.)

  18. Future prospects of superfine structure of neutron resonance levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ideno, Kazumi

    1996-01-01

    Neutron resonance spectra appear simply and regularly in the light of superfine structure (SFS). It is found that the relative shifts (i.e. the relative distances) between the SFSs for groups of nuclei have definite values and are closely interrelated to the symmetry properties of the compound systems if we treat neutron zero energy as a common reference point. An origin of the SFSs and its possible application to an evaluation of nuclear data are discussed. (author)

  19. Mirror structures above and below the linear instability threshold: Cluster observations, fluid model and hybrid simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Génot

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Using 5 years of Cluster data, we present a detailed statistical analysis of magnetic fluctuations associated with mirror structures in the magnetosheath. We especially focus on the shape of these fluctuations which, in addition to quasi-sinusoidal forms, also display deep holes and high peaks. The occurrence frequency and the most probable location of the various types of structures is discussed, together with their relation to local plasma parameters. While these properties have previously been correlated to the β of the plasma, we emphasize here the influence of the distance to the linear mirror instability threshold. This enables us to interpret the observations of mirror structures in a stable plasma in terms of bistability and subcritical bifurcation. The data analysis is supplemented by the prediction of a quasi-static anisotropic MHD model and hybrid numerical simulations in an expanding box aimed at mimicking the magnetosheath plasma. This leads us to suggest a scenario for the formation and evolution of mirror structures.

  20. Utilization threshold of surface water and groundwater based on the system optimization of crop planting structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang FU,Jiahong LI,Tianxiao LI,Dong LIU,Song CUI

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the diversity of the agricultural system, this research calculates the planting structures of rice, maize and soybean considering the optimal economic-social-ecological aspects. Then, based on the uncertainty and randomness of the water resources system, the interval two-stage stochastic programming method, which introduces the uncertainty of the interval number, is used to calculate the groundwater exploitation and the use efficiency of surface water. The method considers the minimum cost of water as the objective of the uncertainty model for surface water and groundwater joint scheduling optimization for different planting structures. Finally, by calculating harmonious entropy, the optimal exploitation utilization interval of surface water and groundwater is determined for optimal cultivation in the Sanjiang Plain. The optimal matching of the planting structure under the economic system is suitable when the mining ratio of the surface is in 44.13%—45.45% and the exploitation utilization of groundwater is in 54.82%—66.86%, the optimal planting structure under the social system is suitable when surface water mining ratio is in 47.84%—48.04% and the groundwater exploitation threshold is in 67.07%—72.00%. This article optimizes the economic-social-ecological-water system, which is important for the development of a water- and food-conserving society and providing a more accurate management environment.

  1. The use of displacement threshold for switching frequency strategy for structural vibration mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widjaja, Joko; Samali, Bijan; Li, Jianchun

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a study of controllable real-time frequency shift using a fluid pin damper, so called 'smart pin', mounted at a beam-column connection. Unlike the stationary frequency shifter, the pin can increase or decrease the rotational stiffness of the connection, leading to an actively adjustable structural frequency due to real-time responses of polarised magneto-rheological (MR) fluid, whose rheological properties can change in milliseconds. The feedback to the pin damper governs the structural frequency changes. To demonstrate this concept, a single storey plane steel frame model with one hinge and one 'smart pin' damper, mounted at each beam-column connection and subjected to two scaled earthquake excitations, namely El-Centro 1940 and Northridge 1994, which respectively represent near- and farfield excitations, was tested using the shake table at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) structures laboratory, for 'proof-of-concept' investigation. Further, the dynamic performance of the model using a proposed switching strategy with a displacement threshold as an indicator for alternately supplied current level (flip-flop) was examined, assuming the earthquake records were known. The results showed some potential use of this control technique for structural vibration mitigation, however, further study to optimize the performance of the switching strategy is still required

  2. Thresholds of surface codes on the general lattice structures suffering biased error and loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2014-01-01

    A family of surface codes with general lattice structures is proposed. We can control the error tolerances against bit and phase errors asymmetrically by changing the underlying lattice geometries. The surface codes on various lattices are found to be efficient in the sense that their threshold values universally approach the quantum Gilbert-Varshamov bound. We find that the error tolerance of the surface codes depends on the connectivity of the underlying lattices; the error chains on a lattice of lower connectivity are easier to correct. On the other hand, the loss tolerance of the surface codes exhibits an opposite behavior; the logical information on a lattice of higher connectivity has more robustness against qubit loss. As a result, we come upon a fundamental trade-off between error and loss tolerances in the family of surface codes with different lattice geometries

  3. Thresholds of surface codes on the general lattice structures suffering biased error and loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, Yuuki [NTT Secure Platform Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-9-11 Midori-cho, Musashino, Tokyo 180-8585, Japan and Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, 5 Sanban-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Fujii, Keisuke [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2014-12-04

    A family of surface codes with general lattice structures is proposed. We can control the error tolerances against bit and phase errors asymmetrically by changing the underlying lattice geometries. The surface codes on various lattices are found to be efficient in the sense that their threshold values universally approach the quantum Gilbert-Varshamov bound. We find that the error tolerance of the surface codes depends on the connectivity of the underlying lattices; the error chains on a lattice of lower connectivity are easier to correct. On the other hand, the loss tolerance of the surface codes exhibits an opposite behavior; the logical information on a lattice of higher connectivity has more robustness against qubit loss. As a result, we come upon a fundamental trade-off between error and loss tolerances in the family of surface codes with different lattice geometries.

  4. Destruction of /sup 18/O in red giants. A search for a sub-threshold resonance in the /sup 18/O+p system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champagne, A E; Pitt, M L

    1986-09-08

    The /sup 18/O(/sup 3/He,d)/sup 19/F reaction has been used to determine if a presumed sub-threshold resonance at Esub(c.m.)=-94 KeV in the /sup 18/O(p,..cap alpha..)/sup 15/N reaction exists at an astrophysically significant level. No evidence for this state was observed which implies a dimensionless reduced width thetasub(p)/sup 2/<5 . 10/sup -5/. In addition, a proton width GAMMAsub(p)=2 x 10/sup -19/ eV has been determined for a d-wave resonance located at Esub(c.m.)=20 keV. The resulting thermonuclear reaction rate is slow enough to ensure that /sup 18/O is not destroyed at red-giant temperatures.

  5. Preoperative thresholds for pulmonary valve replacement in patients with corrected tetralogy of Fallot using cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhof, T.; Straten, A. van; Vliegen, H.W.; Meijboom, F.J.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Spijkerboer, A.M.; Bouma, B.J.; Zwinderman, A.H.; Hazekamp, M.G.; Roos, A.; Mulder, B.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To facilitate the optimal timing of pulmonary valve replacement, we analyzed preoperative thresholds of right ventricular (RV) volumes above which no decrease or normalization of RV size takes place after surgery. METHODS AND RESULTS: Between 1993 and 2006, 71 adult patients with

  6. Preoperative thresholds for pulmonary valve replacement in patients with corrected tetralogy of Fallot using cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhof, Thomas; van Straten, Alexander; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Spijkerboer, Anje M.; Bouma, Berto J.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Hazekamp, Mark G.; de Roos, Albert; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background - To facilitate the optimal timing of pulmonary valve replacement, we analyzed preoperative thresholds of right ventricular ( RV) volumes above which no decrease or normalization of RV size takes place after surgery. Methods and Results - Between 1993 and 2006, 71 adult patients with

  7. Adjustable threshold-voltage in all-inkjet-printed organic thin film transistor using double-layer dielectric structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Wen-Jong; Lee, Chang-Hung; Hsu, Chun-Hao; Yang, Shih-Hsien; Lin, Chih-Ting

    2013-01-01

    An all-inkjet-printed organic thin film transistor (OTFT) with a double-layer dielectric structure is proposed and implemented in this study. By using the double-layer structure with different dielectric materials (i.e., polyvinylphenol with poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene)), the threshold-voltage of OTFT can be adjusted. The threshold-voltage shift can be controlled by changing the composition of dielectric layers. That is, an enhancement-mode OTFT can be converted to a depletion-mode OTFT by selectively printing additional dielectric layers to form a high-k/low-k double-layer structure. The printed OTFT has a carrier mobility of 5.0 × 10 −3 cm 2 /V-s. The threshold-voltages of the OTFTs ranged between − 13 V and 10 V. This study demonstrates an additional design parameter for organic electronics manufactured using inkjet printing technology. - Highlights: • A double-layer dielectric organic thin film transistor, OTFT, is implemented. • The threshold voltage of OTFT can be configured by the double dielectric structure. • The composition of the dielectric determines the threshold voltage shift. • The characteristics of OTFTs can be adjusted by double dielectric structures

  8. On the quark structure of resonance states in dual models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, D.V.; Zheltukhin, A.A.; Pashnev, A.I.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown using as an example the Veneziano dual model, that each particular dual model already contains a certain latent quark structure unambiauously determined by internal properties of the dual model. To prove this degeneration of the resonance state spectrum is studied by introducing an additional disturbing interaction into the model being considered. Induced transitions of particles into a vacuum act as such an additional disturbance. This method complements the known factorization method of Fubini, Gordon and Veneziano and turns out to be free from an essential limitation of the latter connected with implicit assumption about the basence of internal additive laws of conservation in the model. By using the method of induced transitions of particles into a vacuum it has been possible to show that the resonance state spectrum is indeed more degenerated than it should be expected from the factorization theorem, and that the supplementary degeneration corresponds to the quark model with an infinite number of quarks of the increasing mass. Structures of some terms of the dual amplitude expansion over the degrees of the constant of the induced transition of particles to vacuum are considered; it is shown that the summation of this expansion may be reduced to a solution of a certain integral equation. On the basis of the integral equation obtained an integral representation ofr dual amplitudes is established. The problems related with degeneration of resonance states and with determination of additive quantum numbers leading to the quark interpretation of the degeneration being considered are discussed

  9. Self-consistent modelling of resonant tunnelling structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiig, T.; Jauho, A.P.

    1992-01-01

    We report a comprehensive study of the effects of self-consistency on the I-V-characteristics of resonant tunnelling structures. The calculational method is based on a simultaneous solution of the effective-mass Schrödinger equation and the Poisson equation, and the current is evaluated...... applied voltages and carrier densities at the emitter-barrier interface. We include the two-dimensional accumulation layer charge and the quantum well charge in our self-consistent scheme. We discuss the evaluation of the current contribution originating from the two-dimensional accumulation layer charges......, and our qualitative estimates seem consistent with recent experimental studies. The intrinsic bistability of resonant tunnelling diodes is analyzed within several different approximation schemes....

  10. Studies of nucleon resonance structure in exclusive meson electroproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aznauryan, I.G.; Bashir, A.; Braun, V.M.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of the structure of excited baryons are key factors to the N* program at Jefferson Lab (JLab). Within the first year of data taking with the Hall B CLAS12 detector following the 12 GeV upgrade, a dedicated experiment will aim to extract the N* electrocouplings at high photon virtualities Q 2 . This experiment will allow exploration of the structure of N* resonances at the highest photon virtualities ever achieved, with a kinematic reach up to Q 2 = 12 GeV 2 . This high-Q 2 reach will make it possible to probe the excited nucleon structures at distance scales ranging from where effective degrees of freedom, such as constituent quarks, are dominant through the transition to where nearly massless bare-quark degrees of freedom are relevant. In this document, we present a detailed description of the physics that can be addressed through N* structure studies in exclusive meson electroproduction. The discussion includes recent advances in reaction theory for extracting N* electrocouplings from meson electroproduction off protons, along with Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD)-based approaches to the theoretical interpretation of these fundamental quantities. This program will afford access to the dynamics of the nonperturbative strong interaction responsible for resonance formation, and will be crucial in understanding the nature of confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking in baryons, and how excited nucleons emerge from QCD. (author)

  11. STAR FORMATION LAWS AND THRESHOLDS FROM INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM STRUCTURE AND TURBULENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renaud, Florent; Kraljic, Katarina; Bournaud, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    We present an analytical model of the relation between the surface density of gas and star formation rate in galaxies and clouds, as a function of the presence of supersonic turbulence and the associated structure of the interstellar medium (ISM). The model predicts a power-law relation of index 3/2, flattened under the effects of stellar feedback at high densities or in very turbulent media, and a break at low surface densities when ISM turbulence becomes too weak to induce strong compression. This model explains the diversity of star formation laws and thresholds observed in nearby spirals and their resolved regions, the Small Magellanic Cloud, high-redshift disks and starbursting mergers, as well as Galactic molecular clouds. While other models have proposed interstellar dust content and molecule formation to be key ingredients to the observed variations of the star formation efficiency, we demonstrate instead that these variations can be explained by ISM turbulence and structure in various types of galaxies.

  12. Resonance structure of $\\tau^{-} \\to K^{-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\

    CERN Document Server

    Asner, D M; Gronberg, J B; Hill, T S; Lange, D J; Morrison, R J; Briere, R A; Behrens, B H; Ford, W T; Gritsan, A; Roy, J D; Smith, J G; Alexander, J P; Baker, R; Bebek, C; Berger, B E; Berkelman, K; Blanc, F; Boisvert, V; Cassel, David G; Dickson, M; Drell, P S; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Foland, A D; Gaidarev, P B; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L K; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hopman, P I; Jones, C D; Kreinick, D L; Lohner, M; Magerkurth, A; Meyer, T O; Mistry, N B; Ng, C R; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Thayer, J G; Thies, P G; Valant-Spaight, B L; Watburton, A; Avery, P; Prescott, C; Rubiera, A I; Yelton, J; Zheng, J; Brandenburg, G; Ershov, A; Gao, Y S; Kim, D Y J; Wilson, R; Browder, T E; Li, Y; Rodríguez, J L; Yamamoto, H; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Ernst, J; Gladding, G E; Gollin, G D; Hans, R M; Johnson, E; Karliner, I; Marsh, M A; Palmer, M; Plager, C; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Janicek, R; Patel, P M; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Bean, A; Besson, D; Davis, R; Kravchenko, I V; Kwak, N; Zhao, X; Anderson, S; Frolov, V V; Kubota, Y; Lee, S J; Mahapatra, R; O'Neill, J J; Poling, R A; Riehle, T; Smith, A; Urheim, J; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Athar, S B; Jian, L; Ling, L; Mahmood, A H; Saleem, M; Timm, S; Wappler, F; Anastassov, A; Duboscq, J E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Hart, T; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pedlar, T K; Schwarthoff, H; Thayer, J B; Von Törne, E; Zoeller, M M; Richichi, S J; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Undrus, A; Chen, S; Fast, J; Hinson, J W; Lee, J; Menon, N; Miller, D H; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Pavlunin, V; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Kwon, Y; Lyon, A L; Thorndike, E H; Jessop, C P; Marsiske, H; Perl, Martin Lewis; Savinov, V; Ugolini, D W; Zhou, X; Coan, T E; Fadeev, V; Maravin, Y; Narsky, I; Stroynowski, R; Ye, J; Wlodek, T; Artuso, M; Ayad, R; Boulahouache, C; Bukin, K; Dambasuren, E; Karamov, S; Kopp, S E; Majumder, G; Moneti, G C; Mountain, R; Schuh, S; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Viehhauser, G; Wang, J C; Wolf, A; Wu, J; Csorna, S E; Danko, I; McLean, K W; Marka, S; Xu, Z; Godang, R; Kinoshita, K; Lai, I C; Schrenk, S; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Perera, L P; Zhou, G J; Eigen, G; Lipeles, E; Schmidtler, M; Shapiro, A; Sun, W M; Weinstein, A J; Würthwein, F; Jaffe, D E; Masek, G E; Paar, H P; Potter, E M; Prell, S; Sharma, V

    2000-01-01

    Using a sample of 4.7 fb/sup -1/ integrated luminosity accumulated with the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) , we investigate the mass spectrum and resonant structure in tau /sup -/ to K/sup -/ pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ nu /sub tau / decays. We measure the relative fractions of K/sub 1/(1270) and K/sub 1/(1400) resonances in these decays, as well as the K/sub 1/ masses and widths. Our fitted K/sub 1/ resonances are somewhat broader than previous hadroproduction measurements, and in agreement with recent CERN LEP results from tau decay. The larger central value of our measured width supports models which attribute the small tau /sup -/ to K/sup -/ pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ nu /sub tau / branching fraction to larger K/sub 1/ widths than are presently tabulated. We also determine the K/sub a/-K/sub b/ mixing angle theta /sub K/. (22 refs) .

  13. Lasing thresholds of helical photonic structures with different positions of a single light-amplifying helix turn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blinov, L M; Palto, S P [A.V. Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federaion (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-30

    Numerical simulation is used to assess the lasing threshold of helical structures of cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) in which only one turn amplifies light. This turn is located either in the centre of symmetric structures of various sizes or in an arbitrary place in asymmetric structures of preset size. In all cases, we find singularities in light amplification by a one-dimensional CLC structure for the most important band-edge modes (m1, m2 and m3) and plot the threshold gain coefficient k{sub th} against the position of the amplifying turn. For the symmetric structures, the lasing threshold of the m1 mode is shown to vary linearly with the inverse of the square of the cavity length. Moreover, modes with a lower density of photonic states (DOS) in the cavity may have a lower lasing threshold. This can be accounted for by the dependence of the density of photonic states on the position of the amplifying turn and, accordingly, by the nonuniform electromagnetic field intensity distribution along the cavity for different modes. In the asymmetric structures, the same field energy distribution is responsible for a correlation between k{sub th} and DOS curves. (lasers)

  14. Histogram-based automatic thresholding for bruise detection of apples by structured-illumination reflectance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thresholding is an important step in the segmentation of image features, and the existing methods are not all effective when the image histogram exhibits a unimodal pattern, which is common in defect detection of fruit. This study was aimed at developing a general automatic thresholding methodology ...

  15. Identification of threshold prostate specific antigen levels to optimize the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer by magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound fusion guided biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakir, Nabeel A; George, Arvin K; Siddiqui, M Minhaj; Rothwax, Jason T; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Stamatakis, Lambros; Su, Daniel; Okoro, Chinonyerem; Raskolnikov, Dima; Walton-Diaz, Annerleim; Simon, Richard; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L; Merino, Maria J; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    Prostate specific antigen sensitivity increases with lower threshold values but with a corresponding decrease in specificity. Magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy detects prostate cancer more efficiently and of higher grade than standard 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsy but the optimal population for its use is not well defined. We evaluated the performance of magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy vs 12-core biopsy across a prostate specific antigen continuum. We reviewed the records of all patients enrolled in a prospective trial who underwent 12-core transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsies from August 2007 through February 2014. Patients were stratified by each of 4 prostate specific antigen cutoffs. The greatest Gleason score using either biopsy method was compared in and across groups as well as across the population prostate specific antigen range. Clinically significant prostate cancer was defined as Gleason 7 (4 + 3) or greater. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. A total of 1,003 targeted and 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsies were performed, of which 564 diagnosed prostate cancer for a 56.2% detection rate. Targeted biopsy led to significantly more upgrading to clinically significant disease compared to 12-core biopsy. This trend increased more with increasing prostate specific antigen, specifically in patients with prostate specific antigen 4 to 10 and greater than 10 ng/ml. Prostate specific antigen 5.2 ng/ml or greater captured 90% of upgrading by targeted biopsy, corresponding to 64% of patients who underwent multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent fusion biopsy. Conversely a greater proportion of clinically insignificant disease was detected by 12-core vs targeted biopsy overall. These differences persisted when controlling for potential confounders on multivariate analysis. Prostate cancer upgrading with targeted biopsy increases

  16. Electronic structure of Mo1-x Re x alloys studied through resonant photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Shyam; Banik, Soma; Sharath Chandra, L. S.; Chattopadhyay, M. K.; Ganguli, Tapas; Lodha, G. S.; Pandey, Sudhir K.; Phase, D. M.; Roy, S. B.

    2016-08-01

    We studied the electronic structure of Mo-rich Mo1-x Re x alloys (0≤slant x≤slant 0.4 ) using valence band photoemission spectroscopy in the photon energy range 23-70 eV and density of states calculations. Comparison of the photoemission spectra with the density of states calculations suggests that, with respect to the Fermi level E F, the d states lie mostly in the binding energy range 0 to  -6 eV, whereas s states lie in the binding energy range  -4 to  -10 eV. We observed two resonances in the photoemission spectra of each sample, one at about 35 eV photon energy and the other at about 45 eV photon energy. Our analysis suggests that the resonance at 35 eV photon energy is related to the Mo 4p-5s transition and the resonance at 45 eV photon energy is related to the contribution from both the Mo 4p-4d transition (threshold: 42 eV) and the Re 5p-5d transition (threshold: 46 eV). In the constant initial state plot, the resonance at 35 eV incident photon energy for binding energy features in the range E F (BE  =  0) to  -5 eV becomes progressively less prominent with increasing Re concentration x and vanishes for x  >  0.2. The difference plots obtained by subtracting the valence band photoemission spectrum of Mo from that of Mo1-x Re x alloys, measured at 47 eV photon energy, reveal that the Re d-like states appear near E F when Re is alloyed with Mo. These results indicate that interband s-d interaction, which is weak in Mo, increases with increasing x and influences the nature of the superconductivity in alloys with higher x.

  17. Structure and direct decay of Giant Monopole Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avez, B.; Simenel, C.

    2013-01-01

    We study structure and direct decay of the Giant Monopole Resonance (GMR) at the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) level using the time-dependent energy density functional method in the linear response regime in a few doubly magic nuclei. A proper treatment of the continuum, through the use of large coordinate space, allows for a separation between the nucleus and its emitted nucleons. The microscopic structure of the GMR is investigated with the decomposition of the strength function into individual single-particle quantum numbers. A similar microscopic decomposition of the spectra of emitted nucleons by direct decay of the GMR is performed. In this harmonic picture of giant resonance, shifting every contribution by the initial single-particle energy allows to reconstruct the GMR strength function. The RPA residual interaction couples bound 1-particle 1-hole states to unbound ones, allowing for the total decay of the GMR. In this article, we then intend to get an understanding of the direct decay mechanism from coherent one-particle-one-hole superpositions, while neglecting more complex configurations. Time-dependent beyond mean-field approaches should be used, in the future, to extend this method. (orig.)

  18. Charge-exchange giant resonances as probes of nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, J.

    2001-09-01

    Giant resonances populated in charge-exchange reactions can reveal detailed information about nuclear structure properties, in spite of their apparent featurelessness. The (p,n) and (n,p) reactions - as well as their analog reactions - proceed via the same nuclear matrix element as beta decay. Thereby, they are useful for probing electroweak properties in nuclei, especially for those not accessible to beta decay. The nuclear physics aspects of double beta decay might be investigated in double charge-exchange reactions. detailed nuclear structure information, such as the presence of ground-state correlations, can be revealed via identification of 'first-forbidden' transitions. In addition, astrophysics aspects and halo properties of nuclei have been investigated in charge exchange. Finally, these experiments have questioned our knowledge of the absolute strength of the strong interaction

  19. Structural and conformational study of polysaccharides by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossennec, Veronique

    1989-01-01

    As some natural polysaccharides are involved in important biological processes, the use of nuclear magnetic resonance appears to be an adapted mean to determine their structure-activity relationship and is therefore the object of this research thesis. By using bi-dimensional proton-based NMR techniques, it is possible to identify minority saccharide units, to determine their conformation, and to identify units which they are bound to. The author reports the application of these methods to swine mucosa heparin, and to heparins displaying a high and low anticoagulant activity. The dermatan sulphate has also been studied, and the NMR analysis allowed some polymer structure irregularities to be identified. A molecular modelling of dermatan sulphate has been performed [fr

  20. Selected cis- and trans-3-fluorostyrene rotamers studied by two-color resonant two-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pei Ying; Tzeng, Wen Bih

    2015-10-01

    We applied two-color resonant two-photon ionization and mass-analyzed threshold ionization techniques to record the vibronic, photoionization efficiency, and cation spectra of the selected rotamers of 3-fluorostyrene. The adiabatic ionization energies of cis- and trans-3-fluorostyrene were determined to be 69 960 ± 5 and 69 856 ± 5 cm-1, respectively. Cation vibrations 10a, 15, 6b, and 12 of both rotamers have been found to have frequencies of 218, 404, 452, and 971 cm-1, respectively. This finding shows that the relative orientation of the vinyl group with respect to the F atom does not affect these vibrations of the 3-fluorostyrene cation. Our one-dimensional potential energy surface calculations support that the cis-trans isomerization of 3-fluorostyrene does not occur under the present experimental conditions.

  1. Structures in the K-shell delta electron spectrum near threshold for ionization by fast charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amundsen, P.A.; Aashamar, K.

    Results of calculations of the delta electron spectrum for K-shell ionization of atoms by fast charged particles for target charges in the range 6 2 <=40 are presented. Appreciable structure is found in the spectrum near the ionization threshold, in particular for fast projectiles and heavy target elements. The structure can be quite sensitive to the details of the effective atomic potentials. (Auth.)

  2. Tunable Fano Resonance in Asymmetric MIM Waveguide Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Zhang, Zhidong; Yan, Shubin

    2017-06-25

    A plasmonic waveguide coupled system that uses a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide with two silver baffles and a coupled ring cavity is proposed in this study. The transmission properties of the plasmonic system were investigated using the finite element method. The simulation results show a Fano profile in the transmission spectrum, which was caused by the interaction of the broadband resonance of the Fabry-Perot (F-P) cavity and the narrow band resonance of the ring cavity. The Fabry-Perot (F-P) cavity in this case was formed by two silver baffles dividing the MIM waveguide. The maximum sensitivity of 718 nm/RIU and the maximum figure of merit of 4354 were achieved. Furthermore, the effects of the structural parameters of the F-P cavity and the ring cavity on the transmission properties of the plasmonic system were analyzed. The results can provide a guide for designing highly sensitive on-chip sensors based on surface plasmon polaritons.

  3. A protocol for patients with cardiovascular implantable devices undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): should defibrillation threshold testing be performed post-(MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Peter Thomas; Ghanbari, Hamid; Alexander, Patrick B; Shaw, Michael K; Daccarett, Marcos; Machado, Christian

    2010-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIED) has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Recent data suggests MRI as a relative rather than absolute contraindication in CIED patients. Recently, the American Heart Association has recommended defibrillation threshold testing (DFTT) in implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) patients undergoing MRI. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of a protocol for MRI in CIED patients, incorporating the new recommendations on DFTT. Consecutive patients with CIED undergoing MRI were included. The protocol consisted of continuous monitoring during imaging, device interrogation pre- and post-MRI, reprogramming of the pacemaker to an asynchronous mode in pacemaker-dependent (PMD) patients and a non-tracking/sensing mode for non-PMD patients. All tachyarrhythmia therapies were disabled. Devices were interrogated for lead impedance, battery life, pacing, and sensing thresholds. All patients with ICD underwent DFTT/defibrillator safety margin testing (DSMT) post-MRI. A total of 92 MRI's at 1.5 Tesla were performed in 38 patients. A total of 13 PMD patients, ten ICD patients, four cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) patients, and 11 non-PMD patients were scanned from four major manufacturers. No device circuitry damage, programming alterations, inappropriate shocks, failure to pace, or changes in sensing, pacing, or defibrillator thresholds were found on single or multiple MRI sessions. Our protocol for MRI in CIED patients appears safe, feasible, and reproducible. This is irrespective of the type of CIED, pacemaker dependancy or multiple 24-h scanning sessions. Our protocol addresses early detection of potential complications and establishes a response system for potential device-related complications. Our observation suggests that routine DFTT/DSMT post-MRI may not be necessary.

  4. On the nature of some monopole resonances of p-shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, G.F.; Vasilevsky, V.S.; Nesterov, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    The resonance structure of states of a continuous spectrum of light nuclei is studied. Using 7 Li and 8 Be as an example it is shown that in these nuclei there exist a near-threshold resonance the share of which is about 50-70 % of isoscalar monopole sum rule. The experimental method of finding the near-threshold resonances is described

  5. Hemoglobin structural dynamics as monitored by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiro, T.G.

    1981-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of the heme group are now understood at a level sufficient to provide a useful monitor of several heme structural features. Some porphyrin vibrational frequencies are sensitive to Fe oxidation state, or π-electron distribution, and give insight into the electronic structure of O 2 , CO and NO hemes. Others are sensitive to Fe spin-state, via the associated geometry variation, and provide an accurate index of the porphyrin core size. When examined during the photolysis of CO-hemoglobin via short laser pulses, these frequencies indicate that conversion from low- to h+gh-spin Fe 11 takes place within 30 ps of photolysis, presumably via intersystem-crossing in the excited state, but that the subsequent relaxation of the Fe atom out of the heme plane takes longer than 20 ns, probably because of restraint by the protein. Axial ligand modes have been identified for several heme derivatives. The Fe-imidazole frequency in deoxyhemoglobin is appreciably lowered in the T quaternary structure, as determined in both static and kinetic experiments, suggesting molecular tension or proximal imidazole H-bond weakening in the T state. (author)

  6. Photoionization using the xchem approach: Total and partial cross sections of Ne and resonance parameters above the 2 s22 p5 threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marante, Carlos; Klinker, Markus; Kjellsson, Tor; Lindroth, Eva; González-Vázquez, Jesús; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando

    2017-08-01

    The XCHEM approach interfaces well established quantum chemistry packages with scattering numerical methods in order to describe single-ionization processes in atoms and molecules. This should allow one to describe electron correlation in the continuum at the same level of accuracy as quantum chemistry methods do for bound states. Here we have applied this method to study multichannel photoionization of Ne in the vicinity of the autoionizing states lying between the 2 s22 p5 and 2 s 2 p6 ionization thresholds. The calculated total photoionization cross sections are in very good agreement with the absolute measurement of Samson et al. [J. Electron Spectrosc. Relat. Phenom. 123, 265 (2002), 10.1016/S0368-2048(02)00026-9], and with independent benchmark calculations performed at the same level of theory. From these cross sections, we have extracted resonance positions, total autoionization widths, Fano profile parameters, and correlation parameters for the lowest three autoionizing states. The values of these parameters are in good agreement with those reported in earlier theoretical and experimental work. We have also evaluated β asymmetry parameter and partial photoionization cross sections and, from the latter, partial autoionization widths and Starace parameters for the same resonances, not yet available in the literature. Resonant features in the calculated β parameter are in good agreement with the experimental observations. We have found that the three lowest resonances preferentially decay into the 2 p-1ɛ d continuum rather than into the 2 p-1ɛ s one [Phys. Rev. A 89, 043415 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.89.043415], in agreement with previous expectations, and that in the vicinity of the resonances the partial 2 p-1ɛ s cross section can be larger than the 2 p-1ɛ d one, in contrast with the accepted idea that the latter should amply dominate in the whole energy range. These results show the potential of the XCHEM approach to describe highly correlated process

  7. Surfacing the Structures of Patriarchy: Teaching and Learning Threshold Concepts in Women's Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Holly; Reddinger, Amy; van Slooten, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Patriarchy is a threshold concept in women's studies--a significant, defining concept that transforms students' understanding of the discipline. This article reviews our design, implementation, and findings of a lesson study crafted to teach women's studies students the complex idea of patriarchy as a social system. We analyze the lesson using…

  8. Simulation of the Optimized Structure of a Laterally Coupled Distributed Feedback (LC-DFB Semiconductor Laser Above Threshold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Seifouri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the laterally coupled distributed feedback semiconductor laser is studied. In the simulations performed, variations of structural parameters such as the grating amplitude a, the ridge width W, the thickness of the active region d, and other structural properties are considered. It is concluded that for certain values ​​of structural parameters, the laser maintains the highest output power, the lowest distortion Bragg frequency δL and the smallest changes in the wavelength λ. Above threshold, output power more than 40mW and SMSR values greater than 50 dB were achieved.

  9. Reduction of structured population models to threshold-type delay equations and functional differential equations: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, H.L. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe (United States))

    1993-01-01

    It is shown by way of a simple example that certain structured population models lead naturally to differential delay equations of the threshold type and that these equations can be transformed in a natural way to functional differential equations. The model examined can be viewed as a model of competition between adults and juveniles of a single population. The results indicate the possibility that this competition leads to instability. 28 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2014-01-01

    A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice.......A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice....

  11. Nanomechanical resonant structures in single-crystal diamond

    OpenAIRE

    Burek, Michael J.; Ramos, Daniel; Patel, Parth; Frank, Ian W.; Lončar, Marko

    2013-01-01

    With its host of outstanding material properties, single-crystal diamond is an attractive material for nanomechanical systems. Here, the mechanical resonance characteristics of freestanding, single-crystal diamond nanobeams fabricated by an angled-etching methodology are reported. Resonance frequencies displayed evidence of significant compressive stress in doubly clamped diamond nanobeams, while cantilever resonance modes followed the expected inverse-length-squared trend. Q-factors on the o...

  12. Multiple Fano-Like MIM Plasmonic Structure Based on Triangular Resonator for Refractive Index Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Jankovic, Nikolina; Cselyuszka, Norbert

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we present a Fano metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure based on an isosceles triangular cavity resonator for refractive index sensing applications. Due to the specific feeding scheme and asymmetry introduced in the triangular cavity, the resonator exhibits four sharp Fano-like resonances. The behavior of the structure is analyzed in detail and its sensing capabilities demonstrated through the responses for various refractive indices. The results show that the sensor has very g...

  13. Reducing support loss in micromechanical ring resonators using phononic band-gap structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Feng-Chia; Huang, Tsun-Che; Wang, Chin-Hung; Chang, Pin [Industrial Technology Research Institute-South, Tainan 709, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Jin-Chen, E-mail: fengchiahsu@itri.org.t, E-mail: hsujc@yuntech.edu.t [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliou, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-21

    In micromechanical resonators, energy loss via supports into the substrates may lead to a low quality factor. To eliminate the support loss, in this paper a phononic band-gap structure is employed. We demonstrate a design of phononic-crystal (PC) strips used to support extensional wine-glass mode ring resonators to increase the quality factor. The PC strips are introduced to stop elastic-wave propagation by the band-gap and deaf-band effects. Analyses of resonant characteristics of the ring resonators and the dispersion relations, eigenmodes, and transmission properties of the PC strips are presented. With the proposed resonator architecture, the finite-element simulations show that the leaky power is effectively reduced and the stored energy inside the resonators is enhanced simultaneously as the operating frequencies of the resonators are within the band gap or deaf bands. Realization of a high quality factor micromechanical ring resonator with minimized support loss is expected.

  14. Reducing support loss in micromechanical ring resonators using phononic band-gap structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Feng-Chia; Huang, Tsun-Che; Wang, Chin-Hung; Chang, Pin; Hsu, Jin-Chen

    2011-01-01

    In micromechanical resonators, energy loss via supports into the substrates may lead to a low quality factor. To eliminate the support loss, in this paper a phononic band-gap structure is employed. We demonstrate a design of phononic-crystal (PC) strips used to support extensional wine-glass mode ring resonators to increase the quality factor. The PC strips are introduced to stop elastic-wave propagation by the band-gap and deaf-band effects. Analyses of resonant characteristics of the ring resonators and the dispersion relations, eigenmodes, and transmission properties of the PC strips are presented. With the proposed resonator architecture, the finite-element simulations show that the leaky power is effectively reduced and the stored energy inside the resonators is enhanced simultaneously as the operating frequencies of the resonators are within the band gap or deaf bands. Realization of a high quality factor micromechanical ring resonator with minimized support loss is expected.

  15. Threshold resummation for the LHC: all order colour structure and application to squark production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwinn, Ch.; Falgari, P.; Benke, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a factorization formula for the production of pairs of heavy coloured particles in hadronic collision at the production threshold. We construct a basis in colour space that diagonalized the soft function appearing in the factorization formula to all orders in perturbation theory. We perform a resummation of soft gluon effects in momentum space and present results for the example of squark-antisquark production at the LHC. (author)

  16. A cost-effectiveness threshold analysis of a multidisciplinary structured educational intervention in pediatric asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E; Sossa-Briceño, Monica P; Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A

    2018-05-01

    Asthma educational interventions have been shown to improve several clinically and economically important outcomes. However, these interventions are costly in themselves and could lead to even higher disease costs. A cost-effectiveness threshold analysis would be helpful in determining the threshold value of the cost of educational interventions, leading to these interventions being cost-effective. The aim of the present study was to perform a cost-effectiveness threshold analysis to determine the level at which the cost of a pediatric asthma educational intervention would be cost-effective and cost-saving. A Markov-type model was developed in order to estimate costs and health outcomes of a simulated cohort of pediatric patients with persistent asthma treated over a 12-month period. Effectiveness parameters were obtained from a single uncontrolled before-and-after study performed with Colombian asthmatic children. Cost data were obtained from official databases provided by the Colombian Ministry of Health. The main outcome was the variable "quality-adjusted life-years" (QALYs). A deterministic threshold sensitivity analysis showed that the asthma educational intervention will be cost-saving to the health system if its cost is under US$513.20. Additionally, the analysis showed that the cost of the intervention would have to be below US$967.40 in order to be cost-effective. This study identified the level at which the cost of a pediatric asthma educational intervention will be cost-effective and cost-saving for the health system in Colombia. Our findings could be a useful aid for decision makers in efficiently allocating limited resources when planning asthma educational interventions for pediatric patients.

  17. Anisotropy of hardness and laser damage threshold of unidirectional organic NLO crystal in relation to the internal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, V.; Arivanandhan, M.; Sankaranarayanan, K.; Hayakawa, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: · Growth rate of the unidirectional organic crystals were measured and the variation in the growth rate was explained based on the attachment energy model. · Anisotropic behaviors of hardness and laser damage threshold of the unidirectional materials were analyzed. · The obtained results were explained based on the crystal structure of the material. - Abstract: Unidirectional benzophenone crystals were grown along , and directions by uniaxially solution crystallization method at ambient temperature. The growth rate of the grown crystals was varied with orientation. The optical absorption coefficients of benzophenone were measured as a function of wavelength. The optical absorption study reveals that the benzophenone crystal has very low absorption in the wavelength range of interest. Moreover, the laser damage threshold and micro hardness for , and oriented unidirectional benzophenone crystals were measured using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm radiation and Vicker's micro hardness tester, respectively. The laser damage threshold is larger for the and oriented crystals compared to oriented crystal at 1064 nm wavelength. The result is consistent with the hardness variation observed for the three different crystallographic directions of benzophenone crystal. The relation between the laser damage profile and mechanical hardness anisotropy is discussed based on the crystal structure of benzophenone.

  18. Structure of bending resonances frequencies in supercritical rotors of gaseous centrifuges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronov, I.N.; Grigor'ev, G.Yu.; Vyazovetskij, Yu.V.; Senchenkov, A.P.; Senchenkov, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    The position and the structure bending resonances for the model supercritical rotors with different construction of the tube are measured. Considerable complication of the resonance system for the tubes with nonuniform properties was established. The effect of the structure of the resonance on the complication of its realization and the ways of optimization of the rotor resonance system is discussed. Made measuring point to possibility for creation highly productive centrifuges relating to supercritical rotors with uniform concrete size carbon composite tube and structure of winding, working after the third bending resonance. The frequency of the fifth resonance falls in the zone of the performance frequency on the rotors with bellows crimps. Carbon composite tubes with the areas of raised flexibility is provided with greater in several times decrement [ru

  19. Effects of cathodic protection potential and stress ratio on fatigue thresholds of structured steels in sea water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolphin, A.S.; Tice, D.R.

    1987-09-01

    The results reported here suggest that the very high thresholds found under reducing {Delta}K conditions may be inapplicable under the increasing {Delta}K conditions likely to be more relevant to real structures. This conclusion is based on just two tests at - 0.85V SCE, and so requires confirmation over a range of R ratios and at free corrosion and overprotection potentials. Crack growth thresholds appear to be higher under cathodic over-protection conditions (-1.05V SCE) than at more positive potentials, due to calcareous scale formation. Tests at negative R ratios are required to ensure this calcareous scale would remain intact under compressive loading. Due to the large observed influence of calcareous scale on crack growth, and particularly on the arrest of growing cracks, more detailed microstructural examination is recommended on the specimens tested in this programme. (author).

  20. Measurement of the electron affinity of As and the fine structure of As- using infrared threshold photodetachment spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, C W; Gibson, N D; Field, R L III; Snedden, A P; Shapiro, J Z; Janczak, C M; Hanstorp, D

    2009-01-01

    The negative ion As - has been investigated using infrared threshold photodetachment spectroscopy. The relative cross section for neutral atom production was measured with a crossed OPO-ion beam apparatus over selected photon energy ranges between 0.63 - 0.82 eV. s-wave thresholds were observed for detachment from As - (4p 4 3 P 0,1,2 ) to the As (4p 3 4 S 3/2 ) ground state. The measurements yield preliminary values for the electron affinity of As (0.8048(2)) eV) and the fine structure intervals of As - (0.1276(2) eV for 3 P 1 - 3 P 2 and 0.1643(10) eV for 3 P 0 - 3 P 2 ). The present results substantially reduce the uncertainties in these quantities.

  1. Structural performance evaluation on aging underground reinforced concrete structures. Part 6. An estimation method of threshold value in performance verification taking reinforcing steel corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Toyofumi; Matsumura, Takuro; Miyagawa, Yoshinori

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses applicability of material degradation model due to reinforcing steel corrosion for RC box-culverts with corroded reinforcement and an estimation method for threshold value in performance verification reflecting reinforcing steel corrosion. First, in FEM analyses, loss of reinforcement section area and initial tension strain arising from reinforcing steel corrosion, and deteriorated bond characteristics between reinforcement and concrete were considered. The full-scale loading tests using corroded RC box-culverts were numerically analyzed. As a result, the analyzed crack patterns and load-strain relationships were in close agreement with the experimental results within the maximum corrosion ratio 15% of primary reinforcement. Then, we showed that this modeling could estimate the load carrying capacity of corroded RC box-culverts. Second, a parametric study was carried out for corroded RC box culverts with various sizes, reinforcement ratios and levels of steel corrosion, etc. Furthermore, as an application of analytical results and various experimental investigations, we suggested allowable degradation ratios for a modification of the threshold value, which corresponds to the chloride induced deterioration progress that is widely accepted in maintenance practice for civil engineering reinforced concrete structures. Finally, based on these findings, we developed two estimation methods for threshold value in performance verification: 1) a structural analysis method using nonlinear FEM included modeling of material degradation, 2) a practical method using a threshold value, which is determined by structural analyses of RC box-culverts in sound condition, is multiplied by the allowable degradation ratio. (author)

  2. Computational modeling of distinct neocortical oscillations driven by cell-type selective optogenetic drive: Separable resonant circuits controlled by low-threshold spiking and fast-spiking interneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorea Vierling-Claassen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Selective optogenetic drive of fast spiking interneurons (FS leads to enhanced local field potential (LFP power across the traditional gamma frequency band (20-80Hz; Cardin et al., 2009. In contrast, drive to regular-spiking pyramidal cells (RS enhances power at lower frequencies, with a peak at 8 Hz. The first result is consistent with previous computational studies emphasizing the role of FS and the time constant of GABAA synaptic inhibition in gamma rhythmicity. However, the same theoretical models do not typically predict low-frequency LFP enhancement with RS drive. To develop hypotheses as to how the same network can support these contrasting behaviors, we constructed a biophysically principled network model of primary somatosensory neocortex containing FS, RS and low-threshold-spiking (LTS interneurons. Cells were modeled with detailed cell anatomy and physiology, multiple dendritic compartments, and included active somatic and dendritic ionic currents. Consistent with prior studies, the model demonstrated gamma resonance during FS drive, dependent on the time-constant of GABAA inhibition induced by synchronous FS activity. Lower frequency enhancement during RS drive was replicated only on inclusion of an inhibitory LTS population, whose activation was critically dependent on RS synchrony and evoked longer-lasting inhibition. Our results predict that differential recruitment of FS and LTS inhibitory populations is essential to the observed cortical dynamics and may provide a means for amplifying the natural expression of distinct oscillations in normal cortical processing.

  3. Measurement of the 13C(α,n)16O reaction with the Trojan horse method: Focus on the sub threshold resonance at −3 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Guardo, G. L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Spartà, R.; Trippella, O.; Kiss, G. G.; Rogachev, G. V.; Avila, M.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Santiago, D.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Lamia, L.

    2014-01-01

    The 13 C(α,n) 16 O reaction is the neutron source of the main component of the s-process. The astrophysical S(E)-factor is dominated by the −3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in 17 O. Its contribution is still controversial as extrapolations, e.g., through R-matrix calculations, and indirect techniques, such as the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC), yield inconsistent results. Therefore, we have applied the Trojan Horse Method (THM) to the 13 C( 6 Li,n 16 O)d reaction to measure its contribution. For the first time, the ANC for the 6.356 MeV level has been deduced through the THM, allowing to attain an unprecedented accuracy. Though a larger ANC for the 6.356 MeV level is measured, our experimental S(E) factor agrees with the most recent extrapolation in the literature in the 140-230 keV energy interval, the accuracy being greatly enhanced thanks to this innovative approach, merging together two well establish indirect techniques, namely, the THM and the ANC

  4. Experimental Protocol to Determine the Chloride Threshold Value for Corrosion in Samples Taken from Reinforced Concrete Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angst, Ueli M; Boschmann, Carolina; Wagner, Matthias; Elsener, Bernhard

    2017-08-31

    The aging of reinforced concrete infrastructure in developed countries imposes an urgent need for methods to reliably assess the condition of these structures. Corrosion of the embedded reinforcing steel is the most frequent cause for degradation. While it is well known that the ability of a structure to withstand corrosion depends strongly on factors such as the materials used or the age, it is common practice to rely on threshold values stipulated in standards or textbooks. These threshold values for corrosion initiation (Ccrit) are independent of the actual properties of a certain structure, which clearly limits the accuracy of condition assessments and service life predictions. The practice of using tabulated values can be traced to the lack of reliable methods to determine Ccrit on-site and in the laboratory. Here, an experimental protocol to determine Ccrit for individual engineering structures or structural members is presented. A number of reinforced concrete samples are taken from structures and laboratory corrosion testing is performed. The main advantage of this method is that it ensures real conditions concerning parameters that are well known to greatly influence Ccrit, such as the steel-concrete interface, which cannot be representatively mimicked in laboratory-produced samples. At the same time, the accelerated corrosion test in the laboratory permits the reliable determination of Ccrit prior to corrosion initiation on the tested structure; this is a major advantage over all common condition assessment methods that only permit estimating the conditions for corrosion after initiation, i.e., when the structure is already damaged. The protocol yields the statistical distribution of Ccrit for the tested structure. This serves as a basis for probabilistic prediction models for the remaining time to corrosion, which is needed for maintenance planning. This method can potentially be used in material testing of civil infrastructures, similar to established

  5. Bandgap properties in locally resonant phononic crystal double panel structures with periodically attached spring–mass resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Denghui, E-mail: qdhsd318@163.com; Shi, Zhiyu, E-mail: zyshi@nuaa.edu.cn

    2016-10-07

    Bandgap properties of the locally resonant phononic crystal double panel structure made of a two-dimensional periodic array of a spring–mass resonator surrounded by n springs (n equals to zero at the beginning of the study) connected between the upper and lower plates are investigated in this paper. The finite element method is applied to calculate the band structure, of which the accuracy is confirmed in comparison with the one calculated by the extended plane wave expansion (PWE) method and the transmission spectrum. Numerical results and further analysis demonstrate that two bands corresponding to the antisymmetric vibration mode open a wide band gap but is cut narrower by a band corresponding to the symmetric mode. One of the regulation rules shows that the lowest frequency on the symmetric mode band is proportional to the spring stiffness. Then, a new design idea of adding springs around the resonator in a unit cell (n is not equal to zero now) is proposed in the need of widening the bandwidth and lowering the starting frequency. Results show that the bandwidth of the band gap increases from 50 Hz to nearly 200 Hz. By introducing the quality factor, the regulation rules with the comprehensive consideration of the whole structure quality limitation, the wide band gap and the low starting frequency are also discussed. - Highlights: • The locally resonant double panel structure opens a band gap in the low frequency region. • The band gap is the coupling between the symmetric and antisymmetric vibration modes. • The band structure of the double panel is the evolution of that of the single plate. • By adding springs around the resonator in a unit cell, the bandwidth gets wider. • The band gap can be controlled by tuning the parameters.

  6. Modified multipole structure for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suominen, P.

    2006-07-01

    Highly-charged heavy-ion beams are usually produced with Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) where the microwave heated plasma is confined in a strong magnetic field. The magnetic field is divided into an axial part (produced by solenoid magnets) and to a radial part (produced by multipole magnet). Experiments have shown that the radial magnetic field component plays a crucial role in the production of highly-charged ions. However, in several modern ECRIS the radial magnetic field strength is below the optimum value, mainly due to the limits in permanent magnet technology. Unfortunately, methods to increase the radial magnetic field strength while still using permanent magnets are often limited. In this thesis work new techniques to improve the radial magnetic field have been studied by simulations and experiments. Due to the computer simulations performed a remarkable radial magnetic field improvement was reached with a relatively simple and cost-effective idea called the Modified MultiPole Structure (MMPS). The MMPS differs strongly from former studies as here the magnetic field is increased only locally without affecting the plasma size. It was not known how this would affect the properties of the plasma and production of highly-charged heavy ions. Consequently, the idea had to be studied experimentally and a new MMPS plasma chamber prototype was designed and constructed for the JYFL 6.4 GHz ECRIS. The new construction is versatile and made it possible to perform several new types of measurements. These showed that the MMPS works well and is especially applicable to increase very high charge-state ion production. Typically the ion current increases by a factor of 2 - 3 in the case of highly charged ions such as Ar16+. (orig.)

  7. Modified multipole structure for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suominen, P.

    2006-01-01

    Highly-charged heavy-ion beams are usually produced with Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) where the microwave heated plasma is confined in a strong magnetic field. The magnetic field is divided into an axial part (produced by solenoid magnets) and to a radial part (produced by multipole magnet). Experiments have shown that the radial magnetic field component plays a crucial role in the production of highly-charged ions. However, in several modern ECRIS the radial magnetic field strength is below the optimum value, mainly due to the limits in permanent magnet technology. Unfortunately, methods to increase the radial magnetic field strength while still using permanent magnets are often limited. In this thesis work new techniques to improve the radial magnetic field have been studied by simulations and experiments. Due to the computer simulations performed a remarkable radial magnetic field improvement was reached with a relatively simple and cost-effective idea called the Modified MultiPole Structure (MMPS). The MMPS differs strongly from former studies as here the magnetic field is increased only locally without affecting the plasma size. It was not known how this would affect the properties of the plasma and production of highly-charged heavy ions. Consequently, the idea had to be studied experimentally and a new MMPS plasma chamber prototype was designed and constructed for the JYFL 6.4 GHz ECRIS. The new construction is versatile and made it possible to perform several new types of measurements. These showed that the MMPS works well and is especially applicable to increase very high charge-state ion production. Typically the ion current increases by a factor of 2 - 3 in the case of highly charged ions such as Ar 16+ . (orig.)

  8. Integrated unaligned resonant modulator tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zortman, William A.; Lentine, Anthony L.

    2017-10-03

    Methods and systems for tuning a resonant modulator are disclosed. One method includes receiving a carrier signal modulated by the resonant modulator with a stream of data having an approximately equal number of high and low bits, determining an average power of the modulated carrier signal, comparing the average power to a predetermined threshold, and operating a tuning device coupled to the resonant modulator based on the comparison of the average power and the predetermined threshold. One system includes an input structure, a plurality of processing elements, and a digital control element. The input structure is configured to receive, from the resonant modulator, a modulated carrier signal. The plurality of processing elements are configured to determine an average power of the modulated carrier signal. The digital control element is configured to operate a tuning device coupled to the resonant modulator based on the average power of the modulated carrier signal.

  9. Effect of the three-dimensional structure of laser emission on the dynamics of low-threshold optical breakdown plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Arutiunian, R. V.; Bol'Shov, L. A.; Derkach, O. N.; Kanevskii, M. F.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of the transverse structure of pulsed CO2 laser emission on the dynamics of laser-induced detonation waves propagating from a metal surface and on plasma transparency recovery is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Particular attention is given to breakdown initiation near the surface. It is suggested that the inclusion of refraction in the plasma into a self-consistent numerical mode is essential for the adequate quantitative description of experimental data on the interaction of laser emission with low-threshold optical breakdown plasmas.

  10. Simulations of Collisional Disruption at the Catastrophic Impact Energy Threshold: Effect of the Target's Internal Structure and Diameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, P.; Benz, W.; Richardson, D. C.

    2005-08-01

    Recent simulations of asteroid break-ups, including both the fragmentation of the parent body and the gravitational interactions of the fragments, have allowed to reproduced successfully the main properties of asteroid families formed in different regimes of impact energy. Here, using the same kind of simulations, we concentrate on a single regime of impact energy, the so-called catastrophic threshold usually designated by Qcrit, which results in the escape of half of the target's mass. Considering a wide range of diameter values and two kinds of internal structures of the parent body, monolithic and pre-shattered, we analyse their potential influences on the value of Qcrit and on the collisional outcome limited here to the fragment size and ejection speed distributions, which are the main outcome properties used by collisional models to study the evolutions of the different populations of small bodies. For all the considered diameters and the two internal structures of the parent body, we confirm that the process of gravitational reaccumulation is at the origin of the largest remnant's mass. We then find that, for a given diameter of the parent body, the impact energy corresponding to the catastrophic disruption threshold is highly dependent on the internal structure of the parent body. In particular, a pre-shattered parent body containing only damaged zones but no macroscopic voids is easier to disrupt than a monolithic parent body. Other kinds of internal properties that can also characterize small bodies in real populations will be investigated in a future work.

  11. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...

  12. Magnetic structure and resonance properties of hexagonal antidot lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchenko, A.I.; Krivoruchko, V.N.

    2012-01-01

    Static and resonance properties of ferromagnetic films with an antidot lattice (pores in the film) are studied. The description of the system is based on micromagnetic modeling and analytical solution of the Landau-Lifshitz equation. The dependences of ferromagnetic resonance spectra on the in-plane direction of applied magnetic field and on the lattice parameters are investigated. The dependences of a dynamic system response on frequency at fixed magnetic field and on field at fixed frequency, when the field changes cause the static magnetic order to change are explored. It is found that the specific peculiarities of the system dynamics leave unchange for both of these experimental conditions. Namely, for low damping the resonance spectra contain three quasi-homogeneous modes which are due to the resonance of different regions (domains) of the antidot lattice cell. It is shown the angular field dependences of each mode are characterized by a twofold symmetry and the related easy axes are mutually rotated by 60 degrees. As the result, a hexagonal symmetry of the system static and dynamic magnetic characteristics is realized. The existence in the resonance spectrum of several quasi-homogeneous modes related to different regions of the unit cell could be fundamental for working elements of magnonic devices.

  13. Dual resonant structure for energy harvesting from random vibration sources at low frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a design with dual resonant structure which can harvest energy from random vibration sources at low frequency range. The dual resonant structure consists of two spring-mass subsystems with different frequency responses, which exhibit strong coupling and broad bandwidth when the two masses collide with each other. Experiments with piezoelectric elements show that the energy harvesting device with dual resonant structure can generate higher power output than the sum of the two separate devices from random vibration sources.

  14. Resonant Tunnelling in Barrier-in-Well and Well-in-Well Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang-Hong, Yao; Zhang-Yan; Wei-Wu, Li; Yong-Chun, Shu; Zhan-Guo, Wang; Jing-Jun, Xu; Guo-Zhi, Jia

    2008-01-01

    A Schrödinger equation is solved numerically for a barrier in a quantum well and a quantum well in another well structure by the transfer matrix technique. Effect of structure parameters on the transmission probabilities is investigated in detail. The results suggest that symmetry plays an important role in the coupling effect between the quantum wells. The relationship between the width of the inner well and the resonant energy levels in well-in-well structures is also studied. It is found that the ground state energy and the second resonant energy decrease with increasing width of the inner well, while the first resonant energy remains constant

  15. Resonant Quasi-Optical Systems with Multi-Row Periodic Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksandr, Rybalko; Rybalko, Yu A.; Buriak, I. A.

    2017-01-01

    Selective properties of resonant quasi-optical systems with periodical multi-row structures in millimeter wavelength range are described. The possibility of selection fluctuations in the volume of open resonator using double-row periodic elements was shown in the experiment at 70-80 GHz. Advantages...... and possibility of control the energy characteristics of such structures are also described. The obtained experimental data is used to confirm the results of computational analysis previously described in the literature. Implementation of resonant quasi-optical systems with multi-row periodic structures...

  16. Enhanced Faraday rotation in one dimensional magneto-plasmonic structure due to Fano resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, S.; Hamidi, S. M.

    2018-04-01

    Enhanced Faraday rotation in a new type of magneto-plasmonic structure with the capability of Fano resonance, has been reported theoretically. A magneto-plasmonic structure composed of a gold corrugated layer deposited on a magneto-optically active layer was studied by means of Lumerical software based on finite-difference time-domain. In our proposed structure, plasmonic Fano resonance and localized surface plasmon have induced enhancement in magneto-optical Faraday rotation. It is shown that the influence of geometrical parameters in gold layer offers a desirable platform for engineering spectral position of Fano resonance and enhancement of Faraday rotation.

  17. Survey of structures revealed in nucleon-nucleon scattering experiments and dibaryon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, K.; Yokosawa, A.

    1979-01-01

    Structures appearing in various experimental data (particularly those with polarized beams) in nucleon-nucleon systems are reviewed. Evidence is presented for the existence of dibaryon resonances with an emphasis on a diproton resonance in 3 F 3 (J/sup P/ = 3 - ) state. 38 references

  18. INFLUENCE OF LEGRAD THRESHOLD STRUCTURE ON HYDROGEOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS IN KOPRIVNICA AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Duić

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Koprivnička Podravina area in structural sense belongs to structural unit of Drava basin. Special role in research area has structure of Legrad which is formed along Ludbreg-Nagykanizsa fault, and together with Drava fault as dominant structure in formation of Drava basin, represent most important structure in area. This is specially important when observing hydraulic characteristics of main well field in Koprivnica area-Ivanščak and Lipovec. Both of them are formated in quternary deposits, but have very different hydraulic and spatial characteristics. Intensive movement along structures has also dominant influence on sedimantation conditions, and consequently to groundwater quality (the paper is published in Croatian.

  19. Observation of Multi-GeV Breakdown Thresholds in Dielectric Wakefield Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, M.C.; Thompson, M.C.; Yoder, R.B.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Kirby, N.A.; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, D.R.; Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; Travish, G.; Scott, A.; Muggli, P.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment designed to test the breakdown threshold of a dielectric subjected to the GV/m-scale electric-fields of an intense electron-beam has been completed. In this experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) facility, the 28.5 GeV SLAC electron beam was focused down and propagated through short fused-silica capillary-tubes with internal diameters of as little as 100 (micro)m. The electric field at the inner surface of the tubes was varied from about 1 GV/m to 22 GV/m by adjusting the longitudinal compression of the electron bunch. We observed a sharp increase in optical emissions from the capillaries in the middle part of this surface field range which we believe indicates the transition between sustainable field levels and breakdown. If this initial interpretation is correct, the multi-GV/m surfaced fields that were sustained equate to on axis accelerating field of several GV/m

  20. Structure of the giant dipole resonance in 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naggar, N.M.

    1977-01-01

    A new scheme is devised to study the giant resonance in the heavy magic nucleus 208 Pb. The effect of the 4 + and 5 - collective excitations of the nucleus core is demonstrated. The calculated cross section is compared with the experimental data. (author)

  1. Low-energy D* + (D-bar)10 scattering and the nature of resonance-like structure Z+(4430)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Ming; Meng Guozhan; He Song; Liu Chuan; Niu Zhiyuan; Shen Yuan; Chen Ying; Li Gang; Zhang Yuanjiang; Liu Yubin; Meng Xiangfei; Ma Jianping; Zhang Jianbo; CLQCD collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Low-energy scattering of D *+ and (D-bar) 1 0 meson is studied using quenched lattice QCD with improved lattice actions on anisotropic lattices. The threshold scattering parameters, namely the scattering length a 0 and the effective range r 0 , for the s-wave scattering in J P = 0 - channel are extracted: a 0 = 2.52(47) fm and r 0 = 0.7(1) fm. It is argued that, albeit the interaction between the two charmed mesons being attractive, it is unlikely that they can form a shallow bound state in this channel. Our calculation provides some useful information on the nature of the newly discovered resonance-like structure Z + (4430) by the Belle Collaboration. (authors)

  2. Determination of the threshold of nanoparticle behavior: Structural and electronic properties study of nano-sized copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Vega, Juan J.; Medrano, L.R.; Landauro, C.V.; Rojas-Tapia, J.

    2014-01-01

    In the present work we determine the threshold of the nanoparticle behavior of copper nanoparticles by studying their structural and electronic properties. The studied nanoparticles contain from 13 to 8217 atoms and were obtained by molecular dynamics simulations using the Johnson potential for copper based on the embedded atom method. The results indicate that for small copper nanoparticles ( 2000atoms, ∼3.5 nm), with spherical-like external shape and large percentage of fcc-like local structure, this effect is negligible and their electronic character are similar to such expected in solid copper. Finally, it has also been shown that copper nanoparticles change their electronic character, from metallic to insulating, after increasing the strength of the chemical disorder

  3. Scaling of the low-energy structure in above-threshold ionization in the tunneling regime: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L; Han, S S; Liu, X; Cheng, Y; Xu, Z Z; Fan, J; Chen, J; Chen, S G; Becker, W; Blaga, C I; DiChiara, A D; Sistrunk, E; Agostini, P; DiMauro, L F

    2013-01-04

    A calculation of the second-order (rescattering) term in the S-matrix expansion of above-threshold ionization is presented for the case when the binding potential is the unscreened Coulomb potential. Technical problems related to the divergence of the Coulomb scattering amplitude are avoided in the theory by considering the depletion of the atomic ground state due to the applied laser field, which is well defined and does not require the introduction of a screening constant. We focus on the low-energy structure, which was observed in recent experiments with a midinfrared wavelength laser field. Both the spectra and, in particular, the observed scaling versus the Keldysh parameter and the ponderomotive energy are reproduced. The theory provides evidence that the origin of the structure lies in the long-range Coulomb interaction.

  4. Integration of community structure data reveals observable effects below sediment guideline thresholds in a large estuary

    KAUST Repository

    Tremblay, Louis A.; Clark, Dana; Sinner, Jim; Ellis, Joanne

    2017-01-01

    The sustainable management of estuarine and coastal ecosystems requires robust frameworks due to the presence of multiple physical and chemical stressors. In this study, we assessed whether ecological health decline, based on community structure

  5. Hydrodynamic loading and viscous damping of patterned perforations on microfabricated resonant structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Kidong; Shim, Jeong; Solovyeva, Vita

    2012-01-01

    We examined the hydrodynamic loading of vertically resonating microfabricated plates immersed in liquids with different viscosities. The planar structures were patterned with focused ion beam, perforating various shapes with identical area but varying perimeters. The hydrodynamic loading of various...

  6. 12 O resonant structure evaluated by two-proton emission process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, T.N.; Teruya, N.; Goncalves, M.

    2009-06-01

    The characteristics of 12 O resonant ground state are investigated through the analysis of the experimental data for the two-proton decay process. The sequential and simultaneous two-proton emission decay modes have been considered in a statistical calculation of the decay energy distribution. The resonant structures of 11 N have been employed as intermediate states for the sequential mode, having their parameters determined by considering the structure of single particle resonance in quantum scattering problem. The width of 12 O resonant ground state has been extracted from a best fit to the experimental data. The contributions from the different channels to the decay energy distribution have been evaluated, and width and peak location parameters of 12 O resonant ground state are compared with results of other works for the sequential and simultaneous two-proton decay modes. (author)

  7. 12O resonant structure evaluated by the two-proton emission process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, T. N.; Teruya, N.; Dimarco, A.; Duarte, S. B.; Tavares, O. A. P.; Goncalves, M.

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of the 12 O resonant ground state are investigated through the analysis of the experimental data for the two-proton decay process. The sequential and simultaneous two-proton emission decay modes have been considered in a statistical calculation of the decay energy distribution. The resonant structures of 11 N have been employed as intermediate states for the sequential mode, having their parameters determined by considering the structure of single particle resonance in quantum scattering problem. The width of the 12 O resonant ground state has been extracted from a best fit to the experimental data. The contributions from the different channels to the decay energy distribution have been evaluated, and width and peak location parameters of the 12 O resonant ground state are compared with results of other works for the sequential and simultaneous two-proton decay modes.

  8. {sup 12} O resonant structure evaluated by two-proton emission process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, T.N. [Fundacao Universidade Federal do Vale do Sao Francisco (UNIVASF), Juazeiro, BA (Brazil); Teruya, N. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Dimarco, A. [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Duarte, S.B.; Tavares, O.A.P. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Goncalves, M. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-06-15

    The characteristics of {sup 12}O resonant ground state are investigated through the analysis of the experimental data for the two-proton decay process. The sequential and simultaneous two-proton emission decay modes have been considered in a statistical calculation of the decay energy distribution. The resonant structures of {sup 11} N have been employed as intermediate states for the sequential mode, having their parameters determined by considering the structure of single particle resonance in quantum scattering problem. The width of {sup 12}O resonant ground state has been extracted from a best fit to the experimental data. The contributions from the different channels to the decay energy distribution have been evaluated, and width and peak location parameters of {sup 12}O resonant ground state are compared with results of other works for the sequential and simultaneous two-proton decay modes. (author)

  9. Evaluation of resonant tunneling transmission coefficient from multilayer structures GaAlAs/GaAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Moghaddasi

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available   A theoretical study of resonant tunneling in multilayered GaAlAs/GaAs structures are presented. The spectrum of resonant energies and its dependence on the barrier structure are analyzed from calculated profiles of barrier transparency versus energy, and from current voltage characteristics computed at selected temperatures and Fermi levels. The present formalism is based on the effective mass approximation and results are via direct numerical evaluations.

  10. Effects of manual threshold setting on image analysis results of a sandstone sample structural characterization by X-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Anderson C.; Fernandes, Celso P.; Fernandes, Jaquiel S.; Marques, Leonardo C.; Appoloni, Carlos R.; Nagata, Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    X-ray microtomography is a nondestructive nuclear technique widely applied for samples structural characterization. This methodology permits the investigation of materials porous phase, without special sample preparation, generating bidimensional images of the irradiated sample. The images are generated by the linear attenuation coefficient mapping of the sample. In order to do a quantitative characterization, the images have to be binarized, separating porous phase from the material matrix. The choice of the correct threshold in the grey level histogram is an important and discerning procedure for the binary images creation. Slight variations of the threshold level led to substantial variations in physical parameters determination, like porosity and pore size distribution values. The aim of this work is to evaluate these variations based on some manual threshold setting. Employing Imago image analysis software, four operators determined the porosity and pore size distribution of a sandstone sample by image analysis. The microtomography measurements were accomplished with the following scan conditions: 60 kV, 165 μA, 1 mm Al filter, 0.45 deg step size and 180.0 deg total rotation angle with and 3.8 μm and 11 μm spatial resolution. The global average porosity values, determined by the operators, range from 27.8 to 32.4 % for 3.8 μm spatial resolution and 12.3 to 28.3 % for 11 μm spatial resolution. Percentage differences among the pore size distributions were also found. For the same pore size range, 5.5 % and 17.1 %, for 3.8 μm and 11 μm spatial resolutions respectively, were noted. (author)

  11. Theoretical study of platonic crystals with periodically structured N-beam resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Penglin; Climente, Alfonso; Sánchez-Dehesa, José; Wu, Linzhi

    2018-03-01

    A multiple scattering theory is applied to study the properties of flexural waves propagating in a plate with periodically structured N-beam resonators. Each resonator consists of a circular hole containing an inner disk connected to background plate with N rectangular beams. The Bloch theorem is employed to obtain the band structure of a two-dimensional lattice containing a single resonator per unit cell. Also, a numerical algorithm has been developed to get the transmittance through resonator slabs infinitely long in the direction perpendicular to the incident wave. For the numerical validation, a square lattice of 2-beam resonators has been comprehensively analyzed. Its band structure exhibits several flat bands, indicating the existence of local resonances embedded in the structure. Particularly, the one featured as the fundamental mode of the inner disk opens a bandgap at low frequencies. This mode has been fully described in terms of a simple spring-mass model. As a practical application of the results obtained, a homogenization approach has been employed to design a focusing lens for flexural waves, where the index gradient is obtained by adjusting the orientation of the resonators beams. Numerical experiments performed within the framework of a three-dimensional finite element method have been employed to discuss the accuracy of the models described here.

  12. Analysis of Ultrasonic Resonance Signal in Multi-Layered Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Hoon; Kim, Dong Ryun

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonic testing are far superior to other nondestructive tests for detecting the disbond interface which occurred in adhesive interface. However, a solid rocket motor consisting of a steel case, rubber insulation, liner, and propellant poses many difficulties for analyzing ultrasonic waves because of the superposition of reflected waves and large differences in acoustic impedance of various materials. Therefore, ultrasonic tests for detecting the disbond interface in solid rocket motor have been applied in very limited areas between the steel case and rubber insulation using an automatic C-scan system. The existing ultrasonic test cannot detect the disbond interface between the liner and propellant of a solid rocket motor because most of the ultrasonic waves are absorbed in the rubber material which has low acoustic impedance. This problem could be overcome by analyzing the resonance frequency from the frequency spectrum using the ultrasonic resonance method. In this paper, a new technique to detect the disbond interface between the liner and propellant using ultrasonic resonance characteristics is discussed in detail.

  13. Analysis of Ultrasonic Resonance Signal in Multi-Layered Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hoon [Dept. of Mechanical Design Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Ryun [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Ultrasonic testing are far superior to other nondestructive tests for detecting the disbond interface which occurred in adhesive interface. However, a solid rocket motor consisting of a steel case, rubber insulation, liner, and propellant poses many difficulties for analyzing ultrasonic waves because of the superposition of reflected waves and large differences in acoustic impedance of various materials. Therefore, ultrasonic tests for detecting the disbond interface in solid rocket motor have been applied in very limited areas between the steel case and rubber insulation using an automatic C-scan system. The existing ultrasonic test cannot detect the disbond interface between the liner and propellant of a solid rocket motor because most of the ultrasonic waves are absorbed in the rubber material which has low acoustic impedance. This problem could be overcome by analyzing the resonance frequency from the frequency spectrum using the ultrasonic resonance method. In this paper, a new technique to detect the disbond interface between the liner and propellant using ultrasonic resonance characteristics is discussed in detail.

  14. Banded Structures in Electron Pitch Angle Diffusion Coefficients from Resonant Wave Particle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, A. K.; Singhal, R. P.; Khazanov, G. V.; Avanov, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Electron pitch angle (D (alpha)) and momentum (D(pp)) diffusion coefficients have been calculated due to resonant interactions with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) and whistler mode chorus waves. Calculations have been performed at two spatial locations L = 4.6 and 6.8 for electron energies 10 keV. Landau (n = 0) resonance and cyclotron harmonic resonances n = +/-1, +/-2,...+/-5 have been included in the calculations. It is found that diffusion coefficient versus pitch angle (alpha) profiles show large dips and oscillations or banded structures. The structures are more pronounced for ECH and lower band chorus (LBC) and particularly at location 4.6. Calculations of diffusion coefficients have also been performed for individual resonances. It is noticed that the main contribution of ECH waves in pitch angle diffusion coefficient is due to resonances n = +1 and n = +2. A major contribution to momentum diffusion coefficients appears from n = +2. However, the banded structures in D alpha and Dpp coefficients appear only in the profile of diffusion coefficients for n = +2. The contribution of other resonances to diffusion coefficients is found to be, in general, quite small or even negligible. For LBC and upper band chorus waves, the banded structures appear only in Landau resonance. The Dpp diffusion coefficient for ECH waves is one to two orders smaller than D alpha coefficients. For chorus waves, Dpp coefficients are about an order of magnitude smaller than D alpha coefficients for the case n does not = 0. In case of Landau resonance, the values of Dpp coefficient are generally larger than the values of D alpha coefficients particularly at lower energies. As an aid to the interpretation of results, we have also determined the resonant frequencies. For ECH waves, resonant frequencies have been estimated for wave normal angle 89 deg and harmonic resonances n = +1, +2, and +3, whereas for whistler mode waves, the frequencies have been calculated for angle

  15. Banded Structures in Electron Pitch Angle Diffusion Coefficients from Resonant Wave-Particle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, A. K.; Singhal, R. P.; Khazanov, G. V.; Avanov, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Electron pitch angle (D(sub (alpha alpha))) and momentum (D(sub pp)) diffusion coefficients have been calculated due to resonant interactions with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) and whistler mode chorus waves. Calculations have been performed at two spatial locations L=4.6 and 6.8 for electron energies less than or equal to 10 keV. Landau (n=0) resonance and cyclotron harmonic resonances n= +/- 1, +/-2, ... +/-5 have been included in the calculations. It is found that diffusion coefficient versus pitch angle (alpha) profiles show large dips and oscillations or banded structures. The structures are more pronounced for ECH and lower band chorus (LBC) and particularly at location 4.6. Calculations of diffusion coefficients have also been performed for individual resonances. It is noticed that the main contribution of ECH waves in pitch angle diffusion coefficient is due to resonances n=+1 and n=+2. A major contribution to momentum diffusion coefficients appears from n=+2. However, the banded structures in D(sub alpha alpha) and D(sub pp) coefficients appear only in the profile of diffusion coefficients for n=+2. The contribution of other resonances to diffusion coefficients is found to be, in general, quite small or even negligible. For LBC and upper band chorus waves, the banded structures appear only in Landau resonance. The D(sub pp) diffusion coefficient for ECH waves is one to two orders smaller than D(sub alpha alpha) coefficients. For chorus waves, D(sub pp) coefficients are about an order of magnitude smaller than D(sub alpha alpha) coefficients for the case n does not equal 0. In case of Landau resonance, the values of D(sub pp) coefficient are generally larger than the values of D(sub alpha alpha) coefficients particularly at lower energies. As an aid to the interpretation of results, we have also determined the resonant frequencies. For ECH waves, resonant frequencies have been estimated for wave normal angle 89 deg and harmonic resonances

  16. Effect of eddy current damping on phononic band gaps generated by locally resonant periodic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkaya, Efe; Yilmaz, Cetin

    2017-02-01

    The effect of eddy current damping on a novel locally resonant periodic structure is investigated. The frequency response characteristics are obtained by using a lumped parameter and a finite element model. In order to obtain wide band gaps at low frequencies, the periodic structure is optimized according to certain constraints, such as mass distribution in the unit cell, lower limit of the band gap, stiffness between the components in the unit cell, the size of magnets used for eddy current damping, and the number of unit cells in the periodic structure. Then, the locally resonant periodic structure with eddy current damping is manufactured and its experimental frequency response is obtained. The frequency response results obtained analytically, numerically and experimentally match quite well. The inclusion of eddy current damping to the periodic structure decreases amplitudes of resonance peaks without disturbing stop band width.

  17. Structure-based thresholds of toxicological concern-guidance for application to substances present at low levels in the diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renwick, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    Health-based guidance values, such as the ADI, use chemical-specific data to determine the highest intake that would be without significant adverse health effects. A threshold of toxicological concern (TTC) is a level of intake predicted to be without adverse effects based on the toxicity of structurally related compounds. The main advantage of the use of TTCs is that the risk of low exposures can be evaluated without the need for chemical-specific animal toxicity data. TTCs have been used for many years for screening the safety of packaging migrants by the FDA in the USA, and of flavoring substances, by the JECFA. A recent reassessment of the use of TTCs, organized by ILSI Europe, has developed a decision tree which allows a systematic approach to the evaluation of low levels of diverse chemicals in food. The decision tree incorporates a series of increasing TTC values into a step-wise approach. Potentially genotoxic carcinogens are considered first, based on the presence of known structural alerts. Aflatoxin-like, azoxy- and nitroso-compounds are removed from consideration because they are the most potent, and a practical TTC could not be established. Other compounds with structural alerts for genotoxicity are allocated a TTC of 0.15 μg/person per day. Compounds without structural alerts for genotoxicity are evaluated based on chemical structure and intake using a series of TTC values derived by the application of a 100-fold uncertainty factor to the 5th percentile of the distribution of NOAELs from chronic studies on compounds sharing similar structural characteristics

  18. A setup for measuring characteristics of microwave electric vacuum devices with open resonance structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybalko, Oleksandr; Ruban, A. I.; Vorob’ev, G. S.

    2015-01-01

    -tuning range, an additional periodic metal–dielectric structure is introduced into the open resonator. The experimental results of investigations of the energy, volt–ampere, and frequency characteristics of the modified diffraction-radiation generator prototype are compared to the characteristics...... of the generator without a metal–dielectric structure....

  19. Panel Resonance Control and Cavity Control in Double-Panel Structures for Active Noise Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2011-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation of panel resonance control and cavity control in a double-panel structure is presented in this paper. The double-panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its low

  20. Noise Reduction in Double‿Panel Structures by Cavity and Panel Resonance Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the cavity and the panel resonance control in a double‿panel structure. The double‿panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its light weight and effective

  1. Noise reduction in double-panel structures by cavity and panel resonance control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.-H.; Berkhoff, A.P

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the cavity and the panel resonance control in a double‐panel structure. The double‐panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its light weight and effective

  2. Electrostatic energy harvesting device with dual resonant structure for wideband random vibration sources at low frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yulong; Wang, Tianyang; Zhang, Ai; Peng, Zhuoteng; Luo, Dan; Chen, Rui; Wang, Fei

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present design and test of a broadband electrostatic energy harvester with a dual resonant structure, which consists of two cantilever-mass subsystems each with a mass attached at the free edge of a cantilever. Comparing to traditional devices with single resonant frequency, the proposed device with dual resonant structure can resonate at two frequencies. Furthermore, when one of the cantilever-masses is oscillating at resonance, the vibration amplitude is large enough to make it collide with the other mass, which provides strong mechanical coupling between the two subsystems. Therefore, this device can harvest a decent power output from vibration sources at a broad frequency range. During the measurement, continuous power output up to 6.2-9.8 μW can be achieved under external vibration amplitude of 9.3 m/s 2 at a frequency range from 36.3 Hz to 48.3 Hz, which means the bandwidth of the device is about 30% of the central frequency. The broad bandwidth of the device provides a promising application for energy harvesting from the scenarios with random vibration sources. The experimental results indicate that with the dual resonant structure, the vibration-to-electricity energy conversion efficiency can be improved by 97% when an external random vibration with a low frequency filter is applied.

  3. Electron paramagnetic resonance parameters and local structure for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HUA-MING ZHANG. 1. , GUANG-DUO LU. 1 ... the above ZFSs, the local structure information for the impurity Gd. 3+ is obtained, i.e., .... parameters, extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) measurements and crystal-field spectrum ...

  4. Hints for electric-field compensation in multicell resonant structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, P; Parodi, R

    1981-03-31

    We propose a lumped-parameter equivalent circuit for a TM/sub 01/ multicell standing wave accelerating structure with full end cells. By the suggested model we can predict the amount of end cell frequency compensation needed to achieve field flatness in the highest mode of the structure.

  5. Plasmon resonance optical tuning based on photosensitive composite structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilardi, Giovanni; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a numerical investigation of a periodic metallic structure sandwiched between two quartz plates. The volume comprised between the quartz plates and the metallic structure is infiltrated by a mixture of azo-dye-doped liquid crystal. The exposure to a low power visible light beam...

  6. Spatial confinement of acoustic and optical waves in stubbed slab structure as optomechanical resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Changsheng, E-mail: lcs135@163.com; Huang, Dan; Guo, Jierong

    2015-02-20

    We theoretically demonstrate that acoustic waves and optical waves can be spatially confined in the same micro-cavity by specially designed stubbed slab structure. The proposed structure presents both phononic and photonic band gaps from finite element calculation. The creation of cavity mode inside the band gap region provides strong localization of phonon and photon in the defect region. The practical parameters to inject cavity and work experimentally at telecommunication range are discussed. This structure can be precisely fabricated, hold promises to enhance acousto-optical interactions and design new applications as optomechanical resonator. - Highlights: • A resonator simultaneously supports acoustic and optical modes. • Strong spatial confinement and slow group velocity. • Potential to work as active optomechanical resonator.

  7. Generating a resonance-like structure in the reaction B{sub c} → B{sub s}ππ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiao-Hai [Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute for Advanced Simulation, Juelich (Germany); Meissner, Ulf G. [Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute for Advanced Simulation, Juelich (Germany); Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    We investigate the process B{sub c}{sup +} → B{sub s}{sup 0}π{sup +}π{sup 0} via B anti K* rescattering. The kinematic conditions for triangle singularities are perfectly satisfied in the rescattering diagrams. A resonance-like structure around the B anti K threshold, which we denote X(5777), is predicted to be present in the invariant mass distribution of B{sub s}{sup 0}π{sup +}. Because the relative weak B anti K (I = 1) interaction does not support the existence of a dynamically generated hadronic molecule, X(5777) can be identified as a pure kinematical effect due to the triangle singularity. Its observation may help to establish a non-resonance interpretation for some XYZ particles. (orig.)

  8. Symposium KK, Resonant Optics in Dielectric and Metallic Structures: Fundamentals and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larouche, Stephane [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Caldwell, Joshua [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-09-06

    Symposium KK focused on the design, fabrication, characterization of novel nanoscale optical resonators and alternative materials for sub-diffraction scale resonant particles. Contributions discussed all aspects of this field, and the organizers had more than 130 contributing participants to this session alone, spanning North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. Participants discussed cutting edge research results focused on the structure, physical and optical properties, and ultrafast dynamic response of nanoscale resonators such as plasmonic and dielectric nanoparticles. A strong focus on state-of-the-art characterization and fabrication approaches, as well as presentations on novel materials for sub-diffraction resonators took place. As expected, the sessions provided strong interdisciplinary interactions and lively debate among presenters and participants.

  9. One-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of pyridine: Determination of accurate ionization energy and cationic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yu Ran; Kang, Do Won; Kim, Hong Lae, E-mail: chkwon@kangwon.ac.kr, E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr; Kwon, Chan Ho, E-mail: chkwon@kangwon.ac.kr, E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Molecular Science and Fusion Technology, College of Natural Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-07

    Ionization energies and cationic structures of pyridine were intensively investigated utilizing one-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy with vacuum ultraviolet radiation generated by four-wave difference frequency mixing in Kr. The present one-photon high-resolution MATI spectrum of pyridine demonstrated a much finer and richer vibrational structure than that of the previously reported two-photon MATI spectrum. From the MATI spectrum and photoionization efficiency curve, the accurate ionization energy of the ionic ground state of pyridine was confidently determined to be 73 570 ± 6 cm{sup −1} (9.1215 ± 0.0007 eV). The observed spectrum was almost completely assigned by utilizing Franck-Condon factors and vibrational frequencies calculated through adjustments of the geometrical parameters of cationic pyridine at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. A unique feature unveiled through rigorous analysis was the prominent progression of the 10 vibrational mode, which corresponds to in-plane ring bending, and the combination of other totally symmetric fundamentals with the ring bending overtones, which contribute to the geometrical change upon ionization. Notably, the remaining peaks originate from the upper electronic state ({sup 2}A{sub 2}), as predicted by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies and symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction calculations. Based on the quantitatively good agreement between the experimental and calculated results, it was concluded that upon ionization the pyridine cation in the ground electronic state should have a planar structure of C{sub 2v} symmetry through the C-N axis.

  10. Low frequency torsional vibration gaps in the shaft with locally resonant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dianlong; Liu Yaozong; Wang Gang; Cai Li; Qiu Jing

    2006-01-01

    The propagation of torsional wave in the shaft with periodically attached local resonators is studied with the transfer matrix theory and the finite element method. The analytical dispersion relation and the complex band structure of such a structure is presented for the first time, which indicates the existence of low frequency gaps. The effect of shaft material on the vibration attenuation in band gap is investigated. The frequency response function of the shaft with finite periodic locally resonant oscillators is simulated with finite element method, which shows large vibration attenuation in the frequency range of the gap as expected. The low frequency torsional gap in shafts provides a new idea for vibration control

  11. Noise Reduction in Double‿Panel Structures by Cavity and Panel Resonance Control

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the cavity and the panel resonance control in a double‿panel structure. The double‿panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its light weight and effective transmission‿loss at high frequency. However, the resonance of the cavity and the poor transmission‿loss at low frequency limit its noise control performance. Applying active control forces on the panels or utili...

  12. Resonant frequency of the silicon micro-structure of MEMS vector hydrophone in fluid-structure interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojun Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The MEMS vector hydrophone developed by the North University of China has advantages of high Signal to Noise Ratio, ease of array integration, etc. However, the resonance frequency of the MEMS device in the liquid is different from that in the air due to the fluid-structure interaction (FSI. Based on the theory of Fluid-Solid Coupling, a generalized distributed mass attached on the micro-structure has been found, which results in the resonance frequency of the microstructure in the liquid being lower than that in the air. Then, an FSI simulation was conducted by ANSYS software. Finally, the hydrophone was measured by using a shaking table and a vector hydrophone calibration system respectively. Results show that, due to the FSI, the resonance frequency of the MEMS devices of the bionic vector hydrophone in the liquid declines approximately 30% compared to the case in the air.

  13. New structural studies of liquid crystal by reflectivity and resonant X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, P.

    2007-04-01

    This memory presents three structural studies of smectic Liquid Crystals by reflectivity and resonant diffraction of X-rays. It is divided in five chapters. In the first a short introduction to Liquid Crystals is given. In particular, the smectic phases that are the object of this study are presented. The second chapter is consecrated to the X-ray experimental techniques that were used in this work. The three last chapters present the works on which this thesis can be divided. Chapter three demonstrates on free-standing films of MHPOBC (historic liquid crystal that possesses the antiferroelectric sub-phases) the possibility to extend the technique of resonant X-ray diffraction to liquid crystals without resonant element. In the fourth chapter the structure of the B 2 liquid crystal phase of bent-core molecules (or banana molecules) is elucidated by using resonant X-ray diffraction combined with polarization analysis of the diffracted beam. A model of the polarization of the resonant beam diffracted by four different structures proposed for the B 2 phase is developed in this chapter. In the fifth chapter a smectic binary mixture presenting a very original critical point of phase separation is studied by X-ray reflectivity and optical microscopy. A concentration gradient in the direction perpendicular to the plane of the film seems to be induced by the free-standing film geometry. The results of a simplified model of the system are compatible with this interpretation

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance structure investigations on crosslinked polyesters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grobelny, J.

    1999-01-01

    Styrene-crosslinked mixed polyesters derived from maleic anhydride, 2,2-di(4-hydroxypropoxyphenyl)propane, oligo(propylene oxide) and 1,2-propylene glycol were investigated by high-resolution solid-state 13 C NMR spectroscopy. The structural modifications accompanying crosslinking were characterized in terms of spin-lattice relaxation times as a function of unsaturated polyester composition. Copolymerization and crosslinking effects were individually evaluated and the latter effect was related to variations in crosslinking density associated with the chemical structure of the unsaturated prepolymer. As the crosslinking effect is suppressed, the mechanical properties undergo expected changes, e.g., impact strength is increased and modulus of elasticity in tension is decreased. (author)

  15. The Spin Structure of the Proton in the Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatemi, Renee H. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Inclusive double spin asymmetries have been measured for $\\vec{p}$($\\vec{e}$,e') using the CLAS detector and a polarized 15NH3 target at Jefferson Lab in 1998. The virtual photon asymmetry A1, the longitudinal spin structure function, g1 (x, Q2), and the first moment Γ$1\\atop{p}$, have been extracted for a Q2 range of 0.15-2.0 GeV2. These results provide insight into the low Q2 evolution of spin dependent asymmetries and structure functions as well as the transition of Γ$1\\atop{p}$ from the photon point, where the Gerasimov, Drell and Hearn Sum Rule is expected to be satisfied, to the deep inelastic region.

  16. Effect of PANI rate percentage on morphology, structure and charge transport mechanism in PANI–PVDF composites above percolation threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saïdi, Sami; Bouzitoun, Mouna; Mannaî, Aymen; Gmati, Fethi; Derouiche, Hassen; Mohamed, Abdellatif Belhadj

    2013-01-01

    Polyaniline–Poly(vinylidene) fluoride (PANI–PVDF) composites were prepared by adding PANI to the PVDF by different weight percentages p % (p = 0, 5, 10, 20, … until 100%). The dc and ac electrical conductivity were studied as a function of PANI percentage in the temperature range 303–453 K. The percolation threshold was found to be equal to 2.95%. When the amount of PANI varies from 5 to 30%, the charge transport mechanism was found to be governed by Mott's three-dimensional variable range hopping model and the dc conductivity decreases within this range. For p > 30%, the conductivity increases and the charge transport mechanism are better fitted by a fluctuation induced tunnelling model (FIT). By calculating the distance ‘s’ between two successive clusters (the distance between two active imines centres (=N + H–) of PANI) from the FIT model, we deduce that electron charge transfer is done by inter-chain hopping for the range [p = 40 to 60%] and by intra-chain hopping for p = 70 to 90%. Some insights about the contribution of the ionic charge transport for PANI concentrations in the interval 5% < p < 30% were obtained using impedance measurements at different frequencies. X-ray diffraction measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate the effect of PANI on the structure and morphology of composites. (paper)

  17. Importance of complex band structure and resonant states for tunneling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dederichs, P. H.; Mavropoulos, Ph.; Wunnicke, O.; Papanikolaou, N.; Bellini, V.; Zeller, R.; Drchal, Václav; Kudrnovský, Josef

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 240, - (2002), s. 108-113 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010829; GA ČR GA202/00/0122; GA MŠk OC P5.30 Grant - others:TSR(XX) 01398 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : magnetoresistance * tunneling * band structure * interface effects Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.046, year: 2002

  18. A New Tuning Module for Resonant Coupling Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Vaccaro, Vittorio G; De Martinis, Carlo; Giove, Dario; Masullo, Maria R; Mauri, Marco; Rainò, Antonio; Variale, Vincenzo

    2005-01-01

    In order to have efficient particle acceleration it is fundamental that the particles experience, in the accelerating gap, field amplitudes as uniform and as high as possible from gap to gap. Because of the unavoidable fabrication errors, an accelerating structure, when assembled, exhibits field values lower than the nominal ones and/or not uniform. All the usual procedures developed in order to adjust the parameter deviations responsible of the malfunction of these structures, are based on field amplitude measurements, by using the bead pull technique, which is a very invasive technique. In this paper the philosophy is reversed: it is assumed that all the information can be got by Sounding the Modes of the whole System (SMS) and correct the deviation of each frequency mode from its nominal value by means of an appropriate tuning of the cavities: resorting to a perturbative technique applied to a circuit model representing this kind of structures, it is possible to calculate the amount of tuning to give to th...

  19. Resonant inelastic collisions of electrons with diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houfek, Karel

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution we give a review of applications of the nonlocal resonance theory which has been successfully used for treating the nuclear dynamics of low-energy electron collisions with diatomic molecules over several decades. We give examples and brief explanations of various structures observed in the cross sections of vibrational excitation and dissociative electron attachment to diatomic molecules such as threshold peaks, boomerang oscillations below the dissociative attachment threshold, or outer-well resonances.

  20. Resonant inelastic collisions of electrons with diatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houfek, Karel, E-mail: karel.houfek@gmail.com [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2012-05-15

    In this contribution we give a review of applications of the nonlocal resonance theory which has been successfully used for treating the nuclear dynamics of low-energy electron collisions with diatomic molecules over several decades. We give examples and brief explanations of various structures observed in the cross sections of vibrational excitation and dissociative electron attachment to diatomic molecules such as threshold peaks, boomerang oscillations below the dissociative attachment threshold, or outer-well resonances.

  1. Fano resonance control in a photonic crystal structure and its application to ultrafast switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Yi; Heuck, Mikkel; Hu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a photonic crystal structure that allows easy and robust control of the Fano spectrum. Its operation relies on controlling the amplitude of light propagating along one of the light paths in the structure from which the Fano resonance is obtained. Short-pulse dynamic ...... reshaping effect of the nonlinear Fano transfer function. As an example, we present a system application of a Fano structure, demonstrating its advantages by the experimental realiza- tion of 10 Gbit/s all-optical modulation with optical control power less than 1mW.......We experimentally demonstrate a photonic crystal structure that allows easy and robust control of the Fano spectrum. Its operation relies on controlling the amplitude of light propagating along one of the light paths in the structure from which the Fano resonance is obtained. Short-pulse dynamic...

  2. Decoupling capabilities of split-loop resonator structure for 7 Tesla MRI surface array coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurshkainen, A.; Kurdjumov, S.; Simovski, C.; Glybovski, S.; Melchakova, I.; van den Berg, C. A. T.; Raaijmakers, A.; Belov, P.

    2017-09-01

    In this work we studied electromagnetic properties of one-dimentional periodic structures composed of split-loop res-onators (SLRs) and investigated their capabilities in decoupling of two dipole antennas for full-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two different finite structures comprising a single-SLR and a double-SLR constitutive elements were studied. Numerical simulations of the structures were performed to evaluate their decoupling capabilities. As it was demonstrated two dipole antennas equipped with either a single or a double-SLR structure exhibit high isolation even for an electrically short distance between the dipoles. Double-SLR structure while dramatically improving isolation of the dipoles keeps the field created by each of the decoupled dipoles comparable with one of a single dipole inside the target area.

  3. Two-Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Determination Module for Introductory Biochemistry: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Lyso-Glycerophospholipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Teresa A.; Rose, Rebecca L.; Bell, Sidney M.

    2013-01-01

    In this laboratory module, introductory biochemistry students are exposed to two-dimensional [superscript 1]H-nuclear magnetic resonance of glycerophospholipids (GPLs). Working in groups of three, students enzymatically synthesized and purified a variety of 2-acyl lyso GPLs. The structure of the 2-acyl lyso GPL was verified using [superscript…

  4. Multiple Fano-Like MIM Plasmonic Structure Based on Triangular Resonator for Refractive Index Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Nikolina; Cselyuszka, Norbert

    2018-01-19

    In this paper, we present a Fano metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure based on an isosceles triangular cavity resonator for refractive index sensing applications. Due to the specific feeding scheme and asymmetry introduced in the triangular cavity, the resonator exhibits four sharp Fano-like resonances. The behavior of the structure is analyzed in detail and its sensing capabilities demonstrated through the responses for various refractive indices. The results show that the sensor has very good sensitivity and maximal figure of merit (FOM) value of 3.2 × 10⁵. In comparison to other similar sensors, the proposed one has comparable sensitivity and significantly higher FOM, which clearly demonstrates its high sensing potential.

  5. Bound states in the continuum on periodic structures surrounded by strong resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lijun; Lu, Ya Yan

    2018-04-01

    Bound states in the continuum (BICs) are trapped or guided modes with their frequencies in the frequency intervals of the radiation modes. On periodic structures, a BIC is surrounded by a family of resonant modes with their quality factors approaching infinity. Typically the quality factors are proportional to 1 /|β - β*|2 , where β and β* are the Bloch wave vectors of the resonant modes and the BIC, respectively. But for some special BICs, the quality factors are proportional to 1 /|β - β*|4 . In this paper, a general condition is derived for such special BICs on two-dimensional periodic structures. As a numerical example, we use the general condition to calculate special BICs, which are antisymmetric standing waves, on a periodic array of circular cylinders, and show their dependence on parameters. The special BICs are important for practical applications, because they produce resonances with large quality factors for a very large range of β .

  6. A set of triple-resonance nuclear magnetic resonance experiments for structural characterization of organophosphorus compounds in mixture samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskela, Harri, E-mail: Harri.T.Koskela@helsinki.fi [VERIFIN, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 31}P triple-resonance NMR pulse experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis of organophosphorus (OP) compounds in complex matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Selective extraction of {sup 1}H, {sup 31}P, and {sup 13}C chemical shifts and connectivities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More precise NMR identification of OP nerve agents and their degradation products. - Abstract: The {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C correlation NMR spectroscopy utilizes J{sub CH} couplings in molecules, and provides important structural information from small organic molecules in the form of carbon chemical shifts and carbon-proton connectivities. The full potential of the {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C correlation NMR spectroscopy has not been realized in the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) related verification analyses due to the sample matrix, which usually contains a high amount of non-related compounds obscuring the correlations of the relevant compounds. Here, the results of the application of {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 31}P triple-resonance NMR spectroscopy in characterization of OP compounds related to the CWC are presented. With a set of two-dimensional triple-resonance experiments the J{sub HP}, J{sub CH} and J{sub PC} couplings are utilized to map the connectivities of the atoms in OP compounds and to extract the carbon chemical shift information. With the use of the proposed pulse sequences the correlations from the OP compounds can be recorded without significant artifacts from the non-OP compound impurities in the sample. Further selectivity of the observed correlations is achieved with the application of phosphorus band-selective pulse in the pulse sequences to assist the analysis of multiple OP compounds in mixture samples. The use of the triple-resonance experiments in the analysis of a complex sample is shown with a test mixture containing typical scheduled OP compounds, including the characteristic degradation

  7. Structure resonances due to space charge in periodic focusing channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Jameson, R. A.

    2018-02-01

    The Vlasov-Poisson model is one of the most effective methods to study the space charge dominated beam evolution self-consistently in a periodic focusing channel. Since the approach to get the solution with this model is not trivial, previous studies are limited in degenerated conditions, either in smoothed channel (constant focusing) [I. Hofmann, Phys. Rev. E 57, 4713 (1998)] or in alternating gradient focusing channel with equal initial beam emittance condition in the degrees of freedom [I. Hofmann et al., Part. Accel. 13, 145 (1983); Chao Li et al., THOBA02, IPAC2016]. To establish a basis, we intentionally limit this article to the study of the pure transverse periodic focusing lattice with arbitrary initial beam condition, and the same lattice structure in both degrees of freedom, but with possibility of different focusing strengths. This will show the extension of the existing work. The full Hamiltonian is invoked for a pure transverse focusing lattice in various initial beam conditions, revealing different mode structure and additional modes beyond those of the degenerated cases. Application of the extended method to realistic lattices (including longitudinal accelerating elements) and further details will then reveal many new insights, and will be presented in later work.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Determinations of Structure and Reaction Kinetics of Epoxy/Amine Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-31

    AD- AISA 542 MCDONNELL DOUGLAS RESEARCH LABS ST LOUIS MO FIG 7/4 MAGNETIC RESONANCE DETERMINATIONS OF STRUCTURE AND REACTION KIN--ETC (U) DEC Al I M...solvent content (methylene chloride). DD I JAN73 1473 EDITION OF I NOV 65 IS OBSOLETE UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (When Doe Fntered

  9. LALAGE - a computer program to calculate the TM01 modes of cylindrically symmetrical multicell resonant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, P.

    1982-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the LALA program to compute resonant frequencies and fields for all the modes of the lowest TM 01 band-pass of multicell structures. The results are compared with those calculated by another popular rf cavity code and with experimentally measured quantities. (author)

  10. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Do Not Help Support DSM-5 Autism Spectrum Disorder Category

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina-Camacho, Laura; Villero, Sonia; Boada, Leticia; Fraguas, David; Janssen, Joost; Mayoral, Maria; Llorente, Cloe; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara

    2013-01-01

    This systematic review aims to determine whether or not structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) data support the DSM-5 proposal of an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnostic category, and whether or not classical DSM-IV autistic disorder (AD) and Asperger syndrome (AS) categories should be subsumed into it. The most replicated sMRI findings…

  11. Structure and dynamics of paramagnetic transients by pulsed EPR and NMR detection of nuclear resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifunac, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    Structure and dynamics of transient radicals in pulse radiolysis can be studied by time resolved EPR and NMR techniques. EPR study of kinetics and relaxation is illustrated. The NMR detection of nuclear resonance in transient radicals is a new method which allows the study of hyperfine coupling, population dynamics, radical kinetics, and reaction mechanism. 9 figures

  12. Influence of the chemical structure on odor qualities and odor thresholds of halogenated guaiacol-derived odorants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhlke, Florian; Lorber, Katja; Wagenstaller, Maria; Buettner, Andrea

    2017-12-01

    Chlorinated guaiacol derivatives are found in waste water of pulp mills using chlorine in the bleaching process of wood pulp. They can also be detected in fish tissue, possibly causing off-odors. To date, there is no systematic investigation on the odor properties of halogenated guaiacol derivatives. To close this gap, odor thresholds in air and odor qualities of 14 compounds were determined by gas chromatography-olfactometry. Overall, the investigated compounds elicited smells that are characteristic for guaiacol, namely smoky, sweet, vanilla-like, but also medicinal and plaster-like. Their odor thresholds in air were, however, very low, ranging from 0.00072 to 23 ng/Lair. The lowest thresholds were found for 5-chloro- and 5-bromoguaiacol, followed by 4,5-dichloro- and 6-chloroguaiacol. Moreover, some inter-individual differences in odor threshold values could be observed, with the highest variations having been recorded for the individual values of 5-iodo- and 4-bromoguaiacol.

  13. Polarized Structure Function $\\sigma_{LT'}$ for $p({\\vec e},e'K^+)\\Lambda$ in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Raue, Brian; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Carman, Daniel; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Anciant, Eric; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asavapibhop, Burin; Asryan, Gegham; Audit, Gerard; Auger, Thierry; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Battaglieri, Marco; Beard, Kevin; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Bonner, Billy; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Burkert, Volker; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Casey, Liam; Cetina, Catalina; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Dennis, Lawrence; Deur, Alexandre; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Doughty, David; Dragovitsch, Peter; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Feuerbach, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girard, Pascal; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Gothe, Ralf; Gothe, Ralf; Griffioen, Keith; Guidal, Michel; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Hu, Jicun; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Kui; Kim, Kyungmo; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, David; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; Lukashin, Konstantin; MacCormick, Marion; Manak, Joseph; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Minehart, Ralph; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Pereira, Sergio; Peterson, Gerald; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, Joshua; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Prok, Yelena; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Rubin, Philip; Sabatie, Franck; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Sayre, Donald; Schumacher, Reinhard; Serov, Vladimir; Shafi, Aziz; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Simionatto, Sebastio; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinsky, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Taiuti, Mauro; Taylor, Shawn; Tedeschi, David; Thoma, Ulrike; Thompson, Richard; Tkabladze, Avtandil; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vineyard, Michael; Vlassov, Alexander; Wang,

    2008-06-01

    The first measurements of the polarized structure function $\\sigma_{LT'}$ for the reaction $p(\\vec e,e'K^+)\\Lambda$ in the nucleon resonance region are reported. Measurements are included from threshold up to $W$=2.05 GeV for central values of $Q^2$ of 0.65 and 1.00 GeV$^2$, and nearly the entire kaon center-of-mass angular range. $\\sigma_{LT'}$ is the imaginary part of the longitudinal-transverse response and is expected to be sensitive to interferences between competing intermediate s-channel resonances, as well as resonant and non-resonant processes. The results for $\\sigma_{LT'}$ are comparable in magnitude to previously reported results from CLAS for $\\sigma_{LT}$, the real part of the same response. An intriguing sign change in $\\sigma_{LT'}$ is observed in the high $Q^2$ data at $W\\approx 1.9$ GeV. Comparisons to several existing model predictions are shown.

  14. Photoionization pathways and thresholds in generation of Lyman-α radiation by resonant four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Oleg A. Louchev; Norihito Saito; Yu Oishi; Koji Miyazaki; Kotaro Okamura; Jumpei Nakamura; Masahiko Iwasaki; Satoshi Wada

    2016-01-01

    We develop a set of analytical approximations for the estimation of the combined effect of various photoionization processes involved in the resonant four-wave mixing generation of ns pulsed Lyman-α (L-α) radiation by using 212.556 nm and 820-845 nm laser radiation pulses in Kr-Ar mixture: (i) multi-photon ionization, (ii) step-wise (2+1)-photon ionization via the resonant 2-photon excitation of Kr followed by 1-photon ionization and (iii) laser-induced avalanche ionization produced by genera...

  15. Polarization dependence of the metamagnetic resonance of cut-wire-pair structure by using plasmon hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dung, Nguyen Van; Yoo, Young Joon; Lee, Young Pak; Tung, Nguyen Thanh; Tung, Bui Son; Lam, Vu Dinh

    2014-01-01

    The influence of lattice constants on the electromagnetic behavior of a cut-wire-pair (CWP) structure has been elucidated. In this report, we performed both simulations and experiments to determine the influence of polarization on the metamagnetic resonance of the CWP structure. The key finding is the result of an investigation on the plasmon hybridization between the two CWs, which showed that the polarization of the incident wave was affected. Good agreement between numerical simulation and measurement is achieved.

  16. A novel strategy for NMR resonance assignment and protein structure determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemak, Alexander; Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Chitayat, Seth; Karra, Murthy; Farès, Christophe; Sunnerhagen, Maria; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2011-01-01

    The quality of protein structures determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is contingent on the number and quality of experimentally-derived resonance assignments, distance and angular restraints. Two key features of protein NMR data have posed challenges for the routine and automated structure determination of small to medium sized proteins; (1) spectral resolution – especially of crowded nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) spectra, and (2) the reliance on a continuous network of weak scalar couplings as part of most common assignment protocols. In order to facilitate NMR structure determination, we developed a semi-automated strategy that utilizes non-uniform sampling (NUS) and multidimensional decomposition (MDD) for optimal data collection and processing of selected, high resolution multidimensional NMR experiments, combined it with an ABACUS protocol for sequential and side chain resonance assignments, and streamlined this procedure to execute structure and refinement calculations in CYANA and CNS, respectively. Two graphical user interfaces (GUIs) were developed to facilitate efficient analysis and compilation of the data and to guide automated structure determination. This integrated method was implemented and refined on over 30 high quality structures of proteins ranging from 5.5 to 16.5 kDa in size.

  17. Perspectives on the relevance of the circadian time structure to workplace threshold limit values and employee biological monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolensky, Michael H; Reinberg, Alain E; Sackett-Lundeen, Linda

    2017-01-01

    The circadian time structure (CTS) and its disruption by rotating and nightshift schedules relative to work performance, accident risk, and health/wellbeing have long been areas of occupational medicine research. Yet, there has been little exploration of the relevance of the CTS to setting short-term, time-weighted, and ceiling threshold limit values (TLVs); conducting employee biological monitoring (BM); and establishing normative reference biological exposure indices (BEIs). Numerous publications during the past six decades document the CTS substantially affects the disposition - absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination - and effects of medications. Additionally, laboratory animal and human studies verify the tolerance to chemical, biological (contagious), and physical agents can differ extensively according to the circadian time of exposure. Because of slow and usually incomplete CTS adjustment by rotating and permanent nightshift workers, occupational chemical and other contaminant encounters occur during a different circadian stage than for dayshift workers. Thus, the intended protection of some TLVs when working the nightshift compared to dayshift might be insufficient, especially in high-risk settings. The CTS is germane to employee BM in that large-amplitude predictable-in-time 24h variation can occur in the concentration of urine, blood, and saliva of monitored chemical contaminants and their metabolites plus biomarkers indicative of adverse xenobiotic exposure. The concept of biological time-qualified (for rhythms) reference values, currently of interest to clinical laboratory pathology practice, is seemingly applicable to industrial medicine as circadian time and workshift-specific BEIs to improve surveillance of night workers, in particular. Furthermore, BM as serial assessments performed frequently both during and off work, exemplified by employee self-measurement of lung function using a small portable peak expiratory flow meter, can

  18. Nonlinear properties of double and triple barrier resonant tunneling structures in the sub-THz range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karuzskij, A.L.; Perestoronin, A.V.; Volchkov, N.A.

    2012-01-01

    The high-frequency nonlinear properties of GaAs/AlAs resonant tunneling diode (RTD) nanostructures and perspectives of implementation of the quantum regime of amplification in such structures, which is especially efficient in the range of sub-THz and THz ranges, are investigated. It is shown that in a triple barrier RTD the symmetry between the processes of amplification and dissipation can be avoided because of the interaction of an electromagnetic wave with both of resonant states in two quantum wells, that results in the significant growth of an RTD efficiency [ru

  19. Resonant structure of the 3d electron's angular distribution in a free Mn+Ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Y.; Dolmatov, V.K.

    1995-01-01

    The 3d-electron angular anisotropy parameter of the free Mn + ion is calculated using the open-quotes spin-polarizedclose quotes random-phase approximation with exchange. Strong resonance structure is discovered, which is due to interference with the powerful 3p → 3d discrete excitation. The effect of the 3p → 4s transition is also noticeable. The ordering of these respective resonances with phonon energy increase proved to be opposite in angular anisotropy parameter to that in 3d-photoionization cross section. A paper describing these results was published

  20. Compound grating structures in photonic crystals for resonant excitation of azobenzene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahns, Sabrina; Kallweit, Christine; Adam, Jost

    Photo-switchable molecules such as azobenzene are of high interest for “smart” surfaces. Such “smart” surfaces respond to external light excitation by changing their macroscopic properties. The absorbance of light on a single normal path through a layer of azobenzene immobilized on a surface......-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations for determination of resonance positions and electric field strengths in compound grating structures. By superimposing two single-period gratings a photonic crystal can be designed supporting multiple guided mode resonances suitable to switch azobenzenes between...

  1. Observation of new resonance structure in the natural spin parity strange meson system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratcliff, B.N.

    1981-04-01

    New data from the LASS spectrometer are presented on the reaction K - p → K - π + n. An energy independent partial wave analysis of this data yields unique K - π + elastic scattering partial wave amplitudes in the invariant mass region from 0.7 GeV to 1.8 GeV, and two distinguishable sets of amplitudes between 1.8 GeV and 2.3 GeV. These amplitudes confirm all of the well known Kπ resonances, and display clear evidence for new resonance structure in the S, P and G waves in the mass region above 1.6 GeV

  2. Size modulated transition in the fluid–structure interaction losses in nano mechanical beam resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishwakarma, S. D.; Pratap, R., E-mail: pratap@mecheng.iisc.ernet.in [Center for Nano Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560012 (India); Pandey, A. K., E-mail: ashok@iith.ac.in [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Hyderabad, Kandi, Sangareddy - 502285 (India); Parpia, J. M.; Craighead, H. G. [Center for Materials Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Verbridge, S. S. [Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2016-05-21

    An understanding of the dominant dissipative mechanisms is crucial for the design of a high-Q doubly clamped nanobeam resonator to be operated in air. We focus on quantifying analytically the viscous losses—the squeeze film damping and drag force damping—that limit the net quality factor of a beam resonator, vibrating in its flexural fundamental mode with the surrounding fluid as air at atmospheric pressure. Specifically, drag force damping dominates at smaller beam widths and squeeze film losses dominate at larger beam widths, with no significant contribution from structural losses and acoustic radiation losses. The combined viscous losses agree well with the experimentally measured Q of the resonator over a large range of beam widths, within the limits of thin beam theory. We propose an empirical relation between the maximum quality factor and the ratio of maximum beam width to the squeeze film air gap thickness.

  3. Shot noise and electronic properties in the inversion-symmetric Weyl semimetal resonant structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanling; Bai, Chunxu; Xu, Xiaoguang; Jiang, Yong

    2018-02-01

    Using the transfer matrix method, the authors combine the analytical formula with numerical calculation to explore the shot noise and conductance of massless Weyl fermions in the Weyl semimetal resonant junction. By varying the barrier strength, the structure of the junction, the Fermi energy, and the crystallographic angle, the shot noise and conductance can be tuned efficiently. For a quasiperiodic superlattice, in complete contrast to the conventional junction case, the effect of the disorder strength on the shot noise and conductance depends on the competition of classical tunneling and Klein tunneling. Moreover, the delta barrier structure is also vital in determining the shot noise and conductance. In particular, a universal Fano factor has been found in a single delta potential case, whereas the resonant structure of the Fano factor perfectly matches with the number of barriers in a delta potential superlattice. These results are crucial for engineering nanoelectronic devices based on this topological semimetal material.

  4. Multi-cavity locally resonant structure with the low frequency and broad band-gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiulong Jiang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-cavity periodic structure with the characteristic of local resonance was proposed in the paper. The low frequency band-gap structure was comparatively analyzed by the finite element method (FEM and electric circuit analogy (ECA. Low frequency band-gap can be opened through the dual influence of the coupling’s resonance in the cavity and the interaction among the couplings between structures. Finally, the influence of the structural factors on the band-gap was analyzed. The results show that the structure, which is divided into three parts equally, has a broader effective band-gap below the frequency of 200 Hz. It is also proved that reducing the interval between unit structures can increase the intensity of the couplings among the structures. And in this way, the width of band-gap would be expanded significantly. Through the parameters adjustment, the structure enjoys a satisfied sound insulation effect below the frequency of 500Hz. In the area of low frequency noise reduction, the structure has a lot of potential applications.

  5. Transmission resonances in a semiconductor-superconductor junction quantum interference structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagaki, Y.; Tokura, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Transport properties in a quantum resonator structure of a normal-conductor endash superconductor (NS) junction are calculated. Quasiparticles in a cavity region undergo multiple reflections due to an abrupt change in the width of the wire and the NS interface. Quantum interference of the reflections modulates the nominal normal reflection probability at the NS boundary. We show that various NS structures can be regarded as the quantum resonator because of the absence of propagation along the NS interface. When the incident energy coincides with the quasibound state energy levels, the zero-voltage conductance exhibits peaks for small voltages applied to the NS junction. The transmission peaks change to dips of nearly perfect reflection when the applied voltage exceeds a critical value. Two branches of the resonance, which are roughly characterized by electron and hole wavelengths, emerge from the individual dip, and the energy difference between them increases with increasing voltage. The electronlike and holelike resonance dips originating from different quasibound states at zero-voltage cross one after another when the voltage approaches the superconducting gap. We find that both crossing and anticrossing can be produced. It is shown that the individual resonance state in the NS system is associated with two zeros and two poles in the complex energy plane. The behavior of the resonance is explained in terms of splitting and merging of the zero-pole pairs. We examine the Green close-quote s function of a one-dimensional NS system in order to find out how the transmission properties are influenced by the scattering from the NS interface. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  6. Flexible structured high-frequency film bulk acoustic resonator for flexible wireless electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Changjian; Shu, Yi; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling; Jin, Hao; Dong, Shu-Rong; Chan, Mansun

    2015-01-01

    Flexible electronics have inspired many novel and very important applications in recent years and various flexible electronic devices such as diodes, transistors, circuits, sensors, and radiofrequency (RF) passive devices including antennas and inductors have been reported. However, the lack of a high-performance RF resonator is one of the key bottlenecks to implement flexible wireless electronics. In this study, for the first time, a novel ultra-flexible structured film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) is proposed. The flexible FBAR is fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate using piezoelectric thin film aluminum nitride (AlN) for acoustic wave excitation. Both the shear wave and longitudinal wave can be excited under the surface interdigital electrodes configuration we proposed. In the case of the thickness extension mode, a flexible resonator with a working frequency as high as of 5.2325 GHz has been realized. The resonators stay fully functional under bending status and after repeated bending and re-flattening operations. This flexible high-frequency resonator will serve as a key building block for the future flexible wireless electronics, greatly expanding the application scope of flexible electronics. (paper)

  7. Application of resonant backscattering spectrometry for determination of pore structure changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paszti, F. E-mail: paszti@rmki.kfki.hu; Szilagyi, E.; Manuaba, A.; Battistig, G

    2000-03-01

    In the present work slightly oxidised porous silicon samples of columnar type were investigated by resonant elastic scattering using the 3045 keV resonance in the {sup 16}O({alpha},{alpha}){sup 16}O reaction. If the incident energy is slightly above the resonance energy, a characteristic peak appears in the energy spectra of the backscattered particles. In porous material the individual ions travel fluctuating distance in pores, hence, the peak width depends on the structure of the sample. When changing the direction of the analysing beam to the sample, the width of the resonance peak changes in a special way characterising the angular distribution of the pore walls. This resonance method was applied to columnar type porous Si samples implanted by 4 MeV N ions at various tilt angles and fluences. It was shown that the beam tilts the pore walls by an angle proportional to the fluence and the sine of the angle between the beam and the pore walls. Meantime, the angular divergence of the pore walls also increases. The underlying mechanism is briefly discussed.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging and image analysis for assessment of HPMC matrix tablets structural evolution in USP Apparatus 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulinowski, Piotr; Dorożyński, Przemysław; Młynarczyk, Anna; Węglarz, Władysław P

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to present a methodology for the processing of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data for the quantification of the dosage form matrix evolution during drug dissolution. The results of the study were verified by comparison with other approaches presented in literature. A commercially available, HPMC-based quetiapine fumarate tablet was studied with a 4.7T MR system. Imaging was performed inside an MRI probe-head coupled with a flow-through cell for 12 h in circulating water. The images were segmented into three regions using threshold-based segmentation algorithms due to trimodal structure of the image intensity histograms. Temporal evolution of dry glassy, swollen glassy and gel regions was monitored. The characteristic features were observed: initial high expansion rate of the swollen glassy and gel layers due to initial water uptake, dry glassy core disappearance and maximum area of swollen glassy region at 4 h, and subsequent gel layer thickness increase at the expense of swollen glassy layer. The temporal evolution of an HPMC-based tablet by means of noninvasive MRI integrated with USP Apparatus 4 was found to be consistent with both the theoretical model based on polymer disentanglement concentration and experimental VIS/FTIR studies.

  9. Q2 dependence of the spin structure function in the resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.; Li, Z.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we show what we can learn from the CEBAF experiments on spin-structure functions, and the transition from the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum rule in the real photon limit to the spin-dependent sum rules in deep inelastic scattering, and how the asymmetry A 1 (x,Q 2 ) approaches the scaling limit in the resonance region. The spin structure function in the resonance region alone cannot determine the spin-dependent sum rule due to the kinematic restriction of the resonance region. The integral ∫ 0 1 {A 1 (x,Q 2 )F 2 (x,Q 2 )/2x[1+R(x,Q 2 )]}dx is estimated from Q 2 =0--2.5 GeV 2 . The result shows that there is a region where both contributions from the baryon resonances and the deep inelastic scattering are important; thus it provides important information on the high twist effects on the spin-dependent sum rule

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging identification of muscular and ligamentous structures of the female pelvic floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezerra, Maria Rita Lima; Soares, Adriano Fleury F.; Faintuch, Salomao; Goldman, Suzan Menasce; Ajzen, Sergio A.; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Szejnfeld, Jacob; Girao, Manoel

    2001-01-01

    The objective was to determine the frequency and to assess the interobserver agreement of identification of muscular and ligamentous pelvic floor structures using magnetic resonance imaging. The method: twenty asymptomatic female volunteers (aged 20-80 years old; mean: 50) were submitted to magnetic resonance imaging (1.5 T) examinations of the pelvis. Turbo spin-echo sequences were employed to obtain T1 and T2 weighted images on axial and sagittal planes. Two independent observers evaluated the scans in order to identify the levator ani (coccygeal, pubococcygeal, iliococcygeal and puborectalis muscles), obturatorius internus and urethral sphincter muscles, and the pubovesical and pubourethral ligaments. The frequency and the interobserver agreement of the identification of the anatomical structures were assessed (kappa statistic - κ). The results: the frequency of identification of the structures ranged from 50 to 100%, and was slightly lower for identification of the ligaments. Interobserver agreement was as follows: levator ani and obturatorius internus muscle (κ=1), pubococcygeal (κ=0.62), iliococcygeal (κ=0.86), puborectalis (κ= 0.27), coccygeal (κ=0) and urethral sphincter muscles (κ=1), pubovesical (κ=0.50) and pubourethral (κ=0.58) ligaments. The conclusion: magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis allowed precise identification of the main muscular and ligamentous pelvic floor structures in most individuals, whereas interobserver agreement was considered good. (author)

  11. Sensitivity of 238U resonance absorption to library multigroup structure as calculated by WIMS-AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughton, P.J.; Donnelly, J.V.

    1995-01-01

    In simulations of the TRX-1 experimental lattice, WIMS-AECL overpredicts, relative to MCNP, resonance absorption in neutron-energy groups containing the three large, low-lying resonances of 238 U when a standard ENDF/B-V-based library is used. A total excess in these groups of 4.0 neutron captures by 238 U per thousand fission neutrons has been observed. Similar comparisons are made in this work for the MIT-4 experimental lattice and simplified CANDU lattice cells containing 37-element fuel, with and without heavy-water coolant. Eleven different 89-group cross-section libraries were constructed for WIMS-AECL from ENDF/B-V data: only the neutron-energy-group boundaries used in generating multigroup cross sections and the Goldstein-Cohen correction factors differ from one library to the next. The first library uses the original 89-group structure, and the other ten involve energy groups of varying widths centred on the three large, low-lying resonances of 238 U. For TRX-1, some reduction in total discrepancy in 238 U capture can be achieved by using a new structure, although the improvement is small. The discrepancies in 238 U capture are of the same order for the MIT-4 case as those observed for TRX-1 for both the original group structure and the ten new structures. The WIMS-AECL calculation of 238 U resonance absorption in the same ranges of energy for the simplified CANDU 37-element lattice are in better agreement with MCNP than they are for TRX-1 and MIT-4: when the original structure is used, WIMS-AECL underpredicts total capture rate by 238 U in the energy range of interest by only 0.56 per thousand fission neutrons (coolant present) and 0.88 per thousand fission neutrons (voided coolant channel). The discrepancies are reduced when some of the new structures are used. For almost all of the cases considered here-TRX-1, MIT-4 and CANDU with coolant-better group-by-group agreement of 238 U capture around the 6.67-eV resonance is achieved by using a new library

  12. Influence of the Chemical Structure on Odor Qualities and Odor Thresholds of Halogenated Guaiacol-Derived Odorants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Juhlke

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chlorinated guaiacol derivatives are found in waste water of pulp mills using chlorine in the bleaching process of wood pulp. They can also be detected in fish tissue, possibly causing off-odors. To date, there is no systematic investigation on the odor properties of halogenated guaiacol derivatives. To close this gap, odor thresholds in air and odor qualities of 14 compounds were determined by gas chromatography-olfactometry. Overall, the investigated compounds elicited smells that are characteristic for guaiacol, namely smoky, sweet, vanilla-like, but also medicinal and plaster-like. Their odor thresholds in air were, however, very low, ranging from 0.00072 to 23 ng/Lair. The lowest thresholds were found for 5-chloro- and 5-bromoguaiacol, followed by 4,5-dichloro- and 6-chloroguaiacol. Moreover, some inter-individual differences in odor threshold values could be observed, with the highest variations having been recorded for the individual values of 5-iodo- and 4-bromoguaiacol.

  13. Finite element analysis for structural modification and control resonance of a vertical pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia M. El-Gazzar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research was to evaluate and enhance dynamic performance for a vertical pumping unit. The original electric motor of the pump unit had been replaced by another one different in design and weights. Vibration has been increased greatly after installing the new motor. Consequently, it is necessary to estimate the change in the vibration characteristics owing to the difference in the boundary conditions of the new motor. Measured vibration levels and frequency analysis were dangerous at 1× due to resonance problem. Finite Element Analysis was used to model the motor structure in order to find its natural frequencies and mode shapes. The results confirm that the third natural frequency is very close to 1× operating speed with deviation about 1%. To solve the resonance problem, it was recommended to increase the structure stiffness. The results after modifications confirmed that the overall vibration level decreases by 89%. Keywords: Vibration, Vertical pump, Modal analysis

  14. Measurement of the Proton and Deuteron Spin Structure Function g1 in the Resonance Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Akagi, T.; Perry Anthony; Antonov, R.; Arnold, R.G.; Todd Averett; Band, H.R.; Bauer, J.M.; Borel, H.; Peter Bosted; Vincent Breton; Button-Shafer, J.; Jian-Ping Chen; T.E. Chupp; J. Clendenin; C. Comptour; K.P. Coulter; G. Court; Donald Crabb; M. Daoudi; Donal Day; F.S. Dietrich; James Dunne; H. Dutz; R. Erbacher; J. Fellbaum; Andrew Feltham; Helene Fonvieille; Emil Frlez; D. Garvey; R. Gearhart; Javier Gomez; P. Grenier; Keith Griffioen; S. Hoeibraten; Emlyn Hughes; Charles Hyde-Wright; J.R. Johnson; D. Kawall; Andreas Klein; Sebastian Kuhn; M. Kuriki; Richard Lindgren; T.J. Liu; R.M. Lombard-Nelsen; Jacques Marroncle; Tomoyuki Maruyama; X.K. Maruyama; James Mccarthy; Werner Meyer; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Ralph Minehart; Joseph Mitchell; J. Morgenstern; Gerassimos Petratos; R. Pitthan; Dinko Pocanic; C. Prescott; R. Prepost; P. Raines; Brian Raue; D. Reyna; A. Rijllart; Yves Roblin; L. Rochester; Stephen Rock; Oscar Rondon-Aramayo; Ingo Sick; Lee Smith; Tim Smith; M. Spengos; F. Staley; P. Steiner; S. St. Lorant; L.M. Stuart; F. Suekane; Z.M. Szalata; Huabin Tang; Y. Terrien; Tracy Usher; Dieter Walz; Frank Wesselmann; J.L. White; K. Witte; C. Young; Brad Youngman; Haruo Yuta; G. Zapalac; Benedikt Zihlmann; Zimmermann, D.

    1997-01-01

    We have measured the proton and deuteron spin structure functions g 1 p and g 1 d in the region of the nucleon resonances for W 2 2 and Q 2 ≅ 0.5 and Q 2 ≅ 1.2 GeV 2 by inelastically scattering 9.7 GeV polarized electrons off polarized 15 NH 3 and 15 ND 3 targets. We observe significant structure in g 1 p in the resonance region. We have used the present results, together with the deep-inelastic data at higher W 2 , to extract Γ(Q 2 ) (triple b ond) ∫ 0 1 g 1 (x,Q 2 ) dx. This is the first information on the low-Q 2 evolution of Gamma toward the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn limit at Q 2 = 0

  15. Derivative corrections to the symmetry energy and the isovector dipole-resonance structure in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blocki, J P; Magner, A G; Ring, P

    2015-01-01

    The effective surface approximation is extended accounting for derivatives of the symmetry energy density per particle. The new expressions for the isovector surface energy constants are used for calculations of improved energies and sum rules of the isovector dipole-resonance strength structure within the Fermi-liquid droplet model. Our results are in reasonable agreement with experimental data and with other theoretical approaches. (paper)

  16. One-step sol-gel imprint lithography for guided-mode resonance structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yin; Liu, Longju; Johnson, Michael; C Hillier, Andrew; Lu, Meng

    2016-03-04

    Guided-mode resonance (GMR) structures consisting of sub-wavelength periodic gratings are capable of producing narrow-linewidth optical resonances. This paper describes a sol-gel-based imprint lithography method for the fabrication of submicron 1D and 2D GMR structures. This method utilizes a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold to fabricate the grating coupler and waveguide for a GMR device using a sol-gel thin film in a single step. An organic-inorganic hybrid sol-gel film was selected as the imprint material because of its relatively high refractive index. The optical responses of several sol-gel GMR devices were characterized, and the experimental results were in good agreement with the results of electromagnetic simulations. The influence of processing parameters was investigated in order to determine how finely the spectral response and resonant wavelength of the GMR devices could be tuned. As an example potential application, refractometric sensing experiments were performed using a 1D sol-gel device. The results demonstrated a refractive index sensitivity of 50 nm/refractive index unit. This one-step fabrication process offers a simple, rapid, and low-cost means of fabricating GMR structures. We anticipate that this method can be valuable in the development of various GMR-based devices as it can readily enable the fabrication of complex shapes and allow the doping of optically active materials into sol-gel thin film.

  17. One-step sol–gel imprint lithography for guided-mode resonance structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yin; Liu, Longju; Lu, Meng; Johnson, Michael; C Hillier, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Guided-mode resonance (GMR) structures consisting of sub-wavelength periodic gratings are capable of producing narrow-linewidth optical resonances. This paper describes a sol–gel-based imprint lithography method for the fabrication of submicron 1D and 2D GMR structures. This method utilizes a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold to fabricate the grating coupler and waveguide for a GMR device using a sol–gel thin film in a single step. An organic–inorganic hybrid sol–gel film was selected as the imprint material because of its relatively high refractive index. The optical responses of several sol–gel GMR devices were characterized, and the experimental results were in good agreement with the results of electromagnetic simulations. The influence of processing parameters was investigated in order to determine how finely the spectral response and resonant wavelength of the GMR devices could be tuned. As an example potential application, refractometric sensing experiments were performed using a 1D sol–gel device. The results demonstrated a refractive index sensitivity of 50 nm/refractive index unit. This one-step fabrication process offers a simple, rapid, and low-cost means of fabricating GMR structures. We anticipate that this method can be valuable in the development of various GMR-based devices as it can readily enable the fabrication of complex shapes and allow the doping of optically active materials into sol–gel thin film. (paper)

  18. Photoionization pathways and thresholds in generation of Lyman-α radiation by resonant four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg A. Louchev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We develop a set of analytical approximations for the estimation of the combined effect of various photoionization processes involved in the resonant four-wave mixing generation of ns pulsed Lyman-α (L-α radiation by using 212.556 nm and 820-845 nm laser radiation pulses in Kr-Ar mixture: (i multi-photon ionization, (ii step-wise (2+1-photon ionization via the resonant 2-photon excitation of Kr followed by 1-photon ionization and (iii laser-induced avalanche ionization produced by generated free electrons. Developed expressions validated by order of magnitude estimations and available experimental data allow us to identify the area for the operation under high input laser intensities avoiding the onset of full-scale discharge, loss of efficiency and inhibition of generated L-α radiation. Calculations made reveal an opportunity for scaling up the output energy of the experimentally generated pulsed L-α radiation without significant enhancement of photoionization.

  19. Photoionization pathways and thresholds in generation of Lyman-α radiation by resonant four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Oishi, Yu; Miyazaki, Koji; Okamura, Kotaro; Nakamura, Jumpei; Iwasaki, Masahiko; Wada, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    We develop a set of analytical approximations for the estimation of the combined effect of various photoionization processes involved in the resonant four-wave mixing generation of ns pulsed Lyman-α (L-α ) radiation by using 212.556 nm and 820-845 nm laser radiation pulses in Kr-Ar mixture: (i) multi-photon ionization, (ii) step-wise (2+1)-photon ionization via the resonant 2-photon excitation of Kr followed by 1-photon ionization and (iii) laser-induced avalanche ionization produced by generated free electrons. Developed expressions validated by order of magnitude estimations and available experimental data allow us to identify the area for the operation under high input laser intensities avoiding the onset of full-scale discharge, loss of efficiency and inhibition of generated L-α radiation. Calculations made reveal an opportunity for scaling up the output energy of the experimentally generated pulsed L-α radiation without significant enhancement of photoionization.

  20. Vibrational structures in electron-CO2 scattering below the 2Πu shape resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Structures of vibrational origin were discovered in vibrationally inelastic electron-CO 2 cross sections in the energy range 0.4-0.9 eV, well below the 2 Π u shape resonance. They appear in the excitation of higher vibrational levels, in particular the highest members of the Fermi polyads of the type (n, 2m, 0) with n+m=2-4. The lowest two structures, at 0.445 and 0.525 eV, are narrow; higher-lying structures are broader and boomerang-like. The structures are absent when the antisymmetric stretch is co-excited. The structures are interpreted in terms of a wavepacket of the nuclei reflected from a potential surface of the CO 2 - anion in a bent and stretched geometry. A state emerging from the virtual state upon bending and stretching and the state resulting from bending the 2 Π u shape resonance are discussed as possibly being responsible for the structures. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  1. Theoretical study of ferromagnetic resonance in exchange - coupled magnetic / nonmagnetic / magnetic multilayer structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezdogan, K.; Oezdemir, M.; Yalcin, O.; Aktas, B.

    2002-01-01

    The dispersion relation on ferromagnetic films was calculation by using torque equation of motion with a damping term. The total energy including zeeman, demagnetizing and anisotropy energy terms was used to get ferromagnetic resonance frequency for both uniform and higher order spin wave modes. In antiferromagnetic films, the torque equation of motion for each sub-lattice were written to derive an expression for the dispersion relation. The magnetic trilayer system under investigation consist of two ferromagnetic layers separated by a nonmagnetic layer. The dispersion relation of magnetic/nonmagnetic/magnetic three layers is calculated by using Landau-Lifshitz dynamic equation of motion for the magnetization with interlayer exchange energy. As for the exchange-coupled resonance of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), the theoretical study has been calculated for both symmetrical and asymmetrical structures. In this systems, the exchange-coupling parameter A 12 between neighboring layers was used to get resonance fields as a function of the angle between the magnetization vectors of each magnetic layers

  2. A novel nonlinear damage resonance intermodulation effect for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampa, Francesco; Scarselli, Gennaro; Meo, Michele

    2017-04-01

    This paper is aimed at developing a theoretical model able to predict the generation of nonlinear elastic effects associated to the interaction of ultrasonic waves with the steady-state nonlinear response of local defect resonance (LDR). The LDR effect is used in nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy to enhance the excitation of the material damage at its local resonance, thus to dramatically increase the vibrational amplitude of material nonlinear phenomena. The main result of this work is to prove both analytically and experimentally the generation of novel nonlinear elastic wave effects, here named as nonlinear damage resonance intermodulation, which correspond to a nonlinear intermodulation between the driving frequency and the LDR one. Beside this intermodulation effect, other nonlinear elastic wave phenomena such as higher harmonics of the input frequency and superharmonics of LDR frequency were found. The analytical model relies on solving the nonlinear equation of motion governing bending displacement under the assumption of both quadratic and cubic nonlinear defect approximation. Experimental tests on a damaged composite laminate confirmed and validated these predictions and showed that using continuous periodic excitation, the nonlinear structural phenomena associated to LDR could also be featured at locations different from the damage resonance. These findings will provide new opportunities for material damage detection using nonlinear ultrasounds.

  3. A new design of a miniature filter on microstrip resonators with an interdigital structure of conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, B. A.; Serzhantov, A. M.; Bal'va, Ya. F.; Leksikov, An. A.; Galeev, R. G.

    2015-05-01

    A microstrip bandpass filter of new design based on original resonators with an interdigital structure of conductors has been studied. The proposed filters of third to sixth order are distinguished for their high frequency-selective properties and much smaller size than analogs. It is established that a broad stop band, extending up to a sixfold central bandpass frequency, is determined by low unloaded Q of higher resonance mode and weak coupling of resonators in the pass band. It is shown for the first time that, as the spacing of interdigital stripe conductors decreases, the Q of higher resonance mode monotonically drops, while the Q value for the first operating mode remains high. A prototype fourth-order filter with a central frequency of 0.9 GHz manufactured on a ceramic substrate with dielectric permittivity ɛ = 80 has microstrip topology dimensions of 9.5 × 4.6 × 1 mm3. The electrodynamic 3D model simulations of the filter characteristics agree well with the results of measurements.

  4. Peculiarities of the fundamental mode structure in stable-resonator lasers upon spatially inhomogeneous amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunkov, Mikhail V; Kostryukov, P V; Telegin, L S; Tunkin, V G; Yakovlev, D V

    2007-01-01

    The structure of the fundamental mode of a laser is calculated by the iteration Fox-Li method in the case of inhomogeneous unsaturated amplification produced by axially symmetric longitudinal pumping. The calculation is performed for different parameters g 1 and g 2 of the resonator within the entire stability region. It is shown that in the case of inhomogeneous amplification, the fundamental mode considerably deviates from the Gaussian mode of an empty resonator only in the so-called critical configurations of the resonator, when the quantity [arccos(g 1 g 2 ) 1/2 ]/π is zero or takes a number of values expressed by irreducible fractions m/n. For the Fresnel number N F = 9, configurations with m/n = 1/2, 2/5, 3/8, 1/3, 3/10, 1/4, 1/5, 1/6, 1/8, and 1/10 are pronounced. As N F increases, the number of critical configurations increases. The expansion in a system of Laguerre-Gaussian beams shows that the fundamental mode in critical configurations is formed by a set of beams with certain radial indices p phased in the active medium. (resonators. modes)

  5. Bi-resonant structure with piezoelectric PVDF films for energy harvesting from random vibration sources at low frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Shanshan; Crovetto, Andrea; Peng, Zhuoteng

    2016-01-01

    and experiments with piezoelectric elements show that the energy harvesting device with the bi-resonant structure can generate higher power output than that of the sum of the two separate devices from random vibration sources at low frequency, and hence significantly improves the vibration-to- electricity......This paper reports on a bi-resonant structure of piezoelectric PVDF films energy harvester (PPEH), which consists of two cantilevers with resonant frequencies of 15 Hz and 22 Hz. With increased acceleration, the vibration amplitudes of the two cantilever-mass structures are increased and collision...

  6. Broadband Acoustic Transmission Enhancement through a Structured Stiff Plate with Locally Resonant Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yong; Liang Bin; Zou Xin-Ye; Cheng Jian-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Broadband acoustic transmission enhancement (ATE) is realized for a periodically structured stiff plate without any opening that is conventionally thought to be only capable of supporting narrowband ATE, by introducing locally resonant (LR) elements. This exotic phenomenon is interpreted by analyzing the vibration pattern of the structure-induced LR modes, and is well modeled by a simple 'spring-mass' system which reveals the contribution of the LR effect to the important broadband performance. Our findings should help to better understand the physical mechanism of ATE and may have potential impact on ultrasonic applications such as broadband acoustic filters or compact acoustic devices in subwavelength scale

  7. Magnetophonon resonance in multimode lattices and two-dimensional structures (DQW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploch, D.; Sheregii, E.; Marchewka, M.; Tomaka, G.

    2007-12-01

    The experimental results obtained for the magneto-transport in the InGaAs/InAlAs double quantum wells (DQW) structures of two different shapes of wells are reported. The Magnetophonon Resonance (MPR) o was observed for both types of the structures at 77-125K temperatures in the pulsed magnetic field. Four kinds of LO-phonons are taken into account to interpret the MPR oscillations in DQW. The particularity of MPR in DQW is the great number Landau levels caused by SAS-splitting all electron states.

  8. Magnetophonon resonance in multimode lattices and two-dimensional structures (DQW)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploch, D; Sheregii, E; Marchewka, M; Tomaka, G [Institute of Physics University of Rzeszow, 35-310 Rzeszow, Rejtana 16 (Poland)

    2007-12-15

    The experimental results obtained for the magneto-transport in the InGaAs/InAlAs double quantum wells (DQW) structures of two different shapes of wells are reported. The Magnetophonon Resonance (MPR) o was observed for both types of the structures at 77-125K temperatures in the pulsed magnetic field. Four kinds of LO-phonons are taken into account to interpret the MPR oscillations in DQW. The particularity of MPR in DQW is the great number Landau levels caused by SAS-splitting all electron states.

  9. Development of techniques in magnetic resonance and structural studies of the prion protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitter, Hans-Marcus L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Magnetic resonance is the most powerful analytical tool used by chemists today. Its applications range from determining structures of large biomolecules to imaging of human brains. Nevertheless, magnetic resonance remains a relatively young field, in which many techniques are currently being developed that have broad applications. In this dissertation, two new techniques are presented, one that enables the determination of torsion angles in solid-state peptides and proteins, and another that involves imaging of heterogenous materials at ultra-low magnetic fields. In addition, structural studies of the prion protein via solid-state NMR are described. More specifically, work is presented in which the dependence of chemical shifts on local molecular structure is used to predict chemical shift tensors in solid-state peptides with theoretical ab initio surfaces. These predictions are then used to determine the backbone dihedral angles in peptides. This method utilizes the theoretical chemicalshift tensors and experimentally determined chemical-shift anisotropies (CSAs) to predict the backbone and side chain torsion angles in alanine, leucine, and valine residues. Additionally, structural studies of prion protein fragments are described in which conformationally-dependent chemical-shift measurements were made to gain insight into the structural differences between the various conformational states of the prion protein. These studies are of biological and pathological interest since conformational changes in the prion protein are believed to cause prion diseases. Finally, an ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging technique is described that enables imaging and characterization of heterogeneous and porous media. The notion of imaging gases at ultra-low fields would appear to be very difficult due to the prohibitively low polarization and spin densities as well as the low sensitivities of conventional Faraday coil detectors. However, Chapter 5 describes how gas imaging

  10. Integration of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Filippini, Nicola; Knight, Steven; Talbot, Kevin; Turner, Martin R

    2011-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as a system failure is a concept supported by the finding of consistent extramotor as well as motor cerebral pathology. The functional correlates of the structural changes detected using advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging and voxel-based morphometry have not been extensively studied. A group of 25 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis was compared to healthy control subjects using a multi-modal neuroimaging approach comprising T(1)-weighted, diffusion-weighted and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Using probabilistic tractography, a grey matter connection network was defined based upon the prominent corticospinal tract and corpus callosum involvement demonstrated by white matter tract-based spatial statistics. This 'amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-specific' network included motor, premotor and supplementary motor cortices, pars opercularis and motor-related thalamic nuclei. A novel analysis protocol, using this disease-specific grey matter network as an input for a dual-regression analysis, was then used to assess changes in functional connectivity directly associated with this network. A spatial pattern of increased functional connectivity spanning sensorimotor, premotor, prefrontal and thalamic regions was found. A composite of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging measures also allowed the qualitative discrimination of patients from controls. An integrated structural and functional connectivity approach therefore identified apparently dichotomous processes characterizing the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cerebral network failure, in which there was increased functional connectivity within regions of decreased structural connectivity. Patients with slower rates of disease progression showed connectivity measures with values closer to healthy controls, raising the possibility that functional connectivity increases might not simply represent a

  11. HIGHER MODE FREQUENCY EFFECTS ON RESONANCE IN MACHINERY, STRUCTURES, AND PIPE SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, R.

    2010-05-02

    The complexities of resonance in multi-degree of freedom systems (multi-DOF) may be clarified using graphic presentations. Multi-DOF systems represent actual systems, such as beams or springs, where multiple, higher order, natural frequencies occur. Resonance occurs when a cyclic load is applied to a structure, and the frequency of the applied load equals one of the natural frequencies. Both equations and graphic presentations are available in the literature for single degree of freedom (SDOF) systems, which describe the response of spring-mass-damper systems to harmonically applied, or cyclic, loads. Loads may be forces, moments, or forced displacements applied to one end of a structure. Multi-DOF systems are typically described only by equations in the literature, and while equations certainly permit a case by case analysis for specific conditions, graphs provide an overall comprehension not gleaned from single equations. In fact, this collection of graphed equations provides novel results, which describe the interactions between multiple natural frequencies, as well as a comprehensive description of increased vibrations near resonance.

  12. Auroral Current and Electrodynamics Structure (ACES) Observations of Ionospheric Feedback in the Alfven Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ian J.; Lessard, Marc; Lund, Eric J.; Bounds, Scott R.; Kletzing, Craig; Kaeppler, Stephen R.; Sigsbee, Kristine M.; Streltsov, Anatoly V.; Labelle, James W.; Dombrowski, Micah P.; hide

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, the Auroral Current and Electrodynamics Structure (ACES) High and Low sounding rockets were launched from the Poker Flat Rocket Range (PFRR) in Alaska, with the science objective of gathering in-situ data to quantify current closure in a discrete auroral arc. As ACES High crossed through the return current of an arc (that was monitored using an all sky camera from the ground at Fort Yukon), its instruments recorded clear Alfv nic signatures both poleward and equatorward of the return current region, but not within the main region of the return current itself. These data provide an excellent opportunity to study ionospheric feedback and how it interacts with the Alfv n resonator. We compare the observations with predictions and new results from a model of ionospheric feedback in the ionospheric Alfv n resonator (IAR) and report the significance and impact of these new data for the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling in the Alfv n Resonator (MICA) rocket mission to launch from PFRR this winter. MICA s primary science objectives specifically focus on better understanding the small-scale structure that the model predicts should exist within the return current region.

  13. Nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation: Applications in magnetism of layered structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlage, Kai; Röhlsberger, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Depth-resolved determination of magnetic spin structures. •Isotopic probe layers allow for probing selected depths in the sample. •High sensitivity to magnetic domain patterns via diffuse scattering. -- Abstract: Nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation has become an established tool within condensed-matter research. Synchrotron radiation with its outstanding brilliance, transverse coherence and polarization has opened this field for many unique studies, for fundamental research in the field of light-matter interaction as well as for materials science. This applies in particular for the electronic and magnetic structure of very small sample volumes like micro- and nano-structures and samples under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure. This article is devoted to the application of the technique to nanomagnetic systems such as thin films and multilayers. After a basic introduction into the method, a number of our experiments are presented to illustrate how magnetic spin structures within such layer systems can be revealed

  14. A New XOR Structure Based on Resonant-Tunneling High Electron Mobility Transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Sharifi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new structure for an exclusive-OR (XOR gate based on the resonant-tunneling high electron mobility transistor (RTHEMT is introduced which comprises only an RTHEMT and two FETs. Calculations are done by utilizing a new subcircuit model for simulating the RTHEMT in the SPICE simulator. Details of the design, input, and output values and margins, delay of each transition, maximum operating frequency, static and dynamic power dissipations of the new structure are discussed and calculated and the performance is compared with other XOR gates which confirm that the presented structure has a high performance. Furthermore, to the best of authors' knowledge, it has the least component count in comparison to the existing structures.

  15. Proton resonance elastic scattering of $^{30}$Mg for single particle structure of $^{31}$Mg

    CERN Multimedia

    The single particle structure of $^{31}$Mg, which is located in the so-called “island of inversion”, will be studied through measuring Isobaric Analog Resonances (IARs) of bound states of $^{31}$Mg. They are located in the high excitation energy of $^{31}$Al. We are going to determine the spectroscopic factors and angular momenta of the parent states by measuring the excitation function of the proton resonance elastic scattering around 0 degrees in the laboratory frame with around 3 MeV/nucleon $^{30}$Mg beam. The present study will reveal the shell evolution around $^{32}$Mg. In addition, the spectroscopic factor of the (7/2)$^{−}$ state which was not yet determined experimentally, may allow one to study the shape coexistence in this nucleus.

  16. Investigation of ferromagnetic resonance and magnetoresistance in anti-spin ice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, I. R. B.; Felix, J. F.; Figueiredo, L. C.; Morais, P. C.; Ferreira, S. O.; Moura-Melo, W. A.; Pereira, A. R.; Quindeau, A.; de Araujo, C. I. L.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we report experimental and theoretical investigations performed in anti-spin ice structures, composed by square lattice of elongated antidots, patterned in nickel thin film. The magnetic vortex crystal state was obtained by micromagnetic simulation as the ground state magnetization, which arises due to the magnetic stray field at the antidot edges inducing chirality in the magnetization of platters among antidots. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and magnetoresistance (MR) measurements were utilized to investigate the vortex crystal magnetization dynamics and magnetoelectric response. By using FMR, it was possible to detect the spin wave modes and vortex crystal resonance, in good agreement with dynamic micromagnetic simulation results. The vortex crystal magnetization configuration and its response to the external magnetic field, were used to explain the isotropic MR behaviour observed.

  17. Inelastic electron scattering, fine structure of M1 giant resonances and Gamow-Teller states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, A.

    1983-01-01

    Recent progress in obtaining detailed fine structure distributions of magnetic giant resonances in nuclei using high resolution inelastic electron scattering at low energy is discussed. Specific examples chosen are the medium heavy nuclei 40 42 44 48 Ca in which M1 excitations are due to neutron spin-flip transitions and the N=28 isotones 50 Ti, 52 Cr and 54 Fe where in addition also proton excitations contribute to the measured M1 strength. It is found that the M1 strength is very fragmented and considerably quenched in comparison to predictions of shell model calculations in a model space that includes up to 2p-2h excitations. Finally, the old problem of M1 strength in 208 Pb is revisited and the results of a form factor measurement of a recently discovered low lying Jsup(π)=1 + state by nuclear resonance fluorescence are presented. (Auth.)

  18. Amplification of the Signal Intensity of Fluorescence-Based Fiber-Optic Biosensors Using a Fabry-Perot Resonator Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chang Hsieh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent biosensors have been widely used in biomedical applications. To amplify the intensity of fluorescence signals, this study developed a novel structure for an evanescent wave fiber-optic biosensor by using a Fabry-Perot resonator structure. An excitation light was coupled into the optical fiber through a laser-drilled hole on the proximal end of the resonator. After entering the resonator, the excitation light was reflected back and forth inside the resonator, thereby amplifying the intensity of the light in the fiber. Subsequently, the light was used to excite the fluorescent molecules in the reactive region of the sensor. The experimental results showed that the biosensor signal was amplified eight-fold when the resonator reflector was formed using a 92% reflective coating. Furthermore, in a simulation, the biosensor signal could be amplified 20-fold by using a 99% reflector.

  19. Nuclear-excited Feshbach resonances in the electron scattering from hydrogen halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoth, G.; Gote, M.; Radle, M.; Jung, K.; Ehrhardt, H.

    1989-01-01

    The energy dependences of the differential cross sections for the electron impact excitation of the higher vibrational levels (v=2 and v=3) of HF and HCl have been measured. Besides the threshold peak a resonance structure has been observed in the v=3 excitation functions of HF below the cusp structure at the opening of the v=4 channel. This resonance structure is the first experimental proof for the existence of the nuclear-excited Feshbach resonances which are interpreted to be the origin of the threshold peaks in the vibrational excitation channels

  20. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance structural studies of peptides and proteins from the vaso-regulatory System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sizun, Philippe

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to show how Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) allows to determine the 3D structure of peptides and proteins in solution. A comparative study of peptides involved in the vaso-regulatory System (form small hormonal peptide to the 65 amido-acid protein hirudin) has allowed to design most efficient NMR 1D and 2D strategies. It rapidly appeared that the size of the peptide plays a key role in the structuration of the molecule, smallest peptides being weakly structured owing to the lack of cooperative effects. As the molecular size increases or if conformational locks are present (disulfide bridges) the probability of stable secondary structure increases. For the protein hirudin, a combination of ail available NMR parameters deduced form dedicated experiments (chemical shifts, coupling constants, overhauser effects, accessibility of amide protons) and molecular modelling under constraints allows a clear 3D structure to be proposed for this protein in solution. Finally, a comparative study of the experimental structures and of those deduced form prediction rules has shed light on the concept of structural predisposition, the latter being of high value for a better understanding of structure-activity relationships. (author) [fr

  1. Structure determination of human Lck unique and SH3 domains by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willbold Dieter

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein tyrosine kinases are involved in signal transduction pathways that regulate cell growth, differentiation, activation and transformation. Human lymphocyte specific kinase (Lck is a 56 kDa protein involved in T-cell- and IL2-receptor signaling. Three-dimensional structures are known for SH3, SH2 and kinase domains of Lck as well as for other tyrosine kinases. No structure is known for the unique domain of any Src-type tyrosine kinase. Results Lck(1–120 comprising unique and SH3 domains was structurally investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We found the unique domain, in contrast to the SH3 part, to have basically no defined structural elements. The solution structure of the SH3 part could be determined with very high precision. It does not show significant differences to Lck SH3 in the absence of the unique domain. Minor differences were observed to the X-ray structure of Lck SH3. Conclusion The unique domain of Lck does not contain any defined structure elements in the absence of ligands and membranes. Presence of the unique domain is not relevant to the three-dimensional structure of the Lck SH3 domain.

  2. Examination of total cross section resonance structure of niobium and silicon in neutron transmission experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianova, Olga; Lomakov, Gleb; Manturov, Gennady

    2017-09-01

    The neutron transmission experiments are one of the main sources of information about the neutron cross section resonance structure and effect in the self-shielding. Such kind of data for niobium and silicon nuclides in energy range 7 keV to 3 MeV can be obtained from low-resolution transmission measurements performed earlier in Russia (with samples of 0.027 to 0.871 atom/barn for niobium and 0.076 to 1.803 atom/barn for silicon). A significant calculation-to-experiment discrepancy in energy range 100 to 600 keV and 300 to 800 keV for niobium and silicon, respectively, obtained using the evaluated nuclear data library ROSFOND, were found. The EVPAR code was used for estimation the average resonance parameters in energy range 7 to 600 keV for niobium. For silicon a stochastic optimization method was used to modify the resolved resonance parameters in energy range 300 to 800 keV. The improved ROSFOND evaluated nuclear data files were tested in calculation of ICSBEP integral benchmark experiments.

  3. Nucleon Resonance Structure from Exclusive Meson Electroproduction with CLAS and CLAS12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, P.L. [Idaho State University, Department of Physics, Pocatello, Idaho 83209-8106 (United States); Burkert, V.D. [Jefferson Lab., 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Gothe, R.W. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States); Mokeev, V.I. [Jefferson Lab., 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Skobeltsyn Nuclear Physics Institute, Moscow State University, 119899 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-15

    The CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab is a unique instrument, which has provided the lion's share of the world's data on meson photo- and electroproduction in the resonance excitation region. The electroexcitation amplitudes for the low-lying resonances P{sub 33}(1232), P{sub 11}(1440), D{sub 13}(1520), and S{sub 11}(1535) were determined over a wide range of Q{sup 2}<5.0GeV{sup 2} in a comprehensive analysis of exclusive single-meson (π{sup +}n,π{sup 0}p) reactions in the electroproduction off protons. Further, CLAS was able to precisely measure π{sup +}π{sup −}p electroproduction differential cross sections provided by the nearly full kinematic coverage of the detector. The electrocouplings of the P{sub 11}(1440) and D{sub 13}(1520) excited states are determined from the exclusive-π{sup +}π{sup −}p reaction. Consistent results on the electrocouplings from two-independent analyses (single- and double-pion electroproduction) have provided compelling evidence for the reliable extraction of the N{sup ⁎} electrocouplings. Preliminary results on the electrocouplings of the S{sub 31}(1620), S{sub 11}(1650), D{sub 33}(1700), and P{sub 13}(1720) states have recently become available. Theoretical analyses of these results have revealed that there are two major contributions to the resonance structure: a) an internal quark core and b) an external meson-baryon cloud. These CLAS results have had considerable impact on QCD-based studies on N{sup ⁎} structure and in the search for manifestations of the dynamical masses of the dressed quarks. Future CLAS12 N{sup ⁎} structure studies at high photon virtualities will considerably extend our capabilities in exploring the nature of confinement in baryons.

  4. Damping characteristic identification of non-linear soil-structural system interaction by phase resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poterasu, V.F.

    1984-01-01

    It is presented a method and the phase resonance for damping characteristic identification of non-linear soil-structural interaction. The algorithm can be applied in case of any, not necessarily, damping characteristic of the system examined. For the identification, the system is harmonically excited and are considered the super-harmonic amplitudes for odd and even powers of the x. The response of shear beam system for different levels of base excitation and for different locations of the load is considered. (Author) [pt

  5. Molecular Structure Laboratory. Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FTNMR) Spectrometer and Ancillary Instrumentation at SUNY Geneseo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, David K [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Geneseo, NY (United States)

    2015-12-31

    An Agilent 400-MR nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer and ancillary equipment were purchased, which are being used for molecular structure elucidation.  The instrumentation is housed in a pre-existing facility designed specifically for its use. This instrument package is being used to expand the research and educational efforts of the faculty and students at SUNY-Geneseo and is made available to neighboring educational institutions and business concerns.  Funds were also used for training of College personnel, maintenance of the instrumentation, and installation of the equipment.

  6. Study of loading by beam of dual-resonator structure of linear electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milovanov, O.S.; Smirnov, I.A.

    1988-01-01

    Loading by the beam of the accelerating structure of an Argus dual-resonator linear electron accelerator with a kinetic energy of ∼ 1 MeV and a pulsed beam current of up to 0.5 A is studied experimentally. It is shown that the conditions for stable single-frequency operation of the magnetron are disrupted and the acceleration process is cut off at certain electron-beam currents. Experimental curves of the maximum beam current and maximum electron efficiency of the Argus linear electron accelerator as functions of rf power are given

  7. Fine structure of the giant M1 resonance in 90Zr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusev, G; Tsoneva, N; Dönau, F; Frauendorf, S; Schwengner, R; Tonchev, A P; Adekola, A S; Hammond, S L; Kelley, J H; Kwan, E; Lenske, H; Tornow, W; Wagner, A

    2013-01-11

    The M1 excitations in the nuclide 90Zr have been studied in a photon-scattering experiment with monoenergetic and linearly polarized beams from 7 to 11 MeV. More than 40 J(π)=1+ states have been identified from observed ground-state transitions, revealing the fine structure of the giant M1 resonance with a centroid energy of 9 MeV and a sum strength of 4.17(56) μ(N)(2). The result for the total M1 strength and its fragmentation are discussed in the framework of the three-phonon quasiparticle-phonon model.

  8. Transverse Resonant Vibration of Non-Bearing Structures Caused by Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jendzelovsky, Norbert; Antal, Roland

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, there are increasing use of very thin, subtle and light structures in the field of building constructions. We can find such a structures as part of roofs or design facades. By using these lamellas like, non-bearing structures as a part of architectural design of buildings, it is necessary to consider wind effects on these structures. Subtle structures of this type are prone to vibration in the transverse direction of the wind flow. The fact that the vibration occurs depends on wind parameters (wind velocity, direction of an air flow) and it also depends on the properties of lamella (shape, length, mass, natural frequency, support type). The principal idea of this article is to show susceptibility of lamellae-like structures to transverse resonant vibration caused by the phenomenon called Von Karman effect. Comparison of susceptibility to transverse resonance vibration was analysed on the different shapes of lamellas loaded by different wind speed. Analysis was based on usage of empirically derived equations. Von Karman effect arise from wind flow past an object. Turbulence in the form of vortices are formed at the object and shed into the flowing stream intermittently. The potential problem is that this turbulence can induce vibrations into the lamella itself. In terms of this vibration problem, two frequencies are interesting. Von Karman shedding frequency is the frequency at which the vortices are formed and shed at the object. The vortex-shedding frequency increases with the velocity of the wind flow and decreases with the size of the object. Natural frequency of the object depends on the construction of the lamella itself. Parameters of lamella as a shape, mass, length, elasticity modulus of material and support types are directly involved in the calculation of natural frequency. Worst case scenario in the term of transverse resonant vibration occurs when the natural frequency of lamella is equal to the vortex-shedding frequency. In this case

  9. Small scale structure of magnetospheric electron density through on-line tracking of plasma resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higel, B.

    1978-01-01

    The plasma resonance phenomena observed at fsub(pe), nfsub(ce), and fsub(qn) by the GEOS-1 S-301 relaxation sounder are identified through a pattern recognition software process implemented in a mini-computer which receives on-line the compressed data. First, this processing system distributes in real time fsub(pe) and fsub(ce) measurements to the ground media. Second, it drives and controls automatically the S-301 on-board experiment by sending appropriate telecommands: the tracking of resonances is performed by shortening the frequency sweeps to a narrow range centered on the resonance location. Examples of such tracking sequences are presented, exhibiting sampling rates of the electron density measurements from once every 22s (slowest rate) to once every 86 ms (highest rate available). The results give evidence of the existence of very small scale structures in the magnetospheric density, having characteristic sizes of the order of a few 10 2 m or/and a few 10 -1 s. The relative amplitude of these density fluctuations is typically 1%. Because of satellite spinning, fixed frequency sounding sequences allow to measure in a few seconds the directivity features of the plasma resonance signals. Examples of directional patterns in the plane perpendicular to the geomagnetic field are presented: the electrostatic nature of the waves received at fsub(pe), nfsub(ce), and fsub(qn) being consistent with these patterns, the corresponding k vector orientations become available. The Bernstein modes properties are used to interpret the nfsub(ce) and fsub(qn) results. (Auth.)

  10. The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT): Exploring the Factor Structure and Cutoff Thresholds in a Representative Post-Conflict Population in Northern Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Alden Hooper; Pearce, Margo Ellen; Katamba, Achilles; Malamba, Samuel S; Muyinda, Herbert; Schechter, Martin T; Spittal, Patricia M

    2017-05-01

    Despite increased use of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) in sub-Saharan Africa, few studies have assessed its underlying conceptual framework, and none have done so in post-conflict settings. Further, significant inconsistencies exist between definitions used for problematic consumption. Such is the case in Uganda, facing one of the highest per-capita alcohol consumption levels regionally, which is thought to be hindering rebuilding in the North after two decades of civil war. This study explores the impact of varying designation cutoff thresholds in the AUDIT as well as its conceptual factor structure in a representative sample of the population. In all, 1720 Cango Lyec Project participants completed socio-economic and mental health questionnaires, provided blood samples and took the AUDIT. Participant characteristics and consumption designations were compared at AUDIT summary score thresholds of ≥3, ≥5 and ≥8. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) explored one-, two- and three-factor level models overall and by sex with relative and absolute fit indicators. There were no significant differences in participant demographic characteristics between thresholds. At higher cutoffs, the test increased in specificity to identify those with hazardous drinking, disordered drinking and suffering from alcohol-related harms. All conceptual models indicated good fit, with three-factor models superior overall and within both sexes. In Northern Uganda, a three-factor AUDIT model best explores alcohol use in the population and is appropriate for use in both sexes. Lower cutoff thresholds are recommended to identify those with potentially disordered drinking to best plan effective interventions and treatments. A CFA of the AUDIT showed good fit for one-, two, and three-factor models overall and by sex in a representative sample in post-conflict Northern Uganda. A three-plus total AUDIT cutoff score is suggested to screen for hazardous drinking in this or

  11. Site effects and soil-structure resonance study in the Kobarid basin (NW Slovenia) using microtremors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosar, A.

    2010-04-01

    The town of Kobarid is located in one of three areas with the highest seismic hazard in Slovenia. It was hit by several 1976-1977 Friuli sequence earthquakes and recently by the 1998 and 2004 Krn Mountains earthquakes which caused damage of intensity up to VII EMS-98 scale. The town is located in a small basin filled with heterogeneous glaciofluvial Quaternary sediments in which site effects due to soft sediments are expected. The existing microzonation which is based on surface geological data only is inadequate, and no borehole or geophysical data are available in the basin that would allow a modelling approach of site effects assessment. The microtremor horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) method was therefore applied in order to assess the fundamental frequency of the sediments. Investigations were performed on a 100×100 m dense grid and 106 free-field measurements acquired. Clear HVSR peaks were obtained in the majority of the surveyed area. The eastern part of the basin is characterized by two well separated peaks which indicate distinct shallow and deep impedance contrasts. The iso-frequency map of sediments shows a distribution in a broad range of 1.8-22.2 Hz. The observed frequencies can be related to the total thickness of Quaternary sediments (sand, gravel) in the western part of the basin only. They are deposited over bedrock built of Cretaceous flysch. In the eastern part the obtained fundamental frequencies are influenced by the presence of a shallow conglomerate layer inside sandy gravel or lacustrine chalk. The extent of these layers was not known before. Microtremor measurements were also performed inside 19 characteristic buildings of various heights (from two to four stories), and longitudinal and transverse fundamental frequencies determined from amplitude spectra. A potential of soil-structure resonance was assessed by comparing building frequencies with the free-field sediments frequencies derived from the iso-frequency map. For two

  12. Site effects and soil-structure resonance study in the Kobarid basin (NW Slovenia using microtremors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gosar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The town of Kobarid is located in one of three areas with the highest seismic hazard in Slovenia. It was hit by several 1976–1977 Friuli sequence earthquakes and recently by the 1998 and 2004 Krn Mountains earthquakes which caused damage of intensity up to VII EMS-98 scale. The town is located in a small basin filled with heterogeneous glaciofluvial Quaternary sediments in which site effects due to soft sediments are expected. The existing microzonation which is based on surface geological data only is inadequate, and no borehole or geophysical data are available in the basin that would allow a modelling approach of site effects assessment. The microtremor horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR method was therefore applied in order to assess the fundamental frequency of the sediments. Investigations were performed on a 100×100 m dense grid and 106 free-field measurements acquired. Clear HVSR peaks were obtained in the majority of the surveyed area. The eastern part of the basin is characterized by two well separated peaks which indicate distinct shallow and deep impedance contrasts. The iso-frequency map of sediments shows a distribution in a broad range of 1.8–22.2 Hz. The observed frequencies can be related to the total thickness of Quaternary sediments (sand, gravel in the western part of the basin only. They are deposited over bedrock built of Cretaceous flysch. In the eastern part the obtained fundamental frequencies are influenced by the presence of a shallow conglomerate layer inside sandy gravel or lacustrine chalk. The extent of these layers was not known before. Microtremor measurements were also performed inside 19 characteristic buildings of various heights (from two to four stories, and longitudinal and transverse fundamental frequencies determined from amplitude spectra. A potential of soil-structure resonance was assessed by comparing building frequencies with the free-field sediments frequencies derived from the iso

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Based Structural Characterization and Backbone Dynamics of Recombinant Bee Venom Melittin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Lisa; Shekhtman, Alexander; Pande, Jayanti

    2018-04-30

    In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in melittin and its variants as their therapeutic potential has become increasingly evident. Melittin is a 26-residue peptide and a toxic component of honey bee venom. The versatility of melittin in interacting with various biological substrates, such as membranes, glycosaminoglycans, and a variety of proteins, has inspired a slew of studies that aim to improve our understanding of the structural basis of such interactions. However, these studies have largely focused on melittin solutions at high concentrations (>1 mM), even though melittin is generally effective at lower (micromolar) concentrations. Here we present high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance studies in the lower-concentration regime using a novel method to produce isotope-labeled ( 15 N and 13 C) recombinant melittin. We provide residue-specific structural characterization of melittin in dilute aqueous solution and in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol/water mixtures, which mimic melittin structure-function and interactions in aqueous and membrane-like environments, respectively. We find that the cis-trans isomerization of Pro14 is key to changes in the secondary structure of melittin. Thus, this study provides residue-specific structural information about melittin in the free state and in a model of the substrate-bound state. These results, taken together with published work from other laboratories, reveal the peptide's structural versatility that resembles that of intrinsically disordered proteins and peptides.

  14. New developments in high field electron paramagnetic resonance with applications in structural biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennati, Marina; Prisner, Thomas F

    2005-01-01

    Recent developments in microwave technologies have led to a renaissance of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) due to the implementation of new spectrometers operating at frequencies ≥90 GHz. EPR at high fields and high frequencies (HF-EPR) has been established up to THz (very high frequency (VHF) EPR) in continuous wave (cw) operation and up to about 300 GHz in pulsed operation. To date, its most prominent application field is structural biology. This review article first gives an overview of the theoretical basics and the technical aspects of HF-EPR methodologies, such as cw and pulsed HF-EPR, as well as electron nuclear double resonance at high fields (HF-ENDOR). In the second part, the article illustrates different application areas of HF-EPR in studies of protein structure and function. In particular, HF-EPR has delivered essential contributions to disentangling complex spectra of radical cofactors or reaction intermediates in photosynthetic reaction centres, radical enzymes (such as ribonucleotide reductase) and in metalloproteins. Furthermore, HF-EPR combined with site-directed spin labelling in membranes and soluble proteins provides new methods of investigating complex molecular dynamics and intermolecular distances

  15. Protein structure analysis using the resonant recognition model and wavelet transforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Q.; Cosic, I.

    1998-01-01

    An approach based on the resonant recognition model and the discrete wavelet transform is introduced here for characterising proteins' biological function. The protein sequence is converted into a numerical series by assigning the electron-ion interaction potential to each amino acid from N-terminal to C-terminal. A set of peaks is found after performing a wavelet transform onto a numerical series representing a group of homologous proteins. These peaks are related to protein structural and functional properties and named characteristic vector of that protein group. Further more, the amino acids contributing mostly to a protein's biological functions, the so-called 'hot spots' amino acids, are predicted by the continuous wavelet transform. It is found that the hot spots are clustered around the protein's cleft structure. The wavelets approach provides a novel methods for amino acid sequence analysis as well as an expansion for the newly established macromolecular interaction model: the resonant recognition model. Copyright (1998) Australasian Physical and Engineering Sciences in Medicine

  16. Studying Autism Spectrum Disorder with Structural and Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Marwa M. T.; Keynton, Robert S.; Mostapha, Mahmoud M. M. O.; ElTanboly, Ahmed H.; Casanova, Manuel F.; Gimel'farb, Georgy L.; El-Baz, Ayman

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modalities have emerged as powerful means that facilitate non-invasive clinical diagnostics of various diseases and abnormalities since their inception in the 1980s. Multiple MRI modalities, such as different types of the sMRI and DTI, have been employed to investigate facets of ASD in order to better understand this complex syndrome. This paper reviews recent applications of structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), to study autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Main reported findings are sometimes contradictory due to different age ranges, hardware protocols, population types, numbers of participants, and image analysis parameters. The primary anatomical structures, such as amygdalae, cerebrum, and cerebellum, associated with clinical-pathological correlates of ASD are highlighted through successive life stages, from infancy to adulthood. This survey demonstrates the absence of consistent pathology in the brains of autistic children and lack of research investigations in patients under 2 years of age in the literature. The known publications also emphasize advances in data acquisition and analysis, as well as significance of multimodal approaches that combine resting-state, task-evoked, and sMRI measures. Initial results obtained with the sMRI and DTI show good promise toward the early and non-invasive ASD diagnostics. PMID:27242476

  17. On the synthesis of resonance lines in dynamical models of structured hot-star winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puls, J.; Owocki, S. P.; Fullerton, A. W.

    1993-01-01

    We examine basic issues involved in synthesizing resonance-line profiles from 1-D, dynamical models of highly structured hot-star winds. Although these models exhibit extensive variations in density as well as velocity, the density scale length is still typically much greater than the Sobolev length. The line transfer is thus treated using a Sobolev approach, as generalized by Rybicki & Hummer (1978) to take proper account of the multiple Sobolev resonances arising from the nonmonotonic velocity field. The resulting reduced-lambda-matrix equation describing nonlocal coupling of the source function is solved by iteration, and line profiles are then derived from formal solution integration using this source function. Two more approximate methods that instead use either a stationary or a structured, local source function yield qualitatively similar line-profiles, but are found to violate photon conservation by 10% or more. The full results suggest that such models may indeed be able to reproduce naturally some of the qualitative properties long noted in observed UV line profiles, such as discrete absorption components in unsaturated lines, or the blue-edge variability in saturated lines. However, these particular models do not yet produce the black absorption troughs commonly observed in saturated lines, and it seems that this and other important discrepancies (e.g., in acceleration time scale of absorption components) may require development of more complete models that include rotation and other 2-D and/or 3-D effects.

  18. Structural and dynamical properties of chlorinated hydrocarbons studied with resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohinc, R.; Žitnik, M.; Bučar, K.; Kavčič, M.; Carniato, S.; Journel, L.; Guillemin, R.; Marchenko, T.; Kawerk, E.; Simon, M.; Cao, W.

    2016-04-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering on a large group of chlorinated hydrocarbons: CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CHCl3, CCl4, CH3CH2Cl, ClCH2CH2Cl, CH3CHCl2, CH3CCl3, C2H2Cl2-iso, C2H2Cl2-cis, C2H2Cl2-trans, and C6H5Cl. Differences in structural and dynamical properties of the molecules generated by diverse chemical environments are observed in the measured Cl(Kα) spectral maps as well as in the Cl(K) total fluorescence yield spectra. The energy position, relative intensity, and the width of the Franck-Condon distribution of low-lying σ∗ and π∗ resonances are extracted by a fitting procedure taking into account the experimental broadening. The theoretical values obtained with the transition potential and Δ Kohn-Sham methods are in good agreement with the experimental parameters indicating subtle differences due to variations in the molecular structure.

  19. On-chip optical filter comprising Fabri-Perot resonator structure and spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seunghoon; Horie, Yu; Faraon, Andrei; Arbabi, Amir

    2018-04-10

    An on-chip optical filter having Fabri-Perot resonators and a spectrometer may include a first sub-wavelength grating (SWG) reflecting layer and a second SWG reflecting layer facing each other. A plurality of Fabri-Perot resonators are formed by the first SWG reflecting layer and the second SWG reflecting layer facing each other. Each of the Fabri-Perot resonators may transmit light corresponding to a resonance wavelength of the Fabri-Perot resonator. The resonance wavelengths of the Fabri-Perot resonators may be determined according to duty cycles of grating patterns.

  20. Silicon coupled-ring resonator structures for slow light applications: potential, impairments and ultimate limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canciamilla, A; Torregiani, M; Ferrari, C; Morichetti, F; Melloni, A; De La Rue, R M; Samarelli, A; Sorel, M

    2010-01-01

    Coupled-ring resonator-based slow light structures are reported and discussed. By combining the advantages of high index contrast silicon-on-insulator technology with an efficient thermo-optical activation, they provide an on-chip solution with a bandwidth of up to 100 GHz and a slowdown factor of up to 16, as well as a continuous reconfiguration scheme and a fine tunability. The performance of these devices is investigated in detail for both static and dynamic operation, in order to evaluate their potential in optical signal processing applications at high bit rate. The main impairments imposed by fabrication imperfections are also discussed in relation to the slowdown factor. In particular, the analysis of the impact of backscatter, disorder and two-photon absorption on the device transfer function reveals the ultimate limits of these structures and provides valuable design rules for their optimization

  1. Cavity resonance absorption in ultra-high bandwidth CRT deflection structure by a resistive load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, M.E.; Hudson, C.L.

    1993-05-11

    An improved ultra-high bandwidth helical coil deflection structure for a cathode ray tube is described comprising a first metal member having a bore therein, the metal walls of which form a first ground plane; a second metal member coaxially mounted in the bore of the first metal member and forming a second ground plane; a helical deflection coil coaxially mounted within the bore between the two ground planes; and a resistive load disposed in one end of the bore and electrically connected to the first and second ground planes, the resistive load having an impedance substantially equal to the characteristic impedance of the coaxial line formed by the two coaxial ground planes to inhibit cavity resonance in the structure within the ultra-high bandwidth of operation. Preferably, the resistive load comprises a carbon film on a surface of an end plug in one end of the bore.

  2. Fine structure of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in 40Ca due to Landau damping?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usman, I.; Buthelezi, Z.; Carter, J.; Cooper, G.R.J.; Fearick, R.W.; Foertsch, S.V.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Neveling, R.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Richter, A.; Roth, R.; Shevchenko, A.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Smit, F.D.

    2011-01-01

    The fragmentation of the Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonance (ISGQR) in 40 Ca has been investigated in high energy-resolution experiments using proton inelastic scattering at E p =200 MeV. Fine structure is observed in the region of the ISGQR and its characteristic energy scales are extracted from the experimental data by means of a wavelet analysis. The experimental scales are well described by Random Phase Approximation (RPA) and second-RPA calculations with an effective interaction derived from a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction by the Unitary Correlation Operator Method (UCOM). In these results characteristic scales are already present at the mean-field level pointing to their origination in Landau damping, in contrast to the findings in heavier nuclei and also to SRPA calculations for 40 Ca based on phenomenological effective interactions, where fine structure is explained by the coupling to two-particle-two-hole (2p-2h) states.

  3. Soft x-ray resonant diffraction study of magnetic structure in magnetoelectric Y-type hexaferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kimura, T.

    2018-05-01

    The effect of magnetic field on the magnetic structure associated with magnetoelectric properties in a Y-type hexaferrite, Ba1.3Sr0.7CoZnFe11AlO22, was investigated by utilizing the soft x-ray resonant diffraction technique. In this hexaferrite, the so-called alternating longitudinal conical phase is stabilized at room temperature and zero magnetic field. Below room temperature, however, this phase is transformed into the so-called transverse conical phase by applying an in-plane magnetic field (≈ 0.3 T). The transverse conical phase persists even after removing the magnetic field. The magnetoelectricity, which is magnetically-induced electric polarization, observed in the hexaferrite is discussed in terms of the temperature-dependent magnetic structure at zero field.

  4. Origin of fine structure of the giant dipole resonance in s d -shell nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearick, R. W.; Erler, B.; Matsubara, H.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Richter, A.; Roth, R.; Tamii, A.

    2018-04-01

    A set of high-resolution zero-degree inelastic proton scattering data on 24Mg, 28Si, 32S, and 40Ca provides new insight into the long-standing puzzle of the origin of fragmentation of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in s d -shell nuclei. Understanding is achieved by comparison with random phase approximation calculations for deformed nuclei using for the first time a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction derived from the Argonne V18 potential with the unitary correlation operator method and supplemented by a phenomenological three-nucleon contact interaction. A wavelet analysis allows one to extract significant scales both in the data and calculations characterizing the fine structure of the GDR. The fair agreement for scales in the range of a few hundred keV supports the surmise that the fine structure arises from ground-state deformation driven by α clustering.

  5. Conformational Structure of Tyrosine, Tyrosyl-Glycine, and Tyrosyl-Glycyl-Glycine by Double Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo-Riziq, Ali; Grace, Louis; Crews, Bridgit; Callahan, Michael P,; van Mourik, Tanja; de Vries, Mattanjah S,

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the variation in conformation for the amino acid tyrosine (Y), alone and in the small peptides tyrosine-glycine (YC) and tyrosine-glycine-glycine (YGG), in the gas phase by using UV-UV and IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. For tyrosine we found seven different conformations, for YG we found four different conformations, and for YGG we found three different conformations. As the peptides get larger, we observe fewer stable conformers, despite the increasing complexity and number of degrees of freedom. We find structural trends similar to those in phenylalanine-glycine glycine (FGG) and tryptophan-glycine-glycine (WGG)j however) the effect of dispersive forces in FGG for stabilizing a folded structure is replaced by that of hydrogen bonding in YGG.

  6. Neutron cross sections in the unresolved resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeva, N.; Lukyanov, A.; Koyumdjieva, N.; Volev, K.

    2005-01-01

    In this work a development of the characteristic function model, created to reveal the resonance cross section structure in the unresolved resonance region is presented. The main advantage of this model is the calculation of resonance averaged self-shielding factors analytically. To determine average values of the cross sections and their functionals the function of joint statistical distribution of the R-matrix real and imaginary parts should be used. The characteristic function of such distribution is determined and the resonance ladder for the unresolved region is optimized to calculate the group averaged functionals in the same way as it is in the resolved resonance region. The main advantage of this model is the calculation of resonance averaged self-shielding factors analytically. The neutron width energy dependence leads to some deformation in the shape of resonances. This deformation is most apparent near the inelastic scattering threshold. For the case when the inelastic channel momentum is zero we present the formula for level shape bellow and over the inelastic threshold and the calculated resonance deformation in dependence of the position of the resonance in respect to the threshold. (authors)

  7. Nuclearmagnetic resonance investigations to the character of the waterbinding for the structure of the native starch corn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    The signals of the proton and deuteron magnetic resonance from water molecules sorbed on native starch contain a splitting, caused from water molecules in ordered regions. This splitting could not be maintained from retrogradated crystalline amylose. The water molecules are ordered more uniform in potato starch then in wheat starch, which is related to the difference in the crystalline structures. The proton resonance of potato starch contains two further components from water molecules in amorphous regions and on the ions respectively. From the deuteron resonance and their dependence on temperature first insights were obtained into the processes occuring by simutaneous treatment with heat and moisture. (orig.) [de

  8. Structures of peptide families by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and distance geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pease, J.H.

    1989-12-01

    The three dimensional structures of several small peptides were determined using a combination of {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and distance geometry calculations. These techniques were found to be particularly helpful for analyzing structural differences between related peptides since all of the peptides' {sup 1}H NMR spectra are very similar. The structures of peptides from two separate classes are presented. Peptides in the first class are related to apamin, an 18 amino acid peptide toxin from honey bee venom. The {sup 1}H NMR assignments and secondary structure determination of apamin were done previously. Quantitative NMR measurements and distance geometry calculations were done to calculate apamin's three dimensional structure. Peptides in the second class are 48 amino acid toxins from the sea anemone Radianthus paumotensis. The {sup 1}H NMR assignments of toxin II were done previously. The {sup 1}H NMR assignments of toxin III and the distance geometry calculations for both peptides are presented.

  9. Partial-wave analysis of K/sup +/p elastic scattering. [Cross sections, polarization, dispersion relations, analytic smoothing threshold structure, 0. 78 to 2. 53 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutkosky, R E; Hicks, H R; Sandusky, J; Shih, C C [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA); Kelly, R L [California Univ., Livermore (USA). Lawrence Livermore Lab.; Miller, R C; Yokosawa, A [Argonne National Lab., Ill. (USA)

    1976-01-05

    K/sup +/p cross-section and polarization data have been analyzed in the momentum range 0.78-2.53 GeV/c. Single energy fits were made using an ACE parametrization which had no cutoff in J, was analytic and has Regge-asymptotic behaviour in the cut cos theta plane, and contained explicit contributions from P, rho, A2, ..lambda.., ..sigma.., and low-mass di-pion exchange. Direct channel analyticity constraints were imposed by a partial wave dispersion relation interpolation procedure, fitting expansions in regulated-norm optimal bases to each partial wave which entered as a search parameter in the single energy fits. Output from these two programs was then used for a simultaneous fit by a linearized least squares program which provided input for another iterative fitting cycle. No strong evidence for the existence of exotic resonances was found. The method of analytic smoothing, in comparison with 'shortest path' methods, is found to allow more significant threshold structure to appear in the amplitudes.

  10. Measurement of the {sup 13}C(α,n){sup 16}O reaction with the Trojan horse method: Focus on the sub threshold resonance at −3 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Cognata, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C.; Guardo, G. L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Spartà, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy); Trippella, O. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Kiss, G. G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania and Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Rogachev, G. V.; Avila, M.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Santiago, D. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida (United States); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-02

    The {sup 13}C(α,n){sup 16}O reaction is the neutron source of the main component of the s-process. The astrophysical S(E)-factor is dominated by the −3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in {sup 17}O. Its contribution is still controversial as extrapolations, e.g., through R-matrix calculations, and indirect techniques, such as the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC), yield inconsistent results. Therefore, we have applied the Trojan Horse Method (THM) to the {sup 13}C({sup 6}Li,n{sup 16}O)d reaction to measure its contribution. For the first time, the ANC for the 6.356 MeV level has been deduced through the THM, allowing to attain an unprecedented accuracy. Though a larger ANC for the 6.356 MeV level is measured, our experimental S(E) factor agrees with the most recent extrapolation in the literature in the 140-230 keV energy interval, the accuracy being greatly enhanced thanks to this innovative approach, merging together two well establish indirect techniques, namely, the THM and the ANC.

  11. Growth, structural, optical, thermal and laser damage threshold studies of an organic single crystal: 1,3,5 – triphenylbenzene (TPB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja, R. Subramaniyan; Babu, G. Anandha; Ramasamy, P.

    2016-01-01

    Good quality single crystals of pure hydrocarbon 1,3,5-Triphenylbenzene (TPB) have been successfully grown using toluene as a solvent using controlled slow cooling solution growth technique. TPB crystallizes in orthorhombic structure with the space group Pna2 1 . The structural perfection of the grown crystal has been analysed by high resolution X-ray diffraction measurements. The range and percentage of the optical transmission are ascertained by recording the UV-vis spectrum. Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were used to study its thermal properties. Powder second harmonic generation studies were carried out to explore its NLO properties. Laser damage threshold value has been determined using Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm.

  12. Evidence for a narrow near-threshold structure in the J/psivarphi mass spectrum in B;{+} --> J/psivarphiK;{+} decays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Di Canto, A; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-06-19

    Evidence is reported for a narrow structure near the J/psivarphi threshold in exclusive B;{+} --> J/psivarphiK;{+} decays produced in p[over]p collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV. A signal of 14 +/- 5 events, with statistical significance in excess of 3.8 standard deviations, is observed in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb;{-1}, collected by the CDF II detector. The mass and natural width of the structure are measured to be 4143.0 +/- 2.9(stat) +/- 1.2(syst) MeV/c;{2} and 11.7_{-5.0};{+8.3}(stat) +/- 3.7(syst) MeV/c;{2}.

  13. The structure of the Gamow-Teller giant resonance and consequences for beta-delayed neutron spectra and element synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapdor, H.V.

    1976-01-01

    Recent results in β-delayed neutron emission are interpreted by structure of the Gamow-Teller giant resonance not included in the 'gross-theory' of β-decay. Inclusion of this structure of the β-decay function is important for calculations of β-decay production rates for heavy nuclides by astrophysical processes and thermonuclear explosions. (Auth.)

  14. Biomechanics of the Peacock’s Display: How Feather Structure and Resonance Influence Multimodal Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakin, Roslyn; McCrossan, Owen; Hare, James F.; Montgomerie, Robert; Amador Kane, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Courtship displays may serve as signals of the quality of motor performance, but little is known about the underlying biomechanics that determines both their signal content and costs. Peacocks (Pavo cristatus) perform a complex, multimodal “train-rattling” display in which they court females by vibrating the iridescent feathers in their elaborate train ornament. Here we study how feather biomechanics influences the performance of this display using a combination of field recordings and laboratory experiments. Using high-speed video, we find that train-rattling peacocks stridulate their tail feathers against the train at 25.6 Hz, on average, generating a broadband, pulsating mechanical sound at that frequency. Laboratory measurements demonstrate that arrays of peacock tail and train feathers have a broad resonant peak in their vibrational spectra at the range of frequencies used for train-rattling during the display, and the motion of feathers is just as expected for feathers shaking near resonance. This indicates that peacocks are able to drive feather vibrations energetically efficiently over a relatively broad range of frequencies, enabling them to modulate the feather vibration frequency of their displays. Using our field data, we show that peacocks with longer trains use slightly higher vibration frequencies on average, even though longer train feathers are heavier and have lower resonant frequencies. Based on these results, we propose hypotheses for future studies of the function and energetics of this display that ask why its dynamic elements might attract and maintain female attention. Finally, we demonstrate how the mechanical structure of the train feathers affects the peacock’s visual display by allowing the colorful iridescent eyespots–which strongly influence female mate choice–to remain nearly stationary against a dynamic iridescent background. PMID:27119380

  15. Biomechanics of the Peacock's Display: How Feather Structure and Resonance Influence Multimodal Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roslyn Dakin

    Full Text Available Courtship displays may serve as signals of the quality of motor performance, but little is known about the underlying biomechanics that determines both their signal content and costs. Peacocks (Pavo cristatus perform a complex, multimodal "train-rattling" display in which they court females by vibrating the iridescent feathers in their elaborate train ornament. Here we study how feather biomechanics influences the performance of this display using a combination of field recordings and laboratory experiments. Using high-speed video, we find that train-rattling peacocks stridulate their tail feathers against the train at 25.6 Hz, on average, generating a broadband, pulsating mechanical sound at that frequency. Laboratory measurements demonstrate that arrays of peacock tail and train feathers have a broad resonant peak in their vibrational spectra at the range of frequencies used for train-rattling during the display, and the motion of feathers is just as expected for feathers shaking near resonance. This indicates that peacocks are able to drive feather vibrations energetically efficiently over a relatively broad range of frequencies, enabling them to modulate the feather vibration frequency of their displays. Using our field data, we show that peacocks with longer trains use slightly higher vibration frequencies on average, even though longer train feathers are heavier and have lower resonant frequencies. Based on these results, we propose hypotheses for future studies of the function and energetics of this display that ask why its dynamic elements might attract and maintain female attention. Finally, we demonstrate how the mechanical structure of the train feathers affects the peacock's visual display by allowing the colorful iridescent eyespots-which strongly influence female mate choice-to remain nearly stationary against a dynamic iridescent background.

  16. Biomechanics of the Peacock's Display: How Feather Structure and Resonance Influence Multimodal Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakin, Roslyn; McCrossan, Owen; Hare, James F; Montgomerie, Robert; Amador Kane, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Courtship displays may serve as signals of the quality of motor performance, but little is known about the underlying biomechanics that determines both their signal content and costs. Peacocks (Pavo cristatus) perform a complex, multimodal "train-rattling" display in which they court females by vibrating the iridescent feathers in their elaborate train ornament. Here we study how feather biomechanics influences the performance of this display using a combination of field recordings and laboratory experiments. Using high-speed video, we find that train-rattling peacocks stridulate their tail feathers against the train at 25.6 Hz, on average, generating a broadband, pulsating mechanical sound at that frequency. Laboratory measurements demonstrate that arrays of peacock tail and train feathers have a broad resonant peak in their vibrational spectra at the range of frequencies used for train-rattling during the display, and the motion of feathers is just as expected for feathers shaking near resonance. This indicates that peacocks are able to drive feather vibrations energetically efficiently over a relatively broad range of frequencies, enabling them to modulate the feather vibration frequency of their displays. Using our field data, we show that peacocks with longer trains use slightly higher vibration frequencies on average, even though longer train feathers are heavier and have lower resonant frequencies. Based on these results, we propose hypotheses for future studies of the function and energetics of this display that ask why its dynamic elements might attract and maintain female attention. Finally, we demonstrate how the mechanical structure of the train feathers affects the peacock's visual display by allowing the colorful iridescent eyespots-which strongly influence female mate choice-to remain nearly stationary against a dynamic iridescent background.

  17. Ferromagnetic resonance study of structure and relaxation of magnetization in NiFe/Ru superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alayo, W., E-mail: willian.rodriguez@ufpel.edu.br [Depto. de Física, Univ. Federal de Pelotas, Campus Universitário, 96010-900, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Landi Jr, S. [Instituto Federal Goiano, Rio Verde 75901-970 (Brazil); Pelegrini, F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia 74001-970 (Brazil); Baggio-Saitovitch, E. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    The structural properties and relaxation processes of magnetization in [Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19}(t{sub 1})/Ru(t{sub 2})]{sub N} superlattices (N=number of bilayers) were analyzed by ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) with a fixed microwave frequency. One series of samples was deposited with constant NiFe layer thickness (t{sub 1}) and variable Ru layer thickness (t{sub 2}); the other series, with constant t{sub 2} and variable t{sub 1}. A single FMR mode was observed for t{sub 2}<15 Å and t{sub 1}>75 Å and it has been attributed to the resonance of the exchange-coupled NiFe layers across the Ru interlayers. For the other values of t{sub 1} and t{sub 2}, several FMR modes appeared and they were associated to non-coupled magnetic phases with different effective magnetization formed during the multilayer growth. The FMR linewidths were analyzed as a function of the magnetic layer thickness and a strong dependence on t{sub 1}{sup −2} was observed. It was attributed to the contribution of the two-magnon scattering mechanism for the linewidth. - Highlights: • We present a study of magnetic properties of NiFe/Ru superlattices by ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). • The FMR spectra show several modes for large Ru thicknesses and for low NiFe thicknesses. • The above behavior is correlated with the interlayer exchange coupling. • The two-magnon scattering mechanism is revealed by the dependence of the FMR linewidth on the NiFe thickness.

  18. Compressively sampled MR image reconstruction using generalized thresholding iterative algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Sana; kaleem, Muhammad; Omer, Hammad

    2018-01-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) is an emerging area of interest in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). CS is used for the reconstruction of the images from a very limited number of samples in k-space. This significantly reduces the MRI data acquisition time. One important requirement for signal recovery in CS is the use of an appropriate non-linear reconstruction algorithm. It is a challenging task to choose a reconstruction algorithm that would accurately reconstruct the MR images from the under-sampled k-space data. Various algorithms have been used to solve the system of non-linear equations for better image quality and reconstruction speed in CS. In the recent past, iterative soft thresholding algorithm (ISTA) has been introduced in CS-MRI. This algorithm directly cancels the incoherent artifacts produced because of the undersampling in k -space. This paper introduces an improved iterative algorithm based on p -thresholding technique for CS-MRI image reconstruction. The use of p -thresholding function promotes sparsity in the image which is a key factor for CS based image reconstruction. The p -thresholding based iterative algorithm is a modification of ISTA, and minimizes non-convex functions. It has been shown that the proposed p -thresholding iterative algorithm can be used effectively to recover fully sampled image from the under-sampled data in MRI. The performance of the proposed method is verified using simulated and actual MRI data taken at St. Mary's Hospital, London. The quality of the reconstructed images is measured in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), artifact power (AP), and structural similarity index measure (SSIM). The proposed approach shows improved performance when compared to other iterative algorithms based on log thresholding, soft thresholding and hard thresholding techniques at different reduction factors.

  19. Quantitative Structure-Use Relationship Model thresholds for Model Validation, Domain of Applicability, and Candidate Alternative Selection

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This file contains value of the model training set confusion matrix, domain of applicability evaluation based on training set to predicted chemicals structural...

  20. Interactive effects between nest microclimate and nest vegetation structure confirm microclimate thresholds for Lesser Prairie-Chicken nest survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisham, Blake A.; Godar, Alixandra J.; Boal, Clint W.; Haukos, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The range of Lesser Prairie-Chickens (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) spans 4 unique ecoregions along 2 distinct environmental gradients. The Sand Shinnery Oak Prairie ecoregion of the Southern High Plains of New Mexico and Texas is environmentally isolated, warmer, and more arid than the Short-Grass, Sand Sagebrush, and Mixed-Grass Prairie ecoregions in Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, and the northeast panhandle of Texas. Weather is known to influence Lesser Prairie-Chicken nest survival in the Sand Shinnery Oak Prairie ecoregion; regional variation may also influence nest microclimate and, ultimately, survival during incubation. To address this question, we placed data loggers adjacent to nests during incubation to quantify temperature and humidity distribution functions in 3 ecoregions. We developed a suite of a priori nest survival models that incorporated derived microclimate parameters and visual obstruction as covariates in Program MARK. We monitored 49 nests in Mixed-Grass, 22 nests in Sand Shinnery Oak, and 30 nests in Short-Grass ecoregions from 2010 to 2014. Our findings indicated that (1) the Sand Shinnery Oak Prairie ecoregion was hotter and drier during incubation than the Mixed- and Short-Grass ecoregions; (2) nest microclimate varied among years within ecoregions; (3) visual obstruction was positively associated with nest survival; but (4) daily nest survival probability decreased by 10% every half-hour when temperature was greater than 34°C and vapor pressure deficit was less than −23 mmHg during the day (about 0600–2100 hours). Our major finding confirmed microclimate thresholds for nest survival under natural conditions across the species' distribution, although Lesser Prairie-Chickens are more likely to experience microclimate conditions that result in nest failures in the Sand Shinnery Oak Prairie ecoregion. The species would benefit from identification of thermal landscapes and management actions that promote cooler, more humid nest microclimates.

  1. Efimov resonances in atomic three-body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezei, J. Zs.; Papp, Z.

    2006-01-01

    In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 143201 (2005)], we reported an accumulation of three-body resonant states attached to n=2 and higher two-body thresholds. A more careful investigation revealed that there are resonances of the same kind above the n=1 threshold as well. This suggests that the resonances attached to the thresholds are Efimov resonances

  2. Structural and functional cardiac changes in myotonic dystrophy type 1: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermans Mieke CE

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (MD1 is a neuromuscular disorder with potential involvement of the heart and increased risk of sudden death. Considering the importance of cardiomyopathy as a predictor of prognosis, we aimed to systematically evaluate and describe structural and functional cardiac alterations in patients with MD1. Methods Eighty MD1 patients underwent physical examination, electrocardiography (ECG, echocardiography and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. Blood samples were taken for determination of NT-proBNP plasma levels and CTG repeat length. Results Functional and structural abnormalities were detected in 35 patients (44%. Left ventricular systolic dysfunction was found in 20 cases, left ventricular dilatation in 7 patients, and left ventricular hypertrophy in 6 patients. Myocardial fibrosis was seen in 10 patients (12.5%. In general, patients had low left ventricular mass indexes. Right ventricular involvement was uncommon and only seen together with left ventricular abnormalities. Functional or structural cardiac involvement was associated with age (p = 0.04, male gender (p Conclusions CMR can be useful to detect early structural and functional myocardial abnormalities in patients with MD1. Myocardial involvement is strongly associated with conduction abnormalities, but a normal ECG does not exclude myocardial alterations. These findings lend support to the hypothesis that MD1 patients have a complex cardiac phenotype, including both myocardial and conduction system alteration.

  3. Structural Image Analysis of the Brain in Neuropsychology Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain provides exceptional image quality for visualization and neuroanatomical classification of brain structure. A variety of image analysis techniques provide both qualitative as well as quantitative methods to relate brain structure with neuropsychological outcome and are reviewed herein. Of particular importance are more automated methods that permit analysis of a broad spectrum of anatomical measures including volume, thickness and shape. The challenge for neuropsychology is which metric to use, for which disorder and the timing of when image analysis methods are applied to assess brain structure and pathology. A basic overview is provided as to the anatomical and pathoanatomical relations of different MRI sequences in assessing normal and abnormal findings. Some interpretive guidelines are offered including factors related to similarity and symmetry of typical brain development along with size-normalcy features of brain anatomy related to function. The review concludes with a detailed example of various quantitative techniques applied to analyzing brain structure for neuropsychological outcome studies in traumatic brain injury.

  4. The structure of phosphate glass biomaterials from neutron diffraction and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickup, D M; Ahmed, I; Guerry, P; Knowles, J C; Smith, M E; Newport, R J

    2007-01-01

    Neutron diffraction and 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to probe the structure of phosphate glass biomaterials of general composition (CaO) 0.5-x (Na 2 O) x (P 2 O 5 ) 0.5 (x = 0, 0.1 and 0.5). The results suggest that all three glasses have structures based on chains of Q 2 phosphate groups. Clear structural differences are observed between the glasses containing Na 2 O and CaO. The P-O bonds to bridging and non-bridging oxygens are less well resolved in the neutron data from the samples containing CaO, suggesting a change in the nature of the bonding as the field strength of the cation increases Na + → Ca 2+ . In the (CaO) 0.5 (P 2 O 5 ) 0.5 glass most of the Ca 2+ ions are present in isolated CaO x polyhedra whereas in the (Na 2 O) 0.5 (P 2 O 5 ) 0.5 glass the NaO x polyhedra share edges leading to a Na-Na correlation. The results of the structural study are related to the properties of the (CaO) 0.4 (Na 2 O) 0.1 (P 2 O 5 ) 0.5 biomaterial

  5. Observation of Conducting Structures in Detonation Nanodiamond Powder by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binh, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Dolmatov, V. Yu.; Lapchuk, N. M.

    2018-01-01

    We have used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to study high-purity detonation nanodiamond (DND) powders at room temperature. In recording the EPR signal with g factor 2.00247 and line width 0.890 mT, with automatic frequency control locking the frequency of the microwave generator (klystron) to the frequency of the experimental cavity, we observed a change in the shape of the EPR signal from the DND powder due to formation of an anisotropic electrically conducting structure in the powder. The electrical conductivity of the DND sample is apparent in the Dysonian EPR lineshape (strongly asymmetric signal with g factor 2.00146 and line width 0.281 mT) together with an abrupt shift of the baseline at the time of resonant absorption, and in the decrease in the cavity Q due to nonresonant microwave absorption. The observed effect can be explained by transition of the DND powder from a dielectric state to a state with metallic conductivity, due to spin ordering in a preferred direction.

  6. Cardiac structure and function in Cushing's syndrome: a cardiac magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenický, Peter; Redheuil, Alban; Roux, Charles; Salenave, Sylvie; Kachenoura, Nadjia; Raissouni, Zainab; Macron, Laurent; Guignat, Laurence; Jublanc, Christel; Azarine, Arshid; Brailly, Sylvie; Young, Jacques; Mousseaux, Elie; Chanson, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Patients with Cushing's syndrome have left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and dysfunction on echocardiography, but echo-based measurements may have limited accuracy in obese patients. No data are available on right ventricular (RV) and left atrial (LA) size and function in these patients. The objective of the study was to evaluate LV, RV, and LA structure and function in patients with Cushing's syndrome by means of cardiac magnetic resonance, currently the reference modality in assessment of cardiac geometry and function. Eighteen patients with active Cushing's syndrome and 18 volunteers matched for age, sex, and body mass index were studied by cardiac magnetic resonance. The imaging was repeated in the patients 6 months (range 2-12 mo) after the treatment of hypercortisolism. Compared with controls, patients with Cushing's syndrome had lower LV, RV, and LA ejection fractions (P Cushing's syndrome is associated with subclinical biventricular and LA systolic dysfunctions that are reversible after treatment. Despite skeletal muscle atrophy, Cushing's syndrome patients have an increased LV mass, reversible upon correction of hypercortisolism.

  7. Structural changes and conductance thresholds in metal-free intrinsic SiOx resistive random access memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehonic, Adnan; Buckwell, Mark; Montesi, Luca; Garnett, Leon; Hudziak, Stephen; Kenyon, Anthony J.; Fearn, Sarah; Chater, Richard; McPhail, David

    2015-01-01

    We present an investigation of structural changes in silicon-rich silicon oxide metal-insulator-metal resistive RAM devices. The observed unipolar switching, which is intrinsic to the bulk oxide material and does not involve movement of metal ions, correlates with changes in the structure of the oxide. We use atomic force microscopy, conductive atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy to examine the structural changes occurring as a result of switching. We confirm that protrusions formed at the surface of samples during switching are bubbles, which are likely to be related to the outdiffusion of oxygen. This supports existing models for valence-change based resistive switching in oxides. In addition, we describe parallel linear and nonlinear conduction pathways and suggest that the conductance quantum, G 0 , is a natural boundary between the high and low resistance states of our devices

  8. Structural changes and conductance thresholds in metal-free intrinsic SiOx resistive random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehonic, Adnan; Buckwell, Mark; Montesi, Luca; Garnett, Leon; Hudziak, Stephen; Fearn, Sarah; Chater, Richard; McPhail, David; Kenyon, Anthony J.

    2015-03-01

    We present an investigation of structural changes in silicon-rich silicon oxide metal-insulator-metal resistive RAM devices. The observed unipolar switching, which is intrinsic to the bulk oxide material and does not involve movement of metal ions, correlates with changes in the structure of the oxide. We use atomic force microscopy, conductive atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy to examine the structural changes occurring as a result of switching. We confirm that protrusions formed at the surface of samples during switching are bubbles, which are likely to be related to the outdiffusion of oxygen. This supports existing models for valence-change based resistive switching in oxides. In addition, we describe parallel linear and nonlinear conduction pathways and suggest that the conductance quantum, G0, is a natural boundary between the high and low resistance states of our devices.

  9. Structural changes and conductance thresholds in metal-free intrinsic SiO{sub x} resistive random access memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehonic, Adnan, E-mail: a.mehonic@ee.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: t.kenyon@ucl.ac.uk; Buckwell, Mark; Montesi, Luca; Garnett, Leon; Hudziak, Stephen; Kenyon, Anthony J., E-mail: a.mehonic@ee.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: t.kenyon@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, UCL, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Fearn, Sarah; Chater, Richard; McPhail, David [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-28

    We present an investigation of structural changes in silicon-rich silicon oxide metal-insulator-metal resistive RAM devices. The observed unipolar switching, which is intrinsic to the bulk oxide material and does not involve movement of metal ions, correlates with changes in the structure of the oxide. We use atomic force microscopy, conductive atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy to examine the structural changes occurring as a result of switching. We confirm that protrusions formed at the surface of samples during switching are bubbles, which are likely to be related to the outdiffusion of oxygen. This supports existing models for valence-change based resistive switching in oxides. In addition, we describe parallel linear and nonlinear conduction pathways and suggest that the conductance quantum, G{sub 0}, is a natural boundary between the high and low resistance states of our devices.

  10. Fragment properties at the catastrophic disruption threshold: The effect of the parent body’s internal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutzi, Martin; Michel, Patrick; Benz, Willy; Richardson, Derek C.

    2010-05-01

    Numerical simulations of asteroid breakups, including both the fragmentation of the parent body and the gravitational interactions between the fragments, have allowed us to reproduce successfully the main properties of asteroid families formed in different regimes of impact energy, starting from a non-porous parent body. In this paper, using the same approach, we concentrate on a single regime of impact energy, the so-called catastrophic threshold usually designated by QD*, which results in the escape of half of the target's mass. Thanks to our recent implementation of a model of fragmentation of porous materials, we can characterize QD* for both porous and non-porous targets with a wide range of diameters. We can then analyze the potential influence of porosity on the value of QD*, and by computing the gravitational phase of the collision in the gravity regime, we can characterize the collisional outcome in terms of the fragment size and ejection speed distributions, which are the main outcome properties used by collisional models to study the evolutions of the different populations of small bodies. We also check the dependency of QD* on the impact speed of the projectile. In the strength regime, which corresponds to target sizes below a few hundreds of meters, we find that porous targets are more difficult to disrupt than non-porous ones. In the gravity regime, the outcome is controlled purely by gravity and porosity in the case of porous targets. In the case of non-porous targets, the outcome also depends on strength. Indeed, decreasing the strength of non-porous targets make them easier to disrupt in this regime, while increasing the strength of porous targets has much less influence on the value of QD*. Therefore, one cannot say that non-porous targets are systematically easier or more difficult to disrupt than porous ones, as the outcome highly depends on the assumed strength values. In the gravity regime, we also confirm that the process of gravitational

  11. Operating and mathematical representation of resonances between flow parameters oscillations and structure vibrations of NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proskuryakov, K.N.; Yang Shan Afshar, E.; Polyakov, N.I. [Nuclear Power Plant Department of Moscow Power Engineering Institute Technical Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01

    The experimental data that have been obtained from the measurements of noise signals in primary circuit of NPP with reactor of WWER-1000 are presented. The causes of resonant interaction between Eigen-Frequencies of Oscillations of the Coolant Pressure (EFOCP) and structure vibrations are discussed. An application-oriented approach to the problem of identification of abnormal phenomena of thermal-hydraulic parameters is proposed. Logarithmic Decrement {delta} is determined. The bigger damping ratio {zeta} provides bigger {delta} and correspondingly smaller values of Q-factor and amplitude X(t)max. All experimental units intended for NPP severe accident investigation must satisfy to the NPP Q-factor criterion of similarity. (authors)

  12. Operating and mathematical representation of resonances between flow parameters oscillations and structure vibrations of NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proskuryakov, K.N.; Yang Shan Afshar, E.; Polyakov, N.I.

    2007-01-01

    The experimental data that have been obtained from the measurements of noise signals in primary circuit of NPP with reactor of WWER-1000 are presented. The causes of resonant interaction between Eigen-Frequencies of Oscillations of the Coolant Pressure (EFOCP) and structure vibrations are discussed. An application-oriented approach to the problem of identification of abnormal phenomena of thermal-hydraulic parameters is proposed. Logarithmic Decrement δ is determined. The bigger damping ratio ζ provides bigger δ and correspondingly smaller values of Q-factor and amplitude X(t)max. All experimental units intended for NPP severe accident investigation must satisfy to the NPP Q-factor criterion of similarity. (authors)

  13. An FFT-accelerated fdtd scheme with exact absorbing conditions for characterizing axially symmetric resonant structures

    KAUST Repository

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn

    2011-01-01

    An accurate and efficient finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for characterizing transient waves interactions on axially symmetric structures is presented. The method achieves its accuracy and efficiency by employing localized and/or fast Fourier transform (FFT) accelerated exact absorbing conditions (EACs). The paper details the derivation of the EACs, discusses their implementation and discretization in an FDTD method, and proposes utilization of a blocked-FFT based algorithm for accelerating the computation of temporal convolutions present in nonlocal EACs. The proposed method allows transient analyses to be carried for long time intervals without any loss of accuracy and provides reliable numerical data pertinent to physical processes under resonant conditions. This renders the method highly useful in characterization of high-Q microwave radiators and energy compressors. Numerical results that demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method are presented.

  14. Assessment of higher order structure comparability in therapeutic proteins using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amezcua, Carlos A; Szabo, Christina M

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we applied nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to rapidly assess higher order structure (HOS) comparability in protein samples. Using a variation of the NMR fingerprinting approach described by Panjwani et al. [2010. J Pharm Sci 99(8):3334-3342], three nonglycosylated proteins spanning a molecular weight range of 6.5-67 kDa were analyzed. A simple statistical method termed easy comparability of HOS by NMR (ECHOS-NMR) was developed. In this method, HOS similarity between two samples is measured via the correlation coefficient derived from linear regression analysis of binned NMR spectra. Applications of this method include HOS comparability assessment during new product development, manufacturing process changes, supplier changes, next-generation products, and the development of biosimilars to name just a few. We foresee ECHOS-NMR becoming a routine technique applied to comparability exercises used to complement data from other analytical techniques. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Compact and Wide Stopband Lowpass Filter Using Open Complementary Split Ring Resonator and Defected Ground Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Karthikeyan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A compact (0.16 λg x 0.08 λg and wide stop¬band lowpass filter design using open complementary split ring resonator (OCSRR and defected ground structure (DGS is presented in this paper. Low pass filter is con-structed using two cascaded stages of OCSRR. Since the rejection bandwidth of the OCSRR is narrow, tapered dumbbell shaped DGS section is placed under the OCSRR to enhance the bandwidth. The cutoff frequency (fc of the proposed lowpass filter is 1.09 GHz. The rejection band¬width of the filter covers the entire ultra wideband spec¬trum. Hence the spurious passband suppression is achieved up to 10 fc. The designed filter has been fabri¬cated and validated by experimental results

  16. The resonating group method three cluster approach to the ground state 9 Li nucleus structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, G.F.; Pozdnyakov, Yu.A.; Terenetsky, K.O.; Verbitsky, V.P.

    1994-01-01

    The three-cluster approach for light atomic nuclei is formulated in frame of the algebraic version of resonating group method. Overlap integral and Hamiltonian matrix elements on generating functions are obtained for 9 Li nucleus. All permissible by Pauli principle 9 Li different cluster nucleon permutations were taken into account in the calculations. The results obtained can be easily generalised on any three-cluster system up to 12 C. Matrix elements obtained in the work were used in the variational calculations of the ground state energetic and geometric 9 Li characteristics. It is shown that 9 Li ground state is not adequate to the shell model limit and has pronounced three-cluster structure. (author). 16 refs., 4 tab., 2 figs

  17. Structure and dynamics of olefin radical cation aggregates. Time-resolved fluorescence detected magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desrosiers, M.F.; Trifunac, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The time-resolved EPR spectra and thus the structure and dynamics of transient hydrocarbon radical cations are obtained by the pulse radiolysis-fluorescence detected magnetic resonance (FDMR) technique. Here the authors report the observation of short-lived radical cations from olefins. FDMR-EPR spectra of radical cations from tetramethylethylene and cyclohexadiene are illustrated. The olefin radical cations, FDMR spectra are concentration-dependent, since dimerization with neutral molecules takes place at higher (>10 -2 M) olefin concentration. Rate constants for the dimerization reaction are derived and the effect of solvent viscosity on aggregate formation is demonstrated. By monitoring the further reactions of dimer cations the authors have obtained EPR evidence for previously unobserved higher-order (multimer) radical cation aggregates of olefins. 16 references, 5 figures

  18. Field-aligned plasma-potential structure formed by local electron cyclotron resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatakeyama, Rikizo; Kaneko, Toshiro; Sato, Noriyoshi

    2001-01-01

    The significance of basic experiments on field-aligned plasma-potential structure formed by local electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) is claimed based on the historical development of the investigation on electric double layer and electrostatic potential confinement of open-ended fusion-oriented plasmas. In the presence of a single ECR point in simple mirror-type configurations of magnetic field, a potential dip (thermal barrier) appears around this point, being followed by a subsequent potential hump (plug potential) along a collisionless plasma flow. The observed phenomenon gives a clear-cut physics to the formation of field-aligned plug potential with thermal barrier, which is closely related to the double layer formation triggered by a negative dip. (author)

  19. Probing the graphite band structure with resonant soft-x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlisle, J.A.; Shirley, E.L.; Hudson, E.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation offers several advantages over surface sensitive spectroscopies for probing the electronic structure of complex multi-elemental materials. Due to the long mean free path of photons in solids ({approximately}1000 {angstrom}), SXF is a bulk-sensitive probe. Also, since core levels are involved in absorption and emission, SXF is both element- and angular-momentum-selective. SXF measures the local partial density of states (DOS) projected onto each constituent element of the material. The chief limitation of SXF has been the low fluorescence yield for photon emission, particularly for light elements. However, third generation light sources, such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS), offer the high brightness that makes high-resolution SXF experiments practical. In the following the authors utilize this high brightness to demonstrate the capability of SXF to probe the band structure of a polycrystalline sample. In SXF, a valence emission spectrum results from transitions from valence band states to the core hole produced by the incident photons. In the non-resonant energy regime, the excitation energy is far above the core binding energy, and the absorption and emission events are uncoupled. The fluorescence spectrum resembles emission spectra acquired using energetic electrons, and is insensitive to the incident photon`s energy. In the resonant excitation energy regime, core electrons are excited by photons to unoccupied states just above the Fermi level (EF). The absorption and emission events are coupled, and this coupling manifests itself in several ways, depending in part on the localization of the empty electronic states in the material. Here the authors report spectral measurements from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  20. Resonant tunneling diodes based on ZnO for quantum cascade structures (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkov, Borislav; Schwarz, Benedikt; Harrer, Andreas; Ristanic, Daniela; Schrenk, Werner; Hugues, Maxime; Chauveau, Jean-Michel; Strasser, Gottfried

    2017-02-01

    The terahertz (THz) spectral range (lambda 30µm - 300µm) is also known as the "THz-gap" because of the lack of compact semiconductor devices. Various real-world applications would strongly benefit from such sources like trace-gas spectroscopy or security-screening. A crucial step is the operation of THz-emitting lasers at room temperature. But this seems out of reach with current devices, of which GaAs-based quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) seem to be the most promising ones. They are limited by the parasitic, non-optical LO-phonon transitions (36meV in GaAs), being on the same order as the thermal energy at room temperature (kT = 26meV). This can be solved by using larger LO-phonon materials like ZnO (E_LO = 72meV). But to master the fabrication of ZnO-based QC structures, a high quality epitaxial growth is crucial followed by a well-controlled fabrication process including ZnO/ZnMgO etching. We use devices grown on m-plane ZnO-substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. They are patterned by reactive ion etching in a CH4-based chemistry (CH4:H2:Ar/30:3:3 sccm) into 50μm to 150μm square mesas. Resonant tunneling diode structures are investigated in this geometry and are presented including different barrier- and well-configurations. We extract contact resistances of 8e-5 Omega cm^2 for un-annealed Ti/Au contacts and an electron mobility of above 130cm^2/Vs, both in good agreement with literature. Proving that resonant electron tunneling can be achieved in ZnO is one of the crucial building blocks of a QCL. This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 665107.

  1. Research on the Band Gap Characteristics of Two-Dimensional Phononic Crystals Microcavity with Local Resonant Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new two-dimensional locally resonant phononic crystal with microcavity structure is proposed. The acoustic wave band gap characteristics of this new structure are studied using finite element method. At the same time, the corresponding displacement eigenmodes of the band edges of the lowest band gap and the transmission spectrum are calculated. The results proved that phononic crystals with microcavity structure exhibited complete band gaps in low-frequency range. The eigenfrequency of the lower edge of the first gap is lower than no microcavity structure. However, for no microcavity structure type of quadrilateral phononic crystal plate, the second band gap disappeared and the frequency range of the first band gap is relatively narrow. The main reason for appearing low-frequency band gaps is that the proposed phononic crystal introduced the local resonant microcavity structure. This study provides a good support for engineering application such as low-frequency vibration attenuation and noise control.

  2. Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Farooqi, Rahmatullah; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-01-01

    Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates 'good' glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from 'bad' glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region

  3. Resonant laser printing of structural colors on high-index dielectric metasurfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Yan, Wei; Levy, Uriel

    2017-01-01

    -dependent resonances. Strong on-resonance energy absorption under pulsed laser irradiation locally elevates the lattice temperature (exceeding 1200 K) in an ultrashort time scale (1 ns). This forms the basis for resonant laser printing, where rapid melting allows for surface energy-driven morphology changes...

  4. Cine magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of cardiac structure and flow dynamics in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagi, Teiji; Kiyomatsu, Yumi; Ohara, Nobutoshi; Takagi, Junichi; Sato, Noboru; Kato, Hirohisa; Eto, Takaharu.

    1989-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging (Cine MRI) was performed in 20 patients aged 19 days to 13 years (mean 4.0 years), who had congenital heart disease confirmed at echocardiography or angiography. Prior to cine MRI, gated MRI was performed to evaluate for cardiac structure. Cine MRI was demonstrated by fast low fip angle shot imaging technique with a 30deg flip angle, 15 msec echo time, 30-40 msec pulse repetition time, and 128 x 128 acquisition matrix. Abnormalities of cardiac structure were extremely well defined in all patients by gated MRI. Intracardiac or intravascular blood flow were visualized in 17 (85%) of 20 patients by cine MRI. Left to right shunt flow through ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, and endocardial cushion defect were visualized with low signal intensity area. Low intensity jets flow through the site of re-coarctation of the aorta were also visualized. However, the good recording of cine MRI was not obtained because of artifacts in 3 of 20 patients (15%) who had severe congestive heart failure or respiratory arrhythmia. Gated MRI provides excellent visualization of fine structure, and cine MRI can provide high spatial resolution imaging of flow dynamic in a variety of congenital heart disease, noninvasively. (author)

  5. Quantitative methods for structural characterization of proteins based on deep UV resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashilov, Victor A; Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Popova, Ludmila A; Lednev, Igor K

    2010-09-01

    Here we report on novel quantitative approaches for protein structural characterization using deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectroscopy. Specifically, we propose a new method combining hydrogen-deuterium (HD) exchange and Bayesian source separation for extracting the DUVRR signatures of various structural elements of aggregated proteins including the cross-beta core and unordered parts of amyloid fibrils. The proposed method is demonstrated using the set of DUVRR spectra of hen egg white lysozyme acquired at various stages of HD exchange. Prior information about the concentration matrix and the spectral features of the individual components was incorporated into the Bayesian equation to eliminate the ill-conditioning of the problem caused by 100% correlation of the concentration profiles of protonated and deuterated species. Secondary structure fractions obtained by partial least squares (PLS) and least squares support vector machines (LS-SVMs) were used as the initial guess for the Bayessian source separation. Advantages of the PLS and LS-SVMs methods over the classical least squares calibration (CLSC) are discussed and illustrated using the DUVRR data of the prion protein in its native and aggregated forms. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Atomic Scale Structural Studies of Macromolecular Assemblies by Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loquet, Antoine; Tolchard, James; Berbon, Melanie; Martinez, Denis; Habenstein, Birgit

    2017-09-17

    Supramolecular protein assemblies play fundamental roles in biological processes ranging from host-pathogen interaction, viral infection to the propagation of neurodegenerative disorders. Such assemblies consist in multiple protein subunits organized in a non-covalent way to form large macromolecular objects that can execute a variety of cellular functions or cause detrimental consequences. Atomic insights into the assembly mechanisms and the functioning of those macromolecular assemblies remain often scarce since their inherent insolubility and non-crystallinity often drastically reduces the quality of the data obtained from most techniques used in structural biology, such as X-ray crystallography and solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). We here present magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy (SSNMR) as a powerful method to investigate structures of macromolecular assemblies at atomic resolution. SSNMR can reveal atomic details on the assembled complex without size and solubility limitations. The protocol presented here describes the essential steps from the production of 13 C/ 15 N isotope-labeled macromolecular protein assemblies to the acquisition of standard SSNMR spectra and their analysis and interpretation. As an example, we show the pipeline of a SSNMR structural analysis of a filamentous protein assembly.

  7. Neural correlates of emotional personality: a structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Koelsch

    Full Text Available Studies addressing brain correlates of emotional personality have remained sparse, despite the involvement of emotional personality in health and well-being. This study investigates structural and functional brain correlates of psychological and physiological measures related to emotional personality. Psychological measures included neuroticism, extraversion, and agreeableness scores, as assessed using a standard personality questionnaire. As a physiological measure we used a cardiac amplitude signature, the so-called E κ value (computed from the electrocardiogram which has previously been related to tender emotionality. Questionnaire scores and E κ values were related to both functional (eigenvector centrality mapping, ECM and structural (voxel-based morphometry, VBM neuroimaging data. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data were obtained from 22 individuals (12 females while listening to music (joy, fear, or neutral music. ECM results showed that agreeableness scores correlated with centrality values in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex, and the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens. Individuals with higher E κ values (indexing higher tender emotionality showed higher centrality values in the subiculum of the right hippocampal formation. Structural MRI data from an independent sample of 59 individuals (34 females showed that neuroticism scores correlated with volume of the left amygdaloid complex. In addition, individuals with higher E κ showed larger gray matter volume in the same portion of the subiculum in which individuals with higher E κ showed higher centrality values. Our results highlight a role of the amygdala in neuroticism. Moreover, they indicate that a cardiac signature related to emotionality (E κ correlates with both function (increased network centrality and structure (grey matter volume of the subiculum of the hippocampal formation, suggesting a role of the hippocampal formation for

  8. Neural correlates of emotional personality: a structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan; Skouras, Stavros; Jentschke, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Studies addressing brain correlates of emotional personality have remained sparse, despite the involvement of emotional personality in health and well-being. This study investigates structural and functional brain correlates of psychological and physiological measures related to emotional personality. Psychological measures included neuroticism, extraversion, and agreeableness scores, as assessed using a standard personality questionnaire. As a physiological measure we used a cardiac amplitude signature, the so-called E κ value (computed from the electrocardiogram) which has previously been related to tender emotionality. Questionnaire scores and E κ values were related to both functional (eigenvector centrality mapping, ECM) and structural (voxel-based morphometry, VBM) neuroimaging data. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were obtained from 22 individuals (12 females) while listening to music (joy, fear, or neutral music). ECM results showed that agreeableness scores correlated with centrality values in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex, and the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens). Individuals with higher E κ values (indexing higher tender emotionality) showed higher centrality values in the subiculum of the right hippocampal formation. Structural MRI data from an independent sample of 59 individuals (34 females) showed that neuroticism scores correlated with volume of the left amygdaloid complex. In addition, individuals with higher E κ showed larger gray matter volume in the same portion of the subiculum in which individuals with higher E κ showed higher centrality values. Our results highlight a role of the amygdala in neuroticism. Moreover, they indicate that a cardiac signature related to emotionality (E κ) correlates with both function (increased network centrality) and structure (grey matter volume) of the subiculum of the hippocampal formation, suggesting a role of the hippocampal formation for

  9. Tunable superconducting resonators with integrated trap structures for coupling with ultracold atomic gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferdinand, Benedikt; Wiedmaier, Dominik; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold [Physikalisches Institut and Center for Quantum Science in LISA+, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Bothner, Daniel [Physikalisches Institut and Center for Quantum Science in LISA+, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-07-01

    We intend to investigate a hybrid quantum system where ultracold atomic gases play the role of a long-living quantum memory, coupled to a superconducting qubit via a coplanar waveguide transmission line resonator. As a first step we developed a resonator chip containing a Z-shaped trapping wire for the atom trap. In order to suppress parasitic resonances due to stray capacitances, and to achieve good ground connection we use hybrid superconductor - normal conductor chips. As an additional degree of freedom we add a ferroelectric capacitor making the resonators voltage-tunable. We furthermore show theoretical results on the expected coupling strength between resonator and atomic cloud.

  10. Fine structure of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance from high-resolution inelastic proton scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevchenko, A.

    2005-02-01

    In the present work the phenomenon of fine structure in the region of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in a number of heavy and medium-heavy nuclei is systematically investigated for the first time. High energy-resolution inelastic proton scattering experiments were carried out in September-October 2001 and in October 2003 at the iThemba LABS cyclotron facility in South Africa with an incident proton energy of 200 MeV. The obtained data with the energy resolution of triangle E 58 Ni, 89 Y, 90 Zr, 120 Sn, 142 Nd, 166 Er, 208 Pb), thereby establishing the global character of this phenomenon. Fine structure can be described using characteristic energy scales, appearing as a result of the decay of collective modes towards the compound nucleus through a hierarchy of couplings to complex degrees of freedom. For the extraction of the characteristic energy scales from the spectra an entropy index method and a novel technique based on the wavelet analysis are utilized. The global analysis of available data shows the presence of three groups of scales, according to their values. To the first group belong the scales with the values around and below 100 keV, which were detected in all the nuclei studied. The second group contains intermediate scales in the range of 100 keV to 1 MeV. These scales show large variations depending on the nuclear structure of the nucleus. The largest scales above 1 MeV are classified to the third group, describing the global structure of the resonance (the width). The interpretation of the observed scales is realized via the comparison with microscopic model calculations including the coupling of the initial one-particle-one-hole excitations to more complex configurations. A qualitative agreement of the experimentally observed scales with those obtained from the theoretical predictions supports the suggestion of the origin of fine structure from the coupling to the two-particle-two-hole states. However, quantitatively, large deviations are

  11. A walk along the steep neutron resonance data evaluation path

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouland, O. [CEA Cadarache (DEN/CAD/DER/SPRC/LEPh), Physics Studies Lab., 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. d' Etudes des Reacteurs

    2008-07-01

    This paper goes through some major steps of a 'resonance evaluator' work and in particular on actual tricky questions: the nature of the experimental data base, the life without R-matrix approximations, the external level gambling, the influence of level structures in observables other than cross sections, the puzzling unresolved resonance range and the disused average sub-threshold fission cross sections. (authors)

  12. Observation of a Neutral Structure near the DD[over ¯]^{*} Mass Threshold in e^{+}e^{-}→(DD[over ¯]^{*})^{0}π^{0} at sqrt[s]=4.226 and 4.257 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablikim, M; Achasov, M N; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S Chen; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, X L; Gao, X Y; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, R P; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, X Q; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kiese, P; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kühn, W; Kupsc, A; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leng, C; Li, C; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, F Y; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, H J; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X M; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, J J; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, D; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, M M; Ma, Q M; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Pan, Y; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Pettersson, J; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prasad, V; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Rosner, Ch; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, M; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, X H; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, W P; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, L J; Wu, Z; Xia, L; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, H; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, J J; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H J; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zeng, Z; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y N; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2015-11-27

    A neutral structure in the DD[over ¯]^{*} system around the DD[over ¯]^{*} mass threshold is observed with a statistical significance greater than 10σ in the processes e^{+}e^{-}→D^{+}D^{*-}π^{0}+c.c. and e^{+}e^{-}→D^{0}D[over ¯]^{*0}π^{0}+c.c. at sqrt[s]=4.226 and 4.257 GeV in the BESIII experiment. The structure is denoted as Z_{c}(3885)^{0}. Assuming the presence of a resonance, its pole mass and width are determined to be [3885.7_{-5.7}^{+4.3}(stat)±8.4(syst)]  MeV/c^{2} and [35_{-12}^{+11}(stat)±15(syst)]  MeV, respectively. The Born cross sections are measured to be σ[e^{+}e^{-}→Z_{c}(3885)^{0}π^{0},Z_{c}(3885)^{0}→DD[over ¯]^{*}]=[77±13(stat)±17(syst)]  pb at 4.226 GeV and [47±9(stat)±10(syst)]  pb at 4.257 GeV. The ratio of decay rates B[Z_{c}(3885)^{0}→D^{+}D^{*-}+c.c.]/B[Z_{c}(3885)^{0}→D^{0}D[over ¯]^{*0}+c.c.] is determined to be 0.96±0.18(stat)±0.12(syst), consistent with no isospin violation in the process, Z_{c}(3885)^{0}→DD[over ¯]^{*}.

  13. Nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation as a unique electronic, structural and thermodynamic probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alp, E. Ercan; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Toellner, Thomas S.; Zhao, Jiyong; Leu, Bogdan M.

    2012-01-01

    Discovery of Moessbauer effect in a nuclear transition was a remarkable development. It revealed how long-lived nuclear states with relatively low energies in the kiloelectron volt (keV) region can be excited without recoil. This new effect had a unique feature involving a coupling between nuclear physics and solid-state physics, both in terms of physics and sociology. Physics coupling originates from the fact that recoilless emission and absorption or resonance is only possible if the requirement that nuclei have to be bound in a lattice with quantized vibrational states is fulfilled, and that the finite electron density on the nucleus couples to nuclear degrees of freedom leading to hyperfine interactions. thus, Moessbauer spectroscopy allows peering into solid-state effects using unique nuclear transitions. Sociological aspects of this coupling had been equally startling and fruitful. The interaction between diverse scientific communities, who learned to use Moessbauer spectroscopy proved to be very valuable. For example, biologists, geologists, chemists, physics, materials scientists, and archeologists, all sharing a common spectroscopic technique, also learned to appreciate the beauty and intricacies of each other's fields. As a laboratory-based technique, Moessbauer spectroscopy matured by the end of the 1970s. Further exciting developments took place when accelerator-based techniques were employed, like synchrotron radiation or 'in-beam'Moessbauer experiments with implanted radioactive ions. More recently, two Moessbauer spectrometers on the surface of the Mars kept the technique vibrant and viable up until present time. In this chapter, the authors look into some of the unique aspects of nuclear resonance excited with synchrotron radiation as a probe of condensed matter, including magnetism, valence, vibrations, and lattice dynamics, and review the development of nuclear resonance inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) and synchrotron Moessbauer spectroscopy

  14. Controlled modification of resonant tunneling in metal-insulator-insulator-metal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrovic, I. Z.; Weerakkody, A. D.; Sedghi, N.; Ralph, J. F.; Hall, S.; Dhanak, V. R.; Luo, Z.; Beeby, S.

    2018-01-01

    We present comprehensive experimental and theoretical work on tunnel-barrier rectifiers comprising bilayer (Nb2O5/Al2O3) insulator configurations with similar (Nb/Nb) and dissimilar (Nb/Ag) metal electrodes. The electron affinity, valence band offset, and metal work function were ascertained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry, and electrical measurements on fabricated reference structures. The experimental band line-up parameters were fed into a theoretical model to predict available bound states in the Nb2O5/Al2O3 quantum well and generate tunneling probability and transmittance curves under applied bias. The onset of strong resonance in the sub-V regime was found to be controlled by a work function difference of Nb/Ag electrodes in agreement with the experimental band alignment and theoretical model. A superior low-bias asymmetry of 35 at 0.1 V and a responsivity of 5 A/W at 0.25 V were observed for the Nb/4 nm Nb2O5/1 nm Al2O3/Ag structure, sufficient to achieve a rectification of over 90% of the input alternate current terahertz signal in a rectenna device.

  15. Composition and structure of natural organic matter through advanced nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dainan Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Natural organic matter (NOM plays important roles in biological, chemical, and physical processes within the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem. Despite its importance, a clear and exhaustive knowledge on NOM chemistry still lacks. Aiming to prove that advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR techniques may contribute to fill such a gap, in this paper we reported relevant examples of its applicability to NOM components, such as biomass, deposition material, sediments, and kerogen samples. It is found that nonhydrolyzable organic carbons (NHC, chars, and polymethylene carbons are important in the investigated samples. The structure of each of the NHC fractions is similar to that of kerogens, highlighting the importance of selective preservation of NOM to the kerogen origin in the investigated aquatic ecosystems. Moreover, during the artificial maturation experiments of kerogen, the chemical and structural characteristics such as protonated aromatic, nonprotonated carbons, and aromatic cluster size play important roles in the origin and variation of nanoporosity during kerogen maturation. Graphical abstract NMR parameters of thermally stimulated kerogens

  16. Structural and functional properties of hemoglobins from unicellular organisms as revealed by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Tsuyoshi; Yeh, Syun-Ru

    2005-01-01

    Hemoglobins have been discovered in organisms from virtually all kingdoms. Their presence in unicellular organisms suggests that the gene for hemoglobin is very ancient and that the hemoglobins must have functions other than oxygen transport, in view of the fact that O2 delivery is a diffusion-controlled process in these organisms. Based on sequence alignment, three groups of hemoglobins have been characterized in unicellular organisms. The group-one hemoglobins, termed truncated hemoglobins, consist of proteins with 110-140 amino acid residues and a novel two-over-two alpha-helical sandwich motif. The group-two hemoglobins, termed flavohemoglobins, consist of a hemoglobin domain, with a classical three-over-three alpha-helical sandwich motif, and a flavin-containing reductase domain that is covalently attached to it. The group-three hemoglobins consist of myoglobin-like proteins that have high sequence homology and structural similarity to the hemoglobin domain of flavohemoglobins. In this review, recent resonance Raman studies of each group of these proteins are presented. Their implications are discussed in the context of the structural and functional properties of these novel hemoglobins.

  17. Waveguide resonance mode response of stacked structures of metallic sub-wavelength slit arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Yasunori; Takano, Keisuke; Sakaguchi, Koichiro; Kato, Kosaku; Nakajima, Makoto; Akiyama, Koichi

    2018-05-01

    Detailed measurements of the optical properties of two-tier systems composed of metallic plates perforated with periodic sub-wavelength slit patterns were carried out using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. We demonstrate that the transmission properties observed experimentally for various configurations can be reproduced successfully by simulations based on the finite-differential time-domain method. Fabry-Perot-like waveguide resonance mode behaviors specific to this quasi-dielectric system were then investigated. For structures with no lateral displacement between the slit-array plates, mode disappearance phenomena, which are caused by destructive interference between the odd-order mode and the blue- or red-shifted even-order modes, were observed experimentally. The uncommon behavior of the even-order modes was examined precisely to explain the slit-width dependence. For structures with half-pitched displacement between the plates, extraordinarily strong transmission was observed experimentally, even when the optical paths were shut off. This result was interpreted in terms of the propagation of surface plasmon polaritons through very thin and labyrinthine spacings that inevitably exist between the metallic plates. Furthermore, the optical mode disappearance phenomena are revealed to be characterized by anticrossing of the two mixing modes formed by even- and odd-order modes. These experimental observations that are supported theoretically are indispensable to the practical use of this type of artificial dielectric and are expected to encourage interest in optical mode behaviors that are not typically observed in conventional dielectric systems.

  18. CARA Risk Assessment Thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejduk, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Warning remediation threshold (Red threshold): Pc level at which warnings are issued, and active remediation considered and usually executed. Analysis threshold (Green to Yellow threshold): Pc level at which analysis of event is indicated, including seeking additional information if warranted. Post-remediation threshold: Pc level to which remediation maneuvers are sized in order to achieve event remediation and obviate any need for immediate follow-up maneuvers. Maneuver screening threshold: Pc compliance level for routine maneuver screenings (more demanding than regular Red threshold due to additional maneuver uncertainty).

  19. Possible seismogenic origin of changes in the ULF EM resonant structure observed at Teoloyucan geomagnetic station, Mexico, 1999-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kotsarenko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the ULF resonant structure observed at Teoloyucan geomagnetic station has been provisionally studied in a possible relation with seismic activity in Mexico in the period 1999-2001. Two resonant lines were observed in the H-component (linear polarization in the frequency bands fR2=10.2–11.1 mHz and fR2=13.6–14.5 mHz, sometimes accompanied by other harmonics. The source of the observed resonances is possibly related with the geomagnetic location of the station (geomagnetic latitude λ=29.1° and its proximity to the equatorial electrojet (λ~30°. An enhancement of the carrier frequency of both resonances in the period 1 month–2 weeks was found before the strongest EQs. Also, a depression of the resonant structure just a few days before and a few days after some EQs seems to be correlated with seismic activity.

  20. Age-related normal structural and functional ventricular values in cardiac function assessed by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiechter, Michael; Gaemperli, Oliver; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Fuchs, Tobias A; Gebhard, Catherine; Stehli, Julia; Klaeser, Bernd; Stähli, Barbara E; Manka, Robert; Manes, Costantina; Tanner, Felix C

    2013-01-01

    The heart is subject to structural and functional changes with advancing age. However, the magnitude of cardiac age-dependent transformation has not been conclusively elucidated. This retrospective cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) study included 183 subjects with normal structural and functional ventricular values. End systolic volume (ESV), end diastolic volume (EDV), and ejection fraction (EF) were obtained from the left and the right ventricle in breath-hold cine CMR. Patients were classified into four age groups (20–29, 30–49, 50–69, and ≥70 years) and cardiac measurements were compared using Pearson’s rank correlation over the four different groups. With advanced age a slight but significant decrease in ESV (r=−0.41 for both ventricles, P<0.001) and EDV (r=−0.39 for left ventricle, r=−0.35 for right ventricle, P<0.001) were observed associated with a significant increase in left (r=0.28, P<0.001) and right (r=0.27, P<0.01) ventricular EF reaching a maximal increase in EF of +8.4% (P<0.001) for the left and +6.1% (P<0.01) for the right ventricle in the oldest compared to the youngest patient group. Left ventricular myocardial mass significantly decreased over the four different age groups (P<0.05). The aging process is associated with significant changes in left and right ventricular EF, ESV and EDV in subjects with no cardiac functional and structural abnormalities. These findings underline the importance of using age adapted values as standard of reference when evaluating CMR studies

  1. Enhanced Sensitivity of Anti-Symmetrically Structured Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors with Zinc Oxide Intermediate Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan-Fu Chiu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel design wherein high-refractive-index zinc oxide (ZnO intermediary layers are used in anti-symmetrically structured surface plasmon resonance (SPR devices to enhance signal quality and improve the full width at half maximum (FWHM of the SPR reflectivity curve. The surface plasmon (SP modes of the ZnO intermediary layer were excited by irradiating both sides of the Au film, thus inducing a high electric field at the Au/ZnO interface. We demonstrated that an improvement in the ZnO (002 crystal orientation led to a decrease in the FWHM of the SPR reflectivity curves. We optimized the design of ZnO thin films using different parameters and performed analytical comparisons of the ZnO with conventional chromium (Cr and indium tin oxide (ITO intermediary layers. The present study is based on application of the Fresnel equation, which provides an explanation and verification for the observed narrow SPR reflectivity curve and optical transmittance spectra exhibited by (ZnO/Au, (Cr/Au, and (ITO/Au devices. On exposure to ethanol, the anti-symmetrically structured showed a huge electric field at the Au/ZnO interface and a 2-fold decrease in the FWHM value and a 1.3-fold larger shift in angle interrogation and a 4.5-fold high-sensitivity shift in intensity interrogation. The anti-symmetrically structured of ZnO intermediate layers exhibited a wider linearity range and much higher sensitivity. It also exhibited a good linear relationship between the incident angle and ethanol concentration in the tested range. Thus, we demonstrated a novel and simple method for fabricating high-sensitivity, high-resolution SPR biosensors that provide high accuracy and precision over relevant ranges of analyte measurement.

  2. A numerical study of threshold states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ata, M.S.; Grama, C.; Grama, N.; Hategan, C.

    1979-01-01

    There are some experimental evidences of charged particle threshold states. On the statistical background of levels, some simple structures were observed in excitation spectrum. They occur near the coulombian threshold and have a large reduced width for the decay in the threshold channel. These states were identified as charged cluster threshold states. Such threshold states were observed in sup(15,16,17,18)O, sup(18,19)F, sup(19,20)Ne, sup(24)Mg, sup(32)S. The types of clusters involved were d, t, 3 He, α and even 12 C. They were observed in heavy-ions transfer reactions in the residual nucleus as strong excited levels. The charged particle threshold states occur as simple structures at high excitation energy. They could be interesting both from nuclear structure as well as nuclear reaction mechanism point of view. They could be excited as simple structures both in compound and residual nucleus. (author)

  3. Peripheral collisions of heavy ions induced by 40Ar at intermediate energies: giant resonance high energy structures and projectile fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, Y.

    1987-09-01

    The results obtained in similar studies at low incident energies are first of all reviewed. The time of flight spectrometer built for the experiments is then described. A study of the properties of the projectile-like fragments shows numerous deviations from the relativistic energy fragmentation model. Evidence for a strong surface transfer reaction component is given and the persistence of mean field effects at intermediate energies is stressed. A calculation of the contribution of the transfer evaporation mechanism to the inelastic spectra shows that this mechanism is responible for the major part of the background measured at high excitation energy and can in some cases induce narrow structures in the spectra. The inelastic spectra shows a strong excitation of the giant quadrupole resonance. In the region between 20 and 80 MeV excitation energy narrow structures are present for all the studied systems. Statistical and Fourier analysises allow to quantify the probabilities of existence, the widths and the excitation energies of these structures. A transfer evaporation hypothesis cannot consistently reproduce all the observed structures. The excitation energies of the structures can be well described by phenomenological laws where the energies are proportional to the -1/3 power of the target mass. Complete calculations of the excitation probabilities of giant resonances and multiphonon states are performed within a model where the nuclear excitation are calculated microscopically in the Random Phase Approximation. It is shown that a possible interpretation of the structures is the excitation of multiphonon states built with 2 + giant resonances [fr

  4. Investigation of Structural Re-ordering of Hydrogen Bonds in LiNbO3:Mg Crystals Around the Threshold Concentration of Magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorov, N. V.; Teplyakova, N. A.; Palatnikov, M. N.; Bobreva, L. A.

    2017-09-01

    Crystals of LiNbO3congr and LiNbO3:Mg (0.19-5.91 mole %) were studied by IR and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that the intensities of the bands corresponding to the stretching vibrations of the OH groups in the IR spectra of LiNbO3:Mg crystals change and components of the bands disappear with increase of the Mg content. This was explained by disappearance of the OH groups close to {Nb}_{Li}^{4+}-{V}_{Li}- defects as a result of displacement of NbLi defects by Mg cations. In the Raman spectra of the LiNbO3:Mg (5.1 mole %) compared with the congruent crystal the lines corresponding to the vibrations of oxygen atoms in the oxygen octahedra and the stretching bridge vibrations of the oxygen atoms along the polar axis become broader, and new low-intensity lines that may correspond to pseudoscalar vibrations of A2-type symmetry also appear. The broadening of the lines is due to deformation of the oxygen octahedra caused both by increase of the Mg content in the crystal structure and by change in the localization of the protons. Suppression of the photorefraction effect in the LiNbO3:Mg crystals with Mg contents above the threshold level can be explained by change in the localization of the protons in the structure and by screening of the space charge field.

  5. The Cannabis Abuse Screening Test and the DSM-5 in the general population: Optimal thresholds and underlying common structure using multiple factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleye, Stéphane

    2017-11-10

    The Cannabis Abuse Screening Test (CAST) aims at screening the problematic use of cannabis. It has never been validated against the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-5 and its relationships with this latter have never been studied. We used a probabilistic telephone survey collected in 2014 (1351 past-year cannabis users aged 15-64) implementing the CAST and a DSM-5 adaptation of the Munich Composite International Diagnostic Interview assessing cannabis use disorders. Data were weighted, and CAST items were considered categorical. Factorial structures were assessed with confirmatory factor analyses; the relationships between the instruments were studied with multiple factor analysis (MFA). One factor for the DSM-5 and two correlated factors for the CAST were the best confirmatory factor analyses solutions. The CAST thresholds for screening moderate/severe and severe cannabis use disorders were 5 (sensitivity = 78.2% and specificity = 79.6%) and 8 (sensitivity = 86.0% and specificity = 86.7%), respectively. The MFA identified two orthogonal dimensions: The first was equally shared by both instruments; the second was the second CAST dimension (extreme frequencies of use before midday and alone, memory problems, and reproaches from friends/family). The CAST structure and screening properties were confirmed. The MFA explains its screening performances by its first dimension and identified the problematic patterns (the second dimension) that are not captured by the DSM-5. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Prediction of Individual Response to Electroconvulsive Therapy via Machine Learning on Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlich, Ronny; Opel, Nils; Grotegerd, Dominik; Dohm, Katharina; Zaremba, Dario; Bürger, Christian; Münker, Sandra; Mühlmann, Lisa; Wahl, Patricia; Heindel, Walter; Arolt, Volker; Alferink, Judith; Zwanzger, Peter; Zavorotnyy, Maxim; Kugel, Harald; Dannlowski, Udo

    2016-06-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most effective treatments for severe depression. However, biomarkers that accurately predict a response to ECT remain unidentified. To investigate whether certain factors identified by structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are able to predict ECT response. In this nonrandomized prospective study, gray matter structure was assessed twice at approximately 6 weeks apart using 3-T MRI and voxel-based morphometry. Patients were recruited through the inpatient service of the Department of Psychiatry, University of Muenster, from March 11, 2010, to March 27, 2015. Two patient groups with acute major depressive disorder were included. One group received an ECT series in addition to antidepressants (n = 24); a comparison sample was treated solely with antidepressants (n = 23). Both groups were compared with a sample of healthy control participants (n = 21). Binary pattern classification was used to predict ECT response by structural MRI that was performed before treatment. In addition, univariate analysis was conducted to predict reduction of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score by pretreatment gray matter volumes and to investigate ECT-related structural changes. One participant in the ECT sample was excluded from the analysis, leaving 67 participants (27 men and 40 women; mean [SD] age, 43.7 [10.6] years). The binary pattern classification yielded a successful prediction of ECT response, with accuracy rates of 78.3% (18 of 23 patients in the ECT sample) and sensitivity rates of 100% (13 of 13 who responded to ECT). Furthermore, a support vector regression yielded a significant prediction of relative reduction in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score. The principal findings of the univariate model indicated a positive association between pretreatment subgenual cingulate volume and individual ECT response (Montreal Neurological Institute [MNI] coordinates x = 8, y = 21, z = -18

  7. Thickness-dependent surface plasmon resonance of ITO nanoparticles for ITO/In-Sn bilayer structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wenzuo; Hong, Ruijin; Jing, Ming; Shao, Wen; Tao, Chunxian; Zhang, Dawei

    2018-01-05

    Tuning the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in doped semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs), which represents an important characteristic in LSPR sensor applications, still remains a challenge. Here, indium tin oxide/indium tin alloy (ITO/In-Sn) bilayer films were deposited by electron beam evaporation and the properties, such as the LSPR and surface morphology, were investigated by UV-VIS-NIR double beam spectrophotometer and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. By simply engineering the thickness of ITO/In-Sn NPs without any microstructure fabrications, the LSPR wavelength of ITO NPs can be tuned by a large amount from 858 to 1758 nm. AFM images show that the strong LSPR of ITO NPs is closely related to the enhanced coupling between ITO and In-Sn NPs. Blue shifts of ITO LSPR from 1256 to 1104 nm are also observed in the as-annealed samples due to the higher free carrier concentration. Meanwhile, we also demonstrated that the ITO LSPR in ITO/In-Sn NPs structures has good sensitivity to the surrounding media and stability after 30 d exposure in air, enabling its application prospects in many biosensing devices.

  8. Approaching Resonant Absorption of Environmental Xenobiotics Harmonic Oscillation by Linear Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia A. Bulucea

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several decades, it has become increasingly accepted that the term xenobiotic relates to environmental impact, since environmental xenobiotics are understood to be substances foreign to a biological system, which did not exist in nature before their synthesis by humans. In this context, xenobiotics are persistent pollutants such as dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls, as well as plastics and pesticides. Dangerous and unstable situations can result from the presence of environmental xenobiotics since their harmful effects on humans and ecosystems are often unpredictable. For instance, the immune system is extremely vulnerable and sensitive to modulation by environmental xenobitics. Various experimental assays could be performed to ascertain the immunotoxic potential of environmental xenobiotics, taking into account genetic factors, the route of xenobiotic penetration, and the amount and duration of exposure, as well as the wave shape of the xenobiotic. In this paper, we propose an approach for the analysis of xenobiotic metabolism using mathematical models and corresponding methods. This study focuses on a pattern depicting mathematically modeled processes of resonant absorption of a xenobiotic harmonic oscillation by an organism modulated as an absorbing oscillator structure. We represent the xenobiotic concentration degree through a spatial concentration vector, and we model and simulate the oscillating regime of environmental xenobiotic absorption. It is anticipated that the results could be used to facilitate the assessment of the processes of environmental xenobiotic absorption, distribution, biotransformation and removal within the framework of compartmental analysis, by establishing appropriate mathematical models and simulations.

  9. Hyperfine structure analysis in magnetic resonance spectroscopy: from astrophysical measurements towards endogenous biosensors in human tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA

    2007-01-01

    The hyperfine interaction of two spins is a well studied effect in atomic systems. Magnetic resonance experiments demonstrate that the detectable dipole transitions are determined by the magnetic moments of the constituents and the external magnetic field. Transferring the corresponding quantum mechanics to molecular bound nuclear spins allows for precise prediction of NMR spectra obtained from metabolites in human tissue. This molecular hyperfine structure has been neglected so far in in vivo NMR spectroscopy but contains useful information, especially when studying molecular dynamics. This contribution represents a review of the concept of applying the Breit-Rabi formalism to coupled nuclear spins and discusses the immobilization of different metabolites in anisotropic tissue revealed by 1H NMR spectra of carnosine, phosphocreatine and taurine. Comparison of atomic and molecular spin systems allows for statements on the biological constraints for direct spin-spin interactions. Moreover, the relevance of hyperfine effects on the line shapes of multiplets of indirectly-coupled spin systems with more than two constituents can be predicted by analyzing quantum mechanical parameters. As an example, the superposition of eigenstates of the AMX system of adenosine 5'-triphosphate and its application for better quantification of 31P-NMR spectra will be discussed. (orig.)

  10. [Hyperfine structure analysis in magnetic resonance spectroscopy: from astrophysical measurements towards endogenous biosensors in human tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Leif

    2007-01-01

    The hyperfine interaction of two spins is a well studied effect in atomic systems. Magnetic resonance experiments demonstrate that the detectable dipole transitions are determined by the magnetic moments of the constituents and the external magnetic field. Transferring the corresponding quantum mechanics to molecular bound nuclear spins allows for precise prediction of NMR spectra obtained from metabolites in human tissue. This molecular hyperfine structure has been neglected so far in in vivo NMR spectroscopy but contains useful information, especially when studying molecular dynamics. This contribution represents a review of the concept of applying the Breit-Rabi formalism to coupled nuclear spins and discusses the immobilization of different metabolites in anisotropic tissue revealed by 1H NMR spectra of carnosine, phosphocreatine and taurine. Comparison of atomic and molecular spin systems allows for statements on the biological constraints for direct spin-spin interactions. Moreover, the relevance of hyperfine effects on the line shapes of multiplets of indirectly-coupled spin systems with more than two constituents can be predicted by analyzing quantum mechanical parameters. As an example, the superposition of eigenstates of the A MX system of adenosine 5'-triphosphate and its application for better quantification of 31P-NMR spectra will be discussed.

  11. Automated Quality Assessment of Structural Magnetic Resonance Brain Images Based on a Supervised Machine Learning Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Andres Pizarro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D-MRI is being increasingly used to delineate morphological changes underlying neuropsychiatric disorders. Unfortunately, artifacts frequently compromise the utility of 3D-MRI yielding irreproducible results, from both type I and type II errors. It is therefore critical to screen 3D-MRIs for artifacts before use. Currently, quality assessment involves slice-wise visual inspection of 3D-MRI volumes, a procedure that is both subjective and time consuming. Automating the quality rating of 3D-MRI could improve the efficiency and reproducibility of the procedure. The present study is one of the first efforts to apply a support vector machine (SVM algorithm in the quality assessment of structural brain images, using global and region of interest (ROI automated image quality features developed in-house. SVM is a supervised machine-learning algorithm that can predict the category of test datasets based on the knowledge acquired from a learning dataset. The performance (accuracy of the automated SVM approach was assessed, by comparing the SVM-predicted quality labels to investigator-determined quality labels. The accuracy for classifying 1457 3D-MRI volumes from our database using the SVM approach is around 80%. These results are promising and illustrate the possibility of using SVM as an automated quality assessment tool for 3D-MRI.

  12. Automated Quality Assessment of Structural Magnetic Resonance Brain Images Based on a Supervised Machine Learning Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Ricardo A; Cheng, Xi; Barnett, Alan; Lemaitre, Herve; Verchinski, Beth A; Goldman, Aaron L; Xiao, Ena; Luo, Qian; Berman, Karen F; Callicott, Joseph H; Weinberger, Daniel R; Mattay, Venkata S

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D-MRI) is being increasingly used to delineate morphological changes underlying neuropsychiatric disorders. Unfortunately, artifacts frequently compromise the utility of 3D-MRI yielding irreproducible results, from both type I and type II errors. It is therefore critical to screen 3D-MRIs for artifacts before use. Currently, quality assessment involves slice-wise visual inspection of 3D-MRI volumes, a procedure that is both subjective and time consuming. Automating the quality rating of 3D-MRI could improve the efficiency and reproducibility of the procedure. The present study is one of the first efforts to apply a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm in the quality assessment of structural brain images, using global and region of interest (ROI) automated image quality features developed in-house. SVM is a supervised machine-learning algorithm that can predict the category of test datasets based on the knowledge acquired from a learning dataset. The performance (accuracy) of the automated SVM approach was assessed, by comparing the SVM-predicted quality labels to investigator-determined quality labels. The accuracy for classifying 1457 3D-MRI volumes from our database using the SVM approach is around 80%. These results are promising and illustrate the possibility of using SVM as an automated quality assessment tool for 3D-MRI.

  13. Spin resonance in the new-structure-type iron-based superconductor CaKFe4As4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Kazuki; Ishikado, Motoyuki; Nagai, Yuki; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Christianson, Andrew D.; Murai, Naoki; Kawashima, Kenji; Yoshida, Yoshiyuki; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Iyo, Akira

    2017-01-01

    The dynamical spin susceptibility in the new-structure-type iron-based superconductor CaKFe 4 As 4 was investigated by using a combination of inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements and random phase approximation (RPA) calculations. Powder INS measurements show that the spin resonance at Q res = 1.17(1) Å -1 , corresponding to the (π, π) nesting wave vector in tetragonal notation, evolves below T c . The characteristic energy of the spin resonance E res = 12.5 meV is smaller than twice the size of the superconducting gap (2Δ). The broad energy feature of the dynamical susceptibility of the spin resonance can be explained by the RPA calculations, in which the different superconducting gaps on different Fermi surfaces are taken into account. Our INS and PRA studies demonstrate that the superconducting pairing nature in CaKFe 4 As 4 is the s ± symmetry. (author)

  14. Seismic response of the geologic structure underlying the Roman Colosseum and a 2-D resonance of a sediment valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Labak

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The seismic response of the geologic structure beneath the Colosseum is investigated using a two-dimensional modeling for a vertically incident plane SH wave. Computations indicate that the southern part of the Colosseum may be exposed to a seismic ground motion with significantly larger amplitudes, differential motion and longer duration than the northern part. because the southern part of the Colosseum is underlain by a sedimentfilled valley created by sedimentary filling of the former tributary of the River Tiber. A 2-D resonance may develop in the valley. Unlike the previous theoretical studies on 2-D resonance in sediment-filled valleys, an effect of heterogeneous valley surroundings on the resonance is partly investigated. A very small sensitivity of the maximum spectral amplifications connected with the fundamental and first higher modes to the presence of a horizontal surface layer (with an intermediate velocity in the valley surroundings is observed in the studied models.

  15. Testing the tetraquark structure for the X resonances in the low-lying region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hungchong [Kookmin University, Department of General Education, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K.S. [Korea Aerospace University, School of Liberal Arts and Science, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Cheoun, Myung-Ki [Soongsil University, Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jido, Daisuke [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Physics, Hachioji, Tokyo (Japan); Oka, Makoto [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Meguro (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Advanced Science Research Center, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2016-07-15

    Assuming the four-quark structure for the X resonances in the low-lying region, we calculate their masses using the color-spin interaction. Specifically, the hyperfine masses of the color-spin interaction are calculated for the possible states in spin-0, spin-1, spin-2 channels. The two states in spin-0 channel as well as the two states in spin-1 channel are diagonalized in order to generate the physical hyperfine masses. By matching the difference in hyperfine masses with the splitting in corresponding hadron masses and using the X(3872) mass as an input, we estimate the masses corresponding to the states J{sup PC} = 0{sup ++}, 1{sup +-}, 2{sup ++}. We find that the masses of two states in 1{sup +-} are close to those of X(3823), X(3900), and the mass of the 2{sup ++} state is close to that of X(3940). For them, the discrepancies are about ∝ 10 MeV. This may suggest that the quantum numbers of the controversial states are X(3823) = 1{sup +-}, X(3900) = 1{sup +-}, X(3940) = 2{sup ++}. In this work, we use the same inputs parameters, the constituent quark masses and the strength of the color-spin interaction, that have been adopted in the previous work on the D- or B-meson excited states. There, it was shown that the four-quark structure can be manifested in their excited states. Thus, our results in this work provide a consistent treatment on open- and hidden-charm mesons as far as the four-quark model is concerned. (orig.)

  16. Generate floor response spectra, Part 2: Response spectra for equipment-structure resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Bo; Jiang, Wei; Xie, Wei-Chau; Pandey, Mahesh D.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The concept of tRS is proposed to deal with tuning of equipment and structures. • Established statistical approaches for estimating tRS corresponding to given GRS. • Derived a new modal combination rule from the theory of random vibration. • Developed efficient and accurate direct method for generating floor response spectra. - Abstract: When generating floor response spectra (FRS) using the direct spectra-to-spectra method developed in the companion paper, probability distribution of t-response spectrum (tRS), which deals with equipment-structure resonance or tuning, corresponding to a specified ground response spectrum (GRS) is required. In this paper, simulation results using a large number of horizontal and vertical ground motions are employed to establish statistical relationships between tRS and GRS. It is observed that the influence of site conditions on horizontal statistical relationships is negligible, whereas the effect of site conditions on vertical statistical relationships cannot be ignored. Considering the influence of site conditions, horizontal statistical relationship suitable for all site conditions and vertical statistical relationships suitable for hard sites and soft sites, respectively, are established. The horizontal and vertical statistical relationships are suitable to estimate tRS for design spectra in USNRC R.G. 1.60 and NUREG/CR-0098, Uniform Hazard Spectra (UHS) in Western North America (WNA), or any GRS falling inside the valid coverage of the statistical relationship. For UHS with significant high frequency spectral accelerations, such as UHS in Central and Eastern North America (CENA), an amplification ratio method is proposed to estimate tRS. Numerical examples demonstrate that the statistical relationships and the amplification ratio method are acceptable to estimate tRS for given GRS and to generate FRS using the direct method in different practical situations.

  17. Generate floor response spectra, Part 2: Response spectra for equipment-structure resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bo, E-mail: b68li@uwaterloo.ca; Jiang, Wei, E-mail: w46jiang@uwaterloo.ca; Xie, Wei-Chau, E-mail: xie@uwaterloo.ca; Pandey, Mahesh D., E-mail: mdpandey@uwaterloo.ca

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • The concept of tRS is proposed to deal with tuning of equipment and structures. • Established statistical approaches for estimating tRS corresponding to given GRS. • Derived a new modal combination rule from the theory of random vibration. • Developed efficient and accurate direct method for generating floor response spectra. - Abstract: When generating floor response spectra (FRS) using the direct spectra-to-spectra method developed in the companion paper, probability distribution of t-response spectrum (tRS), which deals with equipment-structure resonance or tuning, corresponding to a specified ground response spectrum (GRS) is required. In this paper, simulation results using a large number of horizontal and vertical ground motions are employed to establish statistical relationships between tRS and GRS. It is observed that the influence of site conditions on horizontal statistical relationships is negligible, whereas the effect of site conditions on vertical statistical relationships cannot be ignored. Considering the influence of site conditions, horizontal statistical relationship suitable for all site conditions and vertical statistical relationships suitable for hard sites and soft sites, respectively, are established. The horizontal and vertical statistical relationships are suitable to estimate tRS for design spectra in USNRC R.G. 1.60 and NUREG/CR-0098, Uniform Hazard Spectra (UHS) in Western North America (WNA), or any GRS falling inside the valid coverage of the statistical relationship. For UHS with significant high frequency spectral accelerations, such as UHS in Central and Eastern North America (CENA), an amplification ratio method is proposed to estimate tRS. Numerical examples demonstrate that the statistical relationships and the amplification ratio method are acceptable to estimate tRS for given GRS and to generate FRS using the direct method in different practical situations.

  18. Threshold quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Okamoto, Tatsuaki; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept of threshold collaborative unitary transformation or threshold quantum cryptography, which is a kind of quantum version of threshold cryptography. Threshold quantum cryptography states that classical shared secrets are distributed to several parties and a subset of them, whose number is greater than a threshold, collaborates to compute a quantum cryptographic function, while keeping each share secretly inside each party. The shared secrets are reusable if no cheating is detected. As a concrete example of this concept, we show a distributed protocol (with threshold) of conjugate coding

  19. New WIMS library generation from ENDF/B6 and effect of resonance group structure on cell parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazirandeh, Ali; Tabesh, Alireza

    2002-01-01

    Due to inaccessibility to NJOY, steps were taken to create WIMS library, which can be extracted from ENDF/B6 without using NJOY. In addition to using preprocessing codes few programs were written to calculate integral resonance, slowing down power per unit lethargy, potential scattering, and differential scattering cross section, scattering matrices. For neutrons with energy above 4 eV, isotropic elastic scattering was assumed. For neutrons below 4 eV the free gas model was used, except for light elements, which tabulated values of S(α,β) in ENDF/B6 used. The Goldstein-Cohen factors are taken from WIMKAL88.Lib. The integral resonance with self absorption per unit lethargy was obtained from GROUPIE output. The P 1 scattering matrices are calculated only for four elements, namely H, D, C and O at 300 K. In order to examine the created libraries, k eff , δ 28 , ρ 28 , ρ 25 and CR are calculated using new WIMS library, WIMKAL88.Lib and NEA329.Lib. The results showed general agreement. The controversial issue of WIMS library group structure, particularly in resonance region has raised the question of whether the number of resonance group i.e., 13 is optimized. We generated different WIMS libraries consisting of 5, 8, 13, 18 and 23 resonance groups. The main aim was to examine the effect to resonance group structure on calculated core parameters, mainly, k eff , δ 28 , ρ 28 , ρ 25 and CR. These parameters are also calculated and compared with those obtained using WIMKAL88, and NEA329 libraries. (author)

  20. Improved algorithms for the calculation of resolved resonance cross sections with applications to the structural Doppler effect in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, R.N.; Toppel, B.J.; Henryson, H. II.

    1980-10-01

    Motivated by a need for an economical yet rigorous tool which can address the computation of the structural material Doppler effect, an extremely efficient improved RABANL capability has been developed utilizing the fact that the Doppler broadened line shape functions become essentially identical to the natural line shape functions or Lorentzian limits beyond about 100 Doppler widths from the resonance energy, or when the natural width exceeds about 200 Doppler widths. The computational efficiency has been further enhanced by preprocessing or screening a significant number of selected resonances during library preparation into composition and temperature independent smooth background cross sections. The resonances which are suitable for such pre-processing are those which are either very broad or those which are very weak. The former contribute very little to the Doppler effect and their self-shielding effect can readily be averaged into slowly varying background cross section data, while the latter contribute very little to either the Doppler or to self-shielding effects. To illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the improved RABANL algorithms and resonance screening techniques, calculations have been performed for two systems, the first with a composition typical of the STF converter region and the second typical of an LMFBR core composition. Excellent agreement has been found for RABANL compared to the reference Monte Carlo solution obtained using the code VIM, and improved results have also been obtained for the narrow resonance approximation in the ultra-fine-group option of MC 2 -2

  1. A New Wavelet Threshold Function and Denoising Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Jing-yi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the effects of denoising, this paper introduces the basic principles of wavelet threshold denoising and traditional structures threshold functions. Meanwhile, it proposes wavelet threshold function and fixed threshold formula which are both improved here. First, this paper studies the problems existing in the traditional wavelet threshold functions and introduces the adjustment factors to construct the new threshold function basis on soft threshold function. Then, it studies the fixed threshold and introduces the logarithmic function of layer number of wavelet decomposition to design the new fixed threshold formula. Finally, this paper uses hard threshold, soft threshold, Garrote threshold, and improved threshold function to denoise different signals. And the paper also calculates signal-to-noise (SNR and mean square errors (MSE of the hard threshold functions, soft thresholding functions, Garrote threshold functions, and the improved threshold function after denoising. Theoretical analysis and experimental results showed that the proposed approach could improve soft threshold functions with constant deviation and hard threshold with discontinuous function problems. The proposed approach could improve the different decomposition scales that adopt the same threshold value to deal with the noise problems, also effectively filter the noise in the signals, and improve the SNR and reduce the MSE of output signals.

  2. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradonjic, Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Percus, Allon [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muller, Tobias [EINDHOVEN UNIV. OF TECH

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  3. Localized surface plasmon polariton resonance in holographically structured Al-doped ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, David; Lowell, David; Mao, Michelle; Hassan, Safaa; Philipose, Usha [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Research and Technology, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States); Li, Li; Jiang, Yan; Cui, Jingbiao [Department of Physics and Materials Science, University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee 38152 (United States); Ding, Jun; Zhang, Hualiang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Lin, Yuankun [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Research and Technology, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    In this paper, we studied the localized surface plasmon polariton (SPP) resonance in hole arrays in transparent conducting aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO). CMOS-compatible fabrication process was demonstrated for the AZO devices. The localized SPP resonance was observed and confirmed by electromagnetic simulations. Using a standing wave model, the observed SPP was dominated by the standing-wave resonance along (1,1) direction in square lattices. This research lays the groundwork for a fabrication technique that can contribute to the core technology of future integrated photonics through its extension into tunable conductive materials.

  4. Interference of laser-induced resonances in the continuous structures of a helium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magunov, A I; Strakhova, S I

    2003-01-01

    Coherent effects in the interference of overlapping laser-induced resonances in helium atoms are considered. The simultaneous action of single-mode radiation of the 294-nm second harmonic of a cw dye laser and a 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser on helium atoms provides the overlap of two resonances induced by transitions from the 1s2s 1 S and 1s4s 1 S helium levels. The shape of the overlapping laser-induced resonances in the rotating-wave approximation is described by analytic expressions, which depend on the laser radiation intensities and the ratio of laser frequencies. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  5. Resonant ionization by laser beams: application to ions sources and to study the nuclear structure of radioactive tellurium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sifi, R.

    2007-07-01

    The radioactive ion beams that are produced through current isotope separators are well separated according to the A mass but not according to the Z parameter. The resonant ionization through laser beams applied to ion sources allows the production of radioactive ion beam in a very selective and efficient way by eliminating the isobaric contamination. The first chapter is dedicated to the resonant ionization by laser beams, we describe the principle, the experimental setting, the lasers used, the ionization schemes and the domain of application. The second chapter deals with the application of resonant ionization to laser ion sources for the production of radioactive ion beams. We present experimental tests performed for getting copper ion beams. Resonant ionization through laser is also used in the spectroscopy experiments performed at the Isolde (isotope separation on-line device) installation in CERN where more than 20 elements are ionized very efficiently. The technique is based on a frequency scanning around the excitation transition of the atoms in order to probe the hyperfine structure. Laser spectroscopy allows the determination of the hyperfine structure as well as the isotopic shift of atoms. In the third chapter the method is applied to the spectroscopy of tellurium atoms. First, we define the 2 parameters on which the extraction is based: charge radius and nuclear moments, then we present several theoretical models that we have used to assess our experimental results. (A.C.)

  6. Development and preliminary validation of the spondyloarthritis research consortium of Canada magnetic resonance imaging sacroiliac joint structural score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksymowych, Walter P; Wichuk, Stephanie; Chiowchanwisawakit, Praveena

    2015-01-01

    on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) SIJ Structural Score (SSS). METHODS: The SSS method for assessment of structural lesions is based on T1-weighted spin echo MRI, validated lesion definitions, slice selection according to well-defined anatomical...... in scores, and was highest for fat metaplasia when both ICC and SDC values were compared. CONCLUSION: The new SPARCC MRI SSS method can detect structural changes in the SIJ with acceptable reliability over a 1-2-year timeframe, and should be further validated in patients with SpA....

  7. Study of Canopy Structure and Growth Characters Role of Two Wheat Cultivars in Competition, on Economic Threshold and Yield of Rye and Wild Mustard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Saadatian

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the role of effective factors on competition of two wheat cultivars against two species of narrow leaf and broad leaf weeds this study was conducted as two separated experiments based on a randomized complete block design with 3 replications at Agricultural Faculty of Bu-Ali Sina University, in 2008-2009. In both Experiments, Alvand and Sayson cultivars were planted with densities of 450 plants m-2. In the 1st experiment, rye with densities of 0, 20, 40, 60 and 80 plants m-2 were planted in inter-rows of wheat. In the 2nd experiment, wild mustard densities were 0, 8, 16, 24 and 32 plants m-2. The results showed that characters such as vertical distribution of leaf area index and dry matter, height and its increase rate in interference, emergence rate, rate of canopy development and precocity led to increasing competitive ability of Alvand than Sayson in competition with two weed species. These factors were effective in reduction seed production of weeds and economic threshold in Alvand. Despite of lower height of wild mustard than rye, distribution of leaf area and canopy structure of wild mustard increased light competition ability and shadow on crop, so that harmful effects of individual plant of wild mustard in different densities was more than rye. Increasing rate of wild mustard seed bank was more than ray.

  8. Quantum-well charge and voltage distribution in a metal–insulator–semiconductor structure upon resonant electron Tunneling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vexler, M. I., E-mail: vexler@mail.ioffe.ru; Illarionov, Yu. Yu.; Grekhov, I. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-15

    The prerequisites for electron storage in the quantum well of a metal–oxide–p{sup +}-Si resonant-tunneling structure and the effect of the stored charge on the voltage distribution are theoretically investigated. Systems with SiO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}, and TiO{sub 2} insulators are studied. It is demonstrated that the occurrence of a charge in the well in the case of resonant transport can be expected in structures on substrates with an acceptor concentration from (5–6) × 10{sup 18} to (2–3) × 10{sup 19} cm{sup –3} in the range of oxide thicknesses dependent on this concentration. In particular, the oxide layer thickness in the structures with SiO{sub 2}/p{sup +}-Si(10{sup 19} cm{sup –3}) should exceed ~3 nm. The electron density in the well can reach ~10{sup 12} cm{sup –2} and higher. However, the effect of this charge on the electrostatics of the structure becomes noticeable only at relatively high voltages far above the activation of resonant transport through the first subband.

  9. Towards fully automated structure-based NMR resonance assignment of 15N-labeled proteins from automatically picked peaks

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard; Gao, Xin; Li, Ming

    2011-01-01

    In NMR resonance assignment, an indispensable step in NMR protein studies, manually processed peaks from both N-labeled and C-labeled spectra are typically used as inputs. However, the use of homologous structures can allow one to use only N-labeled NMR data and avoid the added expense of using C-labeled data. We propose a novel integer programming framework for structure-based backbone resonance assignment using N-labeled data. The core consists of a pair of integer programming models: one for spin system forming and amino acid typing, and the other for backbone resonance assignment. The goal is to perform the assignment directly from spectra without any manual intervention via automatically picked peaks, which are much noisier than manually picked peaks, so methods must be error-tolerant. In the case of semi-automated/manually processed peak data, we compare our system with the Xiong-Pandurangan-Bailey- Kellogg's contact replacement (CR) method, which is the most error-tolerant method for structure-based resonance assignment. Our system, on average, reduces the error rate of the CR method by five folds on their data set. In addition, by using an iterative algorithm, our system has the added capability of using the NOESY data to correct assignment errors due to errors in predicting the amino acid and secondary structure type of each spin system. On a publicly available data set for human ubiquitin, where the typing accuracy is 83%, we achieve 91% accuracy, compared to the 59% accuracy obtained without correcting for such errors. In the case of automatically picked peaks, using assignment information from yeast ubiquitin, we achieve a fully automatic assignment with 97% accuracy. To our knowledge, this is the first system that can achieve fully automatic structure-based assignment directly from spectra. This has implications in NMR protein mutant studies, where the assignment step is repeated for each mutant. © Copyright 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  10. Towards fully automated structure-based NMR resonance assignment of 15N-labeled proteins from automatically picked peaks

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2011-03-01

    In NMR resonance assignment, an indispensable step in NMR protein studies, manually processed peaks from both N-labeled and C-labeled spectra are typically used as inputs. However, the use of homologous structures can allow one to use only N-labeled NMR data and avoid the added expense of using C-labeled data. We propose a novel integer programming framework for structure-based backbone resonance assignment using N-labeled data. The core consists of a pair of integer programming models: one for spin system forming and amino acid typing, and the other for backbone resonance assignment. The goal is to perform the assignment directly from spectra without any manual intervention via automatically picked peaks, which are much noisier than manually picked peaks, so methods must be error-tolerant. In the case of semi-automated/manually processed peak data, we compare our system with the Xiong-Pandurangan-Bailey- Kellogg\\'s contact replacement (CR) method, which is the most error-tolerant method for structure-based resonance assignment. Our system, on average, reduces the error rate of the CR method by five folds on their data set. In addition, by using an iterative algorithm, our system has the added capability of using the NOESY data to correct assignment errors due to errors in predicting the amino acid and secondary structure type of each spin system. On a publicly available data set for human ubiquitin, where the typing accuracy is 83%, we achieve 91% accuracy, compared to the 59% accuracy obtained without correcting for such errors. In the case of automatically picked peaks, using assignment information from yeast ubiquitin, we achieve a fully automatic assignment with 97% accuracy. To our knowledge, this is the first system that can achieve fully automatic structure-based assignment directly from spectra. This has implications in NMR protein mutant studies, where the assignment step is repeated for each mutant. © Copyright 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  11. An FFT-accelerated fdtd scheme with exact absorbing conditions for characterizing axially symmetric resonant structures

    KAUST Repository

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn; Pazynin, Vadim L.; Sirenko, Yu K.; Bagci, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    under resonant conditions. This renders the method highly useful in characterization of high-Q microwave radiators and energy compressors. Numerical results that demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method are presented.

  12. A 1H nuclear magnetic resonance study of structural and organisational changes in the cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunnah, Susan K.

    2000-01-01

    Increasing importance is being placed on understanding the role of membrane lipids in many different areas of biochemistry. It is of interest to determine what interactions may occur between membrane lipids and drug species. Furthermore, an increasing body of evidence suggests that membrane lipids are involved in the pathology of numerous diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, cancer and HIV. Clearly, the more information available on the mechanisms involved in diseases, the greater the potential for identifying a cure or even a prevention. 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the alterations in membrane lipid organisation and structure in intact, viable cultured cells. Changes in the 1 H NMR spectra and the spin-lattice relaxation measurements of the human K562 and the rat FRTL-5 cell lines were observed on the addition of the fatty acid species: triolein, evening primrose oil, arachidonic acid and ITF 1779. Results indicate that the membrane lipids are reorganised to accommodate the interpolation of these molecules. The spatial arrangement adopted by each of these species appeared to dictate its effect on the lipids. Doxorubicin and menadione, both known to cause oxidative stress, were added to K562 cells. Although both agents are known to act by different mechanisms, the NMR data and scanning electron microscopy suggested that both caused similar alterations in the membrane organisation and lipid fluidity. Protrusions were formed indicating areas of weakness in the membrane. Spin-echo NMR was employed to investigate the action of the thiol-containing compounds, penicillamine, captopril and N-acetylcysteine in erythrocytes under conditions of oxidative stress. Results indicate that while captopril acts as a free radical scavenger, penicillamine may act as either oxidant or reductant. N-acetylcysteine was observed to act as a reducing agent. (author)

  13. A {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance study of structural and organisational changes in the cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunnah, Susan K

    2000-07-01

    Increasing importance is being placed on understanding the role of membrane lipids in many different areas of biochemistry. It is of interest to determine what interactions may occur between membrane lipids and drug species. Furthermore, an increasing body of evidence suggests that membrane lipids are involved in the pathology of numerous diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, cancer and HIV. Clearly, the more information available on the mechanisms involved in diseases, the greater the potential for identifying a cure or even a prevention. {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the alterations in membrane lipid organisation and structure in intact, viable cultured cells. Changes in the {sup 1}H NMR spectra and the spin-lattice relaxation measurements of the human K562 and the rat FRTL-5 cell lines were observed on the addition of the fatty acid species: triolein, evening primrose oil, arachidonic acid and ITF 1779. Results indicate that the membrane lipids are reorganised to accommodate the interpolation of these molecules. The spatial arrangement adopted by each of these species appeared to dictate its effect on the lipids. Doxorubicin and menadione, both known to cause oxidative stress, were added to K562 cells. Although both agents are known to act by different mechanisms, the NMR data and scanning electron microscopy suggested that both caused similar alterations in the membrane organisation and lipid fluidity. Protrusions were formed indicating areas of weakness in the membrane. Spin-echo NMR was employed to investigate the action of the thiol-containing compounds, penicillamine, captopril and N-acetylcysteine in erythrocytes under conditions of oxidative stress. Results indicate that while captopril acts as a free radical scavenger, penicillamine may act as either oxidant or reductant. N-acetylcysteine was observed to act as a reducing agent. (author)

  14. Structural and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Cerebellum: Considerations for Assessing Cerebellar Ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deistung, Andreas; Stefanescu, Maria R; Ernst, Thomas M; Schlamann, Marc; Ladd, Mark E; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Timmann, Dagmar

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain is of high interest for diagnosing and understanding degenerative ataxias. Here, we present state-of-the-art MRI methods to characterize structural alterations of the cerebellum and introduce initial experiments to show abnormalities in the cerebellar nuclei. Clinically, T1-weighted MR images are used to assess atrophy of the cerebellar cortex, the brainstem, and the spinal cord, whereas T2-weighted and PD-weighted images are typically employed to depict potential white matter lesions that may be associated with certain types of ataxias. More recently, attention has also focused on the characterization of the cerebellar nuclei, which are discernible on spatially highly resolved iron-sensitive MR images due to their relatively high iron content, including T2 (*)-weighted images, susceptibility-weighted images (SWI), effective transverse relaxation rate (R2 (*)) maps, and quantitative susceptibility maps (QSM). Among these iron-sensitive techniques, QSM reveals the best contrast between cerebellar nuclei and their surroundings. In particular, the gyrification of the dentate nuclei is prominently depicted, even at the clinically widely available field strength of 3 T. The linear relationship between magnetic susceptibility and local iron content allows for determination of iron deposition in cerebellar nuclei non-invasively. The increased signal-to-noise ratio of ultrahigh-field MRI (B0 ≥ 7 T) and advances in spatial normalization methods enable functional MRI (fMRI) at the level of the cerebellar cortex and cerebellar nuclei. Data from initial fMRI studies are presented in three common forms of hereditary ataxias (Friedreich's ataxia, spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6). Characteristic changes in the fMRI signal are discussed in the light of histopathological data and current knowledge of the underlying physiology of the fMRI signal in the cerebellum.

  15. Conformational states of N-acylalanine dithio esters: correlation of resonance Raman spectra with structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.; Angus, R.H.; Storer, A.C.; Varughese, K.I.; Carey, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    The conformational states of N-acylalanine dithio esters, involving rotational isomers about the RC(=O)NH-CH(CH 3 ) and NHCH(CH 3 )-C(=S) bonds, are defined and compared to those of N-acylglycine dithio esters. The structure of N-(p-nitrobenzoyl)-DL-alanine ethyl dithio ester has been determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis; it is a B-type conformer with the amide N atom cis to the thiol sulfur. Raman and resonance Raman (RR) measurements on this compound and for the B conformers of solid N-benzoyl-DL-alanine ethyl dithio ester and N-(β-phenylpropionyl)-DL-alanine ethyl dithio ester and its NHCH(CD 3 )C(=S) and NHCH(CH 3 ) 13 C(=S) analogues are used to set up a library of RR data for alanine-based dithio esters in a B-conformer state. RR data for this solid material in its isotopically unsubstituted and CH(C-D 3 )C(=S) and CH(CH 3 ) 13 C(=S) forms provide information on the RR signatures of alanine dithio esters in A-like conformations. RR spectra are compared for the solid compounds, for N-(p-nitrobenzoyl)-DL-alanine, N-(β-phenylpropionyl)-DL-alanine, and (methyloxycarbonyl)-L-phenylalanyl-DL-alanine ethyl dithio ester, and for several 13 C=S- and CD 3 -substituted analogues in CCl 4 or aqueous solutions. The RR data demonstrate that the alanine-based dithio esters take up A, B, and C 5 conformations in solution. The RR spectra of these conformers are clearly distinguishable from those for the same conformers of N-acylglycine dithio esters. However, the crystallographic and spectroscopic results show that the results show that the conformational properties of N-acylglycine and N-acylalanine dithio esters are very similar

  16. Influence of the electron cyclotron resonance plasma confinement on reducing the bremsstrahlung production of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source with metal-dielectric structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, L; Stiebing, K E; Dobrescu, S

    2009-01-01

    The influence of metal-dielectric (MD) layers (MD structures) inserted into the plasma chamber of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) onto the production of electron bremsstrahlung radiation has been studied in a series of dedicated experiments at the 14 GHz ECRIS of the Institut für Kernphysik der Universität Frankfurt. The IKF-ECRIS was equipped with a MD liner, covering the inner walls of the plasma chamber, and a MD electrode, covering the plasma-facing side of the extraction electrode. On the basis of similar extracted currents of highly charged ions, significantly reduced yields of bremsstrahlung radiation for the "MD source" as compared to the standard (stainless steel) source have been measured and can be explained by the significantly better plasma confinement in a MD source as compared to an "all stainless steel" ECRIS.

  17. Influence of the electron cyclotron resonance plasma confinement on reducing the bremsstrahlung production of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source with metal-dielectric structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schachter, L.; Dobrescu, S.; Stiebing, K. E.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of metal-dielectric (MD) layers (MD structures) inserted into the plasma chamber of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) onto the production of electron bremsstrahlung radiation has been studied in a series of dedicated experiments at the 14 GHz ECRIS of the Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet Frankfurt. The IKF-ECRIS was equipped with a MD liner, covering the inner walls of the plasma chamber, and a MD electrode, covering the plasma-facing side of the extraction electrode. On the basis of similar extracted currents of highly charged ions, significantly reduced yields of bremsstrahlung radiation for the 'MD source' as compared to the standard (stainless steel) source have been measured and can be explained by the significantly better plasma confinement in a MD source as compared to an ''all stainless steel'' ECRIS.

  18. Effect of Resonant Magnetic Perturbations on secondary structures in Drift-Wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leconte, Michael

    2011-10-01

    In this work, we study the effects of RMPs on turbulence, flows and confinement, in the framework of two paradigmatic models, resistive ballooning and resistive drift waves. For resistive ballooning turbulence, we use 3D global numerical simulations, including RMP fields and (externally-imposed) sheared rotation profile. Without RMPs, relaxation oscillations of the pressure profile occur. With RMPs, results show that long-lived convection cells are generated by the combined effects of pressure modulation and toroidal curvature coupling. These modify the global structure of the turbulence and eliminate relaxation oscillations. This effect is due mainly to a modification of the pressure profile linked to the presence of residual magnetic island chains. Hence convection-cell generation increases for increasing δBr/B0. For RMP effect on zonal flows in drift wave turbulence, we extend the Hasegawa-Wakatani model to include RMP fields. The effect of the RMPs is to induce a linear coupling between the zonal electric field and the zonal density gradient, which drives the system to a state of electron radial force balance for large δBr/B0. Both the vorticity flux (Reynolds stress), and particle flux are modulated. We derive an extended predator prey model which couples zonal potential and density dynamics to the evolution of turbulence intensity. This model has both turbulence drive and RMP amplitude as control parameters, and predicts a novel type of transport bifurcation in the presence of RMPs. We find a novel set of system states that are similar to the Hmode-like state of the standard predator-prey model, but for which the power threshold is now a function of the RMP strength. For small RMP amplitude and low collisionality, both the ambient turbulence and zonal flow energy increase with δBr/B0. For larger RMP strength, the turbulence energy increases, but the energy of zonal flows decreases with δBr/B0, corresponding to a damping of zonal flows. At high

  19. Determination of retinal chromophore structure in bacteriorhodopsin with resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S O; Lugtenburg, J; Mathies, R A

    1985-01-01

    The analysis of the vibrational spectrum of the retinal chromophore in bacteriorhodopsin with isotopic derivatives provides a powerful "structural dictionary" for the translation of vibrational frequencies and intensities into structural information. Of importance for the proton-pumping mechanism is the unambiguous determination of the configuration about the C13=C14 and C=N bonds, and the protonation state of the Schiff base nitrogen. Vibrational studies have shown that in light-adapted BR568 the Schiff base nitrogen is protonated and both the C13=C14 and C=N bonds are in a trans geometry. The formation of K625 involves the photochemical isomerization about only the C13=C14 bond which displaces the Schiff base proton into a different protein environment. Subsequent Schiff base deprotonation produces the M412 intermediate. Thermal reisomerization of the C13=C14 bond and reprotonation of the Schiff base occur in the M412------O640 transition, resetting the proton-pumping mechanism. The vibrational spectra can also be used to examine the conformation about the C--C single bonds. The frequency of the C14--C15 stretching vibration in BR568, K625, L550 and O640 argues that the C14--C15 conformation in these intermediates is s-trans. Conformational distortions of the chromophore have been identified in K625 and O640 through the observation of intense hydrogen out-of-plane wagging vibrations in the Raman spectra (see Fig. 2). These two intermediates are the direct products of chromophore isomerization. Thus it appears that following isomerization in a tight protein binding pocket, the chromophore cannot easily relax to a planar geometry. The analogous observation of intense hydrogen out-of-plane modes in the primary photoproduct in vision (Eyring et al., 1982) suggests that this may be a general phenomenon in protein-bound isomerizations. Future resonance Raman studies should provide even more details on how bacterio-opsin and retinal act in concert to produce an

  20. Using Functional or Structural Magnetic Resonance Images and Personal Characteristic Data to Identify ADHD and Autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Ghiassian

    Full Text Available A clinical tool that can diagnose psychiatric illness using functional or structural magnetic resonance (MR brain images has the potential to greatly assist physicians and improve treatment efficacy. Working toward the goal of automated diagnosis, we propose an approach for automated classification of ADHD and autism based on histogram of oriented gradients (HOG features extracted from MR brain images, as well as personal characteristic data features. We describe a learning algorithm that can produce effective classifiers for ADHD and autism when run on two large public datasets. The algorithm is able to distinguish ADHD from control with hold-out accuracy of 69.6% (over baseline 55.0% using personal characteristics and structural brain scan features when trained on the ADHD-200 dataset (769 participants in training set, 171 in test set. It is able to distinguish autism from control with hold-out accuracy of 65.0% (over baseline 51.6% using functional images with personal characteristic data when trained on the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE dataset (889 participants in training set, 222 in test set. These results outperform all previously presented methods on both datasets. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a single automated learning process that can produce classifiers for distinguishing patients vs. controls from brain imaging data with above-chance accuracy on large datasets for two different psychiatric illnesses (ADHD and autism. Working toward clinical applications requires robustness against real-world conditions, including the substantial variability that often exists among data collected at different institutions. It is therefore important that our algorithm was successful with the large ADHD-200 and ABIDE datasets, which include data from hundreds of participants collected at multiple institutions. While the resulting classifiers are not yet clinically relevant, this work shows that there is a signal in

  1. Segmentation of internal brain structures in three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraud, Th.

    1998-01-01

    For neurological studies, the in vivo aspect of imaging systems is very attractive. Brain images are currently a classical tool used in clinical routine and research. The most appropriate system to observe brain anatomy is tridimensional magnetic resonance imaging, and a major issue of image processing is to segment automatically cerebral structures. This is the scope of our thesis. The number of applications is steadily growing: morphometric measurements, pathology detection, surgery planning, getting a reference for functional studies,a and so forth. The use of pattern recognition to classify the different cerebral tissues from the only radiometric levels of the images is limited. Even supervised, these methods can not lead to distinguish easily several classes of grey matter. When these methods are automatic, their use has to be empirical in order to ensure robust results, and has to be restricted to regions of interest in order to get reliable results. As these methods do not fully respect the spatial consistency of classes in the images, we have introduced contextual information with the help of different formalisms. With Markovian regularization, we have shown that energetic terms of localization permit the separation of two grey classes: cortex and central nuclei. With mathematical morphology, we have proposed processing chains dedicated to several cerebral objects; in particular, brain segmentation is robust and reproducible, and we have successfully obtained individual markers for lateral ventricles, caudate nuclei, putamen and thalami. We have also proposed a contextual method to estimate pure tissue characteristics from a rough segmentation. Our main contribution has been to present a recognition method which is progressive and atlas guided. The originality of this method is manifold. At first, it takes into account structural information processed as flexible spatial constraints the formalism of which relies on fuzzy set theory and information fusion

  2. gamma-decay of resonance-like structure observed in sup 3 sup 0 Si(p,gamma) sup 3 sup 1 P reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Kachan, A S; Korda, L P; Mishchenko, V M; Korda, V Y

    2002-01-01

    gamma-Decay of a resonance-like structure observed in the reaction sup 3 sup 0 Si (p, gamma) sup 3 sup 1 P in the energy region E sub p = 1.4 - 2.7 MeV of accelerated protons is studied. The M1 resonance built on the ground state of sup 3 sup 1 P is identified. The position of the M1 resonance is explained taking into account pairing forces.

  3. Design proposal for door thresholds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolka Radim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Panels for openings in structures have always been an essential and integral part of buildings. Their importance in terms of a building´s functionality was not recognised. However, the general view on this issue has changed from focusing on big planar segments and critical details to sub-elements of these structures. This does not only focus on the forms of connecting joints but also on the supporting systems that keep the panels in the right position and ensure they function properly. One of the most strained segments is the threshold structure, especially the entrance door threshold structure. It is the part where substantial defects in construction occur in terms of waterproofing, as well as in the static, thermal and technical functions thereof. In conventional buildings, this problem is solved by pulling the floor structure under the entrance door structure and subsequently covering it with waterproofing material. This system cannot work effectively over the long term so local defects occur. A proposal is put forward to solve this problem by installing a sub-threshold door coupler made of composite materials. The coupler is designed so that its variability complies with the required parameters for most door structures on the European market.

  4. Nonmonotonous electron mobility due to structurally induced resonant coupling of subband states in an asymmetric double quantum well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Nayak

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We show that sharp nonmonotic variation of low temperature electron mobility μ can be achieved in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs barrier delta-doped double quantum well structure due to quantum mechanical transfer of subband electron wave functions within the wells. We vary the potential profile of the coupled structure as a function of the doping concentration in order to bring the subbands into resonance such that the subband energy levels anticross and the eigen states of the coupled structure equally share both the wells thereby giving rise to a dip in mobility. When the wells are of equal widths, the dip in mobility occurs under symmetric doping of the side barriers. In case of unequal well widths, the resonance can be obtained by suitable asymmetric variation of the doping concentrations. The dip in mobility becomes sharp and also the wavy nature of mobility takes a rectangular shape by increasing the barrier width. We show that the dip in mobility at resonance is governed by the interface roughness scattering through step like changes in the subband mobilities. It is also gratifying to show that the drop in mobility at the onset of occupation of second subband is substantially supressed through the quantum mechanical transfer of subband wave functions between the wells. Our results can be utilized for performance enhancement of coupled quantum well devices.

  5. Band structure effects on resonant tunneling in III-V quantum wells versus two-dimensional vertical heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Philip M., E-mail: philip.campbell@gatech.edu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Electronic Systems Laboratory, Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Tarasov, Alexey; Joiner, Corey A.; Vogel, Eric M. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Ready, W. Jud [Electronic Systems Laboratory, Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2016-01-14

    Since the invention of the Esaki diode, resonant tunneling devices have been of interest for applications including multi-valued logic and communication systems. These devices are characterized by the presence of negative differential resistance in the current-voltage characteristic, resulting from lateral momentum conservation during the tunneling process. While a large amount of research has focused on III-V material systems, such as the GaAs/AlGaAs system, for resonant tunneling devices, poor device performance and device-to-device variability have limited widespread adoption. Recently, the symmetric field-effect transistor (symFET) was proposed as a resonant tunneling device incorporating symmetric 2-D materials, such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), separated by an interlayer barrier, such as hexagonal boron-nitride. The achievable peak-to-valley ratio for TMD symFETs has been predicted to be higher than has been observed for III-V resonant tunneling devices. This work examines the effect that band structure differences between III-V devices and TMDs has on device performance. It is shown that tunneling between the quantized subbands in III-V devices increases the valley current and decreases device performance, while the interlayer barrier height has a negligible impact on performance for barrier heights greater than approximately 0.5 eV.

  6. Band structure effects on resonant tunneling in III-V quantum wells versus two-dimensional vertical heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Philip M.; Tarasov, Alexey; Joiner, Corey A.; Ready, W. Jud; Vogel, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Since the invention of the Esaki diode, resonant tunneling devices have been of interest for applications including multi-valued logic and communication systems. These devices are characterized by the presence of negative differential resistance in the current-voltage characteristic, resulting from lateral momentum conservation during the tunneling process. While a large amount of research has focused on III-V material systems, such as the GaAs/AlGaAs system, for resonant tunneling devices, poor device performance and device-to-device variability have limited widespread adoption. Recently, the symmetric field-effect transistor (symFET) was proposed as a resonant tunneling device incorporating symmetric 2-D materials, such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), separated by an interlayer barrier, such as hexagonal boron-nitride. The achievable peak-to-valley ratio for TMD symFETs has been predicted to be higher than has been observed for III-V resonant tunneling devices. This work examines the effect that band structure differences between III-V devices and TMDs has on device performance. It is shown that tunneling between the quantized subbands in III-V devices increases the valley current and decreases device performance, while the interlayer barrier height has a negligible impact on performance for barrier heights greater than approximately 0.5 eV.

  7. Resonant line transfer in a fog: using Lyman-alpha to probe tiny structures in atomic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronke, Max; Dijkstra, Mark; McCourt, Michael; Peng Oh, S.

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by observational and theoretical work that suggest very small-scale (≲ 1 pc) structure in the circumgalactic medium of galaxies and in other environments, we study Lyman-α (Lyα) radiative transfer in an extremely clumpy medium with many clouds of neutral gas along the line of sight. While previous studies have typically considered radiative transfer through sightlines intercepting ≲ 10 clumps, we explored the limit of a very large number of clumps per sightline (up to fc 1000). Our main finding is that, for covering factors greater than some critical threshold, a multiphase medium behaves similarly to a homogeneous medium in terms of the emergent Lyα spectrum. The value of this threshold depends on both the clump column density and the movement of the clumps. We estimated this threshold analytically and compare our findings to radiative transfer simulations with a range of covering factors, clump column densities, radii, and motions. Our results suggest that (I) the success in fitting observed Lyα spectra using homogeneous "shell models" (and the corresponding failure of multiphase models) hints at the presence of very small-scale structure in neutral gas, which is in agreement within a number of other observations; and (II) the recurrent problems of reproducing realistic line profiles from hydrodynamical simulations may be due to their inability to resolve small-scale structure, which causes simulations to underestimate the effective covering factor of neutral gas clouds. The movie associated to Fig. B.2 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Gross resonance-like structure of the complete fusion excitation function for the 16O + 28Si reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Jiwen; Zheng Pingzi; Liu Guoxing

    1993-01-01

    The complete fusion excitation function for the 16 O + 28 Si reaction is measured in the incident energy range from 50 to 90 MeV with step of 1.0 MeV using a position sensitive ΔE-E telescope system. The striking gross resonance-like structure is observed when E c.m. c.m. 34.5, 38.5 and 43.0 MeV respectively. The structure vanishes gradually when E c.m. > 46.0 MeV

  9. Quantum resonance of nanometre-scale metal-ZnO-metal structure and its application in sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijie Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the thickness dependence of the potential profile of the metal-ZnO-metal (MZM structure has been conducted based on Poisson’s equation and Schottky theory. Quantum scattering theory is then used to calculate the transmission probability of an electron passing through the MZM structure. Results show that the quantum resonance (QR effect becomes pronounced when the thickness of the ZnO film reaches to around 6 nm. Strain induced piezopotentials are considered as biases to the MZM, which significantly changes the QR according to the analysis. This effect can be potentially employed as nanoscale strain sensors.

  10. High-precision hyperfine structure measurement in slow atomic ion beams by collinear laser-rf double resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarjit Sen; Childs, W.J.; Goodman, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    A new collinear laser-ion beam apparatus for slow ions (1 to 1.5 keV) has been built for measuring the hyperfine structure of metastable levels of ions with laser-rf double resonance technique. Narrow linewidths of ∼60 kHz (FWHM) have been observed for the first time in such systems. As a first application the hyperfine structure of the 4f 7 ( 8 S 0 )5d 9 D/sub J/ 0 metastable levels of /sup 151,153/Eu + has been measured with high precision. 10 refs., 8 figs

  11. Effect of inhomogeneous temperature fields on acoustic streaming structures in resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Červenka, Milan; Bednařík, Michal

    2017-06-01

    Acoustic streaming in 2D rectangular resonant channels filled with a fluid with a spatial temperature distribution is studied within this work. An inertial force is assumed for driving the acoustic field; the temperature inhomogeneity is introduced by resonator walls with prescribed temperature distribution. The method of successive approximations is employed to derive linear equations for calculation of primary acoustic and time-averaged secondary fields including the streaming velocity. The model equations have a standard form which allows their numerical integration using a universal solver; in this case, COMSOL Multiphysics was employed. The numerical results show that fluid temperature variations in the direction perpendicular to the resonator axis influence strongly the streaming field if the ratio of the channel width and the viscous boundary layer thickness is big enough; the streaming in the Rayleigh vortices can be supported as well as opposed, which can ultimately lead to the appearance of additional vortices.

  12. Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging techniques to probe muscle structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malis, Vadim

    Structural and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies of skeletal muscle allow the elucidation of muscle physiology under normal and pathological conditions. Continuing on the efforts of the Muscle Imaging and Modeling laboratory, the focus of the thesis is to (i) extend and refine two challenging imaging modalities: structural imaging using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and functional imaging based on Velocity Encoded Phase Contrast Imaging (VE-PC) and (ii) apply these methods to explore age related structure and functional differences of the gastrocnemius muscle. Diffusion Tensor Imaging allows the study of tissue microstructure as well as muscle fiber architecture. The images, based on an ultrafast single shot Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) sequence, suffer from geometric distortions and low signal to noise ratio. A processing pipeline was developed to correct for distortions and to improve image Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). DTI acquired on a senior and young cohort of subjects were processed through the pipeline and differences in DTI derived indices and fiber architecture between the two cohorts were explored. The DTI indices indicated that at the microstructural level, fiber atrophy was accompanied with a reduction in fiber volume fraction. At the fiber architecture level, fiber length and pennation angles decreased with age that potentially contribute to the loss of muscle force with age. Velocity Encoded Phase Contrast imaging provides tissue (e.g. muscle) velocity at each voxel which allows the study of strain and Strain Rate (SR) under dynamic conditions. The focus of the thesis was to extract 2D strain rate tensor maps from the velocity images and apply the method to study age related differences. The tensor mapping can potentially provide unique information on the extracellular matrix and lateral transmission the role of these two elements has recently emerged as important determinants of force loss with age. In the cross sectional study on

  13. Growth, structural, physical and computational perspectives of trans-4-hydroxy-l-proline: a promising organic nonlinear optical material with large laser-induced damage threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumurugan, Ramaiah; Anitha, Kandasamy

    2017-05-01

    In this work, a systematic study of an organic nonlinear optical (NLO) material, trans-4-hydroxy-l-proline (THP), C5H9NO3 is reported. An optical quality single crystals of THP have been successfully grown by using slow evaporation solution growth technique (SEST). The single crystal x-ray diffraction (SXRD) analysis reveals that grown crystal belongs to the orthorhombic system with non-centrosymmetric space group (NCS), P212121. Powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD) analysis shows relatively a good crystalline nature. The molecular structure of THP was recognized by NMR (1H and 13C) studies and its vibrational modes were confirmed by FTIR and FT-Raman vibrational studies. UV-Vis-NIR spectrum of grown crystal shows high optical transparency in the visible and near-IR region with low near-UV cut-off wavelength at 218 nm. Photoluminescence study confirms ultraviolet wavelength emission of THP crystal. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of grown crystal is 1.6 times greater with respect to standard potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP). Nonlinear refractive index (n 2) and nonlinear absorption coefficient (β) were determined using the Z-scan technique. The title compound owns high thermal stability of 294 °C and specific heat capacity (C P) of 1.21 J g-1 K-1 at 300 K and 11.33 J g-1 K-1 at 539 K (melting point). The laser-induced damage threshold (LDT) value of grown crystal was measured as 7.25 GW cm-2. The crystal growth mechanism and defects of grown crystal were studied by chemical etching technique. Mechanical strength was extensively studied by Vickers microhardness test and crystal void percentage analysis. Moreover, density functional theory (DFT) studies were carried out to probe the Mulliken charge distribution, frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) and first order hyperpolarizability (β) of the optimized molecular structure to get a better insight of the molecular properties. These characterization results endorse that grown THP crystal as a

  14. Are there novel resonances in nanoplasmonic structures due to nonlocal response?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wubs, Martijn; Raza, Søren; Toscano, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    In tiny metallic nanostructures, quantum confinement and nonlocal response change the collective plasmonic behaviour with resulting important consequences for e.g. field-enhancement and extinction cross sections. Here we report on nonlocal resonances in the hydrodynamical Drude model for plasmonic...

  15. Structure Determination of Anionic Metal Clusters via Infrared Resonance Enhanced Multiple Photon Electron Detachment Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haertelt, M.; Lapoutre, V. J. F.; Bakker, J. M.; Redlich, B.; Harding, D. J.; Fielicke, A.; Meijer, G.

    2011-01-01

    We report vibrational spectra of anionic metal clusters, measured via electron detachment following resonant absorption of multiple infrared photons. To facilitate the sequential absorption of the required large number of photons, the cluster beam interacts with the infrared radiation inside the

  16. Measurements of the spectral location of the structured target resonance for ultrarelativistic electrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersen, K.; Ketel, T.J.

    2014-01-01

    When an ultrarelativistic electron traverses two closely spaced foils, a radiation spectrum 'resonance' appears, arising from the photon formation length extending from one foil, across the gap and into the second foil. Several theoretical approaches yield quite different answers to the spectral

  17. Resonance structure of 32S+n from measurements of neutron total and capture cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halperin, J.; Johnson, C.H.; Winters, R.R.; Macklin, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Neutron total and capture cross sections of 32 S have been measured up to 1100 keV neutron energy [E/sub exc/( 33 S) =9700 keV]. Spin and parity assignments have been made for 28 of the 64 resonances found in this region. Values of total radiation widths, reduced neutron widths, level spacings, and neutron strength functions have been evaluated for s/sub 1/2/, p/sub 1/2/, p/sub 3/2/, and d/sub 5/2/ levels. Single particle contributions using the valency model account for a significant portion of the total radiation width only for the p/sub 1/2/-wave resonances. A significant number of resonances can be identified with reported levels excited in 32 S(d,p) and 29 Si(α,n) reactions. A calculation of the Maxwellian average cross section appropriate to stellar interiors indicates an average capture cross section at 30 keV, sigma-bar approx. = 4.2(2) mb, a result that is relatively insensitive to the assumed stellar temperature. Direct (potential) capture and the s-wave resonance capture contributions to the thermal capture cross section do not fully account for the reported thermal cross section (530 +- 40 mb) and a bound state is invoked to account for the discrepancy

  18. Atomic and Molecular Complex Resonances from Real Eigenvalues Using Standard (Hermitian) Electronic Structure Calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Landau, A.; Haritan, I.; Kaprálová-Žďánská, Petra Ruth; Moiseyev, N.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 19 (2016), s. 3098-3108 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13029 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : autoionizing states * coordinate calculation * scattering resonances Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 2.847, year: 2016

  19. Study of internal structure of the human fetus in utero by echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, I R; Stehling, M K; Blamire, A M; Coxon, R J; Howseman, A M; Chapman, B; Ordidge, R J; Mansfield, P; Symonds, E M; Worthington, B S

    1990-08-01

    The ultrafast echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging technology, developed and built in Nottingham, has been used to produce the first snapshot images of the human fetus in utero. The imager, operating at a proton resonance frequency of 22 MHz, produces transaxial views in 64 or 128 milliseconds. These images comprise either 64 x 128 or 128 x 128 pixels with an in-plane resolution of 3 x 3 mm2. The slice thickness is 10 mm. Fetal scans of up to 32 contiguous slices are produced in a few minutes. These have been used to study the internal structure of the uterus and the fetus in a range of cases with gestations ranging from 26 weeks to term. Echo-planar imaging seems particularly suitable as an imaging modality since its high speed obviates image blurring arising from fetal motion.

  20. Anatomical pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging segmentation for regional structure-function measurements of asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, F. [Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Svenningsen, S.; Eddy, R. L.; Capaldi, D. P. I.; Sheikh, K. [Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Fenster, A.; Parraga, G., E-mail: gparraga@robarts.ca [Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Pulmonary magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) and x-ray computed-tomography have provided strong evidence of spatially and temporally persistent lung structure-function abnormalities in asthmatics. This has generated a shift in their understanding of lung disease and supports the use of imaging biomarkers as intermediate endpoints of asthma severity and control. In particular, pulmonary {sup 1}H MRI can be used to provide quantitative lung structure-function measurements longitudinally and in response to treatment. However, to translate such biomarkers of asthma, robust methods are required to segment the lung from pulmonary {sup 1}H MRI. Therefore, their objective was to develop a pulmonary {sup 1}H MRI segmentation algorithm to provide regional measurements with the precision and speed required to support clinical studies. Methods: The authors developed a method to segment the left and right lung from {sup 1}H MRI acquired in 20 asthmatics including five well-controlled and 15 severe poorly controlled participants who provided written informed consent to a study protocol approved by Health Canada. Same-day spirometry and plethysmography measurements of lung function and volume were acquired as well as {sup 1}H MRI using a whole-body radiofrequency coil and fast spoiled gradient-recalled echo sequence at a fixed lung volume (functional residual capacity + 1 l). We incorporated the left-to-right lung volume proportion prior based on the Potts model and derived a volume-proportion preserved Potts model, which was approximated through convex relaxation and further represented by a dual volume-proportion preserved max-flow model. The max-flow model led to a linear problem with convex and linear equality constraints that implicitly encoded the proportion prior. To implement the algorithm, {sup 1}H MRI was resampled into ∼3 × 3 × 3 mm{sup 3} isotropic voxel space. Two observers placed seeds on each lung and on the background of 20 pulmonary {sup 1}H MR images

  1. Threshold Signature Schemes Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiya Victorovna Beresneva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to an investigation of threshold signature schemes. The systematization of the threshold signature schemes was done, cryptographic constructions based on interpolation Lagrange polynomial, elliptic curves and bilinear pairings were examined. Different methods of generation and verification of threshold signatures were explored, the availability of practical usage of threshold schemes in mobile agents, Internet banking and e-currency was shown. The topics of further investigation were given and it could reduce a level of counterfeit electronic documents signed by a group of users.

  2. Particles near threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, T.; Willenbrock, S.

    1993-01-01

    We propose returning to the definition of the width of a particle in terms of the pole in the particle's propagator. Away from thresholds, this definition of width is equivalent to the standard perturbative definition, up to next-to-leading order; however, near a threshold, the two definitions differ significantly. The width as defined by the pole position provides more information in the threshold region than the standard perturbative definition and, in contrast with the perturbative definition, does not vanish when a two-particle s-wave threshold is approached from below

  3. Multi-resonance peaks fiber Bragg gratings based on largely-chirped structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xuan-Yu; Wei, Wei-Hua; Chen, Yong-Yi; Qin, Li; Ning, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Yong-Sen

    2018-04-01

    A composite fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with multi-resonance peaks (MRPs) has been realized by using femtosecond (fs) laser point-by-point inscription in single-mode fiber. This device contains a segment of largely-chirped gratings with the ultrahigh chirp coefficients and a segment of uniform high-order gratings. The observed MRPs are distributed in an ultra-broadband wavelength range from 1200 nm to 1700 nm in the form of quasi-period or multi-peak-group. For the 8th-order MRPs-FBG, we studied the axial strain and high-temperature sensing characteristics of different resonance peaks experimentally. Moreover, we have demonstrated a multi-wavelength fiber lasers with three-wavelength stable output by using a 9th-order MRPs-FBG as the wavelength selector. This work is significant for the fabrication and functionalization of FBGs with complicated spectra characteristics.

  4. Three-body hadronic structure of low-lying 1/2+ Σ and Λ resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Torres, A.; Khemchandani, K.P.; Oset, E.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the dynamical generation of some low-lying 1/2 + Σ's and Λ's in two-meson one-baryon systems. These systems have been constructed by adding a pion in the S-wave to the anti KN pair and its coupled channels, where the 1/2 - Λ(1405)-resonance gets dynamically generated. We solve Faddeev equations in the coupled-channel approach to calculate the T-matrix for these systems as a function of the total energy and the invariant mass of one of the meson-baryon pairs. This squared T-matrix shows peaks at the energies very close to the masses of the strangeness -1,1/2 + resonances listed in the particle data book. (orig.)

  5. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of structural magnetic resonance imaging data in a two-center study

    OpenAIRE

    Chalavi Sima; Simmons Andrew; Dijkstra Hildebrand; Barker Gareth J; Reinders AAT Simone

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Multi-center magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies present an opportunity to advance research by pooling data. However, brain measurements derived from MR-images are susceptible to differences in MR-sequence parameters. It is therefore necessary to determine whether there is an interaction between the sequence parameters and the effect of interest, and to minimise any such interaction by careful choice of acquisition parameters. As an exemplar of the issues involved in ...

  6. High-pressure electron-resonance studies of electronic, magnetic, and structural phase transitions. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pifer, J.H.; Croft, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    Research is described in development of a high-pressure electron-resonance probe capable of operating down to 1.5 0 K temperatures. The apparatus has been used to measure the EPR of a sample of DPPH at room temperature and zero pressure. EPR has been used to measure valence field instabilities in alloy systems. Studies have been done on metal-insulator transitions at high pressure, and are briefly described

  7. Proton emission from resonant laser absorption and self-focusing effects from hydrogenated structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cutroneo, M.; Torrisi, L.; Margarone, Daniele; Picciotto, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 272, May (2013), s. 50-54 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0087 Grant - others:OP VK 2 LaserGen(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0087 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : resonant absorption * self-focusing * Thomson parabola * spectrometer Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.538, year: 2013

  8. Coherent vs Incoherent Emission from Semiconductor Structures after Resonant Femtosecond Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurioli, Massimo; Bogani, Franco; Ceccherini, Simone; Colocci, Marcello

    1997-04-01

    We show that an interferometric correlation measurement with fs time resolution provides an unambiguous discrimination between coherent and incoherent emission after resonant femtosecond excitation. The experiment directly probes the most important difference between the two emissions, that is, the phase correlation with the excitation pulse. The comparison with cw frequency resolved measurements demonstrates that the relationship between coherent and incoherent emission is similar under femtosecond and steady-state excitation.

  9. Resonance structure in the fission of ( sup 235 U+n)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, M.S. (Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), NM (USA). Physics Div.); Leal, L.C.; De Saussure, G.; Perez, R.B.; Larson, N.M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-10-09

    A new multilevel reduced R-matrix analysis of the neutron-induced resonance cross sections of {sup 235}U has been carried out. We used as a constraint in the analysis the angular anisotropy measurements of Pattenden and Postma, obtaining a Bohr-channel (or J, K channel) representation of the resonances in a two-fission vector space for each spin state. Hambsch et al., have reported definitive measurements of the mass- and kinetic-energy distributions of fission fragments of ({sup 235}U+n) in the resonance region and analyzed their results according to the fission-channel representation of Brosa et al., extracting relative contributions of the two asymmetric and one symmetric Brosa fission channels. We have explored the connection between Bohr-channel and asymmetric Brosa-channel representations. The results suggest that a simple rotation of coordinates in channel space may be the only transformation required; the multilevel fit to the total and partial cross sections is invariant to such a transformation. (orig.).

  10. Resonance-inclined optical nuclear spin polarization of liquids in diamond structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q.; Schwarz, I.; Jelezko, F.; Retzker, A.; Plenio, M. B.

    2016-02-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of molecules in a solution at room temperature has the potential to revolutionize nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. The prevalent methods for achieving DNP in solutions are typically most effective in the regime of small interaction correlation times between the electron and nuclear spins, limiting the size of accessible molecules. To solve this limitation, we design a mechanism for DNP in the liquid phase that is applicable for large interaction correlation times. Importantly, while this mechanism makes use of a resonance condition similar to solid-state DNP, the polarization transfer is robust to a relatively large detuning from the resonance due to molecular motion. We combine this scheme with optically polarized nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center spins in nanodiamonds to design a setup that employs optical pumping and is therefore not limited by room temperature electron thermal polarization. We illustrate numerically the effectiveness of the model in a flow cell containing nanodiamonds immobilized in a hydrogel, polarizing flowing water molecules 4700-fold above thermal polarization in a magnetic field of 0.35 T, in volumes detectable by current NMR scanners.

  11. Excited-state structure and electronic dephasing time of Nile blue from absolute resonance Raman intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, Mary K.; Mathies, Richard A.

    1992-06-01

    Absolute resonance Raman cross sections are measured for Nile blue 690 perchlorate dissolved in ethylene glycol with excitation at 514, 531, and 568 nm. These values and the absorption spectrum are modeled using a time-dependent wave packet formalism. The excited-state equilibrium geometry changes are quantitated for 40 resonance Raman active modes, seven of which (590, 1141, 1351, 1429, 1492, 1544, and 1640 cm-1 ) carry 70% of the total resonance Raman intensity. This demonstrates that in addition to the prominent 590 and 1640 cm-1 modes, a large number of vibrational degrees of freedom are Franck-Condon coupled to the electronic transition. After exposure of the explicit vibrational progressions, the residual absorption linewidth is separated into its homogeneous [350 cm-1 half-width at half-maximum (HWHM)] and inhomogeneous (313 cm-1 HWHM) components through an analysis of the absolute Raman cross sections. The value of the electronic dephasing time derived from this study (25 fs) compares well to previously published results. These data should be valuable in multimode modeling of femtosecond experiments on Nile blue.

  12. Interplay between structure and magnetism in HoxPr1-x alloys. 2. Resonant x-ray magnetic scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigliante, A.; Christensen, M.J.; Hill, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    X-ray-scattering techniques have been used to study the crystal and magnetic structures of HoxPr1-x alloys in the form of thin films. Three distinct crystal structures are found as a function of concentration x, each of which has a characteristic magnetic structure. For x greater than or equal to 0.......6 a hexagonal-close-packed phase is found with the magnetic moments ordered in a basal-plane helix, whereas for 0.4 less than or equal to x... hexagonal-close-packed and remain nonmagnetic down to the lowest temperatures studied. Using x-ray magnetic resonance scattering techniques, we demonstrate that a small, static spin-density wave is induced within the alloy 5d band at both the Pr and Ho sites in both of the magnetically ordered phases...

  13. Validity of the independent-processes approximation for resonance structures in electron-ion scattering cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badnell, N.R.; Pindzola, M.S.; Griffin, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    The total inelastic cross section for electron-ion scattering may be found in the independent-processes approximation by adding the resonant cross section to the nonresonant background cross section. We study the validity of this approximation for electron excitation of multiply charged ions. The resonant-excitation cross section is calculated independently using distorted waves for various Li-like and Na-like ions using (N+1)-electron atomic-structure methods previously developed for the calculation of dielectronic-recombination cross sections. To check the effects of interference between the two scattering processes, we also carry out detailed close-coupling calculations for the same atomic ions using the R-matrix method. For low ionization stages, interference effects manifest themselves sometimes as strong window features in the close-coupling cross section, which are not present in the independent-processes cross section. For higher ionization stages, however, the resonance features found in the independent-processes approximation are found to be in good agreement with the close-coupling results

  14. Structural Characterization of Amadori Rearrangement Product of Glucosylated Nα-Acetyl-Lysine by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanjiang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maillard reaction is a nonenzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and free amino acid moieties, which is known as one of the most important modifications in food science. It is essential to characterize the structure of Amadori rearrangement products (ARPs formed in the early stage of Maillard reaction. In the present study, the Nα-acetyl-lysine-glucose model had been successfully set up to produce ARP, Nα-acetyl-lysine-glucose. After HPLC purification, ARP had been identified by ESI-MS with intense [M+H]+ ion at 351 m/z and the purity of ARP was confirmed to be over 90% by the relative intensity of [M+H]+ ion. Further structural characterization of the ARP was accomplished by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, including 1D 1H NMR and 13C NMR, the distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer (DEPT-135 and 2D 1H-1H and 13C-1H correlation spectroscopy (COSY and 2D nuclear overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY. The complexity of 1D 1H NMR and 13C NMR was observed due to the presence of isomers in glucose moiety of ARP. However, DEPT-135 and 2D NMR techniques provided more structural information to assign the 1H and 13C resonances of ARP. 2D NOESY had successfully confirmed the glycosylated site between 10-N in Nα-acetyl-lysine and 7′-C in glucose.

  15. All-optical control of microfiber resonator by graphene's photothermal effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yadong; Gan, Xuetao; Zhao, Chenyang; Fang, Liang; Mao, Dong; Zhang, Fanlu; Xi, Teli; Zhao, Jianlin; Xu, Yiping; Ren, Liyong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate an efficient all-optical control of microfiber resonator assisted by graphene's photothermal effect. Wrapping graphene onto a microfiber resonator, the light-graphene interaction can be strongly enhanced via the resonantly circulating light, which enables a significant modulation of the resonance with a resonant wavelength shift rate of 71 pm/mW when pumped by a 1540 nm laser. The optically controlled resonator enables the implementation of low threshold optical bistability and switching with an extinction ratio exceeding 13 dB. The thin and compact structure promises a fast response speed of the control, with a rise (fall) time of 294.7 μs (212.2 μs) following the 10%–90% rule. The proposed device, with the advantages of compact structure, all-optical control, and low power acquirement, offers great potential in the miniaturization of active in-fiber photonic devices.

  16. All-optical control of microfiber resonator by graphene's photothermal effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yadong; Gan, Xuetao; Zhao, Chenyang; Fang, Liang; Mao, Dong; Zhang, Fanlu; Xi, Teli; Zhao, Jianlin, E-mail: jlzhao@nwpu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Space Applied Physics and Chemistry, Ministry of Education, and Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Optical Information Technology, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Xu, Yiping; Ren, Liyong [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi' an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an 710119 (China)

    2016-04-25

    We demonstrate an efficient all-optical control of microfiber resonator assisted by graphene's photothermal effect. Wrapping graphene onto a microfiber resonator, the light-graphene interaction can be strongly enhanced via the resonantly circulating light, which enables a significant modulation of the resonance with a resonant wavelength shift rate of 71 pm/mW when pumped by a 1540 nm laser. The optically controlled resonator enables the implementation of low threshold optical bistability and switching with an extinction ratio exceeding 13 dB. The thin and compact structure promises a fast response speed of the control, with a rise (fall) time of 294.7 μs (212.2 μs) following the 10%–90% rule. The proposed device, with the advantages of compact structure, all-optical control, and low power acquirement, offers great potential in the miniaturization of active in-fiber photonic devices.

  17. Nano-structured Fabry–Pérot resonators in neutron optics and tunneling of neutron wave-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maaza, M.; Hamidi, D.

    2012-01-01

    Correlated to the quantum mechanics wave-particle duality, the optical analogy between electromagnetic waves and cold neutrons manifests itself through several interference phenomena particularly the so called Frustrated Total Reflection i.e., the tunneling process in Fabry–Pérot nano-structured cavities. Prominent resonant situations offered by this configuration allow the attainment of numerous fundamental investigations and surface-interface studies as well as to devise new kinds of neutron optics devices. This review contribution reports such possibilities in addition to the recently observed peculiar Goos–Hänchen longitudinal shift of neutron wave-particles which was predicted by Sir Isaac Newton as early as 1730.

  18. Analytical properties and resonant structure of the S-matrix in case of noncentral and parity-violating interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, V.S.; Zaichenko, A.K.

    1981-01-01

    The analytical properties and the resonant structure of the nonrelativistic S-matrix are investigated for elastic scattering with absorption for central, noncentral and parity-violating interactions and when the equations of motion for particles inside a sphere with finite radius are unknown. The conditions for the completeness of wave functions outside the interaction sphere, for the symmetry and for the generalized unitarity of the S-matrix are used. The conditions of micro- and macro-causality for the obtained results are investigated. (author)

  19. Hyperfine structure of 147,149Sm measured using saturated absorption spectroscopy in combination with resonance-ionization mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyunmin; Lee, Miran; Rhee, Yongjoo

    2003-01-01

    The hyperfine structures of four levels of the Sm isotopes have been measured by means of diode-laser-based Doppler-free saturated absorption spectroscopy in combination with a diode-laser-initiated resonance-ionization mass spectroscopy. It was demonstrated that combining the two spectroscopic methods was very effective for the identification and accurate measurement of the spectral lines of atoms with several isotopes, such as the rare-earth elements. From the obtained spectra, the hyperfine constants A and B for the odd-mass isotopes 147 Sm and 149 Sm were determined for four upper levels of the studied transitions.

  20. Narrow n anti n resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanova, L.N.; Dalkarov, O.D.; Kerbikov, B.O.; Shapiro, I.S.

    1975-01-01

    The present status of the problem of quasinuclear states in systems of nucleons and antinucleons is reviewed. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental data on narrow meson resonances near N anti N threshold which appeared in 1971-74

  1. Polarization of photoneutrons from the threshold region of 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.J.; Jackson, H.E.

    1975-01-01

    In order to determine the parities of several resonances in 208 Pb, the polarization of photoneutrons from the 208 Pb(γ,n(pol)) 207 Pb reaction was measured. This represents the first measurement of the polarization of photoneutrons from resonances near threshold. The observations are tabulated. (SDF)

  2. Neutron resonance averaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs

  3. Double Photoionization Near Threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehlitz, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    The threshold region of the double-photoionization cross section is of particular interest because both ejected electrons move slowly in the Coulomb field of the residual ion. Near threshold both electrons have time to interact with each other and with the residual ion. Also, different theoretical models compete to describe the double-photoionization cross section in the threshold region. We have investigated that cross section for lithium and beryllium and have analyzed our data with respect to the latest results in the Coulomb-dipole theory. We find that our data support the idea of a Coulomb-dipole interaction.

  4. Thresholds in radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, R.; Hofmann, W.

    1982-01-01

    Interpretations of biological radiation effects frequently use the word 'threshold'. The meaning of this word is explored together with its relationship to the fundamental character of radiation effects and to the question of perception. It is emphasised that although the existence of either a dose or an LET threshold can never be settled by experimental radiobiological investigations, it may be argued on fundamental statistical grounds that for all statistical processes, and especially where the number of observed events is small, the concept of a threshold is logically invalid. (U.K.)

  5. First amplitude analysis of resonant structures in the 5-pion continuum at COMPASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubert, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    The study of hadronic scattering amplitudes and in particular the spectroscopy of light mesons provide a unique tool to investigate the strong interaction. At very lowenergies the meson spectrum is governed by the spontaneous breakdown of the chiral symmetry of the QCD vacuum. At higher masses a series of resonances appears. Their origin and their relation to chiral symmetry breaking is only partly understood. In particular for masses above ∝ 1.6 GeV/c 2 while a large number of states have been reported they are still poorly known experimentally. One complication are multi-body final states into which heavy mesons can decay. In this thesis a method for the amplitude analysis of the π - π + π - π + π - system is being developed. The COMPASS experiment at CERN uses the diffractive dissociation of a 190 GeV pion beam as a source of meson resonances up to masses of about 3 GeV/c 2 . A partial wave decomposition of the 5π system is presented here which for the first time allows to search for mesonic 5-body resonances. A novel technique based on an evolutionary algorithm is developed to solve the problem of finding a reliable truncation of the partial wave expansion of the hadronic amplitude. The method for the first time allows the investigation of systematic uncertainties introduced by the use truncated isobar model amplitudes. The well known π 2 (1670) and π(1800) states are found with good agreement to measurements in other channels. In addition there is evidence for several other resonant contributions, among them the controversial π 2 (1880) which is being discussed as a hybrid-meson candidate. In the course of the analysis a new software-framework for amplitude analysis has been developed, which is now being used by the COMPASS collaboration for the analysis of several hadronic channels. Future experiments in particle physics will have to collect large amounts of data in order to search for the subtle effects that would indicate new physics beyond the

  6. Investigations of functional and structural changes in migraine with aura by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    technology to study these features of migraine with aura (MA) is functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which has the potential not only to detect, but also to localize hypersensitive cortex. The main objective of this thesis was to investigate the cortical responsivity of patients with MA during.......e. ≥= 90% of auras occurring in the same visual hemifield (study II). To circumvent bias relating to differences between right and left hemispheres (e.g. caused by physiological left/right bias, asymmetry of the visual stimulation or magnetic field inhomogeneity of the scanner), we included an equal number...

  7. Chiral Domain Structure in Superfluid 3He-A Studied by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, J.; Okamoto, Y.; Nishioka, K.; Takagi, T.; Sasaki, Y.

    2018-05-01

    The existence of a spatially varying texture in superfluid 3He is a direct manifestation of the complex macroscopic wave function. The real space shape of the texture, namely, a macroscopic wave function, has been studied extensively with the help of theoretical modeling but has never been directly observed experimentally with spatial resolution. We have succeeded in visualizing the texture by a specialized magnetic resonance imaging. With this new technology, we have discovered that the macroscopic chiral domains, of which sizes are as large as 1 mm, and corresponding chiral domain walls exist rather stably in 3He - A film at temperatures far below the transition temperature.

  8. Statistics of Poincare recurrences and the structure of the stochastic layer of a nonlinear resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirikov, B.V.; Shepelyansky, D.L.

    1983-02-01

    Motion in the stochastic layer around the separatrix of a nonlinear resonance was investigated. The integral distribution function F(tau) of trajectory recurrence times tau to the center of the layer was numerically determined. It was found that the distribution F(tau) = A tau - /sup p/ is a power function, the exponent assuming two different values: for tau less than or equal to tau 0 , p = 1/2 and for tau >> tau 0 , p = 3/2 (time tau 0 is determined by the characteristics of the layer)

  9. Structure and aqueous reactivity of silicate glasses high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance contribution; Structure et reactivite aqueuse des verres silicates apport de la resonance magnetique nucleaire haute-resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angeli, F

    2000-10-25

    This research aims at getting a better understanding of the relations which may exist between the chemical composition of the oxide silicate glasses, the structure and the aqueous reactivity. We study the cations present in most glasses, more particularly the radioactive waste glasses, and those which are more liable to bring information both about structure and reactivity. Among the experimental methods used, the nuclear magnetic resonance of multi-quantum magic-angle spinning (NMR MQ-MAS) has been carried out for the structural characterization of the pristine and altered glasses. In the first part, we discuss the possibility of deducting a type of information from a quantitative approach of the {sup 23}Na, {sup 27}Al and {sup 17}O NMR MQ-MAS. In the second part, we apply this method to glasses containing between two and six oxides. The vitreous compositions studied permit to focus our attention on the influence of sodium, aluminum and calcium on their local structural environment. We point out an evolution of the distributions of bond distances and angles in relation to the glass chemical composition. We show the strong potentiality of the {sup 17}O used to probe the pristine and altered glasses. The influence of the different cations studied on the rate of glass dissolution is debated from the alterations made on short periods. On the basis of all these data, we discuss the importance of the structural effect which may influence the kinetic phenomena of alteration. (author)

  10. Resonance Assignments and Secondary Structure Analysis of Dynein Light Chain 8 by Magic-angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Shangjin; Butterworth, Andrew H.; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Yan, Si; Lightcap, Christine M.; Williams, John C.; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2011-08-04

    Dynein light chain LC8 is the smallest subunit of the dynein motor complex and has been shown to play important roles in both dynein-dependent and dynein-independent physiological functions via its interaction with a number of its binding partners. It has also been linked to pathogenesis including roles in viral infections and tumorigenesis. Structural information for LC8-target proteins is critical to understanding the underlying function of LC8 in these complexes. However, some LC8-target interactions are not amenable to structural characterization by conventional structural biology techniques owing to their large size, low solubility, and crystallization difficulties. Here, we report magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of the homodimeric apo-LC8 protein as a first effort in addressing more complex, multi-partner, LC8-based protein assemblies. We have established site-specific backbone and side-chain resonance assignments for the majority of the residues of LC8, and show TALOS+-predicted torsion angles ø and ψ in close agreement with most residues in the published LC8 crystal structure. Data obtained through these studies will provide the first step toward using MAS NMR to examine the LC8 structure, which will eventually be used to investigate protein–protein interactions in larger systems that cannot be determined by conventional structural studies.

  11. Photoionization dynamics of excited Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe atoms near threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhorukov, V L; Petrov, I D; Schäfer, M; Merkt, F; Ruf, M-W; Hotop, H

    2012-01-01

    A review of experimental and theoretical studies of the threshold photoionization of the heavier rare-gas atoms is presented, with particular emphasis on the autoionization resonances in the spectral region between the lowest two ionization thresholds 2 P 3/2 and 2 P 1/2 , accessed from the ground or excited states. Observed trends in the positions, widths and shapes of the autoionization resonances depending on the atomic number, the principal quantum number n, the orbital angular momentum quantum number ℓ and further quantum numbers specifying the fine- and hyperfine-structure levels are summarized and discussed in the light of ab initio and multichannel quantum defect theory calculations. The dependence of the photoionization spectra on the initially prepared neutral state are also discussed, including results on the photoionization cross sections and photoelectron angular distributions of polarized excited states. The effects of various approximations in the theoretical treatment of photoionization in these systems are analysed. The very large diversity of observed phenomena and the numerous anomalies in spectral structures associated with the threshold ionization of the rare-gas atoms can be described in terms of a limited set of interactions and dynamical processes. Examples are provided illustrating characteristic aspects of the photoionization, and sets of recommended parameters describing the energy-level structure and photoionization dynamics of the rare-gas atoms are presented which were extracted in a critical analysis of the very large body of experimental and theoretical data available on these systems in the literature. (topical review)

  12. Detection of stiff nanoparticles within cellular structures by contact resonance atomic force microscopy subsurface nanomechanical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reggente, Melania; Passeri, Daniele; Angeloni, Livia; Scaramuzzo, Francesca Anna; Barteri, Mario; De Angelis, Francesca; Persiconi, Irene; De Stefano, Maria Egle; Rossi, Marco

    2017-05-04

    Detecting stiff nanoparticles buried in soft biological matrices by atomic force microscopy (AFM) based techniques represents a new frontier in the field of scanning probe microscopies, originally developed as surface characterization methods. Here we report the detection of stiff (magnetic) nanoparticles (NPs) internalized in cells by using contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM) employed as a potentially non-destructive subsurface characterization tool. Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) NPs were internalized in microglial cells from cerebral cortices of mouse embryos of 18 days by phagocytosis. Nanomechanical imaging of cells was performed by detecting the contact resonance frequencies (CRFs) of an AFM cantilever held in contact with the sample. Agglomerates of NPs internalized in cells were visualized on the basis of the local increase in the contact stiffness with respect to the surrounding biological matrix. A second AFM-based technique for nanomechanical imaging, i.e., HarmoniX™, as well as magnetic force microscopy and light microscopy were used to confirm the CR-AFM results. Thus, CR-AFM was demonstrated as a promising technique for subsurface imaging of nanomaterials in biological samples.

  13. Regional Seismic Threshold Monitoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kvaerna, Tormod

    2006-01-01

    ... model to be used for predicting the travel times of regional phases. We have applied these attenuation relations to develop and assess a regional threshold monitoring scheme for selected subregions of the European Arctic...

  14. Effect of resonant tunneling on electroluminescence in nc-Si/SiO2 multilayers-based p-i-n structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, D.Y.; Wang, Y.Y.; Sun, Y.; He, Y.J.; Zhang, G.

    2015-01-01

    P-i-n structures with SiO 2 /nc-Si/SiO 2 multilayers as intrinsic layer were prepared in conventional plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. Their carrier transport and electroluminescence properties were investigated. Two resonant tunneling related current peaks with current dropping gradually under forward bias were observed in the current voltage curve. Non-uniformity of the interfaces might be responsible for the gradual dropping of the current. Electroluminescence intensity of the device under bias of 7 V which is near the resonant tunneling peak voltage of 7.2 V was weaker than that under 6.5 V. According to the Gaussian fitting results of the spectra, the intensity of the sub-peak of 650 nm originating from recombination of injected electrons and holes was decreased the most. When resonant tunneling conditions are met, it might be that most of the injected electrons participate in resonant tunneling and fewer in Pool–Frenkel tunneling, which is the main carrier transport mechanism, to contribute to electroluminescence intensity. - Highlights: • Two resonant tunneling peaks with current dropping gradually were observed. • The EL intensity of the structure under resonant tunneling peak voltage is weakened. • P–F tunneling is the main transport mechanism besides resonant tunneling

  15. First amplitude analysis of resonant structures in the 5-pion continuum at COMPASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubert, Sebastian

    2012-07-06

    The study of hadronic scattering amplitudes and in particular the spectroscopy of light mesons provide a unique tool to investigate the strong interaction. At very lowenergies the meson spectrum is governed by the spontaneous breakdown of the chiral symmetry of the QCD vacuum. At higher masses a series of resonances appears. Their origin and their relation to chiral symmetry breaking is only partly understood. In particular for masses above {proportional_to} 1.6 GeV/c{sup 2} while a large number of states have been reported they are still poorly known experimentally. One complication are multi-body final states into which heavy mesons can decay. In this thesis a method for the amplitude analysis of the {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} system is being developed. The COMPASS experiment at CERN uses the diffractive dissociation of a 190 GeV pion beam as a source of meson resonances up to masses of about 3 GeV/c{sup 2}. A partial wave decomposition of the 5{pi} system is presented here which for the first time allows to search for mesonic 5-body resonances. A novel technique based on an evolutionary algorithm is developed to solve the problem of finding a reliable truncation of the partial wave expansion of the hadronic amplitude. The method for the first time allows the investigation of systematic uncertainties introduced by the use truncated isobar model amplitudes. The well known {pi}{sub 2}(1670) and {pi}(1800) states are found with good agreement to measurements in other channels. In addition there is evidence for several other resonant contributions, among them the controversial {pi}{sub 2}(1880) which is being discussed as a hybrid-meson candidate. In the course of the analysis a new software-framework for amplitude analysis has been developed, which is now being used by the COMPASS collaboration for the analysis of several hadronic channels. Future experiments in particle physics will have to collect large amounts of data in order to

  16. Nuclear structure studies of rare francium isotopes using Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084441

    It was known for many years that nuclei possessing certain numbers of protons (Z) and neutrons (N), called the magic numbers (8,20,28,50,82,126...), exhibit characteristic behavior and are in general more stable than their neighboring isotopes. As the capabilities of producing isotopes with more extreme values of Z and N increased, it was realized that those spherical nuclei only represent a small fraction of the total number of isotopes and that most isotopes are deformed. In order to study exotic isotopes and their deformation, it was necessary to develop new experimental techniques that would be powerful enough to be able to cope with very small production yields, but precise enough to measure the nuclear properties (such as radii and moments) with relatively small uncertainties. One technique that can measure nuclear properties of scarcely produced isotopes is in-source resonant ionization, but this technique does not allow for sufficient precision to deduce nuclear quadrupole moments. Furthermore, this t...

  17. Three-Wave Resonance Modulation and Fine Structures in the Solar Short Centimeter Wave Bursts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王德焴; 吴洪敖; 秦至海

    1994-01-01

    A theoretical model is presented. We propose that when the radiation of solar radio bursts propagates outward as a pump wave through the conora, the three-wave resonance interaction would occur if the radio emission interacts with the MHD wave and scattering wave in the conora. This process induces a nonlinear modulation in the emission flux S. The statistical relations between the repetition rates R and S and between the modulation amplitude △S and S, observed from 1.36cm, 2cm and 3.2cm solar radio bursts could be well interpreted by this model under the conditions of imperfect matching and k2≠0. The appreciable difference in the modulation periods among the 2cm, 3.2cm and 1.36cm waves might be caused by the differences in the MHD waves joining in the modulation. Several theoretical expectations have been made from this model, which may be inspected in further observation.

  18. Giant angular resonance and the structure of the lowest-lying nuclear states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlov, I.N.; Usmanov, P.N.; Yuldashbaeva, Eh.Kh.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis is given of the Hamiltonian of the two-rotor model, which is based on the assumption that the giant angular resonance exists, i.e. that it is possible to rotate the neutron component of a deformed nucleus as a whole with respect to the proton component. The realization of the projections on the intrinsic axes of the angular momentum operators is found, the Hamiltonian matrix is determined in the basis convenient for the case of strong neutron-proton coupling. The spectrum of the two-rotor model is determined taking into account the nondiagonal matrix elements in the lowest order of the perturbation theory. The g factors and the probabilities of the M1 transitions are discussed

  19. {sup 23}Na nuclear magnetic resonance study of the structure and dynamic of natrolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paczwa, Mateusz; Olszewski, Marcin; Sergeev, Nikolaj [Szczecin Univ. (Poland). Inst. of Physics; Sapiga, Aleksej A.; Sapiga, Aleksej V. [Taurida National V.I. Vernadsky Univ., Simferopol, Crimea (Ukraine)

    2015-07-01

    The temperature dependences of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra of {sup 23}Na nuclei in natrolite (Na{sub 2}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 10} . 2H{sub 2}O) have been studied. The temperature dependences of the spin-lattice relaxation times T{sub 1} in natrolite have also been studied. It has been shown that the spin-lattice relaxation of the {sup 23}Na is governed by the electric quadrupole interaction with the crystal electric field gradients modulated by translational motion of H{sub 2}O molecules in the natrolite pores. The dipolar interactions with paramagnetic impurities become significant as a relaxation mechanism of the {sup 23}Na nuclei only at low temperature (<270 K).

  20. Diabetic neuropathy: structural analysis of nerve hydration by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffey, R.H.; Eaton, P.; Sibbitt, R.R.; Sibbitt, W.L. Jr.; Bicknell, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The water content of the sural nerve of diabetic patients was quantitatively defined by magnetic resonance proton imaging as a putative reflection of activity of the aldose-reductase pathway. Thirty-nine patients were evaluated, comparing group A, symptomatic diabetic men with sensory neuropathy; group B, similarly symptomatic diabetic men treated aldose-reductase inhibition; group C, neurologically asymptomatic diabetic men; and group D, control nondiabetic men. Marked increase in hydration of the sural nerve was seen in more than half of the symptomatic diabetic patients. Two of 11 neurologically asymptomatic diabetics had increased nerve hydration, suggesting a presymptomatic alteration of the nerve. Symptomatic diabetics treated with aldose-reductase inhibitors had normal nerve water levels. Increased level of peripheral nerve water represents a new finding in diabetes mellitus. It seems to be related to aldose-reductase activity, involved in the development of neuropathy, and similar to events that occur in other target tissue in human diabetes

  1. Dissection of Rovibronic Structure by Polarization-Resolved Two-Color Resonant Four-Wave Mixing Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Daniel; Burns, Lori A.; Vaccaro, Patrick H.

    2009-08-01

    A synergistic theoretical and experimental investigation of stimulated emission pumping (SEP) as implemented in the coherent framework of two-color resonant four-wave mixing (TC-RFWM) spectroscopy is presented, with special emphasis directed toward the identification of polarization geometries that can distinguish spectral features according to their attendant changes in rotational quantum numbers. A vector-recoupling formalism built upon a perturbative treatment of matter-field interactions and a state-multipole expansion of the density operator allowed the weak-field signal intensity to be cast in terms of a TC-RFWM response tensor, RQ(K)(ɛ4*ɛ3ɛ2*ɛ1;Jg,Je,Jh,Jf), which separates the transverse characteristics of the incident and generated electromagnetic waves (ɛ4*ɛ3ɛ2*ɛ1) from the angular momentum properties of the PUMP and DUMP resonances (Jg,Je,Jh,Jf). For an isolated SEP process induced in an isotropic medium, the criteria needed to discriminate against subsets of rovibronic structure were encoded in the roots of a single tensor element, R0(0)(ɛ4*ɛ3ɛ2*ɛ1;Jg,Je,Jh,Je). By assuming all optical fields to be polarized linearly and invoking the limit of high quantum numbers, specific angles of polarization for the detected signal field were found to suppress DUMP resonances selectively according to the nature of their rotational branch and the rotational branch of the meshing PUMP line. These predictions were corroborated by performing SEP measurements on the ground electronic potential energy surface of tropolone in two distinct regimes of vibrational excitation, with the near-ultraviolet Ã1B2-X˜1A1 (π* ← π) absorption system affording the requisite PUMP and DUMP transitions.

  2. Solution structure of apamin determined by nuclear magnetic resonance and distance geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pease, J.H.B.; Wemmer, D.E.

    1988-11-01

    The solution structure of the bee venom neurotoxin apamin has been determined with a distance geometry program using distance constraints derived from NMR. Twenty embedded structures were generated and refined by using the program DSPACE. After error minimization using both conjugate gradient and dynamics algorithms, six structures had very low residual error. Comparisons of these show that the backbone of the peptide is quite well-defined with the largest rms difference between backbone atoms in these structures of 1.34 /Angstrom/. The side chains have far fewer constraints and show greater variability in their positions. The structure derived here is generally consistent with the qualitative model previously described, with most differences occurring in the loop between the ..beta..-turn (residues 2-5) and the C-terminal ..cap alpha..-helix (residues 9-17). Comparisons are made with previously derived models from NMR data and other methods.

  3. Solution structure of apamin determined by nuclear magnetic resonance and distance geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pease, J.H.B.; Wemmer, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The solution structure of the bee venom neurotoxin apamin has been determined with a distance geometry program using distance constraints derived from NMR. Twenty embedded structures were generated and refined by using the program DSPACE. After error minimization using both conjugate gradient and dynamics algorithms, six structures had very low residual error. Comparisons of these show that the backbone of the peptide is quite well-defined with the largest rms difference between backbone atoms in these structures of 1.34 /Angstrom/. The side chains have far fewer constraints and show greater variability in their positions. The structure derived here is generally consistent with the qualitative model previously described, with most differences occurring in the loop between the β-turn (residues 2-5) and the C-terminal α-helix (residues 9-17). Comparisons are made with previously derived models from NMR data and other methods

  4. Surface Resonance Bands on (001)W: Experimental Dispersion Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willis, R. F.; Feuerbacher, B.; Christensen, N. Egede

    1977-01-01

    A band of unbound surface states (resonances), located in an energy region above the vacuum threshold corresponding to an energy band gap in the electron states of the bulk crystal, has been observed by angle-resolved secondary-electron-emission spectroscopy. The experimental dispersion behavior...... is in agreement with the two-dimensional band structure of a clean (001)W surface recently proposed by Smith and Mittheiss....

  5. The resonant structure of ^18Ne and its relevance in the breakout of the Hot CNO cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Tan, W.; Aprahamian, A.; Bucher, B.; Gorres, J.; Roberts, A.; Villano, A.; Wiescher, M.; Brune, C.; Heinen, Z.; Massey, T.; Mach, H.; Guray, N.; Guray, R. T.

    2009-10-01

    In explosive hydrogen burning environments such as Novae and X-ray bursts, temperatures and densities achieved are sufficiently high to bypass the beta decay of the waiting points of the hot CNO cycle by alpha captures, leading to a thermonuclear runaway via the rp-process. One of the two paths to a breakout from the hot CNO cycle is the route starting from ^14O(α,p)^17F followed by ^17F(p,γ)^18Ne and ^18Ne(α,p). The ^14O(α,p) reaction proceeds through resonant states in ^18Ne, making the reaction rate dependent on the excitation energies and spins as well as partial and total widths of these resonances. We used the ^16O(^3He,n) reaction and charged particle-neutron coincidences to measure the structure details of levels in ^18Ne. In particular, the α and proton decay branching ratios via ground state and excited states in ^17F were measured. The analysis of the data will allow us to provide crucial information to be included in the reaction network calculations that could have great impact on the nuclear energy generation and nucleosynthesis that occur in these explosive environments.

  6. Occupied and unoccupied electronic structures of an L-cysteine film studied by core-absorption and resonant photoelectron spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, M.; Hideshima, T.; Azuma, J.; Yamamoto, I.; Imamura, M.; Takahashi, K.

    2016-04-01

    Unoccupied and occupied electronic structures of an L-cysteine film have been studied by absorption and resonant photoelectron spectroscopies. Core absorptions at S-L, C-K, N-K, and O-K levels indicate that the lower unoccupied states are predominantly composed of oxygen-2p, carbon-2p, and sulfur-4s+3d orbitals, while higher unoccupied states may be attributed dominantly to nitrogen-np (n ≥ 3), oxygen-np (n ≥ 3), and sulfur-ns+md (n ≥ 4, m ≥ 3) orbitals. Resonant photoelectron spectra at S-L23 and O-K levels indicate that the highest occupied state is originated from sulfur-3sp orbitals, while oxygen-2sp orbitals contribute to the deeper valence states. The delocalization lifetimes of the oxygen-1s and sulfur-2p excited states are estimated from a core-hole clock method to be about 9 ± 1 and 125 ± 25 fs, respectively.

  7. Occupied and unoccupied electronic structures of an L-cysteine film studied by core-absorption and resonant photoelectron spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamada, M., E-mail: kamada@cc.saga-u.ac.jp; Hideshima, T.; Azuma, J.; Yamamoto, I.; Imamura, M.; Takahashi, K. [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, Honjo 1, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Unoccupied and occupied electronic structures of an L-cysteine film have been studied by absorption and resonant photoelectron spectroscopies. Core absorptions at S-L, C-K, N-K, and O-K levels indicate that the lower unoccupied states are predominantly composed of oxygen-2p, carbon-2p, and sulfur-4s+3d orbitals, while higher unoccupied states may be attributed dominantly to nitrogen-np (n ≥ 3), oxygen-np (n ≥ 3), and sulfur-ns+md (n ≥ 4,  m ≥ 3) orbitals. Resonant photoelectron spectra at S-L{sub 23} and O-K levels indicate that the highest occupied state is originated from sulfur-3sp orbitals, while oxygen-2sp orbitals contribute to the deeper valence states. The delocalization lifetimes of the oxygen-1s and sulfur-2p excited states are estimated from a core-hole clock method to be about 9 ± 1 and 125 ± 25 fs, respectively.

  8. Studies of the resonance structure in $D^0\\to K^0_S K^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Buchanan, Emma; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fohl, Klaus; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Sterpka, Christopher Francis; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-03-31

    Amplitude models are applied to studies of resonance structure in $D^0\\to K^0_S K^- \\pi^+$ and $D^0\\to K^0_S K^+ \\pi^-$ decays using $pp$ collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3.0\\,\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ collected by the LHCb experiment. Relative magnitude and phase information is determined, and coherence factors and related observables are computed for both the whole phase space and a restricted region of $100\\,\\mathrm{MeV/}c^2$ around the $K^{*}(892)^{\\pm}$ resonance. Two formulations for the $K\\pi$ $S$-wave are used, both of which give a good description of the data. The ratio of branching fractions $\\mathcal{B}(D^0\\to K^0_S K^+ \\pi^-)/\\mathcal{B}(D^0\\to K^0_S K^- \\pi^+)$ is measured to be $0.655\\pm0.004\\,(\\textrm{stat})\\pm0.006\\,(\\textrm{syst})$ over the full phase space and $0.370\\pm0.003\\,(\\textrm{stat})\\pm0.012\\,(\\textrm{syst})$ in the restricted region. A search for $CP$ violation is performed using the amplitude models and no significant effect is found. Predictions from $SU(3)$ fl...

  9. Optimization of relativistic backward wave oscillator with non-uniform slow wave structure and a resonant reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zaigao; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    This letter optimizes synchronously 18 parameters of a relativistic backward wave oscillator with non-uniform slow wave structure (SWS) and a resonant reflector by using the parallel genetic algorithms and particle-in-cell simulation. The optimization results show that the generation efficiency of microwave from the electron beam has increased 32% compared to that of the original device. After optimization, the electromagnetic mode propagating in the resonant changes from the original TM 020 mode of reflector to higher-order TM 021 mode, which has a high reflection coefficient in a broader frequency range than that of the former. The modulation of current inside the optimized device is much deeper than that in the original one. The product of the electric field and current is defined. Observing this product, it is found that the interaction of the electron beam with the electromagnetic wave in the optimized device is much stronger than that in the original device, and at the rear part of SWS of the optimized device, the electron beam dominantly gives out the energy to the electromagnetic wave, leading to the higher generation efficiency of microwave than that of the original device

  10. Hydrogen depth resolution in multilayer metal structures, comparison of elastic recoil detection and resonant nuclear reaction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielunski, L.S. E-mail: leszekw@optushome.com.au; Grambole, D.; Kreissig, U.; Groetzschel, R.; Harding, G.; Szilagyi, E

    2002-05-01

    Four different metals: Al, Cu, Ag and Au have been used to produce four special multilayer samples to study the depth resolution of hydrogen. The layer structure of each sample was analysed using 2 MeV He Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, 4.5 MeV He elastic recoil detection (ERD) and 30 MeV F{sup 6+} HIERD. Moreover the hydrogen distribution was analysed in all samples using H({sup 15}N, {alpha}{gamma}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) with resonance at 6.385 MeV. The results show that the best depth resolution and sensitivity for hydrogen detection are offered by resonance NRA. The He ERD shows good depth resolution only for the near surface hydrogen. In this technique the depth resolution is rapidly reduced with depth due to multiple scattering effects. The 30 MeV F{sup 6+} HIERD demonstrated similar hydrogen depth resolution to He ERD for low mass metals and HIERD resolution is substantially better for heavy metals and deep layers.

  11. Threshold guidance update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickham, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is developing the concept of threshold quantities for use in determining which waste materials must be handled as radioactive waste and which may be disposed of as nonradioactive waste at its sites. Waste above this concentration level would be managed as radioactive or mixed waste (if hazardous chemicals are present); waste below this level would be handled as sanitary waste. Last years' activities (1984) included the development of a threshold guidance dose, the development of threshold concentrations corresponding to the guidance dose, the development of supporting documentation, review by a technical peer review committee, and review by the DOE community. As a result of the comments, areas have been identified for more extensive analysis, including an alternative basis for selection of the guidance dose and the development of quality assurance guidelines. Development of quality assurance guidelines will provide a reasonable basis for determining that a given waste stream qualifies as a threshold waste stream and can then be the basis for a more extensive cost-benefit analysis. The threshold guidance and supporting documentation will be revised, based on the comments received. The revised documents will be provided to DOE by early November. DOE-HQ has indicated that the revised documents will be available for review by DOE field offices and their contractors

  12. Magnetic x-ray linear dichroism in resonant and non-resonant Gd 4f photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, S.; Gammon, W.J.; Pappas, D.P. [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The enhancement of the magnetic linear dichroism in resonant 4f photoemission (MLDRPE) is studied from a 50 monolayer film of Gd/Y(0001). The ALS at beamline 7.0.1 provided the source of linearly polarized x-rays used in this study. The polarized light was incident at an angle of 30 degrees relative to the film plane, and the sample magnetization was perpendicular to the photon polarization. The linear dichroism of the 4f core levels is measured as the photon energy is tuned through the 4d-4f resonance. The authors find that the MLDRPE asymmetry is strongest at the resonance. Near the threshold the asymmetry has several features which are out of phase with the fine structure of the total yield.

  13. Magnetic x-ray linear dichroism in resonant and non-resonant Gd 4f photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.; Gammon, W.J.; Pappas, D.P.

    1997-01-01

    The enhancement of the magnetic linear dichroism in resonant 4f photoemission (MLDRPE) is studied from a 50 monolayer film of Gd/Y(0001). The ALS at beamline 7.0.1 provided the source of linearly polarized x-rays used in this study. The polarized light was incident at an angle of 30 degrees relative to the film plane, and the sample magnetization was perpendicular to the photon polarization. The linear dichroism of the 4f core levels is measured as the photon energy is tuned through the 4d-4f resonance. The authors find that the MLDRPE asymmetry is strongest at the resonance. Near the threshold the asymmetry has several features which are out of phase with the fine structure of the total yield

  14. 河流水生态修复阈值界定指标体系初步构建%The preliminary structure of definition index system for river water ecological restoration threshold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于鲁冀; 吕晓燕; 宋思远; 梁静; 王小青

    2013-01-01

    pollution load, there were very few study on the threshold of ecological restoration. The studies on index system of river ecological restoration threshold had yet appeared. By analyzing the importance of threshold in river ecological restoration, it pointed out that the determination of the river restoration threshold was the basis of degraded river ecological restoration and provided a scientific basis and decision support for the area to restore the river ecosystem. What’s more, it was urgent needs for the development of the water environment management. On the basis, it put forward the river ecological restoration threshold concept which was to define to which degradation extent should the river ecological systems need to be restored according to river ecosystem natural properties and functions of river and needs of regional socio-economic development, If the degree of degradation were more than the ecological restoration threshold, it will need manual restoration. Otherwise, it will not need restoration. Through summarizing index system construction principles, screening methods and threshold calculation methods, this paper put forward the technical route of river ecological restoration threshold. Combining frequency analysis method with theory analysis method, index system and threshold calculation method system of river ecological restoration threshold were initially built on six elements (physical structure, hydrological conditions, water quality, aquatic organisms, stream function and social economic) which influenced river restoration. This laid the foundation for next quantitative screening and threshold calculation of river ecological restoration threshold index system.

  15. Resonant structure, formation and stability of the planetary system HD155358

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silburt, Ari; Rein, Hanno

    2017-08-01

    Two Jovian-sized planets are orbiting the star HD155358 near exact mean motion resonance (MMR) commensurability. In this work, we re-analyse the radial velocity (RV) data previously collected by Robertson et al. Using a Bayesian framework, we construct two models - one that includes and the other that excludes gravitational planet-planet interactions (PPIs). We find that the orbital parameters from our PPI and no planet-planet interaction (noPPI) models differ by up to 2σ, with our noPPI model being statistically consistent with previous results. In addition, our new PPI model strongly favours the planets being in MMR, while our noPPI model strongly disfavours MMR. We conduct a stability analysis by drawing samples from our PPI model's posterior distribution and simulating them for 109 yr, finding that our best-fitting values land firmly in a stable region of parameter space. We explore a series of formation models that migrate the planets into their observed MMR. We then use these models to directly fit to the observed RV data, where each model is uniquely parametrized by only three constants describing its migration history. Using a Bayesian framework, we find that a number of migration models fit the RV data surprisingly well, with some migration parameters being ruled out. Our analysis shows that PPIs are important to take into account when modelling observations of multiplanetary systems. The additional information that one can gain from interacting models can help constrain planet migration parameters.

  16. Design and Analysis of a New Tuning Fork Structure for Resonant Pressure Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Sun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a micromachined resonant pressure sensor. The sensor is designed to optimize the sensitivity and reduce the cross-talk between the driving electrodes and sensing electrodes. The relationship between the sensitivity of the sensor and the main design parameters is analyzed both theoretically and numerically. The sensing and driving electrodes are optimized to get both high sensing capacitance and low cross-talk. This sensor is fabricated using a micromachining process based on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI wafer. An open-loop measurement system and a closed-loop self-oscillation system is employed to measure the characteristics of the sensor. The experiment result shows that the sensor has a pressure sensitivity of about 29 Hz/kPa, a nonlinearity of 0.02%FS, a hysteresis error of 0.05%FS, and a repeatability error of 0.01%FS. The temperature coefficient is less than 2 Hz/°C in the range of −40 to 80 °C and the short-term stability of the sensor is better than 0.005%FS.

  17. Electromagnetic structure of the lowest-lying decuplet resonances in covariant chiral perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, L. S.; Camalich, J. Martin; Vacas, M. J. Vicente

    2009-01-01

    We present a calculation of the leading SU(3)-breaking O(p 3 ) corrections to the electromagnetic moments and charge radius of the lowest-lying decuplet resonances in covariant chiral perturbation theory. In particular, the magnetic dipole moment of the members of the decuplet is predicted fixing the only low-energy constant (LEC) present up to this order with the well-measured magnetic dipole moment of the Ω - . We predict μ Δ ++ =6.04(13) and μ Δ + =2.84(2), which agree well with the current experimental information. For the electric quadrupole moment and the charge radius, we use state-of-the-art lattice QCD results to determine the corresponding LECs, whereas for the magnetic octupole moment there is no unknown LEC up to the order considered here, and we obtain a pure prediction. We compare our results with those reported in large N c , lattice QCD, heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory, and other models.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the structure elucidation and biosynthesis of natural products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meksuriyen, D.

    1988-01-01

    Examination of a chloroform extract of Dracaena loureiri Gagnep (Agavaceae), a Thia medicinal plant possessing antibacterial activity, has led to the isolation of fifteen flavenoids. The biogenic relationships among these flavenoids isolated were briefly discussed. Definition of the skeleton and the unambiguous assignment of all of the protons of the isolates was achieved through extensive 2D-homonuclear chemical shift correlation, nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) difference spectroscopy and 2D-NOE experiments. The 1 H and 13 C NMR spectra of staurosporine, a potent biologically active agent from Streptomyces staurosporeus, were unambiguously assigned by using 2D homonuclear chemical shift correlation, NOE, 1 H-detected heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence via direct coupling and via multiple-bond coupling for resonance assignments of protonated and nonprotonated carbons, respectively. S. Staurosporeus was found to utilize endogenous and exogenous D- and L-isomers of trytophan in the production of staurosporine. The biosynthesis of staurosporine was examined by employing carbon-14, tritium, and carbon-13 labeled precursors

  19. Direct determination of resonance energy transfer in photolyase: structural alignment for the functional state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chuang; Guo, Lijun; Ai, Yuejie; Li, Jiang; Wang, Lijuan; Sancar, Aziz; Luo, Yi; Zhong, Dongping

    2014-11-13

    Photoantenna is essential to energy transduction in photoinduced biological machinery. A photoenzyme, photolyase, has a light-harvesting pigment of methenyltetrahydrofolate (MTHF) that transfers its excitation energy to the catalytic flavin cofactor FADH¯ to enhance DNA-repair efficiency. Here we report our systematic characterization and direct determination of the ultrafast dynamics of resonance energy transfer from excited MTHF to three flavin redox states in E. coli photolyase by capturing the intermediates formed through the energy transfer and thus excluding the electron-transfer quenching pathway. We observed 170 ps for excitation energy transferring to the fully reduced hydroquinone FADH¯, 20 ps to the fully oxidized FAD, and 18 ps to the neutral semiquinone FADH(•), and the corresponding orientation factors (κ(2)) were determined to be 2.84, 1.53 and 1.26, respectively, perfectly matching with our calculated theoretical values. Thus, under physiological conditions and over the course of evolution, photolyase has adopted the optimized orientation of its photopigment to efficiently convert solar energy for repair of damaged DNA.

  20. Hairpin structures in DNA containing arabinofuranosylcytosine. A combination of nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieters, J.M.L.; de Vroom, E.; van der Marel, G.A.; van Boom, J.H.; Altona, C.; Koning, T.H.G.; Kaptein, R.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and model-building studies were carried out on the hairpin form of the octamer d(CG a CTAGCG) ( a C = arabinofuranosylcytosine), referred to as the TA compound. The nonexchangeable protons of the TA compound were assigned by means of nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) and correlated spectroscopy (COSY). Form a detailed analysis of the coupling data and of the NOESY spectra the following conclusions are reached: (i) the hairpin consists of a stem of three Watson-Crick type base pairs, and the two remaining residues, T(4) and dA(5), participate in a loop. (ii) All sugar rings show conformational flexibility although a strong preference for the S-type (C2'-endo) conformer is observed. (iii) The thymine does not stack upon the 3' side of the stem as expected, but swings into the minor groove. (iv) At the 5'-3' loop-stem junction a stacking discontinuity occurs as a consequence of a sharp turn in that part of the backbone, caused by the unusual β + and γ t torsion angles in residue dG(6). (v) The A base slides over the 5' side of the stem to stack upon the a C(3) residue at the 3' side of the stem in an antiparallel fashion. On the basis of J couplings and a set approximate proton-proton distances from NOE cross peaks, a model for the hairpin was constructed

  1. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation of anatomical structure and function of the ventricles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Usui, Masahiro; Takenaka, Katsu

    1990-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is being widely employed for evaluation of cardiovascular anatomies and functions. However, the indications for cardiac MRI to obtain information which cannot be obtained using other conventional methods have not yet been determined. To demonstrate the usefulness of MRI in delineating the apex of the left ventricle and free wall of the right ventricle, end-diastolic short axis MRI images were obtained in 20 patients with apical hypertrophy and in 9 normal volunteers. To compare the accuracy of estimations of left ventricular volumes obtained using the modified Simpson's method of MRI with that using the MRI area length method, 19 patients, in whom left ventriculography had been performed, were studied. The apex of the left ventricle was evaluated circumferentially and distribution of hypertrophied muscles was defined. Sixty-five percent of the length of the right ventricular free wall was clearly delineated. Correlation coefficients of the ejection fraction between MRI and angiography were 0.85 with the modified Simpson's method of MRI, and 0.62 with the area length method of MRI. Three themes were chosen to demonstrate good clinical indications for cardiac MRI. (author)

  2. Near threshold fatigue testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, D. C.; Strum, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurement of the near-threshold fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) behavior provides a basis for the design and evaluation of components subjected to high cycle fatigue. Typically, the near-threshold fatigue regime describes crack growth rates below approximately 10(exp -5) mm/cycle (4 x 10(exp -7) inch/cycle). One such evaluation was recently performed for the binary alloy U-6Nb. The procedures developed for this evaluation are described in detail to provide a general test method for near-threshold FCGR testing. In particular, techniques for high-resolution measurements of crack length performed in-situ through a direct current, potential drop (DCPD) apparatus, and a method which eliminates crack closure effects through the use of loading cycles with constant maximum stress intensity are described.

  3. 1H and 31P resonance assignments and secondary structure of hairpin conformer of IA mismatched oligonucleotide d-GGTACIAGTACC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chary, K.V.R.; Rastogi, V.K.; Govil, Girjesh

    1994-01-01

    Almost complete 1 H and 31 P resonance assignments of two coexisting conformers, duplex and an hairpin, of d-GGTACIAGTACC at 1.25mM concentration and 305 K have been achieved. The results demonstrate that the hairpin conformer has a structure with two purines I6 and A7 forming a two-base loop on a B-DNA stem. Stacking is continued on the 5'-side of the loop, with the I6 stacked upon C5. The base A7, on the 3'-side of the loop stacks partially with I6. The glycosidic angle for G8 is in the anti domain and it maintains normal Watson-Crick base-pairing with the opposite C5. (author). 28 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Structural characterization of phospholipids by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marto, J A; White, F M; Seldomridge, S; Marshall, A G

    1995-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry provides for structural analysis of the principal biological phospholipids: glycerophosphatidylcholine, -ethanolamine, -serine, and -inositol. Both positive and negative molecular or quasimolecular ions are generated in high abundance. Isolated molecular ions may be collisionally activated in the source side of a dual trap mass analyzer, yielding fragments serving to identify the polar head group (positive ion mode) and fatty acid side chains (negative ion mode). Azimuthal quadrupolar excitation following collisionally activated dissociation refocuses productions close to the solenoid axis; subsequent transfer of product ions to the analyzer ion trap allows for high-resolution mass analysis. Cyro-cooling of the sample probe with liquid nitrogen greatly reduces matrix adduction encountered in the negative ion mode.

  5. Azide derivatized anticancer agents of Vitamin K 3: X-ray structural, DSC, resonance spectral and API studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badave, Kirti; Patil, Yogesh; Gonnade, Rajesh; Srinivas, Darbha; Dasgupta, Rajan; Khan, Ayesha; Rane, Sandhya

    2011-12-01

    Compound 1 [1-imino (acetyl hydrazino)-Vitamin K 3], displays valence tautomerically related electronic isomers as Form I and Form II. Form I exhibits 2D packing fragment with 1D ribbon chains of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and shows EPR silent features. While Form II is EPR active and exhibits biradical nature with double quantum transitions at g = 2.0040. 1H NMR of compound 2, [1-imino (hydrazino carboxylate)-Vitamin K 3] and Form II exhibit π delocalization via resonance assisted H-bonding [RAHB] effect compared to Form I. Molecular interactions in Form I and II are visualized by DSC. The electronic structures of compounds 1 and 2 have been correlated to their API values by measuring anticancer activities, mitochondrial potentials and DNA shearing patterns. Form II and compound 2 indicate mitochondria mediated apoptosis (˜75% cell death) while Form I causes 35% cell death.

  6. Strong reflection and periodic resonant transmission of helical edge states in topological-insulator stub-like resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagaki, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The helical edge states of two-dimensional topological insulators (TIs) experience appreciable quantum mechanical scattering in narrow channels when the width changes abruptly. The interference of the geometry scattering in narrow-wide-narrow waveguide structures is shown to give rise to the strong suppression of transmission when the incident energy is barely above the propagation threshold. Periodic resonant transmission takes place in this high reflection regime while the length of the wide section is varied. The resonance condition is governed by the transverse confinement in the wide section, where the form of quantization is manifested to differ for the two orthogonal directions. The confined energy levels in TI quantum dots are derived based on this observation. In addition, the off-diagonal spin-orbit term is found to produce an anomalous resonance state, which merges with the bottom ordinary resonance state to annihilate

  7. Resonant Plasmonic Enhancement of InGaN/GaN LED using Periodically Structured Ag Nanodisks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fadil, Ahmed; Iida, Daisuke; Zhu, Xiaolong

    2013-01-01

    Ag nanodisks are fabricated on GaN-based LED to enhance emission efficiency. Nanosphere lithography is used to obtain a periodic nano-structure, and a photoluminescence enhancement of 2.7 is reported with Ag nanodisk diameter of 330 nm.......Ag nanodisks are fabricated on GaN-based LED to enhance emission efficiency. Nanosphere lithography is used to obtain a periodic nano-structure, and a photoluminescence enhancement of 2.7 is reported with Ag nanodisk diameter of 330 nm....

  8. Malnutrition and Risk of Structural Brain Changes Seen on Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de van der Schueren, Marian A E; Lonterman-Monasch, Sabine; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Kramer, Mark H; Maier, Andrea B; Muller, Majon

    2016-12-01

    To study the associations between protein energy malnutrition, micronutrient malnutrition, brain atrophy, and cerebrovascular lesions. Cross-sectional. Geriatric outpatient clinic. Older adults (N = 475; mean age 80 ± 7). Nutritional status was assessed using the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) and according to serum micronutrient levels (vitamins B1, B6, B12, D; folic acid). White matter hyperintensities (WMHs), global cortical brain atrophy, and medial temporal lobe atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were rated using visual rating scales. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess associations between the three MNA categories (malnutrition (MNA = 17-23.5). Participants at risk of malnutrition (odds ratio (OR) = 1.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01-3.71) or who were malnourished (OR = 2.80, 95% CI = 1.19-6.60) had a greater probability of having severe WMHs independent of age and sex than those with adequate nutritional status. Results remained significant after further adjustments for cognitive function, depressive symptoms, cardiovascular risk factors, history of cardiovascular disease, smoking and alcohol use, and micronutrient levels. Lower vitamin B1 (OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 1.11-2.08) and B12 (OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.02-2.04) levels were also related to greater risk of severe WMHs, independent of age and sex. Results remained significant after additional adjustments. MNA and vitamin levels were not associated with measures of brain atrophy. Malnutrition and lower vitamin B1 and B12 levels were independently associated with greater risk of WMHs. Underlying mechanisms need to be further clarified, and whether nutritional interventions can modify these findings also needs to be studied. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  9. Brain structural changes in spasmodic dysphonia: A multimodal magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostic, Vladimir S; Agosta, Federica; Sarro, Lidia; Tomić, Aleksandra; Kresojević, Nikola; Galantucci, Sebastiano; Svetel, Marina; Valsasina, Paola; Filippi, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    The pathophysiology of spasmodic dysphonia is poorly understood. This study evaluated patterns of cortical morphology, basal ganglia, and white matter microstructural alterations in patients with spasmodic dysphonia relative to healthy controls. T1-weighted and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were obtained from 13 spasmodic dysphonia patients and 30 controls. Tract-based spatial statistics was applied to compare diffusion tensor MRI indices (i.e., mean, radial and axial diffusivities, and fractional anisotropy) between groups on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Cortical measures were analyzed using surface-based morphometry. Basal ganglia were segmented on T1-weighted images, and volumes and diffusion tensor MRI metrics of nuclei were measured. Relative to controls, patients with spasmodic dysphonia showed increased cortical surface area of the primary somatosensory cortex bilaterally in a region consistent with the buccal sensory representation, as well as right primary motor cortex, left superior temporal, supramarginal and superior frontal gyri. A decreased cortical area was found in the rolandic operculum bilaterally, left superior/inferior parietal and lingual gyri, as well as in the right angular gyrus. Compared to controls, spasmodic dysphonia patients showed increased diffusivities and decreased fractional anisotropy of the corpus callosum and major white matter tracts, in the right hemisphere. Altered diffusion tensor MRI measures were found in the right caudate and putamen nuclei with no volumetric changes. Multi-level alterations in voice-controlling networks, that included regions devoted not only to sensorimotor integration, motor preparation and motor execution, but also processing of auditory and visual information during speech, might have a role in the pathophysiology of spasmodic dysphonia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Systematics of the excitation of M1 resonances in medium heavy nuclei by 200 MeV proton inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djalali, C.; Marty, N.; Morlet, M.

    1982-01-01

    In a series of seventeen nuclei ranging from 51 V to 140 Ca, broad resonance structures are observed at energies between 8 and 10 MeV, nearly mass independent. These resonances have very forward peaked angular distributions which imply that they are populated by an angular momentum transfer of zero. This together with the observed excitation energies suggests an M1 character for these resonances. In 51 V, 58 Ni, 60 Ni, 62 Ni, a sharp peak located at an excitation energy above the threshold for neutron emission is interpreted as a part of the T 0+1 component of the M1 resonances. Cross-sections are given for all the M1 resonances. For 58 Ni, 90 Zr, 92 Mo, 120 Sn and 140 Ca, an ''attenuation'' factor for the cross-sections is extracted in a OWIA calculation assuming simple shell model structures for these resonances

  11. Dual curved photonic crystal ring resonator based channel drop filter using two-dimensional photonic crystal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhipa, Mayur Kumar, E-mail: mayurchhipa1@gmail.com [Deptt. of Electronics and Communication Engineering, Government Engineering College Ajmer Rajasthan INDIA (India); Dusad, Lalit Kumar [Rajasthan Technical University Kota, Rajasthan (India)

    2016-05-06

    In this paper channel drop filter (CDF) is designed using dual curved photonic crystal ring resonator (PCRR). The photonic band gap (PBG) is calculated by plane wave expansion (PWE) method and the photonic crystal (PhC) based on two dimensional (2D) square lattice periodic arrays of silicon (Si) rods in air structure have been investigated using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The number of rods in Z and X directions is 21 and 20 respectively with lattice constant 0.540 nm and rod radius r = 0.1 µm. The channel drop filter has been optimized for telecommunication wavelengths λ = 1.591 µm with refractive indices 3.533. In the designed structure further analysis is also done by changing whole rods refractive index and it has been observed that this filter may be used for filtering several other channels also. The designed structure is useful for CWDM systems. This device may serve as a key component in photonic integrated circuits. The device is ultra compact with the overall size around 123 µm{sup 2}.

  12. Use of chemical fractionation and proton nuclear magnetic resonance to probe the physical structure of the primary plant cell wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, I.E.P.; Wallace, J.C.; MacKay, A.L.; Volke, F.

    1990-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance has been used to monitor the microscopic physical properties of etiolated hypocotyl cell walls from Phaseolus vulgaris L. at all stages in a series of chemical fractionations with ammonium oxalate and potassium hydroxide. Solid echo measurements indicate that 75% of the polymers in the intact cell wall, including the cellulose and most of the hemicelluloses, are arranged such that there is almost complete restraint of molecular motion. The chemical fractionations generally altered the physical structures of the remaining cell wall components. Digestion with 0.25% ammonium oxalate/oxalic acid solubilized the pectin and increased the mobility of the hemicellulose I component. Extraction with 4% potassium hydroxide removed the hemicellulose I component and loosened the hemicellulose II. Further extraction with 24% potassium hydroxide removed the hemicellulose II and loosened some of the cellulose. The cellulose crystallinity, as monitored by Jeener echo measurements decreased from 83% to 63% during these fractionations. We conclude that, while hemicellulose I is firmly attached to hemicellulose II, it is not in a closely packed structure. Hemicellulose II is strongly bound to cellulose and has a much more closely packed structure

  13. Structures excited by heavy ions in 208Pb target. Interpretation involving giant resonances and multiphonon excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, P.

    1984-01-01

    Kinetic energy spectra of heavy fragments from the 36Ar+208Pb reaction at 11 MeV/n and 20 Ne+ 208 Pb at 30 MeV/n have been measured with a time of flight spectrometer. Numerous structures ranging up to 100 MeV excitation energy are observed in the inelastic and few nucleon transfer channels. These structures are shown to be due to an excitation of the 208 Pb target nucleus and not to decay products of excited ejectiles. Positions of low lying structures (E* 208 Pb. The linear response of the target nucleus to the external field created by the projectile is calculated microscopically in the Random Phase Approximation resolved using the Green's function method in coordinate space with a Skyrme interaction. In the independant quasi-boson approximation multiple phonon excitations reproduce the main features of the experimental data and appear as a plausible interpretation of the observed structures. The theoretical calculations and experimental observations suggest that multiphonon excitations play an important role in heavy ion reactions and contribute strongly to the kinetic energy dissipation [fr

  14. The mechanical structure of the WEST Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating launchers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vulliez, K., E-mail: karl.vulliez@cea.fr [Laboratoire d’étanchéité, CEA/DEN/DTEC/SDTC, 2 rue James Watt, 26700 Pierrelatte (France); Chen, Z. [Institute of Plasma Physics, CAS, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Ferlay, F. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Winkler, K. [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Helou, W.; Hillairet, J.; Mollard, P.; Patterlini, J.C.; Bernard, J.M.; Delaplanche, J.M.; Lombard, G.; Prou, M.; Volpe, R. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The design of a CW ICRH launcher for WEST was achieved. • Major upgrade were made on the launcher to improve performances and reliability. • 3 launchers are about to be built to be operated on WEST in 2015. • Increasing information will decrease quality if hospital costs are very different. • The compete RF and mechanical structure were analyzed by FEM. - Abstract: The WEST ICRH system has to deal with two challenging issues that no other ICRH system before ITER has faced simultaneously so far, i.e. ELMs resilience and Continuous Wave (CW) RF operation. The technical solution chosen to meet the requests imposed by the WEST scenarios is to build three new launchers based on the RF structure successfully tested in short pulses in 2007 on Tore Supra prototype launcher. This paper gives an overview of the mechanical structure of the CW ELMs resilient WEST ICRH launchers. The technical solutions chosen to drive the mechanical design are presented, in regard of the past experience on the 2007 TS prototype, together with the significant work carried out on the mechanical design to improve the launcher structure. The thermal and electro-mechanical analyses conducted and their impact on the launcher design are also presented. These three new CW ELMs resilient ICRH launchers are foreseen to be installed on WEST in 2016, and operational for the first plasmas.

  15. Ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging of the basal ganglia and related structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, B.R.; Temel, Y.; Roebroeck, A.; Uludag, K.; Ivanov, D.; Kuijf, M.L.; ter Haar Romeny, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation is a treatment for Parkinson's disease and other related disorders, involving the surgical placement of electrodes in the deeply situated basal ganglia or thalamic structures. Good clinical outcome requires accurate targeting. However, due to limited visibility of the target

  16. Roundtrip matrix method for calculating the leaky resonant modes of open nanophotonic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Mørk, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We present a numerical method for calculating quasi-normal modes of open nanophotonic structures. The method is based on scattering matrices and a unity eigenvalue of the roundtrip matrix of an internal cavity, and we develop it in detail with electromagnetic fields expanded on Bloch modes...

  17. Structural magnetic resonance imaging can identify trigeminal system abnormalities in classical trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle DeSouza

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN is a chronic pain disorder that has been described as one ofthe most severe pains one can suffer. The most prevalent theory of TN etiology is that the trigeminal nerve is compressed at the root entry zone (REZ by blood vessels. However, there is significant evidence showing a lack of neurovascular compression (NVC for many cases of classical TN. Furthermore, a considerable number of patients who are asymptomatic have MR evidence of NVC. Since there is no validated animal model that reproduces the clinical features of TN, our understanding of TN pathology mainly comes from biopsy studies that have limitations. Sophisticated structural MRI techniques including diffusion tensor imaging provide new opportunities to assess the trigeminal nerves and CNS to provide insight into TN etiology and pathogenesis. Specifically, studies have used high-resolution structural MRI methods to visualize patterns of trigeminal nerve-vessel relationships and to detect subtle pathological features at the trigeminal REZ. Structural MRI has also identified CNS abnormalities in cortical and subcortical gray matter and white matter and demonstrated that effective neurosurgical treatment for TN is associated with a reversal of specific nerve and brain abnormalities. In conclusion, this review highlights the advanced structural neuroimaging methods that are valuable tools to assess the trigeminal system in TN and may inform our current understanding of TN pathology. These methods may in the future have clinical utility for the development of neuroimaging-based biomarkers of TN.

  18. Radiography, Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Craniofacial Structures in Pig

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyllar, M.; Štembírek, Jan; Putnová, I.; Stehlík, L.; Odehnalová, S.; Buchtová, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 6 (2014), s. 435-452 ISSN 0340-2096 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP304/08/P289 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : craniofacial structures in pig Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 0.672, year: 2014

  19. Angular distributions of threshold photoneutrons from 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haacke, L.C.

    1973-01-01

    The shape of the 41 keV resonance in the 208 Pb(γ,n) 207 Pb reaction has been considered in some detail in view of recent reports of asymmetry interpreted in terms of interference between resonant and nonresonant neutron capture amplitudes. Additional threshold measurements were made using bremsstrahlung with an endpoint energy of 8.0 MeV. It has been concluded that asymmetry in the present data appears to be induced by the presence of an unresolved resonance, and that this interpretation of the resonance shape cannot be confuted on the basis of (n,γ) or total neutron cross section measurements made elsewhere. (author)

  20. Threshold factorization redux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chay, Junegone; Kim, Chul

    2018-05-01

    We reanalyze the factorization theorems for the Drell-Yan process and for deep inelastic scattering near threshold, as constructed in the framework of the soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), from a new, consistent perspective. In order to formulate the factorization near threshold in SCET, we should include an additional degree of freedom with small energy, collinear to the beam direction. The corresponding collinear-soft mode is included to describe the parton distribution function (PDF) near threshold. The soft function is modified by subtracting the contribution of the collinear-soft modes in order to avoid double counting on the overlap region. As a result, the proper soft function becomes infrared finite, and all the factorized parts are free of rapidity divergence. Furthermore, the separation of the relevant scales in each factorized part becomes manifest. We apply the same idea to the dihadron production in e+e- annihilation near threshold, and show that the resultant soft function is also free of infrared and rapidity divergences.

  1. Elaborating on Threshold Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rountree, Janet; Robins, Anthony; Rountree, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    We propose an expanded definition of Threshold Concepts (TCs) that requires the successful acquisition and internalisation not only of knowledge, but also its practical elaboration in the domains of applied strategies and mental models. This richer definition allows us to clarify the relationship between TCs and Fundamental Ideas, and to account…

  2. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  3. [Functional neuro-navigation and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging for the resection of gliomas involving eloquent language structures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-lei; Xu, Bai-nan; Wang, Fei; Meng, Xiang-hui; Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Jin-li; Yu, Xin-guang; Zhou, Ding-biao

    2011-08-01

    To explore the clinical value of functional neuro-navigation and high-field-strength intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) for the resection of intracerebral gliomas involving eloquent language structures. From April 2009 to April 2010, 48 patients with intracerebral gliomas involving eloquent language structures, were operated with functional neuro-navigation and iMRI. Blood oxygen level dependent functional MRI (BOLD-fMRI) was used to depict both Broca and Wernicke cortex, while diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) based fiber tracking was used to delineate arcuate fasciculus. The reconstructed language structures were integrated into a navigation system, so that intra-operative microscopic-based functional neuro-navigation could be achieved. iMRI was used to update the images for both language structures and residual tumors. All patients were evaluated for language function pre-operatively and post-operatively upon short-term and long-term follow-up. In all patients, functional neuro-navigation and iMRI were successfully achieved. In 38 cases (79.2%), gross total resection was accomplished, while in the rest 10 cases (20.8%), subtotal resection was achieved. Only 1 case (2.1%) developed long-term (more than 3 months) new language function deficits at post-operative follow-up. No peri-operative mortality was recorded. With functional neuro-navigation and iMRI, the eloquent structures for language can be precisely located, while the resection size can be accurately evaluated intra-operatively. This technique is safe and helpful for preservation of language function.

  4. Structure-Related Roles for the Conservation of the HIV-1 Fusion Peptide Sequence Revealed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Soraya; Huarte, Nerea; Rujas, Edurne; Andreu, David; Nieva, José L; Jiménez, María Angeles

    2017-10-17

    Despite extensive characterization of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) hydrophobic fusion peptide (FP), the structure-function relationships underlying its extraordinary degree of conservation remain poorly understood. Specifically, the fact that the tandem repeat of the FLGFLG tripeptide is absolutely conserved suggests that high hydrophobicity may not suffice to unleash FP function. Here, we have compared the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures adopted in nonpolar media by two FP surrogates, wtFP-tag and scrFP-tag, which had equal hydrophobicity but contained wild-type and scrambled core sequences LFLGFLG and FGLLGFL, respectively. In addition, these peptides were tagged at their C-termini with an epitope sequence that folded independently, thereby allowing Western blot detection without interfering with FP structure. We observed similar α-helical FP conformations for both specimens dissolved in the low-polarity medium 25% (v/v) 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP), but important differences in contact with micelles of the membrane mimetic dodecylphosphocholine (DPC). Thus, whereas wtFP-tag preserved a helix displaying a Gly-rich ridge, the scrambled sequence lost in great part the helical structure upon being solubilized in DPC. Western blot analyses further revealed the capacity of wtFP-tag to assemble trimers in membranes, whereas membrane oligomers were not observed in the case of the scrFP-tag sequence. We conclude that, beyond hydrophobicity, preserving sequence order is an important feature for defining the secondary structures and oligomeric states adopted by the HIV FP in membranes.

  5. Fractal network dimension and viscoelastic powerlaw behavior: II. An experimental study of structure-mimicking phantoms by magnetic resonance elastography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Jing; Posnansky, Oleg; Hirsch, Sebastian; Scheel, Michael; Taupitz, Matthias; Sack, Ingolf; Braun, Juergen

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of the complex shear modulus, G*, of soft biological tissue is governed by the rigidity and topology of multiscale mechanical networks. Multifrequency elastography can measure the frequency dependence of G* in soft biological tissue, providing information about the structure of tissue networks at multiple scales. In this study, the viscoelastic properties of structure-mimicking phantoms containing tangled paper stripes embedded in agarose gel are investigated by multifrequency magnetic resonance elastography within the dynamic range of 40–120 Hz. The effective media viscoelastic properties are analyzed in terms of the storage modulus (the real part of G*), the loss modulus (the imaginary part of G*) and the viscoelastic powerlaw given by the two-parameter springpot model. Furthermore, diffusion tensor imaging is used for investigating the effect of network structures on water mobility. The following observations were made: the random paper networks with fractal dimensions between 2.481 and 2.755 had no or minor effects on the storage modulus, whereas the loss modulus was significantly increased about 2.2 kPa per fractal dimension unit (R = 0.962, P < 0.01). This structural sensitivity of the loss modulus was significantly correlated with the springpot powerlaw exponent (0.965, P < 0.01), while for the springpot elasticity modulus, a trend was discernable (0.895, P < 0.05). No effect of the paper network on water diffusion was observed. The gel phantoms with embedded paper stripes presented here are a feasible way for experimentally studying the effect of network topology on soft-tissue viscoelastic parameters. In the dynamic range of in vivo elastography, the fractal network dimension primarily correlates to the loss behavior of soft tissue as can be seen from the loss modulus or the powerlaw exponent of the springpot model. These findings represent the experimental underpinning of structure-sensitive elastography for an improved characterization of

  6. Structural phase transition at the percolation threshold in epitaxial (La0.7Ca0.3MnO3)1-x:(MgO)x nanocomposite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshnyaga, V; Damaschke, B; Shapoval, O; Belenchuk, A; Faupel, J; Lebedev, O I; Verbeeck, J; van Tendeloo, G; Mücksch, M; Tsurkan, V; Tidecks, R; Samwer, K

    2003-04-01

    'Colossal magnetoresistance' in perovskite manganites such as La0.7Ca0.3MnO3 (LCMO), is caused by the interplay of ferro-paramagnetic, metal-insulator and structural phase transitions. Moreover, different electronic phases can coexist on a very fine scale resulting in percolative electron transport. Here we report on (LCMO)1-x:(MgO)x (0 strain. The largest colossal magnetoresistance of 10(5)% was observed at the percolation threshold in the conductivity at xc 0.3, which is coupled to a structural phase transition from orthorhombic (0 < x < or 0.1) to rhombohedral R3c structure (0.33 < or = x < or = 0.8). An increase of the Curie temperature for the Rc phase was observed. These results may provide a general method for controlling the magnetotransport properties of manganite-based composite films by appropriate choice of the second phase.

  7. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of structural magnetic resonance imaging data in a two-center study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalavi, Sima; Simmons, Andrew; Dijkstra, Hildebrand; Barker, Gareth J; Reinders, AAT Simone

    2012-01-01

    Multi-center magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies present an opportunity to advance research by pooling data. However, brain measurements derived from MR-images are susceptible to differences in MR-sequence parameters. It is therefore necessary to determine whether there is an interaction between the sequence parameters and the effect of interest, and to minimise any such interaction by careful choice of acquisition parameters. As an exemplar of the issues involved in multi-center studies, we present data from a study in which we aimed to optimize a set of volumetric MRI-protocols to define a protocol giving data that are consistent and reproducible across two centers and over time. Optimization was achieved based on data quality and quantitative measures, in our case using FreeSurfer and Voxel Based Morphometry approaches. Our approach consisted of a series of five comparisons. Firstly, a single-center dataset was collected, using a range of candidate pulse-sequences and parameters chosen on the basis of previous literature. Based on initial results, a number of minor changes were implemented to optimize the pulse-sequences, and a second single-center dataset was collected. FreeSurfer data quality measures were compared between datasets in order to determine the best performing sequence(s), which were taken forward to the next stage of testing. We subsequently acquired short-term and long-term two-center reproducibility data, and quantitative measures were again assessed to determine the protocol with the highest reproducibility across centers. Effects of a scanner software and hardware upgrade on the reproducibility of the protocols at one of the centers were also evaluated. Assessing the quality measures from the first two datasets allowed us to define artefact-free protocols, all with high image quality as assessed by FreeSurfer. Comparing the quantitative test and retest measures, we found high within-center reproducibility for all protocols, but lower

  8. New structural studies of liquid crystal by reflectivity and resonant X-ray diffraction; Nouvelles etudes structurales de cristaux liquides par reflectivite et diffraction resonante des rayons X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, P

    2007-04-15

    This memory presents three structural studies of smectic Liquid Crystals by reflectivity and resonant diffraction of X-rays. It is divided in five chapters. In the first a short introduction to Liquid Crystals is given. In particular, the smectic phases that are the object of this study are presented. The second chapter is consecrated to the X-ray experimental techniques that were used in this work. The three last chapters present the works on which this thesis can be divided. Chapter three demonstrates on free-standing films of MHPOBC (historic liquid crystal that possesses the antiferroelectric sub-phases) the possibility to extend the technique of resonant X-ray diffraction to liquid crystals without resonant element. In the fourth chapter the structure of the B{sub 2} liquid crystal phase of bent-core molecules (or banana molecules) is elucidated by using resonant X-ray diffraction combined with polarization analysis of the diffracted beam. A model of the polarization of the resonant beam diffracted by four different structures proposed for the B{sub 2} phase is developed in this chapter. In the fifth chapter a smectic binary mixture presenting a very original critical point of phase separation is studied by X-ray reflectivity and optical microscopy. A concentration gradient in the direction perpendicular to the plane of the film seems to be induced by the free-standing film geometry. The results of a simplified model of the system are compatible with this interpretation.

  9. Structural characterization of heat treated pitch by solid state /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sfihi, H.; Tougne, P.; Legrand, A.P.; Couderc, P.; Saint-Romain, J.L.

    1988-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to determine structural parameters (aromaticity factor, fractions of protonated and non-protonated aromatic carbons) of some pitches, and to follow their evolution as a function of the heat treatment duration. For such a determination, /sup 13/C-/sup 1/H cross polarization combined with magic angle spinning and dipolar dephasing (CP/MAS/DD) NMR was used. 15 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Recurrent ponded infiltration into structured soil : a magnetic resonance imaging study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Votrubová, Jana; Císlerová, M.; Gao Amin, M.; Hall, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 12 (2003), 21/1-21/12 ISSN 0043-1397 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3060001; GA AV ČR IAA3060002; GA MŽP SA/650/5/03 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2060917 Keywords : structured soil * infiltration -outflow experiment * preferential flow Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 1.549, year: 2003

  11. Search for resonance structures in inclusive charged pion spectra from p-barp annihilation at rest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelopoulos, A.; Apostolakis, A.; Papaelias, P.

    1985-01-01

    The charged pion momentum spectra from p-barp annihilation at rest have been measured with high statistics. A search for structures finds four narrow lines which are identified with the absorption and decay processes of kaons stopping in the target. Limits of 1-6 x 10 -4 /p-bar (90% C.L.) are placed on the yield of a narrow state in the mass range 1000--1660 MeV

  12. The band gap variation of a two dimensional binary locally resonant structure in thermal environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the numerical investigation of thermal effect on band gap dynamical characteristic for a two-dimensional binary structure composed of aluminum plate periodically filled with nitrile rubber cylinder is presented. Initially, the band gap of the binary structure variation trend with increasing temperature is studied by taking the softening effect of thermal stress into account. A breakthrough is made which found the band gap being narrower and shifting to lower frequency in thermal environment. The complete band gap which in higher frequency is more sensitive to temperature that it disappears with temperature increasing. Then some new transformed models are created by changing the height of nitrile rubber cylinder from 1mm to 7mm. Simulations show that transformed model can produce a wider band gap (either flexure or complete band gap. A proper forbidden gap of elastic wave can be utilized in thermal environment although both flexure and complete band gaps become narrower with temperature. Besides that, there is a zero-frequency flat band appearing in the first flexure band, and it becomes broader with temperature increasing. The band gap width decreases trend in thermal environment, as well as the wider band gap induced by the transformed model with higher nitrile rubber cylinder is useful for the design and application of phononic crystal structures in thermal environment.

  13. Double resonance spectroscopy of the D1Πu+ and B′′ B-bar 1Σu+ states near the third dissociation threshold of H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekey, R C; Cordova, A E; Duan, W; Chartrand, A M; McCormack, E F

    2013-01-01

    Double-resonance laser spectroscopy via the E,F 1 Σ g + ,v ′ =6,J ′ state was used to probe the energy region below the third dissociation limit of molecular hydrogen. Resonantly enhanced multi-photon ionization spectra were recorded by detecting ion production as a function of energy using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Energies and line widths for the v = 14–17 levels of the D 1 Π u + state of H 2 are reported and compared to experimental data obtained by using VUV synchrotron light excitation (Dickenson et al 2010 J. Chem. Phys. 133 144317) and fully ab initio non-adiabatic calculations of D 1 Π u + state energies and line widths (Glass-Maujean et al 2012 Phys. Rev. A 86 052507). Several high vibrational levels of the B ′′ B-bar 1 Σ u + state were also observed in this region. Term energies and rotational constants for the v = 67–69 vibrational levels are reported and compared to highly accurate ro-vibrational energy level predictions from fully ab initio non-adiabatic calculations of the first six 1 Σ u + levels of H 2 (Wolniewicz et al 2006 J. Mol. Spectrosc. 238 118). While additional observed transitions can be assigned to other states, several unassigned features in the spectra highlight the need for a fully integrated theoretical treatment of dissociation and ionization to understand the complex pattern of highly vibrationally excited states expected in this region. (paper)

  14. Structural characterization of Kraft lignins from different spent cooking liquors by 1D and 2D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Costas, C.; Gouveia, S.; Sanromán, M.A.; Moldes, D.

    2014-01-01

    Three Kraft lignins isolated from black liquors of several paper pulp mills of the North of Spain and Portugal were structurally characterized by using monodimensional ( 1 H and 13 C) and bidimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometry. From the latter, 13 C– 1 H heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) and heteronuclear multiple bond correlation (HMBC) were employed. Lignins from black liquors are usually burned for power generation. Nevertheless, they could become high value added products within a biorefinery context. In that case, a good understanding of their structure is a prior step to transform them. From all the NMR techniques studied, HSQC has risen as the most powerful tool in lignin characterization. Kraft cooking conditions and the type of wood seem to be the main factors that determine the differences observed in the lignins. All the samples have shown an important decrease in the number of β–O–4′ linkages, due to the Kraft process, and resinol has become the most resistant linkage to the process. Moreover, all samples seem to be mainly linked to a one polysaccharide: xylan. Several parameters like S/G ratio, portion of phenolic and aliphatic hydroxyls, amount of aromatic protons and other structural aspects were also estimated. - Highlights: • Lignins from three Kraft spent liquors were obtained by acid precipitation. • Structural characterization of the dissolved lignins was performed by NMR. • Wood source and pulping conditions determine the lignin characteristics. • Kraft process implies cleavage of β–O–4 linkages and survival of resinol linkages. • Comparison of the samples would aid decisions on its future revalorization

  15. Structural characterization of a poly(methacrylic acid)-poly(methyl methacrylate) copolymer by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordanengo, Remi [Universites Aix-Marseille I, II et III - CNRS, UMR 6264: Laboratoire Chimie Provence, Spectrometries Appliquees a la Chimie Structurale, F-13397 Marseille (France); Viel, Stephane [Aix-Marseille Universite - CNRS, UMR 6263: Institut des Sciences Moleculaires de Marseille, Chimiometrie et Spectrometries, F-13397 Marseille (France); Hidalgo, Manuel; Allard-Breton, Beatrice [ARKEMA, Centre de Recherche Rhone Alpes, Rue Henri Moissan, F-69493 Pierre-Benite (France); Thevand, Andre [Universites Aix-Marseille I, II et III - CNRS, UMR 6264: Laboratoire Chimie Provence, Spectrometries Appliquees a la Chimie Structurale, F-13397 Marseille (France); Charles, Laurence, E-mail: laurence.charles@univ-provence.fr [Universites Aix-Marseille I, II et III - CNRS, UMR 6264: Laboratoire Chimie Provence, Spectrometries Appliquees a la Chimie Structurale, F-13397 Marseille (France)

    2009-11-03

    Mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been combined to achieve the complete microstructural characterization of a poly(methacrylic acid)-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMAA-PMMA) copolymer synthesized by nitroxide-mediated polymerization. Various PMAA-PMMA species could be identified which mainly differ in terms of terminaisons. {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR experiments revealed the structure of the end-groups as well as the proportion of each co-monomer in the copolymers. These end-group masses were further confirmed from m/z values of doubly charged copolymer anions detected in the single stage mass spectrum. In contrast, copolymer composition derived from MS data was not consistent with NMR results, obviously due to strong mass bias well known to occur during electrospray ionization of these polymeric species. Tandem mass spectrometry could reveal the random nature of the copolymer based on typical dissociation reactions, i.e., water elimination occurred from any two contiguous MAA units while MAA-MMA pairs gave rise to the loss of a methanol molecule. Polymer backbone cleavages were also observed to occur and gave low abundance fragment ions which allowed the structure of the initiating end-group to be confirmed.

  16. Structural Elucidation of Metabolites of Synthetic Cannabinoid UR-144 by Cunninghamella elegans Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shimpei; Kuzhiumparambil, Unnikrishnan; Fu, Shanlin

    2018-03-08

    The number of new psychoactive substances keeps on rising despite the controlling efforts by law enforcement. Although metabolism of the newly emerging drugs is continuously studied to keep up with the new additions, the exact structures of the metabolites are often not identified due to the insufficient sample quantities for techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The aim of the study was to characterise several metabolites of the synthetic cannabinoid (1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl) (2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl) methanone (UR-144) by NMR spectroscopy after the incubation with the fungus Cunninghamella elegans. UR-144 was incubated with C. elegans for 72 h, and the resulting metabolites were chromatographically separated. Six fractions were collected and analysed by NMR spectroscopy. UR-144 was also incubated with human liver microsomes (HLM), and the liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry analysis was performed on the HLM metabolites with the characterised fungal metabolites as reference standards. Ten metabolites were characterised by NMR analysis including dihydroxy metabolites, carboxy and hydroxy metabolites, a hydroxy and ketone metabolite, and a carboxy and ketone metabolite. Of these metabolites, dihydroxy metabolite, carboxy and hydroxy metabolites, and a hydroxy and ketone metabolite were identified in HLM incubation. The results indicate that the fungus is capable of producing human-relevant metabolites including the exact isomers. The capacity of the fungus C. elegans to allow for NMR structural characterisation by enabling production of large amounts of metabolites makes it an ideal model to complement metabolism studies.

  17. Identifying the default mode network structure using dynamic causal modeling on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Xin; Biswal, Bharat B

    2014-02-01

    The default mode network is part of the brain structure that shows higher neural activity and energy consumption when one is at rest. The key regions in the default mode network are highly interconnected as conveyed by both the white matter fiber tracing and the synchrony of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signals. However, the causal information flow within the default mode network is still poorly understood. The current study used the dynamic causal modeling on a resting-state fMRI data set to identify the network structure underlying the default mode network. The endogenous brain fluctuations were explicitly modeled by Fourier series at the low frequency band of 0.01-0.08Hz, and those Fourier series were set as driving inputs of the DCM models. Model comparison procedures favored a model wherein the MPFC sends information to the PCC and the bilateral inferior parietal lobule sends information to both the PCC and MPFC. Further analyses provide evidence that the endogenous connectivity might be higher in the right hemisphere than in the left hemisphere. These data provided insight into the functions of each node in the DMN, and also validate the usage of DCM on resting-state fMRI data. © 2013.

  18. Resonant electronic transport through a triple quantum-dot with Λ-type level structure under dual radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Chun; Xing, Yunhui; Zhang, Chao; Ma, Zhongshui

    2014-01-01

    Due to quantum interference, light can transmit through dense atomic media, a phenomenon known as electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We propose that EIT is not limited to light transmission and there is an electronic analog where resonant transparency in charge transport in an opaque structure can be induced by electromagnetic radiation. A triple-quantum-dots system with Λ-type level structure is generally opaque due to the level in the center dot being significantly higher and therefore hopping from the left dot to the center dot is almost forbidden. We demonstrate that an electromagnetically induced electron transparency (EIET) in charge of transport can indeed occur in the Λ-type system. The direct evidence of EIET is that an electron can travel from the left dot to the right dot, while the center dot apparently becomes invisible. We analyze EIET and the related shot noise in both the zero and strong Coulomb blockade regimes. It is found that the EIET (position, height, and symmetry) can be tuned by several controllable parameters of the radiation fields, such as the Rabi frequencies and detuning frequencies. The result offers a transparency/opaque tuning technique in charge transport using interfering radiation fields

  19. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Correlates of Aggression in Psychosis: A Systematic Review and Effect Size Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Widmayer

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aggression in psychoses is of high clinical importance, and volumetric MRI techniques have been used to explore its structural brain correlates.Methods: We conducted a systematic review searching EMBASE, ScienceDirect, and PsycINFO through September 2017 using thesauri representing aggression, psychosis, and brain imaging. We calculated effect sizes for each study and mean Hedge's g for whole brain (WB volume. Methodological quality was established using the PRISMA checklist (PROSPERO: CRD42014014461.Results: Our sample consisted of 12 studies with 470 patients and 155 healthy controls (HC. After subtracting subjects due to cohort overlaps, 314 patients and 96 HC remained. Qualitative analyses showed lower volumes of WB, prefrontal regions, temporal lobe, hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum, and higher volumes of lateral ventricles, amygdala, and putamen in violent vs. non-violent people with schizophrenia. In quantitative analyses, violent persons with schizophrenia exhibited a significantly lower WB volume than HC (p = 0.004, and also lower than non-violent persons with schizophrenia (p = 0.007.Conclusions: We reviewed evidence for differences in brain volume correlates of aggression in persons with schizophrenia. Our results point toward a reduced whole brain volume in violent as opposed to non-violent persons with schizophrenia. However, considerable sample overlap in the literature, lack of reporting of potential confounding variables, and missing research on affective psychoses limit our explanatory power. To permit stronger conclusions, further studies evaluating structural correlates of aggression in psychotic disorders are needed.

  20. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Correlates of Aggression in Psychosis: A Systematic Review and Effect Size Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmayer, Sonja; Sowislo, Julia F; Jungfer, Hermann A; Borgwardt, Stefan; Lang, Undine E; Stieglitz, Rolf D; Huber, Christian G

    2018-01-01

    Background: Aggression in psychoses is of high clinical importance, and volumetric MRI techniques have been used to explore its structural brain correlates. Methods: We conducted a systematic review searching EMBASE, ScienceDirect, and PsycINFO through September 2017 using thesauri representing aggression, psychosis, and brain imaging. We calculated effect sizes for each study and mean Hedge's g for whole brain (WB) volume. Methodological quality was established using the PRISMA checklist (PROSPERO: CRD42014014461). Results: Our sample consisted of 12 studies with 470 patients and 155 healthy controls (HC). After subtracting subjects due to cohort overlaps, 314 patients and 96 HC remained. Qualitative analyses showed lower volumes of WB, prefrontal regions, temporal lobe, hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum, and higher volumes of lateral ventricles, amygdala, and putamen in violent vs. non-violent people with schizophrenia. In quantitative analyses, violent persons with schizophrenia exhibited a significantly lower WB volume than HC ( p = 0.004), and also lower than non-violent persons with schizophrenia ( p = 0.007). Conclusions: We reviewed evidence for differences in brain volume correlates of aggression in persons with schizophrenia. Our results point toward a reduced whole brain volume in violent as opposed to non-violent persons with schizophrenia. However, considerable sample overlap in the literature, lack of reporting of potential confounding variables, and missing research on affective psychoses limit our explanatory power. To permit stronger conclusions, further studies evaluating structural correlates of aggression in psychotic disorders are needed.