WorldWideScience

Sample records for three-dimensional unit cell

  1. Three-dimensional reconstruction of statistically optimal unit cells of polydisperse particulate composites from microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.; Brandyberry, M.; Tudor, A.; Matous, K.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a systematic approach for characterization and reconstruction of statistically optimal representative unit cells of polydisperse particulate composites. Microtomography is used to gather rich three-dimensional data of a packed glass bead system. First-, second-, and third-order probability functions are used to characterize the morphology of the material, and the parallel augmented simulated annealing algorithm is employed for reconstruction of the statistically equivalent medium. Both the fully resolved probability spectrum and the geometrically exact particle shapes are considered in this study, rendering the optimization problem multidimensional with a highly complex objective function. A ten-phase particulate composite composed of packed glass beads in a cylindrical specimen is investigated, and a unit cell is reconstructed on massively parallel computers. Further, rigorous error analysis of the statistical descriptors (probability functions) is presented and a detailed comparison between statistics of the voxel-derived pack and the representative cell is made.

  2. Development of a three-dimensional unit cell to model the micromechanical response of a collagen-based extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilo, Monica E; Roeder, Blayne A; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L; Kokini, Klod; Nauman, Eric A

    2010-04-01

    The three-dimensional microstructure and mechanical properties of the collagen fibrils within the extracellular matrix (ECM) is now being recognized as a primary factor in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, an appreciation of the mechanical aspects by which a cell interacts with its ECM is required for the development of engineered tissues. Ultimately, using these interactions to design tissue equivalents requires mathematical models with three-dimensional architecture. In this study, a three-dimensional model of a collagen fibril matrix undergoing uniaxial tensile stress was developed by making use of cellular solids. A structure consisting of thin struts was chosen to represent the arrangement of collagen fibrils within an engineered ECM. To account for the large deformation of tissues, the collagen fibrils were modeled as hyperelastic neo-Hookean or Mooney-Rivlin materials. The use of cellular solids allowed the fibril properties to be related to the ECM properties in closed form, which, in turn, allowed the estimation of fibril properties using ECM experimental data. A set of previously obtained experimental data consisting of simultaneous measures of the fibril microstructure and mechanical tests was used to evaluate the model's capability to estimate collagen fibril mechanical property when given tissue-scale data and to predict the tissue-scale mechanical properties when given estimated fibril stiffness. The fibril tangent modulus was found to be 1.26 + or - 0.70 and 1.62 + or - 0.88 MPa when the fibril was modeled as neo-Hookean and Mooney-Rivlin material, respectively. There was no statistical significance of the estimated fibril tangent modulus among the different groups. Sensitivity analysis showed that the fibril mechanical properties and volume fraction were the two input parameters which required accurate values. While the volume fraction was easily obtained from the initial image of the gel, the fibril mechanical properties

  3. Prediction of equibiaxial loading stress in collagen-based extracellular matrix using a three-dimensional unit cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilo, Monica E; Bell, Brett J; Roeder, Blayne A; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L; Kokini, Klod; Nauman, Eric A

    2013-03-01

    Mechanical signals are important factors in determining cell fate. Therefore, insights as to how mechanical signals are transferred between the cell and its surrounding three-dimensional collagen fibril network will provide a basis for designing the optimum extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment for tissue regeneration. Previously we described a cellular solid model to predict fibril microstructure-mechanical relationships of reconstituted collagen matrices due to unidirectional loads (Acta Biomater 2010;6:1471-86). The model consisted of representative volume elements made up of an interconnected network of flexible struts. The present study extends this work by adapting the model to account for microstructural anisotropy of the collagen fibrils and a biaxial loading environment. The model was calibrated based on uniaxial tensile data and used to predict the equibiaxial tensile stress-stretch relationship. Modifications to the model significantly improved its predictive capacity for equibiaxial loading data. With a comparable fibril length (model 5.9-8μm, measured 7.5μm) and appropriate fibril anisotropy the anisotropic model provides a better representation of the collagen fibril microstructure. Such models are important tools for tissue engineering because they facilitate prediction of microstructure-mechanical relationships for collagen matrices over a wide range of microstructures and provide a framework for predicting cell-ECM interactions. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Three-Dimensional Cell Behavior in Microgels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Tapomoy; Palmer, Glyn; Ghivizzani, Steven; Keselowsky, Benjamin; Sawyer, W. Gregory; Angelini, Thomas

    The number of dimensions in which particles can freely move strongly influences the collective behavior that emerges from their individual fluctuations. Thus, in 2D systems of cells in petri-dishes, our growing understanding of collective migration may be insufficient to explain cell behavior in 3D tissues. To study cell behavior in 3D, polymer scaffolds are used. Contemporary designs of 3D cell growth scaffolds enable cell migration and proliferative expansion by incorporating of degradable motifs. Matrix degradation creates space for cells to move and proliferate. However, different cell types and experimental conditions require the design of different scaffolds to optimize degradation with specific cell behaviors. By contrast, liquid like solids made from packed microgels can yield under cell generated stresses, allowing for cell motion without the need for scaffold degradation. Moreover, the use of microgels as 3D culture media allows arranging cells in arbitrary structures, harvesting cells, and delivering drugs and nutrients. Preliminary data describing cell behavior in 3D microgel culture will be presented. This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1352043.

  5. Quantitative volumetric Raman imaging of three dimensional cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallepitis, Charalambos; Bergholt, Mads S.; Mazo, Manuel M.; Leonardo, Vincent; Skaalure, Stacey C.; Maynard, Stephanie A.; Stevens, Molly M.

    2017-03-01

    The ability to simultaneously image multiple biomolecules in biologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) cell culture environments would contribute greatly to the understanding of complex cellular mechanisms and cell-material interactions. Here, we present a computational framework for label-free quantitative volumetric Raman imaging (qVRI). We apply qVRI to a selection of biological systems: human pluripotent stem cells with their cardiac derivatives, monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in conventional cell culture systems and mesenchymal stem cells inside biomimetic hydrogels that supplied a 3D cell culture environment. We demonstrate visualization and quantification of fine details in cell shape, cytoplasm, nucleus, lipid bodies and cytoskeletal structures in 3D with unprecedented biomolecular specificity for vibrational microspectroscopy.

  6. Quantitative volumetric Raman imaging of three dimensional cell cultures

    KAUST Repository

    Kallepitis, Charalambos

    2017-03-22

    The ability to simultaneously image multiple biomolecules in biologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) cell culture environments would contribute greatly to the understanding of complex cellular mechanisms and cell–material interactions. Here, we present a computational framework for label-free quantitative volumetric Raman imaging (qVRI). We apply qVRI to a selection of biological systems: human pluripotent stem cells with their cardiac derivatives, monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in conventional cell culture systems and mesenchymal stem cells inside biomimetic hydrogels that supplied a 3D cell culture environment. We demonstrate visualization and quantification of fine details in cell shape, cytoplasm, nucleus, lipid bodies and cytoskeletal structures in 3D with unprecedented biomolecular specificity for vibrational microspectroscopy.

  7. Engineering three-dimensional cell mechanical microenvironment with hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guoyou; Wang, Lin; Wang, Shuqi; Han, Yulong; Wu, Jinhui; Zhang, Qiancheng; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian

    2012-12-01

    Cell mechanical microenvironment (CMM) significantly affects cell behaviors such as spreading, migration, proliferation and differentiation. However, most studies on cell response to mechanical stimulation are based on two-dimensional (2D) planar substrates, which cannot mimic native three-dimensional (3D) CMM. Accumulating evidence has shown that there is a significant difference in cell behavior in 2D and 3D microenvironments. Among the materials used for engineering 3D CMM, hydrogels have gained increasing attention due to their tunable properties (e.g. chemical and mechanical properties). In this paper, we provide an overview of recent advances in engineering hydrogel-based 3D CMM. Effects of mechanical cues (e.g. hydrogel stiffness and externally induced stress/strain in hydrogels) on cell behaviors are described. A variety of approaches to load mechanical stimuli in 3D hydrogel-based constructs are also discussed.

  8. Engineering three-dimensional cell mechanical microenvironment with hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Guoyou; Wang Lin; Han Yulong; Zhang Qiancheng; Xu Feng; Lu Tianjian; Wang Shuqi; Wu Jinhui

    2012-01-01

    Cell mechanical microenvironment (CMM) significantly affects cell behaviors such as spreading, migration, proliferation and differentiation. However, most studies on cell response to mechanical stimulation are based on two-dimensional (2D) planar substrates, which cannot mimic native three-dimensional (3D) CMM. Accumulating evidence has shown that there is a significant difference in cell behavior in 2D and 3D microenvironments. Among the materials used for engineering 3D CMM, hydrogels have gained increasing attention due to their tunable properties (e.g. chemical and mechanical properties). In this paper, we provide an overview of recent advances in engineering hydrogel-based 3D CMM. Effects of mechanical cues (e.g. hydrogel stiffness and externally induced stress/strain in hydrogels) on cell behaviors are described. A variety of approaches to load mechanical stimuli in 3D hydrogel-based constructs are also discussed. (topical review)

  9. Voro++: a three-dimensional Voronoi cell library in C++

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rycroft, Chris

    2009-01-15

    Voro++ is a free software library for the computation of three dimensional Voronoi cells. It is primarily designed for applications in physics and materials science, where the Voronoi tessellation can be a useful tool in the analysis of densely-packed particle systems, such as granular materials or glasses. The software comprises of several C++ classes that can be modified and incorporated into other programs. A command-line utility is also provided that can use most features of the code. Voro++ makes use of a direct cell-by-cell construction, which is particularly suited to handling special boundary conditions and walls. It employs algorithms which are tolerant for numerical precision errors, and it has been successfully employed on very large particle systems.

  10. Microfluidic engineered high cell density three-dimensional neural cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, D. Kacy; Vukasinovic, Jelena; Glezer, Ari; La Placa, Michelle C.

    2007-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) neural cultures with cells distributed throughout a thick, bioactive protein scaffold may better represent neurobiological phenomena than planar correlates lacking matrix support. Neural cells in vivo interact within a complex, multicellular environment with tightly coupled 3D cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions; however, thick 3D neural cultures at cell densities approaching that of brain rapidly decay, presumably due to diffusion limited interstitial mass transport. To address this issue, we have developed a novel perfusion platform that utilizes forced intercellular convection to enhance mass transport. First, we demonstrated that in thick (>500 µm) 3D neural cultures supported by passive diffusion, cell densities =104 cells mm-3), continuous medium perfusion at 2.0-11.0 µL min-1 improved viability compared to non-perfused cultures (p death and matrix degradation. In perfused cultures, survival was dependent on proximity to the perfusion source at 2.00-6.25 µL min-1 (p 90% viability in both neuronal cultures and neuronal-astrocytic co-cultures. This work demonstrates the utility of forced interstitial convection in improving the survival of high cell density 3D engineered neural constructs and may aid in the development of novel tissue-engineered systems reconstituting 3D cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions.

  11. Microfabrication and Test of a Three-Dimensional Polymer Hydro-focusing Unit for Flow Cytometry Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ren; Feeback, Daniel L.; Wang, Wan-Jun

    2005-01-01

    This paper details a novel three-dimensional (3D) hydro-focusing micro cell sorter for micro flow cytometry applications. The unit was microfabricated by means of SU-8 3D lithography. The 3D microstructure for coaxial sheathing was designed, microfabricated, and tested. Three-dimensional hydrofocusing capability was demonstrated with an experiment to sort labeled tanned sheep erythrocytes (red blood cells). This polymer hydro-focusing microstructure is easily microfabricated and integrated with other polymer microfluidic structures. Keywords: SU-8, three-dimensional hydro-focusing, microfluidic, microchannel, cytometer

  12. Three dimensional vortices and interfaces in Hele-Shaw cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pumir, A.

    1987-06-01

    A model of nonviscous flow, based on the Biot-Savart equations is used to examine the existence of singularities in three dimensional, incompressible, hydrodynamic equations. The results suggest a fairly simple physical mechanism, which could lead to the formation of singularities in the nonviscous case: two vortex tubes with opposite circulations pair up and stretch each other, until the radii of the vortex cores become extremely small, causing a divergence of the vorticity. The cases of a perfect and a slightly viscous fluid are considered. The results are unclear as to whether the vorticity of a slightly viscous fluid can become infinite or not, and whether singularities exist. The dynamics of hydrodynamic interfaces are also investigated. The propagation of bubbles in a slightly viscous fluid, in a Hele-Shaw cell are described [fr

  13. Three-Dimensional Printing and Cell Therapy for Wound Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kogelenberg, Sylvia; Yue, Zhilian; Dinoro, Jeremy N; Baker, Christopher S; Wallace, Gordon G

    2018-05-01

    Significance: Skin tissue damage is a major challenge and a burden on healthcare systems, from burns and other trauma to diabetes and vascular disease. Although the biological complexities are relatively well understood, appropriate repair mechanisms are scarce. Three-dimensional bioprinting is a layer-based approach to regenerative medicine, whereby cells and cell-based materials can be dispensed in fine spatial arrangements to mimic native tissue. Recent Advances: Various bioprinting techniques have been employed in wound repair-based skin tissue engineering, from laser-induced forward transfer to extrusion-based methods, and with the investigation of the benefits and shortcomings of each, with emphasis on biological compatibility and cell proliferation, migration, and vitality. Critical issues: Development of appropriate biological inks and the vascularization of newly developed tissues remain a challenge within the field of skin tissue engineering. Future Directions: Progress within bioprinting requires close interactions between material scientists, tissue engineers, and clinicians. Microvascularization, integration of multiple cell types, and skin appendages will be essential for creation of complex skin tissue constructs.

  14. [Three dimensional bioprinting technology of human dental pulp cells mixtures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shi-hua; Lv, Pei-jun; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Ting

    2013-02-18

    To explore the three dimensional(3D)bioprinting technology, using human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) mixture as bioink and to lay initial foundations for the application of the 3D bioprinting technology in tooth regeneration. Imageware 11.0 computer software was used to aid the design of the 3D biological printing blueprint. Sodium alginate-gelatin hydrosol was prepared and mixed with in vitro isolated hDPCs. The mixture contained 20 g/L sodium alginate and 80 g/L gelatin with cell density of 1×10(6)/mL. The bioprinting of hDPCs mixture was carried out according to certain parameters; the 3D constructs obtained by printing were examined; the viability of hDPCs after printing by staining the constructs with calcein-AM and propidium iodide dye and scanning of laser scanning confocal microscope was evaluated. The in vitro constructs obtained by the bioprinting were cultured, and the proliferation of hDPCs in the constructs detected. By using Imageware 11.0 software, the 3D constructs with the grid structure composed of the accumulation of staggered cylindrical microfilament layers were obtained. According to certain parameters, the hDPCs-sodium alginate-gelatin blends were printed by the 3D bioprinting technology. The self-defined shape and dimension of 3D constructs with the cell survival rate of 87%± 2% were constructed. The hDPCs could proliferate in 3D constructs after printing. In this study, the 3D bioprinting of hDPCs mixtures was realized, thus laying initial foundations for the application of the 3D bioprinting technology in tooth regeneration.

  15. Quantitative volumetric Raman imaging of three dimensional cell cultures

    KAUST Repository

    Kallepitis, Charalambos; Bergholt, Mads S.; Mazo, Manuel M.; Leonardo, Vincent; Skaalure, Stacey C.; Maynard, Stephanie A.; Stevens, Molly M.

    2017-01-01

    in conventional cell culture systems and mesenchymal stem cells inside biomimetic hydrogels that supplied a 3D cell culture environment. We demonstrate visualization and quantification of fine details in cell shape, cytoplasm, nucleus, lipid bodies

  16. Three Dimensional Simulation of Ion Thruster Plume-Spacecraft Interaction Based on a Graphic Processor Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Junxue; Xie Kan; Qiu Qian; Tang Haibin; Li Juan; Tian Huabing

    2013-01-01

    Based on the three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) method and Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), a parallel particle simulation code combined with a graphic processor unit (GPU) has been developed for the simulation of charge-exchange (CEX) xenon ions in the plume of an ion thruster. Using the proposed technique, the potential and CEX plasma distribution are calculated for the ion thruster plume surrounding the DS1 spacecraft at different thrust levels. The simulation results are in good agreement with measured CEX ion parameters reported in literature, and the GPU's results are equal to a CPU's. Compared with a single CPU Intel Core 2 E6300, 16-processor GPU NVIDIA GeForce 9400 GT indicates a speedup factor of 3.6 when the total macro particle number is 1.1×10 6 . The simulation results also reveal how the back flow CEX plasma affects the spacecraft floating potential, which indicates that the plume of the ion thruster is indeed able to alleviate the extreme negative floating potentials of spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit

  17. On the size distribution of one-, two- and three-dimensional Voronoi cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marthinsen, K.

    1994-03-01

    The present report gives a presentation of the different cell size distribution obtained by computer simulations of random Voronoi cell structures in one-, two- and three-dimensional space. The random Voronoi cells are constructed from cell centroids randomly distributed along a string, in the plane and in three-dimensional space, respectively. The size distributions are based on 2-3 · 10 4 cells. For the spacial polyhedra both the distribution of volumes, areas and radii are presented, and the two latter quantities are compared to the distributions of areas and radii from a planar section through the three-dimensional structure as well as to the corresponding distributions obtained from a pure two-dimensional cell structure. 11 refs., 11 figs

  18. Dielectric spectroscopy for non-invasive monitoring of epithelial cell differentiation within three-dimensional scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daoud, Jamal; Tabrizian, Maryam; Asami, Koji; Rosenberg, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we introduce a cellular differentiation cellular model based on dielectric spectroscopy that characterizes epithelial differentiation processes. Non-invasive cellular monitoring was achieved within a three-dimensional microenvironment consisting of a cell-containing collagen I gel seeded onto microfabricated scaffolds. In this proof-of-concept investigation, Madin–Darby canine kidney cells were cultured within microfabricated, geometrically controlled scaffolds and allowed us to differentiate to hollow cyst-like structures. This transformation within the three-dimensional environment is monitored and characterized through dielectric spectroscopy while maintaining cell culture in vitro. (paper)

  19. Parallel geometric classification of stem cells by their three-dimensional morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juba, Derek; Cardone, Antonio; Yiu Ip, Cheuk; Varshney, Amitabh; Simon Jr, Carl G; K Tison, Christopher; Kumar, Girish; Brady, Mary

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for tools to classify cells based on their three-dimensional (3D) shape. Cells exist in vivo in 3D, cells are frequently cultured within 3D scaffolds in vitro and 3D scaffolds are used for cell delivery in tissue engineering therapies. Recent work indicates that the physical structure of a tissue engineering scaffold can direct stem cell function by driving stem cells into morphologies that induce their differentiation. Thus, we have developed a rapid method for classifying cells based on their 3D shape. First, random lines are intersected with 3D Z-stacks of confocal images of stem cells. The intersection lengths are stored in histograms, which are then used to train a support vector machine (SVM) learning algorithm to distinguish between stem cells cultured on differentiation-inducing 3D scaffolds and those cultured on non-differentiating flat substrates. The trained SVM is able to properly classify the ‘new’ query cells over 80% of the time. The algorithm is easily parallelizable and we demonstrate its implementation on a commodity graphics processing unit (GPU). Use of a GPU to run the algorithm increases throughput by over 100-fold as compared to use of a CPU. The algorithm is also progressive, providing an approximate answer quickly and refining the answer over time. This allows further increase in the throughput of the algorithm by allowing the SVM classification scheme to terminate early if it becomes confident enough of the class of the cell being analyzed. These results demonstrate a rapid method for classifying stem cells based on their 3D shape that can be used by tissue engineers for identifying 3D tissue scaffold structures that drive stem cells into shapes that correlate with differentiation. (paper)

  20. Embryonic stem cells in scaffold-free three-dimensional cell culture: osteogenic differentiation and bone generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschel, Jörg; Naujoks, Christian; Depprich, Rita; Lammers, Lydia; Kübler, Norbert; Meyer, Ulrich; Wiesmann, Hans-Peter

    2011-07-14

    Extracorporeal formation of mineralized bone-like tissue is still an unsolved challenge in tissue engineering. Embryonic stem cells may open up new therapeutic options for the future and should be an interesting model for the analysis of fetal organogenesis. Here we describe a technique for culturing embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in the absence of artificial scaffolds which generated mineralized miromasses. Embryonic stem cells were harvested and osteogenic differentiation was stimulated by the addition of dexamethasone, ascorbic acid, and ß-glycerolphosphate (DAG). After three days of cultivation microspheres were formed. These spherical three-dimensional cell units showed a peripheral zone consisting of densely packed cell layers surrounded by minerals that were embedded in the extracellular matrix. Alizarine red staining confirmed evidence of mineralization after 10 days of DAG stimulation in the stimulated but not in the control group. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated scorching crystallites and collagenous fibrils as early indication of bone formation. These extracellular structures resembled hydroxyl apatite-like crystals as demonstrated by distinct diffraction patterns using electron diffraction analysis. The micromass culture technique is an appropriate model to form three-dimensional bone-like micro-units without the need for an underlying scaffold. Further studies will have to show whether the technique is applicable also to pluripotent stem cells of different origin. © 2011 Handschel et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  1. Embryonic stem cells in scaffold-free three-dimensional cell culture: osteogenic differentiation and bone generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Ulrich

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Extracorporeal formation of mineralized bone-like tissue is still an unsolved challenge in tissue engineering. Embryonic stem cells may open up new therapeutic options for the future and should be an interesting model for the analysis of fetal organogenesis. Here we describe a technique for culturing embryonic stem cells (ESCs in the absence of artificial scaffolds which generated mineralized miromasses. Embryonic stem cells were harvested and osteogenic differentiation was stimulated by the addition of dexamethasone, ascorbic acid, and ß-glycerolphosphate (DAG. After three days of cultivation microspheres were formed. These spherical three-dimensional cell units showed a peripheral zone consisting of densely packed cell layers surrounded by minerals that were embedded in the extracellular matrix. Alizarine red staining confirmed evidence of mineralization after 10 days of DAG stimulation in the stimulated but not in the control group. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated scorching crystallites and collagenous fibrils as early indication of bone formation. These extracellular structures resembled hydroxyl apatite-like crystals as demonstrated by distinct diffraction patterns using electron diffraction analysis. The micromass culture technique is an appropriate model to form three-dimensional bone-like micro-units without the need for an underlying scaffold. Further studies will have to show whether the technique is applicable also to pluripotent stem cells of different origin.

  2. Reversible gelling culture media for in-vitro cell culture in three-dimensional matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yuehuei H.; Mironov, Vladimir A.; Gutowska, Anna

    2000-01-01

    A gelling cell culture medium useful for forming a three dimensional matrix for cell culture in vitro is prepared by copolymerizing an acrylamide derivative with a hydrophilic comonomer to form a reversible (preferably thermally reversible) gelling linear random copolymer in the form of a plurality of linear chains having a plurality of molecular weights greater than or equal to a minimum gelling molecular weight cutoff, mixing the copolymer with an aqueous solvent to form a reversible gelling solution and adding a cell culture medium to the gelling solution to form the gelling cell culture medium. Cells such as chondrocytes or hepatocytes are added to the culture medium to form a seeded culture medium, and temperature of the medium is raised to gel the seeded culture medium and form a three dimensional matrix containing the cells. After propagating the cells in the matrix, the cells may be recovered by lowering the temperature to dissolve the matrix and centrifuging.

  3. Three-Dimensional Optical Trapping for Cell Isolation Using Tapered Fiber Probe by Dynamic Chemical Etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, K; Okada, J; Nomura, Y; Tamura, K

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, chemically etched fiber probe was proposed for laser trapping and manipulation of cells. We fabricated tapered fiber probe by dynamic chemical etching technique. Three-Dimensional optical trap of a yeast cell dispersed in water solution could be formed by the fiber tip with 17deg tip. Optical forces were sufficient to move the yeast cell for trapping and manipulation. From these experimental results, it was found that our proposed tapered fiber tip was a promising tool for cell isolation.

  4. Three-Dimensional Organization of Chromosome Territories and the Human Interphase Cell Nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); C. Münkel (Christian); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractTo study the three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories and the human interphase cell nucleus we developed models which could be compared to experiments. Despite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its 3D-organization is widely unknown. Using Monte

  5. Three-Dimensional Organization of Chromosome Territories and the Human Cell Nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractTo study the three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories and the human interphase cell nucleus we developed models, which could be compared to experiments. Despite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its 3D-organization is widely unknown. Using Monte

  6. Three-dimensional photoacoustic tomography based on graphics-processing-unit-accelerated finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Kuan; He, Ling; Zhu, Ziqiang; Tang, Jingtian; Xiao, Jiaying

    2013-12-01

    Compared with commonly used analytical reconstruction methods, the frequency-domain finite element method (FEM) based approach has proven to be an accurate and flexible algorithm for photoacoustic tomography. However, the FEM-based algorithm is computationally demanding, especially for three-dimensional cases. To enhance the algorithm's efficiency, in this work a parallel computational strategy is implemented in the framework of the FEM-based reconstruction algorithm using a graphic-processing-unit parallel frame named the "compute unified device architecture." A series of simulation experiments is carried out to test the accuracy and accelerating effect of the improved method. The results obtained indicate that the parallel calculation does not change the accuracy of the reconstruction algorithm, while its computational cost is significantly reduced by a factor of 38.9 with a GTX 580 graphics card using the improved method.

  7. Cell-free DNA in a three-dimensional spheroid cell culture model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aucamp, Janine; Calitz, Carlemi; Bronkhorst, Abel J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Investigating the biological functions of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is limited by the interference of vast numbers of putative sources and causes of DNA release into circulation. Utilization of three-dimensional (3D) spheroid cell cultures, models with characteristics closer to the in vivo...... cultures can serve as effective, simplified in vivo-simulating “closed-circuit” models since putative sources of cfDNA are limited to only the targeted cells. In addition, cfDNA can also serve as an alternative or auxiliary marker for tracking spheroid growth, development and culture stability. Biological...... significance 3D cell cultures can be used to translate “closed-circuit” in vitro model research into data that is relevant for in vivo studies and clinical applications. In turn, the utilization of cfDNA during 3D culture research can optimize sample collection without affecting the stability of the growth...

  8. Three-Dimensional Simulation of Ultrasound-Induced Microalgal Cell Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M; Yuan, W; Hale, Andy

    2016-03-01

    The three-dimensional distribution (x, y, and z) of ultrasound-induced microalgal cell disruption in a sonochemical reactor was predicted by solving the Helmholtz equation using a three-dimensional acoustic module in the COMSOL Multiphysics software. The simulated local ultrasound pressure at any given location (x, y, and z) was found to correlate with cell disruption of a freshwater alga, Scenedesmus dimorphus, represented by the change of algal cell particle/debris concentration, chlorophyll-a fluorescence density (CAFD), and Nile red stained lipid fluorescence density (LFD), which was also validated by the model reaction of potassium iodide oxidation (the Weissler reaction). Furthermore, the effect of ultrasound power intensity and processing duration on algal cell disruption was examined to address the limitation of the model.

  9. Tailor-made three-dimensional hybrid scaffolds for cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Psycharakis, Stylianos; Melissinaki, Vasileia; Giakoumaki, Anastasia; Ranella, Anthi [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, PO Box 1527, 711 10 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Tosca, Androniki, E-mail: ranthi@iesl.forth.gr [Department of Medicine, University of Crete, 710 03 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2011-08-15

    The construction of the ideal three-dimensional scaffold for cell culture is one of the most intriguing topics in tissue engineering. It has been shown that cells can be cultured on most organic biomimetic materials, which now are losing popularity in favour of novel, hybrid systems. In this study, a series of photosensitive sol-gel hybrid materials, based on silicon-zirconium and silicon-titanium oxides, have been investigated for their suitability in three-dimensional scaffold fabrication. These materials can be structured by two-photon polymerization, a laser-based technique allowing the fabrication of micrometre-size structures with submicron resolution. The work presented here examined the effect of the organic/inorganic composition of the materials on cell behaviour and the establishment of a 'cell-culture friendly' environment. This is vital for cell adhesion, growth and differentiation, as the organic part of the material provides the soft matrix for cell growth, whereas the inorganic component gives the mechanical stability and rigidity of the three-dimensional structures. In addition, the use of femtosecond laser structuring permits the fabrication of a wide range of mechanically stable scaffolds of different sizes and shapes to be tested in terms of cell viability, proliferation and orientation.

  10. Tailor-made three-dimensional hybrid scaffolds for cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psycharakis, Stylianos; Melissinaki, Vasileia; Giakoumaki, Anastasia; Ranella, Anthi; Tosca, Androniki

    2011-01-01

    The construction of the ideal three-dimensional scaffold for cell culture is one of the most intriguing topics in tissue engineering. It has been shown that cells can be cultured on most organic biomimetic materials, which now are losing popularity in favour of novel, hybrid systems. In this study, a series of photosensitive sol-gel hybrid materials, based on silicon-zirconium and silicon-titanium oxides, have been investigated for their suitability in three-dimensional scaffold fabrication. These materials can be structured by two-photon polymerization, a laser-based technique allowing the fabrication of micrometre-size structures with submicron resolution. The work presented here examined the effect of the organic/inorganic composition of the materials on cell behaviour and the establishment of a 'cell-culture friendly' environment. This is vital for cell adhesion, growth and differentiation, as the organic part of the material provides the soft matrix for cell growth, whereas the inorganic component gives the mechanical stability and rigidity of the three-dimensional structures. In addition, the use of femtosecond laser structuring permits the fabrication of a wide range of mechanically stable scaffolds of different sizes and shapes to be tested in terms of cell viability, proliferation and orientation.

  11. Colony, hanging drop, and methylcellulose three dimensional hypoxic growth optimization of renal cell carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matak, Damian; Brodaczewska, Klaudia K; Lipiec, Monika; Szymanski, Łukasz; Szczylik, Cezary; Czarnecka, Anna M

    2017-08-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most lethal of the common urologic malignancies, comprising 3% of all human neoplasms, and the incidence of kidney cancer is rising annually. We need new approaches to target tumor cells that are resistant to current therapies and that give rise to recurrence and treatment failure. In this study, we focused on low oxygen tension and three-dimensional (3D) cell culture incorporation to develop a new RCC growth model. We used the hanging drop and colony formation methods, which are common in 3D culture, as well as a unique methylcellulose (MC) method. For the experiments, we used human primary RCC cell lines, metastatic RCC cell lines, human kidney cancer stem cells, and human healthy epithelial cells. In the hanging drop assay, we verified the potential of various cell lines to create solid aggregates in hypoxic and normoxic conditions. With the semi-soft agar method, we also determined the ability of various cell lines to create colonies under different oxygen conditions. Different cell behavior observed in the MC method versus the hanging drop and colony formation assays suggests that these three assays may be useful to test various cell properties. However, MC seems to be a particularly valuable alternative for 3D cell culture, as its higher efficiency of aggregate formation and serum independency are of interest in different areas of cancer biology.

  12. Ho:YAG laser: intervertebral disk cell interaction using three-dimensional cell culture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masato; Ishihara, Miya; Arai, Tsunenori; Asazuma, Takashi; Kikuchi, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Makoto; Fujikawa, Kyosuke

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence on the intervertebral disc cells after laser irradiation using three- dimensional culture system and to clarify the optimum Ho:YAG laser irradiation condition on percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) for lumbar disc herniation. Since the Ho:YAG laser ablation is characterized by water-vapor bubble dynamics, not only thermal effect but also acoustic effect on cell metabolism might occur in the intervertebral disc. We studied the disc cell reaction from the metabolic point of view to investigate photothermal and photoacoustic effects on three-dimensional cultured disc cell. Intervertebral discs were obtained from female 30 Japanese white rabbits weighing about 1 kg. A pulsed Ho:YAG laser (wavelength: 2.1 micrometer, pulse width: about 200 microseconds) was delivered through a 200 micrometer-core diameter single silica glass fiber. We used the Ho:YAG laser irradiation fluence ranging from 60 to approximately 800 J/cm2 at the fiber end. To investigate acoustic effect, the acoustic transducer constructed with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVdF) film and acoustic absorber was used to detect the stress wave. Thermocouple and thermography were used to investigate thermal effect. Concerning damage of plasma membrane and ability of matrix synthesis, thermal effect might mainly affect cell reaction in total energy of 54 J (closed to practically used condition), but in 27 J, acoustic effect might contribute to it. We found that total energy was key parameter among the optimum condition, so that temperature and/or stress wave may influence Ho:YAG laser-disc cell interactions.

  13. Three-dimensional organization of micronuclei induced by colchicine in PtK sub 1 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraud, G.; Laquerriere, F.; Masson, C.; Arnoult, J.; Labidi, B.; Hernandez-Verdun, D. (Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France))

    1989-03-01

    In PtK{sub 1} cells micronucleated by colchicine, the authors previously demonstrated that some micronuclei contain a single chromosome. Here, they investigated interphase chromosome organization in micronucleated PtK{sub 1} cells using conventional electron microscopy and three-dimensional computer reconstruction. The distribution of micronuclei was not always polarized, but in some cells they formed a ring. When this occurred, centrioles and Golgi apparatus were located inside the ring. On freeze-fracture replicas, they observed that nuclear pore distinction among the micronuclei was heterogeneous, and on thin sections some micronuclei displayed an incomplete nuclear envelope, with gaps in the double membrane and areas without lamina or condensed chromatin. By autoradiography, they showed that the fibrillar dots were not sites of active transcription. They applied three dimensional reconstruction to one micronucleated cell containing 22 micronuclei whose size indicated that each micronucleus probably contained one chromosome. In this cell they demonstrated that only the smallest micronuclei had an incomplete nuclear envelope. The presence in micronuclei of either nucleoli or fibrillar dots was found to be mutually exclusive. Taken together, these findings indicate that in the diploid nuclei of PtK{sub 1} cells, the three-dimensional organization of the nucleolar domain seems to be directly controlled by the X-chromosome.

  14. Three-dimensional epithelial tissues generated from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Kyle J; Shamis, Yulia; Carlson, Mark W; Aberdam, Edith; Aberdam, Daniel; Garlick, Jonathan A

    2009-11-01

    The use of pluripotent human embryonic stem (hES) cells for tissue engineering may provide advantages over traditional sources of progenitor cells because of their ability to give rise to multiple cell types and their unlimited expansion potential. We derived cell populations with properties of ectodermal and mesenchymal cells in two-dimensional culture and incorporated these divergent cell populations into three-dimensional (3D) epithelial tissues. When grown in specific media and substrate conditions, two-dimensional cultures were enriched in cells (EDK1) with mesenchymal morphology and surface markers. Cells with a distinct epithelial morphology (HDE1) that expressed cytokeratin 12 and beta-catenin at cell junctions became the predominant cell type when EDK1 were grown on surfaces enriched in keratinocyte-derived extracellular matrix proteins. When these cells were incorporated into the stromal and epithelial tissue compartments of 3D tissues, they generated multilayer epithelia similar to those generated with foreskin-derived epithelium and fibroblasts. Three-dimensional tissues demonstrated stromal cells with morphologic features of mature fibroblasts, type IV collagen deposition in the basement membrane, and a stratified epithelium that expressed cytokeratin 12. By deriving two distinct cell lineages from a common hES cell source to fabricate complex tissues, it is possible to explore environmental cues that will direct hES-derived cells toward optimal tissue form and function.

  15. Three-dimensional nanometry of vesicle transport in living cells using dual-focus imaging optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Sato, Takashi; Gonda, Kohsuke; Higuchi, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    Dual-focus imaging optics for three-dimensional tracking of individual quantum dots has been developed to study the molecular mechanisms of motor proteins in cells. The new system has a high spatial and temporal precision, 2 nm in the x-y sample plane and 5 nm along the z-axis at a frame time of 2 ms. Three-dimensional positions of the vesicles labeled with quantum dots were detected in living cells. Vesicles were transported on the microtubules using 8-nm steps towards the nucleus. The steps had fluctuation of ∼20 nm which were perpendicular to the axis of the microtubule but with the constant distance from the microtubule. The most of perpendicular movement was not synchronized with the 8-nm steps, indicating that dynein moved on microtubules without changing the protofilaments. When the vesicles changed their direction of movement toward the cell membrane, they moved perpendicular with the constant distance from the microtubule. The present method is powerful tool to investigate three dimensional movement of molecules in cells with nanometer and millisecond accuracy

  16. Single-cell printing to form three-dimensional lines of olfactory ensheathing cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othon, Christina M; Ringeisen, Bradley R; Wu Xingjia; Anders, Juanita J

    2008-01-01

    Biological laser printing (BioLP(TM)) is a unique tool capable of printing high resolution two- and three-dimensional patterns of living mammalian cells, with greater than 95% viability. These results have been extended to primary cultured olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), harvested from adult Sprague-Dawley rats. OECs have been found to provide stimulating environments for neurite outgrowth in spinal cord injury models. BioLP is unique in that small load volumes (∼μLs) are required to achieve printing, enabling low numbers of OECs to be harvested, concentrated and printed. BioLP was used to form several 8 mm lines of OECs throughout a multilayer hydrogel scaffold. The line width was as low as 20 μm, with most lines comprising aligned single cells. Fluorescent confocal microscopy was used to determine the functionality of the printed OECs, to monitor interactions between printed OECs, and to determine the extent of cell migration throughout the 3D scaffold. High-resolution printing of low cell count, harvested OECs is an important advancement for in vitro study of cell interactions and functionality. In addition, these cell-printed scaffolds may provide an alternative for spinal cord repair studies, as the single-cell patterns formed here are on relevant size scales for neurite outgrowth

  17. Simulating three dimensional wave run-up over breakwaters covered by antifer units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi-Jilani, A.; Niri, M. Zakiri; Naderi, Nader

    2014-06-01

    The paper presents the numerical analysis of wave run-up over rubble-mound breakwaters covered by antifer units using a technique integrating Computer-Aided Design (CAD) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. Direct application of Navier-Stokes equations within armour blocks, is used to provide a more reliable approach to simulate wave run-up over breakwaters. A well-tested Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) Volume of Fluid (VOF) code (Flow-3D) was adopted for CFD computations. The computed results were compared with experimental data to check the validity of the model. Numerical results showed that the direct three dimensional (3D) simulation method can deliver accurate results for wave run-up over rubble mound breakwaters. The results showed that the placement pattern of antifer units had a great impact on values of wave run-up so that by changing the placement pattern from regular to double pyramid can reduce the wave run-up by approximately 30%. Analysis was done to investigate the influences of surface roughness, energy dissipation in the pores of the armour layer and reduced wave run-up due to inflow into the armour and stone layer.

  18. Simulating three dimensional wave run-up over breakwaters covered by antifer units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Najafi-Jilani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the numerical analysis of wave run-up over rubble-mound breakwaters covered by antifer units using a technique integrating Computer-Aided Design (CAD and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD software. Direct application of Navier-Stokes equations within armour blocks, is used to provide a more reliable approach to simulate wave run-up over breakwaters. A well-tested Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS Volume of Fluid (VOF code (Flow-3D was adopted for CFD computations. The computed results were compared with experimental data to check the validity of the model. Numerical results showed that the direct three dimensional (3D simulation method can deliver accurate results for wave run-up over rubble mound breakwaters. The results showed that the placement pattern of antifer units had a great impact on values of wave run-up so that by changing the placement pattern from regular to double pyramid can reduce the wave run-up by approximately 30%. Analysis was done to investigate the influences of surface roughness, energy dissipation in the pores of the armour layer and reduced wave run-up due to inflow into the armour and stone layer.

  19. Optical Fiber/Nanowire Hybrid Structures for Efficient Three-Dimensional Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Weintraub, Benjamin

    2009-11-09

    Wired up: The energy conversion efficiency of three-dimensional dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) in a hybrid structure that integrates optical fibers and nanowire arrays is greater than that of a two-dimensional device. Internal axial illumination enhances the energy conversion efficiency of a rectangular fiber-based hybrid structure (see picture) by a factor of up to six compared to light illumination normal to the fiber axis from outside the device.

  20. Quantification of three-dimensional cell-mediated collagen remodeling using graph theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Cemal Cagatay; Lund, Amanda W; Can, Ali; Plopper, George E; Yener, Bülent

    2010-09-30

    Cell cooperation is a critical event during tissue development. We present the first precise metrics to quantify the interaction between mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and extra cellular matrix (ECM). In particular, we describe cooperative collagen alignment process with respect to the spatio-temporal organization and function of mesenchymal stem cells in three dimensions. We defined two precise metrics: Collagen Alignment Index and Cell Dissatisfaction Level, for quantitatively tracking type I collagen and fibrillogenesis remodeling by mesenchymal stem cells over time. Computation of these metrics was based on graph theory and vector calculus. The cells and their three dimensional type I collagen microenvironment were modeled by three dimensional cell-graphs and collagen fiber organization was calculated from gradient vectors. With the enhancement of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation, acceleration through different phases was quantitatively demonstrated. The phases were clustered in a statistically significant manner based on collagen organization, with late phases of remodeling by untreated cells clustering strongly with early phases of remodeling by differentiating cells. The experiments were repeated three times to conclude that the metrics could successfully identify critical phases of collagen remodeling that were dependent upon cooperativity within the cell population. Definition of early metrics that are able to predict long-term functionality by linking engineered tissue structure to function is an important step toward optimizing biomaterials for the purposes of regenerative medicine.

  1. Quantification of three-dimensional cell-mediated collagen remodeling using graph theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal Cagatay Bilgin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell cooperation is a critical event during tissue development. We present the first precise metrics to quantify the interaction between mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and extra cellular matrix (ECM. In particular, we describe cooperative collagen alignment process with respect to the spatio-temporal organization and function of mesenchymal stem cells in three dimensions.We defined two precise metrics: Collagen Alignment Index and Cell Dissatisfaction Level, for quantitatively tracking type I collagen and fibrillogenesis remodeling by mesenchymal stem cells over time. Computation of these metrics was based on graph theory and vector calculus. The cells and their three dimensional type I collagen microenvironment were modeled by three dimensional cell-graphs and collagen fiber organization was calculated from gradient vectors. With the enhancement of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation, acceleration through different phases was quantitatively demonstrated. The phases were clustered in a statistically significant manner based on collagen organization, with late phases of remodeling by untreated cells clustering strongly with early phases of remodeling by differentiating cells. The experiments were repeated three times to conclude that the metrics could successfully identify critical phases of collagen remodeling that were dependent upon cooperativity within the cell population.Definition of early metrics that are able to predict long-term functionality by linking engineered tissue structure to function is an important step toward optimizing biomaterials for the purposes of regenerative medicine.

  2. Three-Dimensional, Transgenic Cell Models to Quantify Space Genotoxic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, S. R.; Sognier, M. A.; Wu, H.; Pingerelli, P. L.; Glickman, B. W.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The space environment contains radiation and chemical agents known to be mutagenic and carcinogenic to humans. Additionally, microgravity is a complicating factor that may modify or synergize induced genotoxic effects. Most in vitro models fail to use human cells (making risk extrapolation to humans more difficult), overlook the dynamic effect of tissue intercellular interactions on genotoxic damage, and lack the sensitivity required to measure low-dose effects. Currently a need exists for a model test system that simulates cellular interactions present in tissue, and can be used to quantify genotoxic damage induced by low levels of radiation and chemicals, and extrapolate assessed risk to humans. A state-of-the-art, three-dimensional, multicellular tissue equivalent cell culture model will be presented. It consists of mammalian cells genetically engineered to contain multiple copies of defined target genes for genotoxic assessment,. NASA-designed bioreactors were used to coculture mammalian cells into spheroids, The cells used were human mammary epithelial cells (H184135) and Stratagene's (Austin, Texas) Big Blue(TM) Rat 2 lambda fibroblasts. The fibroblasts were genetically engineered to contain -a high-density target gene for mutagenesis (60 copies of lacl/LacZ per cell). Tissue equivalent spheroids were routinely produced by inoculation of 2 to 7 X 10(exp 5) fibroblasts with Cytodex 3 beads (150 micrometers in diameter). at a 20:1 cell:bead ratio, into 50-ml HARV bioreactors (Synthecon, Inc.). Fibroblasts were cultured for 5 days, an equivalent number of epithelial cells added, and the fibroblast/epithelial cell coculture continued for 21 days. Three-dimensional spheroids with diameters ranging from 400 to 600 micrometers were obtained. Histological and immunohistochemical Characterization revealed i) both cell types present in the spheroids, with fibroblasts located primarily in the center, surrounded by epithelial cells; ii) synthesis of extracellular matrix

  3. A three-dimensional non-isothermal model for a membraneless direct methanol redox fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lin; Yuan, Xianxia; Jiang, Fangming

    2018-05-01

    In the membraneless direct methanol redox fuel cell (DMRFC), three-dimensional electrodes contribute to the reduction of methanol crossover and the open separator design lowers the system cost and extends its service life. In order to better understand the mechanisms of this configuration and further optimize its performance, the development of a three-dimensional numerical model is reported in this work. The governing equations of the multi-physics field are solved based on computational fluid dynamics methodology, and the influence of the CO2 gas is taken into consideration through the effective diffusivities. The numerical results are in good agreement with experimental data, and the deviation observed for cases of large current density may be related to the single-phase assumption made. The three-dimensional electrode is found to be effective in controlling methanol crossover in its multi-layer structure, while it also increases the flow resistance for the discharging products. It is found that the current density distribution is affected by both the electronic conductivity and the concentration of reactants, and the temperature rise can be primarily attributed to the current density distribution. The sensitivity and reliability of the model are analyzed through the investigation of the effects of cell parameters, including porosity values of gas diffusion layers and catalyst layers, methanol concentration and CO2 volume fraction, on the polarization characteristics.

  4. Generation of a Three-Dimensional Kidney Structure from Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Yasuhiro; Taguchi, Atsuhiro; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi

    2017-01-01

    The kidney is a vital organ that has an important role in the maintenance of homeostasis by fluid volume regulation and waste product excretion. This role cannot be performed without the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the kidney. Therefore, it is important to generate the 3D structure of the kidney when inducing functional kidney tissue or the whole organ from pluripotent stem cells. In this chapter, we describe the detailed methods to induce kidney progenitor cells from pluripotent stem cells, which are based on embryological development. We also provide a method to generate 3D kidney tissue with vascularized glomeruli upon transplantation.

  5. Label-free three-dimensional imaging of cell nucleus using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jian; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zi; Huang, Zhiwei, E-mail: biehzw@nus.edu.sg [Optical Bioimaging Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-09-08

    We report the implementation of the combined third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy for label-free three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of cell nucleus morphological changes in liver tissue. THG imaging shows regular spherical shapes of normal hepatocytes nuclei with inner chromatin structures while revealing the condensation of chromatins and nuclear fragmentations in hepatocytes of diseased liver tissue. Colocalized THG and TPEF imaging provides complementary information of cell nuclei and cytoplasm in tissue. This work suggests that 3-D THG microscopy has the potential for quantitative analysis of nuclear morphology in cells at a submicron-resolution without the need for DNA staining.

  6. Label-free three-dimensional imaging of cell nucleus using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Jian; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    We report the implementation of the combined third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy for label-free three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of cell nucleus morphological changes in liver tissue. THG imaging shows regular spherical shapes of normal hepatocytes nuclei with inner chromatin structures while revealing the condensation of chromatins and nuclear fragmentations in hepatocytes of diseased liver tissue. Colocalized THG and TPEF imaging provides complementary information of cell nuclei and cytoplasm in tissue. This work suggests that 3-D THG microscopy has the potential for quantitative analysis of nuclear morphology in cells at a submicron-resolution without the need for DNA staining.

  7. Three-dimensional ultrasound. Early personal experience with a dedicated unit and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesarani, F.; Isolato, G.; Capello, S.; Bianchi, S.D.

    1999-01-01

    The authors report our preliminary clinical experience with three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) in abdominal and small parts imaging, comparing the yield of 3D versus 2D US and the through a literature review [it

  8. Accelerating image reconstruction in three-dimensional optoacoustic tomography on graphics processing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Huang, Chao; Kao, Yu-Jiun; Chou, Cheng-Ying; Oraevsky, Alexander A; Anastasio, Mark A

    2013-02-01

    Optoacoustic tomography (OAT) is inherently a three-dimensional (3D) inverse problem. However, most studies of OAT image reconstruction still employ two-dimensional imaging models. One important reason is because 3D image reconstruction is computationally burdensome. The aim of this work is to accelerate existing image reconstruction algorithms for 3D OAT by use of parallel programming techniques. Parallelization strategies are proposed to accelerate a filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm and two different pairs of projection/backprojection operations that correspond to two different numerical imaging models. The algorithms are designed to fully exploit the parallel computing power of graphics processing units (GPUs). In order to evaluate the parallelization strategies for the projection/backprojection pairs, an iterative image reconstruction algorithm is implemented. Computer simulation and experimental studies are conducted to investigate the computational efficiency and numerical accuracy of the developed algorithms. The GPU implementations improve the computational efficiency by factors of 1000, 125, and 250 for the FBP algorithm and the two pairs of projection/backprojection operators, respectively. Accurate images are reconstructed by use of the FBP and iterative image reconstruction algorithms from both computer-simulated and experimental data. Parallelization strategies for 3D OAT image reconstruction are proposed for the first time. These GPU-based implementations significantly reduce the computational time for 3D image reconstruction, complementing our earlier work on 3D OAT iterative image reconstruction.

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Sense Three Dimensional Type I Collagen through Discoidin Domain Receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, A W; Stegemann, J P; Plopper, G E

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix provides structural and organizational cues for tissue development and defines and maintains cellular phenotype during cell fate determination. Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells use this matrix to tightly regulate the balance between their differentiation potential and self-renewal in the native niche. When understood, the mechanisms that govern cell-matrix crosstalk during differentiation will allow for efficient engineering of natural and synthetic matrices to specifically direct and maintain stem cell phenotype. This work identifies the discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a collagen activated receptor tyrosine kinase, as a potential link through which stem cells sense and respond to the 3D organization of their extracellular matrix microenvironment. DDR1 is dependent upon both the structure and proteolytic state of its collagen ligand and is specifically expressed and localized in three dimensional type I collagen culture. Inhibition of DDR1 expression results in decreased osteogenic potential, increased cell spreading, stress fiber formation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Additionally, loss of DDR1 activity alters the cell-mediated organization of the naïve type I collagen matrix. Taken together, these results demonstrate a role for DDR1 in the stem cell response to and interaction with three dimensional type I collagen. Dynamic changes in cell shape in 3D culture and the tuning of the local ECM microstructure, directs crosstalk between DDR1 and two dimensional mechanisms of osteogenesis that can alter their traditional roles.

  10. A cell-based biosensor for nanomaterials cytotoxicity assessment in three dimensional cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubiak-Szepietowska, Monika; Karczmarczyk, Aleksandra; Winckler, Thomas; Feller, Karl-Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used in consumer and medicinal products. The high prevalence of nanoparticles in the environment raises concerns regarding their effects on human health, but there is limited knowledge about how NPs interact with cells or tissues. Because the European Union has called for a substantial reduction of animal experiments for scientific purposes (Directive 2010/63), increased efforts are required to develop in vitro models to evaluate potentially hazardous agents. Here, we describe a new cell-based biosensor for the evaluation of NPs cytotoxicity. The new biosensor is based on transgenic human hepatoblastoma cells (HepG2) that express a secreted form of alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) as a reporter protein whose expression is induced upon activation of a stress response pathway controlled by the transcription regulator nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). The NF-κB-HepG2 sensor cells were cultured in a Matrigel-based three dimensional environment to simulate the in vivo situation. The new biosensor cells offer the advantage of generating fast and reproducible readout at lower concentrations and shorter incubation time than conventional viability assays, avoid possible interaction between nanomaterials and assay compounds, therefore, minimize generation of false positive or negative results and indicate mechanism of toxicity through NF-κB signaling.

  11. Fabrication of cell-benign inverse opal hydrogels for three-dimensional cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Pilseon; Ji, Dong Hwan; Kim, Min Kyung; Kim, Jaeyun

    2017-05-15

    Inverse opal hydrogels (IOHs) for cell culture were fabricated and optimized using calcium-crosslinked alginate microbeads as sacrificial template and gelatin as a matrix. In contrast to traditional three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds, the gelatin IOHs allowed the utilization of both the macropore surface and inner matrix for cell co-culture. In order to remove templates efficiently for the construction of 3D interconnected macropores and to maintain high cell viability during the template removal process using EDTA solution, various factors in fabrication, including alginate viscosity, alginate concentration, alginate microbeads size, crosslinking calcium concentration, and gelatin network density were investigated. Low viscosity alginate, lower crosslinking calcium ion concentration, and lower concentration of alginate and gelatin were found to obtain high viability of cells encapsulated in the gelatin matrix after removal of the alginate template by EDTA treatment by allowing rapid dissociation and diffusion of alginate polymers. Based on the optimized fabrication conditions, gelatin IOHs showed good potential as a cell co-culture system, applicable to tissue engineering and cancer research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A mathematical model of collective cell migration in a three-dimensional, heterogeneous environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Stonko

    Full Text Available Cell migration is essential in animal development, homeostasis, and disease progression, but many questions remain unanswered about how this process is controlled. While many kinds of individual cell movements have been characterized, less effort has been directed towards understanding how clusters of cells migrate collectively through heterogeneous, cellular environments. To explore this, we have focused on the migration of the border cells during Drosophila egg development. In this case, a cluster of different cell types coalesce and traverse as a group between large cells, called nurse cells, in the center of the egg chamber. We have developed a new model for this collective cell migration based on the forces of adhesion, repulsion, migration and stochastic fluctuation to generate the movement of discrete cells. We implement the model using Identical Math Cells, or IMCs. IMCs can each represent one biological cell of the system, or can be aggregated using increased adhesion forces to model the dynamics of larger biological cells. The domain of interest is filled with IMCs, each assigned specific biophysical properties to mimic a diversity of cell types. Using this system, we have successfully simulated the migration of the border cell cluster through an environment filled with larger cells, which represent nurse cells. Interestingly, our simulations suggest that the forces utilized in this model are sufficient to produce behaviors of the cluster that are observed in vivo, such as rotation. Our framework was developed to capture a heterogeneous cell population, and our implementation strategy allows for diverse, but precise, initial position specification over a three- dimensional domain. Therefore, we believe that this model will be useful for not only examining aspects of Drosophila oogenesis, but also for modeling other two or three-dimensional systems that have multiple cell types and where investigating the forces between cells is of

  13. A mathematical model of collective cell migration in a three-dimensional, heterogeneous environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonko, David P; Manning, Lathiena; Starz-Gaiano, Michelle; Peercy, Bradford E

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is essential in animal development, homeostasis, and disease progression, but many questions remain unanswered about how this process is controlled. While many kinds of individual cell movements have been characterized, less effort has been directed towards understanding how clusters of cells migrate collectively through heterogeneous, cellular environments. To explore this, we have focused on the migration of the border cells during Drosophila egg development. In this case, a cluster of different cell types coalesce and traverse as a group between large cells, called nurse cells, in the center of the egg chamber. We have developed a new model for this collective cell migration based on the forces of adhesion, repulsion, migration and stochastic fluctuation to generate the movement of discrete cells. We implement the model using Identical Math Cells, or IMCs. IMCs can each represent one biological cell of the system, or can be aggregated using increased adhesion forces to model the dynamics of larger biological cells. The domain of interest is filled with IMCs, each assigned specific biophysical properties to mimic a diversity of cell types. Using this system, we have successfully simulated the migration of the border cell cluster through an environment filled with larger cells, which represent nurse cells. Interestingly, our simulations suggest that the forces utilized in this model are sufficient to produce behaviors of the cluster that are observed in vivo, such as rotation. Our framework was developed to capture a heterogeneous cell population, and our implementation strategy allows for diverse, but precise, initial position specification over a three- dimensional domain. Therefore, we believe that this model will be useful for not only examining aspects of Drosophila oogenesis, but also for modeling other two or three-dimensional systems that have multiple cell types and where investigating the forces between cells is of interest.

  14. The fabrication and cell culture of three-dimensional rolled scaffolds with complex micro-architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yaxiong; Li Xiao; Qu Xiaoli; Zhu Lin; He Jiankang; Zhao Qian; Wu Wanquan; Li Dichen

    2012-01-01

    Cell cultures for tissue engineering are traditionally prepared on two-dimensional or three-dimensional scaffolds with simple pores; however, this limits mass transportation, which is necessary for cell viability and function. In this paper, an innovative method is proposed for fabricating porous scaffolds with designed complex micro-architectures. Channels devised by computer-aided design were used to simulate features of blood vessels in native rat liver. Rapid prototyping and microreplication were used to produce a negative polydimethylsiloxane mold, and then a planar porous scaffold with predefined microchannel parameters was obtained by freeze-drying a silk fibroin/gelatin solution of an optimized concentration. After seeding with rat primary hepatocytes, the planar scaffold was rolled up to build spatial channels. By reconstructing the three-dimensional channel model in the scaffold in the form of micro-computed topography data and observing the cross-sections of the scroll, we confirmed that the bent channels were still interconnected, with restricted deviations. A comparison of the primary hepatocyte culture in the scaffolds with and without the devised channels proved that our design influenced cell organization and improved cell survival and proliferation. This method can be used for the construction of complex tissues for implantation and for culturing cells in vitro for biological tests and observations.

  15. Electrospinning PCL Scaffolds Manufacture for Three-Dimensional Breast Cancer Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Rabionet

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In vitro cell culture is traditionally performed within two-dimensional (2D environments, providing a quick and cheap way to study cell properties in a laboratory. However, 2D systems differ from the in vivo environment and may not mimic the physiological cell behavior realistically. For instance, 2D culture models are thought to induce cancer stem cells (CSCs differentiation, a rare cancer cell subpopulation responsible for tumor initiation and relapse. This fact hinders the development of therapeutic strategies for tumors with a high relapse percentage, such as triple negative breast cancer (TNBC. Thus, three-dimensional (3D scaffolds have emerged as an attractive alternative to monolayer culture, simulating the extracellular matrix structure and maintaining the differentiation state of cells. In this work, scaffolds were fabricated through electrospinning different poly(ε-caprolactone-acetone solutions. Poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL meshes were seeded with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC cells and 15% PCL scaffolds displayed significantly (p < 0.05 higher cell proliferation and elongation than the other culture systems. Moreover, cells cultured on PCL scaffolds exhibited higher mammosphere forming capacity and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity than 2D-cultured cells, indicating a breast CSCs enrichment. These results prove the powerful capability of electrospinning technology in terms of poly(ε-caprolactone nanofibers fabrication. In addition, this study has demonstrated that electrospun 15% PCL scaffolds are suitable tools to culture breast cancer cells in a more physiological way and to expand the niche of breast CSCs. In conclusion, three-dimensional cell culture using PCL scaffolds could be useful to study cancer stem cell behavior and may also trigger the development of new specific targets against such malignant subpopulation.

  16. Clonorchis sinensis infestation promotes three-dimensional aggregation and invasion of cholangiocarcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihee Won

    Full Text Available Numerous experimental and epidemiological studies have demonstrated a correlation between Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis infestation and cholangiocarcinoma (CCA. However, the role of C. sinensis in the increased invasiveness and proliferation involved in the malignancy of CCA has not been addressed yet. Here, we investigated the possibility that C. sinensis infestation promotes expression of focal and cell-cell adhesion proteins in CCA cells and secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. Adhesion proteins help maintain cell aggregates, and MMPs promote the three-dimensional invasion of cells into the neighboring extracellular matrix (ECM. Using a novel microfluidic assay, we quantitatively addressed the role of excretory-secretory products (ESPs gradients from C. sinensis in promoting the invasion of cells into the neighboring ECM.

  17. Quantification of plant cell coupling with three-dimensional photoactivation microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesche, J; Schulz, A

    2012-07-01

    Plant cells are directly connected by plasmodesmata that form channels through the cell wall and enable the intercellular movement of cytosolic solutes, membrane lipids and signalling molecules. Transport through plasmodesmata is regulated not only by a fixed size-exclusion limit, but also by physiological and pathological adaptation. To understand plant cell communication, carbon allocation and pathogen attack, the capacities for a specific molecule to pass a specific cell-wall interface is an essential parameter. So far, the degree of cell coupling was derived from frequency and diameter of plasmodesmata in relevant tissues as assessed by electron microscopy of fixed material. However, plasmodesmata functionality and capacity can only be determined in live material, not from electron microscopy, which is static and prone to fixation artefacts. Plasmodesmata functionality was a few times assessed using fluorescent tracers with diffusion properties similar to cytosolic solutes. Here, we used three-dimensional photoactivation microscopy to quantify plasmodesmata-mediated cell-wall permeability between living Cucurbita maxima leaf mesophyll cells with caged fluorescein as tracer. For the first time, all necessary functional and anatomical data were gathered for each individual cell from three-dimensional time series. This approach utilized a confocal microscope equipped with resonant scanner, which provides the high acquisition speed necessary to record optical sections of whole cells and offers time resolution high enough to follow the kinetics of photoactivation. The results were compared to two-dimensional measurements, which are shown to give a good estimate of cell coupling adequate for homogenous tissues. The two-dimensional approach is limited whenever tissues interfaces are studied that couple different cell types with diverse cell geometries. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2011 Royal Microscopical Society.

  18. Development of human nervous tissue upon differentiation of embryonic stem cells in three-dimensional culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preynat-Seauve, Olivier; Suter, David M; Tirefort, Diderik; Turchi, Laurent; Virolle, Thierry; Chneiweiss, Herve; Foti, Michelangelo; Lobrinus, Johannes-Alexander; Stoppini, Luc; Feki, Anis; Dubois-Dauphin, Michel; Krause, Karl Heinz

    2009-03-01

    Researches on neural differentiation using embryonic stem cells (ESC) require analysis of neurogenesis in conditions mimicking physiological cellular interactions as closely as possible. In this study, we report an air-liquid interface-based culture of human ESC. This culture system allows three-dimensional cell expansion and neural differentiation in the absence of added growth factors. Over a 3-month period, a macroscopically visible, compact tissue developed. Histological coloration revealed a dense neural-like neural tissue including immature tubular structures. Electron microscopy, immunochemistry, and electrophysiological recordings demonstrated a dense network of neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes able to propagate signals. Within this tissue, tubular structures were niches of cells resembling germinal layers of human fetal brain. Indeed, the tissue contained abundant proliferating cells expressing markers of neural progenitors. Finally, the capacity to generate neural tissues on air-liquid interface differed for different ESC lines, confirming variations of their neurogenic potential. In conclusion, this study demonstrates in vitro engineering of a human neural-like tissue with an organization that bears resemblance to early developing brain. As opposed to previously described methods, this differentiation (a) allows three-dimensional organization, (b) yields dense interconnected neural tissue with structurally and functionally distinct areas, and (c) is spontaneously guided by endogenous developmental cues.

  19. A three-dimensional tetrahedral-shaped conjugated small molecule for organic solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QIN Yang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis of a novel three-dimensional tetrahedral-shaped small molecule,SO,containing a tetraphenylsilane core and cyanoester functionalized terthiophene arms.A deep lying HOMO energy level of -5.3 eV and a narrow bandgap of 1.9 eV were obtained from cyclic voltammetry measurements.Absorption,X-ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry experiments all indicate high crystallinity of this compound.Solar cells employing SO were fabricated and evaluated.The relatively low performance was mainly ascribed to lack of appreciable phase separation,which is confirmed by optical microscopy.

  20. High-Efficiency Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell with Three-Dimensional Photoanode

    KAUST Repository

    Tétreault, Nicolas

    2011-11-09

    Herein, we present a straightforward bottom-up synthesis of a high electron mobility and highly light scattering macroporous photoanode for dye-sensitized solar cells. The dense three-dimensional Al/ZnO, SnO2, or TiO 2 host integrates a conformal passivation thin film to reduce recombination and a large surface-area mesoporous anatase guest for high dye loading. This novel photoanode is designed to improve the charge extraction resulting in higher fill factor and photovoltage for DSCs. An increase in photovoltage of up to 110 mV over state-of-the-art DSC is demonstrated. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  1. The therapeutic potential of three-dimensional multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell spheroids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrenko, Yuriy; Syková, Eva; Kubinová, Šárka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, apr 26 (2017), s. 94 ISSN 1757-6512 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01396S; GA ČR(CZ) GA17-03765S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells * three-dimensional spheroids * clinical-grade manufacturing Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neuroscience s (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 4.211, year: 2016

  2. High-Efficiency Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell with Three-Dimensional Photoanode

    KAUST Repository

    Té treault, Nicolas; Arsenault, É ric; Heiniger, Leo-Philipp; Soheilnia, Navid; Brillet, Jé ré mie; Moehl, Thomas; Zakeeruddin, Shaik; Ozin, Geoffrey A.; Grä tzel, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Herein, we present a straightforward bottom-up synthesis of a high electron mobility and highly light scattering macroporous photoanode for dye-sensitized solar cells. The dense three-dimensional Al/ZnO, SnO2, or TiO 2 host integrates a conformal passivation thin film to reduce recombination and a large surface-area mesoporous anatase guest for high dye loading. This novel photoanode is designed to improve the charge extraction resulting in higher fill factor and photovoltage for DSCs. An increase in photovoltage of up to 110 mV over state-of-the-art DSC is demonstrated. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  3. Comprehensive analysis of signal transduction in three-dimensional ECM-based tumor cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Eke

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of signal transduction and protein phosphorylation is fundamental to understand physiological and pathological cell behavior as well as identification of novel therapeutic targets. Despite the fact that more physiological three-dimensional cell culture assays are increasingly used, particularly proteomics and phosphoproteomics remain challenging due to easy, robust and reproducible sample preparation. Here, we present an easy-to-perform, reliable and time-efficient method for the production of 3D cell lysates without compromising cell adhesion before cell lysis. The samples can be used for Western blotting as well as phosphoproteome array technology. This technique would be of interest for researchers working in all fields of biology and drug development.

  4. Sub-15 fs multiphoton lithography of three-dimensional structures for live cell applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licht, Martin; Uchugonova, Aisada; König, Karsten; Straub, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Development, morphology and intratissue location of cells are influenced by the 3D nano- and microenvironment. In this paper we demonstrate multiphoton photopolymerization to generate three-dimensional structures for cell culture applications with micro- and nanotopographic features using SU-8 photoresist and mr-NIL 6000 nanoimprint resist. Moving the focal spot of high-repetition rate near-infrared sub-15 fs pulsed laser light by a galvanometric beam scanner in combination with a piezoelectric vertical stage, nearly arbitrary trajectories of polymerized photoresist were generated. This technique can be used to generate cage structures with submicron interior features for live cell applications. Preliminary experiments with PC-3 and HT-1080 cells indicate the influence of the structures on cell behavior. (paper)

  5. Structural Analysis of Three-dimensional Human Neural Tissue derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terrence Brooks, Patrick; Rasmussen, Mikkel Aabech; Hyttel, Poul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed at establishing a method for production of a three-dimensional (3D) human neural tissue derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and analyzing the outcome by a combination of tissue ultrastructure and expression of neural markers. Methods: A two......-step cell culture procedure was implemented by subjecting human iPSCs to a 3D scaffoldbased neural differentiation protocol. First, neural fate-inducing small molecules were used to create a neuroepithelial monolayer. Second, the monolayer was trypsinized into single cells and seeded into a porous...... polystyrene scaffold and further cultured to produce a 3D neural tissue. The neural tissue was characterized by a combination of immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results: iPSCs developed into a 3D neural tissue expressing markers for neural progenitor cells, early neural...

  6. Three-dimensional intracellular structure of a whole rice mesophyll cell observed with FIB-SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oi, Takao; Enomoto, Sakiko; Nakao, Tomoyo; Arai, Shigeo; Yamane, Koji; Taniguchi, Mitsutaka

    2017-07-01

    Ultrathin sections of rice leaf blades observed two-dimensionally using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) show that the chlorenchyma is composed of lobed mesophyll cells, with intricate cell boundaries, and lined with chloroplasts. The lobed cell shape and chloroplast positioning are believed to enhance the area available for the gas exchange surface for photosynthesis in rice leaves. However, a cell image revealing the three-dimensional (3-D) ultrastructure of rice mesophyll cells has not been visualized. In this study, a whole rice mesophyll cell was observed using a focused ion beam scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM), which provides many serial sections automatically, rapidly and correctly, thereby enabling 3-D cell structure reconstruction. Rice leaf blades were fixed chemically using the method for conventional TEM observation, embedded in resin and subsequently set in the FIB-SEM chamber. Specimen blocks were sectioned transversely using the FIB, and block-face images were captured using the SEM. The sectioning and imaging were repeated overnight for 200-500 slices (each 50 nm thick). The resultant large-volume image stacks ( x = 25 μm, y = 25 μm, z = 10-25 μm) contained one or two whole mesophyll cells. The 3-D models of whole mesophyll cells were reconstructed using image processing software. The reconstructed cell models were discoid shaped with several lobes around the cell periphery. The cell shape increased the surface area, and the ratio of surface area to volume was twice that of a cylinder having the same volume. The chloroplasts occupied half the cell volume and spread as sheets along the cell lobes, covering most of the inner cell surface, with adjacent chloroplasts in close contact with each other. Cellular and sub-cellular ultrastructures of a whole mesophyll cell in a rice leaf blade are demonstrated three-dimensionally using a FIB-SEM. The 3-D models and numerical information support the hypothesis that rice mesophyll

  7. Three-dimensional anode engineering for the direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, A.; Oloman, C. W.; Gyenge, E. L.

    Catalyzed graphite felt three-dimensional anodes were investigated in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) operated with sulfuric acid supporting electrolyte. With a conventional serpentine channel flow field the preferred anode thickness was 100 μm, while a novel flow-by anode showed the best performance with a thickness of 200-300 μm. The effects of altering the methanol concentration, anolyte flow rate and operating temperature on the fuel cell superficial power density were studied by full (2 3 + 1) factorial experiments on a cell with anode area of 5 cm 2 and excess oxidant O 2 at 200 kPa(abs). For operation in the flow-by mode with 2 M methanol at 2 cm 3 min -1 and 353 K the peak power density was 2380 W m -2 with a PtRuMo anode catalyst, while a PtRu catalyst yielded 2240 W m -2 under the same conditions.

  8. A three-dimensional model of PEM fuel cells with serpentine flow channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, P.T.; Berning, T.; Bang, M.; Djilali, N.

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional computational model of PEM fuel cell with serpentine flow field channels is presented in this paper. This model presents a comprehensive account for all important transport phenomena in fuel cell such as heat transfer, mass transfer, electrode kinetics, and potential fields in the membrane and gas diffusion layers. A new approach of solving for the potential losses across the cell was also developed in this model. The dependency of local current density on oxygen concentration and activation overpotential is fully addressed in this model. The computational domain consists of serpentine gas flow channels, porous gas diffusion layers, catalyst layers, and a membrane. Results obtained from this model are in good agreement with experimental results. (author)

  9. Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Models for Infectious Disease and Drug Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Honer zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Ott, C. Mark

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) cell cultures hold enormous potential to advance our understanding of infectious disease and to effectively translate basic cellular research into clinical applications. Using novel NASA bioreactor technology, the rotating wall vessel (RWV), we have engineered physiologically relevant 3-D human tissue culture models for infectious disease studies. The design of the RWV is based on the understanding that organs and tissues function in a 3-D environment, and that this 3-D architecture is critical for the differentiated form and function of tissues in vivo. The RWV provides large numbers of cells which are amenable to a wide variety of experimental manipulations and provides an easy, reproducible, and cost-effective approach to enhance differentiated features of cell culture models.

  10. Three-dimensional ionic conduction in the strained electrolytes of solid oxide fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Yupei; Zou, Minda; Lv, Weiqiang; He, Weidong; Mao, Yiwu; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Flexible power sources including fuel cells and batteries are the key to realizing flexible electronic devices with pronounced foldability. To understand the bending effects in these devices, theoretical analysis on three-dimensional (3-D) lattice bending is necessary. In this report, we derive a 3-D analytical model to analyze the effects of electrolyte crystal bending on ionic conductivity in flexible solid-state batteries/fuel cells. By employing solid oxide fuel cells as a materials' platform, the intrinsic parameters of bent electrolyte materials, including lattice constant, Young's modulus, and Poisson ratio, are evaluated. Our work facilitates the rational design of highly efficient flexible electrolytes for high-performance flexible device applications.

  11. Mouse embryonic stem cell culture for generation of three-dimensional retinal and cortical tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiraku, Mototsugu; Sasai, Yoshiki

    2011-12-15

    Generation of compound tissues with complex structures is a major challenge in cell biology. In this article, we describe a protocol for mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) culture for in vitro generation of three-dimensional retinal tissue, comparing it with the culture protocol for cortical tissue generation. Dissociated ESCs are reaggregated in a 96-well plate with reduced cell-plate adhesion and cultured as floating aggregates. Retinal epithelium is efficiently generated when ESC aggregates are cultured in serum-free medium containing extracellular matrix proteins, spontaneously forming hemispherical vesicles and then progressively transforming into a shape reminiscent of the embryonic optic cup in 9-10 d. In long-term culture, the ESC-derived optic cup generates a fully stratified retinal tissue consisting of all major neural retinal components. In contrast, the cortical differentiation culture can be started without exogenous extracellular matrix proteins, and it generates stratified cortical epithelia consisting of four distinct layers in 13 d.

  12. FITTING A THREE DIMENSIONAL PEM FUEL CELL MODEL TO MEASUREMENTS BY TUNING THE POROSITY AND

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Mads; Odgaard, Madeleine; Condra, Thomas Joseph

    2004-01-01

    the distribution of current density and further how thisaffects the polarization curve.The porosity and conductivity of the catalyst layer are some ofthe most difficult parameters to measure, estimate and especiallycontrol. Yet the proposed model shows how these two parameterscan have significant influence...... on the performance of the fuel cell.The two parameters are shown to be key elements in adjusting thethree-dimensional model to fit measured polarization curves.Results from the proposed model are compared to single cellmeasurements on a test MEA from IRD Fuel Cells.......A three-dimensional, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a PEM fuel cell is presented. The model consists ofstraight channels, porous gas diffusion layers, porous catalystlayers and a membrane. In this computational domain, most ofthe transport phenomena which govern the performance of the...

  13. Alginate foam-based three-dimensional culture to investigate drug sensitivity in primary leukaemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimpoor, Mahroo; Yebra-Fernandez, Eva; Parhizkar, Maryam; Orlu, Mine; Craig, Duncan; Khorashad, Jamshid S; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2018-04-01

    The development of assays for evaluating the sensitivity of leukaemia cells to anti-cancer agents is becoming an important aspect of personalized medicine. Conventional cell cultures lack the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the bone marrow (BM), the extracellular matrix and stromal components which are crucial for the growth and survival of leukaemia stem cells. To accurately predict the sensitivity of the leukaemia cells in an in vitro assay a culturing system containing the essential components of BM is required. In this study, we developed a porous calcium alginate foam-based scaffold to be used for 3D culture. The new 3D culture was shown to be cell compatible as it supported the proliferation of both normal haematopoietic and leukaemia cells. Our cell differential assay for myeloid markers showed that the porous foam-based 3D culture enhanced myeloid differentiation in both leukaemia and normal haematopoietic cells compared to two-dimensional culture. The foam-based scaffold reduced the sensitivity of the leukaemia cells to the tested antileukaemia agents in K562 and HL60 leukaemia cell line model and also primary myeloid leukaemia cells. This observation supports the application of calcium alginate foams as scaffold components of the 3D cultures for investigation of sensitivity to antileukaemia agents in primary myeloid cells. © 2018 The Author(s).

  14. Macroporous Hydrogel Scaffolds for Three-Dimensional Cell Culture and Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Changjiang; Wang, Dong-An

    2017-10-01

    Hydrogels have been promising candidate scaffolds for cell delivery and tissue engineering due to their tissue-like physical properties and capability for homogeneous cell loading. However, the encapsulated cells are generally entrapped and constrained in the submicron- or nanosized gel networks, seriously limiting cell growth and tissue formation. Meanwhile, the spatially confined settlement inhibits attachment and spreading of anchorage-dependent cells, leading to their apoptosis. In recent years, macroporous hydrogels have attracted increasing attention in use as cell delivery vehicles and tissue engineering scaffolds. The introduction of macropores within gel scaffolds not only improves their permeability for better nutrient transport but also creates space/interface for cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix deposition. Herein, we will first review the development of macroporous gel scaffolds and outline the impact of macropores on cell behaviors. In the first part, the advantages and challenges of hydrogels as three-dimensional (3D) cell culture scaffolds will be described. In the second part, the fabrication of various macroporous hydrogels will be presented. Third, the enhancement of cell activities within macroporous gel scaffolds will be discussed. Finally, several crucial factors that are envisaged to propel the improvement of macroporous gel scaffolds are proposed for 3D cell culture and tissue engineering.

  15. Three dimensional analysis of planar solid oxide fuel cell stack considering radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T.; Inui, Y.; Urata, A.; Kanno, T. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2007-05-15

    The authors have been engaged in numerical simulations of the planar type solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to make clear the dependence of the cell performance on its operating conditions. Up to now, the authors have already developed the simulation codes for the one channel region and the single cell plate in its cell stack. To calculate accurately the effect of radiation heat transfer from the cell stack surfaces, however, a code that can treat the whole cell stack is necessary. In the present study, therefore, the authors newly develop a three dimensional simulation code of the planar SOFC stack, and the detailed effect of the radiation heat transfer is investigated. It is made clear that the conventional codes are sufficiently accurate, and the newly developed whole cell stack code is not inevitable to predict the maximum cell temperature. This is because the thermal conductivity of the cell materials made of ceramics is very small, and the central part of the cell stack is almost free from the influence of radiation heat transfer. On the other hand, the stack simulation is needed to calculate accurately the cell voltage because the radiation heat transfer reduces it when the ambient temperature is low. The bad influence of low ambient temperature on the voltage is, however, small and relatively high voltage is obtained even when the ambient temperature is very low. (author)

  16. Matrix mechanics and fluid shear stress control stem cells fate in three dimensional microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guobao; Lv, Yonggang; Guo, Pan; Lin, Chongwen; Zhang, Xiaomei; Yang, Li; Xu, Zhiling

    2013-07-01

    Stem cells have the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into multiple mature cell types during early life and growth. Stem cells adhesion, proliferation, migration and differentiation are affected by biochemical, mechanical and physical surface properties of the surrounding matrix in which stem cells reside and stem cells can sensitively feel and respond to the microenvironment of this matrix. More and more researches have proven that three dimensional (3D) culture can reduce the gap between cell culture and physiological environment where cells always live in vivo. This review summarized recent findings on the studies of matrix mechanics that control stem cells (primarily mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)) fate in 3D environment, including matrix stiffness and extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness. Considering the exchange of oxygen and nutrients in 3D culture, the effect of fluid shear stress (FSS) on fate decision of stem cells was also discussed in detail. Further, the difference of MSCs response to matrix stiffness between two dimensional (2D) and 3D conditions was compared. Finally, the mechanism of mechanotransduction of stem cells activated by matrix mechanics and FSS in 3D culture was briefly pointed out.

  17. Establishment of three-dimensional cultures of human pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica M.; Menter, David G.; Abbruzzese, James L.; Reddy, Shrikanth A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cultures of epithelial cells offer singular advantages for studies of morphogenesis or the role of cancer genes in oncogenesis. In this study, as part of establishing a 3D culture system of pancreatic duct epithelial cells, we compared human pancreatic duct epithelial cells (HPDE-E6E7) with pancreatic cancer cell lines. Our results show, that in contrast to cancer cells, HPDE-E6E7 organized into spheroids with what appeared to be apical and basal membranes and a luminal space. Immunostaining experiments indicated that protein kinase Akt was phosphorylated (Ser473) and CTMP, a negative Akt regulator, was expressed in both HPDE-E6E7 and cancer cells. However, a nuclear pool of CTMP was detectable in HPDE-E6E7 cells that showed a dynamic concentrated expression pattern, a feature that further distinguished HPDE-E637 cells from cancer cells. Collectively, these data suggest that 3D cultures of HPDE-E6E7 cells are useful for investigating signaling and morphological abnormalities in pancreatic cancer cells

  18. Rapid fabrication of detachable three-dimensional tissues by layering of cell sheets with heating centrifuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Yuji; Kagawa, Yuki; Hasegawa, Akiyuki; Kubo, Hirotsugu; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2018-01-18

    Confluent cultured cells on a temperature-responsive culture dish can be harvested as an intact cell sheet by decreasing temperature below 32°C. A three-dimensional (3-D) tissue can be fabricated by the layering of cell sheets. A resulting 3-D multilayered cell sheet-tissue on a temperature-responsive culture dish can be also harvested without any damage by only temperature decreasing. For shortening the fabrication time of the 3-D multilayered constructs, we attempted to layer cell sheets on a temperature-responsive culture dish with centrifugation. However, when a cell sheet was attached to the culture surface with a conventional centrifuge at 22-23°C, the cell sheet hardly adhere to the surface due to its noncell adhesiveness. Therefore, in this study, we have developed a heating centrifuge. In centrifugation (55g) at 36-37°C, the cell sheet adhered tightly within 5 min to the dish without significant cell damage. Additionally, centrifugation accelerated the cell sheet-layering process. The heating centrifugation shortened the fabrication time by one-fifth compared to a multilayer tissue fabrication without centrifugation. Furthermore, the multilayered constructs were finally detached from the dishes by decreasing temperature. This rapid tissue-fabrication method will be used as a valuable tool in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative therapy. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2018. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  19. Three-dimensional culture of human mesenchymal stem cells in a polyethylene terephthalate matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Yanfen; Li Ding; Shang Chunhua; Wang Jufang; Wang Xiaoning; Yang Shangtian

    2010-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was used as the scaffold material to support the proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The cells were cultured either statically in multi-wells or in a spinner flask agitated at 80 rpm for up to 20 days. To optimize the cell expansion condition, effects of the initial cell density and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were examined. During culture, cell growth and metabolism were tested. After 20 days, cells were harvested and surface markers were identified and quantified with flow cytometry. The results showed that hMSCs seeded at the lowest density gave the highest expansion fold. hMSCs grown in porous three-dimensional (3D) matrices displayed significantly different characteristics in terms of their proliferation and metabolism. PET matrices with 3D space could sustain cell proliferation for a long time. In addition, a low concentration (5 ng mL -1 ) of bFGF significantly enhanced the expansion of hMSCs in PET. Cell attachment and distribution in PET matrices were studied with confocal laser microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, which also confirmed cell proliferation. Furthermore, most of the cells in PET matrices were CD29, CD44 and CD105 positive, and CD34, CD45 and CD14 negative, confirming that hMSCs cultured in 3D PET matrices can be expanded and maintained in their undifferentiated state for at least 20 days without subculturing.

  20. Assembly of multiple cell gradients directed by three-dimensional microfluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiwei; Feng, Xiaojun; Wang, Yachao; Du, Wei; Chen, Peng; Liu, Chao; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2015-08-07

    Active control over the cell gradient is essential for understanding biological systems and the reconstitution of the functionality of many types of tissues, particularly for organ-on-a-chip. Here, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic strategy for generating controllable cell gradients. In this approach, a homogeneous cell suspension is loaded into a 3D stair-shaped PDMS microchannel to generate a cell gradient within 10 min by sedimentation. We demonstrate that cell gradients of various profiles (exponential and piecewise linear) can be achieved by precisely controlling the height of each layer during the fabrication. With sequential seeding, we further demonstrate the generation of two overlapping cell gradients on the same glass substrate with pre-defined designs. The cell gradient-based QD cytotoxicity assay also demonstrated that cell behaviors and resistances were regulated by the changes in cell density. These results reveal that the proposed 3D microfluidic strategy provides a simple and versatile means for establishing controllable gradients in cell density, opening up a new avenue for reconstructing functional tissues.

  1. A physiologic three-dimensional cell culture system to investigate the role of decorin in matrix organisation and cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidler, Daniela G.; Schaefer, Liliana; Robenek, Horst; Iozzo, Renato V.; Kresse, Hans; Schoenherr, Elke

    2005-01-01

    In vivo cells exist in a three-dimensional environment generated and maintained by multiple cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Proteoglycans, like decorin, affect these complex interactions. Thus, we sought to investigate the role of decorin in a three-dimensional environment where the matrix was generated over time by decorin-deficient fibroblasts in the presence of L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate. The cells were viable and proliferated in response to FGF2. Decorin was incorporated in the matrix and caused a ∼2 nm shift in the average diameter of the collagen fibrils, and the range and distribution of the fibrils became narrower and more uniform. Although there were no appreciable changes in collagen composition, we found that exogenous decorin induced the de novo synthesis of collagen I and V and cross-linked β (I). In the early phases of the three-dimensional culture, decorin reduced apoptosis. However, following the establishment of a three-dimensional matrix, the cells did not require decorin for their survival

  2. Three-dimensional two-phase mass transport model for direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.W.; Zhao, T.S.; Xu, C.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) steady-state model for liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) is presented in this paper. This 3D mass transport model is formed by integrating five sub-models, including a modified drift-flux model for the anode flow field, a two-phase mass transport model for the porous anode, a single-phase model for the polymer electrolyte membrane, a two-phase mass transport model for the porous cathode, and a homogeneous mist-flow model for the cathode flow field. The two-phase mass transport models take account the effect of non-equilibrium evaporation/ condensation at the gas-liquid interface. A 3D computer code is then developed based on the integrated model. After being validated against the experimental data reported in the literature, the code was used to investigate numerically transport behaviors at the DMFC anode and their effects on cell performance

  3. Scanning ion conductance microscopy for visualizing the three-dimensional surface topography of cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Masato; Mizutani, Yusuke; Iwata, Futoshi; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2018-01-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM), which belongs to the family of scanning probe microscopy, regulates the tip-sample distance by monitoring the ion current through the use of an electrolyte-filled nanopipette as the probing tip. Thus, SICM enables "contact-free" imaging of cell surface topography in liquid conditions. In this paper, we applied hopping mode SICM for obtaining topographical images of convoluted tissue samples such as trachea and kidney in phosphate buffered saline. Some of the SICM images were compared with the images obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after drying the same samples. We showed that the imaging quality of hopping mode SICM was excellent enough for investigating the three-dimensional surface structure of the soft tissue samples. Thus, SICM is expected to be used for imaging a wide variety of cells and tissues - either fixed or alive- at high resolution under physiologically relevant liquid conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A three-dimensional model for negative half cell of the vanadium redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xiangkun; Zhang Huamin; Xing Feng

    2011-01-01

    A stationary, isothermal, three-dimensional model for negative half cell of the vanadium redox flow battery is developed, which is based on the comprehensive conservation laws, such as charge, mass and momentum, together with a kinetic model for reaction involving vanadium species. The model is validated against the results calculated by the available two-dimensional model. With the given geometry of the negative half cell, the distributions of velocity, concentration, overpotential and transfer current density in the sections that are perpendicular and parallel to the applied current are studied. It is shown that the distribution of the electrolyte velocity in the electrode has significant impact on the distribution of concentration, overpotential and transfer current density. The lower velocity in the electrode will cause the higher overpotential, further result in the side reaction and corrosion of key materials locally. The development of the design of the vanadium redox flow battery is discussed, and the further research is proposed.

  5. Three-dimensional printing of Hela cells for cervical tumor model in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yu; Yao, Rui; Ouyang, Liliang; Ding, Hongxu; Zhang, Ting; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Kaitai; Cheng, Shujun

    2014-01-01

    Advances in three-dimensional (3D) printing have enabled the direct assembly of cells and extracellular matrix materials to form in vitro cellular models for 3D biology, the study of disease pathogenesis and new drug discovery. In this study, we report a method of 3D printing for Hela cells and gelatin/alginate/fibrinogen hydrogels to construct in vitro cervical tumor models. Cell proliferation, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) protein expression and chemoresistance were measured in the printed 3D cervical tumor models and compared with conventional 2D planar culture models. Over 90% cell viability was observed using the defined printing process. Comparisons of 3D and 2D results revealed that Hela cells showed a higher proliferation rate in the printed 3D environment and tended to form cellular spheroids, but formed monolayer cell sheets in 2D culture. Hela cells in 3D printed models also showed higher MMP protein expression and higher chemoresistance than those in 2D culture. These new biological characteristics from the printed 3D tumor models in vitro as well as the novel 3D cell printing technology may help the evolution of 3D cancer study. (paper)

  6. Three-dimensional cell manipulation and patterning using dielectrophoresis via a multi-layer scaffold structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, H K; Huan, Z; Mills, J K; Yang, J; Sun, D

    2015-02-07

    Cell manipulation is imperative to the areas of cellular biology and tissue engineering, providing them a useful tool for patterning cells into cellular patterns for different analyses and applications. This paper presents a novel approach to perform three-dimensional (3D) cell manipulation and patterning with a multi-layer engineered scaffold. This scaffold structure employed dielectrophoresis as the non-contact mechanism to manipulate cells in the 3D domain. Through establishing electric fields via this multi-layer structure, the cells in the medium became polarized and were attracted towards the interior part of the structure, forming 3D cellular patterns. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the manipulation and the patterning processes with the proposed structure. Results show that with the presence of a voltage input, this multi-layer structure was capable of manipulating different types of biological cells examined through dielectrophoresis, enabling automatic cell patterning in the time-scale of minutes. The effects of the voltage input on the resultant cellular pattern were examined and discussed. Viability test was performed after the patterning operation and the results confirmed that majority of the cells remained viable. After 7 days of culture, 3D cellular patterns were observed through SEM. The results suggest that this scaffold and its automated dielectrophoresis-based patterning mechanism can be used to construct artificial tissues for various tissue engineering applications.

  7. Three-dimensional bioprinting of stem-cell derived tissues for human regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeldon, Gregor; Lucendo-Villarin, Baltasar; Shu, Wenmiao

    2018-07-05

    Stem cell technology in regenerative medicine has the potential to provide an unlimited supply of cells for drug testing, medical transplantation and academic research. In order to engineer a realistic tissue model using stem cells as an alternative to human tissue, it is essential to create artificial stem cell microenvironment or niches. Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is a promising tissue engineering field that offers new opportunities to precisely place stem cells within their niches layer-by-layer. This review covers bioprinting technologies, the current development of 'bio-inks' and how bioprinting has already been applied to stem-cell culture, as well as their applications for human regenerative medicine. The key considerations for bioink properties such as stiffness, stability and biodegradation, biocompatibility and printability are highlighted. Bioprinting of both adult and pluriopotent stem cells for various types of artificial tissues from liver to brain has been reviewed. 3D bioprinting of stem-cell derived tissues for human regenerative medicine is an exciting emerging area that represents opportunities for new research, industries and products as well as future challenges in clinical translation.This article is part of the theme issue 'Designer human tissue: coming to a lab near you'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  8. Therapeutic effect analysis of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Zhijun; Cao Yongzhen; Zhang Wenxue; Liang Feng

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the treatment effect of non-small cell lung cancer of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and to study the effect of patient survival related factors. Methods: Retrospective analysis was mack for 136 cases of non-small cell lung cancer, all accept 3D-CRT, through the case data collection and long-term follow-up, using the single factor and multiple factor analysis survival time and its influencing factors. Results: The recent curative effects of 136 cases of patients with three dimensional conformal radiotherapy: Complete response (CR) 14.7% (20/136), partial response (PR) 60.3 (82/136), stable disease(SD) 19.9% (27/136), progression disease (PD) 5.1% (7/136), total effective rate is 75% (102/136). One, two, three, five year survival rate is 79.4%, 45.4%, 22.1%, 12.5%. Side effects: Class 1 radiated esophagitis 35 cases, Class 2 radiated esophagitis 16 cases, Class 3 and above radiated esophagitis 0 case. Class I radiated pneumonia 20 cases, Class 2 radiated pneumonia 9 cases, Class 3 radiated pneumonia 0 case. Single factor analysis shows the influence of gender, age, pathology, phase, dose, and first-phase curative effect to the survival time are of a statistical significance, Multiple factor analysis showed KPS score, phase, dose, first-phase curative effect are the survival time independent factors. Conclusion: 3D-CRT for patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma is a safe, effective treatment method, Side effects are relatively low, and the patients survival time is long after radiotherapy. (authors)

  9. Thicker three-dimensional tissue from a "symbiotic recycling system" combining mammalian cells and algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Yuji; Kagawa, Yuki; Sakaguchi, Katsuhisa; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2017-01-31

    In this paper, we report an in vitro co-culture system that combines mammalian cells and algae, Chlorococcum littorale, to create a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue. While the C2C12 mouse myoblasts and rat cardiac cells consumed oxygen actively, intense oxygen production was accounted for by the algae even in the co-culture system. Although cell metabolism within thicker cardiac cell-layered tissues showed anaerobic respiration, the introduction of innovative co-cultivation partially changed the metabolism to aerobic respiration. Moreover, the amount of glucose consumption and lactate production in the cardiac tissues and the amount of ammonia in the culture media decreased significantly when co-cultivated with algae. In the cardiac tissues devoid of algae, delamination was observed histologically, and the release of creatine kinase (CK) from the tissues showed severe cardiac cell damage. On the other hand, the layered cell tissues with algae were observed to be in a good histological condition, with less than one-fifth decline in CK release. The co-cultivation with algae improved the culture condition of the thicker tissues, resulting in the formation of 160 μm-thick cardiac tissues. Thus, the present study proposes the possibility of creating an in vitro "symbiotic recycling system" composed of mammalian cells and algae.

  10. Increased Paracrine Immunomodulatory Potential of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Three-Dimensional Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Follin, Bjarke; Juhl, Morten; Cohen, Smadar

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) have been investigated extensively through the past years, proving to have great clinical therapeutic potential. In vitro cultivation of MSCs in three-dimensional (3D) culture systems, such as scaffolds, hydrogels, or spheroids, have recently gained attention...... for tissue engineering applications. Studies on MSC spheroids demonstrated that such cultivation increased the paracrine immunomodulatory potential of the MSCs, accompanied by phenotypic alterations. In this review, we gather results from recent experimental studies on the immunomodulatory abilities of MSCs...... when cultured as spheroids or in biomaterials like scaffolds or hydrogels compared to regular two-dimensional (2D) culture and show that alterations occurring to MSCs in spheroids also occur in MSCs in biomaterials. We provide a brief description of known mechanisms of MSC immunomodulatory capacity...

  11. Three-dimensional super-resolved live cell imaging through polarized multi-angle TIRF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Cheng; Zhao, Guangyuan; Liu, Wenjie; Chen, Youhua; Zhang, Zhimin; Jin, Luhong; Xu, Yingke; Kuang, Cuifang; Liu, Xu

    2018-04-01

    Measuring three-dimensional nanoscale cellular structures is challenging, especially when the structure is dynamic. Owing to the informative total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) imaging under varied illumination angles, multi-angle (MA) TIRF has been examined to offer a nanoscale axial and a subsecond temporal resolution. However, conventional MA-TIRF still performs badly in lateral resolution and fails to characterize the depth image in densely distributed regions. Here, we emphasize the lateral super-resolution in the MA-TIRF, exampled by simply introducing polarization modulation into the illumination procedure. Equipped with a sparsity and accelerated proximal algorithm, we examine a more precise 3D sample structure compared with previous methods, enabling live cell imaging with a temporal resolution of 2 s and recovering high-resolution mitochondria fission and fusion processes. We also shared the recovery program, which is the first open-source recovery code for MA-TIRF, to the best of our knowledge.

  12. Electron and ion heating by whistler turbulence: Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, R. Scott; Gary, S. Peter; Wang, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying whistler turbulence are carried out on a collisionless, homogeneous, magnetized, electron-ion plasma model. In addition, the simulations use an initial ensemble of relatively long wavelength whistler modes with a broad range of initial propagation directions with an initial electron beta β e = 0.05. The computations follow the temporal evolution of the fluctuations as they cascade into broadband turbulent spectra at shorter wavelengths. Three simulations correspond to successively larger simulation boxes and successively longer wavelengths of the initial fluctuations. The computations confirm previous results showing electron heating is preferentially parallel to the background magnetic field B o , and ion heating is preferentially perpendicular to B o . The new results here are that larger simulation boxes and longer initial whistler wavelengths yield weaker overall dissipation, consistent with linear dispersion theory predictions of decreased damping, stronger ion heating, consistent with a stronger ion Landau resonance, and weaker electron heating

  13. A three-dimensional cell-based smoothed finite element method for elasto-plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kye Hyung; Im, Se Yong; Lim, Jae Hyuk; Sohn, Dong Woo

    2015-01-01

    This work is concerned with a three-dimensional cell-based smoothed finite element method for application to elastic-plastic analysis. The formulation of smoothed finite elements is extended to cover elastic-plastic deformations beyond the classical linear theory of elasticity, which has been the major application domain of smoothed finite elements. The finite strain deformations are treated with the aid of the formulation based on the hyperelastic constitutive equation. The volumetric locking originating from the nearly incompressible behavior of elastic-plastic deformations is remedied by relaxing the volumetric strain through the mean value. The comparison with the conventional finite elements demonstrates the effectiveness and accuracy of the present approach.

  14. A three-dimensional cell-based smoothed finite element method for elasto-plasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kye Hyung; Im, Se Yong [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jae Hyuk [KARI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Dong Woo [Korea Maritime and Ocean University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    This work is concerned with a three-dimensional cell-based smoothed finite element method for application to elastic-plastic analysis. The formulation of smoothed finite elements is extended to cover elastic-plastic deformations beyond the classical linear theory of elasticity, which has been the major application domain of smoothed finite elements. The finite strain deformations are treated with the aid of the formulation based on the hyperelastic constitutive equation. The volumetric locking originating from the nearly incompressible behavior of elastic-plastic deformations is remedied by relaxing the volumetric strain through the mean value. The comparison with the conventional finite elements demonstrates the effectiveness and accuracy of the present approach.

  15. Three-dimensional architecture of hair-cell linkages as revealedby electron-microscopic tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auer, Manfred; Koster, Bram; Ziese, Ulrike; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Volkmann, Niels; Wang, Da Neng; Hudspeth, A. James

    2006-07-28

    The senses of hearing and balance rest upon mechanoelectrical transduction by the hair bundles of hair cells in the inner ear. Located at the apical cellular surface, each hair bundle comprises several tens of stereocilia and a single kinocilium that are interconnected by extracellular proteinaceous links. Using electron-microscopic tomography of bullfrog saccular sensory epithelia, we examined the three-dimensional structures of ankle or basal links, kinociliary links, and tip links. We observed clear differences in the dimensions and appearances of the three links. We found two distinct populations of tip links suggestive of the involvement of two proteins or splice variants. We noted auxiliary links connecting the upper portions of tip links to the taller stereocilia. Tip links and auxiliary links show a tendency to adopt a globular conformation when disconnected from the membrane surface.

  16. Three-dimensional hydrogel cell culture systems for modeling neural tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, John

    Two-dimensional (2-D) neural cell culture systems have served as physiological models for understanding the cellular and molecular events that underlie responses to physical and chemical stimuli, control sensory and motor function, and lead to the development of neurological diseases. However, the development of three-dimensional (3-D) cell culture systems will be essential for the advancement of experimental research in a variety of fields including tissue engineering, chemical transport and delivery, cell growth, and cell-cell communication. In 3-D cell culture, cells are provided with an environment similar to tissue, in which they are surrounded on all sides by other cells, structural molecules and adhesion ligands. Cells grown in 3-D culture systems display morphologies and functions more similar to those observed in vivo, and can be cultured in such a way as to recapitulate the structural organization and biological properties of tissue. This thesis describes a hydrogel-based culture system, capable of supporting the growth and function of several neural cell types in 3-D. Alginate hydrogels were characterized in terms of their biomechanical and biochemical properties and were functionalized by covalent attachment of whole proteins and peptide epitopes. Methods were developed for rapid cross-linking of alginate hydrogels, thus permitting the incorporation of cells into 3-D scaffolds without adversely affecting cell viability or function. A variety of neural cell types were tested including astrocytes, microglia, and neurons. Cells remained viable and functional for longer than two weeks in culture and displayed process outgrowth in 3-D. Cell constructs were created that varied in cell density, type and organization, providing experimental flexibility for studying cell interactions and behavior. In one set of experiments, 3-D glial-endothelial cell co-cultures were used to model blood-brain barrier (BBB) structure and function. This co-culture system was

  17. Degradation-mediated cellular traction directs stem cell fate in covalently crosslinked three-dimensional hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetan, Sudhir; Guvendiren, Murat; Legant, Wesley R.; Cohen, Daniel M.; Chen, Christopher S.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2013-05-01

    Although cell-matrix adhesive interactions are known to regulate stem cell differentiation, the underlying mechanisms, in particular for direct three-dimensional encapsulation within hydrogels, are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that in covalently crosslinked hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels, the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is directed by the generation of degradation-mediated cellular traction, independently of cell morphology or matrix mechanics. hMSCs within HA hydrogels of equivalent elastic moduli that permit (restrict) cell-mediated degradation exhibited high (low) degrees of cell spreading and high (low) tractions, and favoured osteogenesis (adipogenesis). Moreover, switching the permissive hydrogel to a restrictive state through delayed secondary crosslinking reduced further hydrogel degradation, suppressed traction, and caused a switch from osteogenesis to adipogenesis in the absence of changes to the extended cellular morphology. Furthermore, inhibiting tension-mediated signalling in the permissive environment mirrored the effects of delayed secondary crosslinking, whereas upregulating tension induced osteogenesis even in the restrictive environment.

  18. Porcine spermatogonial stem cells self-renew effectively in a three dimensional culture microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Eun; Park, Min Hee; Kim, Min Seong; Park, Yeo Reum; Yun, Jung Im; Cheong, Hee Tae; Kim, Minseok; Choi, Jung Hoon; Lee, Eunsong; Lee, Seung Tae

    2017-12-01

    Generally, self-renewal of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) is maintained in vivo in a three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment consisting of the seminiferous tubule basement membrane, indicating the importance of the 3D microenvironment for in vitro culture of SSCs. Here, we report a 3D culture microenvironment that effectively maintains porcine SSC self-renewal during culture. Porcine SSCs were cultured in an agarose-based 3D hydrogel and in 2D culture plates either with or without feeder cells. Subsequently, the effects of 3D culture on the maintenance of undifferentiated SSCs were identified by analyzing cell colony formation and morphology, AP activity, and transcriptional and translational regulation of self-renewal-related genes and the effects on proliferation by analyzing cell viability and single cell-derived colony number. The 3D culture microenvironment constructed using a 0.2% (w/v) agarose-based 3D hydrogel showed the strongest maintenance of porcine SSC self-renewal and induced significant improvements in proliferation compared with 2D culture microenvironments. These results demonstrate that self-renewal of porcine SSCs can be maintained more effectively in a 3D than in a 2D culture microenvironment. Moreover, this will play a significant role in developing novel culture systems for SSCs derived from diverse species in the future, which will contribute to SSC-related research. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  19. A Novel Microgravity Simulator Applicable for Three-Dimensional Cell Culturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, Simon L.; Richard, Stéphane; Walther, Isabelle; Furrer, Reinhard; Anderegg, Roland; Sekler, Jörg; Egli, Marcel

    2014-10-01

    Random Positioning Machines (RPM) were introduced decades ago to simulate microgravity. Since then numerous experiments have been carried out to study its influence on biological samples. The machine is valued by the scientific community involved in space relevant topics as an excellent experimental tool to conduct pre-studies, for example, before sending samples into space. We have developed a novel version of the traditional RPM to broaden its operative range. This novel version has now become interesting to researchers who are working in the field of tissue engineering, particularly those interested in alternative methods for three-dimensional (3D) cell culturing. The main modifications concern the cell culture condition and the algorithm that controls the movement of the frames for the nullification of gravity. An incubator was integrated into the inner frame of the RPM allowing precise control over the cell culture environment. Furthermore, several feed-throughs now allow a permanent supply of gas like CO 2. All these modifications substantially improve conditions to culture cells; furthermore, the rewritten software responsible for controlling the movement of the frames enhances the quality of the generated microgravity. Cell culture experiments were carried out with human lymphocytes on the novel RPM model to compare the obtained response to the results gathered on an older well-established RPM as well as to data from space flights. The overall outcome of the tests validates this novel RPM for cell cultivation under simulated microgravity conditions.

  20. Three-dimensional bioprinting of embryonic stem cells directs highly uniform embryoid body formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Liliang; Yao, Rui; Mao, Shuangshuang; Sun, Wei; Chen, Xi; Na, Jie

    2015-01-01

    With the ability to manipulate cells temporarily and spatially into three-dimensional (3D) tissue-like construct, 3D bioprinting technology was used in many studies to facilitate the recreation of complex cell niche and/or to better understand the regulation of stem cell proliferation and differentiation by cellular microenvironment factors. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have the capacity to differentiate into any specialized cell type of the animal body, generally via the formation of embryoid body (EB), which mimics the early stages of embryogenesis. In this study, extrusion-based 3D bioprinting technology was utilized for biofabricating ESCs into 3D cell-laden construct. The influence of 3D printing parameters on ESC viability, proliferation, maintenance of pluripotency and the rule of EB formation was systematically studied in this work. Results demonstrated that ESCs were successfully printed with hydrogel into 3D macroporous construct. Upon process optimization, about 90% ESCs remained alive after the process of bioprinting and cell-laden construct formation. ESCs continued proliferating into spheroid EBs in the hydrogel construct, while retaining the protein expression and gene expression of pluripotent markers, like octamer binding transcription factor 4, stage specific embryonic antigen 1 and Nanog. In this novel technology, EBs were formed through cell proliferation instead of aggregation, and the quantity of EBs was tuned by the initial cell density in the 3D bioprinting process. This study introduces the 3D bioprinting of ESCs into a 3D cell-laden hydrogel construct for the first time and showed the production of uniform, pluripotent, high-throughput and size-controllable EBs, which indicated strong potential in ESC large scale expansion, stem cell regulation and fabrication of tissue-like structure and drug screening studies. (paper)

  1. Three-dimensional bioprinting of embryonic stem cells directs highly uniform embryoid body formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liliang; Yao, Rui; Mao, Shuangshuang; Chen, Xi; Na, Jie; Sun, Wei

    2015-11-04

    With the ability to manipulate cells temporarily and spatially into three-dimensional (3D) tissue-like construct, 3D bioprinting technology was used in many studies to facilitate the recreation of complex cell niche and/or to better understand the regulation of stem cell proliferation and differentiation by cellular microenvironment factors. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have the capacity to differentiate into any specialized cell type of the animal body, generally via the formation of embryoid body (EB), which mimics the early stages of embryogenesis. In this study, extrusion-based 3D bioprinting technology was utilized for biofabricating ESCs into 3D cell-laden construct. The influence of 3D printing parameters on ESC viability, proliferation, maintenance of pluripotency and the rule of EB formation was systematically studied in this work. Results demonstrated that ESCs were successfully printed with hydrogel into 3D macroporous construct. Upon process optimization, about 90% ESCs remained alive after the process of bioprinting and cell-laden construct formation. ESCs continued proliferating into spheroid EBs in the hydrogel construct, while retaining the protein expression and gene expression of pluripotent markers, like octamer binding transcription factor 4, stage specific embryonic antigen 1 and Nanog. In this novel technology, EBs were formed through cell proliferation instead of aggregation, and the quantity of EBs was tuned by the initial cell density in the 3D bioprinting process. This study introduces the 3D bioprinting of ESCs into a 3D cell-laden hydrogel construct for the first time and showed the production of uniform, pluripotent, high-throughput and size-controllable EBs, which indicated strong potential in ESC large scale expansion, stem cell regulation and fabrication of tissue-like structure and drug screening studies.

  2. Patterned three-dimensional encapsulation of embryonic stem cells using dielectrophoresis and stereolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Piyush; Marchwiany, Daniel; Duarte, Carlos; Bashir, Rashid

    2013-03-01

    Controlling the assembly of cells in three dimensions is very important for engineering functional tissues, drug screening, probing cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions, and studying the emergent behavior of cellular systems. Although the current methods of cell encapsulation in hydrogels can distribute them in three dimensions, these methods typically lack spatial control of multi-cellular organization and do not allow for the possibility of cell-cell contacts as seen for the native tissue. Here, we report the integration of dielectrophoresis (DEP) with stereolithography (SL) apparatus for the spatial patterning of cells on custom made gold micro-electrodes. Afterwards, they are encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels of different stiffnesses. This technique can mimic the in vivo microscale tissue architecture, where the cells have a high degree of three dimensional (3D) spatial control. As a proof of concept, we show the patterning and encapsulation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and C2C12 skeletal muscle myoblasts. mESCs show high viability in both the DEP (91.79% ± 1.4%) and the no DEP (94.27% ± 0.5%) hydrogel samples. Furthermore, we also show the patterning of mouse embryoid bodies (mEBs) and C2C12 spheroids in the hydrogels, and verify their viability. This robust and flexible in vitro platform can enable various applications in stem cell differentiation and tissue engineering by mimicking elements of the native 3D in vivo cellular micro-environment. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Three-dimensional atomic mapping of hydrogenated polymorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wanghua, E-mail: wanghua.chen@polytechnique.edu; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere [LPICM, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Pareige, Philippe [GPM, CNRS, Université et INSA de Rouen, Normandie Université, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France)

    2016-06-20

    Hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H) is a nanostructured material consisting of silicon nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous silicon matrix. Its use as the intrinsic layer in thin film p-i-n solar cells has led to good cell properties in terms of stability and efficiency. Here, we have been able to assess directly the concentration and distribution of nanocrystals and impurities (dopants) in p-i-n solar cells, by using femtosecond laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT). An effective sample preparation method for APT characterization is developed. Based on the difference in atomic density between hydrogenated amorphous and crystalline silicon, we are able to distinguish the nanocrystals from the amorphous matrix by using APT. Moreover, thanks to the three-dimensional reconstruction, we demonstrate that Si nanocrystals are homogeneously distributed in the entire intrinsic layer of the solar cell. The influence of the process pressure on the incorporation of nanocrystals and their distribution is also investigated. Thanks to APT we could determine crystalline fractions as low as 4.2% in the pm-Si:H films, which is very difficult to determine by standard techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Moreover, we also demonstrate a sharp p/i interface in our solar cells.

  4. Three-dimensional culture conditions lead to decreased radiation induced cytotoxicity in human mammary epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowa, Marianne B.; Chrisler, William B.; Zens, Kyra D.; Ashjian, Emily J.; Opresko, Lee K.

    2010-01-01

    For both targeted and non-targeted exposures, the cellular responses to ionizing radiation have predominantly been measured in two-dimensional monolayer cultures. Although convenient for biochemical analysis, the true interactions in vivo depend upon complex interactions between cells themselves and the surrounding extracellular matrix. This study directly compares the influence of culture conditions on radiation induced cytotoxicity following exposure to low-LET ionizing radiation. Using a three-dimensional (3D) human mammary epithelial tissue model, we have found a protective effect of 3D cell culture on cell survival after irradiation. The initial state of the cells (i.e., 2D versus 3D culture) at the time of irradiation does not alter survival, nor does the presence of extracellular matrix during and after exposure to dose, but long term culture in 3D which offers significant reduction in cytotoxicity at a given dose (e.g. ∼4-fold increased survival at 5 Gy). The cell cycle delay induced following exposure to 2 and 5 Gy was almost identical between 2D and 3D culture conditions and cannot account for the observed differences in radiation responses. However the amount of apoptosis following radiation exposure is significantly decreased in 3D culture relative to the 2D monolayer after the same dose. A likely mechanism of the cytoprotective effect afforded by 3D culture conditions is the down regulation of radiation induced apoptosis in 3D structures.

  5. Three dimensional extrusion printing induces polymer molecule alignment and cell organization within engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ting; Ringel, Julia P; Lim, Casey G; Bracaglia, Laura G; Noshin, Maeesha; Baker, Hannah B; Powell, Douglas A; Fisher, John P

    2018-04-16

    Proper cell-material interactions are critical to remain cell function and thus successful tissue regeneration. Many fabrication processes have been developed to create microenvironments to control cell attachment and organization on a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold. However, these approaches often involve heavy engineering and only the surface layer can be patterned. We found that 3D extrusion based printing at high temperature and pressure will result an aligned effect on the polymer molecules, and this molecular arrangement will further induce the cell alignment and different differentiation capacities. In particular, articular cartilage tissue is known to have zonal collagen fiber and cell orientation to support different functions, where collagen fibers and chondrocytes align parallel, randomly, and perpendicular, respectively, to the surface of the joint. Therefore, cell alignment was evaluated in a cartilage model in this study. We used small angle X-ray scattering analysis to substantiate the polymer molecule alignment phenomenon. The cellular response was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Seeded mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) showed different morphology and orientation on scaffolds, as a combined result of polymer molecule alignment and printed scaffold patterns. Gene expression results showed improved superficial zonal chondrogenic marker expression in parallel-aligned group. The cell alignment was successfully maintained in the animal model after 7 days with distinct MSC morphology between the casted and parallel printed scaffolds. This 3D printing induced polymer and cell alignment will have a significant impact on developing scaffold with controlled cell-material interactions for complex tissue engineering while avoiding complicated surface treatment, and therefore provides new concept for effective tissue repairing in future clinical applications. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Fabrication of three-dimensional porous cell-laden hydrogel for tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Chang Mo; Sant, Shilpa; Masaeli, Mahdokht; Kachouie, Nezamoddin N; Zamanian, Behnam; Khademhosseini, Ali; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2010-01-01

    For tissue engineering applications, scaffolds should be porous to enable rapid nutrient and oxygen transfer while providing a three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment for the encapsulated cells. This dual characteristic can be achieved by fabrication of porous hydrogels that contain encapsulated cells. In this work, we developed a simple method that allows cell encapsulation and pore generation inside alginate hydrogels simultaneously. Gelatin beads of 150-300 μm diameter were used as a sacrificial porogen for generating pores within cell-laden hydrogels. Gelation of gelatin at low temperature (4 0 C) was used to form beads without chemical crosslinking and their subsequent dissolution after cell encapsulation led to generation of pores within cell-laden hydrogels. The pore size and porosity of the scaffolds were controlled by the gelatin bead size and their volume ratio, respectively. Fabricated hydrogels were characterized for their internal microarchitecture, mechanical properties and permeability. Hydrogels exhibited a high degree of porosity with increasing gelatin bead content in contrast to nonporous alginate hydrogel. Furthermore, permeability increased by two to three orders while compressive modulus decreased with increasing porosity of the scaffolds. Application of these scaffolds for tissue engineering was tested by encapsulation of hepatocarcinoma cell line (HepG2). All the scaffolds showed similar cell viability; however, cell proliferation was enhanced under porous conditions. Furthermore, porous alginate hydrogels resulted in formation of larger spheroids and higher albumin secretion compared to nonporous conditions. These data suggest that porous alginate hydrogels may have provided a better environment for cell proliferation and albumin production. This may be due to the enhanced mass transfer of nutrients, oxygen and waste removal, which is potentially beneficial for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications.

  7. Three-dimensional visualization and quantification for the growth and invasion of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihito Shimazu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent advance in three-dimensional (3D imaging technology allows us to inspect visually and quantitatively the architecture of complex biological tissues and pathological lesions. We initiated histology-based 3D reconstruction of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC in order to collect quantitative information of diagnostic value regarding cancer invasion and prognosis. The basic procedures for 3D reconstruction are: preparation of serial histological sections in combination with immunostaining of cell/tissue constituents of interest, alignment and superposition of digitized images, computer-assisted color segmentation of labeled targets, and finally viewing and morphometric analysis of the reconstruct. Our past experience showed that cytokeratin-positive tumor parenchyma can be segmented readily from the surrounding stroma with the aid of Image-J and RATOC TRI-SRF2 software. Cytoplasm/nucleus segmentation of individual SCC cells was also feasible at higher magnifications, leading to quantitative analysis of several histological parameters in tissue space, e.g., parenchyma and stroma volume, nuclear numbers and nuclear/cytoplasm volume ratio, as well as proliferation activity of cancer cells by counting separately the number of Ki-67 positive and negative nuclei in the parenchyma. The results support the wide potential usage and advantage of histology-based 3D reconstruction in cancer biology understanding and pathological diagnosis.

  8. A high-resolution map of the three-dimensional chromatin interactome in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Fulai; Li, Yan; Dixon, Jesse R; Selvaraj, Siddarth; Ye, Zhen; Lee, Ah Young; Yen, Chia-An; Schmitt, Anthony D; Espinoza, Celso A; Ren, Bing

    2013-11-14

    A large number of cis-regulatory sequences have been annotated in the human genome, but defining their target genes remains a challenge. One strategy is to identify the long-range looping interactions at these elements with the use of chromosome conformation capture (3C)-based techniques. However, previous studies lack either the resolution or coverage to permit a whole-genome, unbiased view of chromatin interactions. Here we report a comprehensive chromatin interaction map generated in human fibroblasts using a genome-wide 3C analysis method (Hi-C). We determined over one million long-range chromatin interactions at 5-10-kb resolution, and uncovered general principles of chromatin organization at different types of genomic features. We also characterized the dynamics of promoter-enhancer contacts after TNF-α signalling in these cells. Unexpectedly, we found that TNF-α-responsive enhancers are already in contact with their target promoters before signalling. Such pre-existing chromatin looping, which also exists in other cell types with different extracellular signalling, is a strong predictor of gene induction. Our observations suggest that the three-dimensional chromatin landscape, once established in a particular cell type, is relatively stable and could influence the selection or activation of target genes by a ubiquitous transcription activator in a cell-specific manner.

  9. Nonlinear optical microscopy reveals invading endothelial cells anisotropically alter three-dimensional collagen matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, P.-F.; Yeh, Alvin T.; Bayless, Kayla J.

    2009-01-01

    The interactions between endothelial cells (ECs) and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are fundamental in mediating various steps of angiogenesis, including cell adhesion, migration and sprout formation. Here, we used a noninvasive and non-destructive nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) technique to optically image endothelial sprouting morphogenesis in three-dimensional (3D) collagen matrices. We simultaneously captured signals from collagen fibers and endothelial cells using second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF), respectively. Dynamic 3D imaging revealed EC interactions with collagen fibers along with quantifiable alterations in collagen matrix density elicited by EC movement through and morphogenesis within the matrix. Specifically, we observed increased collagen density in the area between bifurcation points of sprouting structures and anisotropic increases in collagen density around the perimeter of lumenal structures, but not advancing sprout tips. Proteinase inhibition studies revealed membrane-associated matrix metalloproteinase were utilized for sprout advancement and lumen expansion. Rho-associated kinase (p160ROCK) inhibition demonstrated that the generation of cell tension increased collagen matrix alterations. This study followed sprouting ECs within a 3D matrix and revealed that the advancing structures recognize and significantly alter their extracellular environment at the periphery of lumens as they progress

  10. Three-dimensional printing of human skeletal muscle cells: An interdisciplinary approach for studying biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, James R; Galpin, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Interdisciplinary exploration is vital to education in the 21st century. This manuscript outlines an innovative laboratory-based teaching method that combines elements of biochemistry/molecular biology, kinesiology/health science, computer science, and manufacturing engineering to give students the ability to better conceptualize complex biological systems. Here, we utilize technology available at most universities to print three-dimensional (3D) scale models of actual human muscle cells (myofibers) out of bioplastic materials. The same methodological approach could be applied to nearly any cell type or molecular structure. This advancement is significant because historically, two-dimensional (2D) myocellular images have proven insufficient for detailed analysis of organelle organization and morphology. 3D imaging fills this void by providing accurate and quantifiable myofiber structural data. Manipulating tangible 3D models combats 2D limitation and gives students new perspectives and alternative learning experiences that may assist their understanding. This approach also exposes learners to 1) human muscle cell extraction and isolation, 2) targeted fluorescence labeling, 3) confocal microscopy, 4) image processing (via open-source software), and 5) 3D printing bioplastic scale-models (×500 larger than the actual cells). Creating these physical models may further student's interest in the invisible world of molecular and cellular biology. Furthermore, this interdisciplinary laboratory project gives instructors of all biological disciplines a new teaching tool to foster integrative thinking. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. BioSig3D: High Content Screening of Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal Cagatay Bilgin

    Full Text Available BioSig3D is a computational platform for high-content screening of three-dimensional (3D cell culture models that are imaged in full 3D volume. It provides an end-to-end solution for designing high content screening assays, based on colony organization that is derived from segmentation of nuclei in each colony. BioSig3D also enables visualization of raw and processed 3D volumetric data for quality control, and integrates advanced bioinformatics analysis. The system consists of multiple computational and annotation modules that are coupled together with a strong use of controlled vocabularies to reduce ambiguities between different users. It is a web-based system that allows users to: design an experiment by defining experimental variables, upload a large set of volumetric images into the system, analyze and visualize the dataset, and either display computed indices as a heatmap, or phenotypic subtypes for heterogeneity analysis, or download computed indices for statistical analysis or integrative biology. BioSig3D has been used to profile baseline colony formations with two experiments: (i morphogenesis of a panel of human mammary epithelial cell lines (HMEC, and (ii heterogeneity in colony formation using an immortalized non-transformed cell line. These experiments reveal intrinsic growth properties of well-characterized cell lines that are routinely used for biological studies. BioSig3D is being released with seed datasets and video-based documentation.

  12. Physically-induced cytoskeleton remodeling of cells in three-dimensional culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Lin Lee

    Full Text Available Characterizing how cells in three-dimensional (3D environments or natural tissues respond to biophysical stimuli is a longstanding challenge in biology and tissue engineering. We demonstrate a strategy to monitor morphological and mechanical responses of contractile fibroblasts in a 3D environment. Cells responded to stretch through specific, cell-wide mechanisms involving staged retraction and reinforcement. Retraction responses occurred for all orientations of stress fibers and cellular protrusions relative to the stretch direction, while reinforcement responses, including extension of cellular processes and stress fiber formation, occurred predominantly in the stretch direction. A previously unreported role of F-actin clumps was observed, with clumps possibly acting as F-actin reservoirs for retraction and reinforcement responses during stretch. Responses were consistent with a model of cellular sensitivity to local physical cues. These findings suggest mechanisms for global actin cytoskeleton remodeling in non-muscle cells and provide insight into cellular responses important in pathologies such as fibrosis and hypertension.

  13. Downregulation of Connective Tissue Growth Factor by Three-Dimensional Matrix Enhances Ovarian Carcinoma Cell Invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbolina, Maria V.; Adley, Brian P.; Kelly, David L.; Shepard, Jaclyn; Fought, Angela J.; Scholtens, Denise; Penzes, Peter; Shea, Lonnie D.; Sharon Stack, M

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) is a leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy, due mainly to the prevalence of undetected metastatic disease. The process of cell invasion during intra-peritoneal anchoring of metastatic lesions requires concerted regulation of many processes, including modulation of adhesion to the extracellular matrix and localized invasion. Exploratory cDNA microarray analysis of early response genes (altered after 4 hours of 3-dimensional collagen culture) coupled with confirmatory real-time RT-PCR, multiple three-dimensional cell culture matrices, Western blot, immunostaining, adhesion, migration, and invasion assays were used to identify modulators of adhesion pertinent to EOC progression and metastasis. cDNA microarray analysis indicated a dramatic downregulation of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in EOC cells placed in invasion-mimicking conditions (3-dimensional type I collagen). Examination of human EOC specimens revealed that CTGF expression was absent in 46% of the tested samples (n=41), but was present in 100% of normal ovarian epithelium samples (n=7). Reduced CTGF expression occurs in many types of cells and may be a general phenomenon displayed by cells encountering a 3D environment. CTGF levels were inversely correlated with invasion such that downregulation of CTGF increased, while its upregulation reduced, collagen invasion. Cells adhered preferentially to a surface comprised of both collagen I and CTGF relative to either component alone using α6β1 and α3β1 integrins. Together these data suggest that downregulation of CTGF in EOC cells may be important for cell invasion through modulation of cell-matrix adhesion. PMID:19382180

  14. Three-dimensional Huh7 cell culture system for the study of Hepatitis C virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uprichard Susan L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to elucidate how Hepatitis C Virus (HCV interacts with polarized hepatocytes in vivo and how HCV-induced alterations in cellular function contribute to HCV-associated liver disease, a more physiologically relevant hepatocyte culture model is needed. As such, NASA-engineered three-dimensional (3-D rotating wall vessel (RWV bioreactors were used in effort to promote differentiation of HCV-permissive Huh7 hepatoma cells. Results When cultured in the RWV, Huh7 cells became morphologically and transcriptionally distinct from more standard Huh7 two-dimensional (2-D monolayers. Specifically, RWV-cultured Huh7 cells formed complex, multilayered 3-D aggregates in which Phase I and Phase II xenobiotic drug metabolism genes, as well as hepatocyte-specific transcripts (HNF4α, Albumin, TTR and α1AT, were upregulated compared to 2-D cultured Huh7 cells. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that these HCV-permissive 3-D cultured Huh7 cells were more polarized than their 2D counterparts with the expression of HCV receptors, cell adhesion and tight junction markers (CD81, scavenger receptor class B member 1, claudin-1, occludin, ZO-1, β-Catenin and E-Cadherin significantly increased and exhibiting apical, lateral and/or basolateral localization. Conclusion These findings show that when cultured in 3-D, Huh7 cells acquire a more differentiated hepatocyte-like phenotype. Importantly, we show that these 3D cultures are highly permissive for HCV infection, thus providing an opportunity to study HCV entry and the effects of HCV infection on host cell function in a more physiologically relevant cell culture system.

  15. Profiling stem cell states in three-dimensional biomaterial niches using high content image informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, Anandika; Brenner, Matthew; Wolujewicz, Paul; Zhang, Zheng; Mao, Yong; Batish, Mona; Kohn, Joachim; Moghe, Prabhas V

    2016-11-01

    materials relies on technologies that can sensitively discern cell response dynamics to biomaterials, while capturing cell-to-cell heterogeneity and preserving cellular native phenotypes. In this study, we illustrate the application of a novel high content image informatics platform to classify emergent human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) phenotypes in a diverse range of 3-D biomaterial scaffolds with high sensitivity and precision, and track cell responses to varied external stimuli. A major in silico innovation is the proposed image profiling technology based on unique three dimensional textural signatures of a mechanoreporter protein within the nuclei of stem cells cultured in 3-D scaffolds. This technology will accelerate the pace of high-fidelity biomaterial screening. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Advanced three-dimensional culture of equine intestinal epithelial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A Stieler; Freund, J M; Gonzalez, L M

    2018-03-01

    Intestinal epithelial stem cells are critical to epithelial repair following gastrointestinal injury. The culture of intestinal stem cells has quickly become a cornerstone of a vast number of new research endeavours that range from determining tissue viability to testing drug efficacy for humans. This study aims to describe the methods of equine stem cell culture and highlights the future benefits of these techniques for the advancement of equine medicine. To describe the isolation and culture of small intestinal stem cells into three-dimensional (3D) enteroids in horses without clinical gastrointestinal abnormalities. Descriptive study. Intestinal samples were collected by sharp dissection immediately after euthanasia. Intestinal crypts containing intestinal stem cells were dissociated from the underlying tissue layers, plated in a 3D matrix and supplemented with growth factors. After several days, resultant 3D enteroids were prepared for immunofluorescent imaging and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis to detect and characterise specific cell types present. Intestinal crypts were cryopreserved immediately following collection and viability assessed. Intestinal crypts were successfully cultured and matured into 3D enteroids containing a lumen and budding structures. Immunofluorescence and PCR were used to confirm the existence of stem cells and all post mitotic, mature cell types, described to exist in the horse intestinal epithelium. Previously frozen crypts were successfully cultured following a freeze-thaw cycle. Tissues were all derived from normal horses. Application of this technique for the study of specific disease was not performed at this time. The successful culture of equine intestinal crypts into 3D "mini-guts" allows for in vitro studies of the equine intestine. Additionally, these results have relevance to future development of novel therapies that harness the regenerative potential of equine intestine in horses with gastrointestinal disease

  17. Three-dimensional anode engineering for the direct methanol fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, A.; Oloman, C.W.; Gyenge, E.L. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of British Columbia, 2360 East Mall, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2009-09-05

    Catalyzed graphite felt three-dimensional anodes were investigated in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) operated with sulfuric acid supporting electrolyte. With a conventional serpentine channel flow field the preferred anode thickness was 100 {mu}m, while a novel flow-by anode showed the best performance with a thickness of 200-300 {mu}m. The effects of altering the methanol concentration, anolyte flow rate and operating temperature on the fuel cell superficial power density were studied by full (2{sup 3} + 1) factorial experiments on a cell with anode area of 5 cm{sup 2} and excess oxidant O{sub 2} at 200 kPa(abs). For operation in the flow-by mode with 2 M methanol at 2 cm{sup 3} min{sup -1} and 353 K the peak power density was 2380 W m{sup -2} with a PtRuMo anode catalyst, while a PtRu catalyst yielded 2240 W m{sup -2} under the same conditions. (author)

  18. A three-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell methodology on unstructured Delaunay-Voronoi grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatsonis, Nikolaos A.; Spirkin, Anton

    2009-01-01

    The mathematical formulation and computational implementation of a three-dimensional particle-in-cell methodology on unstructured Delaunay-Voronoi tetrahedral grids is presented. The method allows simulation of plasmas in complex domains and incorporates the duality of the Delaunay-Voronoi in all aspects of the particle-in-cell cycle. Charge assignment and field interpolation weighting schemes of zero- and first-order are formulated based on the theory of long-range constraints. Electric potential and fields are derived from a finite-volume formulation of Gauss' law using the Voronoi-Delaunay dual. Boundary conditions and the algorithms for injection, particle loading, particle motion, and particle tracking are implemented for unstructured Delaunay grids. Error and sensitivity analysis examines the effects of particles/cell, grid scaling, and timestep on the numerical heating, the slowing-down time, and the deflection times. The problem of current collection by cylindrical Langmuir probes in collisionless plasmas is used for validation. Numerical results compare favorably with previous numerical and analytical solutions for a wide range of probe radius to Debye length ratios, probe potentials, and electron to ion temperature ratios. The versatility of the methodology is demonstrated with the simulation of a complex plasma microsensor, a directional micro-retarding potential analyzer that includes a low transparency micro-grid.

  19. Three-dimensional spheroid culture promotes odonto/osteoblastic differentiation of dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mioko; Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Takashino, Nami; Koizumi, Yu; Takimoto, Koyo; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Saito, Masahiro; Suda, Hideaki

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) spheroid culture is a method for creating 3D aggregations of cells and their extracellular matrix without a scaffold mimicking the actual tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of 3D spheroid culture on the phenotype of immortalized mouse dental papilla cells (MDPs) that have the ability to differentiate into odontoblasts. We cultured MDPs for 1, 3, 7, and 14 days in 96-well low-attachment culture plates for 3D spheroid culture or flat-bottomed plates for two-dimensional (2D) monolayer culture. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were detected by immunohistochemical staining of Ki67 and cleaved caspase-3, respectively. Hypoxia was measured by the hypoxia probe LOX-1. Odonto/osteoblastic differentiation marker gene expression was evaluated by quantitative PCR. We also determined mineralized nodule formation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and dentine matrix protein-1 (DMP1) expression. Vinculin and integrin signalling-related proteins were detected immunohistochemically. Odonto/osteoblastic marker gene expression and mineralized nodule formation were significantly up-regulated in 3D spheroid-cultured MDPs compared with those in 2D monolayer-cultured MDPs (podonto/osteoblastic differentiation of MDPs, which may be mediated by integrin signalling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Three-dimensional piezoelectric fibrous scaffolds selectively promote mesenchymal stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaraju, Sita M; Shen, Yueyang; Elele, Ezinwa; Khusid, Boris; Eshghinejad, Ahmad; Li, Jiangyu; Jaffe, Michael; Arinzeh, Treena Livingston

    2017-12-01

    The discovery of electric fields in biological tissues has led to efforts in developing technologies utilizing electrical stimulation for therapeutic applications. Native tissues, such as cartilage and bone, exhibit piezoelectric behavior, wherein electrical activity can be generated due to mechanical deformation. Yet, the use of piezoelectric materials have largely been unexplored as a potential strategy in tissue engineering, wherein a piezoelectric biomaterial acts as a scaffold to promote cell behavior and the formation of large tissues. Here we show, for the first time, that piezoelectric materials can be fabricated into flexible, three-dimensional fibrous scaffolds and can be used to stimulate human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and corresponding extracellular matrix/tissue formation in physiological loading conditions. Piezoelectric scaffolds that exhibit low voltage output, or streaming potential, promoted chondrogenic differentiation and piezoelectric scaffolds with a high voltage output promoted osteogenic differentiation. Electromechanical stimulus promoted greater differentiation than mechanical loading alone. Results demonstrate the additive effect of electromechanical stimulus on stem cell differentiation, which is an important design consideration for tissue engineering scaffolds. Piezoelectric, smart materials are attractive as scaffolds for regenerative medicine strategies due to their inherent electrical properties without the need for external power sources for electrical stimulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Three-dimensional bioprinting is not only about cell-laden structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Bo; Xing, Tian-Long; Yin, Rui-Xue; Shi, Yong; Yang, Shi-Mo; Zhang, Wen-Jun

    2016-08-01

    In this review, we focused on a few obstacles that hinder three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting process in tissue engineering. One of the obstacles is the bioinks used to deliver cells. Hydrogels are the most widely used bioink materials; however, they aremechanically weak in nature and cannot meet the requirements for supporting structures, especially when the tissues, such as cartilage, require extracellular matrix to be mechanically strong. Secondly and more importantly, tissue regeneration is not only about building all the components in a way that mimics the structures of living tissues, but also about how to make the constructs function normally in the long term. One of the key issues is sufficient nutrient and oxygen supply to the engineered living constructs. The other is to coordinate the interplays between cells, bioactive agents and extracellular matrix in a natural way. This article reviews the approaches to improve the mechanical strength of hydrogels and their suitability for 3D bioprinting; moreover, the key issues of multiple cell lines coprinting with multiple growth factors, vascularization within engineered living constructs etc. were also reviewed.

  2. Three-dimensional bioprinting is not only about cell-laden structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Bo Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we focused on a few obstacles that hinder three-dimensional (3D bioprinting process in tissue engineering. One of the obstacles is the bioinks used to deliver cells. Hydrogels are the most widely used bioink materials; however, they are mechanically weak in nature and cannot meet the requirements for supporting structures, especially when the tissues, such as cartilage, require extracellular matrix to be mechanically strong. Secondly and more importantly, tissue regeneration is not only about building all the components in a way that mimics the structures of living tissues, but also about how to make the constructs function normally in the long term. One of the key issues is sufficient nutrient and oxygen supply to the engineered living constructs. The other is to coordinate the interplays between cells, bioactive agents and extracellular matrix in a natural way. This article reviews the approaches to improve the mechanical strength of hydrogels and their suitability for 3D bioprinting; moreover, the key issues of multiple cell lines coprinting with multiple growth factors, vascularization within engineered living constructs etc. were also reviewed.

  3. Three-dimensional graphene as gas diffusion layer for micro direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingli; Zhang, Xiaojian; Li, Jianyu; Qi, Gary

    2018-05-01

    The gas diffusion layer (GDL), as an important structure of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), provides a support layer for the catalyst and the fuel and the product channel. Traditionally, the material of GDL is generally carbon paper (CP). In this paper, a new material, namely three-dimensional graphene (3DG) is used as GDL for micro DMFC. The experimental results reveal that the performance of the DMFC has been improved significantly by application of 3DG. The peak powers increase from 25 mW to 31.2 mW and 32 mW by using 3DG as the anode and cathode GDL instead of CP, respectively. The reason may be the decrease of charge and mass transfer resistance of the cell. This means that the unique 3D porous architecture of the 3DG can provide lower contact resistance and sufficient fuel diffusion paths. The output performance of the cell will be further improved when porous metal current collectors is used.

  4. Breast fibroblasts modulate epithelial cell proliferation in three-dimensional in vitro co-culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadlonova, Andrea; Novak, Zdenek; Johnson, Martin R; Bowe, Damon B; Gault, Sandra R; Page, Grier P; Thottassery, Jaideep V; Welch, Danny R; Frost, Andra R

    2005-01-01

    Stromal fibroblasts associated with in situ and invasive breast carcinoma differ phenotypically from fibroblasts associated with normal breast epithelium, and these alterations in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAF) may promote breast carcinogenesis and cancer progression. A better understanding of the changes that occur in fibroblasts during carcinogenesis and their influence on epithelial cell growth and behavior could lead to novel strategies for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. To this end, the effect of CAF and normal breast-associated fibroblasts (NAF) on the growth of epithelial cells representative of pre-neoplastic breast disease was assessed. NAF and CAF were grown with the nontumorigenic MCF10A epithelial cells and their more transformed, tumorigenic derivative, MCF10AT cells, in direct three-dimensional co-cultures on basement membrane material. The proliferation and apoptosis of MCF10A cells and MCF10AT cells were assessed by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeling and TUNEL assay, respectively. Additionally, NAF and CAF were compared for expression of insulin-like growth factor II as a potential mediator of their effects on epithelial cell growth, by ELISA and by quantitative, real-time PCR. In relatively low numbers, both NAF and CAF suppressed proliferation of MCF10A cells. However, only NAF and not CAF significantly inhibited proliferation of the more transformed MCF10AT cells. The degree of growth inhibition varied among NAF or CAF from different individuals. In greater numbers, NAF and CAF have less inhibitory effect on epithelial cell growth. The rate of epithelial cell apoptosis was not affected by NAF or CAF. Mean insulin-like growth factor II levels were not significantly different in NAF versus CAF and did not correlate with the fibroblast effect on epithelial cell proliferation. Both NAF and CAF have the ability to inhibit the growth of pre-cancerous breast epithelial cells. NAF have greater inhibitory capacity than CAF

  5. Generation of Homogenous Three-Dimensional Pancreatic Cancer Cell Spheroids Using an Improved Hanging Drop Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Matthew J; Colbert, Kevin; Keshishian, Vazrik; Ho, Jason; Corr, Stuart J; Curley, Steven A; Godin, Biana

    2016-04-01

    In vitro characterization of tumor cell biology or of potential anticancer drugs is usually performed using tumor cell lines cultured as a monolayer. However, it has been previously shown that three-dimensional (3D) organization of the tumor cells is important to provide insights on tumor biology and transport of therapeutics. Several methods to create 3D tumors in vitro have been proposed, with hanging drop technique being the most simple and, thus, most frequently used. However, in many cell lines this method has failed to form the desired 3D tumor structures. The aim of this study was to design and test an easy-to-use and highly reproducible modification of the hanging drop method for tumor sphere formation by adding methylcellulose polymer. Most pancreatic cancer cells do not form cohesive and manageable spheres when the original hanging drop method is used, thus we investigated these cell lines for our modified hanging drop method. The spheroids produced by this improved technique were analyzed by histology, light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and scanning electron microscopy. Results show that using the proposed simple method; we were able to produce uniform spheroids for all five of the tested human pancreatic cancer cell lines; Panc-1, BxPC-3, Capan-1, MiaPaCa-2, and AsPC-1. We believe that this method can be used as a reliable and reproducible technique to make 3D cancer spheroids for use in tumor biology research and evaluation of therapeutic responses, and for the development of bio-artificial tissues.

  6. A safe and efficient method to retrieve mesenchymal stem cells from three-dimensional fibrin gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Bita; Janson, Isaac A; Kong, Yen P; Putnam, Andrew J

    2014-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) display multipotent characteristics that make them ideal for potential therapeutic applications. MSCs are typically cultured as monolayers on tissue culture plastic, but there is increasing evidence suggesting that they may lose their multipotency over time in vitro and eventually cease to retain any resemblance to in vivo resident MSCs. Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems that more closely recapitulate the physiological environment of MSCs and other cell types are increasingly explored for their capacity to support and maintain the cell phenotypes. In much of our own work, we have utilized fibrin, a natural protein-based material that serves as the provisional extracellular matrix during wound healing. Fibrin has proven to be useful in numerous tissue engineering applications and has been used clinically as a hemostatic material. Its rapid self-assembly driven by thrombin-mediated alteration of fibrinogen makes fibrin an attractive 3D substrate, in which cells can adhere, spread, proliferate, and undergo complex morphogenetic programs. However, there is a significant need for simple cost-effective methods to safely retrieve cells encapsulated within fibrin hydrogels to perform additional analyses or use the cells for therapy. Here, we present a safe and efficient protocol for the isolation of MSCs from 3D fibrin gels. The key ingredient of our successful extraction method is nattokinase, a serine protease of the subtilisin family that has a strong fibrinolytic activity. Our data show that MSCs recovered from 3D fibrin gels using nattokinase are not only viable but also retain their proliferative and multilineage potentials. Demonstrated for MSCs, this method can be readily adapted to retrieve any other cell type from 3D fibrin gel constructs for various applications, including expansion, bioassays, and in vivo implantation.

  7. Microtissues Enhance Smooth Muscle Differentiation and Cell Viability of hADSCs for Three Dimensional Bioprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yipeng

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Smooth muscle differentiated human adipose derived stem cells (hADSCs provide a crucial stem cell source for urinary tissue engineering, but the induction of hADSCs for smooth muscle differentiation still has several issues to overcome, including a relatively long induction time and equipment dependence, which limits access to abundant stem cells within a short period of time for further application. Three-dimensional (3D bioprinting holds great promise in regenerative medicine due to its controllable construction of a designed 3D structure. When evenly mixed with bioink, stem cells can be spatially distributed within a bioprinted 3D structure, thus avoiding drawbacks such as, stem cell detachment in a conventional cell-scaffold strategy. Notwithstanding the advantages mentioned above, cell viability is often compromised during 3D bioprinting, which is often due to pressure during the bioprinting process. The objective of our study was to improve the efficiency of hADSC smooth muscle differentiation and cell viability of a 3D bioprinted structure. Here, we employed the hanging-drop method to generate hADSC microtissues in a smooth muscle inductive medium containing human transforming growth factor β1 and bioprinted the induced microtissues onto a 3D structure. After 3 days of smooth muscle induction, the expression of α-smooth muscle actin and smoothelin was higher in microtissues than in their counterpart monolayer cultured hADSCs, as confirmed by immunofluorescence and western blotting analysis. The semi-quantitative assay showed that the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA was 0.218 ± 0.077 in MTs and 0.082 ± 0.007 in Controls; smoothelin expression was 0.319 ± 0.02 in MTs and 0.178 ± 0.06 in Controls. Induced MTs maintained their phenotype after the bioprinting process. Live/dead and cell count kit 8 assays showed that cell viability and cell proliferation in the 3D structure printed with microtissues were higher at all time

  8. A phasor approach analysis of multiphoton FLIM measurements of three-dimensional cell culture models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakner, P. H.; Möller, Y.; Olayioye, M. A.; Brucker, S. Y.; Schenke-Layland, K.; Monaghan, M. G.

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a useful approach to obtain information regarding the endogenous fluorophores present in biological samples. The concise evaluation of FLIM data requires the use of robust mathematical algorithms. In this study, we developed a user-friendly phasor approach for analyzing FLIM data and applied this method on three-dimensional (3D) Caco-2 models of polarized epithelial luminal cysts in a supporting extracellular matrix environment. These Caco-2 based models were treated with epidermal growth factor (EGF), to stimulate proliferation in order to determine if FLIM could detect such a change in cell behavior. Autofluorescence from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H) in luminal Caco-2 cysts was stimulated by 2-photon laser excitation. Using a phasor approach, the lifetimes of involved fluorophores and their contribution were calculated with fewer initial assumptions when compared to multiexponential decay fitting. The phasor approach simplified FLIM data analysis, making it an interesting tool for non-experts in numerical data analysis. We observed that an increased proliferation stimulated by EGF led to a significant shift in fluorescence lifetime and a significant alteration of the phasor data shape. Our data demonstrates that multiphoton FLIM analysis with the phasor approach is a suitable method for the non-invasive analysis of 3D in vitro cell culture models qualifying this method for monitoring basic cellular features and the effect of external factors.

  9. Three-dimensional WS2 nanosheet networks for H2O2 produced for cell signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Quan, Yingzhou; Zhang, Yueyu; Jiang, Min; Al-Enizi, Abdullah M.; Kong, Biao; An, Tiance; Wang, Wenshuo; Xia, Limin; Gong, Xingao; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an important molecular messenger for cellular signal transduction. The capability of direct probing of H2O2 in complex biological systems can offer potential for elucidating its manifold roles in living systems. Here we report the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) WS2 nanosheet networks with flower-like morphologies on a variety of conducting substrates. The semiconducting WS2 nanosheets with largely exposed edge sites on flexible carbon fibers enable abundant catalytically active sites, excellent charge transfer, and high permeability to chemicals and biomaterials. Thus, the 3D WS2-based nano-bio-interface exhibits a wide detection range, high sensitivity and rapid response time for H2O2, and is capable of visualizing endogenous H2O2 produced in living RAW 264.7 macrophage cells and neurons. First-principles calculations further demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of probing H2O2 is attributed to the efficient and spontaneous H2O2 adsorption on WS2 nanosheet edge sites. The combined features of 3D WS2 nanosheet networks suggest attractive new opportunities for exploring the physiological roles of reactive oxygen species like H2O2 in living systems.Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an important molecular messenger for cellular signal transduction. The capability of direct probing of H2O2 in complex biological systems can offer potential for elucidating its manifold roles in living systems. Here we report the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) WS2 nanosheet networks with flower-like morphologies on a variety of conducting substrates. The semiconducting WS2 nanosheets with largely exposed edge sites on flexible carbon fibers enable abundant catalytically active sites, excellent charge transfer, and high permeability to chemicals and biomaterials. Thus, the 3D WS2-based nano-bio-interface exhibits a wide detection range, high sensitivity and rapid response time for H2O2, and is capable of visualizing endogenous H2O2 produced in

  10. Three-dimensional co-culture facilitates the differentiation of embryonic stem cells into mature cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Dong-Bo; He, Yong; Chen, Rui; Teng, Ji-Wei; Wang, Hong-Tao; Zeng, Di; Liu, Xiong-Tao; Ding, Lu; Huang, Jin-Yan; Zheng, Qiang-Sun

    2011-12-01

    The cardiomyocyte (CM) differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is routinely cultured as two-dimensional (2D) monolayer, which doesn't mimic in vivo physiological environment and may lead to low differentiated level of ESCs. Here, we develop a novel strategy that enhances CM differentiation of ESCs in collagen matrix three-dimensional (3D) culture combined with indirect cardiac fibroblasts co-culture. ESCs were cultured in hanging drops to form embryoid bodies (EBs) and then applied on collagen matrix. The EBs were indirectly co-cultured with cardiac fibroblasts by the hanging cell culture inserts (PET 1 µm). The molecular expressions and ultrastructural characteristics of ESC-derived CMs (ESCMs) were analyzed by real time RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). We found that the percentage of beating EBs with cardiac fibroblasts co-culture was significantly higher than that without co-culture after differentiation period of 8 days. Type I collagen used as 3D substrates enhanced the late-stage CM differentiation of ESCs and had effect on ultrastructural mature of ESCMs in late-stage development. The combined effects of 3D and co-culture that mimic in vivo physiological environment further improved the efficiency of CM differentiation from ESCs, resulting in fiber-like structures of cardiac cells with organized sarcomeric structure in ESCMs. This novel 3D co-culture system emphasizes the fact that the ESC differentiation is actively responding to cues from their environment and those cues can drive phenotypic control, which provides a useful in vitro model to investigate CM differentiation of stem cells. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation on gain saturation effect of microchannel plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Yuan, Zheng; Cao, Zhurong, E-mail: cao33jin@aliyun.com; Deng, Bo; Chen, Tao; Deng, Keli [Research Center of Laser Fusion, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)

    2016-07-15

    We present here the results of the simulation work, using the three-dimensional particle-in-cell method, on the performance of the lead glass microchannel plate under saturated state. We calculated the electron cascade process with different DC bias voltages under both self-consistent condition and non-self-consistent condition. The comparative results have demonstrated that the strong self-consistent field can suppress the cascade process and make the microchannel plate saturated. The simulation results were also compared to the experimental data and good agreement was obtained. The simulation results also show that the electron multiplication process in the channel is accompanied by the buildup process of positive charges in the channel wall. Though the interactions among the secondary electron cloud in the channel, the positive charges in the channel wall, and the external acceleration field can make the electron-surface collision more frequent, the collision energy will be inevitably reduced, thus the electron gain will also be reduced.

  12. Three-dimensional culture of buffalo granulosa cells in hanging drop mimics the preovulatory follicle stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Monica; Agrawal, Himanshu; Pandey, Mamta; Singh, Dheer; Onteru, Suneel K

    2018-03-01

    Granulosa cell (GC) culture models mimicking the intrafollicular environment are limited. Such models have a great potential in reproductive toxicity studies. The buffalo, a monovulatory species like humans, could be a better model than polyovulatory rodents. Therefore, we targeted the development and characterization of three-dimensional (3D) culture systems for buffalo GCs. The GCs from small ovarian follicles (SF) maintained the CYP19 gene expression for 144 hr in a 2D culture system. Hence, GCs from SF were cultured directly in 3D using hanging drop and Poly-([2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate]) (polyHEMA) methods in the DMEM media containing 1 ng/ml FSH and 10 ng/ml IGF-1 for 144 hr. The expression profile of nine GC-specific transcripts; CYP19, TNFAIP6, AMH, PTI, NR4A1, FSHR, RUNX, LHR, and COX2/PTGS2; revealed that 3D-spheroids developed in hanging drop method maintained the GC phenotype of preovulatory follicles. Therefore, hanging drop method is a best method for culturing GCs to mimic the intrafollicular environment. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Three-dimensional cellulose sponge: Fabrication, characterization, biomimetic mineralization, and in vitro cell infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Mahesh Kumar; Pant, Hem Raj; Tiwari, Arjun Prasad; Maharjan, Bikendra; Liao, Nina; Kim, Han Joo; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2016-01-20

    In this study, cellulose based scaffolds were produced by electrospinning of cellulose acetate (CA) solution followed by its saponification with NaOH/ethanol system for 24h. The resulting nonwoven cellulose mat was treated with sodium borohydride (SB) solution. In situ hydrolysis of SB solution into the pores of the membrane produced hydrogen gas resulting a three-dimensional (3D) cellulose sponge. SEM images demonstrated an open porous and loosely packed fibrous mesh compared to the tightly packed single-layered structure of the conventional electrospun membrane. 3D cellulose sponge showed admirable ability to nucleate bioactive calcium phosphate (Ca-P) crystals in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. SEM-EDX and X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the minerals deposited on the nanofibers have the nonstoichiometric composition similar to that of hydroxyapatite, the mineralized component of the bone. 3D cellulose sponge exhibited the better cell infiltration, spreading and proliferation compared to 2D cellulose mat. Therefore, a facile fabrication of 3D cellulose sponge with improved mineralization represents an innovative strategy for the bone tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A novel three-dimensional carbonized PANI1600@CNTs network for enhanced enzymatic biofuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zepeng; Jiao, Kailong; Cheng, Jin; Peng, Ruiyun; Jiao, Shuqiang; Hu, Zongqian

    2018-03-15

    A novel three-dimensional (3D) carbon composite of PANI 1600 @CNTs with rhizobium-like structure is prepared by in-situ polymerization of aniline monomers around and along the functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and then carbonized at 1600°C for enzymatic biofuel cells (EBFCs). The SEM and TEM images clearly show that the carbonized PANI grew seamlessly on the surface of CNTs and presented the rhizobium-like structure. The carbonized PANI acts like conductive "glue" and connects the adjacent tubes together, which can assemble the CNTs into a 3D network. The PANI 1600 @CNTs composite modified glassy carbon electrodes based on glucose oxidase (GOx) and laccase (Lac) exhibit high electrochemical performance. A glucose//O 2 EBFC constitutes of the fabricated anode and cathode performs a maximum power density of 1.12mWcm -2 at 0.45V. Furthermore, three of the fabricated EBFCs in series are able to lightening up a yellow light-emitting diode (LED) whose turn-on voltage is about at 1.8V. This work may be helpful for exploiting novel substrates by carbonizing the composites of conducting polymer with nano materials at high-temperature for immobilization of enzymes in the EBFCs or biosensor fields. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Inertia-dependent dynamics of three-dimensional vesicles and red blood cells in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zheng Yuan; Wang, Shu Qi; He, Long; Xu, Feng; Bai, Bo Feng

    2013-10-28

    A three-dimensional (3D) simulation study of the effect of inertia on the dynamics of vesicles and red blood cells (RBCs) has not been reported. Here, we developed a 3D model based on the front tracking method to investigate how inertia affects the dynamics of spherical/non-spherical vesicles and biconcave-shaped RBCs with the Reynolds number ranging from 0.1 to 10. The results showed that inertia induced non-spherical vesicles transitioned from tumbling to swinging, which was not observed in previous 2D models. The critical viscosity ratio of inner/outer fluids for the tumbling–swinging transition remarkably increased with an increasing Reynolds number. The deformation of vesicles was greatly enhanced by inertia, and the frequency of tumbling and tank-treading was significantly decreased by inertia. We also found that RBCs can transit from tumbling to steady tank-treading through the swinging regime when the Reynolds number increased from 0.1 to 10. These results indicate that inertia needs to be considered at moderate Reynolds number (Re ~ 1) in the study of blood flow in the human body and the flow of deformable particle suspension in inertial microfluidic devices. The developed 3D model provided new insights into the dynamics of RBCs under shear flow, thus holding great potential to better understand blood flow behaviors under normal/disease conditions.

  16. Three-dimensional random resistor-network model for solid oxide fuel cell composite electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbaspour, Ali; Luo Jingli; Nandakumar, K.

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional reconstruction of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) composite electrodes was developed to evaluate the performance and further investigate the effect of microstructure on the performance of SOFC electrodes. Porosity of the electrode is controlled by adding pore former particles (spheres) to the electrode and ignoring them in analysis step. To enhance connectivity between particles and increase the length of triple-phase boundary (TPB), sintering process is mimicked by enlarging particles to certain degree after settling them inside the packing. Geometrical characteristics such as length of TBP and active contact area as well as porosity can easily be calculated using the current model. Electrochemical process is simulated using resistor-network model and complete Butler-Volmer equation is used to deal with charge transfer process on TBP. The model shows that TPBs are not uniformly distributed across the electrode and location of TPBs as well as amount of electrochemical reaction is not uniform. Effects of electrode thickness, particle size ratio, electron and ion conductor conductivities and rate of electrochemical reaction on overall electrochemical performance of electrode are investigated.

  17. Three-dimensional endothelial cell morphogenesis under controlled ion release from copper-doped phosphate glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stähli, Christoph; James-Bhasin, Mark; Nazhat, Showan N

    2015-02-28

    Copper ions represent a promising angiogenic agent but are associated with cytotoxicity at elevated concentrations. Phosphate-based glasses (PGs) exhibit adjustable dissolution properties and allow for controlled ion release. This study examined the formation of capillary-like networks by SVEC4-10 endothelial cells (ECs) seeded in a three-dimensional (3D) type I collagen hydrogel matrix mixed with PG particles of the formulation 50P2O5-30CaO-(20-x)Na2O-xCuO (x=0 and 10 mol%). Copper and total phosphorus release decreased over time and was more sustained in the case of 10% CuO PG. Moreover, increasing the concentration of 10% CuO PG in collagen substantially delayed dissolution along with preferential release of copper. A 3D morphometric characterization method based on confocal laser scanning microscopy image stacks was developed in order to quantify EC network length, connectivity and branching. Network length was initially reduced in a concentration-dependent fashion by 10% CuO PG and, to a lesser extent, by 0% CuO PG, but reached values identical to the non-PG control by day 5 in culture. This reduction was attributed to a PG-mediated decrease in cell metabolic activity while cell proliferation as well as network connectivity and branching were independent of PG content. Gene expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-1 and -2 was up-regulated by PGs, indicating that MMPs did not play a critical role in network growth. The relationship between ion release and EC morphogenesis in 3D provided in this study is expected to contribute to an ultimately successful pro-angiogenic application of CuO-doped PGs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Strontium-doped organic-inorganic hybrids towards three-dimensional scaffolds for osteogenic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, Łukasz, E-mail: lukasz.john@chem.uni.wroc.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Wrocław, 14 F. Joliot-Curie, 50-383 Wrocław (Poland); Podgórska, Marta [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Wrocław, 14 F. Joliot-Curie, 50-383 Wrocław (Poland); Nedelec, Jean-Marie [Université Clermont Auvergne, SIGMA Clermont, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6296, ICCF, F-63178 Aubiere (France); Cwynar-Zając, Łucja [Department of Histology and Embryology, Wrocław Medical University, 6a Chałubińskiego, 50-368 Wrocław (Poland); Dzięgiel, Piotr [Department of Histology and Embryology, Wrocław Medical University, 6a Chałubińskiego, 50-368 Wrocław (Poland); Department of Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy in Conservative and Interventional Medicine, 35 Paderewskiego, 51-612 Wrocław (Poland)

    2016-11-01

    Biomimetic organic–inorganic hybrid bioscaffolds are developed to complement or replace damaged fragments in bone tissue surgery. The aim of this work was to develop a simple and fast method to prepare composite material for bone engineering, avoiding time consuming and complex methodologies. The resulting materials (also called in this work as hybrid composites or hybrid scaffolds) have a three-dimensional macroporous polymer-like network derived from triethoxyvinylsilane (TEVS) and 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) monomers, with incorporated calcium, strontium, and phosphate ions. The materials were fully characterized using FT-IR, biomineralization studies, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, scratch tests, Young's modulus and compressive strength tests, and gas physisorption. We report a comprehensive study on the in vitro effect of novel strontium doped materials on human bone cells. In vitro investigations were conducted using a normal human osteoblast cell line that mimics the cellular events of the in vivo intramembranous bone formation process. The materials do not have a negative impact on the survival of the normal human osteoblasts; moreover, materials doped with strontium show that not only are cells able to survive, but they also attach to and grow on a bioscaffolds surface. For this reason, they may be used in future in vivo experiments. - Highlights: • New hybrid scaffolds derived from TEVS and HEMA doped with Ca{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, and PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} ions have been developed. • A comprehensive characterization of the scaffolds for regenerative medicine was performed. • The incorporation of Sr{sup 2+} ions into the scaffolds was non-cytotoxic to the osteoblasts.

  19. Cytocompatibility of calcium silicate-based sealers in a three-dimensional cell culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; Zaia, Alexandre A; Peters, Ove A

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate cytotoxic effects and cytokine production of calcium silicate-based sealers (EndoSeal, EndoSequence BC Sealer, and MTA Fillapex) using an in vitro root canal filling model and three-dimensional (3D) cell culture. AH Plus as a reference was compared to contemporary calcium silicate cements regarding cell viability and cytokine production. Root canals of 30 human maxillary incisors were prepared using a single-file reciprocating technique. The samples were randomly distributed and canals filled with either AH Plus, EndoSeal, EndoSequence BC Sealer, and MTA Fillapex (n = 6). In the negative control group, the root canal remained unfilled. Sealers were placed into the canals along with a gutta-percha cone placed to working length. Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts, cultured in a type I collagen 3D scaffold, were exposed to filling material and the respective root apex for 24 h. Cytocompatibility of the materials was evaluated using the methyl-thiazoldiphenyl-tetrazolium (MTT) assay. The production of IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 was analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). One-way analysis of variance was performed, and when the F-ratios were significant, data were compared by Duncan's multiple-range test. The alpha-type error was set at 0.05. EndoSeal, Endosequence BC Sealer and AH Plus showed cell viability that was similar to the negative control group (P > 0.05), while MTA Fillapex sealer was cytotoxic (P culture, AH Plus, EndoSeal, and EndoSequence BC Sealer were cytocompatible. These results may suggest that AH Plus, EndoSeal and EndoSequence BC Sealer may achieve better biological response when compared to MTA Fillapex.

  20. Three-Dimensional Environment Sustains Hematopoietic Stem Cell Differentiation into Platelet-Producing Megakaryocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzyk-Nivau, Audrey; Poirault-Chassac, Sonia; Gandrille, Sophie; Derkaoui, Sidi-Mohammed; Kauskot, Alexandre; Letourneur, Didier; Le Visage, Catherine; Baruch, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) differentiate into megakaryocytes (MK), whose function is to release platelets. Attempts to improve in vitro platelet production have been hampered by the low amplification of MK. Providing HSC with an optimal three-dimensional (3D) architecture may favor MK differentiation by mimicking some crucial functions of the bone marrow structure. To this aim, porous hydrogel scaffolds were used to study MK differentiation from HSC as well as platelet production. Flow cytometry, qPCR and perfusion studies showed that 3D was suitable for longer kinetics of CD34+ cell proliferation and for delayed megakaryocytic differentiation far beyond the limited shelf-life observed in liquid culture but also increased production of functional platelets. We provide evidence that these 3D effects were related to 1) persistence of MK progenitors and precursors and 2) prolongation of expression of EKLF and c-myb transcription factors involved in early MK differentiation. In addition, presence of abundant mature MK with increased ploidy and impressive cytoskeleton elongations was in line with expression of NF-E2 transcription factor involved in late MK differentiation. Platelets produced in flow conditions were functional as shown by integrin αIIbβ3 activation following addition of exogenous agonists. This study demonstrates that spatial organization and biological cues synergize to improve MK differentiation and platelet production. Thus, 3D environment constitutes a powerful tool for unraveling the physiological mechanisms of megakaryopoiesis and thrombopoiesis in the bone marrow environment, potentially leading to an improved amplification of MK and platelet production.

  1. Real-time monitoring of cisplatin cytotoxicity on three-dimensional spheroid tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baek NH

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available NamHuk Baek,1,* Ok Won Seo,1,* Jaehwa Lee,1 John Hulme,2 Seong Soo A An2 1Department of Research and Development, NanoEntek Inc., Seoul, 2Department of BioNano Technology, Gachon University, Gyeonggi-do, Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Three-dimensional (3D cell cultivation is a powerful technique for monitoring and understanding diverse cellular mechanisms in developmental cancer and neuronal biology, tissue engineering, and drug development. 3D systems could relate better to in vivo models than two-dimensional (2D cultures. Several factors, such as cell type, survival rate, proliferation rate, and gene and protein expression patterns, determine whether a particular cell line can be adapted to a 3D system. The 3D system may overcome some of the limitations of 2D cultures in terms of cell–cell communication and cell networks, which are essential for understanding differentiation, structural organization, shape, and extended connections with other cells or organs. Here, the effect of the anticancer drug cisplatin, also known as cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II or CDDP, on adenosine triphosphate (ATP generation was investigated using 3D spheroid-forming cells and real-time monitoring for 7 days. First, 12 cell lines were screened for their ability to form 3D spheroids: prostate (DU145, testis (F9, embryonic fibroblast (NIH-3T3, muscle (C2C12, embryonic kidney (293T, neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y, adenocarcinomic alveolar basal epithelial cell (A549, cervical cancer (HeLa, HeLa contaminant (HEp2, pituitary epithelial-like cell (GH3, embryonic cell (PA317, and osteosarcoma (U-2OS cells. Of these, eight cell lines were selected: NIH-3T3, C2C12, 293T, SH-SY5Y, A549, HeLa, PA317, and U-2OS; and five underwent real-time monitoring of CDDP cytotoxicity: HeLa, A549, 293T, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS. ATP generation was blocked 1 day after addition of 50 µM CDDP, but cytotoxicity in HeLa, A549, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS cells could be

  2. Cell origami: self-folding of three-dimensional cell-laden microstructures driven by cell traction force.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Kuribayashi-Shigetomi

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method of generating three-dimensional (3D cell-laden microstructures by applying the principle of origami folding technique and cell traction force (CTF. We harness the CTF as a biological driving force to fold the microstructures. Cells stretch and adhere across multiple microplates. Upon detaching the microplates from a substrate, CTF causes the plates to lift and fold according to a prescribed pattern. This self-folding technique using cells is highly biocompatible and does not involve special material requirements for the microplates and hinges to induce folding. We successfully produced various 3D cell-laden microstructures by just changing the geometry of the patterned 2D plates. We also achieved mass-production of the 3D cell-laden microstructures without causing damage to the cells. We believe that our methods will be useful for biotechnology applications that require analysis of cells in 3D configurations and for self-assembly of cell-based micro-medical devices.

  3. Cell origami: self-folding of three-dimensional cell-laden microstructures driven by cell traction force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuribayashi-Shigetomi, Kaori; Onoe, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a method of generating three-dimensional (3D) cell-laden microstructures by applying the principle of origami folding technique and cell traction force (CTF). We harness the CTF as a biological driving force to fold the microstructures. Cells stretch and adhere across multiple microplates. Upon detaching the microplates from a substrate, CTF causes the plates to lift and fold according to a prescribed pattern. This self-folding technique using cells is highly biocompatible and does not involve special material requirements for the microplates and hinges to induce folding. We successfully produced various 3D cell-laden microstructures by just changing the geometry of the patterned 2D plates. We also achieved mass-production of the 3D cell-laden microstructures without causing damage to the cells. We believe that our methods will be useful for biotechnology applications that require analysis of cells in 3D configurations and for self-assembly of cell-based micro-medical devices.

  4. Principles of the Kenzan Method for Robotic Cell Spheroid-Based Three-Dimensional Bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Nicanor I; Hibino, Narutoshi; Nakayama, Koichi

    2017-06-01

    Bioprinting is a technology with the prospect to change the way many diseases are treated, by replacing the damaged tissues with live de novo created biosimilar constructs. However, after more than a decade of incubation and many proofs of concept, the field is still in its infancy. The current stagnation is the consequence of its early success: the first bioprinters, and most of those that followed, were modified versions of the three-dimensional printers used in additive manufacturing, redesigned for layer-by-layer dispersion of biomaterials. In all variants (inkjet, microextrusion, or laser assisted), this approach is material ("scaffold") dependent and energy intensive, making it hardly compatible with some of the intended biological applications. Instead, the future of bioprinting may benefit from the use of gentler scaffold-free bioassembling methods. A substantial body of evidence has accumulated, indicating this is possible by use of preformed cell spheroids, which have been assembled in cartilage, bone, and cardiac muscle-like constructs. However, a commercial instrument capable to directly and precisely "print" spheroids has not been available until the invention of the microneedles-based ("Kenzan") spheroid assembling and the launching in Japan of a bioprinter based on this method. This robotic platform laces spheroids into predesigned contiguous structures with micron-level precision, using stainless steel microneedles ("kenzans") as temporary support. These constructs are further cultivated until the spheroids fuse into cellular aggregates and synthesize their own extracellular matrix, thus attaining the needed structural organization and robustness. This novel technology opens wide opportunities for bioengineering of tissues and organs.

  5. Preliminary results of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yingjie; Wang Luhua; Wang Xin; Feng Qinfu; Zhang Hongxing; Xiao Zefen; Yin Weibo

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effects and complications of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Between March 1999 and September 2003, 91 NSCLC patients treated with 3DCRT were reviewed at the Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. This patient cohort consisted of 73 men and 18 women. The median age was 66 years. Radio-therapy was delivered at 2 Gy fraction, 5 fractions per week. The median total dose was 60 Gy. Results: With a median follow-up time of 17 months, the response rate after 3DCRT was 57.1%, with complete remission 11.0% (10/91) and partial remission 46.2%(42/91). The median survival time (MST) was 16 months, with 1- and 2- year overall survivals (OS) of 67.0% and 32.6%, 1- and 2-year local progression free survivals (LPFS) of 82.6% and 53.0%, respectively. The independent adverse prognostic factors by univariate analysis and multivariate analysis was weight loss ≥5%. Grade 2 acute radiation pneumonitis was observed in 2 patients and grade 3 in 4 patients. Late lung injury developed in 1 patient with grade 2, 1 patient with grade 3, respectively. Acute radiation esophagitis was observed in 8 patients with grade 2. Acute grade 2 hematologic toxicity developed in 5 patients. Conclusions: 3DCRT was feasible in the treatment of NSCLC with good immediate tumor response and acceptable normal tissue complication. The total dose may potentially be increased. (authors)

  6. Hepatic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in a Perfused Three-Dimensional Multicompartment Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Freyer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The hepatic differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC holds great potential for application in regenerative medicine, pharmacological drug screening, and toxicity testing. However, full maturation of hiPSC into functional hepatocytes has not yet been achieved. In this study, we investigated the potential of a dynamic three-dimensional (3D hollow fiber membrane bioreactor technology to improve the hepatic differentiation of hiPSC in comparison to static two-dimensional (2D cultures. A total of 100 × 106 hiPSC were seeded into each 3D bioreactor (n = 3. Differentiation into definitive endoderm (DE was induced by adding activin A, Wnt3a, and sodium butyrate to the culture medium. For further maturation, hepatocyte growth factor and oncostatin M were added. The same differentiation protocol was applied to hiPSC maintained in 2D cultures. Secretion of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP, a marker for DE, was significantly (p < 0.05 higher in 2D cultures, while secretion of albumin, a typical characteristic for mature hepatocytes, was higher after hepatic differentiation of hiPSC in 3D bioreactors. Functional analysis of multiple cytochrome P450 (CYP isoenzymes showed activity of CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4 in both groups, although at a lower level compared to primary human hepatocytes (PHH. CYP2B6 activities were significantly (p < 0.05 higher in 3D bioreactors compared with 2D cultures, which is in line with results from gene expression. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the majority of cells was positive for albumin, cytokeratin 18 (CK18, and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-alpha (HNF4A at the end of the differentiation process. In addition, cytokeratin 19 (CK19 staining revealed the formation of bile duct-like structures in 3D bioreactors similar to native liver tissue. The results indicate a better maturation of hiPSC in the 3D bioreactor system compared to 2D cultures and emphasize the potential of dynamic 3D culture

  7. Three-dimensional counting of morphologically normal human red blood cells via digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Faliu; Moon, Inkyu; Lee, Yeon H.

    2015-01-01

    Counting morphologically normal cells in human red blood cells (RBCs) is extremely beneficial in the health care field. We propose a three-dimensional (3-D) classification method of automatically determining the morphologically normal RBCs in the phase image of multiple human RBCs that are obtained by off-axis digital holographic microscopy (DHM). The RBC holograms are first recorded by DHM, and then the phase images of multiple RBCs are reconstructed by a computational numerical algorithm. To design the classifier, the three typical RBC shapes, which are stomatocyte, discocyte, and echinocyte, are used for training and testing. Nonmain or abnormal RBC shapes different from the three normal shapes are defined as the fourth category. Ten features, including projected surface area, average phase value, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, perimeter, mean corpuscular hemoglobin surface density, circularity, mean phase of center part, sphericity coefficient, elongation, and pallor, are extracted from each RBC after segmenting the reconstructed phase images by using a watershed transform algorithm. Moreover, four additional properties, such as projected surface area, perimeter, average phase value, and elongation, are measured from the inner part of each cell, which can give significant information beyond the previous 10 features for the separation of the RBC groups; these are verified in the experiment by the statistical method of Hotelling's T-square test. We also apply the principal component analysis algorithm to reduce the dimension number of variables and establish the Gaussian mixture densities using the projected data with the first eight principal components. Consequently, the Gaussian mixtures are used to design the discriminant functions based on Bayesian decision theory. To improve the performance of the Bayes classifier and the accuracy of estimation of its error rate, the leaving-one-out technique is applied. Experimental results show that the proposed method can

  8. Promising survival with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, John; Raben, Adam; Zelefsky, Michael; Burt, Michael; Leibel, Steve; Burman, Chandra; Kutcher, Gerard; Harrison, Louis; Hahn, Cathy; Ginsberg, Robert; Rusch, Valerie; Kris, Mark; Fuks, Zvi

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Local failure is a major obstacle to the cure of locally advanced non small-cell lung cancer. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-DCRT) selects optimal treatment parameters to increase dose to tumor and reduce normal tissue dose, potentially representing an enhancement of the therapeutic ratio of radiation therapy for lung cancer. We performed this analysis of 45 non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with 3-DCRT alone, to evaluate the ability of computer derived lung dose volume histograms to predict serious pulmonary toxicity, to assess the feasibility of this approach, and to examine the resulting survival. Methods: There were 28 males (62%) and 17 females (38%). The median age was 65 (range: 38-82). Tumor stage was Stage I/II in 13%, IIIa in 42%, and IIIb in 44%. The histology was squamous in 44%, adenocarcinoma in 36%, and other non-small cell histologies in the others. Only 47% of patients. had combined favorable prognostic factors (i.e. KPS ≤ 80, and ≤5% wt. loss). The median dose of radiation to gross disease was 70.2 Gy (range: 52.2-72 Gy) delivered in fractions of 1.8 Gy, 5 days per week. Results: Seven patients did not complete 3-DCRT due to disease progression outside the port. Follow-up data are mature: the median follow up of the 6 survivors is 43.5 months (35-59). Thoracic progression occurred in 46%. Median survival (all 45 patients.) is 15.7 months and survival is 32% at 2 years and 12% at 59 months. Pulmonary toxicity ≥grade 3 occurred in 9% of patients. Dose volume histograms were available in 31 patients and showed a correlation between risk of pulmonary toxicity and indices of dose to lung parenchyma. Grade 3 or higher pulmonary toxicity occurred in 38% ((3(8))) of patients with >30% of lung volume receiving ≥25 Gy, versus 4% ((1(23))) of patients with ≤30% lung receiving ≥25 Gy (P = 0.04). Grade 3 or higher pulmonary toxicity occurred in 29% ((4(14))) of patients with a predicted pulmonary normal tissue

  9. Cytokeratin expression of engrafted three-dimensional culture tissues using epithelial cells derived from porcine periodontal ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Rie; Kitajima, Kayoko; Arai, Kyoko; Igarashi, Masaru

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the differentiation and proliferation of epithelial cells derived from periodontal ligaments after three-dimensional culture using collagen gel with fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo. Epithelial cells and fibroblasts were derived from porcine periodontal ligaments. Epithelial cells were labeled using a fluorescent red membrane marker (PKH-26GL) and were seeded onto collagen gel with fibroblasts, followed by incubation in an air-liquid interface for 7 days. Three-dimensional cultures were grafted onto the backs of nude mice and removed at 1, 7, and 14 days after surgery (in vivo model). Unfixed sections (5 μm) were used to detect the presence of red fluorescent cells. Paraffin sections were analyzed histologically and immunohistochemically. Specimens were compared with three-dimensional culture tissues at 8, 14 and 21 days (in vitro model). Grafted three-dimensional cultures formed a stratified epithelial structure similar to skin in vivo. Epithelial cells were sequenced in basal-layer-like structures at 14 days in vivo. Immunohistochemical findings showed that the expression of cytokeratin was detected in the epithelial layer in in vitro and in vivo models. Ck8 + 18 + 19 was expressed in the upper epithelial layer in the in vitro model at 14 and 21 days, but not in vivo. Involucrin was expressed in the certified layers in vitro at 14 days, but not in vivo. Laminin was detected at the dermo-epidermal junction in vivo at 7 and 14 days, but not in vitro. These results suggest that differentiation of three-dimensional culture tissues differs in vivo and in vitro. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Three-dimensional analysis of micro- and nanostructure of biomaterials and cells by method of scanning probe nanotomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Efimov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to perform a three-dimensional analysis of micro- and nanosctucture and quantitative morphological parameters of alginate spherical microcarriers and porous regenerated silk macrocarriers modifi ed by microparticles of decellularized rat liver matrix and human hepatoma HepG2 cells adhered to micro- and macro carriers. Materials and methods. Three-dimensional porous matrices made from regenerated silk by salt leaching technique and alginate spherical microcarriers fabricated by encapsulation were vitalized by human hepatome HepG2 cells. Study of three-dimensional structure of cells and micro- and macro carriers was carried out at –120 °С by scanning probe cryonanotomography technique with use of experimental setup combining cryoultramicrotome and scanning probe microscope.Results. Three-dimensional nanotomographical reconstructions of HepG2 cells adhered to macropore wall of regenerated silk macrocarrier and to spherical alginate microcarrier are obtained. Morphological parameters (mean roughness, effective surface area and autocorrelation length are determined for surfaces of macro and microcarriers and adhered cells. The determined mean roughness of alginate microcarrier surface is 76.4 ± 7.5 nm, while that of surface of macropore wall of regenerated silk macrocarrier is 133.8 ± 16.2 nm. At the same time mean roughness of cells adhered to micro- and macrocarriers are 118.5 ± 9.0 и 158.8 ± 21.6 nm correspondingly. Three-dimensional reconstructions of intracellular compartments with dimensions from 140 to 500 nm are also obtained.Conclusion. Obtained as a result of study quantitative morphology characteristics of surfaces of cell carriers and adhered cells show signifi cant degree of correlation of morphological parameters of cells and their carriers. Use of scanning probe cryonanotomography technique for three-dimensional analysis of structure and characteristics of biomaterials, cells and bio-artifi cial cellular systems

  11. Study of the cell activity in three-dimensional cell culture by using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunngam, Pakajiraporn; Mahardika, Anggara; Hiroko, Matsuyoshi; Andriana, Bibin Bintang; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a estimation technique of local cell activity in cultured 3D cell aggregate with gelatin hydrogel microspheres by using Raman spectroscopy. It is an invaluable technique allowing real-time, nondestructive, and invasive measurement. Cells in body generally exist in 3D structure, which physiological cell-cell interaction enhances cell survival and biological functions. Although a 3D cell aggregate is a good model of the cells in living tissues, it was difficult to estimate their physiological conditions because there is no effective technique to make observation of intact cells in the 3D structure. In this study, cell aggregates were formed by MC3T-E1 (pre-osteoblast) cells and gelatin hydrogel microspheres. In appropriate condition MC3T-E1 cells can differentiate into osteoblast. We assume that the activity of the cell would be different according to the location in the aggregate because the cells near the surface of the aggregate have more access to oxygen and nutrient. Raman imaging technique was applied to measure 3D image of the aggregate. The concentration of the hydroxyapatite (HA) is generated by osteoblast was estimated with a strong band at 950-970 cm-1 which assigned to PO43- in HA. It reflects an activity of the specific site in the cell aggregate. The cell density in this specific site was analyzed by multivariate analysis of the 3D Raman image. Hence, the ratio between intensity and cell density in the site represents the cell activity.

  12. Three-dimensional printing of stem cell-laden hydrogels submerged in a hydrophobic high-density fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte Campos, Daniela F; Blaeser, Andreas; Weber, Michael; Fischer, Horst; Jäkel, Jörg; Neuss, Sabine; Jahnen-Dechent, Wilhelm

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, bioprinting technologies have begun providing important tissue engineering strategies for regenerative medicine and organ transplantation. The major drawback of past approaches has been poor or inadequate material-printing device and substrate combinations, as well as the relatively small size of the printed construct. Here, we hypothesise that cell-laden hydrogels can be printed when submerged in perfluorotributylamine (C 12 F 27 N), a hydrophobic high-density fluid, and that these cells placed within three-dimensional constructs remain viable allowing for cell proliferation and production of extracellular matrix. Human mesenchymal stem cells and MG-63 cells were encapsulated into agarose hydrogels, and subsequently printed in high aspect ratio in three dimensional structures that were supported in high density fluorocarbon. Three-dimensional structures with various shapes and sizes were manufactured and remained stable for more than six months. Live/dead and DAPI stainings showed viable cells 24 h after the printing process, as well as after 21 days in culture. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses after 14 and 21 days revealed viable cells with marked matrix production and signs of proliferation. The compressive strength values of the printed gels consequently increased during the two weeks in culture, revealing encouraging results for future applications in regenerative medicine. (paper)

  13. Learning the Cell Structures with Three-Dimensional Models: Students' Achievement by Methods, Type of School and Questions' Cognitive Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarowitz, Reuven; Naim, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    The cell topic was taught to 9th-grade students in three modes of instruction: (a) students "hands-on," who constructed three-dimensional cell organelles and macromolecules during the learning process; (b) teacher demonstration of the three-dimensional model of the cell structures; and (c) teaching the cell topic with the regular…

  14. Capturing Three-Dimensional Genome Organization in Individual Cells by Single-Cell Hi-C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Takashi; Wingett, Steven W; Fraser, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Hi-C is a powerful method to investigate genome-wide, higher-order chromatin and chromosome conformations averaged from a population of cells. To expand the potential of Hi-C for single-cell analysis, we developed single-cell Hi-C. Similar to the existing "ensemble" Hi-C method, single-cell Hi-C detects proximity-dependent ligation events between cross-linked and restriction-digested chromatin fragments in cells. A major difference between the single-cell Hi-C and ensemble Hi-C protocol is that the proximity-dependent ligation is carried out in the nucleus. This allows the isolation of individual cells in which nearly the entire Hi-C procedure has been carried out, enabling the production of a Hi-C library and data from individual cells. With this new method, we studied genome conformations and found evidence for conserved topological domain organization from cell to cell, but highly variable interdomain contacts and chromosome folding genome wide. In addition, we found that the single-cell Hi-C protocol provided cleaner results with less technical noise suggesting it could be used to improve the ensemble Hi-C technique.

  15. Chromium poisoning in (La,Sr)MnO3 cathode: Three-dimensional simulation of a solid oxide fuel cell

    OpenAIRE

    Miyoshi, Kota; Iwai, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Masashi; Saito, Motohiro; Yoshida, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model of a single solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) considering chromium poisoning on the cathode side has been developed to investigate the evolution of the SOFC performance over long-term operation. The degradation model applied in the simulation describes the loss of the cathode electrochemical activity as a decrease in the active triple-phase boundary (TPB) length. The calculations are conducted for two types of cell: lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM)/yttria-sta...

  16. A novel three-dimensional cell culture method enhances antiviral drug screening in primary human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koban, Robert; Neumann, Markus; Daugs, Aila; Bloch, Oliver; Nitsche, Andreas; Langhammer, Stefan; Ellerbrok, Heinz

    2018-02-01

    Gefitinib is a specific inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and FDA approved for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. In a previous study we could show the in vitro efficacy of gefitinib for treatment of poxvirus infections in monolayer (2D) cultivated cell lines. Permanent cell lines and 2D cultures, however, are known to be rather unphysiological; therefore it is difficult to predict whether determined effective concentrations or the drug efficacy per se are transferable to the in vivo situation. 3D cell cultures, which meanwhile are widely distributed across all fields of research, are a promising tool for more predictive in vitro investigations of antiviral compounds. In this study the spreading of cowpox virus and the antiviral efficacy of gefitinib were analyzed in primary human keratinocytes (NHEK) grown in a novel 3D extracellular matrix-based cell culture model and compared to the respective monolayer culture. 3D-cultivated NHEK grew in a polarized and thus a more physiological manner with altered morphology and close cell-cell contact. Infected cultures showed a strongly elevated sensitivity towards gefitinib. EGFR phosphorylation, cell proliferation, and virus replication were significantly reduced in 3D cultures at gefitinib concentrations which were at least 100-fold lower than those in monolayer cultures and well below the level of cytotoxicity. Our newly established 3D cell culture model with primary human cells is an easy-to-handle alternative to conventional monolayer cell cultures and previously described more complex 3D cell culture systems. It can easily be adapted to other cell types and a broad spectrum of viruses for antiviral drug screening and many other aspects of virus research under more in vivo-like conditions. In consequence, it may contribute to a more targeted realization of necessary in vivo experiments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cell culture for three-dimensional modeling in rotating-wall vessels: an application of simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, R. P.; Goodwin, T. J.; Wolf, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    High-density, three-dimensional cell cultures are difficult to grow in vitro. The rotating-wall vessel (RWV) described here has cultured BHK-21 cells to a density of 1.1 X 10(7) cells/ml. Cells on microcarriers were observed to grow with enhanced bridging in this batch culture system. The RWV is a horizontally rotated tissue culture vessel with silicon membrane oxygenation. This design results in a low-turbulence, low-shear cell culture environment with abundant oxygenation. The RWV has the potential to culture a wide variety of normal and neoplastic cells.

  18. Three-dimensional organoid culture reveals involvement of Wnt/β-catenin pathway in proliferation of bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takahiro; Sopko, Nikolai A; Kates, Max; Liu, Xiaopu; Joice, Gregory; McConkey, David J; Bivalacqua, Trinity J

    2018-02-16

    There has been increasing awareness of the importance of three-dimensional culture of cancer cells. Tumor cells growing as multicellular spheroids in three-dimensional culture, alternatively called organoids, are widely believed to more closely mimic solid tumors in situ . Previous studies concluded that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is required for regeneration of the normal urothelium after injury and that β-catenin is upregulated in human bladder cancers, but no clear evidence has been advanced to support the idea that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is directly involved in deregulated proliferation and the other malignant characteristics of bladder cancer cells. Here we report that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway activator, CHIR99021, promoted proliferation of established human bladder cancer cell lines when they were grown in organoid culture but not when they were grown in conventional adherent cultures. CHIR99021 activated Wnt/β-catenin pathway in bladder cancer cell lines in organoid culture. CHIR99021 also stimulated proliferation and the Wnt/b-catenin pathway in primary human bladder cancer organoids. RNAi-mediated knockdown of β-catenin blocked growth of organoids. The effects of CHIR99021 were associated with decreased expression of the urothelial terminal differentiation marker, cytokeratin 20. Our data suggest that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is required for the proliferation of bladder cancer cells in three-dimensional organoid culture and provide a concrete example of why organoid culture is important for cancer research.

  19. Coating of hydrophobins on three-dimensional electrospun poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffolds for cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou Sen; Li Xinxin; Li Xiaoyu; Feng Xizeng, E-mail: xzfeng@nankai.edu.c [College of Life Science, Nankai University, Weijin Road 94, Tianjin, 300071 (China)

    2009-09-15

    Surface modification with hydrophobins is very important for cell adhesion in its applications in biosensor fabrication. In this study, we modified the surface of three-dimensional electrospun poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) scaffolds with hydrophobin HFBI and collagen, and investigated its applications for cell adhesion. We found that HFBI could not only improve the hydrophilicity of the three-dimensional electrospun PLGA scaffolds but also endow the electrospun PLGA scaffolds with water permeability. This permeability should be attributed to both the hydrophilicity of the modified PLGA surface and the large positive capillary effect induced by the microstructures. Further experiment indicated that HFBI modification could improve collagen immobilization on the electrospun PLGA scaffolds and the HFBI/collagen modified electrospun PLGA scaffolds showed higher efficiency in promoting cell adhesion than the native PLGA scaffolds. This finding should be of potential application in biosensor device fabrication.

  20. Micromechanical Modeling of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode Supports based on Three-dimensional Reconstructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwok, Kawai; Jørgensen, Peter Stanley; Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2014-01-01

    Ni-3YSZ in the operating temperature through numerical micromechanical modeling. Three-dimensional microstructures of Ni-3YSZ anode supports are reconstructed from a two-dimensional image stack obtained via focused ion beam tomography. Time-dependent stress distributions in the microscopic scale...... are computed by the finite element method. The macroscopic creep response of the porous anode support is determined based on homogenization theory. It is shown that micromechanical modeling provides an effective tool to study the effect of microstructures on the macroscopic properties....

  1. Ultrasonic three-dimensional on-chip cell culture for dynamic studies of tumor immune surveillance by natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakou, Athanasia E; Ohlin, Mathias; Önfelt, Björn; Wiklund, Martin

    2015-08-07

    We demonstrate a simple method for three-dimensional (3D) cell culture controlled by ultrasonic standing waves in a multi-well microplate. The method gently arranges cells in a suspension into a single aggregate in each well of the microplate and, by this, nucleates 3D tissue-like cell growth for culture times between two and seven days. The microplate device is compatible with both high-resolution optical microscopy and maintenance in a standard cell incubator. The result is a scaffold- and coating-free method for 3D cell culture that can be used for controlling the cellular architecture, as well as the cellular and molecular composition of the microenvironment in and around the formed cell structures. We demonstrate the parallel production of one hundred synthetic 3D solid tumors comprising up to thousands of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) HepG2 cells, we characterize the tumor structure by high-resolution optical microscopy, and we monitor the functional behavior of natural killer (NK) cells migrating, docking and interacting with the tumor model during culture. Our results show that the method can be used for determining the collective ability of a given number of NK cells to defeat a solid tumor having a certain size, shape and composition. The ultrasound-based method itself is generic and can meet any demand from applications where it is advantageous to monitor cell culture from production to analysis of 3D tissue or tumor models using microscopy in one single microplate device.

  2. Quantifying the correlation between spatially defined oxygen gradients and cell fate in an engineered three-dimensional culture model

    OpenAIRE

    Ardakani, Amir G.; Cheema, Umber; Brown, Robert A.; Shipley, Rebecca J.

    2014-01-01

    A challenge in three-dimensional tissue culture remains the lack of quantitative information linking nutrient delivery and cellular distribution. Both in vivo and in vitro, oxygen is delivered by diffusion from its source (blood vessel or the construct margins). The oxygen level at a defined distance from its source depends critically on the balance of diffusion and cellular metabolism. Cells may respond to this oxygen environment through proliferation, death and chemotaxis, resulting in spat...

  3. On the effect of long-term electrical stimulation on three-dimensional cell cultures: Hen embryo brain spheroids

    OpenAIRE

    Uroukov, Ivan S; Bull, Larry

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive dataset of multielectrode array recordings was collected from three-dimensional hen embryo brain cell cultures, termed spheroids, under long-term electrical stimulation. The aim is to understand the ongoing changes in the spiking activity under electrical stimulation within the lifetime of 14–72DIV of the neuronal networks contained therein. The spiking dynamics were analyzed and behavioral characteristics derived. Some effects on spiking patterns and exhaustion were followed ...

  4. Three-dimensional morphological imaging of human induced pluripotent stem cells by using low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Toyohiko; Kakuno, Yumi; Goto, Kentaro; Fukami, Tadashi; Sugiyama, Norikazu; Iwai, Hidenao; Mizuguchi, Yoshinori; Yamashita, Yutaka

    2014-03-01

    There is an increasing need for non-invasive imaging techniques in the field of stem cell research. Label-free techniques are the best choice for assessment of stem cells because the cells remain intact after imaging and can be used for further studies such as differentiation induction. To develop a high-resolution label-free imaging system, we have been working on a low-coherence quantitative phase microscope (LC-QPM). LC-QPM is a Linnik-type interference microscope equipped with nanometer-resolution optical-path-length control and capable of obtaining three-dimensional volumetric images. The lateral and vertical resolutions of our system are respectively 0.5 and 0.93 μm and this performance allows capturing sub-cellular morphological features of live cells without labeling. Utilizing LC-QPM, we reported on three-dimensional imaging of membrane fluctuations, dynamics of filopodia, and motions of intracellular organelles. In this presentation, we report three-dimensional morphological imaging of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS cells). Two groups of monolayer hiPS cell cultures were prepared so that one group was cultured in a suitable culture medium that kept the cells undifferentiated, and the other group was cultured in a medium supplemented with retinoic acid, which forces the stem cells to differentiate. The volumetric images of the 2 groups show distinctive differences, especially in surface roughness. We believe that our LC-QPM system will prove useful in assessing many other stem cell conditions.

  5. Three-dimensional growth patterns of various human tumor cell lines in simulated microgravity of a NASA bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M; Techy, G B; Saroufeem, R; Yazan, O; Narayan, K S; Goodwin, T J; Spaulding, G F

    1997-06-01

    Growth patterns of a number of human tumor cell lines that from three-dimensional structures of various architectures when cultured without carrier beads in a NASA rotary cell culture system are described and illustrated. The culture system, which was designed to mimic microgravity, maintained cells in suspension under very low-shear stress throughout culture. Spheroid (particulate) production occurred within a few hours after culture was started, and spheroids increased in size by cell division and fusion of small spheroids, usually stabilizing at a spheroid diameter of about 0.5 mm. Architecture of spheroids varied with cell type. Cellular interactions that occurred in spheroids resulted in conformation and shape changes of cells, and some cell lines produced complex, epithelial-like architectures. Expression of the cell adhesion molecules, CD44 and E cadherin, was upregulated in the three-dimensional constructs. Coculture of fibroblast spheroids with PC3 prostate cancer cells induced tenascin expression by the fibroblasts underlying the adherent prostate epithelial cells. Invasion of the fibroblast spheroids by the malignant epithelium was also demonstrated.

  6. Evaluation of the osteogenic differentiation of gingiva-derived stem cells grown on culture plates or in stem cell spheroids: Comparison of two- and three-dimensional cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Il; Ko, Youngkyung; Park, Jun-Beom

    2017-09-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture systems provide a convenient in vitro model for the study of complex cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions in the absence of exogenous substrates. The current study aimed to evaluate the osteogenic differentiation potential of gingiva-derived stem cells cultured in two-dimensional or three-dimensional systems. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to compare the growth of gingiva-derived stem cells in monolayer culture to a three-dimensional culture system with microwells. For three-dimensional culture, gingiva-derived stem cells were isolated and seeded into polydimethylsiloxane-based concave micromolds. Alkaline phosphatase activity and alizarin red S staining assays were then performed to evaluate osteogenesis and the degree of mineralization, respectively. Stem cell spheroids had a significantly increased level of alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization compared with cells from the two-dimensional culture. In addition, an increase in mineralized deposits was observed with an increase in the loading cell number. The results of present study indicate that gingiva-derived stem cell spheroids exhibit an increased osteogenic potential compared with stem cells from two-dimensional culture. This highlights the potential of three-dimensional culture systems using gingiva-derived stem cells for regenerative medicine applications requiring stem cells with osteogenic potential.

  7. Fetal Therapy Model of Myelomeningocele with Three-Dimensional Skin Using Amniotic Fluid Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Kajiwara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Myelomeningocele (MMC is a congenital disease without genetic abnormalities. Neurological symptoms are irreversibly impaired after birth, and no effective treatment has been reported to date. Only surgical repairs have been reported so far. In this study, we performed antenatal treatment of MMC with an artificial skin using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs generated from a patient with Down syndrome (AF-T21-iPSCs and twin-twin transfusion syndrome (AF-TTTS-iPSCs to a rat model. We manufactured three-dimensional skin with epidermis generated from keratinocytes derived from AF-T21-iPSCs and AF-TTTS-iPSCs and dermis of human fibroblasts and collagen type I. For generation of epidermis, we developed a protocol using Y-27632 and epidermal growth factor. The artificial skin was successfully covered over MMC defect sites during pregnancy, implying a possible antenatal surgical treatment with iPSC technology.

  8. Three-dimensional neuroepithelial culture from human embryonic stem cells and its use for quantitative conversion to retinal pigment epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhu

    Full Text Available A goal in human embryonic stem cell (hESC research is the faithful differentiation to given cell types such as neural lineages. During embryonic development, a basement membrane surrounds the neural plate that forms a tight, apico-basolaterally polarized epithelium before closing to form a neural tube with a single lumen. Here we show that the three-dimensional epithelial cyst culture of hESCs in Matrigel combined with neural induction results in a quantitative conversion into neuroepithelial cysts containing a single lumen. Cells attain a defined neuroepithelial identity by 5 days. The neuroepithelial cysts naturally generate retinal epithelium, in part due to IGF-1/insulin signaling. We demonstrate the utility of this epithelial culture approach by achieving a quantitative production of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells from hESCs within 30 days. Direct transplantation of this RPE into a rat model of retinal degeneration without any selection or expansion of the cells results in the formation of a donor-derived RPE monolayer that rescues photoreceptor cells. The cyst method for neuroepithelial differentiation of pluripotent stem cells is not only of importance for RPE generation but will also be relevant to the production of other neuronal cell types and for reconstituting complex patterning events from three-dimensional neuroepithelia.

  9. Direct Conversion of Equine Adipose-Derived Stem Cells into Induced Neuronal Cells Is Enhanced in Three-Dimensional Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Gayle F; Hilbert, Bryan J; Trope, Gareth D; Kalle, Wouter H J; Strappe, Padraig M

    2015-12-01

    The ability to culture neurons from horses may allow further investigation into equine neurological disorders. In this study, we demonstrate the generation of induced neuronal cells from equine adipose-derived stem cells (EADSCs) using a combination of lentiviral vector expression of the neuronal transcription factors Brn2, Ascl1, Myt1l (BAM) and NeuroD1 and a defined chemical induction medium, with βIII-tubulin-positive induced neuronal cells displaying a distinct neuronal morphology of rounded and compact cell bodies, extensive neurite outgrowth, and branching of processes. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of dimensionality on neuronal transdifferentiation, comparing conventional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer culture against three-dimensional (3D) culture on a porous polystyrene scaffold. Neuronal transdifferentiation was enhanced in 3D culture, with evenly distributed cells located on the surface and throughout the scaffold. Transdifferentiation efficiency was increased in 3D culture, with an increase in mean percent conversion of more than 100% compared to 2D culture. Additionally, induced neuronal cells were shown to transit through a Nestin-positive precursor state, with MAP2 and Synapsin 2 expression significantly increased in 3D culture. These findings will help to increase our understanding of equine neuropathogenesis, with prospective roles in disease modeling, drug screening, and cellular replacement for treatment of equine neurological disorders.

  10. Three-dimensional spheroid culture of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells promotes cell yield and stemness maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Guo, Gang; Li, Li; Chen, Fei; Bao, Ji; Shi, Yu-Jun; Bu, Hong

    2015-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation is a promising treatment of many diseases. However, conventional techniques with cells being cultured as a monolayer result in slow cell proliferation and insufficient yield to meet clinical demands. Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems are gaining attention with regard to recreating a complex microenvironment and to understanding the conditions experienced by cells. Our aim is to establish a novel 3D system for the culture of human umbilical cord MSCs (hUC-MSCs) within a real 3D microenvironment but with no digestion or passaging. Primary hUC-MSCs were isolated and grown in serum-free medium (SFM) on a suspension Rocker system. Cell characteristics including proliferation, phenotype and multipotency were recorded. The therapeutic effects of 3D-cultured hUC-MSCs on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced acute liver failure in mouse models were examined. In the 3D Rocker system, hUC-MSCs formed spheroids in SFM and maintained high viability and active proliferation. Compared with monolayer culture, the 3D-culture system yielded more hUC-MSCs cells within the same volume. The spheroids expressed higher levels of stem cell markers and displayed stronger multipotency. After transplantation into mouse, 3D hUC-MSCs significantly promoted the secretion of interferon-γ and interleukin-6 but inhibited that of tumor necrosis factor-α, thereby alleviating liver necrosis and promoting regeneration following CCl4 injury. The 3D culture of hUC-MSCs thus promotes cell yield and stemness maintenance and represents a promising strategy for hUC-MSCs expansion on an industrial scale with great potential for cell therapy and biotechnology.

  11. Prediction of deformation and hygro-thermal stresses distribution in PEM fuel cell vehicle using three-dimensional CFD model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadiq Al-Baghdadi, Maher A.R. [Fuel Cell Research Center, International Energy & Environment Foundation, Al-Najaf, P.O.Box 39 (Iraq)

    2012-07-01

    Durability is one of the most critical remaining issues impeding successful commercialization of broad PEM fuel cell transportation energy applications. Automotive fuel cells are likely to operate with neat hydrogen under load-following or load-levelled modes and be expected to withstand variations in environmental conditions, particularly in the context of temperature and atmospheric composition. In addition, they are also required to survive over the course of their expected operational lifetimes i.e., around 5,500 hrs, while undergoing as many as 30,000 startup/shutdown cycles. The damage mechanisms in a PEM fuel cell are accelerated by mechanical stresses arising during fuel cell assembly (bolt assembling), and the stresses arise during fuel cell running, because it consists of the materials with different thermal expansion and swelling coefficients. Therefore, in order to acquire a complete understanding of the damage mechanisms in the membrane, mechanical response under steady-state hygro-thermal stresses should be studied under real cell operating conditions and in real cell geometry (three-dimensional). In this work, full three-dimensional, non-isothermal computational fluid dynamics model of a PEM fuel cell has been developed to simulate the stresses inside the PEM fuel cell, which are occurring during fuel cell assembly (bolt assembling), and the stresses arise during fuel cell running due to the changes of temperature and relative humidity. A unique feature of the present model is to incorporate the effect of hygro and thermal stresses into actual three-dimensional fuel cell model. In addition, the temperature and humidity dependent material properties are utilize in the simulation for the membrane. The model is shown to be able to understand the many interacting, complex electrochemical, transport phenomena, and stresses distribution that have limited experimental data. This model is used to study and analyse the effect of operating parameters on the

  12. Effects of endothelial cells on human mesenchymal stem cell activity in a three-dimensional in vitro model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Saleh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available An increasing body of data suggest that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs reside in a perivascular niche. To more closely mimic this in vivo microenvironment and for better understanding of its complexity, and the factors that regulate the MSC activity, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs were co-cultured with human bone marrow MSCs – using a novel three-dimensional (3D spheroid co-culture system. Using confocal microscopy of fluorescently labelled cells, we observed HUVECs and MSCs to self-assemble and form organised structures with segregated cell-type partitioning. Under osteogenic conditions, the rate and extent of differentiation in MSC/HUVEC spheroids was significantly elevated compared to 3D co-cultures of MSCs and human dermal fibroblast controls as shown by alkaline phosphatase staining. Conversely, HUVECs inhibited adipogenic differentiation and the proliferation of MSCs in 3D co-cultures indicating that HUVECs suppressed MSC cycling and selectively promoted osteogenic differentiation in 3D. We have also shown that HUVECs enhanced activation of endogenous Wnt signalling and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP signalling as shown by increased levels of active nuclear β-catenin and pSmad 1/5/8 immunopositivity respectively. These data suggest strongly that endothelial cells regulate the MSC activity in simulated in vivo conditions, by maintaining quiescence and facilitating niche exit via osteogenic differentiation following appropriate cues. Our findings also underline the importance of 3D heterotypic cell-cell interactions in the regulation of MSC behaviour, suggesting that multicellular cocktails and/or 3D-based delivery strategies may be beneficial for bone repair.

  13. Reassembly of anterior pituitary organization by hanging drop three-dimensional cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, Takehiro; Kouki, Tom; Fujiwara, Ken; Ramadhani, Dini; Horiguchi, Kotaro; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2013-08-29

    The anterior pituitary gland comprises 5 types of hormone-producing cells and non-endocrine cells, such as folliculostellate (FS) cells. The cells form a lobular structure surrounded by extracellular matrix (ECM) but are not randomly distributed in each lobule; hormone-producing cells have affinities for specific cell types (topographic affinity), and FS cells form a homotypic meshwork. To determine whether this cell and ECM organization can be reproduced in vitro, we developed a 3-dimensional (3D) model that utilizes hanging drop cell culture. We found that the topographic affinities of hormone-producing cells were indeed maintained (ie, GH to ACTH cells, GH to TSH cells, PRL to LH/FSH cells). Fine structures in hormone-producing cells retained their normal appearance. In addition, FS cells displayed well-developed cytoplasmic protrusions, which interconnected with adjacent FS cells to form a 3D meshwork. In addition, reassembly of gap junctions and pseudofollicles among FS cells was observed in cell aggregates. Major ECM components-collagens and laminin-were deposited and distributed around the cells. In sum, the dissociated anterior pituitary cells largely maintained their in vivo anterior pituitary architectures. This culture system appears to be a powerful experimental tool for detailed analysis of anterior pituitary cell organization.

  14. Quantifying the correlation between spatially defined oxygen gradients and cell fate in an engineered three-dimensional culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardakani, Amir G; Cheema, Umber; Brown, Robert A; Shipley, Rebecca J

    2014-09-06

    A challenge in three-dimensional tissue culture remains the lack of quantitative information linking nutrient delivery and cellular distribution. Both in vivo and in vitro, oxygen is delivered by diffusion from its source (blood vessel or the construct margins). The oxygen level at a defined distance from its source depends critically on the balance of diffusion and cellular metabolism. Cells may respond to this oxygen environment through proliferation, death and chemotaxis, resulting in spatially resolved gradients in cellular density. This study extracts novel spatially resolved and simultaneous data on tissue oxygenation, cellular proliferation, viability and chemotaxis in three-dimensional spiralled, cellular collagen constructs. Oxygen concentration gradients drove preferential cellular proliferation rates and viability in the higher oxygen zones and induced chemotaxis along the spiral of the collagen construct; an oxygen gradient of 1.03 mmHg mm(-1) in the spiral direction induced a mean migratory speed of 1015 μm day(-1). Although this movement was modest, it was effective in balancing the system to a stable cell density distribution, and provided insights into the natural cell mechanism for adapting cell number and activity to a prevailing oxygen regime.

  15. Three-Dimensional Organotypic Co-Culture Model of Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Macrophages to Study "Salmonella Enterica" Colonization Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Mark; Yang, J; Barilla, J.; Crabbe, A.; Sarker, S. F.; Liu, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional/3-D organotypic models of human intestinal epithelium mimic the differentiated form and function of parental tissues often not exhibited by 2-D monolayers and respond to Salmonella in ways that reflect in vivo infections. To further enhance the physiological relevance of 3-D models to more closely approximate in vivo intestinal microenvironments during infection, we developed and validated a novel 3-D intestinal co-culture model containing multiple epithelial cell types and phagocytic macrophages, and applied to study enteric infection by different Salmonella pathovars.

  16. A small molecule-based strategy for endothelial differentiation and three-dimensional morphogenesis from human embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Geng, Yijie; Feng, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    The emerging models of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) self-organizing organoids provide a valuable in vitro platform for studying self-organizing processes that presumably mimic in vivo human developmental events. Here we report that through a chemical screen, we identified two novel and structurally similar small molecules BIR1 and BIR2 which robustly induced the self-organization of a balloon-shaped three-dimensional structure when applied to two-dimensional adherent hESC cultures in the ...

  17. Establishment of a long-term three-dimensional primary culture of mouse glandular stomach epithelial cells within the stem cell niche

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katano, Takahito; Ootani, Akifumi; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Tanida, Satoshi; Tsukamoto, Hironobu; Ozeki, Keiji; Ebi, Masahide; Mori, Yoshinori; Kataoka, Hiromi; Kamiya, Takeshi; Toda, Shuji; Joh, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We established a 3D culture system to allow long-term culture of stomach cells. ► In this culture system, gastric epithelial cells grew for about 3 months. ► The cultured cells differentiated into multi-units of the stomach. ► This culture method should be useful for elucidating the cause of gastric diseases. -- Abstract: Compared to the small intestine and colon, little is known about stem cells in the stomach because of a lack of specific stem cell markers and an in vitro system that allows long-term culture. Here we describe a long-term three-dimensional (3D) primary gastric culture system within the stem cell niche. Glandular stomach cells from neonatal mice cultured in collagen gel yielded expanding sphere-like structures for 3 months. The wall of the gastrospheres consisted of a highly polarized epithelial monolayer with an outer lining of myofibroblasts. The epithelial cells showed a tall columnar cell shape, basal round nuclei, and mucus-filled cytoplasm as well as expression of MUC5AC, indicating differentiation into gastric surface mucous cells. These cells demonstrated the features of fully differentiated gastric surface mucous cells such as microvilli, junctional complexes, and glycogen and secretory granules. Fewer than 1% of cultured epithelial cells differentiated into enteroendocrine cells. Active proliferation of the epithelial cells and many apoptotic cells in the inner lumen revealed the rapid cell turnover in gastrospheres in vitro. This method enables us to investigate the role of signaling between cell–cell and epithelial–mesenchymal interactions in an environment that is extremely similar to the in vivo environment

  18. Establishment of a long-term three-dimensional primary culture of mouse glandular stomach epithelial cells within the stem cell niche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katano, Takahito [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Ootani, Akifumi [Department of Gastroenterology and GI Endoscopy Center, Shin-Kokura Hospital, Federation of National Public Service Personnel Mutual Aid Associations, 1-3-1 Kanada, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu 803-0816 (Japan); Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Mizoshita, Tsutomu, E-mail: tmizoshi@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Tanida, Satoshi; Tsukamoto, Hironobu; Ozeki, Keiji; Ebi, Masahide; Mori, Yoshinori; Kataoka, Hiromi; Kamiya, Takeshi [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Toda, Shuji [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Joh, Takashi [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► We established a 3D culture system to allow long-term culture of stomach cells. ► In this culture system, gastric epithelial cells grew for about 3 months. ► The cultured cells differentiated into multi-units of the stomach. ► This culture method should be useful for elucidating the cause of gastric diseases. -- Abstract: Compared to the small intestine and colon, little is known about stem cells in the stomach because of a lack of specific stem cell markers and an in vitro system that allows long-term culture. Here we describe a long-term three-dimensional (3D) primary gastric culture system within the stem cell niche. Glandular stomach cells from neonatal mice cultured in collagen gel yielded expanding sphere-like structures for 3 months. The wall of the gastrospheres consisted of a highly polarized epithelial monolayer with an outer lining of myofibroblasts. The epithelial cells showed a tall columnar cell shape, basal round nuclei, and mucus-filled cytoplasm as well as expression of MUC5AC, indicating differentiation into gastric surface mucous cells. These cells demonstrated the features of fully differentiated gastric surface mucous cells such as microvilli, junctional complexes, and glycogen and secretory granules. Fewer than 1% of cultured epithelial cells differentiated into enteroendocrine cells. Active proliferation of the epithelial cells and many apoptotic cells in the inner lumen revealed the rapid cell turnover in gastrospheres in vitro. This method enables us to investigate the role of signaling between cell–cell and epithelial–mesenchymal interactions in an environment that is extremely similar to the in vivo environment.

  19. Poster - 21: Verification of Monitor Unit Calculations for Breast Field-In-Field Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosztyla, Robert; Pierce, Greg; Ploquin, Nicolas; Roumeliotis, Michael; Schinkel, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the source of systematic monitor unit (MU) calculation discrepancies between RadCalc and Eclipse treatment planning software for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy field-in-field breast treatments. Methods: Data were reviewed for 28 patients treated with a field-in-field breast technique with MU calculations from RadCalc that were larger than MU calculations from Eclipse for at least one field. The distance of the calculation point from the jaws was measured in each field’s beam’s-eye-view and compared with the percentage difference in MU (%ΔMU) between RadCalc and Eclipse. 10×10, 17×13 and 20×20 cm 2 beam profiles were measured using the Profiler 2 diode array for 6-MV photon beams and compared with profiles calculated with Eclipse and RadCalc using a gamma analysis (3%, 3 mm). Results: The mean %ΔMU was 1.3%±0.3%. There was a statistically-significant correlation between %ΔMU and the distance of the calculation point from the Y jaw (r=−0.43, p<0.001). RadCalc profiles differed from measured profiles, especially near the jaws. The gamma pass rate for 6-MV fields of 17×13 cm 2 field size was 95%±1% for Eclipse-generated profiles and 53%±20% for RadCalc-generated profiles (p=0.01). Conclusions: Calculations using RadCalc for field-in-field breast plans resulted in MUs that were larger than expected from previous clinical experience with wedged plans with calculation points far from the jaws due to the position of the calculation point near the jaws in the beam’s-eye-view of each field.

  20. Poster - 21: Verification of Monitor Unit Calculations for Breast Field-In-Field Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosztyla, Robert; Pierce, Greg; Ploquin, Nicolas; Roumeliotis, Michael; Schinkel, Colleen [Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the source of systematic monitor unit (MU) calculation discrepancies between RadCalc and Eclipse treatment planning software for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy field-in-field breast treatments. Methods: Data were reviewed for 28 patients treated with a field-in-field breast technique with MU calculations from RadCalc that were larger than MU calculations from Eclipse for at least one field. The distance of the calculation point from the jaws was measured in each field’s beam’s-eye-view and compared with the percentage difference in MU (%ΔMU) between RadCalc and Eclipse. 10×10, 17×13 and 20×20 cm{sup 2} beam profiles were measured using the Profiler 2 diode array for 6-MV photon beams and compared with profiles calculated with Eclipse and RadCalc using a gamma analysis (3%, 3 mm). Results: The mean %ΔMU was 1.3%±0.3%. There was a statistically-significant correlation between %ΔMU and the distance of the calculation point from the Y jaw (r=−0.43, p<0.001). RadCalc profiles differed from measured profiles, especially near the jaws. The gamma pass rate for 6-MV fields of 17×13 cm{sup 2} field size was 95%±1% for Eclipse-generated profiles and 53%±20% for RadCalc-generated profiles (p=0.01). Conclusions: Calculations using RadCalc for field-in-field breast plans resulted in MUs that were larger than expected from previous clinical experience with wedged plans with calculation points far from the jaws due to the position of the calculation point near the jaws in the beam’s-eye-view of each field.

  1. Three-dimensional growth of human endothelial cells in an automated cell culture experiment container during the SpaceX CRS-8 ISS space mission - The SPHEROIDS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Jessica; Gass, Samuel; Nebuloni, Stefano; Echegoyen, David; Riwaldt, Stefan; Baake, Christin; Bauer, Johann; Corydon, Thomas J; Egli, Marcel; Infanger, Manfred; Grimm, Daniela

    2017-04-01

    Human endothelial cells (ECs) were sent to the International Space Station (ISS) to determine the impact of microgravity on the formation of three-dimensional structures. For this project, an automatic experiment unit (EU) was designed allowing cell culture in space. In order to enable a safe cell culture, cell nourishment and fixation after a pre-programmed timeframe, the materials used for construction of the EUs were tested in regard to their biocompatibility. These tests revealed a high biocompatibility for all parts of the EUs, which were in contact with the cells or the medium used. Most importantly, we found polyether ether ketones for surrounding the incubation chamber, which kept cellular viability above 80% and allowed the cells to adhere as long as they were exposed to normal gravity. After assembling the EU the ECs were cultured therein, where they showed good cell viability at least for 14 days. In addition, the functionality of the automatic medium exchange, and fixation procedures were confirmed. Two days before launch, the ECs were cultured in the EUs, which were afterwards mounted on the SpaceX CRS-8 rocket. 5 and 12 days after launch the cells were fixed. Subsequent analyses revealed a scaffold-free formation of spheroids in space. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Poly(2-oxazoline) hydrogels as next generation three-dimensional cell supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargaville, Tim R; Hollier, Brett G; Shokoohmand, Ali; Hoogenboom, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic hydrogels selectively decorated with cell adhesion motifs are rapidly emerging as promising substrates for 3D cell culture. When cells are grown in 3D they experience potentially more physiologically relevant cell–cell interactions and physical cues compared with traditional 2D cell culture on stiff surfaces. A newly developed polymer based on poly(2-oxazoline)s has been used for the first time to control attachment of fibroblast cells and is discussed here for its potential use in 3D cell culture with particular focus on cancer cells toward the ultimate aim of high-throughput screening of anticancer therapies. Advantages and limitations of using poly(2-oxazoline) hydrogels are discussed and compared with more established polymers, especially polyethylene glycol (PEG). PMID:24714592

  3. Optical imaging of three dimensional cell constructs grown in microgravity and in immunodeficient mice, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rolling wall vessels (RWV) utilizing both single cell lines and co-cultures with two or more cell types are contributing significantly to our understanding of tumor...

  4. Bystander responses in three-dimensional cultures containing radiolabelled and unlabelled human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, M.; Azzam, E. I.; Howell, R. W.

    2006-01-01

    Research on the radiation-induced bystander effect has been carried out mainly in 2-D tissue culture systems. This study uses a 3-D model, wherein apparently normal human diploid fibroblasts (AG1522) are grown in a carbon scaffold, to investigate the induction of a G 1 checkpoint in bystander cells present alongside radiolabelled cells. Cultures were simultaneously pulse-labelled with 3 H-deoxycytidine ( 3 HdC) to selectively irradiate a minor fraction of cells, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to identify the radiolabelled cells. After thorough washing of cultures, iododeoxyuridine (IdU) was administered to detect proliferating bystander cells. The cultures were harvested at various times thereafter, and cells were reacted with two monoclonal antibodies specific to IdU/BrdU or BrdU, respectively, stained with propidium iodide, and subjected to multi-parameter flow cytometry. Cell-cycle progression was followed in radiolabelled cells (BrdU + ) that were chronically irradiated by low energy beta particles emitted by DNA-incorporated 3 H, and in unlabelled bystander cells (BrdU - ) by a flow cytometry based cumulative labelling index assay. As expected, radiolabelled cells were delayed, in a dose-dependent manner, in G 2 and subsequently G 1 . No delay occurred in progression of bystander cells through G 1 , when the labelled cells were irradiated at dose rates up to 0.32 Gy h -1 . (authors)

  5. In vitro generation of three-dimensional substrate-adherent embryonic stem cell-derived neural aggregates for application in animal models of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargus, Gunnar; Cui, Yi-Fang; Dihné, Marcel; Bernreuther, Christian; Schachner, Melitta

    2012-05-01

    In vitro-differentiated embryonic stem (ES) cells comprise a useful source for cell replacement therapy, but the efficiency and safety of a translational approach are highly dependent on optimized protocols for directed differentiation of ES cells into the desired cell types in vitro. Furthermore, the transplantation of three-dimensional ES cell-derived structures instead of a single-cell suspension may improve graft survival and function by providing a beneficial microenvironment for implanted cells. To this end, we have developed a new method to efficiently differentiate mouse ES cells into neural aggregates that consist predominantly (>90%) of postmitotic neurons, neural progenitor cells, and radial glia-like cells. When transplanted into the excitotoxically lesioned striatum of adult mice, these substrate-adherent embryonic stem cell-derived neural aggregates (SENAs) showed significant advantages over transplanted single-cell suspensions of ES cell-derived neural cells, including improved survival of GABAergic neurons, increased cell migration, and significantly decreased risk of teratoma formation. Furthermore, SENAs mediated functional improvement after transplantation into animal models of Parkinson's disease and spinal cord injury. This unit describes in detail how SENAs are efficiently derived from mouse ES cells in vitro and how SENAs are isolated for transplantation. Furthermore, methods are presented for successful implantation of SENAs into animal models of Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, and spinal cord injury to study the effects of stem cell-derived neural aggregates in a disease context in vivo.

  6. A Bioengineered Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Platform Integrated with Microfluidics To Address Antimicrobial Resistance in Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena K. Bielecka

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance presents one of the most significant threats to human health, with the emergence of totally drug-resistant organisms. We have combined bioengineering, genetically modified bacteria, longitudinal readouts, and fluidics to develop a transformative platform to address the drug development bottleneck, utilizing Mycobacterium tuberculosis as the model organism. We generated microspheres incorporating virulent reporter bacilli, primary human cells, and an extracellular matrix by using bioelectrospray methodology. Granulomas form within the three-dimensional matrix, and mycobacterial stress genes are upregulated. Pyrazinamide, a vital first-line antibiotic for treating human tuberculosis, kills M. tuberculosis in a three-dimensional culture but not in a standard two-dimensional culture or Middlebrook 7H9 broth, demonstrating that antibiotic sensitivity within microspheres reflects conditions in patients. We then performed pharmacokinetic modeling by combining the microsphere system with a microfluidic plate and demonstrated that we can model the effect of dynamic antibiotic concentrations on mycobacterial killing. The microsphere system is highly tractable, permitting variation of cell content, the extracellular matrix, sphere size, the infectious dose, and the surrounding medium with the potential to address a wide array of human infections and the threat of antimicrobial resistance.

  7. Three-dimensional architecture and cell composition of a Choukroun's platelet-rich fibrin clot and membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohan Ehrenfest, David M; Del Corso, Marco; Diss, Antoine; Mouhyi, Jaafar; Charrier, Jean-Baptiste

    2010-04-01

    Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF; Choukroun's technique) is a second-generation platelet concentrate for surgical use. This easy protocol allows the production of leukocyte and platelet-rich fibrin clots and membranes starting from 10-ml blood samples. The purposes of this study were to determine the cell composition and three-dimensional organization of this autologous biomaterial and to evaluate the influence of different collection tubes (dry glass or glass-coated plastic tubes) and compression procedures (forcible or soft) on the final PRF-membrane architecture. After centrifugation, blood analyses were performed on the residual waste plasmatic layers after collecting PRF clots. The PRF clots and membranes were processed for examination by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Approximately 97% of the platelets and >50% of the leukocytes were concentrated in the PRF clot and showed a specific three-dimensional distribution, depending on the centrifugation forces. Platelets and fibrin formed large clusters of coagulation in the first millimeters of the membrane beyond the red blood cell base. The fibrin network was very mature and dense. Moreover, there was no significant difference in the PRF architecture between groups using the different tested collection tubes and compression techniques, even if these two parameters could have influenced the growth factor content and biologic matrix properties. The PRF protocol concentrated most platelets and leukocytes from a blood harvest into a single autologous fibrin biomaterial. This protocol offers reproducible results as long as the main production principles are respected.

  8. Fetal Therapy Model of Myelomeningocele with Three-Dimensional Skin Using Amniotic Fluid Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiwara, Kazuhiro; Tanemoto, Tomohiro; Wada, Seiji; Karibe, Jurii; Ihara, Norimasa; Ikemoto, Yu; Kawasaki, Tomoyuki; Oishi, Yoshie; Samura, Osamu; Okamura, Kohji; Takada, Shuji; Akutsu, Hidenori; Sago, Haruhiko; Okamoto, Aikou; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2017-06-06

    Myelomeningocele (MMC) is a congenital disease without genetic abnormalities. Neurological symptoms are irreversibly impaired after birth, and no effective treatment has been reported to date. Only surgical repairs have been reported so far. In this study, we performed antenatal treatment of MMC with an artificial skin using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generated from a patient with Down syndrome (AF-T21-iPSCs) and twin-twin transfusion syndrome (AF-TTTS-iPSCs) to a rat model. We manufactured three-dimensional skin with epidermis generated from keratinocytes derived from AF-T21-iPSCs and AF-TTTS-iPSCs and dermis of human fibroblasts and collagen type I. For generation of epidermis, we developed a protocol using Y-27632 and epidermal growth factor. The artificial skin was successfully covered over MMC defect sites during pregnancy, implying a possible antenatal surgical treatment with iPSC technology. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Noninvasive Real-Time Assessment of Cell Viability in a Three-Dimensional Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouzi, Seyed Hossein; Amoabediny, Ghassem; Doryab, Ali; Safiabadi-Tali, Seyed Hamid; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2018-04-01

    Maintaining cell viability within 3D tissue engineering scaffolds is an essential step toward a functional tissue or organ. Assessment of cell viability in 3D scaffolds is necessary to control and optimize tissue culture process. Monitoring systems based on respiration activity of cells (e.g., oxygen consumption) have been used in various cell cultures. In this research, an online monitoring system based on respiration activity was developed to monitor cell viability within acellular lung scaffolds. First, acellular lung scaffolds were recellularized with human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells, and then, cell viability was monitored during a 5-day period. The real-time monitoring system generated a cell growth profile representing invaluable information on cell viability and proliferative states during the culture period. The cell growth profile obtained by the monitoring system was consistent with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide analysis and glucose consumption measurement. This system provided a means for noninvasive, real-time, and repetitive investigation of cell viability. Also, we showed the applicability of this monitoring system by introducing shaking as an operating parameter in a long-term culture.

  10. A three-dimensional approach to in vitro culture of immune-related cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Sofie Bruun

    setups for improved activation/differentiation of immune cells. Conclusively, this work highlights the importance of acknowledging the effect from external factors when analyzing data generated from in vitro cultures. This being even more important when working with immune cells since these cells adopt......T lymphocytes are key players during the initiation of an adaptive immune response. The activation of these cells in vivo requires migration within the lymph nodes until they encounter antigen presenting cells (APCs) that can activate them to secrete IFN-γ which mediates downstream effector...... functions. The in vitro reactivation of antigen-experienced T lymphocytes and detection of IFN-γ from cell cultures can be used in a diagnostic assay to test for disease or vaccine efficacy. Practical procedures of the IFN-γ release assay (IGRA) was investigated using bovine cells and whole blood cultures...

  11. Simultaneous characterization of pancreatic stellate cells and other pancreatic components within three-dimensional tissue environment during chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenyan; Fu, Ling

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and other pancreatic components that play a critical role in exocrine pancreatic diseases are generally identified separately by conventional studies, which provide indirect links between these components. Here, nonlinear optical microscopy was evaluated for simultaneous characterization of these components within a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue environment, primarily based on multichannel detection of intrinsic optical emissions and cell morphology. Fresh rat pancreatic tissues harvested at 1 day, 7 days, and 28 days after induction of chronic pancreatitis were imaged, respectively. PSCs, inflammatory cells, blood vessels, and collagen fibers were identified simultaneously. The PSCs at day 1 of chronic pancreatitis showed significant enlargement compared with those in normal pancreas (ppancreatic components coincidently within 3-D pancreatic tissues. It is a prospect for intravital observation of dynamic events under natural physiological conditions, and might help uncover the key mechanisms of exocrine pancreatic diseases, leading to more effective treatments.

  12. Three-dimensional simulation of pseudopod-driven swimming of amoeboid cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Eric; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-11-01

    Pseudopod-driven locomotion is common in eukaryotic cells, such as amoeba, neutrophils, and cancer cells. Pseudopods are protrusions of the cell body that grow, bifurcate, and retract. Due to the dynamic nature of pseudopods, the shape of a motile cell constantly changes. The actin-myosin protein dynamics is a likely mechanism for pseudopod growth. Existing theoretical models often focus on the acto-myosin dynamics, and not the whole cell shape dynamics. Here we present a full 3D simulation of pseudopod-driven motility by coupling a surface-bound reaction-diffusion (RD) model for the acto-myosin dynamics, a continuum model for the cell membrane deformation, and flow of the cytoplasmic and extracellular fluids. The whole cell is represented as a viscous fluid surrounded by a membrane. A finite-element method is used to solve the membrane deformation, and the RD model on the deforming membrane, while a finite-difference/spectral method is used to solve the flow fields inside and outside the cell. The fluid flow and cell deformation are coupled by the immersed-boundary method. The model predicts pseudopod growth, bifurcation, and retraction as observed for a swimming amoeba. The work provides insights on the role of membrane stiffness and cytoplasmic viscosity on amoeboid swimming. Funded by NSF CBET 1438255.

  13. Three-dimensional telomere architecture of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: comparison of tumor and normal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunpaweravong, S; Sunpaweravong, P; Sathitruangsak, C; Mai, S

    2016-05-01

    Telomeres are repetitive nucleotide sequences (TTAGGG)n located at the ends of chromosomes that function to preserve chromosomal integrity and prevent terminal end-to-end fusions. Telomere loss or dysfunction results in breakage-bridge-fusion cycles, aneuploidy, gene amplification and chromosomal rearrangements, which can lead to genomic instability and promote carcinogenesis. Evaluating the hypothesis that changes in telomeres contribute to the development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and to determine whether there are differences between young and old patients, we compared the three-dimensional (3D) nuclear telomere architecture in ESCC tumor cells with that of normal epithelial cells obtained from the same patient. Patients were equally divided by age into two groups, one comprising those less than 45 years of age and the other consisting of those over 80 years of age. Tumor and normal epithelial cells located at least 10 cm from the border of the tumor were biopsied in ESCC patients. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed for each sample to confirm and identify the cancer and normal epithelial cells. This study was based on quantitative 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization (Q-FISH), 3D imaging and 3D analysis of paraffin-embedded slides. The 3D telomere architecture data were computer analyzed using 100 nuclei per slide. The following were the main parameters compared: the number of signals (number of telomeres), signal intensity (telomere length), number of telomere aggregates, and nuclear volume. Tumor and normal epithelial samples from 16 patients were compared. The normal epithelial cells had more telomere signals and higher intensities than the tumor cells, with P-values of P architecture and found no statistically significant differences in any parameter tested between the young and old patients in either the tumor or epithelial cells. The 3D nuclear telomeric signature was able to detect differences in telomere architecture

  14. Programmable full-adder computations in communicating three-dimensional cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausländer, David; Ausländer, Simon; Pierrat, Xavier; Hellmann, Leon; Rachid, Leila; Fussenegger, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Synthetic biologists have advanced the design of trigger-inducible gene switches and their assembly into input-programmable circuits that enable engineered human cells to perform arithmetic calculations reminiscent of electronic circuits. By designing a versatile plug-and-play molecular-computation platform, we have engineered nine different cell populations with genetic programs, each of which encodes a defined computational instruction. When assembled into 3D cultures, these engineered cell consortia execute programmable multicellular full-adder logics in response to three trigger compounds.

  15. Photothermal Microneedle Etching: Improved Three-Dimensional Microfabrication Method for Agarose Gel for Topographical Control of Cultured Cell Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriguchi, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2006-08-01

    We have developed a new three-dimensional (3D) microfabrication method for agarose gel, photothermal microneedle etching (PTMNE), by means of an improved photothermal spot heating using a focused 1064 nm laser beam for melting a portion of the agarose layer at the tip of the microneedle, where a photoabsorbent chromium layer is coated to be heated. The advantage of this method is that it allows the 3D control of the melting topography within the thick agarose layer with a 2 μm resolution, whereas conventional photothermal etching can enable only two-dimensional (2D) control on the surface of the chip. By this method, we can form the spheroid clusters of particular cells from isolated single cells without any physical contact with other cells in other chambers, which is important for measuring the community effect of the cell group from isolated single cells. When we set single cancer cells in microchambers of 100 μm in diameter, formed in a 50-μm-thick agarose layer, we observed that they grew, divided, and formed spheroid clusters of cells in each microchamber. The result indicates the potential of this method to be a fundamental technique in the research of multicellular spherical clusters of cells for checking the community effect of cells in 3D structures, such as the permeabilities of chemicals and substrates into the cluster, which is complementary to conventional 2D dish cultivation and can contribute to the cell-based screening of drugs.

  16. Organotypic three-dimensional culture model of mesenchymal and epithelial cells to examine tissue fusion events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissue fusion during early mammalian development requires coordination of multiple cell types, the extracellular matrix, and complex signaling pathways. Fusion events during processes including heart development, neural tube closure, and palatal fusion are dependent on signaling ...

  17. Mesenchymal cells reactivate Snail1 expression to drive three-dimensional invasion programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowe, R.G.; Li, X.Y.; Hu, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is required for mesodermal differentiation during development. The zinc-finger transcription factor, Snail1, can trigger EMT and is sufficient to transcriptionally reprogram epithelial cells toward a mesenchymal phenotype during neoplasia and fibrosis. Whet...

  18. Teratoma formation of human embryonic stem cells in three-dimensional perfusion culture bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachelscheid, H; Wulf-Goldenberg, A; Eckert, K; Jensen, J; Edsbagge, J; Björquist, P; Rivero, M; Strehl, R; Jozefczuk, J; Prigione, A; Adjaye, J; Urbaniak, T; Bussmann, P; Zeilinger, K; Gerlach, J C

    2013-09-01

    Teratoma formation in mice is today the most stringent test for pluripotency that is available for human pluripotent cells, as chimera formation and tetraploid complementation cannot be performed with human cells. The teratoma assay could also be applied for assessing the safety of human pluripotent cell-derived cell populations intended for therapeutic applications. In our study we examined the spontaneous differentiation behaviour of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in a perfused 3D multi-compartment bioreactor system and compared it with differentiation of hESCs and human induced pluripotent cells (hiPSCs) cultured in vitro as embryoid bodies and in vivo in an experimental mouse model of teratoma formation. Results from biochemical, histological/immunohistological and ultrastuctural analyses revealed that hESCs cultured in bioreactors formed tissue-like structures containing derivatives of all three germ layers. Comparison with embryoid bodies and the teratomas revealed a high degree of similarity of the tissues formed in the bioreactor to these in the teratomas at the histological as well as transcriptional level, as detected by comparative whole-genome RNA expression profiling. The 3D culture system represents a novel in vitro model that permits stable long-term cultivation, spontaneous multi-lineage differentiation and tissue formation of pluripotent cells that is comparable to in vivo differentiation. Such a model is of interest, e.g. for the development of novel cell differentiation strategies. In addition, the 3D in vitro model could be used for teratoma studies and pluripotency assays in a fully defined, controlled environment, alternatively to in vivo mouse models. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. A novel photoanode with three-dimensionally, hierarchically ordered nanobushes for highly efficient photoelectrochemical cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karuturi, Siva Krishna; Liu, Lijun; Su, Liap Tat; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Luo, Jingshan; Cheng, Chuanwei; Fan, Hong Jin [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2012-08-08

    A 3D hierarchically ordered nanobush structure is fabricated for use as a photoanode in photoelectrochemical cells. The photoanode structure has several favorable intrinsic characteristics, including high interface area, direct electron transport pathways, and engineered light scattering centers. Sensitization with CdS quantum dots is demonstrated, and this nanobush photoanode is expected to be advantageous also in solar cells. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Three dimensional analysis of histone methylation patterns in normal and tumor cell nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Cremer

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Histone modifications represent an important epigenetic mechanism for the organization of higher order chromatin structure and gene regulation. Methylation of position-specific lysine residues in the histone H3 and H4 amino termini has been linked with the formation of constitutive and facultative heterochromatin as well as with specifically repressed single gene loci. Using an antibody, directed against dimethylated lysine 9 of histone H3 and several other lysine methylation sites, we visualized the nuclear distribution pattern of chromatin flagged by these methylated lysines in 3D preserved nuclei of normal and malignant cell types. Optical confocal serial sections were used for a quantitative evaluation. We demonstrate distinct differences of these histone methylation patterns among nuclei of different cell types after exit of the cell cycle. Changes in the pattern formation were also observed during the cell cycle. Our data suggest an important role of methylated histones in the reestablishment of higher order chromatin arrangements during telophase/early G1. Cell type specific histone methylation patterns are possibly causally involved in the formation of cell type specific heterochromatin compartments, composed of (pericentromeric regions and chromosomal subregions from neighboring chromosome territories, which contain silent genes.

  1. Three-dimensional manipulation of single cells using surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Mao, Zhangming; Chen, Yuchao; Xie, Zhiwei; Lata, James P; Li, Peng; Ren, Liqiang; Liu, Jiayang; Yang, Jian; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-02-09

    The ability of surface acoustic waves to trap and manipulate micrometer-scale particles and biological cells has led to many applications involving "acoustic tweezers" in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. Here, we present 3D acoustic tweezers, which use surface acoustic waves to create 3D trapping nodes for the capture and manipulation of microparticles and cells along three mutually orthogonal axes. In this method, we use standing-wave phase shifts to move particles or cells in-plane, whereas the amplitude of acoustic vibrations is used to control particle motion along an orthogonal plane. We demonstrate, through controlled experiments guided by simulations, how acoustic vibrations result in micromanipulations in a microfluidic chamber by invoking physical principles that underlie the formation and regulation of complex, volumetric trapping nodes of particles and biological cells. We further show how 3D acoustic tweezers can be used to pick up, translate, and print single cells and cell assemblies to create 2D and 3D structures in a precise, noninvasive, label-free, and contact-free manner.

  2. Understanding effects of matrix protease and matrix organization on directional persistence and translational speed in three-dimensional cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Muhammad H; Matsudaira, Paul; Lauffenburger, Douglas A

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have shown significant differences in migration mechanisms between two- and three-dimensional environments. While experiments have suggested a strong dependence of in vivo migration on both structure and proteolytic activity, the underlying biophysics of such dependence has not been studied adequately. In addition, the existing models of persistent random walk migration are primarily based on two-dimensional movement and do not account for the effect of proteolysis or matrix inhomogeneity. Using lattice Monte Carlo methods, we present a model to study the role of matrix metallo-proteases (MMPs) on directional persistence and speed. The simulations account for a given cell's ability to deform as well as to digest the matrix as the cell moves in three dimensions. Our results show a bimodal dependence of speed and persistence on matrix pore size and suggest high sensitivity on MMP activity, which is in very good agreement with experimental studies carried out in 3D matrices.

  3. Three-Dimensional Vascular Network Assembly From Diabetic Patient-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Xin Yi; Black, Rebecca; Dickerman, Kayla; Federico, Joseph; Lévesque, Mathieu; Mumm, Jeff; Gerecht, Sharon

    2015-12-01

    In diabetics, hyperglycemia results in deficient endothelial progenitors and cells, leading to cardiovascular complications. We aim to engineer 3-dimensional (3D) vascular networks in synthetic hydrogels from type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) patient-derived human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), to serve as a transformative autologous vascular therapy for diabetic patients. We validated and optimized an adherent, feeder-free differentiation procedure to derive early vascular cells (EVCs) with high portions of vascular endothelial cadherin-positive cells from hiPSCs. We demonstrate similar differentiation efficiency from hiPSCs derived from healthy donor and patients with T1D. T1D-hiPSC-derived vascular endothelial cadherin-positive cells can mature to functional endothelial cells-expressing mature markers: von Willebrand factor and endothelial nitric oxide synthase are capable of lectin binding and acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake, form cords in Matrigel and respond to tumor necrosis factor-α. When embedded in engineered hyaluronic acid hydrogels, T1D-EVCs undergo morphogenesis and assemble into 3D networks. When encapsulated in a novel hypoxia-inducible hydrogel, T1D-EVCs respond to low oxygen and form 3D networks. As xenografts, T1D-EVCs incorporate into developing zebrafish vasculature. Using our robust protocol, we can direct efficient differentiation of T1D-hiPSC to EVCs. Early endothelial cells derived from T1D-hiPSC are functional when mature. T1D-EVCs self-assembled into 3D networks when embedded in hyaluronic acid and hypoxia-inducible hydrogels. The capability of T1D-EVCs to assemble into 3D networks in engineered matrices and to respond to a hypoxic microenvironment is a significant advancement for autologous vascular therapy in diabetic patients and has broad importance for tissue engineering. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Three-Dimensional Inverse Opal Photonic Crystal Substrates toward Efficient Capture of Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hongwei; Dong, Biao; Xiao, Qiaoqin; Sun, Xueke; Zhang, Xinran; Lyu, Jiekai; Yang, Yudan; Xu, Lin; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Shuang; Song, Hongwei

    2017-09-13

    Artificial fractal structures have attracted considerable scientific interest in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) detection and capture, which plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer. Herein, we designed a bionic TiO 2 inverse opal photonic crystal (IOPC) structure for highly efficient immunocapture of CTCs by combination of a magnetic Fe 3 O 4 @C6@silane nanoparticles with anti-EpCAM (antiepithelial cell adhesion molecule) and microchannel structure. Porous structure and dimension of IOPC TiO 2 can be precisely controlled for mimicking cellular components, and anti-EpCAM antibody was further modified on IOPC interface by conjugating with polydopamine (PDA). The improvement of CTCs capture efficiency reaches a surprising factor of 20 for the IOPC interface compared to that on flat glass, suggesting that the IOPCs are responsible for the dramatic enhancement of the capture efficiency of MCF-7 cells. IOPC substrate with pore size of 415 nm leads to the optimal CTCs capture efficiency of 92% with 1 mL/h. Besides the cell affinity, IOPCs also have the advantage of light scattering property which can enhance the excitation and emission light of fluorescence labels, facilitating the real-time monitoring of CTCs capture. The IOPC-based platform demonstrates excellent performance in CTCs capture, which will take an important step toward specific recognition of disease-related rare cells.

  5. Bioprinting three-dimensional cell-laden tissue constructs with controllable degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhengjie; Su, Xin; Xu, Yuanyuan; Kong, Bin; Sun, Wei; Mi, Shengli

    2016-04-19

    Alginate hydrogel is a popular biologically inert material that is widely used in 3D bioprinting, especially in extrusion-based printing. However, the printed cells in this hydrogel could not degrade the surrounding alginate gel matrix, causing them to remain in a poorly proliferating and non-differentiating state. Here, we report a novel study of the 3D printing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs)/collagen/gelatin/alginate hydrogel incubated with a medium containing sodium citrate to obtain degradation-controllable cell-laden tissue constructs. The 3D-printed hydrogel network with interconnected channels and a macroporous structure was stable and achieved high cell viability (over 90%). By altering the mole ratio of sodium citrate/sodium alginate, the degradation time of the bioprinting constructs can be controlled. Cell proliferation and specific marker protein expression results also revealed that with the help of sodium citrate degradation, the printed HCECs showed a higher proliferation rate and greater cytokeratin 3(CK3) expression, indicating that this newly developed method may help to improve the alginate bioink system for the application of 3D bioprinting in tissue engineering.

  6. The self-crosslinking smart hyaluronic acid hydrogels as injectable three-dimensional scaffolds for cells culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Shaoquan; He, Mengmeng; Sui, Junhui; Cai, Hanxu; Sun, Yong; Liang, Jie; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2016-04-01

    Although the disulfide bond crosslinked hyaluronic acid hydrogels have been reported by many research groups, the major researches were focused on effectively forming hydrogels. However, few researchers paid attention to the potential significance of controlling the hydrogel formation and degradation, improving biocompatibility, reducing the toxicity of exogenous and providing convenience to the clinical operations later on. In this research, the novel controllable self-crosslinking smart hydrogels with in-situ gelation property was prepared by a single component, the thiolated hyaluronic acid derivative (HA-SH), and applied as a three-dimensional scaffold to mimic native extracellular matrix (ECM) for the culture of fibroblasts cells (L929) and chondrocytes. A series of HA-SH hydrogels were prepared depending on different degrees of thiol substitution (ranging from 10 to 60%) and molecule weights of HA (0.1, 0.3 and 1.0 MDa). The gelation time, swelling property and smart degradation behavior of HA-SH hydrogel were evaluated. The results showed that the gelation and degradation time of hydrogels could be controlled by adjusting the component of HA-SH polymers. The storage modulus of HA-SH hydrogels obtained by dynamic modulus analysis (DMA) could be up to 44.6 kPa. In addition, HA-SH hydrogels were investigated as a three-dimensional scaffold for the culture of fibroblasts cells (L929) and chondrocytes cells in vitro and as an injectable hydrogel for delivering chondrocytes cells in vivo. These results illustrated that HA-SH hydrogels with controllable gelation process, intelligent degradation behavior, excellent biocompatibility and convenient operational characteristics supplied potential clinical application capacity for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The performance of human dental pulp stem cells on different three-dimensional scaffold materials.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, W.; Walboomers, X.F.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Daamen, W.F.; Bian, Z.; Jansen, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo behavior of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) isolated from impacted third molars, when seeded onto different 3-dimensional (3-D) scaffold materials: i.e. a spongeous collagen, a porous ceramic, and a fibrous titanium mesh.

  8. The three-dimensional organization of a self replicating nano fabrication site: The human cell nucleus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); C. Münkel (Christian); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    1997-01-01

    markdownabstractThe eukaryotic cell is a prime example of a functioning nano-machinery. The synthesis of proteins, maintenance of structure and duplication of the machinery itself are all fine-tuned biochemical processes that depend on the precise structural arrangement of the cellular components.

  9. Education Catching up with Science: Preparing Students for Three-Dimensional Literacy in Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, IJsbrand M.; Dahmani, Hassen-Reda; Delouche, Pamina; Bidabe, Marissa; Schneeberger, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    The large number of experimentally determined molecular structures has led to the development of a new semiotic system in the life sciences, with increasing use of accurate molecular representations. To determine how this change impacts students' learning, we incorporated image tests into our introductory cell biology course. Groups of students…

  10. Three-dimensional photonic crystals as intermediate filter for thin-film tandem solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielawny, Andreas; Miclea, Paul T.; Wehrspohn, Ralf B.; Lee, Seung-Mo; Knez, Mato; Rockstuhl, Carsten; Lisca, Marian; Lederer, Falk L.; Carius, Reinhard

    2008-04-01

    The concept of a 3D photonic crystal structure as diffractive and spectrally selective intermediate filter within 'micromorphous' (a-Si/μc-Si) tandem solar cells has been investigated numerically and experimentally. Our device aims for the enhancement of the optical pathway of incident light within the amorphous silicon top cell in its spectral region of low absorption. From our previous simulations, we expect a significant improvement of the tandem cell efficiency of about absolutely 1.3%. This increases the efficiency for a typical a-Si / μc-Si tandem cell from 11.1% to 12.4%, as a result of the optical current-matching of the two junctions. We suggest as wavelength-selective optical element a 3D-structured optical thin-film, prepared by self-organized artificial opal templates and replicated with atomic layer deposition. The resulting samples are highly periodic thin-film inverted opals made of conducting and transparent zinc-oxide. We describe the fabrication processes and compare experimental data on the optical properties in reflection and transmission with our simulations and photonic band structure calculations.

  11. Three-dimensional single-particle tracking in live cells: news from the third dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont, A; Wehnekamp, F; Katayama, Y; Lamb, D C; Gorelashvili, M; Schüller, V; Arcizet, D; Heinrich, D

    2013-01-01

    Single-particle tracking (SPT) is of growing importance in the biophysical community. It is used to investigate processes such as drug and gene delivery, viral uptake, intracellular trafficking or membrane-bound protein mobility. Traditionally, SPT is performed in two dimensions (2D) because of its technical simplicity. However, life occurs in three dimensions (3D) and many methods have been recently developed to track particles in 3D. Now, is the third dimension worth the effort? Here we investigate the differences between the 2D and 3D analyses of intracellular transport with the 3D development of a time-resolved mean square displacement (MSD) analysis introduced previously. The 3D trajectories, and the 2D projections, of fluorescent nanoparticles were obtained with an orbital tracking microscope in two different cell types: in Dictyostelium discoideum ameba and in adherent, more flattened HuH-7 human cells. As expected from the different 3D organization of both cells’ cytoskeletons, a third of the active transport was lost upon projection in the ameba whereas the identification of the active phases was barely affected in the HuH-7 cells. In both cell types, we found intracellular diffusion to be anisotropic and the diffusion coefficient values derived from the 2D analysis were therefore biased. (paper)

  12. Three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories in the human interphase cell nucleus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); C. Münkel (Christian); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    1998-01-01

    markdownabstractThe synthesis of proteins, maintenance of structure and duplication of the eukaryotic cell itself are all fine-tuned biochemical processes that depend on the precise structural arrangement of the cellular components. The regulation of genes – their transcription and replication -

  13. The APC tumor suppressor is required for epithelial cell polarization and three-dimensional morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesko, Alyssa C.; Goss, Kathleen H.; Yang, Frank F.; Schwertner, Adam; Hulur, Imge; Onel, Kenan; Prosperi, Jenifer R.

    2015-01-01

    The Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) tumor suppressor has been previously implicated in the control of apical-basal polarity; yet, the consequence of APC loss-of-function in epithelial polarization and morphogenesis has not been characterized. To test the hypothesis that APC is required for the establishment of normal epithelial polarity and morphogenesis programs, we generated APC-knockdown epithelial cell lines. APC depletion resulted in loss of polarity and multi-layering on permeable supports, and enlarged, filled spheroids with disrupted polarity in 3D culture. Importantly, these effects of APC knockdown were independent of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, but were rescued with either full-length or a carboxy (c)-terminal segment of APC. Moreover, we identified a gene expression signature associated with APC knockdown that points to several candidates known to regulate cell-cell and cell-matrix communication. Analysis of epithelial tissues from mice and humans carrying heterozygous APC mutations further support the importance of APC as a regulator of epithelial behavior and tissue architecture. These data also suggest that the initiation of epithelial-derived tumors as a result of APC mutation or gene silencing may be driven by loss of polarity and dysmorphogenesis. PMID:25578398

  14. Influence of three-dimensional hyaluronic acid microenvironments on mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Cindy; Burdick, Jason A

    2009-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent progenitor cells whose plasticity and self-renewal capacity have generated significant interest for applications in tissue engineering. The objective of this study was to investigate MSC chondrogenesis in photo-cross-linked hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels. Because HA is a native component of cartilage, and MSCs may interact with HA via cell surface receptors, these hydrogels could influence stem cell differentiation. In vitro and in vivo cultures of MSC-laden HA hydrogels permitted chondrogenesis, measured by the early gene expression and production of cartilage-specific matrix proteins. For in vivo culture, MSCs were encapsulated with and without transforming growth factor beta-3 (TGF-beta3) or pre-cultured for 2 weeks in chondrogenic medium before implantation. Up-regulation of type II collagen, aggrecan, and sox 9 was observed for all groups over MSCs at the time of encapsulation, and the addition of TGF-beta3 further enhanced the expression of these genes. To assess the influence of scaffold chemistry on chondrogenesis, HA hydrogels were compared with relatively inert poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels and showed enhanced expression of cartilage-specific markers. Differences between HA and PEG hydrogels in vivo were most noticeable for MSCs and polymer alone, indicating that hydrogel chemistry influences the commitment of MSCs to undergo chondrogenesis (e.g., approximately 43-fold up-regulation of type II collagen of MSCs in HA over PEG hydrogels). Although this study investigated only early markers of tissue regeneration, these results emphasize the importance of material cues in MSC differentiation microenvironments, potentially through interactions between scaffold materials and cell surface receptors.

  15. Patterned carbon nanotubes as a new three-dimensional scaffold for mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitirim, Verda Ceylan [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Bilkent University, 06800, Ankara (Turkey); Kucukayan-Dogu, Gokce [Institute of Engineering and Science, Material Science and Nanotechnology Graduate Program, Bilkent University, 06800, Ankara (Turkey); Bengu, Erman [Department of Chemistry, Bilkent University, 06800, Ankara (Turkey); Akcali, Kamil Can, E-mail: akcali@fen.bilkent.edu.tr [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Bilkent University, 06800, Ankara (Turkey); Bilgen, Bilkent University Genetics and Biotechnology Research Center, 06800, Ankara (Turkey)

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the cellular adhesive features of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) on non-coated and collagen coated patterned and vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) structures mimicking the natural extra cellular matrix (ECM). Patterning was achieved using the elasto-capillary induced by water treatment on the CNT arrays. After confirmation with specific markers both at transcript and protein levels, MSCs from different passages were seeded on either collagen coated or non-coated patterned CNTs. Adhesion and growth of MSCs on the patterned CNT arrays were examined using scanning electron microscopy image analysis and 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. The highest MSC count was observed on the non-coated patterned CNTs at passage zero, while decreasing numbers of MSCs were found at the later passages. Similarly, MTT assay results also revealed a decrease in the viability of the MSCs for the later passages. Overall, the cell count and viability experiments indicated that MSCs were able to better attach to non-coated patterned CNTs compared to those coated with collagen. Therefore, the patterned CNT surfaces can be potentially used as a scaffold mimicking the ECM environment for MSC growth which presents an alternative approach to MSC-based transplantation therapy applications. - Highlights: • Synthesized vertically aligned CNTs were patterned to be used as scaffold. • The growth of mesenchymal stem cells was achieved on the patterned CNTs. • The cell number was counted higher on the patterned CNTs than collagen coated CNTs. • The MTT assay results revealed the cell viability on the patterned CNTs.

  16. Patterned carbon nanotubes as a new three-dimensional scaffold for mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitirim, Verda Ceylan; Kucukayan-Dogu, Gokce; Bengu, Erman; Akcali, Kamil Can

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the cellular adhesive features of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) on non-coated and collagen coated patterned and vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) structures mimicking the natural extra cellular matrix (ECM). Patterning was achieved using the elasto-capillary induced by water treatment on the CNT arrays. After confirmation with specific markers both at transcript and protein levels, MSCs from different passages were seeded on either collagen coated or non-coated patterned CNTs. Adhesion and growth of MSCs on the patterned CNT arrays were examined using scanning electron microscopy image analysis and 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. The highest MSC count was observed on the non-coated patterned CNTs at passage zero, while decreasing numbers of MSCs were found at the later passages. Similarly, MTT assay results also revealed a decrease in the viability of the MSCs for the later passages. Overall, the cell count and viability experiments indicated that MSCs were able to better attach to non-coated patterned CNTs compared to those coated with collagen. Therefore, the patterned CNT surfaces can be potentially used as a scaffold mimicking the ECM environment for MSC growth which presents an alternative approach to MSC-based transplantation therapy applications. - Highlights: • Synthesized vertically aligned CNTs were patterned to be used as scaffold. • The growth of mesenchymal stem cells was achieved on the patterned CNTs. • The cell number was counted higher on the patterned CNTs than collagen coated CNTs. • The MTT assay results revealed the cell viability on the patterned CNTs

  17. Tumor cell culture on collagen–chitosan scaffolds as three-dimensional tumor model: A suitable model for tumor studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Mahmoudzadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cells naturally live in three-dimensional (3D microenvironments, while common laboratory tests and evaluations are done in two-dimensional (2D plates. This study examined the impact of cultured 4T1 cancer cells in a 3D collagen–chitosan scaffold compared with 2D plate cultures. Collagen–chitosan scaffolds were provided and passed confirmatory tests. 4T1 tumor cells were cultured on scaffolds and then tumor cells growth rate, resistance to X-ray radiation, and cyclophosphamide as a chemotherapy drug were analyzed. Furthermore, 4T1 cells were extracted from the scaffold model and were injected into the mice. Tumor growth rate, survival rate, and systemic immune responses were evaluated. Our results showed that 4T1 cells infiltrated the scaffolds pores and constructed a 3D microenvironment. Furthermore, 3D cultured tumor cells showed a slower proliferation rate, increased levels of survival to the X-ray irradiation, and enhanced resistance to chemotherapy drugs in comparison with 2D plate cultures. Transfer of extracted cells to the mice caused enhanced tumor volume and decreased life span. This study indicated that collagen–chitosan nanoscaffolds provide a suitable model of tumor that would be appropriate for tumor studies.

  18. Tumor cell culture on collagen-chitosan scaffolds as three-dimensional tumor model: A suitable model for tumor studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh, Aziz; Mohammadpour, Hemn

    2016-07-01

    Tumor cells naturally live in three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments, while common laboratory tests and evaluations are done in two-dimensional (2D) plates. This study examined the impact of cultured 4T1 cancer cells in a 3D collagen-chitosan scaffold compared with 2D plate cultures. Collagen-chitosan scaffolds were provided and passed confirmatory tests. 4T1 tumor cells were cultured on scaffolds and then tumor cells growth rate, resistance to X-ray radiation, and cyclophosphamide as a chemotherapy drug were analyzed. Furthermore, 4T1 cells were extracted from the scaffold model and were injected into the mice. Tumor growth rate, survival rate, and systemic immune responses were evaluated. Our results showed that 4T1 cells infiltrated the scaffolds pores and constructed a 3D microenvironment. Furthermore, 3D cultured tumor cells showed a slower proliferation rate, increased levels of survival to the X-ray irradiation, and enhanced resistance to chemotherapy drugs in comparison with 2D plate cultures. Transfer of extracted cells to the mice caused enhanced tumor volume and decreased life span. This study indicated that collagen-chitosan nanoscaffolds provide a suitable model of tumor that would be appropriate for tumor studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Two and three dimensional electron backscattered diffraction analysis of solid oxide cells materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath

    in solid oxide fuel cell and electrolysis cell. Conductivity of STN is one of the important properties that researchers desire to improve. Grin boundary conductivity contributes to the overall conductivity of the STN. Grain boundary density controlled by mainly grain growth in material processing. Grain......There are two main technique were developed in this work: a technique to calculate grain boundary energy and pressure and a technique to measure lattice constant from EBSD. The techniques were applied to Nb-doped Strontium titanate (STN) and yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) which are commonly used...... boundary migration in grain growth involves grain boundary mobility and net pressure on it. Thus grain boundary energy and pressure of STN were calculated in this work. Secondary phase is undesired in STN and YSZ synthesis. The secondary phase in ceramics with the same compounds can have different lattice...

  20. Three-dimensional amorphous silicon solar cells on periodically ordered ZnO nanocolumns

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neykova, Neda; Moulin, E.; Campa, A.; Hruška, Karel; Poruba, Aleš; Stückelberger, M.; Haug, F.J.; Topič, M.; Ballif, C.; Vaněček, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 212, č. 8 (2015), s. 1823-1829 ISSN 1862-6300 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7E12029; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05053S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 283501 - FAST TRACK Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : amorphous materials * hydrothermal growth * nanostructures * silicon * solar cells * ZnO Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.648, year: 2015

  1. Three-dimensional bioprinting of complex cell laden alginate hydrogel structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabriz, Atabak Ghanizadeh; Hermida, Miguel A; Leslie, Nicholas R; Shu, Wenmiao

    2015-12-21

    Different bioprinting techniques have been used to produce cell-laden alginate hydrogel structures, however these approaches have been limited to 2D or simple three-dimension (3D) structures. In this study, a new extrusion based bioprinting technique was developed to produce more complex alginate hydrogel structures. This was achieved by dividing the alginate hydrogel cross-linking process into three stages: primary calcium ion cross-linking for printability of the gel, secondary calcium cross-linking for rigidity of the alginate hydrogel immediately after printing and tertiary barium ion cross-linking for long-term stability of the alginate hydrogel in culture medium. Simple 3D structures including tubes were first printed to ensure the feasibility of the bioprinting technique and then complex 3D structures such as branched vascular structures were successfully printed. The static stiffness of the alginate hydrogel after printing was 20.18 ± 1.62 KPa which was rigid enough to sustain the integrity of the complex 3D alginate hydrogel structure during the printing. The addition of 60 mM barium chloride was found to significantly extend the stability of the cross-linked alginate hydrogel from 3 d to beyond 11 d without compromising the cellular viability. The results based on cell bioprinting suggested that viability of U87-MG cells was 93 ± 0.9% immediately after bioprinting and cell viability maintained above 88% ± 4.3% in the alginate hydrogel over the period of 11 d.

  2. Onset of oscillatory binary fluid convection in three-dimensional cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Arantxa; Batiste, Oriol [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Barcelona (Spain)

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the influence of the transverse walls on the onset of convection in a horizontal rectangular cavity of infinite length filled with a binary mixture when heated from below. For the first time we take into account the effect of the third dimension without making any approximation and considering realistic boundary conditions. In previous numerical works the width of the cell was either taken to be infinity (bulk mixtures) or different approximations usually valid in the narrow cell limit were assumed (i.e., Hele-Shaw and non-ideal Hele-Shaw approximations). The results we find show that the presence of the walls has a considerable effect on the onset of convection even for intermediate transverse aspect ratio cells. They also show that the approximations generally assumed fail to reproduce the correct behaviour of the critical parameters in an important range of aspect ratio values when the primary bifurcation is oscillatory. We have compared the critical values of the Rayleigh number and the frequency with those reported in the literature (Ohlsen et al. [1]) and we find a quantitative agreement within the experimental error. (orig.)

  3. Thicker three-dimensional tissue from a “symbiotic recycling system” combining mammalian cells and algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Yuji; Kagawa, Yuki; Sakaguchi, Katsuhisa; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report an in vitro co-culture system that combines mammalian cells and algae, Chlorococcum littorale, to create a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue. While the C2C12 mouse myoblasts and rat cardiac cells consumed oxygen actively, intense oxygen production was accounted for by the algae even in the co-culture system. Although cell metabolism within thicker cardiac cell-layered tissues showed anaerobic respiration, the introduction of innovative co-cultivation partially changed the metabolism to aerobic respiration. Moreover, the amount of glucose consumption and lactate production in the cardiac tissues and the amount of ammonia in the culture media decreased significantly when co-cultivated with algae. In the cardiac tissues devoid of algae, delamination was observed histologically, and the release of creatine kinase (CK) from the tissues showed severe cardiac cell damage. On the other hand, the layered cell tissues with algae were observed to be in a good histological condition, with less than one-fifth decline in CK release. The co-cultivation with algae improved the culture condition of the thicker tissues, resulting in the formation of 160 μm-thick cardiac tissues. Thus, the present study proposes the possibility of creating an in vitro “symbiotic recycling system” composed of mammalian cells and algae. PMID:28139713

  4. Three dimensional live-cell STED microscopy at increased depth using a water immersion objective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Jörn; Wurm, Christian A.; Keller-Findeisen, Jan; Schönle, Andreas; Harke, Benjamin; Reuss, Matthias; Winter, Franziska R.; Donnert, Gerald

    2018-05-01

    Modern fluorescence superresolution microscopes are capable of imaging living cells on the nanometer scale. One of those techniques is stimulated emission depletion (STED) which increases the microscope's resolution many times in the lateral and the axial directions. To achieve these high resolutions not only close to the coverslip but also at greater depths, the choice of objective becomes crucial. Oil immersion objectives have frequently been used for STED imaging since their high numerical aperture (NA) leads to high spatial resolutions. But during live-cell imaging, especially at great penetration depths, these objectives have a distinct disadvantage. The refractive index mismatch between the immersion oil and the usually aqueous embedding media of living specimens results in unwanted spherical aberrations. These aberrations distort the point spread functions (PSFs). Notably, during z- and 3D-STED imaging, the resolution increase along the optical axis is majorly hampered if at all possible. To overcome this limitation, we here use a water immersion objective in combination with a spatial light modulator for z-STED measurements of living samples at great depths. This compact design allows for switching between objectives without having to adapt the STED beam path and enables on the fly alterations of the STED PSF to correct for aberrations. Furthermore, we derive the influence of the NA on the axial STED resolution theoretically and experimentally. We show under live-cell imaging conditions that a water immersion objective leads to far superior results than an oil immersion objective at penetration depths of 5-180 μm.

  5. Differences in growth properties of endometrial cancer in three dimensional (3D) culture and 2D cell monolayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitcholtan, Kenny; Asselin, Eric; Parent, Sophie; Sykes, Peter H.; Evans, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models have an invaluable role in understanding the behaviour of tumour cells in a well defined microenvironment. This is because some aspects of tumour characteristics cannot be fully recapitulated in a cell monolayer (2D). In the present study, we compared growth patterns, expression of signalling molecules, and metabolism-associated proteins of endometrial cancer cell lines in 3D and 2D cell cultures. Cancer cells formed spherical structures in 3D reconstituted basement membrane (3D rBM), and the morphological appearance was cell line dependent. Cell differentiation was observed after 8 days in the 3D rBM. There was reduced proliferation, detected by less expression of PCNA in 3D rBM than in 2D cell monolayers. The addition of exogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF) to cancer cells induced phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt in both cell culture conditions. The uptake of glucose was selectively altered in the 3D rBM, but there was a lack of association with Glut-1 expression. The secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) was selectively altered in 3D rBM, and it was cell line dependent. Our data demonstrated that 3D rBM as an in vitro model can influence proliferation and metabolism of endometrial cancer cell behaviour compared to 2D cell monolayer. Changes are specific to individual cell types. The use of 3D rBM is, therefore, important in the in vitro study of targeted anticancer therapies.

  6. Differences in growth properties of endometrial cancer in three dimensional (3D) culture and 2D cell monolayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitcholtan, Kenny, E-mail: kenny.chitcholtan@otago.ac.nz [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Otago, Christchurch, 2 Riccarton Avenue, Christchurch 8011 (New Zealand); Asselin, Eric, E-mail: Eric.Asselin@uqtr.ca [Department of Chemistry and Biology, University of Quebec, at Trois-Rivières, C.P. 500, Trois-Rivières, Quebec, Canada G9A 5H7 (Canada); Parent, Sophie, E-mail: Sophie.Parent@uqtr.ca [Department of Chemistry and Biology, University of Quebec, at Trois-Rivières, C.P. 500, Trois-Rivières, Quebec, Canada G9A 5H7 (Canada); Sykes, Peter H., E-mail: peter.sykes@otago.ac.nz [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Otago, Christchurch, 2 Riccarton Avenue, Christchurch 8011 (New Zealand); Evans, John J., E-mail: john.evans@otago.ac.nz [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Otago, Christchurch, 2 Riccarton Avenue, Christchurch 8011 (New Zealand); Centre of Neuroendocrinology and The MacDiarmid Institute of Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, University of Otago, Christchurch, 2 Riccarton Avenue, Christchurch 8011 (New Zealand)

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models have an invaluable role in understanding the behaviour of tumour cells in a well defined microenvironment. This is because some aspects of tumour characteristics cannot be fully recapitulated in a cell monolayer (2D). In the present study, we compared growth patterns, expression of signalling molecules, and metabolism-associated proteins of endometrial cancer cell lines in 3D and 2D cell cultures. Cancer cells formed spherical structures in 3D reconstituted basement membrane (3D rBM), and the morphological appearance was cell line dependent. Cell differentiation was observed after 8 days in the 3D rBM. There was reduced proliferation, detected by less expression of PCNA in 3D rBM than in 2D cell monolayers. The addition of exogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF) to cancer cells induced phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt in both cell culture conditions. The uptake of glucose was selectively altered in the 3D rBM, but there was a lack of association with Glut-1 expression. The secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) was selectively altered in 3D rBM, and it was cell line dependent. Our data demonstrated that 3D rBM as an in vitro model can influence proliferation and metabolism of endometrial cancer cell behaviour compared to 2D cell monolayer. Changes are specific to individual cell types. The use of 3D rBM is, therefore, important in the in vitro study of targeted anticancer therapies.

  7. Three-dimensional densitometry imaging of diatom cells using STIM tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habchi, C.; Nguyen, D.T.; Deves, G.; Incerti, S.; Lemelle, L.; Van Vang, P. Le; Moretto, Ph.; Ortega, R.; Seznec, H.; Sakellariou, A.; Sergeant, C.; Simionovici, A.; Ynsa, M.D.; Gontier, E.; Heiss, M.; Pouthier, T.; Boudou, A.; Rebillat, F.

    2006-01-01

    Scanning transmission ion microscopy tomography (STIM-T) was carried out on diatom cells with the aim of displaying their 3D structure and performing density measurements on their silica skeleton. Two software packages were compared for data reduction: TomoRebuild, based on a simple filtered backprojection algorithm, and DISRA, an iterative program. Silicon carbide microfibres of known density were also analysed as reference specimens. Similar results were obtained with both algorithms, demonstrating the ability of STIM-T to provide density measurements at the cell level without requiring any standard calibration samples. This unique feature stresses the interest of STIM-T to accurately normalise X ray emission micro-tomography data from synchrotron radiation (SXRF: synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence) or ion beam sources (PIXE: particle induced X-ray emission). Possible enhancements of the DISRA code are discussed in order to facilitate its use for the reconstruction of future PIXE/STIM tomography data. A 'nanoprobe' coupled to a Singletron[reg] accelerator, allowing a spatial resolution of a few tens of nanometers, is going to be built in the coming months at the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan (CENBG). This new facility will bring promising applications in imaging and analysis at the sub-cellular level

  8. Fabrication of large size alginate beads for three-dimensional cell-cluster culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengtao; Ruan, Meilin; Liu, Hongni; Cao, Yiping; He, Rongxiang

    2017-08-01

    We fabricated large size alginate beads using a simple microfluidic device under a co-axial injection regime. This device was made by PDMS casting with a mold formed by small diameter metal and polytetrafluorothylene tubes. Droplets of 2% sodium alginate were generated in soybean oil through the device and then cross-linked in a 2% CaCl2 solution, which was mixed tween80 with at a concentration of 0.4 to 40% (w/v). Our results showed that the morphology of the produced alginate beads strongly depends on the tween80 concentration. With the increase of concentration of tween80, the shape of the alginate beads varied from semi-spherical to tailed-spherical, due to the decrease of interface tension between oil and cross-link solution. To access the biocompatibility of the approach, MCF-7 cells were cultured with the alginate beads, showing the formation of cancer cells clusters which might be useful for future studies.

  9. Three-dimensional minority carrier lifetime mapping of thin film semiconductors for solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Brian [PLANT PV, Inc., Belmont, CA (United States); Peters, Craig [PLANT PV, Inc., Belmont, CA (United States); Barnard, Edward [PLANT PV, Inc., Belmont, CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    This project addresses the difficulty of accurately measuring charge carrier dynamics in novel semiconductor materials for thin film photovoltaic cells. We have developed a two- photon lifetime tomography technique to separate bulk minority carrier lifetime from surface recombination effects and effects of recombination at sub-surface defects. This technique also enables us to characterize how local defects such as grain boundaries– buried below the surface of a sample–affect carrier lifetimes in the active layer, dynamics that have been previously inaccessible. We have applied this newly developed technique to illuminate how CdCl2 treatment improves CdTe PV efficiency. From striking 3D lifetime tomography maps, a clear, sub- surface understanding emerges of the photophysical changes that occur in CdTe active medium following exposure to CdCl2, a standard step in the fabrication of high-efficiency CdTe-based solar cells. This work demonstrates a well-defined method to quantify grain-boundary, interface, and bulk recombination in CdTe and other optically-active polycrystalline semiconductor materials; information that can provide critical information to the development of next- generation photovoltaics and many other semiconductor technologies.

  10. Dye-sensitized solar cell module realized photovoltaic and photothermal highly efficient conversion via three-dimensional printing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Qi-Zhang; Zhu Yan-Qing; Shi Ji-Fu; Wang Lei-Lei; Zhong Liu-Wen; Xu Gang

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology is employed to improve the photovoltaic and photothermal conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) module. The 3D-printed concentrator is optically designed and improves the photovoltaic efficiency of the DSC module from 5.48% to 7.03%. Additionally, with the 3D-printed microfluidic device serving as water cooling, the temperature of the DSC can be effectively controlled, which is beneficial for keeping a high photovoltaic conversion efficiency for DSC module. Moreover, the 3D-printed microfluidic device can realize photothermal conversion with an instantaneous photothermal efficiency of 42.1%. The integrated device realizes a total photovoltaic and photothermal conversion efficiency of 49% at the optimal working condition. (paper)

  11. Mechanical behaviour of a fuel cell stack under vibrating conditions linked to aircraft applications part II: Three-dimensional modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouss, Vicky; Charon, Willy [M3M, University of Technology Belfort - Montbeliard (France); FCLAB, Rue Thierry Mieg, F 90010 Belfort, Cedex (France); Candusso, Denis [INRETS, The French National Institute for Transport and Safety Research (France); FCLAB, Rue Thierry Mieg, F 90010 Belfort, Cedex (France)

    2008-11-15

    The implementation of fuel cells (FC) in transportation systems such as airplanes requires better understanding of their mechanical behaviour in vibrating environment. To this end, a FC stack was tested on a vibrating platform for all three orthogonal axes. The experimental procedure is described in the first part of the paper. This second part of the paper demonstrates how the experimental data collected can be used to create a three-dimensional, multi-input and multi-output model based on the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) approach. Indeed FCs are nonlinear mechanical systems, difficult to be physically modelled. The ANN methodology which depends strictly on raw data is a particularly interesting alternative solution to model FCs, for example, for monitoring purpose. The ANN model is described along with the training, pruning and validation stages. The results are exposed and commented. (author)

  12. Dye-sensitized solar cell module realized photovoltaic and photothermal highly efficient conversion via three-dimensional printing technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-Zhang Huang; Yan-Qing Zhu; Ji-Fu Shi; Lei-Lei Wang; Liu-Wen Zhong; Gang Xu

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology is employed to improve the photovoltaic and photothermal conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) module.The 3D-printed concentrator is optically designed and improves the photovoltaic efficiency of the DSC module from 5.48% to 7.03%.Additionally,with the 3D-printed microfluidic device serving as water cooling,the temperature of the DSC can be effectively controlled,which is beneficial for keeping a high photovoltaic conversion efficiency for DSC module.Moreover,the 3D-printed microfluidic device can realize photothermal conversion with an instantaneous photothermal efficiency of 42.1%.The integrated device realizes a total photovoltaic and photothermal conversion efficiency of 49% at the optimal working condition.

  13. A two- and three-dimensional approach for visualizing human embryonic stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøchner, Christian Beltoft; Vestentoft, Peter S; Lynnerup, Niels

    2010-01-01

    visualization of this 2D-expression pattern can be created by developing a 3D-model of the culture, based on serial paraffin sections. Individual sections are stained using individual markers. Using 3D image processing software such as Mimics or 3D-Doctor, the actual 3D-rendering of an entire colony can...... be accomplished. An extended version of this technique even allows for a high-magnification 3D-reconstruction of an area of interest (AOI), e.g., the developing hepatic stem cells. These techniques allow both a 2D and a 3D visualization of hESC colonies and lead to new insights into and information about...

  14. [Evaluation of three-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype heterogeneity in non-small cell carcinoma and its significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui; Liu, Jinkang; Chen, Shengxi; Xiong, Zeng; Zhou, Jianhua; Tong, Shiyu; Chen, Hao; Zhou, Moling

    2012-06-01

    To explore the degree, mechanism and clinical significance of three-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype heterogeneity (3D-TMAPH) in non-small cell carcinoma (NSCLC). Twenty-one samples of solitary pulmonary nodules were collected integrally. To establish two-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype (2D-TMAP) and three-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype (3D-TMAP), five layers of each nodule were selected and embedded in paraffin. Test indices included the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), EphB4, ephfinB2 and microvascular density marked by anti-CD34 (CD34-MVD). The degrees of 3D-TMAPH were evaluated by the coefficient of variation and extend of heterogeneity. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to investigate the relationships between 2D-TMAP, 3D-TMAP and clinicopathological features. 3D-TMAPH showed that 2D-TMAP heterogeneity was expressed in the tissues of NSCLC. The heterogeneities in the malignant nodules were significantly higher than those in the active inflammatory nodules and tubercular nodules. In addition, different degrees of heterogeneity of CD34-MVD and PCNA were found in NSCLC tissues. The coefficients of variation of CD34- MVD and PCNA were positively related to the degree of differentiation (all P0.05). The level of heterogeneity of various expression indexes (ephrinB2, EphB4, VEGF) in NSCLC tissues were inconsistent, but there were no significant differences in heterogeneity in NSCLC tissues with different histological types (P>0.05). 3D-TMAPH exists widely in the microenvironment during the genesis and development of NSCLC and has a significant impact on its biological complexity.

  15. Three-dimensional neural differentiation of embryonic stem cells with ACM induction in microfibrous matrices in bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Ouyang, Anli; Li, Yan; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2013-01-01

    The clinical use of pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-derived neural cells requires an efficient differentiation process for mass production in a bioreactor. Toward this goal, neural differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in three-dimensional (3D) polyethylene terephthalate microfibrous matrices was investigated in this study. To streamline the process and provide a platform for process integration, the neural differentiation of ESCs was induced with astrocyte-conditioned medium without the formation of embryoid bodies, starting from undifferentiated ESC aggregates expanded in a suspension bioreactor. The 3D neural differentiation was able to generate a complex neural network in the matrices. When compared to 2D differentiation, 3D differentiation in microfibrous matrices resulted in a higher percentage of nestin-positive cells (68% vs. 54%) and upregulated gene expressions of nestin, Nurr1, and tyrosine hydroxylase. High purity of neural differentiation in 3D microfibrous matrix was also demonstrated in a spinner bioreactor with 74% nestin + cells. This study demonstrated the feasibility of a scalable process based on 3D differentiation in microfibrous matrices for the production of ESC-derived neural cells. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  16. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel/chitosan scaffold hybrid for three-dimensional stem cell culture and cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellati, Amir; Kiamahalleh, Meisam Valizadeh; Madani, S Hadi; Dai, Sheng; Bi, Jingxiu; Jin, Bo; Zhang, Hu

    2016-11-01

    Providing a controllable and definable three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment for chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) remains a great challenge for cartilage tissue engineering. In this work, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) polymers with the degrees of polymerization of 100 and 400 (NI100 and NI400) were prepared and the polymer solutions were introduced into the preprepared chitosan porous scaffolds (CS) to form hybrids (CSNI100 and CSNI400, respectively). SEM images indicated that the PNIPAAm gel partially occupied chitosan pores while the interconnected porous structure of chitosan was preserved. MSCs were incorporated within the hybrid and cell proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation were monitored. After 7-day incubation of the cell-laden constructs in a growth medium, the cell viability in CSNI100 and CSNI400 were 54 and 108% higher than that in CS alone, respectively. Glycosaminoglycan and total collagen contents increased 2.6- and 2.5-fold after 28-day culture of cell-laden CSNI400 in the chondrogenic medium. These results suggest that the hybrid structure composed of the chitosan porous scaffold and the well-defined PNIPAAm hydrogel, in particular CSNI400, is suitable for 3D stem cell culture and cartilage tissue engineering. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2764-2774, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Three-Dimensional Carbon Nanotube−Textile Anode for High-Performance Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Xing; Hu, Liangbing; Pasta, Mauro; Wells, George F.; Kong, Desheng; Criddle, Craig S.; Cui, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) harness the metabolism of microorganisms, converting chemical energy into electrical energy. Anode performance is an important factor limiting the power density of MFCs for practical application. Improving the anode design is thus important for enhancing the MFC performance, but only a little development has been reported. Here, we describe a biocompatible, highly conductive, two-scale porous anode fabricated from a carbon nanotube-textile (CNT-textile) composite for high-performance MFCs. The macroscale porous structure of the intertwined CNT-textile fibers creates an open 3D space for efficient substrate transport and internal colonization by a diverse microflora, resulting in a 10-fold-larger anolyte-biofilm-anode interfacial area than the projective surface area of the CNT-textile. The conformally coated microscale porous CNT layer displays strong interaction with the microbial biofilm, facilitating electron transfer from exoelectrogens to the CNT-textile anode. An MFC equipped with a CNT-textile anode has a 10-fold-lower charge-transfer resistance and achieves considerably better performance than one equipped with a traditional carbon cloth anode: the maximum current density is 157% higher, the maximum power density is 68% higher, and the energy recovery is 141% greater. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  18. Three dimensional microstructural network of elastin, collagen, and cells in Achilles tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xin; Wu, Jian-Ping; Allison, Garry T; Xu, Jiake; Rubenson, Jonas; Zheng, Ming-Hao; Lloyd, David G; Gardiner, Bruce; Wang, Allan; Kirk, Thomas Brett

    2017-06-01

    Similar to most biological tissues, the biomechanical, and functional characteristics of the Achilles tendon are closely related to its composition and microstructure. It is commonly reported that type I collagen is the predominant component of tendons and is mainly responsible for the tissue's function. Although elastin has been found in varying proportions in other connective tissues, previous studies report that tendons contain very small quantities of elastin. However, the morphology and the microstructural relationship among the elastic fibres, collagen, and cells in tendon tissue have not been well examined. We hypothesize the elastic fibres, as another fibrillar component in the extracellular matrix, have a unique role in mechanical function and microstructural arrangement in Achilles tendons. It has been shown that elastic fibres present a close connection with the tenocytes. The close relationship of the three components has been revealed as a distinct, integrated and complex microstructural network. Notably, a "spiral" structure within fibril bundles in Achilles tendons was observed in some samples in specialized regions. This study substantiates the hierarchical system of the spatial microstructure of tendon, including the mapping of collagen, elastin and tenocytes, with 3-dimensional confocal images. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1203-1214, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Education catching up with science: preparing students for three-dimensional literacy in cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Ijsbrand M; Dahmani, Hassen-Reda; Delouche, Pamina; Bidabe, Marissa; Schneeberger, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    The large number of experimentally determined molecular structures has led to the development of a new semiotic system in the life sciences, with increasing use of accurate molecular representations. To determine how this change impacts students' learning, we incorporated image tests into our introductory cell biology course. Groups of students used a single text dealing with signal transduction, which was supplemented with images made in one of three iconographic styles. Typically, we employed realistic renderings, using computer-generated Protein Data Bank (PDB) structures; realistic-schematic renderings, using shapes inspired by PDB structures; or schematic renderings, using simple geometric shapes to represent cellular components. The control group received a list of keywords. When students were asked to draw and describe the process in their own style and to reply to multiple-choice questions, the three iconographic approaches equally improved the overall outcome of the tests (relative to keywords). Students found the three approaches equally useful but, when asked to select a preferred style, they largely favored a realistic-schematic style. When students were asked to annotate "raw" realistic images, both keywords and schematic representations failed to prepare them for this task. We conclude that supplementary images facilitate the comprehension process and despite their visual clutter, realistic representations do not hinder learning in an introductory course.

  20. Three-Dimensional Carbon Nanotube−Textile Anode for High-Performance Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Xing

    2011-01-12

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) harness the metabolism of microorganisms, converting chemical energy into electrical energy. Anode performance is an important factor limiting the power density of MFCs for practical application. Improving the anode design is thus important for enhancing the MFC performance, but only a little development has been reported. Here, we describe a biocompatible, highly conductive, two-scale porous anode fabricated from a carbon nanotube-textile (CNT-textile) composite for high-performance MFCs. The macroscale porous structure of the intertwined CNT-textile fibers creates an open 3D space for efficient substrate transport and internal colonization by a diverse microflora, resulting in a 10-fold-larger anolyte-biofilm-anode interfacial area than the projective surface area of the CNT-textile. The conformally coated microscale porous CNT layer displays strong interaction with the microbial biofilm, facilitating electron transfer from exoelectrogens to the CNT-textile anode. An MFC equipped with a CNT-textile anode has a 10-fold-lower charge-transfer resistance and achieves considerably better performance than one equipped with a traditional carbon cloth anode: the maximum current density is 157% higher, the maximum power density is 68% higher, and the energy recovery is 141% greater. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  1. The effects of dynamic and three-dimensional environments on chondrogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Youngmee; Kim, Sang-Heon; Kim, Soo Hyun [Biomaterials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, PO Box 131, Cheonryang, Seoul, 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Ha, E-mail: soohkim@kist.re.k [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 261 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Articular cartilage is subjected to complex loading, which plays a major role in its growth, development and maintenance. Previously, we found that mechanical stimuli enhanced the development and function of engineered cartilage tissues in elastic mechano-active poly(lactide-co-caprolactone) (PLCL) scaffolds. In addition, it is well known that the three-dimensional spatial organization of cells and extracellular matrices in hydrogels is crucial to chondrogenesis. This study was conducted to enhance the chondrogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in the hybrid scaffolds of fibrin gels and PLCL scaffolds in dynamic environments by compression. A highly elastic scaffold was fabricated from very elastic PLCL with 85% porosity and a 300-500{mu}m pore size using a gel-pressing method. A mixture of rabbit BMSCs and fibrin gels was then seeded onto the PLCL scaffolds and subjected to continuous compressive deformation of 5% strain at 0.1 Hz for 10 days in a chondrogenic medium containing 10 ng ml{sup -1} TGF-beta{sub 1}. The BMSCs-seeded scaffold constructs were then implanted subcutaneously into nude mice. As a control, the cell-PLCL scaffold constructs were cultured under dynamic conditions or the cell-PLCL/fibrin hybrid scaffold constructs and the cell-PLCL scaffold constructs were cultured under static conditions for 10 days in vitro. The results revealed that cells adhered onto the hybrid scaffolds of fibrin gels and PLCL scaffolds cultured under dynamic conditions. In addition, the accumulation of the extracellular matrix of cell-scaffold constructs, which was increased through mechanical stimulation, showed that chondrogenic differentiation was sustained and enhanced significantly in the stimulated hybrid scaffold constructs. Overall, the results of this study indicate that the proper periodic application of dynamic compression and the three-dimensional environments of the hybrid scaffolds composed of fibrin gels and elastic PLCL can encourage

  2. Three-dimensional development of tensile pre-strained annulus fibrosus cells for tissue regeneration: An in-vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuah, Yon Jin [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637459 (Singapore); Lee, Wu Chean [University Hospital Conventry & Warwickshire NHS Trust, Clifford Bridge Road, West Midlands CV2, 2DX (United Kingdom); Wong, Hee Kit [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, National University Health System, NUHS Tower Block Level 11, 1E Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119228 (Singapore); Kang, Yuejun, E-mail: yuejun.kang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637459 (Singapore); Hee, Hwan Tak, E-mail: HTHee@ntu.edu.sg [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637459 (Singapore); Pinnacle Spine & Scoliosis Centre, 3 Mount Elizabeth, Mount Elizabeth Medical Centre, #04-07, Singapore 228510 (Singapore); School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637459 (Singapore)

    2015-02-01

    Prior research has investigated the immediate response after application of tensile strain on annulus fibrosus (AF) cells for the past decade. Although mechanical strain can produce either catabolic or anabolic consequences to the cell monolayer, little is known on how to translate these findings into further tissue engineering applications. Till to date, the application and effect of tensile pre-strained cells to construct a three-dimensional (3D) AF tissue remains unknown. This study aims to investigate the effect of tensile pre-strained exposure of 1 to 24 h on the development of AF pellet culture for 3 weeks. Equibiaxial cyclic tensile strain was applied on AF monolayer cells over a period of 24 h, which was subsequently developed into a cell pellet. Investigation on cellular proliferation, phenotypic gene expression, and histological changes revealed that tensile pre-strain for 24 h had significant and lasting effect on the AF tissue development, with enhanced cell proliferation, and up-regulation of collagen type I, II, and aggrecan expression. Our results demonstrated the regenerative ability of AF cell pellets subjected to 24 h tensile pre-straining. Knowledge on the effects of tensile pre-strain exposure is necessary to optimize AF development for tissue reconstruction. Moreover, the tensile pre-strained cells may further be utilized in either cell therapy to treat mild disc degeneration disease, or the development of a disc construct for total disc replacement. - Highlights: • Establishment of tensile pre-strained cell line population for annulus development. • Tensile strain limits collagen gene expression declination in monolayer culture. • Tensile pre-strained cells up-regulate their matrix protein in 3D pellet culture.

  3. Ultrastructural characteristics of three undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cell lines and their differentiated three-dimensional derivatives: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Suzan; Elsafadi, Mona; Mobarak, Mohammed; Alrwili, Ali; Vishnubalaji, Radhakrishnan; Manikandan, Muthurangan; Al-Qudsi, Fatma; Karim, Saleh; Al-Nabaheen, May; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Mahmood, Amer

    2014-04-01

    The fine structures of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) grown as colonies and differentiated in three-dimensional (3D) culture as embryoid bodies (EBs) were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Undifferentiated mESCs expressed markers that proved their pluripotency. Differentiated EBs expressed different differentiation marker proteins from the three germ layers. The ultrastructure of mESCs revealed the presence of microvilli on the cell surfaces, large and deep infolded nuclei, low cytoplasm-to-nuclear ratios, frequent lipid droplets, nonprominent Golgi apparatus, and smooth endoplasmic reticulum. In addition, we found prominent juvenile mitochondria and free ribosomes-rich cytoplasm in mESCs. Ultrastructure of the differentiated mESCs as EBs showed different cell arrangements, which indicate the different stages of EB development and differentiation. The morphologies of BALB/c and 129 W9.5 EBs were very similar at day 4, whereas C57BL/6 EBs were distinct from the others at day 4. This finding suggested that differentiation of EBs from different cell lines occurs in the same pattern but not at the same rate. Conversely, the ultrastructure results of BALB/c and 129 W9.5 ESCs revealed differentiating features, such as the dilated profile of a rough endoplasmic reticulum. In addition, we found low expression levels of undifferentiated markers on the outer cells of BALB/c and 129 W9.5 mESC colonies, which suggests a faster differentiation potential.

  4. Rotating three-dimensional dynamic culture of adult human bone marrow-derived cells for tissue engineering of hyaline cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Shinsuke; Mishima, Hajime; Ishii, Tomoo; Akaogi, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Ohyabu, Yoshimi; Chang, Fei; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2009-04-01

    The method of constructing cartilage tissue from bone marrow-derived cells in vitro is considered a valuable technique for hyaline cartilage regenerative medicine. Using a rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor developed in a NASA space experiment, we attempted to efficiently construct hyaline cartilage tissue from human bone marrow-derived cells without using a scaffold. Bone marrow aspirates were obtained from the iliac crest of nine patients during orthopedic operation. After their proliferation in monolayer culture, the adherent cells were cultured in the RWV bioreactor with chondrogenic medium for 2 weeks. Cells from the same source were cultured in pellet culture as controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluations (collagen type I and II) and quantification of glycosaminoglycan were performed on formed tissues and compared. The engineered constructs obtained using the RWV bioreactor showed strong features of hyaline cartilage in terms of their morphology as determined by histological and immunohistological evaluations. The glycosaminoglycan contents per microg DNA of the tissues were 10.01 +/- 3.49 microg/microg DNA in the case of the RWV bioreactor and 6.27 +/- 3.41 microg/microg DNA in the case of the pellet culture, and their difference was significant. The RWV bioreactor could provide an excellent environment for three-dimensional cartilage tissue architecture that can promote the chondrogenic differentiation of adult human bone marrow-derived cells.

  5. Selective killing of hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells by three-dimensional nanographene nanoparticles based on triptycene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoqin; Gan, Lu; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Chun; Yong, Tuying; Wang, Ziyi; Xu, Huibi; Yang, Xiangliang

    2015-03-01

    Carbon-based materials have been widely used in the biomedical fields including drug delivery and cancer therapies. In this paper, a recently synthesized three-dimensional nanographene (NG) based on triptycene self-assembles into nanoparticles which selectively kill human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells as compared to human normal liver HL7702 cells. Obvious differences in cellular accumulation, the endocytic pathway and intracellular trafficking of NG nanoparticles are observed in HepG2 cells and HL7702 cells. Further studies reveal that NG nanoparticles significantly increase the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HepG2 cells, but not in HL7702 cells. NG nanoparticle-induced ROS result in apoptosis induction and the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 cells. Moreover, IKK/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling is found to be activated by NG nanoparticle-induced ROS and serves to antagonize NG nanoparticle-induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Our studies show that the distinct behaviors of cellular uptake and ROS-mediated cytotoxicity are responsible for the selective killing of HepG2 cells. This study provides a foundation for understanding the mechanism of selective induction of apoptosis in cancer cells by NG nanoparticles and designing more effective chemotherapeutical agents.Carbon-based materials have been widely used in the biomedical fields including drug delivery and cancer therapies. In this paper, a recently synthesized three-dimensional nanographene (NG) based on triptycene self-assembles into nanoparticles which selectively kill human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells as compared to human normal liver HL7702 cells. Obvious differences in cellular accumulation, the endocytic pathway and intracellular trafficking of NG nanoparticles are observed in HepG2 cells and HL7702 cells. Further studies reveal that NG nanoparticles significantly increase the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HepG2 cells, but not in HL7702

  6. Three dimensional strained semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Lars; Conway, Adam; Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Leao, Cedric Rocha; Shao, Qinghui

    2016-11-08

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and at least one thin film in contact with at least one exterior surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a strain in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced strain of at least 0.05%, and an induced strain in at least 5% of a volume of the three dimensional structure. In another embodiment, a method includes forming a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and depositing at least one thin film on at least one surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a strain in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced strain of at least 0.05%, and an induced strain in at least 5% of a volume of the structure.

  7. The Influence of IL-10 and TNFα on Chondrogenesis of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Three-Dimensional Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Jagielski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chondrogenic differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are a promising cell source for articular cartilage repair. This study was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of two three-dimensional (3D culture systems for chondrogenic MSC differentiation in comparison to primary chondrocytes and to assess the effect of Interleukin (IL-10 and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNFα on chondrogenesis by MSCs in 3D high-density (H-D culture. MSCs were isolated from femur spongiosa, characterized using a set of typical markers and introduced in scaffold-free H-D cultures or non-woven polyglycolic acid (PGA scaffolds for chondrogenic differentiation. H-D cultures were stimulated with recombinant IL-10, TNFα, TNFα + IL-10 or remained untreated. Gene and protein expression of type II collagen, aggrecan, sox9 and TNFα were examined. MSCs expressed typical cell surface markers and revealed multipotency. Chondrogenic differentiated cells expressed cartilage-specific markers in both culture systems but to a lower extent when compared with articular chondrocytes. Chondrogenesis was more pronounced in PGA compared with H-D culture. IL-10 and/or TNFα did not impair the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. Moreover, in most of the investigated samples, despite not reaching significance level, IL-10 had a stimulatory effect on the type II collagen, aggrecan and TNFα expression when compared with the respective controls.

  8. The influence of IL-10 and TNFα on chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stromal cells in three-dimensional cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagielski, Michal; Wolf, Johannes; Marzahn, Ulrike; Völker, Anna; Lemke, Marion; Meier, Carola; Ertel, Wolfgang; Godkin, Owen; Arens, Stephan; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2014-09-09

    Chondrogenic differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a promising cell source for articular cartilage repair. This study was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of two three-dimensional (3D) culture systems for chondrogenic MSC differentiation in comparison to primary chondrocytes and to assess the effect of Interleukin (IL)-10 and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)α on chondrogenesis by MSCs in 3D high-density (H-D) culture. MSCs were isolated from femur spongiosa, characterized using a set of typical markers and introduced in scaffold-free H-D cultures or non-woven polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds for chondrogenic differentiation. H-D cultures were stimulated with recombinant IL-10, TNFα, TNFα + IL-10 or remained untreated. Gene and protein expression of type II collagen, aggrecan, sox9 and TNFα were examined. MSCs expressed typical cell surface markers and revealed multipotency. Chondrogenic differentiated cells expressed cartilage-specific markers in both culture systems but to a lower extent when compared with articular chondrocytes. Chondrogenesis was more pronounced in PGA compared with H-D culture. IL-10 and/or TNFα did not impair the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. Moreover, in most of the investigated samples, despite not reaching significance level, IL-10 had a stimulatory effect on the type II collagen, aggrecan and TNFα expression when compared with the respective controls.

  9. Enhanced photocurrent in thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells via shape controlled three-dimensional nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilali, Mohamed M; Banerjee, Sanjay; Sreenivasan, S V; Yang Shuqiang; Miller, Mike; Xu, Frank

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we have explored manufacturable approaches to sub-wavelength controlled three-dimensional (3D) nano-patterns with the goal of significantly enhancing the photocurrent in amorphous silicon solar cells. Here we demonstrate efficiency enhancement of about 50% over typical flat a-Si thin-film solar cells, and report an enhancement of 20% in optical absorption over Asahi textured glass by fabricating sub-wavelength nano-patterned a-Si on glass substrates. External quantum efficiency showed superior results for the 3D nano-patterned thin-film solar cells due to enhancement of broadband optical absorption. The results further indicate that this enhanced light trapping is achieved with minimal parasitic absorption losses in the deposited transparent conductive oxide for the nano-patterned substrate thin-film amorphous silicon solar cell configuration. Optical simulations are in good agreement with experimental results, and also show a significant enhancement in optical absorption, quantum efficiency and photocurrent. (paper)

  10. Variations in gene and protein expression in canine chondrodystrophic nucleus pulposus cells following long-term three-dimensional culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munetaka Iwata

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration greatly affects quality of life. The nucleus pulposus (NP of chondrodystrophic dog breeds (CDBs is similar to the human NP, because the cells disappear with age and are replaced by fibrochondrocyte-like cells. However, because IVD develops as early as within the first year of life, we used canines as a model to investigate in vitro the mechanisms underlying IVD degeneration. Specifically, we evaluated the potential of a three-dimensional (3D culture of healthy NP as an in vitro model system to investigate the mechanisms of IVD degeneration. Agarose hydrogels were populated with healthy NP cells from beagles after performing magnetic resonance imaging, and mRNA expression profiles and pericellular extracellular matrix (ECM protein distribution were determined. After 25 days of 3D culture, there was a tendency for redifferentiation into the native NP phenotype, and mRNA levels of Col2A1, COMP, and CK18 were not significantly different from those of freshly isolated cells. Our findings suggest that long-term 3D culture promoted chondrodystrophic NP redifferentiation through reconstruction of the pericellular microenvironment. Further, lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced expression of TNF-α, MMP3, MMP13, VEGF, and PGES mRNA in the 3D cultures, creating a molecular milieu that mimics that of degenerated NP. These results suggest that this in vitro model represents a reliable and cost-effective tool for evaluating new therapies for disc degeneration.

  11. Co2 and Co3 Mixed Cluster Secondary Building Unit Approach toward a Three-Dimensional Metal-Organic Framework with Permanent Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Yao Chao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Large and permanent porosity is the primary concern when designing metal-organic frameworks (MOFs for specific applications, such as catalysis and drug delivery. In this article, we report a MOF Co11(BTB6(NO34(DEF2(H2O14 (1, H3BTB = 1,3,5-tris(4-carboxyphenylbenzene; DEF = N,N-diethylformamide via a mixed cluster secondary building unit (SBU approach. MOF 1 is sustained by a rare combination of a linear trinuclear Co3 and two types of dinuclear Co2 SBUs in a 1:2:2 ratio. These SBUs are bridged by BTB ligands to yield a three-dimensional (3D non-interpenetrated MOF as a result of the less effective packing due to the geometrically contrasting SBUs. The guest-free framework of 1 has an estimated density of 0.469 g cm−3 and exhibits a potential solvent accessible void of 69.6% of the total cell volume. The activated sample of 1 exhibits an estimated Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET surface area of 155 m2 g−1 and is capable of CO2 uptake of 58.61 cm3 g−1 (2.63 mmol g−1, 11.6 wt % at standard temperature and pressure in a reversible manner at 195 K, showcasing its permanent porosity.

  12. Preparation of three-dimensional macroporous chitosan-gelatin B microspheres and HepG2-cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fang; Cui, Long; Peng, Cheng-Hong; Wu, Xu-Bo; Han, Bao-San; Dong, Ya-Dong

    2016-12-01

    Chitosan-gelatin B microspheres with an open, interconnected, highly macroporous (100-200 µm) structure were prepared via a three-step protocol combining freeze-drying with an electrostatic and ionic cross-linking method. Saturated tripolyphosphate ethanol solution (85% ethanol) was chosen as the crosslinking agent to prevent destruction of the porous structure and to improve the biostability of the chitosan-gelatin B microspheres, with N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethyl-carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide as a second crosslinking agent to react with gelatin A and fixed chitosan-gelatin B microspheres to attain improved biocompatibility. Water absorption of the three-dimensional macroporous chitosan-gelatin B microspheres (3D-P-CGMs) was 12.84, with a porosity of 85.45%. In vitro lysozyme degradation after 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, and 21 days showed improved biodegradation in the 3D-P-CGMs. The morphology of human hepatoma cell lines (HepG2 cells) cultured on the 3D-P-CGMs was spherical, unlike that of cells cultured under traditional two-dimensional conditions. Scanning electron microscopy and paraffin sections were used to confirm the porous structure of the 3D-P-CGMs. HepG2 cells were able to migrate inside through the pore. Cell proliferation and levels of albumin and lactate dehydrogenase suggested that the 3D-P-CGMs could provide a larger specific surface area and an appropriate microenvironment for cell growth and survival. Hence, the 3D-P-CGMs are eminently suitable as macroporous scaffolds for cell cultures in tissue engineering and cell carrier studies. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Streamline three-dimensional thermal model of a lithium titanate pouch cell battery in extreme temperature conditions with module simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaguemont, Joris; Omar, Noshin; Martel, François; Van den Bossche, Peter; Van Mierlo, Joeri

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, the development of a three-dimensional (3D) lithium titanium oxide (LTO) pouch cell is presented to first better comprehend its thermal behavior within electrified vehicle applications, but also to propose a strong modeling base for future thermal management system. Current 3D-thermal models are based on electrochemical reactions which are in need for elaborated meshing effort and long computational time. There lacks a fast electro-thermal model which can capture voltage, current and thermal distribution variation during the whole process. The proposed thermal model is a reduce-effort temperature simulation approach involving a 0D-electrical model accommodating a 3D-thermal model to exclude electrochemical processes. The thermal model is based on heat-transfer theory and its temperature distribution prediction incorporates internal conduction and heat generation effect as well as convection. In addition, experimental tests are conducted to validate the model. Results show that both the heat dissipation rate and surface temperature uniformity data are in agreement with simulation results, which satisfies the application requirements for electrified vehicles. Additionally, a LTO battery pack sizing and modeling is also designed, applied and displays a non-uniformity of the cells under driving operation. Ultimately, the model will serve as a basis for the future development of a thermal strategy for LTO cells that operate in a large temperature range, which is a strong contribution to the existing body of scientific literature.

  14. Three-dimensional matrix fiber alignment modulates cell migration and MT1-MMP utility by spatially and temporally directing protrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraley, Stephanie I.; Wu, Pei-Hsun; He, Lijuan; Feng, Yunfeng; Krisnamurthy, Ranjini; Longmore, Gregory D.; Wirtz, Denis

    2015-10-01

    Multiple attributes of the three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) have been independently implicated as regulators of cell motility, including pore size, crosslink density, structural organization, and stiffness. However, these parameters cannot be independently varied within a complex 3D ECM protein network. We present an integrated, quantitative study of these parameters across a broad range of complex matrix configurations using self-assembling 3D collagen and show how each parameter relates to the others and to cell motility. Increasing collagen density resulted in a decrease and then an increase in both pore size and fiber alignment, which both correlated significantly with cell motility but not bulk matrix stiffness within the range tested. However, using the crosslinking enzyme Transglutaminase II to alter microstructure independently of density revealed that motility is most significantly predicted by fiber alignment. Cellular protrusion rate, protrusion orientation, speed of migration, and invasion distance showed coupled biphasic responses to increasing collagen density not predicted by 2D models or by stiffness, but instead by fiber alignment. The requirement of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity was also observed to depend on microstructure, and a threshold of MMP utility was identified. Our results suggest that fiber topography guides protrusions and thereby MMP activity and motility.

  15. Performance analysis of three-dimensional-triple-level cell and two-dimensional-multi-level cell NAND flash hybrid solid-state drives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaki, Yukiya; Yamada, Tomoaki; Matsui, Chihiro; Yamaga, Yusuke; Takeuchi, Ken

    2018-04-01

    In order to improve performance of solid-state drives (SSDs), hybrid SSDs have been proposed. Hybrid SSDs consist of more than two types of NAND flash memories or NAND flash memories and storage-class memories (SCMs). However, the cost of hybrid SSDs adopting SCMs is more expensive than that of NAND flash only SSDs because of the high bit cost of SCMs. This paper proposes unique hybrid SSDs with two-dimensional (2D) horizontal multi-level cell (MLC)/three-dimensional (3D) vertical triple-level cell (TLC) NAND flash memories to achieve higher cost-performance. The 2D-MLC/3D-TLC hybrid SSD achieves up to 31% higher performance than the conventional 2D-MLC/2D-TLC hybrid SSD. The factors of different performance between the proposed hybrid SSD and the conventional hybrid SSD are analyzed by changing its block size, read/write/erase latencies, and write unit of 3D-TLC NAND flash memory, by means of a transaction-level modeling simulator.

  16. MicroRNA expression in the vildagliptin-treated two- and three-dimensional HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Yasunari; Asakura, Mitsutoshi; Mitsugi, Ryo; Fujii, Hideaki; Nagai, Kenichiro; Atsuda, Koichiro; Itoh, Tomoo; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2016-06-01

    Vildagliptin is an inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 that is used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. While vildagliptin can induce hepatic dysfunction in humans, the molecular mechanism has not been determined yet. Recent studies indicated that certain types of microRNA (miRNA) were linking to the development of drug-induced hepatotoxicity. In the present study, therefore, we identified hepatic miRNAs that were highly induced or reduced by the vildagliptin treatment in mice. MiR-222 and miR-877, toxicity-associated miRNAs, were induced 31- and 53-fold, respectively, by vildagliptin in the liver. While a number of miRNAs were significantly regulated by the orally treated vildagliptin in vivo, such regulation was not observed in the vildagliptin-treated HepG2 cells. In addition to the regular two-dimensional (2D) culture, we carried out the three-dimensional (3D) culturing of HepG2 cells. In the 3D-HepG2 cells, a significant reduction of miR-222 was observed compared to the expression level in 2D-HepG2 cells. A slight induction of miR-222 by vildagliptin was observed in the 3D-HepG2 cells, although miR-877 was not induced by vildagliptin even in the 3D-HepG2 cells. Further investigations are needed to overcome the discrepancy in the responsiveness of the miRNA expressions to vildagliptin between in vivo and in vitro. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A small molecule-based strategy for endothelial differentiation and three-dimensional morphogenesis from human embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijie Geng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The emerging models of human embryonic stem cell (hESC self-organizing organoids provide a valuable in vitro platform for studying self-organizing processes that presumably mimic in vivo human developmental events. Here we report that through a chemical screen, we identified two novel and structurally similar small molecules BIR1 and BIR2 which robustly induced the self-organization of a balloon-shaped three-dimensional structure when applied to two-dimensional adherent hESC cultures in the absence of growth factors. Gene expression analyses and functional assays demonstrated an endothelial identity of this balloon-like structure, while cell surface marker analyses revealed a VE-cadherin+CD31+CD34+KDR+CD43− putative endothelial progenitor population. Furthermore, molecular marker labeling and morphological examinations characterized several other distinct DiI-Ac-LDL+ multi-cellular modules and a VEGFR3+ sprouting structure in the balloon cultures that likely represented intermediate structures of balloon-formation.

  18. Three-dimensional, Computer-tomographic Analysis of Membrane Proteins (TrkA, caveolin, clathrin) in PC12 Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Tomoki; Arii, Tatsuo; Takaoka, Akio; Yoshimura, Ryoichi; Endo, Yasuhisa

    2007-01-01

    Signaling of nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptor (TrkA) promotes neuronal differentiation, synapse formation and survival. It has been known that the complex of NGF and TrkA is internalized into the cytoplasm and transported for further signal transduction, but the ultrastructural information of this process is virtually unknown. In order to clarify the relationship between the internalization of TrkA and the membrane-associated proteins (caveolin and clathrin), the localization and three-dimensional structures of those proteins were examined with computer tomography of high voltage electron microscopy in PC12 cells. TrkA immunoreactivity was found only at definite areas in the plasma membrane, as ring and cluster structures. Its 3D image indicated that those cluster structures contained small pits, which did not appear to be typical caveolae in size and shape. 3D images of clathrin and caveolin-1 immunoreactivities indicated that the formation of those small pits was associated with clathrin, but not with caveolin-1. Caveolin-1 immunoreactivity was found as a mesh-like structure just beneath the plasma membrane. These results suggest that clathrin rather than caveolin is mainly involved in the process of TrkA internalization, at least in differentiated PC12 cells

  19. A small molecule-based strategy for endothelial differentiation and three-dimensional morphogenesis from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yijie; Feng, Bradley

    2016-07-01

    The emerging models of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) self-organizing organoids provide a valuable in vitro platform for studying self-organizing processes that presumably mimic in vivo human developmental events. Here we report that through a chemical screen, we identified two novel and structurally similar small molecules BIR1 and BIR2 which robustly induced the self-organization of a balloon-shaped three-dimensional structure when applied to two-dimensional adherent hESC cultures in the absence of growth factors. Gene expression analyses and functional assays demonstrated an endothelial identity of this balloon-like structure, while cell surface marker analyses revealed a VE-cadherin(+)CD31(+)CD34(+)KDR(+)CD43(-) putative endothelial progenitor population. Furthermore, molecular marker labeling and morphological examinations characterized several other distinct DiI-Ac-LDL(+) multi-cellular modules and a VEGFR3(+) sprouting structure in the balloon cultures that likely represented intermediate structures of balloon-formation.

  20. Three-dimensional bioprinting of cell-laden constructs with polycaprolactone protective layers for using various thermoplastic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byoung Soo; Jang, Jinah; Chae, Suhun; Gao, Ge; Kong, Jeong-Sik; Ahn, Minjun; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-08-22

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell-printed constructs have been recognized as promising biological substitutes for tissue/organ regeneration. They provide tailored physical properties and biological cues via multi-material printing process. In particular, hybrid bioprinting, enabling to use biodegradable synthetic polymers as framework, has been an attractive method to support weak hydrogels. The constructs with controlled architecture and high shape fidelity were fabricated through this method, depositing spatial arrangement of multi-cell types into microscale constructs. Among biodegradable synthetic polymers, polycaprolactone (PCL) has been commonly chosen in fabrication of cell-printed constructs because of its low melting temperature of 60 °C to be dispensed with extrusion-based bioprinting system. However, in addition to PCL, various synthetic polymers have been widely applied for tissue regeneration. These polymers have distinctive characteristics essential for tissue/organ regeneration. Nevertheless, it is difficult to use some polymers, such as poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and polylactic acid (PLA) with 3D bioprinting technology because of their high melting temperature to be dispensed, which can result in thermal damage to the cells in the printed constructs during the fabrication process. We present a novel bioprinting method to use various synthetic polymers in fabrication of cell-printed constructs. PCL was introduced as a protective layer to prevent thermal damage caused by high temperature of polymers during fabrication. Remarkable improvement in cellular activities in the printed constructs with PCL layers was observed compared with the construct without PCL. This bioprinting method can be applied to fabricate more tissue-like constructs through the use of various biomaterials.

  1. Three-dimensional ultrastructural analyses of anterior pituitary gland expose spatial relationships between endocrine cell secretory granule localization and capillary distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitomi, Munetake; Ohta, Keisuke; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Togo, Akinobu; Hirashima, Shingo; Uemura, Kei-Ichiro; Okayama, Satoko; Morioka, Motohiro; Nakamura, Kei-Ichiro

    2016-10-31

    Endocrine and endothelial cells of the anterior pituitary gland frequently make close appositions or contacts, and the secretory granules of each endocrine cell tend to accumulate at the perivascular regions, which is generally considered to facilitate secretory functions of these cells. However, three-dimensional relationships between the localization pattern of secretory granules and blood vessels are not fully understood. To define and characterize these spatial relationships, we used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) three-dimensional reconstruction method based on focused ion-beam slicing and scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM). Full three-dimensional cellular architectures of the anterior pituitary tissue at ultrastructural resolution revealed that about 70% of endocrine cells were in apposition to the endothelial cells, while almost 30% of endocrine cells were entirely isolated from perivascular space in the tissue. Our three-dimensional analyses also visualized the distribution pattern of secretory granules in individual endocrine cells, showing an accumulation of secretory granules in regions in close apposition to the blood vessels in many cases. However, secretory granules in cells isolated from the perivascular region tended to distribute uniformly in the cytoplasm of these cells. These data suggest that the cellular interactions between the endocrine and endothelial cells promote an uneven cytoplasmic distribution of the secretory granules.

  2. Reconstitution of bone-like matrix in osteogenically differentiated mesenchymal stem cell–collagen constructs: A three-dimensional in vitro model to study hematopoietic stem cell niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WY Lai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs and osteoblasts are important niche cells for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in bone marrow osteoblastic niche. Here, we aim to partially reconstitute the bone marrow HSC niche in vitro using collagen microencapsulation for investigation of the interactions between HSCs and MSCs. Mouse MSCs (mMSCs microencapsulated in collagen were osteogenically differentiated to derive a bone-like matrix consisting of osteocalcin, osteopontin, and calcium deposits and secreted bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2. Decellularized bone-like matrix was seeded with fluorescence-labeled human MSCs and HSCs. Comparing with pure collagen scaffold, significantly more HSCs and HSC–MSC pairs per unit area were found in the decellularized bone-like matrix. Moreover, incubation with excess neutralizing antibody of BMP2 resulted in a significantly higher number of HSC per unit area than that without in the decellularized matrix. This work suggests that the osteogenic differentiated MSC–collagen microsphere is a valuable three-dimensional in vitro model to elucidate cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions in HSC niche.

  3. Three Dimensional Human Neuro-Spheroid Model of Alzheimer’s Disease Based on Differentiated Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han-Kyu; Velazquez Sanchez, Clara; Chen, Mei; Morin, Peter J.; Wells, John M.; Hanlon, Eugene B.

    2016-01-01

    The testing of candidate drugs to slow progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) requires clinical trials that are lengthy and expensive. Efforts to model the biochemical milieu of the AD brain may be greatly facilitated by combining two cutting edge technologies to generate three-dimensional (3D) human neuro-spheroid from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) derived from AD subjects. We created iPSC from blood cells of five AD patients and differentiated them into 3D human neuronal culture. We characterized neuronal markers of our 3D neurons by immunocytochemical staining to validate the differentiation status. To block the generation of pathologic amyloid β peptides (Aβ), the 3D-differentiated AD neurons were treated with inhibitors targeting β-secretase (BACE1) and γ-secretases. As predicted, both BACE1 and γ-secretase inhibitors dramatically decreased Aβ generation in iPSC-derived neural cells derived from all five AD patients, under standard two-dimensional (2D) differentiation conditions. However, BACE1 and γ-secretase inhibitors showed less potency in decreasing Aβ levels in neural cells differentiated under 3D culture conditions. Interestingly, in a single subject AD1, we found that BACE1 inhibitor treatment was not able to significantly reduce Aβ42 levels. To investigate underlying molecular mechanisms, we performed proteomic analysis of 3D AD human neuronal cultures including AD1. Proteomic analysis revealed specific reduction of several proteins that might contribute to a poor inhibition of BACE1 in subject AD1. To our knowledge, this is the first iPSC-differentiated 3D neuro-spheroid model derived from AD patients’ blood. Our results demonstrate that our 3D human neuro-spheroid model can be a physiologically relevant and valid model for testing efficacy of AD drug. PMID:27684569

  4. Dose escalation of chart in non-small cell lung cancer: is three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy really necessary?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGibney, Carol; Holmberg, Ola; McClean, Brendan; Williams, Charles; McCrea, Pamela; Sutton, Phil; Armstrong, John

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, pre clinically, the potential for dose escalation of continuous, hyperfractionated, accelerated radiation therapy (CHART) for non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we examined the strategy of omission of elective nodal irradiation with and without the application of three-dimensional conformal radiation technology (3DCRT). Methods and Materials: 2D, conventional therapy plans were designed according to the specifications of CHART for 18 patients with NSCLC (Stages Ib, IIb, IIIa, and IIIb). Further plans were generated with the omission of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) from the treatment portals (2D minus ENI plans [2D-ENI plans]). Both sets were inserted in the patient's planning computed tomographies (CTs). These reconstructed plans were then compared to alternative, three-dimensional treatment plans which had been generated de novo, with the omission of ENI: 3D minus elective nodal irradiation (3D-ENI plans). Dose delivery to the planning target volumes (PTVs) and to the organs at risk were compared between the 3 sets of corresponding plans. The potential for dose escalation of each patient's 2D-ENI and 3D-ENI plan beyond 54 Gy, standard to CHART, was also determined. Results: PTV coverage was suboptimal in the 2D CHART and the 2D-ENI plans. Only in the 3D-ENI plans did 100% of the PTV get ≥95% of the dose prescribed (i.e., 51.5 Gy [51.3-52.2]). Using 3D-ENI plans significantly reduced the dose received by the spinal cord, the mean and median doses to the esophagus and the heart. It did not significantly reduce the lung dose when compared to 2D-ENI plans. Escalation of the dose (minimum ≥1 Gy) with optimal PTV coverage was possible in 55.5% of patients using 3D-ENI, but was possible only in 16.6% when using the 2D-ENI planning strategy. Conclusions: 3DCRT is fundamental to achieving optimal PTV coverage in NSCLC. A policy of omission of elective nodal irradiation alone (and using 2D technology) will not achieve optimal PTV coverage or

  5. Facial rejuvenation starts in the midface: three-dimensional volumetric facial rejuvenation has beneficial effects on nontreated neighboring esthetic units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollina, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Facial aging is a major indication for minimal invasive esthetic procedures. Dermal fillers are a cornerstone in the approach for facial sculpturing. But where to start? Our concept is midfacial volume restoration in first place. This will result in a healthy and youthful appearance creating a facial V-shape. But midfacial filler injection does not only improve the malar area. It has also beneficial effects on neighboring esthetic units. We report on such improvements in periocular and nasolabial region, upper lips and perioral tissue, and the jaw line and discuss anatomical background. We hypothesize that midfacial deep filler injections also may activate subdermal white adipose tissue stem cells contributing to longer lasting rejuvenation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Three-dimensional models of cancer for pharmacology and cancer cell biology: capturing tumor complexity in vitro/ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, John A; Graeser, Ralph; de Hoogt, Ronald; Vidic, Suzana; Brito, Catarina; Gutekunst, Matthias; van der Kuip, Heiko

    2014-09-01

    Cancers are complex and heterogeneous pathological "organs" in a dynamic interplay with their host. Models of human cancer in vitro, used in cancer biology and drug discovery, are generally highly reductionist. These cancer models do not incorporate complexity or heterogeneity. This raises the question as to whether the cancer models' biochemical circuitry (not their genome) represents, with sufficient fidelity, a tumor in situ. Around 95% of new anticancer drugs eventually fail in clinical trial, despite robust indications of activity in existing in vitro pre-clinical models. Innovative models are required that better capture tumor biology. An important feature of all tissues, and tumors, is that cells grow in three dimensions. Advances in generating and characterizing simple and complex (with added stromal components) three-dimensional in vitro models (3D models) are reviewed in this article. The application of stirred bioreactors to permit both scale-up/scale-down of these cancer models and, importantly, methods to permit controlled changes in environment (pH, nutrients, and oxygen) are also described. The challenges of generating thin tumor slices, their utility, and potential advantages and disadvantages are discussed. These in vitro/ex vivo models represent a distinct move to capture the realities of tumor biology in situ, but significant characterization work still remains to be done in order to show that their biochemical circuitry accurately reflects that of a tumor. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Investigation of Rising-Sun Magnetrons Operated at Relativistic Voltages Using Three Dimensional Particle-in-Cell Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemke, R.W.; Genoni, T.C.; Spencer, T.A.

    1999-01-01

    This work is an attempt to elucidate effects that may limit efficiency in magnetrons operated at relativistic voltages (V ∼ 500 kV). Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation is used to investigate the behavior of 14 and 22 cavity, cylindrical, rising-sun magnetrons. Power is extracted radially through a single iris located at the end of every other cavity. Numerical results show that in general output power and efficiency increase approximately linearly with increasing iris width (decreasing vacuum Q) until the total Q becomes too low for stable oscillation in the n-mode to be maintained. Beyond this point mode competition and/or switching occur and efficiency decreases. Results reveal that the minimum value of Q (maximum efficiency) that can be achieved prior to the onset of mode competition is significantly affected by the magnitude of the 0-space-harmonic of the π-mode, a unique characteristic of rising-suns, and by the magnitude of the electron current density (space-charge effects). By minimizing these effects, up to 3.7 GW output power has been produced at an efficiency of 40%

  8. Three-dimensional self-consistent radiation transport model for the fluid simulation of plasma display panel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.C.; Yang, S.S.; Lee, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    In plasma display panels (PDPs), the resonance radiation trapping is one of the important processes. In order to incorporate this effect in a PDP cell, a three-dimensional radiation transport model is self-consistently coupled with a fluid simulation. This model is compared with the conventional trapping factor method in gas mixtures of neon and xenon. It shows the differences in the time evolutions of spatial profile and the total number of resonant excited states, especially in the afterglow. The generation rates of UV light are also compared for the two methods. The visible photon flux reaching the output window from the phosphor layers as well as the total UV photon flux arriving at the phosphor layer from the plasma region are calculated for resonant and nonresonant excited species. From these calculations, the time-averaged spatial profiles of the UV flux on the phosphor layers and the visible photon flux through the output window are obtained. Finally, the diagram of the energy efficiency and the contribution of each UV light are shown

  9. Accelerated hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jinming; Zheng Aiqing; Yu Yonghua; Wang Xuetao; Yuan Shuanghu; Han Dali; Li Kunhai

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect and complication of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with accelerated hypofractionated three dimensional conforms] radiation therapy (3DCRT). Methods: There were squamous carcinoma 21, adenocarcinoma 7, squamous-adenocarcinoma 4 and other cancer 3. There were 17 stage I and 18 stage II. Thirty-five patients of NSCLC were treated with a dose of 30-48 Gy in 6 or 8 Gy per fraction, 3 times a week. The outcome of these patients Was analyzed. Results: The overall 1-, 2- and 3- Year survival rate was 78.2%, 46.9% and 36.3%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year recurrence-free survival rate was 64.6 % and 39.7 %, respectively. The acute radiation pneumonitis and late lung fibrosis rates were high. Univariate analysis showed that Vm was a significant predictor of acute radiation pneumonitis. Conclusion: Compared with accelerated hypofractionated irradiation, the routine conventional fractionated radiation therapy may be preferred for more patients of NSCLC. (authors)

  10. Hierarchically Three-Dimensional Nanofiber Based Textile with High Conductivity and Biocompatibility As a Microbial Fuel Cell Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yifei; Liu, Qiongzhen; Chen, Jiahui; Wang, Bo; Wang, Yuedan; Liu, Ke; Li, Mufang; Jiang, Haiqing; Lu, Zhentan; Wang, Dong

    2016-07-19

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) encompass complex bioelectrocatalytic reactions that converting chemical energy of organic compounds to electrical energy. Improving the anode configuration is thought to be a critical step for enhancing MFCs performance. In present study, a hierarchically structured textile polypyrrole/poly(vinyl alcohol-co-polyethylene) nanofibers/poly(ethylene terephthalate) (referred to PPy/NFs/PET) is shown to be excellent anode for MFCs. This hierarchical PPy/NFs/PET anode affords an open porous and three-dimensional interconnecting conductive scaffold with larger surface roughness, facilitating microbial colonization and electron transfer from exoelectrogens to the anode. The mediator-less MFC equipped with PPy/NFs/PET anode achieves a remarkable maximum power density of 2420 mW m(-2) with Escherichia coli as the microbial catalyst at the current density of 5500 mA m(-2), which is approximately 17 times higher compared to a reference anode PPy/PET (144 mW m(-2)). Considering the low cost, low weight, facile fabrication, and good winding, this PPy/NFs/PET textile anode promises a great potential for high-performance and cost-effective MFCs in a large scale.

  11. Multistack integration of three-dimensional hyperbranched anatase titania architectures for high-efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wu-Qiang; Xu, Yang-Fan; Rao, Hua-Shang; Su, Cheng-Yong; Kuang, Dai-Bin

    2014-04-30

    An unprecedented attempt was conducted on suitably functionalized integration of three-dimensional hyperbranched titania architectures for efficient multistack photoanode, constructed via layer-by-layer assembly of hyperbranched hierarchical tree-like titania nanowires (underlayer), branched hierarchical rambutan-like titania hollow submicrometer-sized spheres (intermediate layer), and hyperbranched hierarchical urchin-like titania micrometer-sized spheres (top layer). Owing to favorable charge-collection, superior light harvesting efficiency and extended electron lifetime, the multilayered TiO2-based devices showed greater J(sc) and V(oc) than those of a conventional TiO2 nanoparticle (TNP), and an overall power conversion efficiency of 11.01% (J(sc) = 18.53 mA cm(-2); V(oc) = 827 mV and FF = 0.72) was attained, which remarkably outperformed that of a TNP-based reference cell (η = 7.62%) with a similar film thickness. Meanwhile, the facile and operable film-fabricating technique (hydrothermal and drop-casting) provides a promising scheme and great simplicity for high performance/cost ratio photovoltaic device processability in a sustainable way.

  12. Induction chemotherapy combined with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Aiqing; Yu Jinming; Zhao Xianguang; Wang Xuetao; Wei Guangsheng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect and complication of induction chemotherapy combined with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) for locally advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Ninety-two such patients were randomized into radiation therapy alone group(RT-, 50 patients) and induction chemotherapy combined radiotherapy group (CMT-, 42 patients). The induction chemotherapy consisted of 2-4 cycles of platinum-based regimen. Results: The overall median survival time was 15 months with 12 months in the RT group and 18 months in the CMT group (P=0.014) respectively. The 1-year overall survival rates were 48.6% and 71.2% in RT and CMT group, respectively (P=0.004). The 2-year survival rates were 20.8% and 37.6% in RT and CMT group, respectively (P=0.041). Treatment was well tolerated and the toxicities were similar in either group. Conclusion: The addition of induction chemotherapy to 3DCRT takes a survival advantage over 3DCRT alone for Stage III NSCLC without increasing toxicities. (authors)

  13. A hybrid nanostructure of platinum-nanoparticles/graphitic-nanofibers as a three-dimensional counter electrode in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chien-Kuo; Tsai, Ming-Chi; Su, Ching-Yuan; Wei, Sung-Yen; Yen, Ming-Yu; Ma, Chen-Chi M; Chen, Fu-Rong; Tsai, Chuen-Horng

    2011-11-07

    We directly synthesized a platinum-nanoparticles/graphitic-nanofibers (PtNPs/GNFs) hybrid nanostructure on FTO glass. We applied this structure as a three-dimensional counter electrode in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), and investigated the cells' photoconversion performance. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  14. Imaging of cellular spread on a three-dimensional scaffold by means of a novel cell-labeling technique for high-resolution computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thimm, B.W.; Hofmann, S.; Schneider, P.; Carretta, R.; Müller, R.

    2012-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) represents a truly three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique that can provide high-resolution images on the cellular level. Thus, one approach to detect single cells is X-ray absorption-based CT, where cells are labeled with a dense, opaque material providing the required

  15. Graphics processing unit accelerated three-dimensional model for the simulation of pulsed low-temperature plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fierro, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.fierro@ttu.edu; Dickens, James; Neuber, Andreas [Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    A 3-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision simulation that is fully implemented on a graphics processing unit (GPU) is described and used to determine low-temperature plasma characteristics at high reduced electric field, E/n, in nitrogen gas. Details of implementation on the GPU using the NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture framework are discussed with respect to efficient code execution. The software is capable of tracking around 10 × 10{sup 6} particles with dynamic weighting and a total mesh size larger than 10{sup 8} cells. Verification of the simulation is performed by comparing the electron energy distribution function and plasma transport parameters to known Boltzmann Equation (BE) solvers. Under the assumption of a uniform electric field and neglecting the build-up of positive ion space charge, the simulation agrees well with the BE solvers. The model is utilized to calculate plasma characteristics of a pulsed, parallel plate discharge. A photoionization model provides the simulation with additional electrons after the initial seeded electron density has drifted towards the anode. Comparison of the performance benefits between the GPU-implementation versus a CPU-implementation is considered, and a speed-up factor of 13 for a 3D relaxation Poisson solver is obtained. Furthermore, a factor 60 speed-up is realized for parallelization of the electron processes.

  16. Migration ability and Toll-like receptor expression of human mesenchymal stem cells improves significantly after three-dimensional culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Panpan; Liu, Zilin; Li, Xue; Zhang, Bing; Wang, Xiaoyuan; Lan, Jing; Shi, Qing; Li, Dong; Ju, Xiuli

    2017-09-16

    While the conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture protocol is well accepted for the culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), this method fails to recapitulate the in vivo native three-dimensional (3D) cellular microenvironment, and may result in phenotypic changes, and homing and migration capacity impairments. MSC preparation in 3D culture systems has been considered an attractive preparatory and delivery method recently. We seeded human umbilical cord-derived MSCs (hUCMSCs) in a 3D culture system with porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM), and investigated the phenotypic changes, the expression changes of some important receptors, including Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) when hUCMSCs were transferred from 2D to 3D systems, as well as the alterations in in vivo homing and migration potential. It was found that the percentage of CD105-positive cells decreased significantly, whereas that of CD34- and CD271-positive cells increased significantly in 3D culture, compared to that in 2D culture. The mRNA and protein expression levels of TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR6, and CXCR4 in hUCMSCs were increased significantly upon culturing with PADM for 3 days, compared to the levels in 2D culture. The numbers of migratory 3D hUCMSCs in the heart, liver, spleen, and bone marrow were significantly greater than the numbers of 2D hUCMSCs, and the worst migration occurred in 3D + AMD3100 (CXCR4 antagonist) hUCMSCs. These results suggested that 3D culture of hUCMSCs with PADM could alter the phenotypic characteristics of hUCMSCs, increase their TLR and CXCR4 expression levels, and promote their migratory and homing capacity in which CXCR4 plays an important role. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fibronectin- and collagen-mimetic ligands regulate bone marrow stromal cell chondrogenesis in three-dimensional hydrogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JT Connelly

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Modification of tissue engineering scaffolds with bioactive molecules is a potential strategy for modulating cell behavior and guiding tissue regeneration. While adhesion to RGD peptides has been shown to inhibit in vitro chondrogenesis, the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM-mimetic ligands with complex secondary and tertiary structures are unknown. This study aimed to determine whether collagen- and fibronectin-mimetic ligands would retain biologic functionality in three-dimensional (3D hydrogels, whether different ECM-mimetic ligands differentially influence in vitro chondrogenesis, and if effects of ligands on differentiation depend on soluble biochemical stimuli. A linear RGD peptide, a recombinant fibronectin fragment containing the seven to ten Type III repeats (FnIII7-10 and a triple helical, collagen mimetic peptide with the GFOGER motif were covalently coupled to agarose gels using the sulfo-SANPAH crosslinker, and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs were cultured within the 3D hydrogels. The ligands retained biologic functionality within the agarose gels and promoted density-dependent BMSC spreading. Interactions with all adhesive ligands inhibited stimulation by chondrogenic factors of collagen Type II and aggrecan mRNA levels and deposition of sulfated glycosaminoglycans. In medium containing fetal bovine serum, interactions with the GFOGER peptide enhanced mRNA expression of the osteogenic gene osteocalcin whereas FnIII7-10 inhibited osteocalcin expression. In conclusion, modification of agarose hydrogels with ECM-mimetic ligands can influence the differentiation of BMSCs in a manner that depends strongly on the presence and nature of soluble biochemical stimuli.

  18. Macrophage involvement affects matrix stiffness-related influences on cell osteogenesis under three-dimensional culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Tao; Wu, Rui-Xin; Xu, Xin-Yue; Wang, Jia; Yin, Yuan; Chen, Fa-Ming

    2018-04-15

    of a scaffold plays critical roles in modulating both reparative cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and immune cells, such as macrophages (Mφs). Although the influences of material stiffness on either Mφs or MSCs, have been extensively described, how the two cell types respond to matrix cues to dynamically affect each other in a three-dimensional (3D) biosystem remains largely unknown. Here, we report our findings that, in a platform wherein Mφs and bone marrow-derived MSCs coexist, matrix stiffness can influence stem cell fate through both direct matrix-associated regulation and indirect Mφ-based modulation. Our data support future studies of the MSC-Mφ-matrix interplay in the 3D context to optimize matrix parameters for the development of the next biomaterial. Copyright © 2018 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A three-dimensional in vitro HepG2 cells liver spheroid model for genotoxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ume-Kulsoom; Mallia, Jefferson de Oliveira; Singh, Neenu; Chapman, Katherine E; Doak, Shareen H; Jenkins, Gareth J S

    2018-01-01

    The liver's role in metabolism of chemicals makes it an appropriate tissue for toxicity testing. Current testing protocols, such as animal testing and two-dimensional liver cell systems, offer limited resemblance to in vivo liver cell behaviour, in terms of gene expression profiles and metabolic competence; thus, they do not always accurately predict human toxicology. In vitro three-dimensional liver cell models offer an attractive alternative. This study reports on the development of a 3D liver model, using HepG2 cells, by a hanging-drop technique, with a focus on evaluating spheroid growth characteristics and suitability for genotoxicity testing. The cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay protocol was adapted to enable micronucleus (MN) detection in the 3D spheroid models. This involved evaluating the difference between hanging vs non-hanging drop positions for dosing of the test agents and comparison of automated Metafer scoring with manual scoring for MN detection in HepG2 spheroids. The initial seeding density, used for all experiments, was 5000 cells/20 μl drop hanging spheroids, harvested on day 4, with >75% cell viability. Albumin secretion (7.8 g/l) and both CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 gene expression were highest in the 3D environment at day 4. Exposure to metabolically activated genotoxicants for 24 h resulted in a 6-fold increase in CYP1A1 enzyme activity (3 μM B[a]P) and a 30-fold increase in CYP1A2 enzyme activity (5 μM PhIP) in 3D hanging spheroids. MN inductions in response to B[a]P or PhIP were 2-fold and 3-fold, respectively, and were greater in 3D hanging spheroids than in 2D format, showing that hanging spheroids are more sensitive to genotoxic agents. HepG2 hanging-drop spheroids are an exciting new alternative system for genotoxicity studies, due to their improved structural and physiological properties, relative to 2D cultures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Efficacy of transpalatal arch as an anchorage reinforcing unit during orthodontic space closure: A three-dimensional finite element study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Shrishail Kudagi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Connecting the contralateral upper molars by means of a transpalatal arch (TPA is thought to decrease the tendency of the molars to move mesially in response to orthodontic force (i.e., provide orthodontic anchorage. This study was hence conducted to investigate the effects of the TPA on the displacement of the molars and stresses generated in the periodontium during orthodontic tooth movement using the finite element method (FEM. Materials and Methods: A three-dimensional (3D model was generated using medical modeling software (Mimics using the computed tomography slice images of the skull which were obtained at a slice thickness of 1 mm. From this, the finite element model was built using HyperMesh and analysis was performed using PATRAN software (MSC Software Corporation, 4675 MacArthur Court, Newport Beach, California 92660. The 3D finite element models were fabricated in two versions such as maxillary first molars including their associated periodontal ligament and alveolar bone one with TPA and another without TPA. Both were subjected to orthodontic forces, and the resultant stress patterns and displacements between the models with and without TPA were determined. Results: The stress and displacement plots in this study failed to show any significant differences in stress and displacement within the periodontium of molars, between the two models – one with TPA and the other without, in response to the orthodontic force. Interpretation and Conclusion: The results of the current finite element analysis, therefore, suggest that the presence of a TPA brings about no change in the initial dental and periodontal stress distribution and displacement.

  1. Three dimensional canonical transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegmen, A.

    2010-01-01

    A generic construction of canonical transformations is given in three-dimensional phase spaces on which Nambu bracket is imposed. First, the canonical transformations are defined as based on cannonade transformations. Second, it is shown that determination of the generating functions and the transformation itself for given generating function is possible by solving correspondent Pfaffian differential equations. Generating functions of type are introduced and all of them are listed. Infinitesimal canonical transformations are also discussed as the complementary subject. Finally, it is shown that decomposition of canonical transformations is also possible in three-dimensional phase spaces as in the usual two-dimensional ones.

  2. Three-dimensional neuroimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toga, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on new neuroimaging technologies that are revolutionizing the study of the brain be enabling investigators to visualize its structure and entire pattern of functional activity in three dimensions. The book provides a theoretical and practical explanation of the new science of creating three-dimensional computer images of the brain. The coverage includes a review of the technology and methodology of neuroimaging, the instrumentation and procedures, issues of quantification, analytic protocols, and descriptions of neuroimaging systems. Examples are given to illustrate the use of three-dimensional enuroimaging to quantitate spatial measurements, perform analysis of autoradiographic and histological studies, and study the relationship between brain structure and function

  3. Investigating the Role of Surface Materials and Three Dimensional Architecture on In Vitro Differentiation of Porcine Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Sofie Bruun; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Brogaard, Louise; Flagstad, Frederikke Bjergvang; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders; Summerfield, Artur; Jungersen, Gregers

    2016-01-01

    In vitro generation of dendritic-like cells through differentiation of peripheral blood monocytes is typically done using two-dimensional polystyrene culture plates. In the process of optimising cell culture techniques, engineers have developed fluidic micro-devises usually manufactured in materials other than polystyrene and applying three-dimensional structures more similar to the in vivo environment. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is an often used polymer for lab-on-a-chip devices but not much is known about the effect of changing the culture surface material from polystyrene to PDMS. In the present study the differentiation of porcine monocytes to monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) was investigated using CD172apos pig blood monocytes stimulated with GM-CSF and IL-4. Monocytes were cultured on surfaces made of two- and three-dimensional polystyrene as well as two- and three-dimensional PDMS and carbonised three-dimensional PDMS. Cells cultured conventionally (on two-dimensional polystyrene) differentiated into moDCs as expected. Interestingly, gene expression of a wide range of cytokines, chemokines, and pattern recognition receptors was influenced by culture surface material and architecture. Distinct clustering of cells, based on similar expression patterns of 46 genes of interest, was seen for cells isolated from two- and three-dimensional polystyrene as well as two- and three-dimensional PDMS. Changing the material from polystyrene to PDMS resulted in cells with expression patterns usually associated with macrophage expression (upregulation of CD163 and downregulation of CD1a, FLT3, LAMP3 and BATF3). However, this was purely based on gene expression level, and no functional assays were included in this study which would be necessary in order to classify the cells as being macrophages. When changing to three-dimensional culture the cells became increasingly activated in terms of IL6, IL8, IL10 and CCR5 gene expression. Further stimulation with LPS resulted

  4. Investigating the Role of Surface Materials and Three Dimensional Architecture on In Vitro Differentiation of Porcine Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Bruun Hartmann

    Full Text Available In vitro generation of dendritic-like cells through differentiation of peripheral blood monocytes is typically done using two-dimensional polystyrene culture plates. In the process of optimising cell culture techniques, engineers have developed fluidic micro-devises usually manufactured in materials other than polystyrene and applying three-dimensional structures more similar to the in vivo environment. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS is an often used polymer for lab-on-a-chip devices but not much is known about the effect of changing the culture surface material from polystyrene to PDMS. In the present study the differentiation of porcine monocytes to monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs was investigated using CD172apos pig blood monocytes stimulated with GM-CSF and IL-4. Monocytes were cultured on surfaces made of two- and three-dimensional polystyrene as well as two- and three-dimensional PDMS and carbonised three-dimensional PDMS. Cells cultured conventionally (on two-dimensional polystyrene differentiated into moDCs as expected. Interestingly, gene expression of a wide range of cytokines, chemokines, and pattern recognition receptors was influenced by culture surface material and architecture. Distinct clustering of cells, based on similar expression patterns of 46 genes of interest, was seen for cells isolated from two- and three-dimensional polystyrene as well as two- and three-dimensional PDMS. Changing the material from polystyrene to PDMS resulted in cells with expression patterns usually associated with macrophage expression (upregulation of CD163 and downregulation of CD1a, FLT3, LAMP3 and BATF3. However, this was purely based on gene expression level, and no functional assays were included in this study which would be necessary in order to classify the cells as being macrophages. When changing to three-dimensional culture the cells became increasingly activated in terms of IL6, IL8, IL10 and CCR5 gene expression. Further stimulation

  5. Identifying cell and molecular stress after radiation in a three-dimensional (3-D) model of oral mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambros, Maria Polikandritou; Parsa, Cyrus; Mulamalla, HariChandana; Orlando, Robert; Lau, Bernard; Huang, Ying; Pon, Doreen; Chow, Moses

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We irradiated a 3-D human oral cell culture of keratinocytes and fibroblasts with 12 and 2 Gy. → 6 h after irradiation the histopathology and apoptosis of the 3-D culture were evaluated. Microarrays were used to assess the gene expression in the irradiated 3-D tissue. → 12 Gy induced significant histopathologic changes and cellular apoptosis. → 12 Gy significantly affected genes of the NF-kB pathway, inflammatory cytokines and DAMPs. -- Abstract: Mucositis is a debilitating adverse effect of chemotherapy and radiation treatment. It is important to develop a simple and reliable in vitro model, which can routinely be used to screen new drugs for prevention and treatment of mucositis. Furthermore, identifying cell and molecular stresses especially in the initiation phase of mucositis in this model will help towards this end. We evaluated a three-dimensional (3-D) human oral cell culture that consisted of oral keratinocytes and fibroblasts as a model of oral mucositis. The 3-D cell culture model was irradiated with 12 or 2 Gy. Six hours after the irradiation we evaluated microscopic sections of the cell culture for evidence of morphologic changes including apoptosis. We used microarrays to compare the expression of several genes from the irradiated tissue with identical genes from tissue that was not irradiated. We found that irradiation with 12 Gy induced significant histopathologic effects including cellular apoptosis. Irradiation significantly affected the expression of several genes of the NF-kB pathway and several inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1B, 1L-8, NF-kB1, and FOS compared to tissue that was not irradiated. We identified significant upregulation of several genes that belong to damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as HMB1, S100A13, SA10014, and SA10016 in the 3-D tissues that received 12 Gy but not in tissues that received 2 Gy. In conclusion, this model quantifies radiation damage and this is an important first

  6. Three-dimensional structure of a glycosylated cell surface antigen from D. discoideum: a primordial adhesion motif

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabbutt, B.C.; Swarbrick, J.; Cubeddu, L.; Hill, A.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: We have determined the solution structure of pre-spore specific antigen (PsA), a predominant cell surface glycoprotein from the slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum. The structure and function of this protein suggests that it serves as a molecular signal for multicellular organisation, and that it may also be an adhesion motif mediating direct cell-cell contact. PsA consists of a 90-residue N-terminal globular domain tethered to the cell membrane via a heavily O-glycosylated stalk and a GPI anchor. No homologous sequences have been identified for the N-terminal domain. At Macquarie University, the D. discoideum organism has been well developed as a eukaryotic expression host for glycosylated proteins. For NMR, we have engineered a soluble form of PsA (residues 1-122) containing the globular 'head' and the glycopeptide linker. 15 N- and 15 N/ 13 C-labelled PsA was generated in this organism via a protocol that is readily adaptable for the cost-effective production of milligram quantities of other isotopically labelled recombinant proteins. Using 3D heteronuclear NMR, we have solved the three-dimensional structure of the PsA glycoprotein. It defines an eight stranded β-sandwich of five-on-three topology in a unique arrangement. A long loop is constrained by a cis proline residue and a disulphide bond to form an opening across one end of the sandwich, exposing portions of the hydrophobic interior. We postulate that this distortion of the sandwich fold structures a binding site. Structural and dynamics information was also obtained concerning the intact glycopeptide linker of the protein, which comprises a repeating P-T-V-T motif. In our recombinant form, each Thr residue is modified by a single GlcNAc sugar. This simple structure yields interpretable NMR spectra, which show the glycosylated linker to be in extended conformation, and undergoing distinctly different mobility from the globular domain. These same sugar residues provide an ideal attachment

  7. Three-dimensional graphene foams loaded with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells promote skin wound healing with reduced scarring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhonghua [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, The Fourth People' s Hospital Of Jinan, Jinan 250031 (China); Wang, Haiqin [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Fifth People' s Hospital Of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Yang, Bo; Sun, Yukai [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, The Fourth People' s Hospital Of Jinan, Jinan 250031 (China); Huo, Ran, E-mail: rhuo12@163.com [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China)

    2015-12-01

    The regeneration of functional skin remains elusive, due to poor engraftment, deficient vascularization, and excessive scar formation. Aiming to overcome these issues, the present study proposed the combination of a three-dimensional graphene foam (GF) scaffold loaded with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to improve skin wound healing. The GFs demonstrated good biocompatibility and promoted the growth and proliferation of MSCs. Meanwhile, the GFs loaded with MSCs obviously facilitated wound closure in animal model. The dermis formed in the presence of the GF structure loaded with MSCs was thicker and possessed a more complex structure at day 14 post-surgery. The transplanted MSCs correlated with upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), which may lead to neo-vascularization. Additionally, an anti-scarring effect was observed in the presence of the 3D-GF scaffold and MSCs, as evidenced by a downregulation of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) together with an increase of TGF-β3. Altogether, the GF scaffold could guide the wound healing process with reduced scarring, and the MSCs were crucial to enhance vascularization and provided a better quality neo-skin. The GF scaffold loaded with MSCs possesses necessary bioactive cues to improve wound healing with reduced scarring, which may be of great clinical significance for skin wound healing. - Highlights: • The GFs promoted the growth and proliferation of MSCs. • The GFs loaded with MSCs obviously facilitated wound closure in the animal model. • An anti-scarring effect was observed in the presence of 3D-GF scaffold and MSCs. • The GF scaffold loaded with MSCs has great effect on skin wound healing.

  8. Three-dimensional graphene foams loaded with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells promote skin wound healing with reduced scarring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhonghua; Wang, Haiqin; Yang, Bo; Sun, Yukai; Huo, Ran

    2015-01-01

    The regeneration of functional skin remains elusive, due to poor engraftment, deficient vascularization, and excessive scar formation. Aiming to overcome these issues, the present study proposed the combination of a three-dimensional graphene foam (GF) scaffold loaded with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to improve skin wound healing. The GFs demonstrated good biocompatibility and promoted the growth and proliferation of MSCs. Meanwhile, the GFs loaded with MSCs obviously facilitated wound closure in animal model. The dermis formed in the presence of the GF structure loaded with MSCs was thicker and possessed a more complex structure at day 14 post-surgery. The transplanted MSCs correlated with upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), which may lead to neo-vascularization. Additionally, an anti-scarring effect was observed in the presence of the 3D-GF scaffold and MSCs, as evidenced by a downregulation of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) together with an increase of TGF-β3. Altogether, the GF scaffold could guide the wound healing process with reduced scarring, and the MSCs were crucial to enhance vascularization and provided a better quality neo-skin. The GF scaffold loaded with MSCs possesses necessary bioactive cues to improve wound healing with reduced scarring, which may be of great clinical significance for skin wound healing. - Highlights: • The GFs promoted the growth and proliferation of MSCs. • The GFs loaded with MSCs obviously facilitated wound closure in the animal model. • An anti-scarring effect was observed in the presence of 3D-GF scaffold and MSCs. • The GF scaffold loaded with MSCs has great effect on skin wound healing

  9. Dual-wavelength optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy for cells with gold nanoparticle bioconjugates in three-dimensional cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Po-Yi; Liu, Wei-Wen; Chen, Shu-Ching; Li, Pai-Chi

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models bridge the gap between typical two-dimensional cultures and in vivo conditions. However, conventional optical imaging methods such as confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy cannot accurately depict cellular processing in 3D models due to limited penetration of photons. We developed a dualwavelength optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), which provides sufficient penetration depth and spatial resolution, for studying CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) trafficking in an in vitro 3D tumor microenvironment. CTLs play a cardinal role in host defense against tumor. Efficient trafficking of CTLs to the tumor microenvironment is a critical step for cancer immunotherapy. For the proposed system, gold nanospheres and indocyanine green (ICG) have been remarkable choices for contrast agents for photoacoustic signals due to their excellent biocompatibility and high optical absorption. With distinct absorption spectrums, targeted cells with gold nanospheres and ICG respectively can be identified by switching 523-nm and 800-nm laser irradiation. Moreover, we use an x-y galvanometer scanner to obtain high scanning rate. In the developed system, lateral and axial resolutions were designed at 1.6 μm and 5 μm, respectively. We successfully showed that dual-spectral OR-PAM can map either the distribution of CTLs with gold nanospheres at a visible wavelength of 523 nm or the 3D structure of tumor spheres with ICG in an in vitro 3D microenvironment. Our OR-PAM can provide better biological relevant information in cellular interaction and is potential for preclinical screening of anti-cancer drugs.

  10. Human endothelial cell growth and phenotypic expression on three dimensional poly(lactide-co-glycolide) sintered microsphere scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbarzadeh, Ehsan; Jiang, Tao; Deng, Meng; Nair, Lakshmi S; Khan, Yusuf M; Laurencin, Cato T

    2007-12-01

    Bone tissue engineering offers promising alternatives to repair and restore tissues. Our laboratory has employed poly(lactide-co-glycolide) PLAGA microspheres to develop a three dimensional (3-D) porous bioresorbable scaffold with a biomimetic pore structure. Osseous healing and integration with the surrounding tissue depends in part on new blood vessel formation within the porous structure. Since endothelial cells play a key role in angiogenesis (formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vasculature), the purpose of this study was to better understand human endothelial cell attachment, viability, growth, and phenotypic expression on sintered PLAGA microsphere scaffold. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination showed cells attaching to the surface of microspheres and bridging the pores between the microspheres. Cell proliferation studies indicated that cell number increased during early stages and reached a plateau between days 10 and 14. Immunofluorescent staining for actin showed that cells were proliferating three dimensionally through the scaffolds while staining for PECAM-1 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule) displayed typical localization at cell-cell contacts. Gene expression analysis showed that endothelial cells grown on PLAGA scaffolds maintained their normal characteristic phenotype. The cell proliferation and phenotypic expression were independent of scaffold pore architecture. These results demonstrate that PLAGA sintered microsphere scaffolds can support the growth and biological functions of human endothelial cells. The insights from this study should aid future studies aimed at enhancing angiogenesis in three dimensional tissue engineered scaffolds.

  11. Three-Dimensional Organization of Chromosome Territories and the Human Cell Nucleus: Comparison between simulated Parameters and Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractDespite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its three-dimensional structure is widely unknown, although it is important for gene regulation and replication. For a long time the interphase nucleus has been viewed as a 'spaghetti soup' of DNA without much internal

  12. A three-dimensional cell culture model to study the mechano-biological behavior in periodontal ligament regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oortgiesen, D.A.W.; Yu, N.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.; Yang, F.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis is a disease affecting the supporting structures of the teeth, which can eventually result in tooth loss. A three-dimensional (3D) tissue culture model was developed that may serve to grow a 3D construct that not only transplants into defective periodontal sites, but also allows to

  13. Experimental Validation of Methanol Crossover in a Three-dimensional, Two-Fluid Model of a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    A fully coupled three-dimensional, steady-state, two-fluid, multi-component and non-isothermal DMFC model has been developed in the commercial CFD package CFX 13 (ANSYS inc.). It accounts for the presence of micro porous layers, non-equilibrium phase change, and methanol and water uptake in the i...

  14. Nanoelectronics-biology frontier: From nanoscopic probes for action potential recording in live cells to three-dimensional cyborg tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaojie; Fu, Tian-Ming; Liu, Jia; Lieber, Charles M

    2013-08-01

    Semiconductor nanowires configured as the active channels of field-effect transistors (FETs) have been used as detectors for high-resolution electrical recording from single live cells, cell networks, tissues and organs. Extracellular measurements with substrate supported silicon nanowire (SiNW) FETs, which have projected active areas orders of magnitude smaller than conventional microfabricated multielectrode arrays (MEAs) and planar FETs, recorded action potential and field potential signals with high signal-to-noise ratio and temporal resolution from cultured neurons, cultured cardiomyocytes, acute brain slices and whole animal hearts. Measurements made with modulation-doped nanoscale active channel SiNW FETs demonstrate that signals recorded from cardiomyocytes are highly localized and have improved time resolution compared to larger planar detectors. In addition, several novel three-dimensional (3D) transistor probes, which were realized using advanced nanowire synthesis methods, have been implemented for intracellular recording. These novel probes include (i) flexible 3D kinked nanowire FETs, (ii) branched intracellular nanotube SiNW FETs, and (iii) active silicon nanotube FETs. Following phospholipid modification of the probes to mimic the cell membrane, the kinked nanowire, branched intracellular nanotube and active silicon nanotube FET probes recorded full-amplitude intracellular action potentials from spontaneously firing cardiomyocytes. Moreover, these probes demonstrated the capability of reversible, stable, and long-term intracellular recording, thus indicating the minimal invasiveness of the new nanoscale structures and suggesting biomimetic internalization via the phospholipid modification. Simultaneous, multi-site intracellular recording from both single cells and cell networks were also readily achieved by interfacing independently addressable nanoprobe devices with cells. Finally, electronic and biological systems have been seamlessly merged in 3D

  15. Stromal cell derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) directed chemoattraction of transiently CXCR4 overexpressing mesenchymal stem cells into functionalized three-dimensional biomimetic scaffolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thieme, S; Ryser, Martin; Gentsch, Marcus

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bone substitute material should not only serve as scaffold in large bone defects but also attract mesenchymal stem cells, a subset of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) that are able to form new bone tissue. An additional crucial step is to attract BMSCs from the surface int...... invaded up to 250 mum into SDF-1alpha-releasing 3D scaffolds, whereas CXCR4-overexpressing BMSC invaded up to 500 mum within 5 days. Thus, the SDF-1alpha/CXCR4 chemoattraction system can be used to efficiently recruit BMSCs into SDF-1alpha-releasing 3D scaffolds in vitro and in vivo....

  16. Evaluation of an objective plan-evaluation model in the three dimensional treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, Mary V.; Jain, Nilesh L.; Kahn, Michael G.; Drzymala, Robert E.; Purdy, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluation of three dimensional (3D) radiotherapy plans is difficult because it requires the review of vast amounts of data. Selecting the optimal plan from a set of competing plans involves making trade-offs among the doses delivered to the target volumes and normal tissues. The purpose of this study was to test an objective plan-evaluation model and evaluate its clinical usefulness in 3D treatment planning for nonsmall cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer treated with definitive radiotherapy were studied using full 3D techniques for treatment design and implementation. For each patient, the evaluator (the treating radiation oncologist) initially ranked three plans using room-view dose-surface isplays and dose-volume histograms, and identified the issues that needed to be improved. The three plans were then ranked by the objective plan-evaluation model. A figure of merit (FOM) was computed for each plan by combining the numerical score (utility in decision-theoretic terms) for each clinical issue. The utility was computed from a probability of occurrence of the issue and a physician-specific weight indicating its clinical relevance. The FOM was used to rank the competing plans for a patient, and the utility was used to identify issues that needed to be improved. These were compared with the initial evaluations of the physician and discrepancies were analyzed. The issues identified in the best treatment plan were then used to attempt further manual optimization of this plan. Results: For the 20 patients (60 plans) in the study, the final plan ranking produced by the plan-evaluation model had an initial 73% agreement with the ranking provided by the evaluator. After discrepant cases were reviewed by the physician, the model was usually judged more objective or 'correct'. In most cases the model was also able to correctly identify the issues that needed improvement in each plan. Subsequent

  17. In vitro three-dimensional coculturing poly3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate with mouse-induced pluripotent stem cells for myocardial patch application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shijun, Xu; Junsheng, Mu; Jianqun, Zhang; Ping, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Identifying a suitable polymeric biomaterial for myocardial patch repair following myocardial infarction, cerebral infarction, and cartilage injury is essential. This study aimed to investigate the effect of the novel polymer material, poly3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate, on the adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of mouse-induced pluripotent stem cells in vitro. Mouse-induced pluripotent stem cells were isolated, expanded, and cultured on either two-dimensional or three-dimensional poly3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate films (membranes were perforated to imitate three-dimensional space). Following attachment onto the films, mouse-induced pluripotent stem cell morphology was visualized using scanning electron microscopy. Cell vitality was detected using the Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and cell proliferation was observed using fluorescent 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Mouse-induced pluripotent stem cells were induced into cardiomyocytes by differentiation medium containing vitamin C. A control group in the absence of an inducer was included. Mouse-induced pluripotent stem cell survival and differentiation were observed using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, respectively. Mouse-induced pluripotent stem cells growth, proliferation, and differentiation were observed on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional poly3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate films. Vitamin C markedly improved the efficiency of mouse-induced pluripotent stem cells differentiation into cardiomyocytes on poly3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate films. Three-dimensional culture was better at promoting mouse-induced pluripotent stem cell proliferation and differentiation compared with two-dimensional culture. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Radiation-induced esophagitis in local advanced non-small cell lung cancer after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Dandan; Wang Yuxiang; Qiu Rong; Zhu Shuchai; Tian Xiuming; Qiao Xueying

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore radiation-induced esophagitis and its related factors in the patients with local advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) which were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods: From January 2001 to December 2008, 203 patients who suffered from stage Ⅲ NSCLC were achieved, including 163 males and 40 females, with a median age of 63 years old, while 79 cases were in stage Ⅲ_a and 124 in stage Ⅲ_b. The equivalent median dose of tumor was 62 Gy(range of 50-78 Gy). Among them, 74 cases were administered with radiotherapy alone, 45 with sequential radiotherapy and chemotherapy, 87 cases with concurrent radiochemotherapy. Radiation esophagitis was evaluated with RTOG standard. The dosimetric parameters was estimated from dose volume histogrma (DVH). The clinical and dosimetric parameters of radiation esophagitis were evaluated by spearman correlatived univariate and Logistic multivariable analysis.Results After radiotherapy, out of 203 patients, 87 had acute radiation esophagitis(RE), 47 in grade 1, 37 in grade 2, and 3 in grade 3 RE. According to spearman correlatived analysis, the correlatived factors included ages, chemotherapy, GTV, PTV, the mean doses of PTV and lung, the max and mean dose of esophagus, V_4_0, V_4_5, V_5_0, V_5_5, V_6_0, length of esophagus (total circumference) treated with 45 Gy (LETT_4_5), and LETT_5_0 (r = -0.162-0.235, P 0.05). There were 21 factors, such as gender, age, smoking, clinical stage, site of tumor, chemotherapy, GTV, PTV, mean dose of PTV and lung, max and mean dose of esophagus, V_4_0-V_6_0 of esophagus, LETT_4_5_-_6_0, incorporated into multivariable analysis, only chemotherapy and V_4_5 of esophagus were independent predicted factors(Wald = 4.626, 9.882, P < 0.05). Conclusions: In local advanced NSCLC after 3D-CRT, chemotherapy(especially concurrent radiochemotherapy) could increase radiation-induced esophagitis. The parameter of DVH could also be used to predict

  19. Three-dimensional spheroid cell culture of umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells leads to enhanced paracrine induction of wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Jorge M; Camões, Sérgio P; Filipe, Elysse; Cipriano, Madalena; Barcia, Rita N; Filipe, Mariana; Teixeira, Mariana; Simões, Sandra; Gaspar, Manuela; Mosqueira, Diogo; Nascimento, Diana S; Pinto-do-Ó, Perpétua; Cruz, Pedro; Cruz, Helder; Castro, Matilde; Miranda, Joana P

    2015-05-09

    The secretion of trophic factors by mesenchymal stromal cells has gained increased interest given the benefits it may bring to the treatment of a variety of traumatic injuries such as skin wounds. Herein, we report on a three-dimensional culture-based method to improve the paracrine activity of a specific population of umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (UCX®) towards the application of conditioned medium for the treatment of cutaneous wounds. A UCX® three-dimensional culture model was developed and characterized with respect to spheroid formation, cell phenotype and cell viability. The secretion by UCX® spheroids of extracellular matrix proteins and trophic factors involved in the wound-healing process was analysed. The skin regenerative potential of UCX® three-dimensional culture-derived conditioned medium (CM3D) was also assessed in vitro and in vivo against UCX® two-dimensional culture-derived conditioned medium (CM2D) using scratch and tubulogenesis assays and a rat wound splinting model, respectively. UCX® spheroids kept in our three-dimensional system remained viable and multipotent and secreted considerable amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor A, which was undetected in two-dimensional cultures, and higher amounts of matrix metalloproteinase-2, matrix metalloproteinase-9, hepatocyte growth factor, transforming growth factor β1, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, fibroblast growth factor 2 and interleukin-6, when compared to CM2D. Furthermore, CM3D significantly enhanced elastin production and migration of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in vitro. In turn, tubulogenesis assays revealed increased capillary maturation in the presence of CM3D, as seen by a significant increase in capillary thickness and length when compared to CM2D, and increased branching points and capillary number when compared to basal medium. Finally, CM3D-treated wounds presented signs of faster and better resolution when compared to untreated and CM

  20. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells exhibit immature nucleus pulposus cell phenotype in a laminin-rich pseudo-three-dimensional culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Brian H; Lee, Esther J; Jing, Liufang; Setton, Lori A; Chen, Jun

    2013-10-02

    Cell supplementation to the herniated or degenerated intervertebral disc (IVD) is a potential strategy to promote tissue regeneration and slow disc pathology. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (HUCMSCs) - originating from the Wharton's jelly - remain an attractive candidate for such endeavors with their ability to differentiate into multiple lineages. Previously, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been studied as a potential source for disc tissue regeneration. However, no studies have demonstrated that MSCs can regenerate matrix with unique characteristics matching that of immature nucleus pulposus (NP) tissues of the IVD. In our prior work, immature NP cells were found to express specific laminin isoforms and laminin-binding receptors that may serve as phenotypic markers for evaluating MSC differentiation to NP-like cells. The goal of this study is to evaluate these markers and matrix synthesis for HUCMSCs cultured in a laminin-rich pseudo-three-dimensional culture system. HUCMSCs were seeded on top of Transwell inserts pre-coated with Matrigel™, which contained mainly laminin-111. Cells were cultured under hypoxia environment with three differentiation conditions: NP differentiation media (containing 2.5% Matrigel™ solution to provide for a pseudo-three-dimensional laminin culture system) with no serum, or the same media supplemented with either insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) or transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Cell clustering behavior, matrix production and the expression of NP-specific laminin and laminin-receptors were evaluated at days 1, 7, 13 and 21 of culture. Data show that a pseudo-three-dimensional culture condition (laminin-1 rich) promoted HUCMSC differentiation under no serum conditions. Starting at day 1, HUCMSCs demonstrated a cell clustering morphology similar to that of immature NP cells in situ and that observed for primary immature NP cells within the similar laminin-rich culture system (prior study

  1. Cell fiber-based three-dimensional culture system for highly efficient expansion of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Nagata, Shogo; Okitsu, Teru; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2017-06-06

    Human pluripotent stem cells are a potentially powerful cellular resource for application in regenerative medicine. Because such applications require large numbers of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cells, a scalable culture system of human pluripotent stem cell needs to be developed. Several suspension culture systems for human pluripotent stem cell expansion exist; however, it is difficult to control the thickness of cell aggregations in these systems, leading to increased cell death likely caused by limited diffusion of gases and nutrients into the aggregations. Here, we describe a scalable culture system using the cell fiber technology for the expansion of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. The cells were encapsulated and cultured within the core region of core-shell hydrogel microfibers, resulting in the formation of rod-shaped or fiber-shaped cell aggregations with sustained thickness and high viability. By encapsulating the cells with type I collagen, we demonstrated a long-term culture of the cells by serial passaging at a high expansion rate (14-fold in four days) while retaining its pluripotency. Therefore, our culture system could be used for large-scale expansion of human pluripotent stem cells for use in regenerative medicine.

  2. Three-dimensional dynamic modelling of Polymer-Electrolyte-Membrane-Fuel-Cell-Systems; Dreidimensionale dynamische Modellierung und Berechnung von Polymer-Elektrolyt-Membran-Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vath, Andreas

    2008-12-15

    This thesis deals with dynamic and multi-dimensional modelling of Polymer- Electrolyte-Membrane-Fuel-Cells (PEMFC). The developed models include all the different layers of the fuel cell e.g. flow field, gas diffusion layer, catalyst layer and membrane with their particular physical, chemical and electrical characteristics. The simulation results have been verified by detailed measurements performed at the research centre for hydrogen and solar energy in Ulm (ZSW Ulm). The developed three dimensional model describes the time- and spatial-dependent charge and mass transport in a fuel cell. Additionally, this model allows the analysis of critical operating conditions. For example, the current density distribution for different membranes is shown during insufficient humidification which results in local overstraining and degradation. The model also allows to analyse extreme critical operating conditions, e.g. short time breakdown of the humidification. Furthermore, the model shows the available potential of improvement opportunities in power density and efficiency of PEMFC due to optimisation of the gas diffusion layer, the catalyst and membrane. In the second part of the work the application of PEMFC systems for combined heat and power units is described by one-dimensional models for an electrical power range between 1 kW and 5 kW. This model contains the necessary components, e.g. gas processing, humidification, gas supply, fuel cell stack, heat storage, pumps, auxiliary burner, power inverter und additional aggregates. As a main result, it is possible to distinctly reduce the energy demand and the carbon dioxide exhaust for different load profiles. Today the costs for fuel cell systems are considerably higher than that of the conventional electrical energy supply. (orig.)

  3. Three-dimensional aromatic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Shinji; Iwanaga, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) networks consisting of aromatic units and linkers are reviewed from various aspects. To understand principles for the construction of such compounds, we generalize the roles of building units, the synthetic approaches, and the classification of networks. As fundamental compounds, cyclophanes with large aromatic units and aromatic macrocycles with linear acetylene linkers are highlighted in terms of transannular interactions between aromatic units, conformational preference, and resolution of chiral derivatives. Polycyclic cage compounds are constructed from building units by linkages via covalent bonds, metal-coordination bonds, or hydrogen bonds. Large cage networks often include a wide range of guest species in their cavity to afford novel inclusion compounds. Topological isomers consisting of two or more macrocycles are formed by cyclization of preorganized species. Some complicated topological networks are constructed by self-assembly of simple building units.

  4. Balancing Cell Migration with Matrix Degradation Enhances Gene Delivery to Cells Cultured Three-Dimensionally Within Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Jaclyn A.; Huang, Alyssa; Shikanova, Ariella; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2010-01-01

    In regenerative medicine, hydrogels are employed to fill defects and support the infiltration of cells that can ultimately regenerate tissue. Gene delivery within hydrogels targeting infiltrating cells has the potential to promote tissue formation, but the delivery efficiency of nonviral vectors within hydrogels is low hindering their applicability in tissue regeneration. To improve their functionality, we have conducted a mechanistic study to investigate the contribution of cell migration and matrix degradation on gene delivery. In this report, lipoplexes were entrapped within hydrogels based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) crosslinked with peptides containing matrix metalloproteinase degradable sequences. The mesh size of these hydrogels is substantially less than the size of the entrapped lipoplexes, which can function to retain vectors. Cell migration and transfection were simultaneously measured within hydrogels with varying density of cell adhesion sites (Arg-Gly-Asp peptides) and solids content. Increasing RGD density increased expression levels up to 100-fold, while greater solids content sustained expression levels for 16 days. Increasing RGD density and decreasing solids content increased cell migration, which indicates expression levels increase with increased cell migration. Initially exposing cells to vector resulted in transient expression that declined after 2 days, verifying the requirement of migration to sustain expression. Transfected cells were predominantly located within the population of migrating cells for hydrogels that supported cell migration. Although the small mesh size retained at least 70% of the lipoplexes in the absence of cells after 32 days, the presence of cells decreased retention to 10% after 16 days. These results indicate that vectors retained within hydrogels contact migrating cells, and that persistent cell migration can maintain elevated expression levels. Thus matrix degradation and cell migration are fundamental design

  5. Squaramide-based supramolecular materials for three-dimensional cell culture of human induced pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tong, Ciqing; Liu, Tingxian; Saez Talens, Victorio; Noteborn, Willem E.M.; Sharp, Thomas H.; Hendrix, Marco M.R.M.; Voets, Ilja K.; Mummery, Christine L.; Orlova, Valeria V.; Kieltyka, Roxanne E.

    2018-01-01

    Synthetic hydrogel materials can recapitulate the natural cell microenvironment; however, it is equally necessary that the gels maintain cell viability and phenotype while permitting reisolation without stress, especially for use in the stem cell field. Here, we describe a family of synthetically

  6. Three-Dimensional Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Araujo, Vitor; Viana, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    In this book, the authors present the elements of a general theory for flows on three-dimensional compact boundaryless manifolds, encompassing flows with equilibria accumulated by regular orbits. The book aims to provide a global perspective of this theory and make it easier for the reader to digest the growing literature on this subject. This is not the first book on the subject of dynamical systems, but there are distinct aspects which together make this book unique. Firstly, this book treats mostly continuous time dynamical systems, instead of its discrete counterpart, exhaustively treated

  7. Three dimensional system integration

    CERN Document Server

    Papanikolaou, Antonis; Radojcic, Riko

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) integrated circuit (IC) stacking is the next big step in electronic system integration. It enables packing more functionality, as well as integration of heterogeneous materials, devices, and signals, in the same space (volume). This results in consumer electronics (e.g., mobile, handheld devices) which can run more powerful applications, such as full-length movies and 3D games, with longer battery life. This technology is so promising that it is expected to be a mainstream technology a few years from now, less than 10-15 years from its original conception. To achieve thi

  8. Three dimensional corrugated organic photovoltaics for building integration; improving the efficiency, oblique angle and diffuse performance of solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kettle, Jeff; Bristow, Noel; Sweet, Tracy K. N.; Jenkins, Nick; Benatto, Gisele Alves dos Reis; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Krebs, Frederik C

    2015-01-01

    The lamination of OPV modules to corrugated roof cladding has been undertaken. The 3-dimensional form of the cladding provides three advantages for outdoor OPV deployment; firstly the ‘footprint’ of the solar cell is reduced, which leads to B10% improved power conversion (PCE) efficiency per unit area. Secondly, the oblique angle performance is enhanced, leading to increased output in the early morning and evening. Indoor characterisation showed a 9-fold enhancement in efficiency was obtainab...

  9. Label-free three-dimensional (3D) structural imaging in live cells using intrinsic optical refractive index

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chen

    2017-04-14

    Here we report a method for visualization of volumetric structural information of live biological samples with no exogenous contrast agents. The process is made possible through a technique that involves generation, synthesis and analysis of three-dimensional (3D) Fourier components of light diffracted by the sample. This leads to the direct recovery of quantitative cellular morphology with no iterative procedures for reduced computational complexity. Combing with the fact that the technique is easily adaptive to any imaging platform and requires minimum sample preparation, our proposed method is particularly promising for observing fast, volumetric and dynamic events previously only accessible through staining methods.

  10. Label-free three-dimensional (3D) structural imaging in live cells using intrinsic optical refractive index

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chen; Malek, Michael; Poon, Ivan K. H.; Jiang, Lanzhou; Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Roberts, Ann; Quiney, Harry; Zhang, Douguo; Yuan, Xiaocong; Lin, Jiao; Depeursinge, Christian; Marquet, Pierre; Kou, Shan Shan

    2017-01-01

    Here we report a method for visualization of volumetric structural information of live biological samples with no exogenous contrast agents. The process is made possible through a technique that involves generation, synthesis and analysis of three-dimensional (3D) Fourier components of light diffracted by the sample. This leads to the direct recovery of quantitative cellular morphology with no iterative procedures for reduced computational complexity. Combing with the fact that the technique is easily adaptive to any imaging platform and requires minimum sample preparation, our proposed method is particularly promising for observing fast, volumetric and dynamic events previously only accessible through staining methods.

  11. Parameters in three-dimensional osteospheroids of telomerized human mesenchymal (stromal) stem cells grown on osteoconductive scaffolds that predict in vivo bone-forming potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burns, Jorge S; Hansen, Pernille Lund; Larsen, Kenneth H

    2010-01-01

    Osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in monolayer culture is artefactual, lacking an organized bone-like matrix. We present a highly reproducible microwell protocol generating three-dimensional ex vivo multicellular aggregates of telomerized hMSC (hMSC-telomerase re......Osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in monolayer culture is artefactual, lacking an organized bone-like matrix. We present a highly reproducible microwell protocol generating three-dimensional ex vivo multicellular aggregates of telomerized hMSC (h......, was deposited in the scaffold concavities. Here, mature osteoblasts stained positively for differentiated osteoblast markers TAZ, biglycan, osteocalcin, and phospho-AKT. Quantification of collagen birefringence and relatively high expression of genes for matrix proteins, including type I collagen, biglycan...

  12. Static and dynamic properties of three-dimensional dot-type magnonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksymov, Artur; Spinu, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    The static and dynamic magnetization of three-dimensional magnonic metamaterials has been investigated. By numerical means it was analyzed the impact of space dimensionality on the properties of magnonic crystal with unit cell consisting of four dots. It is find out the possibility of multi-vortex core formation which is related to the increasing of the crystal height by three-dimensional periodicity of single crystal layer. Additionally is provided the analysis of ferromagnetic resonance phenomenon for two-dimensional and three-dimensional structures. For the unsaturated magnetization of three-dimensional crystal the several pronounced resonance frequencies were detected.

  13. Static and dynamic properties of three-dimensional dot-type magnonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksymov, Artur, E-mail: maxyartur@gmail.com [Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Department of General Physics, Chernivtsi National University, Chernivtsi 58012 (Ukraine); Spinu, Leonard [Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Department of Physics, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The static and dynamic magnetization of three-dimensional magnonic metamaterials has been investigated. By numerical means it was analyzed the impact of space dimensionality on the properties of magnonic crystal with unit cell consisting of four dots. It is find out the possibility of multi-vortex core formation which is related to the increasing of the crystal height by three-dimensional periodicity of single crystal layer. Additionally is provided the analysis of ferromagnetic resonance phenomenon for two-dimensional and three-dimensional structures. For the unsaturated magnetization of three-dimensional crystal the several pronounced resonance frequencies were detected.

  14. Three Dimensional Dirac Semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaheer, Saad

    2014-03-01

    Dirac points on the Fermi surface of two dimensional graphene are responsible for its unique electronic behavior. One can ask whether any three dimensional materials support similar pseudorelativistic physics in their bulk electronic spectra. This possibility has been investigated theoretically and is now supported by two successful experimental demonstrations reported during the last year. In this talk, I will summarize the various ways in which Dirac semimetals can be realized in three dimensions with primary focus on a specific theory developed on the basis of representations of crystal spacegroups. A three dimensional Dirac (Weyl) semimetal can appear in the presence (absence) of inversion symmetry by tuning parameters to the phase boundary separating a bulk insulating and a topological insulating phase. More generally, we find that specific rules governing crystal symmetry representations of electrons with spin lead to robust Dirac points at high symmetry points in the Brillouin zone. Combining these rules with microscopic considerations identifies six candidate Dirac semimetals. Another method towards engineering Dirac semimetals involves combining crystal symmetry and band inversion. Several candidate materials have been proposed utilizing this mechanism and one of the candidates has been successfully demonstrated as a Dirac semimetal in two independent experiments. Work carried out in collaboration with: Julia A. Steinberg, Steve M. Young, J.C.Y. Teo, C.L. Kane, E.J. Mele and Andrew M. Rappe.

  15. Virtual Reconstruction and Three-Dimensional Printing of Blood Cells as a Tool in Cell Biology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto, Ingrid; Monteiro, Douglas; Girard-Dias, Wendell; Dos Santos, Thaisa Oliveira; Rosa Belmonte, Simone Letícia; Pinto de Oliveira, Jairo; Mauad, Helder; da Silva Pacheco, Marcos; Lenz, Dominik; Stefanon Bittencourt, Athelson; Valentim Nogueira, Breno; Lopes Dos Santos, Jorge Roberto; Miranda, Kildare; Guimarães, Marco Cesar Cunegundes

    2016-01-01

    The cell biology discipline constitutes a highly dynamic field whose concepts take a long time to be incorporated into the educational system, especially in developing countries. Amongst the main obstacles to the introduction of new cell biology concepts to students is their general lack of identification with most teaching methods. The introduction of elaborated figures, movies and animations to textbooks has given a tremendous contribution to the learning process and the search for novel teaching methods has been a central goal in cell biology education. Some specialized tools, however, are usually only available in advanced research centers or in institutions that are traditionally involved with the development of novel teaching/learning processes, and are far from becoming reality in the majority of life sciences schools. When combined with the known declining interest in science among young people, a critical scenario may result. This is especially important in the field of electron microscopy and associated techniques, methods that have greatly contributed to the current knowledge on the structure and function of different cell biology models but are rarely made accessible to most students. In this work, we propose a strategy to increase the engagement of students into the world of cell and structural biology by combining 3D electron microscopy techniques and 3D prototyping technology (3D printing) to generate 3D physical models that accurately and realistically reproduce a close-to-the native structure of the cell and serve as a tool for students and teachers outside the main centers. We introduce three strategies for 3D imaging, modeling and prototyping of cells and propose the establishment of a virtual platform where different digital models can be deposited by EM groups and subsequently downloaded and printed in different schools, universities, research centers and museums, thereby modernizing teaching of cell biology and increasing the accessibility to

  16. Quantifying the mechanical micro-environment during three-dimensional cell expansion on microbeads by means of individual cell-based modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Bart; Odenthal, Tim; Tijskens, Engelbert; Ramon, Herman; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

    2013-10-01

    Controlled in vitro three-dimensional cell expansion requires culture conditions that optimise the biophysical micro-environment of the cells during proliferation. In this study, we propose an individual cell-based modelling platform for simulating the mechanics of cell expansion on microcarriers. The lattice-free, particle-based method considers cells as individual interacting particles that deform and move over time. The model quantifies how the mechanical micro-environment of individual cells changes during the time of confluency. A sensitivity analysis is performed, which shows that changes in the cell-specific properties of cell-cell adhesion and cell stiffness cause the strongest change in the mechanical micro-environment of the cells. Furthermore, the influence of the mechanical properties of cells and microbead is characterised. The mechanical micro-environment is strongly influenced by the adhesive properties and the size of the microbead. Simulations show that even in the absence of strong biological heterogeneity, a large heterogeneity in mechanical stresses can be expected purely due to geometric properties of the culture system.

  17. Three-Dimensional Graphene–RGD Peptide Nanoisland Composites That Enhance the Osteogenesis of Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ee-Seul Kang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphene derivatives have immense potential in stem cell research. Here, we report a three-dimensional graphene/arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD peptide nanoisland composite effective in guiding the osteogenesis of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs. Amine-modified silica nanoparticles (SiNPs were uniformly coated onto an indium tin oxide electrode (ITO, followed by graphene oxide (GO encapsulation and electrochemical deposition of gold nanoparticles. A RGD–MAP–C peptide, with a triple-branched repeating RGD sequence and a terminal cysteine, was self-assembled onto the gold nanoparticles, generating the final three-dimensional graphene–RGD peptide nanoisland composite. We generated substrates with various gold nanoparticle–RGD peptide cluster densities, and found that the platform with the maximal number of clusters was most suitable for ADSC adhesion and spreading. Remarkably, the same platform was also highly efficient at guiding ADSC osteogenesis compared with other substrates, based on gene expression (alkaline phosphatase (ALP, runt-related transcription factor 2, enzyme activity (ALP, and calcium deposition. ADSCs induced to differentiate into osteoblasts showed higher calcium accumulations after 14–21 days than when grown on typical GO-SiNP complexes, suggesting that the platform can accelerate ADSC osteoblastic differentiation. The results demonstrate that a three-dimensional graphene–RGD peptide nanoisland composite can efficiently derive osteoblasts from mesenchymal stem cells.

  18. Distribution of lithostratigraphic units within the central block of Yucca Mountain, Nevada: A three-dimensional computer-based model, Version YMP.R2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buesch, D.C.; Nelson, J.E.; Dickerson, R.P.; Drake, R.M. II; San Juan, C.A.; Spengler, R.W.; Geslin, J.K.; Moyer, T.C.

    1996-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is underlain by 14.0 to 11.6 Ma volcanic rocks tilted eastward 3 degree to 20 degree and cut by faults that were primarily active between 12.7 and 11.6 Ma. A three-dimensional computer-based model of the central block of the mountain consists of seven structural subblocks composed of six formations and the interstratified-bedded tuffaceous deposits. Rocks from the 12.7 Ma Tiva Canyon Tuff, which forms most of the exposed rocks on the mountain, to the 13.1 Ma Prow Pass Tuff are modeled with 13 surfaces. Modeled units represent single formations such as the Pah Canyon Tuff, grouped units such as the combination of the Yucca Mountain Tuff with the superjacent bedded tuff, and divisions of the Topopah Spring Tuff such as the crystal-poor vitrophyre interval. The model is based on data from 75 boreholes from which a structure contour map at the base of the Tiva Canyon Tuff and isochore maps for each unit are constructed to serve as primary input. Modeling consists of an iterative cycle that begins with the primary structure-contour map from which isochore values of the subjacent model unit are subtracted to produce the structure contour map on the base of the unit. This new structure contour map forms the input for another cycle of isochore subtraction to produce the next structure contour map. In this method of solids modeling, the model units are presented by surfaces (structure contour maps), and all surfaces are stored in the model. Surfaces can be converted to form volumes of model units with additional effort. This lithostratigraphic and structural model can be used for (1) storing data from, and planning future, site characterization activities, (2) preliminary geometry of units for design of Exploratory Studies Facility and potential repository, and (3) performance assessment evaluations

  19. Three-dimensional cardiac microtissues composed of cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells co-differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giacomelli, Elisa; Bellin, Milena; Sala, Luca; Van Meer, Berend J.; Tertoolen, Leon G.J.; Orlova, Valeria V.; Mummery, Christine L.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells in the heart are in close proximity and in constant dialogue. Endothelium regulates the size of the heart, supplies oxygen to the myocardium and secretes factors that support cardiomyocyte function. Robust and predictive cardiac disease models that faithfully

  20. Acellular Mouse Kidney ECM can be Used as a Three-Dimensional Substrate to Test the Differentiation Potential of Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Renal Progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambi, Manpreet; Chow, Theresa; Whiteley, Jennifer; Li, Mira; Chua, Shawn; Raileanu, Vanessa; Rogers, Ian M

    2017-08-01

    The development of strategies for tissue regeneration and bio-artificial organ development is based on our understanding of embryogenesis. Differentiation protocols attempt to recapitulate the signaling modalities of gastrulation and organogenesis, coupled with cell selection regimens to isolate the cells of choice. This strategy is impeded by the lack of optimal in vitro culture systems since traditional culture systems do not allow for the three-dimensional interaction between cells and the extracellular matrix. While artificial three-dimensional scaffolds are available, using the natural extracellular matrix scaffold is advantageous because it has a distinct architecture that is difficult to replicate. The adult extracellular matrix is predicted to mediate signaling related to tissue repair not embryogenesis but existing similarities between the two argues that the extracellular matrix will influence the differentiation of stem and progenitor cells. Previous studies using undifferentiated embryonic stem cells grown directly on acellular kidney ECM demonstrated that the acellular kidney supported cell growth but limited differentiation occurred. Using mouse kidney extracellular matrix and mouse embryonic stem cells we report that the extracellular matrix can support the development of kidney structures if the stem cells are first differentiated to kidney progenitor cells before being applied to the acellular organ.

  1. Experimental Validation of Methanol Crossover in a Three-dimensional, Two-Fluid Model of a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    A fully coupled three-dimensional, steady-state, two-fluid, multi-component and non-isothermal DMFC model has been developed in the commercial CFD package CFX 13 (ANSYS inc.). It accounts for the presence of micro porous layers, non-equilibrium phase change, and methanol and water uptake...... in the ionomer phase of the catalytic layer, and detailed membrane transport of methanol and water. In order to verify the models ability to predict methanol crossover, simulation results are compared with experimental measurements under different current densities along with air and methanol stoichiometries....... Methanol crossover is indirectly measured based on the combined anode and cathode exhaust CO2 mole fraction and by accounting for the CO2 production at the anode as a function of current density. This approach is simple and assumes that all crossed over methanol is oxidized. Moreover, it takes CO2...

  2. Generation of glucose-responsive functional islets with a three-dimensional structure from mouse fetal pancreatic cells and iPS cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Saito

    Full Text Available Islets of Langerhans are a pancreatic endocrine compartment consisting of insulin-producing β cells together with several other hormone-producing cells. While some insulin-producing cells or immature pancreatic cells have been generated in vitro from ES and iPS cells, islets with proper functions and a three-dimensional (3D structure have never been successfully produced. To test whether islets can be formed in vitro, we first examined the potential of mouse fetal pancreatic cells. We found that E16.5 pancreatic cells, just before forming islets, were able to develop cell aggregates consisting of β cells surrounded by glucagon-producing α cells, a structure similar to murine adult islets. Moreover, the transplantation of these cells improved blood glucose levels in hyperglycemic mice. These results indicate that functional islets are formed in vitro from fetal pancreatic cells at a specific developmental stage. By adopting these culture conditions to the differentiation of mouse iPS cells, we developed a two-step system to generate islets, i.e. immature pancreatic cells were first produced from iPS cells, and then transferred to culture conditions that allowed the formation of islets from fetal pancreatic cells. The islets exhibited distinct 3D structural features similar to adult pancreatic islets and secreted insulin in response to glucose concentrations. Transplantation of the islets improved blood glucose levels in hyperglycemic mice. In conclusion, the two-step culture system allows the generation of functional islets with a 3D structure from iPS cells.

  3. Continuous three dimensional analysis of running mechanics during a marathon by means of inertial magnetic measurement units to objectify changes in running mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reenalda, Jasper; Maartens, Erik; Maartens, Erik; Homan, Lotte; Buurke, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in wearable and wireless sensor technology allow for a continuous three dimensional analysis of running mechanics in the sport specific setting. The present study is the first to demonstrate the possibility of analyzing three dimensional (3D) running mechanics continuously, by

  4. Differentiation Potential of Human Chorion-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Motor Neuron-Like Cells in Two- and Three-Dimensional Culture Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Faezeh; Mirzaei, Esmaeil; Ai, Jafar; Lotfi, Abolfazl; Sayahpour, Forough Azam; Barough, Somayeh Ebrahimi; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi

    2016-04-01

    Many people worldwide suffer from motor neuron-related disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal cord injuries. Recently, several attempts have been made to recruit stem cells to modulate disease progression in ALS and also regenerate spinal cord injuries. Chorion-derived mesenchymal stem cells (C-MSCs), used to be discarded as postpartum medically waste product, currently represent a class of cells with self renewal property and immunomodulatory capacity. These cells are able to differentiate into mesodermal and nonmesodermal lineages such as neural cells. On the other hand, gelatin, as a simply denatured collagen, is a suitable substrate for cell adhesion and differentiation. It has been shown that electrospinning of scaffolds into fibrous structure better resembles the physiological microenvironment in comparison with two-dimensional (2D) culture system. Since there is no report on potential of human chorion-derived MSCs to differentiate into motor neuron cells in two- and three-dimensional (3D) culture systems, we set out to determine the effect of retinoic acid (RA) and sonic hedgehog (Shh) on differentiation of human C-MSCs into motor neuron-like cells cultured on tissue culture plates (2D) and electrospun nanofibrous gelatin scaffold (3D).

  5. Compressive elasticity of three-dimensional nanofiber matrix directs mesenchymal stem cell differentiation to vascular cells with endothelial or smooth muscle cell markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingate, K; Bonani, W; Tan, Y; Bryant, S J; Tan, W

    2012-04-01

    The importance of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in vascular regeneration is becoming increasingly recognized. However, few in vitro studies have been performed to identify the effects of environmental elasticity on the differentiation of MSC into vascular cell types. Electrospinning and photopolymerization techniques were used to fabricate a three-dimensional (3-D) polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate nanofiber hydrogel matrix with tunable elasticity for use as a cellular substrate. Compression testing demonstrated that the elastic modulus of the hydrated 3-D matrices ranged from 2 to 15 kPa, similar to the in vivo elasticity of the intima basement membrane and media layer. MSC seeded on rigid matrices (8-15 kPa) showed an increase in cell area compared with those seeded on soft matrices (2-5 kPa). Furthermore, the matrix elasticity guided the cells to express different vascular-specific phenotypes with high differentiation efficiency. Around 95% of MSC seeded on the 3-D matrices with an elasticity of 3 kPa showed Flk-1 endothelial markers within 24h, while only 20% of MSC seeded on the matrices with elasticity >8 kPa demonstrated Flk-1 marker. In contrast, ∼80% of MSC seeded on 3-D matrices with elasticity >8 kPa demonstrated smooth muscle α-actin marker within 24h, while fewer than 10% of MSC seeded on 3-D matrices with elasticity elasticity of the substrate could be a powerful tool for vascular tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Robust and automated three-dimensional segmentation of densely packed cell nuclei in different biological specimens with Lines-of-Sight decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, B; Schmitz, A; Muñoz-Descalzo, S; Ansari, N; Pampaloni, F; Stelzer, E H K; Fischer, S C

    2015-06-08

    Due to the large amount of data produced by advanced microscopy, automated image analysis is crucial in modern biology. Most applications require reliable cell nuclei segmentation. However, in many biological specimens cell nuclei are densely packed and appear to touch one another in the images. Therefore, a major difficulty of three-dimensional cell nuclei segmentation is the decomposition of cell nuclei that apparently touch each other. Current methods are highly adapted to a certain biological specimen or a specific microscope. They do not ensure similarly accurate segmentation performance, i.e. their robustness for different datasets is not guaranteed. Hence, these methods require elaborate adjustments to each dataset. We present an advanced three-dimensional cell nuclei segmentation algorithm that is accurate and robust. Our approach combines local adaptive pre-processing with decomposition based on Lines-of-Sight (LoS) to separate apparently touching cell nuclei into approximately convex parts. We demonstrate the superior performance of our algorithm using data from different specimens recorded with different microscopes. The three-dimensional images were recorded with confocal and light sheet-based fluorescence microscopes. The specimens are an early mouse embryo and two different cellular spheroids. We compared the segmentation accuracy of our algorithm with ground truth data for the test images and results from state-of-the-art methods. The analysis shows that our method is accurate throughout all test datasets (mean F-measure: 91%) whereas the other methods each failed for at least one dataset (F-measure≤69%). Furthermore, nuclei volume measurements are improved for LoS decomposition. The state-of-the-art methods required laborious adjustments of parameter values to achieve these results. Our LoS algorithm did not require parameter value adjustments. The accurate performance was achieved with one fixed set of parameter values. We developed a novel and

  7. Influence of Different Three-Dimensional Open Porous Titanium Scaffold Designs on Human Osteoblasts Behavior in Static and Dynamic Cell Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Markhoff

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment of osseous defects micro-structured three-dimensional materials for bone replacement serve as leading structure for cell migration, proliferation and bone formation. The scaffold design and culture conditions are crucial for the limited diffusion distance of nutrients and oxygen. In static culture, decreased cell activity and irregular distribution occur within the scaffold. Dynamic conditions entail physical stimulation and constant medium perfusion imitating physiological nutrient supply and metabolite disposal. Therefore, we investigated the influence of different scaffold configurations and cultivation methods on human osteoblasts. Cells were seeded on three-dimensional porous Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds manufactured with selective laser melting (SLM or electron beam melting (EBM varying in porosity, pore size and basic structure (cubic, diagonal, pyramidal and cultured under static and dynamic conditions. Cell viability, migration and matrix production were examined via mitochondrial activity assay, fluorescence staining and ELISA. All scaffolds showed an increasing cell activity and matrix production under static conditions over time. Expectations about the dynamic culture were only partially fulfilled, since it enabled proliferation alike the static one and enhanced cell migration. Overall, the SLM manufactured scaffold with the highest porosity, small pore size and pyramidal basic structure proved to be the most suitable structure for cell proliferation and migration.

  8. Influence of Different Three-Dimensional Open Porous Titanium Scaffold Designs on Human Osteoblasts Behavior in Static and Dynamic Cell Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markhoff, Jana; Wieding, Jan; Weissmann, Volker; Pasold, Juliane; Jonitz-Heincke, Anika; Bader, Rainer

    2015-08-24

    In the treatment of osseous defects micro-structured three-dimensional materials for bone replacement serve as leading structure for cell migration, proliferation and bone formation. The scaffold design and culture conditions are crucial for the limited diffusion distance of nutrients and oxygen. In static culture, decreased cell activity and irregular distribution occur within the scaffold. Dynamic conditions entail physical stimulation and constant medium perfusion imitating physiological nutrient supply and metabolite disposal. Therefore, we investigated the influence of different scaffold configurations and cultivation methods on human osteoblasts. Cells were seeded on three-dimensional porous Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds manufactured with selective laser melting (SLM) or electron beam melting (EBM) varying in porosity, pore size and basic structure (cubic, diagonal, pyramidal) and cultured under static and dynamic conditions. Cell viability, migration and matrix production were examined via mitochondrial activity assay, fluorescence staining and ELISA. All scaffolds showed an increasing cell activity and matrix production under static conditions over time. Expectations about the dynamic culture were only partially fulfilled, since it enabled proliferation alike the static one and enhanced cell migration. Overall, the SLM manufactured scaffold with the highest porosity, small pore size and pyramidal basic structure proved to be the most suitable structure for cell proliferation and migration.

  9. Three dimensional corrugated organic photovoltaics for building integration; improving the efficiency, oblique angle and diffuse performance of solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettle, Jeff; Bristow, Noel; Sweet, Tracy K. N.

    2015-01-01

    The lamination of OPV modules to corrugated roof cladding has been undertaken. The 3-dimensional form of the cladding provides three advantages for outdoor OPV deployment; firstly the ‘footprint’ of the solar cell is reduced, which leads to B10% improved power conversion (PCE) efficiency per unit...... area. Secondly, the oblique angle performance is enhanced, leading to increased output in the early morning and evening. Indoor characterisation showed a 9-fold enhancement in efficiency was obtainable, when compared to a flat module. Thirdly, an improvement in performance under diffuse lighting...... conditions was measured, when compared to a flat module. The average daily yield of the 3D module was 17–29% higher than a flat module, with higher relative enhancements observed on cloudier days. Geographically, the 3D module appears to be well-suited to countries with a high latitude, due to the enhanced...

  10. Three-dimensional collagen I promotes gemcitabine resistance in vitro in pancreatic cancer cells through HMGA2-dependent histone acetyltransferase expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surabhi Dangi-Garimella

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is associated with a pronounced collagen-rich stromal reaction that has been shown to contribute to chemo-resistance. We have previously shown that PDAC cells are resistant to gemcitabine chemotherapy in the collagen microenvironment because of increased expression of the chromatin remodeling protein high mobility group A2 (HMGA2. We have now found that human PDAC tumors display higher levels of histone H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation in fibrotic regions. We show that relative to cells grown on tissue culture plastic, PDAC cells grown in three-dimensional collagen gels demonstrate increased histone H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation, along with increased expression of p300, PCAF and GCN5 histone acetyltransferases (HATs. Knocking down HMGA2 attenuates the effect of collagen on histone H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation and on collagen-induced p300, PCAF and GCN5 expression. We also show that human PDAC tumors with HMGA2 demonstrate increased histone H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation. Additionally, we show that cells in three-dimensional collagen gels demonstrate increased protection against gemcitabine. Significantly, down-regulation of HMGA2 or p300, PCAF and GCN5 HATs sensitizes the cells to gemcitabine in three-dimensional collagen. Overall, our results increase our understanding of how the collagen microenvironment contributes to chemo-resistance in vitro and identify HATs as potential therapeutic targets against this deadly cancer.

  11. Changes in Pulmonary Function After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, or Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose L.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B.; Eapen, George; Liu, Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the extent of change in pulmonary function over time after definitive radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with modern techniques and to identify predictors of changes in pulmonary function according to patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 250 patients who had received ≥60 Gy radio(chemo)therapy for primary NSCLC in 1998–2010 and had undergone pulmonary function tests before and within 1 year after treatment. Ninety-three patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 97 with intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 60 with proton beam therapy. Postradiation pulmonary function test values were evaluated among individual patients compared with the same patient’s preradiation value at the following time intervals: 0–4 (T1), 5–8 (T2), and 9–12 (T3) months. Results: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) was reduced in the majority of patients along the three time periods after radiation, whereas the forced expiratory volume in 1 s per unit of vital capacity (FEV1/VC) showed an increase and decrease after radiation in a similar percentage of patients. There were baseline differences (stage, radiotherapy dose, concurrent chemotherapy) among the radiation technology groups. On multivariate analysis, the following features were associated with larger posttreatment declines in DLCO: pretreatment DLCO, gross tumor volume, lung and heart dosimetric data, and total radiation dose. Only pretreatment DLCO was associated with larger posttreatment declines in FEV1/VC. Conclusions: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide is reduced in the majority of patients after radiotherapy with modern techniques. Multiple factors, including gross tumor volume, preradiation lung function, and dosimetric parameters, are associated with the DLCO decline. Prospective studies are needed to better understand whether new radiation technology, such as proton beam therapy

  12. An automated three-dimensional detection and segmentation method for touching cells by integrating concave points clustering and random walker algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong He

    Full Text Available Characterizing cytoarchitecture is crucial for understanding brain functions and neural diseases. In neuroanatomy, it is an important task to accurately extract cell populations' centroids and contours. Recent advances have permitted imaging at single cell resolution for an entire mouse brain using the Nissl staining method. However, it is difficult to precisely segment numerous cells, especially those cells touching each other. As presented herein, we have developed an automated three-dimensional detection and segmentation method applied to the Nissl staining data, with the following two key steps: 1 concave points clustering to determine the seed points of touching cells; and 2 random walker segmentation to obtain cell contours. Also, we have evaluated the performance of our proposed method with several mouse brain datasets, which were captured with the micro-optical sectioning tomography imaging system, and the datasets include closely touching cells. Comparing with traditional detection and segmentation methods, our approach shows promising detection accuracy and high robustness.

  13. Data of a fluorescent imaging-based analysis of anti-cancer drug effects on three-dimensional cultures of breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Itou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D cell culture is a powerful tool to study cell growth under 3D condition. To perform a simple test for anti-cancer drugs in 3D culture, visualization of non-proliferated cells is required. We propose a fluorescent imaging-based assay to analyze cancer cell proliferation in 3D culture. We used a pulse-labeling technique with a photoconvertible fluorescent protein Kaede to identify non-proliferated cells. This assay allows us to observe change in cell proliferation in 3D culture by simple imaging. Using this assay, we obtained the data of the effects of anti-cancer drugs, 5-fluorouracil and PD0332991 in a breast cancer cell line, MCF-7.

  14. Three dimensional graphene foam supported platinum-ruthenium bimetallic nanocatalysts for direct methanol and direct ethanol fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Chih-Chien; Lin, Po-Yuan; Xue, Yuhua; Akolkar, Rohan; Dai, Liming; Yu, Xiong; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2014-06-01

    A novel composite material of hierarchically structured platinum-ruthenium (PtRu) nanoparticles grown on large surface area three dimensional graphene foam (3D GF) is reported. 3D GF was incorporated with PtRu bimetallic nanoparticles as an electrochemical nanocatalyst for methanol and ethanol oxidation. PtRu/3D GF nanocatalyst showed a higher tolerance to poisoning by CO and exhibited improved catalytic activity for both methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) results and long-term cycling stability tests demonstrated that GF provided a promising platform for the development of electrochemical nanocatalysts. Specifically, PtRu/3D GF nanocatalyst showed excellent catalytic activity toward MOR and EOR compared with PtRu/Graphene (Commercial graphene), PtRu/C (Vulcan XC-72R carbon), and PtRu alone. The crystal size of PtRu on 3D GF was reduced to 3.5 nm and its active surface area was enhanced to 186.2 m2 g-1. Consequently, the MOR and EOR rates were nearly doubled on PtRu/3D GF compared to those on PtRu/Graphene.

  15. Three dimensional energy profile:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowsari, Reza; Zerriffi, Hisham

    2011-01-01

    The provision of adequate, reliable, and affordable energy has been considered as a cornerstone of development. More than one-third of the world's population has a very limited access to modern energy services and suffers from its various negative consequences. Researchers have been exploring various dimensions of household energy use in order to design strategies to provide secure access to modern energy services. However, despite more than three decades of effort, our understanding of household energy use patterns is very limited, particularly in the context of rural regions of the developing world. Through this paper, the past and the current trends in the field of energy analysis are investigated. The literature on rural energy and energy transition in developing world has been explored and the factors affecting households' decisions on energy use are listed. The and the factors affecting households' decisions on energy use are listed. The gaps identified in the literature on rural household energy analysis provide a basis for developing an alternative model that can create a more realistic view of household energy use. The three dimensional energy profile is presented as a new conceptual model for assessment of household energy use. This framework acts as a basis for building new theoretical and empirical models of rural household energy use. - Highlights: ► Reviews literature on household energy, energy transitions and decision-making in developing countries. ► Identifies gaps in rural household energy analysis and develops a new conceptual framework. ► The 3-d energy profile provides a holistic view of household energy system characteristics. ► Illustrates the use of the framework for understanding household energy transitions.

  16. Three-dimensional echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Presents tips and tricks for beginners and experts Provides educational material for 3D training courses Features comprehensively illustrated cases Includes an accompanying DVD with video clips of all sample cases Three-dimensional echocardiography is the most recent fundamental advancement in echocardiography. Since real-time 3D echocardiography became commercially available in 2002, it has rapidly been accepted in echo labs worldwide. This book covers all clinically relevant aspects of this fascinating new technology, including a comprehensive explanation of its basic principles, practical aspects of clinical application, and detailed descriptions of specific uses in the broad spectrum of clinically important heart disease. The book was written by a group of well-recognized international experts in the field, who have not only been involved in the scientific and clinical evolution of 3D echocardiography since its inception but are also intensively involved in expert training courses. As a result, the clear focus of this book is on the practical application of 3D echocardiography in daily clinical routine with tips and tricks for both beginners and experts, accompanied by more than 150 case examples comprehensively illustrated in more than 800 images and more than 500 videos provided on a DVD. In addition to an in-depth review of the most recent literature on real-time 3D echocardiography, this book represents an invaluable reference work for beginners and expert users of 3D echocardiography. - Tips and tricks for beginners and experts - Educational material for 3D training courses - Comprehensively illustrated cases - DVD with video clips of all sample cases.

  17. Three-dimensional self-branching anatase TiO_2 nanorods with the improved carrier collection for SrTiO_3-based perovskite solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Yajing; Wang, Chen; Tang, Ying; Huang, Lu; Fu, Jianxun; Shi, Weimin; Wang, Linjun; Yang, Weiguang

    2016-01-01

    The organic–inorganic perovskite solar cells based on ternary oxide SrTiO_3 shows a higher Voc, attributed to its slightly higher conduction band edge and better morphology of absorber material. However, its less efficient carrier collection and limited overall interfacial areas between the absorber material and the electron-transport layer (ETL), dramatically reducing the Jsc. Here, By adjusting the concentrations of the Ti(OBu)_4, we successfully prepared the three-dimensional (3D) self-branching anatase TiO_2 nanorod/SrTiO_3 nanocomposites, and slightly tuned the particle size of SrTiO_3. With the incorporation of the three-dimensional (3D) self-branching anatase TiO_2 nanorod, the Jsc of the device based on SrTiO_3 was highly boosted. The best performing solar cell we obtained exhibited a PCE of 9.99% with a Jsc of 19.48 mA/cm"2. The excellent performance could be ascribed to the improvement of charge carrier collection of SrTiO_3, better surface coverage and crystallinity of CH_3NH_3PbI_3, and enhanced light scattering ability caused by 3D self-branching anatase TiO_2 nanorods. - Highlights: • The three-dimensional (3D) self-branching anatase TiO_2 nanorod/SrTiO_3 nanocomposites were prepared. • The particle sizes of SrTiO_3 can be slightly tuned. • The best performing solar cell we obtained exhibited a PCE of 9.99% with the Jsc of 19.48 mA/cm"2.

  18. Assessment of three-dimensional joint kinematics of the upper limb during simulated swimming using wearable inertial-magnetic measurement units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantozzi, Silvia; Giovanardi, Andrea; Magalhães, Fabrício Anício; Di Michele, Rocco; Cortesi, Matteo; Gatta, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the joint kinematics during swimming plays a fundamental role both in sports conditioning and in clinical contexts. Contrary to the traditional video analysis, wearable inertial-magnetic measurements units (IMMUs) allow to analyse both the underwater and aerial phases of the swimming stroke over the whole length of the swimming pool. Furthermore, the rapid calibration and short data processing required by IMMUs provide coaches and athletes with an immediate feedback on swimming kinematics during training. This study aimed to develop a protocol to assess the three-dimensional kinematics of the upper limbs during swimming using IMMUs. Kinematics were evaluated during simulated dry-land swimming trials performed in the laboratory by eight swimmers. A stereo-photogrammetric system was used as the gold standard. The results showed high coefficient of multiple correlation (CMC) values, with median (first-third quartile) of 0.97 (0.93-0.95) and 0.99 (0.97-0.99) for simulated front-crawl and breaststroke, respectively. Furthermore, the joint angles were estimated with an accuracy increasing from distal to proximal joints, with wrist indices showing median CMC values always higher than 0.90. The present findings represent an important step towards the practical use of technology based on IMMUs for the kinematic analysis of swimming in applied contexts.

  19. Application of a Three-Dimensional Poroelastic BEM to Modeling the Biphasic Mechanics of Cell-Matrix Interactions in Articular Cartilage (REVISION).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Mansoor A; Guilak, Farshid

    2007-06-15

    Articular cartilage exhibits viscoelasticity in response to mechanical loading that is well described using biphasic or poroelastic continuum models. To date, boundary element methods (BEMs) have not been employed in modeling biphasic tissue mechanics. A three dimensional direct poroelastic BEM, formulated in the Laplace transform domain, is applied to modeling stress relaxation in cartilage. Macroscopic stress relaxation of a poroelastic cylinder in uni-axial confined compression is simulated and validated against a theoretical solution. Microscopic cell deformation due to poroelastic stress relaxation is also modeled. An extended Laplace inversion method is employed to accurately represent mechanical responses in the time domain.

  20. Three-dimensional polymer scaffolds for enhanced differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells to hepatocyte-like cells: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitrangi, Swati; Nair, Prabha; Khanna, Aparna

    2017-08-01

    Stem cell-based tissue engineering has emerged as a promising avenue for the treatment of liver diseases and as drug metabolism and toxicity models in drug discovery and development. The in vitro simulation of a micro-environmental niche for hepatic differentiation remains elusive, due to lack of information about crucial factors for the stem cell niche. For generation of functional hepatocytes, an in vivo three-dimensional (3D) micro-environment and architecture should be reproduced. Towards this, we fabricated three scaffolds as dextran-gelatin (DG1), chitosan-hyaluronic acid (CH1) and gelatin-vinyl acetate (GEVAC). Hepatic differentiation of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) was induced by culturing hUC-MSCs on these scaffolds. The scaffolds support hepatic differentiation by mimicking the native extracellular matrix (ECM) micro-environment and architecture to facilitate 3D cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The expression of hepatic markers, glycogen storage, urea production, albumin secretion and cytochrome P450 (CYP450) activity indicated the hepatic differentiation of hUC-MSCs. The differentiated hUC-MSCs on the 3D scaffolds formed hepatospheroids (3D hepatocyte aggregates), as illustrated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal microscopy and cytoskeleton organization. It was observed that the 3D scaffolds supported improved cell morphology, expression of hepatic markers and metabolic activities, as compared to Matrigel-coated plates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the use of a well-characterized scaffold (GEVAC) for enhanced differentiation of hUC-MSCs to hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. A novel three-dimensional system to study interactions between endothelial cells and neural cells of the developing central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milner Richard

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During angiogenesis in the developing central nervous system (CNS, endothelial cells (EC detach from blood vessels growing on the brain surface, and migrate into the expanding brain parenchyma. Brain angiogenesis is regulated by growth factors and extracellular matrix (ECM proteins secreted by cells of the developing CNS. In addition, recent evidence suggests that EC play an important role in establishing the neural stem cell (NSC niche. Therefore, two-way communication between EC and neural cells is of fundamental importance in the developing CNS. To study the interactions between brain EC and neural cells of the developing CNS, a novel three-dimensional (3-D murine co-culture system was developed. Fluorescent-labelled brain EC were seeded onto neurospheres; floating cellular aggregates that contain NSC/neural precursor cells (NPC and smaller numbers of differentiated cells. Using this system, brain EC attachment, survival and migration into neurospheres was evaluated and the role of integrins in mediating the early adhesive events addressed. Results Brain EC attached, survived and migrated deep into neurospheres over a 5-day period. Neurospheres express the ECM proteins fibronectin and laminin, and brain EC adhesion to neurospheres was inhibited by RGD peptides and antibodies specific for the β1, but not the α6 integrin subunit. Conclusion A novel 3-D co-culture system for analysing the interactions between EC and neural cells of the developing CNS is presented. This system could be used to investigate the reciprocal influence of EC and NSC/NPC; to examine how NSC/NPC influence cerebral angiogenesis, and conversely, to examine how EC regulate the maintenance and differentiation of NSC/NPC. Using this system it is demonstrated that EC attachment to neurospheres is mediated by the fibronectin receptor, α5β1 integrin.

  2. Optimization of three-dimensional imaging on in vitro produced porcine blastocysts and chimeras for stem cell testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Jan Ole Bertelsen; Freude, Kristine; Li, Rong

    2015-01-01

    . This is relevant for testing of presumed pluripotent stem cells. The gold standard for pluripotent stem cells is to test if the cells are capable of contributing to germline chimeras. Differential staining can be used to evaluate the possibility of chimeric contribution; if the cells are located in the area...

  3. Proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of CD105-positive enriched rat synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells in three-dimensional porous scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Jun; Chen Anmin; You Hongbo; Li Kunpeng; Zhang Di; Guo Fengjing

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell-based tissue engineering has provided an alternative strategy to treat cartilage lesions, and synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) are considered as a promising cell source for cartilage repair. In this study, the SMSCs were isolated from rat synovium, and CD105-positive (CD105 + ) cells were enriched using magnetic activated cell sorting. Sorted cells were subsequently seeded onto the chitosan-alginate composite three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds and cultured in chondrogenic culture medium in the presence of TGF-β 3 and BMP-2 for 2 weeks in vitro. After 2 weeks in culture, scanning electron microscopy results showed that cells attached and proliferated well on scaffolds, and secreted extracellular matrix were also observed. From day 7 to day 14, the total DNA and glucosaminoglycan content of the cells cultured in scaffolds were found to have increased significantly, and cell cycle analyses revealed that the percentage of cells in the S and G2/M phases increased and the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase decreased. Compared with non-sorted cells, the sorted cells cultured in scaffolds underwent more chondrogenic differentiation, as evidenced by higher expression of type II collagen and Sox9 at the protein and mRNA levels. The results suggest that CD105 + enriched SMSCs may be a potential cell source for cartilage tissue engineering, and the chitosan-alginate composite 3D porous scaffold could provide a favorable microenvironment for supporting proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of cells.

  4. Three-dimensional culture and interaction of cancer cells and dendritic cells in an electrospun nano-submicron hybrid fibrous scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Eon; Kim, Chang Gun; Kim, Jin Soo; Jin, Songwan; Yoon, Sik; Bae, Hae-Rahn; Kim, Jeong-Hwa; Jeong, Young Hun; Kwak, Jong-Young

    2016-01-01

    An artificial three-dimensional (3D) culture system that mimics the tumor microenvironment in vitro is an essential tool for investigating the cross-talk between immune and cancer cells in tumors. In this study, we developed a 3D culture system using an electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibrous scaffold (NFS). A hybrid NFS containing an uninterrupted network of nano- and submicron-scale fibers (400 nm to 2 µm) was generated by deposition onto a stainless steel mesh instead of an aluminum plate. The hybrid NFS contained multiplanar pores in a 3D structure. Surface-seeded mouse CT26 colon cancer cells and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs) were able to infiltrate the hybrid NFS within several hours. BM-DCs cultured on PCL nanofibers showed a baseline inactive form, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated BM-DCs showed increased expression of CD86 and major histocompatibility complex Class II. Actin and phosphorylated FAK were enriched where unstimulated and LPS-stimulated BM-DCs contacted the fibers in the 3D hybrid NFS. When BM-DCs were cocultured with mitoxantrone-treated CT26 cells in a 3D hybrid NFS, BM-DCs sprouted cytoplasm to, migrated to, synapsed with, and engulfed mitoxantrone-treated CT26 cancer cells, which were similar to the naturally occurring cross-talk between these two types of cells. The 3D hybrid NFS developed here provides a 3D structure for coculture of cancer and immune cells. PMID:27042051

  5. Fabrication of All-Solid-State Lithium-Ion Cells Using Three-Dimensionally Structured Solid Electrolyte Li7La3Zr2O12 Pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Mao; Munakata, Hirokazu; Kanamura, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    All-solid-state lithium-ion batteries using Li + -ion conducting ceramic electrolytes have been focused on as attractive future batteries for electric vehicles and renewable energy conversion systems because high safety can be realized due to non-flammability of ceramic electrolytes. In addition, a higher volumetric energy density than that of current lithium-ion batteries is expected since the all-solid-state lithium-ion batteries can be made in bipolar cell configurations. However, the special ideas and techniques based on ceramic processing are required to construct the electrochemical interface for all-solid-state lithium-ion batteries since the battery development has been done so far based on liquid electrolyte system over 100 years. As one of the promising approaches to develop practical all-solid-state batteries, we have been focusing on three-dimensionally (3D) structured cell configurations such as an interdigitated combination of 3D pillars of cathode and anode, which can be realized by using solid electrolyte membranes with hole-array structures. The application of such kinds of 3D structures effectively increases the interface between solid electrode and solid electrolyte per unit volume, lowering the internal resistance of all-solid-state lithium-ion batteries. In this study, Li 6.25 Al 0.25 La 3 Zr 2 O 12 (LLZAl), which is a Al-doped Li 7 La 3 Zr 2 O 12 (LLZ) with Li + -ion conductivity of ~10 –4 S ⋅cm −1 at room temperature and high stability against lithium-metal, was used as a solid electrolyte, and its pellets with 700 μm depth holes in 700 μm × 700 μm area were fabricated to construct 3D-structured all-solid-state batteries with LiCoO 2 /LLZAl/lithium-metal configuration. It is expected that the LiCoO 2 –LLZAl interface is formed by point-to-point contact even when the LLZAl pellet with 3D hole-array structure is applied. Therefore, Li 3 BO 3 , which is a mechanically soft solid electrolyte with a low melting point at around 700

  6. Three-dimensional ICT reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Aidong; Li Ju; Chen Fa; Sun Lingxia

    2005-01-01

    The three-dimensional ICT reconstruction method is the hot topic of recent ICT technology research. In the context, qualified visual three-dimensional ICT pictures are achieved through multi-piece two-dimensional images accumulation by, combining with thresholding method and linear interpolation. Different direction and different position images of the reconstructed pictures are got by rotation and interception respectively. The convenient and quick method is significantly instructive to more complicated three-dimensional reconstruction of ICT images. (authors)

  7. Three-dimensional ICT reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Aidong; Li Ju; Chen Fa; Sun Lingxia

    2004-01-01

    The three-dimensional ICT reconstruction method is the hot topic of recent ICT technology research. In the context qualified visual three-dimensional ICT pictures are achieved through multi-piece two-dimensional images accumulation by order, combining with thresholding method and linear interpolation. Different direction and different position images of the reconstructed pictures are got by rotation and interception respectively. The convenient and quick method is significantly instructive to more complicated three-dimensional reconstruction of ICT images. (authors)

  8. Quasi-three dimensional dynamic modeling of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell with consideration of two-phase water transport through a gas diffusion layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sanggyu

    2015-01-01

    Water management is one of the challenging issues for low-temperature PEMFCs (proton exchange membrane fuel cells). When liquid water is formed at the GDL (gas diffusion layer), the pathway of reactant gas can be blocked, which inhibits the electrochemical reaction of PEMFC. Thus, liquid water transport through GDL is a critical factor determining the performance of a PEMFC. In present study, quasi-three dimensional dynamic modeling of PEMFC with consideration of two-phase water transport through GDL is developed. To investigate the distributions of PEMFC characteristics, including current density, species mole fraction, and membrane hydration, the PEMFC was discretized into twenty control volumes along the anode channel. To resolve the mass and energy conservation, the PEMFC is discretized into eleven and fifteen control volumes in the perpendicular direction, respectively. The dynamic variation of PEMFC characteristics of cell voltage, overvoltage of activation and ohmic, liquid water saturation through a GDL, and oxygen concentration were captured during transient behavior. - Highlights: • A quasi-three dimensional two-phase dynamic model of PEMFC is developed. • Presented model is validated by comparison with experimental data. • Two-phase model is compared with one-phase model at steady-states and transients.

  9. Three-Dimensional Scaffold Chip with Thermosensitive Coating for Capture and Reversible Release of Individual and Cluster of Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi-Bo; Xie, Min; Chen, Yan; Xiong, Jun; Liu, Ya; Chen, Zhen; Guo, Shan; Shu, Ying; Wang, Ming; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Dong, Wei-Guo; Huang, Wei-Hua

    2017-08-01

    Tumor metastasis is attributed to circulating tumor cells (CTC) or CTC clusters. Many strategies have hitherto been designed to isolate CTCs, but there are few methods that can capture and gently release CTC clusters as efficient as single CTCs. Herein, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold chip with thermosensitive coating for high-efficiency capture and release of individual and cluster CTCs. The 3D scaffold chip successfully combines the specific recognition and physically obstructed effect of 3D scaffold structure to significantly improve cell clusters capture efficiency. Thermosensitive gelatin hydrogel uniformly coated on the scaffold dissolves at 37 °C quickly, and the captured cells are gently released from chip with high viability. Notably, this platform was applied to isolate CTCs from cancer patients' blood samples. This allows global DNA and RNA methylation analysis of collected single CTC and CTC clusters, indicating the great potential of this platform in cancer diagnosis and downstream analysis at the molecular level.

  10. A three-dimensional comparison of tick-borne flavivirus infection in mammalian and tick cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle K Offerdahl

    Full Text Available Tick-borne flaviviruses (TBFV are sustained in nature through cycling between mammalian and tick hosts. In this study, we used African green monkey kidney cells (Vero and Ixodes scapularis tick cells (ISE6 to compare virus-induced changes in mammalian and arthropod cells. Using confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and electron tomography (ET, we examined viral protein distribution and the ultrastructural changes that occur during TBFV infection. Within host cells, flaviviruses cause complex rearrangement of cellular membranes for the purpose of virus replication. Virus infection was accompanied by a marked expansion in endoplasmic reticulum (ER staining and markers for TBFV replication were localized mainly to the ER in both cell lines. TEM of Vero cells showed membrane-bound vesicles enclosed in a network of dilated, anastomosing ER cisternae. Virions were seen within the ER and were sometimes in paracrystalline arrays. Tubular structures or elongated vesicles were occasionally noted. In acutely and persistently infected ISE6 cells, membrane proliferation and vesicles were also noted; however, the extent of membrane expansion and the abundance of vesicles were lower and no viral particles were observed. Tubular profiles were far more prevalent in persistently infected ISE6 cells than in acutely infected cells. By ET, tubular profiles, in persistently infected tick cells, had a cross-sectional diameter of 60-100 nm, reached up to 800 nm in length, were closed at the ends, and were often arranged in fascicle-like bundles, shrouded with ER membrane. Our experiments provide analysis of viral protein localization within the context of both mammalian and arthropod cell lines as well as both acute and persistent arthropod cell infection. Additionally, we show for the first time 3D flavivirus infection in a vector cell line and the first ET of persistent flavivirus infection.

  11. Modeling optimizes PEM fuel cell durability using three-dimensional multi-phase computational fluid dynamics model

    OpenAIRE

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2010-01-01

    Damage mechanisms in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell are accelerated by mechanical stresses arising during fuel cell assembly (bolt assembling), and the stresses arise during fuel cell running, because it consists of the materials with different thermal expansion and swelling coefficients. Therefore, in order to acquire a complete understanding of the damage mechanisms in the membrane and gas diffusion layers, mechanical response under steady-state hygro-thermal stresses should be ...

  12. Three Mile Island Unit 1 Main Steam Line Break Three-Dimensional Neutronics/Thermal-Hydraulics Analysis: Application of Different Coupled Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, Francesco; Moreno, Jose Luis Gago; Galassi, Giorgio Maria; Grgic, Davor; Spadoni, Antonino

    2003-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the double ended main steam line break (MSLB) accident assumed to occur in the Babcock and Wilcox Three Mile Island Unit 1 (TMI-1) has been carried out at the Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione of the University of Pisa, Italy, in cooperation with the University of Zagreb, Croatia. The overall activity has been completed within the framework of the participation in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development-Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations-Nuclear Science Committee pressurized water reactor MSLB benchmark.Thermal-hydraulic system codes (various versions of Relap5), three-dimensional (3-D) neutronics codes (Parcs, Quabbox, and Nestle), and one subchannel code (Cobra) have been adopted for the analysis. Results from the following codes (or code versions) are assumed as reference:1. Relap5/mod3.2.2, beta version, coupled with the 3-D neutron kinetics Parcs code parallel virtual machine (PVM) coupling2. Relap5/mod3.2.2, gamma version, coupled with the 3-D neutron kinetics Quabbox code (direct coupling)3. Relap5/3D code coupled with the 3-D neutron kinetics Nestle code.The influence of PVM and of direct coupling is also discussed.Boundary and initial conditions of the system, including those relevant to the fuel status, have been supplied by Pennsylvania State University in cooperation with GPU Nuclear Corporation (the utility, owner of TMI) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The comparison among the results obtained by adopting the same thermal-hydraulic nodalization and the coupled code version is discussed in this paper.The capability of the control rods to recover the accident has been demonstrated in all the cases as well as the capability of all the codes to predict the time evolution of the assigned transient. However, one stuck control rod caused some 'recriticality' or 'return to power' whose magnitude is largely affected by boundary and initial conditions

  13. Three-dimensional Invasion of Human Glioblastoma Cells Remains Unchanged by X-ray and Carbon Ion Irradiation In Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eke, Iris; Storch, Katja; Kaestner, Ina; Vehlow, Anne [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany); Faethe, Christina; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang [Institute of Physiology and Pathophysiology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Taucher-Scholz, Gisela [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt (Germany); Temme, Achim; Schackert, Gabriele [Section of Experimental Neurosurgery/Tumor Immunology, Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany); Cordes, Nils, E-mail: Nils.Cordes@Oncoray.de [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Cell invasion represents one of the major determinants that treatment has failed for patients suffering from glioblastoma. Contrary findings have been reported for cell migration upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Here, the migration and invasion capability of glioblastoma cells on and in collagen type I were evaluated upon irradiation with X-rays or carbon ions. Methods and Materials: Migration on and invasion in collagen type I were evaluated in four established human glioblastoma cell lines exposed to either X-rays or carbon ions. Furthermore, clonogenic radiation survival, proliferation (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine positivity), DNA double-strand breaks ({gamma}H2AX/53BP1-positive foci), and expression of invasion-relevant proteins (eg, {beta}1 integrin, FAK, MMP2, and MMP9) were explored. Migration and invasion assays for primary glioblastoma cells also were carried out with X-ray irradiation. Results: Neither X-ray nor carbon ion irradiation affected glioblastoma cell migration and invasion, a finding similarly observed in primary glioblastoma cells. Intriguingly, irradiated cells migrated unhampered, despite DNA double-strand breaks and reduced proliferation. Clonogenic radiation survival was increased when cells had contact with extracellular matrix. Specific inhibition of the {beta}1 integrin or proliferation-associated signaling molecules revealed a critical function of JNK, PI3K, and p38 MAPK in glioblastoma cell invasion. Conclusions: These findings indicate that X-rays and carbon ion irradiation effectively reduce proliferation and clonogenic survival without modifying the migration and invasion ability of glioblastoma cells in a collagen type I environment. Addition of targeted agents against members of the MAPK and PI3K signaling axis to conventional chemoradiation therapy seems potentially useful to optimize glioblastoma therapy.

  14. Three dimensional MEMS supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wei

    2011-10-15

    The overall objective of this research is to achieve compact supercapacitors with high capacitance, large power density, and long cycle life for using as micro power sources to drive low power devices and sensors. The main shortcoming of supercapacitors as a power source is that its energy density typically is about 1/10 of that of batteries. To achieve compact supercapacitors of large energy density, supercapacitors must be developed with high capacitance and power density which are mainly depended on the effective surface area of the electrodes of the supercapacitors. Many studies have been done to increase the effective surface area by modifying the electrode materials, however, much less investigations are focus on machining the electrodes. In my thesis work, micro- and nano-technologies are applied as technology approaches for machining the electrodes with three dimensional (3D) microstructures. More specific, Micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) fabrication process flow, which integrates the key process such as LIGA-like (German acronym for Lithographie, Galvanoformung, Abformung, which mean Lithography, Electroplating and Molding) technology or DRIE (deep reactive ion etching), has been developed to enable innovative designs of 3D MEMS supercapacitors which own the electrodes of significantly increased geometric area. Two types of 3D MEMS supercapcitors, based on LIGA-like and DRIE technology respectively, were designed and successfully created. The LIGA-like based 3D MEMS supercapacitor is with an interdigital 3D structure, and consists of silicon substrate, two electroplated nickel current collectors, two PPy (poly pyrrole) electrodes, and solid state electrolyte. The fabrication process flow developed includes the flowing key processes, SU-8 lithography, nickel electroplating, PPy polymerization and solid state electrolyte coating. Electrochemical tests showed that the single electrode of the supercapacitor has the specific capacitance of 0.058 F cm-2

  15. Three-dimensional culture and interaction of cancer cells and dendritic cells in an electrospun nano-submicron hybrid fibrous scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim TE

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tae-Eon Kim,1–3,* Chang Gun Kim,1–3,* Jin Soo Kim,4 Songwan Jin,4 Sik Yoon,5 Hae-Rahn Bae,6 Jeong-Hwa Kim,7,8 Young Hun Jeong,7,8 Jong-Young Kwak1–3 1Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, 2Department of Biomedical Sciences, The Graduate School, Ajou University, Suwon, South Korea; 3Immune Network Pioneer Research Center, Ajou University Medical Center, Suwon, South Korea; 4Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Polytechnic University, Gyeonggi, South Korea; 5Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan, South Korea; 6Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan, South Korea; 7School of Mechanical Engineering, 8Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: An artificial three-dimensional (3D culture system that mimics the tumor microenvironment in vitro is an essential tool for investigating the cross-talk between immune and cancer cells in tumors. In this study, we developed a 3D culture system using an electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL nanofibrous scaffold (NFS. A hybrid NFS containing an uninterrupted network of nano- and submicron-scale fibers (400 nm to 2 µm was generated by deposition onto a stainless steel mesh instead of an aluminum plate. The hybrid NFS contained multiplanar pores in a 3D structure. Surface-seeded mouse CT26 colon cancer cells and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs were able to infiltrate the hybrid NFS within several hours. BM-DCs cultured on PCL nanofibers showed a baseline inactive form, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS-activated BM-DCs showed increased expression of CD86 and major histocompatibility complex Class II. Actin and phosphorylated FAK were enriched where unstimulated and LPS-stimulated BM-DCs contacted the fibers in the 3D hybrid NFS. When BM-DCs were cocultured with mitoxantrone-treated CT26 cells in

  16. Cell Type–Specific Three-Dimensional Structure of Thalamocortical Circuits in a Column of Rat Vibrissal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kock, Christiaan P. J.; Bruno, Randy M.; Ramirez, Alejandro; Meyer, Hanno S.; Dercksen, Vincent J.; Helmstaedter, Moritz; Sakmann, Bert

    2012-01-01

    Soma location, dendrite morphology, and synaptic innervation may represent key determinants of functional responses of individual neurons, such as sensory-evoked spiking. Here, we reconstruct the 3D circuits formed by thalamocortical afferents from the lemniscal pathway and excitatory neurons of an anatomically defined cortical column in rat vibrissal cortex. We objectively classify 9 cortical cell types and estimate the number and distribution of their somata, dendrites, and thalamocortical synapses. Somata and dendrites of most cell types intermingle, while thalamocortical connectivity depends strongly upon the cell type and the 3D soma location of the postsynaptic neuron. Correlating dendrite morphology and thalamocortical connectivity to functional responses revealed that the lemniscal afferents can account for some of the cell type- and location-specific subthreshold and spiking responses after passive whisker touch (e.g., in layer 4, but not for other cell types, e.g., in layer 5). Our data provides a quantitative 3D prediction of the cell type–specific lemniscal synaptic wiring diagram and elucidates structure–function relationships of this physiologically relevant pathway at single-cell resolution. PMID:22089425

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging tracking of human adipose derived stromal cells within three-dimensional scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Lalande

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available For bone tissue engineering, human Adipose Derived Stem Cells (hADSCs are proposed to be associated with a scaffold for promoting bone regeneration. After implantation, cellularised scaffolds require a non-invasive method for monitoring their fate in vivo. The purpose of this study was to use Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI-based tracking of these cells, labelled with magnetic agents for in vivo longitudinal assessment. hADSCs were isolated from adipose tissue and labelled with USPIO-rhodamine (Ultrasmall SuperParamagnetic Iron Oxide. USPIO internalisation, absence of toxicity towards hADSCs, and osteogenic differentiation of the labelled cells were evaluated in standard culture conditions. Labelled cells were then seeded within a 3D porous polysaccharide-based scaffold and imaged in vitro using fluorescence microscopy and MRI. Cellularised scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in nude mice and MRI analyses were performed from 1 to 28 d after implantation. In vitro, no effect of USPIO labelling on cell viability and osteogenic differentiation was found. USPIO were efficiently internalised by hADSCs and generated a high T2* contrast. In vivo MRI revealed that hADSCs remain detectable until 28 d after implantation and could migrate from the scaffold and colonise the area around it. These data suggested that this scaffold might behave as a cell carrier capable of both holding a cell fraction and delivering cells to the site of implantation. In addition, the present findings evidenced that MRI is a reliable technique to validate cell-seeding procedures in 3D porous scaffolds, and to assess the fate of hADSCs transplanted in vivo.

  18. Phase II study of radiotherapy with three-dimensional conformal boost concurrent with paclitaxel and cisplatin for Stage IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Seok; Yoon, Sang Min; Choi, Eun Kyung; Yi, Byong Yong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-wook; Shin, Seong Soo; Lee, Jung Shin; Suh, Cheolwon; Kim, Sang-We; Kim, Dong Soon; Kim, Woo Sung; Park, Heon Joo; Park, Charn Il

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of concurrent chemoradiotherapy with paclitaxel/cisplatin for Stage IIIB locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Radiotherapy was administered to a total dose of 70.2 Gy (daily fraction of 1.8 Gy, 5 days/wk), over an 8-week period, combined with chemotherapy. The chemotherapy consisted of weekly 40 mg/m 2 of paclitaxel plus 20 mg/m 2 of cisplatin for 8 consecutive weeks. All patients received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), based on computed tomography simulated planning after 41.4 Gy. The median follow-up period of survivors was 24 months. Results: Between January 2000 and October 2002, 135 patients with a median age of 60 years were enrolled and analyzed in this prospective trial. The overall response rate was 75% including 2 cases of complete response. The major patterns of failure were local failure and distant metastasis. The 2-year overall and progression-free survival rates were 37% and 18%, respectively. The median overall and progression-free survival times were 17 months and 9 months, respectively. Hematologic toxicity >Grade 2 was observed in 19% of patients and severe non-hematologic toxicity was infrequent. Conclusions: Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, combined with paclitaxel and cisplatin chemotherapy, was associated with a satisfactory outcome with manageable toxicity. Further investigations are needed to improve the local control

  19. Imaging of cellular spread on a three-dimensional scaffold by means of a novel cell-labeling technique for high-resolution computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimm, Benjamin W; Hofmann, Sandra; Schneider, Philipp; Carretta, Roberto; Müller, Ralph

    2012-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) represents a truly three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique that can provide high-resolution images on the cellular level. Thus, one approach to detect single cells is X-ray absorption-based CT, where cells are labeled with a dense, opaque material providing the required contrast for CT imaging. Within the present work, a novel cell-labeling method has been developed showing the feasibility of labeling fixed cells with iron oxide (FeO) particles for subsequent CT imaging and quantitative morphometry. A biotin-streptavidin detection system was exploited to bind FeO particles to its target endothelial cells. The binding of the particles was predominantly close to the cell centers on 2D surfaces as shown by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and CT. When cells were cultured on porous, 3D polyurethane surfaces, significantly more FeO particles were detected compared with surfaces without cells and FeO particle labeling using CT. Here, we report on the implementation and evaluation of a novel cell detection method based on high-resolution CT. This system has potential in cell tracking for 3D in vitro imaging in the future.

  20. Viral infection of human progenitor and liver-derived cells encapsulated in three-dimensional PEG-based hydrogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Nam-Joon; Elazar, Menashe; Xiong, Anming; Glenn, Jeffrey S [Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CCSR Building Room 3115A, 269 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Lee, Wonjae [Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Chiao, Eric; Baker, Julie [Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Frank, Curtis W, E-mail: jeffrey.glenn@stanford.ed, E-mail: curt.frank@stanford.ed [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    We have studied the encapsulation of human progenitor cells into 3D PEG hydrogels. Replication-incompetent lentivirus promoter reporter vectors were found to efficiently detect the in vivo expression of human hepatic genes in hydrogel-encapsulated liver progenitor cells. Similarly, hydrogel-encapsulated cells could be efficiently infected with hepatitis C virus, and progeny infectious virus could be recovered from the media supernatants of the hydrogels. Provocatively, the diameters of these virus particles range from {approx}50 to 100 nm, while the calculated mesh size of the 8 k hydrogel is 44.6 +- 1.7 A. To reconcile how viral particles can penetrate the hydrogels to infect the encapsulated cells, we propose that microfractures/defects of the hydrogel result in a functional pore size of up to 20 fold greater than predicted by theoretical mesh calculations. These results suggest a new model of hydrogel structure, and have exciting implications for tissue engineering and hepatitis virus studies. (communication)

  1. Viral infection of human progenitor and liver-derived cells encapsulated in three-dimensional PEG-based hydrogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Nam-Joon; Elazar, Menashe; Xiong, Anming; Glenn, Jeffrey S; Lee, Wonjae; Chiao, Eric; Baker, Julie; Frank, Curtis W

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the encapsulation of human progenitor cells into 3D PEG hydrogels. Replication-incompetent lentivirus promoter reporter vectors were found to efficiently detect the in vivo expression of human hepatic genes in hydrogel-encapsulated liver progenitor cells. Similarly, hydrogel-encapsulated cells could be efficiently infected with hepatitis C virus, and progeny infectious virus could be recovered from the media supernatants of the hydrogels. Provocatively, the diameters of these virus particles range from ∼50 to 100 nm, while the calculated mesh size of the 8 k hydrogel is 44.6 ± 1.7 A. To reconcile how viral particles can penetrate the hydrogels to infect the encapsulated cells, we propose that microfractures/defects of the hydrogel result in a functional pore size of up to 20 fold greater than predicted by theoretical mesh calculations. These results suggest a new model of hydrogel structure, and have exciting implications for tissue engineering and hepatitis virus studies. (communication)

  2. Nanoelectronics-biology frontier: From nanoscopic probes for action potential recording in live cells to three-dimensional cyborg tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Xiaojie; Fu, Tian-Ming; Liu, Jia; Lieber, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires configured as the active channels of field-effect transistors (FETs) have been used as detectors for high-resolution electrical recording from single live cells, cell networks, tissues and organs. Extracellular measurements with substrate supported silicon nanowire (SiNW) FETs, which have projected active areas orders of magnitude smaller than conventional microfabricated multielectrode arrays (MEAs) and planar FETs, recorded action potential and field potential signa...

  3. Quantitative investigation of red blood cell three-dimensional geometric and chemical changes in the storage lesion using digital holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaferzadeh, Keyvan; Moon, Inkyu

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative phase information obtained by digital holographic microscopy (DHM) can provide new insight into the functions and morphology of single red blood cells (RBCs). Since the functionality of a RBC is related to its three-dimensional (3-D) shape, quantitative 3-D geometric changes induced by storage time can help hematologists realize its optimal functionality period. We quantitatively investigate RBC 3-D geometric changes in the storage lesion using DHM. Our experimental results show that the substantial geometric transformation of the biconcave-shaped RBCs to the spherocyte occurs due to RBC storage lesion. This transformation leads to progressive loss of cell surface area, surface-to-volume ratio, and functionality of RBCs. Furthermore, our quantitative analysis shows that there are significant correlations between chemical and morphological properties of RBCs.

  4. Visualization and quantitation of abundant macroautophagy in virus-infected cells by confocal three-dimensional fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Wallen; Yamada, Masaki; Moninger, Thomas; Grose, Charles

    2013-10-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human herpesvirus. Primary infection causes varicella (chickenpox), a viremic illness typified by an exanthem consisting of several hundred vesicles. When VZV reactivates from latency in the spinal ganglia during late adulthood, the emerging virus causes a vesicular dermatomal rash (herpes zoster or shingles). To expand investigations of autophagy during varicella and zoster, newer 3D imaging technology was combined with laser scanning confocal microscopy to provide animations of autophagosomes in the vesicular rash. First, the cells were immunolabeled with antibodies against VZV proteins and the LC3 protein, an integral autophagosomal protein. Antibody reagents lacking activity against the human blood group A1 antigen were selected. After laser excitation of the samples, optimized emission detection bandwidths were configured by Zeiss Zen control software. Confocal Z-stacks comprising up to 40 optical slices were reconstructed into 3D animations with the aid of Imaris software. With this imaging technology, individual autophagosomes were clearly detectable as spheres within each vesicular cell. To enumerate the number of autophagosomes, data sets from 50 cells were reconstructed as 3D fluorescence images and analyzed with MeasurementPro software. The mean number of autophagosomes per infected vesicular cell was >100, although over 200 autophagosomes were seen in a few cells. In summary, macroautophagy was easily quantitated within VZV-infected cells after immunolabeling and imaging by 3D confocal animation technology. These same 3D imaging techniques will be applicable for investigations of autophagy in other virus-infected cells. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Taking into account positioning errors during a three dimensional conformal radiotherapy for a non at small cells lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, D.; Maisonobe, J.A.; Leignel, D.; Durdux, C.; Henni, M.; Dessard-Diana, B.; Housset, M.; Giraud, P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: According to the report 62 of the International commission on radiation units and measurements (ICRU), the estimated target volume adds to the internal margin that takes into account the movements of the target volume during breathing, an external margin that takes into account the uncertainties of beams positioning. Our objective was to describe a method of estimated target volume calculation taking into account the technique of irradiation chosen in the service. (N.C.)

  6. Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Rapid Prototyped Three-Dimensional Hydroxyapatite/Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canciani, Elena; Dellavia, Claudia; Ferreira, Lorena Maria; Giannasi, Chiara; Carmagnola, Daniela; Carrassi, Antonio; Brini, Anna Teresa

    2016-05-01

    In the study, we assess a rapid prototyped scaffold composed of 30/70 hydroxyapatite (HA) and beta-tricalcium-phosphate (β-TCP) loaded with human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) to determine cell proliferation, differentiation toward osteogenic lineage, adhesion and penetration on/into the scaffold.In this in vitro study, hASCs isolated from fat tissue discarded after plastic surgery were expanded, characterized, and then loaded onto the scaffold. Cells were tested for: viability assay (Alamar Blue at days 3, 7 and Live/Dead at day 32), differentiation index (alkaline phosphatase activity at day 14), scaffold adhesion (standard error of the mean analysis at days 5 and 18), and penetration (ground sections at day 32).All the hASC populations displayed stemness markers and the ability to differentiate toward adipogenic and osteogenic lineages.Cellular vitality increased between 3 and 7 days, and no inhibitory effect by HA/β-TCP was observed. Under osteogenic stimuli, scaffold increased alkaline phosphatase activity of +243% compared with undifferentiated samples. Human adipose-derived stem cells adhered on HA/β-TCP surface through citoplasmatic extensions that occupied the macropores and built networks among them. Human adipose derived stem cells were observed in the core of HA/β-TCP. The current combination of hASCs and HA/β-TCP scaffold provided encouraging results. If authors' data will be confirmed in preclinical models, the present engineering approach could represent an interesting tool in treating large bone defects.

  7. Simulating Photons and Plasmons in a Three-dimensional Lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pletzer, A.; Shvets, G.

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional metallic photonic structures are studied using a newly developed mixed finite element-finite difference (FE-FD) code, Curly3d. The code solves the vector Helmholtz equation as an eigenvalue problem in the unit cell of a triply periodic lattice composed of conductors and/or dielectrics. The mixed FE-FD discretization scheme ensures rapid numerical convergence of the eigenvalue and allows the code to run at low resolution. Plasmon and photonic band structure calculations are presented

  8. Three-dimensional reciprocal space profile of an individual nanocrystallite inside a thin-film solar cell absorber layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slobodskyy, Taras; Schroth, Philip; Minkevich, Andrey; Grigoriev, Daniil; Fohtung, Edwin; Riotte, Markus; Baumbach, Tilo; Powalla, Michael; Lemmer, Uli; Slobodskyy, Anatoliy

    2013-01-01

    The strain profile of an individual Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 nanocrystallite in a solar cell absorber layer is accessed using synchrotron radiation. We find that the investigated crystallite is inhomogeneously strained. The strain is most likely produced by a combination of intergranular strain and composition variations in nanocrystals inside the polycrystalline semiconductor film and carries information about the intercrystalline interaction. The measurements are made nondestructively and without additional sample preparation or x-ray beam nanofocusing. This is the first step towards measurements of strain profiles of individual crystallites inside a working solar cell. (paper)

  9. Increasing platelet concentration in platelet-rich plasma inhibits anterior cruciate ligament cell function in three-dimensional culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ryu; Cheng, Mingyu; Murray, Martha M

    2014-02-01

    Tissue engineering is one new strategy being developed to treat ACL ruptures. One such approach is bio-enhanced ACL repair, where a suture repair is supplemented with a bio-active scaffold containing platelets. However, the optimal concentration of platelets to stimulate ACL healing is not known. We hypothesized that increasing platelet concentrations in the scaffold would enhance critical cell behaviors. Porcine ACL fibroblasts were obtained from explant culture and suspended in platelet poor plasma (PPP), 1× platelet-rich plasma (PRP), 3× PRP, 5× PRP, or phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The cell suspensions were cultured in a 3D collagen scaffold. Cellular metabolism (MTT assay), apoptosis (TUNEL assay), and gene expression for type I and type III collagen were measured. 1× PRP significantly outperformed 5× PRP in all parameters studied: Type I and III collagen gene expression, apoptosis prevention, and cell metabolism stimulation. ACL fibroblasts cultured with 1× PRP had the highest type I and type III collagen gene expression. 1× PRP and PPP groups had the highest cell metabolism and lowest apoptosis rates. Concentration of platelets had significant effects on the behavior of ACL fibroblasts; thus, it is an important parameter that should be specified in clinical or basic science studies. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Three-dimensional cell organization leads to almost immediate HRE activity as demonstrated by molecular imaging of MG-63 spheroids using two-photon excitation microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indovina, Paola; Collini, Maddalena; Chirico, Giuseppe; Santini, Maria Teresa

    2007-02-20

    Hypoxia through HRE (hypoxia-responsive element) activity in MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells grown in monolayer and as very small, three-dimensional tumor spheroids was investigated using molecular imaging techniques. MG-63 cells were stably transfected with a vector constructed with multiple copies of the HRE sequence of the human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene and with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) coding sequence. During hypoxia when HIF-1alpha (hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha) is stabilized, the binding of HIF-1 to the HRE sequences of the vector allows the transcription of EGFP and the appearance of fluorescence. Transfected monolayer cells were characterized by flow cytometric analysis in response to various hypoxic conditions and HIF-1alpha expression in these cells was assessed by Western blotting. Two-photon excitation (TPE) microscopy was then used to examine both MG-63-transfected monolayer cells and spheroids at 2 and 5 days of growth in normoxic conditions. Monolayer cells reveal almost no fluorescence, whereas even very small spheroids (HRE activation. This activation of the HRE sequences, which control a wide variety of genes, suggests that monolayer cells and spheroids of the MG-63 cell line have different genes activated and thus diverse functional activities.

  11. Three-dimensional imaging for precise structural control of Si quantum dot networks for all-Si solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Hao, Xiaojing; Huang, Shujuan; Puthen-Veettil, Binesh; Conibeer, Gavin; Green, Martin A.; Perez-Wurfl, Ivan

    2013-07-01

    All-Si tandem solar cells based on Si quantum dots (QDs) are a promising approach to future high-performance, thin film solar cells using abundant, stable and non-toxic materials. An important prerequisite to achieve a high conversion efficiency in such cells is the ability to control the geometry of the Si QD network. This includes the ability to control both, the size and arrangement of Si QDs embedded in a higher bandgap matrix. Using plasmon tomography we show the size, shape and density of Si QDs, that form in Si rich oxide (SRO)/SiO2 multilayers upon annealing, can be controlled by varying the SRO stoichiometry. Smaller, more spherical QDs of higher densities are obtained at lower Si concentrations. In richer SRO layers ellipsoidal QDs tend to form. Using electronic structure calculations within the effective mass approximation we show that ellipsoidal QDs give rise to reduced inter-QD coupling in the layer. Efficient carrier transport via mini-bands is in this case more likely across the multilayers provided the SiO2 spacer layer is thin enough to allow coupling in the vertical direction.All-Si tandem solar cells based on Si quantum dots (QDs) are a promising approach to future high-performance, thin film solar cells using abundant, stable and non-toxic materials. An important prerequisite to achieve a high conversion efficiency in such cells is the ability to control the geometry of the Si QD network. This includes the ability to control both, the size and arrangement of Si QDs embedded in a higher bandgap matrix. Using plasmon tomography we show the size, shape and density of Si QDs, that form in Si rich oxide (SRO)/SiO2 multilayers upon annealing, can be controlled by varying the SRO stoichiometry. Smaller, more spherical QDs of higher densities are obtained at lower Si concentrations. In richer SRO layers ellipsoidal QDs tend to form. Using electronic structure calculations within the effective mass approximation we show that ellipsoidal QDs give rise to

  12. Modeling two-phase flow in three-dimensional complex flow-fields of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinyong; Luo, Gang; Wang, Chao-Yang

    2017-10-01

    3D fine-mesh flow-fields recently developed by Toyota Mirai improved water management and mass transport in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell stacks, suggesting their potential value for robust and high-power PEM fuel cell stack performance. In such complex flow-fields, Forchheimer's inertial effect is dominant at high current density. In this work, a two-phase flow model of 3D complex flow-fields of PEMFCs is developed by accounting for Forchheimer's inertial effect, for the first time, to elucidate the underlying mechanism of liquid water behavior and mass transport inside 3D complex flow-fields and their adjacent gas diffusion layers (GDL). It is found that Forchheimer's inertial effect enhances liquid water removal from flow-fields and adds additional flow resistance around baffles, which improves interfacial liquid water and mass transport. As a result, substantial improvements in high current density cell performance and operational stability are expected in PEMFCs with 3D complex flow-fields, compared to PEMFCs with conventional flow-fields. Higher current density operation required to further reduce PEMFC stack cost per kW in the future will necessitate optimizing complex flow-field designs using the present model, in order to efficiently remove a large amount of product water and hence minimize the mass transport voltage loss.

  13. Highly concentrated collagen solutions leading to transparent scaffolds of controlled three-dimensional organizations for corneal epithelial cell colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidu, Aurélien; Ghoubay-Benallaoua, Djida; Teulon, Claire; Asnacios, Sophie; Grieve, Kate; Portier, François; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Borderie, Vincent; Mosser, Gervaise

    2018-05-29

    This study aimed at controlling both the organization and the transparency of dense collagen scaffolds making use of the lyotropic mesogen properties of collagen. Cholesteric or plywood-like liquid crystal phases were achieved using mixtures of acetic and hydrochloric acids as solvents. The critical pH at which the switch between the two phases occurred was around pH = 3. The use of the two acids led to fibrillated collagen I scaffolds, whose visual aspect ranged from opaque to transparent. Rheological investigations showed that viscoelastic properties of the plywood-like solutions were optimized for molding due to faster recovery. They also confirmed the correlation between the elastic modulus and the diameter of collagen fibrils obtained after fibrillogenesis under ammonia vapor. Human corneal epithelial cells, grown from donor limbal explants, were cultured both on transparent plywood-like matrices and on human amniotic membranes for 14 days. The development of corneal epithelium and the preservation of epithelial stem cells were checked by optical microscopy, colony formation assay, immuno-fluorescence and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. A higher level of amplification of limbal stem cells was obtained with collagen matrices compared with amniotic membranes, showing the high biocompatibility of our scaffolds. We therefore suggest that collagen solutions presenting both plywood-like organization and transparency might be of interest for biomedical applications in ophthalmology.

  14. Three-Dimensional Bioprinting Nanotechnologies towards Clinical Application of Stem Cells and Their Secretome in Salivary Gland Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao N. Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Salivary gland (SG functional damage and severe dry mouth (or xerostomia are commonly observed in a wide range of medical conditions from autoimmune to metabolic disorders as well as after radiotherapy to treat specific head and neck cancers. No effective therapy has been developed to completely restore the SG functional damage on the long-term and reverse the poor quality of life of xerostomia patients. Cell- and secretome-based strategies are currently being tested in vitro and in vivo for the repair and/or regeneration of the damaged SG using (1 epithelial SG stem/progenitor cells from salispheres or explant cultures as well as (2 nonepithelial stem cell types and/or their bioactive secretome. These strategies will be the focus of our review. Herein, innovative 3D bioprinting nanotechnologies for the generation of organotypic cultures and SG organoids/mini-glands will also be discussed. These bioprinting technologies will allow researchers to analyze the secretome components and extracellular matrix production, as well as their biofunctional effects in 3D mini-glands ex vivo. Improving our understanding of the SG secretome is critical to develop effective secretome-based therapies towards the regeneration and/or repair of all SG compartments for proper restoration of saliva secretion and flow into the oral cavity.

  15. Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Hepatic Endoderm and Its Role in Bioartificial Liver Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver carries out a range of functions essential for bodily homeostasis. The impairment of liver functions has serious implications and is responsible for high rates of patient morbidity and mortality. Presently, liver transplantation remains the only effective treatment, but donor availability is a major limitation. Therefore, artificial and bioartificial liver devices have been developed to bridge patients to liver transplantation. Existing support devices improve hepatic encephalopathy to a certain extent; however their usage is associated with side effects. The major hindrance in the development of bioartificial liver devices and cellular therapies is the limited availability of human hepatocytes. Moreover, primary hepatocytes are difficult to maintain and lose hepatic identity and function over time even with sophisticated tissue culture media. To overcome this limitation, renewable cell sources are being explored. Human embryonic stem cells are one such cellular resource and have been shown to generate a reliable and reproducible supply of human hepatic endoderm. Therefore, the use of human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatic endoderm in combination with tissue engineering has the potential to pave the way for the development of novel bioartificial liver devices and predictive drug toxicity assays.

  16. Three-dimensional imaging for precise structural control of Si quantum dot networks for all-Si solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourkoutis, Lena F; Hao, Xiaojing; Huang, Shujuan; Puthen-Veettil, Binesh; Conibeer, Gavin; Green, Martin A; Perez-Wurfl, Ivan

    2013-08-21

    All-Si tandem solar cells based on Si quantum dots (QDs) are a promising approach to future high-performance, thin film solar cells using abundant, stable and non-toxic materials. An important prerequisite to achieve a high conversion efficiency in such cells is the ability to control the geometry of the Si QD network. This includes the ability to control both, the size and arrangement of Si QDs embedded in a higher bandgap matrix. Using plasmon tomography we show the size, shape and density of Si QDs, that form in Si rich oxide (SRO)/SiO2 multilayers upon annealing, can be controlled by varying the SRO stoichiometry. Smaller, more spherical QDs of higher densities are obtained at lower Si concentrations. In richer SRO layers ellipsoidal QDs tend to form. Using electronic structure calculations within the effective mass approximation we show that ellipsoidal QDs give rise to reduced inter-QD coupling in the layer. Efficient carrier transport via mini-bands is in this case more likely across the multilayers provided the SiO2 spacer layer is thin enough to allow coupling in the vertical direction.

  17. Proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of CD105-positive enriched rat synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells in three-dimensional porous scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi Jun; Chen Anmin; You Hongbo; Li Kunpeng; Zhang Di; Guo Fengjing, E-mail: fjguo@tjh.tjmu.edu.cn [Department of Orthopedics, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China)

    2011-02-15

    Stem cell-based tissue engineering has provided an alternative strategy to treat cartilage lesions, and synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) are considered as a promising cell source for cartilage repair. In this study, the SMSCs were isolated from rat synovium, and CD105-positive (CD105{sup +}) cells were enriched using magnetic activated cell sorting. Sorted cells were subsequently seeded onto the chitosan-alginate composite three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds and cultured in chondrogenic culture medium in the presence of TGF-{beta}{sub 3} and BMP-2 for 2 weeks in vitro. After 2 weeks in culture, scanning electron microscopy results showed that cells attached and proliferated well on scaffolds, and secreted extracellular matrix were also observed. From day 7 to day 14, the total DNA and glucosaminoglycan content of the cells cultured in scaffolds were found to have increased significantly, and cell cycle analyses revealed that the percentage of cells in the S and G2/M phases increased and the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase decreased. Compared with non-sorted cells, the sorted cells cultured in scaffolds underwent more chondrogenic differentiation, as evidenced by higher expression of type II collagen and Sox9 at the protein and mRNA levels. The results suggest that CD105{sup +} enriched SMSCs may be a potential cell source for cartilage tissue engineering, and the chitosan-alginate composite 3D porous scaffold could provide a favorable microenvironment for supporting proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of cells.

  18. Effect of dynamic three-dimensional culture on osteogenic potential of human periodontal ligament-derived mesenchymal stem cells entrapped in alginate microbeads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiatini, R; Penolazzi, L; Lambertini, E; Angelozzi, M; Morganti, C; Mazzitelli, S; Trombelli, L; Nastruzzi, C; Piva, R

    2015-08-01

    Bioreactors are devices that efficiently create an environment that enables cell cultures to grow in a three-dimensional (3D) context mimicking in vivo conditions. In this study, we investigate the effect of dynamic fluid flow on the osteogenic potential of human mesenchymal stem cells obtained from periodontal ligament and entrapped in alginate microbeads. After proper immunophenotyping, cells were encapsulated in barium alginate, cultured in 3D static or 3D dynamic conditions represented by a bioreactor system. Calcein-AM/propidium iodide staining was used to assess cellular viability. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the expression of osteogenic markers (Runx2 and COL1). Alizarin Red S staining and the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to assess mineral matrix deposition. Optimal encapsulation procedure, in terms of polymer pumping rate, distance from droplet generator to the gelling bath and atomizing airflow was assessed. Cell viability was not affected by encapsulation in alginate microbeads. Bioreactor cell exposure was effective in anticipating osteogenic differentiation and improving mineral matrix deposition. For the first time human mesenchymal stem cells obtained from periodontal ligaments encapsulated in alginate microbeads were cultured in a bioreactor system. This combination could represent a promising strategy to create a cell-based smart system with enhanced osteogenic potential useful for many different dental applications. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A three-dimensional numerical investigation of trapezoid baffles effect on non-isothermal reactant transport and cell net power in a PEMFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perng, Shiang-Wuu; Wu, Horng-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We study how angle and height of trapezoid baffle affect PEMFC net power. • The jet-type, trapping, and blockage effects augment non-isothermal transport in flow channel. • Greater angles and heights of trapezoid baffles provide more reactant to the catalyst layer. • Baffles of 1.5 mm and 90° fully block flow channel to show bad heat transfer and large pressure drop. • Maximum enhancement of cell net power is 90% with baffles of 60° angle and 1.125 mm height. - Abstract: The present study performed a three-dimensional numerical simulation to observe how trapezoid baffles affect non-isothermal reactant transports and cell net power in the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) by the SIMPLE-C method. The geometric parameters of trapezoid baffles installed in the gas channel employed in this study include the angle and height with the same gas diffusion and catalyst layers to realize the cell net power considering the effect of liquid water formation on the fluid flow field. The cell net power is adopted to evaluate the real enhancement of cell performance due to the additional pumping power induced by the pressure loss through the PEMFC. The results illustrated that compared with traditional gas channel without baffles, the novel gas channel with trapezoid baffles, whose angle is 60° and height is 1.125 mm, enhances the cell net power best by approximately 90% among all trapezoid baffle designs

  20. Confocal stereology and image analysis: methods for estimating geometrical characteristics of cells and tissues from three-dimensional confocal images

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubínová, Lucie; Janáček, Jiří; Karen, Petr; Radochová, Barbora; Difato, Francesco; Krekule, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 53, Suppl.1 (2004), s. S47-S55 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/01/0257; GA ČR GA310/02/1470; GA AV ČR KJB6011309; GA AV ČR KJB5039302 Grant - others:SI - CZ(CZ) KONTAKT 001/2001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : confocal microscopy * image analysis * stereology Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.140, year: 2004

  1. Multifunctional, chitosan-based nano therapeutics: design and application for two- and three-dimensional cell culture systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarato, Giulia

    There is a constant demand for sensitive and effective anti-cancer drug delivery systems, capable of detecting early-stage pathological conditions and increasing patient survival. Recently, chitosan-based drug delivery nanocomplexes have shown to smartly respond to the distinctive features of the tumor microenvironment, a complex network of extracellular molecules, stromal and endothelial cells, which supports the tumor formation and its metastatic invasion. Due to biocompatibility, easy chemical tailorability, and pH-responsiveness, chitosan has emerged as a promising candidate for the formulation of supramolecular multifunctional materials. The present study focuses on the design, fabrication and characterization of fluorescently labelled, hydrophobically modified glycol chitosan nano-micelles (HGC NPs), suitably tailored for the delivery of anti-neoplastic compounds to various tumor models. Doxorubicin-loaded HGC NPs have been delivered to a bone cancer model, both in monolayer and in 3D spheroid configuration, to assess for differences in the delivery profiles and in the therapeutic efficacy. Compared to the free drug, nanocomplexes showed rapid uptake and a more homogeneous distribution in 3D spheroids, a powerful cellular tool which recapitulates some of the in vivo tumor microenvironment features. In a second part of this thesis work, with the purpose of designing an active targeting tumor-homing nano-therapeutic system, HGC NPs have been linked, via avidin-biotin interaction, with a IVS4 peptide, a small molecule with inhibitory activity on MMP-14-mediated functions. An extensive study conducted on triple negative breast cancer cells in monolayer revealed the MMP-14-IVS4-HGC association at the cancer cell membrane, the preferential uptake, and the consequent impairment of protease-associated migratory ability. As an additional application of our engineered construct, HGC micelles have been decorated with a liver kinase B1 (LKB1), a critical kinase involved

  2. Three-dimensional growth as multicellular spheroid activates the proangiogenic phenotype of colorectal carcinoma cells via LFA-1-dependent VEGF: implications on hepatic micrometastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muruzabal Francisco J

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recruitment of vascular stromal and endothelial cells is an early event occurring during cancer cell growth at premetastatic niches, but how the microenvironment created by the initial three-dimensional (3D growth of cancer cells affects their angiogenesis-stimulating potential is unclear. Methods The proangiogenic profile of CT26 murine colorectal carcinoma cells was studied in seven-day cultured 3D-spheroids of Results Spheroid-derived CT26 cells increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF secretion by 70%, which in turn increased the in vitro migration of primary cultured hepatic sinusoidal endothelium (HSE cells by 2-fold. More importantly, spheroid-derived CT26 cells increased lymphocyte function associated antigen (LFA-1-expressing cell fraction by 3-fold; and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1, given to spheroid-cultured CT26 cells, further increased VEGF secretion by 90%, via cyclooxygenase (COX-2-dependent mechanism. Consistent with these findings, CT26 cancer cells significantly increased LFA-1 expression in non-hypoxic avascular micrometastases at their earliest inception within hepatic lobules in vivo; and angiogenesis also markedly increased in both subcutaneous tumors and hepatic metastases produced by spheroid-derived CT26 cells. Conclusion 3D-growth per se enriched the proangiogenic phenotype of cancer cells growing as multicellular spheroids or as subclinical hepatic micrometastases. The contribution of integrin LFA-1 to VEGF secretion via COX-2 was a micro environmental-related mechanism leading to the pro-angiogenic activation of soluble ICAM-1-activated colorectal carcinoma cells. This mechanism may represent a new target for specific therapeutic strategies designed to block colorectal cancer cell growth at a subclinical micrometastatic stage within the liver.

  3. Three-Dimensional Transport Modeling for Proton Exchange Membrane(PEM Fuel Cell with Micro Parallel Flow Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Soon Hwang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling and simulation for heat and mass transport in micro channel are beingused extensively in researches and industrial applications to gain better understanding of thefundamental processes and to optimize fuel cell designs before building a prototype forengineering application. In this study, we used a single-phase, fully three dimensionalsimulation model for PEMFC that can deal with both anode and cathode flow field forexamining the micro flow channel with electrochemical reaction. The results show thathydrogen and oxygen were solely supplied to the membrane by diffusion mechanism ratherthan convection transport, and the higher pressure drop at cathode side is thought to becaused by higher flow rate of oxygen at cathode. And it is found that the amount of water incathode channel was determined by water formation due to electrochemical reaction pluselectro-osmotic mass flux directing toward the cathode side. And it is very important tomodel the back diffusion and electro-osmotic mass flux accurately since the two flux wasclosely correlated each other and greatly influenced for determination of ionic conductivityof the membrane which directly affects the performance of fuel cell.

  4. Three-Dimensional Transport Modeling for Proton Exchange Membrane(PEM) Fuel Cell with Micro Parallel Flow Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pil Hyong; Han, Sang Seok; Hwang, Sang Soon

    2008-03-03

    Modeling and simulation for heat and mass transport in micro channel are beingused extensively in researches and industrial applications to gain better understanding of thefundamental processes and to optimize fuel cell designs before building a prototype forengineering application. In this study, we used a single-phase, fully three dimensionalsimulation model for PEMFC that can deal with both anode and cathode flow field forexamining the micro flow channel with electrochemical reaction. The results show thathydrogen and oxygen were solely supplied to the membrane by diffusion mechanism ratherthan convection transport, and the higher pressure drop at cathode side is thought to becaused by higher flow rate of oxygen at cathode. And it is found that the amount of water incathode channel was determined by water formation due to electrochemical reaction pluselectro-osmotic mass flux directing toward the cathode side. And it is very important tomodel the back diffusion and electro-osmotic mass flux accurately since the two flux wasclosely correlated each other and greatly influenced for determination of ionic conductivityof the membrane which directly affects the performance of fuel cell.

  5. Production and release of infectious hepatitis C virus from human liver cell cultures in the three-dimensional radial-flow bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizaki, Hideki; Nagamori, Seishi; Matsuda, Mami; Kawakami, Hayato; Hashimoto, Osamu; Ishiko, Hiroaki; Kawada, Masaaki; Matsuura, Tomokazu; Hasumura, Satoshi; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Miyamura, Tatsuo

    2003-01-01

    Lack of efficient culture systems for hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been a major obstacle in HCV research. Human liver cells grown in a three-dimensional radial-flow bioreactor were successfully infected following inoculation with plasma from an HCV carrier. Subsequent detection of increased HCV RNA suggested viral replication. Furthermore, transfection of HCV RNA transcribed from full-length cDNA also resulted in the production and release of HCV virions into supernatant. Infectivity was shown by successful secondary passage to a new culture. Introduction of mutations in RNA helicase and polymerase regions of HCV cDNA abolished virus replication, indicating that reverse genetics of this system is possible. The ability to replicate and detect the extracellular release of HCV might provide clues with regard to the persistent nature of HCV infection. It will also accelerate research into the pathogenicity of HCV, as well as the development of prophylactic agents and new therapy

  6. Investigation of electronic band structure and charge transfer mechanism of oxidized three-dimensional graphene as metal-free anodes material for dye sensitized solar cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeblein, Manuela; Bruno, Annalisa; Loh, G. C.; Bolker, Asaf; Saguy, Cecile; Antila, Liisa; Tsang, Siu Hon; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    2017-10-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) offer an optimal trade-off between conversion-efficiency and low-cost fabrication. However, since all its electrodes need to fulfill stringent work-function requirements, its materials have remained unchanged since DSSC's first report early-90s. Here we describe a new material, oxidized-three-dimensional-graphene (o-3D-C), with a band gap of 0.2 eV and suitable electronic band-structure as alternative metal-free material for DSSCs-anodes. o-3D-C/dye-complex has a strong chemical bonding via carboxylic-group chemisorption with full saturation after 12 sec at capacity of ∼450 mg/g (600x faster and 7x higher than optimized metal surfaces). Furthermore, fluorescence quenching of life-time by 28-35% was measured demonstrating charge-transfer from dye to o-3D-C.

  7. Three dimensional characterization of nickel coarsening in solid oxide cells via ex-situ ptychographic nano-tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Angelis, Salvatore; Jørgensen, Peter Stanley; Tsai, Esther Hsiao Rho

    2018-01-01

    Nickel coarsening is considered a significant cause of solid oxide cell (SOC) performance degradation. Therefore, understanding the morphological changes in the nickel-yttria stabilized zirconia (Ni-YSZ) fuel electrode is crucial for the wide spread usage of SOC technology. This paper reports...... a study of the initial 3D microstructure evolution of a SOC analyzed in the pristine state and after 3 and 8 h of annealing at 850 °C, in dry hydrogen. The analysis of the evolution of the same location of the electrode shows a substantial change of the nickel and pore network during the first 3 h...... of treatment, while only negligible changes are observed after 8 h. The nickel coarsening results in loss of connectivity in the nickel network, reduced nickel specific surface area and decreased total triple phase boundary density. For the condition of this experiment, nickel coarsening is shown...

  8. Three dimensional electrochemical simulation of solid oxide fuel cell cathode based on microstructure reconstructed by marching cubes method

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, An; Gong, Jiaming; Shikazono, Naoki

    2018-05-01

    In the present study, a model is introduced to correlate the electrochemical performance of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with the 3D microstructure reconstructed by focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) in which the solid surface is modeled by the marching cubes (MC) method. Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to solve the governing equations. In order to maintain the geometries reconstructed by the MC method, local effective diffusivities and conductivities computed based on the MC geometries are applied in each grid, and partial bounce-back scheme is applied according to the boundary predicted by the MC method. From the tortuosity factor and overpotential calculation results, it is concluded that the MC geometry drastically improves the computational accuracy by giving more precise topology information.

  9. The three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation analysis of cavity of high power subterahertz pulsed gyrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Koyu; Jiang, Weihua

    2013-01-01

    High power sub-terahertz pulsed gyrotrons for Collective Thomson Scattering (CTS) diagnostics of fusion plasmas are being developed. The typical target parameters are: output power of 100-200 kW, operation frequency of 300 GHz, and pulsed length > 10 us. In order to support experimental development, numerical simulations were carried out by using Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code MAGIC. The oscillation mode of the electromagnetic radiation was selected as TE_1_5_,_2, for which the beam parameters and cavity dimensions were determined accordingly. The simulation results have showed maximum power of 144 kW at oscillation frequency of 292.80 GHz, with oscillation efficiency of 22.15%. (author)

  10. Elastic three-dimensional poly (epsilon-caprolactone) nanofibre scaffold enhances migration, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rampichová, Michala; Chvojka, J.; Buzgo, Matej; Prosecká, Eva; Mikeš, P.; Vysloužilová, L.; Tvrdík, D.; Kochová, P.; Gregor, T.; Lukáš, D.; Amler, Evžen

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 1 (2013), s. 23-37 ISSN 0960-7722 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500390702; GA ČR GAP304/10/1307 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NT12156; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10145; GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/03.0088; GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0090; GA UK(CZ) 96610; GA UK(CZ) 97110; GA UK(CZ) 330611; GA UK(CZ) 384311; GA UK(CZ) 164010; GA UK(CZ) 626011 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : mesenchymal stem cell * polycaprolactone * bone tissue engineering Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines Impact factor: 3.280, year: 2013

  11. Evaluation on prognosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with different clinical stage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuxiang; Zhu Shuchai; Qiu Rong; Liu Zhikun; Shen Wenbin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prognostic significance of 3 clinical stage system in 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: From January 2004 to August 2007, 179 cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma were treated with 3DCRT. Before radiation, each patient was staged with UICC 2003 TNM stage, stage of Chinese esophageal cancer cooperation group (cooperation group' stage), and Zhu's clinical stage respectively. Concordance of each clinical stage and prognosis was analyzed with SPSS 11.5. Results In 179 cases of esophageal cancer, Concordance was better in T stage (Kappa = 0.271) than in TNM stage (Kappa = 0.167) between cooperation group' stage and Zhu's stage. Among them, 98 cases was staged with UICC stage, concordance of T stage was better between UICC-T and cooperation group' T stage (Kappa =0.261) than between UICCT and Zhu's T stage (Kappa = 0.045) ;concordance of TNM stage was better between UICC-TNM and Zhu's TNM stage (Kappa = 0.597) than between UICC-TNM and cooperation group' TNM stage (Kappa =0.299). With multivariate analysis, T (χ 2 value is 11.58, 26.00 and 51.05, all P 2 value is 15.28, 16.10 and 16.10, all P 2 value is 5.59, 27.78 and 27.78, all P 2 value is 15.77, 34, 35 and 51.10, all P 1 - T 3 was difficult to definite and the prognosis was not significantly different in T 1 - T 3 stage. Conclusions: In this study, 3 kinds of clinical stage could evaluate prognosis of esophageal cancer after radiotherapy; cooperation group' stage and Zhu's stage need further application, with further accuracy needed. (authors)

  12. Dia-Interacting Protein (DIP) Imposes Migratory Plasticity in mDia2-Dependent Tumor Cells in Three-Dimensional Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Meghan M.; Lei, Jun; Nestor-Kalinoski, Andrea L.; Eisenmann, Kathryn M.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor cells rely upon membrane pliancy to escape primary lesions and invade secondary metastatic sites. This process relies upon localized assembly and disassembly cycles of F-actin that support and underlie the plasma membrane. Dynamic actin generates both spear-like and bleb structures respectively characterizing mesenchymal and amoeboid motility programs utilized by metastatic cells in three-dimensional matrices. The molecular mechanism and physiological trigger(s) driving membrane plasticity are poorly understood. mDia formins are F-actin assembly factors directing membrane pliancy in motile cells. mDia2 is functionally coupled with its binding partner DIP, regulating cortical actin and inducing membrane blebbing in amoeboid cells. Here we show that mDia2 and DIP co-tether to nascent blebs and this linkage is required for bleb formation. DIP controls mesenchymal/amoeboid cell interconvertability, while CXCL12 induces assembly of mDia2:DIP complexes to bleb cortices in 3D matrices. These results demonstrate how DIP-directed mDia2-dependent F-actin dynamics regulate morphological plasticity in motile cancer cells. PMID:23024796

  13. Dia-interacting protein (DIP imposes migratory plasticity in mDia2-dependent tumor cells in three-dimensional matrices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan M Wyse

    Full Text Available Tumor cells rely upon membrane pliancy to escape primary lesions and invade secondary metastatic sites. This process relies upon localized assembly and disassembly cycles of F-actin that support and underlie the plasma membrane. Dynamic actin generates both spear-like and bleb structures respectively characterizing mesenchymal and amoeboid motility programs utilized by metastatic cells in three-dimensional matrices. The molecular mechanism and physiological trigger(s driving membrane plasticity are poorly understood. mDia formins are F-actin assembly factors directing membrane pliancy in motile cells. mDia2 is functionally coupled with its binding partner DIP, regulating cortical actin and inducing membrane blebbing in amoeboid cells. Here we show that mDia2 and DIP co-tether to nascent blebs and this linkage is required for bleb formation. DIP controls mesenchymal/amoeboid cell interconvertability, while CXCL12 induces assembly of mDia2:DIP complexes to bleb cortices in 3D matrices. These results demonstrate how DIP-directed mDia2-dependent F-actin dynamics regulate morphological plasticity in motile cancer cells.

  14. Investigating the Role of Surface Materials and Three Dimensional Architecture on In Vitro Differentiation of Porcine Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Sofie Bruun; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Skovgaard, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    In vitro generation of dendritic-like cells through differentiation of peripheral blood monocytes is typically done using two-dimensional polystyrene culture plates. In the process of optimising cell culture techniques, engineers have developed fluidic micro-devises usually manufactured in materi......In vitro generation of dendritic-like cells through differentiation of peripheral blood monocytes is typically done using two-dimensional polystyrene culture plates. In the process of optimising cell culture techniques, engineers have developed fluidic micro-devises usually manufactured......-dimensional PDMS and carbonised three-dimensional PDMS. Cells cultured conventionally (on two-dimensional polystyrene) differentiated into moDCs as expected. Interestingly, gene expression of a wide range of cytokines, chemokines, and pattern recognition receptors was influenced by culture surface material...... and IL23A) but the influence of the surfaces was unchanged. These findings highlights future challenges of combining and comparing data generated from microfluidic cell culture-devices made using alternative materials to data generated using conventional polystyrene plates used by most laboratories today....

  15. Three dimensional characterization of nickel coarsening in solid oxide cells via ex-situ ptychographic nano-tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Salvatore; Jørgensen, Peter Stanley; Tsai, Esther Hsiao Rho; Holler, Mirko; Kreka, Kosova; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2018-04-01

    Nickel coarsening is considered a significant cause of solid oxide cell (SOC) performance degradation. Therefore, understanding the morphological changes in the nickel-yttria stabilized zirconia (Ni-YSZ) fuel electrode is crucial for the wide spread usage of SOC technology. This paper reports a study of the initial 3D microstructure evolution of a SOC analyzed in the pristine state and after 3 and 8 h of annealing at 850 °C, in dry hydrogen. The analysis of the evolution of the same location of the electrode shows a substantial change of the nickel and pore network during the first 3 h of treatment, while only negligible changes are observed after 8 h. The nickel coarsening results in loss of connectivity in the nickel network, reduced nickel specific surface area and decreased total triple phase boundary density. For the condition of this experiment, nickel coarsening is shown to be predominantly curvature driven, and changes in the electrode microstructure parameters are discussed in terms of local microstructural evolution.

  16. Formation of three-dimensional cell/polymer constructs for bone tissue engineering in a spinner flask and a rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikavitsas, Vassilios I.; Bancroft, Gregory N.; Mikos, Antonios G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the cell culture conditions of three-dimensional polymer scaffolds seeded with rat marrow stromal cells (MSCs) cultured in different bioreactors concerning the ability of these cells to proliferate, differentiate towards the osteoblastic lineage, and generate mineralized extracellular matrix. MSCs harvested from male Sprague-Dawley rats were culture expanded, seeded on three-dimensional porous 75:25 poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) biodegradable scaffolds, and cultured for 21 days under static conditions or in two model bioreactors (a spinner flask and a rotating wall vessel) that enhance mixing of the media and provide better nutrient transport to the seeded cells. The spinner flask culture demonstrated a 60% enhanced proliferation at the end of the first week when compared to static culture. On day 14, all cell/polymer constructs exhibited their maximum alkaline phosphatase activity (AP). Cell/polymer constructs cultured in the spinner flask had 2.4 times higher AP activity than constructs cultured under static conditions on day 14. The total osteocalcin (OC) secretion in the spinner flask culture was 3.5 times higher than the static culture, with a peak OC secretion occurring on day 18. No considerable AP activity and OC secretion were detected in the rotating wall vessel culture throughout the 21-day culture period. The spinner flask culture had the highest calcium content at day 14. On day 21, the calcium deposition in the spinner flask culture was 6.6 times higher than the static cultured constructs and over 30 times higher than the rotating wall vessel culture. Histological sections showed concentration of cells and mineralization at the exterior of the foams at day 21. This phenomenon may arise from the potential existence of nutrient concentration gradients at the interior of the scaffolds. The better mixing provided in the spinner flask, external to the outer surface of the scaffolds, may explain the

  17. Embedded vertically aligned cadmium telluride nanorod arrays grown by one-step electrodeposition for enhanced energy conversion efficiency in three-dimensional nanostructured solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Shurong; Mu, Yannan; Liu, Li; A, Runa; Yang, Jiandong; Zhu, Guijie; Meng, Xianwei; Fu, Wuyou; Yang, Haibin

    2017-11-01

    Vertically aligned CdTe nanorods (NRs) arrays are successfully grown by a simple one-step and template-free electrodeposition method, and then embedded in the CdS window layer to form a novel three-dimensional (3D) heterostructure on flexible substrates. The parameters of electrodeposition such as deposition potential and pH of the solution are varied to analyze their important role in the formation of high quality CdTe NRs arrays. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of the solar cell based on the 3D heterojunction structure is studied in detail. In comparison with the standard planar heterojunction solar cell, the 3D heterojunction solar cell exhibits better photovoltaic performance, which can be attributed to its enhanced optical absorption ability, increased heterojunction area and improved charge carrier transport. The better photoelectric property of the 3D heterojunction solar cell suggests great application potential in thin film solar cells, and the simple electrodeposition process represents a promising technique for large-scale fabrication of other nanostructured solar energy conversion devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Interplay between cellular activity and three-dimensional scaffold-cell constructs with different foam structure processed by electron beam melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nune, Krishna C; Misra, R Devesh K; Gaytan, Sara M; Murr, Lawrence E

    2015-05-01

    The cellular activity, biological response, and consequent integration of scaffold-cell construct in the physiological system are governed by the ability of cells to adhere, proliferate, and biomineralize. In this regard, we combine cellular biology and materials science and engineering to fundamentally elucidate the interplay between cellular activity and interconnected three-dimensional foamed architecture obtained by a novel process of electron beam melting and computational tools. Furthermore, the organization of key proteins, notably, actin, vinclulin, and fibronectin, involved in cellular activity and biological functions and relationship with the structure was explored. The interconnected foamed structure with ligaments was favorable to cellular activity that includes cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. The primary rationale for favorable modulation of cellular functions is that the foamed structure provided a channel for migration and communication between cells leading to highly mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM) by the differentiating osteoblasts. The filopodial interaction amongst cells on the ligaments was a governing factor in the secretion of ECM, with consequent influence on maturation and mineralization. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Three-Dimensional Human Cardiac Tissue Engineered by Centrifugation of Stacked Cell Sheets and Cross-Sectional Observation of Its Synchronous Beatings by Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Yuji; Hasegawa, Akiyuki; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Kobayashi, Mari; Iwana, Shin-Ichi; Kabetani, Yasuhiro; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissues are engineered by stacking cell sheets, and these tissues have been applied in clinical regenerative therapies. The optimal fabrication technique of 3D human tissues and the real-time observation system for these tissues are important in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, cardiac physiology, and the safety testing of candidate chemicals. In this study, for aiming the clinical application, 3D human cardiac tissues were rapidly fabricated by human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cardiac cell sheets with centrifugation, and the structures and beatings in the cardiac tissues were observed cross-sectionally and noninvasively by two optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems. The fabrication time was reduced to approximately one-quarter by centrifugation. The cross-sectional observation showed that multilayered cardiac cell sheets adhered tightly just after centrifugation. Additionally, the cross-sectional transmissions of beatings within multilayered human cardiac tissues were clearly detected by OCT. The observation showed the synchronous beatings of the thicker 3D human cardiac tissues, which were fabricated rapidly by cell sheet technology and centrifugation. The rapid tissue-fabrication technique and OCT technology will show a powerful potential in cardiac tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug discovery research.

  20. Fibrin promotes proliferation and matrix production of intervertebral disc cells cultured in three-dimensional poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha'ban, Munirah; Yoon, Sun Jung; Ko, Youn Kyung; Ha, Hyun Jung; Kim, Soon Hee; So, Jung Won; Idrus, Ruszymah Bt Hj; Khang, Gilson

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we have proven that fibrin and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffolds facilitate cell proliferation, matrix production and early chondrogenesis of rabbit articular chondrocytes in in vitro and in vivo experiments. In this study, we evaluated the potential of fibrin/PLGA scaffold for intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue engineering using annulus fibrosus (AF) and nucleus pulposus (NP) cells in relation to potential clinical application. PLGA scaffolds were soaked in cells-fibrin suspension and polymerized by dropping thrombin-sodium chloride (CaCl(2)) solution. A PLGA-cell complex without fibrin was used as control. Higher cellular proliferation activity was observed in fibrin/PLGA-seeded AF and NP cells at each time point of 3, 7, 14 and 7 days using the MTT assay. After 3 weeks in vitro incubation, fibrin/PLGA exhibited a firmer gross morphology than PLGA groups. A significant cartilaginous tissue formation was observed in fibrin/PLGA, as proven by the development of cells cluster of various sizes and three-dimensional (3D) cartilaginous histoarchitecture and the presence of proteoglycan-rich matrix and glycosaminoglycan (GAG). The sGAG production measured by 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assay revealed greater sGAG production in fibrin/PLGA than PLGA group. Immunohistochemical analyses showed expressions of collagen type II, aggrecan core protein and collagen type I genes throughout in vitro culture in both fibrin/PLGA and PLGA. In conclusion, fibrin promotes cell proliferation, stable in vitro tissue morphology, superior cartilaginous tissue formation and sGAG production of AF and NP cells cultured in PLGA scaffold. The 3D porous PLGA scaffold-cell complexes using fibrin can provide a vehicle for delivery of cells to regenerate tissue-engineered IVD tissue.

  1. Breast Cancer Cells in Three-dimensional Culture Display an Enhanced Radioresponse after Coordinate Targeting of Integrin ?5?1 and Fibronectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Jin-Min; Onodera, Yasuhito; Bissell, Mina J; Park, Catherine C

    2010-04-07

    Tactics to selectively enhance cancer radioresponse are of great interest. Cancer cells actively elaborate and remodel their extracellular matrix (ECM) to aid in survival and progression. Previous work has shown that {beta}1-integrin inhibitory antibodies can enhance the growth-inhibitory and apoptotic responses of human breast cancer cell lines to ionizing radiation, either when cells are cultured in three-dimensional laminin-rich ECM (3D lrECM) or grown as xenografts in mice. Here, we show that a specific {alpha} heterodimer of {beta}1-integrin preferentially mediates a prosurvival signal in human breast cancer cells that can be specifically targeted for therapy. 3D lrECM culture conditions were used to compare {alpha}-integrin heterodimer expression in malignant and nonmalignant cell lines. Under these conditions, we found that expression of {alpha}5{beta}1-integrin was upregulated in malignant cells compared with nonmalignant breast cells. Similarly, we found that normal and oncofetal splice variants of fibronectin, the primary ECM ligand of {alpha}5{beta}1-integrin, were also strikingly upregulated in malignant cell lines compared with nonmalignant acini. Cell treatment with a peptide that disrupts the interactions of {alpha}5{beta}1-integrin with fibronectin promoted apoptosis in malignant cells and further heightened the apoptotic effects of radiation. In support of these results, an analysis of gene expression array data from breast cancer patients revealed an association of high levels of {alpha}5-integrin expression with decreased survival. Our findings offer preclinical validation of fibronectin and {alpha}5{beta}1-integrin as targets for breast cancer therapy.

  2. Effect of DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine on radiosensitivity of the human lung cancer cells in three-dimensional culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Dong; Xue Gang; Li Xiaoman; Chen Yaxiong; Ren Zhenxin; Du Yarong; Hu Burong

    2014-01-01

    5-Aza-CdR is a specific inhibitor of DNMTs which could suppress tumor growth by demethylation of genomic DNA. There have only few studies thus far concerning it as radiosensitizers in three-dimensional (3D) cells. The principal aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of 5-Aza-CdR on the radiosensitivity of A549 cells in monolayer (2D) and 3D cultures in an attempt to find out a new combination treatments with radiotherapy. The cell proliferation was detected by MTT assay after pretreated with different doses of 5-Aza-CdR for 72 h. A549 cells were treated with or without 5-Aza-CdR (2, 5 μmol/L) for 72 h before be exposed to X-rays of 1, 2, 4, 6 Gy, respectively. The DNA damage was evaluated by micronucleus assay and clonogenic assays. Pretreatment with 5-Aza-CdR inhibited the A549 cell proliferation significantly. More micronucleus were observed after irradiation in 3D cells pretreated with 2 and 5 μmol/L concentration of drug than those without treatment. The survival fractions of cells pretreated by both 2 and 5 μmol/L drug reduced significantly in 3D cultures after irradiation. These significances, however, were found in 2D cells pretreated by only 5 μmol/L drug. Our results suggest that 5-Aza-CdR can inhibit the A549 cells proliferation and apparently enhance the radiosensitivity of cells in 3D cultures. Using of the low dose 5-Aza-CdR in clinical radiotherapy may reduce side effects and enhance effectively the cancer target therapy. (authors)

  3. Osteogenic Differentiation of Three-Dimensional Bioprinted Constructs Consisting of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Fei Wang

    Full Text Available Here, we aimed to investigate osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs in three-dimensional (3D bioprinted tissue constructs in vitro and in vivo. A 3D Bio-plotter dispensing system was used for building 3D constructs. Cell viability was determined using live/dead cell staining. After 7 and 14 days of culture, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR was performed to analyze the expression of osteogenesis-related genes (RUNX2, OSX, and OCN. Western blotting for RUNX2 and immunofluorescent staining for OCN and RUNX2 were also performed. At 8 weeks after surgery, osteoids secreted by osteogenically differentiated cells were assessed by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E staining, Masson trichrome staining, and OCN immunohistochemical staining. Results from live/dead cell staining showed that most of the cells remained alive, with a cell viability of 89%, on day 1 after printing. In vitro osteogenic induction of the 3D construct showed that the expression levels of RUNX2, OSX, and OCN were significantly increased on days 7 and 14 after printing in cells cultured in osteogenic medium (OM compared with that in normal proliferation medium (PM. Fluorescence microscopy and western blotting showed that the expression of osteogenesis-related proteins was significantly higher in cells cultured in OM than in cells cultured in PM. In vivo studies demonstrated obvious bone matrix formation in the 3D bioprinted constructs. These results indicated that 3D bioprinted constructs consisting of hASCs had the ability to promote mineralized matrix formation and that hASCs could be used in 3D bioprinted constructs for the repair of large bone tissue defects.

  4. Three-dimensional culture of sebaceous gland cells revealing the role of prostaglandin E{sub 2}-induced activation of canonical Wnt signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Go J., E-mail: medical21go@yahoo.co.jp; Saya, Hideyuki

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Three-dimensional culture generates “semi-vivo” sebaceous glands. •Xenograft model failed to mimic the biology of sebaceous glands in vivo. •Proinflammatory cytokine PGE{sub 2} enhances Wnt signal activity in the organoids. •PGE{sub 2} influences on the mitochondrial and lipid metabolism in the organoids. •Considering 3R agenda, “semi-vivo” sebaceous glands are useful for research. -- Abstract: Background: Prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) is a proinflammatory mediator and activates the canonical Wnt–β-catenin signaling pathway in hematopoietic stem cells. The SZ95 cell line was established from human sebaceous gland cells and is studied as a model system for these cells. Given that 2D culture of SZ95 cells does not recapitulate the organization of sebaceous glands in situ, we developed a 3D culture system for these cells and examined the effects of PGE{sub 2} on cell morphology and function. Results: SZ95 cells maintained in 3D culture formed organoids that mimicked the organization of sebaceous glands in situ, including the establishment of a basement membrane. Organoids exposed to PGE{sub 2} were larger and adopted a more complex organization compared with control organoids. PGE{sub 2} activated the canonical Wnt signaling pathway as well as increased cell viability and proliferation, mitochondrial metabolism, and lipid synthesis in the organoids. Conclusions: Culture of SZ95 cells in 3D culture system recapitulates the structure and susceptibility to PGE{sub 2} of sebaceous glands in situ and should prove useful for studies of the response of these glands to inflammation and other environmental stressors. Our results also implicate PGE{sub 2}-induced activation of canonical Wnt signaling pathway in regulation of the morphology,proliferation, and function of “semi-vivo” sebaceous glands.

  5. Significance of soluble growth factors in the chondrogenic response of human umbilical cord matrix stem cells in a porous three dimensional scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RS Nirmal

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell based tissue engineering has emerged as a promising strategy for articular cartilage regeneration. Foetal derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs with their ease of availability, pluripotency and high expansion potential have been demonstrated to be an attractive cell source over adult MSCs. However, there is a need for optimisation of chondrogenic signals to direct the differentiation of these multipotent MSCs to chondrogenic lineage. In this study we have demonstrated the in vitro chondrogenesis of human umbilical cord matrix MSCs in three dimensional PVA-PCL (polyvinyl alcohol-polycaprolactone scaffolds in the presence of the individual growth factors TGFβ1, TGFβ3, IGF, BMP2 and their combination with BMP2. Gene expression, histology and immunohistology were evaluated after 28 d culture. The induced cells showed the feature of chondrocytes in their morphology and expression of typical chondrogenic extracellular matrix molecules. Moreover, the real-time PCR assay has shown the expression of gene markers of chondrogenesis, SOX9, collagen type II and aggrecan. The expression of collagen type I and collagen type X was also evaluated. This study has demonstrated the successful chondrogenic induction of human umbilical cord MSCs in 3D scaffolds. Interestingly, the growth factor combination of TGF-β3 and BMP-2 was found to be more effective for chondrogenesis as shown by the real-time PCR studies. The findings of this study suggest the importance of using growth factor combinations for successful chondrogenic differentiation of umbilical cord MSCs.

  6. Bioprinting of a mechanically enhanced three-dimensional dual cell-laden construct for osteochondral tissue engineering using a multi-head tissue/organ building system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Jin-Hyung; Lee, Jung-Seob; Cho, Dong-Woo; Kim, Jong Young

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to build a mechanically enhanced three-dimensional (3D) bioprinted construct containing two different cell types for osteochondral tissue regeneration. Recently, the production of 3D cell-laden structures using various scaffold-free cell printing technologies has opened up new possibilities. However, ideal 3D complex tissues or organs have not yet been printed because gel-state hydrogels have been used as the principal material and are unable to maintain the desired 3D structure due to their poor mechanical strength. In this study, thermoplastic biomaterial polycaprolactone (PCL), which shows relatively high mechanical properties as compared with hydrogel, was used as a framework for enhancing the mechanical stability of the bioprinted construct. Two different alginate solutions were then infused into the previously prepared framework consisting of PCL to create the 3D construct for osteochondral printing. For this work, a multi-head tissue/organ building system (MtoBS), which was particularly designed to dispense thermoplastic biomaterial and hydrogel having completely different rheology properties, was newly developed and used to bioprint osteochondral tissue. It was confirmed that the line width, position and volume control of PCL and alginate solutions were adjustable in the MtoBS. Most importantly, dual cell-laden 3D constructs consisting of osteoblasts and chondrocytes were successfully fabricated. Further, the separately dispensed osteoblasts and chondrocytes not only retained their initial position and viability, but also proliferated up to 7 days after being dispensed. (paper)

  7. Bioprinting of a mechanically enhanced three-dimensional dual cell-laden construct for osteochondral tissue engineering using a multi-head tissue/organ building system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jin-Hyung; Lee, Jung-Seob; Kim, Jong Young; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to build a mechanically enhanced three-dimensional (3D) bioprinted construct containing two different cell types for osteochondral tissue regeneration. Recently, the production of 3D cell-laden structures using various scaffold-free cell printing technologies has opened up new possibilities. However, ideal 3D complex tissues or organs have not yet been printed because gel-state hydrogels have been used as the principal material and are unable to maintain the desired 3D structure due to their poor mechanical strength. In this study, thermoplastic biomaterial polycaprolactone (PCL), which shows relatively high mechanical properties as compared with hydrogel, was used as a framework for enhancing the mechanical stability of the bioprinted construct. Two different alginate solutions were then infused into the previously prepared framework consisting of PCL to create the 3D construct for osteochondral printing. For this work, a multi-head tissue/organ building system (MtoBS), which was particularly designed to dispense thermoplastic biomaterial and hydrogel having completely different rheology properties, was newly developed and used to bioprint osteochondral tissue. It was confirmed that the line width, position and volume control of PCL and alginate solutions were adjustable in the MtoBS. Most importantly, dual cell-laden 3D constructs consisting of osteoblasts and chondrocytes were successfully fabricated. Further, the separately dispensed osteoblasts and chondrocytes not only retained their initial position and viability, but also proliferated up to 7 days after being dispensed.

  8. Glycosaminoglycan-Mimetic Signals Direct the Osteo/Chondrogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Three-Dimensional Peptide Nanofiber Extracellular Matrix Mimetic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Elif; Guler, Mustafa O; Tekinay, Ayse B

    2016-04-11

    Recent efforts in bioactive scaffold development focus strongly on the elucidation of complex cellular responses through the use of synthetic systems. Designing synthetic extracellular matrix (ECM) materials must be based on understanding of cellular behaviors upon interaction with natural and artificial scaffolds. Hence, due to their ability to mimic both the biochemical and mechanical properties of the native tissue environment, supramolecular assemblies of bioactive peptide nanostructures are especially promising for development of bioactive ECM-mimetic scaffolds. In this study, we used glycosaminoglycan (GAG) mimetic peptide nanofiber gel as a three-dimensional (3D) platform to investigate how cell lineage commitment is altered by external factors. We observed that amount of fetal bovine serum (FBS) presented in the cell media had synergistic effects on the ability of GAG-mimetic nanofiber gel to mediate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages. In particular, lower FBS concentration in the culture medium was observed to enhance osteogenic differentiation while higher amount FBS promotes chondrogenic differentiation in tandem with the effects of the GAG-mimetic 3D peptide nanofiber network, even in the absence of externally administered growth factors. We therefore demonstrate that mesenchymal stem cell differentiation can be specifically controlled by the combined influence of growth medium components and a 3D peptide nanofiber environment.

  9. Three-dimensional scanning near field optical microscopy (3D-SNOM) imaging of random arrays of copper nanoparticles: implications for plasmonic solar cell enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezugwu, Sabastine; Ye, Hanyang; Fanchini, Giovanni

    2015-01-07

    In order to investigate the suitability of random arrays of nanoparticles for plasmonic enhancement in the visible-near infrared range, we introduced three-dimensional scanning near-field optical microscopy (3D-SNOM) imaging as a useful technique to probe the intensity of near-field radiation scattered by random systems of nanoparticles at heights up to several hundred nm from their surface. We demonstrated our technique using random arrays of copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs) at different particle diameter and concentration. Bright regions in the 3D-SNOM images, corresponding to constructive interference of forward-scattered plasmonic waves, were obtained at heights Δz ≥ 220 nm from the surface for random arrays of Cu-NPs of ∼ 60-100 nm in diameter. These heights are too large to use Cu-NPs in contact of the active layer for light harvesting in thin organic solar cells, which are typically no thicker than 200 nm. Using a 200 nm transparent spacer between the system of Cu-NPs and the solar cell active layer, we demonstrate that forward-scattered light can be conveyed in 200 nm thin film solar cells. This architecture increases the solar cell photoconversion efficiency by a factor of 3. Our 3D-SNOM technique is general enough to be suitable for a large number of other applications in nanoplasmonics.

  10. Therapeutic Potential of Human Adipose-Derived Stem/Stromal Cell Microspheroids Prepared by Three-Dimensional Culture in Non-Cross-Linked Hyaluronic Acid Gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineda, Kazuhide; Feng, Jingwei; Ishimine, Hisako; Takada, Hitomi; Doi, Kentaro; Kuno, Shinichiro; Kinoshita, Kahori; Kanayama, Koji; Kato, Harunosuke; Mashiko, Takanobu; Hashimoto, Ichiro; Nakanishi, Hideki; Kurisaki, Akira; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional culture of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells for spheroid formation is known to enhance their therapeutic potential for regenerative medicine. Spheroids were prepared by culturing human adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (hASCs) in a non-cross-linked hyaluronic acid (HA) gel and compared with dissociated hASCs and hASC spheroids prepared using a nonadherent dish. Preliminary experiments indicated that a 4% HA gel was the most appropriate for forming hASC spheroids with a relatively consistent size (20-50 µm) within 48 hours. Prepared spheroids were positive for pluripotency markers (NANOG, OCT3/4, and SOX-2), and 40% of the cells were SSEA-3-positive, a marker of the multilineage differentiating stress enduring or Muse cell. In contrast with dissociated ASCs, increased secretion of cytokines such as hepatocyte growth factor was detected in ASC spheroids cultured under hypoxia. On microarray ASC spheroids showed upregulation of some pluripotency markers and downregulation of genes related to the mitotic cell cycle. After ischemia-reperfusion injury to the fat pad in SCID mice, local injection of hASC spheroids promoted tissue repair and reduced the final atrophy (1.6%) compared with that of dissociated hASCs (14.3%) or phosphate-buffered saline (20.3%). Part of the administered hASCs differentiated into vascular endothelial cells. ASC spheroids prepared in a HA gel contain undifferentiated cells with therapeutic potential to promote angiogenesis and tissue regeneration after damage. This study shows the therapeutic value of human adipose-derived stem cell spheroids prepared in hyarulonic acid gel. The spheroids have various benefits as an injectable cellular product and show therapeutic potential to the stem cell-depleted conditions such as diabetic chronic skin ulcer. ©AlphaMed Press.

  11. The usefulness of three-dimensional cell culture in induction of cancer stem cells from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Daisuke; Kato, Kazunori; Nohara, Shigeo; Iwanuma, Yoshimi; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Spheroids were created from esophageal carcinoma cells using NanoCulture® Plates. •The proportion of strongly ALDH-positive cells increased in 3-D culture. •Expression of cancer stem cell-related genes was enhanced in 3-D culture. •CA-9 expression was enhanced, suggesting hypoxia had been induced in 3-D culture. •Drug resistance was increased. 3-D culture is useful for inducing cancer stem cells. -- Abstract: In recent years, research on resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in cancer treatment has come under the spotlight, and researchers have also begun investigating the relationship between resistance and cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells are assumed to be present in esophageal cancer, but experimental methods for identification and culture of these cells have not yet been established. To solve this problem, we created spheroids using a NanoCulture® Plate (NCP) for 3-dimensional (3-D) cell culture, which was designed as a means for experimentally reproducing the 3-D structures found in the body. We investigated the potential for induction of cancer stem cells from esophageal cancer cells. Using flow cytometry we analyzed the expression of surface antigen markers CD44, CD133, CD338 (ABCG2), CD318 (CDCP1), and CD326 (EpCAM), which are known cancer stem cell markers. None of these surface antigen markers showed enhanced expression in 3-D cultured cells. We then analyzed aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymatic activity using the ALDEFLUOR reagent, which can identify immature cells such as stem cells and precursor cells. 3-D-cultured cells were strongly positive for ALDH enzyme activity. We also analyzed the expression of the stem cell-related genes Sox-2, Nanog, Oct3/4, and Lin28 using RT-PCR. Expression of Sox-2, Nanog, and Lin28 was enhanced. Analysis of expression of the hypoxic surface antigen marker carbonic anhydrase-9 (CA-9), which is an indicator of cancer stem cell induction and maintenance, revealed that CA-9 expression

  12. Three-dimensional bone tissue substitute based on a human mesenchymal stem cell culture on a nanofiber carrier and inorganic matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Krbec

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to construct a composite structure for bone tissue substitute on the basis of a degradable composite of an organic nanofiber carrier and an inorganic matrix in 3D, and to achieve subsequent colonisation by differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC towards osteocytes. We developed an active bone tissue substitute using nanofiber technology for a polycaprolactone (PCL scaffold with the addition of hydroxyapatite and the colonisation of both components with hMSC with the ability of differentiation towards osteocytes. The constructed composition included the components necessary for bone healing (inorganic and cellular and it also forms a spatially-oriented 3D structure. We used polycaprolactone Mw 70,000 with electrostatic spinning for the formation of nanofibers using a modified NanospiderTM method. For the inorganic component we used orthophosphate-calcium silicate with a crystal size of 1-2 mm which the nanofiber membrane was coated with. Both components were connected together with a tissue adhesive based of fibrin glue. Cultivated hMSC cells at a concentration of 1.2 × 104/cm2 were multiplied in vitro and then cultivated in the expansion medium. HMSC overgrew both the PCL membrane and the Si-CaP crystals. After colonisation with cultivated cells, this composite 3D structure can serve as a three-dimensional bone tissue replacement.

  13. Phase I/II Trial of Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell Transplantation with a Three-Dimensional Woven-Fabric Scaffold for Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Baba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine is emerging as a promising option, but the potential of autologous stem cells has not been investigated well in clinical settings of periodontal treatment. In this clinical study, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of a new regenerative therapy based on the surgical implantation of autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs with a biodegradable three-dimensional (3D woven-fabric composite scaffold and platelet-rich plasma (PRP. Ten patients with periodontitis, who required a surgical procedure for intrabony defects, were enrolled in phase I/II trial. Once MSCs were implanted in each periodontal intrabony defect, the patients were monitored during 36 months for a medical exam including laboratory tests of blood and urine samples, changes in clinical attachment level, pocket depth, and linear bone growth (LBG. All three parameters improved significantly during the entire follow-up period (p<0.0001, leading to an average LBG of 4.7 mm after 36 months. Clinical mobility measured by Periotest showed a decreasing trend after the surgery. No clinical safety problems attributable to the investigational MSCs were identified. This clinical trial suggests that the stem cell therapy using MSCs-PRP/3D woven-fabric composite scaffold may constitute a novel safe and effective regenerative treatment option for periodontitis.

  14. Regeneration of dental pulp/dentine complex with a three-dimensional and scaffold-free stem-cell sheet-derived pellet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Sijia; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Fang; Wang, Weiqi; Ding, Yin; Li, Dechao; Jin, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Dental pulp/dentine complex regeneration is indispensable to the construction of biotissue-engineered tooth roots and represents a promising approach to therapy for irreversible pulpitis. We used a tissue-engineering method based on odontogenic stem cells to design a three-dimensional (3D) and scaffold-free stem-cell sheet-derived pellet (CSDP) with the necessary physical and biological properties. Stem cells were isolated and identified and stem cells from root apical papilla (SCAPs)-based CSDPs were then fabricated and examined. Compact cell aggregates containing a high proportion of extracellular matrix (ECM) components were observed, and the CSDP culture time was prolonged. The expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), dentine sialoprotein (DSPP), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and runt-related gene 2 (RUNX2) mRNA was higher in CSDPs than in cell sheets (CSs), indicating that CSDPs have greater odonto/osteogenic potential. To further investigate this hypothesis, CSDPs and CSs were inserted into human treated dentine matrix fragments (hTDMFs) and transplanted into the subcutaneous space in the backs of immunodeficient mice, where they were cultured in vivo for 6 weeks. The root space with CSDPs was filled entirely with a dental pulp-like tissue with well-established vascularity, and a continuous layer of dentine-like tissue was deposited onto the existing dentine. A layer of odontoblast-like cells was found to express DSPP, ALP and BSP, and human mitochondria lined the surface of the newly formed dentine-like tissue. These results clearly indicate that SCAP-CSDPs with a mount of endogenous ECM have a strong capacity to form a heterotopic dental pulp/dentine complex in empty root canals; this method can be used in the fabrication of bioengineered dental roots and also provides an alternative treatment approach for pulp disease. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Characterization of A Three-Dimensional Organotypic Co-Culture Skin Model for Epidermal Differentiation of Rat Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanavati, Zeinab; Orazizadeh, Mahmoud; Bayati, Vahid; Abbaspour, Mohammad Reza; Khorsandi, Layasadat; Mansouri, Esrafil; Neisi, Niloofar

    2016-01-01

    The organotypic co-culture is a well-known technique to examine cellular interactions and their roles in stem cell proliferation and differentiation. This study aims to evaluate the effects of dermal fibroblasts (DFs) on epidermal differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) using a three-dimensional (3D) organotypic co- culture technique. In this experimental research study, rat DFs and ASCs were isolated and cultured separately on electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) matrices. The PCL matrices seeded by ASCs were superimposed on to the matrices seeded by DFs in order to create a 3D organotypic co-culture. In the control groups, PCL matrices seeded by ASCs were placed on matrices devoid of DFs. After 10 days, we assessed the expressions of keratinocyte-related genes by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and expression of pan-cytokeratin protein by immunofluorescence in the differentiated keratinocyte-like cells from co- culture and control groups. Keratinocyte-like cell morphologies were also observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The early, intermediate, and terminal differentiation keratinocyte markers-Cytokeratin14, Filaggrin, and Involucrin significantly expressed in the co-culture groups com- pared to the control ones (P<0.05). We observed pan-cytokeratin in keratinocyte-like cells of both groups by immunofluorescence. SEM observation of the co-culture groups showed that the differentiated keratinocyte-like cells developed a polygonal cobblestone shape, considered characteristic of keratinocytes. The 3D organotypic co-culture bilayered construct that consisted of DFs and ASCs was an effective technique for epidermal differentiation of ASCs. This co-culture might be useful for epidermal differentiation of stem cells for future applications in skin regeneration.

  16. Positive results of three-dimensional planning Co60 beam through distinctive examples of location depending on the type treated in the oncology unit Pinar del Rio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazco, Julio

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this work is presented through case studies discussed in our institution, which has brought several advantages to use Planning Three-dimensional beam and cobalt 60 Theraplan Plus System, showing thus qualitative and quantitative (clinical case of lung cancer) that have achieved by the use of this new tool. To illustrate the above 5 clinical cases are chosen belonging to 5 different sites (endometrium, prostate, lung, pineal gland and brainstem) and are presented in each case the advantages provided by using the Tridimensional Planning System. (Author)

  17. Tunable hydrogel composite with two-step processing in combination with innovative hardware upgrade for cell-based three-dimensional bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüst, Silke; Godla, Marie E; Müller, Ralph; Hofmann, Sandra

    2014-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) bioprinting is the layer-by-layer deposition of biological material with the aim of achieving stable 3-D constructs for application in tissue engineering. It is a powerful tool for the spatially directed placement of multiple materials and/or cells within the 3-D sample. Encapsulated cells are protected by the bioink during the printing process. Very few materials are available that fulfill requirements for bioprinting as well as provide adequate properties for cell encapsulation during and after the printing process. A hydrogel composite including alginate and gelatin precursors was tuned with different concentrations of hydroxyapatite (HA) and characterized in terms of rheology, swelling behavior and mechanical properties to assess the versatility of the system. Instantaneous as well as long-term structural integrity of the printed hydrogel was achieved with a two-step mechanism combining the thermosensitive properties of gelatin with chemical crosslinking of alginate. Novel syringe tip heaters were developed for improved temperature control of the bioink to avoid clogging. Human mesenchymal stem cells mixed into the hydrogel precursor survived the printing process and showed high cell viability of 85% living cells after 3 days of subsequent in vitro culture. HA enabled the visualization of the printed structures with micro-computed tomography. The inclusion of HA also favors the use of the bioink for bone tissue engineering applications. By adding factors other than HA, the composite could be used as a bioink for applications in drug delivery, microsphere deposition or soft tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Preparation, structural characterization, and in vitro cell studies of three-dimensional SiO2-CaO binary glass scaffolds built ofultra-small nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Honglin; Li, Wei; Ao, Haiyong; Li, Gen; Tu, Junpin; Xiong, Guangyao; Zhu, Yong; Wan, Yizao

    2017-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) nanofibrous scaffolds hold great promises in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this work, for the first time, 3D SiO 2 -CaO binary glass nanofibrous scaffolds have been fabricated via a combined method of template-assisted sol-gel and calcination by using bacterial cellulose as the template. SEM with EDS, TEM, and AFM confirm that the molar ratio of Ca to Si and fiber diameter of the resultant SiO 2 -CaO nanofibers can be controlled by immersion time in the solution of tetraethyl orthosilicate and ethanol. The optimal immersion time was 6h which produced the SiO 2 -CaO binary glass containing 60at.% Si and 40at.% Ca (named 60S40C). The fiber diameter of 60S40C scaffold is as small as 29nm. In addition, the scaffold has highly porous 3D nanostructure with dominant mesopores at 10.6nm and macropores at 20μm as well as a large BET surface area (240.9m 2 g -1 ), which endow the 60S40C scaffold excellent biocompatibility and high ALP activity as revealed by cell studies using osteoblast cells. These results suggest that the 60S40C scaffold has great potential in bone tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Changes in expression of cartilaginous genes during chondrogenesis of Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells on three-dimensional biodegradable poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduszyński, Piotr; Aleksander-Konert, Ewelina; Zajdel, Alicja; Wilczok, Adam; Jelonek, Katarzyna; Witek, Andrzej; Dzierżewicz, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    In cartilage tissue regeneration, it is important to develop biodegradable scaffolds that provide a structural and logistic template for three-dimensional cultures of chondrocytes. In this study, we evaluated changes in expression of cartilaginous genes during in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of WJ-MSCs on PLGA scaffolds. The biocompatibility of the PLGA material was investigated using WJ-MSCs by direct and indirect contact methods according to the ISO 10993-5 standard. PLGA scaffolds were fabricated by the solvent casting/salt-leaching technique. We analyzed expression of chondrogenic genes of WJ-MSCs after a 21-day culture. The results showed the biocompatibility of PLGA and confirmed the usefulness of PLGA as material for fabrication of 3D scaffolds that can be applied for WJ-MSC culture. The in vitro penetration and colonization of the scaffolds by WJ-MSCs were assessed by confocal microscopy. The increase in cell number demonstrated that scaffolds made of PLGA copolymers enabled WJ-MSC proliferation. The obtained data showed that as a result of chondrogenesis of WJ-MSCs on the PLGA scaffold the expression of the key markers collagen type II and aggrecan was increased. The observed changes in transcriptional activity of cartilaginous genes suggest that the PLGA scaffolds may be applied for WJ-MSC differentiation. This primary study suggests that chondrogenic capacity of WJ-MSCs cultured on the PLGA scaffolds can be useful for cell therapy of cartilage.

  20. Three-dimensional printed polymeric system to encapsulate human mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into islet-like insulin-producing aggregates for diabetes treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omaima M Sabek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is one of the most prevalent, costly, and debilitating diseases in the world. Pancreas and islet transplants have shown success in re-establishing glucose control and reversing diabetic complications. However, both are limited by donor availability, need for continuous immunosuppression, loss of transplanted tissue due to dispersion, and lack of vascularization. To overcome the limitations of poor islet availability, here, we investigate the potential of bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into islet-like insulin-producing aggregates. Islet-like insulin-producing aggregates, characterized by gene expression, are shown to be similar to pancreatic islets and display positive immunostaining for insulin and glucagon. To address the limits of current encapsulation systems, we developed a novel three-dimensional printed, scalable, and potentially refillable polymeric construct (nanogland to support islet-like insulin-producing aggregates’ survival and function in the host body. In vitro studies showed that encapsulated islet-like insulin-producing aggregates maintained viability and function, producing steady levels of insulin for at least 4 weeks. Nanogland—islet-like insulin-producing aggregate technology here investigated as a proof of concept holds potential as an effective and innovative approach for diabetes cell therapy.

  1. Three-dimensional printed polymeric system to encapsulate human mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into islet-like insulin-producing aggregates for diabetes treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabek, Omaima M; Farina, Marco; Fraga, Daniel W; Afshar, Solmaz; Ballerini, Andrea; Filgueira, Carly S; Thekkedath, Usha R; Grattoni, Alessandro; Gaber, A Osama

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is one of the most prevalent, costly, and debilitating diseases in the world. Pancreas and islet transplants have shown success in re-establishing glucose control and reversing diabetic complications. However, both are limited by donor availability, need for continuous immunosuppression, loss of transplanted tissue due to dispersion, and lack of vascularization. To overcome the limitations of poor islet availability, here, we investigate the potential of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into islet-like insulin-producing aggregates. Islet-like insulin-producing aggregates, characterized by gene expression, are shown to be similar to pancreatic islets and display positive immunostaining for insulin and glucagon. To address the limits of current encapsulation systems, we developed a novel three-dimensional printed, scalable, and potentially refillable polymeric construct (nanogland) to support islet-like insulin-producing aggregates' survival and function in the host body. In vitro studies showed that encapsulated islet-like insulin-producing aggregates maintained viability and function, producing steady levels of insulin for at least 4 weeks. Nanogland-islet-like insulin-producing aggregate technology here investigated as a proof of concept holds potential as an effective and innovative approach for diabetes cell therapy.

  2. Targetting in atelectatic lung by positron emission tomography in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Kai; Wang Luhua; Liang Jun; Ou Guangfei; Lu Jima

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the potential benefit of incorporating fluorodeoxyglucose positron e- mission tomography (FDG PET) to delineate tire gross tumor volume(GTV) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) complicated with atelectasis who are to be treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT). Methods: Fourteen patients histopathologically proven as having NSCLC with image diagnosed as complicated with various degrees were studied in this study. All patients were scanned with both thoracic CT and thoracic or whole body PET. The GTV was delineated basing on both CT image and PET image (CT-GTV, PET- GTV) and the volume of each GTV(designated CT-GTV and PET-GTV) was compared by 3DCRT plan. Results: Each paired CT-GTV and PET-GTV was different from each other. All patients' GTV was reduced to an average of 27 cm 3 (20.4%) with median CT-PET of 133 cm 3 (90-180 cm 3 ) and median PET-GTV of 106 cm 3 , with a in- crease of 16.9%, 22 cm 3 ). The reduction of PET-GTV was due to PET could so differ cancer-induced atelectasis from gross tumor that it reduced the tarbet volume and spared more surrounding normal tissues. Conclusions: The incorporation of FDG PET data with gross tumor delineation is able to improve the accuracy of 3DCRT for non-small cell lung cancer patients complicated with atelectasis. (authors)

  3. Three-dimensional biomedical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robb, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Scientists in biomedical imaging provide researchers, physicians, and academicians with an understanding of the fundamental theories and practical applications of three-dimensional biomedical imaging methodologies. Succinct descriptions of each imaging modality are supported by numerous diagrams and illustrations which clarify important concepts and demonstrate system performance in a variety of applications. Comparison of the different functional attributes, relative advantages and limitations, complementary capabilities, and future directions of three-dimensional biomedical imaging modalities are given. Volume 1: Introductions to Three-Dimensional Biomedical Imaging Photoelectronic-Digital Imaging for Diagnostic Radiology. X-Ray Computed Tomography - Basic Principles. X-Ray Computed Tomography - Implementation and Applications. X-Ray Computed Tomography: Advanced Systems and Applications in Biomedical Research and Diagnosis. Volume II: Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography. Position Emission Tomography (PET). Computerized Ultrasound Tomography. Fundamentals of NMR Imaging. Display of Multi-Dimensional Biomedical Image Information. Summary and Prognostications

  4. Effects of ethanol and acetaldehyde on tight junction integrity: in vitro study in a three dimensional intestinal epithelial cell culture model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhaseen Elamin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intestinal barrier dysfunction and translocation of endotoxins are involved in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. Exposure to ethanol and its metabolite, acetaldehyde at relatively high concentrations have been shown to disrupt intestinal epithelial tight junctions in the conventional two dimensional cell culture models. The present study investigated quantitatively and qualitatively the effects of ethanol at concentrations detected in the blood after moderate ethanol consumption, of its metabolite acetaldehyde and of the combination of both compounds on intestinal barrier function in a three-dimensional cell culture model. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Caco-2 cells were grown in a basement membrane matrix (Matrigel™ to induce spheroid formation and were then exposed to the compounds at the basolateral side. Morphological differentiation of the spheroids was assessed by immunocytochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. The barrier function was assessed by the flux of FITC-labeled dextran from the basal side into the spheroids' luminal compartment using confocal microscopy. Caco-2 cells grown on Matrigel assembled into fully differentiated and polarized spheroids with a central lumen, closely resembling enterocytes in vivo and provide an excellent model to study epithelial barrier functionality. Exposure to ethanol (10-40 mM or acetaldehyde (25-200 µM for 3 h, dose-dependently and additively increased the paracellular permeability and induced redistribution of ZO-1 and occludin without affecting cell viability or tight junction-encoding gene expression. Furthermore, ethanol and acetaldehyde induced lysine residue and microtubules hyperacetylation. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that ethanol at concentrations found in the blood after moderate drinking and acetaldehyde, alone and in combination, can increase the intestinal epithelial permeability. The data also point to the involvement of protein hyperacetylation in

  5. CD44+/CD24- breast cancer cells exhibit phenotypic reversion in three-dimensional self-assembling peptide RADA16 nanofiber scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi K

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Kun Mi,1 Zhihua Xing2 1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sichuan Cancer Hospital and Institute, 2Laboratory of Ethnopharmacology, Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China Background: Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds have been shown to be a ­permissive biological material for tissue repair, cell proliferation, differentiation, etc. Recently, a subpopulation (CD44+/CD24- of breast cancer cells has been reported to have stem/progenitor cell properties. The aim of this study was to investigate whether this subpopulation of cancer cells have different phenotypes in self-assembling COCH3-RADARADARADARADA-CONH2 (RADA16 peptide nanofiber scaffold compared with Matrigel® (BD Biosciences, Two Oak Park, Bedford, MA, USA and collagen I.Methods: CD44 and CD24 expression was determined by flow cytometry. Cell proliferation was measured by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine assay and DNA content measurement. Immunostaining was used to indicate the morphologies of cells in three-dimensional (3D cultures of different scaffolds and the localization of β-catenin in the colonies. Western blot was used to determine the expression of signaling proteins. In vitro migration assay and inoculation into nude mice were used to evaluate invasion and tumorigenesis in vivo.Results: The breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-435S contained a high percentage (>99% of CD44+/CD24- cells, which exhibited phenotypic reversion in 3D RADA16 nanofiber scaffold compared with collagen I and Matrigel. The newly formed reverted acini-like colonies reassembled a basement membrane and reorganized their cytoskeletons. At the same time, cells cultured and embedded in RADA16 peptide scaffold exhibited growth arrest. Also, they exhibited different migration potential, which links their migration ability with their cellular morphology. Consistent with studies in vitro, the in vivo tumor

  6. Human mammary fibroblasts stimulate invasion of breast cancer cells in a three-dimensional culture and increase stroma development in mouse xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Charlotta J; Moreira, José; Lukanidin, Eugene M; Ambartsumian, Noona S

    2010-01-01

    Tumour phenotype is regulated in a complex fashion as a result of interactions between malignant cells and the tumour stroma. Fibroblasts are the most abundant and perhaps most active part of the tumour stroma. A better understanding of the changes that occur in fibroblasts in response to the presence of malignant cells may lead to the development of new strategies for cancer treatment. We explored the effects of fibroblasts on the growth and invasion of mammary carcinoma tumour cells in vitro and in vivo. In order to analyse secreted factors that affect invasive abilities of breast cancer cells we co-cultured human mammary fibroblasts (HMF3s) and cancer cells (MCF7S1) in three-dimensional (3D) growth conditions devoid of heterogeneous cell-cell contact. To study the possible influence of fibroblasts on MCF7S1 cancer cell growth in vivo we co-injected HMF3s and MCF7S1 cells in Balb/c nu/nu mice. In 3D co-culture both HMF3s and MCF7S1 cells demonstrated enhanced invasion into a Matrigel matrix. This was correlated with enhanced expression of the metastasis promoting S100A4 protein in fibroblasts, stimulation of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 activity, and enhanced secretion of a range of different cytokines. Orthotopic injection of oestrogen-dependent MCF7S1 cancer cells together with fibroblasts showed stimulation of tumour growth in mice without an external oestrogen supply. The resulting tumours were characterized by increased development of extracellular matrix, as well as an increase of murine S100A4 concentration and activity of MMP-2 in the tumour interstitial fluid. Stimulation of the invasive phenotype of tumour cells in 3D co-cultures with fibroblasts could be correlated with increased production of S100A4 and MMP-2. We propose that enhanced development of mouse host-derived tumour stroma in a MCF7S1 co-injection xenograft model leads to oestrogen independency and is triggered by the initial presence of human fibroblasts

  7. A comparison of three-dimensional culture systems to evaluate in vitro chondrogenesis of equine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Ashlee E; Ackerman-Yost, Jeremy C; Nixon, Alan J

    2013-10-01

    To compare in vitro three-dimensional (3D) culture systems that model chondrogenesis of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs from five horses 2-3 years of age were consolidated in fibrin 0.3% alginate, 1.2% alginate, 2.5×10(5) cell pellets, 5×10(5) cell pellets, and 2% agarose, and maintained in chondrogenic medium with supplemental TGF-β1 for 4 weeks. Pellets and media were tested at days 1, 14, and 28 for gene expression of markers of chondrogenic maturation and hypertrophy (ACAN, COL2B, COL10, SOX9, 18S), and evaluated by histology (hematoxylin and eosin, Toluidine Blue) and immunohistochemistry (collagen type II and X). alginate, fibrin alginate (FA), and both pellet culture systems resulted in chondrogenic transformation. Adequate RNA was not obtained from agarose cultures at any time point. There was increased COL2B, ACAN, and SOX9 expression on day 14 from both pellet culture systems. On day 28, increased expression of COL2B was maintained in 5×10(5) cell pellets and there was no difference in ACAN and SOX9 between FA and both pellet cultures. COL10 expression was significantly lower in FA cultures on day 28. Collagen type II was abundantly formed in all culture systems except alginate and collagen type X was least in FA hydrogels. equine MSCs respond to 3D culture in FA blended hydrogel and both pellet culture systems with chondrogenic induction. For prevention of terminal differentiation and hypertrophy, FA culture may be superior to pellet culture systems.

  8. Clinical significance of three-dimensional measurement of tumour thickness on magnetic resonance imaging in patients with oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Minsu [Gyeongsang National University Hospital, School of Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Hyun; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Kim, Ji Won; Lee, Yoon-Se; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Choi, Seung-Ho [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Centre, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Hyun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Centre, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang-Yoon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Centre, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    To identify the clinical significance of primary tumour thickness (TT) and its direction in patients with oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC), we measured TT in all axial/coronal/sagittal views on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and evaluated their meaning. A total of 53 OTSCC patients were analysed who had undergone preoperative three-dimensional MRI and had been surgically treated. TT measured on axial (mediolateral direction), coronal (superoinferior direction), and sagittal (anteroposterior direction) views was compared to that in pathologic specimens. The association between TT on MRI and other pathologic parameters was also evaluated. TT on MRI in each plane showed relatively high concordance rates with the histological measurements. TT in all three planes was significantly correlated with lymph node (LN) metastasis. Occult LN metastasis was found in 15 of 39 (38.5 %) patients, and the cutoff value of TT in axial/coronal/sagittal MRI predicting occult LN metastasis was 6.7 mm, 7.2 mm, and 12.3 mm, respectively. TT on MRI did not show any significant association with recurrence and survival. TT on MRI in all three planes showed relatively high coincidence with TT on histopathology and presented a potential cut-off value as a predictive indicator for occult LN metastasis. (orig.)

  9. Determination of red blood cell deformability using centrifugal force in a three-dimensional-printed mini-disk (3D-PMD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjung Lim

    Full Text Available Measuring red blood cell (RBC deformability has become important for clinical disease diagnostics. Various methods for measuring RBC deformability have been developed; however, they require costly and large instruments, long measuring time, and skilled personnel. In this study, we present a three-dimensional-printed mini-disk (3D-PMD for measuring RBC deformability to overcome the previous limitations. For a miniaturized and low-cost setup, the 3D-PMD was fabricated by a 3D printing technique, which had not yet been used for fabricating a lab-on-a-compact disk (LOCD. Using a 3D printing technique, a multi-layered fluidic channel on the mini CD could be fabricated easily. During rotation by a spinning motor, the difference of the length of compressed RBCs in the fluidic channel was measured and analysed as compressibility indices (CIs of normal and glutaraldehyde-treated hardened RBCs. The rotation speed and time were decided as 3000 rpm and 30 min, respectively, at which the difference of CI values between normal and hardened RBCs was largest (CInormal-CIhardened = 0.195.

  10. Direct Simulation of Transport Properties from Three-Dimensional (3D) Reconstructed Solid-Oxide Fuel-Cell (SOFC) Electrode Microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunda, Naga Siva Kumar; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2012-01-01

    A well-known approach to develop a high efficiency solid-oxide fuel-cell (SOFC) consists of extracting the microstructure and transport properties such as volume fractions, internal surface area, geometric connectivity, effective gas diffusivity, effective electronic conductivity and geometric tortuosities from three-dimensional (3D) microstructure of the SOFC electrodes; thereafter, performing the SOFC efficiency calculations using previously mentioned quantities. In the present work, dual-beam focused ion beam - scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) is applied on one of the SOFC cathodes, a lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) electrode, to estimate the aforementioned properties. A framework for calculating transport properties is presented in this work. 3D microstructures of LSM electrode are reconstructed from a series of two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional FIB-SEM images. Volume percentages of connected, isolated and dead-ends networks of pore and LSM phases are estimated. Different networks of pore and LSM phases are discretized with tetrahedral elements. Finally, the finite element method (FEM) is applied to calculate effective gas diffusivity and electronic conductivity of pore and LSM phases, respectively. Geometric tortuosities are estimated from the porosity and effective transport properties. The results obtained using FEM are compared with the finite volume method (FVM) results obtained by Gunda et al. [J. Power Sources, 196(7), 35929(2011)] and other numerical results obtained on randomly generated porous medium. Effect of consideration of dead-ends and isolated-ends networks on calculation of effective transport properties is studied.

  11. Uncemented three-dimensional-printed prosthetic replacement for giant cell tumor of distal radius: a new design of prosthesis and surgical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Minxun; Min, Li; Xiao, Cong; Li, Yongjiang; Luo, Yi; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Wenli; Tu, Chongqi

    2018-01-01

    Currently, it is challenging to treat giant cell tumor (GCT) of distal radius. For Campanacci grade III or recurrent GCTs, en bloc resection has been accepted as a better treatment option. Although numerous methods are available for reconstruction, all of them have some limitations in joint function and complications. In this study, our aims were to treat the GCT of distal radius with uncemented three-dimensional (3D)-printed prosthesis and to present and evaluate the surgical techniques and short-term outcomes. Between September 2015 and March 2017, 11 patients with distal radius GCTs were treated with personalized uncemented 3D-printed prosthesis. The preoperative/postoperative pain, range of motion, and grip strengths of all patients were evaluated. Oncological results, complications, and degenerative changes in the wrist joint were evaluated. Functional outcomes were assessed according to the disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) questionnaire and Mayo wrist scoring systems. The average follow-up was 14.45 months (range, 8-18 months). There was a significant decrease in the mean postoperative visual analog scale score (2.33) compared with the preoperative score (5.22; p 3D-printed prosthesis can be alternative options to treat Campanacci grade III or recurrent GCTs of distal radius and can result in short-term oncologic salvage, good postoperative function, and low complication rate. However, a long-term follow-up is required to determine the outcome.

  12. On the stimulated Raman sidescattering in inhomogeneous plasmas: revisit of linear theory and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, C. Z.; Zhuo, H. B.; Yin, Y.; Liu, Z. J.; Zheng, C. Y.; Zhao, Y.; He, X. T.

    2018-02-01

    Stimulated Raman sidescattering (SRSS) in inhomogeneous plasma is comprehensively revisited on both theoretical and numerical aspects due to the increasing concern of its detriments to inertial confinement fusion. Firstly, two linear mechanisms of finite beam width and collisional effects that could suppress SRSS are investigated theoretically. Thresholds for the eigenmode and wave packet in a finite-width beam are derived as a supplement to the theory proposed by Mostrom and Kaufman (1979 Phys. Rev. Lett. 42 644). Collisional absorption of SRSS is efficient at high-density plasma and high-Z material, otherwise, it allows emission of sidescattering. Secondly, we have performed the first three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in the context of SRSS to investigate its linear and nonlinear effects. Simulation results are qualitatively agreed with the linear theory. SRSS with the maximum growth gain is excited at various densities, grows to an amplitude that is comparable with the pump laser, and evolutes to lower densities with a large angle of emergence. Competitions between SRSS and other parametric instabilities such as stimulated Raman backscattering, two-plasmon decay, and stimulated Brillouin scattering are discussed. These interaction processes are determined by gains, occurrence sites, scattering geometries of each instability, and will affect subsequent evolutions. Nonlinear effects of self-focusing and azimuthal magnetic field generation are observed to be accompanied with SRSS. In addition, it is found that SRSS is insensitive to ion motion, collision (low-Z material), and electron temperature.

  13. Resolving the three-dimensional microstructure of polymer electrolyte fuel cell electrodes using nanometer-scale X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epting, William K.; Gelb, Jeff; Litster, Shawn

    2012-02-08

    The electrodes of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) are composite porous layers consisting of carbon and platinum nanoparticles and a polymer electrolyte binder. The proper composition and arrangement of these materials for fast reactant transport and high electrochemical activity is crucial to achieving high performance, long lifetimes, and low costs. Here, the microstructure of a PEFC electrode using nanometer-scale X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT) with a resolution of 50 nm is investigated. The nano-CT instrument obtains this resolution for the low-atomic-number catalyst support and binder using a combination of a Fresnel zone plate objective and Zernike phase contrast imaging. High-resolution, non-destructive imaging of the three-dimensional (3D) microstructures provides important new information on the size and form of the catalyst particle agglomerates and pore spaces. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) is applied to evaluate the limits of the resolution and to verify the 3D reconstructions. The computational reconstructions and size distributions obtained with nano-CT can be used for evaluating electrode preparation, performing pore-scale simulations, and extracting effective morphological parameters for large-scale computational models. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Clinical significance of three-dimensional measurement of tumour thickness on magnetic resonance imaging in patients with oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Minsu; Moon, Hyun; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Kim, Ji Won; Lee, Yoon-Se; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Choi, Seung-Ho; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Sang-Yoon

    2016-01-01

    To identify the clinical significance of primary tumour thickness (TT) and its direction in patients with oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC), we measured TT in all axial/coronal/sagittal views on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and evaluated their meaning. A total of 53 OTSCC patients were analysed who had undergone preoperative three-dimensional MRI and had been surgically treated. TT measured on axial (mediolateral direction), coronal (superoinferior direction), and sagittal (anteroposterior direction) views was compared to that in pathologic specimens. The association between TT on MRI and other pathologic parameters was also evaluated. TT on MRI in each plane showed relatively high concordance rates with the histological measurements. TT in all three planes was significantly correlated with lymph node (LN) metastasis. Occult LN metastasis was found in 15 of 39 (38.5 %) patients, and the cutoff value of TT in axial/coronal/sagittal MRI predicting occult LN metastasis was 6.7 mm, 7.2 mm, and 12.3 mm, respectively. TT on MRI did not show any significant association with recurrence and survival. TT on MRI in all three planes showed relatively high coincidence with TT on histopathology and presented a potential cut-off value as a predictive indicator for occult LN metastasis. (orig.)

  15. Deposition of nano-size particles on reticulated vitreous carbon using colloidal precursors : three-dimensional anodes for borohydride fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J.; Gyenge, E.L. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    2006-07-01

    In addition to their inherently larger specific surface area, mesoscopic materials also possess a higher density of surface constrained sites, which could serve as active sites in catalysis as well as facilitate the surface diffusion of small molecules and ions relevant to various catalytic steps. This study investigated the organosol method for the deposition of platinum (Pt), iridium (Ir), gold (Au) and nickel (Ni) nano-particles on reticulated vitreous carbon to evaluate the electrocatalytic activity for BH{sub 4} oxidation by both fundamental electrochemical studies and fuel cell experiments. The application of the organosol nanometal preparation technique was based on the quaternary ammonium compound N(C{sub 8}H{sub 17}){sub 4}B(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 3}H acting as both reductant and colloid stabilizer. A current assisted variant was also studied where the reticulated vitreous carbon substrate served as the cathode operating at superficial current densities between 1.0 and 2.5 mA per cm{sup 2}. The organosol method produced a low catalyst load on reticulated vitreous carbons between 0.01 and 0.12 mg per cm{sup 2}. The electrodes were evaluated for catalytic activity toward the electro-oxidation of BH{sub 4} by cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry and fuel cell experiments. Borohydride fuel cells with liquid electrolyte (2 M NaOH) were assembled using a 3-dimensional anode, a cation exchange membrane and a commercial oxygen cathode. Results showed that the anode catalyst mass activity was higher for the 3-D design compared to the case when a gas diffusion electrode served as the anode. It was concluded that the extended reaction zone of the three-dimensional anode with liquid electrolyte improved the catalyst utilization efficiency by allowing the reduction of the catalyst load. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Dosimetry analysis on radiation-induced acute esophagitis after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZZhu Shuchai; Cui Yanli; Li Juan; Liu Zhikun; Shen Wenbin; Su Jingwei; Wang Yuxiang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the related factors with radiation-induced esophagitis after threedimensional conformal radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), in order to explore the predictors for optimizing the treatment planning of NSCLC. Methods: From Aug 2000 to Dec 2004, 104 NSCLC patients received radiotherapy and were eligible for this study, 45 cases squamous cell carcinoma, 20 cases adenocarcinoma, 33 cases carrying with cancer cells by test and 6 case with no definitive pathologic feature.46 patients were treated with three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), the other 58 patients conventional radiotherapy (CRT) before later-course 3DCRT. All the patients received the prescribed dose between 60-78 Gy and the median dose 66 Gy. The correlation of the variables were evaluated by Spearman relationship analysis. The morbidity of radiation-induced esophagitis was analyzed by X 2 test. The multivariate effect on radiation-induced esophagitis was statistically processed by Logistic regression model. Results: In 104 patients, the morbidity of radiation- induced esophagitis was 46.2%, including 32 cases at grade 1, 15 cases at grade 2, 1 case at grade 3. Univariate analysis showed the maximal and mean dose of esophagus, the volume of esophagus irradiated, the values of V 40 , V 45 , V 50 , V 55 , V 60 , LETT 45 , LETT 50 , LETT 55 , LETT 60 for the esophagus were correlated with radiation-induced esophagitis. Logistic regression model showed that the maximum dose received by the esophagus was the independent factor of ≥ 2 grade radiation-induced esophagitis. Conclusions: The maxmal dose of esophagus received might be the important factor of radiation-induced esophagitis. (authors)

  17. Template-free synthesis of three-dimensional nanoporous N-doped graphene for high performance fuel cell oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Sheng; Zhou, Xuejun; Xu, Nengneng; Bai, Zhengyu; Qiao, Jinli; Zhang, Jiujun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • 3-D porous N-doped graphene was prepared using one-step silica template-free method. • High specific surface area of 920 m 2 g −1 was achieved for 3-D porous N-doped graphene. • Much higher ORR activity was observed for N-doped graphene than S-doped one in 0.1 M KOH. • The as-prepared catalyst gave a peak power density of 275 mW cm −2 as zinc–air battery cathode. - Abstract: Three-dimensional nanoporous nitrogen-doped graphene (3D-PNG) has been synthesized through a facial one-step synthesis method without additional silica template. The as-prepared 3D-PNGwas used as an electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which shows excellent electrochemistry performance, demonstrated by half-cell electrochemical evaluation in 0.1 M KOH including prominent ORR activity, four electron-selectivity and remarkable methanol poisoning stability compared to commercial 20%Pt/C catalyst. The physical and surface properties of 3D-PNG catalyst were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and BET surface area analysis. The experiments show that 3D-PNG catalyst possesses super-large specific surface area reaching 920 m 2 g −1 , which is superior to our most recently reported 3D-PNG synthesized by silica template (670 m 2 g −1 ) and other doped graphene catalysts in literature. When used for constructing a zinc–air battery cathode, such an 3D-PNG catalyst can give a discharge peak power density of 275 mW cm −2 . All the results announce a unique procedure to product high-efficiency graphene-based non-noble metal catalyst materials for electrochemical energy devices including both fuel cells and metal–air batteries.

  18. Effects of BMP-2 and dexamethasone on osteogenic differentiation of rat dental follicle progenitor cells seeded on three-dimensional beta-TCP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Lulu; Jin Zuolin; Duan Yinzhong [Department of Orthodontics, Stomatological College, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Liu Hongchen; Wang Dongsheng; E Lingling [Department of Stomatology, China PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Xu Lin, E-mail: jinzuolin88@yahoo.com.c, E-mail: duanyinzhong@yahoo.com.c [Department of Stomatology, the First Hospital of PLA, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2009-12-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of BMP-2 and dexamethasone (Dex) on osteogenic differentiation of rat dental follicle progenitor cells (RDFCs) seeded on three-dimensional beta-TCP. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP), the calcium and phosphonium, the osteocalcin in media of the third passage RDFCs on biomaterial beta-TCP after 1-3, 3-7, 7-14 days of culture were examined respectively. The growth of cells on the scaffolds was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) after 3, 7 days of culture and by implanting in the backs of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice for bone regeneration. The third passage RDFCs could be seen adhered, extended and proliferated on the beta-TCP by scanning electron microscopy. The ALP activity, the calcium and phosphoniums and the osteocalcin content of dexamethasone (10{sup -8} M) or/and BMP-2 (100 ng ml{sup -1}) were significantly higher than their existence in the control group. They were the significantly highest among four groups after joint application of BMP-2 and dexamethasone. After 8 weeks of implantation, the percentage of the new bones formed area in the RDFCs+beta-TCP+BMP-2+Dex group was significantly higher than that in the RDFCs+beta-TCP+BMP-2 group. In contrast, beta-TCP, RDFCs+beta-TCP+Dex and control constructs lacked new bone formation by histological staining and histomorphometric analysis. The BMP-2+Dex could significantly promote osteogenic differentiation of RDFCs on beta-TCP. beta-TCP supported fast cellular adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of RDFCs. The feasibility of its application in periodontal tissue engineering was also proved.

  19. Effects of BMP-2 and dexamethasone on osteogenic differentiation of rat dental follicle progenitor cells seeded on three-dimensional β-TCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lulu; Jin Zuolin; Duan Yinzhong; Liu Hongchen; Wang Dongsheng; E Lingling; Xu Lin

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of BMP-2 and dexamethasone (Dex) on osteogenic differentiation of rat dental follicle progenitor cells (RDFCs) seeded on three-dimensional β-TCP. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP), the calcium and phosphonium, the osteocalcin in media of the third passage RDFCs on biomaterial β-TCP after 1-3, 3-7, 7-14 days of culture were examined respectively. The growth of cells on the scaffolds was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) after 3, 7 days of culture and by implanting in the backs of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice for bone regeneration. The third passage RDFCs could be seen adhered, extended and proliferated on the β-TCP by scanning electron microscopy. The ALP activity, the calcium and phosphoniums and the osteocalcin content of dexamethasone (10 -8 M) or/and BMP-2 (100 ng ml -1 ) were significantly higher than their existence in the control group. They were the significantly highest among four groups after joint application of BMP-2 and dexamethasone. After 8 weeks of implantation, the percentage of the new bones formed area in the RDFCs+β-TCP+BMP-2+Dex group was significantly higher than that in the RDFCs+β-TCP+BMP-2 group. In contrast, β-TCP, RDFCs+β-TCP+Dex and control constructs lacked new bone formation by histological staining and histomorphometric analysis. The BMP-2+Dex could significantly promote osteogenic differentiation of RDFCs on β-TCP. β-TCP supported fast cellular adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of RDFCs. The feasibility of its application in periodontal tissue engineering was also proved.

  20. (Weakly) three-dimensional caseology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomraning, G.C.

    1996-01-01

    The singular eigenfunction technique of Case for solving one-dimensional planar symmetry linear transport problems is extended to a restricted class of three-dimensional problems. This class involves planar geometry, but with forcing terms (either boundary conditions or internal sources) which are weakly dependent upon the transverse spatial variables. Our analysis involves a singular perturbation about the classic planar analysis, and leads to the usual Case discrete and continuum modes, but modulated by weakly dependent three-dimensional spatial functions. These functions satisfy parabolic differential equations, with a different diffusion coefficient for each mode. Representative one-speed time-independent transport problems are solved in terms of these generalised Case eigenfunctions. Our treatment is very heuristic, but may provide an impetus for more rigorous analysis. (author)

  1. Equilibrium: three-dimensional configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter considers toroidal MHD configurations that are inherently three-dimensional. The motivation for investigation such complicated equilibria is that they possess the potential for providing toroidal confinement without the need of a net toroidal current. This leads to a number of advantages with respect to fusion power generation. First, the attractive feature of steady-state operation becomes more feasible since such configurations no longer require a toroidal current transformer. Second, with zero net current, one potentially dangerous class of MHD instabilities, the current-driven kink modes, is eliminated. Finally, three-dimensional configurations possess nondegenerate flux surfaces even in the absence of plasma pressure and plasma current. Although there is an enormous range of possible three-dimensional equilibria, the configurations of interest are accurately described as axisymmetric tori with superimposed helical fields; furthermore, they possess no net toroidal current. Instead, two different and less obvious restoring forces are developed: the helical sideband force and the toroidal dipole current force. Each is discussed in detail in Chapter 7. A detailed discussion of the parallel current constraint, including its physical significance, is given in section 7.2. A general analysis of helical sideband equilibria, along with a detailed description of the Elmo bumpy torus, is presented in sections 7.3 and 7.4. A general description of toroidal dipole-current equilibria, including a detailed discussion of stellarators, heliotrons, and torsatrons, is given in sections 7.5 and 7.6

  2. Non small cells stage I bronchial cancers: three-dimensional radiotherapy and radiotherapy in stereotactic conditions; Cancers bronchiques non a petites cellules de stade I: radiotherapie tridimensionnelle et radiotherapie en conditions stereotaxiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schipman, B.; Bosset, J.F. [CHU, 25 - Besancon (France); Marchesi, V.; Beckendorf, V.; Desandes, E.; Peiffert, D. [CRLCC Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandaeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Bosset, M. [CHU, 26 - Valence (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report a comparison between three-dimensional conformation radiotherapy and robotic irradiation in stereotactic conditions (with CyberKnife) for patients suffering from a bronchial cancer with no small cells of stage I. Acute and late toxicity have been recorded, and the monitoring comprised a clinic examination and a thoracic scanography. The external radiotherapy results in an important local control rate and an acceptable toxicity. Some prospective studies are still needed to compare three-dimensional conformation respiratory-gated radiotherapy and radiotherapy in stereotactic conditions. Short communication

  3. Predictors of grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 radiation pneumonitis in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Jun; Li, Guang; Ma, Lianghua; Han, Chong; Zhang, Shuo; Yao, Lei [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The First Hospital of China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China)], e-mail: gl1963516@yahoo.cn; Diao, Rao [Dept. of Experimental Technology Center, China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China); Zang, Shuang [Dept. of Nursing, China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China)

    2013-08-15

    Grade {>=}3 radiation pneumonitis (RP) is generally severe and life-threatening. Predictors of grade {>=}2 are usually used for grade {>=}3 RP prediction, but it is unclear whether these predictors are appropriate. In this study, predictors of grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 RP were investigated separately. The increased risk of severe RP in elderly patients compared with younger patients was also evaluated. Material and methods: A total of 176 consecutive patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer were followed up prospectively after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. RP was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Mean lung dose (MLD), mean heart dose, ratio of planning target volume to total lung volume (PTV/Lung), and dose-volume histogram comprehensive value of both heart and lung were associated with both grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 RP in univariate analysis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, age and MLD were predictors of both grade {>=}2 RP and grade {>=}3 RP; receipt of chemotherapy predicted grade {>=}3 RP only; and sex and PTV/Lung predicted grade {>=}2 RP only. Among patients who developed high-grade RP, MLD and PTV/Lung were significantly lower in patients aged {>=}70 years than in younger patients (p<0.05 for both comparisons). Conclusions: The predictors were not completely consistent between grade {>=}2 RP and grade {>=}3 RP. Elderly patients had a higher risk of severe RP than younger patients did, possibly due to lower tolerance of radiation to the lung.

  4. Primary observing pulmonary function variety following three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy of III phase non-small cell lung cancer

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    Cai Feng; Li Guang; Zhao Yuxia; Dang Jun; Yao Lei; Wu Chunli

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the pulmonary function, DVH and radiation pneumonitis after three-dimensional conformal radiation treatment of III phase non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods: 71 patients (male 52, female 19, median age 63, KPS≥80) were evaluated by pulmonary function tests before radiotherapy and in M1 and M3 after radiotherapy respectively. After 3 months of follow-up time, it reviewed the appearance and grade of radiation pneumonitis. Then V 20 , V 30 and MLD were worked out from dose volume histogram. Results: All patients completed radiotherapy, and total dose was 66-70 Gy. FVC (L), FEV 1 (L) and C L CO were (2.58±0.65) L, (1.85±0.58) L and (15.15±4.65)ml/(min) before radio- therapy, with(2.96±0.76) L, (2.13±0.65) L and (14.71±3.92) ml/(min) in M1 after radiotherapy, with (2.65±0.61) L, (1.92±0.52) L and (13.15±3.71)ml/(min)in M3 after radiotherapy. The accidence of radiation pneumonitis was 30%, moderate and severe radiation pneumonitis was 7%. With V 20 , V 30 and MLD increasing, the grade of radiation pneumonitis was increasing. V 20 , V 30 and MLD were related to the change in C L CO value among before, M1 and M3 after radiotherapy, and the correlation coefficient was more than 0.2. Conclusions: There is a relationship in the pulmonary fiction, DVH and radiation pneumonitis surely. The change in C L CO value between before radiotherapy and M1 after radiotherapy could predict the radiation pneumonitis. V 20 , V 30 and MLD are not only correlated to radiation pneumonitis evidently but the change in FEV 1 and C L CO after radiotherapy. (authors)

  5. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy for postoperative recurrence of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: clinical efficacy and failure pattern

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    Bao, Yong; Rong, TieHua; Li, Qun; Liu, Hui; Liu, ShiLiang; Zhou, QiChao; Cai, PeiQiang; Anfossi, Simone; Li, QiaoQiao; Hu, YongHong; Liu, MengZhong; Fu, JianHua

    2013-01-01

    To assess the therapeutic outcome and failure pattern of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT)-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for recurrence of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) after radical surgery. Treatment outcome and failure pattern were retrospectively evaluated in 83 patients with localized cervical and thoracic recurrences after radical surgery for thoracic esophageal SCC. All patients were treated with 3DCRT-based CCRT (median radiation dose 60 Gy), in which 39 received concurrent cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil (PF), and 44 received concurrent docetaxel plus cisplatin (TP). Treatment response was evaluated at 1–3 months after CCRT. With a median follow-up of 34 months (range, 2–116 months), the 3-year overall survival (OS) of all the patients was 51.8% and the median OS time was 43.0 months. The overall tumor response rate was 75.9% (63/83), with a complete remission (CR) rate of 44.6% (37/83). In univariate analysis, tumor response after CCRT (p = 0.000), recurrence site (p = 0.028) and concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.090) showed a trend favoring better OS. Multivariate analysis revealed that tumor response after CCRT (p = 0.000) and concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.010) were independent predictors of OS. Forty-seven patients had progressive diseases after CCRT, 27 had local failure (27/47, 57.4%), 18 had distant metastasis (18/47, 38.3%) and 2 had both local and distant failures (2/47, 4.3%). 3DCRT-based CCRT is effective in postoperatively recurrent esophageal SCC. Patients that obtained complete remission after CCRT appeared to achieve long-term OS and might benefit from concurrent TP regimen. Local and distant failures remained high and prospective studies are needed to validate these factors

  6. Results of induction chemotherapy followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and concurrent weekly paclitaxel for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weihua; Bao Yong; Chen Ming; Zhang Li; Xu Guangchuan; Li Kaixin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of induction chemotherapy (ICT) followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) plus concurrent weekly paclitaxel for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Patients with stage III NSCLC in favorable conditions were treated with 2 to 4 cycles of carboplatin (AUC=5-6, d1) combined with paclitaxel (175 mg/m 2 , d1), then followed by weekly paclitaxel (40 mg/m 2 ) and concurrent 3DCRT within 34 weeks. The prescription dose of radiotherapy was given as high as possible while total lung V 20 ≤31% and total dose of the spinal cord ≤50 Gy. Results: ICT was well tolerated. During the concurrent chemoradiotherapy,the treatment of 4 patients was ended ahead of the schedule because of severe pulmonary and cardiac toxicities; the treatment of 2 patients was delayed for 7 and 12 days because of fatigue. Leucopenia(33/56) was in grade 1-2 except 1 patient in grade 3. Lymphocytopenia was severe (54/56,42 in grade 3). Three patients developed grade 3 acute radiation-induced esophagitis, and 3 developed grade 3-4 radiation-induced pneumonitis. There was one patients each who developed grade 2,3, and 4 late esophageal damage, respectively. Nine developed grade 2 pulmonary fibrosis. The overall response rate was 69.7%. The 1-year overall survival rate was 72.3%. The 1-year local progression-free survival rate was 62.7%. Conclusions: The schedule of ICT followed by weekly paclitaxel and concurrent 3DCRT can be well tolerated by most of the favorable patients with stage III NSCLC, and the toxicity is tolerable. Results of this study are encouraging, though long-term results should be followed up. (authors)

  7. Comparison of two dimensional and three dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy weekend less

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Elena M.; Joy Williams, Frances; Ethan Lyn, Basil; Aird, Edwin G.A.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer being treated with continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy weekend less (CHARTWEL) were planned and treated with a three dimensional (3D) conformal protocol and comparison made with two dimensional (2D) planning, as used previously, to compare past practice and methods. Patients and methods: Twenty-four patients were planned initially using 3D and then replanned using a 2D system. The 2D plans were transferred onto the 3D system and recalculated. Dose volume histograms could then be constructed of planning target volumes for phases 1 and 2 (PTV 1 and 2, respectively), lung and spinal cord for the 2D plans and compared with the 3D plans. Results: There was a significantly lower absolute dose to the isocentre with 2D compared to 3D planning with dose reductions of 3.9% for phase 1, 4.4% for phase 2 and 4.7% for those treated with a single phase. Maximum dose to spinal cord was greater in 17 of the 24 2D plans with a median dose reduction of 0.82 Gy for 3D (P=0.04). The percentage volume of whole lung receiving ≥20 Gy (V 20 ) was greater in 16 of the 24 2D plans with a median reduction in V 20 of 2.4% for 3D (P=0.03). Conclusions: A lower dose to tumour was obtained using 2D planning due to the method of dose calculation and spinal cord and lung doses were significantly higher

  8. Patient outcomes of monotherapy with hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for stage T2 or T3 non-small cell lung cancer: a retrospective study

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    Sakaguchi, Masakuni; Maebayashi, Toshiya; Aizawa, Takuya; Ishibashi, Naoya; Fukushima, Shoko; Abe, Osamu; Saito, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) is a treatment option for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are medically unable to tolerate surgery and who are not amenable to treatment with stereotactic body radiotherapy. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of 3D-CRT as a monotherapy in patients with localized stage T2 or T3 NSCLC. This retrospective study consisted of 29 patients (20 males) aged 56–89 years (median, 76 years) with histologically confirmed NSCLC who underwent 3D-CRT between 2005 and 2014. The median duration of patient observation was 17.0 months (range, 1.0–64.0 months). Complete and partial responses occurred in 13.8 and 44.8 % of patients, respectively, and the overall response rate was 58.2 %. Meanwhile, the 1- and 3-year survival rates were 65.8 and 33.8 %, respectively. In T2 NSCLC, the median survival time (MST) was 12 months, and the 1- and 3-year survival rates were 62.4 and 21.4 %, respectively. In T3 NSCLC, the MST was 17 months, and the 1- and 3-year survival rates were 72.9 and 48.6 %, respectively. Severe toxicities (Common Terminology Criteria Grade 3) were not observed. The mean biologically effective dose required to improve local control exceeded 80 Gy (range, 67.2–96.0 Gy). These findings support a role for 3D-CRT as a treatment option for patients who refuse or could not tolerate surgical therapy with early-stage NSCLC. Although this was a small, retrospective study, it may form the basis for future, larger controlled studies on 3D-CRT as a monotherapy for NSCLC

  9. A combinatorial variation in surface chemistry and pore size of three-dimensional porous poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds modulates the behaviors of mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yingdi; Tan, Ke; Zhou, Yan; Ye, Zhaoyang, E-mail: zhaoyangye@ecust.edu.cn; Tan, Wen-Song

    2016-02-01

    Biomaterial properties play significant roles in controlling cellular behaviors. The objective of the present study was to investigate how pore size and surface chemistry of three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds regulate the fate of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro in combination. First, on poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) films, the hydrolytic treatment was found to stimulate the adhesion, spreading and proliferation of human MSCs (hMSCs) in comparison with pristine films, while the aminolysis showed mixed effects. Then, 3D porous PCL scaffolds with varying pore sizes (100–200 μm, 200–300 μm and 300–450 μm) were fabricated and subjected to either hydrolysis or aminolysis. It was found that a pore size of 200–300 μm with hydrolysis in 3D scaffolds was the most favorable condition for growth of hMSCs. Importantly, while a pore size of 200–300 μm with hydrolysis for 1 h supported the best osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs, the chondrogenic differentiation was greatest in scaffolds with a pore size of 300–450 μm and treated with aminolysis for 1 h. Taken together, these results suggest that surface chemistry and pore size of 3D porous scaffolds may potentially have a synergistic impact on the behaviors of MSCs. - Highlights: • Surface chemistry of poly(ε-caprolactone) films actively modulates MSC behaviors. • Varying surface chemistry and pore size in combination is enabled in 3D scaffolds. • Surface chemistry and pore size potentially dictate MSC fates in synergy.

  10. A combinatorial variation in surface chemistry and pore size of t