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Sample records for three-region conduction-controlled rewetting

  1. A three-region conduction-controlled rewetting analysis by the Heat Balance Integral Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, S.K.; Das, P.K.; Bhattacharyya, S.

    2009-01-01

    Conduction-controlled rewetting of two-dimensional objects is analyzed by the Heat Balance Integral Method (HBIM) considering three distinct regions: a dry region ahead of wet front, the sputtering region immediately behind the wet front and a continuous film region further upstream. The HBIM yields solutions for wet front velocity, sputtering length and temperature field with respect to wet front. Employing this method, it is seen that heat transfer mechanism is dependent upon two temperature parameters. One of them characterizes the initial wall temperature while the other specifies the range of temperature for sputtering region. Additionally, the mechanism of heat transfer is found to be dependent on two Biot numbers comprising a convective heat transfer in the wet region and a boiling heat transfer in the sputtering region. The present solution exactly matches with the one-dimensional analysis of K.H. Sun, G.E. Dix, C.L. Tien [Cooling of a very hot vertical surface by falling liquid film, ASME J. Heat Transf. 96 (1974) 126-131] for low Biot numbers. Good agreement with experimental results is also observed. (authors)

  2. A general one-dimensional model for conduction-controlled rewetting of a surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, E.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1977-01-01

    A computer-oriented analytical method for predicting the rewetting rate of a hot dry wall is proposed. The wall, which is modeled as a thin flat plate with internal heat generation, receives a variable heat flux from one side while it is cooled from the other side. The model accounts for the large variations of the heat transfer coefficient near the wet front and for the temperature dependence of the thermal and physical properties of the wall. The one-dimensional heat-conduction equation is solved by dividing the quenching zone into small segments of arbitrary temperature increment and constant properties and heat transfer coefficient. A trial-and-error method is developed to predict the velocity of the wet front, the length of the quenching zone and the temperature profile. The one-dimensional models of other authors can be obtained as particular cases of the present model. (Auth.)

  3. Rewetting of composite slab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satapathy, A.K.; Singh, K.C.

    1996-01-01

    The process of re-establishment of wetting of hot surface is of practical importance in chemical, metallurgical and nuclear industries. Rewetting is considered in emergency core cooling in nuclear reactors in the event of postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA). This paper deals with numerical solution of the two-dimensional quasi-static conduction controlled rewetting of an infinite parallel sided composite slab assuming perfect contact is maintained at the interface. On the wetted side upstream of the quench front, a constant heat transfer coefficient is assumed. The downstream of quench front and unwetted side of slab are supposed to be adiabatic. The solution gives the quench front temperature as a function of various model parameters such as Peclet number, wet side Blot number, dimensionless thickness of slab and cladding to fuel ratio of thermal conductivities. The results show that for large values of rewetting velocities, the dimensionless rewetting temperature is unaffected by fuel properties for all values of Blot numbers. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  4. Rewetting during bottom flooding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, K.G.

    1984-11-01

    A qualitative description of the rewetting process during bottom reflooding of a PWR is presented. Rewetting is seen as the end product of a path taken over a heat transfer surface which defines how the surface heat flux varies with surface temperature and with distance from the rewetting front. The main components are liquid contact, vapour convection and thermal radiation. In this paper the general topography of the heat transfer surface is deduced from consideration of the ways in which the conditions of the vapour and liquid phases in the flow are expected to vary with distance from the rewetting front. The deduced surface has a heat transfer ridge which decreases in height, and whose steep face moves to lower temperatures, with increasing distance from the rewetting front, and a valley which becomes negative with increasing distance. There is a different surface for each position along a subchannel, strongly influenced by the proximity of spacer grids, and by whether these grids are wet or dry. The form of this family of heat transfer surfaces is used to explain the phenomena of reflooding of clusters of heated rods. (U.K.)

  5. Installation for rewetting experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezende, H.C.; Ladeira, L.C.D.

    1986-03-01

    A test facility for rewetting experiments (ITR), has been erected at the Thermalhydraulics Laboratory of Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), with the objective of performing investigation of basic phenomena that occur during the reflood phase of a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), utilizing tubular and annular test sections. The mechanical aspects of the facility, its power supply system and its instrumentation are described. The results of the calibration of the instruments and the description of two typical testes performed to verify the operational conditions are presented. A comparison with calculations using a computer code is also presented. (Author) [pt

  6. Reflooding phase of the LOCA in PWRs. Part II: rewetting and liquid entrainment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, E.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1978-01-01

    Surface rewetting and liquid-droplet entrainment play an important role in the analysis of the reflooding phase of the loss-of-coolant accident in pressurized-water reactors. The definitions and the various interpretations given to the rewetting temperature and the rewetting mechanisms of the fuel rods are discussed. Published models of the axial-conduction-controlled rewetting process include one-dimensional solutions in two axial regions, one-dimensional solutions in three axial regions with or without precursory cooling, one- and two-dimensional numerical-difference techniques using temperature-dependent heat-transfer coefficients, and analytical two-dimensional solutions. The basic physical assumptions and the numerical values assigned to the various parameters, as well as empirical rewetting correlations, are discussed. The physical mechanisms for liquid-droplet entrainment and analytical formulations of the critical gas velocity and of the droplet diameter at the onset of entrainment are reviewed

  7. Rewetting of a hot metallic wall by liquid spray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castiglia, F.; Giardina, M.; Lombardo, C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Rewetting is the re-establishment of liquid in contact with a hot dried surface, whose initial temperature is higher than the so-called 'rewetting temperature'. This phenomenology is of interest in many industrial processes, for example: in metallurgical quenching, in electronic equipments cooling, in cryogenic processes, in preserving the integrity of toxic and dangerous substances metallic containers endangered by a hypothetical fire. Moreover it is essential for the re-establishment of normal and safe temperature levels following rod cluster dryout or hypothesized loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs) in nuclear reactors. In spite of the large amount of experimental and theoretical work done in the past decades, the above depicted phenomenology still deserves further clarifications and deepening. For this reason, recently at the Institute of Energetic Thermal-Fluid Dynamics of ENEA (Ente per le Nuove Tecnologie, l'Energia e l'Ambiente, at Casaccia, Italy), experimental researches have been carried out on the rewetting of vertical surfaces, at ambient pressure and various water flow rates by spraying subcooled water at the top. Spraying devices of various configuration, able to supply water drops of uniform diameter, have been used [1]. As it is known when, following the drops impact in some region at the top of the surface the temperature is lowered below the rewetting temperature, a liquid falling film forms, the front of which advances with a velocity ( the so called 'rewetting velocity'), limited by the rapidity by which the heat is conducted into the solid (conduction controlled rewetting). In the past, about the rewetting the researchers of Department of Nuclear Engineering of the University of Palermo have carried out an extensive theoretical work and more recently, have proposed a semi-theoretical model which proved successful in correlating a lot of experimental data [2]. This model has been suitably modified in order to

  8. Rewetting of a hot metallic wall by liquid spray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castiglia, F.; Giardina, M.; Lombardo, C. [University of Palermo, Department of Nuclear Engineering, V.le delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Rewetting is the re-establishment of liquid in contact with a hot dried surface, whose initial temperature is higher than the so-called 'rewetting temperature'. This phenomenology is of interest in many industrial processes, for example: in metallurgical quenching, in electronic equipments cooling, in cryogenic processes, in preserving the integrity of toxic and dangerous substances metallic containers endangered by a hypothetical fire. Moreover it is essential for the re-establishment of normal and safe temperature levels following rod cluster dryout or hypothesized loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs) in nuclear reactors. In spite of the large amount of experimental and theoretical work done in the past decades, the above depicted phenomenology still deserves further clarifications and deepening. For this reason, recently at the Institute of Energetic Thermal-Fluid Dynamics of ENEA (Ente per le Nuove Tecnologie, l'Energia e l'Ambiente, at Casaccia, Italy), experimental researches have been carried out on the rewetting of vertical surfaces, at ambient pressure and various water flow rates by spraying subcooled water at the top. Spraying devices of various configuration, able to supply water drops of uniform diameter, have been used [1]. As it is known when, following the drops impact in some region at the top of the surface the temperature is lowered below the rewetting temperature, a liquid falling film forms, the front of which advances with a velocity ( the so called 'rewetting velocity'), limited by the rapidity by which the heat is conducted into the solid (conduction controlled rewetting). In the past, about the rewetting the researchers of Department of Nuclear Engineering of the University of Palermo have carried out an extensive theoretical work and more recently, have proposed a semi-theoretical model which proved successful in correlating a lot of experimental data [2]. This model has been

  9. Safety rewetting process by imersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, V.Q.

    1981-09-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of the slow transient phenomena encountered during emergency core cooling rewetting of pressurized water reactors was done. To perform this study a low pressure and low heat flux water loop was used, with two basic tests sections, one tubular and another annular. After being heated by the Joule effect, the test section was quenched at a constant flow rate by bottom flooding of water at room temperature. The effects of wall temperature and fluid flow rate in tjhe performance of the rewetting process were investigated. Our results were in good agreement with those obtained by other laboratories. (Author) [pt

  10. Influence on rewetting temperature and wetting delay during rewetting rod bundle by various radial jet models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debbarma, Ajoy; Pandey, Krishna Murari [National Institute of Technology, Assam (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2016-03-15

    Numerical investigation of the rewetting of single sector fuel assembly of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) has been carried out to exhibit the effect of coolant jet diameters (2, 3 and 4 mm) and jet directions (Model: M, X and X2). The rewetting phenomena with various jet models are compared on the basis of rewetting temperature and wetting delay. Temperature-time curve have been evaluated from rods surfaces at different circumference, radial and axial locations of rod bundle. The cooling curve indicated the presence of vapor in respected location, where it prevents the contact between the firm and fluid phases. The peak wall temperature represents as rewetting temperature. The time period observed between initial to rewetting temperature point is wetting delay. It was noted that as improved in various jet models, rewetting temperature and wetting delay reduced, which referred the coolant stipulation in the rod bundle dominant vapor formation.

  11. Influence on rewetting temperature and wetting delay during rewetting rod bundle by various radial jet models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debbarma, Ajoy; Pandey, Krishna Murari

    2016-01-01

    Numerical investigation of the rewetting of single sector fuel assembly of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) has been carried out to exhibit the effect of coolant jet diameters (2, 3 and 4 mm) and jet directions (Model: M, X and X2). The rewetting phenomena with various jet models are compared on the basis of rewetting temperature and wetting delay. Temperature-time curve have been evaluated from rods surfaces at different circumference, radial and axial locations of rod bundle. The cooling curve indicated the presence of vapor in respected location, where it prevents the contact between the firm and fluid phases. The peak wall temperature represents as rewetting temperature. The time period observed between initial to rewetting temperature point is wetting delay. It was noted that as improved in various jet models, rewetting temperature and wetting delay reduced, which referred the coolant stipulation in the rod bundle dominant vapor formation.

  12. Simulated drawdown and rewetting of littoral sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klamt, Anna-Marie; Reitzel, Kasper; Andersen, Frede Østergaard

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to answer the question if temporary drawdowns could be a beneficial restoration measure for endangered Lobelia lakes. Intact littoral sediment cores with and without plants were used to simulate a drawdown over an almost 5 months period and a subsequent rewetting. During drawdown...... dying of plants. Upon rewetting effluxes of total dissolved phosphorus and dissolved organic carbon were observed which are most likely attributable to the degraded plant material. A phosphorus uptake experiment with dried and rewetted sediment cores without plants showed that the initial high P binding...

  13. Test facility for rewetting experiments at CDTN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezende, Hugo C.; Mesquita, Amir Z.; Ladeira, Luiz C.D.; Santos, Andre A.C.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important subjects in nuclear reactor safety analysis is the reactor core rewetting after a Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) in a Light Water Reactor LWR. Several codes for the prediction of the rewetting evolution are under development based on experimental results. In a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) the reflooding phase of a LOCA is when the fuel rods are rewetted from the bottom of the core to its top after having been totally uncovered and dried out. Out-of-pile reflooding experiments performed with electrical heated fuel rod simulators show different quench behavior depending the rods geometry. A test facility for rewetting experiments (ITR - Instalacao de Testes de Remolhamento) has been constructed at the Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory of the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), with the objective of performing investigations on basic phenomena that occur during the reflood phase of a LOCA in a PWR, using tubular and annular test sections. This paper presents the design aspects of the facility, and the current stage of the works. The mechanical aspects of the installation as its instrumentation are described. Two typical tests are presented and results compered with theoretical calculations using computer code. (author)

  14. Test facility for rewetting experiments at CDTN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezende, Hugo C.; Mesquita, Amir Z.; Ladeira, Luiz C.D.; Santos, Andre A.C., E-mail: hcr@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (SETRE/CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Tecnologia de Reatores

    2015-07-01

    One of the most important subjects in nuclear reactor safety analysis is the reactor core rewetting after a Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) in a Light Water Reactor LWR. Several codes for the prediction of the rewetting evolution are under development based on experimental results. In a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) the reflooding phase of a LOCA is when the fuel rods are rewetted from the bottom of the core to its top after having been totally uncovered and dried out. Out-of-pile reflooding experiments performed with electrical heated fuel rod simulators show different quench behavior depending the rods geometry. A test facility for rewetting experiments (ITR - Instalacao de Testes de Remolhamento) has been constructed at the Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory of the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), with the objective of performing investigations on basic phenomena that occur during the reflood phase of a LOCA in a PWR, using tubular and annular test sections. This paper presents the design aspects of the facility, and the current stage of the works. The mechanical aspects of the installation as its instrumentation are described. Two typical tests are presented and results compered with theoretical calculations using computer code. (author)

  15. Solution to a fuel-and-cladding rewetting model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olek, S.

    1989-06-01

    A solution by the Wiener-Hopf technique is derived for a model for the rewetting of a nuclear fuel rod. The gap between the fuel and the cladding is modelled by an imperfect contact between the two. A constant heat transfer coefficient is assumed on the wet side, whereas the dry side is assumed to be adiabatic. The solution for the rewetting temperature is in the form of an integral whose integrand contains the model parameters, including the rewetting velocity. Numerical results are presented for a large number of these parameters. It is shown that there are such large values of the rewetting temperature and the gap resistance, or such low values of the initial wall temperature, for which the rewetting velocity is unaffected by the fuel properties. (author) l fig., 7 tabs., 17 refs

  16. Analytical models for the rewetting of hot surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olek, S.

    1988-10-01

    Some aspects concerning analytical models for the rewetting of hot surface are discussed. These include the problems with applying various forms of boundary conditions, compatibility of boundary conditions with the physics of the rewetting problems, recent analytical models, the use of the separation of variables method versus the Wiener-Hopf technique, and the use of transformations. The report includes an updated list of rewetting models as well as benchmark solutions in tabular form for several models. It should be emphasized that this report is not meant to cover the topic of rewetting models. It merely discusses some points which are less commonly referred to in the literature. 93 refs., 3 figs., 22 tabs

  17. Multiyear greenhouse gas balances at a rewetted temperate peatland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David; Farrell, Catherine A; Fallon, David; Moser, Gerald; Müller, Christoph; Renou-Wilson, Florence

    2016-12-01

    Drained peat soils are a significant source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to the atmosphere. Rewetting these soils is considered an important climate change mitigation tool to reduce emissions and create suitable conditions for carbon sequestration. Long-term monitoring is essential to capture interannual variations in GHG emissions and associated environmental variables and to reduce the uncertainty linked with GHG emission factor calculations. In this study, we present GHG balances: carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), methane (CH 4 ) and nitrous oxide (N 2 O) calculated for a 5-year period at a rewetted industrial cutaway peatland in Ireland (rewetted 7 years prior to the start of the study); and compare the results with an adjacent drained area (2-year data set), and with ten long-term data sets from intact (i.e. undrained) peatlands in temperate and boreal regions. In the rewetted site, CO 2 exchange (or net ecosystem exchange (NEE)) was strongly influenced by ecosystem respiration (R eco ) rather than gross primary production (GPP). CH 4 emissions were related to soil temperature and either water table level or plant biomass. N 2 O emissions were not detected in either drained or rewetted sites. Rewetting reduced CO 2 emissions in unvegetated areas by approximately 50%. When upscaled to the ecosystem level, the emission factors (calculated as 5-year mean of annual balances) for the rewetted site were (±SD) -104 ± 80 g CO 2 -C m -2  yr -1 (i.e. CO 2 sink) and 9 ± 2 g CH 4 -C m -2  yr -1 (i.e. CH 4 source). Nearly a decade after rewetting, the GHG balance (100-year global warming potential) had reduced noticeably (i.e. less warming) in comparison with the drained site but was still higher than comparative intact sites. Our results indicate that rewetted sites may be more sensitive to interannual changes in weather conditions than their more resilient intact counterparts and may switch from an annual CO 2 sink to a source if triggered by slightly drier

  18. Rewetting and liquid entrainment during reflooding: state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, E.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1977-05-01

    Considerable interest has recently been generated in the problems of surface rewetting and the physics of liquid droplet entrainment due to their role in light water nuclear reactor safety. Published models of the rewetting process include simple one-dimensional solutions in two axial regions, one-dimensional solutions in three axial regions with or without precursory cooling, one- and two-dimensional numerical-difference techniques using temperature dependent heat transfer coefficients, and analytical two-dimensional solutions. The basic assumptions of these models and the numerical values assigned to the various parameters, as well as empirical rewetting correlations, are discussed. The various mechanisms for liquid droplet entrainment and analytical formulations of the critical gas velocity and of the droplet diameter at the onset of entrainment are reviewed

  19. Partial drying accelerates bacterial growth recovery to rewetting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meisner, Annelein; Leizeaga, Ainara; Rousk, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    , bacterial growth rates increase immediately in a linear fashion. In the Type 2 pattern, bacterial growth rates increase exponentially after a lag period. However, soils are often only partially dried. Partial drying (higher remaining moisture content before rewetting) may be considered a less harsh...

  20. Calculations on the effect of pellet filling on the rewetting of overheated nuclear reactor fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, K.G.; Loveless, J.

    1977-03-01

    Numerical solutions of the rewetting equations are presented which show the effect of filler material and gas gap on the rate of rewetting of an overheated fuel pin. It is shown that taking the presence of the fuel into account can lead to a large reduction in the calculated rewetting speed compared with a calculation which neglects the presence of fuel. The effect is most marked in conditions where rewetting speeds tend to be already low, such as at high pin temperatures and low ambient pressure. A comparison is made between the predictions of the present method and experimental data obtained on zircaloy and stainless steel pins filled with magnesia and with boron nitride. In all cases filling the pins produced a large reduction in rewetting speed and the agreement between the calculated and measured effect was encouraging. It is concluded that the presence of the UO 2 pellet filling should be taken into account when calculating rewetting speeds in safety assessments. (author)

  1. Self-rewetting fluids with suspended carbon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, R; Di Paola, R; Gattia, D Mirabile; Marazzi, R; Antisari, M Vittori

    2011-10-01

    Thermal management is very important in modern electronic systems. Recent researches have been dedicated to the study of the heat transfer performances of binary or multi-component heat transfer fluids with peculiar surface tension properties and in particular to "self-rewetting fluids," i.e., liquids with a surface tension increasing with temperature and concentration. Thermophysical properties like surface tension, wettability and thermal conductivity, at different temperatures, have been measured not only for binary mixtures, but also for a number of ternary aqueous solutions with relatively low freezing point and for nanoparticles suspensions (so called nanofluids). Some of them interestingly exhibit the same anomalous positive surface tension gradient with temperature as binary self-rewetting solutions. Since in the course of liquid/vapour phase change, self-rewetting fluids behaviour induces a rather strong liquid inflow (caused by both temperature and concentration gradients) from the cold region (where liquid condensates) to the hot evaporator region, several interesting applications may be envisaged, e.g., the development of advanced wickless heat pipes for utilization in reduced gravity environments. The present work is dedicated to the study of the thermophysical properties of nanofluids based on water/alcohol solutions with suspended carbon nanostructures, in particular single-wall carbon nanohorns (SWNH), synthesised by an homemade apparatus with an AC arc discharge in open air. The potential interest of the proposed studies stems from the large number of possible industrial applications, including space technologies and terrestrial applications, such as cooling of electronic components.

  2. Analysis of Tank PMD Rewetting Following Thrust Resettling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weislogel, M. M.; Sala, M. A.; Collicott, S. H.; Rame, Enrique (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recent investigations have successfully demonstrated closed-form analytical solutions of spontaneous capillary flows in idealized cylindrical containers with interior corners. In this report, the theory is extended and applied to complex containers modeling spacecraft fuel tanks employing propellant management devices (PMDs). The specific problem investigated is one of spontaneous rewetting of a typical partially filled liquid fuel/cryogen tank with PMD after thrust resettling. The transients of this flow impact the logistics of orbital maneuvers and potentially tank thermal control. The general procedure to compute the initial condition (mean radius of curvature for the interface) for the closed-form transient flows is first outlined then solved for several 'complex' cylindrical tanks exhibiting symmetry. The utility and limitations of the technique as a design tool are discussed in a summary, which also highlights comparisons with NASA flight data of a model propellant tank with PMD.

  3. Design of Spillway Structures of Peatland Rewetting systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sainov Mihail Petrovich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In summer 2010 drought and heat weather cause numerous peat fires. During two months Moscow was shrouded in acid smoke. To prevent such situations government of Moscow region decided to rewet previously drained peatlands. Peatland rewetting systems can be divided into two types. The first type is watering system based on previously used drainage system. The main idea of this method is rising of groundwater levels with the help of special water retaining constructions installed in drainage canals. The design of water receivers allows keeping up water level in canals and draining excesses. There are two types of water receivers: dock-type water receiver and water receiver as a portal to the gate. The choice of one or another type of water receiver depends on the canal depth. If it is less than 1.5 m, we apply portal construction. At the depth of more than 1.5 m the mine water receiver is more suitable. The second way of watering previously drained peatlands is the creation of ponds, dams on streams and small rivers. Special discharge structures increase water level in the river upstream. In downstream water level rises due to the redistribution of the flow. As a result, the groundwater level rises and peat become watered. There are two types of spillway structures: with direct overflow wall and labyrinth overflow wall. Structure with direct overflow wall is applicable on small rivers. In narrow alignments with high consumptions it is better to use another type of weir. As output it is necessary to notice that all constructions used in peatlands watering were designed as simple and reliable as possible. It is so because unpredictable weather conditions can cause beyond the design flows so weirs must have necessary reserve of passing costs.

  4. A Global Database of Gas Fluxes from Soils after Rewetting or Thawing, Version 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This database contains information compiled from published studies on gas flux from soil following rewetting or thawing. The resulting database includes 222 field...

  5. Carbon balance of rewetted and drained peat soils used for biomass production: A mesocosm study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karki, Sandhya; Elsgaard, Lars; Kandel, Tanka

    2016-01-01

    of lower CO2 emissions without losing agricultural land. The present study quantified the carbon balance (CO2, CH4 and harvested biomass C) of rewetted and drained peat soils under intensively managed reed canary grass (RCG) cultivation. Mesocosms were maintained at five different ground water levels (GWL......), i.e., 0, 10, 20 cm below the soil surface, representing rewetted peat soils, and 30 and 40 cm below the soil surface, representing drained peat soils. Net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 and CH4 emissions were measured during the growing period of RCG (May to September) using transparent and opaque...... closed chamber methods. The average dry biomass yield was significantly lower from rewetted peat soils (12 Mg ha−1) than drained peat soils (15 Mg ha−1). Also, CO2 fluxes of gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) from rewetted peat soils were significantly lower than drained peat...

  6. Investigation on the rewetting temperature behavior in a vertical annulus geometry with uniform and cosine power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, S.; Chun, S. Y.; Kim, B. D.; Park, J. K.; Baek, W. P.

    2005-01-01

    All theoretical predictions for the rewetting process by the various models based on one-, two- and three-dimensional analytical and numerical studies require the knowledge of the rewetting temperature. (Kim and Lee, 1979) Incorrectly assumed values of rewetting temperature could lead to serious errors in the analysis of the problem. This parameter was assumed to be constant by many researchers such as Martini et al. (1973), Yamanouchi (1968), and Yu et al. (1977). However, the rewetting temperature is not constant and depends on the physical properties of the test section and coolant flow condition. In the present study, experimental data on the rewetting temperature acquired in the present reflood test series are compared with the previous rewetting temperature correlations proposed by Berenson (1961), Henry (1974), and Kim and Lee (1979)

  7. Dispersal timing and drought history influence the response of bacterioplankton to drying-rewetting stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székely, Anna J; Langenheder, Silke

    2017-08-01

    The extent and frequency of drought episodes is expected to increase in the following decades making it a crucial stress factor for smaller water bodies. However, very little is known about how bacterioplankton is affected by increased evaporation and how these communities reassemble after rewetting. Here, we present results from a microcosm experiment that assessed the effect of drying-rewetting stress on bacterioplankton in the light of the stress history and the rate and timing of dispersal after the rewetting. We found that the drying phase resulted mainly in a change of function, whereas the complete desiccation and rewetting processes strongly affected both composition and function, which were, however, influenced by the initial conditions and stress history of the communities. Effects of dispersal were generally stronger when it occurred at an early stage after the rewetting. At this stage, selective establishment of dispersed bacteria coupled with enhanced compositional and functional recovery was found, whereas effects of dispersal were neutral, that is, predictable by dispersal rates, at later stages. Our studies therefore show that both the stress history and the timing of dispersal are important factors that influence the response of bacterial communities to environmental change and stress events.

  8. Revegetation dynamics after 15 years of rewetting in two extracted peatlands in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Kozlov

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The restoration of extracted peatlands poses challenges with regard to their recolonisation by vegetation. The most significant problems are unstable water levels, destroyed propagule bank, and temperature fluctuations on bare peat surfaces. Rewetting is considered necessary for the re-establishment of peat-forming vegetation. Revegetation was investigated in a long-term field study at two rewetted extracted peatland sites in south-central Sweden, namely Västkärr (originally a lagg fen and Porla (originally a bog. Both sites were expanses of bare peat before rewetting. Rewetting procedures were applied in 1999 and strongly promoted plant colonisation. At Västkärr, colonisation started in the first year after rewetting, mostly by species that were not found during repeat vegetation surveys 15 years later. By 2014, Västkärr was a shallow lake surrounded by mesotrophic and eutrophic vegetation with species such as Carex rostrata, Lemna minor, Typha latifolia, Phalaris arundinacea and Phragmites australis. Revegetation of the Porla site was slower and started with Eriophorum vaginatum and Polytrichum spp. Sphagnum mosses appeared after six years and had established quite well after 13 years. A residual Sphagnum peat layer, inflowing surface water and groundwater provided spatially variable nutrient conditions. Sphagnum species and E. vaginatum established in nutrient-poor areas, while C. rostrata, P. australis and Eriophorum angustifolium colonised more nutrient-rich locations.

  9. Measurement and analysis of the re-wetting front velocity during quench cooling of hot horizontal tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takrouri, Kifah, E-mail: takroukj@mcmaster.ca [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Luxat, John, E-mail: luxatj@mcmaster.ca [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Hamed, Mohamed [Thermal Processing Laboratory (TPL), Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Two phase flow & re-wetting front velocity were studied for quench of hot tubes. • The velocity decreased as temperature difference between tube and coolant decreased. • Increasing surface curvature was found to decrease the re-wetting front velocity. • Increasing tube thermal conductivity decreased the velocity. • Correlations were developed to predict the front velocity. - Abstract: When a liquid is put into contact with a hot dry surface, there exists a maximum temperature called the re-wetting temperature below which the liquid is in actual contact with the surface. Re-wetting occurs after destabilization of a vapor film that exists between the hot surface and the liquid. If re-wetting is established at a location on the hot surface, a wet patch appears at that location and starts to spread to cover and cool the entire surface. The outer edge of the wet patch is called the re-wetting front and can proceed only if the surface ahead of it cools down to the re-wetting temperature. Study of re-wetting heat transfer is very important in nuclear reactor safety for limiting the extent of core damage during the early stages of severe accidents after loss of coolant accidents LOCA and is essential for predicting the rate at which the coolant cools an overheated core. One of the important parameters in re-wetting cooling is the velocity at which the re-wetting front moves on the surface. In this study, experimental tests were carried out to investigate the re-wetting front velocity on hot horizontal cylindrical tubes being cooled by a vertical rectangular water multi-jet system. Effects of initial surface temperature in the range 400–740 °C, water subcooling in the range 15–80 °C and jet velocity in the range 0.17–1.43 m/s on the re-wetting front velocity were investigated. The two-phase flow behavior was observed by using a high-speed camera. The re-wetting front velocity was found to increase by increasing water subcooling, decreasing

  10. Summertime greenhouse gas fluxes from an urban bog undergoing restoration through rewetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Christen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rewetting can promote the ecological recovery of disturbed peatland ecosystems and may help to revert these ecosystems to carbon dioxide (CO2 sinks. However, rewetting of disturbed peatlands can also cause substantial emissions of methane (CH4 and possibly nitrous oxide (N2O. This study quantified summertime emissions of the three major long-lived greenhouse gases (GHGs CO2, CH4 and N2O; from undisturbed, disturbed and rewetted soils in the Burns Bog Ecological Conservancy Area (BBECA, a 20 km2 urban bog located in Delta, British Columbia, Canada. Four sites were chosen that represent different stages before or after ecological recovery in the BBECA: (i a relatively undisturbed scrub pine / Sphagnum / low shrub ecosystem; (ii a Rhynchospora alba / Sphagnum ecosystem that was disturbed by peat mining more than 65 years ago; (iii a R. alba / Dulichium arundinaceum ecosystem that was disturbed by peat mining 50 years ago and rewetted five years ago; and (iv a disturbed and rewetted surface with little vegetation cover that was cleared of vegetation 16 years ago and rewetted two years ago. The GHG fluxes from soils and ground vegetation were measured at all sites during June–August 2014, using a portable non-steady-state chamber system for CO2 and syringe sampling and laboratory analysis for CH4 and N2O fluxes. All four sites exhibited net GHG emissions into the atmosphere, dominated by CH4, which contributed 81–98 % of net CO2 equivalent (CO2e emissions. Overall, the median CH4 flux for all measurements and sites was ~74 mg m-2 day-1 (~30–410 mg m-2 day-1, 25th–75th percentiles. Fluxes in the rewetted (water-saturated sedge ecosystem were highest, with a quarter of the values higher than 3,000 mg m-2 day-1 (median 78 mg m-2 day-1. Exchange of CO2 due to photosynthesis and respiration was of secondary importance compared to soil CH4 emissions. Continuous CO2 flux measurements using the eddy covariance approach in the disturbed and rewetted R

  11. Reflooding phase of the LOCA - state of the art II. Rewetting and liquid entrainment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, E.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1977-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which hot fuel rods quench and the physics of liquid droplet entrainment is important for the analysis of the reflooding phase of the LOCA. Published models of the rewetting process include simple one-dimensional solutions. The basic physical assumptions of these models and the numerical values assigned to the various parameters, as well as empirical rewetting correlations are discussed. The various mechanisms for liquid droplet entrainment and analytical formulations of the critical gas velocity and of the droplet diameter at the onset of entrainment are reviewed

  12. Do drying and rewetting cycles modulate effects of sulfadiazine spiked manure in soil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jechalke, Sven; Radl, Viviane; Schloter, Michael; Heuer, Holger; Smalla, Kornelia

    2016-05-01

    Naturally occurring drying-rewetting events in soil have been shown to affect the dissipation of veterinary antibiotics entering soil by manure fertilization. However, knowledge of effects on the soil microbial community structure and resistome is scarce. Here, consequences of drying-rewetting cycles on effects of sulfadiazine (SDZ) in soil planted with Dactylis glomerata L. were investigated in microcosms. Manure containing SDZ or not was applied to the pregrown grass and incubated for 56 days in a climate chamber. Water was either added daily or reduced during two drying events of 7 days, each followed by a recovery phase. Total community DNA was analyzed to reveal the effects on the bacterial community structure and on the abundance of sul1, sul2, intI1 ,intI2, qacE+qacEΔ1, traN and korB genes relative to 16S rRNA genes. 16S rRNA gene-based DGGE fingerprints indicated that drying-rewetting cycles modulated the effects of SDZ on the bacterial community structure in the soil. Furthermore, the SDZ treatment increased the relative abundance of sulfonamide resistance and integrase genes compared to the control. However, this increase was not different between moisture regimes, indicating that drying-rewetting had only a negligible effect on the selection of the resistome by SDZ in the manured soil. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Rewetting phenomena and their relation to intermolecular forces between a hot wall and the fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerweck, V.

    1989-12-01

    The rewetting phenomena and the different physical concepts which are used in their modelisation are reviewed. The present work studies the effect of the intermolecular forces between the hot wall and the fluid on this phase transition. Using suitable approximations, a local equation of state is obtained by the treatment of the fluid-fluid and fluid-wall intermolecular interactions. This local equation of state depends on the distance from the wall, and the critical pressure and temperature become a function of the distance from the wall, whereas the critical density is left constant throughout the fluid. At the wall, the critical pressure and temperature are half their bulk values and increase towards the bulk value as the distance from the wall increases. The penetration of a temperature profile in this fluid is studied by assuming that the liquid density is not strongly affected by this temperature profile as long as there is no phase transition. It is shown that the phase transition will occur extremely rapidly when the interfacial temperature upon contact is higher than the minimum of the local spinodal temperature, which varies with the distance from the wall. The result ist cast in the form of an interfacial rewetting temperature fT c above which rewetting of the surface by liquid-wall contacts is not expected because these contacts will be terminated in extremely short times. Comparing the theory with available data shows that in the usual rewetting situations the theory reduces to the use of the bulk spinodal temperature. For surfaces coated with poorly wetted materials the correction factor due to surface effects applies, reducing the rewetting temperature, in agreement with the experimental data. For liquid metals it appears that the theory is applied in a region where the basic theoretical approximations are very coarse; but even in that case the experimental trend is qualitatively predicted by the theory. (author) 43 figs., 11 tabs., 105 refs

  14. Sulfur and carbon isotope biogeochemistry of a rewetted brackish fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebsch, Franziska; Gehre, Matthias; Winkel, Matthias; Koehler, Stefan; Koch, Marian; Jurasinski, Gerald; Spitzy, Alejandro; Liebner, Susanne; Sachs, Torsten; Schmiedinger, Iris; Kretzschmann, Lisett; Saborowski, Anke; Böttcher, Michael E.

    2015-04-01

    Coastal wetlands are at the interface between terrestrial freshwater and marine and exhibit very specific biogeochemical conditions. Intermittent sea water intrusion affects metabolic pathways, i. e. anaerobic carbon metabolism is progressively dominated by sulfate reduction with lower contribution of methanogenesis whilst methane production is increasingly shifted from acetoclastic to hydrogenotrophic. Due to expanding anthropogenic impact a large proportion of coastal ecosystems is degraded with severe implications for the biogeochemical processes. We use concentration patterns and stable isotope signatures of water, sulfate, dissolved carbonate, and methane (δ2H, δ13C, δ18O, δ34S) to investigate the S and C metabolic cycle in a rewetted fen close to the southern Baltic Sea border. Such studies are crucial to better predict dynamic ecosystem feedback to global change like organic matter (OM) decomposition or greenhouse gas emissions. Yet, little is known about the metabolic pathways in such environments. The study site is part of the TERENO Observatory "Northeastern German Lowlands' and measurements of methane emissions have run since 2009. High methane fluxes up to 800 mg m-2 hr-1 indicate that methanogenesis is the dominant C metabolism pathway despite of high sulfate concentrations (up to 37 mM). The presented data are part of a comprehensive biogeochemical investigation that we conducted in autumn 2014 and that comprises 4 pore water profiles and sediment samples within a transect of 300-1500 m distance to the Baltic Sea. Depth of organic layers ranged from 25 to 140 cm with high OM contents (up to 90 dwt.%). Sulfate/chloride ratios in the pore waters were lower than in the Baltic Sea for most sites and sediment depths indicated a substantial net sulfate loss. Sulfide concentrations were negligible at the top and increased parallel to the sulfate concentrations with depth to values of up to 0.3 mM. One pore water profiles situated 1150 m from the Baltic

  15. An experimental study of the effect of external thermocouples on rewetting during reflood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shires, G.L.; Butcher, A.A.; Carpenter, B.G.; McCune, D.S.; Pearson, K.G.

    1980-04-01

    The validation of computer codes used for PWR safety assessment often depends upon experiments carried out with either real fuel pins or electrically heated fuel pin simulators. In some cases, and this applies particularly to in-pile tests, temperatures are measured by means of sheathed thermocouples attached externally to the pins and this raises the question of the possible effect of such thermocouples on the two phase hydraulics and heat transfer which are being studied. This paper describes the experiments which subjected two realistic fuel pin simulators, one with and one without external thermocouples, to identical bottom flooding conditions. They demonstrate very clearly that external thermocouples act as preferential rewetting sites and thereby increase the rate of propagation of the quench front. In the view of the authors of this paper the facts described raise serious doubts about the validity of rewetting data obtained from experiments employing external thermocouples. (U.K.)

  16. Self-rewetting carbon nanofluid as working fluid for space and terrestrial heat pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Paola, R.; Savino, R.; Mirabile Gattia, D.; Marazzi, R.; Vittori Antisari, M.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal management is very important in modern electronic systems. Recent researches have been dedicated to the study of the heat transfer performances of binary heat transfer fluids with peculiar surface tension properties and in particular to that of “self-rewetting fluids”, i.e., liquids with a surface tension increasing with temperature and concentration. Since in the course of liquid/vapor-phase change, self-rewetting fluids behavior induces a rather strong liquid inflow (caused by both temperature and concentration gradients) from the cold region (where liquid condensates) to the hot evaporator region, this fluids have been proposed and investigated as new heat transfer fluids for advanced heat transfer devices, e.g., heat pipes or heat spreaders for terrestrial and space applications (Savino et al. in Space Technol 25(1):59–61, 2009). The present work is dedicated to the study of the thermophysical properties of a new class of heat transfer fluids based on water/alcohol solutions with suspended carbon nanostructures, in particular single-wall carbon nanohorns (SWNH), synthesized by a homemade apparatus with an AC arc discharge in open air (Mirabile Gattia et al. in Nanotechnology 18:255604, 2007). SWNHs are cone-shaped nanoparticles with diameters between 1 and 5 nm and lengths in the range of 20–100 nm. SWNHs could be found in the form of quite-spherical aggregates with diameters ranging from 20 to 100 nm. The paper also discusses the results of these investigations and laboratory characterization tests of different heat pipes, including reference ordinary heat pipes and innovative pipes filled with self-rewetting fluids and self-rewetting nanofluids. The potential interest of the proposed studies stems from the large number of possible industrial applications, including space technologies and terrestrial applications, such as cooling of electronic components.

  17. High methane emissions dominate annual greenhouse gas balances 30 years after bog rewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanselow-Algan, M.; Schmidt, S. R.; Greven, M.; Fiencke, C.; Kutzbach, L.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2015-02-01

    Natural peatlands are important carbon sinks and sources of methane (CH4). In contrast, drained peatlands turn from a carbon sink to a carbon source and potentially emit nitrous oxide (N2O). Rewetting of peatlands thus implies climate change mitigation. However, data about the time span that is needed for the re-establishment of the carbon sink function by restoration is scarce. We therefore investigated the annual greenhouse gas (GHG) balances of three differently vegetated bog sites 30 years after rewetting. All three vegetation communities turned out to be sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) ranging between 0.6 ± 1.43 t CO2 ha-2 yr-1 (Sphagnum-dominated vegetation) and 3.09 ± 3.86 t CO2 ha-2 yr-1 (vegetation dominated by heath). While accounting for the different global warming potential (GWP) of the three greenhouse gases, the annual GHG balance was calculated. Emissions ranged between 25 and 53 t CO2-eq ha-1 yr-1 and were dominated by large emissions of CH4 (22 up to 51 t CO2-eq ha-1 yr-1), while highest rates were found at purple moor grass (Molinia caerulea) stands. These are to our knowledge the highest CH4 emissions so far reported for bog ecosystems in temperate Europe. As the restored area was subject to large fluctuations in water table, we conclude that the high CH4 emission rates were caused by a combination of both the temporal inundation of the easily decomposable plant litter of this grass species and the plant-mediated transport through its tissues. In addition, as a result of the land use history, the mixed soil material can serve as an explanation. With regards to the long time span passed since rewetting, we note that the initial increase in CH4 emissions due to rewetting as described in the literature is not limited to a short-term period.

  18. Self-rewetting carbon nanofluid as working fluid for space and terrestrial heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paola, R.; Savino, R.; Mirabile Gattia, D.; Marazzi, R.; Vittori Antisari, M.

    2011-11-01

    Thermal management is very important in modern electronic systems. Recent researches have been dedicated to the study of the heat transfer performances of binary heat transfer fluids with peculiar surface tension properties and in particular to that of "self-rewetting fluids", i.e., liquids with a surface tension increasing with temperature and concentration. Since in the course of liquid/vapor-phase change, self-rewetting fluids behavior induces a rather strong liquid inflow (caused by both temperature and concentration gradients) from the cold region (where liquid condensates) to the hot evaporator region, this fluids have been proposed and investigated as new heat transfer fluids for advanced heat transfer devices, e.g., heat pipes or heat spreaders for terrestrial and space applications (Savino et al. in Space Technol 25(1):59-61, 2009). The present work is dedicated to the study of the thermophysical properties of a new class of heat transfer fluids based on water/alcohol solutions with suspended carbon nanostructures, in particular single-wall carbon nanohorns (SWNH), synthesized by a homemade apparatus with an AC arc discharge in open air (Mirabile Gattia et al. in Nanotechnology 18:255604, 2007). SWNHs are cone-shaped nanoparticles with diameters between 1 and 5 nm and lengths in the range of 20-100 nm. SWNHs could be found in the form of quite-spherical aggregates with diameters ranging from 20 to 100 nm. The paper also discusses the results of these investigations and laboratory characterization tests of different heat pipes, including reference ordinary heat pipes and innovative pipes filled with self-rewetting fluids and self-rewetting nanofluids. The potential interest of the proposed studies stems from the large number of possible industrial applications, including space technologies and terrestrial applications, such as cooling of electronic components.

  19. A Pilot Study: The Efficacy of Virgin Coconut Oil as Ocular Rewetting Agent on Rabbit Eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haliza Abdul Mutalib

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. An open-label pilot study of virgin coconut oil (VCO was conducted to determine the safety of the agent as ocular rewetting eye drops on rabbits. Methods. Efficacy of the VCO was assessed by measuring NIBUT, anterior eye assessment, corneal staining, pH, and Schirmer value before instillation and at 30 min, 60 min, and two weeks after instillation. Friedman test was used to analyse any changes in all the measurable variables over the period of time. Results. Only conjunctival redness with instillation of saline agent showed significant difference over the period of time (P0.05. There were no changes in the NIBUT, limbal redness, palpebral conjunctiva redness, corneal staining, pH, and Schirmer value over the period of time for each agent (P>0.05. Conclusion. VCO acts as safe rewetting eye drops as it has shown no significant difference in the measurable parameter compared to commercial brand eye drops and saline. These study data suggest that VCO is safe to be used as ocular rewetting agent on human being.

  20. Reflooding Experiment on BETA Test Loop: The Effects of Inlet Temperature on the Rewetting Velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khairul H; Anhar R Antariksawan; Edy Sumarno; Kiswanta; Giarno; Joko P; Ismu Handoyo

    2003-01-01

    Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) on Nuclear Reactor Plant is an important topic because this condition is a severe accident that can be postulated. The phenomenon of LOCA on Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) can be divided in three stages, e.g.: blowdown, refill and reflood. In the view of Emergency Coolant System evaluation, the reflood is the most important stage. In this stage, an injection of emergency water coolant must be done in a way that the core can be flooded and the overheating can be avoid. The experiment of rewetting on BETA Test Loop had been conducted. The experiment using one heated rod of the test section to study effects of inlet temperature on the wetting velocity. Results of the series of experiments on 2,5 lt/min flow rate and variable of temperature : 28 o C, 38 o C, 50 o C, 58 o C it was noticed that for 58 o C inlet temperature of test section and 572 o C rod temperature the rewetting phenomenon has been observed. The time of refill was 32.81 sec and time of rewetting was 42.87 sec. (author)

  1. Towards large-scale paludiculture: addressing the challenges of biomass harvesting in wet and rewetted peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Schröder

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Peatland drainage causes peat degradation, which results in high greenhouse gas emissions and ongoing subsidence of the ground surface. To avoid further land degradation, the rewetting of peatlands is essential. The new land use concept of paludiculture - the use of wet and rewetted peatlands for agriculture and forestry - now offers possibilities for landowners and land managers to continue using these sites under wet conditions. But new challenges arise due to the limited bearing capacity of wet soils, which restricts accessibility for machinery. Whilst many site-specific technical solutions for harvesting on wet peatland are available, it remains unclear whether current machinery is suitable for use in the large-scale implementation of paludiculture. Repeated crossings of the same ground can easily disturb the upper peat layer and cause serious problems for the removal of biomass. In this article we present available machinery and approaches to biomass harvesting; and explore how the number of transport runs required for biomass removal varies with productivity of the site, cargo capacity and working width of the harvesting machinery. The results are used in a discussion of logistics and infrastructure requirements to facilitate the implementation of paludiculture. Whilst there is still considerable scope for improvement of harvesting technologies, our results show that a peat-conserving harvest from wet and rewetted peatlands is possible with adjustments to harvesting technique, logistics and site infrastructure.

  2. CFD analysis of rewetting of a single sector AHWR fuel cluster with changing jet directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debbarma, Ajoy, E-mail: ajoy@debbarma.me; Pandey, Krishna Murari, E-mail: kmpandey2001@yahoo.com

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • CFD analysis of three modes of jet impingement in AHWR fuel cluster is analyzed. • Single sector (9 rod bundle) of AHWR has been analyzed with ANSYS 14.0-CFX. • It is observed that the wetting delay gets reduced significantly by proposed jet models. - Abstract: The transient numerical analysis of the rewetting of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) fuel assembly with jet impingement has been conducted. The present study is concerned with three different types of jet impingement directions, Model: M is the existing design of AHWR and other two Model: X and X2 was introduced in the study and compared with an existing model of AHWR. The present investigation aims to study thermo-rewetting behavior with respect to the coolant jet impingement directions. The computational results are validated with available experimental data. It is observed that the wetting delay has been reduced significantly with the proposed jet models and the jet direction has been an effective parameter in increasing the rewetting performance.

  3. Annual greenhouse gas budget for a bog ecosystem undergoing restoration by rewetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-C. Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Many peatlands have been drained and harvested for peat mining, agriculture, and other purposes, which has turned them from carbon (C sinks into C emitters. Rewetting of disturbed peatlands facilitates their ecological recovery and may help them revert to carbon dioxide (CO2 sinks. However, rewetting may also cause substantial emissions of the more potent greenhouse gas (GHG methane (CH4. Our knowledge of the exchange of CO2 and CH4 following rewetting during restoration of disturbed peatlands is currently limited. This study quantifies annual fluxes of CO2 and CH4 in a disturbed and rewetted area located in the Burns Bog Ecological Conservancy Area in Delta, BC, Canada. Burns Bog is recognized as the largest raised bog ecosystem on North America's west coast. Burns Bog was substantially reduced in size and degraded by peat mining and agriculture. Since 2005, the bog has been declared a conservancy area, with restoration efforts focusing on rewetting disturbed ecosystems to recover Sphagnum and suppress fires. Using the eddy covariance (EC technique, we measured year-round (16 June 2015 to 15 June 2016 turbulent fluxes of CO2 and CH4 from a tower platform in an area rewetted for the last 8 years. The study area, dominated by sedges and Sphagnum, experienced a varying water table position that ranged between 7.7 (inundation and −26.5 cm from the surface during the study year. The annual CO2 budget of the rewetted area was −179 ± 26.2 g CO2–C m−2 yr−1 (CO2 sink and the annual CH4 budget was 17 ± 1.0 g CH4–C m−2 yr−1 (CH4 source. Gross ecosystem productivity (GEP exceeded ecosystem respiration (Re during summer months (June–August, causing a net CO2 uptake. In summer, high CH4 emissions (121 mg CH4–C m−2 day−1 were measured. In winter (December–February, while roughly equal magnitudes of GEP and Re made the study area CO2 neutral, very low CH4 emissions (9 mg CH4–C m−2

  4. Annual greenhouse gas budget for a bog ecosystem undergoing restoration by rewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Ching; Christen, Andreas; Black, Andrew T.; Johnson, Mark S.; Jassal, Rachhpal S.; Ketler, Rick; Nesic, Zoran; Merkens, Markus

    2017-06-01

    Many peatlands have been drained and harvested for peat mining, agriculture, and other purposes, which has turned them from carbon (C) sinks into C emitters. Rewetting of disturbed peatlands facilitates their ecological recovery and may help them revert to carbon dioxide (CO2) sinks. However, rewetting may also cause substantial emissions of the more potent greenhouse gas (GHG) methane (CH4). Our knowledge of the exchange of CO2 and CH4 following rewetting during restoration of disturbed peatlands is currently limited. This study quantifies annual fluxes of CO2 and CH4 in a disturbed and rewetted area located in the Burns Bog Ecological Conservancy Area in Delta, BC, Canada. Burns Bog is recognized as the largest raised bog ecosystem on North America's west coast. Burns Bog was substantially reduced in size and degraded by peat mining and agriculture. Since 2005, the bog has been declared a conservancy area, with restoration efforts focusing on rewetting disturbed ecosystems to recover Sphagnum and suppress fires. Using the eddy covariance (EC) technique, we measured year-round (16 June 2015 to 15 June 2016) turbulent fluxes of CO2 and CH4 from a tower platform in an area rewetted for the last 8 years. The study area, dominated by sedges and Sphagnum, experienced a varying water table position that ranged between 7.7 (inundation) and -26.5 cm from the surface during the study year. The annual CO2 budget of the rewetted area was -179 ± 26.2 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1 (CO2 sink) and the annual CH4 budget was 17 ± 1.0 g CH4-C m-2 yr-1 (CH4 source). Gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) exceeded ecosystem respiration (Re) during summer months (June-August), causing a net CO2 uptake. In summer, high CH4 emissions (121 mg CH4-C m-2 day-1) were measured. In winter (December-February), while roughly equal magnitudes of GEP and Re made the study area CO2 neutral, very low CH4 emissions (9 mg CH4-C m-2 day-1) were observed. The key environmental factors controlling the seasonality of

  5. Investigating the legacy effect of drought on microbial responses to drying and rewetting along a Texan precipitation gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Lettice; Leizeaga, Ainara; Hawkes, Christine; Rousk, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Hydrological regimes will intensify due to climate change, thus increasing the duration and intensity of drought and rainfall events. Rewetting of dry soil is known to stimulate dramatic CO2 releases. A clear understanding of the mechanisms that determine the dynamics of CO2 loss upon rewetting is therefore required to characterise ecosystem C-budgets and predict responses to climate change. Laboratory studies have identified two distinct responses upon rewetting; bacterial growth either increases linearly immediately, with maximal respiration also occurring immediately and decreasing exponentially with time ("Type 1"), or bacterial growth increases exponentially after a period of near-zero growth, with a sustained period of elevated respiration, sometimes followed by a secondary increase in respiration coinciding with the onset of bacterial growth ("Type 2"). A shift from a Type 1 to a Type 2 response has been observed with increasing duration and intensity of drying prior to rewetting. The size of the surviving microbial community after drying, relative to resources available after rewetting, is suggested to dictate whether a Type 1 or 2 response occurs, with more 'harsh' (i.e. longer or more severe) drying reducing microbial biomass such that carbon available upon rewetting is sufficient to support exponential growth (leading to Type 2 response). However, this is yet to be tested in intact ecosystems. We investigated the legacy of drought on microbial responses to drying and rewetting using grassland soils from a natural precipitation gradient in Texas. Mean annual precipitation spanned a 500 mm range (400-900 mm year-1) across the 400 km gradient, while mean annual temperature was constant. Soil properties (pH, SOM) did not vary systematically across the gradient, with differences reflecting land-use history rather than rainfall. Air dried soils from 18 sites were rewetted to 50 % water holding capacity with bacterial growth, fungal growth and respiration

  6. Contrasted response of colloidal, organic and inorganic dissolved phosphorus forms during rewetting of dried riparian soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Sen; Gruau, Gérard; Malique, François; Dupas, Rémi; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal; Petitjean, Patrice; Bouhnik-Le Coz, Martine

    2017-04-01

    Riparian vegetated buffer strip (RVBS) are currently used to protect surface waters from phosphorus (P) emissions because of their ability to retain P-enriched soil particles. However, this protection role may be counterbalanced by the development in these zones of conditions able to trigger the release of highly mobile dissolved or colloidal P forms. Rewetting after drying is one of these conditions. So far, the potential sources of P mobilized during rewetting after drying are not clearly identified, nor are clearly identified the chemical nature of the released dissolved P species, or the role of the soil P speciation on these forms. In this study, two riparian soils (G and K) showing contrasting soil P speciation (65% of inorganic P species in soil G, as against 70% of organic P) were submitted to three successive dry/wet cycles in the laboratory. Conventional colorimetric determination of P concentrations combined with ultrafiltration, and measurements of iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) contents using ICP-MS and TOC analyzers, respectively, were used to study the response of the different P forms to rewetting after drying and also their release kinetics during soil leaching. For both soils, marked P release peaks were observed at the beginning of each wet cycles, with the organic-rich K soils giving, however, larger peaks than the inorganic one (G soil). For both soils also, concentrations in molybdate reactive P (MRP) remained quite constant throughout each leaching episode, contrary to the molybdate unreactive P (MUP) concentrations which were high immediately after rewetting and then decreased rapidly during leaching. A speciation change was observed from the beginning to the end of all leaching cycles. Colloidal P was found to be a major fraction of the total P immediately after rewetting (up to 50-70%) and then decreased to the end of each wet cycle where most of the eluted P was true dissolved inorganic P. Colloidal

  7. CO2 response to rewetting of hydrophobic soils - Can soil water repellency inhibit the 'Birch effect'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Garcia, Carmen; Urbanek, Emilia; Doerr, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Rewetting of dry soils is known to cause a short-term CO2 pulse commonly known as the 'Birch effect'. The displacement of CO2 with water during the process of wetting has been recognised as one of the sources of this pulse. The 'Birch effect' has been extensively observed in many soils, but some studies report a lack of such phenomenon, suggesting soil water repellency (SWR) as a potential cause. Water infiltration in water repellent soils can be severely restricted, causing overland flow or increased preferential flow, resulting in only a small proportion of soil pores being filled with water and therefore small gas-water replacement during wetting. Despite the suggestions of a different response of CO2 fluxes to wetting under hydrophobic conditions, this theory has never been tested. The aim of this study is to test the hypothesis that CO2 pulse does not occur during rewetting of water repellent soils. Dry homogeneous soils at water-repellent and wettable status have been rewetted with different amounts of water. CO2 flux as a response to wetting has been continuously measured with the CO2 flux analyser. Delays in infiltration and non-uniform heterogeneous water flow were observed in water repellent soils, causing an altered response in the CO2 pulse in comparison to typically observed 'Birch effect' in wettable systems. The main conclusion from the study is that water repellency not only affects water relations in soil, but has also an impact on greenhouse gas production and transport and therefore should be included as an important parameter during the sites monitoring and modelling of gas fluxes.

  8. Bacterial community composition and extracellular enzyme activity in temperate streambed sediment during drying and rewetting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Pohlon

    Full Text Available Droughts are among the most important disturbance events for stream ecosystems; they not only affect stream hydrology but also the stream biota. Although desiccation of streams is common in Mediterranean regions, phases of dryness in headwaters have been observed more often and for longer periods in extended temperate regions, including Central Europe, reflecting global climate change and enhanced water withdrawal. The effects of desiccation and rewetting on the bacterial community composition and extracellular enzyme activity, a key process in the carbon flow of streams and rivers, were investigated in a typical Central European stream, the Breitenbach (Hesse, Germany. Wet streambed sediment is an important habitat in streams. It was sampled and exposed in the laboratory to different drying scenarios (fast, intermediate, slow for 13 weeks, followed by rewetting of the sediment from the fast drying scenario via a sediment core perfusion technique for 2 weeks. Bacterial community structure was analyzed using CARD-FISH and TGGE, and extracellular enzyme activity was assessed using fluorogenic model substrates. During desiccation the bacterial community composition shifted toward composition in soil, exhibiting increasing proportions of Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria and decreasing proportions of Bacteroidetes and Betaproteobacteria. Simultaneously the activities of extracellular enzymes decreased, most pronounced with aminopeptidases and less pronounced with enzymes involved in the degradation of polymeric carbohydrates. After rewetting, the general ecosystem functioning, with respect to extracellular enzyme activity, recovered after 10 to 14 days. However, the bacterial community composition had not yet achieved its original composition as in unaffected sediments within this time. Thus, whether the bacterial community eventually recovers completely after these events remains unknown. Perhaps this community undergoes permanent changes

  9. Polyphenols as enzyme inhibitors in different degraded peat soils: Implication for microbial metabolism in rewetted peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Dominik; Roth, Cyril; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Fenner, Nathalie; Reuter, Hendrik

    2015-04-01

    Recently, more than 30,000 ha of drained minerotrophic peatlands (= fens) in NE Germany were rewetted to restore their ecological functions. Due to an extended drainage history, a re-establishment of their original state is not expected in the short-term. Elevated concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, ammonium and phosphate have been measured in the soil porewater of the upper degraded peat layers of rewetted fens at levels of one to three orders higher than the values in pristine systems; an indicator of increased microbial activity in the upper degraded soil layers. On the other hand there is evidence that the substrate availability within the degraded peat layer is lowered since the organic matter has formerly been subject to intense decomposition over the decades of drainage and intense agricultural use of the areas. Previously however, it was suggested that inhibition of hydrolytic enzymes by polyphenolic substances is suspended during aeration of peat soils mainly due to the decomposition of the inhibiting polyphenols by oxidising enzymes such as phenol oxidase. Accordingly we hypothesised a lack of enzyme inhibiting polyphenols in degraded peat soils of rewetted fens compared to less decomposed peat of more natural fens. We collected both peat samples at the soil surface (0-20 cm) and fresh roots of dominating vascular plants and mosses (as peat parent material) from five formerly drained rewetted sites and five more natural sites of NE Germany and NW Poland. Less decomposed peat and living roots were used to obtain an internal standard for polyphenol analysis and to run enzyme inhibition tests. For all samples we determined the total phenolic contents and in addition we distinguished between the contents of hydrolysable and condensed tannic substances. From a methodical perspective the advantage of internal standards compared to the commercially available standards cyanidin chloride and tannic acid became apparent. Quantification with cyanidin or

  10. High methane emissions dominated annual greenhouse gas balances 30 years after bog rewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanselow-Algan, M.; Schmidt, S. R.; Greven, M.; Fiencke, C.; Kutzbach, L.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2015-07-01

    Natural peatlands are important carbon sinks and sources of methane (CH4). In contrast, drained peatlands turn from a carbon sink to a carbon source and potentially emit nitrous oxide (N2O). Rewetting of peatlands thus potentially implies climate change mitigation. However, data about the time span that is needed for the re-establishment of the carbon sink function by restoration are scarce. We therefore investigated the annual greenhouse gas (GHG) balances of three differently vegetated sites of a bog ecosystem 30 years after rewetting. All three vegetation communities turned out to be sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) ranging between 0.6 ± 1.43 t CO2 ha-2 yr-1 (Sphagnum-dominated vegetation) and 3.09 ± 3.86 t CO2 ha-2 yr-1 (vegetation dominated by heath). While accounting for the different global warming potential (GWP) of CO2, CH4 and N2O, the annual GHG balance was calculated. Emissions ranged between 25 and 53 t CO2-eq ha-1 yr-1 and were dominated by large emissions of CH4 (22-51 t CO2-eq ha-1 yr-1), with highest rates found at purple moor grass (Molinia caerulea) stands. These are to our knowledge the highest CH4 emissions so far reported for bog ecosystems in temperate Europe. As the restored area was subject to large fluctuations in the water table, we assume that the high CH4 emission rates were caused by a combination of both the temporal inundation of the easily decomposable plant litter of purple moor grass and the plant-mediated transport through its tissues. In addition, as a result of the land use history, mixed soil material due to peat extraction and refilling can serve as an explanation. With regards to the long time span passed since rewetting, we note that the initial increase in CH4 emissions due to rewetting as described in the literature is not inevitably limited to a short-term period.

  11. Drying/rewetting cycles mobilize old C from deep soils from a California annual grassland

    OpenAIRE

    Schimel, JP; Wetterstedt, JAM; Holden, PA; Trumbore, SE

    2011-01-01

    We measured the 14 C and 13 C signatures of CO 2 respired from surface and deep soils released through multiple dry/rewetting cycles in laboratory incubations. The C respired from surface soils included components fixed before and after the 1960s. However, that respired from deep soils was derived from organic matter with a mean turnover time estimated in the range of 650-850 years. This reinforces previous research suggesting that a substantial amount of deep soil C is chemically labile b...

  12. Effects of soil rewetting and thawing on soil gas fluxes: a review of current literature and suggestions for future research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.-G. Kim

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The rewetting of dry soils and the thawing of frozen soils are short-term, transitional phenomena in terms of hydrology and the thermodynamics of soil systems. The impact of these short-term phenomena on larger scale ecosystem fluxes is increasingly recognized, and a growing number of studies show that these events affect fluxes of soil gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4, nitrous oxide (N2O, ammonia (NH3 and nitric oxide (NO. Global climate models predict that future climatic change is likely to alter the frequency and intensity of drying-rewetting events and thawing of frozen soils. These future scenarios highlight the importance of understanding how rewetting and thawing will influence dynamics of these soil gases. This study summarizes findings using a new database containing 338 studies conducted from 1956 to 2011, and highlights open research questions. The database revealed conflicting results following rewetting and thawing in various terrestrial ecosystems and among soil gases, ranging from large increases in fluxes to non-significant changes. Studies reporting lower gas fluxes before rewetting tended to find higher post-rewetting fluxes for CO2, N2O and NO; in addition, increases in N2O flux following thawing were greater in warmer climate regions. We discuss possible mechanisms and controls that regulate flux responses, and recommend that a high temporal resolution of flux measurements is critical to capture rapid changes in gas fluxes after these soil perturbations. Finally, we propose that future studies should investigate the interactions between biological (i.e., microbial community and gas production and physical (i.e., porosity, diffusivity, dissolution changes in soil gas fluxes, apply techniques to capture rapid changes (i.e., automated measurements, and explore synergistic experimental and modelling approaches.

  13. Greenhouse gas exchange of rewetted bog peat extraction sites and a Sphagnum cultivation site in northwest Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, C.; Höper, H.

    2015-04-01

    During the last decades an increasing area of drained peatlands has been rewetted. Especially in Germany, rewetting is the principal treatment on cutover sites when peat extraction is finished. The objectives are bog restoration and the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The first sites were rewetted in the 1980s. Thus, there is a good opportunity to study long-term effects of rewetting on greenhouse gas exchange, which has not been done so far on temperate cutover peatlands. Moreover, Sphagnum cultivating may become a new way to use cutover peatlands and agriculturally used peatlands as it permits the economical use of bogs under wet conditions. The climate impact of such measures has not been studied yet. We conducted a field study on the exchange of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide at three rewetted sites with a gradient from dry to wet conditions and at a Sphagnum cultivation site in NW Germany over the course of more than 2 years. Gas fluxes were measured using transparent and opaque closed chambers. The ecosystem respiration (CO2) and the net ecosystem exchange (CO2) were modelled at a high temporal resolution. Measured and modelled values fit very well together. Annually cumulated gas flux rates, net ecosystem carbon balances (NECB) and global warming potential (GWP) balances were determined. The annual net ecosystem exchange (CO2) varied strongly at the rewetted sites (from -201.7 ± 126.8 to 29.7± 112.7g CO2-C m-2 a-1) due to differing weather conditions, water levels and vegetation. The Sphagnum cultivation site was a sink of CO2 (-118.8 ± 48.1 and -78.6 ± 39.8 g CO2-C m-2 a-1). The annual CH4 balances ranged between 16.2 ± 2.2 and 24.2 ± 5.0g CH4-C m-2 a-1 at two inundated sites, while one rewetted site with a comparatively low water level and the Sphagnum farming site show CH4 fluxes close to 0. The net N2O fluxes were low and not significantly different between the four sites. The annual NECB was between -185.5 ± 126.9 and 49

  14. Rewetted industrial cutaway peatlands in western Ireland: a prime location for climate change mitigation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wilson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rewetting of drained industrial peatlands may reduce greenhouse gas (GHG emissions and promote recolonisation by peat forming plant species. We investigated carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O dynamics over a three-year period in a rewetted industrial peatland in Ireland. Sample plots were established in bare peat, Juncus effusus-Sphagnum cuspidatum, Sphagnum cuspidatum and Eriophorum angustifolium dominated microsites. The relationships between fluxes and environmental variables were examined and regression models were used to provide an estimate of the annual GHG balance for each microsite. All the vegetated microsites were carbon sinks for the duration of the study. Highest uptake occurred in the Eriophorum microsite (146–583 g C m-2 yr-1, followed by Juncus-Sphagnum (35–204 g C m-2 yr-1 and Sphagnum (5–140 g C m-2 yr-1. The bare peat microsite was a source of 37–82 g C m-2 yr-1. No N2O fluxes were detected. Strong inter-annual variation was observed in all microsites, driven by variation in precipitation and subsequent changes in the position of the water table. In terms of Global Warming Potential (GWP, the microsites had either a cooling effect (Eriophorum, a close to neutral effect (Juncus-Sphagnum, Sphagnum or a warming effect (bare peat on the climate.

  15. Long-term grassland management effects on soil Phosphorus status on rewetted Histosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Sebastian; Müller, Jürgen; Kayser, Manfred

    2017-04-01

    Since the Neolithic Period, the cultivation of wetlands has played a significant role for the settlement of Humans northwest Germany. A continuing drainage of the wetlands over the centuries and an intensified soil cultivation during the last decades has caused irreversible peat degradation and led to fundamental changes in the landscape. Nowadays, almost 70 % of the 4345 km2 peatland of Lower Saxony is altered by agriculture. For the revitalization of wetland ecosystems, permanent rewetting is an integral component to preserve the functions of organic soils and achieve resilient, speciesrich wetlands. However, permanent rewetting measures are not always feasible. In our study area at the Osterfeiner Moor, a fen located in the Dümmer lowlands near Osnabrück, intensive forage cropping areas were converted into extensive permanent grasslands accompanied by temporary rewetting during winter. This management practice combined with zero fertilization and a low mowing and grazing intensity aims at mitigating mineralisation of peat layers and creating a habitat for endangered meadow bird species. In this semi-natural ecosystem soil phosphorus (P) dynamics play a crucial role. However, longterm research results on P availability of degraded and rewetted fens are still lacking. Thus, we investigated the interaction of different grassland uses and P dynamics in the soil. We described P depletion of the topsoil over a time scale of 17 years after the implementation of restoration measures. Our study site comprises of 180 ha protected grassland divided into 52 management plots. According to the management system, we divided the plots into meadows, pastures and combinations of cutting and grazing. The soils in our study area can be characterised as drained organic soils, WRB: Rheic Sapric Histosols (Drainic), with drastic degradation properties through moorsh forming processes. Plant-available P (double lactate extraction method: PDL) was analysed from representative topsoil

  16. The sensitivity of Sphagnum to surface layer conditions in a re-wetted bog: a simulation study of water stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouwenaars, J.M.; Gosen, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    The behaviour of the water table in re-wetted bogs varies widely between different locations so that recolonising Sphagnum is vulnerable to water stress, especially when the water table is drawn down in summer. It is important to understand how physical site conditions influence the occurrence of

  17. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and soil nutrient addition on the growth of Phragmites australis under different drying-rewetting cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jin-Feng; An, Jing; Gao, Jun-Qin; Zhang, Xiao-Ya; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2018-01-01

    The frequency of soil drying-rewetting cycles is predicted to increase under future global climate change, and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are symbiotic with most plants. However, it remains unknown how AMF affect plant growth under different frequencies of soil drying-rewetting cycles. We subjected a clonal wetland plant Phragmites australis to three frequencies of drying-rewetting cycles (1, 2, or 4 cycles), two nutrient treatments (with or without), and two AMF treatments (with or without) for 64 days. AMF promoted the growth of P. australis, especially in the 2 cycles of the drying-rewetting treatment. AMF had a significant positive effect on leaf mass and number of ramets in the 2 cycles of the drying-rewetting treatment with nutrient addition. In the 2 cycles of drying-rewetting treatment without nutrient addition, AMF increased leaf area and decreased belowground to aboveground biomass ratio. These results indicate that AMF may assist P. australis in coping with medium frequency of drying-rewetting cycles, and provide theoretical guidance for predicting how wetland plants respond to future global climate change.

  18. Conception of a model for the description of the rewetting phase of reactor fuel pins following a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinderer, B.; Schuetzle, R.

    1976-10-01

    The aim of the present paper has been the development of a model describing rewetting of fuel rods in the reflood phase after a loss of coolant accident of a reactor. Because a suitable solution to the problem could not be found an appropriate model has been implemented into an IKE computer program for transient, two-dimensional heat conductance for a cylindrical rod. Developing this model experimental results of up-to-date literature were used. Remarkable is that very small meshes are necessary around the rewetting front to calculate the rewetting velocity which is strongly dependent on the quench temperature. (orig.) [de

  19. Investigation of the minimum film boiling temperature of water during rewetting under forced convective conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, X.C.; Bartsch, G.; Wang, B.X.

    1992-01-01

    The minimum film boiling temperature of water has been measured on a copper hollow cylinder of 50 mm length with the mass flux rate ranging from 25 to 500 kg/m 2 s and the pressure from 0.1 to 1.0 MPa at subcoolings of 5 to 50 K. Film boiling is established with help of a temperature-controlled system. Rewetting can be initiated by cutting off or very gradually reducing the power supply to the test section. A numerical method for solving the two-dimensional nonlinear inverse heat conduction problem is utilized in the data reduction, taking into account the axial heat conduction. The results are compared with the steady-state maximum transition boiling temperatures measured on the same test section and with the true quench temperatures available in the literature so far. (4 figures, 1 table) (Author)

  20. Computational simulation of natural circulation and rewetting experiments using the TRAC/PF1 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.D. da.

    1994-05-01

    In this work the TRAC code was used to simulate experiments of natural circulation performed in the first Brazilian integral test facility at (COPESP), Sao Paulo and a rewetting experiment in a single tube test section carried out at CDTN, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. In the first simulation the loop behavior in two transient conditions with different thermal power, namely 20 k W and 120 k W, was verified in the second one the quench front propagation, the liquid mass collected in the carry over measuring tube and the wall temperature at different elevations during the flooding experiment was measured. A comparative analysis, for code consistency, shows a good agreement between the code results and experimental data, except for the quench from velocity. (author). 15 refs, 19 figs, 12 tabs

  1. Nutritional responses to soil drying and rewetting cycles under partial root-zone drying irrigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yaosheng; Jensen, Christian Richardt; Liu, Fulai

    2017-01-01

    signaling that regulates stomatal aperture. PRI induced soil DRW cycles and more soil water dynamics in the root zone enhance soil nutrient mineralization process and thus increase the bioavailability of soil nutrients, resulting in improved nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) uptake, in which soil microbial...... processes play a key role. Studies investigating how soil DRW cycles and water dynamics under PRI on nutrient transport in soil solution, soil microbe mediated P transformation, interactions between phytohormones and nutrient uptake, root morphological and architectural traits for nutrient acquisition......Abstract Repeated soil drying and rewetting (DRW) cycles occur in rainfed and irrigated agriculture. The intensity and frequency of DRW cycles regulate both microbial physiology and soil physical processes, hereby affecting the mineralization and immobilization of soil nutrients...

  2. Effect of reed canary grass cultivation on greenhouse gas emission from peat soil at controlled rewetting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karki, Sandhya; Elsgaard, Lars; Lærke, Poul Erik

    2015-01-01

    Cultivation of bioenergy crops in rewetted peatland (paludiculture) is considered as a possible land use option to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. However, bioenergy crops like reed canary grass (RCG) can have a complex influence on GHG fluxes. Here we determined the effect of RCG...... and bare soil were measured at weekly to fortnightly intervals with static chamber techniques for a period of 1 year. Cultivation of RCG increased both ER and CH4 emissions, but decreased the N2O emissions. The presence of RCG gave rise to 69, 75 and 85% of total ER at −20, −10 and 0 cm GWL, respectively...... from ER were obviously the dominant RCG-derived GHG flux, but above-ground biomass yields, and preliminary measurements of gross photosynthetic production, showed that ER could be more than balanced due to the photosynthetic uptake of CO2 by RCG. Our results support that RCG cultivation could be a good...

  3. Greenhouse gas emissions from rewetted bog peat extraction sites and a Sphagnum cultivation site in Northwest Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, C.; Höper, H.

    2014-03-01

    During the last three decades, an increasing area of drained peatlands was rewetted. This was done with the objective to convert these sites from sources back to sinks or, at least, to much smaller sources of greenhouse gases (GHG). However, available data is still scarce, especially on the long-term climatic effects of rewetting of temperate bogs. Moreover, first field trials are established for Sphagnum cultivating (paludiculture) on wet bog sites and an assessment of the climate impact of such measures has not been studied yet. We conducted a field study on the exchange of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide at three rewetted sites with a gradient from dry to wet conditions and at a Sphagnum cultivation site in NW Germany over more than two years. Gas fluxes were measured using transparent and opaque closed chambers. The ecosystem respiration (CO2) and the net ecosystem exchange (CO2) were modelled in high time resolution using automatically monitored climate data. Measured and modelled values fit very well together (R2 between 0.88 and 0.98). Annually cumulated gas flux rates, net ecosystem carbon balances (NECB) and global warming potential (GWP) balances were determined. The annual net ecosystem exchange (CO2) varied strongly at the rewetted sites (from -201.7 ± 126.8 to 29.7 ± 112.7 g CO2-C m-2 a-1) due to different weather conditions, water level and vegetation. The Sphagnum cultivation site was a sink of CO2 (-118.8 ± 48.1 and -78.6 ± 39.8 g CO2-C m-2 a-1). The yearly CH4 balances ranged between 16.2 ± 2.2 and 24.2 ± 5.0 g CH4-C m-2 a-1 at two inundated sites, while one rewetted site with a comparatively low water level and the Sphagnum farming site show CH4 fluxes close to zero. The net N2O fluxes were low and not significantly different between the four sites. The annual NECB at the rewetted sites was between -183.8 ± 126.9 and 51.6 ± 112.8 g CO2-C m-2 a-1 and at the Sphagnum cultivating site -114.1 ± 48.1 and -75.3 ± 39.8 g CO2-C m-2 a-1

  4. Nitrogen supply modulates the effect of changes in drying-rewetting frequency on soil C and N cycling and greenhouse gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillas, Lourdes; Durán, Jorge; Rodríguez, Alexandra; Roales, Javier; Gallardo, Antonio; Lovett, Gary M; Groffman, Peter M

    2015-10-01

    Climate change and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition are two of the most important global change drivers. However, the interactions of these drivers have not been well studied. We aimed to assess how the combined effect of soil N additions and more frequent soil drying-rewetting events affects carbon (C) and N cycling, soil:atmosphere greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange, and functional microbial diversity. We manipulated the frequency of soil drying-rewetting events in soils from ambient and N-treated plots in a temperate forest and calculated the Orwin & Wardle Resistance index to compare the response of the different treatments. Increases in drying-rewetting cycles led to reductions in soil NO3- levels, potential net nitrification rate, and soil : atmosphere GHG exchange, and increases in NH4+ and total soil inorganic N levels. N-treated soils were more resistant to changes in the frequency of drying-rewetting cycles, and this resistance was stronger for C- than for N-related variables. Both the long-term N addition and the drying-rewetting treatment altered the functionality of the soil microbial population and its functional diversity. Our results suggest that increasing the frequency of drying-rewetting cycles can affect the ability of soil to cycle C and N and soil : atmosphere GHG exchange and that the response to this increase is modulated by soil N enrichment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A correlation for the quench front velocity in the rewetting of a rod by a falling film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castiglia, F.; Olivieri, E.; Taibi, S.; Vella, G.

    1989-01-01

    In recent works the exact analytical solutions to the problem of the steady propagation of the quench front in the rewetting by a falling film of both hot vertical slabs and rods have been presented. These solutions furnish the temperature distribution in the solid and, in particular, the dimensioless sputtering temperature, in terms of the Biot number B and the dimensionless front velocity u. As it is well known, however, in practical applications it result more convenient to deal with an explicit - even if approximate - formula which gives the dimensionless rewetting velocity in terms of B and Θ. In view of this, in the present paper, an extension to the case of rods of a simple and reliable correlation for the prediction of the quench front velocity, already proposed for slabs, is presented. Also in this case, the correlation proves fairly satisfactory and confirms its validity in the full range of practical interest the operating parameters

  6. Turn on, fade out - methane exchange in a coastal fen over a period of six years after rewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurasinski, Gerald; Glatzel, Stephan; Hahn, Juliane; Koch, Stefan; Koch, Marian; Koebsch, Franziska

    2016-04-01

    The rewetting of drained peatlands is widely regarded as an adequate measure for the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. Therefore, especially in NE Germany, many peatlands are being rewetted. Our knowledge about greenhouse gas exchange associated with rewetting is mainly based on short-term experiments or space-for-time substitutions. These approaches do not consider the transient character of ecosystem acclimatization to flooding by rewetting. Moreover data in this regard on coastal peatland ecosystems are sparse. Here, we present 7 years of data on CH4-exchange in a coastal fen after rewetting by flooding. On the site „Rodewiese", which is located within the NSG "Hütelmoor und Heiligensee" in the Northeast of Rostock, NE Germany, we have established a long term research observatory addressing atmospheric C-exchange. The site is part of the TERENO network. Since summer 2009 we determine CH4 fluxes with closed chambers distributed widely across the study site and CO2-exchange with eddy covariance as well as ancillary data on vegetation, hydrology, and biogeochemistry. This talk addresses the CH4-exchange over time whereas CO2-exchange data are presented by Koebsch et al. in the same session. Rewetting turned the site from a summer dry fen with mean annual water levels of around -0.08m into a shallow lake with water levels up to 0.60m. In the first year after flooding, we observed a substantial die-back of vegetation, especially in stands of Carex acutiformis. Flooding increased methane release rates to extremely high levels of up to 4.3 t ha-1 a-1 for sedge stands and 2.7 t ha-1 a-1 on average, which amounts to 75.6 t ha-1 a-1 in CO2-equivalents. Thereafter, the averaged annual CH4 emissions decreased asymptotically and where at an average of 0.5 t ha-1 a-1 (14 t ha-1 a-1 in CO2-equivalents) in 2015. Factoring in the NEE of the growing season (from Eddy measurements) suggests that the system may be slightly above neutral with respect to the greenhouse

  7. Conversion of a moderately rewetted fen to a shallow lake - implications for net CO2 exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebsch, Franziska; Glatzel, Stephan; Hofmann, Joachim; Forbrich, Inke; Jurasinski, Gerald

    2013-04-01

    Extensive rewetting projects to re-establish the natural carbon (C) sequestration function of degraded peatlands are currently taking place in Europe and North-America. Year-round flooding provides a robust measure to prevent periods of drought that are associated with ongoing peat mineralization and to initiate the accumulation of new organic matter. Here, we present measurements of net carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange during the gradual conversion of a moderately rewetted fen to a shallow lake. When we started our measurements in 2009, mean growing season water level (MWGL) was 0 cm. In 2010 the site was flooded throughout the year with MWGL of 36 cm. Extraordinary strong rainfalls in July 2011 resulted in a further increase of MWGL to 56 cm. Measurements of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) were conducted during growing seasons (May-October) using the Eddy Covariance method. Information about vegetation vitality was deduced from the enhanced vegetation index (EVI) based on MODIS data. Ecosystem respiration (Reco) and gross ecosystem production (GEP) were high during vegetation period 2009 (1273.4 and -1572.1 g CO2-C m-2), but decreased by 61 and 46% respectively when the fen was flooded throughout 2010. Under water-logged conditions, heterotrophic respiration declines and gas exchange is limited. Moreover, flooding is a severe stress factor for plants and decreases autotrophic respiration and photosynthesis. However, in comparison to 2010, rates of Reco and GEP doubled during the beginning of growing season 2011, indicating plastic response strategies of wetland plants to flooding. Presumably, plants were not able to cope with the further increase of water levels to up to 120 cm in June/July 2011, resulting in another drop of GEP and Reco. The effects of plant vitality on GEP were confirmed by the remote sensed vegetation index. Throughout all three growing seasons, the fen was a distinct net CO2 sink (2009: -333.3±12.3, 2010: -294.1±8.4, -352.4±5.1 g CO2-C m-2

  8. Blowdown and rewetting characteristics for AHWR under postulated LOCA - an analytical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, D.; Chatterjee, B.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a thorium fuelled, natural circulation driven and heavy water moderated reactor. The cooling of the nuclear fuel is achieved through natural circulation mode for the tube type reactor where hot and cold leg of the reactor has been designed to be long and high enough to avail the gravity head desired to overcome the hydraulic resistances in the flow path. The natural circulation cooling mode makes AHWR very different as compared to other tube type reactors with forced circulation e.g RBMK. This cooling feature which calls for longer pipes length and elevation head is having an influence on the blowdown characteristic and the initial fuel heatup characteristic of the reactor. Analyses of Loss of Coolant Accident carried out for different break sizes in the inlet header of the reactor identifies two competing transient forces namely 'blowdown force' and 'natural circulation' which act against each other due to virtue of the break location. The flow in the reactor channel is being decided by these two forces and eventually the flow condition decides the fuel heatup. It has been observed through analyses that variation of break sizes from moving smaller break sizes to bigger one (30% to 200%), causes an enhancement in blowdown forces and weakening of driving force for natural circulation as quality appears in cold leg section. A balance of these two forces is observed for 200% break case, causing a sustained flow stagnation condition leading to maximum fuel heat up among all the break cases. The blowdown characterization study is being carried out with RELAP5/mod3.4 code and the influences of transient forces on the fuel heatup are presented. It is concluded that the fuel heat up during blowdown phase is significantly dependent on the two competing forces namely blowdown and natural circulation which eventually depend on break sizes. The mist flow regime remains for a longer period during rewetting phase and the

  9. Effects of Drought and Rewetting on Growth and Gas Exchange of Minor European Broadleaved Tree Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Kunz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Widespread and economically important European tree species such as Norway spruce, Scots pine, and European beech are projected to be negatively affected by the increasing intensity and frequency of dry and hot conditions in a future climate. Hence, there is an increasing need to investigate the suitability of presumably more drought tolerant species to ensure future ecological stability, biodiversity, and productivity of forests. Based on their distribution patterns and climatic envelopes, the rare, minor broadleaved tree species Sorbus torminalis ((L. CRANTZ, S. domestica (L., Acer campestre (L., and A. platanoides (L. are assumed to be drought tolerant, however, there is only limited experimental basis to support that notion. This study aimed at quantifying growth and gas exchange of seedlings of these species during drought conditions, and their capacity to recover following drought. For that purpose, they were compared to the common companion species Quercus petraea ((MATTUSCHKA LIEBL. and Fagus sylvatica (L.. Here, potted seedlings of these species were exposed to water limitation followed by rewetting cycles in a greenhouse experiment. Photosynthesis and transpiration rates, stomatal conductance as well as root and shoot growth rates indicated a high drought resistance of A. campestre and A. platanoides. Sorbus domestica showed a marked ability to recover after drought stress. Therefore, we conclude that these minor tree species have the potential to enrich forests on drought-prone sites. Results from this pot experiment need to be complemented by field studies, in which the drought response of the species is not influenced by restrictions to root development.

  10. Oscillatory instability of a self-rewetting film driven by thermal modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, William; Agnon, Yehuda; Oron, Alex

    2016-11-01

    Here we consider the self-rewetting fluids (SRWFs) that exhibit a well-defined minimum surface tension with respect to temperature, in contrast to those where surface tension decreases linearly. Utilization of SRWFs has grown significantly in the past decade, due to observations that heat transfer is enhanced in applications such as film boiling and pulsating heat pipes. With similar applications in mind, we investigate the dynamics of a thin SRWF film which is subjected to a temperature modulation in the bounding gas. A model is developed within the framework of the long-wave approximation, and a time-averaged thermocapillary driving force for destabilization is uncovered for SRWFs that results from the nonlinear surface tension. Linear analysis of the nonlinear PDE for the film thickness is used to determine the critical conditions at which this driving force destabilizes the film, and, numerical integration of this evolution equation reveals that linearly unstable perturbations saturate to regular periodic solutions (when the modulational frequency is set properly). Properties of these flows such as bifurcation and long-domain flows, where multiple unstable linear modes interact, will also be discussed.

  11. Ecosystem respiration, methane and nitrous oxide fluxes from ecotopes in a rewetted extracted peatland in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jordan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem respiration (carbon dioxide; CO2, methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O fluxes to the atmosphere were determined using an opaque closed chamber method within various ecotopes (vegetation covered, bare peat and open water in a rewetted extracted peatland and within an adjacent open poor fen in Sweden. Ecotopes had a significant impact on CO2 and CH4 fluxes to the atmosphere. Ecosystem respiration and CH4 emissions from the bare peat site, the constructed shallow lake and the open poor fen were low but were much higher from ecotopes with Eriophorum vaginatum tussocks and Eriophorum angustifolium. A combination of vascular plant cover and high soil temperatures enhanced ecosystem respiration, while a combination of vascular plant cover, high water table levels and high soil temperatures enhanced CH4 emissions. N2O emissions contributed little to total greenhouse gas (GHG fluxes from the soil-plant-water systems to the atmosphere. However, the overall climate impact of CH4 emissions from the study area did not exceed the impact of soil and plant respiration. With regard to management of extracted peatlands, the construction of a nutrient-poor shallow lake showed great potential for lowering GHG fluxes to the atmosphere.

  12. The effect of an exceptionally wet summer on methane effluxes from a 15-year re-wetted fen in north-east Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Huth

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Re-wetting minerotrophic fens has become an important strategy to mitigate climate change in Germany. However, recent studies report raised methane (CH4 effluxes during the first years after flooding. A minerotrophic fen in north-east Germany that was re-wetted 15 years ago was exposed to exceptionally heavy rainfall and freshwater flooding in August 2011. We measured CH4 effluxes from wetland vegetation stands dominated by Phragmites australis (Cav. Trin. ex Steud., Typha latifolia L. and Carex acutiformis Ehrh., using the closed-chamber method, fortnightly from March 2011 to March 2012 with extra sampling during the flooding. The respective annual effluxes of CH4 (mean ± 1 standard error from the three vegetation types were 18.5 ± 1.3, 21.1 ± 1.2 and 47.5 ± 5.0 g m-2 a-1, with the August effluxes contributing 40 %, 50 % and 10 % of the annual effluxes. Despite the freshwater flooding in August, annual CH4 effluxes from the 15-year re-wetted fen are similar to those reported from pristine fens. These results are promising because they indicate that, although CH4 effluxes are elevated after re-wetting, they may return to values typical for pristine fens after 15 years. Hence, re-wetting can achieve the purpose of reducing greenhouse gas effluxes from drained minerotrophic fens.

  13. Complete annual CO2, CH4, and N2O balance of a temperate riparian wetland 12 years after rewetting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandel, Tanka; Lærke, Poul Erik; Hoffmann, Carl Christian

    2018-01-01

    Drained riparian wetlands have been rewetted and restored in recent decades to remove nutrients, increase biodiversity, and mitigate soil carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Yet, few studies have documented the long-term effects of rewetting on complete greenhouse gas (GHG) balances including emissio...

  14. Copper pollution decreases the resistance of soil microbial community to subsequent dry-rewetting disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Wang, Jun-Tao; Hu, Hang-Wei; Ma, Yi-Bing; Zhang, Li-Mei; He, Ji-Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Dry-rewetting (DW) disturbance frequently occurs in soils due to rainfall and irrigation, and the frequency of DW cycles might exert significant influences on soil microbial communities and their mediated functions. However, how microorganisms respond to DW alternations in soils with a history of heavy metal pollution remains largely unknown. Here, soil laboratory microcosms were constructed to explore the impacts of ten DW cycles on the soil microbial communities in two contrasting soils (fluvo-aquic soil and red soil) under three copper concentrations (zero, medium and high). Results showed that the fluctuations of substrate induced respiration (SIR) decreased with repeated cycles of DW alternation. Furthermore, the resistance values of substrate induced respiration (RS-SIR) were highest in non-copper-stressed (zero) soils. Structural equation model (SEM) analysis ascertained that the shifts of bacterial communities determined the changes of RS-SIR in both soils. The rate of bacterial community variance was significantly lower in non-copper-stressed soil compared to the other two copper-stressed (medium and high) soils, which might lead to the higher RS-SIR in the fluvo-aquic soil. As for the red soil, the substantial increase of the dominant group WPS-2 after DW disturbance might result in the low RS-SIR in the high copper-stressed soil. Moreover, in both soils, the bacterial diversity was highest in non-copper-stressed soils. Our results revealed that initial copper stress could decrease the resistance of soil microbial community structure and function to subsequent DW disturbance. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Current status of the post boiling transition research in Japan. Integrity evaluation of nuclear fuel assemblies after boiling transition and development of rewetting correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Takashi; Mizokami, Shinya; Kudo, Yoshiro; Komura, Seiichi; Nagata, Yoshifumi; Morooka, Shinichi

    2003-01-01

    Development of rewetting correlation formula was the key to predict fuel-cladding temperature after Boiling Transition (BT). Japanese BWR utilities and vendors performed some tests of rewetting and made two rewetting correlation formulas. The effect on fuel integrity after BT depends on temperature of fuel rod and time of dryout. Main cause of losing fuel integrity during BWR's Anticipated Operational Occurrences (AOO) after BT is embrittlement of the claddings due to oxidation. Ballooning of fuel rod is excepted because its pressure boundary isn't broken. In Japan, the Standards Committee of Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) is making post BT standard. This standard provides guidelines based on the latest knowledge to judge fuel integrity in case of BT and the validity of reusing the fuel assembly that experienced BT in BWRs. (author)

  16. Short-Term Effects of Drying-Rewetting and Long-Term Effects of Nutrient Loading on Periphyton N:P Stoichiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres D. Sola

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P concentrations and N:P ratios critically influence periphyton productivity and nutrient cycling in aquatic ecosystems. In coastal wetlands, variations in hydrology and water source (fresh or marine influence nutrient availability, but short-term effects of drying and rewetting and long-term effects of nutrient exposure on periphyton nutrient retention are uncertain. An outdoor microcosm experiment simulated short-term exposure to variation in drying-rewetting frequency on periphyton mat nutrient retention. A 13-year dataset from freshwater marshes of the Florida Everglades was examined for the effect of long-term proximity to different N and P sources on mat-forming periphyton nutrient standing stocks and stoichiometry. Field sites were selected from one drainage with shorter hydroperiod and higher connectivity to freshwater anthropogenic nutrient supplies (Taylor Slough/Panhandle, TS/Ph and another drainage with longer hydroperiod and higher connectivity to marine nutrient supplies (Shark River Slough, SRS. Total P, but not total N, increased in periphyton mats exposed to both low and high drying-rewetting frequency with respect to the control mats in our experimental microcosm. In SRS, N:P ratios slightly decreased downstream due to marine nutrient supplies, while TS/Ph increased. Mats exposed to short-term drying-rewetting had higher nutrient retention, similar to nutrient standing stocks from long-term field data. Periphyton mat microbial communities may undergo community shifts upon drying-rewetting and chronic exposure to nutrient loads. Additional work on microbial species composition may further explain how periphyton communities interact with drying-rewetting dynamics to influence nutrient cycling and retention in wetlands.

  17. A numerical solution model of the rewetting of a nuclear fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braz Filho, F.A.

    1984-01-01

    The study of thermal behaviour of a nuclear reactor fuel rod during the reflooding phase of the loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is presented. A mathematical model and a numerical scheme were proposed in order to solve the bidimensional heat conduction equation in cylindrical coordinates. The phenomenon of reflooding is not completely understood. One of the main difficulties is to estimate the heat transfer coefficient (h). For this reason two different models were elaborated: in the first three regions are considered and in each region h is considered constant; in the second the h profile is adjusted according to the boiling curve. The three region model yields satisfactory results at high and low mass flows while the 'boiling curve' model yields reasonable at low flows. (Author) [pt

  18. Eddy covariance measurements of greenhouse gases from a restored and rewetted raised bog ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. C.; Christen, A.; Black, T. A.; Johnson, M. S.; Ketler, R.; Nesic, Z.; Merkens, M.

    2015-12-01

    Wetland ecosystems play a significant role in the global carbon (C) cycle. Wetlands act as a major long-term storage of carbon by sequestrating carbon-dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere. Meanwhile, they can emit significant amounts of methane (CH4) due to anaerobic microbial decomposition. The Burns Bog Ecological Conservancy Area (BBECA) is recognized as one of Canada's largest undeveloped natural areas retained within an urban area. Historically, it has been substantially reduced in size and degraded by peat mining and agriculture. Since 2005, the bog has been declared a conservancy area, and the restoration efforts in BBECA focus on rewetting the disturbed ecosystems to promote a transition back to a raised bog. A pilot study measured CH4, CO2 and N2O exchanges in 2014 and concluded to monitor CO2, CH4 fluxes continuously. From the perspective of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, CO2 sequestered in bog needs to be protected and additional CO2 and CH4 emissions due to land-cover change need to be reduced by wise management. In this study, we measured the growing-season (June-September) fluxes of CO2 and CH4 exchange using eddy covariance (EC). A floating platform with an EC system for both CO2 (closed-path) and CH4 (open-path) began operation in June 2015. During the growing-season, gross ecosystem photosynthesis (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (Re) averaged 5.87 g C m-2 day-1 and 2.02 g C m-2 day-1, respectively. The magnitude of GEP and Re were lower than in previous studies of pristine northern peatlands. The daily average CH4 emission was 0.99 (±1.14) g C m-2 day-1 and it was higher than in most previous studies. We also characterized how environmental factors affected the seasonal dynamics of these exchanges in this disturbed peatland. Our measurements showed that soil temperature and soil water content were major drivers of seasonal changes of GHG fluxes. The daily average GHG warming potential (GWP) of the emissions in the growing seasons (from CO2 and CH4

  19. Flight distance of mosquitoes (Culicidae): A metadata analysis to support the management of barrier zones around rewetted and newly constructed wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonschot, P.F.M.; Besse-Lototskaya, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Society responds to changes in climate and land use via mitigation measures, including rainwater retention and storage in rewetted and newly constructed wetlands. Humans living close to these wetlands express concerns about future mosquito nuisance situations, and request the necessary distance

  20. Effects of rewetting on greenhouse gas emissions in different microtopes in a cut-over drained bog in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vybornova, Olga; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria; Kutzbach, Lars

    2016-04-01

    In peatlands, all biogeochemical processes and the amount of exported carbon and nitrogen compounds are strongly influenced by changes in the water table. Peatland drainage leads to increased peat oxidization and changes peatlands from carbon sinks to net carbon sources. Especially, the emissions of the important greenhouse gases (GHG) carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide are increased due to drainage. The currently ongoing restoration in the bog Himmelmoor (N 53° 44'20", E 9° 51'00", Quickborn) with an extent of about 6 km2 one of the largest raised bogs in Schleswig-Holstein, offers the possibility to characterize and to document the development of the fluxes at different sites before, during and after rewetting, using a method of small-scale closed chambers. Six subsites with differing water level and land use were identified: an area that was rewetted 30 years ago with Sphagnum vegetation, an area rewetted in 2009, an area with on-going peat extraction, deep peat cutting ditches refilled with peat with and without Eriophorum angustifolium vegetation and a comparatively dry peat dam. We determined that in the course of years 2014-2015 the measured N2O and CO2 fluxes varied between -0,1 and 1,9 mg m-2 h-1 and between -0,12 and 1,09 g m-2 h-1, respectively, and the highest nitrous oxide as well as carbon dioxide fluxes are typical for the dry peat dam study site. The measured CH4 fluxes were between -1,8 and 22,7 mg m-2 h-1, where the highest rates were found on the area rewetted 30 years ago and on the peat cutting ditches with Eriophorum angustifolium. Accounting for the different global warming potentials (GWP) of the measured greenhouse gases, the annual GHG balance was calculated. Emissions from all study sites ranged between 5,2 and 36 t CO2-eq ha-1 year-1 and were dominated by high emissions of CO2 (2,5 up to 25,5 t CO2-eq ha-1 year-1). Highest emission rates were found at the dry peat dam site and at the area rewetted 30 years ago. The peat dams and

  1. Light sensitive memristor with bi-directional and wavelength-dependent conductance control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, P.; Hartmann, F.; Emmerling, M.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.; Worschech, L.; Rebello Sousa Dias, M.; Castelano, L. K.; Marques, G. E.; Lopez-Richard, V.; Höfling, S.

    2016-01-01

    We report the optical control of localized charge on positioned quantum dots in an electro-photo-sensitive memristor. Interband absorption processes in the quantum dot barrier matrix lead to photo-generated electron-hole-pairs that, depending on the applied bias voltage, charge or discharge the quantum dots and hence decrease or increase the conductance. Wavelength-dependent conductance control is observed by illumination with red and infrared light, which leads to charging via interband and discharging via intraband absorption. The presented memristor enables optical conductance control and may thus be considered for sensory applications in artificial neural networks as light-sensitive synapses or optically tunable memories.

  2. Light sensitive memristor with bi-directional and wavelength-dependent conductance control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, P.; Hartmann, F., E-mail: fabian.hartmann@physik.uni-wuerzburg.de; Emmerling, M.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.; Worschech, L. [Technische Physik and Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen Research Center for Complex Material Systems, Physikalisches Institut, Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Rebello Sousa Dias, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, 13565-905 São Carlos, São Paulo (Brazil); Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Castelano, L. K.; Marques, G. E.; Lopez-Richard, V. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, 13565-905 São Carlos, São Paulo (Brazil); Höfling, S. [Technische Physik and Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen Research Center for Complex Material Systems, Physikalisches Institut, Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-11

    We report the optical control of localized charge on positioned quantum dots in an electro-photo-sensitive memristor. Interband absorption processes in the quantum dot barrier matrix lead to photo-generated electron-hole-pairs that, depending on the applied bias voltage, charge or discharge the quantum dots and hence decrease or increase the conductance. Wavelength-dependent conductance control is observed by illumination with red and infrared light, which leads to charging via interband and discharging via intraband absorption. The presented memristor enables optical conductance control and may thus be considered for sensory applications in artificial neural networks as light-sensitive synapses or optically tunable memories.

  3. Biomassa microbiana em amostras de solos secadas ao ar e reumedecidas Microbial biomass in air dried and rewetted soil samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Samarão Gonçalves

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar a viabilidade do condicionamento de amostras como terra fina secada ao ar (TFSA por curto período, para a determinação do carbono da biomassa microbiana (BMS-C, pelo método da fumigaçãoextração, e verificar a respiração microbiana basal (RB do solo. O condicionamento como TFSA, procedendo-se à fumigação para a análise da BMS-C imediatamente ou 24 horas após o reumedecimento, proporcionou valores de BMS-C para os solos Podzólicos, Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo álico e Orgânico, semelhantes aos valores dos seus controles. Os solos Glei Pouco Húmico e Vertissolo apresentaram valores de BMS-C similares aos do controle a partir de 24 horas de incubação; o solo Planossolo arenoso apresentou valores similares aos do controle com 72 horas, e a Rendizina, com 168 horas de incubação. Na maioria dos solos, a RB determinada na TFSA apresentou valores maiores do que os do tratamento-controle, quando avaliada imediatamente ou 24 horas após o reumedecimento a 60% da capacidade máxima de retenção de água, seguida de queda e manutenção em níveis semelhantes ao do controle nos períodos subseqüentes. O précondicionamento, de curta duração, como TFSA, é promissor para a determinação da BMS-C, quando níveis e períodos adequados de reumedecimento são adotados.The objective of this work was to evaluate the utilization of short term air dried soil samples in a determination of soil microbial biomass (SMB-C, by a fumigationextraction method, and soil microbial basal respiration (BR. Zero time or 24 hours rewetting incubation period before fumigation procedure gave values of SMB-C similar to those of the control for the Podzolic soils, Allic RedYellow Latosol and Organic soil. Low Humic Gley and Vertisol soils gave values of SMB-C similar to those of the control for periods of incubation equal or higher than 24 hours. Planosol (sandy soil and Rendzina soils gave values of SMB-C similar to the

  4. Experimental investigation of quench and re-wetting temperatures of hot horizontal tubes well above the limiting temperature for solid–liquid contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takrouri, Kifah, E-mail: takroukj@mcmaster.ca [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Luxat, John, E-mail: luxatj@mcmaster.ca [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Hamed, Mohamed [Thermal Processing Laboratory (TPL), Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Quench and re-wetting temperatures were measured upon jet quenching of hot cylindrical tubes. • Correlations have been developed and provided good fit of data. • Quench and re-wetting temperatures were found to greatly depend on water subcooling. • Stagnation point showed higher quench and re-wetting temperatures than other locations. • Quench temperature decreased by increasing surface curvature and tube conductivity. • Re-wetting temperature is a weak function of both variables. - Abstract: Quench cooling of a hot dry surface involves the rapid decrease in surface temperature resulting from bringing the hot surface into sudden contact with a coolant at a lower temperature. Quench temperature is the onset of the rapid decrease in surface temperature and corresponds to the onset of destabilization of a vapor film that exists between the hot surface and the coolant. Situations involving quench cooling are encountered in a number of postulated accidents in Canada Deuterium Uranium CANDU reactors, such as the quench of a hot calandria tube in certain Loss of Coolant Accidents LOCA. If the calandria tube temperature is not reduced by initiation of quench heat transfer, then this may lead to subsequent fuel channel failure and for this accident knowledge of quench heat transfer characteristics is of great importance. In this study, a Water Quench Facility WQF has been designed and built at the Thermal Processing Laboratory TPL at McMaster University and a series of experimental tests were carried out to investigate the quench of hot horizontal tubes using a vertical rectangular water multi-jet system. The tubes were heated to a temperature between 380 and 780 °C then cooled to the jet temperature. The temperature variation with time in tube circumferential and axial directions was measured. The two-phase flow behavior and the propagation of the re-wetting front around and along the tubes were simultaneously observed using a high-speed camera

  5. Prevalence and risk factors associated with Theileria parva infection in cattle in three regions of Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerario, Isack I.; Simuunza, Martin C; Chenyambuga, Sebastian W

    2017-01-01

    of ECF in Tanzania has continued to be a challenge due to inadequate epidemiological information. The main objective of this study was to determine the epidemiological situation of Theileria parva infections in cattle kept under pastoral and agro-pastoral farming systems in Mara, Singida, and Mbeya...... not found to be significant predictors of being PCR positive for T. parva. The present study showed high variation in tick burden and T. parva prevalence across the regions. Therefore, different strategic planning and cost-effective control measures for ticks and T. parva infection should be implemented...... regions of Tanzania. Blood samples were collected from 648 cattle in the three regions. Genomic DNA was extracted and amplified in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using T. parva-specific primers targeting the 104-kD antigen (P104) gene. In addition, information was collected on the possible risk factors...

  6. Arsenic content of soils from three regions of Santa Catarina State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Cristina de Souza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The determination of trace elements is necessary in order to monitor their entry into the soil system and to remediate contaminated areas. The purpose of this study was to determine the natural content of arsenic (As in soils of three regions of Santa Catarina State (SC: the Southern Plateau, the Metropolitan area and the Southern Coast. Arsenic content was obtained after digestion in a microwave oven, following the USEPA 3051 A protocol and quantification was made by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization. The results were analyzed by the Scott-Knott test at a 5% significance level. Soil attributes that best correlated with arsenic content were clay, organic carbon, cation exchange capacity and Al and Fe oxides. The arsenic levels are related to the source material and the slope of regional soils.

  7. Transition from natural-convection-controlled freezing to conduction-controlled freezing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparrow, E.M.; Ramsey, J.W.; Harris, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the transition between freezing controlled by natural convection in the liquid adjacent to a freezing interface and freezing controlled by heat conduction in the solidified material. The freezing took place on a cooled vertical tube immersed in an initially superheated liquid contained in an adiabatic-walled vessel. At early and intermediate times, temperature differences throughout the liquid induce a vigorous natural convection motion which retards freezing, but the temperature differences diminish with time and natural convection ebbs. At large times, the freezing rate is fully controlled by heat conduction in the solidified material. The frozen specimens for short and intermediate freezing times are smooth-surfaced and tapered, while those for large times are straight-sided and have surfaces that are overlaid with a thicket of large discrete crystals. These characteristics correspond respectively to those of natural-convection- controlled freezing and conduction-controlled freezing. At early times, the measured mass of the frozen material is identical to that for natural-convection-controlled freezing and conduction-controlled freezing. At early times, the measured mass of the frozen material is identical to that for natural-convection-controlled freezing. At later times, the frozen mass tends to approach that for conduction-controlled freezing, but a residual deficit remains

  8. Vowel change across three age groups of speakers in three regional varieties of American English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacewicz, Ewa; Fox, Robert A.; Salmons, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This acoustic study examines sound (vowel) change in apparent time across three successive generations of 123 adult female speakers ranging in age from 20 to 65 years old, representing three regional varieties of American English, typical of western North Carolina, central Ohio and southeastern Wisconsin. A set of acoustic measures characterized the dynamic nature of formant trajectories, the amount of spectral change over the course of vowel duration and the position of the spectral centroid. The study found a set of systematic changes to /I, ε, æ/ including positional changes in the acoustic space (mostly lowering of the vowels) and significant variation in formant dynamics (increased monophthongization). This common sound change is evident in both emphatic (articulated clearly) and nonemphatic (casual) productions and occurs regardless of dialect-specific vowel dispersions in the vowel space. The cross-generational and cross-dialectal patterns of variation found here support an earlier report by Jacewicz, Fox, and Salmons (2011) which found this recent development in these three dialect regions in isolated citation-form words. While confirming the new North American Shift in different styles of production, the study underscores the importance of addressing the stress-related variation in vowel production in a careful and valid assessment of sound change. PMID:22125350

  9. The Relationship Between Emotional Intelligence and Couples Marital Satisfaction in Three Regions of the Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    زهره نصیری زارچ

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to thoroughly investigate the relationship between emotional intelligence and couples satisfaction performed in three regions of the Isfahan city. The research design was a descriptive correlative and the statistical population of the study consisted of all married couples who had at least one child in third grade of primary schools and from socioeconomic conditions point of view lived in rich, semi-rich and under rich areas of the city. In the research 318 samples (159 couples were chosen using random Multi-stage cluster sampling. the research aim was fundamentally based on two standard questionnaires of Bar-On emotional intelligence and ENRICH marital satisfaction. The data was analyzed using Pearson correlation method, t-test, stepwise regression. The result analysis showed that in the rich area of the components self-esteem, empathy and impulse control, in the semi-rich area Happiness, Stress Tolerance, Assertiveness, reality testing, flexibility, independence, interpersonal relationship, optimism, impulse control and problem solving and in the under rich area while Stress Tolerance and Assertiveness are the most  predictive power, in under rich area. the most significant point of the survey shows that assertiveness, reality testing, impulse control and interpersonal relationships have reversed effects, in the semi-rich area. Considering the result of the study shows that some other major factors influence couples satisfaction as well as emotional intelligence and nowadays, in the modern society satisfying providing couples satisfaction, highly depends on other social economic factor.

  10. Vowel change across three age groups of speakers in three regional varieties of American English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacewicz, Ewa; Fox, Robert A; Salmons, Joseph

    2011-10-01

    This acoustic study examines sound (vowel) change in apparent time across three successive generations of 123 adult female speakers ranging in age from 20 to 65 years old, representing three regional varieties of American English, typical of western North Carolina, central Ohio and southeastern Wisconsin. A set of acoustic measures characterized the dynamic nature of formant trajectories, the amount of spectral change over the course of vowel duration and the position of the spectral centroid. The study found a set of systematic changes to /I, ε, æ/ including positional changes in the acoustic space (mostly lowering of the vowels) and significant variation in formant dynamics (increased monophthongization). This common sound change is evident in both emphatic (articulated clearly) and nonemphatic (casual) productions and occurs regardless of dialect-specific vowel dispersions in the vowel space. The cross-generational and cross-dialectal patterns of variation found here support an earlier report by Jacewicz, Fox, and Salmons (2011) which found this recent development in these three dialect regions in isolated citation-form words. While confirming the new North American Shift in different styles of production, the study underscores the importance of addressing the stress-related variation in vowel production in a careful and valid assessment of sound change.

  11. Prevalence of Dyslipidemias in Three Regions in Venezuela: The VEMSOLS Study Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rivas, Juan P.; Nieto-Martínez, Ramfis; Brajkovich, Imperia; Ugel, Eunice; Rísquez, Alejandro

    2018-01-01

    Background The prevalence of dyslipidemia in multiple regions of Venezuela is unknown. The Venezuelan Metabolic Syndrome, Obesity and Lifestyle Study (VEMSOLS) was undertaken to evaluate cardiometabolic risk factors in Venezuela. Objective To determine the prevalence of dyslipidemia in five populations from three regions of Venezuela. Methods During the years 2006 to 2010, 1320 subjects aged 20 years or older were selected by multistage stratified random sampling from all households in five municipalities from 3 regions of Venezuela: Lara State (Western region), Merida State (Andean region), and Capital District (Capital region). Anthropometric measurements and biochemical analysis were obtained from each participant. Dyslipidemia was defined according to the NCEP/ATPIII definitions. Results Mean age was 44.8 ± 0.39 years and 68.5% were females. The prevalence of lipids abnormalities related to the metabolic syndrome (low HDL-c [58.6%; 95% CI 54.9 - 62.1] and elevated triglycerides [39.7%; 36.1 - 43.2]) were the most prevalent lipid alterations, followed by atherogenic dyslipidemia (25.9%; 22.7 - 29.1), elevated LDL-c (23.3%; 20.2 - 26.4), hypercholesterolemia (22.2%; 19.2 - 25.2), and mix dyslipidemia (8.9%; 6.8 - 11.0). Dyslipidemia was more prevalent with increasing body mass index. Conclusion Dyslipidemias are prevalent cardiometabolic risk factors in Venezuela. Among these, a higher prevalence of low HDL is a condition also consistently reported in Latin America. PMID:29538522

  12. High soil solution carbon and nitrogen concentrations in a drained Atlantic bog are reduced to natural levels by 10 years of rewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, S.; Tiemeyer, B.; Gelbrecht, J.; Freibauer, A.

    2014-04-01

    Anthropogenic drainage of peatlands releases additional greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, and dissolved carbon (C) and nutrients to downstream ecosystems. Rewetting drained peatlands offers a possibility to reduce nitrogen (N) and C losses. In this study, we investigate the impact of drainage and rewetting on the cycling of dissolved C and N as well as on dissolved gases, over a period of 1 year and a period of 4 months. We chose four sites within one Atlantic bog complex: a near-natural site, two drained grasslands with different mean groundwater levels and a former peat cutting area rewetted 10 years ago. Our results clearly indicate that long-term drainage has increased the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), ammonium, nitrate and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) compared to the near-natural site. DON and ammonium contributed the most to the total dissolved nitrogen. Nitrate concentrations below the mean groundwater table were negligible. The concentrations of DOC and N species increased with drainage depth. In the deeply-drained grassland, with a mean annual water table of 45 cm below surface, DOC concentrations were twice as high as in the partially rewetted grassland with a mean annual water table of 28 cm below surface. The deeply drained grassland had some of the highest-ever observed DOC concentrations of 195.8 ± 77.3 mg L-1 with maximum values of >400 mg L-1. In general, dissolved organic matter (DOM) at the drained sites was enriched in aromatic moieties and showed a higher degradation status (lower DOC to DON ratio) compared to the near-natural site. At the drained sites, the C to N ratios of the uppermost peat layer were the same as of DOM in the peat profile. This suggests that the uppermost degraded peat layer is the main source of DOM. Nearly constant DOM quality through the profile furthermore indicated that DOM moving downwards through the drained sites remained largely biogeochemically unchanged. Unlike DOM concentration, DOM

  13. Rewetting of semi-dried ink patterns by vapour annealing for developing a reflow process in reverse offset printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusaka, Yasuyuki; Ushijima, Hirobumi; Sugihara, Kazuyoshi; Koutake, Masayoshi

    2017-01-01

    A process for reflowing patterned materials for reverse offset printing was developed, with the aim of mitigating the step-coverage problem in multilayered devices. The proposed reflow process involves a single step of vapour annealing at moderate temperatures ranging from 60 to 70 °C. This step successfully changes the height profile of semi-dried ink patterns formed on a silicone blanket, from an initially rectangular shape to a rounded shape. A systematic investigation on the effects of various vapour species and vapour temperatures on the reflow process revealed that the miscibility between the vapour and the ink, and a low boiling point of the respective solvent (high vapour pressure) are the prerequisites for successful reflows of semi-dried ink layers patterned on a silicone blanket. The results suggested that the rewetting of previously semi-dried patterns is the main mechanism in the reflow process, which led to a change in the height profile. Furthermore, the reflowed patterns demonstrated almost identical peak-height thicknesses, irrespective of the width of the patterns. This is a unique property that is unattainable by other printing methods, including gravure offset printing and microcontact printing, wherein printed patterns have rounded shapes without a reflow process, but their thickness inevitably depends on the pattern sizes. (technical note)

  14. Highly efficient conductance control in a topological insulator based magnetoelectric transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Xiaopeng; Li, Xi-Lai; Li, Xiaodong; Semenov, Yuriy G. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Kim, Ki Wook, E-mail: kwk@ncsu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-12-14

    The spin-momentum interlocked properties of the topological insulator (TI) surface states are exploited in a transistor-like structure for efficient conductance control in the TI-magnet system. Combined with the electrically induced magnetization rotation as part of the gate function, the proposed structure takes advantage of the magnetically modulated TI electronic band dispersion in addition to the conventional electrostatic barrier. The transport analysis coupled with the magnetic simulation predicts super-steep current-voltage characteristics near the threshold along with the GHz operating frequencies. Potential implementation to a complementary logic is also examined. The predicted characteristics are most suitable for applications requiring low power or those with small signals.

  15. Variability of Mediterranean aerosols properties at three regional background sites in the western Mediterranean Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard, Michaël.; Totems, Julien; Barragan, Rubén.; Dulac, François; Mallet, Marc; Comerón, Adolfo; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Augustin, Patrick; Chazette, Patrick; Léon, Jean-François; Olmo-Reyes, Francisco José; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Rocadenbosch, Francesc

    2014-10-01

    In the framework of the project ChArMEx (the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/), the variability of aerosol optical, microphysical and radiative properties is examined in three regional background sites on a southwest - northeast (SW-NE) straight line in the middle of the western Mediterranean Basin (WMB). The three sites are on the northward transport pathway of African dust: - Ersa, Corsica Island, France (43.00ºN, 9.36ºW, 80 m a.s.l), - Palma de Mallorca, Mallorca Island, Spain (39.55ºN, 2.62ºE, 10 m a.s.l) and - Alborán, Alboran Island, Spain (35.94ºN, 3.04ºW, 15 m a.s.l). AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) sun-photometer products are mainly used. A preliminary analysis shows that at Ersa and Palma sites the annual aerosol optical depth (AOD) has a similar trend with a peak around 0.2 in July. The winter/spring AOD is lower in Palma than in Ersa, while it is reverse in summer/autumn. The aerosol particle size distribution (and the coarse mode fraction) shows clearly the SW-NE gradient with a decreasing coarse mode peak (and a decreasing coarse mode fraction from 0.5 - 0.35 - 0.2 in July) along the axis Alborán - Palma de Mallorca - Ersa. In addition to the seasonal and annual variability analysis, the analysis of AERONET products is completed with a large variety of ground-based and sounding balloons remote sensing and in situ instruments during the Special Observation Period (SOP) of the ADRIMED campaign in June 2013. The second part of the presentation will focus on the comparison of the observations at Palma de Mallorca and Ersa of the same long-range transported airmasses. The observations include lidar vertical profiles, balloon borne OPC (Optical Particle Counter) and MSG/SEVIRI AOD, among others.

  16. The Effect of High Ambient Temperature on the Elderly Population in Three Regions of Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joacim Rocklöv

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The short-term effects of high temperatures are a serious concern in the context of climate change. In areas that today have mild climates the research activity has been rather limited, despite the fact that differences in temperature susceptibility will play a fundamental role in understanding the exposure, acclimatization, adaptation and health risks of a changing climate. In addition, many studies employ biometeorological indexes without careful investigation of the regional heterogeneity in the impact of relative humidity. We aimed to investigate the effects of summer temperature and relative humidity and regional differences in three regions of Sweden allowing for heterogeneity of the effect over the scale of summer temperature. To do so, we collected mortality data for ages 65+ from Stockholm, Göteborg and Skåne from the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare and the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute for the years 1998 through 2005. In Stockholm and Skåne on average 22 deaths per day occurred, while in Göteborg the mean frequency of daily deaths was 10. We fitted time-series regression models to estimate relative risks of high ambient temperatures on daily mortality using smooth functions to control for confounders, and estimated non-linear effects of exposure while allowing for auto-regressive correlation of observations within summers. The effect of temperature on mortality was found distributed over the same or following day, with statistically significant cumulative combined relative risk of about 5.1% (CI = 0.3, 10.1 per °C above the 90th percentile of summer temperature. The effect of high relative humidity was statistically significant in only one of the regions, as was the effect of relative humidity (above 80th percentile and temperature (above 90th percentile. In the southernmost region studied there appeared to be a significant increase in mortality with decreasing low summer temperatures that was not

  17. Drained peatlands used for extraction and agriculture: biogeochemical status with special attention to greenhouse gas fluxes and rewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirin, Andrey; Chistotin, Maxim; Suvorov, Gennady; Glagolev, Mikhail; Kravchenko, Irina; Minaeva, Tatiana

    2010-05-01

    ditches. The findings were supported by the studies conducted from 2005 at drained peatland sites in Moscow region (European part of Russia) which are used for peat extraction or as hayfield (Chistotin et al., 2006). Unexpected transient methane fluxes were observed at the inter-ditch surfaces in two types of sites: milled peat extraction area and used as a hay field after partial peat extraction. Under warm and wet conditions methane was released even from peat stockpiles. Microbiological studies showed not lower and near to twice higher genomic diversity of methanogens in extracted sites and in a hayfield as compared to virgin mire. We suppose that well-developed plant roots at the grassland provide a source of fresh organic material used for CH4 production. To test this hypothesis, a pot experiment with mesocosms which model three succession stages (bare peat, grass sowing, and developed grassland) under permanently high or fluctuating wetness was conducted. Methane efflux from peat under developed grassland was higher as compared to the other treatments. Under permanently high water supply the methane emission was 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher. The obtained results clearly showed that plant organic matter can be an additional source of methane after rewetting which is obviously needed for abandoned peatland sites not used for agriculture any more. To mitigate the emissions, such management options as removal of the surface peat layer before rewetting could be applied. This practice could have additional benefits achieved by bringing day surface closer to ground water table level and forming more favorable soil conditions for mire species.

  18. Impact of drying-rewetting events on the response of soil microbial functions to dairyfibre and Miscanthus biochars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnett, Sam; Vink, Stefanie; Baker, Kate; Saghir, Muhammad; Hornung, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Biochar application has been shown to positively affect soil microbial functions such as reducing greenhouse gas emissions, increasing water/nutrient availability and increasing crop yields in tropical regions (Lehmann & Joseph, 2009). Understanding the dynamics of biochar application to soil microbial processes is critical for ensuring that soil quality, integrity and sustainability of the soil sub-system are maintained for crop growth. The aim of this British Ecological Society (BES) funded study was to examine the effect of two types of biochar on soil physicochemistry, GHG production, soil enzyme activities and microbial biomass in typical agricultural soil types and whether the effects were altered by drying, rewetting and flooding events. Miscanthus and dairyfibre (a mixture of straw and manure) feedstocks from Harper Adams University were pyrolyzed by Aston University at 450 °C using 100 kg/hr pyroformer technology. Two sieved soil types (sandy loam and clay loam) were mixed with dry biochar to produce 2 and 10 % w/w treatments for comparison with controls and maintained at 15 °C in temperature controlled incubators. At 0, 22, 44, 80, 101, and 114 days, soil was collected for determination of heterotrophic respiration, and microbial biomass by substrate-induced respiration (SIR), by gas headspace incubation and analysis of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) by gas chromatography. Soil was sampled for the determination of water-extractable carbon, pH, and extracellular enzyme activities. Soil samples were maintained at field gravimetric water content between 0 and 44 days; air dried between 44 and 80 days; rewetted between 80 and 101 days; and flooded between 101 to 114 days. Results showed that the impact of biochar on soil microbial processes was dependent on biochar type and soil type, the level of biochar application and changes in soil moisture. Biochar affected soil pH particularly within the dairyfibre treatments, potentially due to the

  19. A One-Dimensional (1-D) Three-Region Model for a Bubbling Fluidized-Bed Adsorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Andrew; Miller, David C.

    2012-01-01

    A general one-dimensional (1-D), three-region model for a bubbling fluidized-bed adsorber with internal heat exchangers has been developed. The model can predict the hydrodynamics of the bed and provides axial profiles for all temperatures, concentrations, and velocities. The model is computationally fast and flexible and allows for any system of adsorption and desorption reactions to be modeled, making the model applicable to any adsorption process. The model has been implemented in both gPROMS and Aspen Custom Modeler, and the behavior of the model has been verified.

  20. Theoretical studies of the influence of filler material gas gap and cladding material on rewetting rate of nuclear reactor fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, D.; Pearson, K.G.; Shires, G.L.

    1977-03-01

    Theoretical studies of the effect of fuel and gas gap on the rewetting rate of overheated fuel pins quenched by a falling film of water are presented. Two approaches have been made: a finite difference technique and an approximate analytical solution. The results obtained by the two methods for the case of a uranium-dioxide-filled Zircaloy clad fuel pin are in close agreement. The paper shows that under high pressure conditions the delaying effect of the stored heat within the fuel on the wetting rate is relatively small, particularly if a gas gap is present between the clad and the fuel. At low pressure conditions, however, the effect of the fuel may be very important. Simplification of the analytical solution shows that at low wetting rates a constant fractional reduction in wetting speed may be anticipated the magnitude of which depends only on the relative thermal diffusivities and heat capacities of the fuel and cladding. (author)

  1. Rate of Decomposition of Organic Matter in Soil as Influenced by Repeated Air Drying-Rewetting and Repeated Additions of Organic Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst

    1974-01-01

    Repeated air drying and rewetting of three soils followed by incubation at 20°C resulted in an increase in the rate of decomposition of a fraction of 14C labeled organic matter in the soils. The labeled organic matter originated from labeled glucose, cellulose and straw, respectively, metabolized...... of the treatment was least in the soil which had been incubated with the labeled material for the longest time. Additions of unlabeled, decomposable organic material also increased the rate of decomposition of the labeled organic matter. The evolution of labeled CO2 during the 1st month of incubation after...... addition was in some cases 4–10 times larger than the evolution from the controls. During the continued incubation the evolution decreased almost to the level of the controls, indicating that the effect was related to the increased biological activity in the soils during decomposition of the added material...

  2. Paludiculture as a chance for peatland and climate: the greenhouse gas balance of biomass production on two rewetted peatlands does not differ from the natural state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Anke; Huth, Vytas; Jurasinski, Gerald; Albrecht, Kerstin; Glatzel, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    In Europe, rising prices for farm land make it increasingly difficult for government administrations to compete with external investors during the acquisition of land for wetland conservation. Thus, adding economic value to these, otherwise "lost", areas by combining extensive land use with nature conservation efforts could increase the amount of ground available for wetland restoration. Against this background, the concept of paludiculture aims to provide biomass for multiple purposes from peatlands with water tables high enough to conserve the peat body. However, as plants have been shown to contribute to greenhouse gas exchange in peatlands, manipulating the vegetation (by harvesting, sowing etc.) might alter the effect of the restored peatlands on climate. Here, we present greenhouse gas data from two experimental paludiculture systems on formerly drained intensive grasslands in northern Germany. In a fen that has been rewetted more than 15 years ago three species of reed plants were harvested to simulate biomass production for bioenergy and as construction material. And in a peat bog that has been converted from drained grassland to a field with a controlled water table around ground surface Sphagnum mosses were cultivated to provide an alternative growing substrate for horticulture. In both systems, we determined carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide exchange using closed chambers over two years. Additionally, water and peat chemistry and environmental parameters as recorded by a weather station were analyzed. Both restored peatlands show greenhouse gas balances comparable to those of natural ecosystems. Nitrous oxide was not emitted in either system. Fluctuations of the emissions reflect changes in weather conditions across the study years. In the fen, relative emission patterns between plant species were not constant over time. We did not find a negative short-term effect of biomass harvest or Sphagnum cultivation on net greenhouse gas balances

  3. Short communication. A survey of potential insect vectors of the plant pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa in three regions of Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao R. S. Lopes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of a rapid-spreading olive disease associated with Xylella fastidiosa in southern Italy represents a high risk to susceptible crops in other countries of the Mediterranean basin, if insect vectors occur in the region. The goal of this study was to identify xylem-feeding Auchenorrhyncha that could potentially act as vectors of X. fastidiosa in three regions of Spain (Andalucía, Murcia and Madrid. Samplings with sweep net and stem tap were carried out in October/2004 on grapevines and adjacent crops (olives, nectarine, citrus, Prunus spp., ornamental trees and herbaceous weeds. Yellow sticky cards were placed in ten vineyards located across 100 km in Andalucía and in three vineyards distant 10-15 km apart in Murcia. Specimens of frequently-trapped species were tested by nested- or multiplex-PCR for the presence of X. fastidiosa. The Typhlocybinae leafhopper, Austroasca (Jacobiasca lybica (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae was the most abundant species in vineyards and citrus orchards. Planthoppers (Hemiptera: Fulgoroidea and psyllids (Hemiptera: Psylloidea were prevalent on olives. Cicadellinae leafhoppers (known as sharpshooters, which are major vectors of X. fastidiosa in the Americas, were not found in the samples. The only potential vectors were spittlebugs (Hemiptera: Cercopoidea collected on Populus sp., herbaceous and on conifer trees (Pinus halepense; the spittlebug Neophileanus sp. was common on conifer trees adjacent to a vineyard in Jumilla. None of the insect samples tested positive for X. fastidiosa by PCR assays. However, spittlebugs already associated with susceptible crops in Spain may allow fast spread of X. fastidiosa in case this pathogen is introduced.

  4. Abiotic and Biotic Soil Characteristics in Old Growth Forests and Thinned or Unthinned Mature Stands in Three Regions of Oregon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Perry

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We compared forest floor depth, soil organic matter, soil moisture, anaerobic mineralizable nitrogen (a measure of microbial biomass, denitrification potential, and soil/litter arthropod communities among old growth, unthinned mature stands, and thinned mature stands at nine sites (each with all three stand types distributed among three regions of Oregon. Mineral soil measurements were restricted to the top 10 cm. Data were analyzed with both multivariate and univariate analyses of variance. Multivariate analyses were conducted with and without soil mesofauna or forest floor mesofauna, as data for those taxa were not collected on some sites. In multivariate analysis with soil mesofauna, the model giving the strongest separation among stand types (P = 0.019 included abundance and richness of soil mesofauna and anaerobic mineralizable nitrogen. The best model with forest floor mesofauna (P = 0.010 included anaerobic mineralizable nitrogen, soil moisture content, and richness of forest floor mesofauna. Old growth had the highest mean values for all variables, and in both models differed significantly from mature stands, while the latter did not differ. Old growth also averaged higher percent soil organic matter, and analysis including that variable was significant but not as strong as without it. Results of the multivariate analyses were mostly supported by univariate analyses, but there were some differences. In univariate analysis, the difference in percent soil organic matter between old growth and thinned mature was due to a single site in which the old growth had exceptionally high soil organic matter; without that site, percent soil organic matter did not differ between old growth and thinned mature, and a multivariate model containing soil organic matter was not statistically significant. In univariate analyses soil mesofauna had to be compared nonparametrically (because of heavy left-tails and differed only in the Siskiyou Mountains, where

  5. A three-region model for tracking a two-phase mixture water level in the micro-simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seok, Ho

    1994-02-01

    A simplified one-dimensional three-region model is developed to predict two-phase mixture and subcooled levels in vertical and horizontal channels during the loss of coolant accidents and to satisfy the requirement of the capability of real-time computation in the micro-simulator. The present model treats a physical component as one node which is divided into three sub-regions by thermal-hydraulic conditions: subcooled region, mixture region, and steam dome region. The bubble rise model and the drift-flux model concept are used to account for the mass and energy transfer between the mixture region and the steam dome region. The conservation equations of mass, energy, and momentum are derived based on the two-fluid model. Especially, the volumes of the subcooled region and the mixture region are adopted as principal unknowns and incorporated in the governing equations. The area change at the junction is modeled in the momentum equation. The non-linear difference equations of mass, energy, and momentum for the three regions are numerically solved by the Implicit Coulant Eulerian (ICE) method similar to that used in advanced safety codes such as TRAC and RELAP5. The proposed model is tested through the comparison of its simulation results with the experimental data of Edwards and O' Brien pipe blodwdown test, GE small vessel blowdown tests, Marviken tests, and 336-rod bundle test in order to confirm its capability of fast calculation but reasonable accuracy. The computation time by RELAP5/MOD3 is up to around 50 times longer than that by the proposed model when the Marviken tests are simulated. The predictions with Bertodanoi's correlation for the drift velocity in the blowdown tests and with the correlation of Ishii et. al. in the 336-rod bundle test are in best agreement with the test data, respectively. A WS-based real-time simulator for two-loop pressurized water reactor plants, also, is developed for classroom training in support of full-support simulator, on

  6. Adaptable Web Modules to Stimulate Active Learning in Engineering Hydrology using Data and Model Simulations of Three Regional Hydrologic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, E. H.; Tarboton, D. G.; Lall, U.; Bodin, M.; Rahill-Marier, B.; Chimmula, S.; Meselhe, E. A.; Ali, A.; Williams, D.; Ma, Y.

    2013-12-01

    server-based system. Open source web technologies and community-based tools are used to facilitate wide dissemination and adaptation by diverse, independent institutions. The new hydrologic learning modules are based on recent developments in hydrologic modeling, data, and resources. The modules are embedded in three regional-scale ecosystems, Coastal Louisiana, Florida Everglades, and Utah Great Salt Lake Basin. These sites provide a wealth of hydrologic concepts and scenarios that can be used in most water resource and hydrology curricula. The study develops several learning modules based on the three hydro-systems covering subjects such as: water-budget analysis, effects of human and natural changes, climate-hydrology teleconnections, and water-resource management scenarios. The new developments include an instructional interface to give critical guidance and support to the learner and an instructor's guide containing adaptation and implementation procedures to assist instructors in adopting and integrating the material into courses and provide a consistent experience. The design of the new hydrologic education developments will be transferable to independent institutions and adaptable both instructionally and technically through a server system capable of supporting additional developments by the educational community.

  7. The Comparison and Modeling of the Driving Factors of Urban Expansion for Thirty-Five Big Cities in the Three Regions in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Guangjin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a national- and regional-scale urban growth model (NRUGM of China based on panel data analysis. Through the panel analysis, population growth, road construction, salary increment per capita, and secondary industry product increment were proven to be the major driving factors for national-scale urban expansion. According to Seventh Five-Year Plan, China had been divided into three regions, Eastern China, Middle China, and Western China, by their geographic position and economic development. We studied the relationship between urban expansion and the driving factors for the three regions between 1990 and 2010 in China. The driving factors of urban expansion were different for the different regions and periods. Population growth and road construction were identified as the two major factors driving urban expansion for Eastern China. Secondary industry and economic development had become the major driving factors for urban expansion over the last twenty years in Middle China. Over the same period, for Western China, economic growth had become the major driving factor for urban expansion. Our results have significant policy implications for China. The macrocontrol of the central government should utilize different policies to adjust urban expansion in the different regions.

  8. Computational simulation of natural circulation and rewetting experiments using the TRAC/PF1 code; Simulacao computacional dos experimentos: circulacao natural no CTE-150 e remolhamento na ITR utilizando o TRAC-PF1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, J.D. da

    1994-05-01

    In this work the TRAC code was used to simulate experiments of natural circulation performed in the first Brazilian integral test facility at (COPESP), Sao Paulo and a rewetting experiment in a single tube test section carried out at CDTN, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. In the first simulation the loop behavior in two transient conditions with different thermal power, namely 20 k W and 120 k W, was verified in the second one the quench front propagation, the liquid mass collected in the carry over measuring tube and the wall temperature at different elevations during the flooding experiment was measured. A comparative analysis, for code consistency, shows a good agreement between the code results and experimental data, except for the quench from velocity. (author). 15 refs, 19 figs, 12 tabs.

  9. Implementing health information exchange for public health reporting: a comparison of decision and risk management of three regional health information organizations in New York state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Andrew B; Wilson, Rosalind V; Kaushal, Rainu; Merrill, Jacqueline A

    2014-01-01

    Health information exchange (HIE) is a significant component of healthcare transformation strategies at both the state and national levels. HIE is expected to improve care coordination, and advance public health, but implementation is massively complex and involves significant risk. In New York, three regional health information organizations (RHIOs) implemented an HIE use case for public health reporting by demonstrating capability to deliver accurate responses to electronic queries via a set of services called the Universal Public Health Node. We investigated process and outcomes of the implementation with a comparative case study. Qualitative analysis was structured around a decision and risk matrix. Although each RHIO had a unique operational model, two common factors influenced risk management and implementation success: leadership capable of agile decision-making and commitment to a strong organizational vision. While all three RHIOs achieved certification for the public health reporting, only one has elected to deploy a production version. PMID:23975626

  10. Prevalence of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS in three regions of England: a repeated cross-sectional study in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayyaz Shagufta

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS or chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS has been used to name a range of chronic conditions characterized by extreme fatigue and other disabling symptoms. Attempts to estimate the burden of disease have been limited by selection bias, and by lack of diagnostic biomarkers and of agreed reproducible case definitions. We estimated the prevalence and incidence of ME/CFS in three regions in England, and discussed the implications of frequency statistics and the use of different case definitions for health and social care planning and for research. Methods We compared the clinical presentation, prevalence and incidence of ME/CFS based on a sample of 143,000 individuals aged 18 to 64 years, covered by primary care services in three regions of England. Case ascertainment involved: 1 electronic search for chronic fatigue cases; 2 direct questioning of general practitioners (GPs on cases not previously identified by the search; and 3 clinical review of identified cases according to CDC-1994, Canadian and Epidemiological Case (ECD Definitions. This enabled the identification of cases with high validity. Results The estimated minimum prevalence rate of ME/CFS was 0.2% for cases meeting any of the study case definitions, 0.19% for the CDC-1994 definition, 0.11% for the Canadian definition and 0.03% for the ECD. The overall estimated minimal yearly incidence was 0.015%. The highest rates were found in London and the lowest in East Yorkshire. All but one of the cases conforming to the Canadian criteria also met the CDC-1994 criteria, however presented higher prevalence and severity of symptoms. Conclusions ME/CFS is not uncommon in England and represents a significant burden to patients and society. The number of people with chronic fatigue who do not meet specific criteria for ME/CFS is higher still. Both groups have high levels of need for service provision, including health and social

  11. Rapid Increase in Ownership and Use of Long-Lasting Insecticidal Nets and Decrease in Prevalence of Malaria in Three Regional States of Ethiopia (2006-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estifanos Biru Shargie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Following recent large scale-up of malaria control interventions in Ethiopia, this study aimed to compare ownership and use of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN, and the change in malaria prevalence using two population-based household surveys in three regions of the country. Each survey used multistage cluster random sampling with 25 households per cluster. Household net ownership tripled from 19.6% in 2006 to 68.4% in 2007, with mean LLIN per household increasing from 0.3 to 1.2. Net use overall more than doubled from 15.3% to 34.5%, but in households owning LLIN, use declined from 71.7% to 48.3%. Parasitemia declined from 4.1% to 0.4%. Large scale-up of net ownership over a short period of time was possible. However, a large increase in net ownership was not necessarily mirrored directly by increased net use. Better targeting of nets to malaria-risk areas and sustained behavioural change communication are needed to increase and maintain net use.

  12. Incidence of tuberculosis and associations with indicators of alcohol consumption in three regions of northwest Russia in 1975-2009: a time-series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, V N; Shelygin, K V; Grjibovski, A M; Mariandyshev, A O; Johansson, E; Bjune, G A

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol has several social consequences that are associated with increased risk of tuberculosis. However, there have been no studies assessing the links between tuberculosis and alcohol consumption in northwest Russia. The aim of this study was to assess associations between the incidence of tuberculosis and indicators of alcohol consumption in three regions of northwest Russia. The study was performed in Arkhangelsk, Murmansk and Vologda regions using the data from 1975 to 2009. Deaths from alcohol poisoning and the incidence of alcohol psychoses were used as indicators of alcohol consumption. Associations between the incidence of tuberculosis and the above mentioned indicators were studied using time-series analysis. We identified significant positive associations between the incidence of tuberculosis and the incidence of alcohol psychoses in the same year in Arkhangelsk region (β = 0.24, 95% CI: 0.10-0.37) and in Vologda region (β = 0.18, 95% CI: 0.10-0.25), but not in Murmansk region. We found an association between the incidence of alcohol psychoses and the incidence of tuberculosis in the same year in Arkhangelsk and Vologda regions suggesting an indirect link between excessive levels of alcohol consumption and the incidence of tuberculosis in Russia.

  13. Validation of precipitation over Japan during 1985-2004 simulated by three regional climate models and two multi-model ensemble means

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishizaki, Yasuhiro [Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba (Japan); National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba (Japan); Nakaegawa, Toshiyuki; Takayabu, Izuru [Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2012-07-15

    We dynamically downscaled Japanese reanalysis data (JRA-25) for 60 regions of Japan using three regional climate models (RCMs): the Non-Hydrostatic Regional Climate Model (NHRCM), modified RAMS version 4.3 (NRAMS), and modified Weather Research and Forecasting model (TWRF). We validated their simulations of the precipitation climatology and interannual variations of summer and winter precipitation. We also validated precipitation for two multi-model ensemble means: the arithmetic ensemble mean (AEM) and an ensemble mean weighted according to model reliability. In the 60 regions NRAMS simulated both the winter and summer climatological precipitation better than JRA-25, and NHRCM simulated the wintertime precipitation better than JRA-25. TWRF, however, overestimated precipitation in the 60 regions in both the winter and summer, and NHRCM overestimated precipitation in the summer. The three RCMs simulated interannual variations, particularly summer precipitation, better than JRA-25. AEM simulated both climatological precipitation and interannual variations during the two seasons more realistically than JRA-25 and the three RCMs overall, but the best RCM was often superior to the AEM result. In contrast, the weighted ensemble mean skills were usually superior to those of the best RCM. Thus, both RCMs and multi-model ensemble means, especially multi-model ensemble means weighted according to model reliability, are powerful tools for simulating seasonal and interannual variability of precipitation in Japan under the current climate. (orig.)

  14. A high-fidelity model for coupling flow and mechanical deformation of the porous paper web - a key to improved understanding of dewatering and rewet at the press section in paper making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Trebotich, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wang, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Xu, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Turpin, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-04-05

    The U.S. pulp and paper industry is the third-largest manufacturing user of energy, with an energy demand of 2,540 trillion Btu in 2010. Within the papermaking process, drying consumes over 400 trillion Btu annually which makes it one of the largest energy saving opportunities. In the 2014 Forest Products Industry Technology Roadmap, it is concluded that increasing the paper web solid content entering the dryer section from the current 45- 55 percent to approaching 65 percent, which would save 1.0 MMBtu per ton or 20 percent of the energy used in drying, is one of the most needed technology breakthroughs to achieve a more sustainable approach for manufacturing pulp and paper products. Achieving such significant energy savings highly depends on understanding the fundamental dynamics of the wet press process and then developing optimized solutions for design of more energy-efficient press processes and equipment. The objective of this project is to develop reliable computational capabilities to accurately simulate the flow of water from/to the porous pulp medium (dewatering/rewetting) during the pressing process in paper making.

  15. Future change of climate in South America in the late twenty-first century: intercomparison of scenarios from three regional climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marengo, Jose A.; Ambrizzi, Tercio; Da Rocha, Rosmeri P.; Alves, Lincoln M.; Cuadra, Santiago V.; Valverde, Maria C.; Torres, Roger R.; Santos, Daniel C.; Ferraz, Simone E. T.

    2010-11-01

    Regional climate change projections for the last half of the twenty-first century have been produced for South America, as part of the CREAS (Cenarios REgionalizados de Clima Futuro da America do Sul) regional project. Three regional climate models RCMs (Eta CCS, RegCM3 and HadRM3P) were nested within the HadAM3P global model. The simulations cover a 30-year period representing present climate (1961-1990) and projections for the IPCC A2 high emission scenario for 2071-2100. The focus was on the changes in the mean circulation and surface variables, in particular, surface air temperature and precipitation. There is a consistent pattern of changes in circulation, rainfall and temperatures as depicted by the three models. The HadRM3P shows intensification and a more southward position of the subtropical Pacific high, while a pattern of intensification/weakening during summer/winter is projected by the Eta CCS/RegCM3. There is a tendency for a weakening of the subtropical westerly jet from the Eta CCS and HadRM3P, consistent with other studies. There are indications that regions such of Northeast Brazil and central-eastern and southern Amazonia may experience rainfall deficiency in the future, while the Northwest coast of Peru-Ecuador and northern Argentina may experience rainfall excesses in a warmer future, and these changes may vary with the seasons. The three models show warming in the A2 scenario stronger in the tropical region, especially in the 5°N-15°S band, both in summer and especially in winter, reaching up to 6-8°C warmer than in the present. In southern South America, the warming in summer varies between 2 and 4°C and in winter between 3 and 5°C in the same region from the 3 models. These changes are consistent with changes in low level circulation from the models, and they are comparable with changes in rainfall and temperature extremes reported elsewhere. In summary, some aspects of projected future climate change are quite robust across this set of

  16. Attitudes and use of medicinal plants during pregnancy among women at health care centers in three regions of Mali, West-Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nergard, Cecilie Sogn; Ho, Thi Phung Than; Diallo, Drissa; Ballo, Ngolo; Paulsen, Berit Smestad; Nordeng, Hedvig

    2015-10-09

    Although, medicinal plants have been important for women's health historically, the knowledge about such use during pregnancy in developing countries is limited. This is the first quantitative, ethnobotanical study on Malian women's use of and attitudes towards the use of medicinal plants during pregnancy. The aim of the study was to describe Malian women's use of medicinal plants during pregnancy according to indications and to evaluate the potentially safety of such use. The overall aim was to preserve valuable information about medicinal plants for women's reproductive health for the future. Data was collected through structured interviews of 209 pregnant women or mothers in three health care centers in Mali. The women were interviewed about their uses of medicinal plants during pregnancy and their attitudes to such use. Nine specific medicinal plants commonly used in Mali and treatment of eleven common ailments in pregnancy were specifically queried about. In total, 79.9 % had used medicinal plants during pregnancy. Only 17 women (8.5 %) had received a recommendation from a traditional practitioner (TP). The most commonly used medicinal plants were Lippia chevalieri (55.5 %), Combretum micranthum (39.7 %), Parkia biglobosa (12.0 %) and Vepris heterophylla (8.1 %). The most common reasons for use were for well-being (37.7 %), symptoms of malaria (37.1 %) and "increased salt-elimination" (to reduce edema) (19.2 %). For treatment of symptoms of malaria and urinary tract infections during pregnancy, the women's choices of medicinal plants agreed with those previously reported from interviews with TPs. Almost 30 % believed that medicinal plants had no adverse effects for the mother. This study showed an extensive use and knowledge of medicinal plants during pregnancy in three regions in Mali. However, exclusive use of medicinal plants as treatment of malaria and urinary tract infections during pregnancy may pose a health risk for the mother and her unborn child. A

  17. Contributing to the debate on categorising shared sanitation facilities as 'unimproved': An account based on field researchers' observations and householders' opinions in three regions, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Khalid; Kilamile, Fadhili; Safari, Emmanuela; Seleman, Amour; Mwakitalima, Anyitike; Balengayabo, Jonas G; Kassile, Telemu; Mangesho, Peter E; Mubyazi, Godfrey M

    2017-01-01

    Health risks associated with poor sanitation behaviours continue to be reported mostly from low-income countries (LICs). Reports show that various factors limit many people from accessing and using improved latrines, forcing some to opt for sharing latrines with neighbours, others practicing open defecation. Meanwhile, debate prevails on whether shared latrines should be categorised as unimproved according to WHO/UNICEF-JMP criteria. We contribute to this debate based on results from a study undertaken in three regions, Tanzania. Data were collected through observations in 1,751 households with latrines, coupled with collection of opinions from heads of such households regarding the latrine-sharing practices. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess associations between the outcome and possible predictor variables. Of all 1,751 latrines, 14.6% were shared. Among the shared latrines, 74.2% were found being generally clean as compared to 69.2% of the non-shared ones. Comparing the shared and non-shared latrines, the non-shared latrines were significantly less likely to be found with floors built with permanent materials (OR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.55, 0.98); washable floors (OR = 0.69; 95% CI: 0.51, 0.93); and lockable doors (OR = 0.73; 95% CI: 0.56, 0.95). Shared latrines were less likely to have floors with faecal matter, functional handwashing facilities (HWFs), HWFs with running water, and roofs; albeit the differences in all these scenarios were not statistically significant. Respondents expressed desire for improved latrines, but also did not find it wrong to share latrines if cleanliness was maintained. Having an 'improved' latrine remains important as JMP recommends, but based on our study findings, we argue that possessing a non-shared latrine neither guarantees safety to its users nor its categorisation as 'improved'. Instead, the state of the latrine, the construction technology used and the behaviours of the users may be

  18. Fotossíntese e potencial hídrico foliar de plantas jovens de andiroba submetidas à deficiência hídrica e à reidratação Photosynthesis and water potential of andiroba seedlings submitted to water stress and rewetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Francisco de Carvalho Gonçalves

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi investigar o desempenho fotossintético de plantas jovens de andiroba (Carapa guianensis, submetidas à deficiência hídrica e à reidratação. As plantas foram irrigadas diariamente, em casa de vegetação, durante 15 dias. Após aclimatação, as plantas foram separadas em dois tratamentos: plantas irrigadas e não irrigadas. Quando a resposta fotossintética das plantas não irrigadas alcançou valores próximos a zero, as plantas foram reidratadas. A cada sete dias, durante 21 dias, foram realizadas as determinações das trocas gasosas e da fluorescência da clorofila a. O potencial hídrico foliar foi determinado no início e no fim do experimento. As taxas de fotossíntese líquida, condutância estomática e transpiração se reduziram em 88, 89 e 89%, respectivamente, após 21 dias de supressão da irrigação. Quanto às variáveis da fluorescência da clorofila a, observaram-se reduções de 27 a 58%. O potencial hídrico foliar das plantas foi reduzido em mais de quatro vezes, após 21 dias de deficiência hídrica. De quatro a oito dias após a reidratação, as plantas recuperaram as características fotossintéticas e o potencial hídrico foliar, o que indica que plantas jovens de andiroba apresentaram alta plasticidade fisiológica em relação ao estresse hídrico.The objective of this work was to investigate the photosynthetic performance of young andiroba plants (Carapa guianensis submitted to water stress and rewetting. The plants were irrigated daily in greenhouse conditions for 15 days. After acclimatization, the plants were separated randomly in two treatments, irrigated and non-irrigated plants. When the photosynthesis of the non-irrigated plants reached values close to zero, the plants were rewetted. Measurements of gas exchanges and chlorophyll a fluorescence were recorded on seven-day intervals, during 21 days. Plant water potentials were determined at the beginning and at the end of the

  19. Impact of Pore-Scale Wettability on Rhizosphere Rewetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Benard

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Vast amounts of water flow through a thin layer of soil around the roots, the rhizosphere, where high microbial activity takes place—an important hydrological and biological hotspot. The rhizosphere was shown to turn water repellent upon drying, which has been interpreted as the effect of mucilage secreted by roots. The effects of such rhizosphere water dynamics on plant and microbial activity are unclear. Furthermore, our understanding of the biophysical mechanisms controlling the rhizosphere water repellency remains largely speculative. Our hypothesis is that the key to describe the emergence of water repellency lies within the microscopic distribution of wettability on the pore-scale. At a critical mucilage content, a sufficient fraction of pores is blocked and the rhizosphere turns water repellent. Here we tested whether a percolation approach is capable to predict the flow behavior near the critical mucilage content. The wettability of glass beads and sand mixed with chia seed mucilage was quantified by measuring the infiltration rate of water drops. Drop infiltration was simulated using a simple pore-network model in which mucilage was distributed heterogeneously throughout the pore space with a preference for small pores. The model approach proved capable to capture the percolation nature of the process, the sudden transition from wettable to water repellent and the high variability in infiltration rates near the percolation threshold. Our study highlights the importance of pore-scale distribution of mucilage in the emergent flow behavior across the rhizosphere.

  20. Project assembling and commissioning of a rewetting test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezende, H.C.

    1985-08-01

    A test facility (ITR - Instalacao de Testes de Remolhamento) has been erected at the Thermal-hydraulics Laboratory of CDTN, dedicated to the investigation of the basic phenomena that can occur during the reflood phase of a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), utilizing tubular and annular test sections. The present work consists in a presentation of the facility design and a report of its commissioning. The mechanical aspects of the facility, its power supply system and its instrumentation are described. The results of the instruments calibration and two operational tests are presented and a comparison is done with calculations perfomed usign a computer code. (Author) [pt

  1. Modelling evaporation from a drained and rewetted peatland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spieksma, J F M; Moors, EJ; Dolman, A J; Schouwenaars, J M

    1997-01-01

    Evaporation from a cutover raised bog in The Netherlands was modelled using a detailed, physically based evaporation model for heterogeneous vegetation and unsaturated soil water how ''SWAPS''. The model enables a quantification of the role of heterogeneity on evaporation. Micro-meteorological

  2. Comparing critical success factors for PV between three regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groenendaal, B.J.; Roosmalen, J.A.M. van

    2000-01-01

    As a research method the project team has chosen to survey the opinion of PV experts and persons involved in the implementation of PV. Therefore, a questionnaire was sent to about 300 persons spread among 3 regions America, Europe and Asia. The returned questionnaires have been statistical analysed with the software tool SPSS. The used analytical methods can be divided in a comparing method (Mann-Whitney test) and ranking methods (Friedman test and the medal classification test). General conclusions are that there is a significant difference in answers between America and Europe about the significance of 'cost reduction'. Also Asia is significant different from America and Europe for the factor 'technical' reliability. There is a significant difference about the status of financing between America and Europe versus Asia. All the regions have a different opinion about the status of RD and D'. Also the status of 'the PV network' is significant different between Asia and America. America and Europe rank 'financial aspects' and 'cost reduction' as the most significant aspects while Asia rank 'specialist knowledge' and 'the PV network' as the most significant. All regions rank 'specialist knowledge' having the worst status and rank 'environmental merits' and 'technical reliability' having the best status. Finally Europe and Asia differ significant about which aspect is the most important for the factors 'internationalisation and other activities'. Europe finds 'harmonisation of policy' the most important internationalisation aspect and Asia prefers 'development aid'. Asia prefers 'pioneering activities' and Europe prefers 'initiatives by social organisations' as most important other activity. (au)

  3. Clinical characteristics of Burkitt's lymphoma from three regions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... following parameters were documented: chief complaint(s); physical examination, specifically pallor, jaundice, oedema, lymphadenopathy, presence of masses, splenomegaly and hepatomegaly. Reports of evaluation of chest radiograph, abdominal ultrasound/scan, bone marrow aspiration, cerebral spinal fluid cytology, ...

  4. Incidence of Endemic Burkitt Lymphoma in Three Regions of Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan-Gordo, Cristina; Casabonne, Delphine; Carrilho, Carla; Ferro, Josefo; Lorenzoni, Cesaltina; Zaqueu, Clesio; Nhabomba, Augusto; Aguilar, Ruth; Bassat, Quique; de Sanjosé, Sílvia; Dobaño, Carlota; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2016-01-01

    Data on the burden and incidence of endemic Burkitt lymphoma (eBL) across Mozambique are scarce. We retrospectively retrieved information on eBL cases from reports of the three main hospitals of Mozambique: Maputo Central Hospital (MCH), Beira Central Hospital (BCH), and Nampula Central Hospital (NCH) between 2004 and 2014. For 2015, we prospectively collected information of new eBL cases attending these hospitals. A total of 512 eBL cases were reported between 2004 and 2015: 153 eBL cases were reported in MCH, 195 in BCH, and 164 in NCH. Mean age of cases was 6.9 years (standard deviation = 2.8); 63% (319/504) of cases were males. For 2015, the estimated incidence rate of eBL was 2.0, 1.7, and 3.9 per 106 person-year at risk in MCH, BCH, and NCH, respectively. Incidence was higher in NCH (northern Mozambique), where intensity of malaria transmission is higher. Data presented show that eBL is a common pediatric malignancy in Mozambique, as observed in neighboring countries. PMID:27799648

  5. Radioactivity levels in three regions of Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, P.; Salazar, A.

    1995-01-01

    The establishment of the first radioactivity levels of natural radiation was carried out during the period 1991 to 1994 in three different regions of Costa Rica. The radionuclides studied belong to different soil types related to each selected region. Utilizing low level counting techniques the specific activity of the natural radioactive chains 238 U daughters, 232 Th and the element 40 K were measured for a total of 120 samples during this period. The amount of 137 Cs, a fall out radionuclide, was also studied. The average national values in Bq.kg -1 measured for 238 U were 11.66 for 214 Bi, 34.42 for 226 Ra and 10.73 for 232 Pb, for 232 Th daughters were 4.08 for 208 Tl, 9.65 for 212 Bi and 7.62 for 228 Ac. The specific activity value for 40 K was 95.14 Bq.kg -1 and for 137 Cs was 2.38 Bq.kg -1 . It is found that Costa Rica is not highly natural radioactive country and that the values for 137 Cs are well below international reported values [es

  6. Low-bias negative differential conductance controlled by electrode separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiao-Hua; Liu, Ran; Bi, Jun-Jie; Jiao, Yang; Wang, Chuan-Kui; Li, Zong-Liang

    2016-12-01

    The electronic transport properties of a single thiolated arylethynylene molecule with 9,10-dihydroanthracene core, denoted as TADHA, is studied by using non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism combined with ab initio calculations. The numerical results show that the TADHA molecule exhibits excellent negative differential conductance (NDC) behavior at lower bias regime as probed experimentally. The NDC behavior of TADHA molecule originates from the Stark effect of the applied bias voltage, by which the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the HOMO-1 are pulled apart and become localized. The NDC behavior of TADHA molecular system is tunable by changing the electrode distance. Shortening the electrode separation can enhance the NDC effect which is attributed to the possible increase of coupling between the two branches of TADHA molecule. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374195 and 11405098) and the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. ZR2013FM006).

  7. Low-bias negative differential conductance controlled by electrode separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Xiao-Hua; Liu Ran; Bi Jun-Jie; Jiao Yang; Wang Chuan-Kui; Li Zong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The electronic transport properties of a single thiolated arylethynylene molecule with 9,10-dihydroanthracene core, denoted as TADHA, is studied by using non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism combined with ab initio calculations. The numerical results show that the TADHA molecule exhibits excellent negative differential conductance (NDC) behavior at lower bias regime as probed experimentally. The NDC behavior of TADHA molecule originates from the Stark effect of the applied bias voltage, by which the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the HOMO-1 are pulled apart and become localized. The NDC behavior of TADHA molecular system is tunable by changing the electrode distance. Shortening the electrode separation can enhance the NDC effect which is attributed to the possible increase of coupling between the two branches of TADHA molecule. (paper)

  8. Hydroxyl accessibility in wood cell walls as affected by drying and re-wetting procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybring, Emil Engelund; Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Burgert, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    The first drying of wood cell walls from the native state has sometimes been described as producing irreversible structural changes which reduce the accessibility to water, a phenomenon often referred to as hornification. This study demonstrates that while changes do seem to take place, these are......The first drying of wood cell walls from the native state has sometimes been described as producing irreversible structural changes which reduce the accessibility to water, a phenomenon often referred to as hornification. This study demonstrates that while changes do seem to take place...

  9. Measurements of void fraction in a heated tube in the rewetting conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    The methods of void fraction measurements by transmission and diffusion of cold, thermal and epithermal neutrons were studied with cylindrical alluminium pieces simulating the steam. A great set of void fraction found in a wet zone was examined and a particulsar attention was given to the sensitivity effects of the method, mainly for high void fraction. Several aspects of the measurement techniques were analyzed, such as the effect of the phase radial distribution, neutron energy, water tempeture, effect of the void axial gradient. The technique of thermal neutron diffusion measurement was used to measure the axial profile of void fraction in a steady two-phase flow, where the pressure, mass velocity and heat flux are representative of the wet conditions. Experimental results are presented and compared with different void fraction models. (E.G.) [pt

  10. Greenhouse gas emissions from short-rotation forestry on a drained and rewetted fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaipfer, Martina; Fuertes Sánchez, Alicia; Drösler, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    More than 95 % of German peatlands have been drained, primarily for agricultural and forestry use. They constitute a significant source of greenhouse gases (GHG) with emissions of approximately 47 million tons per year. Propelled by the German energy turnaround farmers have increasingly converted their cropland to short rotation forestry (SRF), amongst them some who are cultivating drained peatland. In this study GHG emissions from alder and poplar short rotation plantations with differing groundwater levels near Rosenheim, Bavaria, were monitored over the course of three-and-a-half years. Moreover, the effect of ploughing for SRF establishment was investigated as well. Understorey GHG fluxes were measured using closed-chamber approaches. Gas samples were enclosed in vials every second week and analysed for their CH4 and N2O concentrations by gas chromatography at a laboratory. On-site measurements of CO2 fluxes were carried out over the course of a day every three to four weeks with a dynamic closed-chamber technique. Allometric methods were employed to estimate carbon sequestration into trees. Sheet piling was installed around a set of measurement sites in December 2014 to accentuate the difference between the sites with high and low water tables. As a result the water level around those sites rose from an average of -36.1 ± 6.1 cm in 2013 and 2014 to -20.8 ± 3.7 cm in 2015. The water table outside the sheet piling showed values of -61.8 ± 5.7 cm and -72.1 ± 6.2 cm in those years, respectively. First results suggest a limited effect of ploughing for SRF establishment on understorey GHG emissions. However, there seems to be a distinct impact on tree productivity. CO2 fluxes in the understorey seem to be strongly influenced by water table, but also land management (mulching of understorey vegetation to reduce weed competition for trees during the first year and for pest control in subsequent years) and shading of the understorey vegetation by trees. There is a clear correlation between CH4 emissions and water table, with higher water levels causing higher emissions. So far it has not been possible to establish any such relationship for N2O emissions as they varied greatly throughout all experimental setups in 2014, and were relatively high in general in 2015. It is expected that the cool and rainy summer of 2016 with its accompanying high water tables inside the sheet piling (-6.8 ± 3.2 cm) led to a reduction of the climatic relevance of the wetter sites.

  11. A study of the process of rewetting of hot surfaces by flooding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.

    1980-12-01

    This report presents the results of an analytical study based on a system approach that gave substantial agreement with experimental data for bottom flooding in a single tube. The experimental results for both confined and unconfined top flooding in a single tube, bottom flooding in annular test sections with a centre heated core, and a visual study are also presented

  12. Shifts in pore connectivity from precipitation versus groundwater rewetting increases soil carbon loss after drought

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Ashly P.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Benscoter, Brian W.; Tfaily, Malak M.; Hinkle, Ross; Liu, Chongxuan; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2017-11-06

    Droughts and other extreme precipitation events are predicted to increase in intensity, duration and extent, with uncertain implications for terrestrial carbon (C) sequestration. Soil wetting from above (precipitation) results in a characteristically different pattern of pore-filling than wetting from below (groundwater), with larger, well-connected pores filling before finer pore spaces, unlike groundwater rise in which capillary forces saturate the finest pores first. Here we demonstrate that pore-scale wetting patterns interact with antecedent soil moisture conditions to alter pore-, core- and field-scale C dynamics. Drought legacy and wetting direction are perhaps more important determinants of short-term C mineralization than current soil moisture content in these soils. Our results highlight that microbial access to C is not solely limited by physical protection, but also by drought or wetting-induced shifts in hydrologic connectivity. We argue that models should treat soil moisture within a three-dimensional framework emphasizing hydrologic conduits for C and resource diffusion.

  13. Phosphorus mobilization in rewetted peat and sand at variable flow rate and redox regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Heiberg, Lisa; Jensen, Henning S.

    2012-01-01

    the upward percolation of groundwater with variable O2 content and flow rate, we investigated the hydro-biogeochemical Fe and P dynamics in intact cores of a carbon rich peat and carbon poor sand. Percolation of deionized water with high, low or no O2 supply at 10 °C caused markedly different in situ redox...... rates from 7.6 to 11 mg P m−2 day−1. Organic or particulate P contributed to 40–45% of total P losses from the peat. In contrast, the high O2 supply during high flow rate kept the peat oxic and lowered TP release rates to 6.7 mg P m−2 day−1. The carbon poor sand demonstrated that this soil type...... regimes in the two soils during 21 or 67 days of continuous percolation at either 1 or 4 mm h−1. Anoxic conditions occurred in the peat soil at both low oxygen supply and anoxic infiltration, causing reductive Fe(III) dissolution with high Fe(II) and P effluent concentrations and total P (TP) release...

  14. Diversity and frequency of Acacia spp. in three regions in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bismillha

    2012-06-28

    Jun 28, 2012 ... effect of soil texture on the frequency of Acacia spp. ... structure. There were great differences between species in relation to diameter distribution. The study shows the scarcity of large diameter trees and also in some cases ... Key words: Acacia, diversity, soil texture, diameter at breast height (DBH) classes.

  15. The development in body mass index, overweight and obesity in three regions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Ulla; Vinding, Anker Lund; Larsen, Finn Breinholt

    2015-01-01

    /2007 and 2010. A random sample of citizens aged more than or equal to 25 years was invited to participate. The overall response rate was 57.5% (n = 177 076). Data from questionnaire and central registers were included. RESULTS: In 2006/2007, the prevalence of overweight, including obesity, was 54.3% and 36.......8% among men and women, respectively. Of the overweight men 12.8% were obese and 11.8% women were obese. The prevalence was highest in the Northern region and among those who were older, had short education, was outside labour market, had low income and residents in rural areas. In 2010, the prevalence...... retired or above 60 years, and with high income. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of overweight and obesity was high and increased. The development, however, was heterogenic....

  16. Diversity and frequency of Acacia spp. in three regions in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bismillha

    2012-06-28

    Jun 28, 2012 ... differences in soil texture associated with the various species, with some ... shape of the diameter distribution of uneven-sized and ... temperature of the hottest month (°C); m is the average ... typical reverse J-shape (Figure 8).

  17. A rubella serosurvey in postpartum women in the three regions of Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Ognio, Luis; Adrianzén, Ana; Ortiz, Ana; Martínez, Carlos; Whittembury, Alvaro; Cabezudo, Edwin; de Oliveira, Lucia; Siqueira, Marilda M; Castillo-Solórzano, Carlos

    2007-08-01

    To determine the proportion of postpartum women aged 15-49 in Peru who are susceptible to rubella, in order to help address strategies to eliminate rubella and to prevent congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) in the country. A cross-sectional survey was conducted during March and April 2003 in six main regional hospitals, in the three geographic regions (coast, mountain, and jungle) of Peru. For the postpartum women who provided written informed consent, a questionnaire was administered and a blood specimen was collected. Sera were tested for rubella immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody, using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent serologic assay (ELISA) kit. Univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analyses were carried out to assess risk factors for susceptibility. In total, 1 236 postpartum women were enrolled. The overall proportion of IgG-antibody negative women was 12.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): 10.9%-14.6%). Bivariate analysis found the following variables associated with susceptibility: living in the jungle region (odds ratio (OR) = 1.65; 95% CI: 1.13-2.42); age jungle region (OR = 1.67; 95% CI: 1.13-2.46); age Peru among the countries facing a moderate level of risk for the occurrence of CRS cases. The findings suggest the need to also provide the rubella vaccine to other population groups, especially women of childbearing age.

  18. Application of the finite element groundwater model FEWA to three regional aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.F.V.; Yeh, G.T.

    1986-06-01

    This report documents the calibration with field data and predictive application of a finite element model of water through aquifers (FEWA). FEWA was described in a report written by G.T. Yeh and D.D. Huff in 1983. The model was first compared with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) two-dimensional model and found superior in treating anisotropic media when the coordinates cannot be made to coincide with the principal directions of hydraulic conductivities. In addition, there was no necessity to define nodal points outside the region, as required by the USGS model. FEWA was next calibrated with measured potentiometric surfaces from the Love Canal area in New York and the Conesville area in Ohio. There were satisfactory matches between computed results and available field data. The calibration and predictive runs of FEWA were then accomplished with the Hialeah-Preston well field data over the Biscayne aquifer in south Florida. The calibration run yielded two values of hydraulic conductivity in the area, and the predictive run gave results that matched well with available data. 18 refs., 28 figs

  19. A tale of three regions : influence of highway investments on population and traffic growth in Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    To what extent may highway investments shape population growth and land development? To answer this question, three decades of data were examined in the Virginia locations of Fairfax County, Spotsylvania County, and Newport News. In each location, a ...

  20. A two-dimensional model with three regions for the reflooding study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motta, A.M.T.; Kinrys, S.; Roberty, N.C.; Carmo, E.G.D. do; Oliveira, L.F.S. de.

    1983-02-01

    A two-dimensional semi-analytical model, with three heat transfer regions is described for the calculation of flood ratio, the lenght of quenching front and the temperature distribution in the cladding. (E.G.) [pt

  1. Postpartum practices of puerperal women and their influencing factors in three regions of Hubei, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Banghua

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 'Sitting month' is a Chinese tradition for women's postpartum custom. The present study aims to explore the postpartum dietary and health practices of puerperal women and identify their influential factors in three selected regions of Hubei, China. Methods A cross-sectional retrospective study was conducted in the selected urban, suburban and rural areas in the province of Hubei from 1 March to 30 May 2003. A total of 2100 women who had given birth to full-term singleton infants in the past two years were selected as the participants. Data regarding postpartum practices and potentially related factors were collected through questionnaire by trained investigators. Results During the puerperium, 18% of the participants never ate vegetables, 78.8% never ate fruit and 75.7% never drank milk. Behaviour taboos such as no bathing, no hair washing or teeth brushing were still popular among the participants. About half of the women didn't get out of the bed two days after giving birth. The average time they stayed in bed during this period was 18.0 h. One third of them didn't have any outdoor activities in that time periods. The educational background of both women and their spouses, location of their residence, family income, postnatal visit, nutrition and health care educational courses were found to be the influencing factors of women's postpartum practices. Conclusion Traditional postpartum dietary and health behaviours were still popular among women in Hubei. Identifying the factors associated with traditional postpartum practices is critical to develop better targeting health education programs. Updated Information regarding postpartum dietary and health practices should be disseminated to women.

  2. Utilization of post-abortion care services in three regional states of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In Ethiopia, utilization of post-abortion care service is minimal and it seems that the expanding services are underutilized. The purpose of this study was to assess factors which influence decisions for utilization of abortion related services at community level. Methodology: The study was carried out in six ...

  3. Challenges in successfully developing three regional radiotherapy centres. The NCCI experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenham, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Full text: This presentation will provide an overview of the processes, experience, challenges and success involved in the establishment of the North Coast Cancer Institute (NCCI). The NCCI is a network of three Integrated Oncology centres in Northern New South Wales offering integrated Medical, Radiation and Haematology outpatient services. NCCI was developed as part of the introduction of radiotherapy into a region previously without access to a local radiotherapy service and as a result with poor radiotherapy utilisation and referral rates. NCCI commenced radiotherapy services in Coffs Harbour in May 2007 followed by Port Macquarie in August of the same year and finally in Lismore in May 20 I O. Radiotherapy services commenced with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and Image guided radiotherapy as standard of care for some disease sites with remote access to planning systems and electronic workflow process supporting the treatment process. Forming a small team to simultaneously design, build and establish two new treatment centres to take advantage of the most contemporary treatment modalities while also planning for a third centre was a significant challenge. The challenges and successful outcomes will be discussed as part of this presentation.

  4. Application of the finite element groundwater model FEWA to three regional aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, K.F.V.; Yeh, G.T.

    1986-06-01

    This report documents the calibration with field data and predictive application of a finite element model of water through aquifers (FEWA). FEWA was described in a report written by G.T. Yeh and D.D. Huff in 1983. The model was first compared with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) two-dimensional model and found superior in treating anisotropic media when the coordinates cannot be made to coincide with the principal directions of hydraulic conductivities. In addition, there was no necessity to define nodal points outside the region, as required by the USGS model. FEWA was next calibrated with measured potentiometric surfaces from the Love Canal area in New York and the Conesville area in Ohio. There were satisfactory matches between computed results and available field data. The calibration and predictive runs of FEWA were then accomplished with the Hialeah-Preston well field data over the Biscayne aquifer in south Florida. The calibration run yielded two values of hydraulic conductivity in the area, and the predictive run gave results that matched well with available data. 18 refs., 28 figs.

  5. A two-dimensional model with three regions for the reflooding study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motta, A.M.T.; Kinrys, S.; Roberty, N.C.; Carmo, E.G.D. do; Oliveira, L.F.S. de

    1982-01-01

    A two-dimensional semi-analytical model, with three heat transfer regions is described for the calculation of flood ratio, the length of quenching front and the temperature distribution in the cladding. (E.G.) [pt

  6. Antioxidant activities and total phenol content of Inula viscosa extracts selected from three regions of Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naima Chahmi

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: Our results of antioxidant assays were justified and partially supported the popular usage of the tested plants. The high antioxidant activity found in the plant from Sefrou and its great biomass in this region suggested that Inula viscosa is a good source of natural antioxidants compounds which might have benefits for health.

  7. Comparing the Rates of Dopamine Hemodynamic Effect Onset after Infusion through Peripheral Veins in Three Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deokkyu Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Dopamine is an inotropic agent that is often selected for continuous infusion. For hemodynamic stability, the rate of infusion is controlled in the range of 5-15 μg/kg/min. This study aimed to compare the time intervals from the administration of dopamine to the onset of its hemodynamic effects when dopamine was administered through three different peripheral veins (the cephalic vein [CV], the great saphenous vein [GSV], and the external jugular vein [EJV]. Methods Patients in group 1, group 2, and group 3 received dopamine infusions in the CV, GSV, and EJV, respectively. A noninvasive continuous cardiac output monitor (NICCOMO™, Medis, Ilmenau, Germany was used to assess cardiac output (CO and systemic vascular resistance (SVR. Six minutes after intubation, baseline heart rate (HR, systolic blood pressure (BP, diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure (MAP, CO, and SVR values were recorded and dopamine infusion was initiated at a dose of 10 μg/kg/min. Hemodynamic changes at 0, 4, 8, 12, and 15 minutes postinfusion were recorded. Results No statistically significant differences were observed among the three groups with respect to the rate of hemodynamic change. In all groups, systolic BP, diastolic BP, MAP, and SVR tended to increase after decreasing for the first 4 minutes; in contrast, HR and CO decreased until 8 minutes, after which they tended to reach a plateau. Conclusions For patients under general anesthesia receiving dopamine at 10 μg/kg/min, there were no clinical differences in the effect of dopamine administered through three different peripheral veins.

  8. Episodic response project: Wet deposition at watersheds in three regions of the eastern United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barchet, W.R.

    1991-11-01

    During the period from August 1988 to June 1990, wet-only sampling of precipitation was carried out at three Episodic Response Project sites and at one supplemental site. The three watershed sites are Moss Lake, Biscuit Brook, and Linn Run. The supplemental site was the MAP3S site at Pennsylvania State University that characterizes the central group of northern Appalachian streams. The site operators adhered by varying degrees to the sample collection protocol based on the daily sampling protocol of the MAP3S Precipitation Chemistry Network. Sulfate and nitrate ion together accounted for more than 80% of total anions (in μEq/L) in the precipitation at all sites. Wet deposition of sulfate at Moss Lake, Biscuit Brook, Penn State, and Linn Run averaged 223, 230, 253, and 402 mg/m 2 /month, respectively, whereas nitrate wet deposition averaged 197, 195, 160, and 233 mg/m 2 /month, respectively. Sulfate deposition was a factor of 2 to 4 higher in summer than in winter. The seasonal pattern for nitrate deposition was weak; the seasonal contrast was less than a factor of 2.5 at all sites. The association between the wet deposition and precipitation chemistry at the MAP3S monitoring site and the average for the study watersheds was dependent on the distance between the site and watershed and the intervening terrain. Precipitation chemistry at the monitoring site is representative of that at the ERP study watersheds in the Adirondack and Catskill regions and in the south-western group of watersheds in the Appalachian region. High spatial variability in precipitation amounts makes this assumption weaker for wet deposition. Chemical input to watersheds from dry deposition has not been determined at any site but could range from a factor of 0.3 to 1.0 of the wet deposition. 7 refs., 38 figs., 12 tabs

  9. 75 FR 6355 - Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) Availability of Funds for Three Regions Including the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-09

    ... working with manufacturers. The proposal should include plans for integration into the MEP national system... Center? i. Organizational Structure. Completeness and appropriateness of the organizational structure...

  10. Estilos de pensamento em educação em enfermagem: a produção científica de três regiões do Brasil Estilos de pensamiento en educación en enfermería: la producción científica de tres regiones de Brasil Thought styles in nursing education: scientific production in three regions of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Cabral Schveitzer

    2013-03-01

    ógicos de las Instituciones de Educación Superior. CONCLUSIÓN: los estilos identificados están en constante movimiento, pero identificar la pedagogía liberadora y su eficacia desde la implementación de las Directrices Curriculares es esencial para el desarrollo de la Educación en Enfermería.This study aimed to identify the Thought Styles of Research Groups in Nursing Education in three regions of Brazil. METHOD: Qualitative research, exploratory and descriptive. RESULTS: Northern Region showed a Style named Liberating, characterized by a pedagogical stance based in dialogue. Midwest Region had a Style named Technicist-Liberating, characterized by an intermediate pedagogical stance that shows exceptions to technicist education and at the same time growing appreciation of critical pedagogical approach. In the Northeast appeared a Style named Technicist-Liberating-Effective, characterized by discussing the deployment of the National Directions for Nurse Courses in the Political Pedagogical Projects in the Institutions of Higher Education. CONCLUSION: The Styles identified are in a constant movement, but it is relevant this time to identify liberating education and its effectiveness by the application of National Directions as essential for the development of Nursing Education and its recognition.

  11. Sap fluxes from different parts of the rootzone modulate xylem ABA concentration during partial rootzone drying and re-wetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, J G; Dodd, I C

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies with partial rootzone drying (PRD) irrigation demonstrated that alternating the wet and dry parts of the rootzone (PRD-Alternated) increased leaf xylem ABA concentration ([X-ABA]leaf) compared with maintaining the same wet and dry parts of the rootzone (PRD-Fixed). To determine the relative contributions of different parts of the rootzone to this ABA signal, [X-ABA]leaf of potted, split-root tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants was modelled by quantifying the proportional water uptake from different soil compartments, and [X-ABA]leaf responses to the entire pot soil-water content (θpot). Continuously measuring soil-moisture depletion by, or sap fluxes from, different parts of the root system revealed that water uptake rapidly declined (within hours) after withholding water from part of the rootzone, but was rapidly restored (within minutes) upon re-watering. Two hours after re-watering part of the rootzone, [X-ABA]leaf was equally well predicted according to θpot alone and by accounting for the proportional water uptake from different parts of the rootzone. Six hours after re-watering part of the rootzone, water uptake by roots in drying soil was minimal and, instead, occurred mainly from the newly irrigated part of the rootzone, thus [X-ABA]leaf was best predicted by accounting for the proportional water uptake from different parts of the rootzone. Contrary to previous results, alternating the wet and dry parts of the rootzone did not enhance [X-ABA]leaf compared with PRD-Fixed irrigation. Further work is required to establish whether altered root-to-shoot ABA signalling contributes to the improved yields of crops grown with alternate, rather than fixed, PRD. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  12. Photosynthetic traits of Sphagnum and feather moss species in undrained, drained and rewetted boreal spruce swamp forests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kangas, L.; Maanavilja, L.; Hájek, Tomáš; Juurola, E.; Chimner, R. A.; Mehtätalo, L.; Tuittila, E. S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 4 (2014), s. 381-396 ISSN 2045-7758 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : bryophyte * ecophysiology * peatland Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.320, year: 2014

  13. Subtle shifts in microbial communities occur alongside the release of carbon induced by drought and rewetting in contrasting peatland ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Caitlin; Freeman, Chris; Golyshin, Peter N; Ackermann, Gail; Fenner, Nathalie; McDonald, James E; Ehbair, Abdassalam; Jones, Timothy G; Murphy, Loretta M; Creer, Simon

    2017-09-12

    Peat represents a globally significant pool of sequestered carbon. However, peatland carbon stocks are highly threatened by anthropogenic climate change, including drought, which leads to a large release of carbon dioxide. Although the enzymatic mechanisms underlying drought-driven carbon release are well documented, the effect of drought on peatland microbial communities has been little studied. Here, we carried out a replicated and controlled drought manipulation using intact peat 'mesocosm cores' taken from bog and fen habitats, and used a combination of community fingerprinting and sequencing of marker genes to identify community changes associated with drought. Community composition varied with habitat and depth. Moreover, community differences between mesocosm cores were stronger than the effect of the drought treatment, emphasising the importance of replication in microbial marker gene studies. While the effect of drought on the overall composition of prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities was weak, a subset of the microbial community did change in relative abundance, especially in the fen habitat at 5 cm depth. 'Drought-responsive' OTUs were disproportionately drawn from the phyla Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria. Collectively, the data provide insights into the microbial community changes occurring alongside drought-driven carbon release from peatlands, and suggest a number of novel avenues for future research.

  14. The geochemistry during management of lake acidification caused by the rewetting of sulfuric (pH < 4) acid sulfate soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosley, Luke M.; Shand, Paul; Self, Peter; Fitzpatrick, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The dynamic geochemistry of a lake acidification event and its management was assessed. • Sulfate complexes dominated the aqueous metal speciation at low pH. • Iron oxydroxysulfate minerals (schwertmannite, jarosite) were identified. • Aerial additions of limestone to the acidic water slowly returned the pH to near neutral. • Coating of the limestone with gypsum and metal precipitates limited its neutralisation efficiency. - Abstract: Understanding the geochemistry and kinetics of acidification events arising from acid sulfate soils is important to enable effective management and risk assessment. Large-scale exposure and oxidation of acid sulfate soils occurred during a drought in the Lower Lakes (Murray–Darling Basin) of South Australia. We examined the geochemical changes that occurred in one region (Boggy Lake) that experienced surface water acidification and was subsequently neutralised via aerial limestone (CaCO 3 ) dosing and dilution via natural lake refill. Very low pH (< 3) and high concentrations (≈10–1000 mg/L Fe, Al, Mn) of dissolved metals were initially found in surface water. The water chemistry exhibited pH-dependent enhancement of constituents typically associated with acid sulfate soils (SO 4 , Al and Fe). Geochemical speciation calculations indicated that most (60–80%) of the acidity was present as dissolved metal-sulfate complexes at low pH. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses showed that the orange-brown precipitates present after an initial limestone dosing were secondary oxyhydroxysulfate minerals (schwertmannite, jarosite). Further limestone dosing resulted in neutralisation of the pH, reduction in dissolved metal concentrations, dissolution of jarosite and schwertmannite precipitates, and formation of other metal oxyhydroxide phases. The results were consistent with a pE-pH diagram constructed for metal-sulfur geochemistry. Assessment of the measured and simulated (using PHREEQC) pH and Ca/Cl ratio during limestone dosing indicated that only about 25% of the limestone dissolved. XRD analyses suggested this passivation of the limestone was due to coating with gypsum and schwertmannite

  15. Calculation of thermoelastic stresses in the rewetting region of the fuel rod cladding during a loss of coolant accident (loca)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberty, N.C.; Carmo, E.G.D. do; Tanajura, C.A.S.

    1982-01-01

    A one-dimensional model for axial distribution calculation of temperature and thermal stresses in the fuel rod cladding for a Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) is developed. The effect of the coolant inlet temperaure, the Leidenfrost and the nucleate boiling in the stress distribution are evaluated. A perturbation in the cladding stress state is obtained. (E.G.) [pt

  16. GWAS for plant growth stages and yield components in spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) harvested in three regions of Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turuspekov, Yerlan; Baibulatova, Aida; Yermekbayev, Kanat; Tokhetova, Laura; Chudinov, Vladimir; Sereda, Grigoriy; Ganal, Martin; Griffiths, Simon; Abugalieva, Saule

    2017-11-14

    Spring wheat is the largest agricultural crop grown in Kazakhstan with an annual sowing area of 12 million hectares in 2016. Annually, the country harvests around 15 million tons of high quality grain. Despite environmental stress factors it is predicted that the use of new technologies may lead to increases in productivity from current levels of 1.5 to up to 3 tons per hectare. One way of improving wheat productivity is by the application of new genomic oriented approaches in plant breeding projects. Genome wide association studies (GWAS) are emerging as powerful tools for the understanding of the inheritance of complex traits via utilization of high throughput genotyping technologies and phenotypic assessments of plant collections. In this study, phenotyping and genotyping data on 194 spring wheat accessions from Kazakhstan, Russia, Europe, and CIMMYT were assessed for the identification of marker-trait associations (MTA) of agronomic traits by using GWAS. Field trials in Northern, Central and Southern regions of Kazakhstan using 194 spring wheat accessions revealed strong correlations of yield with booting date, plant height, biomass, number of spikes per plant, and number of kernels per spike. The accessions from Europe and CIMMYT showed high breeding potential for Southern and Central regions of the country in comparison with the performance of the local varieties. The GGE biplot method, using average yield per plant, suggested a clear separation of accessions into their three breeding origins in relationship to the three environments in which they were evaluated. The genetic variation in the three groups of accessions was further studied using 3245 polymorphic SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) markers. The application of Principal Coordinate analysis clearly grouped the 194 accessions into three clades according to their breeding origins. GWAS on data from nine field trials allowed the identification of 114 MTAs for 12 different agronomic traits. Field evaluation of foreign germplasm revealed its poor yield performance in Northern Kazakhstan, which is the main wheat growing region in the country. However, it was found that EU and CIMMYT germplasm has high breeding potential to improve yield performance in Central and Southern regions. The use of Principal Coordinate analysis clearly separated the panel into three distinct groups according to their breeding origin. GWAS based on use of the TASSEL 5.0 package allowed the identification of 114 MTAs for twelve agronomic traits. The study identifies a network of key genes for improvement of yield productivity in wheat growing regions of Kazakhstan.

  17. Numerical study of criticality of the slab reactors with three regions in one-group transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A. dos.

    1979-01-01

    The criticality of slab reactors consisting of core, blanket, and reflector is studied numerically based on the singular-eigenfunction-expansion method in one-group transport theory. The purpose of this work is three-fold: (1) it is shown that the three-media problem can be converted, using a recently developed method, to a set of regular integral equations for the expansion coefficients, such that numerical solutions can be obtained for the first time based on an exact theory; (2) highly accurate numerical results that can serve as standards of comparison for various approximate methods are reported for representative sets of parameters; and (3) the accuracy of the P sub(N) approximation, one of the more often used methods, is analyzed compared to the exact results [pt

  18. [Three regions of Rpb10 mini-subunit of nuclear RNA polymerases are strictly conserved in all eukaryotes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpakovskiĭ, G V; Lebedenko, E N

    1996-12-01

    The rpb10+ cDNA from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was cloned using two independent approaches (PCR and genetic suppression). The cloned cDNA encoded the Rpb10 subunit common for all three RNA polymerases. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the Sz. pombe Rbp10 subunit (71 amino acid residues) with those of the homologous subunits of RNA polymerases I, II, and III from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Home sapiens revealed that heptapeptides RCFT/SCGK (residues 6-12), RYCCRRM (residues 43-49), and HVDLIEK (residues 53-59) were evolutionarily the most conserved structural motifs of these subunits. It is shown that the Rbp10 subunit from Sz. pombe can substitute its homolog (ABC10 beta) in the baker's yeast S. cerevisiae.

  19. Contamination Levels and Identification of Bacteria in Milk Sampled from Three Regions of Tanzania: Evidence from Literature and Laboratory Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Msalya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Milk in Tanzania has been reported to be contaminated with large number of bacteria. This is because (1 milk is obtained from animals with unknown health status, (2 good milking and handling practices are to a large extent not observed, and (3 marketing and distribution are done in informal channels. These factors are potential causes of milk-borne diseases and milk quality loss. The aim of this study was to assess nutritional risks in milk as reported in literature over a period of 20 years and through analyses of samples collected during the present study. The issues highlighted in literature were high bacteria and coliform counts exceeding standard levels in East Africa, prevalence of bacteria and drug residues in milk, and adulteration. Based on performed analyses, total bacterial count 1.0×107 colony forming units per millilitre (cfu/ml and total coliform count 1.1×107 cfu/ml, also greater than recommended levels, were found. Ten bacteria types were isolated from milk samples (five, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria innocua, Listeria ivanovii, and Klebsiella spp. are reported in Tanzanian for the first time. Two drugs tetracycline and sulphur were detected. Therefore, it is worth noting that integrated research is needed to evaluate the situation and address these challenges.

  20. Severe and uncomplicated falciparum malaria in children from three regions and three ethnic groups in Cameroon: prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achidi Eric A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify the factors that account for differences in clinical outcomes of malaria as well as its relationship with ethnicity, transmission intensity and parasite density. Methods A prospective study was conducted in nine health facilities in the Centre, Littoral and South West regions of Cameroon, and in three ethnic groups; the Bantu, Semi-Bantu and Foulbe. Children aged one month to 13 years, with diagnosis suggestive of malaria, were recruited and characterized using the WHO definition for severe and uncomplicated malaria. Malaria parasitaemia was determined by light microscopy, haematological analysis using an automated haematology analyser and glucose level by colorimetric technique. Results Of the febrile children screened, 971 of the febrile children screened fulfilled the inclusion criteria for specific malaria clinical phenotypes. Forty-nine (9.2% children had cerebral malaria, a feature that was similar across age groups, ethnicity and gender but lower (P P P = 0.009 and Foulbe (P = 0.026 counterparts in the Centre region. The overall study case fatality was 4.8 (47/755, with cerebral malaria being the only significant risk factor associated with death. Severe anaemia, though a common and major clinical presentation, was not significantly associated with risk of death. Conclusion About half of the acutely febrile children presented with severe malaria, the majority being cases of severe malaria anaemia, followed by respiratory distress and cerebral malaria. The latter two were less prevalent in the Centre region compared to the other regions. Cerebral malaria and hyperpyrexia were the only significant risk factors associated with death.

  1. Relationship between sagittal plane kinematics, foot morphology and vertical forces applied to three regions of the foot

    OpenAIRE

    Hannah, I.; Sawacha, Z.; Guiotto, A.; Mazza, C.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic analysis of human motion with a multi-segment musculoskeletal foot model requires the distribution of loading applied to the modeled foot segments to be determined. This work thus examines the existence of any correlation between intersegmental foot kinematics, foot morphology, and the distribution of vertical loading in a multi-segment foot model. Gait analysis trials were performed by 20 healthy subjects at a self-selected speed with intersegmental foot joint angles and the distribu...

  2. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance of coagulase-negative Staphylococci isolated from poultry farms in three regions of Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boamah, Vivian Etsiapa; Agyare, Christian; Odoi, Hayford; Adu, Francis; Gbedema, Stephen Yao; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in animal production has been associated with the development and spread of antibiotic-resistant organisms including commensals. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) species, which were until recently considered non-pathogenic, have been associated with opportunistic infections and high resistance to several antibiotics. This study sought to determine the prevalence, identity, and phenotypic resistance of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. isolated from some selected poultry farms and farm workers in the Ashanti, Brong Ahafo, and Greater Accra regions of Ghana. Poultry litter samples and oral swabs of poultry farm workers were collected, from which bacterial species were isolated, identified, and analyzed. Various selective media were used for the presumptive identification of the different species. Confirmation of bacterial identity was done using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of the isolates was performed using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Zones of growth inhibition were interpreted based on the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) guidelines. Two hundred and fifty-six coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp., comprising S. sciuri (42.97%), S. lentus (35.94%), S. gallinarum (6.64%), S. xylosus (4.30%), S. haemolyticus (3.91%), S. saprophyticus (1.95%), and S. cohnii (0.39%) were confirmed by MALDI-TOF. CoNS were isolated from samples from the Brong Ahafo (48.83%), Ashanti (33.59%), and Greater Accra (17.78%) regions. Isolates from poultry litter constituted 55.47%, and farm workers 44.53%. All the isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and amikacin. The isolates exhibited high resistance toward tetracycline (57.03%), doxycycline (43.75%), and oxacillin (43.36%). Multi-drug resistance (MDR) was observed in 19.14% of the isolates. MDR was higher in isolates obtained from poultry farm workers (61.22%) than isolates from poultry litter (38.78%). The above findings call for stricter monitoring of antibiotic usage in both animal production and in humans.

  3. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance of coagulase-negative Staphylococci isolated from poultry farms in three regions of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boamah VE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vivian Etsiapa Boamah,1 Christian Agyare,1 Hayford Odoi,1 Francis Adu,1 Stephen Yao Gbedema,1 Anders Dalsgaard2 1Microbiology Section, Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana; 2Section of Food Safety and Zoonoses, Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederisksberg, Denmark Abstract: The use of antibiotics in animal production has been associated with the development and spread of antibiotic-resistant organisms including commensals. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS species, which were until recently considered non-pathogenic, have been associated with opportunistic infections and high resistance to several antibiotics. This study sought to determine the prevalence, identity, and phenotypic resistance of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. isolated from some selected poultry farms and farm workers in the Ashanti, Brong Ahafo, and Greater Accra regions of Ghana. Poultry litter samples and oral swabs of poultry farm workers were collected, from which bacterial species were isolated, identified, and analyzed. Various selective media were used for the presumptive identification of the different species. Confirmation of bacterial identity was done using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of the isolates was performed using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Zones of growth inhibition were interpreted based on the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST guidelines. Two hundred and fifty-six coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp., comprising S. sciuri (42.97%, S. lentus (35.94%, S. gallinarum (6.64%, S. xylosus (4.30%, S. haemolyticus (3.91%, S. saprophyticus (1.95%, and S. cohnii (0.39% were confirmed by MALDI-TOF. CoNS were isolated from samples from the Brong Ahafo (48.83%, Ashanti (33.59%, and Greater Accra (17.78% regions. Isolates from poultry litter constituted 55.47%, and farm workers 44.53%. All the isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and amikacin. The isolates exhibited high resistance toward tetracycline (57.03%, doxycycline (43.75%, and oxacillin (43.36%. Multi-drug resistance (MDR was observed in 19.14% of the isolates. MDR was higher in isolates obtained from poultry farm workers (61.22% than isolates from poultry litter (38.78%. The above findings call for stricter monitoring of antibiotic usage in both animal production and in humans. Keywords: poultry farms, antibiotic resistance, antibiotics, antimicrobials 

  4. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance of coagulase-negative Staphylococci isolated from poultry farms in three regions of Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boamah, Vivian Etsiapa; Agyare, Christian; Odoi, Hayford

    2017-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in animal production has been associated with the development and spread of antibiotic-resistant organisms including commensals. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) species, which were until recently considered non-pathogenic, have been associated with opportunistic...... usage in both animal production and in humans....... infections and high resistance to several antibiotics. This study sought to determine the prevalence, identity, and phenotypic resistance of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. isolated from some selected poultry farms and farm workers in the Ashanti, Brong Ahafo, and Greater Accra regions of Ghana...

  5. Surface accumulation conduction controlled sensing characteristic of p-type CuO nanorods induced by oxygen adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C; Fu, X Q; Xue, X Y; Wang, Y G; Wang, T H

    2007-01-01

    P-type CuO nanorods were synthesized by a hydrothermal method and the ethanol-sensing properties of sensors based on CuO were investigated. The sensor resistance increased when it was exposed to ethanol and decreased in the air, which is contrary to the case for sensors realized from n-type semiconductor. The resistance of the CuO-based sensor was about 2 kΩ in air and 6 kΩ in ethanol vapour with concentration of 2000 ppm. Such a sensing property is attributed to surface accumulation conduction. Sensors based on CuO nanorods have potential applications in detecting ethanol in low concentration

  6. Drying/rewetting cycles of the soil under alternate partial root-zone drying irrigation reduce carbon and nitrogen retention in the soil-plant systems of potato

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Yanqi; Yan, Fei; Liu, Fulai

    2013-01-01

    for five weeks. For each N rate, the PRD and DI plants received a same amount of water, which allowed re-filling one half of the PRD pots close to full water holding capacity. The results showed that plant dry biomass, plant water use, and water use efficiency were increased with increasing N...... retention in the soil–plant systems of potato. Potato plants were grown in 20 L split-root pots with three N-fertilization rates, viz., 1.4 (N1), 2.5 (N2), and 4 (N3) g N pot−1 soil, respectively. At tuber initiation and earlier tuber bulking stages, the plants were subjected to PRD and DI treatment...

  7. Modelling of the steam-water-countercurrent flow in the rewetting and flooding phase after loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curca-Tivig, F.

    1990-01-01

    A new interphase momentum exchange model has been developed to simulate the Refill- Reflood Phase after LOCAs. Special phenomena of steam/water- countercurrent flow - like limitation or onset of downward-watee penetration - have been modelled and integrated into a flooding model. The interphase momentum exchange model interconnected with the flooding model has been implemented into the advanced system code RELAP5/MOD1. The new version of this code can now be utilized to predict the hot leg emergency-core-cooling (ECC) injection for German PWRs. The interfacial momentum transfer model developed includes the interphase frictional drag, the force due to virtual mass and the momenta due to interphase mass transfer. The modelling of the interfacial shear or drag accounts for the effects of phase and velocity profiles. The flooding model predicts countercurrent-flow limitation, onset of water penetration and partial delivery. The flooding correlation specifies the maximum down flow liquid velocity in case of countercurrent flow through flow restrictions for a given vapor velocity. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Are autism spectrum conditions more prevalent in an information-technology region? A school-based study of three regions in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelfsema, Martine T; Hoekstra, Rosa A; Allison, Carrie; Wheelwright, Sally; Brayne, Carol; Matthews, Fiona E; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2012-05-01

    We tested for differences in the prevalence of autism spectrum conditions (ASC) in school-aged children in three geographical regions in the Netherlands. Schools were asked to provide the number of children enrolled, the number having a clinical diagnosis of ASC and/or two control neurodevelopmental conditions. Prevalence was evaluated by negative binomial regression and adjustments were made for non-response and size of the schools. The prevalence estimates of ASC in Eindhoven was 229 per 10,000, significantly higher than in Haarlem (84 per 10,000) and Utrecht (57 per 10,000), whilst the prevalence for the control conditions were similar in all regions. Phase two is planned to validate school-reported cases using standardized diagnostic methods and to explore the possible causes for these differences.

  9. Genetic characterization of UCS region of Pneumocystis jirovecii and construction of allelic profiles of Indian isolates based on sequence typing at three regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rashmi; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan; Guleria, Randeep; Kumar, Lalit; Luthra, Kalpana; Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla

    2013-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is an opportunistic pathogen that causes severe pneumonia in immunocompromised patients. To study the genetic diversity of P. jirovecii in India the upstream conserved sequence (UCS) region of Pneumocystis genome was amplified, sequenced and genotyped from a set of respiratory specimens obtained from 50 patients with a positive result for nested mitochondrial large subunit ribosomal RNA (mtLSU rRNA) PCR during the years 2005-2008. Of these 50 cases, 45 showed a positive PCR for UCS region. Variations in the tandem repeats in UCS region were characterized by sequencing all the positive cases. Of the 45 cases, one case showed five repeats, 11 cases showed four repeats, 29 cases showed three repeats and four cases showed two repeats. By running amplified DNA from all these cases on a high-resolution gel, mixed infection was observed in 12 cases (26.7%, 12/45). Forty three of 45 cases included in this study had previously been typed at mtLSU rRNA and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region by our group. In the present study, the genotypes at those two regions were combined with UCS repeat patterns to construct allelic profiles of 43 cases. A total of 36 allelic profiles were observed in 43 isolates indicating high genetic variability. A statistically significant association was observed between mtLSU rRNA genotype 1, ITS type Ea and UCS repeat pattern 4. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. INTEGRATION OF TRANSLANGUAGING IN LESSONS: An approach to teaching and learning in Namibian junior secondary schools. A qualitative case study in three regions in Namibia.

    OpenAIRE

    Shifidi, Linus Nghifingiwanga

    2014-01-01

    Mastergradsoppgave i tilpasset opplæring, Avdeling for lærerutdanning og naturvitenskap, Høgskolen i Hedmark, 2014. Master in Adapted education. English: The history of Namibia shows that Namibia was a German colony from 1884 to 1914. After Independence in 1990, English became the official language and the language of instruction as from grade 4 up to University level. The Namibian language policy instructs teachers and learners to use English across the curriculum except in mother ton...

  11. Monitoring of copper, arsenic and antimony levels in agricultural soils impacted and non-impacted by mining activities, from three regions in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gregori, Ida; Fuentes, Edwar; Rojas, Mariela; Pinochet, Hugo; Potin-Gautier, Martine

    2003-04-01

    This paper reports a comparative study of the concentration of three important environmental elements that are often found together in mineral deposits and then associated with mining activities; copper, arsenic and antimony. These elements were determined in 26 different agricultural soils from regions I, II and V in Chile, zones where the most important and biggest copper industries of this country are located. As background levels of these elements in soils have not been well established, in this study, both, impacted and non-impacted agricultural soils from different regions were considered. The relationships between the concentrations of these elements in soils were also examined. The concentration ranges for copper, arsenic and antimony were 11-530; 2.7-202 and 0.42-11 mg kg(-1) respectively. The copper concentrations in non-polluted soils from the north and central zone of Chile were similar. However, three sites from the north region have copper concentration as higher as 100 mg kg(-1), values that exceed the critical concentration for copper in soils. The concentration of arsenic and antimony in the north soils were higher than in non-impacted ones and, in the case of arsenic, greatly exceeded the world average concentration reported for this element in soils. The highest arsenic and antimony concentrations were found in Calama and Quillagua soils, two different sites in the Loa valley. The arsenic/antimony concentration ratio was higher in Quillagua soil. The high concentrations of three elements determined in impacted soils from region V (Puchuncaví and Catemu valleys) clearly shows the impact produced in this zone by the industrial and mining activities developed in their proximities. At Puchuncaví valley a clear decrease was observed in copper, arsenic and antimony concentrations in soils on the function of the distance from the industrial complex "Las Ventanas", and all concentrations exceeded the reported critical values for this matrix. Instead at Catemu valley, only the copper concentration was higher than this value. Statistically significant correlation was found for Cu-Sb in all soils; more significant Cu-As, Cu-Sb and Sb-As correlations were evaluated for soils from Puchuncaví and Catemu valleys, corroborating that high concentrations of copper, arsenic and antimony in these soils coming from the same pollution sources, the copper industry and the thermoelectric power plant.

  12. Modeling of quench front progression and heat transfer by radiation during reflooding of a tubular test section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, P.; Deruaz, R.

    1976-01-01

    Heat transfer modeling is presented in the scope of emergency core cooling. The rewetting of a hot dry wall during reflooding is a conduction-controlled phenomenon described by a model of heat-transfer coefficient. Upstream of the quench front, a two-dimensional approach involving both axial and transverse (or radial) heat conduction is discussed in view of thick walls, high quench front velocities and nucleate boiling. Downstream of the quench-front, high wall temperatures are reached so that a thermal radiation model is required to separate the different mechanisms of heat transfer. An attempt is made to consider radiation between walls, water droplets and vapor, with scattering emission and absorption of the two phases

  13. Ecofisiologia de plantas jovens de mogno-africano submetidas a deficit hídrico e reidratação Ecophysiology of young African mahogany plants subjected to water deficit and rewetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Paulo Ferreira de Albuquerque

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a capacidade de plantas jovens de mogno-africano (Khaya ivorensis em recuperar seu status hídrico e trocas gasosas após período de deficit hídrico. Plantas com aproximadamente 315 dias, irrigadas (controle e não irrigadas, foram avaliadas aos 14 dias da suspensão da irrigação e após um, três e sete dias da retomada da irrigação (reidratação. No dia 14, o potencial hídrico foliar de antemanhã (Ψam das plantas estressadas foi reduzido a -2,66 MPa. Com a restrição hídrica, foram observadas reduções significativas no conteúdo relativo de água na antemanhã (redução de 32%, na taxa de assimilação líquida de CO2 (90%, na condutância estomática (95%, na transpiração (93% e na razão entre concentração intercelular e ambiental de CO2 (37%. Durante a reidratação, o status hídrico das plantas estressadas foi restabelecido após três dias. As trocas gasosas também se restabeleceram, mas de forma mais lenta que o status hídrico. Sob deficit hídrico, a concentração de prolina aumentou e a de carboidratos solúveis totais diminuiu. Plantas jovens de mogno-africano são tolerantes ao deficit hídrico moderado.The objective of this work was to evaluate the capacity of young plants of African mahogany (Khaya ivorensis to recover their water status and gas exchange after water deficit. Plants with approximately 315 days, irrigated (control and non-irrigated, were evaluated after water was withheld for 14 days, and after one, three, and seven days of irrigation resumption (rehydration. On day 14, the predawn leaf water potential (Ψam of stressed plants was reduced to -2.66 MPa. With water deficit, significant decreases were observed in predawn relative water content (32% reduction, in net assimilation rate of CO2 (90%, in stomatal conductance (95%, in transpiration (93%, and in intercellular to ambient ratio of CO2 concentration (37%. During rehydration, the water status of stressed plants was recovered after three days. Gas exchange was also recovered, but in a slower rate than water status. Under water deficit, proline concentration increased and total soluble carbohydrate concentration decreased. Young African mahogany plants are tolerant to moderate water deficit.

  14. The size, characteristics and partnership networks of the health-related non-profit sector in three regions of South Africa: implications of changing primary health care policy for community-based care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pletzen, Ermien; Zulliger, R; Moshabela, M; Schneider, H

    2014-09-01

    Health-related community-based care in South Africa is mostly provided through non-profit organizations (NPOs), but little is known about the sector. In the light of emerging government policy on greater formalization of community-based care in South Africa, this article assesses the size, characteristics and partnership networks of health-related NPOs in three South African communities and explores implications of changing primary health care policy for this sector. Data were collected (2009-11) from three sites: Khayelitsha (urban), Botshabelo (semi-rural) and Bushbuckridge (semi/deep rural). Separate data sources were used to identify all health-related NPOs in the sites. Key characteristics of identified NPOs were gathered using a standardized tool. A typology of NPOs was developed combining level of resources (well, moderate, poor) and orientation of activities ('Direct service', 'Developmental' and/or 'Activist'). Network analysis was performed to establish degree and density of partnerships among NPOs. The 138 NPOs (n = 56 in Khayelitsha, n = 47 in Bushbuckridge; n = 35 in Botshabelo) were mostly local community-based organizations (CBOs). The main NPO orientation was 'Direct service' (n = 120, 87%). Well- and moderately resourced NPOs were successful at combining orientations. Most organizations with an 'Activist' orientation were urban. No poorly resourced organizations had this orientation. Well-resourced organizations with an 'Activist' orientation were highly connected in Khayelitsha NPO networks, while poorly resourced CBOs were marginalized. A contrasting picture emerged in Botshabelo where CBOs were highly connected. Networks in Bushbuckridge were fragmented and linear. The NPO sector varies geographically in numbers, resources, orientation of activities and partnership networks. NPOs may perform important developmental roles and strong potential for social capital may reside in organizational networks operating in otherwise impoverished environments. A uniform approach to policy implementation may not accommodate variations in the NPO sector. Considerations for adaptation may be necessary in light of the observed differences between urban and rural settings. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine © The Author 2013; all rights reserved.

  15. A rubella serosurvey in postpartum women in the three regions of Peru Estudio serológico de rubéola en mujeres recién paridas en las tres regiones de Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Suárez-Ognio

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the proportion of postpartum women aged 15-49 in Peru who are susceptible to rubella, in order to help address strategies to eliminate rubella and to prevent congenital rubella syndrome (CRS in the country. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted during March and April 2003 in six main regional hospitals, in the three geographic regions (coast, mountain, and jungle of Peru. For the postpartum women who provided written informed consent, a questionnaire was administered and a blood specimen was collected. Sera were tested for rubella immunoglobulin G (IgG antibody, using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent serologic assay (ELISA kit. Univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analyses were carried out to assess risk factors for susceptibility. RESULTS: In total, 1 236 postpartum women were enrolled. The overall proportion of IgG-antibody negative women was 12.8% (95% confidence interval (CI: 10.9%-14.6%. Bivariate analysis found the following variables associated with susceptibility: living in the jungle region (odds ratio (OR = 1.65; 95% CI: 1.13-2.42; age OBJETIVO: Determinar la proporción de mujeres recién paridas de 15-49 años de edad susceptibles a la rubéola en Perú, a fin de contribuir a establecer estrategias para eliminar la rubéola y evitar el síndrome de rubéola congénita (SRC en el país. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio transversal en marzo y abril de 2003 en seis hospitales regionales principales de tres regiones geográficas (costa, sierra y selva de Perú. A las mujeres recién paridas que dieron su consentimiento informado por escrito se les aplicó un cuestionario y se les tomó una muestra de sangre. La detección serológica de anticuerpos de la clase IgG contra rubéola se realizó mediante un ensayo inmunoenzimático comercial tipo ELISA. Se realizaron análisis con una, dos y múltiples variables para evaluar los factores de riesgo de ser susceptible a la enfermedad. RESULTADOS: En total participaron 1 236 mujeres recién paridas. La proporción de mujeres negativas a anticuerpos IgG contra rubéola fue de 12,8% (intervalo de confianza de 95% [IC95%]: 10,9% a 14,6%. Según el análisis bifactorial, las variables asociadas con la vulnerabilidad a la enfermedad fueron: vivir en la región de la selva (razón de posibilidades [odds ratio, OR] = 1,65; IC95%: 1,13 a 2,42; tener menor de 19 años de edad (OR = 2,02; IC95%: 1,35 a 3,03; ser ama de casa (OR = 1,69; IC95%: 1,12 a 2,55; y tener 11 años o menos de educación (OR = 2,12; IC95%: 1,20 a 3,75. Las variables asociadas con la vulnerabilidad a la enfermedad según el análisis multifactorial fueron: vivir en la región de la selva (OR = 1,67; IC95%: 1,13 a 2,46; tener menos de 19 años de edad (OR = 1,62; IC95%: 1,07 a 2,47; tener menos de 4 niños nacidos vivos (OR = 1,85; IC95%: 1,00 a 3,40; y tener 11 años o menos de educación (OR = 2,07; IC95%: 1,16 a 3,71. CONCLUSIONES: En la zona estudiada, la proporción de mujeres recién paridas susceptibles a la rubéola fue de 12,8%, lo que coloca a Perú entre los países con riesgo moderado de tener casos de SRC. Estos resultados indican la necesidad de vacunar también contra la rubéola a otros grupos de la población, especialmente a las mujeres en edad de procrear.

  16. Prevalência de helmintos intestinais em três mesorregiões do Estado de Minas Gerais Prevalence of intestinal helminths in three regions of Minas Gerais State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar dos Santos Carvalho

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizado um levantamento das helmintoses intestinais em 18.973 escolares do primeiro grau (7 a 14 anos, da rede pública do Estado de Minas Gerais, utilizando o método de Kato-Katz de exame de fezes (duas lâminas por amostra. Foram estudadas 3 mesorregiões: Triângulo Mineiro/Alto Paranaíba (60 municípios, Noroeste de Minas (13 e Sul/Sudoeste (144. Entre os escolares examinados, 15.545 (82% estavam negativos, 2.863 (15% monoparasitados e 565 (3% poliparasitados. A prevalência de A. lumbricoides foi de 10,3%, de T. trichiura 4,7%, de ancilostomídeos 2,9%, de E. vermicularis 1,2%, de H. nana 0,4% e de Taenia sp 0,2%. As maiores prevalências de helmintos/mesorregião foram de 24,2% para T. trichiura e 18,7% para A. lumbricoides (Sul/Sudoeste e 12,1% para ancilostomídeos e 0,7% para Taenia sp (Noroeste de Minas. As helmintoses intestinais continuam sendo um grave problema de saúde pública, inclusive em áreas onde as condições socioeconômicas são mais favoráveis.A parasitological assay of feces, through the Kato-Katz method, was undertaken in 18,973 schoolchildren (7 to 14 years old, at primary school level, from a public school of the State of Minas Gerais. Three mesoregions were studied: Triângulo Mineiro/ Alto Paraíba ( 60 municipalities; northwest Minas Gerais (13 and south/south-west regions of Minas Gerais (144. Among the examined children, 15,545 (82% were negative; 2,863 (15% were infected with a single species of helminthes and 565 (3% were infected by more than one species. The prevalence rates were: A. lumbricoides 10.3%; T. trichiura 4.7%; hookworm 2.9%; E. vermicularis 1.2%; H. nana 0.4% and Taenia sp 0.2%. The largest helminthes prevalence/mesoregion were for T. trichiura (24.2% and A. lumbricoides (18.7% in the south/south-west region; hookworm (12.1% and Taenia sp (0.7% in the northwest region of Minas Gerais. Intestinal helminthiasis is still regarded as a serious public health problem, including regions where the socio-economic conditions are more favorable.

  17. Heat transfer correlation development and assessment: a summary and assessment of return to nucleate boiling phenomena during blowdown tests conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, A.M.; Tolman, E.L.

    1979-04-01

    The data are presented which were obtained in Loss-of-Coolant Experiments (LOCE) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) which demonstrate the presence of cladding rewetting after the critical heat flux has been exceeded as a viable cooling mechanism during the blowdown phase of a LOCE. A brief review of the mechanisms associated with the boiling crisis and rewetting is also provided. The relevance of INEL LOCE rewetting data to nuclear reactor licensing Evaluation Model Requirements is considered, and the conclusion is made that the elimination of rewetting and return to nucleate boiling (RNB) in Evaluation Models represents a definite conservatism

  18. Can frequent precipitation moderate drought impact on peatmoss carbon uptake in northern peatlands?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijp, J.J.; Limpens, J.; Metselaar, K.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.; Berendse, F.; Robroek, B.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Northern peatlands represent a large global carbon store that potentially can be destabilised by summer water table drawdown. Precipitation can moderate negative impacts of water table drawdown by rewetting peatmoss (Sphagnum spp.), the ecosystems’ key species. Yet, the frequency for such rewetting

  19. Development of a thermal-hydraulic code for reflood analysis in a PWR experimental loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Sabrina P.; Mesquita, Amir Z.; Rezende, Hugo C.; Palma, Daniel A.P.

    2017-01-01

    A process of fundamental importance in the event of Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in Pressurized Water nuclear Reactors (PWR) is the reflood of the core or rewetting of nuclear fuels. The Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) has been developing since the 70’s programs to allow Brazil to become independent in the field of reactor safety analysis. To that end, in the 80’s was designed, assembled and commissioned one Rewetting Test Facility (ITR in Portuguese). This facility aims to investigate the phenomena involved in the thermal hydraulic reflood phase of a Loss of Coolant Accident in a PWR nuclear reactor. This work aim is the analysis of physical and mathematical models governing the rewetting phenomenon, and the development a thermo-hydraulic simulation code of a representative experimental circuit of the PWR reactors core cooling channels. It was possible to elaborate and develop a code called REWET. The results obtained with REWET were compared with the experimental results of the ITR, and with the results of the Hydroflut code, that was the old program previously used. An analysis was made of the evolution of the wall temperature of the test section as well as the evolution of the front for two typical tests using the two codes calculation, and experimental results. The result simulated by REWET code for the rewetting time also came closer to the experimental results more than those calculated by Hydroflut code. (author)

  20. Development of a thermal-hydraulic code for reflood analysis in a PWR experimental loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Sabrina P.; Mesquita, Amir Z.; Rezende, Hugo C., E-mail: sabrinapral@gmail.com, E-mail: amir@cdtn.brm, E-mail: hcr@cdtn.br, E-mail: hcr@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Palma, Daniel A.P., E-mail: dapalma@cnen.gov.br [Comissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    A process of fundamental importance in the event of Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in Pressurized Water nuclear Reactors (PWR) is the reflood of the core or rewetting of nuclear fuels. The Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) has been developing since the 70’s programs to allow Brazil to become independent in the field of reactor safety analysis. To that end, in the 80’s was designed, assembled and commissioned one Rewetting Test Facility (ITR in Portuguese). This facility aims to investigate the phenomena involved in the thermal hydraulic reflood phase of a Loss of Coolant Accident in a PWR nuclear reactor. This work aim is the analysis of physical and mathematical models governing the rewetting phenomenon, and the development a thermo-hydraulic simulation code of a representative experimental circuit of the PWR reactors core cooling channels. It was possible to elaborate and develop a code called REWET. The results obtained with REWET were compared with the experimental results of the ITR, and with the results of the Hydroflut code, that was the old program previously used. An analysis was made of the evolution of the wall temperature of the test section as well as the evolution of the front for two typical tests using the two codes calculation, and experimental results. The result simulated by REWET code for the rewetting time also came closer to the experimental results more than those calculated by Hydroflut code. (author)

  1. Experimental studies on mitigation of LOCA for a high flux research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, A.K.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental studies on the rewetting behaviour of hot vertical annular channels were performed to study the mitigation of consequences of loss of coolant accident (LOCA) for a high flux research reactor. Studies were carried out to study the rewetting behaviour with hot inner tube, for bottom flooding and top flow rewetting conditions. The tube was made of stainless steel. Experiments were conducted for water flow rates in the annulus upto 7 litres per minute (l pm) (11.7 x 10 -5 m 3 s -1 ). The initial surface temperature of the inner tube was varied from 200 to 500 degC. (author)

  2. Caracterización molecular de 15 aislamientos de Beauveria bassiana asociados con Cosmopolites y Metamasius en plátano y banano en tres regiones de Colombia Molecular characterization of 15 isolations of Beauveria bassiana related to Cosmopolites and Metamasius in plantain and banana in three regions of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Fernando Marmolejo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Se colectaron picudos de Cosmopolites y Metamasius en municipios del Valle del Cauca, Caldas y Quindío. Se obtuvieron cultivos monospóricos con diluciones de 10-10 y 10-11. Los aislamientos fueron almacenados a -80°C con glicerol al 10% y el ADN a -20°C. Los marcadores moleculares RAM generaron 82 fragmentos de los cuales 67% fueron polimórficos con una heterocigocidad de 0.24, que indica diversidad media a alta. A un índice de similitud 0.84 se formaron 5 grupos: uno con 11 aislamientos y 4 con un solo aislamiento. En el gran grupo se detectó un duplicado y se encontró diversidad del hongo en los sitios muestreados. No se encontró relación entre aislamientos sobre Cosmopolites y Metamasius o zona geográfica en la formación de grupos genéticos.Weevils Cosmopolites and Metamasius in municipalities of the Valle del Cauca, Caldas and Quindío departaments of Colombia were collected. Monosporic cultures were obtained from10-10 and 10-11 dilutions of Beauveria bassiana. Isolates were kept at -80°C with 10% glycerol and DNA stored at -20°C. RAMs molecular markers generated a total of 82 fragments of which 67% were polymorphic. A heterozygosity value of 0.24 indicated a medium - high diversity. Five groups were formed which have a similarity value of 0.84 and one big group with 11 isolates and four groups with only one isolate. In the big group was detected a duplicate and fungi genetic diversity in the sampled places. Neither relationship among isolates of Cosmopolites and Metamasius nor geographical zone related to the formation of genetic groups.

  3. Recurrence and frequency of disturbance have cumulative effect on methanotrophic activity, abundance, and community structure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, A.; van den Brink, E.; Reim, A.; Krause, S.; Bodelier, P.L.E.

    2016-01-01

    Alternate prolonged drought and heavy rainfall is predicted to intensify with global warming. Desiccation-rewetting events alter the soil quality and nutrient concentrations which drive microbial-mediated processes, including methane oxidation, a key biogeochemical process catalyzed by

  4. Problems of two-phase flows in water cooled and moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syu, Yu.

    1984-01-01

    Heat exchange in two-phase flows of coolant in loss of coolant accidents in PWR and BWR reactors has been investigated. Three main stages of accident history are considered: blowdown, reflooding using emergency core cooling system and rewetting. Factors, determining the rate of coolant leakage and the rate of temperature increase in fuel cladding during blowdown, processes of vapour during reflooding and liquid priming by vapour during rewetting, are discussed

  5. An analysis of hot plate initial temperature effect on rectangular narrow gap quenching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M-Hadi Kusuma; Mulya Juarsa; Anhar Riza Antariksawan; Nandy Putra

    2012-01-01

    The understanding about thermal management in the event of a severe accident such as the melting nuclear reactor fuel and reactor core, became a priority to maintain the integrity of reactor pressure vessel. Thus the debris will not out from the reactor pressure vessel and resulting impact of more substantial to the environment. One way to maintain the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel was cooling of the excess heat generated due to the accident. To get understanding of this aspect, there search focused on the effect of the initial temperature of the hot plate in the rectangular narrow gap quenching process. The initial temperature effect on quenching process is related to cooling process (thermal management) when the occurrence of a nuclear accident due to loss of coolant accident or severe accident. In order to address the problem, it is crucial to conduct research to get a better understanding of thermal management regarding to nuclear cooling accident. The research focused on determining the rewetting temperature of hot plate cooling on 220°C, 400°C, and 600°C with 0.2 liters/sec cooling water flowrate. Experiments were carried out by injecting 85°C cooling water temperature into the narrow gap at flowrates of 0.2 liters/sec. Data of transient temperature measurements were recorded using a data acquisition system in order to know the rewetting temperature during the quenching process. This study aims to understand the effect of hot plate initial temperature on rewetting during rectangular narrow gap quenching process. The results obtained show that the rewetting point on cooling the hot plate 220°C, 400°C and 600°occurs at varying rewetting temperatures. At 220°C hot plate initial temperature, the rewetting temperature occurs on 220°C. At 400°C hot plate initial temperature, the rewetting temperature occurs on 379.51°C. At 600°C hot plate initial temperature, the rewetting temperature occurs on 426.63°C. Significant differences of hot plate

  6. ANALISA PENGARUH SUHU AWAL PELAT PANAS PADA PROSES QUENCHING CELAH SEMPIT REKTANGULAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hadi Kusuma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pemahaman terhadap manajemen termal apabila terjadi suatu kecelakaan parah reaktor nuklir seperti melelehnya bahan bakar dan teras reaktor, menjadi prioritas utama untuk menjaga integritas bejana tekan reaktor. Dengan demikian hasil lelehan bahan bakar dan teras reaktor (debris tidak keluar dari bejana tekan reaktor dan mengakibatkan dampak lain yang lebih besar ke lingkungan. Salah satu cara yang dilakukan untuk menjaga integritas bejana tekan reaktor adalah dengan melakukan pendinginan terhadap panas berlebih yang dihasilkan akibat dari kecelakaan tersebut. Untuk mempelajari dan mendapatkan pemahaman mengenai hal tersebut, maka dilakukan penelitian mengenai pengaruh suhu awal pelat panas dalam proses quenching (pendinginan secara tiba-tiba celah sempit rektangular. Penelitian difokuskan pada penentuan suhu rewetting dari pendinginan pelat panas dengan suhu awal pelat 220 0C, 400 0C, dan 600 0C dengan laju aliran air pendingin 0,2 liter/detik. Eksperimen dilakukan dengan menginjeksikan air pada laju aliran 0,2 liter/detik pada suhu air pendingin 85 0C ke dalam celah sempit rektangular. Data hasil pengukuran digunakan untuk mengetahui suhu rewetting yang terjadi pada pendinginan pelat panas tersebut. Tujuannya adalah untuk memahami pengaruh suhu awal pelat panas terhadap rewetting pada proses quenching di celah sempit rektangular. Hasil yang diperoleh menunjukkan bahwa titik rewetting pada pendinginan pelat panas 220 0C, 400 0C, dan 600 0C terjadi pada suhu rewetting yang berbeda-beda. Pada suhu awal pelat panas 220 0C, suhu rewetting terjadi pada 220 0C yaitu langsung ketika air dilewatkan melalui celah sempit rektangular. Pada suhu awal pelat panas 400 0C, suhu rewetting terjadi pada 379,51 0C. Dan pada suhu awal pelat panas 600 0C, suhu rewetting terjadi pada 426,63 0C. Perbedaan suhu awal pelat panas yang sangat signifikan menyebabkan terjadinya perubahan sifat fisik benda uji, berbedanya rejim pendidihan yang dialami oleh fluida yang

  7. The Impact of Extreme Weather Events on Dissolved Organic Matter and Microbial Biomass of chernozem soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Ann-Christin; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this experiment was to study the impact of the extreme weather events freezing-thawing and drying-rewetting on C-, N- and P-dynamics in dissolved organic matter and microbial biomass. The three variants of a chernozem soil (Voronezh region, Russia) are (1) fertilized maize cropping, (2) unfertilized maize cropping and (3) a bare fallow. After both abiotic perturbations the respiration rates were generally lower in the freezing-thawing than in the drying-rewetting treatment, due to the lower temperature. The elevated respiration came along with the decay of organic matter, which was also manifested in increased mineralization of C, N and P immediately after rewetting. However, freezing-thawing had significantly less impact on C-, N- and P-mobilization. We conclude that drying-rewetting leads to an initially increased mobilization of C, N and P, which becomes obvious as increased amounts of DOM immediately after rewetting. Freezing-thawing does not affect mobilization in the same way. There, only an increased mobilization of C can be observed. Especially concerning N and P, the reaction is dependent on the form of use/cropping in both treatments.

  8. Experimental Study on Boiling Crisis in Pool Boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Satbyoul; Kim, Hyungdae [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    They postulated that failure in re-wetting of a dry patch by a cooling liquid is governed by microhydrodynamics near the wall. Chu et al. commonly observed that active coalescence of newly generated bubbles with preexisting bubbles results in a residual dry patch and prevents the complete rewetting of the dry patch, leading to CHF. In this work, to reveal the key physical mechanism of CHF during the rewetting process of a dry patch, dynamics of dry patches and thermal pattern of a boiling surface are simultaneously observed using TR and IR thermometry techniques. Local dynamics of dry patch and thermal pattern on a boiling surface in synchronized manner for both space and time using TR and IR thermometry were measured during pool boiling of water. Observation and quantitative examination of CHF was performed. - The hydrodynamic and thermal behaviors of irreversible dry patch were observed. The dry patches coalesce into a large dry patch and it locally dried out. Due to the failure of liquid rewetting, the dry patch is not completely rewetted, resulting in the burn out at which temperature is -140°C. - When temperature of a dry patch rises beyond the instantaneous nucleation temperature, several bubbles nucleate at the head of the advancing liquid meniscus and prevents the liquid front, and eventually the overheated dry patch remains alive after the departure of the massive bubble.

  9. An analytical study of thermo-hydrodynamic behaviour of the reflood-phase during a LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murao, Y.

    1977-12-01

    The objectives of this study are - the check of the quench model proposed by the author and T. Sudoh, - the establishment of the thermo-hydrodynamics downstream from the quench front, and - the stabilization of the numerical calculations. In order to study these therms, the new version of the reflood analysis code 'REFLA-1D' was developed. The quench modes were classified into the following three types: 1) Liquid column type (rewetting by subcooled water), 2) Dryout type (annular flow type, rewetting by saturated water), and 3) Rewetting type (entire surface temperature higher than rewetting temperature). For the thermo-hydrodynamic model downstream from the quench front, the flow pattern was divided into the five regimes: 1) Subcooled film boiling regime, 2) Transition flow regime, 3) Dispersed flow regime, 4) Superheated steam flow regime, and 5) Rewetted regime. To stabilze the numerical calculation and shorten the computing time, the Lagrangian form of the energy equation of gase phase and dispersed flow region was used instead of the Eulerian form. Considerably close agreement between three PWR-FLECHT tests and the calculated results for the critical Weber number Wec=1.0 was obtained for fuel clad surface temperature and quench time except in earlier stage before turnaround, but poor agreement for the heat transfer characteristics in the transition flow region defined between the quench front and the dispersed flow region. The calculation was relatively stable and the computing time is about the same as a real time for a IBM 370-158 computer. (orig.) [de

  10. Design aspects of gamma densitometers for void fraction measurements in small scale two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, A.M.C.; Banerjee, S.

    1981-01-01

    Design procedure for a single-beam gamma densitometer operated in the count mode is described. The design is simple, compact and is particularly suited for small scale two-phase flow experiments with thin-metal walled or non-metallic test sections. The choice of gamma sources, scintillators and signal processing systems is discussed. The procedure has been applied by the authors in the design of densitometers for two transient experiments: refilling and rewetting experiments and flow boiling experiments. Good average void measurements were obtained for relatively fast transients. It has also been shown that some useful flow parameters other than void fractions can be obtained if two or more densitometers are used, eg, the average rewetting and entrained liquid velocities in the refilling and rewetting experiments, and the average void velocity in the flow boiling experiments. (orig.)

  11. Thermalhydraulic behavior of electrically heated rod during a critical heat flux transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Rita de Cassia Fernandes de; Carajilescov, Pedro

    1997-01-01

    In nuclear reactors, the occurrence of critical heat flux leads to fuel rod overheating with clad fusion and radioactive products leakage. To predict the effects of such phenomenon, experiments are performed using electrically heated rods to simulate operational and accidental conditions of nuclear fuel rods. In the present work, a theoretical analysis of the drying and rewetting front propagation is performed during a critical heat flux experiment, starting with the application of slope of electrical power from steady state condition. After the occurrence of critical heat flux, the drying front propagation is predicted. After a few seconds, a power cut is considered and the rewetting front behavior is analytically observed. Studies done with several values of coolant mass flow rate show that this variable has more influence on the drying front velocity than on the rewetting one. (author)

  12. Recent results from CEC cost sharing research programme on LWR fuel behaviour under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairbairn, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    The present structure and intentions of the CEC sponsored cost sharing programme for LWR safety research are outlined. Detailed results are reported for two projects from this programme. The first project concerns experimental data on the thermohydraulic effects of flow diversion around ballooned fuel rods. Data are presented on single and two phase heat transfer in an electrically heated rod bundle. Detailed photographic data on droplet behaviour are also given. The second project is an investigation of the effects of zircaloy oxidation on rewetting during reflood. It is shown that as oxide thickness increases from 1μm to 76μm that rewet rates can increase by up to 40%. A systematic effect of oxidation on rewet temperatures is also noted. (author)

  13. Loss-of-coolant accident test series TC-1 experiment operating specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yackle, T.R.

    1979-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to specify the experiment operating procedure for the test series TC-1. The effects of externally mounted cladding thermocouples on the fuel rod thermal behavior during LOCA blowdown and reflood cycles will be investigated in the test. Potential thermocouple effects include: (a) delayed DNB, (b) momentary cladding rewets following DNB, (c) premature cladding rewet during a blowdown two-phase slug period, and (d) early cladding rewet during reflood. The two-phase slug period will be controlled by momentarily opening the hot leg valve. The slug will consist of lower plenum liquid that is sent through the flow shrouds and will be designed to quench the fuel rods at a rate that is similar to the slug experienced early in the LOFT L2-2 and L2-3 tests

  14. The THETIS 80% blocked cluster experiment. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, C.A.; Pearson, K.G.; Jowitt, D.

    1984-09-01

    Thermal-hydraulics experiments on a model PWR fuel assembly containing partial blockage are reported. Extensive data on the rewetting of the cluster are presented. Above the rewetting front the surface heat flux decreased with height because of the increasing superheating of the steam in the two-phase coolant. Heat transfer in the blockage was good early in the transients but deteriorated later. Cooling of the 80 percent blockage was generally no better than with the 90 percent blockage. There is good agreement between the experimental data and predictions using BERTHA. (U.K.)

  15. The effects of water potential on some microbial populations and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of water potential on some microbial populations and decrease kinetic of organic carbon in soil treated with cow manure under laboratory conditions. ... Fourth irrigation treatment was drying-rewetting cycle (D-W) between -0.3 to -15 bars. After 0, 10, 20, 40, 60 and 90 days of incubation, soils were sampled for ...

  16. Can frequent precipitation moderate the impact of drought on peatmoss carbon uptake in northern peatlands?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijp, J.J.; Limpens, J.; Metselaar, K.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.; Berendse, F.; Robroek, B.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Northern peatlands represent a large global carbon store that can potentially be destabilized by summer water table drawdown. Precipitation can moderate the negative impacts of water table drawdown by rewetting peatmoss (Sphagnum spp.), the ecosystem's key species. Yet, the frequency of such

  17. The use of a large-strain consolidation model to optimise multilift tailing deposits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vardon, P.J.; Yao, Y.; Van Paassen, L.A.; Van Tol, A.F.

    2015-01-01

    Thin-lift atmospheric fine drying (AFD) is a technique used to dewater mine and oil sand tailings, which utilises both self-weight consolidation and atmospheric evaporation. The disposed layers undergo a cyclic drying and rewetting process due to precipitation and deposition of additional lifts on

  18. Shrinkage and swelling properties of flocculated mature fine tailings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, Y.; Van Tol, A.F.; Van Paassen, L.A.; Vardon, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    In the atmospheric fines drying technique, mature fine tailings (MFT) are treated with polymers and deposited in thin layers on a sloped surface for sub-aerial drying. During the whole drying period, the tailings deposits can experience rewetting during periods of rainy weather or as result of the

  19. Restoration of brook valley meadows in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootjans, A.P.; Bakker, J.P.; Jansen, A.J.M.; Kemmers, R.H.

    2002-01-01

    Until recently, restoration measures in Dutch brook valley meadows consisted of re-introducing traditional management techniques, such as mowing without fertilisation and low-intensity grazing. In the Netherlands, additional measures, such as rewetting and sod cutting, are now carried out on a large

  20. Effects of moisture content on some physical properties of red pepper

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-14

    Jun 14, 2010 ... In the moisture range of 7.27 to 20.69% dry basis (d.b.), studies on rewetted red pepper seed ... m-3; ρt, true density, kg m-3; φ, sphericity of seed; al, ... the experiments in this study. ... For each experiment, a sample was.

  1. Differences in carbon accumulation of two cut-over peatlands in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roderfeld, H.; Vasander, H.; Tolonen, K.

    1994-01-01

    This study focused on the ecology of abandoned peatlands in Finland. The aim is to produce information about conditions favourable for recolonisation and regeneration of mires. This could serve as a basis for the management of milled peat cut-over sites which are designed for rewetting

  2. The effects of hydrologic fluctuation and sulfate regeneration on mercury cycling in an experimental peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.K. Coleman Wasik; D.R. Engstrom; C.P.J. Mitchell; E.B. Swain; B.A. Monson; S.J. Balogh; J.D. Jeremiason; B.A. Branfireun; R.K. Kolka; J.E. Almendinger

    2015-01-01

    A series of severe droughts during the course of a long-term, atmospheric sulfate-deposition experiment in a boreal peatland in northern Minnesota created a unique opportunity to study how methylmercury (MeHg) production responds to drying and rewetting events in peatlands under variable levels of sulfate loading. Peat oxidation during extended dry periods mobilized...

  3. Thermohydraulic tests in the area of reactor safety done in CDTN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladeira, L.C.D.

    1990-01-01

    The main experimental works performed in the last five years at the Thermohydraulics Laboratory of the Nuclear Technology Development Center, in the field of reactor safety are briefly described. This paper cover the performing and analysis of pressure drop, heat transfer and mixing tests in 3X3 rod bundle and rewetting tests in single tube section. (autor) [pt

  4. Sphagnum farming in a eutrophic world : The importance of optimal nutrient stoichiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temmink, Ralph J. M.; Fritz, Christian; van Dijk, Gijs; Hensgens, Geert; Lamers, Leon P. M.; Krebs, Matthias; Gaudig, Greta; Joosten, Hans

    Large areas of peatlands have worldwide been drained to facilitate agriculture, which has adverse effects on the environment and the global climate. Agriculture on rewetted peatlands (paludiculture) provides a sustainable alternative to drainage-based agriculture. One form of paludiculture is the

  5. Viscoelastic sorption behavior of starch and gluten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinders, M.B.J.; Oliver, L.

    2015-01-01

    The migration of gasses and liquids through (bio) polymers plays an important role in numerous applications and processes like, e.g., drying and (re)wetting of foods and food ingredients, packaging, and controlled release. A good understanding of the transport mechanisms is therefore of great

  6. Thermalhydraulic behavior of electrically heated rods during critical heat flux transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Rita de Cassia Fernandes de

    1997-01-01

    In nuclear reactors, the occurrence of critical heat flux leads to fuel rod overheating with clad fusion and radioactive products leakage. To predict the effects of such phenomenon, experiments are performed utilizing heated rods to simulate operational and accidental conditions of nuclear fuel rods, with special attention to the phenomenon of boiling crisis. The use of mechanisms which detect the abrupt temperature rise allows the electric power switch off. These facts prevent the test section from damage. During the critical heat flux phenomenon the axial heat conduction becomes very important. The study of the dryout and rewetting fronts yields the analysis, planning and following of critical heat flux experiments. These facts are important during the reflooding of nuclear cores at severe accidents. In the present work it is performed a theoretical analysis of the drying and rewetting front propagation during a critical heat flux experiment, starting with the application of an electrical power step or power slope from steady state condition. After the occurrence of critical heat flux, it is predicted the drying front propagation. After a few seconds, a power cut is considered and the rewetting front behavior is analytically observed. In all these transients the coolant pressure is 13,5 MPa. For one of them, comparisons are done with a pressure of 8,00 MPa. Mass flow and enthalpy influences on the fronts velocities are also analysed. These results show that mass flow has more importance on the drying front velocities whereas the pressure alters strongly the rewetting ones. (author)

  7. Experimental analysis of a Flat Plate Pulsating Heat Pipe with Self-ReWetting Fluids during a parabolic flight campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecere, Anselmo; De Cristofaro, Davide; Savino, Raffaele; Ayel, Vincent; Sole-Agostinelli, Thibaud; Marengo, Marco; Romestant, Cyril; Bertin, Yves

    2018-06-01

    A Flat Plate Pulsating Heat Pipe (FPPHP) filled with an ordinary liquid (water) and a self-rewetting mixture (dilutes aqueous solutions of long-chain alcohols with unusual surface tension behavior) is investigated under variable gravity conditions on board a 'Zero-g' plane during the 65th Parabolic Flight Campaign of the European Space Agency. The FPPHP thermal performance in terms of evaporator and condenser temperatures, start-up levels and flow regimes is characterized for the two working fluids and a power input ranging from 0 to 200 W (up to 17 W/cm2 at the heater/evaporator wall interface). The experimental set-up also includes a transparent plate enabling the visualization of the oscillating flow patterns during the experiments. For a low power input (4 W/cm2), the pulsating heat pipe filled with pure water is not able to work under low-g conditions, because the evaporator immediately exhibits dry-out conditions and the fluid oscillations stops, preventing heat transfer between the hot and cold side and resulting in a global increase of the temperatures. On the other hand, the FPPHP filled with the self-rewetting fluid runs also during the microgravity phase. The liquid rewets several times the evaporator zone triggering the oscillatory regime. The self-rewetting fluid helps both the start-up and the thermal performance of the FPPHP in microgravity conditions.

  8. Soil CO2 evolution: Response from arginine additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short-term response of soil C mineralization following drying/rewetting has been proposed as an indicator of soil microbial activity. Houston Black clay was amended with four rates of arginine to vary microbial response and keep other soil properties constant. The evolution of CO2 during one and thr...

  9. Revival of Dutch Sphagnum bogs: a reasonable perspective?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomassen, H.B.M.

    2004-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the area of raised bogs has been virtually lost during two millennia of human impact. Much effort has been invested in rewetting these cut-over bogs, but the recovery of Sphagnum-dominated vegetation often failed. The work presented includes research on the role of hydrochemistry

  10. Sensitivity study with respect to direction of ADI method during re-flooding in AHWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, M.; Mukhopadhyay, D. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Reactor Safety Div.; Ghosh, A.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Raja Ramanna Fellow; Kumar, R. [Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)

    2015-05-15

    The Advanced Heavy water Reactor (AHWR) is a natural circulation vertical pressure tube type boiling light water cooled and heavy water moderated reactor. As the AHWR fuel bundle quenching under accident condition is designed primarily with radial jets at several axial locations, bottom re-flooding still remain open as another option. Radial direction injection of emergency core cooling leads to rewetting of AHWR fuel cluster in circumferential direction. A 3D fuel pin model has been developed by using Finite Difference Method (FDM) of transient heat conduction equation. Alternating Direction Implicit technique of Finite Difference Method (FDM) has been used for discretisation of numerical equation in different time step at different direction. Sensitivity numerical study with respect to direction of ADI method has been carried out to optimize the time step during the transient as well as steady state and is found that it is insensitivity with direction of solution. Further, to assess influence of circumferential rewetting vis-a-vis axial rewetting. Both the analyses are carried out with same fluid temperature and heat transfer coefficients as boundary conditions. It has been found from the analyses that for radial jet, the circumferential conduction is significant and overall the fuel temperature falls in the quench plane with the initiation of quenching event. The paper discusses the sensitivity study with respect to direction of ADI solution and comparison of numerical results for circumferential and axial rewetting for single pin.

  11. Large CO2 and CH4 release from a flooded formerly drained fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, T.; Franz, D.; Koebsch, F.; Larmanou, E.; Augustin, J.

    2016-12-01

    Drained peatlands are usually strong carbon dioxide (CO2) sources. In Germany, up to 4.5 % of the national CO2 emissions are estimated to be released from agriculturally used peatlands and for some peatland-rich northern states, such as Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, this share increases to about 20%. Reducing this CO2 source and restoring the peatlands' natural carbon sink is one objective of large-scale nature protection and restoration measures, in which 37.000 ha of drained and degraded peatlands in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania are slated for rewetting. It is well known, however, that in the initial phase of rewetting, a reduction of the CO2 source strength is usually accompanied by an increase in CH4 emissions. Thus, whether and when the intended effects of rewetting with regard to greenhouse gases are achieved, depends on the balance of CO2 and CH4 fluxes and on the duration of the initial CH4 emission phase. In 2013, a new Fluxnet site went online at a flooded formerly drained river valley fen site near Zarnekow, NE Germany (DE-Zrk), to investigate the combined CO2 and CH4 dynamics at such a heavily degraded and rewetted peatland. The site is dominated by open water with submerged and floating vegetation and surrounding Typha latifolia.Nine year after rewetting, we found large CH4 emissions of 53 g CH4 m-2 a-1 from the open water area, which are 4-fold higher than from the surrounding vegetation zone (13 g CH4 m-2 a-1). Surprisingly, both the open water and the vegetated area were net CO2 sources of 158 and 750 g CO2 m-2 a-1, respectively. Unusual meteorological conditions with a warm and dry summer and a mild winter might have facilitated high respiration rates, particularly from temporally non-inundated organic mud in the vegetation zone.

  12. Resuscitation of the rare biosphere contributes to pulses of ecosystem activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach eAanderud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dormancy is a life history trait that may have important implications for linking microbial communities to the functioning of natural and managed ecosystems. Rapid changes in environmental cues may resuscitate dormant bacteria and create pulses of ecosystem activity. In this study, we used heavy-water (H218O stable isotope probing (SIP to identify fast-growing bacteria that were associated with pulses of trace gases (CO2, CH4, and N2O from different ecosystems (agricultural site, grassland, deciduous forest, and coniferous forest following a soil-rewetting event. Irrespective of ecosystem type, a large fraction (69 - 74% of the bacteria that responded to rewetting were below detection limits in the dry soils. Based on the recovery of sequences, in just a few days, hundreds of rare taxa increased in abundance and in some cases became dominant members of the rewetted communities, especially bacteria belonging to the Sphingomonadaceae, Comamonadaceae, and Oxalobacteraceae. Resuscitation led to dynamic shifts in the rank abundance of taxa that caused previously rare bacteria to comprise nearly 60% of the sequences that were recovered in rewetted communities. This rapid turnover of the bacterial community corresponded with a 5 20 fold increase in the net production of CO2 and up to a 150% reduction in the net production of CH4 from rewetted soils. Results from our study demonstrate that the rare biosphere may account for a large and dynamic fraction of a community that is important for the maintenance of bacterial biodiversity. Moreover, our findings suggest that the resuscitation of rare taxa from seed banks contribute to ecosystem functioning.

  13. Fate of Uranium in Wetlands: Impact of Drought Followed by Re-flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, E.; Huang, S.; Koster van Groos, P. G.; Scheckel, K.; Peacock, A. D.; Kaplan, D. I.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Uranium contamination in groundwater can be mitigated in anoxic zones by iron-reducing bacteria that reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) and by uranium immobilization through complexation and sorption. Wetlands often link ground and surface-waters, making them strategic systems for potentially limiting migration of uranium contamination. Little is known about how drought periods that result in the drying of wetland soils, and consequent redox changes, affect uranium fate and transport in wetlands. In order to better understand the fate and stability of immobilized uranium in wetland soils, and how dry periods affect the uranium stability, we dosed saturated wetland mesocosms planted with Scirpus acutus with low levels of uranyl-acetate for 5 months before imposing a 9-day drying period followed by a 13-day rewetting period. Concentrations of uranium in mesocosm effluent increased after rewetting, but the cumulative amount of uranium released in the 13 days following the drying constituted less than 1% of the uranium immobilized in the soil during the 5 months prior to the drought. This low level of remobilization suggests that the uranium immobilized in these soils was not primarily bioreduced U(IV), which could have been oxidized to soluble U(VI) during the drought and released in the effluent during the subsequent flood. XANES analyses confirm that most of the uranium immobilized in the mesocosms was U(VI) sorbed to iron oxides. Compared to mesocosms that did not experience drying or rewetting, mesocosms that were sacrificed immediately after drying and after 13 days of rewetting had less uranium in soil near roots and more uranium on root surfaces. Metal-reducing bacteria only dominated the bacterial community after 13 days of rewetting and not immediately after drying, indicating that these bacteria are not responsible for this redistribution of uranium after the drying and rewetting. Results show that short periods of drought conditions in a wetland may

  14. Methane Exchange in a Coastal Fen in the First Year after Flooding - A Systems Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Juliane; Köhler, Stefan; Glatzel, Stephan; Jurasinski, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Background Peatland restoration can have several objectives, for example re-establishing the natural habitat, supporting unique biodiversity attributes or re-initiating key biogeochemical processes, which can ultimately lead to a reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Every restoration measure, however, is itself a disturbance to the ecosystem. Methods Here, we examine an ecosystem shift in a coastal fen at the southern Baltic Sea which was rewetted by flooding. The analyses are based on one year of bi-weekly closed chamber measurements of methane fluxes gathered at spots located in different vegetation stands. During measurement campaigns, we recorded data on water levels, peat temperatures, and chemical properties of peat water. In addition we analyzed the first 20 cm of peat before and after flooding for dry bulk density (DBD), content of organic matter and total amounts of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), sulfur (S), and other nutrients. Results Rewetting turned the site from a summer dry fen into a shallow lake with water levels up to 0.60 m. We observed a substantial die-back of vegetation, especially in stands of sedges (Carex acutiformis Ehrh). Concentrations of total organic carbon and nitrogen in the peat water, as well as dry bulk density and concentrations of C, N and S in the peat increased. In the first year after rewetting, the average annual exchange of methane amounted to 0.26 ± 0.06 kg m-2. This is equivalent to a 190-times increase in methane compared to pre-flooding conditions. Highest methane fluxes occurred in sedge stands which suffered from the heaviest die-back. None of the recorded environmental variables showed consistent relationships with the amounts of methane exchanged. Conclusions Our results suggest that rewetting projects should be monitored not only with regard to vegetation development but also with respect to biogeochemical conditions. Further, high methane emissions that likely occur directly after rewetting by flooding should

  15. Effect of drying on the desorption of diuron and terbuthylazine from natural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartz, Bernd; Louchart, Xavier

    2007-03-01

    This work was initiated to study the effects of climate induced soil water status variations which can reach extreme values under natural conditions on the sorption process of hydrophobic organic compounds. Based on the classical slurry batch methodology an approach is developed that allows the fast and careful complete drying of soil suspensions (microwave technique). Classical adsorption experiments were followed by three desorption steps with and without drying cycles. Drying and re-wetting enhanced the sorption-desorption hysteresis and Freundlich adsorption coefficients increased from 5.9 to 16 and 5.2 to 21 over three drying cycles for diuron and terbuthylazine respectively. Assuming the validity of a dual stage adsorption process, model evaluation suggests that drying is as a shrinking-like process leading to conformational changes of the dominant sorbent (soil organic matter) which restrict the intra-micro-particle diffusion. Rewetting only leads to a partial recovery of the diffusional pore space.

  16. Interactive effects of elevated CO2, warming, and drought on photosynthesis of Deschampsia flexuosa in a temperate heath ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost; Ro-Poulsen, H.; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard

    2011-01-01

    Global change factors affect plant carbon uptake in concert. In order to investigate the response directions and potential interactive effects, and to understand the underlying mechanisms, multifactor experiments are needed. The focus of this study was on the photosynthetic response to elevated CO2...... not decrease gs, but stimulated Pn via increased Ci. The T×CO2 synergistically increased plant carbon uptake via photosynthetic capacity up-regulation in early season and by better access to water after rewetting. The effects of the combination of drought and elevated CO2 depended on soil water availability......, with additive effects when the soil water content was low and D×CO2 synergistic stimulation of Pn after rewetting. The photosynthetic responses appeared to be highly influenced by growth pattern. The grass has opportunistic water consumption, and a biphasic growth pattern allowing for leaf dieback at low soil...

  17. In situ changes in the moisture content of heated, welded tuff based on thermal neutron measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Carlson, R.C.; Buscheck, T.A.

    1991-07-01

    Thermal neutron logs were collected to monitor changes in moisture content within a welded tuff rock mass heated from a borehole containing an electrical heater which remained energized for 195 days. Thermal neutron measurements were made in sampling boreholes before, during and after heating. The results generally corroborated our conceptual understanding of hydrothermal flow as well as most of the numerical modeling conducting for this study. Conceptual models have been developed in conjunction with the numerical model calculations to explain differences in the drying and re-wetting behavior above and below the heater. Numerical modeling indicated that the re-wetting of the dried-out zone was dominated by the binary diffusion of water vapor through fractures. Saturation gradients in the rock matrix resulted in relative humidity gradients which drove water vapor (primarily along fractures) back to the dried-out zone where it condensed along the fracture walls and was imbibed by the matrix. 4 refs., 28 figs

  18. Splines employment for inverse problem of nonstationary thermal conduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonov, S.P.; Spolitak, S.I.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical solution has been obtained for an inverse problem of nonstationary thermal conduction which is faced in nonstationary heat transfer data processing when the rewetting in channels with uniform annular fuel element imitators is investigated. In solving the problem both boundary conditions and power density within the imitator are regularized via cubic splines constructed with the use of Reinsch algorithm. The solution can be applied for calculation of temperature distribution in the imitator and the heat flux in two-dimensional approximation (r-z geometry) under the condition that the rewetting front velocity is known, and in one-dimensional r-approximation in cases with negligible axial transport or when there is a lack of data about the temperature disturbance source velocity along the channel

  19. Investigation of the mobilizability of persistent pollutants in the system groundwater/soil/plant of a former fen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hein, D.; Goertz, W.; Leisner-Saaber, J.; Rathje, M.

    1993-01-01

    For a former fen situated at the eastern border of the Lower terraces of the river Rhine in the close neighbourhood of densely populated urban districts a biotope-managementplan suggests the rewetting and restauration of typical landscape forms. High concentrations of heavy metals and low pH-values of the soil imply a potential danger especially for the groundwater. In order to solve this conflict between the aims of protecting rare biotopes and of saving groundwater-resources investigations were carried out considering all environmental compartments concerned: groundwater, surfacewater, soil and plants. The results demonstate that a step-by-step rewetting of the area is possible without a previous exchange of soil. In addition, careful groundwater control has to be carried out. (orig.) [de

  20. Mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions from reed canary grass in paludiculture: effect of groundwater level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karki, Sandhya; Elsgaard, Lars; Audet, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    below the soil surface. Gross primary production (GPP) was estimated from the above ground biomass yield. Results The mean dry biomass yield across all water table treatments was 6 Mg ha−1 with no significant differences between the treatments. Raising the GWL to the surface decreased both the net...... of peatlands grown with reed canary grass (RCG) and rewetted to various extents. Methods Gas fluxes of CO2, methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) were measured with a static chamber technique for 10 months from mesocosms sown with RCG and manipulated to ground water levels (GWL) of 0, −10, −20, −30 and −40 cm...... The results showed that a reduction in total GHG emission can be achieved without losing the productivity of newly established RCG when GWL is maintained close to the surface. Further studies should address the practical constrains and long-term productivity of RCG cultivation in rewetted peatlands....

  1. A study on quench phenomena during reflood phase, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murao, Yoshio; Sudoh, Takashi

    1977-03-01

    Based on the observation with an outside-heated quartz tube experiment of the reflood phase, three quench modes for bottom flooding are proposed : 1) liquid column type, 2) dryout type, 3) droplet-rewetting type. Using Blair's correlation for quench velocity, the approximate correlation for maximum liquid superheat, the assumption that the heat transfer upstream of the quench front is a function of the local liquid subcooling and the data of PWR-FLECHT experiments, the correlation for quench velocity of the liquid column type and of the dryout type are obtained. The quench temperature for the droplet-rewetting type is also derived. These relations are compared with the results of PWR-FLECHT Group 1 experiments and of Piggott and Porthouse's experiments. The agreements among them are fairly good. (auth.)

  2. The top-down reflooding model in the Cathare code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartak, J.; Bestion, D.; Haapalehto, T.

    1993-01-01

    A top-down reflooding model was developed for the French best-estimate thermalhydraulic code CATHARE. The paper presents the current state of development of this model. Based on a literature survey and on compatibility considerations with respect to the existing CATHARE bottom reflooding package, a falling film top-down reflooding model was developed and implemented into CATHARE version 1.3E. Following a brief review of previous work, the paper describes the most important features of the model. The model was validated with the WINFRITH single tube top-down reflooding experiment and with the REWET - II simultaneous bottom and top-down reflooding experiment in rod bundle geometry. The results demonstrate the ability of the new package to describe the falling film rewetting phenomena and the main parametric trends both in a simple analytical experimental setup and in a much more complex rod bundle reflooding experiment. (authors). 9 figs., 28 refs

  3. Numerical Simulation of Liquid Nitrogen Chilldown of a Vertical Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darr, Samuel; Hu, Hong; Schaeffer, Reid; Chung, Jacob; Hartwig, Jason; Majumdar, Alok

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a one-dimensional numerical simulation of the transient chilldown of a vertical stainless steel tube with liquid nitrogen. The direction of flow is downward (with gravity) through the tube. Heat transfer correlations for film, transition, and nucleate boiling, as well as critical heat flux, rewetting temperature, and the temperature at the onset of nucleate boiling were used to model the convection to the tube wall. Chilldown curves from the simulations were compared with data from 55 recent liquid nitrogen chilldown experiments. With these new correlations the simulation is able to predict the time to rewetting temperature and time to onset of nucleate boiling to within 25% for mass fluxes ranging from 61.2 to 1150 kg/(sq m s), inlet pressures from 175 to 817 kPa, and subcooled inlet temperatures from 0 to 14 K below the saturation temperature.

  4. RELAP5/MOD2 code assessment using a LOFT L2-3 loss of coolant experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Young Seok; Chung, Bub Dong; Kim, Hho Jung

    1990-01-01

    The LOFT LOCE L2-3 was simulated using the RELAP5/MOD2 Cycle 36.04 code to assess its capability in predicting the thermal-hydraulic phenomena in LBLOCA of the PWR. The reactor vessel was simulated with two core channels and split downcomer modeling for a base case calculation using the frozen code. The result of the base calculation showed that the code predicted the hydraulic behavior, and the blowdown thermal response at high power region of the core in a reasonable range and that the code had deficiencies in the critical flow model during subcooled-two-phase transition period, in the CHF correlation at high mass flux and in the blowdown rewet criteria. An overprediction of coolant inventory due to the deficiencies yielded the poor prediction of reflood thermal response. A Sensitivity calculation with an updated version from RELAP5/MOD2 Cycle 36.04 improved the prediction of the rewet phenomena

  5. Prediction of thermal-Hydraulic phenomena in the LBLOCA experiment L2-3 using RELAP5/MOD2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Young Seok; Chung, Bub Dong; Kim, Hho Jung

    1991-01-01

    The LOFT LOCE L2-3 was simulated using the RELAP5/MOD2 Cycle 36.04 code to assess its capability in predicting the thermal-hydraulic phenomena in LBLOCA of a PWR. The reactor vessel was simulated with two core channels and split downcomer modeling for a base case calculation using the frozen code. The result of the base calculation showed that the code predicted the hydraulic behavior, and the blowdown thermal response at high power region of the core reasonably and that the code had deficiencies in the critical flow model during subcooled-two-phase transition period, in the CHF correlation at high mass flux and in the blowdown rewet criteria. An overprediction of coolant inventory due to the deficiencies yielded the poor prediction of reflood thermal response. Improvement of the code, RELAP5/MOD2 Cycle 36.04, based on the sensitivity study increased the accuracy of the prediction of the rewet phenomena. (Author)

  6. Numerical simulation on the explosive boiling phenomena on the surface of molten metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Deqi; Peng Cheng; Wang Qinghua; Pan Liangming

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, numerical simulation was carried out to investigate the explosive boiling phenomenon on high temperature surface also the influence of vapor growth rate during explosive boiling, vapor condensation in sub-cooled water and the subsequent effect on flowing and heat transfer. The simulation result indicates that the steam on the molten metal surface grows with very high speed, and it pushes away the sub-cooled water around and causes severe flowing. The steam clusters which block the sub-cooled water to rewet the molten metal surface are appearing at the same time. During the growth, lifting off as well as condensation of the steam clusters, the sub-cooled water around is strongly disturbed, and obvious vortexes appear. Conversely, the vortex will influence the steam cluster detachment and cub-cooled water rewetting the metal surface. This simulation visually displays the complex explosive boiling phenomena on the molten metal surface with high temperature. (authors)

  7. Proceedings of the ANS/ASME/NRC international topical meeting on nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics: fundamental aspects of two-phase flow and boiling heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning critical flow of two-phase mixtures; two-phase flow instrumentation; critical heat flux and effects of local disturbances; heat transfer and rewetting during reflood; hydrodynamic mechanisms in boiling heat transfer; and entrainment and droplet deposition in two-phase flow. Five papers have been previously abstracted and input to the data base

  8. Climate change induces shifts in abundance and activity pattern of bacteria and archaea catalyzing major transformation steps in nitrogen turnover in a soil from a mid-European beech forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, Silvia; Tejedor, Javier; Bimüller, Carolin; Bimueller, Carolin; Dannenmann, Michael; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Knabner, Ingrid Kögel; Schloter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing climate change will lead to more extreme weather events, including severe drought periods and intense drying rewetting cycles. This will directly influence microbial nitrogen (N) turnover rates in soil by changing the water content and the oxygen partial pressure. Therefore, a space for time climate change experiment was conducted by transferring intact beech seedling-soil mesocosms from a northwest (NW) exposed site, representing today's climatic conditions, to a southwest (SW) exposed site, providing a model climate for future conditions with naturally occurring increased soil temperature (+0.8°C in average). In addition, severe drought and intense rainfall was simulated by a rainout shelter at SW and manual rewetting after 39 days drought, respectively. Soil samples were taken in June, at the end of the drought period (August), 24 and 72 hours after rewetting (August) and after a regeneration period of four weeks (September). To follow dynamics of bacterial and archaeal communities involved in N turnover, abundance and activity of nitrifiers, denitrifiers, N2-fixing microbes and N-mineralizers was analyzed based on marker genes and the related transcripts by qPCR from DNA and RNA directly extracted from soil. Abundance of the transcripts was reduced under climate change with most pronounced effects for denitrification. Our results revealed that already a transfer from NW to SW without further treatment resulted in decreased cnor and nosZ transcripts, encoding for nitric oxide reductase and nitrous oxide reductase, respectively, while nirK transcripts, encoding for nitrite reductase, remained unaffected. Severe drought additionally led to reduced nirK and cnor transcripts at SW. After rewetting, nirK transcripts increased rapidly at both sites, while cnor and nosZ transcripts increased only at NW. Our data indicate that the climate change influences activity pattern of microbial communities involved in denitrification processes to a different extend

  9. Effect of Rice Husk Ash on Soil Stabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Qasim; Aroj Bashir; Mubashar Tanvir; Malik Muhammad Anees

    2015-01-01

    The soil frequently is fragile and has low stability in heavy loading. The objective of this study is to review the stabilization of soil using sustainable methods. Some strengthening approaches are available for stabilization of expansive soils. These methods consist of stabilization with soil replacement, chemical additives, moisture control, rewetting, surcharge loading, compaction control and thermal methods. The disadvantages may be associated with all these methods due to ineffectivenes...

  10. Silver matrix composites reinforced with galvanically silvered particles

    OpenAIRE

    J. Śleziona; J. Wieczorek,

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper presents the possibility of the application of metalic layers drifted with the use of the galvanic methods on the ceramic particles surface. The application of the layers was aimed at obtaining the rewetting of the reinforcing particles with the liquid silver in the course of the producing of silver matrix composites with the use of mechanical stirring method. To enable introducing of the iron powder and glass carbon powder to liquid silver the solution of covering the powd...

  11. Sphagnum farming on cut-over bog in NW Germany: Long-term studies on Sphagnum growth

    OpenAIRE

    G. Gaudig; M. Krebs; H. Joosten

    2017-01-01

    Sphagnum farming allows sustainable and climate-friendly land use on bogs while producing a renewable substitute for peat in horticultural growing media. We studied Sphagnum productivity on an experimental Sphagnum culture established on a cut-over bog in Germany with strongly humified peat at the surface. Preparation of the site included levelling of the peat surface, construction of an irrigation system, spreading of Sphagnum papillosum fragments, covering them with straw, and finally rewet...

  12. Greenhouse gas balance of an establishing Sphagnum culture on a former bog grassland in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    A. Günther; G. Jurasinski; K. Albrecht; G. Gaudig; M. Krebs; S. Glatzel

    2017-01-01

    The cultivation of Sphagnum mosses on re-wetted peat bogs for use in horticulture is a new land use strategy. We provide the first greenhouse gas balances for a field-scale Sphagnum farming experiment on former bog grassland, in its establishment phase. Over two years we used closed chambers to make measurements of GHG exchange on production strips of Sphagnum palustre L. and Sphagnum papillosum Lindb. and on irrigation ditches. Methane fluxes of both Sphagnum species showed a significant dec...

  13. Effects of moisture content on some physical properties of red ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The physical properties of red pepper seed were evaluated as a function of moisture content. The average length, width and thickness were 4.46, 3.66 and 0.79 mm, respectively, at 7.27% d.b. moisture content. In the moisture range of 7.27 to 20.69% dry basis (d.b.), studies on rewetted red pepper seed showed that the ...

  14. Effect of areal power density and relative humidity on corrosion resistant container performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gansemer, J.D.

    1994-10-01

    The impact of the rewetting process on the performance of waste containers at the Yucca Mountain repository is analyzed. This paper explores the impact of the temperature-humidity relationships on pitting corrosion failure of stainless steel containers for different areal power densities (APDs)in the repository. It compares the likely performance of containers in a repository with a low APD, 55 Kw/acre, and a high APD, 110 kW/acre

  15. Effective water cooling of very hot surfaces during the LOCA accident.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štepánek, J.; Bláha, V.; Dostál, V.; Entler, Slavomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 124, November (2017), s. 1211-1214 ISSN 0920-3796. [SOFT 2016: Symposium on Fusion Technology /29./. Prague, 05.09.2016-09.09.2016] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : LOCA * Quenching * Divertor cooling * Heat transfer * Rewetting Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.319, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379617303733

  16. Recurrence and frequency of disturbance have cumulative effect on methanotrophic activity, abundance, and community structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian eHo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternate prolonged drought and heavy rainfall is predicted to intensify with global warming. Desiccation-rewetting events alter the soil quality and nutrient concentrations which drive microbial-mediated processes, including methane oxidation, a key biogeochemical process catalyzed by methanotrophic bacteria. Although aerobic methanotrophs showed remarkable resilience to a suite of physical disturbances induced as a single event, their resilience to recurring disturbances is less known. Here, using a rice field soil in a microcosm study, we determined whether recurrence and frequency of desiccation-rewetting impose an accumulating effect on the methanotrophic activity. The response of key aerobic methanotroph subgroups (type Ia, Ib, and II were monitored using qPCR assays, and was supported by a t-RFLP analysis. The methanotrophic activity was resilient to recurring desiccation-rewetting, but increasing the frequency of the disturbance by two-fold significantly decreased methane uptake rate. Both the qPCR and t-RFLP analyses were congruent, showing the dominance of type Ia/Ib methanotrophs prior to disturbance, and after disturbance, the recovering community was predominantly comprised of type Ia (Methylobacter methanotrophs. Both type Ib and type II (Methylosinus/Methylocystis methanotrophs were adversely affected by the disturbance, but type II methanotrophs showed recovery over time, indicating relatively higher resilience to the disturbance. This revealed distinct, yet unrecognized traits among the methanotroph community members. Our results show that recurring desiccation-rewetting before a recovery in community abundance had an accumulated effect, compromising methanotrophic activity. While methanotrophs may recover well following sporadic disturbances, their resilience may reach a ‘tipping point’ where activity no longer recovered if disturbance persists and increase in frequency.

  17. The blowdown, refill and reflood phase during a LOCA. Survey of the main physical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reocreux, M.

    1980-05-01

    In this paper, the main physical phenomena occuring during a LOCA are reviewed. They are presented in a chronological order. For each phenomena, a detailed physical description is given followed by the review of the general modelling problems. For some of these phenomena, modelling details are given for critical flow, for two-phase flow and heat transfer, for critical heat flux and post critical heat flux heat transfer, for reflood and rewet heat transfer and in the survey on LOCA computation codes

  18. Influence of incorrect application of a water-based adhesive system on the marginal adaptation of Class V restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschke, A; Blunck, U; Roulet, J F

    2000-10-01

    To determine the influence of incorrectly performed steps during the application of the water-based adhesive system OptiBond FL on the marginal adaptation of Class V composite restorations. In 96 extracted human teeth Class V cavities were prepared. Half of the margin length was situated in dentin. The teeth were randomly divided into 12 groups. The cavities were filled with Prodigy resin-based composite in combination with OptiBond FL according to the manufacturer's instructions (Group O) and including several incorrect application steps: Group A: prolonged etching (60 s); Group B: no etching of dentin; Group C: excessive drying after etching; Group D: short rewetting after excessive drying; Group E: air drying and rewetting; Group F: blot drying; Group G: saliva contamination; Group H: application of primer and immediate drying; group I: application of only primer; group J: application of only adhesive; Group K: no light curing of the adhesive before the application of composite. After thermocycling, replicas were taken and the margins were quantitatively analyzed in the SEM. Statistical analysis of the results was performed using non-parametric procedures. With exception of the "rewetting groups" (D and E) and the group with saliva contamination (G), all other application procedures showed a significantly higher amount of marginal openings in dentin compared to the control group (O). Margin quality in enamel was only affected when the primer was not applied.

  19. Comparative study on heat pipe performance using aqueous solutions of alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senthilkumar, R.; Vaidyanathan, S.; Sivaraman, B. [Annamalai University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Annamalai Nagar, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2012-12-15

    This paper deals with the performance characterization of heat pipes using an aqueous solution of long chain alcohols like n-Butanol, n-Pentanol, n-Hexanol and n-Heptanol as working mediums. These solutions are called as self-rewetting fluids, since these fluid mixtures possess a non-linear dependence of the surface tension with temperature. A cylindrical heat pipe made up of copper with two layers of wrapped screen is used as a wick material and partially filled with the self-rewetting fluid water mixture and tested for its heat transport capability like thermal efficiency and thermal resistance at different inclinations and input power levels. A number of tests have been performed with heat pipes, filled with various aqueous solutions of alcohols with a concentration of 2 ml/l in de-ionized water (DI water) on volume basis. The results obtained for heat pipes using self rewetting fluids show improved performances, when compared to DI water heat pipes. (orig.)

  20. Bacterial regrowth potential in alkaline sludges from open-sun and covered sludge drying beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkan, U.; Topac, F.O.; Birden, B.; Baskaya, H.S. [Uludag University, Gorukle (Turkey). Dept. of Environmnetal Engineering

    2007-10-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the regrowth potentials of wastewater sludges dried in two pilot-scale drying processes namely, Open-Sun Sludge Drying Bed (OSDB) and Covered Sludge Drying Bed (CSDB). Quicklime and/or coal fly ash were added to raw sludge samples prior to drying processes in order to enhance bacterial inactivation. Following three drying cycles (March-April, June-July and August-October), sludge samples were taken from the beds for the regrowth experiments. Addition of alkaline materials prevented the regrowth of faecal coliforms in all rewetted samples except for the samples obtained after the rainfall events in OSDB. Rewetting of these samples in the regrowth experiments increased faecal coliform numbers by 3.5-7 log units. In contradiction, the observed bacterial numbers in rewetted alkaline samples from CSDB were below the EPA Class B criterion (2 million MPN g{center_dot} 1) dry sludge). The combination of additional heat from solar collectors, protection from the rain and the unfavourable living conditions owing to alkaline materials appeared to inactivate bacteria more effectively in CSDB and hence eliminated regrowth potential more efficiently.

  1. Macroinvertebrate community responses to a dewatering disturbance gradient in a restored stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Muehlbauer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Dewatering disturbances are common in aquatic systems and represent a relatively untapped field of disturbance ecology, yet studying dewatering events along gradients in non-dichotomous (i.e. wet/dry terms is often difficult. Because many stream restorations can essentially be perceived as planned hydrologic manipulations, such systems can make ideal test-cases for understanding processes of hydrological disturbance. In this study we used an experimental drawdown in a 440 ha stream/wetland restoration site to assess aquatic macroinvertebrate community responses to dewatering and subsequent rewetting. The geomorphic nature of the site and the design of the restoration allowed dewatering to occur predictably along a gradient and decoupled the hydrologic response from any geomorphic (i.e. habitat heterogeneity effects. In the absence of such heterogeneous habitat refugia, reach-scale wetted perimeter and depth conditions exerted a strong control on community structure. The community exhibited an incremental response to dewatering severity over the course of this disturbance, which was made manifest not as a change in community means but as an increase in community variability, or dispersion, at each site. The dewatering also affected inter-species abundance and distributional patterns, as dewatering and rewetting promoted alternate species groups with divergent habitat tolerances. Finally, our results indicate that rapid rewetting – analogous to a hurricane breaking a summer drought – may represent a recovery process rather than an additional disturbance and that such processes, even in newly restored systems, may be rapid.

  2. Modelling hydrological processes and dissolved organic carbon dynamics in a rehabilitated Sphagnum-dominated peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard-Jannin, Léonard; Binet, Stéphane; Gogo, Sébastien; Leroy, Fabien; Perdereau, Laurent; Laggoun-Défarge, Fatima

    2017-04-01

    Sphagnum-dominated peatlands represent a global major stock of carbon (C). Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exports through runoff and leaching could reduce their potential C sink function and impact downstream water quality. DOC production in peatlands is strongly controlled by the hydrology, especially water table depth (WTD). Therefore, disturbances such as drainage can lead to increase DOC exports by lowering the WTD. Hydrological restoration (e.g. rewetting) can be undertaken to restore peatland functioning with an impact on DOC exports. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of drainage and rewetting on hydrological processes and their interactions with DOC dynamics in a Sphagnum dominated peatland. A hydrological model has been applied to a drained peatland (La Guette, France) which experienced a rewetting action on February 2014 and where WTD has been recorded in four piezometers at a 15 min time step since 2009. In addition, DOC concentrations in the peatland have been measured 6 times a year since 2014. The hydrological model is a WTD dependent reservoir model composed by two reservoirs representing the micro and macro porosity of the peatland (Binet et al., 2013). A DOC production module in both reservoirs was implemented based on temperature and WTD. The model was calibrated against WTD and DOC concentrations for each piezometer. The results show that the WTD in the study area is strongly affected by local meteorological conditions that could hide the effect of the rewetting action. The preliminary results evidenced that an additional source of water, identified as groundwater supply originating from the surrounding sandy layer aquifer, is necessary to maintain the water balance, especially during wet years (NS>0.8). Finally, the DOC module was able to describe DOC concentrations measured in the peatland and could be used to assess the impact of rewetting on DOC dynamics at different locations and to identify the factors of control of DOC

  3. On the frontier of boiling curve and beyond design of its origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stosic, Z.V.

    2005-01-01

    An advanced approach of Extended Design of the Boiling Curve beyond its origin is proposed. It is developed from the fact that both CHF (Critical Heat Flux) and rewetting affect the Boiling Curve on the heating surface through two simultaneous processes taking place on both sides of the heating surface. The first is two-phase flow thermal-hydraulics with resultant heat transferred from the heating surface to the coolant. The second one is the heat conduction through material itself, allied with the balance of generated and accumulated energy. Both of these processes are triggered by the change in HTC (Heat Transfer Coefficient) on the heating surface, which accordingly influences the Boiling Curve. Depending on direction of the Transition - from nucleate to film boiling or vice versa - these processes act differently and direct the Boiling Curve to diverse paths. The proposed physically based concept recognises this fact and introduces HTC as the triggering parameter with instant effect. It is implemented in the subchannel code COBRA 3-CP providing stable rewetting which has been deficient in COBRA since its origin. Results of validation and obtained agreements with transient measured data prove legality of the advanced concept of Boiling Curve. This approach is being used for transient analyses of PWR (Pressurised Water Reactor) gaining benefits from properly predicting the rewetting. The method is well-qualified to be applied also in other thermal-hydraulic codes like COBRA/TRAC, COBRA-TF, TRAC and/or RELAP, where the classical steady-state and poolboiling approach has been originally implemented. (author)

  4. Experimental study on two-phase flow natural circulation in a core catcher cooling channel for EU-APR1400 using air-water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ki Won [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Nguyen, Thanh Hung [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States); Ha, Kwang Soon; Kim, Hwan Yeol; Song, Jinho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyun Sun [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Revankar, Shripad T., E-mail: shripad@postech.ac.kr [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States); Kim, Moo Hwan [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Two-phase flow regimes and transition behavior were observed in the coolant channel. • Test were conducted for natural circulation with air-water. • Data were obtained on flow regime, void fraction, flow rates and re-wetting time. • The data were related to a cooling capability of core catcher system. - Abstract: Ex-vessel core catcher cooling system driven by natural circulation is designed using a full scaled air-water system. A transparent half symmetric section of a core catcher coolant channel of a pressurized water reactor was designed with instrumentations for local void fraction measurement and flow visualization. Two designs of air-water top separator water tanks are studied including one with modified ‘super-step’ design which prevents gas entrainment into down-comer. In the experiment air flow rates are set corresponding to steam generation rate for given corium decay power. Measurements of natural circulation flow rate, spatial local void fraction distribution and re-wetting time near the top wall are carried out for various air flow rates which simulate boiling-induced vapor generation. Since heat transfer and critical heat flux are strongly dependent on the water mass flow rate and development of two-phase flow on the heated wall, knowledge of two-phase flow characteristics in the coolant channel is essential. Results on flow visualization showing two phase flow structure specifically near the high void accumulation regions, local void profiles, rewetting time, and natural circulation flow rate are presented for various air flow rates that simulate corium power levels. The data are useful in assessing the cooling capability of and safety of the core catcher system.

  5. Safety and efficacy of topical azithromycin ophthalmic solution 1.0% in the treatment of contact lens-related dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Jason J; Bickle, Katherine M; Zink, Richard C; Schiewe, Michael D; Haque, Reza M; Nichols, Kelly K

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of azithromycin ophthalmic solution 1% in patients with contact lens-related dry eye (CLDE). This was a 4-week, single-center, open-label clinical trial in patients diagnosed with CLDE using the Contact Lens Dry Eye Questionnaire (CLDEQ). Fifty patients were enrolled in this study. The patients were randomized to 1 of 2 treatment groups: azithromycin ophthalmic solution administered bid on days 1 and 2 and on days 3 to 29±1 or Visine for Contacts rewetting drops administered qid on days 1 to 29±1. The patient diaries were used daily to collect data on comfortable and total contact lens wear time and ocular dryness throughout the treatment period. Tear osmolarity, fluorescein corneal staining, and visual acuity were also assessed during clinic visits. Fifty patients were enrolled, and 44 completed the study. One patient discontinued in the azithromycin group, and five patients discontinued in the rewetting drops group because of adverse events. A statistically significant increase in mean comfortable contact lens wear time from baseline was observed for the subjects treated with azithromycin ophthalmic solution as compared with the subjects treated with rewetting drops at week 4 (P=0.004; primary endpoint), in addition to weeks 2 and 3. The improvement in the mean comfortable wear time for the patients in the azithromycin treatment group exceeded 2 hrs throughout the treatment period (weeks 1-4). No significant differences were observed between the groups for total wear time, low contrast visual acuity, or tear osmolarity. Subject-rated ocular dryness (PM time assessments) was significantly improved from baseline in the subjects treated with azithromycin ophthalmic solution as compared with those treated with rewetting drops at weeks 2 and 3 endpoints (P=0.015 for each week). Additionally, a statistical difference was observed in favor of the azithromycin treatment group at week 2 for the

  6. Interactive effects of drought, elevated CO2 and warming on photosynthetic capacity and photosystem performance in temperate heath plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Michelsen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    performance was negatively influenced by high air temperature, low soil water content and high irradiance dose. The experimental treatments of elevated CO2 and prolonged drought generally down-regulated Jmax, Vcmax and PItotal. Recovery from these depressions was found in the evergreen shrub after rewetting......, leaf nitrogen content and chlorophyll-a fluorescence OJIP induction curves. The PSII performance was evaluated via the total performance index PItotal, which integrates the function of antenna, reaction centers, electron transport and end-acceptor reduction according to the OJIP-test. The PSII...

  7. German mires - Utilisation and protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roderfeld, H.

    1996-01-01

    Mires in Germany are mainly used for agriculture. Peat mining is important regionally, but forest utilisation less so. Twenty years ago in the former West Germany, the first steps from peatland utilisation to peatland protection were taken. Bog protection programmes were developed first. Nowadays research directed to fen protection has begun, prompted by the decreasing importance of agriculture in Central Europe and an increasing environmental awareness. The situation regarding mire protection in Germany is presented for each Federal State individually. A rough estimate suggests 45 000 ha of protected bogs and 25 000 ha of protected fens. These areas include natural and semi-natural mires as well as rewetted mires. (30 refs.)

  8. Quenching of hot wall of vertical-narrow-annular passages by water falling down counter-currently

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Yasuo; Ohtake, Hiroyasu; Arai, Manabu; Okabayashi, Yoshiaki; Nagae, Takashi; Okano, Yukimitsu

    2004-01-01

    quenching of a thin-gap annular flow passage by gravitational liquid penetration was examined by using water. The outer wall of the test flow channel was made of stainless steel. The inner wall was made of glass or stainless steel. The annular gap spacings tested were 10, 5.0, 2.0, 1.0 and 0.5 mm. No inner wall case; the gap width = ∞, was also tested. The stainless steel walls(s) was (were) heated electrically. When the glass wall was used for the inner wall, a fiber scope was inserted inside to observe a flow state. The quenching was observed for the gap spacing over 1.0 mm. When the spacing was less than 1.0 mm, the wall was gradually and monotonously cooled down without any quenching. As the gap spacing became narrow, the counter-current flow limiting; flooding, severely occurred. The peak heat flux during the quenching process became lower than that in pool boiling as the gap spacing became narrower. The quenching propagated from the bottom when the gap spacing was larger than 5 mm. When the gap clearance was less than 2.0 mm, the quenching proceeded from the top in the bottom closed case. It was visually observed that liquid accumulated in the lower portion of the flow passage in the 5 mm gap case and the rewetting front propagated upward from the bottom. In the 1.0 mm gap case, the moving-down of the rewetting front was observed. The quenching velocity became slow as the gap spacing became narrow. Quenching simulation was performed by solving a transient heat conduction equation. The simulation indicated that the quenching velocity becomes fast as the peak heat flux becomes low with the gap spacing, which was opposite to the experimental results. It was also suggested that precursory cooling is one of key factors to control the rewetting velocity; as the precursory cooling becomes weak, the rewetting velocity becomes slow. (author)

  9. In situ measurements reveal extremely low pH in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Knud Erik; Loibide, Amaia Irixar; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2017-01-01

    We measured pH in situ in the top organic soil horizons in heathland and pine forest and found values between 2.6 and 3.2. This was 0.5e0.8 units lower than concurrent laboratory pH measurements of the same soil, which raises questions about the interpretation of pH measurements. We propose that ...... that the higher pH recorded by standard laboratory methods may be due to buffering ions from soil biota released from drying, grinding and rewetting of soil samples, whereas the in situ pH reflects the correct level of acidification....

  10. Some aspects of model improvements in RELAP-UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brittain, I.; Fayers, F.J.

    1974-03-01

    This report gives details of changes in model which have been, or are about to be, implemented in the UK version of RELAP III. The changes embrace features representing steam slip ratio, momentum flux terms including change of area, frictional pressure drop interaction with discharge conditions, options for discharge models, the Smith slip ratio and two-phase multiplier, modifications to dryout and rewetting criteria, bubble rise in a horizontal steam drum, pipework heat and radiation cooling, spray cooling under stagnant conditions, determination of steady state conditions, and inclusion of a slave pin calculation. Most of these features are already programmed, those on which work is continuing being indicated in the test. (author)

  11. Control of Surface Attack by Gallium Alloys in Electrical Contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-28

    and atmospheric control but does not allow visual observation of the contact brushes. This machine is a small homopolar motor built from mild steel...collectors,gallium, homopolar devices,liquid metals,~- is. ABSTRACT ICNI.. .. w 41N"w -~dv.mp.d Wrllt by Itabata" * Electrical contact between a copp’er...32 5 Test rig with felt metal brushes 32 6 Homopolar test apparatus 33 7 Rewetting of alloy track 33 8 Alloy track after running with finger 34 brushes

  12. The design of electrical heater pins to simulate transient dryout and post-dryout of water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, M.H.; Butcher, A.A.; Sidoli, J.E.A.

    1978-11-01

    A theoretical assessment of indirect and direct filled heater simulations of nuclear reactor fuel pins is described. For reasons of fast temperature response, a direct unfilled heater, with thermocouples buried in the walls, is recommended for studies of Loss-of-Coolant Accidents leading to dryout, post-dryout and rewetting. A design of heater pins, for use in SGHWR or PWR experiments, and compatible with existing 9MW power supplies, is described. Experiments to confirm collapse pressure calculations at 1000 0 C and thermocouple response times are also reported. (author)

  13. Reflooding Experimental On Beta Test Loop : The Characterisation And Preliminary Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khairul, H.; Antariksawan, Anhar R.; Sumamo, Edy; Kiswanta; Giarno; Joko, P.; H, Ismu

    2001-01-01

    The characterisation and preliminary experiment of reflooding had been conducted. The characteristics of main system and component had been identified completely. From these characteristics the experiment condition was set up : heated rod voltage was 20 volt, frequency,of pump was 19 Hz, flow rate was 1 m3/h. The first of experiment did not show the phenomena of rewetting. Possibly because the heated rod temperature was too low. For the second experiment, the voltage of heated rod was increased to 22 Volt and the flow rate was decreased. The result was that the nucleation boiling on the surfaced of heated rod, was observed during the water re flooded the test section

  14. High net CO2 and CH4 release at a eutrophic shallow lake on a formerly drained fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Daniela; Koebsch, Franziska; Larmanou, Eric; Augustin, Jürgen; Sachs, Torsten

    2016-05-01

    Drained peatlands often act as carbon dioxide (CO2) hotspots. Raising the groundwater table is expected to reduce their CO2 contribution to the atmosphere and revitalise their function as carbon (C) sink in the long term. Without strict water management rewetting often results in partial flooding and the formation of spatially heterogeneous, nutrient-rich shallow lakes. Uncertainties remain as to when the intended effect of rewetting is achieved, as this specific ecosystem type has hardly been investigated in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange. In most cases of rewetting, methane (CH4) emissions increase under anoxic conditions due to a higher water table and in terms of global warming potential (GWP) outperform the shift towards CO2 uptake, at least in the short term.Based on eddy covariance measurements we studied the ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of CH4 and CO2 at a shallow lake situated on a former fen grassland in northeastern Germany. The lake evolved shortly after flooding, 9 years previous to our investigation period. The ecosystem consists of two main surface types: open water (inhabited by submerged and floating vegetation) and emergent vegetation (particularly including the eulittoral zone of the lake, dominated by Typha latifolia). To determine the individual contribution of the two main surface types to the net CO2 and CH4 exchange of the whole lake ecosystem, we combined footprint analysis with CH4 modelling and net ecosystem exchange partitioning.The CH4 and CO2 dynamics were strikingly different between open water and emergent vegetation. Net CH4 emissions from the open water area were around 4-fold higher than from emergent vegetation stands, accounting for 53 and 13 g CH4 m-2 a-1 respectively. In addition, both surface types were net CO2 sources with 158 and 750 g CO2 m-2 a-1 respectively. Unusual meteorological conditions in terms of a warm and dry summer and a mild winter might have facilitated high respiration rates. In sum, even after 9

  15. Contrasting effects of repeated summer drought on soil carbon efflux in hydric and mesic heathland soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sowerby, Alwyn; Emmett, Bridget A.; Tietema, Albert

    2008-01-01

    storage. To test the importance of drought, and more importantly repeated drought year-on-year, we used automated retractable curtains to exclude rain and produce repeated summer drought in three heathlands at varying moisture conditions. This included a hydric system limited by water-excess (in the UK...... and DK sites during the winter re-wetting period that indicates any change in soil C storage due to changes in soil C efflux may be short lived in these mesic systems. In contrast, in the hydric UK site after 2 years of drought treatment, the persistent reduction in soil moisture throughout the year...

  16. A novel method for collection of soil-emitted nitric oxide (NO) for natural abundance stable N isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Z.; Elliott, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    The global inventory of NO emissions is poorly constrained with a large portion of the uncertainty attributed to soil NO emissions that result from soil abiotic and microbial processes. While natural abundance stable N isotopes (δ15N) in various soil N-containing compounds have proven to be a robust tracer of soil N cycling, soil δ15N-NO is rarely quantified mainly due to the diffuse nature, low concentrations, and high reactivity of soil-emitted NO. Here, we present the development and application of a dynamic flux chamber system capable of simultaneously measuring soil NO fluxes and collecting NO for δ15N-NO measurements. The system couples a widely used flow-through soil chamber with a NO collection train, in which NO can be converted to NO2 through O3 titration in a Teflon reaction coil, followed by NO2 collection in a 20% triethanolamine (TEA) solution as nitrite and nitrate for δ15N analysis using the denitrifier method. The efficiency of NO-NO2 conversion in the reaction coil and the recovery of NO in the TEA solution were determined experimentally and found to be quantitative (>99%) over a 10 to 749 ppbv NO mixing ratio range. An analytical NO tank (δ15N-NO=71.0±0.4‰) was used to calibrate the method for δ15N-NO analysis. The resulting accuracy and precision (1σ) of the method across various environmental conditions were 1.6‰ and 1.2‰, respectively. Using this new method, controlled laboratory incubations have been conducted to characterize NO emissions induced by rewetting of air-dried surface soil sampled from an urban forest. Pulsed NO emissions, up to 30 times higher than maximum soil NO emissions under steady state, were triggered upon the rewetting and lasted for next 36 hours. While the measured δ15N-NO over the course of the NO pulsing ranged from -52.0‰ and -34.6‰, reinforcing the notion that soil δ15N-NO is lower than those of fossil-fuel combustion sources, a transient δ15N-NO shift was captured immediately after the

  17. A finite element model for the quench front evolution problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folescu, J.; Galeao, A.C.N.R.; Carmo, E.G.D. do.

    1985-01-01

    A model for the rewetting problem associated with the loss of coolant accident in a PWR reactor is proposed. A variational formulation for the time-dependent heat conduction problem on fuel rod cladding is used, and appropriate boundary conditions are assumed in order to simulate the thermal interaction between the fuel rod cladding and the fluid. A numerical procedure which uses the finite element method for the spatial discretization and a Crank-Nicolson-like method for the step-by-step integration is developed. Some numerical results are presented showing the quench front evolution and its stationary profile. (Author) [pt

  18. Methanogenesis limitations in degraded peatlands after their hydrological restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanová, Zuzana

    2017-04-01

    Peatlands are ecosystems that can have a high degree of carbon sequestration due to CO2 fixation and low decomposition rates, but on the other hand, they are a source of CH4. Past drainage or mining can disturb these natural functions with rewetting being the main method used to bring back their original ecosystem properties. Methanogenic community composition and its activity seems to be very sensitive to environmental changes and therefore its limited activity after restoration can reflect the not fully restored functioning of the microbial community and its processes in the rewetted peatlands. To find the cause for this methanogenesis limitation we determined the abundance and composition of the methanogenic community and methane potential production in pristine, long-term drained and rewetted bogs and spruce swamp forests (SSF) in the Šumava Mountains (Czech Republic), using high-throughput barcoded sequencing, qPCR and anaerobic incubation of peat samples in relation to peat biochemical properties. Long-term drainage led to a strongly reduced diversity, abundance and activity of the methanogenic community in both peatland types. In restored sites, methanogenic abundance and community composition reached a pristine like state, however their activity measured as CH4 production remained as low as in drained sites. Substrate limitation was expected; therefore we further added different substrates during anaerobic incubation of the peat samples. In addition to glucose and ethanol, we added natural complex substrates from peatland plants (sedges, Sphagnum) to simulate the effect of the spreading of peatland species and their litter on methanogenic activity. The results unambiguously confirmed the limitation of methanogens by substrate availability due to the previous long-term drainage and strongly decomposed peat. The addition of natural substrates led to an increase in CH4 production, which was close to values in pristine sites. The limited CH4 production

  19. Can frequent precipitation moderate the impact of drought on peatmoss carbon uptake in northern peatlands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijp, Jelmer J; Limpens, Juul; Metselaar, Klaas; van der Zee, Sjoerd E A T M; Berendse, Frank; Robroek, Bjorn J M

    2014-07-01

    Northern peatlands represent a large global carbon store that can potentially be destabilized by summer water table drawdown. Precipitation can moderate the negative impacts of water table drawdown by rewetting peatmoss (Sphagnum spp.), the ecosystem's key species. Yet, the frequency of such rewetting required for it to be effective remains unknown. We experimentally assessed the importance of precipitation frequency for Sphagnum water supply and carbon uptake during a stepwise decrease in water tables in a growth chamber. CO2 exchange and the water balance were measured for intact cores of three peatmoss species (Sphagnum majus, Sphagnum balticum and Sphagnum fuscum) representative of three hydrologically distinct peatland microhabitats (hollow, lawn and hummock) and expected to differ in their water table-precipitation relationships. Precipitation contributed significantly to peatmoss water supply when the water table was deep, demonstrating the importance of precipitation during drought. The ability to exploit transient resources was species-specific; S. fuscum carbon uptake increased linearly with precipitation frequency for deep water tables, whereas carbon uptake by S. balticum and S. majus was depressed at intermediate precipitation frequencies. Our results highlight an important role for precipitation in carbon uptake by peatmosses. Yet, the potential to moderate the impact of drought is species-specific and dependent on the temporal distribution of precipitation. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Analysis of LOFT loss-of-coolant experiments L2-2, L2-3, and L3-0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leach, L.P.; Linebarger, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    A summary of results from Loss-of-Coolant Experiments (LOCE) L2-2, L2-3, and L3-0, conducted in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility, and conclusions from posttest analyses of the experimental data are presented. LOCEs L2-2 and L2-3 were nuclear large break experiments and were dominated by a core-wide fuel rod cladding rewet, which limited the maximum fuel temperature. Analytical models only conservatively predicted the measured fuel rod temperatures and will require improvements to provide best estimate predictions in this area. Analysis of a large commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR) indicates that the cladding rewet observed in LOFT is also likely to occur in a large PWR, and that, therefore, safety analysis calculations of large loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA) are more conservative than previously thought. LOCE L3-0 was an isothermal small break (top of pressurizer) experiment and illustrated that the pressurizer fills after the primary system fluid saturates someplace other than the pressurizer itself, that the indicated pressurizer level is higher than the actual level, and that additional model development and assessment work is necessary in order to predict small LOCAs as accurately as large LOCAs

  1. Post-CHF low-void heat transfer of water: measurements in the complete transition boiling region at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannsen, K.; Meinen, W.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation of low-void heat transfer of water has been performed in the range of CHF and the minimum stable film boiling temperature. The heat transfer system used consists of a vertically mounted copper tube of 1 cm I.D. and 5 cm length with surface-temperature controlled, indirect Joule heating. Results are presented for upflowing water at inverted annular flow conditions in the inlet subcooling range of 2.5 - 40 0 C and mass flux range of 137-600 kg/m 2 s in terms of boiling curves and heat transfer coefficients versus wall temperature. Heat transfer in the stationary rewetting front, which occurs within the test section during operation in the transition boiling mode, is also dealt with. At high mass flux, occurrence of an inverse rewetting front has been observed. It is also noted that, at fixed location, minimum heat flux observed is usually not associated with the minimum stable film boiling temperature

  2. Effects of a FeCrAl layer fabricated by sputtering process on pool boiling critical heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Gwang Hyeok; Son, Hong Hyun; Jeun, Gyoodong; Kim, Sung Joong

    2016-01-01

    The thermal safety margin of a FeCrAl-layered heater was investigated measuring pool boiling critical heat flux (CHF). Boiling experiments were conducted in a pool of deionized water at atmospheric pressure. For a comparison work, bare and FeCrAl-layered heater samples were prepared. The sputtering technique was employed to fabricate the FeCrAl layer. It was confirmed that the key sputtering parameters on the surface structure were substrate temperature and deposition time. As compared to the bare sample, surface wettability and roughness increased. Higher values of the surface roughness were observed at temperatures of 150degC and 600degC. The FeCrAl-layered heaters showed improved CHF up to ∼40%. The highest enhancement of 42% was observed for the heater sample fabricated at a substrate temperature of 150degC. With employing recent CHF models that incorporate the surface effects, it was evaluated that increased roughness at the micrometer scale mainly contributed to the CHF enhancement. Furthermore, visual observations showed at least 2 msec reduction in the rewetting times for the FeCrAl-layered heaters, and the improved CHF may be attributed to the suppressed hot dry spots due to the rewetting phenomena. (author)

  3. Development of boiling transition analysis code TCAPE-INS/B based on mechanistic methods for BWR fuel bundles. Models and validations with boiling transition experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Naoyuki; Utsuno, Hideaki; Kasahara, Fumio

    2003-01-01

    The Boiling Transition (BT) analysis code TCAPE-INS/B based on the mechanistic methods coupled with subchannel analysis has been developed for the evaluation of the integrity of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel rod bundles under abnormal operations. Objective of the development is the evaluation of the BT without using empirical BT and rewetting correlations needed for different bundle designs in the current analysis methods. TCAPE-INS/B consisted mainly of the drift-flux model, the film flow model, the cross-flow model, the thermal conductivity model and the heat transfer correlations. These models were validated systematically with the experimental data. The accuracy of the prediction for the steady-state Critical Heat Flux (CHF) and the transient temperature of the fuel rod surface after the occurrence of BT were evaluated on the validations. The calculations for the experiments with the single tube and bundles were carried out for the validations of the models incorporated in the code. The results showed that the steady-state CHF was predicted within about 6% average error. In the transient calculations, BT timing and temperature of the fuel rod surface gradient agreed well with experimental results, but rewetting was predicted lately. So, modeling of heat transfer phenomena during post-BT is under modification. (author)

  4. Effect of drying on the desorption of diuron and terbuthylazine from natural soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennartz, Bernd [Institute for Land Use, Rostock University, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 6, D-18051 Rostock (Germany)]. E-mail: bernd.lennartz@uni-rostock.de; Louchart, Xavier [Laboratory on Interactions between Soils, Agrosystems and Hydrosystems (LISAH), National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA), 2 place Viala, 34060 Montpellier Cedex 1 (France)

    2007-03-15

    This work was initiated to study the effects of climate induced soil water status variations which can reach extreme values under natural conditions on the sorption process of hydrophobic organic compounds. Based on the classical slurry batch methodology an approach is developed that allows the fast and careful complete drying of soil suspensions (microwave technique). Classical adsorption experiments were followed by three desorption steps with and without drying cycles. Drying and re-wetting enhanced the sorption-desorption hysteresis and Freundlich adsorption coefficients increased from 5.9 to 16 and 5.2 to 21 over three drying cycles for diuron and terbuthylazine respectively. Assuming the validity of a dual stage adsorption process, model evaluation suggests that drying is as a shrinking-like process leading to conformational changes of the dominant sorbent (soil organic matter) which restrict the intra-micro-particle diffusion. Rewetting only leads to a partial recovery of the diffusional pore space. - Drying of soil samples increased the binding of herbicidal compounds which is interpreted as a reduction of diffusional mass transfer into and out of the soil organic matter.

  5. Effect of drying on the desorption of diuron and terbuthylazine from natural soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennartz, Bernd; Louchart, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    This work was initiated to study the effects of climate induced soil water status variations which can reach extreme values under natural conditions on the sorption process of hydrophobic organic compounds. Based on the classical slurry batch methodology an approach is developed that allows the fast and careful complete drying of soil suspensions (microwave technique). Classical adsorption experiments were followed by three desorption steps with and without drying cycles. Drying and re-wetting enhanced the sorption-desorption hysteresis and Freundlich adsorption coefficients increased from 5.9 to 16 and 5.2 to 21 over three drying cycles for diuron and terbuthylazine respectively. Assuming the validity of a dual stage adsorption process, model evaluation suggests that drying is as a shrinking-like process leading to conformational changes of the dominant sorbent (soil organic matter) which restrict the intra-micro-particle diffusion. Rewetting only leads to a partial recovery of the diffusional pore space. - Drying of soil samples increased the binding of herbicidal compounds which is interpreted as a reduction of diffusional mass transfer into and out of the soil organic matter

  6. An experimental investigation of the effect of clad ballooning on the effectiveness of PWR emergency cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, C.A.; Pearson, K.G.; Jowitt, D.

    1985-01-01

    A series of single phase cooling, forced reflood, gravity reflood and level swell experiments has been performed on a full length, electrically heated 7x7 rod fuel cluster (in the THETIS Rig) containing a blockage simulating very severe clad ballooning. The single phase cooling experiments provided data on the level of heat transfer within the cluster and the enhancement produced by turbulence created by the spacer grids. The forced reflood experiments have led to a better understanding of the rewetting processes during bottom reflooding, the very important influence of spacer grids in two-phase flow and the complicated heat transfer processes within the blockage. The insight obtained has been used to develop a mechanistic model. The gravity reflood experiments investigated steam binding and inlet flow oscillation effects. The variation in inlet flow produced by the variations in system parameters was the dominant influence. The inlet flow oscillations which occurred in gravity reflood appeared not to influence overall rewetting or heat removal performance. The level swell experiments investigated the relationship between void fraction and superficial steam velocity at pressures up to 40 bar and compared the data with various correlations. The correlation of Gardner was found to be most satisfactory. 107 refs., 252 figs.

  7. Production of biomass in wet peatlands (paludiculture). The EU-AID project 'Wetland energy' in Belarus. Solutions for the substitution of fossil fuels (peat briquettes) by biomass from wet peatlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichtmann, Wendelin [Michael Succow Stiftung fuer den Schutz der Natur, Greifswald (Germany); Haberl, Andreas; Tanneberger, Franziska

    2012-07-01

    In Belarus, a pilot project demonstrating site adapted management of wet peatlands for biomass production have started recently. In cooperation with local stakeholders, the currently environmentally unfriendly peat extraction for energy will be converted into a sustainable land use system. By replacing the peat briquettes with locally produced briquettes using biomass from rewetted peatlands the income situation of remote and rural areas will be improved. In various combustion trials of peatland biomass in Germany and Belarus the suitability of the material for energy production has been demonstrated. The EU-Aid funded project in Belarus is realized by the Michael Succow Foundation in cooperation with the International Sacharov Environmental University (ISEU) and the Institute for Nature Management of the National Academy of Sciences (IfNM). Applied, site-specific management concepts, employing site adapted machinery for reed and sedge vegetation on wet peatlands will not only result in avoidance of environmentally harmful peat extraction, but also in benefits for distinctive biodiversity. This site adapted peatlands management (paludiculture) comprises the reduction of greenhousegas (GHG) emissions by rewetting of drained peatlands and by the replacement of fossil fuels by biomass from these sites. Under favourable conditions additionally CO{sub 2} sequestration by new peat formation reestablished. The biomass will be harvested with site adapted machinery and processed to fuel briquettes. (orig.)

  8. REBEKA bundle experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiehr, K.

    1988-05-01

    This report is a summary of experimental investigations describing the fuel rod behavior in the refilling and reflooding phase of a loss-of-coolant accident of a PWR. The experiments were performed with 5x5 and 7x7 rod bundles, using indirectly electrically heated fuel rod simulators of full length with original PWR-KWU-geometry, original grid spacers and Zircaloy-4-claddings (Type Biblis B). The fuel rod simulators showed a cosine shaped axial power profile in 7 steps and continuous, respectively. The results describe the influence of the different parameters such as bundle size on the maximum coolant channel blockage, that of the cooling on the size of the circumferential strain of the cladding (azimuthal temperature distribution) a cold control rod guide thimble and the flow direction (axial temperature distribution) on the resulting coolant channel blockage. The rewetting behavior of different fuel rod simulators including ballooned and burst Zircaloy claddings is discussed as well as the influence of thermocouples on the cladding temperature history and the rewetting behavior. All results prove the coolability of a PWR in the case of a LOCA. Therefore, it can be concluded that the ECC-criteria established by licensing authorities can be fulfilled. (orig./HP) [de

  9. FIX-II/2032, BWR Pump Trip Experiment 2032, Simulation Mass Flow and Power Transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    1 - Description of test facility: In the FIX-II pump trip experiments, mass flow and power transients were simulated subsequent to a total loss of power to the recirculation pumps in an internal pump boiling water reactor. The aim was to determine the initial power limit to give dryout in the fuel bundle for the specified transient. In addition, the peak cladding temperature was measured and the rewetting was studied. 2 - Description of test: Pump trip experiment 2032 was a part of test group 2, i.e. the mass flow transient was to simulate the pump coast down with a pump inertia of 11.3 kg.m -2 . The initial power in the 36-rod bundle was 4.44 MW which gave dryout after 1.4 s from the start of the flow transient. A maximum rod cladding temperature of 457 degrees C was measured. Rewetting was obtained after 7.6 s. 3 - Experimental limitations or shortcomings: No ECCS injection systems

  10. Effect of tetracycline on the bond performance of etch-and-rinse adhesives to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Stanislawczuk

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of modified tetracycline on the resin-dentin bond strength (µTBS, silver nitrate uptake (SNU and solution homogeneity (SH of two adhesives. Dentin surfaces were treated with phosphoric acid, rinsed off and either rewetted with water (control group - CO, 2% minocycline (MI, 2% doxycyline (DO or 2% chlorhexidine (CH. Adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond 2 and Prime Bond NT and composite were applied and light-polymerized. Specimens were sectioned to obtain bonded sticks (0.8 mm² to test under tension at 0.5 mm/min. For SNU, specimens were immersed in silver nitrate and analyzed by EDX-SEM. SH was qualitatively analyzed after mixing the adhesives with different solvent-based solutions containing MI, DO and CH. Lower µTBS values were observed in the DO group compared with MI and CH (p = 0.01. Lower SNU was observed for MI and CH. The lowest µTBS for both adhesives was observed for the DO group (p = 0.01. Signs of phase separation were observed for DO with both adhesives. MI or CH used as rewetting solutions after acid etching did not affect the µTBS and hybrid layer quality.

  11. BWR stability: analysis of cladding temperature for high amplitude oscillations - 146

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, P.; Wehle, F.

    2010-01-01

    Power oscillations associated with density waves in boiling water reactors (BWRs) have been studied widely. Industrial research in this area is active since the invention of the first BWR. Stability measurements have been performed in various plants during commissioning phase but especially the magnitude and divergent nature of the oscillations during the LaSalle Unit 2 nuclear power plant event on March 9, 1988, renewed concern about the state of knowledge on BWR instabilities and possible consequences to fuel rod integrity. The objective of this paper is to present a simplified stability tool, applicable for stability analysis in the non-linear regime, which extends to high amplitude oscillations where inlet reverse flow occurs. In case of high amplitude oscillations a cyclical dryout and rewetting process at the fuel rod may take place, which leads in turn to rapid changes of the heat transfer from the fuel rod to the coolant. The application of this stability tool allows for a conservative determination of the fuel rod cladding temperature in case of high amplitude oscillations during the dryout / re-wet phase. Moreover, it reveals in good agreement to experimental findings the stabilizing effect of the reverse bundle inlet flow, which might be obtained for large oscillation amplitudes. (authors)

  12. Nitrous oxide emissions from an intensively managed greenhouse vegetable cropping system in Northern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Feifei; Jiang Rongfeng; Chen Qing; Zhang Fusuo; Su Fang

    2009-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions from a typical greenhouse vegetable system in Northern China were measured from February 2004 to January 2006 using a close chamber method. Four nitrogen management levels (NN, MN, CN, and SN) were used. N 2 O emissions occurred intermittently in the growing season, strongly correlating with N fertilization and irrigation. No peak emissions were observed after fertilization in the late Autumn season due to low soil temperature. 57-94% of the seasonal N 2 O emissions came from the initial growth stage, corresponding to the rewetting process in the soil. The annual N 2 O emissions ranged from 2.6 to 8.8 kg N ha -1 yr -1 , accounting for 0.27-0.30% of the annual nitrogen input. Compared with conventional N management, site-specific N management reduced N fertilization rate by 69% in 2004 and by 76% in 2005, and consequently reduced N 2 O emissions by 51% in 2004 and 27% in 2005, respectively. - High N 2 O emissions coming from the initial growth stage can be attributed to the rewetting process in the greenhouse soil.

  13. Changes in the dynamics of foliar N metabolites in oak saplings by drought and air warming depend on species and soil type.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Hu

    Full Text Available Climate change poses direct or indirect influences on physiological mechanisms in plants. In particular, long living plants like trees have to cope with the predicted climate changes (i.e. drought and air warming during their life span. The present study aimed to quantify the consequences of simulated climate change for foliar N metabolites over a drought-rewetting-drought course. Saplings of three Central European oak species (i.e. Quercus robur, Q. petraea, Q. pubescens were tested on two different soil types (i.e. acidic and calcareous. Consecutive drought periods increased foliar amino acid-N and soluble protein-N concentrations at the expense of structural N in all three oak species. In addition, transient effects on foliar metabolite dynamics were observed over the drought-rewetting-drought course. The lowest levels of foliar soluble protein-N, amino acid-N and potassium cation with a minor response to drought and air warming were found in the oak species originating from the driest/warmest habitat (Q. pubescens compared to Q. robur and Q. petraea. Higher foliar osmolyte-N and potassium under drought and air warming were observed in all oak species when grown on calcareous versus acidic soil. These results indicate that species-specific differences in physiological mechanisms to compensate drought and elevated temperature are modified by soil acidity.

  14. Land Use, Land Use History, and Soil Type Affect Soil Greenhouse Gas Fluxes From Agricultural Landscapes of the East African Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanyama, I.; Rufino, M. C.; Pelster, D. E.; Wanyama, G.; Atzberger, C.; van Asten, P.; Verchot, Louis V.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2018-03-01

    This study aims to explain effects of soil textural class, topography, land use, and land use history on soil greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes in the Lake Victoria region. We measured GHG fluxes from intact soil cores collected in Rakai, Uganda, an area characterized by low-input smallholder (soil cores were air dried and rewetted to water holding capacities (WHCs) of 30, 55, and 80%. Soil CO2, CH4, and N2O fluxes were measured for 48 h following rewetting. Cumulative N2O fluxes were highest from soils under perennial crops and the lowest from soils under annual crops (P soils had lower N2O fluxes than the clay soils (P soil CO2 fluxes were highest from eucalyptus plantations and lowest from annual crops across multiple WHC (P = 0.014 at 30% WHC and P soil cores from the top soil. This study reveals that land use and soil type have strong effects on GHG fluxes from agricultural land in the study area. Field monitoring of fluxes is needed to confirm whether these findings are consistent with what happens in situ.

  15. Effect of heat transfer in the fog region during core reflooding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouai, N. M.; El-sawy, H. M.

    1993-01-01

    Core reflooding following a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) received considerable attention during the past thirty years. In this paper a one dimensional model is used to study the effect of the heat transfer in the fog region ahead of the wet front reflooding rate of a cylindrical fuel element following a LOCA in a PWR. The heat conduction equation in the cladding is solved in coordinate system moving with the wet front under a variety of condition to investigate the effects of such parameters as the initial cladding surface temperature, the decay heat generation rate in the fuel and the mode of heat transfer prevailing. The cladding surface is divided into three axial regions according to the mechanism of heat transfer, namely, a boiling region behind the wet front, a fog region ahead of the wet front and a dry region further downstream of the wet front. The effect of changing the heat transfer coefficient in the fog region on the rewetting rate and on the fog length is investigated. The results of this simple model show that increasing the heat transfer in the fog region increases the rewetting velocity and consequently decreases the fog length. The results are in general agreement with a more accurate two-dimensional model and experimental data. (author)

  16. Influence of altered precipitation pattern on greenhouse gas emissions and soil enzyme activities in Pannonian soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstner, Stefan Johannes; Michel, Kerstin; Berthold, Helene; Baumgarten, Andreas; Wanek, Wolfgang; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Kitzler, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    Precipitation patterns are likely to be altered due to climate change. Recent models predict a reduction of mean precipitation during summer accompanied by a change in short-term precipitation variability for central Europe. Correspondingly, the risk for summer drought is likely to increase. This may especially be valid for regions which already have the potential for rare, but strong precipitation events like eastern Austria. Given that these projections hold true, soils in this area will receive water irregularly in few, heavy rainfall events and be subjected to long-lasting dry periods in between. This pattern of drying/rewetting can alter soil greenhouse gas fluxes, creating a potential feedback mechanism for climate change. Microorganisms are the key players in most soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) transformation processes including greenhouse gas exchange. A conceptual model proposed by Schimel and colleagues (2007) links microbial stress-response physiology to ecosystem-scale biogeochemical processes: In order to cope with decreasing soil water potential, microbes modify resource allocation patterns from growth to survival. However, it remains unclear how microbial resource acquisition via extracellular enzymes and microbial-controlled greenhouse gas fluxes respond to water stress induced by soil drying/rewetting. We designed a laboratory experiment to test for effects of multiple drying/rewetting cycles on soil greenhouse gas fluxes (CO2, CH4, N2O, NO), microbial biomass and extracellular enzyme activity. Three soils representing the main soil types of eastern Austria were collected in June 2012 at the Lysimeter Research Station of the Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES) in Vienna. Soils were sieved to 2mm, filled in steel cylinders and equilibrated for one week at 50% water holding capacity (WHC) for each soil. Then soils were separated into two groups: One group received water several times per week (C=control), the other group received

  17. Non-equilbrium dynamics of ecosystem processes in a changing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Joseph Pignatello

    The relatively mild and stable climate of the last 10,000 years betrays a history of environmental variability and rapid changes. Humans have recently accelerated global environmental change, ushering in the Anthropocene. Meeting accelerating demands for food, energy, and goods and services has accelerated species extinctions, shows of reactive nitrogen and phosphorus, and warming of the atmosphere. I address the over- arching question of how ecosystems will respond to changing and variable environments through several focused studies. Each study examines an ecosystem response to ex- pected environmental changes in the future. To address how the changing environment affects the sizes and turnover rates of slowly and quickly cycling soil carbon pools, I analyzed the responses of grassland soils to simulated species diversity loss, increased deposition of nitrogen and increased atmospheric CO2. I used a soil respiration experiment to fit models of soil carbon pool turnover to respired carbon dioxide. Species diversity, nitrogen deposition and atmospheric CO2 had no effect on the total soil carbon after 8 years of treatments. Although total soil carbon did not change, the rates of cycling in the fast and slow pools changed in response to elevated CO2 and diversity loss treatments. Nitrogen treatments increased the size of the slowly cycling carbon pool. Precipitation variability has increased around most of the world since the industrial revolution. I used plant mesocosms in a greenhouse experiment to manipulate rainfall variability and mycorrhizal associations. I hypothesized that 1) rewetting events re- sult in higher nitrogen uxes from dry soils than moist soils, 2) a repeated pattern of events caused by low-frequency simulated rainfall results in higher nitrogen uxes and 3) the better ability of ectomycorrhizal fungi relative to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to decompose and assimilate organic nitrogen reduces leaching losses of nitrogen caused by both rewetting

  18. Seasonal Trace Gas Dynamics on Minerotrophic Fen Peatlands in NE-Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebels, Michael; Beyer, Madlen; Augustin, Jürgen; Minke, Merten; Juszczak, Radoszlav; Serba, Tomasz

    2010-05-01

    In Germany more than 99 % of fens have lost their carbon and nutrient sink function due to heavy drainage and agricultural land use especially during the last decades and thus resulted in compression and heavy peat loss (CHARMAN 2002; JOOSTEN & CLARKE 2002; SUCCOW & JOOSTEN 2001; AUGUSTIN et al. 1996; KUNTZE 1993). Therefore fen peatlands play an important part (4-5 %) in the national anthropogenic trace gas budget. But only a small part of drained and agricultural used fens in NE Germany can be restored. Knowledge of the influence of land use to trace gas exchange is important for mitigation of the climate impact of the anthropogenic peatland use. We study carbon exchanges of several fen peatland use areas between soil and atmosphere at different sites in NE-Germany. Our research covers peatlands of supposed strongly climate forcing land use (cornfield and intensive pasture) and of probably less forcing, alternative types (meadow and extensive pasture) as well as rewetted (formerly drained) areas and near-natural sites like a low-degraded fen and a wetted alder woodland. We measured trace gas fluxes with manual and automatic chambers in periodic routines since spring 2007. The used chamber technique bases on DROESLER (2005). In total we now do research at 22 sites situated in 5 different locations covering agricultural, varying states of rewetted and near-natural treatments. We present results of at least 2 years of measurements and show significant differences in their annual trace gas balances depending on the genesis of the observed sites and the seasonal dynamics. Crosswise comparison of different site treatments combined with the seasonal environmental observations give good hints for the identification of main flux driving parameters. That is that a reduced intensity in land use as a supposed mitigating treatment did not show the expected effect, though a normal meadow treatment surprisingly resulted in the lowest balances in both years. For implementing a

  19. Seasonal Carbon Dynamics on Selected Fen Peatland Sites in NE-Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebels, Michael; Beyer, Madlen; Augustin, Jürgen; Minke, Merten; Juszczak, Radoszlav; Serba, Tomasz

    2010-05-01

    In Germany more than 99 % of fens have lost their carbon and nutrient sink function due to heavy drainage and agricultural land use especially during the last decades and thus resulted in compression and heavy peat loss (CHARMAN 2002; JOOSTEN & CLARKE 2002; SUCCOW & JOOSTEN 2001; AUGUSTIN et al. 1996; KUNTZE 1993). Therefore fen peatlands play an important part (4-5 %) in the national anthropogenic trace gas budget. But only a small part of drained and agricultural used fens in NE Germany can be restored. Knowledge of the influence of land use to trace gas exchange is important for mitigation of the climate impact of the anthropogenic peatland use. We study carbon exchanges of several fen peatland use areas between soil and atmosphere at different sites in NE-Germany. Our research covers peatlands of supposed strongly climate forcing land use (cornfield and intensive pasture) and of probably less forcing, alternative types (meadow and extensive pasture) as well as rewetted (formerly drained) areas and near-natural sites like a low-degraded fen and a wetted alder woodland. We measured trace gas fluxes with manual and automatic chambers in periodic routines since spring 2007. The used chamber technique bases on DROESLER (2005). In total we now do research at 22 sites situated in 5 different locations covering agricultural, varying states of rewetted and near-natural treatments. We present results of at least 2 years of measurements and show significant differences in their annual carbon balances depending on the genesis of the observed sites and the seasonal dynamics. Crosswise comparison of different site treatments combined with the seasonal environmental observations give good hints for the identification of main flux driving parameters. That is that a reduced intensity in land use as a supposed mitigating treatment did not show the expected effect, though a normal meadow treatment surprisingly resulted in the lowest CO2 balances in both years. For implementing a

  20. The development of national quality performance standards for disposable absorbent products for adult incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Nancy; McInnis, Elaine

    2013-09-01

    Disposable absorbent products are widely used in inpatient care settings and in the community to manage adult urinary and fecal incontinence, but few product standards exist to help guide their production or optimal use. Increasing costs and reduced revenues have caused a number of states to evaluate absorbent product use among persons who receive care at home with the assistance of the Medicaid Waiver Program, further increasing concerns about the lack of product performance standards. To address these issues, the National Association For Continence (NAFC) formed a council of experts and key stakeholders with the objective of establishing national, independent quality performance standards for disposable absorbent products provided by states to Waiver Program recipients. The Council consisted of representatives from five purposefully selected states, technical directors from six nonwoven product manufacturers, an officer of the nonwoven manufactures trade association, a delegate from an academic nursing program and professional societies, a family caregiver, and a patient representative. Following a consensus method and guidelines for use, nine specific recommendations were developed, posted for public comment, and further refined. Final recommendations for product performance assessment include: rewet rate (a measure of a product's ability to withstand multiple incontinent episodes between changes), rate of acquisition (a measure of the speed at which urine is drawn away from the skin by a product, product retention capacity (a measure of a product's capacity to hold fluid without rewetting the skin), sizing options, absorbency levels, product safety, closure technology, breathable zones (a measure of the air permeability across a textile-like fabric at a controlled differential pressure), and elasticity. The Council also set values for and recommended four quantifiable parameters, and the testing methodology associated with each, to help consumers and states

  1. Fuel rod quenching with oxidation and precursory cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidi, A.; Elias, E.; Olek, S.

    1999-01-01

    During a loss-of-coolant-accident in LWR fuel rods may be temporarily exposed thus reaching high temperature levels. The injection of cold water into the core, while providing the necessary cooling to prevent melting may also generate steam inducing exothermal oxidation of the cladding. A number of high temperature quenching experiments [I] have demonstrated that during the early phase of the quenching process, the rate of hydrogen generation increased markedly and the surface temperatures rose rapidly. These effects are believed to result from thermal stresses breaking up the oxide layer on the zircalloy cladding, thus exposing the inner surface to oxidizing atmosphere. Steam reacts exothermally with the metallic components of the newly formed surface causing temporarily local temperature escalation. The main objective of this study is to develop and assess a one-dimensional time-dependent rewetting model to address the problem of quenching of hot surfaces undergoing exothermic oxidation reactions. Addressing a time-dependent problem is an important aspect of the work since it is believed that the progression of a quench-front along a hot oxidizing surface is an unsteady process. Several studies dealing with time-dependent rewetting problems have been published, e.g. [2]-[5], but none considers oxidation reactions downstream of the quench-front. The main difficulty in solving time-dependent rewetting problems stems from the fact that either the quench-front velocity or the quench-front positions constitute a time-dependent eigenvalue of the problem. The model is applied to describe the interrelated processes of cooling and exothermic steam-metal reactions at the vapor zirconium-cladding interface during quenching of degraded fuel rods. A constant heat transfer coefficient is assumed upstream of the quenching front whereas the combined effect of oxidation and post dry-out cooling is described by prescribing a heat flux distribution of general form downstream. The

  2. Land use of drained peatlands: Greenhouse gas fluxes, plant production, and economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimir, Åsa; He, Hongxing; Coria, Jessica; Nordén, Anna

    2017-10-10

    Drained peatlands are hotspots for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, which could be mitigated by rewetting and land use change. We performed an ecological/economic analysis of rewetting drained fertile peatlands in a hemiboreal climate using different land use strategies over 80 years. Vegetation, soil processes, and total GHG emissions were modeled using the CoupModel for four scenarios: (1) business as usual-Norway spruce with average soil water table of -40 cm; (2) willow with groundwater at -20 cm; (3) reed canary grass with groundwater at -10 cm; and (4) a fully rewetted peatland. The predictions were based on previous model calibrations with several high-resolution datasets consisting of water, heat, carbon, and nitrogen cycling. Spruce growth was calibrated by tree-ring data that extended the time period covered. The GHG balance of four scenarios, including vegetation and soil, were 4.7, 7.1, 9.1, and 6.2 Mg CO 2 eq ha -1  year -1 , respectively. The total soil emissions (including litter and peat respiration CO 2 + N 2 O + CH 4 ) were 33.1, 19.3, 15.3, and 11.0 Mg CO 2 eq ha -1  year -1 , respectively, of which the peat loss contributed 35%, 24%, and 7% of the soil emissions for the three drained scenarios, respectively. No peat was lost for the wet peatland. It was also found that draining increases vegetation growth, but not as drastically as peat respiration does. The cost-benefit analysis (CBA) is sensitive to time frame, discount rate, and carbon price. Our results indicate that the net benefit was greater with a somewhat higher soil water table and when the peatland was vegetated with willow and reed canary grass (Scenarios 2 and 3). We conclude that saving peat and avoiding methane release using fairly wet conditions can significantly reduce GHG emissions, and that this strategy should be considered for land use planning and policy-making. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Belowground in situ redox dynamics and methanogenesis recovery in a degraded fen during dry-wet cycles and flooding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Estop-Aragonés

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate change induced drying and flooding may alter the redox conditions of organic matter decomposition in peat soils. The seasonal and intermittent changes in pore water solutes (NO3, Fe2+, SO42−, H2S, acetate and dissolved soil gases (CO2, O2, CH4, H2 under natural water table fluctuations were compared to the response under a reinforced drying and flooding in fen peats. Oxygen penetration during dryings led to CO2 and CH4 degassing and to a regeneration of dissolved electron acceptors (NO3, Fe3+ and SO42−. Drying intensity controlled the extent of the electron acceptor regeneration. Iron was rapidly reduced and sulfate pools ~ 1 mM depleted upon rewetting and CH4 did not substantially accumulate until sulfate levels declined to ~ 100 μmol L−1. The post-rewetting recovery of soil methane concentrations to levels ~ 80 μmol L−1 needed 40–50 days after natural drought. This recovery was prolonged after experimentally reinforced drought. A greater regeneration of electron acceptors during drying was not related to prolonged methanogenesis suppression after rewetting. Peat compaction, solid phase content of reactive iron and total reduced inorganic sulfur and organic matter content controlled oxygen penetration, the regeneration of electron acceptors and the recovery of CH4 production, respectively. Methane production was maintained despite moderate water table decline of 20 cm in denser peats. Flooding led to accumulation of acetate and H2, promoted CH4 production and strengthened the co-occurrence of iron and sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. Mass balances during drying and flooding indicated that an important fraction of the electron flow must have been used for the

  4. Nitrate retention capacity of milldam-impacted legacy sediments and relict A horizon soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzman, Julie N.; Kaye, Jason P.

    2017-05-01

    While eutrophication is often attributed to contemporary nutrient pollution, there is growing evidence that past practices, like the accumulation of legacy sediment behind historic milldams, are also important. Given their prevalence, there is a critical need to understand how N flows through, and is retained in, legacy sediments to improve predictions and management of N transport from uplands to streams in the context of climatic variability and land-use change. Our goal was to determine how nitrate (NO3-) is cycled through the soil of a legacy-sediment-strewn stream before and after soil drying. We extracted 10.16 cm radius intact soil columns that extended 30 cm into each of the three significant soil horizons at Big Spring Run (BSR) in Lancaster, Pennsylvania: surface legacy sediment characterized by a newly developing mineral A horizon soil, mid-layer legacy sediment consisting of mineral B horizon soil and a dark, organic-rich, buried relict A horizon soil. Columns were first preincubated at field capacity and then isotopically labeled nitrate (15NO3-) was added and allowed to drain to estimate retention. The columns were then air-dried and subsequently rewet with N-free water and allowed to drain to quantify the drought-induced loss of 15NO3- from the different horizons. We found the highest initial 15N retention in the mid-layer legacy sediment (17 ± 4 %) and buried relict A soil (14 ± 3 %) horizons, with significantly lower retention in the surface legacy sediment (6 ± 1 %) horizon. As expected, rewetting dry soil resulted in 15N losses in all horizons, with the greatest losses in the buried relict A horizon soil, followed by the mid-layer legacy sediment and surface legacy sediment horizons. The 15N remaining in the soil following the post-drought leaching was highest in the mid-layer legacy sediment, intermediate in the surface legacy sediment, and lowest in the buried relict A horizon soil. Fluctuations in the water table at BSR which affect

  5. Long-term properties of TVO's bituminized resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkiainen, M.; Vuorinen, U.

    1989-06-01

    Long-term properties of bituminized spent ion-exchange resins from Olkiluoto power plant have been studied since 1981. This report summarizes the results on water uptake and leaching obtained up till now. It is observed that water uptake in excess of rewetting of the ion-exchange resins is taking place. Leach test in water equilibrated with cement have been performed for about five years. Separation of granular resin particles caused by density differences observed in former experiments was further studied and confirmed in this work. Anaerobic corrosion of a steel drum has been studied in laboratory conditions generally giving corrosion rates below l μm/a. Radiolytic gases will accumulate and be trapped in the waste product. The rate of swelling is estimated by a specially constructed device based on ultrasonic distance meter observing changes in level of the product surface in the drum

  6. Swamp future. Energy for Western Pomerania Grid formation and potentials for the thermal utilization of biomass from paludi culture; MoorZukunft. Energie fuer Vorpommern. Netzwerkbildung und Potentiale fuer die thermische Verwertung von Biomasse aus Paludikultur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordt, Anke; Schroeder, Christian [Greifswald Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Botanik und Landschaftsoekologie; Schroeder, Philipp

    2013-10-01

    MoorZukunft aims to initiate pilot projects for utilisation biomass from ''wet'' peatland for energy purposes. Also alternative concepts of funding regional cooperations are to be developed. The implementation of paludiculture, the sustainable cultivation of rewetted peatland, needs innovative unions between farmers who produce primary material for paludi-products and biomass consumers for energy or material utilisation. Areas for implementing paludiculture are identified and potential partners for regional use and consumption are cross-linked. Business models will be developed with the parties of possible cooperations, i.g. between farmer and municipal energy supplier and functional attended until realisation. The procedure to initiate pilot projects will be explained. This expands from requests of areas and partners until possible forms of organisation locally shared utilisation partnerships. (orig.)

  7. Heater rod temperature change at boiling transition under flow oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Shigeru; Toba, Akio; Takigawa, Yukio; Ebata, Shigeo; Morooka, Shin-ichi; Shirakawa, Ken-etsu; Utsuno, Hideaki.

    1986-01-01

    The experiments were performed to investigate the boiling transition phenomenon under flow oscillation (OSBT) during thermal hydraulic instability. It was found, from the experimental results, that the thermal hydraulic instability did not immediately lead to the boiling transition (BT) and, even when the BT occurred due to a power increase, the change in the heater rod temperature was periodically up and down with a saw-toothed shape and no excursion occurred. To investigate the temperature change characteristics, an analysis was also performed using the transient thermal hydraulics code. The analytical results showed that the shape of the heater rod temperature change was well simulated by presuming a repeat of alternate BT and rewetting. Based on these results, further analysis has been performed with the lumped parameter model to investigate the temperature profile characteristics as well as the effects of the post-BT heat transfer coefficient and the flow oscillation period on the maximum temperature. (author)

  8. Temperate heath plant response to dry conditions depends on growth strategy and less on physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost; Kongstad, J.; Schmidt, I. K.

    2012-01-01

    of these differences in response in dry versus rewetting conditions can be used to highlight the limitations coherent in different strategies adopted by, for example, evergreen shrubs and grasses. We investigated the leaf-level photosynthetic performance, leaf C, N and d13C along with vegetation cover and biomass...... in the evergreen dwarf shrub Calluna vulgaris and the grass species Deschampsia flexuosa in a temperate heath during seasonal changes in soil moisture. Higher photosynthetic capacity compensated for lower stomatal conductance and sustained higher rates of photosynthesis in the grass compared to the dwarf shrub....... In combination with dieback of aboveground biomass and reduction of stomatal conductance reduction during dry conditions, the grass continued to have high carbon uptake in the remaining leaves. The dwarf shrub endured the dry conditions by preserving shoot biomass and reducing stomatal conductance. Soil...

  9. Mitigating wildfire carbon loss in managed northern peatlands through restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granath, Gustaf; Moore, Paul A.; Lukenbach, Maxwell C.; Waddington, James M.

    2016-06-01

    Northern peatlands can emit large amounts of carbon and harmful smoke pollution during a wildfire. Of particular concern are drained and mined peatlands, where management practices destabilize an array of ecohydrological feedbacks, moss traits and peat properties that moderate water and carbon losses in natural peatlands. Our results demonstrate that drained and mined peatlands in Canada and northern Europe can experience catastrophic deep burns (>200 t C ha-1 emitted) under current weather conditions. Furthermore, climate change will cause greater water losses in these peatlands and subject even deeper peat layers to wildfire combustion. However, the rewetting of drained peatlands and the restoration of mined peatlands can effectively lower the risk of these deep burns, especially if a new peat moss layer successfully establishes and raises peat moisture content. We argue that restoration efforts are a necessary measure to mitigate the risk of carbon loss in managed peatlands under climate change.

  10. Nitrogen Release in Pristine and Drained Peat Profiles in Response to Water Table Fluctuations: A Mesocosm Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merjo P. P. Laine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the northern hemisphere, variability in hydrological conditions was suggested to increase as a consequence of climate warming, which may result in longer droughts than the area has experienced before. Due to their predominately anoxic conditions, peatlands are expected to respond to changes in hydrological conditions, such as successive drying and rewetting periods. As peatlands are rich in organic matter, any major changes in water table may influence the decomposition of it. The hydrological conditions may also influence release of nutrients from peat profiles as well as affect their transport to downstream ecosystems. In our mesocosm experiment, artificial water table fluctuations in pristine peat profiles caused an increase in dissolved organic nitrogen (DON and ammonium (NH4+-N concentrations, while no response was found in drained peat profiles, although originating from the same peatland complex.

  11. A device for emergency cooling visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezende, Hugo Cesar; Ladeira, Luiz Carlos Duarte

    1995-01-01

    A test facility for rewetting experiments, Emergency Cooling Visualization Device, has been erected at CDTN, with the objective of Emergency Cooling visualization device performing visual observations of basic phenomena that occur during the reflood phase of a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), in a Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR), utilizing annular test sections. It permits to film or photograph the advance of a wetting front and the flow and heat transfer conditions. Then it is possible to observe the heat transfer regions and flow zones: steam convection, fog cooling, film boiling, nucleate boiling and fluid convection. Finally, this facility is the first test facility, in the Thermohydraulics Laboratory of CDTN, that uses a indirectly heated fuel rod simulator. (author). 3 refs, 5 figs

  12. Quenching technology: a selected overview of the current state-of-the-art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauralice de Campos Franceschini Canale

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Many papers have been published on a wide range of aspects of the fundamental physics and chemistry of quenching such as: additive technology, surface rewetting, hardness distribution prediction, role of heat transfer and residual stresses, etc.1,2. However, relatively little information has been published on the application of these insightful research results for the solution of long standing quench tank production problems. This paper will address three areas where technical advancements have been, or may be, made. These include discussion of: 1 the application fundamental fluid dynamics to characterize quenching uniformity due to agitation; 2 the use of "waves" to provide uniform agitation during the quenching process; and 3 the use of pressure as a variable to mediate heat transfer throughout the quenching process.

  13. Core thermal response during Semiscale Mod-1 blowdown heat transfer tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, T.K.

    1976-06-01

    Selected experimental data and results calculated from experimental data obtained from the Semiscale Mod-1 PWR blowdown heat transfer test series are analyzed. These tests were designed primarily to provide information on the core thermal response to a loss-of-coolant accident. The data are analyzed to determine the effect of core flow on the heater rod thermal response. The data are also analyzed to determine the effects of initial operating conditions on the rod cladding temperature behavior during the transient. The departure from nucleate boiling and rewetting characteristics of the rod surfaces are examined for radial and axial patterns in the response. Repeatability of core thermal response data is also investigated. The test data and the core thermal response calculated with the RELAP4 code are compared

  14. Vessel coolant mass depletion during a 5% SBLOCA in the Semiscale Mod-2C facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, R.A.; Loomis, G.G.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results are presented from two 5% small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) simulations in the Semiscale Mod-2C facility. In performing the simulated 5% SBLOCAs, boundary conditions scaled from a pressurized water reactor (PWR) were used. The experiment was run with initial conditions typical of a PWR (15.6 MPa pressure and 35 K core differential temperature). The Mod-2C facility represents the state-of-the-art in small facilities scaled from PWRs. Phenomena which occurred during the transient included: primary fluid saturation (change from subcooled to saturated blowdown), break uncovery (a centerline break was simulated), condensation-induced liquid hold-up in the steam generator primary tubes, pump suction liquid seal formation and core level depression with resulting core rod temperature excursion, pump suction liquid seal clearance, loop fluid mass redistribution, and gradual core rewet. The influence of core bypass flow is also discussed. 11 refs., 13 figs

  15. Cobra-IE Evaluation by Simulation of the NUPEC BWR Full-Size Fine-Mesh Bundle Test (BFBT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, C. J.; Aumiler, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    The COBRA-IE computer code is a thermal-hydraulic subchannel analysis program capable of simulating phenomena present in both PWRs and BWRs. As part of ongoing COBRA-IE assessment efforts, the code has been evaluated against experimental data from the NUPEC BWR Full-Size Fine-Mesh Bundle Tests (BFBT). The BFBT experiments utilized an 8 x 8 rod bundle to simulate BWR operating conditions and power profiles, providing an excellent database for investigation of the capabilities of the code. Benchmarks performed included steady-state and transient void distribution, single-phase and two-phase pressure drop, and steady-state and transient critical power measurements. COBRA-IE effectively captured the trends seen in the experimental data with acceptable prediction error. Future sensitivity studies are planned to investigate the effects of enabling and/or modifying optional code models dealing with void drift, turbulent mixing, rewetting, and CHF

  16. Development, design, and preliminary operation of a resin-feed processing facility for resin-based HTGR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.; Drago, J.P.; Million, D.L.; Spence, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Fuel kernels for recycle of 233 U to High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors are prepared by loading carboxylic acid cation exchange resins with uranium and carbonizing at controlled conditions. Resin-feed processing was developed and a facility was designed, installed, and operated to control the kernel size, shape, and composition by processing the resin before adding uranium. The starting materials are commercial cation exchange resins in the sodium form. The size separations are made by vibratory screening of resin slurries in water. After drying in a fluidized bed, the nonspherical particles are separated from spherical particles on vibratory plates of special design. The sized, shape-separated spheres are then rewetted and converted to the hydrogen form. The processing capacity of the equipment tested is equivalent to about 1 kg of uranium per hour and could meet commercial recycle plant requirements without scale-up of the principal process components

  17. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD3.1 using LOFT L2-3 experiment data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Yong; Ban, Chang Hwan; Chung, Bob Dong

    1994-06-01

    The capability of RELAP5/MOD3.1 to predict overall LOCA thermal hydraulic phenomena was assessed utilizing the data of LOFT L2-3 experiment. Loop behaviors such as mass flow rate, water density, momentum flux, and the heating-up and rewetting of the fuel rod cladding during blowdown were well calculated. Reflood heat-up of the fuel rod cladding at the high power region of the core was reasonably predicted. But in the upper part of the core, cladding heat-up was calculated incorrectly since present code has no capability to calculate the top-down quenching which of highly multi-dimensional behavior. (Author) 10 refs., 46 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Clay Dispersibility and Soil Friability-Testing the Soil Clay-to-Carbon Saturation Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2012-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with OC...... as a predictor of clay dispersibility and soil friability. Soil was sampled 3 yr in a field varying in clay content (∼100 to ∼220 g kg−1 soil) and grown with different crop rotations. Clay dispersibility was measured after end-over-end shaking of field-moist soil and 1- to 2-mm sized aggregates either air......-dried or rewetted to −100 hPa matric potential. Tensile strength of 1- to 2-, 2- to 4-, 4- to 8-, and 8- to 16-mm air-dried aggregates was calculated from their compressive strength, and soil friability estimated from the strength–volume relation. Crop rotation characteristics gave only minor effects on clay...

  19. Numerical simulation of liquid film flow on revolution surfaces with momentum integral method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottoni Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    The momentum integral method is applied in the frame of safety analysis of pressure water reactors under hypothetical loss of coolant accident (LOCA) conditions to simulate numerically film condensation, rewetting and vaporization on the inner surface of pressure water reactor containment. From the conservation equations of mass and momentum of a liquid film arising from condensation of steam upon the inner of the containment during a LOCA in a pressure water reactor plant, an integro-differential equation is derived, referring to an arbitrary axisymmetric surface of revolution. This equation describes the velocity distribution of the liquid film along a meridian of a surface of revolution. From the integro-differential equation and ordinary differential equation of first order for the film velocity is derived and integrated numerically. From the velocity distribution the film thickness distribution is obtained. The solution of the enthalpy equation for the liquid film yields the temperature distribution on the inner surface of the containment. (authors)

  20. Geometric effects of spacer grid in an annulus flow channel during reflooding period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, S.; Chun, S. Y.; Kim, B. D.; Park, J. K.; Yun, Y. J.; Baek, W. P.

    2004-01-01

    A number of studies on the reflooding phase were actively carried out from the early 70's due to its importance for the safety of the nuclear reactor. (Martini et al., 1973; Henry, 1974; Chung, 1978;) However, few studies have presented the spacer grid effect during the reflooding period. Since the grid is an obstruction in the flow passage, it causes an increased pressure drop due to form and skin friction losses. On the other hand, the spacer grid tends to increase the local wall heat transfer. The present work has been performed in a vertical annulus flow channel with various flow conditions. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the effects of a swirl-vane spacer grid on the rewetting phenomena during the reflooding phase

  1. The surface properties of PS/PMMA blends nanostructured polymeric layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosycevas, I.; Tamulevicius, S.; Guobiene, A.

    2004-01-01

    Solvent cast thin films of blends polystyrene (PS) and poly (methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) with nominal compositions ranging from 25/75 wt.%/v% (w/v) up to 75/25 w/v PS/PMMA with toluene as the mutual solvent on crystalline Si (100) and silica substrates has been studied. Films of PS and PMMA blends have been examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and ellipsometry. The blend films with less than 50% PMMA bulk concentration generally exhibit pitted surfaces; the pit size varies with film thickness and bulk composition. When the PMMA bulk concentration is greater than 50%, the film surface can be described as island-like phase-separated structure. The surface segregation and morphology are explained in terms of solubility of the two polymers in the solvent and rewetting of PMMA relative to PS

  2. Numerical analysis of reflood simulation based on a mechanistic, best-estimate, approach by KREWET code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Moon-Hyun; Jeong, Eun-Soo

    1983-01-01

    A new computer code entitled KREWET has been developed in an effort to improve the accuracy and applicability of the existing reflood heat transfer simulation computer code. Sample calculations for temperature histories and heat transfer coefficient are made using KREWET code and the results are compared with the predictions of REFLUX, QUEN1D, and the PWR-FLECHT data for various conditions. These show favourable agreement in terms of clad temperature versus time. For high flooding rates (5-15cm/sec) and high pressure (∼413 Kpa), reflood predictions are reasonably well predicted by KREWET code as well as with other codes. For low flooding rates (less than ∼4cm/sec) and low pressure (∼138Kpa), predictions show considerable error in evaluating the rewet position versus time. This observation is common to all the codes examined in the present work

  3. Numerical analysis for reflood simulation based on a mechanistic, best-estimate, approach by KREWET code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, M.-H.; Jeong, E.-S.

    1983-01-01

    A new computer code entitled KREWET has been developed in an effort to improve the accuracy and applicability of the existing reflood heat transfer simulation computer code. Sample calculations for temperature histories and heat transfer coefficient are made using KREWET code and the results are compared with the predictions of REFLUX, QUENID, and the PWR-FLECHT data for various conditions. These show favorable agreement in terms of clad temperature versus time. For high flooding rates (5-15cm/sec) and high pressure (approx. =413 Kpa), reflood predictions are reasonably well predicted by KREWET code as well as with other codes. For low flooding rates (less than approx. =4cm/sec) and low pressure (approx. =138 Kpa), predictions show considerable error in evaluating the rewet position versus time. This observation is common to all the codes examined in the present work

  4. Global Network : Integration and Harmonization of ICT Policy and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC has invested in the development of three regional networks focused on issues of inclusive information and communication technology (ICT) policy and regulation: Latin America - REDIS/DIRSI (103371), Asia - LIRNEAsia (103017). Africa - LINK Centre (101584). The three regional research networks were built as ...

  5. Leaching characteristics of vanadium in mine tailings and soils near a vanadium titanomagnetite mining site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jinyan; Tang, Ya; Yang, Kai [College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Rouff, Ashaki A. [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Queens College City University of New York, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Flushing, NY 11367 (United States); Elzinga, Evert J. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ (United States); Huang, Jen-How, E-mail: jen-how.huang@unibas.ch [Institute of Environmental Geosciences, University of Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Vanadium in the soil and mine tailings has low solubility. • The leachability of vanadium in the mine tailings is lower than in the soil. • Low risk of vanadium migrating from the soil and mine tailings into the surrounding environment. • Drought and rewetting increase vanadium release from the soil and mine tailings. • Soil leaching processes control vanadium transport in soils overlain with mine tailings. -- Abstract: A series of column leaching experiments were performed to understand the leaching behaviour and the potential environmental risk of vanadium in a Panzhihua soil and vanadium titanomagnetite mine tailings. Results from sequential extraction experiments indicated that the mobility of vanadium in both the soil and the mine tailings was low, with <1% of the total vanadium readily mobilised. Column experiments revealed that only <0.1% of vanadium in the soil and mine tailing was leachable. The vanadium concentrations in the soil leachates did not vary considerably, but decreased with the leachate volume in the mine tailing leachates. This suggests that there was a smaller pool of leachable vanadium in the mine tailings compared to that in the soil. Drought and rewetting increased the vanadium concentrations in the soil and mine tailing leachates from 20 μg L{sup −1} to 50–90 μg L{sup −1}, indicating the potential for high vanadium release following periods of drought. Experiments with soil columns overlain with 4, 8 and 20% volume mine tailings/volume soil exhibited very similar vanadium leaching behaviour. These results suggest that the transport of vanadium to the subsurface is controlled primarily by the leaching processes occurring in soils.

  6. Effects of prolonged soil drought on CH4 oxidation in a temperate spruce forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borken, W.; Brumme, R.; Xu, Y.-J.

    2000-03-01

    Our objective was to determine potential impacts of changes in rainfall amount and distribution on soil CH4 oxidation in a temperate forest ecosystem. We constructed a roof below the canopy of a 65-year-old Norway spruce forest (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and simulated two climate change scenarios: (1) an extensively prolonged summer drought of 172 days followed by a rewetting period of 19 days in 1993 and (2) a less intensive summer drought of 108 days followed by a rewetting period of 33 days in 1994. CH4 oxidation, soil matric potential, and soil temperature were measured hourly to daily over a 2-year period. The results showed that annual CH4 oxidation in the drought experiment increased by 102% for the climate change scenario 1 and by 41% for the climate change scenario 2, compared to those of the ambient plot (1.33 kg CH4 ha-1 in 1993 and 1.65 kg CH4 ha-1 in 1994). We tested the relationships between CH4 oxidation rates, water-filled pore space (WFPS), soil matric potential, gas diffusivity, and soil temperature. Temporal variability in the CH4 oxidation rates corresponded most closely to soil matric potential. Employing soil matric potential and soil temperature, we developed a nonlinear model for estimating CH4 oxidation rates. Modeled results were in strong agreement with the measured CH4 oxidation for the ambient (r2 = 0.80) and drought plots (r2 = 0.89) over two experimental years, suggesting that soil matric potential is a highly reliable parameter for modeling CH4 oxidation rate.

  7. Experimental study and modelling of transient boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    A failure in the control system of the power of a nuclear reactor can lead to a Reactivity Initiated Accident in a nuclear power plant. Then, a power peak occurs in some fuel rods, high enough to lead to the coolant film boiling. It leads to an important increase of the temperature of the rod. The possible risk of the clad failure is a matter of interest for the Institut de Radioprotection et de Securite Nucleaire. The transient boiling heat transfer is not yet understood and modelled. An experimental set-up has been built at the Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse (IMFT). Subcooled HFE-7000 flows vertically upward in a semi annulus test section. The inner half cylinder simulates the clad and is made of a stainless steel foil, heated by Joule effect. Its temperature is measured by an infrared camera, coupled with a high speed camera for the visualization of the flow topology. The whole boiling curve is studied in steady state and transient regimes: convection, onset of boiling, nucleate boiling, critical heat flux, film boiling and rewetting. The steady state heat transfers are well modelled by literature correlations. Models are suggested for the transient heat flux: the convection and nucleate boiling evolutions are self-similar during a power step. This observation allows to model more complex evolutions, as temperature ramps. The transient Hsu model well represents the onset of nucleate boiling. When the intensity of the power step increases, the film boiling begins at the same temperature but with an increasing heat flux. For power ramps, the critical heat flux decreases while the corresponding temperature increases with the heating rate. When the wall is heated, the film boiling heat transfer is higher than in steady state but it is not understood. A two-fluid model well simulates the cooling film boiling and the rewetting. (author)

  8. Modelling the diurnal and seasonal dynamics of soil CO2 exchange in a semiarid ecosystem with high plant–interspace heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We used process-based modelling to investigate the roles of carbon-flux (C-flux components and plant–interspace heterogeneities in regulating soil CO2 exchanges (FS in a dryland ecosystem with sparse vegetation. To simulate the diurnal and seasonal dynamics of FS, the modelling considered simultaneously the CO2 production, transport and surface exchanges (e.g. biocrust photosynthesis, respiration and photodegradation. The model was parameterized and validated with multivariate data measured during the years 2013–2014 in a semiarid shrubland ecosystem in Yanchi, northwestern China. The model simulation showed that soil rewetting could enhance CO2 dissolution and delay the emission of CO2 produced from rooting zone. In addition, an ineligible fraction of respired CO2 might be removed from soil volumes under respiration chambers by lateral water flows and root uptakes. During rewetting, the lichen-crusted soil could shift temporally from net CO2 source to sink due to the activated photosynthesis of biocrust but the restricted CO2 emissions from subsoil. The presence of plant cover could decrease the root-zone CO2 production and biocrust C sequestration but increase the temperature sensitivities of these fluxes. On the other hand, the sensitivities of root-zone emissions to water content were lower under canopy, which may be due to the advection of water flows from the interspace to canopy. To conclude, the complexity and plant–interspace heterogeneities of soil C processes should be carefully considered to extrapolate findings from chamber to ecosystem scales and to predict the ecosystem responses to climate change and extreme climatic events. Our model can serve as a useful tool to simulate the soil CO2 efflux dynamics in dryland ecosystems.

  9. Water level fluctuations in a tropical reservoir: the impact of sediment drying, aquatic macrophyte dieback, and oxygen availability on phosphorus mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keitel, Jonas; Zak, Dominik; Hupfer, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Reservoirs in semi-arid areas are subject to water level fluctuations (WLF) that alter biogeochemical processes in the sediment. We hypothesized that wet-dry cycles may cause internal eutrophication in such systems when they affect densely vegetated shallow areas. To assess the impact of WLF on phosphorus (P) mobilization and benthic P cycling of iron-rich sediments, we tested the effects of (i) sediment drying and rewetting, (ii) the impact of organic matter availability in the form of dried Brazilian Waterweed (Egeria densa), and (iii) alternating redox conditions in the surface water. In principle, drying led to increased P release after rewetting both in plant-free and in plant-amended sediments. Highest P mobilization was recorded in plant amendments under oxygen-free conditions. After re-establishment of aerobic conditions, P concentrations in surface water decreased substantially owing to P retention by sediments. In desiccated and re-inundated sediments, P retention decreased by up to 30% compared to constantly inundated sediments. We showed that WLF may trigger biochemical interactions conducive to anaerobic P release. Thereby, E. densa showed high P release and even P uptake that was redox-controlled and superimposed sedimentary P cycling. Macrophytes play an important role in the uptake of P from the water but may be also a significant source of P in wet-dry cycles. We estimated a potential for the abrupt release of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) by E. densa of 0.09-0.13 g SRP per m(2) after each wet-dry cycle. Released SRP may exceed critical P limits for eutrophication, provoking usage restrictions. Our results have implications for management of reservoirs in semi-arid regions affected by WLF.

  10. Modelling the diurnal and seasonal dynamics of soil CO2 exchange in a semiarid ecosystem with high plant-interspace heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jinnan; Wang, Ben; Jia, Xin; Feng, Wei; Zha, Tianshan; Kellomäki, Seppo; Peltola, Heli

    2018-01-01

    We used process-based modelling to investigate the roles of carbon-flux (C-flux) components and plant-interspace heterogeneities in regulating soil CO2 exchanges (FS) in a dryland ecosystem with sparse vegetation. To simulate the diurnal and seasonal dynamics of FS, the modelling considered simultaneously the CO2 production, transport and surface exchanges (e.g. biocrust photosynthesis, respiration and photodegradation). The model was parameterized and validated with multivariate data measured during the years 2013-2014 in a semiarid shrubland ecosystem in Yanchi, northwestern China. The model simulation showed that soil rewetting could enhance CO2 dissolution and delay the emission of CO2 produced from rooting zone. In addition, an ineligible fraction of respired CO2 might be removed from soil volumes under respiration chambers by lateral water flows and root uptakes. During rewetting, the lichen-crusted soil could shift temporally from net CO2 source to sink due to the activated photosynthesis of biocrust but the restricted CO2 emissions from subsoil. The presence of plant cover could decrease the root-zone CO2 production and biocrust C sequestration but increase the temperature sensitivities of these fluxes. On the other hand, the sensitivities of root-zone emissions to water content were lower under canopy, which may be due to the advection of water flows from the interspace to canopy. To conclude, the complexity and plant-interspace heterogeneities of soil C processes should be carefully considered to extrapolate findings from chamber to ecosystem scales and to predict the ecosystem responses to climate change and extreme climatic events. Our model can serve as a useful tool to simulate the soil CO2 efflux dynamics in dryland ecosystems.

  11. Capillary pressure and saturation relations for supercritical CO2 and brine in sand: High-pressure Pc(Sw) controller/meter measurements and capillary scaling predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Jung, Jong-Won; Kim, Tae Wook; Kim, Yongman; Dong, Wenming

    2013-08-01

    In geologic carbon sequestration, reliable predictions of CO2 storage require understanding the capillary behavior of supercritical (sc) CO2. Given the limited availability of measurements of the capillary pressure (Pc) dependence on water saturation (Sw) with scCO2 as the displacing fluid, simulations of CO2 sequestration commonly rely on modifying more familiar air/H2O and oil/H2O Pc(Sw) relations, adjusted to account for differences in interfacial tensions. In order to test such capillary scaling-based predictions, we developed a high-pressure Pc(Sw) controller/meter, allowing accurate Pc and Sw measurements. Drainage and imbibition processes were measured on quartz sand with scCO2-brine at pressures of 8.5 and 12.0 MPa (45°C), and air-brine at 21°C and 0.1 MPa. Drainage and rewetting at intermediate Sw levels shifted to Pc values that were from 30% to 90% lower than predicted based on interfacial tension changes. Augmenting interfacial tension-based predictions with differences in independently measured contact angles from different sources led to more similar scaled Pc(Sw) relations but still did not converge onto universal drainage and imbibition curves. Equilibrium capillary trapping of the nonwetting phases was determined for Pc = 0 during rewetting. The capillary-trapped volumes for scCO2 were significantly greater than for air. Given that the experiments were all conducted on a system with well-defined pore geometry (homogeneous sand), and that scCO2-brine interfacial tensions are fairly well constrained, we conclude that the observed deviations from scaling predictions resulted from scCO2-induced decreased wettability. Wettability alteration by scCO2 makes predicting hydraulic behavior more challenging than for less reactive fluids.

  12. Persistence and dioxin-like toxicity of carbazole and chlorocarbazoles in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumbo, John; Henkelmann, Bernhard; Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Pfister, Gerd; Nguyen, Nghia; Schroll, Reiner; Munch, Jean Charles; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2015-01-01

    Halogenated carbazoles have recently been detected in soil and water samples, but their environmental effects and fate are unknown. Eighty-four soil samples obtained from a site with no recorded history of pollution were used to assess the persistence and dioxin-like toxicity of carbazole and chlorocarbazoles in soil under controlled conditions for 15 months. Soil samples were divided into two temperature conditions, 15 and 20 °C, both under fluctuating soil moisture conditions comprising 19 and 44 drying-rewetting cycles, respectively. This was characterized by natural water loss by evaporation and rewetting to -15 kPa. Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and cleanup were performed after incubation. Identification and quantification were done using high-resolution gas chromatogram/mass spectrometer (HRGC/MS), while dioxin-like toxicity was determined by ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) induction in H4IIA rat hepatoma cells assay and multidimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (mQSAR) modelling. Carbazole, 3-chlorocarbazole and 3,6-dichlorocarbazole were detected including trichlorocarbazole not previously reported in soils. Carbazole and 3-chlorocarbazole showed significant dissipation at 15 °C but not at 20 °C incubating conditions indicating that low temperature could be suitable for dissipation of carbazole and chlorocarbazoles. 3,6-Dichlorocarbazole was resistant at both conditions. Trichlorocarbazole however exhibited a tendency to increase in concentration with time. 3-Chlorocarbazole, 3,6-dibromocarbazole and selected soil extracts exhibited EROD activity. Dioxin-like toxicity did not decrease significantly with time, whereas the sum chlorocarbazole toxic equivalence concentrations (∑TEQ) did not contribute significantly to the soil assay dioxin-like toxicity equivalent concentrations (TCDD-EQ). Carbazole and chlorocarbazoles are persistent with the latter also toxic in natural conditions.

  13. GDOT Local Beneficiary Analysis of TIA Project Expenditures, Phase II : Impact Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-01

    In 2012, voters in three regions of GeorgiaCentral Savannah River Area, Heart of Georgia Altamaha, and River Valleyapproved the Transportation Investment Act (TIA) referendum, which added 1% to local sales taxes. Seventy-five percent of the add...

  14. 75 FR 56916 - Viruses, Serums, Toxins, and Analogous Products; Expiration Date Required for Serials and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... been shown that the potency of most veterinary biologics degrade in a nonlinear fashion, which may... registration of veterinary medicinal products among three regions: The European Union, Japan, and the United...

  15. Utilization of HIV Testing and Counseling in Ghana: Implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    African Journal of Reproductive Health March 2014; 18(1): 145 ... However, HIV positive test rates at DCs were comparatively higher across the ... decreases mortality and morbidity in persons ..... with three regions recording negative growth.

  16. 47 CFR 2.104 - International Table of Frequency Allocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Union (ITU) has divided the world into three Regions 1 as shown in Figure 1 of this section and... as follows: (1) The term “African Broadcasting Area” means: (i) African countries, parts of countries...

  17. 77 FR 29665 - International Conference on Harmonisation; Addendum to International Conference on Harmonisation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-18

    ... three regions: The European Union, Japan, and the United States. The six ICH sponsors are the European... products derived from cell-culture systems such as bacteria, yeast, and eukaryotic cells, including...

  18. Calculation of the apparent neutron parameters in a borehole geometry for neutron porosity tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woznicka, U.; Drabina, A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the next step of a development of the theoretical solutions, which gives a possibility to calculate the apparent neutron slowing down and migration lengths in the three region cylindrical system which represents the borehole, the intermediate zone (e.g. mud cake at the borehole walls), and the geological formation. A solution of the neutron diffusion equation in energy two-group approach for spatial moments of the neutron flux is given for the three-region cylindrical coaxial geometry. The influence of the intermediate zone is presented. The numerical code MOM3 has been written to calculate the apparent slowing down and migration lengths for the three-region cylindrical system as mentioned above. Additionally the MCNP calculation for the three-region borehole geometry is presented in the paper

  19. Numerical Speadsheet Modeling of Natural Attenuation for Groundwater Contaminant Plumes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Twesme, Troy

    1999-01-01

    .... The model was used to evaluate natural attenuation for removal of a trichloroethylene (TCE) plume from a surficial aquifer containing three regions with distinctly different processes for degradation of TCE...

  20. The Alliance to Scale Digital Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Seed ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Alliance to Scale Digital Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Seed Alliance). This project will support digital innovations that solve development challenges. ... It combines three regional, competitive small grants and awards programs from ...

  1. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    Factors Influencing The Practice Of Exclusive Breastfeeding In. Three Regions Of ... The objective of this study was to assess the factors influencing EBF in Nigeria. Methodology ... it also provides immense benefits to the mother; mothers in the ...

  2. 75 FR 10487 - International Conference on Harmonisation; Guidance on S9 Nonclinical Evaluation for Anticancer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... drugs and biotechnology derived products, intended to treat patients with advanced cancer. The... seeking scientifically based harmonized technical procedures for pharmaceutical development. One of the... requirements for the registration of pharmaceutical products among three regions: The European Union, Japan...

  3. Flow regimes and mechanistic modeling of critical heat flux under subcooled flow boiling conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Corre, Jean-Marie

    Thermal performance of heat flux controlled boiling heat exchangers are usually limited by the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) above which the heat transfer degrades quickly, possibly leading to heater overheating and destruction. In an effort to better understand the phenomena, a literature review of CHF experimental visualizations under subcooled flow boiling conditions was performed and systematically analyzed. Three major types of CHF flow regimes were identified (bubbly, vapor clot and slug flow regime) and a CHF flow regime map was developed, based on a dimensional analysis of the phenomena and available data. It was found that for similar geometric characteristics and pressure, a Weber number (We)/thermodynamic quality (x) map can be used to predict the CHF flow regime. Based on the experimental observations and the review of the available CHF mechanistic models under subcooled flow boiling conditions, hypothetical CHF mechanisms were selected for each CHF flow regime, all based on a concept of wall dry spot overheating, rewetting prevention and subsequent dry spot spreading. It is postulated that a high local wall superheat occurs locally in a dry area of the heated wall, due to a cyclical event inherent to the considered CHF two-phase flow regime, preventing rewetting (Leidenfrost effect). The selected modeling concept has the potential to span the CHF conditions from highly subcooled bubbly flow to early stage of annular flow. A numerical model using a two-dimensional transient thermal analysis of the heater undergoing nucleation was developed to mechanistically predict CHF in the case of a bubbly flow regime. In this type of CHF two-phase flow regime, the high local wall superheat occurs underneath a nucleating bubble at the time of bubble departure. The model simulates the spatial and temporal heater temperature variations during nucleation at the wall, accounting for the stochastic nature of the boiling phenomena. The model has also the potential to evaluate

  4. Nitrate retention capacity of milldam-impacted legacy sediments and relict A horizon soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. N. Weitzman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available While eutrophication is often attributed to contemporary nutrient pollution, there is growing evidence that past practices, like the accumulation of legacy sediment behind historic milldams, are also important. Given their prevalence, there is a critical need to understand how N flows through, and is retained in, legacy sediments to improve predictions and management of N transport from uplands to streams in the context of climatic variability and land-use change. Our goal was to determine how nitrate (NO3− is cycled through the soil of a legacy-sediment-strewn stream before and after soil drying. We extracted 10.16 cm radius intact soil columns that extended 30 cm into each of the three significant soil horizons at Big Spring Run (BSR in Lancaster, Pennsylvania: surface legacy sediment characterized by a newly developing mineral A horizon soil, mid-layer legacy sediment consisting of mineral B horizon soil and a dark, organic-rich, buried relict A horizon soil. Columns were first preincubated at field capacity and then isotopically labeled nitrate (15NO3− was added and allowed to drain to estimate retention. The columns were then air-dried and subsequently rewet with N-free water and allowed to drain to quantify the drought-induced loss of 15NO3− from the different horizons. We found the highest initial 15N retention in the mid-layer legacy sediment (17 ± 4 % and buried relict A soil (14 ± 3 % horizons, with significantly lower retention in the surface legacy sediment (6 ± 1 % horizon. As expected, rewetting dry soil resulted in 15N losses in all horizons, with the greatest losses in the buried relict A horizon soil, followed by the mid-layer legacy sediment and surface legacy sediment horizons. The 15N remaining in the soil following the post-drought leaching was highest in the mid-layer legacy sediment, intermediate in the surface legacy sediment, and lowest in the buried relict A horizon soil. Fluctuations

  5. Effects of land use intensity on the full greenhouse gas balance in an Atlantic peat bog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Beetz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands can either be net sinks or net sources of greenhouse gases (GHGs, depending on the mean annual water level and other factors like average annual temperature, vegetation development, and land use. Whereas drained and agriculturally used peatlands tend to be carbon dioxide (CO2 and nitrous oxide (N2O sources but methane (CH4 sinks, restored (i.e. rewetted peatlands rather incorporate CO2, tend to be N2O neutral and release CH4. One of the aims of peatland restoration is to decrease their global warming potential (GWP by reducing GHG emissions.

    We estimated the greenhouse gas exchange of a peat bog restoration sequence over a period of 2 yr (1 July 2007–30 June 2009 in an Atlantic raised bog in northwest Germany. We set up three study sites representing different land use intensities: intensive grassland (deeply drained, mineral fertilizer, cattle manure and 4–5 cuts per year; extensive grassland (rewetted, no fertilizer or manure, up to 1 cutting per year; near-natural peat bog (almost no anthropogenic influence. Daily and annual greenhouse gas exchange was estimated based on closed-chamber measurements. CH4 and N2O fluxes were recorded bi-weekly, and net ecosystem exchange (NEE measurements were carried out every 3–4 weeks. Annual sums of CH4 and N2O fluxes were estimated by linear interpolation while NEE was modelled.

    Regarding GWP, the intensive grassland site emitted 564 ± 255 g CO2–C equivalents m−2 yr−1 and 850 ± 238 g CO2–C equivalents m−2 yr−1 in the first (2007/2008 and the second (2008/2009 measuring year, respectively. The GWP of the extensive grassland amounted to −129 ± 231 g CO2–C equivalents m−2 yr−1 and 94 ± 200 g CO2–C equivalents m−2 yr

  6. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in soil extracts investigated by FT-ICR-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, D.; Steffen, D.; Jablonowski, N. D.; Burauel, P.

    2012-04-01

    Soil drying and rewetting usually increases the release of xenobiotics like pesticides present in agricultural soils. Besides the effect on the release of two aged 14C-labeled pesticide residues we focus on the characterisation of simultaneously remobilized dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to gain new insights into structure and stability aspects of soil organic carbon fractions. The test soil (gleyic cambisol; Corg 1.2%, pH 7.2) was obtained from the upper soil layer of two individual outdoor lysimeter studies containing either environmentally long-term aged 14C residues of the herbicide ethidimuron (0-10 cm depth; time of aging: 9 years) or methabenzthiazuron (0-30 cm depth; time of aging: 17 years). Soil samples (10 g dry soil equivalents) were (A=dry/wet) previously dried (45°C) or (B=wet/wet) directly mixed with pure water (1+2, w:w), shaken (150 rpm, 1 h), and centrifuged (2000 g). This extraction procedure was repeated several individual times, for both setups. The first three individual extractions, respectively were used for further investigations. Salt was removed from samples prior analysis because of a possible quench effect in the electrospray (ESI) source by solid phase extraction (SPE) with Chromabond C18 Hydra-cartridges (Macherey-Nagel) and methanol as backextraction solvent. The so preconcentrated and desalted samples were introduced by flow injection analysis (FIA) in a fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS), equipped with an ESI source and a 7 T supra-conducting magnet (LTQ-FT Ultra, ThermoFisher Scientific). This technique is the key technique for complex natural systems attributed by their outstanding mass resolution (used 400.000 at m/z 400 Da) and mass accuracy (≤ 1ppm) by simultaneously providing molecular level details of thousands of compounds and was successful applied for the investigations of natural organic matter (NOM) different sources like marine and surface water, soil, sediment, bog and crude oil

  7. Can deficit irrigation techniques be used to enhance phosphorus and water use efficiency and benefit crop yields?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Hannah R.; Dodd, Ian C.; Blackwell, Martin S. A.; Surridge, Ben W. J.

    2015-04-01

    Soil drying and rewetting (DRW) affects the forms and availability of phosphorus (P). Water soluble P has been reported to increase 1.8- to 19-fold after air-drying with the majority of the increase (56-100%) attributable to organic P. Similarly, in two contrasting soil types DRW increased concentrations of total P and reactive P in leachate, likely due to enhanced P mineralisation and physiochemical processes causing detachment of soil colloids, with faster rewetting rates related to higher concentrations of P. The intensity of drying as well as the rate of rewetting influences organic and inorganic P cycling. How these dynamics are driven by soil water status, and impact crop P acquisition and growth, remains unclear. Improving P and water use efficiencies and crop yields is globally important as both P and water resources become increasingly scarce, whilst demand for food increases. Irrigation supply below the water requirement for full crop evapotranspiration is employed by agricultural practitioners where water supply is limited. Regulated deficit irrigation describes the scheduling of water supply to correspond to the times of highest crop demand. Alternate wetting and drying (AWD) is applied in lowland irrigated rice production to avoid flooding at certain times of crop development, and has benefited P nutrition and yields. This research aims to optimise the benefits of P availability and uptake achieved by DRW by guiding deficit irrigation management strategies. Further determination of underlying processes driving P cycling at fluctuating soil moisture status is required. Presented here is a summary of the literature on DRW effects on soil P availability and plant P uptake and partitioning, in a range of soil types and cropping systems, with emphasis on alternate wetting and drying irrigation (AWD) compared to continuous flooding in lowland irrigated rice production. Soil water contents and matric potentials, and effects on P dynamics, are highly variable

  8. Verification of thermal-hydraulic computer codes against standard problems for WWER reflooding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander D Efanov; Vladimir N Vinogradov; Victor V Sergeev; Oleg A Sudnitsyn

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The computational assessment of reactor core components behavior under accident conditions is impossible without knowledge of the thermal-hydraulic processes occurring in this case. The adequacy of the results obtained using the computer codes to the real processes is verified by carrying out a number of standard problems. In 2000-2003, the fulfillment of three Russian standard problems on WWER core reflooding was arranged using the experiments on full-height electrically heated WWER 37-rod bundle model cooldown in regimes of bottom (SP-1), top (SP-2) and combined (SP-3) reflooding. The representatives from the eight MINATOM's organizations took part in this work, in the course of which the 'blind' and posttest calculations were performed using various versions of the RELAP5, ATHLET, CATHARE, COBRA-TF, TRAP, KORSAR computer codes. The paper presents a brief description of the test facility, test section, test scenarios and conditions as well as the basic results of computational analysis of the experiments. The analysis of the test data revealed a significantly non-one-dimensional nature of cooldown and rewetting of heater rods heated up to a high temperature in a model bundle. This was most pronounced at top and combined reflooding. The verification of the model reflooding computer codes showed that most of computer codes fairly predict the peak rod temperature and the time of bundle cooldown. The exception is provided by the results of calculations with the ATHLET and CATHARE codes. The nature and rate of rewetting front advance in the lower half of the bundle are fairly predicted practically by all computer codes. The disagreement between the calculations and experimental results for the upper half of the bundle is caused by the difficulties of computational simulation of multidimensional effects by 1-D computer codes. In this regard, a quasi-two-dimensional computer code COBRA-TF offers certain advantages. Overall, the closest

  9. Estimating Soil Organic Carbon of Cropland Soil at Different Levels of Soil Moisture Using VIS-NIR Spectroscopy

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    Qinghu Jiang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic carbon (SOC is an essential property for soil function, fertility and sustainability of agricultural systems. It can be measured with visible and near-infrared reflectance (VIS-NIR spectroscopy efficiently based on empirical equations and spectra data for air/oven-dried samples. However, the spectral signal is interfered with by soil moisture content (MC under in situ conditions, which will affect the accuracy of measurements and calibration transfer among different areas. This study aimed to (1 quantify the influences of MC on SOC prediction by VIS-NIR spectroscopy; and (2 explore the potentials of orthogonal signal correction (OSC and generalized least squares weighting (GLSW methods in the removal of moisture interference. Ninety-eight samples were collected from the Jianghan plain, China, and eight MCs were obtained for each sample by a rewetting process. The VIS-NIR spectra of the rewetted soil samples were measured in the laboratory. Partial least squares regression (PLSR was used to develop SOC prediction models. Specifically, three validation strategies, namely moisture level validation, transferability validation and mixed-moisture validation, were designed to test the potentials of OSC and GLSW in removing the MC effect. Results showed that all of the PLSR models generated at different moisture levels (e.g., 50–100, 250–300 g·kg−1 were moderately successful in SOC predictions (r2pre = 0.58–0.85, RPD = 1.55–2.55. These models, however, could not be transferred to soil samples with different moisture levels. OSC and GLSW methods are useful filter transformations improving model transferability. The GLSW-PLSR model (mean of r2pre = 0.77, root mean square error for prediction (RMSEP = 3.08 g·kg−1, and residual prediction deviations (RPD = 2.09 outperforms the OSC-PLSR model (mean of r2pre = 0.67, RMSEP = 3.67 g·kg−1, and RPD = 1.76 when the moisture-mixed protocol is used. Results demonstrated the use of OSC

  10. Evolution of water repellency of organic growing media used in Horticulture and consequences on hysteretic behaviours of the water retention curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Jean-Charles; Qi, Guifang; Charpentier, Sylvain; Boivin, Pascal

    2010-05-01

    Most of growing media used in horticulture (particularly peat substrates) shows hysteresis phenomena during desiccation and rehydration cycles, which greatly affects their hydraulic properties. The origins of these properties have often been related to one or several of the specific mechanisms such as the non-geometrical uniformity of the pores (also called ‘ink bottle' effect), presence of trapped air, shrinkage-swelling phenomena, and changes in water repellency. However, recent results showed that changes in wettability during desiccation and rehydration could be considered as one of the main factors leading to hysteretic behaviour in these materials with high organic matter contents (Naasz et al., 2008). The general objective was to estimate the evolutions of changes in water repellency on the water retention properties and associated hysteresis phenomena in relation to the intensity and the number of drying/wetting cycles. For this, simultaneous shrinkage/swelling and water retention curves were obtained using method previously developed for soil shrinkage analysis by Boivin (2006) that we have adapted for growing media and to their physical behaviours during rewetting. The experiment was performed in a climatic chamber at 20°C. A cylinder with the growing medium tested was placed on a porous ceramic disk which is used to control the pressure and to full/empty water of the sample. The whole of the device was then placed on a balance to record the water loss/storage with time; whereas linear displacement transducers were used to measure the changes in sample height and diameter upon drying and wetting in the axial and radial directions. Ceramic cups (2 cm long and 0.21 cm diameter) connected to pressure transducers were inserted in the middle of the samples to record the water pressure head. In parallell, contact angles were measured by direct droplet method at different steps during the drying/rewetting cycles. First results obtained on weakly decomposed

  11. Therapeutic efficiency of sodium hyaluronate eye drops on dry eye in juvenile with myopia wearing rigid gas permeable contact lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the therapeutic efficiency of preservative-free sodium hyaluronate eye drops on dry eye in juvenile myopia wearing rigid gas permeable contact lens(RGP.METHODS:Ninety cases with dry eye related to wearing RGP in juvenile with myopia from January to May 2015 were selected. The patients aged 12.75±4.15 years old,with diopter of -3.50±1.50D as spherical equivalent and received normalized RGP. They were divided into 3 groups randomly,each group of 30 cases(60 eyes:group A used rewetting drops,1 drop each time,4 times per day; group B used preservative-free sodium hyaluronate eye drops(1g/L,1 drop each time,4 times per day; group C used rewetting drops at first, then sodium hyaluronate eye drops was used 15 minutes later.All cases had been detected and evaluated by subjective symptoms of dry eye,Schirmer I test(SⅠt,break-up time(BUTand corneal fluorescent staining,at pre-therapy and 1, 2, 4wk of post-therapy.RESULTS:The subjective symptoms of dry eye,corneal fluorescent staining and BUT of three groups had been obviously improved at 1wk after therapies than those before therapies(PP>0.05.Every index of the three groups measured at 2 and 4wk after treatments had no significant differences compared to those measured at 1wk(P>0.05.There was no significant difference on subjective symptoms,SⅠt and BUT between group A and B(P>0.05,except on corneal fluorescent staining, on which group B was superior to group A and on which the difference was significant(PPPCONCLUSION:Preservative-free sodium hyaluronate eye drops(1g/Lcan stabilize the tear film and promote the repair of corneal epithelial defects and significantly improve dry eye symptoms and signs in juvenile myopia wearing RGP,so it has certain clinical application value.

  12. Paludiculture on marginal lands - sustainable use of wet peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmke, Claudia; Dahms, Tobias; Wichmann, Sabine; Wichtmann, Wendelin

    2017-04-01

    Peatlands are marginal lands. If they are drained, they show a short initial productive period. Soil degradation due to peat oxidation leads to numerous problems which increasingly restrict agricultural use and cause significant environmental impacts such as greenhouse gas emissions and eutrophication and thereby produce high external costs. Worldwide greenhouse gas emissions from drained peatlands have a significant share ( 10%) in the emissions from agriculture, forestry and other land use (AFOLU) sectors (Smith et al. 2014). In Germany they contribute more than 35% to the total emissions from agriculture (agricultural sector and cropland and grassland management) (UBA 2016). Rewetting drained peatlands can significantly reduce environmental problems caused by peatland drainage. Continuation of agricultural use with adapted crops and machinery, so called paludiculture (Latin ‚palus' = swamp) stops further degradation, maintains the peat body, reduces climate change mitigation and produces renewable fuels and raw materials. Fen and bog soils are suitable for various different paludicultures. The biomass of Sphagnum (sphagnum farming) cultivated on cut-over bogs or degraded bog grasslands can be used as raw material for horticultural growing media. Flood-tolerant and productive plant species like Common Reed, Reed Canary Grass, Cattail, Black Alder and different Sedge species are suitable for paludiculture on fen soils. Biomass utilization ranges from traditional forms, like fodder production or the use of Common Reed as roof thatch, to new utilization options, that includes biomass use for heat generation, co-subtrates for biorefineries or construction and insulation products. The above-ground biomass of one hectare Common Reed (winter yield=8 t DM) equates to an energy content of 3,000 litre heating oil. A district heating plant (800 kW) in NE Germany demonstrates the feasibility of using biomass from wet fen meadows for local heat generation. Moreover, tests

  13. Can restoration convert a degraded bog in southern Bavaria to a carbon sink and climate cooler?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Christoph; Drösler, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    The peatland area of Germany is about 14.000 km² (Succow & Joosten 2001) with 8% natural like bogs and 4% natural like fens (Höper 2006). All other peatland areas are more or less intensively used and thus, lost their sink function for carbon. If, theoretically, all German peatlands would be rewetted, this restoration would lead to a carbon mitigation of 9.5 Mio. t CO2-C equivalents (Freibauer et al. 2009). In test areas like the studied bog, the viability and potential of peatland restoration for climate mitigation can be proofed. The investigated bog is situated close to the Bavarian Alps; one part of this bog is extensively used and had been rewetted in 1993 except of a small stripe; management was stopped totally at another stripe. The second part of this bog had been drained without any further use. Here a Calluna heath established, accompanied by Pine trees. The restoration of this bog heath was done in two time steps; here a chronosequence of succession after restoration at different water table levels was investigated. To get to the greenhouse gas (GHG) balances of CO2 CH4 and N2O, gas flux measurements were done for two years using the chamber technique of Drösler (2005). At both areas, the degraded sites were sources for GHG (+203 to +736 g CO2-C-equiv m-2 a-1). Restoration reduced these emissions depending on water table and succession of bog species (-51 to +557 g CO2-C-equiv m-2 a-1). Depending on the vegetation's vitality GHG balances of already established natural like sites varied in between the years (-189 to +264 g CO2-C-equiv m-2 a-1) mainly driven by the oscillation of their water table. Stop of management and development of Sphagnum communities turned most of the sites into sinks for GHG (-216 to +7 g CO2-C-equiv m-2 a-1). Thus restoration turned degraded bogs efficiently to carbon sinks and climate coolers in dependence of a proper water table management, withdrawal of land use and vegetation succession. Key words: bog, greenhouse gases

  14. Growth and death of bacteria and fungi underlie rainfall-induced carbon dioxide pulses from seasonally dried soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazewicz, Steven J; Schwartz, Egbert; Firestone, Mary K

    2014-05-01

    The rapid increase in microbial activity that occurs when a dry soil is rewetted has been well documented and is of great interest due to implications of changing precipitation patterns on soil C dynamics. Several studies have shown minor net changes in microbial population diversity or abundance following wet-up, but the gross population dynamics of bacteria and fungi resulting from soil wet-up are virtually unknown. Here we applied DNA stable isotope probing with H218O coupled with quantitative PCR to characterize new growth, survival, and mortality of bacteria and fungi following the rewetting of a seasonally dried California annual grassland soil. Microbial activity, as determined by CO2 production, increased significantly within three hours of wet-up, yet new growth was not detected until after three hours, suggesting a pulse of nongrowth activity immediately following wet-up, likely due to osmo-regulation and resuscitation from dormancy in response to the rapid change in water potential. Total microbial abundance revealed little change throughout the seven-day post-wet incubation, but there was substantial turnover of both bacterial and fungal populations (49% and 52%, respectively). New growth was linear between 24 and 168 hours for both bacteria and fungi, with average growth rates of 2.3 x 10(8) bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies x [g dry mass](-1) x h(-1) and 4.3 x 10(7) fungal ITS copies x [g dry mass](-1) x h(-1). While bacteria and fungi differed in their mortality and survival characteristics during the seven-day incubation, mortality that occurred within the first three hours was similar, with 25% and 27% of bacterial and fungal gene copies disappearing from the pre-wet community, respectively. The rapid disappearance of gene copies indicates that cell death, occurring either during the extreme dry down period (preceding five months) or during the rapid change in water potential due to wet-up, generates a significant pool of available C that likely

  15. Soil hydrology of agroforestry systems: Competition for water or positive tree-crops interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerjets, Rowena; Richter, Falk; Jansen, Martin; Carminati, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    In dry periods during the growing season crops may suffer from severe water stress. The question arises whether the alternation of crop and tree strips might enhance and sustain soil water resources available for crops during drought events. Trees reduce wind exposure, decreasing the potential evapotranspiration of crops and soils; additionally hydraulic lift from the deep roots of trees to the drier top soil might provide additional water for shallow-rooted crops. To understand the above and belowground water relations of agroforestry systems, we measured soil moisture and soil water potential in crop strips as a function of distance to the trees at varying depth as well as meteorological parameters. At the agroforestry site Reiffenhausen, Lower Saxony, Germany, two different tree species are planted, each in one separated tree strip: willow breed Tordis ((Salix viminalis x Salix Schwerinii) x Salix viminalis) and poplar clone Max 1 (Populus nigra x Populus maximowiczii). In between the tree strips a crop strip of 24 m width was established with annual crop rotation, managed the same way as the reference site. During a drought period in May 2016 with less than 2 mm rain in four weeks, an overall positive effect on hydrological conditions of the agroforestry system was observed. The results show that trees shaded the soil surface, lowering the air temperature and further increasing the soil moisture in the crop strips compared to the reference site, which was located far from the trees. At the reference site the crops took up water in the upper soil (sunlight. The two tree species behaved differently. The poplar strips showed more marked diurnal changes in soil water potential, with fast drying during daytime and rewetting during nighttime. We suppose that the rewetting during nighttime was caused by hydraulic lift, which supports passively the drier upper soil with water from the wetter, lower soil layers. This experimental study shows the importance of above- and

  16. Water level, vegetation composition, and plant productivity explain greenhouse gas fluxes in temperate cutover fens after inundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minke, Merten; Augustin, Jürgen; Burlo, Andrei; Yarmashuk, Tatsiana; Chuvashova, Hanna; Thiele, Annett; Freibauer, Annette; Tikhonov, Vitalij; Hoffmann, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    Peat extraction leaves a land surface with a strong relief of deep cutover areas and higher ridges. Rewetting inundates the deep parts, while less deeply extracted zones remain at or above the water level. In temperate fens the flooded areas are colonized by helophytes such as Eriophorum angustifolium, Carex spp., Typha latifolia or Phragmites australis dependent on water depth. Reeds of Typha and Phragmites are reported as large sources of methane, but data on net CO2 uptake are contradictory for Typha and rare for Phragmites. Here, we analyze the effect of vegetation, water level and nutrient conditions on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for representative vegetation types along water level gradients at two rewetted cutover fens (mesotrophic and eutrophic) in Belarus. Greenhouse gas emissions were measured campaign-wise with manual chambers every 2 to 4 weeks for 2 years and interpolated by modelling. All sites had negligible nitrous oxide exchange rates. Most sites were carbon sinks and small GHG sources. Methane emissions generally increased with net ecosystem CO2 uptake. Mesotrophic small sedge reeds with water table around the land surface were small GHG sources in the range of 2.3 to 4.2 t CO2 eq. ha-1 yr-1. Eutrophic tall sedge - Typha latifolia reeds on newly formed floating mats were substantial net GHG emitters in the range of 25.1 to 39.1 t CO2 eq. ha-1 yr. They represent transient vegetation stages. Phragmites reeds ranged between -1.7 to 4.2 t CO2 eq. ha-1 yr-1 with an overall mean GHG emission of 1.3 t CO2 eq. ha-1 yr-1. The annual CO2 balance was best explained by vegetation biomass, which includes the role of vegetation composition and species. Methane emissions were obviously driven by biological activity of vegetation and soil organisms. Shallow flooding of cutover temperate fens is a suitable measure to arrive at low GHG emissions. Phragmites australis establishment should be promoted in deeper flooded areas and will lead to moderate, but

  17. Colonization of overlaying water by bacteria from dry river sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazi, Stefano; Amalfitano, Stefano; Piccini, Claudia; Zoppini, Annamaria; Puddu, Alberto; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2008-10-01

    We studied the diversity, community composition and activity of the primary microbial colonizers of the water above freshly re-wetted sediments from a temporary river. Dried sediments, collected from Mulargia River (Sardinia, Italy), were covered with sterile freshwater in triplicate microcosms, and changes of the planktonic microbial assemblage were monitored over a 48 h period. During the first 9 h bacterial abundance was low (1.5 x 10(4) cells ml(-1)); it increased to 3.4 x 10(6) cells ml(-1) after 28 h and did not change thereafter. Approximately 20% of bacteria exhibited DNA de novo synthesis already after 9 h of incubation. Changes of the ratios of (3)H-leucine to (3)H-thymidine incorporation rates indicated a shift of growth patterns during the experiment. Extracellular enzyme activity showed a maximum at 48 h with aminopeptidase activity (430.8 +/- 22.6 nmol MCA l(-1) h(-1)) significantly higher than alkaline phosphatase (98.6 +/- 4.3 nmol MUF l(-1) h(-1)). The primary microbial colonizers of the overlaying water - as determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis - were related to at least six different phylogenetic lineages of Bacilli and to Alphaproteobacteria (Brevundimonas spp. and Caulobacter spp.). Large bacterial cells affiliated to one clade of Bacillus sp. were rare in the dried sediments, but constituted the majority of the planktonic microbial assemblage and of cells with detectable DNA-synthesis until 28 h after re-wetting. Their community contribution decreased in parallel with a rise of flagellated and ciliated protists. Estimates based on cell production rates suggested that the rapidly enriched Bacillus sp. suffered disproportionally high loss rates from selective predation, thus favouring the establishment of a more heterogenic assemblage of microbes (consisting of Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Cytophaga-Flavobacteria). Our results suggest that the primary microbial colonizers of the water above dried sediments are passively released

  18. Microbial drivers of spatial heterogeneity of nitrous oxide pulse dynamics following drought in an experimental tropical rainforest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J. C.; Sengupta, A.; U'Ren, J.; Van Haren, J. L. M.; Meredith, L. K.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a long-lived, potent greenhouse gas with increasing atmospheric concentrations. Soil microbes in agricultural and natural ecosystems are the dominant source of N2O, which involves complex interactions between N-cycling microbes, metabolisms, soil properties, and plants. Tropical rainforests are the largest natural source of N2O, however the microbial and environmental drivers are poorly understood as few studies have been performed in these environments. Thus, there is an urgent need for further research to fill in knowledge gaps regarding tropical N-cycling, and the response of soil microbial communities to changes in precipitation patterns, temperature, nitrogen deposition, and land use. To address this data gap, we performed a whole-forest drought in the tropical rainforest biome in Biosphere 2 (B2) and analyzed connections between soil microbes, forest heterogeneity, and N2O emissions. The B2 rainforest is the hottest tropical rainforest on Earth, and is an important model system for studying the response of tropical forests to warming with controlled experimentation. In this study, we measured microbial community abundance and diversity profiles (16S rRNA and ITS2 amplicon sequencing) along with their association with soil properties (e.g. pH, C, N) during the drought and rewetting at five locations (3 depths), including regions that have been previously characterized with high and low N2O drought pulse dynamics (van Haren et al., 2005). In this study, we present the spatial distribution of soil microbial communities within the rainforest at Biosphere 2 and their correlations with edaphic factors. In particular, we focus on microbial, soil, and plant factors that drive high and low N2O pulse zones. As in the past, we found that N2O emissions were highest in response to rewetting in a zone hypothesized to be rich in nutrients from a nearby sugar palm. We will characterize microbial indicator species and nitrogen cycling genes to better

  19. Climate mitigation scenarios of drained peat soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimir Klemedtsson, Åsa; Coria, Jessica; He, Hongxing; Liu, Xiangping; Nordén, Anna

    2014-05-01

    The national inventory reports (NIR) submitted to the UNFCCC show Sweden - which as many other countries has wetlands where parts have been drained for agriculture and forestry purposes, - to annually emit 12 million tonnes carbon dioxide equivalents, which is more GHG'es than industrial energy use release in Sweden. Similar conditions can be found in other northern countries, having cool and wet conditions, naturally promoting peat accumulation, and where land use management over the last centuries have promoted draining activities. These drained peatland, though covering only 2% of the land area, have emissions corresponding to 20% of the total reported NIR emissions. This substantial emission contribution, however, is hidden within the Land Use Land Use Change and Forestry sector (LULUCF) where the forest Carbon uptake is even larger, which causes the peat soil emissions become invisible. The only drained soil emission accounted in the Swedish Kyoto reporting is the N2O emission from agricultural drained organic soils of the size 0.5 million tonnes CO2e yr-1. This lack of visibility has made incentives for land use change and management neither implemented nor suggested, however with large potential. Rewetting has the potential to decrease soil mineralization, why CO2 and N2O emissions are mitigated. However if the soil becomes very wet CH4 emission will increase together with hampered plant growth. By ecological modeling, using the CoupModel the climate change mitigation potential have been estimated for four different land use scenarios; 1, Drained peat soil with Spruce (business as usual scenario), 2, raised ground water level to 20 cm depth and Willow plantation, 3, raised ground water level to 10 cm depth and Reed Canary Grass, and 4, rewetting to an average water level in the soil surface with recolonizing wetland plants and mosses. We calculate the volume of biomass production per year, peat decomposition, N2O emission together with nitrate and DOC

  20. Impacts of air pollution and climate change on forest ecosystems - Multiple stressors and ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nature of scientific investigation involving hypothesis testing dictates the need to conduct controlled experiments, limiting the number of independent variables in order to identify cause and effect relationships. Single or two-factor studies are useful to identify potentia...

  1. A study of the loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.W.; Chung, M.K.; Kim, S.H.; Park, J.S.; Lee, C.B.; Kim, S.B.; Won, S.Y.; Cho, Y.R.

    1983-01-01

    The primary objectives of this project are: (1) To review the published information on LOCA/ECCS study (2) To investigate reflood phenomena and to provide necessary information for analytical model development (3) To modyfy and develop a reflood analysis code. To review the published information on LOCA/ECCS, heat transfer phenomena are divided into 4 regions. Heat transfer correlations published in the references are reviewed and classified according to the regions. To investigate reflood phenomena and to provide better modeling of reflood phenomena, experments have been carried out with an electrically heated 3x3 rod bundle. Heat flux and heat transfer coefficients at the hot surface have been determined from the experimental data by HTC program. The influences of the parameters such as flooding rate, coolant subcooling and power generation on the propagation of rewetting front were also investigated. Calculations obtained from REFLUX code were compared with the experimental data to help an understanding of the reflood heat transfer mechanisms, and then some modifications of the code were provided. Improvements in heat transfer correlations of transition and inverted annular film boiling region, and the logic for the selection of heat transfer regime allowed better estimate for rod temperature behavior. (Author)

  2. Measurement of wetted area fraction in subcooled pool boiling of water using infrared thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyungdae; Park, Youngjae; Buongiorno, Jacopo

    2013-01-01

    The wetted area fraction in subcooled pool boiling of water at atmospheric pressure is measured using the DEPIcT (DEtection of Phase by Infrared Thermography) technique. DEPIcT exploits the contrast in infrared (IR) light emissions between wet and dry areas on the surface of an IR-transparent heater to visualize the instantaneous distribution of the liquid and gas phases in contact with the heater surface. In this paper time-averaged wetted area fraction data in nucleate boiling are reported as functions of heat flux (from 30% up to 100% of the Critical Heat Flux) and subcooling (ΔT sub = 0, 5, 10, 30 and 50 °C). The results show that the wetted area fraction monotonically decreases with increasing heat flux and increases with increasing subcooling: both trends are expected. The range of time-averaged wetted area fractions is from 90%, at low heat flux and high subcooling, to 50% at high heat flux (right before CHF) and low subcooling. It is also shown that the dry areas are periodically rewetted by liquid sloshing on the surface at any subcooling and heat flux; however, the dry areas expand irreversibly at CHF

  3. Experimental evidence and modelling of drought induced alternative stable soil moisture states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David; Jones, Scott; Lebron, Inma; Reinsch, Sabine; Dominguez, Maria; Smith, Andrew; Marshal, Miles; Emmett, Bridget

    2017-04-01

    The theory of alternative stable states in ecosystems is well established in ecology; however, evidence from manipulation experiments supporting the theory is limited. Developing the evidence base is important because it has profound implications for ecosystem management. Here we show evidence of the existence of alternative stable soil moisture states induced by drought in an upland wet heath. We used a long-term (15 yrs) climate change manipulation experiment with moderate sustained drought, which reduced the ability of the soil to retain soil moisture by degrading the soil structure, reducing moisture retention. Moreover, natural intense droughts superimposed themselves on the experiment, causing an unexpected additional alternative soil moisture state to develop, both for the drought manipulation and control plots; this impaired the soil from rewetting in winter. Our results show the coexistence of three stable states. Using modelling with the Hydrus 1D software package we are able to show the circumstances under which shifts in soil moisture states are likely to occur. Given the new understanding it presents a challenge of how to incorporate feedbacks, particularly related to soil structure, into soil flow and transport models?

  4. Soil microbial community responses to antibiotic-contaminated manure under different soil moisture regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Rüdiger; Radl, Viviane; Rosendahl, Ingrid; Albert, Andreas; Amelung, Wulf; Schloter, Michael; Thiele-Bruhn, Sören

    2014-01-01

    Sulfadiazine (SDZ) is an antibiotic frequently administered to livestock, and it alters microbial communities when entering soils with animal manure, but understanding the interactions of these effects to the prevailing climatic regime has eluded researchers. A climatic factor that strongly controls microbial activity is soil moisture. Here, we hypothesized that the effects of SDZ on soil microbial communities will be modulated depending on the soil moisture conditions. To test this hypothesis, we performed a 49-day fully controlled climate chamber pot experiments with soil grown with Dactylis glomerata (L.). Manure-amended pots without or with SDZ contamination were incubated under a dynamic moisture regime (DMR) with repeated drying and rewetting changes of >20 % maximum water holding capacity (WHCmax) in comparison to a control moisture regime (CMR) at an average soil moisture of 38 % WHCmax. We then monitored changes in SDZ concentration as well as in the phenotypic phospholipid fatty acid and genotypic 16S rRNA gene fragment patterns of the microbial community after 7, 20, 27, 34, and 49 days of incubation. The results showed that strongly changing water supply made SDZ accessible to mild extraction in the short term. As a result, and despite rather small SDZ effects on community structures, the PLFA-derived microbial biomass was suppressed in the SDZ-contaminated DMR soils relative to the CMR ones, indicating that dynamic moisture changes accelerate the susceptibility of the soil microbial community to antibiotics.

  5. Iron traps terrestrially derived dissolved organic matter at redox interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Thomas; Zak, Dominik; Biester, Harald; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Reactive iron and organic carbon are intimately associated in soils and sediments. However, to date, the organic compounds involved are uncharacterized on the molecular level. At redox interfaces in peatlands, where the biogeochemical cycles of iron and dissolved organic matter (DOM) are coupled, this issue can readily be studied. We found that precipitation of iron hydroxides at the oxic surface layer of two rewetted fens removed a large fraction of DOM via coagulation. On aeration of anoxic fen pore waters, >90% of dissolved iron and 27 ± 7% (mean ± SD) of dissolved organic carbon were rapidly (within 24 h) removed. Using ultra-high-resolution MS, we show that vascular plant-derived aromatic and pyrogenic compounds were preferentially retained, whereas the majority of carboxyl-rich aliphatic acids remained in solution. We propose that redox interfaces, which are ubiquitous in marine and terrestrial settings, are selective yet intermediate barriers that limit the flux of land-derived DOM to oceanic waters. PMID:23733946

  6. Temporal dynamics of hot desert microbial communities reveal structural and functional responses to water input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Alacia; Valverde, Angel; Ramond, Jean-Baptiste; Makhalanyane, Thulani P; Jansson, Janet K; Hopkins, David W; Aspray, Thomas J; Seely, Mary; Trindade, Marla I; Cowan, Don A

    2016-09-29

    The temporal dynamics of desert soil microbial communities are poorly understood. Given the implications for ecosystem functioning under a global change scenario, a better understanding of desert microbial community stability is crucial. Here, we sampled soils in the central Namib Desert on sixteen different occasions over a one-year period. Using Illumina-based amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we found that α-diversity (richness) was more variable at a given sampling date (spatial variability) than over the course of one year (temporal variability). Community composition remained essentially unchanged across the first 10 months, indicating that spatial sampling might be more important than temporal sampling when assessing β-diversity patterns in desert soils. However, a major shift in microbial community composition was found following a single precipitation event. This shift in composition was associated with a rapid increase in CO 2 respiration and productivity, supporting the view that desert soil microbial communities respond rapidly to re-wetting and that this response may be the result of both taxon-specific selection and changes in the availability or accessibility of organic substrates. Recovery to quasi pre-disturbance community composition was achieved within one month after rainfall.

  7. Soil Desiccation Techniques Strategies For Immobilization Of Deep Vadose Contaminants At The Hanford Central Plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benecke, M.W.; Chronister, G.B.; Truex, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Deep vadose zone contamination poses some of the most difficult remediation challenges for the protection of groundwater at the Hanford Site where processes and technologies are being developed and tested for use in the on-going effort to remediate mobile contamination in the deep vadose zone, the area deep beneath the surface. Historically, contaminants were discharged to the soil along with significant amounts of water, which continues to drive contaminants deeper in the vadose zone toward groundwater. Soil desiccation is a potential in situ remedial technology well suited for the arid conditions and the thick vadose zone at the Hanford Site. Desiccation techniques could reduce the advance of contaminants by removing the pore water to slow the rate of contaminants movement toward groundwater. Desiccation technologies have the potential to halt or slow the advance of contaminants in unsaturated systems, as well as aid in reduction of contaminants from these same areas. Besides reducing the water flux, desiccation also establishes capillary breaks that would require extensive rewetting to resume pore water transport. More importantly, these techniques have widespread application, whether the need is to isolate radio nuclides or address chemical contaminant issues. Three different desiccation techniques are currently being studied at Hanford.

  8. Copper Pollution Increases the Resistance of Soil Archaeal Community to Changes in Water Regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Liu, Yu-Rong; Cui, Li-Juan; Hu, Hang-Wei; Wang, Jun-Tao; He, Ji-Zheng

    2017-11-01

    Increasing efforts have been devoted to exploring the impact of environmental stresses on soil bacterial communities, but the work on the archaeal community is seldom. Here, we constructed microcosm experiments to investigate the responses of archaeal communities to the subsequent dry-rewetting (DW) disturbance in two contrasting soils (fluvo-aquic and red soil) after 6 years of copper pollution. Ten DW cycles were exerted on the two soils with different copper levels, followed by a 6-week recovery period. In both soils, archaeal diversity (Shannon index) in the high copper-level treatments increased over the incubation period, and archaeal community structure changed remarkably as revealed by the non-metric multidimensional scaling ordinations. In both soils, copper pollution altered the response of dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) to the DW disturbance. Throughout the incubation and recovery period, the resistance of archaeal abundance to the DW disturbance was higher in the copper-polluted soils than soils without pollution. Taken together, copper pollution altered the response of soil archaeal diversity and community composition to the DW disturbance and increased the resistance of the archaeal abundance. These findings have important implications for understanding soil microbial responses to ongoing environmental change.

  9. Time-scales of hydrological forcing on the geochemistry and bacterial community structure of temperate peat soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Flavia L. D.; Aquilina, Luc; De Ridder, Jo; Francez, André-Jean; Quaiser, Achim; Caudal, Jean-Pierre; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe; Dufresne, Alexis

    2015-10-01

    Peatlands are an important global carbon reservoir. The continued accumulation of carbon in peatlands depends on the persistence of anoxic conditions, in part induced by water saturation, which prevents oxidation of organic matter, and slows down decomposition. Here we investigate how and over what time scales the hydrological regime impacts the geochemistry and the bacterial community structure of temperate peat soils. Peat cores from two sites having contrasting groundwater budgets were subjected to four controlled drought-rewetting cycles. Pore water geochemistry and metagenomic profiling of bacterial communities showed that frequent water table drawdown induced lower concentrations of dissolved carbon, higher concentrations of sulfate and iron and reduced bacterial richness and diversity in the peat soil and water. Short-term drought cycles (3-9 day frequency) resulted in different communities from continuously saturated environments. Furthermore, the site that has more frequently experienced water table drawdown during the last two decades presented the most striking shifts in bacterial community structure, altering biogeochemical functioning of peat soils. Our results suggest that the increase in frequency and duration of drought conditions under changing climatic conditions or water resource use can induce profound changes in bacterial communities, with potentially severe consequences for carbon storage in temperate peatlands.

  10. Large-scale in situ heater tests for hydrothermal characterization at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscheck, T.A.; Wilder, D.G.; Nitao, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    To safely and permanently store high-level nuclear waste, the potential Yucca Mountain repository site must mitigate the release and transport of radionuclides for tens of thousands of years. In the failure scenario of greatest concern, water would contact a waste package, accelerate its failure rate, and eventually transport radionuclides to the water table. Our analyses indicate that the ambient hydrological system will be dominated by repository-heat-driven hydrothermal flow for tens of thousands of years. In situ heater tests are required to provide an understanding of coupled geomechanical-hydrothermal-geochemical behavior in the engineered and natural barriers under repository thermal loading conditions. In situ heater tests have been included in the Site Characterization Plan in response to regulatory requirements for site characterization and to support the validation of process models required to assess the total systems performance at the site. Because of limited time, some of the in situ tests will have to be accelerated relative to actual thermal loading conditions. We examine the trade-offs between the limited test duration and generating hydrothermal conditions applicable to repository performance during the entire thermal loading cycle, including heating (boiling and dry-out) and cooldown (re-wetting). For in situ heater tests to be applicable to actual repository conditions, a minimum heater test duration of 6-7 yr (including 4 yr of full-power heating) is required

  11. Granule size control and targeting in pulsed spray fluid bed granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Henrik; Liu, Anchang; Räikkönen, Heikki; Hatara, Juha; Antikainen, Osmo; Airaksinen, Sari; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Lou, Honxiang; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2009-07-30

    The primary aim of the study was to investigate the effects of pulsed liquid feed on granule size. The secondary aim was to increase knowledge of this technique in granule size targeting. Pulsed liquid feed refers to the pump changing between on- and off-positions in sequences, called duty cycles. One duty cycle consists of one on- and off-period. The study was performed with a laboratory-scale top-spray fluid bed granulator with duty cycle length and atomization pressure as studied variables. The liquid feed rate, amount and inlet air temperature were constant. The granules were small, indicating that the powder has only undergone ordered mixing, nucleation and early growth. The effect of atomizing pressure on granule size depends on inlet air relative humidity, with premature binder evaporation as a reason. The duty cycle length was of critical importance to the end product attributes, by defining the extent of intermittent drying and rewetting. By varying only the duty cycle length, it was possible to control granule nucleation and growth, with a wider granule size target range in increased relative humidity. The present study confirms that pulsed liquid feed in fluid bed granulation is a useful tool in end product particle size targeting.

  12. Fire Distribution in Peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra and Borneo in 2015 with Special Emphasis on Peatland Fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Jukka; Shi, Chenghua; Liew, Soo Chin

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we analyze the spatio-temporal distribution of vegetation fires in Peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra, and Borneo in the severe El Niño year of 2015, concentrating on the distribution of fires between mineral soils and peatland areas, and between land cover types in peatland areas. The results reveal that 53% of all Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire detections were recorded in peatlands that cover only 12% of the study area. However, fire occurrence in the peatland areas was highly dependent on land cover type. Pristine peat swamp forests (PSF) experienced only marginal fire activity (30 fire detections per 1000 km 2 ) compared to deforested undeveloped peatlands (831-915 fire detections per 1000 km 2 ). Our results also highlight the extreme fire vulnerability of the southern Sumatran and Bornean peatlands under strong El Niño conditions: 71% of all peatland hotspots were detected in the provinces of South Sumatra and Central Kalimantan, which contain 29% of peatlands in the study area. Degraded PSF and all deforested peatland land cover types, including managed areas, in the two provinces were severely affected, demonstrating how difficult it is to protect even managed drained agricultural areas from unwanted fires during dry periods. Our results thereby advocate rewetting and rehabilitation as the primary management option for highly fire prone degraded undeveloped peatland areas, whenever feasible, as a means to reduce fire risk during future dry episodes.

  13. Water potential changes in faecal matter and Escherichia coli survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, L M; Walker, M J

    2008-10-01

    This study investigated the influence of a range of evaporation rates (2.0, 5.3 and 7.4 mm day(-1)) on degradation of E. coli (ATCC Strain 25922) inoculated in canine faeces. Experiments were carried out in an environmental chamber and a first order exponential decay function (Chick's Law) was used to estimate degradation rates. We estimated die-off coefficients using linear regression. Die-off rates were -0.07, -0.22 and -0.23 h(-1), respectively, for evaporation rates of 2.0, 5.3 and 7.4 mm day(-1) (P = 0.000+, for each model). Nearly complete die-off was found within 15-60 h (7.4-2.0 mm day(-1) evaporation rates), which corresponds with a water potential of approximately -22.4 MPa. This study indicates that canine faeces need not be desiccated to achieve complete loss of indicator organisms. Water potential, which is a combination of osmotic and matric potential, is a key stress that increases as evaporation removes water from the faecal matrix and increases concentration of the remaining faecal solution. Evaporation may remove populations of indicator organisms in faeces relatively quickly, even though faeces are not completely dehydrated. This research may be used as the foundation for studies more closely resembling real-world evaporation conditions including diurnal fluctuations, rewetting and freezing.

  14. The NEPTUN experiments on LOCA thermal-hydraulics for tight-lattice PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreier, J.; Chawla, R.; Rouge, N.; Yanar, S.

    1990-01-01

    The NEPTUN test facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute is currently being used to provide a broad data base for the validation of thermal-hydraulics codes used in predicting the reflooding behaviour of a tight-lattice PWR (light water highb conversion reactor, LWHCR). The present paper gives a description of the facility and the matrix to be covered in the experimental program. Results are presented from a number of forced-feed, bottom-reflooding experiments, comparisons being made with (a) measurements carried out earlier for standard-PWR geometry and (b) the results of a calculational benchmark exercise conducted in the framework of a Swiss/German LWHCR-development agreement. Rewetting for the tight, hexagonal-geometry (p/d = 1.13) NEPTUN-III test bundle has been found to occur in all tests carried out to date, in which reasonably LWHCR-representative values for the various thermal-hydraulics parameters are used. Results of the calculational benchmark exercise have confirmed the need for further code development efforts for achieving reliable predictions of LWHCR reflooding behaviour. (author) 11 figs., 3 tabs., 3 refs

  15. Temporal dynamics of hot desert microbial communities reveal structural and functional responses to water input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Alacia; Valverde, Angel; Ramond, Jean-Baptiste; Makhalanyane, Thulani P.; Jansson, Janet K.; Hopkins, David W.; Aspray, Thomas J.; Seely, Mary; Trindade, Marla I.; Cowan, Don A.

    2016-09-29

    The temporal dynamics of desert soil microbial communities are poorly understood. Given the implications for ecosystem functioning under a global change scenario, a better understanding of desert microbial community stability is crucial. Here, we sampled soils in the central Namib Desert on sixteen different occasions over a one-year period. Using Illumina-based amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we found that α-diversity (richness) was more variable at a given sampling date (spatial variability) than over the course of one year (temporal variability). Community composition remained essentially unchanged across the first 10 months, indicating that spatial sampling might be more important than temporal sampling when assessing β-diversity patterns in desert soils. However, a major shift in microbial community composition was found following a single precipitation event. This shift in composition was associated with a rapid increase in CO2 respiration and productivity, supporting the view that desert soil microbial communities respond rapidly to re-wetting and that this response may be the result of both taxon-specific selection and changes in the availability or accessibility of organic substrates. Recovery to quasi pre-disturbance community composition was achieved within one month after rainfall.

  16. Reversibility of temperature driven discrete layer-by-layer formation of dioctyl-benzothieno-benzothiophene films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohr, M; Ehmann, H M A; Jones, A O F; Salzmann, I; Shen, Q; Teichert, C; Ruzié, C; Schweicher, G; Geerts, Y H; Resel, R; Sferrazza, M; Werzer, O

    2017-03-22

    Film forming properties of semiconducting organic molecules comprising alkyl-chains combined with an aromatic unit have a decisive impact on possible applications in organic electronics. In particular, knowledge on the film formation process in terms of wetting or dewetting, and the precise control of these processes, is of high importance. In the present work, the subtle effect of temperature on the morphology and structure of dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT) films deposited on silica surfaces by spin coating is investigated in situ via X-ray diffraction techniques and atomic force microscopy. Depending on temperature, bulk C8-BTBT exhibits a crystalline, a smectic A and an isotropic phase. Heating of thin C8-BTBT layers at temperatures below the smectic phase transition temperature leads to a strong dewetting of the films. Upon approaching the smectic phase transition, the molecules start to rewet the surface in the form of discrete monolayers with a defined number of monolayers being present at a given temperature. The wetting process and layer formation is well defined and thermally stable at a given temperature. On cooling the reverse effect is observed and dewetting occurs. This demonstrates the full reversibility of the film formation behavior and reveals that the layering process is defined by an equilibrium thermodynamic state, rather than by kinetic effects.

  17. The effect of long-term forestry drainage on the current state of peatland soils: A case study from the Central Sudetes, SW Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Glina

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available One important need in the context of peatland restoration is to gain knowledge of soil organic matter quality and current soil-forming process in degraded peatlands. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of long-term drainage on soil transformation processes. In autumn 2012, soil survey and sampling was carried out on five shallow peatlands in the Central Sudeten Mountains (Poland which had been drained for forestry use in the late 1800s or early 1900s. Four organic soils (Histosols and one organo-mineral soil (Histic Gleysol were studied. The surface soil horizons were mainly transformed due to long-term forestry drainage. Increased aeration of these layers had enhanced their content of labile forms of carbon and they were undergoing secondary transformation. Soil transformation was more advanced in fen peatlands than in transitional mire or raised bogs. Only the fens exhibited characteristic evidence of the moorsh-forming process. Further drying of these soils will negatively affect their rewetting potential and significantly reduce the effective application of restoration treatments. In order to reduce organic matter transformation and loss from the investigated peatland areas, their drainage ditches should be blocked. Additionally, some trees should be removed from their central areas to reduce evapotranspiration.

  18. First international workshop on fundamental aspects of post-dryout heat transfer: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.

    1984-12-01

    The purpose of the First International Workshop on Fundamental Aspects of Post-Dryout Heat Transfer was to review recent developments and the state of art in the field of post-dryout heat transfer. The workshop centered on interchanging ideas, reviewing current research results, and defining future research needs. The following five sessions dealing with the fundamental aspects of post-dryout heat transfer were held. A Computer Code Modeling and Flow Phenomena session was held dealing with flow rgimes, drop size, drop formation and behavior, interfacial area, interfacial drag, and computer modeling. A Quenching Phenomena session was held dealing with nature of rewetting, maximum wetting temperature, Leidenfrost phenomenon and heat transfer in the vicinity of quench front. A Low-Void Heat Transfer session was held dealing with inverted annular-flow heat transfer, inverted slug-flow heat transfer thermal non-equilibrium and computer modeling. A Dispersed-Flow Heat Transfer session was held dealing with drop interfacial heat transfer, vapor convection, thermal non-equilibrium and correlations and models

  19. Low methane flux from a constructed boreal wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M. G.; Humphreys, E.; Carey, S. K.

    2016-12-01

    The Sandhill Fen Watershed project in northern Alberta, Canada, is a pilot study in reconstructing a mixed upland and lowland boreal plain ecosystem. The physical construction of the 50 ha area was completed in 2012 and revegetation programs, through planting and seeding, began that same year and continued into 2013. Since then, the vegetation has developed a substantial cover over the reclaimed soil and peat substrates used to cap the engineered topography constructed from mine tailings. To monitor the dynamics of carbon cycling processes in this novel ecosystem, near weekly gas chamber measurements of methane fluxes were carried out over 3 growing seasons. Soil moisture, temperature and ion flux measurements, using Plant Root Simulator probes, were also collected alongside the gas flux plots. In the 3rd season, a transect was established in the lowlands along a moisture gradient to collect continuous reduction-oxidation potential measurements along with these other variables. Overall, methane effluxes remained low relative to what is expected for rewetted organic substrates. However, there is a trend over time towards increasing methane gas emissions that coincides with increasing fluxes of reduced metal ions and decreasing fluxes of sulphate in the fully saturated substrates. The suppressed levels of methane fluxes are possibly due to naturally occurring high levels of sulphate in the donor materials used to cap the ecosystem construction.

  20. Long-term nitrogen addition affects the phylogenetic turnover of soil microbial community responding to moisture pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chi; Yao, Minjie; Stegen, James C; Rui, Junpeng; Li, Jiabao; Li, Xiangzhen

    2017-12-13

    How press disturbance (long-term) influences the phylogenetic turnover of soil microbial communities responding to pulse disturbances (short-term) is not fully known. Understanding the complex connections between the history of environmental conditions, assembly processes and microbial community dynamics is necessary to predict microbial response to perturbation. We started by investigating phylogenetic spatial turnover (based on DNA) of soil prokaryotic communities after long-term nitrogen (N) deposition and temporal turnover (based on RNA) of communities responding to pulse by conducting short-term rewetting experiments. The results showed that moderate N addition increased ecological stochasticity and phylogenetic diversity. In contrast, high N addition slightly increased homogeneous selection and decreased phylogenetic diversity. Examining the system with higher phylogenetic resolution revealed a moderate contribution of variable selection across the whole N gradient. The moisture pulse experiment showed that high N soils had higher rates of phylogenetic turnover across short phylogenetic distances and significant changes in community compositions through time. Long-term N input history influenced spatial turnover of microbial communities, but the dominant community assembly mechanisms differed across different N deposition gradients. We further revealed an interaction between press and pulse disturbances whereby deterministic processes were particularly important following pulse disturbances in high N soils.

  1. Energetic utilization of Paludi biomass; Energetische Nutzung von Paludi-Biomassen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlhaus, Matthias; Jantzen, Christian [Fachhochschule Stralsund (DE). Inst. fuer Regenerative EnergieSysteme (IRES)

    2011-07-01

    Paludiculture as the new way of adapted cultivation from wetlands can provide a significant contribution to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. Definite statements about the possible emission reductions, by first avoidance (rewetting) and second substitution of fossil fuels can be made only by the results of the current research project. The material use of the Paludi-biomass would be favored from an energetic point of view. Unfortunately, caused of the high opportunity costs, there are only niche markets currently. The possibilities of energy use from this biomass will reduce both environmental and economic reasons, to the direct thermal conversion. The fuel properties are in some aspects similar to those of wood. The compaction of these harbaceous crops to pellets or briquettes is advantageous from an economic and process engineering point of view but requires an energy-intensive conditioning of the biomass. During the combustion some problems appears can be traced on the high mineral content as well as the low temperature when the ash is melting (ash melting behavior). The combination of these two factors requires the use of suitable additives regarding to a continuous operation of a conversation plan. (orig.)

  2. ELECTRICAL IMAGING AT THE LARGE BLOCK TEST YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.

    2000-01-01

    A monolithic block of densely welded tuff was excavated from a site on Fran Ridge near Yucca Mountain, Nevada so that coupled thermohydrological processes could be studied in a controlled, in situ experiment. A series of heaters were placed in a horizontal plane about 3 m from the top of the 3 m by 3 m by 4.5 m high block. Temperatures were measured at many points within and on the block surface and a suite of other measurements were taken to define the thermal and hydrologic response. Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to map 2 dimensional images of moisture content changes along four planes in the block. The ERT images clearly delineate the drying and wetting of the rockmass during the 13 months of heating and subsequent six months of cool down. The main feature is a prominent dry zone that forms around the heaters then gradually disappears as the rock cools down. Other features include linear anomalies of decreasing moisture content which are fractures dehydrating as the block heats up. There are also examples of compact anomalies of wetting. Some of these appear to be water accumulation in fractures which are draining condensate from the block. Others may be rain water entering a fracture at the top of the block. During cooldown a general rewetting is observed although this is less certain because of poor data quality during this stage of the experiment

  3. Uncovering stability mechanisms in microbial ecosystems - combining microcosm experiments, computational modelling and ecological theory in a multidisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrich, Anja; König, Sara; Banitz, Thomas; Centler, Florian; Frank, Karin; Kästner, Matthias; Miltner, Anja; Thullner, Martin; Wick, Lukas

    2015-04-01

    Although bacterial degraders in soil are commonly exposed to fluctuating environmental conditions, the functional performance of the biodegradation processes can often be maintained by resistance and resilience mechanisms. However, there is still a gap in the mechanistic understanding of key factors contributing to the stability of such an ecosystem service. Therefore we developed an integrated approach combining microcosm experiments, simulation models and ecological theory to directly make use of the strengths of these disciplines. In a continuous interplay process, data, hypotheses, and central questions are exchanged between disciplines to initiate new experiments and models to ultimately identify buffer mechanisms and factors providing functional stability. We focus on drying and rewetting-cycles in soil ecosystems, which are a major abiotic driver for bacterial activity. Functional recovery of the system was found to depend on different spatial processes in the computational model. In particular, bacterial motility is a prerequisite for biodegradation if either bacteria or substrate are heterogeneously distributed. Hence, laboratory experiments focussing on bacterial dispersal processes were conducted and confirmed this finding also for functional resistance. Obtained results will be incorporated into the model in the next step. Overall, the combination of computational modelling and laboratory experiments identified spatial processes as the main driving force for functional stability in the considered system, and has proved a powerful methodological approach.

  4. The fate of recently fixed carbon after drought release: towards unravelling C storage regulation in Tilia platyphyllos and Pinus sylvestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiano, Lucía; Timofeeva, Galina; Saurer, Matthias; Siegwolf, Rolf; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Hommel, Robert; Gessler, Arthur

    2017-09-01

    Carbon reserves are important for maintaining tree function during and after stress. Increasing tree mortality driven by drought globally has renewed the interest in how plants regulate allocation of recently fixed C to reserve formation. Three-year-old seedlings of two species (Tilia platyphyllos and Pinus sylvestris) were exposed to two intensities of experimental drought during ~10 weeks, and 13 C pulse labelling was subsequently applied with rewetting. Tracking the 13 C label across different organs and C compounds (soluble sugars, starch, myo-inositol, lipids and cellulose), together with the monitoring of gas exchange and C mass balances over time, allowed for the identification of variations in C allocation priorities and tree C balances that are associated with drought effects and subsequent drought release. The results demonstrate that soluble sugars accumulated in P. sylvestris under drought conditions independently of growth trends; thus, non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) formation cannot be simply considered a passive overflow process in this species. Once drought ceased, C allocation to storage was still prioritized at the expense of growth, which suggested the presence of 'drought memory effects', possibly to ensure future growth and survival. On the contrary, NSC and growth dynamics in T. platyphyllos were consistent with a passive (overflow) view of NSC formation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Paludiculture. A regional bio energy concept for Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania; Paludikultur. Ein regionales Bioenergiekozept fuer Mecklenburg-Vorpommern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Christian; Dahms, Tobias; Joosten, Hans [Greifswald Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Botanik und Landschaftsoekologie; Wichmann, Sabine [Greifswald Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Botanik und Landschaftsoekologie; DUENE e.V., Greifswald (Germany); Wichtmann, Wendelin [DUENE e.V., Greifswald (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Approximately 13 %, 300.000 ha, of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania are covered with peatlands that are mainly drained for agriculture. Peatland drainage induces decomposition and continuing subsidence (lowering) of the peat surface, which requires ever increasing investments in deeper drainage. As a result of drainage and subsequent peat oxidation, the peatlands of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania emit 6 Mio t CO{sub 2}eq a{sup -1}, i.e. 30 % of the state's overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Alternative land use options must be developed and implemented to reduce GHG emissions. A promising option is paludiculture: the production of biomass on rewetted peatlands. Paludiculture (Latin 'palus' = swamp) provides land use opportunities that avoid peat degradation by installing and maintaining permanently water saturated soil conditions. New techniques for harvesting biomass from wet peatlands and for using wetland biomass as a raw material for industry and for energy generation are now being tested in the VIP Project Vorpommern Initiative Paludiculture. Here we present the first experiences from implementing paludiculture in Vorpommern. Furthermore we estimate the production potential of wetland biomass in Mecklenburg-West Pomerania. (orig.)

  6. Towards developing IPCC methane ‘emission factors’ for peatlands (organic soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Couwenberg

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available (1 Huge reductions of carbon dioxide (CO2 and nitrous oxide (N2O effluxes can be attained by rewetting drained peatlands, but this will increase methane (CH4 effluxes.(2 The scientific data base for methane effluxes from peatlands is much larger than that for CO2 or N2O. Once anoxic conditions are provided, the availability of fresh plant material is the major factor in methane production. Old (recalcitrant peat plays only a subordinate role in gas efflux.(3 The annual mean water level is a surprisingly good indicator for methane effluxes, but at high water levels the cover of aerenchymous shunts (gas conductive plant tissue becomes a better proxy. Ideally, both water level and cover of aerenchymous shunts should be assessed to arrive at robust estimates of methane effluxes.(4 The available data provide sufficient guidance for arriving at moderately accurate (Tier 1 estimates consistent with IPCC methodologies. For more accurate estimation (higher tier approaches, vegetation provides a promising basis for development of more detailed efflux factors. Vegetation is a good proxy for mean water levels and can provide - with extra attention to aerenchymous shunts - a robust proxy for accurate and spatially explicit estimates of methane effluxes over large areas.

  7. Short-term vegetation change on rehabilitated peatland on Rietvlei Nature Reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.E. Venter

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural peatlands occur on the Rietvlei Nature Reserve. Before the Pretoria City Council acquired the land, these peatlands were mined by private land-owners. Ditches were constructed to drain the area for mining and the peatlands became desicrated. Later the area was proclaimed as a nature reserve and has since then been managed as such. Rehabilitation of the drained peatland on Rietvlei Nature Reserve first started in 2000 as a Working for Water project. The aim of the rehabilitation was to close the ditches and rewet the peatland, to enable possible revival of the peatland. A baseline vegetation survey was undertaken during the summer (March to April of 2001 to determine the nature of the pioneer communities that established on the rehabilitated area. This survey was repeated during the summer (March to April of 2002 to detect changes in the vegetation. The same sample plots were used on both occasions. The initial pioneer vegetation was mostly composed of weedy annuals.

  8. Electrical resistivity monitoring of the single heater test in Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.

    1997-10-01

    Of the several thermal, mechanical and hydrological measurements being used to monitor the rockmass response in the Single Heater Test, electrical resistance tomography (ERT) is being used to monitor the movement of liquid water with a special interest in the movement of condensate out of the system. Images of resistivity change were calculated using data collected before, during and after the heating episode. This report will concentrate on the results obtained after heating ceased; previous reports discuss the results obtained during the heating phase. The changes recovered show a region of increasing resistivity approximately centered around the heater as the rock mass cooled. The size of this region grows with time and the resistivity increases become stronger. The increases in resistivity are caused by both temperature and saturation changes. The Waxman Smits model has been used to calculate rock saturation after accounting for temperature effects. The saturation estimates suggest that during the heating phase, a region of drying forms around the heater. During the cooling phase, the dry region has remained relatively stable. Wetter rock regions which developed below the heater during the heating phase, are slowly becoming smaller in size during the cooling phase. The last set of images indicate that some rewetting of the dry zone may be occurring. The accuracy of the saturation estimates depends on several factors that are only partly understood

  9. Effect of polymers on the retention and aging of enzyme on bioactive papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohidus Samad; Haniffa, Sharon B M; Slater, Alison; Garnier, Gil

    2010-08-01

    The effect of polymer on the retention and the thermal stability of bioactive enzymatic papers was measured using a colorimetric technique quantifying the intensity of the enzyme-substrate product complex. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was used as model enzyme. Three water soluble polymers: a cationic polyacrylamide (CPAM), an anionic polyacrylic acid (PAA) and a neutral polyethylene oxide (PEO) were selected as retention aids. The model polymers increased the enzyme adsorption on paper by around 50% and prevented enzyme desorption upon rewetting of the papers. The thermal deactivation of ALP retained on paper with polymers follows two sequential first order reactions. This was also observed for ALP simply physisorbed on paper. The retention aid polymers instigated a rapid initial deactivation which significantly decreased the longevity of the enzymatic papers. This suggests some enzyme-polymer interaction probably affecting the enzyme tertiary structure. A deactivation mathematical model predicting the enzymatic paper half-life was developed. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Some preliminary results of post-dryout heat transfer measurements at low qualities and pressures up to 20 bar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swinnerton, D.; Pearson, K.G.; O'Mahoney, R.

    1987-01-01

    Steady state data have been obtained on post-dryout heat transfer for flow in a tube of inside diameter 10 mm and length 920 mm. The experiments covered mass velocities up to 200 kg/m 2 s at 10 and 20 bar and up to 1000 kg/m 2 s at 2 and 5 bar. Inlet qualities were close to zero and the equilibrium quality at exit ranged up to 60%. The tube was prevented from rewetting by massive copper hot patches, brazed to it at each end. Surface temperature measurements were made along the length of the tube. An in-stream thermocouple inserted into the flow at exit from the tube provided a measure of vapor temperature at this location. Typical sets of data are presented and the trends discussed. These new data extend the range of the available database against which the combined effects of the heat transfer and hydraulic models in reactor safety codes can be assessed. Comparisons are made with predictions obtained using the TRAC-PF1/MOD1 computer code and the reflood code BERTHA

  11. Simulation of a postulated 2% cold leg break in Angra 2 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmieiri, Elcio Tadeu; Azevedo, Carlos Vicente Goulart de; Aronne, Ivan Dionysio

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the simulation of a 2% break in the cold leg pipe of Angra 2 nuclear power plant, with the computer code RELAP5/Mod3.3. The main boundary conditions specified for this simulation were: no injection from high pressure injection system; enhanced depressurization of the primary system by opening the pressure operated relief valve (PORV) and the safety relief valve (SRV) when core temperature reaches circa 100 K above saturation; and accumulator injection starting at 2.7 MPa. The specific objectives to be addressed with this simulation are: the core boil-off and dryout at relatively high pressure in the primary system; the phenomena during enhanced primary depressurization; the effectiveness of hot leg accumulator injection into the partially uncovered rod bundle; and the core rewetting. The results obtained were compared with the Lobi A1-93 test, which was performed under the same boundary conditions. This activity was executed in the scope of IAEA research project Evaluation of Uncertainties in the Simulation of Accidents in Angra 2 using RELAP5/MOD3 Code Applying CIAU Methodology (author)

  12. Plasmid stability in dried cells of the desert cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis and its potential for GFP imaging of survivors on Earth and in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billi, Daniela

    2012-06-01

    Two GFP-based plasmids, namely pTTQ18-GFP-pDU1(mini) and pDUCA7-GFP, of about 7 kbp and 15 kbp respectively, able to replicate in Chroococcidiopsis sp. CCMEE 029 and CCMEE 123, were developed. Both plasmids were maintained in Chroococcidiopsis cells after 18 months of dry storage as demonstrated by colony PCR, plasmid restriction analysis, GFP imaging and colony-forming ability under selection of dried transformants; thus suggesting that strategies employed by this cyanobacterium to stabilize dried chromosomal DNA, must have protected plasmid DNA. The suitability of pDU1(mini)-plasmid for GFP tagging in Chroococcidiopsis was investigated by using the RecA homolog of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. After 2 months of dry storage, the presence of dried cells with a GFP-RecA(Syn) distribution resembling that of hydrated cells, supported its capability of preventing desiccation-induced genome damage, whereas the rewetted cells with filamentous GFP-RecA(Syn) structures revealed sub-lethal DNA damage. The long-term stability of plasmid DNA in dried Chroococcidiopsis has implication for space research, for example when investigating the recovery of dried cells after Martian and space simulations or when developing life support systems based on phototrophs with genetically enhanced stress tolerance and stored in the dry state for prolonged periods.

  13. Radiation Synthesis of Superabsorbent Polymers Based on Natural Polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Murat; Hayrabolulu, Hande

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of proposed research contract were first synthesize superabsorbent polymers based on natural polymers to be used as disposable diapers and soil conditioning materials in agriculture, horticulture and other super adsorbent using industries. We have planned to use the natural polymers; locust beam gum, tara gum, guar gum and sodium alginate on the preparation of natural superabsorbent polymers(SAP). The aqueous solution of natural polymers and their blends with trace amount of monomer and cross-linking agents will be irradiated in paste like conditions by gamma rays for the preparation of cross-linked superabsorbent systems. The water absorption and deswellling capacity of prepared super adsorbents and retention capacity, absorbency under load, suction power, swelling pressure and pet-rewet properties will be determined. Use of these materials instead of synthetic super absorbents will be examined by comparing the performance of finished products. The experimental studies achieved in the second year of project mainly on the effect of radiation on the chemistry of sodium alginate polymers in different irradiation conditions and structure-property relationship particularly with respect to radiation induced changes on the molecular weight of natural polymers and preliminary studies on the synthesis of natural-synthetic hydride super adsorbent polymers were given in details

  14. Ancient Soils in a Sunburnt Country: Nutrient and Carbon Distributions in an Australian Dryland River System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, R. E.; Grierson, P. F.; Adams, M. A.

    2005-05-01

    Riparian systems are hotspots in dryland landscapes for nutrient supply and transformation. Biogeochemical fluxes in riparian systems are closely coupled to hydrological flowpaths, which, in dryland regions, are characterised by catastrophic flooding and long periods of erratic or no flow. Re-wetting of soils stimulates soil microbial processes that drive mineralization of nutrients necessary for plant growth. We present here the first data of a 3-year research project investigating biogeochemical processes in riparian systems in the semi-arid Pilbara region of Western Australia. Spatial patterns of nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon were closely related to topographic zone (across floodplain and channels) and vegetation type. NO3- and PCi concentrations were four-fold higher in channel, bank and riparian soils than in soils of floodplain and riparian-floodplain transition zones. Nitrogen distribution was highly heterogeneous in riparian soils (NO3- CV=102%, NH4+ CV=84%) while phosphorus was particularly heterogeneous in floodplain soils (PCi CV=153%, PCo CV=266%), in comparison to other zones. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and enzymatic profiles will be used to assess microbial functional groups, combined with mineralisation experiments and stable isotope studies (15N and 13C). These data will improve understanding of biogeochemical cycling in dryland riparian systems, and contribute to improved regional management of water resources.

  15. RELAP5 model to simulate the thermal-hydraulic effects of grid spacers and cladding rupture during reflood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nithianandan, C.K.; Klingenfus, J.A.; Reilly, S.S. [B& W Nuclear Technologies, Lynchburg, VA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Droplet breakup at spacer grids and a cladding swelled and ruptured locations plays an important role in the cooling of nuclear fuel rods during the reflooding period of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). During the reflood phase, a spacer grid affects the thermal-hydraulic system behavior through increased turbulence, droplet breakup due to impact on grid straps, grid rewetting, and liquid holdup due to grid form losses. Recently, models to simulate spacer grid effects and blockage and rupture effects on system thermal hydraulics were added to the B&W Nuclear Technologies (BWNT) version of the RELAP5/MOD2 computer code. Several FLECHT-SEASET forced reflood tests, CCTF Tests C1-19 and C2-6, SCTF Test S3-15, and G2 Test 561 were simulated using RELAP5/MOD2-B&W to verify the applicability of the model at the cladding swelled and rupture locations. The results demonstrate the importance of modeling the thermal-hydraulic effects due to grids, and clad swelling and rupture to correctly predict the clad temperature response during the reflood phase of large break LOCA. The RELAP5 models and the test results are described in this paper.

  16. Contrasting vulnerability of drained tropical and high-latitude peatlands to fluvial loss of stored carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Chris D.; Page, Susan E.; Jones, Tim; Moore, Sam; Gauci, Vincent; Laiho, Raija; Hruška, Jakub; Allott, Tim E. H.; Billett, Michael F.; Tipping, Ed; Freeman, Chris; Garnett, Mark H.

    2014-11-01

    Carbon sequestration and storage in peatlands rely on consistently high water tables. Anthropogenic pressures including drainage, burning, land conversion for agriculture, timber, and biofuel production, cause loss of pressures including drainage, burning, land conversion for agriculture, timber, and biofuel production, cause loss of peat-forming vegetation and exposure of previously anaerobic peat to aerobic decomposition. This can shift peatlands from net CO2 sinks to large CO2 sources, releasing carbon held for millennia. Peatlands also export significant quantities of carbon via fluvial pathways, mainly as dissolved organic carbon (DOC). We analyzed radiocarbon (14C) levels of DOC in drainage water from multiple peatlands in Europe and Southeast Asia, to infer differences in the age of carbon lost from intact and drained systems. In most cases, drainage led to increased release of older carbon from the peat profile but with marked differences related to peat type. Very low DOC-14C levels in runoff from drained tropical peatlands indicate loss of very old (centuries to millennia) stored peat carbon. High-latitude peatlands appear more resilient to drainage; 14C measurements from UK blanket bogs suggest that exported DOC remains young (use changes in the tropics. Data from the UK Peak District, an area where air pollution and intensive land management have triggered Sphagnum loss and peat erosion, suggest that additional anthropogenic pressures may trigger fluvial loss of much older (>500 year) carbon in high-latitude systems. Rewetting at least partially offsets drainage effects on DOC age.

  17. Sphagnum farming on cut-over bog in NW Germany: Long-term studies on Sphagnum growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gaudig

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Sphagnum farming allows sustainable and climate-friendly land use on bogs while producing a renewable substitute for peat in horticultural growing media. We studied Sphagnum productivity on an experimental Sphagnum culture established on a cut-over bog in Germany with strongly humified peat at the surface. Preparation of the site included levelling of the peat surface, construction of an irrigation system, spreading of Sphagnum papillosum fragments, covering them with straw, and finally rewetting. Provided there was an adequate (95 % initial cover of Sphagnum fragments, the most relevant variables for Sphagnum productivity were found to be water supply and regular mowing of vascular plants. As long as sufficient water was supplied, the dry biomass accumulation of the established Sphagnum lawn remained high, reaching 3.7 t ha-1 yr-1 between 2007 and 2011. Annual dry Sphagnum biomass productivity over the period 2010–2011 was up to 6.9 t ha-1. During periods when high water table could not be maintained, substantial decomposition of the previously accumulated biomass occurred. After nine years the net accumulated dry mass per hectare was on average 19.5 t of pure Sphagnum and 0.7 t of subsurface vascular-plant biomass. Nitrogen deposition in the study region is apparently sufficient to support fast Sphagnum growth, whereas phosphorus and potassium may be limiting.

  18. What rules GHG-(greenhouse gas)-fluxes in a prealpine bog - management or watertable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Christoph; Drösler, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    Being an important sink of carbon, the small stripe of bogs in the foreland of the Alps plays an important role for the carbon balance of Germany. A big part was drained for peat-use and to get agricultural land in the last centuries. Restoration of these degraded bogs can help to rebuild this function, whereas the watertable is an important co-factor for the amount of mitigation of greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4 and N2O). To estimate GHG-balances gas-flux measurements, using the chamber method developed by Drösler (2005) were done in 2007 and 2008 on a degraded bog-meadow, which was partly rewetted in 1993 and which is still managed in large areas. This mosaic of restored, drained and managed areas showed big differences in their carbon-balances from a high source (~ 500 g CO2-C m-2 a-1) to a moderate sink (~ -200 g CO2-C m-2 a-1). Where the management was stopped in 1993, some Sphagnum-communities developed which helped to turn these areas from moderate sources (47 g CO2-C m-2 a-1) or sinks (-58 g CO2-C m-2 a-1) to permanent sinks with uptakes between (-150 and -250 g CO2-C m-2 a-1). Key words: bog, carbon-balance, greenhouse gases, restoration, watertable

  19. Greenhouse gas balance of an establishing Sphagnum culture on a former bog grassland in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Günther

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The cultivation of Sphagnum mosses on re-wetted peat bogs for use in horticulture is a new land use strategy. We provide the first greenhouse gas balances for a field-scale Sphagnum farming experiment on former bog grassland, in its establishment phase. Over two years we used closed chambers to make measurements of GHG exchange on production strips of Sphagnum palustre L. and Sphagnum papillosum Lindb. and on irrigation ditches. Methane fluxes of both Sphagnum species showed a significant decrease over the study period. This trend was stronger for S. papillosum. In contrast, the estimated CO2 fluxes did not show a significant temporal trend over the study period. The production strips of both Sphagnum species were net GHG sinks of 5–9 t ha 1 a 1 (in CO2-equivalents during the establishment phase of the moss carpets. In comparison, the ditches were a CO2 source instead of a CO2 sink and emitted larger amounts of CH4, resulting in net GHG release of ~11 t ha 1 a 1 CO2-equivalents. We conclude that Sphagnum farming fields should be designed to minimise the area covered by irrigation ditches. Overall, Sphagnum farming on bogs has lower on-field GHG emissions than low-intensity agriculture.

  20. The emission of nitrous oxide upon wetting a rice soil following a dry season fallow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, B. H.; Holt, L. S.; Austin, E. R.

    1993-12-01

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to measure nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from a soil, which had been planted to flooded transplanted rice, as it was rewetted to simulate the end of a dry season fallow period. The pots of soil had been cropped to transplanted rice with two commonly used nitrogen (N) fertilizer treatments and a control, and the soil had been puddled before transplanting. Large amounts of nitrate N accumulated in the soils during the dry season fallow, and the N fertilizers applied to the previous crop had little effect on nitrate accumulation. There was little N2O emission during the nitrification period. With water additions meant to simulate rainfall events at the beginning of a wet season, the soil redox dropped slightly, and large amounts of N2O began to be emitted. Large emissions began 5 days after each of the two simulated rainy season watering events and stopped abruptly at soil saturation, even though considerable amounts of nitrate still remained in the soil after saturation. Total measured emissions amounted to 6 to 7 kg N2O-N ha-1 for the period. Although these measurements were made in a system which may have favored nitrate accumulation, they are the first known measurements of N2O made from a rice soil as it is wetted. Nitrous oxide emitted from the flooding of rice soils that have accumulated nitrate during a dry season fallow may be a major source of N2O additions to the atmosphere.

  1. Analysis of heat transfer under high heat flux nucleate boiling conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.; Dinh, N. [3145 Burlington Laboratories, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Analysis was performed for a heater infrared thermometric imaging temperature data obtained from high heat flux pool boiling and liquid film boiling experiments BETA. With the OpenFOAM solver, heat flux distribution towards the coolant was obtained by solving transient heat conduction of heater substrate given the heater surface temperature data as boundary condition. The so-obtained heat flux data was used to validate them against the state-of-art wall boiling model developed by D. R. Shaver (2015) with the assumption of micro-layer hydrodynamics. Good agreement was found between the model prediction and data for conditions away from the critical heat flux (CHF). However, the data indicate a different heat transfer pattern under CHF, which is not captured by the current model. Experimental data strengthen the notion of burnout caused by the irreversible hot spot due to failure of rewetting. The observation forms a basis for a detailed modeling of micro-layer hydrodynamics under high heat flux.

  2. The CHF enhancement on pool boiling using nano-fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Won Joon; Jeong, Yong Hoon

    2009-01-01

    A increase of CHF was observed with nano-fluid. The addition of nano-particle helped to increase the wettability. This happens with the decrease in bubble diameter, breakup of bubbles and avoidance of bubble coalescence. CHF increase or decrease depends upon competition between high wettability and high instability. An optimum nano-fluid concentration is needed which must have high crystalline content. When the concentration reaches at a critical value, CHF will tend to a constant value. Deposition of nano-particles increasing the wettability and the rewetting are cause of CHF enhancement. It delay the growth of dry patch by increasing of wettability and lead to CHF enhancement. Now, we must define the wettability of nano-fluids. At case of nano-fluids using metallic particle, the explanation using contact angle using was reasonable. But, at case of nan-fluids using hydrophobic CNT, this explanation can't be acceptable. Moreover, at case of surfactant solution, contact angle was very low. But CHF enhancement was not great. So, wettability about nano-fluids must be defined anew for explanation of CHF enhancement. I suggest the extension of micro layer are acceptable concept for increasing wettability using nano-fluids

  3. Deformation, oxidation and embrittlement of PWB fuel cladding in a loss-of-coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, P.D.; Hindle, E.D.; Mann, C.A.

    1986-09-01

    The scope of this report is limited to the oxidation, embrittlement and deformation of PWB fuel in a loss of coolant accident in which the emergency core coolant systems operate in accordance with the design, ie accidents within the design basis of the plant. A brief description is given of the thermal hydraulic events during large and small breaks of the primary circuit, followed by the correct functioning and remedial action of the emergency core cooling systems. The possible damage to the fuel cladding during these events is also described. The basic process of oxidation of zircaloy-4 fuel cladding by steam, and the reaction kinetics of the oxidation are reviewed in detail. Variables having a possible influence on the oxidation kinetics are also considered. The embrittlement of zircaloy-4 cladding by oxidation is also reviewed in detail. It is related to fracture during the thermal shock of rewetting or by the ambient impact forces as a result of post-accident fuel handling. Criteria based both on total oxidation and on the detailed distribution of oxygen through the oxidised cladding wall are considered. The published computer codes for the calculation of oxygen concentration are reviewed in terms of the model employed and the limitations apparent in these models when calculating oxygen distribution in cladding in the actual conditions of a loss of coolant accident. The factors controlling the deformation and rupture of cladding in a loss of coolant accident are reviewed in detail.

  4. Technical basis and programmatic requirements for Engineered Barrier System Field Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wunan.

    1992-11-01

    The purpose of this study plant is to describe tests known as Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (EBSFT), which are to be conducted in the Exploratory Study Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The EBSFT is designed to provide information on the interaction between waste packages (simulated by heated containers), the surrounding rock mass, and its vadose water. The Yucca Mountain site is being characterized to determine its suitability as a potential deep geological repository for high-level nuclear waste. Water is the main medium by which radioactive nuclides travel to the accessible environment. Therefore, the movement of water over the approximate 10,000--year lifetime required for radioactive nuclide decay must be understood. Development of a repository and emplacement of nuclear wastes impose stress loadings on the repository rock mass. The stress loadings include (1) thermal energy and irradiation from the waste packages, and (2) mechanical stress due to the mining of openings, and the transporting of waste canisters. The influence f the thermal stress may extend to all lithological units, including the saturated zone under the ground water table, in Yucca Mountain. In general, the purpose of this study is to investigate the movement of water in the rock mass under the influence of the thermal loading of the waste packages. Specifically, the study will investigate heat flow mechanism, relationship between boiling and dry-out, and the rewetting of the dry-out region when the repository is cooled down

  5. Habitat Fragmentation can Modulate Drought Effects on the Plant-soil-microbial System in Mediterranean Holm Oak (Quercus ilex) Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Rentería, Dulce; Curiel Yuste, Jorge; Rincón, Ana; Brearley, Francis Q; García-Gil, Juan Carlos; Valladares, Fernando

    2015-05-01

    Ecological transformations derived from habitat fragmentation have led to increased threats to above-ground biodiversity. However, the impacts of forest fragmentation on soils and their microbial communities are not well understood. We examined the effects of contrasting fragment sizes on the structure and functioning of soil microbial communities from holm oak forest patches in two bioclimatically different regions of Spain. We used a microcosm approach to simulate the annual summer drought cycle and first autumn rainfall (rewetting), evaluating the functional response of a plant-soil-microbial system. Forest fragment size had a significant effect on physicochemical characteristics and microbial functioning of soils, although the diversity and structure of microbial communities were not affected. The response of our plant-soil-microbial systems to drought was strongly modulated by the bioclimatic conditions and the fragment size from where the soils were obtained. Decreasing fragment size modulated the effects of drought by improving local environmental conditions with higher water and nutrient availability. However, this modulation was stronger for plant-soil-microbial systems built with soils from the northern region (colder and wetter) than for those built with soils from the southern region (warmer and drier) suggesting that the responsiveness of the soil-plant-microbial system to habitat fragmentation was strongly dependent on both the physicochemical characteristics of soils and the historical adaptation of soil microbial communities to specific bioclimatic conditions. This interaction challenges our understanding of future global change scenarios in Mediterranean ecosystems involving drier conditions and increased frequency of forest fragmentation.

  6. Optical performance of multifocal soft contact lenses via a single-pass method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakaraju, Ravi C; Ehrmann, Klaus; Falk, Darrin; Ho, Arthur; Papas, Eric

    2012-08-01

    A physical model eye capable of carrying soft contact lenses (CLs) was used as a platform to evaluate optical performance of several commercial multifocals (MFCLs) with high- and low-add powers and a single-vision control. Optical performance was evaluated at three pupil sizes, six target vergences, and five CL-correcting positions using a spatially filtered monochromatic (632.8 nm) light source. The various target vergences were achieved by using negative trial lenses. A photosensor in the retinal plane recorded the image point-spread that enabled the computation of visual Strehl ratios. The centration of CLs was monitored by an additional integrated en face camera. Hydration of the correcting lens was maintained using a humidity chamber and repeated instillations of rewetting saline drops. All the MFCLs reduced performance for distance but considerably improved performance along the range of distance to near target vergences, relative to the single-vision CL. Performance was dependent on add power, design, pupil, and centration of the correcting CLs. Proclear (D) design produced good performance for intermediate vision, whereas Proclear (N) design performed well at near vision (p 4 mm in diameter. Acuvue Oasys bifocal produced performance comparable with single-vision CL for most vergences. Direct measurement of single-pass images at the retinal plane of a physical model eye used in conjunction with various MFCLs is demonstrated. This method may have utility in evaluating the relative effectiveness of commercial and prototype designs.

  7. Heat tranfer decrease during water boiling in a tube for the heat flux step distribution by the tube length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remizov, O.V.; Sergeev, V.V.; Yurkov, Yu.I.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the heat flux distribution along the circular tube length on supercritical convective heat transfer at parameters typical for steam generators heated by liquid metal is studied. The effect of conditions in a under- and a supercritical zones of a vertical tube with independently heated lower and upper sections on supercritical convective heat transfer is studied on a water circulation loop at 9.8-17.7 MPa pressure and 330-1000 kg/m 2 s mass velocities. The experimental heat fluxes varied within the following limits: at the upper section from 0 to 474 kW/m 2 , at the lower section from 190 to 590 kW/m 2 . Analysis of the obtained data shows that when heat flux changes in the supercritical zone rewetting of the heated surface and simultaneous existence of two critical zones are observed. The effect of heat flux in the supercritical zone on convective heat transfer is ambiguous: the heat flux growth up to 60-100 kW/m 2 leads to increasing minimum values of the heat transfer factor in the supercritical zone, and a further heat flux growth - to their reduction. The conclusion is made that the value of heat flux in the undercritical zone affects convective heat transfer in the supercritical zone mainly through changing the value of critical vapour content

  8. Drying process strongly affects probiotics viability and functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaconelli, Cyril; Lemetais, Guillaume; Kechaou, Noura; Chain, Florian; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Langella, Philippe; Gervais, Patrick; Beney, Laurent

    2015-11-20

    Probiotic formulations are widely used and are proposed to have a variety of beneficial effects, depending on the probiotic strains present in the product. The impact of drying processes on the viability of probiotics is well documented. However, the impact of these processes on probiotics functionality remains unclear. In this work, we investigated variations in seven different bacterial markers after various desiccation processes. Markers were composed of four different viability evaluation (combining two growth abilities and two cytometric measurements) and in three in vitro functionalities: stimulation of IL-10 and IL-12 production by PBMCs (immunomodulation) and bacterial adhesion to hexadecane. We measured the impact of three drying processes (air-drying, freeze-drying and spray-drying), without the use of protective agents, on three types of probiotic bacteria: Bifidobacterium bifidum, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus zeae. Our results show that the bacteria respond differently to the three different drying processes, in terms of viability and functionality. Drying methods produce important variations in bacterial immunomodulation and hydrophobicity, which are correlated. We also show that adherence can be stimulated (air-drying) or inhibited (spray-drying) by drying processes. Results of a multivariate analysis show no direct correlation between bacterial survival and functionality, but do show a correlation between probiotic responses to desiccation-rewetting and the process used to dry the bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Reflooding experiments on a 49-rod cluster containing a long 90% blockage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, K.G.; Cooper, C.A.; Jowitt, D.; Kinneir, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    A series of reflooding experiments was performed on a model fuel assembly, containing a very severe partial blockage, in the THETIS rig. The assembly comprised 49 full length, electrically heated fuel rod simulators and the blockage was created by attaching thin-walled, preformed swellings to a group of 16 rods. Results are presented for single phase and forced reflooding experiments. The most important findings relate to the improvements in heat transfer created by spacer grids and the nature of the heat transfer processes within the blockage. Spacer grids are shown to improve heat transfer by increasing turbulence and also, when wet, by cooling the steam flowing through them. Liquid penetration evidently deteriorates as the rewetting front approaches the blockage, allowing the steam through the blockage to superheat strongly and giving rise to a late peak in cladding temperature. At low reflooding rates there is a temperature penalty associated with the blockage which becomes increasingly larger as the reflooding rate is reduced. The adequacy of cooling in this very severe blockage becomes questionable when the reflooding rate falls to about 2cm/s. (U.K.)

  10. Analysis of heat transfer under high heat flux nucleate boiling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Dinh, N.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis was performed for a heater infrared thermometric imaging temperature data obtained from high heat flux pool boiling and liquid film boiling experiments BETA. With the OpenFOAM solver, heat flux distribution towards the coolant was obtained by solving transient heat conduction of heater substrate given the heater surface temperature data as boundary condition. The so-obtained heat flux data was used to validate them against the state-of-art wall boiling model developed by D. R. Shaver (2015) with the assumption of micro-layer hydrodynamics. Good agreement was found between the model prediction and data for conditions away from the critical heat flux (CHF). However, the data indicate a different heat transfer pattern under CHF, which is not captured by the current model. Experimental data strengthen the notion of burnout caused by the irreversible hot spot due to failure of rewetting. The observation forms a basis for a detailed modeling of micro-layer hydrodynamics under high heat flux.

  11. Analysis of breaks in pipe connections to the hot leg and to the loop seal in the primary system of Ringhals 2 PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, L.; Sjoeberg, A.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis has been made of seven different cases of breaks in pipes connected to the hot leg and to the loop seal in Ringhals 2 PWR. The pipes, in which guillotine breaks are postulated, have nominal diameters ranging from 1 to 14 inches. The purpose of the analysis is to supplement the basis for a review of the inspection procedures for the safety of pressure vessels prescribed by SKI. A similar analysis already exists concerning breaks in the cold leg connections. The analysis has been made using the thermal hydraulic computer code RELAPS/MOD2 and with best estimate assumptions. This means that normal operating conditions have been adopted for the input to the calculations. However, the capacity of the safety injection system was assumed to be reduced by having one pump not operating each of the low pressure and high pressure safety injection system. The results of the analysis are presented in tables and as computer plots. The analysis shows that the consequences with respect to increased fuel rod and cladding temperatures are quite harmless. Only the two cases with the largest break sizes lead to critical heat flux (CHF) and increased temperatures for the hottest rods in the core. The peak cladding temperature was 636 degrees C for the 12 inch break. In both cases rewetting occurred within 25 s of accident initiation. In the cases with breaks in connections of 6 inch diameter and smaller the RELAP5 calculations indicated a substantial margin to CHF throughout the transient. (authors)

  12. A phenological timetable of oak growth under experimental drought and air warming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M Kuster

    Full Text Available Climate change is expected to increase temperature and decrease summer precipitation in Central Europe. Little is known about how warming and drought will affect phenological patterns of oaks, which are considered to possess excellent adaptability to these climatic changes. Here, we investigated bud burst and intra-annual shoot growth of Quercus robur, Q. petraea and Q. pubescens grown on two different forest soils and exposed to air warming and drought. Phenological development was assessed over the course of three growing seasons. Warming advanced bud burst by 1-3 days °C⁻¹ and led to an earlier start of intra-annual shoot growth. Despite this phenological shift, total time span of annual growth and shoot biomass were not affected. Drought changed the frequency and intensity of intra-annual shoot growth and advanced bud burst in the subsequent spring of a severe summer drought by 1-2 days. After re-wetting, shoot growth recovered within a few days, demonstrating the superior drought tolerance of this tree genus. Our findings show that phenological patterns of oaks are modified by warming and drought but also suggest that ontogenetic factors and/or limitations of water and nutrients counteract warming effects on the biomass and the entire span of annual shoot growth.

  13. Simulation of stresses, residual stresses, and distortion in stepped cylinders of AISI 4140 due to martensitical hardening by immersion cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehlers, M.; Mueller, H.; Loehe, D. [Karlsruhe Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Materials Science and Engineering I

    1999-09-01

    Heat treatment improves mechanical properties of steel parts, but also causes residual stresses and distortion. Stresses and deformation occurring during heat treatment can not be measured in-situ with appropriate temporal and spatial resolution. In order to evaluate the processes occurring in the workpiece during quenching as well as the residual stresses and distortions, numerical methods have to be used. Heat conduction, phase transformations, and mechanical behaviour of the material as well as the couplings between the processes such as transformation plasticity have to be modeled for the simulation of steel hardening. Temperature and phase dependent properties (including TTT-data) have to incorporated into calculations. One of the major factors determining the evolution of stress and deformation is the heat-transfer coefficient between component and quenching medium. For vapourizing liquids, heat transfer depends on temperature and location. But heat transfer is not only influenced by the quenchant but also by part geometry and size. Stepped cylinders of AISI 4140 steel were quenched in water and oil. Both experimental measurements and numerical calculations were carried out. The variation of dive-in direction strongly influences the rewetting of the specimen surface and therefore the cooling behaviour, stress and deformation evolution, and resultant residual stresses and distortion. Excellent agreement is obtained between calculated and experimental results. (orig.)

  14. Influence of a flow obstacle on the occurrence of burnout in boiling two-phase upward flow within a vertical annular channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, S.; Fukano, T. E-mail: fukanot@mech.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2003-10-01

    When a flow obstruction such as a cylindrical spacer is set in a boiling two-phase flow within an annular channel, the inner tube of which is used as a heater, the temperature on the surface of the heating tube is severely affected by its existence. In some cases, the cylindrical spacer has a cooling effect, and in the other cases it causes the dryout of the cooling water film on the heating surface resulting in the burnout of the heating tube. In the present paper, we have focused our attention on the influence of a flow obstacle on the occurrence of burnout of the heating tube in boiling two-phase flow. The results are summarized as follows: - When the heat flux approaches the burnout condition, the wall temperature on the heating tube fluctuates with a large amplitude. And once the wall temperature exceeds the Leidenfrost temperature, the burnout occurs without exception. - The trigger of dryout of the water film which causes the burnout is not the nucleate boiling but the evaporation of the base film between disturbance waves. - The burnout never occurs at the downstream side of the spacer. This is because the dryout area downstream of the spacer is rewetted easily by the disturbance waves.

  15. Enhanced pool boiling critical heat flux induced by capillary wicking effect of a Cr-sputtered superhydrophilic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Hong Hyun; Seo, Gwang Hyeok; Kim, Sung Joong [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In light of boiling heat transfer, the smooth surface potentially reduces active nucleation of bubbles and rewetting of dry spots near the critical heat flux (CHF). This kind of process is highly likely to deteriorate the CHF. Thus, it is essential to produce appropriate microstructures on the surface for the enhancement of the CHF. In this study, to investigate the microstructural effect of thin film-fabricated surfaces on the pool boiling CHF, we controlled the surface roughness in a narrow range of 0.1-0.25 μm and its morphologies, in the form of micro-scratches using PVD sputtering technique. Specifically for DC magnetron sputtering, pure chromium (Cr) was selected as a target material owing to its high oxidation resistance. In order to analyze the CHF trend with changes in roughness, we introduced existing capillary wicking-based models because superhydrophilic characteristics of microstructures are highly related to the capillary wicking behaviors in micro-flow channels. After Cr sputtering under given conditions, the Cr-sputtered surfaces showed superhydrophilic characteristics and its capability became more enhanced with an increase of surface roughness. Judging from spreading behavior of a liquid droplet, the presence of micro-wicking channels, coupled with Cr nanostructures, effectively enhanced the advancing rate of drop base diameter. The CHF exhibited an increasing trend with increasing surface roughness. However, the enhancement ratio agreed poorly with the predictions of the roughness factor-based models, all of which originated from a conventional static force balance.

  16. The effect of Sphagnum farming on the greenhouse gas balance of donor and propagation areas, irrigation polders and commercial cultivation sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestmann, Jan; Tiemeyer, Bärbel

    2017-04-01

    Drainage of peatlands for agriculture, forestry and peat extraction turned these landscapes into hotspots of greenhouse gas emissions. Climate protection now fosters rewetting projects to restore the natural peatland function as a sink of atmospheric carbon. One possible way to combine ecological and economical goals is Sphagnum farming, i.e. the cultivation of Sphagnum mosses as high-quality substrates for horticulture. This project scientifically evaluates the attempt of commercial Sphagnum farming on former peat extraction sites in north-western Germany. The exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) of the whole peatland-based production chain comprising a donor mire, a propagation area, an irrigation polder and a cultivation site will be determined in a high temporal resolution for two years using manual chambers. This will allow evaluating the greenhouse gas balance of Sphagnum farming sites in comparison to near-natural sites and the potential of Sphagnum farming for restoring drained peatlands to sinks of atmospheric carbon. The influence of different irrigation techniques will also be tested. Additionally, selected plots will be equipped with open top chambers in order to examine the greenhouse gas exchange under potential future climate change conditions. Finally, a 13C pulse labeling experiment will make it possible to trace the newly sequestered CO2 in biomass, soil, respiration and dissolved organic carbon.

  17. Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration is dependent on readily decomposable C substrate concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionova, A. A.; Yevdokimov, I. V.; Bykhovets, S. S.

    2007-06-01

    Temperature acclimation of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition is one of the major uncertainties in predicting soil CO2 efflux by the increase in global mean temperature. A reasonable explanation for an apparent acclimation proposed by Davidson and colleagues (2006) based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics suggests that temperature sensitivity decreases when both maximal activity of respiratory enzymes (Vmax) and half- saturation constant (Ks) cancel each other upon temperature increase. We tested the hypothesis of the canceling effect by the mathematical simulation of the data obtained in the incubation experiments with forest and arable soils. Our data confirm the hypothesis and suggest that concentration of readily decomposable C substrate as glucose equivalent is an important factor controlling temperature sensitivity. The highest temperature sensitivity was observed when C substrate concentration was much lower than Ks. Increase of substrate content to the half-saturation constant resulted in temperature acclimation associated with the canceling effect. Addition of the substrate to the level providing respiration at a maximal rate Vmax leads to the acclimation of the whole microbial community as such. However, growing microbial biomass was more sensitive to the temperature alterations. This study improves our understanding of the instability of temperature sensitivity of soil respiration under field conditions, explaining this phenomenon by changes in concentration of readily decomposable C substrate. It is worth noting that this pattern works regardless of the origin of C substrate: production by SOM decomposition, release into the soil by rhizodeposition, litter fall or drying-rewetting events.

  18. Experimental restoration of a fen plant community after peat mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobbaert, D.; Rochefort, L.; Price, J.S. [Univ. Laval, Sainte-Foy (Canada). Dept. de Phytologie

    2004-11-01

    Methods: The effectiveness of introducing fen plants with the application of donor diaspore material was tested. The donor diaspore material, containing seeds, rhizomes, moss fragments, and other plant propagules, was collected from two different types of natural fens. We tested whether the application of straw mulch would increase fen species cover and biodiversity compared to control plots without straw mulch. Terrace levels of different peat depths (15 cm, 40 cm, and 56 cm) were created to test the effects of different environmental site conditions on the success of re-vegetation. Results: Applying donor seed bank from natural fens was found to significantly increase fen plant cover and richness after the two growing seasons. Straw mulch proved to significantly increase fen plant richness. The intermediate terrace level (40 cm) had the highest fen plant establishment. Compared to reference sites, the low terrace level (15 cm) was richer in base cations, whereas the high terrace level (56 cm) was much drier. Conclusions: The application of donor diaspore material was demonstrated as an effective technique for establishing vascular fen plants. Further rewetting measures are considered necessary at the restoration site to create a fen ecosystem rather than simply restoring some fen species (Location: Riviere-du-Loup peatland, southern Quebec, Canada at 100 m a.s.l.)

  19. Reactor safety activities at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN)-Nuclebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro, R.B.

    1986-08-01

    This report presents the major activities developed at NUCLEBRAS in the area of Reactor Safety. The Thermohydraulics and Reactor Safety program consists of activities in the analytical and experimental area. The more recent activities under way in the analytical area are presented together with some results. They are mainly related to the development and assessment of advanced computer codes to be used in the analysis of the behavior of the plant during operational transients and postulated accidents and in thermohydraulic core design. In the experimental area, the main accomplishments and activities under way are reported they refer to steady state CHF tests in a 9-rod bundle and rewetting experiments in a tubular test section. In particular, the status of the design development of a new facility for Separate Effects LOCA tests (DTL-ES) is described. Concerning the Components Testing program, the basic characteristics of a valve test facility (CTC) are described and the present status of its construction is reported. Reference is also made to existing installations and a summary of tests already performed for Angra-2 components qualification is presented. (Author) [pt

  20. Efficiency of fluorescence in situ hybridization for bacterial cell identification in temporary river sediments with contrasting water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazi, Stefano; Amalfitano, Stefano; Pizzetti, Ilaria; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2007-09-01

    We studied the efficiency of two hybridization techniques for the analysis of benthic bacterial community composition under varying sediment water content. Microcosms were set up with sediments from four European temporary rivers. Wet sediments were dried, and dry sediments were artificially rewetted. The percentage of bacterial cells detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization with fluorescently monolabeled probes (FISH) significantly increased from dry to wet sediments, showing a positive correlation with the community activity measured via incorporation of (3)H leucine. FISH and signal amplification by catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD-FISH) could significantly better detect cells with low activity in dried sediments. Through the application of an optimized cell permeabilization protocol, the percentage of hybridized cells by CARD-FISH showed comparable values in dry and wet conditions. This approach was unrelated to (3)H leucine incorporation rates. Moreover, the optimized protocol allowed a significantly better visualization of Gram-positive Actinobacteria in the studied samples. CARD-FISH is, therefore, proposed as an effective technique to compare bacterial communities residing in sediments with contrasting water content, irrespective of differences in the activity state of target cells. Considering the increasing frequencies of flood and drought cycles in European temporary rivers, our approach may help to better understand the dynamics of microbial communities in such systems.

  1. Influence of a flow obstacle on the occurrence of burnout in boiling two-phase upward flow within a vertical annular channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, S.; Fukano, T.

    2003-01-01

    When a flow obstruction such as a cylindrical spacer is set in a boiling two-phase flow within an annular channel, the inner tube of which is used as a heater, the temperature on the surface of the heating tube is severely affected by its existence. In some cases, the cylindrical spacer has a cooling effect, and in the other cases it causes the dryout of the cooling water film on the heating surface resulting in the burnout of the heating tube. In the present paper, we have focused our attention on the influence of a flow obstacle on the occurrence of burnout of the heating tube in boiling two-phase flow. The results are summarized as follows: - When the heat flux approaches the burnout condition, the wall temperature on the heating tube fluctuates with a large amplitude. And once the wall temperature exceeds the Leidenfrost temperature, the burnout occurs without exception. - The trigger of dryout of the water film which causes the burnout is not the nucleate boiling but the evaporation of the base film between disturbance waves. - The burnout never occurs at the downstream side of the spacer. This is because the dryout area downstream of the spacer is rewetted easily by the disturbance waves

  2. Analytical modeling of complete Nukiyama curves corresponding to expected low void fraction at high subcooling and flow rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder-Richter, D.

    1996-01-01

    On the basis of a new hypothesis of thermodynamic states (the superheated wall layer is not metastable but saturated at locally elevated pressure), an analytical estimation is presented of the whole boiling curve [except critical heat flux (CHF), but fixed at this point, known by experiments or correlation]. The curvature of the boiling curve (bubbly flow) is deduced from thermodynamics of irreversible processes. The wall temperature corresponding to departure from nucleate boiling is calculated from balances of momentum at the interfaces, based on the assumption that the speed of sound may be a limit for maximum evaporation mass flux and thereby heat flux, i.e., CHF. Heat flux during transition boiling is determined from balance of energy at the rewetting front. The Leidenfrost temperature, as well as wall temperature at CHF, can be calculated analytically without using empirical coefficients. Heat flux of bubbly flow and transition boiling can be matched at any empirical CHF point. All these results are determined from properties of state alone, i.e., the models can be verified for all fluids including water and liquid metals (so far at moderate heat fluxes). 52 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Degradation of atrazine and isoproturon in surface and sub-surface soil materials undergoing different moisture and aeration conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Salah; Wood, Martin

    2005-02-01

    The influence of different moisture and aeration conditions on the degradation of atrazine and isoproturon was investigated in environmental samples aseptically collected from surface and sub-surface zones of agricultural land. The materials were maintained at two moisture contents corresponding to just above field capacity or 90% of field capacity. Another two groups of samples were adjusted with water to above field capacity, and, at zero time, exposed to drying-rewetting cycles. Atrazine was more persistent (t(1/2) = 22-35 days) than isoproturon (t(1/2) = 5-17 days) in samples maintained at constant moisture conditions. The rate of degradation for both herbicides was higher in samples maintained at a moisture content of 90% of field capacity than in samples with higher moisture contents. The reduction in moisture content in samples undergoing desiccation from above field capacity to much lower than field capacity enhanced the degradation of isoproturon (t(1/2) = 9-12 days) but reduced the rate of atrazine degradation (t(1/2) = 23-35 days). This demonstrates the variability between different micro-organisms in their susceptibility to desiccation. Under anaerobic conditions generated in anaerobic jars, atrazine degraded much more rapidly than isoproturon in materials taken from three soil profiles (0-250 cm depth). It is suggested that some specific micro-organisms are able to survive and degrade herbicide under severe conditions of desiccation. Copyright (c) 2005 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Free-living spirochetes from Cape Cod microbial mats detected by electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teal, T. H.; Chapman, M.; Guillemette, T.; Margulis, L.

    1996-01-01

    Spirochetes from microbial mats and anaerobic mud samples collected in salt marshes were studied by light microscopy, whole mount and thin section transmission electron microscopy. Enriched in cellobiose-rifampin medium, selective for Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis, seven distinguishable spirochete morphotypes were observed. Their diameters ranged from 0.17 micron to > 0.45 micron. Six of these morphotypes came from southwest Cape Cod, Massachusetts: five from Microcoleus-dominated mat samples collected at Sippewissett salt marsh and one from anoxic mud collected at School Street salt marsh (on the east side of Eel Pond). The seventh morphotype was enriched from anoxic mud sampled from the north central Cape Cod, at the Sandy Neck salt marsh. Five of these morphotypes are similar or identical to previously described spirochetes (Leptospira, Spirochaeta halophila, Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis, Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi and Treponema), whereas the other two have unique features that suggest they have not been previously described. One of the morphotypes resembles Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi (the largest free-living spirochete described), in its large variable diameter (0.4-3.0 microns), cytoplasmic granules, and spherical (round) bodies with composite structure. This resemblance permits its tentative identification as a Sippewissett strain of Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi. Microbial mats samples collected in sterile Petri dishes and stored dry for more than four years yielded many organisms upon rewetting, including small unidentified spirochetes in at least 4 out of 100 enrichments.

  5. The deformation, oxidation and embrittlement of PWB fuel cladding in a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, P.D.; Hindle, E.D.; Mann, C.A.

    1986-09-01

    The scope of this report is limited to the oxidation, embrittlement and deformation of PWB fuel in a loss of coolant accident in which the emergency core coolant systems operate in accordance with the design, ie accidents within the design basis of the plant. A brief description is given of the thermal hydraulic events during large and small breaks of the primary circuit, followed by the correct functioning and remedial action of the emergency core cooling systems. The possible damage to the fuel cladding during these events is also described. The basic process of oxidation of zircaloy-4 fuel cladding by steam, and the reaction kinetics of the oxidation are reviewed in detail. Variables having a possible influence on the oxidation kinetics are also considered. The embrittlement of zircaloy-4 cladding by oxidation is also reviewed in detail. It is related to fracture during the thermal shock of rewetting or by the ambient impact forces as a result of post-accident fuel handling. Criteria based both on total oxidation and on the detailed distribution of oxygen through the oxidised cladding wall are considered. The published computer codes for the calculation of oxygen concentration are reviewed in terms of the model employed and the limitations apparent in these models when calculating oxygen distribution in cladding in the actual conditions of a loss of coolant accident. The factors controlling the deformation and rupture of cladding in a loss of coolant accident are reviewed in detail. (author)

  6. Hyper-dry conditions provide new insights into the cause of extreme floods after wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, John A.; Ebel, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    A catastrophic wildfire in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains near Boulder, Colorado provided a unique opportunity to investigate soil conditions immediately after a wildfire and before alteration by rainfall. Measurements of near-surface (θ; and matric suction, ψ), rainfall, and wind velocity were started 8 days after the wildfire began. These measurements established that hyper-dryconditions (θ 3 cm-3; ψ > ~ 3 x 105 cm) existed and provided an in-situ retention curve for these conditions. These conditions exacerbate the effects of water repellency (natural and fire-induced) and limit the effectiveness of capillarity and gravity driven infiltration into fire-affected soils. The important consequence is that given hyper-dryconditions, the critical rewetting process before the first rain is restricted to the diffusion–adsorption of water-vapor. This process typically has a time scale of days to weeks (especially when the hydrologic effects of the ash layer are included) that is longer than the typical time scale (minutes to hours) of some rainstorms, such that under hyper-dryconditions essentially no rain infiltrates. The existence of hyper-dryconditions provides insight into why, frequently during the first rain storm after a wildfire, nearly all rainfall becomes runoff causing extremefloods and debris flows.

  7. A multi-adaptive framework for the crop choice in paludicultural cropping systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Silvestri

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The conventional cultivation of drained peatland causes peat oxidation, soil subsidence, nutrient loss, increasing greenhouse gas emissions and biodiversity reduction. Paludiculture has been identified as an alternative management strategy consisting in the cultivation of biomass on wet and rewetted peatlands. This strategy can save these habitats and restore the ecosystem services provided by the peatlands both on the local and global scale. This paper illustrates the most important features to optimise the crop choice phase which is the crucial point for the success of paludiculture systems. A multi-adaptive framework was proposed. It was based on four points that should be checked to identify suitable crops for paludicultural cropping system: biological traits, biomass production, attitude to cultivation and biomass quality. The main agronomic implications were explored with the help of some results from a plurennial open-field experimentation carried out in a paludicultural system set up in the Massaciuccoli Lake Basin (Tuscany, Italy and a complete example of the method application was provided. The tested crops were Arundo donax L., Miscanthus×giganteus Greef et Deuter, Phragmites australis L., Populus×canadensis Moench. and Salix alba L. The results showed a different level of suitability ascribable to the different plant species proving that the proposed framework can discriminate the behaviour of tested crops. Phragmites australis L. was the most suitable crop whereas Populus×canadensis Moench and Miscanthus×giganteus Greef et Deuter (in the case of biogas conversion occupied the last positions in the ranking.

  8. PWR [pressurized water reactor] pressurizer transient response: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, S.I.

    1987-08-01

    To predict PWR pressurizer transients, Ahl proposed a three region model with a universal coefficient to represent condensation on the water surface. Specifically, this work checks the need for three regions and the modeling of the interfacial condensation coefficient. A computer model has been formulated using the basic mass and energy conservation laws. A two region vapor and liquid model was first used to predict transients run on a one-eleventh scale Freon pressurizer. These predictions verified the need for a second liquid region. As a result, a three region model was developed and used to predict full-scale pressurizer transients at TMI-2, Shippingport, and Stade. Full-scale pressurizer predictions verified the three region model and pointed out the shortcomings of Ahl's universal condensation coefficient. In addition, experiments were run using water at low pressure to study interface condensation. These experiments showed interface condensation to be significant only when spray flow is turned on; this result was incorporated in the final three region model

  9. Metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chu-Hsuan; Liu, Chee Wee

    2010-01-01

    The major radiation of the sun can be roughly divided into three regions: ultraviolet, visible, and infrared light. Detection in these three regions is important to human beings. The metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetector, with a simpler process than the pn-junction photodetector and a lower dark current than the MSM photodetector, has been developed for light detection in these three regions. Ideal UV photodetectors with high UV-to-visible rejection ratio could be demonstrated with III-V metal-insulator-semiconductor UV photodetectors. The visible-light detection and near-infrared optical communications have been implemented with Si and Ge metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetectors. For mid- and long-wavelength infrared detection, metal-insulator-semiconductor SiGe/Si quantum dot infrared photodetectors have been developed, and the detection spectrum covers atmospheric transmission windows.

  10. Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor Photodetectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu-Hsuan Lin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The major radiation of the Sun can be roughly divided into three regions: ultraviolet, visible, and infrared light. Detection in these three regions is important to human beings. The metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetector, with a simpler process than the pn-junction photodetector and a lower dark current than the MSM photodetector, has been developed for light detection in these three regions. Ideal UV photodetectors with high UV-to-visible rejection ratio could be demonstrated with III-V metal-insulator-semiconductor UV photodetectors. The visible-light detection and near-infrared optical communications have been implemented with Si and Ge metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetectors. For mid- and long-wavelength infrared detection, metal-insulator-semiconductor SiGe/Si quantum dot infrared photodetectors have been developed, and the detection spectrum covers atmospheric transmission windows.

  11. Influence of the poison management in the optimization of the fuel management in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Ipojuca, T. da.

    1981-03-01

    The global optimum fuel and poison management policy was determined by the method of Dynamic Programming. A 620 MWe Pressurized Water Reactor similar to Angra I was studied. The reactor core was divided into three regions of equal volume surrounded by a reflector. Two fuel shuffling schemes and three poison management schemes were simultaneously employed, and fifteen consecutive stages were studied. When uniform poisoning was permitted in all the three regions the out-in scheme of fuel shuffling was the best scheme along the cycles. For the first stages the poison management reduces the generated energy cost, but this reduction gets smaller along the cycles. (Author) [pt

  12. Soil microbial activities beneath Stipa tenacissima L. and in surrounding bare soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosadová, I.; Ruiz Sinoga, J. D.; Záhora, J.; Fišerová, H.

    2010-05-01

    open steppe dominated by Stipa tenacissima. In February 2009 representative soil samples from the top 10 cm were taken beneath grass tussock and from bare soil. Soil samples in three replicates were incubated after rewetting with distilled water (basal microbial activities) and after rewetting with the glucose solution and with the mixture of glucose and peptone solution (potential microbial activities). The CO2, C2H4 evolved under controlled conditions (60% WHC, 24°C) during a 37-day aerobic incubation were determined. Ammonia and nitrate nitrogen were estimated in percolates after simulated rainfall (on the 16th day of incubation) and in the incubated soil samples at the end of incubation. Net ammonification and net nitrification rates were determined by subtracting initial soil mineral N from both mineral N in percolates plus final mineral N contents at 37th day. Basal, potential microbial respiration and net nitrification in the soils beneath S. tenacissima were, in general, not significantly different from the bare soils. The differences between plant-covered soil and bare soil in cumulative values of CO2 production and in amounts of accumulated NO3--N (net nitrification) were less than ± 10%. Greater differences were found in the net ammonification, which were higher beneath S. tenacissima, mainly in the control (basal activities) variant (about 38 %). Significantly less ethylene produced by microbial activity in soils beneath S. tenacissima after the addition of glucose indicates the dependence of rhizospheric microbial communities on available carbon compounds mainly from root exudates. It can be concluded, similarly as published Goberna et al., (2007), that the distribution of soil microbial properties in semi-arid Mediterranean ecosystems is not necessarily associated with the patchy plant distribution and that some microbial activities characteristics can be unexpectedly homogenous.

  13. Detecting peatland drains with Object Based Image Analysis and Geoeye-1 imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, J; Holden, N M

    2017-12-01

    results show that information on drain extent and location can be extracted from high resolution imagery and mapped with a high degree of accuracy. Under Article 3.4 of the Kyoto Protocol Annex 1 parties can account for greenhouse gas emission by sources and removals by sinks resulting from "wetlands drainage and rewetting". The ability to map the spatial extent, density and location of peatlands drains means that Annex 1 parties can develop strategies for drain blocking to aid reduction of CO 2 emissions, DOC runoff and water discoloration. This paper highlights some uncertainty around using one-size-fits-all emission factors for GHG in drained peatlands and re-wetting scenarios. However, the OBIA method is robust and accurate and could be used to assess the extent of drains in peatlands across the globe aiding the refinement of peatland carbon dynamics .

  14. Drought effects on ecosystem functioning and interactions with CO2 and warming - results from CLIMAITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Claus; Ibrom, Andreas; Linden, Leon G.; Selsted, Merete B.; Albert, Kristian R.; Kongstad, Jane; Andresen, Louise C.

    2010-05-01

    Current predictions indicate that, unless greenhouse gas emissions are significantly curtailed, atmospheric CO2 concentrations will double during the present century inducing an additional 1.4 to 5.8oC increase in mean global temperature, alterations in global and regional precipitation patterns, and increase the frequency and magnitude of severe weather events (e.g. droughts and floods). Such changes will have strong effects on the terrestrial ecosystems as CO2, temperature and water are main drivers in ecosystem processes. There is growing concern that climate driven changes in precipitation patterns and water availability will have significant effects on ecosystem processes and functioning, and in some regions may be the most influential climate change factor. Yet, it has received much less attention in recent climate change research relative to elevated CO2 and temperature. Furthermore, most precipitation experiments have focussed on water alone despite the fact that at least CO2 and temperature will change simultaneously and both of these factors will have direct or indirect effects on water status and use in the ecosystem. In the CLIMAITE project a Danish heathland has been exposed since 2005 to elevated CO2, temperature and extended drought in a full factorial experiment (Mikkelsen et al., 2008). The CO2 concentration in the canopy level is elevated by 50% by the Free Air Carbon Enrichment (FACE) technique, temperature is elevated by 1-2 °C by the passive night time warming technique and summer drought is extended for 4-6 weeks by rain out shelters. The full factor combination mimics recent climate projections for Denmark 2075. Following the experiments, responses of major ecosystem processes and functioning is recorded. Drought generally leads to hypothesised reductions in most ecosystem processes during and shortly after the drought but on the short term, many of these processes also show a strong potential to recover during rewetting. Drought reduces

  15. Towards a Global High Resolution Peatland Map in 2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelmes, Alexandra; Barthelmes, Karen-Doreen; Joosten, Hans; Dommain, Rene; Margalef, Olga

    2015-04-01

    Some 3% of land area on planet Earth (approx. 4 million km2) is covered by peatlands. About 10% (~ 0.3 % of the land area) are drained and responsible for a disproportional 5 % of the global anthropogenic CO2 emissions (Victoria et al., 2012). Additionally, peatland drainage and degradation lead to land subsidence, soil degradation, water pollution, and enhanced susceptibility to fire (Holden et al., 2004; Joosten et al., 2012). The global importance of peatlands for carbon storage and climate change mitigation has currently been recognized in international policy - since 2008 organic soils are subject of discussion in the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) (Joosten, 2011). In May 2013 the European Parliament decided that the global post 2020 climate agreement should include the obligation to report emissions and removals from peatland drainage and rewetting. Implementation of such program, however, necessitates the rapid availability of reliable, comprehensive, high resolution, spatially explicit data on the extent and status of peatlands. For many reporting countries this requires an innovation in peatland mapping, i.e. the better and integrative use of novel, but already available methods and technologies. We developed an approach that links various science networks, methodologies and data bases, including those of peatland/landscape ecology for understanding where and how peatlands may occur, those of remote sensing for identifying possible locations, and those of pedology (legacy soil maps) and (palaeo-)ecology for ground truthing. Such integration of old field data, specialized knowledge, and modern RS and GIS technologies enables acquiring a rapid, comprehensive, detailed and rather reliable overview, even on a continental scale. We illustrate this approach with a high resolution overview of peatland distribution, area, status and greenhouse gas fluxes e.g. for the East African countries Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda and Zambia. Furthermore, we

  16. Tensile bond strength of self-etching versus total-etching adhesive systems under different dentinal substrate conditions Resistência de união à tração de sistemas adesivos autocondicionantes versus de condicionamento total, em diferentes condições de substrato dentinário

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Henrique Susin

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of acid etchants to produce surface demineralization and collagen network exposure, allowing adhesive monomers interdiffusion and consequently the formation of a hybrid layer, has been considered the most efficient mechanism of dentin bonding. The aim of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength to dentin of three adhesive systems, two self-etching ones (Clearfil SE Bond - CSEB and One Up Bond F - OUBF and one total-etching one (Single Bond - SB, under three dentinal substrate conditions (wet, dry and re-wet. Ninety human, freshly extracted third molars were sectioned at the occlusal surface to remove enamel and to form a flat dentin wall. The specimens were restored with composite resin (Filtek Z250 and submitted to tensile bond strength testing (TBS in an MTS 810. The data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p = 0.05. Wet dentin presented the highest TBS values for SB and CSEB. Dry dentin and re-wet produced significantly lower TBS values when using SB. OUBF was not affected by the different conditions of the dentin substrate, producing similar TBS values regardless of the surface pretreatments.O uso de condicionadores ácidos para desmineralizar a superfície dental e expor a rede de fibras colágenas para interdifusão dos monômeros adesivos e conseqüente formação da camada híbrida tem sido considerado o mais eficiente mecanismo de adesão dos agentes de união. O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar a resistência de união à dentina de três sistemas adesivos, dois autocondicionantes (Clearfil SE Bond - CSEB e One Up Bond F - OUBF e um de condicionamento total (Single Bond - SB, sob três diferentes condições de substrato dentinário (úmido, seco e reidratado. Noventa terceiros molares humanos recém-extraídos foram cortados na superfície oclusal, para se remover o esmalte e formar uma parede plana de dentina. Os espécimes foram restaurados com resina composta (Filtek Z250 e submetidos ao teste de

  17. Special Education and Care Services for Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders in France: Families' Opinion and Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattaz, Cécile; Ledesert, Bernard; Masson, Olivier; Ouss, Lisa; Ropers, Géraldine; Baghdadli, Amaria

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on parents' satisfaction with the special education and care services proposed to their child with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Data were collected in three regions of France, using a questionnaire designed for the purpose of this study. Among the 530 families contacted, 212 filled in the questionnaire (response rate =…

  18. Proceedings of the SRBR-KBVR osteoarticular section meeting of October 18, 2003 in Antwerp--Part one. Imaging of chronic ankle pain, with a focus on soccer injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, M.; de Jonge, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    Chronic ankle pain is a very common problem encountered in soccer injuries. It can be divided into three regional entities, including anterior ankle pain, deep ankle pain and posterior ankle pain. The purpose of this presentation is to present the value of each imaging technique (standard

  19. Disconnect Between Public Sector Management System and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    three regional governments, this article exposes how public sector management system (public finance and human resource management system) determines decentralization outcomes. It contends that outcomes of decentralization reforms are shaped not only by political and economic factors, as suggested in the ...

  20. Strengthening Social Science Research in Iraq | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This grant will allow the Iraqi Institute of Strategic Studies to map the country's social science research capacity by means of field research and a survey in three regions: Baghdad, southern Iraq and Kurdistan. In doing so, the Institute will identify strengths and weaknesses, gaps in the literature, themes of current interest to ...

  1. Different measles outbreaks in Belgium, January to June 2016 – a challenge for public health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammens, Tine; Maes, Virginie; Hutse, Veronik; Laisnez, Valeska; Schirvel, Carole; Trémérie, Jean Marie; Sabbe, Martine

    2016-01-01

    During the first half of 2016, several outbreaks of measles were reported in the three regions of Belgium. Main challenges for public health were severe complications occurring in adults, nosocomial transmission and infection in healthcare workers. Here, we describe those outbreaks and lessons learnt for public health. PMID:27541858

  2. Economic efficiency in forest service program development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert J. Hrubes

    1984-01-01

    This report analyzes the procedures used in three regions of the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, for selecting the projects that constitute their annual program budget. Personnel at the Southwest (R-3), Pacific Southwest (R-5), and Southern (R-8) Regions were interviewed during September and October 1982. Of special concern was the extent to which...

  3. Hierarchical clustering of Alzheimer and "normal" brains using elemental concentrations and glucose metabolism determined by PIXE, INAA and PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutts, DA; Spyrou, NM; Maguire, RP; Leenders, KL

    Brain tissue samples, obtained from the Alzheimer Disease Brain Bank, Institute of Psychiatry, London, were taken from both left and right hemispheres of three regions of the cerebrum, namely the frontal, parietal and occipital lobes for both Alzheimer and 'normal' subjects. Trace element

  4. Financial crises as catalysts for regional cooperation? Chances and obstacles for financial integration in ASEAN+3, MERCOSUR and the eurozone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krapohl, S.

    2015-01-01

    This article compares and analyses the different answers from the Association of Southeast Asian Nations+3 (ASEAN+3), Mercado Común del Dur (MERCOSUR) and the eurozone on financial crises in their respective regions. All three regions were hit by economic turmoil between 1997 and 2012, but whereas

  5. Language Policy in Ethiopia: History and Current Trends | Getachew ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interviews were conducted with various bodies that are concerned with developing, implementing and monitoring language use policies, such as the Ethiopian Language Research Center, the Ministry of Tourism and Culture, the information and education bureaus of three regional states, namely the Amhara, Oromiya and ...

  6. The spectrum of integrated millimeter flux of the Magellanic Clouds and 30 Doradus from Tophat and Dirbe data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aguirre, J.E.; Bezaire, J.J.; Cheng, E.S.

    2003-01-01

    -fit dust temperatures, optical depths, and emissivity power-law indices, and we compare these results with other measurements in these regions and elsewhere. Using published dust grain opacities, we estimate the mass of the measured dust component in the three regions....

  7. Migrant's agency in the smuggling process : the perspectives of smuggled migrants in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Liempt, I.; Doomernik, J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on migrants who have been smuggled to the Netherlands from three regions: Iraq, Horn of Africa, and the former Soviet Union. The central questions are: to what extent do smugglers give direction to migration; and how much autonomy do migrants themselves have in deciding where they

  8. Drying process in the formation of sol-gel derived TiO2 ceramic membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, K.N.P.; Kumar, K.N.P.; Zaspalis, V.T.; Zaspalis, V.T.; Keizer, Klaas; Burggraaf, Anthonie; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate drying data for thin titania gel layers dried at 40°C and 20% relative humidity (RH) are given. The drying rate versus free moisture content diagram should show three regions as predicted by the classical drying theory. They are the constant rate period, the first falling rate period and

  9. Effect of root strength and soil saturation on hillslope stability in forests with natural cedar decline in headwater regions of SE Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelaide C. Johnson; Peter. Wilcock

    1998-01-01

    A natural decline in the population of yellow-cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis) is occurring in pristine southeast Alaska forests and may be the most significant forest decline in the western United States. The frequency of landslides in cedar decline areas is three times larger than in areas of healthy forest. Three regions are investigated in...

  10. Assessing the risk of expansion into a foreign country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krijgsman, J.P.W.

    1994-01-01

    Experience has shown that country risks are not only reasonably predictable but that risks have remained stable despite the turbulence of the times. Country risk, the additional dangers to business in other than the domestic economy, include credit and market risk. Comparison of three regions and individual country ranking rates China highest followed by Venezuela with Russia last. (author)

  11. The Role of Decision Support in Adapting to Climate Change: Findings from Three Place-based Regional Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes the methodologies and findings of three regional assessments and considers the role of decision support in assisting adaptation to climate change. Background. In conjunction with the US Global Change Research Program’s (USGCRP’s) National Assessment of ...

  12. Pre-Adult Background Variables and Divorce: A Note of Caution about Overreliance on Explained Variance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Norval D.; Shelton, Beth Ann

    1983-01-01

    Examined multiple regression results in adjusted percentages for data from a project to assess the impact of formative experiences on adult well being. Differences from some of the adjusted percentages reveal a divorce rate higher for female children of divorce and for individuals from a three-region "divorce belt." (Author/JAC)

  13. What we do | Page 152 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Global Network : Integration and Harmonization of ICT Policy and Regulation Regional Research Networks. IDRC has invested in the development of three regional networks focused on issues of inclusive information and communication technology (ICT) policy and regulation: Latin America - REDIS/DIRSI (103371), Asia ...

  14. Government deficits, the real interest rate and Ldc debt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijnbergen, S.J.G.; Deepak, L.

    1985-01-01

    A paper on a study that used a three-regions model of global saving-investment balance to present a global crowding out interpretation of economic trends. Presents details of the growth of social expenditures and structural public sector deficit; Gives information on changes of the age pyramid,

  15. Closing remarks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-12-12

    Dec 12, 2007 ... dian industry who had been involved in making magnet positioning systems and magnets for the LHC, as well as some ... the three regions went their separate ways. In fact, a large number of .... we are making decisions keeping in mind the cost of physics, we may also want to keep in mind the cost of these ...

  16. School Psychology in China (PRC), Hong Kong and Taiwan: A Cross-Regional Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Kuo, Yi-Lung; Van Dyke, Don C.

    2008-01-01

    Although China (People's Republic of China [PRC]), Hong Kong and Taiwan have many similarities in language, culture, values, Confucian traditions, family systems and other social-environmental variables, school psychological services in the three regions are distinctly different in both history and practice. Few studies in the psychology…

  17. Soft tissue technique - lateral view of the foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyss, R.

    1980-02-01

    For exact anatomic analysis, radiographs are made of and correlated with anatomic sections of a cadaver foot. Three regions are being differentiated: The dorsal and the plantar and the calcaneal region. Normal findings are being presented as well as some pathologic soft tissue changes with special emphasis on the syndrome of 'high edge calcaneus'.

  18. Soft tissue technique - lateral view of the foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyss, R.

    1980-01-01

    For exact anatomic analysis, radiographs are made of and correlated with anatomic sections of a cadaver foot. Three regions are being differentiated: The dorsal and the plantar and the calcaneal region. Normal findings are being presented as well as some pathologic soft tissue changes with special emphasis on the syndrome of 'high edge calcaneus'. (orig.) [de

  19. 78 FR 74151 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Providing Waiver...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ... requirements for the registration of pharmaceutical products among three regions: The European Union, Japan...(R2) Expert Working Group for revisions of the guidance. A final version of the guidance was...-0230 and 0910- 0308, FDA currently has OMB approval for approximately 60 hours for the preparation and...

  20. Urban and rural land use in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian Martinuzzi; William A. Gould; Olga M. Ramos Gonzalez; Maya Quinones; Michael E. Jimenez

    2008-01-01

    We have developed three land use regions for Puerto Rico: Urban, Suburban, and Rural (Gould et al. 2008; Martinuzzi et al. 2007). These three regions can also be considered urban, densely-populated rural, and sparsely-populated rural or as urban and wildland with a wildland-urban interface. The suburban use is the most dynamic in terms of population growth and land...

  1. Mapping wildland fuels and forest structure for land management: a comparison of nearest neighbor imputation and other methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth B. Pierce; Janet L. Ohmann; Michael C. Wimberly; Matthew J. Gregory; Jeremy S. Fried

    2009-01-01

    Land managers need consistent information about the geographic distribution of wildland fuels and forest structure over large areas to evaluate fire risk and plan fuel treatments. We compared spatial predictions for 12 fuel and forest structure variables across three regions in the western United States using gradient nearest neighbor (GNN) imputation, linear models (...

  2. Production function analysis for smallholder semi-subsistence and semi-commercial poultry production systems in three agro-ecological regions in Northern provinces of Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tung, Dinh Xuan; Rasmussen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    A formal cross section survey of 360 smallholder poultry keeping farms located in three agro-ecological regions in Vietnam was conducted. Cobb-Douglas production functions were applied to analyse and compare semi-subsistence and semi-commercial smallholder poultry systems in three regions...

  3. Women in engineering program advocates network (WEPAN): Evaluation of the fourth annual conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brainard, S.G.

    1994-08-01

    The 1994 WEPAN conference highlighted the establishment of the three Regional Centers for Women in Engineering, which are located at the University of Washington, Purdue University, and Stevens Insitute of Technology. An overall evaluation was conducted on the effectiveness of the conference, including the quality of plenary sessions, workshops, registration, accommodations and reception.

  4. In-vitro evaluation of the quality of Paracetamol and Co-trimoxazole ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This pilot study provides objective evidence to show that substandard and unregistered ... country has been focusing much of its attention in the area of rational drug use, while not .... The country was divided into three regions and in each ...

  5. Refinement of genotype-phenotype correlation in 18 patients carrying a 1q24q25 deletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatron, Nicolas; Haddad, Véronique; Andrieux, Joris

    2015-01-01

    of different sizes (490 kb to 20.95 Mb) localized within chromosome bands 1q23.3-q31.2 (chr1:160797550-192912120, hg19). The 490 kb deletion is the smallest deletion reported to date associated with this phenotype. We delineated three regions that may contribute to the phenotype: a proximal one (chr1...

  6. Contribution à l'étude comparative des laits crus des chamelles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of the present study is the physicochemical and biochemical characterization of raw camel milk for processing at the main dairies located in the wilayas of Nouakchott. Methodology and Results: This study was conducted on a total of 196 samples from milk collection centers in three regions of Mauritania.

  7. All projects related to | Page 559 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Strengthening Mission 2007 through Demonstration of Social Enterprise Models, Products ... in its approach to technological connectivity but bottom-up in relation to content and knowledge management. ... IDRC has invested in the development of three regional networks focused on issues ... Careers · Contact Us · Site map.

  8. Materiele cultuur en levensstijl : een onderzoek naar de taal der dingen op het Nederlandse platteland in de 19e eeuw : de Zaanstreek, Oost-Groningen, Oost-Brabant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    Using probate inventories as a source, this study describes the development of the material culture of the household in the Dutch countryside in the nineteenth century in three regions: the Zaanstreek, eastern Groningen, eastern Brabant. During the century a trend towards greater domesticity

  9. Low numbers of repeat units in variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) regions of white spot syndrome virus are correlated with disease outbreaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran Thi Tuyet, H.; Zwart, M.P.; Phuong, N.T.; Jong, de M.C.M.; Vlak, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the most important pathogen in shrimp farming systems worldwide including the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. The genome of WSSV is characterized by the presence of two major 'indel regions' found at ORF14/15 and ORF23/24 (WSSV-Thailand) and three regions with variable

  10. Computational Study of Collisions Between O(3P) and NO(2Pi) at Temperatures Relevant to the Hypersonic Flight Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-29

    distances of the NO2 molecule (Figure 1), and V1(x), V2 (x), and V3(x) are the potential energies for the three regions for which the distances r12 (N...Dunker, Res. Chem. Intermed. 20, 463–502 (1994). 7T. Schwartzentruber, L. Scalabrin, and I. Boyd, J. Spacecraft Rockets 45, 1196–1206 (2008). 8S. Mishra

  11. Magnetic measurements of the transuranium elements. Progress report, January 1, 1984-December 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huray, P.G.; Nave, S.E.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of the magnetic properties of dhcp californium-249 metal indicated the presence of three regions of differing magnetic character. Additional measurements are also reported. Magnetic moments and valence states of terbium in TbF 3 , BaTbO 3 , and TbO 1 8 are discussed. Progress on high-field operation of the micro-magnetic susceptometer is reported

  12. Introversion/Extroversion & Teachers' Perception on Dominican EFL College Students' Performance = La Introversion/Extroversion vs. La Percepcion Profesoral en el Desempeno de Estudiantes Universitarios Dominicanos de Ingles como Lengua Extranjera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavarez Da Costa, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the relationship between introversion/extroversion and a student's performance (academic achievement) as perceived by Teachers of English as a Foreign Language in three regional centers of the Universidad Autonoma de Santo Domingo. There have been a great number of international studies already published to try to explain…

  13. Underascertainment of Child Abuse Fatalities in France: Retrospective Analysis of Judicial Data to Assess Underreporting of Infant Homicides in Mortality Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tursz, Anne; Crost, Monique; Gerbouin-Rerolle, Pascale; Cook, Jon M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Test the hypothesis of an underestimation of infant homicides in mortality statistics in France; identify its causes; examine data from the judicial system and their contribution in correcting this underestimation. Methods: A retrospective, cross-sectional study was carried out in 26 courts in three regions of France of cases of infant…

  14. Exploring dark current voltage characteristics of micromorph silicon tandem cells with computer simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturiale, A.; Li, H. B. T.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Rubinelli, F.A.

    2009-01-01

    The transport mechanisms controlling the forward dark current-voltage characteristic of the silicon micromorph tandem solar cell were investigated with numerical modeling techniques. The dark current-voltage characteristics of the micromorph tandem structure at forward voltages show three regions:

  15. Molecular screening for Yq microdeletion in men with idiopathic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    used to define three regions on Yq (AZFa, AZFb and AZFc) which are critical for spermatogenesis and are recurrently deleted in infertile males. ... factor is therefore responsible in about 50% of infertile couples. Forty to fifty percent of these men have ... ethically not possible in these cases. 2.1 PCR analysis. In cytogenetically ...

  16. No-arbitrage bounds for financial scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geyer, Alois; Hanke, Michael; Weissensteiner, Alex

    2014-01-01

    We derive no-arbitrage bounds for expected excess returns to generate scenarios used in financial applications. The bounds allow to distinguish three regions: one where arbitrage opportunities will never exist, a second where arbitrage may be present, and a third, where arbitrage opportunities...

  17. Simulation of fluid flow and energy transport processes associated with high-level radioactive waste disposal in unsaturated alluvium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, David W.

    1986-01-01

    Many parts of the Great Basin have thick zones of unsaturated alluvium which might be suitable for disposing of high-level radioactive wastes. A mathematical model accounting for the coupled transport of energy, water (vapor and liquid), and dry air was used to analyze one-dimensional, vertical transport above and below an areally extensive repository. Numerical simulations were conducted for a hypothetical repository containing spent nuclear fuel and located 100 m below land surface. Initial steady state downward water fluxes of zero (hydrostatic) and 0.0003 m yr−1were considered in an attempt to bracket the likely range in natural water flux. Predicted temperatures within the repository peaked after approximately 50 years and declined slowly thereafter in response to the decreasing intensity of the radioactive heat source. The alluvium near the repository experienced a cycle of drying and rewetting in both cases. The extent of the dry zone was strongly controlled by the mobility of liquid water near the repository under natural conditions. In the case of initial hydrostatic conditions, the dry zone extended approximately 10 m above and 15 m below the repository. For the case of a natural flux of 0.0003 m yr−1 the relative permeability of water near the repository was initially more than 30 times the value under hydrostatic conditions, consequently the dry zone extended only about 2 m above and 5 m below the repository. In both cases a significant perturbation in liquid saturation levels persisted for several hundred years. This analysis illustrates the extreme sensitivity of model predictions to initial conditions and parameters, such as relative permeability and moisture characteristic curves, that are often poorly known.

  18. Mitigating climate change through the understanding of Nitrous Oxide (N2O) consumption processes in peat lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akrami, N.; Barker, X. Z.; Horwath, W. R.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrous Oxide (N2O) with global warming potential of 298 over a 100-year horizon is one of the most potent green house gases. In the United States, agriculture share to N2O emissions is over 70%. Peat lands, however, are being considered as both sources and sinks of greenhouse gases. N2O emissions are a product of both production and consumption processes. However, there is still a lack of understanding of N2O consumption processes in soils. In this work, the potential of re-wetted peat lands planted to rice in Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, to act as a potential sink for N2O is being evaluated. Four peat land soils with 1%, 5%, 11% and 23% of organic carbon have been anaerobically incubated with different water contents (15%, 30%, 50%, 75% and 100% of their water holding capacity). 15N-N2O gas has been injected to the headspace of experiment jars and the production and consumption rate of 15N-N2O, 15N-N2 and production rate of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) and Methane (CH4) along with dissolved Nitrate (NO3-), Nitrite (NO2-), Ammonium (NH4+), Iron (II) and Iron (III) concentration has been quantified. Our results show promising N2O consumption rates under high carbon content and relatively high water content treatments. This research introduces organic carbon and water content as two major criteria in N2O consumption processes in peat lands that make it a potential hotspot for climate changes mitigation through adopting effective management practices to decrease greenhouse gas emissions.

  19. Hydrodynamically induced dryout and post dryout important to heavy water reactors: A yearly progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, M.; Revankar, S.T.; Babelli, I.; Lele, S.

    1992-06-01

    Recently, the safety of low pressure liquid cooled nuclear reactors has become a very important issue with reference to the operation of the heavy water reactors at Savannah River Plant. Under accident conditions such as loss-of-flow or loss-of-coolant, these reactors typically encounter unstable two-phase flow which may lead to the occurrence of dryout and subsequent fuel failure. An analytical study using the one-dimensional drift flux model was carried out to investigate the two-phase flow instability for Westinghouse Savannah River Site reactor. The analysis indicates that the first and higher order instabilities exist in the possible transient operational conditions. The instabilities are encountered at higher heat fluxes or lower flow rates. The subcooling has a stabilizing effect except at very low subcooling. An experimental loop has been designed and constructed to study the CBF induced by various flow instabilities. Details of this test loop are presented. Initial test results have been presented. The two-phase flow regimes and hydrodynamic behaviors in the post dryout region have been studied under propagating rewetting conditions. The effect of subcooling and inlet velocity on flow transition as well as on the quench front propagation was investigated. The test liquid was Freon 113 which was introduced into the bottom of the quartz test section whose walls were maintained well above the film boiling temperature of the test liquid, via a transparent heat transfer fluid. The flow regimes observed down stream of the upward moving quench front were the rough wavy, the agitated, and the dispersed droplet/ligaments. A correlation for the flow regime transition between the inverted annular and the dispersed droplet/ligament flow patterns was developed. The correlation showed a marked dependence on the void fraction at the CBF location and hence on the flow regime encountered in the pre-CBF region

  20. Release of dissolved phosphorus from riparian wetlands: Evidence for complex interactions among hydroclimate variability, topography and soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Sen; Gruau, Gérard; Dupas, Rémi; Rumpel, Cornélia; Crème, Alexandra; Fovet, Ophélie; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal; Jeanneau, Laurent; Humbert, Guillaume; Petitjean, Patrice

    2017-11-15

    In agricultural landscapes, establishment of vegetated buffer zones in riparian wetlands (RWs) is promoted to decrease phosphorus (P) emissions because RWs can trap particulate P from upslope fields. However, long-term accumulation of P risks the release of dissolved P, since the unstable hydrological conditions in these zones may mobilize accumulated particulate P by transforming it into a mobile dissolved P species. This study evaluates how hydroclimate variability, topography and soil properties interact and influence this mobilization, using a three-year dataset of molybdate-reactive dissolved P (MRDP) and total dissolved P (TDP) concentrations in soil water from two RWs located in an agricultural catchment in western France (Kervidy-Naizin), along with stream P concentrations. Two main drivers of seasonal dissolved P release were identified: i) soil rewetting during water-table rise after dry periods and ii) reductive dissolution of soil Fe (hydr)oxides during prolonged water saturation periods. These mechanisms were shown to vary greatly in space (according to topography) and time (according to intra- and interannual hydroclimate variability). The concentration and speciation of the released dissolved P also varied spatially depending on soil chemistry and local topography. Comparison of sites revealed a similar correlation between soil P speciation (percentage of organic P ranging from 35-70%) and the concentration and speciation of the released P (MRDP from topography and soil chemistry must be considered to decrease the risk of remobilizing legacy soil P when establishing riparian buffer zones in agricultural landscapes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Multi-year coupled biogeochemical and biophysical impacts of restoring drained agricultural peatlands to wetlands across the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemes, K. S.; Eichelmann, E.; Chamberlain, S.; Knox, S. H.; Oikawa, P.; Sturtevant, C.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2017-12-01

    Globally, delta ecosystems are critical for human livelihoods, but are at increasingly greater risk of degradation. The Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (`Delta') has been subsiding dramatically, losing close to 100 Tg of carbon since the mid 19th century due in large part to agriculture-induced oxidation of the peat soils through drainage and cultivation. Efforts to re-wet the peat soils through wetland restoration are attractive as climate mitigation activities. While flooded wetland systems have the potential to sequester significant amounts of carbon as photosynthesis outpaces aerobic respiration, the highly-reduced conditions can result in significant methane emissions. This study will utilize three years (2014-2016) of continuous, gap-filled, CO2 and CH4 flux data from a mesonetwork of seven eddy covariance towers in the Delta to compute GHG budgets for the restored wetlands and agricultural baseline sites measured. Along with biogeochemical impacts of wetland restoration, biophysical impacts such as changes in reflectance, energy partitioning, and surface roughness, can have significant local to regional impacts on air temperature and heat fluxes. We hypothesize that despite flooded wetlands reducing albedo, wetland land cover will cool the near-surface air temperature due to increased net radiation being preferentially partitioned into latent heat flux and rougher canopy conditions allowing for more turbulent mixing with the atmosphere. This study will investigate the seasonal and diurnal patterns of turbulent energy fluxes and the surface properties that drive them. With nascent policy mechanisms set to compensate landowners and farmers for low emission land use practices beyond reforestation, it is essential that policy mechanisms take into consideration how the biophysical impacts of land use change could drive local to regional-scale climatic perturbations, enhancing or attenuating the biogeochemical impacts.

  2. Hydrologic cycle and dynamics of aquatic macrophytes in two intermittent rivers of the semi-arid region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pedro

    Full Text Available The dynamics of aquatic macrophytes in intermittent rivers is generally related to the characteristics of the resistance and resilience of plants to hydrologic disturbances of flood and drought. In the semi-arid region of Brazil, intermittent rivers and streams are affected by disturbances with variable intensity, frequency, and duration throughout their hydrologic cycles. The aim of the present study is to determine the occurrence and variation of biomass of aquatic macrophyte species in two intermittent rivers of distinct hydrologic regimes. Their dynamics were determined with respect to resistance and resilience responses of macrophytes to flood and drought events by estimating the variation of biomass and productivity throughout two hydrologic cycles. Twenty-one visits were undertaken in the rewetting, drying, and drought phases in a permanent puddle in the Avelós stream and two temporary puddles in the Taperoá river, state of Paraíba, Northeast Brazil. The sampling was carried out by using the square method. Floods of different magnitudes occurred during the present study in the river and in the stream. The results showed that floods and droughts are determining factors in the occurrence of macrophytes and in the structure of their aquatic communities. The species richness of the aquatic macrophyte communities was lower in the puddles of the river and stream subject to flood events, when compared to areas where the run-off water is retained. At the beginning of the recolonization process, the intensity of the floods was decisive in the productivity and biomass of the aquatic macrophytes in the Taperoá river and the Avelós stream. In intermediate levels of disturbance, the largest values of productivity and biomass and the shortest time for starting the recolonization process occurred.

  3. System-Scale Model of Aquifer, Vadose Zone, and River Interactions for the Hanford 300 Area - Application to Uranium Reactive Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Bacon, Diana H.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Parker, Kyle R.; Waichler, Scott R.; Williams, Mark D.

    2013-10-01

    This report represents a synthesis and integration of basic and applied research into a system-scale model of the Hanford 300 Area groundwater uranium plume, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Richland Operations (DOE-RL) office. The report integrates research findings and data from DOE Office of Science (DOE-SC), Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), and DOE-RL projects, and from the site remediation and closure contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, LLC (WCH). The three-dimensional, system-scale model addresses water flow and reactive transport of uranium for the coupled vadose zone, unconfined aquifer, and Columbia River shoreline of the Hanford 300 Area. The system-scale model of the 300 Area was developed to be a decision-support tool to evaluate processes of the total system affecting the groundwater uranium plume. The model can also be used to address “what if” questions regarding different remediation endpoints, and to assist in design and evaluation of field remediation efforts. For example, the proposed cleanup plan for the Hanford 300 Area includes removal, treatment, and disposal of contaminated sediments from known waste sites, enhanced attenuation of uranium hot spots in the vadose and periodically rewetted zone, and continued monitoring of groundwater with institutional controls. Illustrative simulations of polyphosphate infiltration were performed to demonstrate the ability of the system-scale model to address these types of questions. The use of this model in conjunction with continued field monitoring is expected to provide a rigorous basis for developing operational strategies for field remediation and for defining defensible remediation endpoints.

  4. Drought-induced photosynthetic inhibition and autumn recovery in two Mediterranean oak species (Quercus ilex and Quercus suber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, M; Pereira, J S; Gazarini, L C; David, T S; David, J S; Rodrigues, A; Maroco, J; Chaves, M M

    2010-08-01

    Responses of leaf water relations and photosynthesis to summer drought and autumn rewetting were studied in two evergreen Mediterranean oak species, Quercus ilex spp. rotundifolia and Quercus suber. The predawn leaf water potential (Ψ(lPD)), stomatal conductance (gs) and photosynthetic rate (A) at ambient conditions were measured seasonally over a 3-year period. We also measured the photosynthetic response to light and to intercellular CO₂ (A/PPFD and A/C(i) response curves) under water stress (summer) and after recovery due to autumn rainfall. Photosynthetic parameters, Vc(max), J(max) and triose phosphate utilization (TPU) rate, were estimated using the Farquhar model. RuBisCo activity, leaf chlorophyll, leaf nitrogen concentration and leaf carbohydrate concentration were also measured. All measurements were performed in the spring leaves of the current year. In both species, the predawn leaf water potential, stomatal conductance and photosynthetic rate peaked in spring, progressively declined throughout the summer and recovered upon autumn rainfall. During the drought period, Q. ilex maintained a higher predawn leaf water potential and stomatal conductance than Q. suber. During this period, we found that photosynthesis was not only limited by stomatal closure, but was also downregulated as a consequence of a decrease in the maximum carboxylation rate (Vc(max)) and the light-saturated rate of photosynthetic electron transport (J(max)) in both species. The Vc(max) and J(max) increased after the first autumnal rains and this increase was related to RuBisCo activity, leaf nitrogen concentration and chlorophyll concentration. In addition, an increase in the TPU rate and in soluble leaf sugar concentration was observed in this period. The results obtained indicate a high resilience of the photosynthetic apparatus to summer drought as well as good recovery in the following autumn rains of these evergreen oak species.

  5. Root and leaf abscisic acid concentration impact on gas exchange in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill plants subjected to partial root-zone drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Valerio

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Partial root-zone drying (PRD is a deficit irrigation technique with great potential for water saving. A split-root experiment was conducted on tomato in controlled environment in order to test the response of two long-time storage cultivars to PRD. Ponderosa tomato, a cultivar with yellow fruits, was compared to Giallo tondo di Auletta, a local cultivar from southern Campania (Italy. Plants were subjected to three irrigation treatments: plants receiving an amount of water equivalent to 100% of plant evapotranspiration (V100; plants in which 50% of the amount of water given to V100 was supplied (V50; and plants where one root compartment was irrigated at 50% of water requirements and the other compartment was allowed to dry, and thereafter every side was rewetted alternatively (PRD. The highest levels of leaf abscisic acid (ABA [on average equal to 104 ng g–1 fresh weight FW] were measured in PRD and V50, at 70 days after transplantation. Root ABA concentration in both PRD and V50 reached mean values of 149 ng g–1 FW. There were differences for the irrigation regime in root ABA biosynthesis and accumulation under partial root-zone drying and conventional deficit irrigation (V50. Assimilation rate, stomatal conductance and intercellular CO2 concentration decreased in relation to the irrigation regime by 22, 36 and 12%, respectively, in PRD, V50 and V100 at 50 days after transplantation. Ponderosa variety accumulated 20% more dry matter than Auletta and significant differences were observed in leaf area. In both PRD and V50 of the two varieties, it was possible to save on average 46% of water. Our results indicate that there is still space to optimise the PRD strategy, to further improve the cumulative physiological effects of the root-sourced signaling system.

  6. Desiccation stress and tolerance in green algae: consequences for ultrastructure, physiological and molecular mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, Andreas; Karsten, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Although most green algae typically occur in aquatic ecosystems, many species also live partly or permanently under aeroterrestrial conditions, where the cells are exposed to the atmosphere and hence regularly experience dehydration. The ability of algal cells to survive in an air-dried state is termed desiccation tolerance. The mechanisms involved in desiccation tolerance of green algae are still poorly understood, and hence the aim of this review is to summarize recent findings on the effects of desiccation and osmotic water loss. Starting from structural changes, physiological, and biochemical consequences of desiccation will be addressed in different green-algal lineages. The available data clearly indicate a range of strategies, which are rather different in streptophycean and non-streptophycean green algae. While members of the Trebouxiophyceae exhibit effective water loss-prevention mechanisms based on the biosynthesis and accumulation of particular organic osmolytes such as polyols, these compounds are so far not reported in representatives of the Streptophyta. In members of the Streptophyta such as Klebsormidium, the most striking observation is the appearance of cross-walls in desiccated samples, which are strongly undulating, suggesting a high degree of mechanical flexibility. This aids in maintaining structural integrity in the dried state and allows the cell to maintain turgor pressure for a prolonged period of time during the dehydration process. Physiological strategies in aeroterrestrial green algae generally include a rapid reduction of photosynthesis during desiccation, but also a rather quick recovery after rewetting, whereas aquatic species are sensitive to drying. The underlying mechanisms such as the affected molecular components of the photosynthetic machinery are poorly understood in green algae. Therefore, modern approaches based on transcriptomics, proteomics, and/or metabolomics are urgently needed to better understand the molecular

  7. Monitoring the effect of restoration measures in Indonesian peatlands by radar satellite imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenicke, J; Englhart, S; Siegert, F

    2011-03-01

    In the context of the ongoing climate change discussions the importance of peatlands as carbon stores is increasingly recognised in the public. Drainage, deforestation and peat fires are the main reasons for the release of huge amounts of carbon from peatlands. Successful restoration of degraded tropical peatlands is of high interest due to their huge carbon store and sequestration potential. The blocking of drainage canals by dam building has become one of the most important measures to restore the hydrology and the ecological function of the peat domes. This study investigates the capability of using multitemporal radar remote sensing imagery for monitoring the hydrological effects of these measures. The study area is the former Mega Rice Project area in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia, where peat drainage and forest degradation is especially intense. Restoration measures started in July 2004 by building 30 large dams until June 2008. We applied change detection analysis with more than 80 ENVISAT ASAR and ALOS PALSAR images, acquired between 2004 and 2009. Radar signal increases of up to 1.36 dB show that high frequency multitemporal radar satellite imagery can be used to detect an increase in peat soil moisture after dam construction, especially in deforested areas with a high density of dams. Furthermore, a strong correlation between cross-polarised radar backscatter coefficients and groundwater levels above -50 cm was found. Monitoring peatland rewetting and quantifying groundwater level variations is important information for vegetation re-establishment, fire hazard warning and making carbon emission mitigation tradable under the voluntary carbon market or REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) mechanism. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Rapid arsenic(V)-reduction by fire in schwertmannite-rich soil enhances arsenic mobilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Scott G.; Bennett, William W.; Burton, Edward D.; Hockmann, Kerstin; Dawson, Nigel; Karimian, Niloofar

    2018-04-01

    Arsenic in acid sulfate soil (ASS) landscapes commonly associates with schwertmannite, a poorly crystalline Fe(III) mineral. Fires in ASS landscapes can thermally transform Fe(III) minerals to more crystalline phases, such as maghemite (γFe2O3). Although thermal genesis of maghemite requires electron transfer via organic matter pyrolysis, the possibility of fire causing concurrent transfer of electrons to schwertmannite-bound As(V) remains unexplored. Here, we subject an organic-rich soil with variable carbon content (∼9-44% organic C) mixed (4:1) with As(V)-bearing schwertmannite (total As of 4.7-5.4 μmol g-1), to various temperatures (200-800 °C) and heating durations (5-120 min). We explore the consequences for As and Fe via X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and selective extracts. Heating transforms schwertmannite to mainly maghemite and hematite at temperatures above 300-400 °C, with some transitory formation of magnetite, and electrons are readily transferred to both Fe(III) and As(V). As(V) reduction to As(III) is influenced by a combination of temperature, heating duration and carbon content and is significantly (P moderate fires in ASS landscapes, even of short duration, may generate considerable labile As(III) species and cause a pulse of As(III)aq mobilisation following initial re-wetting. Further research is warranted to examine if analogous As(III) formation occurs during combustion of organic-rich soil containing common As-bearing Fe(III) minerals such as ferrihydrite and goethite.

  9. Development of a detailed BWR core thermal-hydraulic analysis method based on the Japanese post-BT standard using a best-estimate code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, H.; Mototani, A.; Kawamura, S.; Abe, N.; Takeuchi, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The post-BT standard is a new fuel integrity standard or the Atomic Energy Society of Japan that allows temporary boiling transition condition in the evaluation for BWR anticipated operational occurrences. For application of the post-BT standard to BWR anticipated operational occurrences evaluation, it is important to identify which fuel assemblies and which axial, radial positions of fuel rods have temporarily experienced the post-BT condition and to evaluates how high the fuel cladding temperature rise was and how long the dryout duration continued. Therefore, whole bundle simulation, in which each fuel assembly is simulated independently by one thermal-hydraulic component, is considered to be an effective analytical method. In the present study, a best-estimate thermal-hydraulic code, TRACG02, has been modified to extend it predictive capability by implementing the post-BT evaluation model such as the post-BT heat transfer correlation and rewetting correlation and enlarging the number of components used for BWR plant simulation. Based on new evaluation methods, BWR core thermal-hydraulic behavior has been analyzed for typical anticipated operational occurrence conditions. The location where boiling transition occurs and the severity of fuel assembly in the case of boiling transition conditions such as fuel cladding temperature, which are important factors in determining whether the reuse of the fuel assembly can be permitted, were well predicted by the proposed evaluation method. In summary, a new evaluation method for a detailed BWR core thermal-hydraulic analysis based on the post-BT standard of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan has been developed and applied to the evaluation of the post-BT standard during the actual BWR plant anticipated operational occurrences. (author)

  10. Soil water content drives spatiotemporal patterns of CO2 and N2O emissions from a Mediterranean riparian forest soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Poblador

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Riparian zones play a fundamental role in regulating the amount of carbon (C and nitrogen (N that is exported from catchments. However, C and N removal via soil gaseous pathways can influence local budgets of greenhouse gas (GHG emissions and contribute to climate change. Over a year, we quantified soil effluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2 and nitrous oxide (N2O from a Mediterranean riparian forest in order to understand the role of these ecosystems on catchment GHG emissions. In addition, we evaluated the main soil microbial processes that produce GHG (mineralization, nitrification, and denitrification and how changes in soil properties can modify the GHG production over time and space. Riparian soils emitted larger amounts of CO2 (1.2–10 g C m−2 d−1 than N2O (0.001–0.2 mg N m−2 d−1 to the atmosphere attributed to high respiration and low denitrification rates. Both CO2 and N2O emissions showed a marked (but antagonistic spatial gradient as a result of variations in soil water content across the riparian zone. Deep groundwater tables fueled large soil CO2 effluxes near the hillslope, while N2O emissions were higher in the wet zones adjacent to the stream channel. However, both CO2 and N2O emissions peaked after spring rewetting events, when optimal conditions of soil water content, temperature, and N availability favor microbial respiration, nitrification, and denitrification. Overall, our results highlight the role of water availability on riparian soil biogeochemistry and GHG emissions and suggest that climate change alterations in hydrologic regimes can affect the microbial processes that produce GHG as well as the contribution of these systems to regional and global biogeochemical cycles.

  11. Effects of Recurring Droughts on Extracellular Enzyme Activity in Mountain Grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchslueger, L.; Bahn, M.; Kienzl, S.; Hofhansl, F.; Schnecker, J.; Richter, A.

    2015-12-01

    Water availability is a key factor for biogeochemical processes and determines microbial activity and functioning, and thereby organic matter decomposition in soils by affecting the osmotic potential, soil pore connectivity, substrate diffusion and nutrient availability. Low water availability during drought periods therefore directly affects microbial activity. Recurring drought periods likely induce shifts in microbial structure that might be reflected in altered responses of microbial turnover of organic matter by extracellular enzymes. To study this we measured a set of potential extracellular enzyme activity rates (cellobiohydrolase CBH; leucine-amino-peptidase LAP; phosphatase PHOS; phenoloxidase POX), in grassland soils that were exposed to extreme experimental droughts during the growing seasons of up to five subsequent years. During the first drought period after eight weeks of rain exclusion all measured potential enzyme activities were significantly decreased. In parallel, soil extractable organic carbon and nitrogen concentrations increased and microbial community structure, determined by phospholipid fatty acid analysis, changed. In soils that were exposed to two and three drought periods only PHOS decreased. After four years of drought again CBH, PHOS and POX decreased, while LAP was unaffected; after five years of drought PHOS and POX decreased and CBH and LAP remained stable. Thus, our results suggest that recurring extreme drought events can cause different responses of extracellular enzyme activities and that the responses change over time. We will discuss whether and to what degree these changes were related to shifts in microbial community composition. However, independent of whether a solitary or a recurrent drought was imposed, in cases when enzyme activity rates were altered during drought, they quickly recovered after rewetting. Overall, our data suggest that microbial functioning in mountain grassland is sensitive to drought, but highly

  12. Water relations and photosynthesis along an elevation gradient for Artemisia tridentata during an historic drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Charlotte C; Loik, Michael E

    2016-05-01

    Quantifying the variation in plant-water relations and photosynthesis over environmental gradients and during unique events can provide a better understanding of vegetation patterns in a future climate. We evaluated the hypotheses that photosynthesis and plant water potential would correspond to gradients in precipitation and soil moisture during a lengthy drought, and that experimental water additions would increase photosynthesis for the widespread evergreen shrub Artemisia tridentata ssp. vaseyana. We quantified abiotic conditions and physiological characteristics for control and watered plants at 2135, 2315, and 2835 m near Mammoth Lakes, CA, USA, at the ecotone of the Sierra Nevada and Great Basin ecoregions. Snowfall, total precipitation, and soil moisture increased with elevation, but air temperature and soil N content did not. Plant water potential (Ψ), stomatal conductance (g s), maximum photosynthetic rate (A max), carboxylation rate (V cmax), and electron transport rate (J max) all significantly increased with elevations. Addition of water increased Ψ, g s, J max, and A max only at the lowest elevation; g s contributed about 30 % of the constraints on photosynthesis at the lowest elevation and 23 % at the other two elevations. The physiology of this foundational shrub species was quite resilient to this 1-in-1200 year drought. However, plant water potential and photosynthesis corresponded to differences in soil moisture across the gradient. Soil re-wetting in early summer increased water potential and photosynthesis at the lowest elevation. Effects on water relations and photosynthesis of this widespread, cold desert shrub species may be disproportionate at lower elevations as drought length increases in a future climate.

  13. Towards advanced code simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scriven, A.H.

    1990-01-01

    The Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) uses advanced thermohydraulic codes extensively to support PWR safety analyses. A system has been developed to allow fully interactive execution of any code with graphical simulation of the operator desk and mimic display. The system operates in a virtual machine environment, with the thermohydraulic code executing in one virtual machine, communicating via interrupts with any number of other virtual machines each running other programs and graphics drivers. The driver code itself does not have to be modified from its normal batch form. Shortly following the release of RELAP5 MOD1 in IBM compatible form in 1983, this code was used as the driver for this system. When RELAP5 MOD2 became available, it was adopted with no changes needed in the basic system. Overall the system has been used for some 5 years for the analysis of LOBI tests, full scale plant studies and for simple what-if studies. For gaining rapid understanding of system dependencies it has proved invaluable. The graphical mimic system, being independent of the driver code, has also been used with other codes to study core rewetting, to replay results obtained from batch jobs on a CRAY2 computer system and to display suitably processed experimental results from the LOBI facility to aid interpretation. For the above work real-time execution was not necessary. Current work now centers on implementing the RELAP 5 code on a true parallel architecture machine. Marconi Simulation have been contracted to investigate the feasibility of using upwards of 100 processors, each capable of a peak of 30 MIPS to run a highly detailed RELAP5 model in real time, complete with specially written 3D core neutronics and balance of plant models. This paper describes the experience of using RELAP5 as an analyzer/simulator, and outlines the proposed methods and problems associated with parallel execution of RELAP5

  14. Rain events decrease boreal peatland net CO2 uptake through reduced light availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijp, Jelmer J; Limpens, Juul; Metselaar, Klaas; Peichl, Matthias; Nilsson, Mats B; van der Zee, Sjoerd E A T M; Berendse, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Boreal peatlands store large amounts of carbon, reflecting their important role in the global carbon cycle. The short-term exchange and the long-term storage of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 ) in these ecosystems are closely associated with the permanently wet surface conditions and are susceptible to drought. Especially, the single most important peat forming plant genus, Sphagnum, depends heavily on surface wetness for its primary production. Changes in rainfall patterns are expected to affect surface wetness, but how this transient rewetting affects net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) remains unknown. This study explores how the timing and characteristics of rain events during photosynthetic active periods, that is daytime, affect peatland NEE and whether rain event associated changes in environmental conditions modify this response (e.g. water table, radiation, vapour pressure deficit, temperature). We analysed an 11-year time series of half-hourly eddy covariance and meteorological measurements from Degerö Stormyr, a boreal peatland in northern Sweden. Our results show that daytime rain events systematically decreased the sink strength of peatlands for atmospheric CO2 . The decrease was best explained by rain associated reduction in light, rather than by rain characteristics or drought length. An average daytime growing season rain event reduced net ecosystem CO2 uptake by 0.23-0.54 gC m(-2) . On an annual basis, this reduction of net CO2 uptake corresponds to 24% of the annual net CO2 uptake (NEE) of the study site, equivalent to a 4.4% reduction of gross primary production (GPP) during the growing season. We conclude that reduced light availability associated with rain events is more important in explaining the NEE response to rain events than rain characteristics and changes in water availability. This suggests that peatland CO2 uptake is highly sensitive to changes in cloud cover formation and to altered rainfall regimes, a process hitherto largely

  15. Effects of Drought Manipulation on Soil Nitrogen Cycling: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homyak, Peter M.; Allison, Steven D.; Huxman, Travis E.; Goulden, Michael L.; Treseder, Kathleen K.

    2017-12-01

    Many regions on Earth are expected to become drier with climate change, which may impact nitrogen (N) cycling rates and availability. We used a meta-analytical approach on the results of field experiments that reduced precipitation and measured N supply (i.e., indices of N mineralization), soil microbial biomass, inorganic N pools (ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-)), and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. We hypothesized that N supply and N2O emissions would be relatively insensitive to precipitation reduction and that reducing precipitation would increase extractable NH4+ and NO3- concentrations because microbial processes continue, whereas plant N uptake diminishes with drought. In support of this hypothesis, extractable NH4+ increased by 25% overall with precipitation reduction; NH4+ also increased significantly with increasing magnitude of precipitation reduction. In contrast, N supply and extractable NO3- did not change and N2O emissions decreased with reduced precipitation. Across studies microbial biomass appeared unchanged, yet from the diversity of studies, it was clear that proportionally smaller precipitation reductions increased microbial biomass, whereas larger proportional reductions in rainfall reduced microbial biomass; there was a positive intercept (P = 0.005) and a significant negative slope (P = 0.0002) for the regression of microbial biomass versus % precipitation reduction (LnR = -0.009 × (% precipitation reduction) + 0.4021). Our analyses imply that relative to other N variables, N supply is less sensitive to reduced precipitation, whereas processes producing N2O decline. Drought intensity and duration, through sustained N supply, may control how much N becomes vulnerable to loss via hydrologic and gaseous pathways upon rewetting dry soils.

  16. Does Biochar Addition Inlfuence the Change Points of Soil Phosphorus Leaching?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xiao-rong; LI Dan; KONG Juan; LIN Qi-mei

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus change point indicating the threshold related to P leaching, largely depends on soil properties. Increasing data have shown that biochar addition can improve soil retention capacity of ions. However, we have known little about weather biochar amendment inlfuence the change point of P leaching. In this study, two soils added with 0, 5, 10, 20, and 50 g biochar kg-1 were incubated at 25°C for 14 d following adjusting the soil moisture to 50%water-holding capacity (WHC). The soils with different available P values were then obtained by adding a series of KH2PO4 solution (ranging from 0 to 600 mg P kg-1 soil), and subjecting to three cycles of drying and rewetting. The results showed that biochar addition signiifcantly lifted the P change points in the tested soils, together with changes in soil pH, organic C, Olen-P and CaCl2-P but little on exchangeable Ca and Mg, oxalate-extractable Fe and Al. The Olsen-P at the change points ranged from 48.65 to 185.07 mg kg-1 in the alluvial soil and 71.25 to 98.65 mg kg-1 in the red soil, corresponding to CaCl2-P of 0.31-6.49 and 0.18-0.45 mg L-1, respectively. The change points of the alluvial soil were readily changed by adding biochar compared with that of the red soil. The enhancement of change points was likely to be explained as the improvement of phosphate retention ability in the biochar-added soils.

  17. Two-phase flow regimes and mechanisms of critical heat flux under subcooled flow boiling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Corre, Jean-Marie; Yao, Shi-Chune; Amon, Cristina H.

    2010-01-01

    A literature review of critical heat flux (CHF) experimental visualizations under subcooled flow boiling conditions was performed and systematically analyzed. Three major types of CHF flow regimes were identified (bubbly, vapor clot and slug flow regime) and a CHF flow regime map was developed, based on a dimensional analysis of the phenomena and available experimental information. It was found that for similar geometric characteristics and pressure, a Weber number (We)/thermodynamic quality (x) map can be used to predict the CHF flow regime. Based on the experimental observations and the review of the available CHF mechanistic models under subcooled flow boiling conditions, hypothetical CHF mechanisms were selected for each CHF flow regime, all based on a concept of wall dry spot overheating, rewetting prevention and subsequent dry spot spreading. Even though the selected concept has not received much attention (in term or theoretical developments and applications) as compared to other more popular DNB models, its basis have often been cited by experimental investigators and is considered by the authors as the 'most-likely' mechanism based on the literature review and analysis performed in this work. The selected modeling concept has the potential to span the CHF conditions from highly subcooled bubbly flow to early stage of annular flow and has been numerically implemented and validated in bubbly flow and coupled with one- and three-dimensional (CFD) two-phase flow codes, in a companion paper. [Le Corre, J.M., Yao, S.C., Amon, C.H., in this issue. A mechanistic model of critical heat flux under subcooled flow boiling conditions for application to one and three-dimensional computer codes. Nucl. Eng. Des.].

  18. Effects of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles deposition on critical heat flux of R-123 in flow boiling heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Seok Bin; Bang, In Cheol [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    In this study, R-123 flow boiling experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of nanoparticle deposition on heater surfaces on flow critical heat flux (CHF) and boiling heat transfer. It is known that CHF enhancement by nanoparticles results from porous structures that are very similar to layers of Chalk River unidentified deposit formed on nuclear fuel rod surfaces during the reactor operation period. Although previous studies have investigated the surface effects through surface modifications, most studies are limited to pool boiling conditions, and therefore, the effects of porous surfaces on flow boiling heat transfer are still unclear. In addition, there have been only few reports on suppression of wetting for decoupled approaches of reasoning. In this study, bare and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticle-coated surfaces were prepared for the study experiments. The CHF of each surface was measured with different mass fluxes of 1,600 kg/m{sup 2}s, 1,800 kg/m{sup 2}s, 2,100 kg/m{sup 2}s, 2,400 kg/m{sup 2}s, and 2,600 kg/m{sup 2}s. The nanoparticle-coated tube showed CHF enhancement up to 17% at a mass flux of 2,400 kg/m{sup 2}s compared with the bare tube. The factors for CHF enhancement are related to the enhanced rewetting process derived from capillary action through porous structures built-up by nanoparticles while suppressing relative wettability effects between two sample surfaces as a highly wettable R-123 refrigerant was used as a working fluid.

  19. A phenomenological model of thermal-hydraulics of convective boiling during the quenching of hot rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, C.; Nelson, R.

    1991-01-01

    After completion of the thermal-hydraulic model developed in a companion paper, the authors performed developmental assessment calculation of the model using steady-state and transient post-critical heat flux (CHF) data. This paper discusses the results of those calculations. The overall interfacial drag model predicted reasonable drag coefficients for both the nucleate boiling and the inverted annular flow (IAF) regimes. The predicted pressure drops agreed reasonably well with the measured data of two transient experiments, CCTF Run 14 and a Lehigh reflood test. The thermal-hydraulic model for post-CHF convective heat transfer predicted the rewetting velocities reasonably well for both experiments. The predicted average slope of the wall temperature traces for these tests showed reasonable agreement with the measured data, indicating that the transient-calculated precursory cooling rates agreed with measured data. The hot-patch model, in conjunction with the other thermal-hydraulic models, was capable of modeling the Winfrith post-CHF hot-patch experiments. The hot-patch model kept the wall temperatures at the specified levels in the hot-patch regions and did not allow any quench-front propagation from either the bottom or the top of the test section. The interfacial heat-transfer model tended to slightly underpredict the vapor temperatures. The maximum difference between calculated and measured vapor temperatures was 20%, with a 10% difference for the remainder of the runs considered. The wall-to-fluid heat transfer was predicted reasonably well, and the predicted wall temperatures were in reasonable agreement with measured data with a maximum relative error of less than 13%

  20. Modeling the unmeasurable: scaling soil physiology from microns to meters and seconds to centuries (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimel, J.; Xu, X.; Lawrence, C. R.

    2013-12-01

    Models are essential tools for linking microbial dynamics to their manifestations at large scales. Yet, developing mechanistically accurate models requires data that we often don't have and may not be able to get, such as the functional life-span of an extracellular enzyme. Yet there are approaches to condense complex microbial dynamics into 'workable' models. One example is in describing soil responses to moisture pulses. We developed a family of five separate models to capture microbial dynamics through dry/wet cycles. The simplest was a straight multi-pool, 1st-order decomposition model, with versions adding levels of microbial mechanism, culminating in one that included exoenzyme-breakdown of detritus. However, this identified the critical mechanism, not as exoenzymes, but as the production of a bioavailable C pool that accumulates in dry soil and is rapidly metabolized on rewetting. A final version of the model therefore stripped out explicit enzymes but retained separate polymer breakdown and substrate use; this model was the most robust. A second pervasive question in soil biology has been what controls the size of the microbial biomass across biomes? We approached this through a physiological model that regulated microbial C assimilation into biomass by two processes: initial assimilation followed by ongoing maintenance. Assimilation is a function of substrate quality, while maintenance is regulated by climate--notably the period of the year during which microbes are active. This model was tested against a global dataset of microbial biomass. It explains why, for example, deserts and tundra have relatively high proportions of their organic matter in microbial biomass, while the low substrate quality and long active periods common in temperate conifer forests lead to low biomass levels.

  1. Moss-cyanobacteria associations as biogenic sources of nitrogen in boreal forest ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin eRousk

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The biological fixation of atmospheric nitrogen (N is a major pathway for available N entering ecosystems. In N-limited boreal forests, a significant amount of N2 is fixed by cyanobacteria living in association with mosses, contributing up to 50 % to the total N input. In this review, we synthesize reports on the drivers of N2 fixation in feather moss-cyanobacteria associations to gain a deeper understanding of their role for ecosystem-N-cycling. Nitrogen fixation in moss-cyanobacteria associations is inhibited by N inputs and therefore, significant fixation occurs only in low N-deposition areas. While it has been shown that artificial N additions in the laboratory as well as in the field inhibit N2 fixation in moss-cyanobacteria associations, the type, as well as the amounts of N that enters the system, affect N2 fixation differently. Another major driver of N2 fixation is the moisture status of the cyanobacteria-hosting moss, wherein moist conditions promote N2 fixation. Mosses experience large fluctuations in their hydrological status, undergoing significant natural drying and rewetting cycles over the course of only a few hours, especially in summer, which likely compromises the N input to the system via N2 fixation. Perhaps the most central question, however, that remains unanswered is the fate of the fixed N2 in mosses. The cyanobacteria are likely to leak N, but whether this N is transferred to the soil and if so, at which rates and timescales, is unknown. Despite our increasing understanding of the drivers of N2 fixation, the role moss-cyanobacteria associations play in ecosystem-N-cycling remains unresolved. Further, the relationship mosses and cyanobacteria share is unknown to date and warrants further investigation.

  2. Belowground Carbon Allocation and Plant-Microbial Interactions Drive Resistance and Resilience of Mountain Grassland Communities to Drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlowsky, S.; Augusti, A.; Ingrisch, J.; Hasibeder, R.; Lavorel, S.; Bahn, M.; Gleixner, G.

    2016-12-01

    Belowground carbon allocation (BCA) and plant-microbial interactions are crucial for the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. Recent research suggests that extreme events can have severe effects on these processes but it is unknown how land use intensity potentially modifies their responses. We studied the resistance and resilience of mountain grassland communities to prolonged drought and investigated the role of plant C allocation and soil microbial communities in mediating drought resistance and immediate recovery. In a common garden experiment we exposed monoliths from an abandoned grassland and a hay meadow to an early summer drought. Two independent 13C pulse labeling experiments were conducted, the first during peak drought and the second during the recovery phase. The 13C incorporation was analyzed in above- and belowground plant parts and in phospho- and neutral lipid fatty acids of soil microorganisms. In addition, a 15N label was added at the rewetting to determine plant N uptake. We found that C uptake, BCA and C transfer to soil microorganisms were less strongly reduced by drought in the abandoned grassland than in the meadow. Moreover, drought induced an increase of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi (AMF) marker in the abandoned grassland. Nevertheless, C uptake and related parameters were quickly recovered and N uptake increased in the meadow during recovery. Unexpectedly, AMF and their C uptake were generally reduced during recovery, while bacteria increased and quickly recovered C uptake, particularly in the meadow. Our results showed a negative relation between high resistance and fast recovery. The more resistant abandoned grassland plant communities seemed to invest more C below ground and into interactions with AMF during drought, likely to access water through their hyphal network. Conversely, meadow communities invested more C from recent photosynthesis into bacterial communities during recovery, obviously to gain more nutrients for regrowth

  3. Microbial properties of soil aggregates created by earthworms and other factors: spherical and prismatic soil aggregates from unreclaimed post-mining sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frouz, J.; Kristufek, V.; Liveckova, M.; van Loo, D.; Jacobs, P.; Van Hoorebeke, L. [Charles University of Prague, Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. of Environmental Studies

    2011-01-15

    Soil aggregates between 2 and 5 mm from 35- and 45-year-old unreclaimed post-mining sites near Sokolov (Czech Republic) were divided into two groups: spherical and prismatic. X-ray tomography indicated that prismatic aggregates consisted of fragments of claystone bonded together by amorphous clay and roots while spherical aggregates consisted of a clay matrix and organic fragments of various sizes. Prismatic aggregates were presumed to be formed by plant roots and physical processes during weathering of Tertiary mudstone, while earthworms were presumed to contribute to the formation of spherical aggregates. The effects of drying and rewetting and glucose addition on microbial respiration, microbial biomass, and counts of bacteria in these aggregates were determined. Spherical aggregates contained a greater percentage of C and N and a higher C-to-N ratio than prismatic ones. The C content of the particulate organic matter was also higher in the spherical than in the prismatic aggregates. Although spherical aggregates had a higher microbial respiration and biomass, the growth of microbial biomass in spherical aggregates was negatively correlated with initial microbial biomass, indicating competition between bacteria. Specific respiration was negatively correlated with microbial biomass. Direct counts of bacteria were higher in spherical than in prismatic aggregates. Bacterial numbers were more stable in the center than in the surface layers of the aggregates. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that bacteria often occurred as individual cells in prismatic aggregates but as small clusters of cells in spherical aggregates. Ratios of colony forming units (cultivatable bacteria) to direct counts were higher in spherical than in prismatic aggregates. Spherical aggregates also contained faster growing bacteria.

  4. Durban Climate Conference: new perspectives on forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perugini L

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent Durban Climate Conference can be considered a step forward in the agroforestry sector within the international climate regulatory regime. After four years of negotiations the long-awaited decision on Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry for the second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol was agreed, including a new activity (wetland drainage and rewetting, defining the accounting rules for forest management (which was shifted from voluntary to mandatory, the accounting for harvested wood products and the treatment of emissions from natural disturbances. Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, conservation, sustainable management of forest, and the enhancement of forest carbon stock (REDD+ has moved ahead as well, with the agreement of two decisions as an intermediate step for the finalization of the REDD+ mechanism architecture. The first decision is about methodological aspects on guidance on system for providing information on how safeguards are addressed and respected and on modalities relating to forest reference emission levels and forest reference levels that are benchmarks for assessing country’s performance in implementing REDD+ activities. The second decision is about policy approaches and incentives on REDD+ activities, that is the controversial issue on the sources of financing for REDD+ mechanism. As source of finance for result-based actions, a wide variety of sources are recognized: public and private, bilateral and multilateral, including the Green Climate Fund, provided that they are new, additional and predictable. Both market and non-market approaches were also considered as possible tool for financing REDD+ action, to be developed by the Conference of Parties. Although a more ambitious outcome would have been desirable, the conference in Durban concluded with the finalization of key outcomes in the forestry sector providing important operational instruments to incentivize sustainable

  5. Restauration de la Tourbière de Landemarais, vingt années de suivi Landemarais peatland restoration : 20 years of monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Clément, Jean-François Lebas, Emmanuelle Nogues et Ahmed Aidoud

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Procéder à la restauration de la dynamique naturelle d’un écosystème passe par un suivi scientifique efficace des opérations et de leurs effets écologiques. Après vingt ans de suivi de la réhabilitation de la tourbière de Landemarais en Bretagne, quels sont les résultats sur le maintien des espèces et des habitats ? Quelles sont les améliorations à envisager dans les pratiques de gestion ?Resulting from terrestrialization of a pond built in Xth century, the telmatic wetland of Landemarais is an acidic mire, locally differentiated by local ombrotrophic bogs. Linked to peat digging, particularly in 1968, the drainage has amplified the woodland dynamics. Integrated within the ENS ("Espaces naturels sensibles" network of the Conseil Général 35 in 1989, the objectives of peatland restoration were recovering open areas after woodland clearing and peat rewetting. These two actions had to be performed for re-initialisation of natural dynamic trajectories, already existing before disturbances. The targeted species populations and peat plant communities have recovered a steady states close to the previous ones. Nevertheless the managers have to face the woody species encroachment, such as Betula and Salix, by cutting and / or digging them every 2-4 years in order to maintain open habitats for conservation of the peatland target species and plant communities. Hypothesis of sod-cutting of the upper peat after woodland clearing is discussed.

  6. Stomatal and Non-Stomatal Turbulent Deposition Flux of Ozone to a Managed Peatland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek S. El-Madany

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ozone is a key trace gas in the troposphere; because it is a greenhouse gas, it is very reactive, and it is potentially toxic to humans, fauna, and vegetation. The main sink processes for ozone are chemical reactions and the turbulent deposition flux to the earth’s surface. The deposition process itself is rather complex: The interactions between co-varying drivers such as the tropospheric ozone concentration, turbulence, and chemical reactions are not well understood. In the case of ozone deposition to vegetation, another aspect that must be studied is the role of stomatal regulation for a wide range of conditions. Therefore, we measured turbulent deposition fluxes of ozone with the eddy covariance technique during the peak of the growing season in 2014 over a managed, rewetted peatland in NW Germany. The deposition flux was large during the day (up to −15 nmol m−2 s−1 and relatively small during the night (between −1 and −2 nmol m−2 s−1. Flux partitioning by applying the surface resistance analogy and further analysis showed that the stomatal uptake was smaller than non-stomatal deposition. The correction of stomatal conductance with the gross primary production (GPP improved the estimation of day- and nighttime stomatal deposition fluxes. Statistical analysis confirmed that the friction velocity (u* was the single most important driver of non-stomatal ozone deposition and that relationships with other environmental drivers are not linear and highly variable. Further research is needed to develop a better process understanding of non-stomatal ozone deposition, to quantify the role of surface deposition to the ozone budget of the atmospheric boundary layer, and to estimate uncertainties associated with the partitioning of ozone deposition into stomatal and non-stomatal fluxes.

  7. Modeling of coupled heat transfer and reactive transport processes in porous media: Application to seepage studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Spycher, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    When hot radioactive waste is placed in subsurface tunnels, a series of complex changes occurs in the surrounding medium. The water in the pore space of the medium undergoes vaporization and boiling. Subsequently, vapor migrates out of the matrix pore space, moving away from the tunnel through the permeable fracture network. This migration is propelled by buoyancy, by the increased vapor pressure caused by heating and boiling, and through local convection. In cooler regions, the vapor condenses on fracture walls, where it drains through the fracture network. Slow imbibition of water thereafter leads to gradual rewetting of the rock matrix. These thermal and hydrological processes also bring about chemical changes in the medium. Amorphous silica precipitates from boiling and evaporation, and calcite from heating and CO2 volatilization. The precipitation of amorphous silica, and to a much lesser extent calcite, results in long-term permeability reduction. Evaporative concentration also results in the precipitation of gypsum (or anhydrite), halite, fluorite and other salts. These evaporative minerals eventually redissolve after the boiling period is over, however, their precipitation results in a significant temporary decrease in permeability. Reduction of permeability is also associated with changes in fracture capillary characteristics. In short, the coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes dynamically alter the hydrological properties of the rock. A model based on the TOUGHREACT reactive transport software is presented here to investigate the impact of THC processes on flow near an emplacement tunnel at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We show how transient changes in hydrological properties caused by THC processes often lead to local flow channeling and saturation increases above the tunnel. For models that include only permeability changes to fractures, such local flow channeling may lead to seepage relative to models where THC effects are ignored. However

  8. Desiccation stress and tolerance in green algae: Consequences for ultrastructure, physiological and molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eHolzinger

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Although most green algae typically occur in aquatic ecosystems, many species also live partly or permanently under aeroterrestrial conditions, where the cells are exposed to the atmosphere and hence regularly experience dehydration. The ability of algal cells to survive in an air-dried state is termed desiccation tolerance. The mechanisms involved in desiccation tolerance of green algae are still poorly understood, and hence the aim of this review is to summarize recent findings on the effects of desiccation and osmotic water loss. Starting from structural changes, physiological and biochemical consequences of desiccation will be addressed in different green-algal lineages. The available data clearly indicate a range of strategies, which are rather different in streptophycean and non-streptophycean green algae. For example, Trebouxiophyceae exhibit effective water loss-prevention mechanisms based on the biosynthesis and accumulation of particular organic osmolytes such as polyols, these compounds are so far not reported in representatives of the Streptophyta. In members of the Streptophyta such as Klebsormidium, the most striking observation is the appearance of cross-walls in desiccated samples, which are strongly undulating, suggesting a high degree of mechanical flexibility. This allows the cell to maintain turgor pressure for a prolonged period of time during the dehydration process. Physiological strategies in aeroterrestrial green algae generally include a rapid reduction of photosynthesis during desiccation, but also a rather quick recovery after rewetting, whereas aquatic species are sensitive to drying. The underlying mechanisms such as the affected molecular components of the photosynthetic machinery are poorly understood in green algae. Therefore, modern approaches based on transcriptomics, proteomics and/or metabolomics are urgently needed to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in desiccation-stress physiology of

  9. Multivariate regulation of soil CO2 and N2 O pulse emissions from agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liyin L; Grantz, David A; Jenerette, G Darrel

    2016-03-01

    Climate and land-use models project increasing occurrence of high temperature and water deficit in both agricultural production systems and terrestrial ecosystems. Episodic soil wetting and subsequent drying may increase the occurrence and magnitude of pulsed biogeochemical activity, affecting carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles and influencing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In this study, we provide the first data to explore the responses of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and nitrous oxide (N2 O) fluxes to (i) temperature, (ii) soil water content as percent water holding capacity (%WHC), (iii) substrate availability throughout, and (iv) multiple soil drying and rewetting (DW) events. Each of these factors and their interactions exerted effects on GHG emissions over a range of four (CO2 ) and six (N2 O) orders of magnitude. Maximal CO2 and N2 O fluxes were observed in environments combining intermediate %WHC, elevated temperature, and sufficient substrate availability. Amendments of C and N and their interactions significantly affected CO2 and N2 O fluxes and altered their temperature sensitivities (Q10 ) over successive DW cycles. C amendments significantly enhanced CO2 flux, reduced N2 O flux, and decreased the Q10 of both. N amendments had no effect on CO2 flux and increased N2 O flux, while significantly depressing the Q10 for CO2 , and having no effect on the Q10 for N2 O. The dynamics across DW cycles could be attributed to changes in soil microbial communities as the different responses to wetting events in specific group of microorganisms, to the altered substrate availabilities, or to both. The complex interactions among parameters influencing trace gas fluxes should be incorporated into next generation earth system models to improve estimation of GHG emissions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Modeling of coupled heat transfer and reactive transport processes in porous media: Application to seepage studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Sonnenthal, E.L.; Spycher, N.

    2007-01-01

    When hot radioactive waste is placed in subsurface tunnels, a series of complex changes occurs in the surrounding medium. The water in the pore space of the medium undergoes vaporization and boiling. Subsequently, vapor migrates out of the matrix pore space, moving away from the tunnel through the permeable fracture network. This migration is propelled by buoyancy, by the increased vapor pressure caused by heating and boiling, and through local convection. In cooler regions, the vapor condenses on fracture walls, where it drains through the fracture network. Slow imbibition of water thereafter leads to gradual rewetting of the rock matrix. These thermal and hydrological processes also bring about chemical changes in the medium. Amorphous silica precipitates from boiling and evaporation, and calcite from heating and CO 2 volatilization. The precipitation of amorphous silica, and to a much lesser extent calcite, results in long-term permeability reduction. Evaporative concentration also results in the precipitation of gypsum (or anhydrite), halite, fluorite and other salts. These evaporative minerals eventually redissolve after the boiling period is over, however, their precipitation results in a significant temporary decrease in permeability. Reduction of permeability is also associated with changes in fracture capillary characteristics. In short, the coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes dynamically alter the hydrological properties of the rock. A model based on the TOUGHREACT reactive transport software is presented here to investigate the impact of THC processes on flow near an emplacement tunnel at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We show how transient changes in hydrological properties caused by THC processes often lead to local flow channeling and saturation increases above the tunnel. For models that include only permeability changes to fractures, such local flow channeling may lead to seepage relative to models where THC effects are ignored. However

  11. Estimates of evapotranspiration and CO2 fluxes in a biofiltration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, E.; Niculescu, A.; Beringer, J.; Deletic, A.

    2009-12-01

    relation to drying and rewetting cycles of the biofilter will be presented and discussed.

  12. Enhanced mobility of non aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) during drying of wet sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Dhivakar; Deshpande, Abhijit P.; Raghunathan, Ravikrishna

    2018-02-01

    Enhanced upward mobility of a non aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) present in wet sand during natural drying, and in the absence of any external pressure gradients, is reported for the first time. This mobility was significantly higher than that expected from capillary rise. Experiments were performed in a glass column with a small layer of NAPL-saturated sand trapped between two layers of water-saturated sand. Drying of the wet sand was induced by flow of air across the top surface of the wet sand. The upward movement of the NAPL, in the direction of water transport, commenced when the drying effect reached the location of the NAPL and continued as long as there was significant water evaporation in the vicinity of NAPL, indicating a clear correlation between the NAPL rise and water evaporation. The magnitude and the rate of NAPL rise was measured at different water evaporation rates, different initial locations of the NAPL, different grain size of the sand and the type of NAPL (on the basis of different NAPL-glass contact angle, viscosity and density). A positive correlation was observed between average rate of NAPL rise and the water evaporation while a negative correlation was obtained between the average NAPL rise rate and the NAPL properties of contact angle, viscosity and density. There was no significant correlation of average NAPL rise rate with variation of sand grain size between 0.1 to 0.5 mm. Based on these observations and on previous studies reported in the literature, two possible mechanisms are hypothesized -a) the effect of the spreading coefficient resulting in the wetting of NAPL on the water films created and b) a moving water film due to evaporation that "drags" the NAPL upwards. The NAPL rise reported in this paper has implications in fate and transport of chemicals in NAPL contaminated porous media such as soils and exposed dredged sediment material, which are subjected to varying water saturation levels due to drying and rewetting.

  13. Large-scale in situ heater tests for hydrothermal characterization at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscheck, T.A.; Wilder, D.G.; Nitao, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    To safely and permanently store high-level nuclear-waste, the potential Yucca Mountain repository site must mitigate the release and transport of radionuclides for tens of thousands of years. In the failure scenario of greatest concern, water would contact a waste package, accelerate its failure rate, and eventually transport radionuclides to the water table. Our analysis indicate that the ambient hydrological system will be dominated by repository-heat-driven hydrothermal flow for tens of thousands of years. In situ heater tests are required to provide an understanding of coupled geomechanical-hydrothermal-geochemical behavior in the engineered and natural barriers under repository thermal loading conditions. In situ heater tests have been included in the Site Characterization Plan in response to regulatory requirements for site characterization and to support the validation of process models required to assess the total systems performance at the site. The success of the License Application (LA) hinges largely on how effectively we validate the process models that provide the basis for performance assessment. Because of limited time, some of the in situ tests will have to be accelerated relative to actual thermal loading conditions. We examine the trade-offs between the limited test duration and generating hydrothermal conditions applicable to repository performance during the entire thermal loading cycle, including heating (boiling and dry-out) and cooldown (re-wetting). For in situ heater tests duration of 6-7 yr (including 4 yr of full-power heating) is required. The parallel use of highly accelerated, shorter-duration tests may provide timely information for the LA, provided that the applicability of the test results can be validated against ongoing nominal-rate heater tests

  14. Carbon balance of renovated grasslands: input- or output-driven?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choncubhair, Órlaith Ní; Osborne, Bruce; Lanigan, Gary

    2015-04-01

    Temperate grasslands constitute over 30% of the Earth's naturally-occurring biomes and make an important contribution towards the partial mitigation of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions by terrestrial ecosystems. In permanent temperate grasslands, biomass production and sward quality can deteriorate over time and periodic renovation activities, involving soil tillage and reseeding, are commonly carried out to halt this decline. Long-term cultivation of agricultural land has been associated with soil aggregate degradation and reduced soil carbon storage. However, the impact of these single tillage disturbances on C cycling in grasslands is less clear. This study evaluated gaseous and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) losses following a single tillage event by subjecting grassland lysimeters with contrasting soil drainage characteristics to simulated conventional inversion or minimum tillage. Field-scale CO2 emissions after conventional tillage were also quantified and empirically modelled over short- and medium-term timeframes to delineate the ecosystem response to environmental variables. Soil moisture was the limiting determinant of ecosystem carbon release following conventional tillage. Freshly-tilled soils were associated with reduced water retention and increased sensitivity to soil moisture, which was particularly pronounced following rewetting events. Significantly elevated but ephemeral CO2 effluxes were detected in the hours following inversion ploughing, however tillage disturbance did not generate significantly enhanced C emission rates in the medium term. Equally, DOC losses were not significantly amplified by conventional tillage compared with conservative minimum tillage and were predominantly controlled by soil drainage across tillage regimes. Our results suggest that a net ecosystem source of 120 to 210 g C m-2 over an approximately two-month period was most likely a consequence of reduced productivity and C input rather than enhanced soil CO2

  15. Root traits contributing to plant productivity under drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise eComas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Geneticists and breeders are positioned to breed plants with root traits that improve productivity under drought. However, a better understanding of root functional traits and how traits are related to whole plant strategies to increase crop productivity under different drought conditions is needed. Root traits associated with maintaining plant productivity under drought include small fine root diameters, long specific root length (SRL, and considerable root length density, especially at depths in soil with available water. In environments with late season water deficits, small xylem diameters in targeted seminal roots save soil water deep in the soil profile for use during crop maturation and result in improved yields. Capacity for deep root growth and large xylem diameters in deep roots may also improve root acquisition of water when ample water at depth is available. Xylem pit anatomy that makes xylem less ‘leaky’ and prone to cavitation warrants further exploration holding promise that such traits may improve plant productivity in water-limited environments without negatively impacting yield under adequate water conditions. Rapid resumption of root growth following soil rewetting may improve plant productivity under episodic drought. Genetic control of many of these traits through breeding appears feasible. Several recent reviews have covered methods for screening root traits but an appreciation for the complexity of root systems (e.g. functional differences between fine and coarse roots needs to be paired with these methods to successfully identify relevant traits for crop improvement. Screening of root traits at early stages in plant development can proxy traits at mature stages but verification is needed on a case by case basis that traits are linked to increased crop productivity under drought. Examples in lesquerella (Physaria and rice (Oryza show approaches to phenotyping of root traits and current understanding of root trait

  16. Rhizosphere hydrophobicity: A positive trait in the competition for water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeppenfeld, Thorsten; Balkenhol, Niko; Kóvacs, Kristóf; Carminati, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The ability to acquire water from the soil is a major driver in interspecific plant competition and it depends on several root functional traits. One of these traits is the excretion of gel-like compounds (mucilage) that modify physical soil properties. Mucilage secreted by roots becomes hydrophobic upon drying, impedes the rewetting of the soil close to the root, the so called rhizosphere, and reduces water availability to plants. The function of rhizosphere hydrophobicity is not easily understandable when looking at a single plant, but it may constitute a competitive advantage at the ecosystem level. We hypothesize that by making the top soil hydrophobic, deep-rooted plants avoid competititon with shallow-rooted plants. To test this hypothesis we used an individual-based model to simulate water uptake and growth of two virtual plant species, one deep-rooted plant capable of making the soil hydrophobic and a shallow-rooted plant. We ran scenarios with different precipitation regimes ranging from dry to wet (350, 700, and 1400 mm total annual precipitation) and from high to low precipitation frequencies (1, 7, and 14 days). Plant species abundance and biomass were chosen as indicators for competitiveness of plant species. At constant precipitation frequency mucilage hydrophobicity lead to a benefit in biomass and abundance of the tap-rooted population. Under wet conditions this effect diminished and tap-rooted plants were less productive. Without this trait both species coexisted. The effect of root exudation trait remained constant under different precipitation frequencies. This study shows that mucilage secretion is a competitive trait for the acquisition of water. This advantage is achieved by the modification of the soil hydraulic properties and specifically by inducing water repellency in soil regions which are shared with other species.

  17. Rhizosphere hydrophobicity: A positive trait in the competition for water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Zeppenfeld

    Full Text Available The ability to acquire water from the soil is a major driver in interspecific plant competition and it depends on several root functional traits. One of these traits is the excretion of gel-like compounds (mucilage that modify physical soil properties. Mucilage secreted by roots becomes hydrophobic upon drying, impedes the rewetting of the soil close to the root, the so called rhizosphere, and reduces water availability to plants. The function of rhizosphere hydrophobicity is not easily understandable when looking at a single plant, but it may constitute a competitive advantage at the ecosystem level. We hypothesize that by making the top soil hydrophobic, deep-rooted plants avoid competititon with shallow-rooted plants. To test this hypothesis we used an individual-based model to simulate water uptake and growth of two virtual plant species, one deep-rooted plant capable of making the soil hydrophobic and a shallow-rooted plant. We ran scenarios with different precipitation regimes ranging from dry to wet (350, 700, and 1400 mm total annual precipitation and from high to low precipitation frequencies (1, 7, and 14 days. Plant species abundance and biomass were chosen as indicators for competitiveness of plant species. At constant precipitation frequency mucilage hydrophobicity lead to a benefit in biomass and abundance of the tap-rooted population. Under wet conditions this effect diminished and tap-rooted plants were less productive. Without this trait both species coexisted. The effect of root exudation trait remained constant under different precipitation frequencies. This study shows that mucilage secretion is a competitive trait for the acquisition of water. This advantage is achieved by the modification of the soil hydraulic properties and specifically by inducing water repellency in soil regions which are shared with other species.

  18. Annual carbon balance of a peatland 10 yr following restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Strack

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Undisturbed peatlands represent long-term net sinks of carbon; however, peat extraction converts these systems into large and persistent sources of greenhouse gases. Although rewetting and restoration following peat extraction have taken place over the last several decades, very few studies have investigated the longer term impact of this restoration on peatland carbon balance. We determined the annual carbon balance of a former horticulturally-extracted peatland restored 10 yr prior to the study and compared these values to the carbon balance measured at neighboring unrestored and natural sites. Carbon dioxide (CO2 and methane (CH4 fluxes were measured using the chamber technique biweekly during the growing season from May to October 2010 and three times over the winter period. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC export was measured from remnant ditches in the unrestored and restored sites. During the growing season the restored site had greater uptake of CO2 than the natural site when photon flux density was greater than 1000 μmol m−2 s−1, while the unrestored site remained a source of CO2. Ecosystem respiration was similar between natural and restored sites, which were both significantly lower than the unrestored site. Methane flux remained low at the restored site except from open water pools, created as part of restoration, and remnant ditches. Export of DOC during the growing season was 5.0 and 28.8 g m−2 from the restored and unrestored sites, respectively. Due to dry conditions during the study year all sites acted as net carbon sources with annual balance of the natural, restored and unrestored sites of 250.7, 148.0 and 546.6 g C m−2, respectively. Although hydrological conditions and vegetation community at the restored site remained intermediate between natural and unrestored conditions, peatland restoration resulted in a large reduction in annual carbon loss from the system resulting in a carbon balance more similar to a natural

  19. Characterization of the fate and transport of nitroaromatic compounds at a former DoD ordnance depot site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klausmeier, M.E.; Yoon, J.

    1999-07-01

    The 975-acre Former Nansemond Ordnance Depot (FNOD) in Suffolk, Virginia was used by the Department of Defense (DoD) from 1917 until the mid-1950's for preparation, storage, transportation, inspection and demilitarization of many classes of ammunition and ordnance. Approximately 28 areas of Concern (AOC) have been identified by the EPA as areas that could pose potential risk to human health or the environment. The primary contaminants of concern are some trace metals and explosive compounds. During a summer 1987 field investigation, a slab of crystalline TNT was found which was estimated to weigh several tons. An enhanced MODFLOW model is being used to identify subsurface flow patterns. The calibrated model will be used to identify contaminant fate and transport behavior at the site. Enhancements to the MODFLOW model include an updated block-centered flow package (BCF4) and an updated recharge-seepage face boundary package (RSF4) to utilize for the FNOD site flow characterization. BCF4 package accurately delineates the water table without relying on an ad hoc rewetting procedure. This is accomplished by calculating the hydraulic head value required to transmit recharging water through the unsaturated zone without inactivating dry cells. The recharge-seepage face package eliminates the projection of heads above the ground surface by adjusting recharge to a cell when a user supplied ponding depth is reached. Using a regional model, a telescoping grid refinement technique was implemented to calculate the boundary conditions around the area of interest and to model quantity and quality interactions between surface and subsurface water regimes in a realistic manner.

  20. Thermocouple psychrometer measurements of in situ water potential changes in heated welded tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Nai-hsien; Wang, H.F.

    1991-05-01

    Ten thermocouple psychrometers (TCPs) to measure water potential (WP) were installed in three holes in G-Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site as part of the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests. These integrated tests measured several parameters as a function of location and time within a few meters of a heater emplaced in welded tuff. The primary goal of the TCP experiment was to find out whether the combination of laboratory calibration and field use of the TCP can provide useful data for determining the change of moisture condition in the field. We calibrated the TCPs in NaCl solutions up to 80 degree C(176 degree F) in the laboratory. In two holes, we used rubber sleeves and packers to house TCPs, and in the third hole, we used foam. All three holes were grouted behind the TCP assemblages. Field results of the heater test showed that small temperature gradients were present for all measurements. Nevertheless, the WP calibration made the necessary correction for the nonisothermal condition. A drying and re-wetting cycle peaked at about day 140 with a WP of -65 bar in borehole P3, located below the heater. A similar cycle but reduced in scale was found at about day 175 with a WP of -45 bar in borehole P2, above the heater. This difference in drying behavior above and below the heater was also observed from neutron data and was explained as a gravity effect. As temperatures increased, the evaporation rate of pore water increased, In unfractured rock, the gas-phase flow was primarily outward. Water condensed above the heater would drain back to keep the boiling region wet, but water condensed below the heater would drain away from the boiling region. This conceptual model explained both the time and magnitude differences for data from holes above and below the heater. 7 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs