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Sample records for three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic

  1. Symptomatic middle cerebral artery stenosis and occlusion. Comparison of three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography with conventional angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Motoshi; Yano, Hirohito; Shinoda, Jun; Funakoshi, Takashi; Kumagai, Morio.

    1994-01-01

    The usefulness of magnetic resonance (MR) angiography using the three-dimensional time-of-flight method for the characterization of symptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusive lesions was evaluated in 10 patients with MCA occlusion and 10 with MCA stenosis. All lesions were symptomatic and documented by conventional angiography. There was no false-negative MR angiogram that failed to demonstrate the MCA occlusive lesion. MR angiography correctly evaluated the location of lesions and the difference between stenosis and occlusion. Stenosis appeared as a focal signal loss (<1.0cm) of the MCA at the site of stenosis, and occlusion as a complete signal loss of the MCA distal to the site of occlusion. However, MR angiography could not distinguish diffuse stenosis and one point stenosis demonstrated by conventional angiography. MR angiography is a useful noninvasive diagnostic method for evaluating occlusive lesions of the MCA in symptomatic patients. (author)

  2. Analogous Three-Dimensional Constructive Interference in Steady State Sequences Enhance the Utility of Three-Dimensional Time of Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography in Delineating Lenticulostriate Arteries in Insular Gliomas: Evidence from a Prospective Clinicoradiologic Analysis of 48 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Arun S; Thakar, Sumit; Sai Kiran, Narayanam Anantha; Aryan, Saritha; Mohan, Dilip; Hegde, Alangar S

    2018-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) time of flight (TOF) imaging is the current gold standard for noninvasive, preoperative localization of lenticulostriate arteries (LSAs) in insular gliomas; however, the utility of this modality depends on tumor intensity. Over a 3-year period, 48 consecutive patients with insular gliomas were prospectively evaluated. Location of LSAs and their relationship with the tumor were determined using a combination of contrast-enhanced coronal 3D TOF magnetic resonance angiography and coronal 3D constructive interference in steady state (CISS) sequences. These findings were analyzed with respect to extent of tumor resection and early postoperative motor outcome. Tumor was clearly visualized in 29 (60.4%) patients with T1-hypointense tumors using 3D TOF and in all patients using CISS sequences. Using combined 3D TOF and CISS, LSA-tumor interface was well seen in 47 patients, including all patients with T1-heterointense or T1-isointense tumors. Extent of resection was higher in the LSA-pushed group compared with the LSA-encased group. In the LSA-encased group, 6 (12.5%) patients developed postoperative hemiparesis; 2 (4.2%) cases were attributed to LSA injury. Contrast-enhanced 3D TOF can delineate LSAs in almost all insular gliomas but is limited in identifying the LSA-tumor interface. This limitation can be overcome by addition of analogous CISS sequences that delineate the LSA-tumor interface regardless of tumor intensity. Combined 3D TOF and 3D CISS is a useful tool for surgical planning and safer resections of insular tumors and may have added surgical relevance when included as an intraoperative adjunct. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Follow-up after embolization of ruptured intracranial aneurysms: a prospective comparison of two-dimensional digital subtraction angiography, three-dimensional digital subtraction angiography, and time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Zbigniew; Strześniewski, Piotr; Lasek, Władysław; Beuth, Wojciech

    2012-11-01

    To prospectively compare of the diagnostic value of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF-MRA) in the follow-up of intracranial aneurysms after endovascular treatment. Seventy-two consecutive patients were examined 3 months after the embolization. The index tests included: two-dimensional DSA (2D-DSA), three-dimensional DSA (3D-DSA), and TOF-MRA. The reference test was a retrospective consensus between 2D-DSA images, 3D-DSA images, and source rotational DSA images. The evaluation included: detection of the residual flow, quantification of the flow, and validity of the decision regarding retreatment. Intraobserver agreement and interobserver agreement were determined. The sensitivity and specificity of residual flow detection ranged from 84.6 % (2D-DSA and TOF-MRA) to 92.3 % (3D-DSA) and from 91.3 % (TOF-MRA) to 97.8 % (3D-DSA), respectively. The accuracy of occlusion degree evaluation ranged from 0.78 (2D-DSA) to 0.92 (3D-DSA, Cohen's kappa). The 2D-DSA method presented lower performance in the decision on retreatment than 3D-DSA (P < 0.05, ROC analysis). The intraobserver agreement was very good for all techniques (κ = 0.80-0.97). The interobserver agreement was moderate for TOF-MRA and very good for 2D-DSA and 3D-DSA (κ = 0.72-0.94). Considering the invasiveness of DSA and the minor difference in the diagnostic performance between 3D-DSA and TOF-MRA, the latter method should be the first-line modality for follow-up after aneurysm embolization.

  4. Follow-up after embolization of ruptured intracranial aneurysms: A prospective comparison of two-dimensional digital subtraction angiography, three-dimensional digital subtraction angiography, and time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serafin, Zbigniew; Strzesniewski, Piotr; Lasek, Wladyslaw; Beuth, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    To prospectively compare of the diagnostic value of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF-MRA) in the follow-up of intracranial aneurysms after endovascular treatment. Seventy-two consecutive patients were examined 3 months after the embolization. The index tests included: two-dimensional DSA (2D-DSA), three-dimensional DSA (3D-DSA), and TOF-MRA. The reference test was a retrospective consensus between 2D-DSA images, 3D-DSA images, and source rotational DSA images. The evaluation included: detection of the residual flow, quantification of the flow, and validity of the decision regarding retreatment. Intraobserver agreement and interobserver agreement were determined. The sensitivity and specificity of residual flow detection ranged from 84.6 % (2D-DSA and TOF-MRA) to 92.3 % (3D-DSA) and from 91.3 % (TOF-MRA) to 97.8 % (3D-DSA), respectively. The accuracy of occlusion degree evaluation ranged from 0.78 (2D-DSA) to 0.92 (3D-DSA, Cohen's kappa). The 2D-DSA method presented lower performance in the decision on retreatment than 3D-DSA (P < 0.05, ROC analysis). The intraobserver agreement was very good for all techniques (κ = 0.80-0.97). The interobserver agreement was moderate for TOF-MRA and very good for 2D-DSA and 3D-DSA (κ = 0.72-0.94). Considering the invasiveness of DSA and the minor difference in the diagnostic performance between 3D-DSA and TOF-MRA, the latter method should be the first-line modality for follow-up after aneurysm embolization. (orig.)

  5. Follow-up after embolization of ruptured intracranial aneurysms: A prospective comparison of two-dimensional digital subtraction angiography, three-dimensional digital subtraction angiography, and time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serafin, Zbigniew; Strzesniewski, Piotr; Lasek, Wladyslaw [Nicolaus Copernicus University, Collegium Medicum, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Bydgoszcz (Poland); Beuth, Wojciech [Nicolaus Copernicus University, Collegium Medicum, Department of Neurosurgery and Neurotraumatology, Bydgoszcz (Poland)

    2012-11-15

    To prospectively compare of the diagnostic value of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF-MRA) in the follow-up of intracranial aneurysms after endovascular treatment. Seventy-two consecutive patients were examined 3 months after the embolization. The index tests included: two-dimensional DSA (2D-DSA), three-dimensional DSA (3D-DSA), and TOF-MRA. The reference test was a retrospective consensus between 2D-DSA images, 3D-DSA images, and source rotational DSA images. The evaluation included: detection of the residual flow, quantification of the flow, and validity of the decision regarding retreatment. Intraobserver agreement and interobserver agreement were determined. The sensitivity and specificity of residual flow detection ranged from 84.6 % (2D-DSA and TOF-MRA) to 92.3 % (3D-DSA) and from 91.3 % (TOF-MRA) to 97.8 % (3D-DSA), respectively. The accuracy of occlusion degree evaluation ranged from 0.78 (2D-DSA) to 0.92 (3D-DSA, Cohen's kappa). The 2D-DSA method presented lower performance in the decision on retreatment than 3D-DSA (P < 0.05, ROC analysis). The intraobserver agreement was very good for all techniques ({kappa} = 0.80-0.97). The interobserver agreement was moderate for TOF-MRA and very good for 2D-DSA and 3D-DSA ({kappa} = 0.72-0.94). Considering the invasiveness of DSA and the minor difference in the diagnostic performance between 3D-DSA and TOF-MRA, the latter method should be the first-line modality for follow-up after aneurysm embolization. (orig.)

  6. A follow-up study of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with intracranial aneurysms using 3.0 T three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Tao; Wang, Peng; Qian, Yi [Department of Radiology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Zheng, Xuan [Clinical Nutrition Department of Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Xiao, Liaoyuan [Department of Nephrology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Yu, Shengqiang, E-mail: yushengqiang_cz@163.com [Department of Nephrology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Liu, Shiyuan, E-mail: laijiangtaotao@163.com [Department of Radiology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)

    2013-11-01

    Objective: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients have an increased risk for intracranial aneurysms (IAs). Our aim was to screen and follow up the unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) detected by 3.0 T three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF MRA) in patients with ADPKD in order to evaluate the growth of UIAs and the value of 3D-TOF MRA. Methods: From 2011 to 2012, we followed up UIAs detected in 40 ADPKD patients who had MRA examinations with an interval of at least 36 months. All MRA examinations were performed on a 3 T system (Achieva X-Series, Philips Medical Systems) with a Sense-Head-8 receiver head coil. The acquired data sets were transferred to a workstation (EWS, Philips Medical) to perform maximum intensity projection (MIP) and volume rendering (VR) with a specialized software package (Philips Medical). The size of UIAs was determined as the longest diameter in transverse or vertical measurement. UIAs that grew more than 20% were considered as enlarged. Results: Fifty UIAs were found in 40 previously examined ADPKD patients who underwent 3.0 T 3D-TOF MRA follow-ups. No patients ever had treatment before the second examination. The longest diameter of all follow-up UIAs was less than 10 mm and mean diameter was 3.64 ± 2.25 mm. UIAs in only 4 patients (10%) were considered as enlarged. None of the 50 IAs in the 40 ADPKD patients ruptured during the MRA follow-up period. Conclusion: 3.0 T 3D-TOF MRA was feasible for UIAs follow-up in ADPKD patients. The chance of enlargement and rupture of UIAs in ADPKD patients was not higher than in the general population.

  7. Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Neutron Diffraction in Transmission Mode for Mapping Crystal Grain Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Cereser, Alberto; Strobl, Markus; Hall, Stephen; Steuwer, Axel; Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Tremsin, Anton; Knudsen, Erik Bergbäck; Shinohara, Takenao; Willendrup, Peter; Fanta, Alice Bastos da Silva; Iyengar, Srinivasan; Larsen, Peter Mahler; Hanashima, Takayasu; Moyoshi, Taketo; Kadletz, Peter M.

    2017-01-01

    The physical properties of polycrystalline materials depend on their microstructure, which is the nano- to centimeter scale arrangement of phases and defects in their interior. Such microstructure depends on the shape, crystallographic phase and orientation, and interfacing of the grains constituting the material. This article presents a new non-destructive 3D technique to study centimeter-sized bulk samples with a spatial resolution of hundred micrometers: time-of-flight three-dimensional ne...

  8. Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Neutron Diffraction in Transmission Mode for Mapping Crystal Grain Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cereser, Alberto; Strobl, Markus; Hall, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    constituting the material. This article presents a new non-destructive 3D technique to study centimeter-sized bulk samples with a spatial resolution of hundred micrometers: time-of-flight three-dimensional neutron diffraction (ToF 3DND). Compared to existing analogous X-ray diffraction techniques, ToF 3DND......-of-flight neutron beamline. The technique was developed and tested with data collected at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of the Japan Proton Accelerator Complex (J-PARC) for an iron sample. We successfully reconstructed the shape of 108 grains and developed an indexing procedure....... The reconstruction algorithms have been validated by reconstructing two stacked Co-Ni-Ga single crystals, and by comparison with a grain map obtained by post-mortem electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)....

  9. Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Neutron Diffraction in Transmission Mode for Mapping Crystal Grain Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereser, Alberto; Strobl, Markus; Hall, Stephen A; Steuwer, Axel; Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Tremsin, Anton S; Knudsen, Erik B; Shinohara, Takenao; Willendrup, Peter K; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos; Iyengar, Srinivasan; Larsen, Peter M; Hanashima, Takayasu; Moyoshi, Taketo; Kadletz, Peter M; Krooß, Philipp; Niendorf, Thomas; Sales, Morten; Schmahl, Wolfgang W; Schmidt, Søren

    2017-08-25

    The physical properties of polycrystalline materials depend on their microstructure, which is the nano- to centimeter scale arrangement of phases and defects in their interior. Such microstructure depends on the shape, crystallographic phase and orientation, and interfacing of the grains constituting the material. This article presents a new non-destructive 3D technique to study centimeter-sized bulk samples with a spatial resolution of hundred micrometers: time-of-flight three-dimensional neutron diffraction (ToF 3DND). Compared to existing analogous X-ray diffraction techniques, ToF 3DND enables studies of samples that can be both larger in size and made of heavier elements. Moreover, ToF 3DND facilitates the use of complicated sample environments. The basic ToF 3DND setup, utilizing an imaging detector with high spatial and temporal resolution, can easily be implemented at a time-of-flight neutron beamline. The technique was developed and tested with data collected at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of the Japan Proton Accelerator Complex (J-PARC) for an iron sample. We successfully reconstructed the shape of 108 grains and developed an indexing procedure. The reconstruction algorithms have been validated by reconstructing two stacked Co-Ni-Ga single crystals, and by comparison with a grain map obtained by post-mortem electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD).

  10. Retrograde flow in the dural sinuses detected by three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, Akira; Nomiyama, Keita; Takase, Yukinori; Nakazono, Takahiko; Tominaga, Yukiko; Imaizumi, Takeshi; Kudo, Sho

    2007-01-01

    Retrograde flow in the left dural sinuses is sometimes detected by three-dimensional time-of-flight (3D-TOF) magnetic resonance (MR) angiography. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of this phenomenon and its characteristic features on 3D-TOF MR angiograms. We retrospectively reviewed cranial MR angiography images of 1,078 patients examined at our institution. All images were obtained by the 3D-TOF technique with one of two 1.5-T scanners. Maximum intensity projection (MIP) images in the horizontal rotation view were displayed stereoscopically. We reviewed the source images, inferosuperior MIP images, and horizontal MIP images and identified retrograde flow in the dural sinuses. We found retrograde flow in the dural sinuses of 67 patients on the source images from 3D-TOF MR angiography; the incidence was 6.2%. In 47 of the 67 patients, retrograde flow was identified in the left inferior petrosal sinus, in 13, it was seen in the left sigmoid sinus, and in 6, it was seen in the left inferior petrosal and left sigmoid sinuses. The remaining patient had retrograde flow in the left inferior petrosal and left and right sigmoid sinuses. The mean age of the patients with retrograde flow was slightly greater than that of the patients without this phenomenon (70 years vs 63 years). Retrograde flow in the dural sinuses frequently occurs on the left side in middle-aged and elderly patients during 3D-TOF MR angiography performed with the patient in the supine position. This phenomenon should not be misdiagnosed as a dural arteriovenous fistula. (orig.)

  11. Three dimensional magnetic abacus memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, ShiLei; Zhang, JingYan; Baker, Alexander A; Wang, ShouGuo; Yu, GuangHua; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2014-08-22

    Stacking nonvolatile memory cells into a three-dimensional matrix represents a powerful solution for the future of magnetic memory. However, it is technologically challenging to access the data in the storage medium if large numbers of bits are stacked on top of each other. Here we introduce a new type of multilevel, nonvolatile magnetic memory concept, the magnetic abacus. Instead of storing information in individual magnetic layers, thereby having to read out each magnetic layer separately, the magnetic abacus adopts a new encoding scheme. It is inspired by the idea of second quantisation, dealing with the memory state of the entire stack simultaneously. Direct read operations are implemented by measuring the artificially engineered 'quantised' Hall voltage, each representing a count of the spin-up and spin-down layers in the stack. This new memory system further allows for both flexible scaling of the system and fast communication among cells. The magnetic abacus provides a promising approach for future nonvolatile 3D magnetic random access memory.

  12. Three dimensional magnetic abacus memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shilei; Zhang, Jingyan; Baker, Alexander; Wang, Shouguo; Yu, Guanghua; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    Stacking nonvolatile memory cells into a three-dimensional matrix represents a powerful solution for the future of magnetic memory. However, it is technologically challenging to access the individual data in the storage medium if large numbers of bits are stacked on top of each other. Here we introduce a new type of multilevel, nonvolatile magnetic memory concept, the magnetic abacus. Instead of storing information in individual magnetic layers, thereby having to read out each magnetic layer separately, the magnetic abacus adopts a new encoding scheme which envisages a classical abacus with the beads operated by electron spins. It is inspired by the idea of second quantization, dealing with the memory state of the entire stack simultaneously. Direct read operations are implemented by measuring the artificially engineered `quantized' Hall voltage, representing a count of the spin-up and spin-down layers in the stack. This concept of `second quantization of memory' realizes the 3D memory architecture with superior reading and operation efficiency, thus is a promising approach for future nonvolatile magnetic random access memory.

  13. Magnetic excitations studied with time-of-flight spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainford, B.

    1996-01-01

    An introduction to time-of-flight neutron spectroscopy is presented in the context of the study of magnetic materials. Examples are taken from the class of rare earth and actinide magnetic materials known as 'strongly correlated electron' systems. (author) 11 figs., 24 refs

  14. Magnetic excitations studied with time-of-flight spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainford, B. [Southampton Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    1996-11-01

    An introduction to time-of-flight neutron spectroscopy is presented in the context of the study of magnetic materials. Examples are taken from the class of rare earth and actinide magnetic materials known as `strongly correlated electron` systems. (author) 11 figs., 24 refs.

  15. Three Dimensional Polarimetric Neutron Tomography of Magnetic Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sales, Morten; Strobl, Markus; Shinohara, Takenao

    2018-01-01

    -destructively with the potential to probe the interior of bulk samples which is not amenable otherwise. Using a pioneering polarimetric set-up for ToF neutron instrumentation in combination with a newly developed tailored reconstruction algorithm, the magnetic field generated by a current carrying solenoid has been measured......Through the use of Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Polarimetric Neutron Tomography (ToF 3DPNT) we have for the first time successfully demonstrated a technique capable of measuring and reconstructing three dimensional magnetic field strengths and directions unobtrusively and non...... and reconstructed, thereby providing the proof-of-principle of a technique able to reveal hitherto unobtainable information on the magnetic fields in the bulk of materials and devices, due to a high degree of penetration into many materials, including metals, and the sensitivity of neutron polarisation to magnetic...

  16. Fast carotid artery MR angiography with compressed sensing based three-dimensional time-of-flight sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Li, Hao; Dong, Li; Huang, Guofu

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we sought to investigate the feasibility of fast carotid artery MR angiography (MRA) by combining three-dimensional time-of-flight (3D TOF) with compressed sensing method (CS-3D TOF). A pseudo-sequential phase encoding order was developed for CS-3D TOF to generate hyper-intense vessel and suppress background tissues in under-sampled 3D k-space. Seven healthy volunteers and one patient with carotid artery stenosis were recruited for this study. Five sequential CS-3D TOF scans were implemented at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5-fold acceleration factors for carotid artery MRA. Blood signal-to-tissue ratio (BTR) values for fully-sampled and under-sampled acquisitions were calculated and compared in seven subjects. Blood area (BA) was measured and compared between fully sampled acquisition and each under-sampled one. There were no significant differences between the fully-sampled dataset and each under-sampled in BTR comparisons (P>0.05 for all comparisons). The carotid vessel BAs measured from the images of CS-3D TOF sequences with 2, 3, 4 and 5-fold acceleration scans were all highly correlated with that of the fully-sampled acquisition. The contrast between blood vessels and background tissues of the images at 2 to 5-fold acceleration is comparable to that of fully sampled images. The images at 2× to 5× exhibit the comparable lumen definition to the corresponding images at 1×. By combining the pseudo-sequential phase encoding order, CS reconstruction, and 3D TOF sequence, this technique provides excellent visualizations for carotid vessel and calcifications in a short scan time. It has the potential to be integrated into current multiple blood contrast imaging protocol. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Three Dimensional Double Layers in Magnetized Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jovanovic, D.; Lynov, Jens-Peter; Michelsen, Poul

    1982-01-01

    Experimental results are presented which demonstrate the formation of fully three dimensional double layers in a magnetized plasma. The measurements are performed in a magnetized stationary plasma column with radius 1.5 cm. Double layers are produced by introducing an electron beam with radius 0.......4 cm along the magnetic field from one end of the column. The voltage drop across the double layer is found to be determined by the energy of the incoming electron beam. In general we find that the width of the double layer along the external magnetic field is determined by plasma density and beam...

  18. Compressed Sensing 3-Dimensional Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography for Cerebral Aneurysms: Optimization and Evaluation.

    OpenAIRE

    Fushimi, Yasutaka; Fujimoto, Koji; Okada, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Akira; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Miyamoto, Susumu; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    [Objectives] The aims of this study were to optimize parameters for Nesterov algorithm (NESTA) in reconstruction of 3-dimensional time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) at 3 T by performing an exhaustive search and to validate the performance of compressed sensing (CS) by applying it to data from cerebral aneurysms and evaluating diagnostic quality. [Materials and Methods] Three-dimensional TOF-MRA was obtained using a 3 T MR system with a 32-channel head coil for both heal...

  19. Magnetic structure of two- and three-dimensional supramolecular compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decurtins, S.; Schmalle, H.W.; Pellaux, R. [Zurich Univ. (Switzerland); Fischer, P.; Fauth, F. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Ouladdiaf, B. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-09-01

    Supramolecular chiral networks of oxalato-bridged transition metals show either two- or three-dimensional structural features. The magnetic structures of such compounds have been investigated by means of elastic neutron powder diffraction. (author) 2 figs., 2 refs.

  20. Three-dimensional Oscillatory Magnetic Reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurgood, Jonathan O.; McLaughlin, James A. [Department of Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 1ST (United Kingdom); Pontin, David I., E-mail: jonathan.thurgood@northumbria.ac.uk [Division of Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee, DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)

    2017-07-20

    Here we detail the dynamic evolution of localized reconnection regions about 3D magnetic null points using numerical simulation. We demonstrate for the first time that reconnection triggered by the localized collapse of a 3D null point that is due to an external magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave involves a self-generated oscillation, whereby the current sheet and outflow jets undergo a reconnection reversal process during which back-pressure formation at the jet heads acts to prise open the collapsed field before overshooting the equilibrium into an opposite-polarity configuration. The discovery that reconnection at fully 3D nulls can proceed naturally in a time-dependent and periodic fashion suggests that oscillatory reconnection mechanisms may play a role in explaining periodicity in astrophysical phenomena associated with magnetic reconnection, such as the observed quasi-periodicity of solar and stellar flare emission. Furthermore, we find that a consequence of oscillatory reconnection is the generation of a plethora of freely propagating MHD waves that escape the vicinity of the reconnection region.

  1. Three-dimensional magnetic properties of soft magnetic composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Z.W.; Zhu, J.G.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) magnetic property measurement system, which can control the three components of the magnetic flux density B vector and measure the magnetic field strength H vector in a cubic sample of soft magnetic material, has been developed and calibrated. This paper studies the relationship between the B and H loci in 3-D space, and the power losses features of a soft magnetic composite when the B loci are controlled to be circles with increasing magnitudes and ellipses evolving from a straight line to circle in three orthogonal planes. It is found that the B and H loci lie in the same magnetization plane, but the H loci and power losses strongly depend on the orientation, position, and process of magnetization. On the other hand, the H vector evolves into a unique locus, and the power loss approaches a unique value, respectively, when the B vector evolves into the round locus with the same magnitude from either a series of circles or ellipses

  2. Three-dimensional black blood MR angiography of the liver during breath holding. A comparison with two-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suto, Y.; Ohuchi, Y.; Kimura, T.; Shirakawa, T.; Mizuuchi, N.; Takizawa, O.; Yamane, T.; Kamba, M.; Moriyama, S.; Ohta, Y.

    1994-01-01

    In 2-D time-of-flight MR angiography (2-D TOF MRA) of the liver, artifacts caused by respiratory motion are unavoidable. Therefore, a 3-D black blood MRA of the liver was attempted in 7 healthy volunteers, using a 3-D gradient echo sequence which allows imaging during breath holding. 2-D TOF MRA was performed as well. In all subjects, 3-D MRA allowed visualization of the trunk, 1st-, and 2nd-order branches of the portal vein without interruption. Right 3rd-order branches were visualized without interruption in 6 of 7 subjects (85%). However, with 2-D MRA, the transverse portion of the left main portal vein could not be visualized in any subject, and the periphery of the portal vein was less clear than with 3-D MRA. (orig.)

  3. Particle identification in the MASPIK time-of-flight magnetic spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhgirej, L.S.; Zarubin, P.I.; Ivanov, V.V.; Kuznetsov, A.S.; Stoletov, G.D.

    1985-01-01

    Characteristics of the system for time-of-flight measurement in the MASPIK magnetic spectrometer with wire chambers designed for studying the nuclear reaction mechanism in extracted beams of relativistic nuclei at the JINR synchrophasotron are considered. The functional diagram of the utilized equipment and mass distribution of secondary particles detected by the spectrometer in the range of momenta of 5.7-8.5 GeV/s are presented. Pulses from two scintillation detectors placed at the distance of 21.9 m from one another are applied for determining time-of-flight of particles detected by the main arm of the spectrometer. These counters are switched also into the trigger system of the facility. The attained time resolution permits to strictly separate protons and deuterons

  4. Functional renormalization group for three-dimensional quantum magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Yasir; Thomale, Ronny; Parisen Toldin, Francesco; Rachel, Stephan; Reuther, Johannes

    2016-10-01

    We formulate a pseudofermion functional renormalization group (PFFRG) scheme to address frustrated quantum magnetism in three dimensions. In a scenario where many numerical approaches fail due to sign problem or small system size, three-dimensional (3D) PFFRG allows for a quantitative investigation of the quantum spin problem and its observables. We illustrate 3D PFFRG for the simple cubic J1-J2-J3 quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet, and benchmark it against other approaches, if available.

  5. Three dimensional magnetic solutions in massive gravity with (nonlinear field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Hendi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Noble Prize in physics 2016 motivates one to study different aspects of topological properties and topological defects as their related objects. Considering the significant role of the topological defects (especially magnetic strings in cosmology, here, we will investigate three dimensional horizonless magnetic solutions in the presence of two generalizations: massive gravity and nonlinear electromagnetic field. The effects of these two generalizations on properties of the solutions and their geometrical structure are investigated. The differences between de Sitter and anti de Sitter solutions are highlighted and conditions regarding the existence of phase transition in geometrical structure of the solutions are studied.

  6. Three dimensional simulation study of spheromak injection into magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Watanabe, T.H.; Sato, T.; Hayashi, T.

    2000-01-01

    The three dimensional dynamics of a spheromak-like compact toroid (SCT) plasmoid, which is injected into a magnetized target plasma region, is investigated by using MHD numerical simulations. It is found that the process of SCT penetration into this region is much more complicated than that which has been analysed so far by using a conducting sphere (CS) model. The injected SCT suffers from a tilting instability, which grows with a similar timescale to that of the SCT penetration. The instability is accompanied by magnetic reconnection between the SCT magnetic field and the target magnetic field, which disrupts the magnetic configuration of the SCT. Magnetic reconnection plays a role in supplying the high density plasma, initially confined in the SCT magnetic field, to the target region. The penetration depth of the SCT high density plasma is also examined. It is shown to be shorter than that estimated from the CS model. The SCT high density plasma is decelerated mainly by the Lorentz force of the target magnetic field, which includes not only the magnetic pressure force but also the magnetic tension force. Furthermore, by comparing the SCT plasmoid injection with the bare plasmoid injection, magnetic reconnection is considered to relax the magnetic tension force, i.e. the deceleration of the SCT plasmoid. (author)

  7. Three dimensional density cavities in guide field collisionless magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.; Divin, A.; Goldman, M.; Newman, D.; Andersson, L.

    2012-03-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection with a guide field reveal for the first time the three dimensional features of the low density regions along the magnetic reconnection separatrices, the so-called cavities. It is found that structures with further lower density develop within the cavities. Because their appearance is similar to the rib shape, these formations are here called low density ribs. Their location remains approximately fixed in time and their density progressively decreases, as electron currents along the cavities evacuate them. They develop along the magnetic field lines and are supported by a strong perpendicular electric field that oscillates in space. In addition, bipolar parallel electric field structures form as isolated spheres between the cavities and the outflow plasma, along the direction of the low density ribs and of magnetic field lines.

  8. Magnetic properties of three-dimensional Hubbard-sigma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hisashi; Ichinose, Ikuo; Tatara, Gen; Matsui, Tetsuo.

    1989-11-01

    It is broadly viewed that the magnetism may play an important role in the high-T c superconductivity in the lamellar CuO 2 materials. In this paper, based on a Hubbard-inspired CP 1 or S 2 nonlinear σ model, we give a quantitative study of some magnetic properties in and around the Neel ordered state of three-dimensional quantum antiferromagnets such as La 2 CuO 4 with and without small hole doping. Our model is a (3+1) dimensional effective field theory describing the low energy spin dynamics of a three-dimensional Hubbard model with a very weak interlayer coupling. The effect of hole dynamics is taken into account in the leading approximation by substituting the CP 1 coupling with an 'effective' one determined by the concentration and the one-loop correction of hole fermions. A stationary-phase equation for the one-loop effective potential of S 2 model is analyzed numerically. The behavior of Neel temperature, magnetization (long range Neel order), spin correlation length, etc as functions of anisotropic parameter, temperature, hole concentrations, etc are investigated in detail. A phase diagram is also supported by the renormlization group analysis. The results show that our anisotropic field theory model with certain values of parameters could give a reasonably well description of the magnetic properties indicated by some experiments on pure and doped La 2 CuO 4 . (author)

  9. Time-of-flight system for a heavy ion magnetic spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catford, W.N.; Fifield, L.K.; Hotchkis, M.A.C.; Ophel, T.R.; Orr, N.A.; Weisser, D.C.; Woods, C.L.

    1987-05-01

    A system to measure the time of flight for heavy ions around an Enge split-pole magnetic spectrometer has been developed. The system consists of a parallel plate avalanche counter at the focal plane and either a microchannel plate detector or a silicon recoil detector in the target chamber. In-beam tests under experimental conditions have demonstrated a typical resolution of 1.0 to 1.5 ns, compared to a total flight time of ∼ 100 ns. Resolution figures approaching these have been recovered, when using the 4.5 deg angular acceptance of the spectrometer, by applying calculated corrections to the raw data according to the angle and focal plane position. A description of the detectors is followed by the results of the in-beam tests. An example of an application to the study of a heavy ion reaction is also described

  10. Three-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of fossils across taxa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mietchen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of life forms in the fossil record is largely determined by the extent to which they were mineralised at the time of their death. In addition to mineral structures, many fossils nonetheless contain detectable amounts of residual water or organic molecules, the analysis of which has become an integral part of current palaeontological research. The methods available for this sort of investigations, though, typically require dissolution or ionisation of the fossil sample or parts thereof, which is an issue with rare taxa and outstanding materials like pathological or type specimens. In such cases, non-destructive techniques could provide a valuable methodological alternative. While Computed Tomography has long been used to study palaeontological specimens, a number of complementary approaches have recently gained ground. These include Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI which had previously been employed to obtain three-dimensional images of pathological belemnites non-invasively on the basis of intrinsic contrast. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether 1H MRI can likewise provide anatomical information about non-pathological belemnites and specimens of other fossil taxa. To this end, three-dimensional MR image series were acquired from intact non-pathological invertebrate, vertebrate and plant fossils. At routine voxel resolutions in the range of several dozens to some hundreds of micrometers, these images reveal a host of anatomical details and thus highlight the potential of MR techniques to effectively complement existing methodological approaches for palaeontological investigations in a wide range of taxa. As for the origin of the MR signal, relaxation and diffusion measurements as well as 1H and 13C MR spectra acquired from a belemnite suggest intracrystalline water or hydroxyl groups, rather than organic residues.

  11. Three-dimensional display of magnetic source imaging (MSI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morioka, Takato; Yamamoto, Tomoya; Nishio, Shunji; Hasuo, Kanehiro; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Fukui, Masashi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Nitta, Koichi

    1995-03-01

    Magnetic source imaging (MSI) is a relatively new, noninvasive technique for defining the relationship between brain structure and function of individual patients, and to establish comparisons from one patient to another. This is achieved by combining detailed neurophysiological data derived via magnetoencephalography (MEG) with neuroimaging data such as computed tomographic scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The noninvasive presurgical mapping of cortical functional somatosensory activity and the direct mapping of epilepsy-associated activity are among the neurosurgical uses that are emerging for MSI. Although the procedure provides clinically useful data, there are still limitations to two-dimensional MSI. We employ three-dimensional (3-D) MSI, superimposing MSI localizations on 3-D volumetric reconstruction of MRI. 3-D MSI enhances the visualization of the entire sensory homunculus and clearly demonstrates the spatial relationship with structural lesions. The functional localization of the epileptic focus in spatial relation to the lesion provides important clues for preoperative planning and on the epileptogenicity of the lesion. 3-D MSI improves localization of the sensory cortex and generator areas of epileptic activity. (author).

  12. Three-dimensional display of magnetic source imaging (MSI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, Takato; Yamamoto, Tomoya; Nishio, Shunji; Hasuo, Kanehiro; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Fukui, Masashi; Nitta, Koichi.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic source imaging (MSI) is a relatively new, noninvasive technique for defining the relationship between brain structure and function of individual patients, and to establish comparisons from one patient to another. This is achieved by combining detailed neurophysiological data derived via magnetoencephalography (MEG) with neuroimaging data such as computed tomographic scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The noninvasive presurgical mapping of cortical functional somatosensory activity and the direct mapping of epilepsy-associated activity are among the neurosurgical uses that are emerging for MSI. Although the procedure provides clinically useful data, there are still limitations to two-dimensional MSI. We employ three-dimensional (3-D) MSI, superimposing MSI localizations on 3-D volumetric reconstruction of MRI. 3-D MSI enhances the visualization of the entire sensory homunculus and clearly demonstrates the spatial relationship with structural lesions. The functional localization of the epileptic focus in spatial relation to the lesion provides important clues for preoperative planning and on the epileptogenicity of the lesion. 3-D MSI improves localization of the sensory cortex and generator areas of epileptic activity. (author)

  13. Diagnostic value of 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography for detecting intracranial aneurysm: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HaiFeng, Liu; YongSheng, Xu; YangQin, Xun; Yu, Dou; ShuaiWen, Wang; XingRu, Lu; JunQiang, Lei

    2017-11-01

    This meta-analysis is to comprehensively evaluate the diagnostic performance of three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF-MRA) for detecting intracranial aneurysm (IA). PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane library were systematically searched for retrieving eligible studies. Study inclusion, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment were performed by two researchers independently. Pooled sensitivity (SEN), specificity (SPE), positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and area under the curve (AUC) were calculated to assess the diagnostic value. In addition, heterogeneity and subgroup analysis were carried out. In total, 18 studies comprising 3463 patients were selected. The results of 3D-TOF-MRA for diagnosing IA were SEN 0.89 (95% CI 0.82-0.94), SPE 0.94 (0.86-0.97), PLR 13.79 (5.92-32.12), NLR 0.11 (0.07-0.19), DOR 121.90 (38.81-382.94), and AUC 0.96 (0.94-0.98), respectively. In the subgroup analysis, studies without subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) tend to perform statistical significantly better (P 3D-TOF-MRA had better SEN in aneurysms > 3 mm than the aneurysms ≤ 3 mm in diameter: 0.89 (0.87-0.92) vs. 0.78 (0.71-0.84) with P 3D-TOF-MRA has an excellent diagnostic performance for the overall assessment of IA and may serve as an alternative for further patient management with IA.

  14. Diagnostic value of 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography for detecting intracranial aneurysm: a meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, HaiFeng; Xu, YongSheng [First Hospital of LanZhou University, Department of Radiology, Lanzhou, Gansu (China); First Clinical Medical College of LanZhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu (China); Xun, YangQin [Lanzhou University, Evidence-based Medicine Center, Lanzhou (China); Dou, Yu; Wang, ShuaiWen; Lu, XingRu; Lei, JunQiang [First Hospital of LanZhou University, Department of Radiology, Lanzhou, Gansu (China)

    2017-11-15

    This meta-analysis is to comprehensively evaluate the diagnostic performance of three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF-MRA) for detecting intracranial aneurysm (IA). PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane library were systematically searched for retrieving eligible studies. Study inclusion, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment were performed by two researchers independently. Pooled sensitivity (SEN), specificity (SPE), positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and area under the curve (AUC) were calculated to assess the diagnostic value. In addition, heterogeneity and subgroup analysis were carried out. In total, 18 studies comprising 3463 patients were selected. The results of 3D-TOF-MRA for diagnosing IA were SEN 0.89 (95% CI 0.82-0.94), SPE 0.94 (0.86-0.97), PLR 13.79 (5.92-32.12), NLR 0.11 (0.07-0.19), DOR 121.90 (38.81-382.94), and AUC 0.96 (0.94-0.98), respectively. In the subgroup analysis, studies without subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) tend to perform statistical significantly better (P < 0.05) in detecting IAs than studies with SAH 0.99 (0.98-1.00) vs. 0.89 (0.86-0.91). The diagnostic value of studies with a two-image reconstruction method was higher than studies with only one image reconstruction method: 0.99 (0.98-1.00) vs. 0.91 (0.89-0.94) with P < 0.05. The 3D-TOF-MRA had better SEN in aneurysms > 3 mm than the aneurysms ≤ 3 mm in diameter: 0.89 (0.87-0.92) vs. 0.78 (0.71-0.84) with P < 0.05. This study demonstrated that 3D-TOF-MRA has an excellent diagnostic performance for the overall assessment of IA and may serve as an alternative for further patient management with IA. (orig.)

  15. Compressed Sensing 3-Dimensional Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography for Cerebral Aneurysms: Optimization and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushimi, Yasutaka; Fujimoto, Koji; Okada, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Akira; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Miyamoto, Susumu; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this study were to optimize parameters for Nesterov algorithm (NESTA) in reconstruction of 3-dimensional time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) at 3 T by performing an exhaustive search and to validate the performance of compressed sensing (CS) by applying it to data from cerebral aneurysms and evaluating diagnostic quality. Three-dimensional TOF-MRA was obtained using a 3 T MR system with a 32-channel head coil for both healthy volunteers and 10 patients (11 aneurysms). No undersampling was applied for imaging parameters, including parallel imaging or other partial Fourier sampling. In the first step, the experimental setup was for healthy subjects to optimize CS parameters of NESTA and the undersampling mask pattern, so 24,696 different reconstruction conditions were surveyed for sampling rates of 8.0X and 5.0X. Mean square error (MSE) was calculated for each image reconstructed with the undersampling pattern and CS parameter sets. Evaluation was by normalized MSE, edge sharpness for MRA reconstructed using fully sampled data (MRA-full), zero-filled MRA (ZF-MRA) with Poisson disk undersampling mask, and CS-MRA (5.0X and 8.0X) with iterations of 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50. CS-MRA (5.0X and 8.0X) with 5, 10, and 50 iterations of the sampling pattern and CS parameter set with the lowest MSE were visually inspected by 2 neuroradiologists to check the diagnostic quality. The sampling pattern and CS parameter set with the lowest MSE were identical for both CS-MRA 5.0X and CS-MRA 8.0X. At the initial 5 to 15 iterations, MSE of both sampling rates greatly decreased from that of ZF-MRA. For subsequent iterations, the decrease in MSE was relatively small. For CS-MRA, sharpness greatly increased from that of ZF-MRA within the initial 5 to 15 iterations, followed by slight increases with further iterations. Two neuroradiologists graded most aneurysms as excellent, with the exception of 1 to 4 aneurysms recognized as good by 1

  16. Highly undersampled peripheral Time-of-Flight magnetic resonance angiography: optimized data acquisition and iterative image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Jana; Grimm, Robert; Forman, Christoph; Hornegger, Joachim; Schmitt, Peter

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acceleration of peripheral Time-of-Flight magnetic resonance angiography using Compressed Sensing and parallel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) while preserving image quality and vascular contrast. An analytical sampling pattern is proposed that combines aspects of parallel MRI and Compressed Sensing. It is used in combination with a dedicated Split Bregman algorithm. This approach is compared with current state-of-the-art patterns and reconstruction algorithms. The acquisition time was reduced from 30 to 2.5 min in a study using ten volunteer data sets, while showing improved sharpness, better contrast and higher accuracy compared to state-of-the-art techniques. This study showed the benefits of the proposed dedicated analytical sampling pattern and Split Bregman algorithm for optimizing the Compressed Sensing reconstruction of highly accelerated peripheral Time-of-Flight data.

  17. Three-dimensional supercritical resolved light-induced magnetic holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Chenglong; Nie, Zhongquan; Ye, Huapeng; Li, Hao; Luo, Yang; Feng, Rui; Yu, Xia; Wen, Feng; Zhang, Ying; Yu, Changyuan; Teng, Jinghua; Luk'yanchuk, Boris; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2017-10-01

    In the era of big data, there exists a growing gap between data generated and storage capacity using two-dimensional (2D) magnetic storage technologies (for example, hard disk drives), because they have reached their performance saturation. 3D volumetric all-optical magnetic holography is emerging rapidly as a promising road map to realizing high-density capacity for its fast magnetization control and subwavelength magnetization volume. However, most of the reported light-induced magnetization confronts the problems of impurely longitudinal magnetization, diffraction-limited spot, and uncontrollable magnetization reversal. To overcome these challenges, we propose a novel 3D light-induced magnetic holography based on the conceptual supercritical design with multibeam combination in the 4π microscopic system. We theoretically demonstrate a 3D deep super-resolved [Formula: see text] purely longitudinal magnetization spot by focusing six coherent circularly polarized beams with two opposing high numerical aperture objectives, which allows 3D magnetic holography with a volumetric storage density of up to 1872 terabit per cubic inches. The number and locations of the super-resolved magnetization spots are controllable, and thus, desired magnetization arrays in 3D volume can be produced with properly designed phase filters. Moreover, flexible magnetization reversals are also demonstrated in multifocal arrays by using different illuminations with opposite light helicity. In addition to data storage, this magnetic holography may find applications in information security, such as identity verification for a credit card with magnetic stripe.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic study of three-dimensional instability of the spontaneous fast magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, T.; Kondoh, K.; Ugai, M.; Shibata, K.

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional instability of the spontaneous fast magnetic reconnection is studied with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation, where the two-dimensional model of the spontaneous fast magnetic reconnection is destabilized in three dimension. Generally, in two-dimensional magnetic reconnection models, every plasma condition is assumed to be uniform in the sheet current direction. In such two-dimensional MHD simulations, the current sheet destabilized by the initial resistive disturbance can be developed to fast magnetic reconnection by a current driven anomalous resistivity. In this paper, the initial resistive disturbance includes a small amount of fluctuations in the sheet current direction, i.e., along the magnetic neutral line. The other conditions are the same as that of previous two-dimensional MHD studies for fast magnetic reconnection. Accordingly, we may expect that approximately two-dimensional fast magnetic reconnection occurs in the MHD simulation. In fact, the fast magnetic reconnection activated on the first stage of the simulation is two dimensional. However, on the subsequent stages, it spontaneously becomes three dimensional and is strongly localized in the sheet current direction. The resulting three-dimensional fast magnetic reconnection intermittently ejects three-dimensional magnetic loops. Such intermittent ejections of the three-dimensional loops are similar to the intermittent downflows observed in the solar flares. The ejection of the three-dimensional loops seems to be random but, numerically and theoretically, it is shown that the aspect ratio of the ejected loops is limited under a criterion.

  19. Brain volume measurement using three-dimensional magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimaru, Yoshihiro

    1996-01-01

    This study was designed to validate accurate measurement method of human brain volume using three dimensional (3D) MRI data on a workstation, and to establish optimal correcting method of human brain volume on diagnosis of brain atrophy. 3D MRI data were acquired by fast SPGR sequence using 1.5 T MR imager. 3D MRI data were segmented by region growing method and 3D image was displayed by surface rendering method on the workstation. Brain volume was measured by the volume measurement function of the workstation. In order to validate the accurate measurement method, phantoms and a specimen of human brain were examined. Phantom volume was measured by changing the lower level of threshold value. At the appropriate threshold value, percentage of error of phantoms and the specimen were within 0.6% and 0.08%, respectively. To establish the optimal correcting method, 130 normal volunteers were examined. Brain volumes corrected with height weight, body surface area, and alternative skull volume were evaluated. Brain volume index, which is defined as dividing brain volume by alternative skull volume, had the best correlation with age (r=0.624, p<0.05). No gender differences was observed in brain volume index in contrast to in brain volume. The clinical usefulness of this correcting method for brain atrophy diagnosis was evaluated in 85 patients. Diagnosis by 2D spin echo MR images was compared with brain volume index. Diagnosis of brain atrophy by 2D MR image was concordant with the evaluation by brain volume index. These results indicated that this measurement method had high accuracy, and it was important to set the appropriate threshold value. Brain volume index was the appropriate indication for evaluation of human brain volume, and was considered to be useful for the diagnosis of brain atrophy. (author)

  20. Three-dimensional imaging of magnetic nanoparticles using multiple pickup coils and field-free line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muta, Masahiro; Hamanaga, Shohei; Tanaka, Naoki; Sasayama, Teruyoshi; Yoshida, Takashi; Enpuku, Keiji

    2018-02-01

    We performed three-dimensional detection of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) samples using third-harmonic signal detection. In this method, a combination of five pickup coils and a gradient field with a field-free line was used to acquire three-dimensional MNP sample position information. The resulting two-dimensional maps of the signal fields generated by the MNP samples are sufficient for three-dimensional MNP image reconstruction. In the experiments, two MNP samples with different Fe contents were set at different positions. Two-dimensional field maps were measured using the five pickup coils, and the three-dimensional MNP sample distribution was then reconstructed from these field maps by solving an inversion problem. We demonstrated three-dimensional detection of two MNP samples where we reconstructed the three-dimensional positions and the Fe contents of these two MNP samples with reasonable accuracy. These results indicate the feasibility of the proposed system for three-dimensional magnetic particle imaging.

  1. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging for groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legchenko, A; Descloitres, M; Guyard, H [IRD/ UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS/G-INP, LTHE UMR 5564, Grenoble F-38041 (France); Vincent, C [Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Geophysique de l' Environnement and CNRS-LGGE, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Garambois, S [Institut des Sciences de la terre (ISTerre), Universite Joseph Fourier and CNRS, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Chalikakis, K [Universite d' Avignon, UMR EMMAH (UAPV-INRA), 33, rue Pasteur, 84000 Avignon (France); Ezersky, M, E-mail: anatoli.legtchenko@ird.fr [Geophysical Institute of Israel, BP182, Lod 71100 (Israel)

    2011-02-15

    The surface nuclear magnetic resonance method (SNMR) is an established geophysical tool routinely used for investigating one-dimensional (1D) and sometimes 2D subsurface water-saturated formations. We have expanded the tool by developing a 3D application. 3D-SNMR is a large-scale method that allows magnetic resonance imaging of groundwater down to about 80 m. Similar to most surface geophysical methods, 3D-SNMR has limited resolution, but it is effective for investigating water-saturated geological formations larger than several tens of meters. Because the performance of the method depends on variable survey conditions, we cannot estimate it in general. For demonstration purposes, we present an example of numerical modeling under fixed conditions. Results show that under certain conditions it is possible to detect a water volume as small as 500 m{sup 3} and the detection threshold depends on the ambient electromagnetic noise magnitude and on the location of the target volume relative to the SNMR loops. The 3D-SNMR method was used to investigate accumulated water within the Tete Rousse glacier (French Alps). Inversion of the field measurements made it possible to locate the principal reservoir in the central part of the glacier and estimate the volume of accumulated water. These results were verified by 20 boreholes installed after the 3D-SNMR results were obtained and by pumping water out of the glacier. Very good correspondence between the 3D-SNMR and borehole results was observed.

  2. Evaluation of the applicability of territorial arterial spin labeling in meningiomas for presurgical assessments compared with 3-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yiping; Wen, Jianbo; Geng, Daoying; Yin, Bo; Luan, Shihai; Liu, Li; Xiong, Ji; Qu, Jianxun

    2017-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the application of territorial arterial spin labelling (t-ASL) in comparison with unenhanced three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF-MRA) in the identification of the feeding vasculature of meningiomas. Thirty consecutive patients with suspected meningiomas underwent conventional MR imaging, unenhanced 3D-TOF-MRA and t-ASL scanning. Four experienced neuro-radiologists assessed the feeding vessels with different techniques separately. For the identification of the origin of the feeding arteries on t-ASL, the inter-observer agreement was excellent (κ = 0.913), while the inter-observer agreement of 3D-TOF-MRA was good (κ = 0.653). The inter-modality agreement between t-ASL and 3D-TOF-MRA for the feeding arteries was moderate (κ = 0.514). All 8 patients with motor or sensory disorders proved to have meningiomas supplied completely or partially by the internal carotid arteries, while all 14 patients with meningiomas supplied by the external carotid arteries or basilar arteries didn't show any symptoms concerning motor or sensory disorders (p = 0.003). T-ASL could complement unenhanced 3D-TOF-MRA and increase accuracy in the identification of the supplying arteries of meningiomas in a safe, intuitive, non-radioactive manner. The information about feeding arteries was potentially related to patients' symptoms and pathology, making it more crucial for neurosurgeons in planning surgery as well as evaluating prognosis. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of the applicability of territorial arterial spin labeling in meningiomas for presurgical assessments compared with 3-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yiping; Wen, Jianbo; Geng, Daoying; Yin, Bo [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Luan, Shihai [Fudan University, Department of Neurosurgery, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Liu, Li [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Xiong, Ji [Fudan University, Department of Pathology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Qu, Jianxun [GE Healthcare, Department of MR Research, Shanghai (China)

    2017-10-15

    To prospectively evaluate the application of territorial arterial spin labelling (t-ASL) in comparison with unenhanced three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF-MRA) in the identification of the feeding vasculature of meningiomas. Thirty consecutive patients with suspected meningiomas underwent conventional MR imaging, unenhanced 3D-TOF-MRA and t-ASL scanning. Four experienced neuro-radiologists assessed the feeding vessels with different techniques separately. For the identification of the origin of the feeding arteries on t-ASL, the inter-observer agreement was excellent (κ = 0.913), while the inter-observer agreement of 3D-TOF-MRA was good (κ = 0.653). The inter-modality agreement between t-ASL and 3D-TOF-MRA for the feeding arteries was moderate (κ = 0.514). All 8 patients with motor or sensory disorders proved to have meningiomas supplied completely or partially by the internal carotid arteries, while all 14 patients with meningiomas supplied by the external carotid arteries or basilar arteries didn't show any symptoms concerning motor or sensory disorders (p = 0.003). T-ASL could complement unenhanced 3D-TOF-MRA and increase accuracy in the identification of the supplying arteries of meningiomas in a safe, intuitive, non-radioactive manner. The information about feeding arteries was potentially related to patients' symptoms and pathology, making it more crucial for neurosurgeons in planning surgery as well as evaluating prognosis. (orig.)

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of three-dimensional cervical anatomy in the second and third trimester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Michael; Bhadelia, Rafeeque A; Myers, Kristin; Socrate, Simona

    2009-05-01

    Although a short cervix is known to be associated with preterm birth, the patterns of three-dimensional, anatomic changes leading to a short cervix are unknown. Our objective was to (1) construct three-dimensional anatomic models during normal pregnancy and (2) use the models to compare cervical anatomy in the second and third trimester. A cross-sectional study was performed in a population of patients referred to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for a fetal indication. Using magnetic resonance images for guidance, three-dimensional solid models of the following anatomic structures were constructed: amniotic cavity, uterine wall, cervical stroma, cervical mucosa and anterior vaginal wall. To compare cervical anatomy in the second and third trimester, models were matched according the size of the bony pelvis. Fourteen patients were imaged and divided into two groups according to gestational age: 20-24 weeks (n=7)) and 31-36 weeks (n=7). Compared to the second trimester, the third trimester was associated with significant descent of the amniotic sac (p=.02). Descent of the amniotic sac was associated with modified anatomy of the uterocervical junction. These three-dimensional changes were associated with a cervix that appeared shorter in the third trimester. We report a technique for constructing MRI-based, three-dimensional anatomic models during pregnancy. Compared to the second trimester, the third trimester is associated with three-dimensional changes in the cervix and lower uterine segment.

  5. IN5 Polarisation Option (IPOP) and HIgh FIeld Magnet Option (HIFIMO) for the IN5 time-of-flight spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollivier, J.; Mutka, H.

    2011-01-01

    The new secondary spectrometer for the cold neutron time-of-flight (ToF) instrument IN5 was built with non-magnetic material, keeping in mind the upgrade option of polarisation analysis (PA) and the possibility of applying high continuous magnetic fields. The refurbished instrument has a high incident flux and elevated count-rate and offers a unique opportunity for applying polarised neutron methods for high resolution inelastic scattering, including single crystal investigations. On IN5 the polarised option would use the PASTIS concept of three sets of compact perpendicular coils (see the PANTHER proposal) allowing XYZPA and a 3 He analyser banana. As for high magnetic fields: a magnet suitable for ToF instruments must place a minimal amount of material in the incoming and outgoing beams and provide a large asymmetric view towards the detectors. An homogeneous field area of about 20 mm diameter over 30 mm height is also required. There is a size constraint set by the 800 mm diameter sample chamber and the optimal angular acceptance towards the detectors is -12 degrees / +135 degrees in the equatorial plane and +/- 22 degrees in the vertical direction

  6. Magnetic field effect on a three-dimensional mixed convective flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An analytical solution to the problem of the MHD free and forced convection three dimensional flow of an incompressible viscous electrically conducting fluid with mass transfer along a vertical porous plate with transverse sinusoidal suction velocity is presented. A uniform magnetic field is assumed to be applied transversely ...

  7. Large anomalous magnetic moment in three-dimensional Dirac and Weyl semimetals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Wurff, E. C I; Stoof, H. T C

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effect of Coulomb interactions on the electromagnetic response of three-dimensional Dirac and Weyl semimetals. In a calculation reminiscent of Schwinger's seminal work on quantum electrodynamics, we find three physically distinct effects for the anomalous magnetic moment of the

  8. Three-dimensional magnetization structures revealed with X-ray vector nanotomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Claire; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Scagnoli, Valerio; Gliga, Sebastian; Holler, Mirko; Raabe, Jörg; Heyderman, Laura J.

    2017-07-01

    In soft ferromagnetic materials, the smoothly varying magnetization leads to the formation of fundamental patterns such as domains, vortices and domain walls. These have been studied extensively in thin films of thicknesses up to around 200 nanometres, in which the magnetization is accessible with current transmission imaging methods that make use of electrons or soft X-rays. In thicker samples, however, in which the magnetization structure varies throughout the thickness and is intrinsically three dimensional, determining the complex magnetic structure directly still represents a challenge. We have developed hard-X-ray vector nanotomography with which to determine the three-dimensional magnetic configuration at the nanoscale within micrometre-sized samples. We imaged the structure of the magnetization within a soft magnetic pillar of diameter 5 micrometres with a spatial resolution of 100 nanometres and, within the bulk, observed a complex magnetic configuration that consists of vortices and antivortices that form cross-tie walls and vortex walls along intersecting planes. At the intersections of these structures, magnetic singularities—Bloch points—occur. These were predicted more than fifty years ago but have so far not been directly observed. Here we image the three-dimensional magnetic structure in the vicinity of the Bloch points, which until now has been accessible only through micromagnetic simulations, and identify two possible magnetization configurations: a circulating magnetization structure and a twisted state that appears to correspond to an ‘anti-Bloch point’. Our imaging method enables the nanoscale study of topological magnetic structures in systems with sizes of the order of tens of micrometres. Knowledge of internal nanomagnetic textures is critical for understanding macroscopic magnetic properties and for designing bulk magnets for technological applications.

  9. Three-dimensional numerical simulation of natural convection under the influence of magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moessner, R.

    1996-04-01

    This report deals with the influence of strong magnetic fields on three-dimensional natural convection. First the dimensionless basic equations are derived in cartesian coordinates. This equations are solved numerically in rectangular domains with a Finite-Difference-Method. The following calculations investigate the flow in an electrically insulated cube which is heated and cooled at side walls. It is possible to perform systematic computations for the variation of the direction of the magnetic field and thermal boundary conditions. (orig.)

  10. Global Classical Solutions of Three Dimensional Viscous MHD System Without Magnetic Diffusion on Periodic Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ronghua; Zhou, Yi; Zhu, Yi

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we study the global existence of classical solutions to the three dimensional incompressible viscous magneto-hydrodynamical system without magnetic diffusion on periodic boxes, that is, with periodic boundary conditions. We work in Eulerian coordinates and employ a time-weighted energy estimate to prove the global existence result, under the assumptions that the initial magnetic field is close enough to an equilibrium state and the initial data have some symmetries.

  11. Self-diffusion in monodisperse three-dimensional magnetic fluids by molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobroserdova, A.B.; Kantorovich, S.S.

    2017-01-01

    In the present work we study the self-diffusion behaviour in the three-dimensional monodisperse magnetic fluids using the Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Density Functional Theory. The peculiarity of computer simulation is to study two different systems: dipolar and soft sphere ones. In the theoretical method, it is important to choose the approximation for the main structures, which are chains. We compare the theoretical results and the computer simulation data for the self-diffusion coefficient as a function of the particle volume fraction and magnetic dipole-dipole interaction parameter and find the qualitative and quantitative agreement to be good. - Highlights: • The paper deals with the study of the self-diffusion in monodisperse three-dimensional magnetic fluids. • The theoretical approach contains the free energy density functional minimization. • Computer simulations are performed by the molecular dynamics method. • We have a good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the theoretical results and computer simulation data.

  12. Self-diffusion in monodisperse three-dimensional magnetic fluids by molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobroserdova, A.B. [Ural Federal University, Lenin Av. 51, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kantorovich, S.S., E-mail: alla.dobroserdova@urfu.ru [Ural Federal University, Lenin Av. 51, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); University of Vienna, Sensengasse 8, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-06-01

    In the present work we study the self-diffusion behaviour in the three-dimensional monodisperse magnetic fluids using the Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Density Functional Theory. The peculiarity of computer simulation is to study two different systems: dipolar and soft sphere ones. In the theoretical method, it is important to choose the approximation for the main structures, which are chains. We compare the theoretical results and the computer simulation data for the self-diffusion coefficient as a function of the particle volume fraction and magnetic dipole-dipole interaction parameter and find the qualitative and quantitative agreement to be good. - Highlights: • The paper deals with the study of the self-diffusion in monodisperse three-dimensional magnetic fluids. • The theoretical approach contains the free energy density functional minimization. • Computer simulations are performed by the molecular dynamics method. • We have a good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the theoretical results and computer simulation data.

  13. Three-dimensional density and compressible magnetic structure in solar wind turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Owen W.; Narita, Yasuhito; Escoubet, C.-Philippe

    2018-03-01

    The three-dimensional structure of both compressible and incompressible components of turbulence is investigated at proton characteristic scales in the solar wind. Measurements of the three-dimensional structure are typically difficult, since the majority of measurements are performed by a single spacecraft. However, the Cluster mission consisting of four spacecraft in a tetrahedral formation allows for a fully three-dimensional investigation of turbulence. Incompressible turbulence is investigated by using the three vector components of the magnetic field. Meanwhile compressible turbulence is investigated by considering the magnitude of the magnetic field as a proxy for the compressible fluctuations and electron density data deduced from spacecraft potential. Application of the multi-point signal resonator technique to intervals of fast and slow wind shows that both compressible and incompressible turbulence are anisotropic with respect to the mean magnetic field direction P⟂ ≫ P∥ and are sensitive to the value of the plasma beta (β; ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure) and the wind type. Moreover, the incompressible fluctuations of the fast and slow solar wind are revealed to be different with enhancements along the background magnetic field direction present in the fast wind intervals. The differences in the fast and slow wind and the implications for the presence of different wave modes in the plasma are discussed.

  14. Magnetic properties of nano-scale hematite, α-Fe2O3, studied by time-of-flight inelastic neutron spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, Adrian H.; Jacobsen, Henrik Skåret; Stewart, J. Ross

    2014-01-01

    Samples of nanoscale hematite, α-Fe2O3, with different surface geometries and properties have been studied with inelastic time-of-flight neutron scattering. The 15 nm diameter nanoparticles previously shown to have two collective magnetic excitation modes in separate triple-axis neutron scatterin...

  15. A differential algebraic integration algorithm for symplectic mappings in systems with three-dimensional magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, P.; Lee, S.Y.; Yan, Y.T.

    2006-01-01

    A differential algebraic integration algorithm is developed for symplectic mapping through a three-dimensional (3-D) magnetic field. The self-consistent reference orbit in phase space is obtained by making a canonical transformation to eliminate the linear part of the Hamiltonian. Transfer maps from the entrance to the exit of any 3-D magnetic field are then obtained through slice-by-slice symplectic integration. The particle phase-space coordinates are advanced by using the integrable polynomial procedure. This algorithm is a powerful tool to attain nonlinear maps for insertion devices in synchrotron light source or complicated magnetic field in the interaction region in high energy colliders

  16. A Differential Algebraic Integration Algorithm for Symplectic Mappings in Systems with Three-Dimensional Magnetic Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, P

    2004-01-01

    A differential algebraic integration algorithm is developed for symplectic mapping through a three-dimensional (3-D) magnetic field. The self-consistent reference orbit in phase space is obtained by making a canonical transformation to eliminate the linear part of the Hamiltonian. Transfer maps from the entrance to the exit of any 3-D magnetic field are then obtained through slice-by-slice symplectic integration. The particle phase-space coordinates are advanced by using the integrable polynomial procedure. This algorithm is a powerful tool to attain nonlinear maps for insertion devices in synchrotron light source or complicated magnetic field in the interaction region in high energy colliders

  17. Magnetic field induced strong valley polarization in the three-dimensional topological semimetal LaBi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nitesh; Shekhar, Chandra; Klotz, J.; Wosnitza, J.; Felser, Claudia

    2017-10-01

    LaBi is a three-dimensional rocksalt-type material with a surprisingly quasi-two-dimensional electronic structure. It exhibits excellent electronic properties such as the existence of nontrivial Dirac cones, extremely large magnetoresistance, and high charge-carrier mobility. The cigar-shaped electron valleys make the charge transport highly anisotropic when the magnetic field is varied from one crystallographic axis to another. We show that the electrons can be polarized effectively in these electron valleys under a rotating magnetic field. We achieved a polarization of 60% at 2 K despite the coexistence of three-dimensional hole pockets. The valley polarization in LaBi is compared to the sister compound LaSb where it is found to be smaller. The performance of LaBi is comparable to the highly efficient bismuth.

  18. Three-dimensional reconstructed magnetic resonance scans: Accuracy in identifying and defining knee meniscal tears

    OpenAIRE

    Kruger, Neil; McNally, Eugene; Al-Ali, Sami; Rout, Raj; Rees, Jonathan L; Price, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine whether three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction from conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is able to accurately detect a meniscal tear, and define the configuration. METHODS Thirty-three patients? 3T MRI scan data were collected and sagittal uni-planar 3D reconstructions performed from the preoperative MRI. There were 24 meniscal tears in 24 patients, and nine controls. All patients had arthroscopic corroboration of MRI findings. Two independent observers prospectively...

  19. Three-dimensional integration technology of magnetic tunnel junctions for magnetoresistive random access memory application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushiji, Kay; Takagi, Hideki; Watanabe, Naoya; Fukushima, Akio; Kikuchi, Katsuya; Kurashima, Yuuichi; Sugihara, Atsushi; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yuasa, Shinji

    2017-06-01

    Three-dimensional integration processes (based on direct wafer bonding and back-surface silicon removal) for magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetization (p-MTJs) were developed. Perfect wafer bonding, namely, bonding without interfacial voids, and damageless silicon removal were successfully demonstrated by using very flat tantalum cap layers. Moreover, p-MTJ nanopillars subjected to these processes exhibited no degradation in magnetoresistance or spin-transfer-torque (STT) switching. Magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) technology incorporating these processes (direct wafer bonding and back-surface silicon removal) will make it possible to integrate epitaxial MTJs (with a single-crystal tunnel barrier) and ferromagnetic electrode layers (based on new materials).

  20. Three dimensional magnetic solutions in massive gravity with (non)linear field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendi, S. H.; Eslam Panah, B.; Panahiyan, S.; Momennia, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Noble Prize in physics 2016 motivates one to study different aspects of topological properties and topological defects as their related objects. Considering the significant role of the topological defects (especially magnetic strings) in cosmology, here, we will investigate three dimensional horizonless magnetic solutions in the presence of two generalizations: massive gravity and nonlinear electromagnetic field. The effects of these two generalizations on properties of the solutions and their geometrical structure are investigated. The differences between de Sitter and anti de Sitter solutions are highlighted and conditions regarding the existence of phase transition in geometrical structure of the solutions are studied.

  1. Impact of magnetic field in three-dimensional flow of Sisko nanofluid with convective condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayat, T. [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Nonlinear Analysis and Applied Mathematics (NAAM) Research Group, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Muhammad, Taseer, E-mail: taseer_qau@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Ahmad, B. [Nonlinear Analysis and Applied Mathematics (NAAM) Research Group, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Shehzad, S.A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan)

    2016-09-01

    This communication addresses the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) three dimensional flow of Sisko nanofluid bounded by a surface stretched bidirectionally. Nanofluid model includes the Brownian motion and thermophoresis. Heat transfer through convective condition is discussed. Developed condition with the zero nanoparticles mass flux at the surface is implemented. The governing problems subject to boundary layer approximations are computed for the convergent series solutions. Effects of interesting flow parameters on the temperature and nanoparticles concentration distributions are studied and discussed. Skin friction coefficients and the local Nusselt number are computed and analyzed. - Highlights: • Three-dimensional flow of Sisko nanofluid is modeled. • Uniform applied magnetic field is adopted. • Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects are accounted. • Heat transfer convective condition is utilized. • Recently constructed condition with zero nanoparticles mass flux is implemented.

  2. CONSTRAINING THREE-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETIC FIELD EXTRAPOLATIONS USING THE TWIN PERSPECTIVES OF STEREO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlon, Paul A.; Gallagher, Peter T.

    2010-01-01

    The three-dimensional magnetic topology of a solar active region (NOAA 10956) was reconstructed using a linear force-free field extrapolation constrained using the twin perspectives of STEREO. A set of coronal field configurations was initially generated from extrapolations of the photospheric magnetic field observed by the Michelson Doppler Imager on SOHO. Using an EUV intensity-based cost function, the extrapolated field lines that were most consistent with 171 A passband images from the Extreme UltraViolet Imager on STEREO were identified. This facilitated quantitative constraints to be placed on the twist (α) of the extrapolated field lines, where ∇ x B = αB. Using the constrained values of α, the evolution in time of twist, connectivity, and magnetic energy were then studied. A flux emergence event was found to result in significant changes in the magnetic topology and total magnetic energy of the region.

  3. Utility of time-resolved three-dimensional magnetic resonance digital subtraction angiography without contrast material for assessment of intracranial dural arterio-venous fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Masaaki; Aoki, Shigeki; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Shimoji, Keigo; Kamagata, Koji; Houshito, Haruyoshi; Kuwatsuru, Ryohei; Oishi, Hidenori; Arai, Hajime

    2011-01-01

    Background: Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) is an arteriovenous shunting disease of the dura. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is expected to be a safer alternative method in evaluation of DAVF, compared with invasive intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (IADSA). Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic use of time-spatial labeling inversion pulse (Time-SLIP) three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance digital subtraction angiography (MRDSA) without contrast material in six patients with DAVF. Material and Methods: Images for 3D time-of-flight MRA, which has been a valuable tool for the diagnosis of DAVF but provide little or less hemodynamic information, and Time-SLIP 3D MRDSA, were acquired for each patient. The presence, side, and grade of the disease were evaluated according to IADSA. Results: In all patients, the presence and side of the DAVF were correctly identified by both 3D time-of-flight MRA and Time-SLIP 3D MRDSA. Cortical reflux present in a patient with a grade 2b DAVF was not detected by Time-SLIP 3D MRDSA, when compared with IADSA findings. Conclusion: Time-SLIP 3D MRDSA provides hemodynamic information without contrast material and is a useful complementary tool for diagnosis of DAVF

  4. Three-dimensionality of field-induced magnetism in a high-temperature superconductor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lake, B.; Lefmann, K.; Christensen, N.B.

    2005-01-01

    Many physical properties of high-temperature superconductors are two-dimensional phenomena derived from their square-planar CuO(2) building blocks. This is especially true of the magnetism from the copper ions. As mobile charge carriers enter the CuO(2) layers, the antiferromagnetism of the parent...... insulators, where each copper spin is antiparallel to its nearest neighbours(1), evolves into a fluctuating state where the spins show tendencies towards magnetic order of a longer periodicity. For certain charge-carrier densities, quantum fluctuations are sufficiently suppressed to yield static long......-period order(2-6), and external magnetic fields also induce such order(7-12). Here we show that, in contrast to the chemically controlled order in superconducting samples, the field-induced order in these same samples is actually three-dimensional, implying significant magnetic linkage between the CuO(2...

  5. Computation of zero β three-dimensional equilibria with magnetic islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiman, A.H.; Greenside, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    A Picard iteration scheme has been implemented for the computation of toroidal, fully three-dimensional, zero β equilibria with islands and stochastic regions. Representation of the variables in appropriate coordinate systems has been found to be a key to making the scheme work well. In particular, different coordinate systems are used for solving magnetic differential equations and Ampere's law. The current profile is adjusted when islands and stochastic regions appear. An underrelaxation of the current profile modifications is generally needed for stable iteration of the algorithm. Some examples of equilibrium calculations are presented. 16 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  6. Integration of the three-dimensional Vlasov equation for a magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1976-04-01

    A second order splitting scheme is developed to integrate the three dimensional Vlasov equation for a plasma in a magnetic field. The integration of the Vlasov equation is divided into a series of intermediate steps and Fourier interpolation and the ASD method with a third order Taylor expansion are used to integrate the fractional equations. Numerical experiments related to cyclotron waves in 2 and 2 1 / 2 D are demonstrated with high accuracy and efficiency. The computer storage requirements are modest; for example, a typical 2D nonlinear electron plasma simulation requires only 4000 ''particles.''

  7. A magnetic particle time-of-flight (MagPTOF) diagnostic for measurements of shock- and compression-bang time at the NIF (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinderknecht, H G; Sio, H; Frenje, J A; Magoon, J; Agliata, A; Shoup, M; Ayers, S; Bailey, C G; Gatu Johnson, M; Zylstra, A B; Sinenian, N; Rosenberg, M J; Li, C K; Sèguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Rygg, J R; Kimbrough, J R; Mackinnon, A; Bell, P; Bionta, R; Clancy, T; Zacharias, R; House, A; Döppner, T; Park, H S; LePape, S; Landen, O; Meezan, N; Robey, H; Glebov, V U; Hohenberger, M; Stoeckl, C; Sangster, T C; Li, C; Parat, J; Olson, R; Kline, J; Kilkenny, J

    2014-11-01

    A magnetic particle time-of-flight (MagPTOF) diagnostic has been designed to measure shock- and compression-bang time using D(3)He-fusion protons and DD-fusion neutrons, respectively, at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This capability, in combination with shock-burn weighted areal density measurements, will significantly constrain the modeling of the implosion dynamics. This design is an upgrade to the existing particle time-of-flight (pTOF) diagnostic, which records bang times using DD or DT neutrons with an accuracy better than ±70 ps [H. G. Rinderknecht et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D902 (2012)]. The inclusion of a deflecting magnet will increase D(3)He-proton signal-to-background by a factor of 1000, allowing for the first time simultaneous measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D(3)He-filled surrogate implosions at the NIF.

  8. Estimating Three-Dimensional Orientation of Human Body Parts by Inertial/Magnetic Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Maria Sabatini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available User-worn sensing units composed of inertial and magnetic sensors are becoming increasingly popular in various domains, including biomedical engineering, robotics, virtual reality, where they can also be applied for real-time tracking of the orientation of human body parts in the three-dimensional (3D space. Although they are a promising choice as wearable sensors under many respects, the inertial and magnetic sensors currently in use offer measuring performance that are critical in order to achieve and maintain accurate 3D-orientation estimates, anytime and anywhere. This paper reviews the main sensor fusion and filtering techniques proposed for accurate inertial/magnetic orientation tracking of human body parts; it also gives useful recipes for their actual implementation.

  9. Estimating three-dimensional orientation of human body parts by inertial/magnetic sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Angelo Maria

    2011-01-01

    User-worn sensing units composed of inertial and magnetic sensors are becoming increasingly popular in various domains, including biomedical engineering, robotics, virtual reality, where they can also be applied for real-time tracking of the orientation of human body parts in the three-dimensional (3D) space. Although they are a promising choice as wearable sensors under many respects, the inertial and magnetic sensors currently in use offer measuring performance that are critical in order to achieve and maintain accurate 3D-orientation estimates, anytime and anywhere. This paper reviews the main sensor fusion and filtering techniques proposed for accurate inertial/magnetic orientation tracking of human body parts; it also gives useful recipes for their actual implementation.

  10. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, differential rotation, and three-dimensional, localized, magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoll, D.A.; Brackbill, J.U.

    2002-01-01

    Results are presented from a study of three-dimensional magnetic reconnection caused by a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and differential rotation. Specifically, subsonic and sub-Alfvenic flow is considered, which is Kelvin-Helmholtz stable in the direction of the magnetic field, but unstable perpendicular to the magnetic field. The flow is modeled by the resistive magnetohydrodynamics equations in three dimensions with constant resistivity. As a result of differential rotation (a gradient in vorticity parallel to the initial field), localized transient reconnection is observed on the Kelvin-Helmholtz time scale. Current amplification is observed along with the generation of parallel current. Results indicate that the observed transient reconnection rate is insensitive to resistivity (even with a constant resistivity model), but is sensitive to the initial flow shear

  11. Three-dimensional sensitivity mapping of a handheld magnetic probe for sentinel lymph node biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Kuwahata

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available An experimental apparatus for three-dimensional sensitivity mapping of a handheld magnetic probe with a permanent magnet and a Hall sensor was developed. To optimize the shapes and sizes of the magnets, the sensitivity mappings of two types of magnets, column- and cone-type magnets, were evaluated by the experimental apparatus. The longitudinal sensitivities of column and cone types are 8 and 9 mm, respectively, for 5 μL of magnetic nanoparticles. The measured longitudinal sensitivities agree well with the sensitivities calculated by the finite element method. Furthermore, the maximum lateral resolutions of column and cone types are 4.1 and 3.7 mm, respectively. In terms of the directionality, the sensitivities of column and cone types of the angle of 90° with respect to the probe axis fall approximately to 72% and 50% at 6 mm distance from the probe head, indicating that the cone type has high directionality due to its sharp shape. The measurement of sensitivity mapping revealed that the characteristics of the cone-type magnet are superior to that of the column-type magnet for the identification of sentinel lymph nodes.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the coronary arteries : clinical results from three dimensional evaluation of a respiratory gated technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geuns, R J; de Bruin, H G; Rensing, B J; Wielopolski, P A; Hulshoff, M D; van Ooijen, P M; Oudkerk, M; de Feyter, P J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance coronary angiography is challenging because of the motion of the vessels during cardiac contraction and respiration. Additional challenges are the small calibre of the arteries and their complex three dimensional course. Respiratory gating, turboflash acquisition, and

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the coronary arteries: clinical results from three dimensional evaluation of a respiratory gated technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.M. van Geuns (Robert Jan); H.G. de Bruin (Hein); B.J.W.M. Rensing (Benno); P.A. Wielopolski (Piotr); M.D. Hulshoff; P.M.A. van Ooijen (Peter); M. Oudkerk (Matthijs); P.J. de Feyter (Pim)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance coronary angiography is challenging because of the motion of the vessels during cardiac contraction and respiration. Additional challenges are the small calibre of the arteries and their complex three dimensional course. Respiratory

  14. THREE-DIMENSIONAL SIMULATIONS OF VERTICAL MAGNETIC FLUX IN THE IMMEDIATE VICINITY OF BLACK HOLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punsly, Brian; Igumenshchev, Igor V.; Hirose, Shigenobu

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on three-dimensional MHD simulations of non-rotating and rapidly rotating black holes and the adjacent black hole accretion disk magnetospheres. A particular emphasis is placed on the vertical magnetic flux that is advected inward from large radii and threads the equatorial plane near the event horizon. In both cases of non-rotating and rotating black holes, the existence of a significant vertical magnetic field in this region is like a switch that creates powerful jets. There are many similarities in the vertical flux dynamics in these two cases in spite of the tremendous enhancement of azimuthal twisting of the field lines and enhancement of the jet power because of an 'ergospheric disk' in the Kerr metric. A three-dimensional approach is essential because two-dimensional axisymmetric flows are incapable of revealing the nature of the vertical flux near a black hole. Poloidal field lines from the ergospheric accretion region have been visualized in three dimensions and much of the article is devoted to a formal classification of the different manifestations of the vertical flux in the Kerr case.

  15. Three-dimensional magnetic interactions in quasi-two-dimensional PdAs2O6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Z. Y.; Wu, Y.; Cao, H. B.; Zhou, H. D.; Yan, J.-Q.

    2017-06-01

    Millimeter-sized PdAs2O6 single crystals are grown using the vapor transport technique. The magnetic order at {{T}\\text{N}}=140 K is studied by measuring magnetic properties, specific heat, and neutron single crystal diffraction. The anisotropic magnetic susceptibility and a metamagnetic transition observed in magnetic fields above 20 kOe suggest that the magnetic moment lies in the ab plane, consistent with the magnetic structure determined by neutron single crystal diffraction. Below 140 K, Pd2+ ions order ferromagnetically in the ab plane but antiferromagnetically along the crystallographic c axis. The ordered moment is refined to be 2.09(2) {μ\\text{B}} /Pd2+ using the fitted magnetic form factor of Pd2+ . A weak λ-type anomaly around T N was observed in specific heat and the magnetic entropy change across T N is 1.72 J mol-1 K.This small entropy change and the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility support the presence of short range correlations in a wide temperature range {{T}\\text{N}} 250 K. The comparison with SrRu2O6 suggests that the magnetic interactions in PdAs2O6 are dominated by Pd-(O-\\text{As}\\text{As} -O)-Pd super-superexchange and three dimensional despite the quasi-two-dimensional arrangement of magnetic ions. The comparison with NiAs2O6 suggests that increasing covalency of isostructural compounds is an effective approach to design and to discover new materials with higher magnetic order temperatures in the localized regime.

  16. [Evaluation of three dimensional orthodontic force produced by magnet of fix appliance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xin; Hou, Zhi-ming; Yao, Ge; Wen, Jing-long

    2008-12-01

    To analyze the feature and magnitude of three dimensional orthodontic force produced by the magnet of fix appliance. Forces detected by universal fatigue test system included the attractive and repulsive,the inclined and rotated orthodontic forces of two magnets in different air gaps, and the integrated inclined and rotated orthodontic forces of two magnets and NiTi wire. The attractive and repulsive forces of two magnets were 4.68 to 0.45 N and 3.00 to 0.40 N respectively in the air gaps of 0 to 5 mm. The inclined orthodontic forces were 1.54 to 1.67 N, 0.63 to 0.69 N, 0.47 to 0.54 N when the magnets were vertically inclined 10 degrees to 40 degrees in the air gaps of 0, 1, 2mm. The rotated orthodontic forces were 0.97 to 1.32 N, 0.53 to 0.59 N, 0.39 to 0.48 N when the magnets were horizontally rotated 10 degrees to 40 degrees in the air gaps of 0, 1, 2mm. The integrated orthodontic force of two magnets and 0.014-inch NiTi wire was 0.32 to 0.5 N when the magnets was vertically inclined 10 degrees to 40 degrees in the air gap of 4 mm. The integrated orthodontic force of two magnets and 0.012-inch NiTi wire was 0.32 to 0.39 N when the magnets were horizontally rotated 10 degrees to 40 degrees in the air gap of 3 mm. Magnets made into orthodontic brackets to some extent could replace the mechanical orthodontic force produced by orthodontic wires and elastics.

  17. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS STUDY OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL FAST MAGNETIC RECONNECTION FOR INTERMITTENT SNAKE-LIKE DOWNFLOWS IN SOLAR FLARES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, T.; Kondo, K.; Ugai, M.; Shibata, K.

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional instability of the spontaneous fast magnetic reconnection is studied with magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation, where the two-dimensional model of the spontaneous fast magnetic reconnection is destabilized in three dimensions. In two-dimensional models, every plasma condition is assumed to be uniform in the sheet current direction. In that case, it is well known that the two-dimensional fast magnetic reconnection can be caused by current-driven anomalous resistivity, when an initial resistive disturbance is locally put in a one-dimensional current sheet. In this paper, it is studied whether the two-dimensional fast magnetic reconnection can be destabilized or not when the initial resistive disturbance is three dimensional, i.e., that which has weak fluctuations in the sheet current direction. According to our study, the two-dimensional fast magnetic reconnection is developed to the three-dimensional intermittent fast magnetic reconnection which is strongly localized in the sheet current direction. The resulting fast magnetic reconnection repeats to randomly eject three-dimensional magnetic loops which are very similar to the intermittent downflows observed in solar flares. In fact, in some observations of solar flares, the current sheet seems to be approximately one dimensional, but the fast magnetic reconnection is strongly localized in the sheet current direction, i.e., fully three dimensional. In addition, the observed plasma downflows as snake-like curves. It is shown that those observed features are consistent with our numerical MHD study.

  18. ALICE Time of Flight Module

    CERN Multimedia

    The Time-Of-Flight system of ALICE consists of 90 such modules, each containing 15 or 19 Multigap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) strips. This detector is used for identification of charged particles. It measures with high precision (50 ps) the time of flight of charged particles and therefore their velocity. The curvature of the particle trajectory inside the magnetic field gives the momentum, thus the particle mass is calculated and the particle is identified The MRPC is a stack of resistive glass plates, separated from each other by nylon fishing line. The mass production of the chambers (~1600, covering a surface of 150 m2) was done at INFN Bologna, while the first prototypes were bult at CERN.

  19. Three dimensional gel dosimetry by use of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Deene, Y.; De Wagter, C.; Van Duyse, B.; Achten, E.; De Neve, W. [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde; De Poorter, J. [Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Magnetic Resonance

    1995-12-01

    As co-monomers are found to polymerize by radiation, they are eligible for constructing a three dimensional dosimeter. Another kind of three dimensional dosimeter, based on the radiation sensitivity of the ferrous ions in a Fricke solution, was tested in a previous study. However, a major problem that occurs in this kind of gel dosimeters is the diffusion of the ferric and ferrous ions. The co-monomer gels are more stable. The degree of polymerisation is visualized with a clinical MRI system. Acrylamide and N,N-methylene-bis-acrylamide are dissolved in a gel composed of gelatin and water. By irradiation the co-monomers are polymerized to polyacrylamide. The gel is casted in humanoid forms. As such, a simulation of the irradiation of the patient can be performed. Magnetic resonance relaxivity images of the irradiated gel display the irradiation dose. The images of the gel are fused with the radiological images of the patient. Quantitation of the dose response of the co-monomer gel is obtained through calibration by test tubes.

  20. Effect of magnetic field on the wave dispersion relation in three-dimensional dusty plasma crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Xuefeng [School of Mathematical Sciences, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang Zhengxiong [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2012-07-15

    Three-dimensional plasma crystals under microgravity condition are investigated by taking into account an external magnetic field. The wave dispersion relations of dust lattice modes in the body centered cubic (bcc) and the face centered cubic (fcc) plasma crystals are obtained explicitly when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the wave motion. The wave dispersion relations of dust lattice modes in the bcc and fcc plasma crystals are calculated numerically when the magnetic field is in an arbitrary direction. The numerical results show that one longitudinal mode and two transverse modes are coupled due to the Lorentz force in the magnetic field. Moreover, three wave modes, i.e., the high frequency phonon mode, the low frequency phonon mode, and the optical mode, are obtained. The optical mode and at least one phonon mode are hybrid modes. When the magnetic field is neither parallel nor perpendicular to the primitive wave motion, all the three wave modes are hybrid modes and do not have any intersection points. It is also found that with increasing the magnetic field strength, the frequency of the optical mode increases and has a cutoff at the cyclotron frequency of the dust particles in the limit of long wavelength, and the mode mixings for both the optical mode and the high frequency phonon mode increase. The acoustic velocity of the low frequency phonon mode is zero. In addition, the acoustic velocity of the high frequency phonon mode depends on the angle of the magnetic field and the wave motion but does not depend on the magnetic field strength.

  1. Three-dimensional demonstration of pelvic veins by magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, C.S.; Duewell, S.; Krestin G.P.; Vesti, B.; Franzeck, U.K.; Bollinger, A.; Schulthess, G.K. von; Fuchs, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    The veins in the pelvis and lower limbs have been demonstrated by means of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in 11 normals and in 20 patients,using a 'time-of-flight' technique (TOF). Using normals, changes in the measurement parameters were used in order to optimise the examination protocol; consequently, the internal and external iliac veins and the superior and inferior gluteal veins could be identified in all cases and the internal pudendal veins in 6 out of 11 cases. This examination protocol was then used in patients with clinical suspicion of lower limb or pelvic vein thrombosis. Comparison of the MRA findings with those of phlebography (7 cases), duplex sonography (6 cases) and colour Doppler examinations (11 cases) showed that MRA was better for diagnosing thrombosis of the internal iliac veins (10 cases) than the other methods. In two patients thromboses of the common iliac veins and the inferior vena cava were demonstrated which were missed by colour Doppler examination. On the basis of our present experiences, MRA, using a two-dimensional TOF technique, appears to be a reliable non-invasive technique for demonstrating the veins of the pelvis and thigh. (orig.) [de

  2. Three-dimensional plasma simulation models and their application to magnetically confined plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, H.

    1977-03-01

    Three-dimensional plasma simulation models using particles have been described and applied to the various microscopic processes in a plasma in a magnetic field. The model makes use of the hybrid approach using eigenfunction expansion in one direction and multipole expansion on a two-dimensional spatial grid introduced in the cross section of a plasma. The models for cylindrical and toroidal systems correctly reproduce the expected fluctuation spectrum in thermal equilibrium. Application to the study of anomalous plasma diffusion due to collisionless drift instabilities in a cylindrical plasma is shown. Some considerations are given as to how to construct a quasi-neutral particle simulation model and particle-fluid hybrid plasma model which eliminate the high frequency oscillations associated with the electrons

  3. Three dimensional display of the brain surface from magnetic resonance images using a personal computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, Jin

    1991-01-01

    A new system for three dimensional display of brain surface from magnetic resonance images has been developed using a personal computer. The system consists of the personal computer with a co-processor for mathematical operation and frame memory for full color graphic display. MRI data were transferred to the computer with the floppy disks. Using the paint algorithm, extraction of brain tissue was performed semi-automatically with a manual operation. Brain surface data were displayed on a CRT by a voxel method from an arbitral direction. The result of clinical application of the system showed that the 3-dimentional display of brain surface was useful in comprehending abnormalities including atrophy and cystic lesions. In this paper, we introduce the new system and discuss clinical applicabilities. (author)

  4. A Factor Increasing Venous Contamination on Bolus Chase Three-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Charcot Neuroarthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çildağ, Mehmet B; Ertuğrul, Mustafa B; Köseoğlu, Ömer Fk; Armstrong, David G

    2018-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the ratio of venous contamination in diabetic cases without foot lesion, with foot lesion and with Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN). Bolus-chase three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) of 396 extremities of patients with diabetes mellitus was analyzed, retrospectively. Extremities were divided into three groups as follows: diabetic patients without foot ulcer or Charcot arthropathy (Group A), patients with diabetic foot ulcers (Group B) and patients with CN accompanying diabetic foot ulcers (Group C). Furthermore, amount of venous contamination classified as no venous contamination, mild venous contamination, and severe venous contamination. The relationship between venous contamination and extremity groups was investigated. Severe venous contamination was seen in Group A, Group B, and Group C, 5.6%, 15.2%, and 34.1%, respectively. Statistically significant difference was seen between groups with regard to venous contamination. Venous contamination following bolus chase MR was higher in patients with CN.

  5. Three-Dimensional Simulations of Electron Beams Focused by Periodic Permanent Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kory, Carol L.

    1999-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional (3D) model of an electron beam focused by a periodic permanent magnet (PPM) stack has been developed. First, the simulation code MAFIA was used to model a PPM stack using the magnetostatic solver. The exact geometry of the magnetic focusing structure was modeled; thus, no approximations were made regarding the off-axis fields. The fields from the static solver were loaded into the 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) solver of MAFIA where fully 3D behavior of the beam was simulated in the magnetic focusing field. The PIC solver computes the time-integration of electromagnetic fields simultaneously with the time integration of the equations of motion of charged particles that move under the influence of those fields. Fields caused by those moving charges are also taken into account; thus, effects like space charge and magnetic forces between particles are fully simulated. The electron beam is simulated by a number of macro-particles. These macro-particles represent a given charge Q amounting to that of several million electrons in order to conserve computational time and memory. Particle motion is unrestricted, so particle trajectories can cross paths and move in three dimensions under the influence of 3D electric and magnetic fields. Correspondingly, there is no limit on the initial current density distribution of the electron beam, nor its density distribution at any time during the simulation. Simulation results including beam current density, percent ripple and percent transmission will be presented, and the effects current, magnetic focusing strength and thermal velocities have on beam behavior will be demonstrated using 3D movies showing the evolution of beam characteristics in time and space. Unlike typical beam optics models, this 3D model allows simulation of asymmetric designs such as non- circularly symmetric electrostatic or magnetic focusing as well as the inclusion of input/output couplers.

  6. Three-dimensional stability of free convection vortices in the presence of a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, Dimitris; Pelekasis, Nikos, E-mail: pel@uth.gr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Thessaly, Pedion Areos, Volos 38334 (Greece)

    2012-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) stability of 2D vortical flow of a liquid metal in a cavity of square cross section is examined. Vortices are produced as a result of free convection and internal heating in the cavity in the presence of a magnetic field. Low-magnetic-Reynolds-number equations are used for the base flow and stability formulation. Finite element methodology is used to discretize the problem. Efficient calculation of the dominant eigenvalues is afforded by the Arnoldi method, while neutral stability diagrams are constructed using continuation techniques. The number of vortices exhibited by the base flow switches from one to two as the internal heating crosses a threshold value. The dominant instability mechanism is the Goertler instability in the case of a single vortex and elliptical instability in the case of two vortices. In elliptic instability, axial vorticity is symmetric, it is characterized by two lobed structures aligned with one of the two principal directions of strain and the dominant eigenmode assumes the form of a traveling wave. The magnetic field opposes buoyancy, alters the direction of maximal strain by accentuating wall shear layers in comparison with the vortex pair in the core and leads to smaller frequencies at criticality.

  7. Dual-spacecraft reconstruction of a three-dimensional magnetic flux rope at the Earth's magnetopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hasegawa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We present the first results of a data analysis method, developed by Sonnerup and Hasegawa (2011, for reconstructing three-dimensional (3-D, magnetohydrostatic structures from data taken as two closely spaced satellites traverse the structures. The method is applied to a magnetic flux transfer event (FTE, which was encountered on 27 June 2007 by at least three (TH-C, TH-D, and TH-E of the five THEMIS probes near the subsolar magnetopause. The FTE was sandwiched between two oppositely directed reconnection jets under a southward interplanetary magnetic field condition, consistent with its generation by multiple X-line reconnection. The recovered 3-D field indicates that a magnetic flux rope with a diameter of ~ 3000 km was embedded in the magnetopause. The FTE flux rope had a significant 3-D structure, because the 3-D field reconstructed from the data from TH-C and TH-D (separated by ~ 390 km better predicts magnetic field variations actually measured along the TH-E path than does the 2-D Grad–Shafranov reconstruction using the data from TH-C (which was closer to TH-E than TH-D and was at ~ 1250 km from TH-E. Such a 3-D nature suggests that the field lines reconnected at the two X-lines on both sides of the flux rope are entangled in a complicated way through their interaction with each other. The generation process of the observed 3-D flux rope is discussed on the basis of the reconstruction results and the pitch-angle distribution of electrons observed in and around the FTE.

  8. Three-dimensional magnetic field produced by an axisymmetric iron yoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laslett, L.J.; Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Brady, V.

    1991-06-01

    A computational procedure, in which separate analyses are performed for conductor and high permeability iron yoke, has been developed for calculating the three-dimensional magnetic field components. Whereas the field components of the isolated 3-D current array can be evaluated at all desired points through the use of a 3-D Biot-Savart law program, we have developed a method for calculating the supplemental field that will arise as a result of the presence of a surrounding high-permeability magnetic yoke with an axially-symmetric bore. We may speak of this supplemental field as an ''image field'' although we shall realize that is may be possible in general to attribute it only to a distinctly diffuse distribution of ''image current'' or magnetic moments. The boundary associated with the ''image field'' is such that at each point along the boundary of the high permeability iron the total scalar potential shall be constant, e.g. V i = -V d (where i=image and d=direct). When we describe both potentials as a series of ''harmonic components'' then the nature of the boundary condition is such that a de-coupling of one harmonic from another is preserved, and therefore it is also true that V i (n) = -V d (n) at the iron interface, where n is a harmonic number. When we solve the appropriate differential equations for these scalar potential functions throughout the iron-free region with the proper applied boundary condition for the scalar potential of each harmonic number, we achieve upon summation the appropriate field contribution of the surrounding high-permeability iron

  9. Automatic measurement of axial length of human eye using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Masaki; Kiryu, Tohru

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of axial length and the evaluation of three dimensional (3D) form of an eye are essential to evaluate the mechanism of myopia progression. We propose a method of automatic measurement of axial length including adjustment of the pulse sequence of short-term scan which could suppress influence of eyeblink, using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which acquires 3D images noninvasively. Acquiring T 2 -weighted images with 3.0 tesla MRI device and eight-channel phased-array head coil, we extracted left and right eye ball images, and then reconstructed 3D volume. The surface coordinates were calculated from 3D volume, fitting the ellipsoid model coordinates with the surface coordinates, and measured the axial length automatically. Measuring twenty one subjects, we compared the automatically measured values of axial length with the manually measured ones, then confirmed significant elongation in the axial length of myopia compared with that of emmetropia. Furthermore, there were no significant differences (P<0.05) between the means of automatic measurements and the manual ones. Accordingly, the automatic measurement process of axial length could be a tool for the elucidation of the mechanism of myopia progression, which would be suitable for evaluating the axial length easily and noninvasively. (author)

  10. Three-dimensional dynamic magnetic resonance angiography for the evaluation of radiosurgically treated cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauvrit, Jean-Yves; Oppenheim, Catherine; Naggara, Olivier; Trystram, Denis; Fredy, Daniel; Meder, Jean-Francois; Nataf, Francois; Roux, Francois-Xavier; Munier, Thierry; Pruvo, Jean-Pierre; Leclerc, Xavier

    2006-01-01

    We assessed the value of three-dimensional (3D) dynamic magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for the follow-up of patients with radiosurgically treated cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Fifty-four patients with cerebral AVMs treated by radiosurgery (RS) were monitored using conventional catheter angiography (CCA) and 3D dynamic MRA with sensitivity encoding based on the parallel imaging. Cerebral AVM was qualitatively classified by two radiologists into one of five categories in terms of residual nidus size and persistence of early draining vein (I, >6 cm; II, 3-6 cm; III, <3 cm; IV, isolated early draining vein; V, complete obliteration). 3D MRA findings showed a good agreement with CCA in 40 cases (κ=0.62). Of 23 nidus detected on CCA, 3D dynamic MRA showed 14 residual nidus. Of 28 occluded nidus on 3D dynamic MRA, 22 nidus were occluded on CCA. The sensitivity and specificity of 3D dynamic MRA for the detection of residual AVM were 81% and 100%. 3D dynamic MRA after RS may therefore be useful in association with MRI and can be repeated as long as opacification of the nidus or early venous drainage persists, one CCA remaining indispensable to affirm the complete occlusion at the end of follow-up. (orig.)

  11. Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Monitor Prostate Response to Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Anna Lia; Gui, Benedetta; D’Agostino, Giuseppe Roberto; Mattiucci, Giancarlo; Clementi, Valeria; Di Molfetta, Ippolita Valentina; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Mantini, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate results of three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and time since external beam irradiation (EBRT) in patients treated with long-term hormone therapy (HT) and EBRT for locally advanced disease to verify successful treatment by documenting the achievement of metabolic atrophy (MA). Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2008, 109 patients were consecutively enrolled. MA was assessed by choline and citrate peak area-to-noise-ratio 1.5:1 or choline signal-to-noise-ratio >5:1. To test the strength of association between MRSI results and the time elapsed since EBRT (TEFRT), PSA levels, Gleason score (GS), and stage, logistic regression (LR) was performed. p value 2 years. MA was detected in 54.1% of patients of group 1, 88.9% of group 2, and in 94.5% of group 3 (100% when PSA nadir was reached). CM was detected in 50% of patients with reached PSA nadir in group 1. Local relapse was found in 3 patients previously showing CM at long TEFRT. Conclusion: MA detection, indicative of successful treatment because growth of normal or abnormal cells cannot occur without metabolism, increases with decreasing PSA levels and increasing time on HT after EBRT. This supports long-term HT in advanced prostate cancer. Larger study series are needed to assess whether MRSI could predict local relapse by detecting CM at long TEFRT.

  12. Three-dimensional numerical modelling of a magnetically deflected dc transferred arc in argon

    CERN Document Server

    Blais, A; Boulos, M I

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a numerical model for the deflection of dc transferred arcs using an external magnetic field as a first step into the modelling of industrial arc furnaces. The arc is deflected by the use of a conductor aligned parallel to the arc axis through which flows an electric current. The model is validated by comparing the results of axisymmetric calculations to modelling results from the scientific literature. The present model is found to be a good representation of the electric dc arc as differences with the literature are easily explained by model parameters such as the critical boundary conditions at the electrodes. Transferred arc cases exhibit the expected behaviour as the temperature T, the velocity v-vector and the electrical potential drop DELTA phi all increase with the arc current I and the argon flow rate Q. Three-dimensional geometry is implemented, enabling one to numerically deflect the arc. For the deflected arc cases, the deflection increases with the arc current I...

  13. Three dimensional dosimetry of radiation sensitive gels using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldock, C.; Murry, P.; Kron, T.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: It is generally believed that clinical radiation therapy treatment can be optimised by obtaining a closer conformation of the administered radiation dose distribution to the tumour volume. This is difficult with traditional radiation therapy techniques since they do not produce dose distributions which adequately cover tumour volumes of complex shapes and sizes while sparing normal healthy tissue. The situation is further complicated if the normal tissues are critical organs or are particularly sensitive to radiation. Radiation therapy techniques employed to obtain a closer conformation of the dose distribution to the tumour volume are referred to as conformal radiotherapy techniques. Since tumours being treated extend throughout some volume, conformal therapy is inherently three-dimensional (3-D) in nature. In conformal radiation therapy it is necessary to be able to accurately measure 3-D radiation dose distributions to verify that the administered dose is the same as that prescribed by the radiation oncologist. Conventional dosimetry techniques such as ion chambers, thermoluminescent dosimeters, radiographic and radiochromic film are not suitable for verification of such 3-D dose distributions. Work has been undertaken to investigate clinical applications of ferrous sulphate or Fricke gel systems in 3-D radiotherapy dosimetry using both magnetic resonance and optical imaging as the techniques of measurement (Harris 1996). This form of dosimeter is very limited in its application due to diffusion of the resultant radiation dose distribution in the gel over the period of time from irradiation to measurement. Newly developed polyacrylamide gels (PAG) do not exhibit similar diffusion problems and are therefore more suitable for radiation dosimetry applications (Baldock 1998). This work demonstrates the application in radiation dosimetry of PAG using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

  14. High resolution three-dimensional magnetization mapping in Tokachidake Volcano using low altitude airborne magnetic survey data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, M.; Mogi, T.; Okuma, S.; Nakatsuka, T.

    2016-12-01

    Tokachidake Volcano, central Hokkaido, Japan erupted in 1926, 1962 and 1988-1989 in the 20th century from the central part. In recent years, expansions of the edifice of the volcano at shallow depth and increases of the volcanic smoke in the Taisho crater were observed (Meteorological Agency of Japan, 2014). Magnetic changes were observed at the 62-2 crater by repeated magnetic measurements in 2008-2009, implying a demagnetization beneath the crater (Hashimoto at al., 2010). Moreover, a very low resistivity part was found right under the 62-2 crater from an AMT survey (Yamaya et al., 2010). However, since the station numbers of the survey are limited, the area coverage is not sufficient. In this study, we have re-analyzed high-resolution aeromagnetic data to delineate the three-dimensional magnetic structure of the volcano to understand the nature of other craters.A low altitude airborne magnetic survey was conducted in 2014 mainly over the active areas of the volcano by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism to manage land slide risk in the volcano. The survey was flown at an altitude of 60 m above ground by a helicopter with a Cesium magnetometer in the towed-bird 30m below the helicopter. The low altitude survey enables us to delineate the detailed magnetic structure. We calculated magnetic anomaly distribution on a smooth surface assuming equivalent anomalies below the observation surface. Then the 3D magnetic imaging method (Nakatsuka and Okuma, 2014) was applied to the magnetic anomalies to reveal the three-dimensional magnetic structure.As a result, magnetization highs were seen beneath the Ground crater, Suribachi crater and Kitamuki crater. This implies that magmatic activity occurred in the past at these craters. These magma should have already solidified and acquired strong remanent magnetization. Relative magnetization lows were seen beneath the 62-2 crater and the Taisho crater where fumarolic activity is active. However a

  15. Neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copley, J.R.D.; Udovic, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    The time-of-flight technique is employed in two of the instruments at the NIST Cold Neutron Research Facility (CNRF). A pulsed monochromatic beam strikes the sample, and the energies of scattered neutrons are determined from their times-of-flight to an array of detectors. The time-of-flight method may be used in a variety of types of experiments such as studies of vibrational and magnetic excitations, tunneling spectroscopy, and quasielastic scattering studies of diffusional behavior; several examples of experiments are discussed. The authors also present brief descriptions of the CNRF time-of-flight instruments, including their modi operandi and some of their more pertinent parameters and performance characteristics

  16. Magnetic Flux Distribution of Linear Machines with Novel Three-Dimensional Hybrid Magnet Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Yao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to propose a novel tubular linear machine with hybrid permanent magnet arrays and multiple movers, which could be employed for either actuation or sensing technology. The hybrid magnet array produces flux distribution on both sides of windings, and thus helps to increase the signal strength in the windings. The multiple movers are important for airspace technology, because they can improve the system’s redundancy and reliability. The proposed design concept is presented, and the governing equations are obtained based on source free property and Maxwell equations. The magnetic field distribution in the linear machine is thus analytically formulated by using Bessel functions and harmonic expansion of magnetization vector. Numerical simulation is then conducted to validate the analytical solutions of the magnetic flux field. It is proved that the analytical model agrees with the numerical results well. Therefore, it can be utilized for the formulation of signal or force output subsequently, depending on its particular implementation.

  17. Magnetically guided left ventricular lead implantation based on a virtual three-dimensional reconstructed image of the coronary sinus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Rivero-Ayerza (Maximo); E. Jessurun; S. Ramcharitar (Steve); Y. van Belle (Yves); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); L.J.L.M. Jordaens (Luc)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAims: Left ventricular (LV) lead implantation is feasible using remote magnetic navigation of a guidewire (Stereotaxis, St Louis, MO, USA). A novel software that performs a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of vessels based on two or more angiographic views has been developed

  18. Characterization of a chip-based bioreactor for three-dimensional cell cultivation via magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gottwald, E.; Kleintschek, T.; Giselbrecht, S.; Truckenmüller, R.K.; Altmann, B; Worgull, M.; Döpfert, J.; Schad, L.; Heilmann, M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the characterization of a chip-based platform (3D-KITChip) for the three-dimensional cultivation of cells under perfusion conditions via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Besides the chip, the microfluidic system is comprised of a bioreactor housing, a medium supply, a pump for

  19. A Three-dimensional Simulation of a Magnetized Accretion Disk: Fast Funnel Accretion onto a Weakly Magnetized Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasao, Shinsuke; Tomida, Kengo; Iwasaki, Kazunari; Suzuki, Takeru K.

    2018-04-01

    We present the results of a global, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulation of an accretion disk with a rotating, weakly magnetized central star. The disk is threaded by a weak, large-scale poloidal magnetic field, and the central star has no strong stellar magnetosphere initially. Our simulation investigates the structure of the accretion flows from a turbulent accretion disk onto the star. The simulation reveals that fast accretion onto the star at high latitudes occurs even without a stellar magnetosphere. We find that the failed disk wind becomes the fast, high-latitude accretion as a result of angular momentum exchange mediated by magnetic fields well above the disk, where the Lorentz force that decelerates the rotational motion of gas can be comparable to the centrifugal force. Unlike the classical magnetospheric accretion scenario, fast accretion streams are not guided by magnetic fields of the stellar magnetosphere. Nevertheless, the accretion velocity reaches the free-fall velocity at the stellar surface due to the efficient angular momentum loss at a distant place from the star. This study provides a possible explanation why Herbig Ae/Be stars whose magnetic fields are generally not strong enough to form magnetospheres also show indications of fast accretion. A magnetically driven jet is not formed from the disk in our model. The differential rotation cannot generate sufficiently strong magnetic fields for the jet acceleration because the Parker instability interrupts the field amplification.

  20. Transluminal color-coded three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography for visualization of signal Intensity distribution pattern within an unruptured cerebral aneurysm: preliminarily assessment with anterior communicating artery aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, T.; Ekino, C.; Ohsako, C.

    2004-01-01

    The natural history of unruptured cerebral aneurysm is not known; also unknown is the potential growth and rupture in any individual aneurysm. The authors have developed transluminal color-coded three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) obtained by a time-of-flight sequence to investigate the interaction between the intra-aneurysmal signal intensity distribution patterns and configuration of unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Transluminal color-coded images were reconstructed from volume data of source magnetic resonance angiography by using a parallel volume-rendering algorithm with transluminal imaging technique. By selecting a numerical threshold range from a signal intensity opacity chart of the three-dimensional volume-rendering dataset several areas of signal intensity were depicted, assigned different colors, and visualized transparently through the walls of parent arteries and an aneurysm. Patterns of signal intensity distribution were analyzed with three operated cases of an unruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm and compared with the actual configurations observed at microneurosurgery. A little difference in marginal features of an aneurysm was observed; however, transluminal color-coded images visualized the complex signal intensity distribution within an aneurysm in conjunction with aneurysmal geometry. Transluminal color-coded three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography can thus provide numerical analysis of the interaction between spatial signal intensity distribution patterns and aneurysmal configurations and may offer an alternative and practical method to investigate the patient-specific natural history of individual unruptured cerebral aneurysms. (orig.)

  1. Fluid-structure interaction of three-dimensional magnetic artificial cilia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaderi, S. N.; Onck, P. R.

    2012-01-01

    A numerical model is developed to analyse the interaction of artificial cilia with the surrounding fluid in a three-dimensional setting in the limit of vanishing fluid inertia forces. The cilia are modelled using finite shell elements and the fluid is modelled using a boundary element approach. The

  2. Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Monitor Prostate Response to Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, Anna Lia, E-mail: alvalentini@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); Gui, Benedetta [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); D' Agostino, Giuseppe Roberto; Mattiucci, Giancarlo [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiotherapy, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); Clementi, Valeria [Clinical Science Development Group, GE Healthcare, Milan (Italy); Di Molfetta, Ippolita Valentina [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); Bonomo, Pierluigi [OU Clinic Radiobiology, I.F.C.A. Florence (Italy); Mantini, Giovanna [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiotherapy, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To correlate results of three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and time since external beam irradiation (EBRT) in patients treated with long-term hormone therapy (HT) and EBRT for locally advanced disease to verify successful treatment by documenting the achievement of metabolic atrophy (MA). Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2008, 109 patients were consecutively enrolled. MA was assessed by choline and citrate peak area-to-noise-ratio <5:1. Cancerous metabolism (CM) was defined by choline-to-creatine ratio >1.5:1 or choline signal-to-noise-ratio >5:1. To test the strength of association between MRSI results and the time elapsed since EBRT (TEFRT), PSA levels, Gleason score (GS), and stage, logistic regression (LR) was performed. p value <0.05 was statistically significant. The patients' outcomes were verified in 2011. Results: MRSI documented MA in 84 of 109 and CM in 25 of 109 cases. LR showed that age, GS, stage, and initial and recent PSA had no significant impact on MRSI results which were significantly related to PSA values at the time of MRSI and to TEFRT. Patients were divided into three groups according to TEFRT: <1 year, 1-2 years, and >2 years. MA was detected in 54.1% of patients of group 1, 88.9% of group 2, and in 94.5% of group 3 (100% when PSA nadir was reached). CM was detected in 50% of patients with reached PSA nadir in group 1. Local relapse was found in 3 patients previously showing CM at long TEFRT. Conclusion: MA detection, indicative of successful treatment because growth of normal or abnormal cells cannot occur without metabolism, increases with decreasing PSA levels and increasing time on HT after EBRT. This supports long-term HT in advanced prostate cancer. Larger study series are needed to assess whether MRSI could predict local relapse by detecting CM at long TEFRT.

  3. Magnetic field effect in three-dimensional flow of an Oldroyd-B nanofluid over a radiative surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shehzad, S.A., E-mail: ali_qau70@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Abdullah, Z. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Abbasi, F.M. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Hayat, T. [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-I-Azam University 45320, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Nonlinear Analysis and Applied Mathematics (NAAM) Research Group, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P. O. Box 80257, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Alsaedi, A. [Nonlinear Analysis and Applied Mathematics (NAAM) Research Group, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P. O. Box 80257, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-02-01

    This article investigates the convective heat and mass conditions in three-dimensional flow of an Oldroyd-B nanofluid. The stretched flow is electrically conducting in the presence of an applied magnetic field. Thermal radiation effects are accounted in the energy equation. The governing nonlinear problems are computed for the convergent approximate solutions. Influences of different parameters on the dimensionless temperature and nanoparticle concentration fields are shown and examined. Quantities of physical interest namely local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are computed and analyzed numerically. Comparison in a limiting case is made with the previous published result and an excellent agreement is noted. - Highlights: • Impact of magnetic field in three-dimensional flow is investigated. • Thermal radiation effects are accounted in the energy equation. • Convective type conditions of temperature and concentration are imposed. • The governing nonlinear problems are computed for the convergent approximate solutions. • Influences of different parameters are shown and examined.

  4. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging overlay to assist with percutaneous transhepatic access at the time of cardiac catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Whiteside

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodality image overlay is increasingly used for complex interventional procedures in the cardiac catheterization lab. We report a case in which three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D MRI overlay onto live fluoroscopic imaging was utilized to safely obtain transhepatic access in a 12-year-old patient with prune belly syndrome, complex and distorted abdominal anatomy, and a vascular mass within the liver.

  5. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging overlay to assist with percutaneous transhepatic access at the time of cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whiteside, Wendy; Christensen, Jason; Zampi, Jeffrey D

    2005-01-01

    Multimodality image overlay is increasingly used for complex interventional procedures in the cardiac catheterization lab. We report a case in which three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D MRI) overlay onto live fluoroscopic imaging was utilized to safely obtain transhepatic access in a 12-year-old patient with prune belly syndrome, complex and distorted abdominal anatomy, and a vascular mass within the liver

  6. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging overlay to assist with percutaneous transhepatic access at the time of cardiac catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Wendy; Christensen, Jason; Zampi, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    Multimodality image overlay is increasingly used for complex interventional procedures in the cardiac catheterization lab. We report a case in which three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D MRI) overlay onto live fluoroscopic imaging was utilized to safely obtain transhepatic access in a 12-year-old patient with prune belly syndrome, complex and distorted abdominal anatomy, and a vascular mass within the liver.

  7. Thermally radiative three-dimensional flow of Jeffrey nanofluid with internal heat generation and magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shehzad, S.A., E-mail: ali_qau70@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Abdullah, Z. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Alsaedi, A. [Nonlinear Analysis and Applied Mathematics (NAAM) Research Group, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P. O. Box 80257, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Abbasi, F.M. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Hayat, T. [Nonlinear Analysis and Applied Mathematics (NAAM) Research Group, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P. O. Box 80257, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Mathematics, Quaid-I-Azam University 45320, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2016-01-01

    This research work addresses the three-dimensional hydromagnetic flow of Jeffrey fluid with nanoparticles. Flow is generated by a bidirectional stretching surface. The effects of thermal radiation and internal heat generation are encountered in energy expressions. More realistic convective boundary conditions at the surface are employed instead of constant surface temperature and mass species conditions. Boundary layer assumptions lead to the governing non-linear mathematical model. Resulting equations through momentum, energy and mass species are made dimensionless using suitable variables. The solution expressions of dimensionless velocities, temperature and nanoparticle concentration have been computed for the convergent series solutions. The impacts of interesting parameters on the dimensionless quantities are displayed and interpreted. The values of physical quantities are computed and analyzed. - Highlights: • Three-dimensional hydromagnetic flow of Jeffrey nanofluid is considered. • Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects are encountered. • Heat transfer analysis is performed with thermal radiation. • Results are plotted and visualized.

  8. Three-dimensional visualization of magnetic domain structure with strong uniaxial anisotropy via scanning hard X-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Motohiro; Kim, Kab-Jin; Kim, Sanghoon; Yoshikawa, Hiroki; Tono, Takayuki; Yamada, Kihiro T.; Taniguchi, Takuya; Mizuno, Hayato; Oda, Kent; Ishibashi, Mio; Hirata, Yuushou; Li, Tian; Tsukamoto, Arata; Chiba, Daichi; Ono, Teruo

    2018-03-01

    An X-ray tomographic technique was developed to investigate the internal magnetic domain structure in a micrometer-sized ferromagnetic sample. The technique is based on a scanning hard X-ray nanoprobe using X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). From transmission XMCD images at the Gd L3 edge as a function of the sample rotation angle, the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of a single component of the magnetic vector in a GdFeCo microdisc was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of 360 nm, using a modified algebraic reconstruction algorithm. The method is applicable to practical magnetic materials and can be extended to 3D visualization of the magnetic domain formation process under external magnetic fields.

  9. Tensor of effective susceptibility in random magnetic composites: Application to two-dimensional and three-dimensional cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posnansky, Oleg P.

    2018-05-01

    The measuring of dynamic magnetic susceptibility by nuclear magnetic resonance is used for revealing information about the internal structure of various magnetoactive composites. The response of such material on the applied external static and time-varying magnetic fields encodes intrinsic dynamic correlations and depends on links between macroscopic effective susceptibility and structure on the microscopic scale. In the current work we carried out computational analysis of the frequency dependent dynamic magnetic susceptibility and demonstrated its dependence on the microscopic architectural elements while also considering Euclidean dimensionality. The proposed numerical method is efficient in the simulation of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments in two- and three-dimensional random magnetic media by choosing and modeling the influence of the concentration of components and internal hierarchical characteristics of physical parameters.

  10. The Effect of Magnetic Field on Positron Range and Spatial Resolution in an Integrated Whole-Body Time-Of-Flight PET/MRI System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Ying; Savic, Dragana; Yang, Jaewon; Shrestha, Uttam; Seo, Youngho

    2014-11-01

    Simultaneous imaging systems combining positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been actively investigated. A PET/MR imaging system (GE Healthcare) comprised of a time-of-flight (TOF) PET system utilizing silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) and 3-tesla (3T) MRI was recently installed at our institution. The small-ring (60 cm diameter) TOF PET subsystem of this PET/MRI system can generate images with higher spatial resolution compared with conventional PET systems. We have examined theoretically and experimentally the effect of uniform magnetic fields on the spatial resolution for high-energy positron emitters. Positron emitters including 18 F, 124 I, and 68 Ga were simulated in water using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit in the presence of a uniform magnetic field (0, 3, and 7 Tesla). The positron annihilation position was tracked to determine the 3D spatial distribution of the 511-keV gammy ray emission. The full-width at tenth maximum (FWTM) of the positron point spread function (PSF) was determined. Experimentally, 18 F and 68 Ga line source phantoms in air and water were imaged with an investigational PET/MRI system and a PET/CT system to investigate the effect of magnetic field on the spatial resolution of PET. The full-width half maximum (FWHM) of the line spread function (LSF) from the line source was determined as the system spatial resolution. Simulations and experimental results show that the in-plane spatial resolution was slightly improved at field strength as low as 3 Tesla, especially when resolving signal from high-energy positron emitters in the air-tissue boundary.

  11. Three-dimensional magnetization process in HoFe.sub.11./sub.Ti

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janssen, Y.; Klaasse, J. C. P.; Brück, E.; De Boer, F. R.; Buschow, K. H. J.; Kamarád, Jiří; Kudrevatykh, N. V.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 319, - (2002), s. 59-72 ISSN 0921-4526 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : HoFe 11 Ti * magnetic anisotropy * magnetization processes * magnetization rotation * rare- earth -transition-metal compounds Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.609, year: 2002

  12. Biomimetic three-dimensional nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and magnetically synthesized single-walled carbon nanotube chitosan nanocomposite for bone regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Owen; Li, Jian; Wang, Mian; Zhang, Lijie Grace; Keidar, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Many shortcomings exist in the traditional methods of treating bone defects, such as donor tissue shortages for autografts and disease transmission for allografts. The objective of this study was to design a novel three-dimensional nanostructured bone substitute based on magnetically synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), biomimetic hydrothermally treated nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite, and a biocompatible hydrogel (chitosan). Both nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and SWCNT have a biomimetic nanostructure, excellent osteoconductivity, and high potential to improve the load-bearing capacity of hydrogels. Methods Specifically, three-dimensional porous chitosan scaffolds with different concentrations of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and SWCNT were created to support the growth of human osteoblasts (bone-forming cells) using a lyophilization procedure. Two types of SWCNT were synthesized in an arc discharge with a magnetic field (B-SWCNT) and without a magnetic field (N-SWCNT) for improving bone regeneration. Results Nanocomposites containing magnetically synthesized B-SWCNT had superior cytocompatibility properties when compared with nonmagnetically synthesized N-SWCNT. B-SWCNT have much smaller diameters and are twice as long as their nonmagnetically prepared counterparts, indicating that the dimensions of carbon nanotubes can have a substantial effect on osteoblast attachment. Conclusion This study demonstrated that a chitosan nanocomposite with both B-SWCNT and 20% nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite could achieve a higher osteoblast density when compared with the other experimental groups, thus making this nanocomposite promising for further exploration for bone regeneration. PMID:22619545

  13. Magnetic-based minimum input motion control of paramagnetic microparticles in three-dimensional space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, I.S.M.; Metz, R.M.P.; Reefman, B.A.; Misra, Sarthak

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic drug carriers such as microrobots and paramagnetic microparticles have the potential to increase the therapeutic indices by selectively targeting the diseased tissue. These magnetic microobjects can be controlled using magnetic-based manipulation systems. In this study, we analyze a minimum

  14. Transition between quasi-two-dimensional and three-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a horizontal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Tobias; Ishimi, Wataru; Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Tasaka, Yuji; Sakuraba, Ataru; Eckert, Sven

    2018-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Bénard convection was studied experimentally and numerically using a liquid metal inside a box with a square horizontal cross section and an aspect ratio of 5. Applying a sufficiently strong horizontal magnetic field converts the convective motion into a flow pattern of quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D) rolls arranged parallel to the magnetic field. The aim of this paper is to provide a detailed description of the flow field, which is often considered as quasi-2D. In this paper, we focus on the transition from a quasi-two-dimensional state toward a three-dimensional flow occurring with decreasing magnetic-field strength. We present systematic flow measurements that were performed by means of ultrasound Doppler velocimetry. The measured data provide insight into the dynamics of the primary convection rolls, the secondary flow induced by Ekman pumping, and they reveal the existence of small vortices that develop around the convection rolls. New flow regimes have been identified by the velocity measurements, which show a pronounced manifestation of three-dimensional flow structures as the ratio Ra /Q increases. The interaction between the primary swirling motion of the convection rolls and the secondary flow becomes increasingly strong. Significant bulging of the convection rolls causes a breakdown of the original recirculation loop driven by Ekman pumping into several smaller cells. The flow measurements are completed by direct numerical simulations. The numerical simulations have proven to be able to qualitatively reproduce the newly discovered flow regimes in the experiment.

  15. A Three-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of the Formation of Solar Chromospheric Jets with Twisted Magnetic Field Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima, H. [Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University, Furocho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-0814 Japan (Japan); Yokoyama, T., E-mail: h.iijima@isee.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2017-10-10

    This paper presents a three-dimensional simulation of chromospheric jets with twisted magnetic field lines. Detailed treatments of the photospheric radiative transfer and the equations of state allow us to model realistic thermal convection near the solar surface, which excites various MHD waves and produces chromospheric jets in the simulation. A tall chromospheric jet with a maximum height of 10–11 Mm and lifetime of 8–10 minutes is formed above a strong magnetic field concentration. The magnetic field lines are strongly entangled in the chromosphere, which helps the chromospheric jet to be driven by the Lorentz force. The jet exhibits oscillatory motion as a natural consequence of its generation mechanism. We also find that the produced chromospheric jet forms a cluster with a diameter of several Mm with finer strands. These results imply a close relationship between the simulated jet and solar spicules.

  16. Magnetic field generation by pointwise zero-helicity three-dimensional steady flow of an incompressible electrically conducting fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasskazov, Andrey; Chertovskih, Roman; Zheligovsky, Vladislav

    2018-04-01

    We introduce six families of three-dimensional space-periodic steady solenoidal flows, whose kinetic helicity density is zero at any point. Four families are analytically defined. Flows in four families have zero helicity spectrum. Sample flows from five families are used to demonstrate numerically that neither zero kinetic helicity density nor zero helicity spectrum prohibit generation of large-scale magnetic field by the two most prominent dynamo mechanisms: the magnetic α -effect and negative eddy diffusivity. Our computations also attest that such flows often generate small-scale field for sufficiently small magnetic molecular diffusivity. These findings indicate that kinetic helicity and helicity spectrum are not the quantities controlling the dynamo properties of a flow regardless of whether scale separation is present or not.

  17. Hong-Ou-Mandel interference mediated by the magnetic plasmon waves in a three-dimensional optical metamaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S M; Mu, S Y; Zhu, C; Gong, Y X; Xu, P; Liu, H; Li, T; Zhu, S N; Zhang, X

    2012-02-27

    We studied the quantum properties of magnetic plasmon waves in a three-dimensional coupled metamaterial. A Hong-Ou-Mandel dip of two-photon interference with a visibility of 86 ± 6.0% was explicitly observed, when the sample was inserted into one of the two arms of the interferometer. This meant that the quantum interference property survived in such a magnetic plasmon wave-mediated transmission process, thus testifying the magnetic plasmon waves owned a quantum nature. A full quantum model was utilized to describe our experimental results. The results showed that the metamaterials could not only steer the classical light but also the non-classical light and they might have potential application in the future quantum information.

  18. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of a plasma jet/cloud streaming across a transverse magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitcu, Gabriel; Echim, Marius

    2014-05-01

    The dynamics of collisionless plasma jets/clouds in magnetic field configurations typical for the terrestrial magnetotail and frontside magnetosheath is a topic of interest for understanding the physics of the magnetosphere and its interaction with the solar wind. The presence of high-speed jets in the frontside magnetosheath has been recently proved experimentally by Cluster and THEMIS spacecrafts. There is increasing evidence that the bursty bulk flows in the magnetotail have jet-like features. In the present paper we use fully electromagnetic 3D explicit particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to investigate the interaction of a localized three-dimensional plasma element/jet/cloud with a transverse magnetic field. We consider a plasma jet/cloud that moves in vacuum and perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field. Ampère and Faraday's laws are used to compute the self-consistent electric and magnetic fields on a three-dimensional spatial grid having a step-size of the order of the Debye length and using a time-step that resolves the plasma frequency. The initial magnetic field inside the simulation domain is uniform and the plasma bulk velocity at the beginning of the simulation is normal to the magnetic field direction. The total time scale of the simulation is of the order of few ion Larmor periods. Space and time variations of the plasma parameters and of the electromagnetic field are analyzed and discussed. We emphasize non-MHD effects like the energy-dispersion signatures at the edges of the plasma element, similar to results previously reported by Voitcu and Echim (2012) using test-kinetic simulations. Acknowledgments: Research supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement no. 313038/STORM, and a grant of the Romanian Ministry of National Education, CNCS - UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-ID-PCE-2012-4-0418.

  19. Three-dimensional morphometric analysis of the coracohumeral distance using magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taku Hatta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available There have been no studies investigating three-dimensional (3D alteration of the coracohumeral distance (CHD associated with shoulder motion. The aim of this study was to investigate the change of 3D-CHD with the arm in flexion/internal rotation and horizontal adduction. Six intact shoulders of four healthy volunteers were obtained for this study. MRI was taken in four arm positions: with the arm in internal rotation at 0°, 45°, and 90° of flexion, and 90° of flexion with maximum horizontal adduction. Using a motion analysis system, 3D models of the coracoid process and proximal humerus were created from MRI data. The CHD among the four positions were compared, and the closest part of coracoid process to the proximal humerus was also assessed. 3D-CHD significantly decreased with the arm in 90° of flexion and in 90° of flexion with horizontal adduction comparing with that in 0° flexion (P<0.05. In all subjects, lateral part of the coracoid process was the closest to the proximal humerus in these positions. In vivo quasi-static motion analysis revealed that the 3D-CHD was narrower in the arm position of flexion with horizontal abduction than that in 0° flexion. The lateral part on the coracoid process should be considered to be closest to the proximal humerus during the motion.

  20. Three-Dimensional Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection: Simulation With a Particle Electromagnetic Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholer, M.; Sidorenko, I.; Jaroschek, C.; Treumann, R. A.; Zeiler, A.

    2002-12-01

    We have investigated the onset of reconnection in thin current sheets by means of three-dimensional full particle (PIC) simulations. Instead of imposing reconnection ab initio, reconnection is allowed to develop out of the numerical noise. We do not impose symmetry about the midplane, so that the drift kink instability, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and the sausage instability are allowed for, and we use a high mass ratio of mi/m_e=160. The system is double periodic with two current sheets, which limits the time reconnection can proceed, but simplifies the boundary conditions. Two cases are investigated: (1) a thin current sheet with exactly antiparallel fields, and (2) a thin current sheet with a guide field of the same order as the antiparallel field. In case (1) the lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI) is excited and leads to current sheet thinning. Subsequently, patchy reconnection sets in, and arranges itself within a few ion times into a single neutral line. In case (2) the onset of reconnection is delayed, but eventually a single neutral line emerges. No sausage mode or kink mode, respectively, preceed in either case the onset of reconnection. After a single neutral line has evolved it kinks in the current direction.

  1. Improved Cerebral Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography at 7 Tesla – Feasibility Study and Preliminary Results Using Optimized Venous Saturation Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrede, Karsten H.; Johst, Sören; Dammann, Philipp; Özkan, Neriman; Mönninghoff, Christoph; Kraemer, Markus; Maderwald, Stefan; Ladd, Mark E.; Sure, Ulrich; Umutlu, Lale; Schlamann, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Conventional saturation pulses cannot be used for 7 Tesla ultra-high-resolution time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF MRA) due to specific absorption rate (SAR) limitations. We overcome these limitations by utilizing low flip angle, variable rate selective excitation (VERSE) algorithm saturation pulses. Material and Methods Twenty-five neurosurgical patients (male n = 8, female n = 17; average age 49.64 years; range 26–70 years) with different intracranial vascular pathologies were enrolled in this trial. All patients were examined with a 7 Tesla (Magnetom 7 T, Siemens) whole body scanner system utilizing a dedicated 32-channel head coil. For venous saturation pulses a 35° flip angle was applied. Two neuroradiologists evaluated the delineation of arterial vessels in the Circle of Willis, delineation of vascular pathologies, presence of artifacts, vessel-tissue contrast and overall image quality of TOF MRA scans in consensus on a five-point scale. Normalized signal intensities in the confluence of venous sinuses, M1 segment of left middle cerebral artery and adjacent gray matter were measured and vessel-tissue contrasts were calculated. Results Ratings for the majority of patients ranged between good and excellent for most of the evaluated features. Venous saturation was sufficient for all cases with minor artifacts in arteriovenous malformations and arteriovenous fistulas. Quantitative signal intensity measurements showed high vessel-tissue contrast for confluence of venous sinuses, M1 segment of left middle cerebral artery and adjacent gray matter. Conclusion The use of novel low flip angle VERSE algorithm pulses for saturation of venous vessels can overcome SAR limitations in 7 Tesla ultra-high-resolution TOF MRA. Our protocol is suitable for clinical application with excellent image quality for delineation of various intracranial vascular pathologies. PMID:25232868

  2. Association of Lumbar Arterial Stenosis with Low Back Symptoms: A Cross-Sectional Study Using Two-Dimensional Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkiakoski, A.; Niinimaeki, J.; Karppinen, J.; Korpelainen, R.; Haapea, M.; Natri, A.; Tervonen, O. (Inst. of Clinical Sciences, Dept. of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Univ. of Oulu, Oulu (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Recent studies indicate that diminished blood flow may cause low back symptoms and intervertebral disc degeneration. Purpose: To explore the association between lumbar arterial stenosis as detected by two-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (2D TOF-MRA) and lumbar pain symptoms in an occupational cohort of middle-aged Finnish males. Material and Methods: 228 male subjects aged 36 to 55 years (mean 47 years) were imaged with 2D TOF-MRA. Additionally, 20 randomly selected subjects were scanned with contrast-enhanced MRA (ceMRA). In each subject, the first (L1) to fourth (L4) segmental lumbar arteries were evaluated for lumbar artery stenosis using a dichotomic scale. One subject was excluded because of poor image quality, reducing the study population to 227 subjects. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between arterial stenosis in 2D TOF-MRA and low back pain and sciatica symptoms (intensity, duration, frequency). Results: Comparing 2D TOF-MRA and ceMRA images, the kappa value (95% confidence interval) was 0.52 (0.31-0.73). The intraobserver reliability kappa value for 2D TOF-MRA was 0.85 (0.77-0.92), and interobserver kappa was 0.57 (0.49-0.65). The sensitivity of 2D TOF-MRA in detecting stenosis was 0.58, the accuracy 0.89, and the specificity 0.94. In 97 (43%) subjects all arteries were normal, whereas 130 (57%) had at least one stenosed artery. The left L4 artery was most often affected. The degree of arterial stenosis was associated with intensity of low back and sciatic pain, and sciatica pain duration during the past 3 months. Conclusion: 2D TOF-MRA is an acceptable imaging method for arterial stenosis compared to ceMRA. Arterial stenosis was associated with subjective pain symptoms, indicating a role of decreased nutrition in spinal disorders

  3. Association of lumbar arterial stenosis with low back symptoms: a cross-sectional study using two-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkiakoski, A; Niinimäki, J; Karppinen, J; Korpelainen, R; Haapea, M; Natri, A; Tervonen, O

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that diminished blood flow may cause low back symptoms and intervertebral disc degeneration. To explore the association between lumbar arterial stenosis as detected by two-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (2D TOF-MRA) and lumbar pain symptoms in an occupational cohort of middle-aged Finnish males. 228 male subjects aged 36 to 55 years (mean 47 years) were imaged with 2D TOF-MRA. Additionally, 20 randomly selected subjects were scanned with contrast-enhanced MRA (ceMRA). In each subject, the first (L1) to fourth (L4) segmental lumbar arteries were evaluated for lumbar artery stenosis using a dichotomic scale. One subject was excluded because of poor image quality, reducing the study population to 227 subjects. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between arterial stenosis in 2D TOF-MRA and low back pain and sciatica symptoms (intensity, duration, frequency). Comparing 2D TOF-MRA and ceMRA images, the kappa value (95% confidence interval) was 0.52 (0.31-0.73). The intraobserver reliability kappa value for 2D TOF-MRA was 0.85 (0.77-0.92), and interobserver kappa was 0.57 (0.49-0.65). The sensitivity of 2D TOF-MRA in detecting stenosis was 0.58, the accuracy 0.89, and the specificity 0.94. In 97 (43%) subjects all arteries were normal, whereas 130 (57%) had at least one stenosed artery. The left L4 artery was most often affected. The degree of arterial stenosis was associated with intensity of low back and sciatic pain, and sciatica pain duration during the past 3 months. 2D TOF-MRA is an acceptable imaging method for arterial stenosis compared to ceMRA. Arterial stenosis was associated with subjective pain symptoms, indicating a role of decreased nutrition in spinal disorders.

  4. Association of Lumbar Arterial Stenosis with Low Back Symptoms: A Cross-Sectional Study Using Two-Dimensional Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korkiakoski, A.; Niinimaeki, J.; Karppinen, J.; Korpelainen, R.; Haapea, M.; Natri, A.; Tervonen, O.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recent studies indicate that diminished blood flow may cause low back symptoms and intervertebral disc degeneration. Purpose: To explore the association between lumbar arterial stenosis as detected by two-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (2D TOF-MRA) and lumbar pain symptoms in an occupational cohort of middle-aged Finnish males. Material and Methods: 228 male subjects aged 36 to 55 years (mean 47 years) were imaged with 2D TOF-MRA. Additionally, 20 randomly selected subjects were scanned with contrast-enhanced MRA (ceMRA). In each subject, the first (L1) to fourth (L4) segmental lumbar arteries were evaluated for lumbar artery stenosis using a dichotomic scale. One subject was excluded because of poor image quality, reducing the study population to 227 subjects. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between arterial stenosis in 2D TOF-MRA and low back pain and sciatica symptoms (intensity, duration, frequency). Results: Comparing 2D TOF-MRA and ceMRA images, the kappa value (95% confidence interval) was 0.52 (0.31-0.73). The intraobserver reliability kappa value for 2D TOF-MRA was 0.85 (0.77-0.92), and interobserver kappa was 0.57 (0.49-0.65). The sensitivity of 2D TOF-MRA in detecting stenosis was 0.58, the accuracy 0.89, and the specificity 0.94. In 97 (43%) subjects all arteries were normal, whereas 130 (57%) had at least one stenosed artery. The left L4 artery was most often affected. The degree of arterial stenosis was associated with intensity of low back and sciatic pain, and sciatica pain duration during the past 3 months. Conclusion: 2D TOF-MRA is an acceptable imaging method for arterial stenosis compared to ceMRA. Arterial stenosis was associated with subjective pain symptoms, indicating a role of decreased nutrition in spinal disorders

  5. Three-Dimensional View of Transient Horizontal Magnetic Fields in the Photosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ishikawa, R.; Tsuneta, S.; Jurčák, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 713, č. 2 (2010), s. 1310-1321 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300030808 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : magnetic fields * Sun * photosphere * granulation * surface magnetism Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 7.436, year: 2010

  6. A prospective comparison between three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging and ventriculography for target-coordinate determination in frame-based functional stereotactic neurosurgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, P. R.; de Bie, R. M.; Majoie, C. B.; Speelman, J. D.; Bosch, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECT: The purpose of this prospective study was to compare stereotactic coordinates obtained with ventriculography with coordinates derived from stereotactic computer-reconstructed three-dimensional magnetic resonance (3D-MR) imaging in functional stereotactic procedures. METHODS: In 15

  7. Computer simulation of three-dimensional heavy ion beam trajectory imaging techniques used for magnetic field estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, C.; Connor, K. A.; Demers, D. R.; Radke, R. J.; Schoch, P. M.

    2007-11-01

    A magnetic field mapping technique via heavy ion beam trajectory imaging is being developed on the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch. This paper describes the computational tools created to model camera images of the light emitted from a simulated ion beam, reconstruct a three-dimensional trajectory, and estimate the accuracy of the reconstruction. First, a computer model is used to create images of the torus interior from any candidate camera location. It is used to explore the visual field of the camera and thus to guide camera parameters and placement. Second, it is shown that a three-dimensional ion beam trajectory can be recovered from a pair of perspectively projected trajectory images. The reconstruction considers effects due to finite beam size, nonuniform beam current density, and image background noise. Third, it is demonstrated that the trajectory reconstructed from camera images can help compute magnetic field profiles, and might be used as an additional constraint to an equilibrium reconstruction code, such as MSTFit.

  8. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in the substantia nigra of healthy controls and patients with Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groeger, Adriane; Godau, Jana; Berg, Daniela; Chadzynski, Grzegorz; Klose, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the substantia nigra in patients with Parkinson's disease three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging with high spatial resolution at 3 Tesla was performed. Regional variations of spectroscopic data between the rostral and caudal regions of the substantia nigra as well as the midbrain tegmentum areas were evaluated in healthy controls and patients with Parkinson's disease. Nine patients with Parkinson's disease and eight age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Data were acquired by using three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging measurements. The ratios between rostral and caudal voxels of the substantia nigra as well as the midbrain tegmentum areas were calculated for the main-metabolites N-acetyl aspartate, creatine, choline, and myo-inositol. Additionally, the metabolite/creatine ratios were calculated. In all subjects spectra of acceptable quality could be obtained with a nominal voxel size of 0.252 ml. The calculated rostral-to-caudal ratios of the metabolites as well as of the metabolite/creatine ratios showed with exception of choline/creatine ratio significant differences between healthy controls and patients with Parkinson's disease. The findings from this study indicate that regional variations in N-acetyl aspartate/creatine ratios in the regions of the substantia nigra may differentiate patients with Parkinson's disease and healthy controls. (orig.)

  9. Three-Dimensional Self-Assembly of Core/Shell-Like Nanostructures for High-Performance Nanocomposite Permanent Magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hailing; Li, Xiaohong; Guo, Defeng; Lou, Li; Li, Wei; Zhang, Xiangyi

    2016-09-14

    Core/shell nanostructures are fascinating for many advanced applications including strong permanent magnets, magnetic recording, and biotechnology. They are generally achieved via chemical approaches, but these techniques limit them to nanoparticles. Here, we describe a three-dimensional (3D) self-assembly of core/shell-like nanocomposite magnets, with hard-magnetic Nd2Fe14B core of ∼45 nm and soft-magnetic α-Fe shell of ∼13 nm, through a physical route. The resulting Nd2Fe14B/α-Fe core/shell-like nanostructure allows both large remanent magnetization and high coercivity, leading to a record-high energy product of 25 MGOe which reaches the theoretical limit for isotropic Nd2Fe14B/α-Fe nanocomposite magnets. Our approach is based on a sequential growth of the core and shell nanocrystals in an alloy melt. These results make an important step toward fabricating core/shell-like nanostructure in 3D materials.

  10. Three-dimensional numerical analyses of liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic flow in magnetic-field outlet-region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumamaru, Hiroshige

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional numerical calculation has been performed on liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow through a rectangular channel in the outlet region of the magnetic field, including a region downstream the magnetic field section. The continuity equation, the momentum equation and the induction equation have been solved numerically by the finite difference method. Along the flow axis (i.e. the channel axis), the pressure decreases rapidly as a fully-developed MHD flow, drops more rapidly in the magnetic-field outlet-region, and finally decreases slowly as a normal non-MHD flow. The pressure recovery that was observed in the magnetic-field inlet-region does not appear in the magnetic-field outlet-region. The total pressure drop through the magnetic-field outlet-region is larger than that through the magnetic-field inlet-region. The flow velocity distribution also changes gradually from a flat profile of a fully-developed MHD flow to a parabolic profile of a non-MHD laminar flow. (author)

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic study for three-dimensional instability of the Petschek type magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, T.; Kondoh, K.

    2013-01-01

    The 3D instability of the spontaneous fast magnetic reconnection process is studied with magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations, where the 2D model of the spontaneous fast magnetic reconnection is destabilized in three dimension. As well known in many 2D numerical MHD studies, when a 1D current sheet is destabilized with the current-driven anomalous resistivity, the 2D Petschek type fast magnetic reconnection is established. This paper shows that the 2D Petschek type fast magnetic reconnection can be destabilized in three dimension by an initial resistive disturbance which includes a weak fluctuation in the sheet current direction, i.e., along the magnetic neutral line. The resulting 3D fast magnetic reconnection finally becomes intermittent and random through a 3D instability. In addition, it is also shown that the 3D instability is suppressed by the uniform resistivity. It suggests that the 3D instability is caused in the Petschek-type reconnection process which is characterized by a strongly localized magnetic diffusion region and the slow shock acceleration of the plasma jets and is suppressed in the Sweet-Parker type reconnection process

  12. Comprehensive Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of myocardial mechanics in mice using three-dimensional cine DENSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Xiaodong

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative noninvasive imaging of myocardial mechanics in mice enables studies of the roles of individual genes in cardiac function. We sought to develop comprehensive three-dimensional methods for imaging myocardial mechanics in mice. Methods A 3D cine DENSE pulse sequence was implemented on a 7T small-bore scanner. The sequence used three-point phase cycling for artifact suppression and a stack-of-spirals k-space trajectory for efficient data acquisition. A semi-automatic 2D method was adapted for 3D image segmentation, and automated 3D methods to calculate strain, twist, and torsion were employed. A scan protocol that covered the majority of the left ventricle in a scan time of less than 25 minutes was developed, and seven healthy C57Bl/6 mice were studied. Results Using these methods, multiphase normal and shear strains were measured, as were myocardial twist and torsion. Peak end-systolic values for the normal strains at the mid-ventricular level were 0.29 ± 0.17, -0.13 ± 0.03, and -0.18 ± 0.14 for Err, Ecc, and Ell, respectively. Peak end-systolic values for the shear strains were 0.00 ± 0.08, 0.04 ± 0.12, and 0.03 ± 0.07 for Erc, Erl, and Ecl, respectively. The peak end-systolic normalized torsion was 5.6 ± 0.9°. Conclusions Using a 3D cine DENSE sequence tailored for cardiac imaging in mice at 7 T, a comprehensive assessment of 3D myocardial mechanics can be achieved with a scan time of less than 25 minutes and an image analysis time of approximately 1 hour.

  13. Comprehensive Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of myocardial mechanics in mice using three-dimensional cine DENSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Quantitative noninvasive imaging of myocardial mechanics in mice enables studies of the roles of individual genes in cardiac function. We sought to develop comprehensive three-dimensional methods for imaging myocardial mechanics in mice. Methods A 3D cine DENSE pulse sequence was implemented on a 7T small-bore scanner. The sequence used three-point phase cycling for artifact suppression and a stack-of-spirals k-space trajectory for efficient data acquisition. A semi-automatic 2D method was adapted for 3D image segmentation, and automated 3D methods to calculate strain, twist, and torsion were employed. A scan protocol that covered the majority of the left ventricle in a scan time of less than 25 minutes was developed, and seven healthy C57Bl/6 mice were studied. Results Using these methods, multiphase normal and shear strains were measured, as were myocardial twist and torsion. Peak end-systolic values for the normal strains at the mid-ventricular level were 0.29 ± 0.17, -0.13 ± 0.03, and -0.18 ± 0.14 for Err, Ecc, and Ell, respectively. Peak end-systolic values for the shear strains were 0.00 ± 0.08, 0.04 ± 0.12, and 0.03 ± 0.07 for Erc, Erl, and Ecl, respectively. The peak end-systolic normalized torsion was 5.6 ± 0.9°. Conclusions Using a 3D cine DENSE sequence tailored for cardiac imaging in mice at 7 T, a comprehensive assessment of 3D myocardial mechanics can be achieved with a scan time of less than 25 minutes and an image analysis time of approximately 1 hour. PMID:22208954

  14. Three Dimensional Imaging of Helicon Wave Fields Via Magnetic Induction Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-13

    field Gauss bz radial magnetic field Gauss B0 magnetic field strength Tesla or Gauss c speed of light m/s cs acoustic velocity...eV ΦB magnetic flux Tesla -m2 λ0 mean free path or beam width m or cm λD Debye length m or cm λHelicon helicon wavelength m or cm...locations Turbo Pump Chamber Convectron vent valve Latched door Latched door Roughing Pump 0.5 meter 1.0 meter Cold Cathode Foreline Convectron

  15. Modeling of the three-dimensional motion of toroidal magnetic clouds in the inner heliosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romashets, E.; Vandas, Marek; Poedts, S.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 466, č. 1 (2007), s. 357-365 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS300120506; GA ČR GA205/06/0875 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : magnetic cloud s * interplanetary magnetic field Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2007

  16. Magnetic point sources in three dimensional Brans-Dicke gravity theories

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, Oscar J. C.; Lemos, Jose' P. S.

    2002-01-01

    We obtain geodesically complete spacetimes generated by static and rotating magnetic point sources in an Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theory of the Brans-Dicke type in three dimensions (3D). The theory is specified by three fields, the dilaton, the graviton and the electromagnetic field, and two parameters, the cosmological constant and the Brans-Dicke parameter, w. When the Brans-Dicke parameter is infinity, our solution reduces to the magnetic counterpart of the BTZ solution, while the w=0 case...

  17. Three-dimensional finite element magnetic simulation of an innovative multi-coiled magnetorheological brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubaidillah; Permata, A. N. S.; Mazlan, S. A.; Tjahjana, D. D. D. P.; Widodo, P. J.

    2017-10-01

    This research delivers a finite element magnetic simulation of a novel disk type multi-coil magnetorheological brake (MR brake). The MR brake axial design had more than one coil located outside of the casing. This design could simplify the maintenance process of brakes. One pair of coils was used as the representative of the entire coil in the simulation process, and it could distribute magnetic flux in all parts of the electromagnetic. The objective of this simulation was to produce magnetic flux on the surface of the disc brake rotor. The value of the MR brake magnetic flux was higher than that of the current MR brake having one coil with a larger size. The result of the simulation would be used to identify the effect of different fluids on each variation. The Magneto-rheological fluid MRF-132DG and MRF-140CG were injected in each gap as much as 0.50, 1.00, and 1.50 mm, respectively. On the simulation process, the coils were energized at 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.00, 1.50, and 2.00 A, respectively. The magnetic flux produced by MRF-140CG was 336 m Tesla on the gap of 0.5 mm. The result of the simulation shows that the smaller the gap variation was, the higher the magnetic value was.

  18. Three-dimensional anisotropy contrast (3DAC) magnetic resonance imaging of the human brain. Application to assess Wallerian degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Hironaka; Katayama, Yasuo; Tsuganezawa, Toshikazu; Yamamuro, Manabu; Terashi, Akiro; Owan, Chojin

    1998-01-01

    Three-dimensional anisotropy contrast (3DAC) magnetic resonance imaging is a new algorithm for the treatment of apparent diffusion tensor using the three primary colors. To determine if 3DAC has a clinical application for human brain, six normal volunteers and twenty patients with supratentorial cerebrovascular accidents were examined using clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the changes in the 3DAC images associated with Wallerian degeneration of the pyramidal tract were evaluated. The 3DAC images exhibited impressive anatomical resolution. In all chronic stage patients with hemiparesis, the colors in the pyramidal tract were faded. Patients examined during the acute stage who later recovered from hemiparesis had no visible changes of the 3DAC image, whereas patients who recovered poorly showed distinct color fading in the pyramidal tract within 14 days following stroke. In conclusion, very fine anatomical structures are visible on 3DAC images, and it can be used as a diagnostic tool for the human brain. (author)

  19. A comparison between magnetic resonance angiography at 3 teslas (time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced) and flat-panel digital subtraction angiography in the assessment of embolized brain aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakiri, Guilherme S.; Santos, Antonio C.; Abud, Thiago G.; Abud, Daniel G., E-mail: gsnakiri@yahoo.com.b [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Medical School. Div. of Radiology; Aragon, Davi C. [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Medical School. Div. of Statistics; Colli, Benedicto O. [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Medical School. Div. of Neurosurgery

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: to compare the time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced- magnetic resonance angiography techniques in a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance unit with digital subtraction angiography with the latest flat-panel technology and 3D reconstruction in the evaluation of embolized cerebral aneurysms. Introduction: many embolized aneurysms are subject to a recurrence of intra-aneurysmal filling. Traditionally, imaging surveillance of coiled aneurysms has consisted of repeated digital subtraction angiography. However, this method has a small but significant risk of neurological complications, and many authors have advocated the use of noninvasive imaging methods for the surveillance of embolized aneurysms. Methods: forty-three aneurysms in 30 patients were studied consecutively between November 2009 and May 2010. Two interventional neuro radiologists rated the time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography, the contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography, and finally the digital subtraction angiography, first independently and then in consensus. The status of aneurysm occlusion was assessed according to the Raymond scale, which indicates the level of recanalization according to degrees: Class 1: excluded aneurysm; Class 2: persistence of a residual neck; Class 3: persistence of a residual aneurysm. The agreement among the analyses was assessed by applying the Kappa statistic. Results: inter-observer agreement was excellent for both methods (K = 0.93; 95 % CI: 0.84-1). Inter-technical agreement was almost perfect between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography (K = 0.98; 95 % CI: 0.93-1) and between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography (K = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.93-1). Disagreement occurred in only one case (2.3%), which was classified as Class I by time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and Class II by digital subtraction angiography. The agreement between contrast-enhanced-magnetic

  20. A comparison between magnetic resonance angiography at 3 teslas (time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced and flat-panel digital subtraction angiography in the assessment of embolized brain aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme S. Nakiri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced- magnetic resonance angiography techniques in a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance unit with digital subtraction angiography with the latest flat-panel technology and 3D reconstruction in the evaluation of embolized cerebral aneurysms. INTRODUCTION: Many embolized aneurysms are subject to a recurrence of intra-aneurismal filling. Traditionally, imaging surveillance of coiled aneurysms has consisted of repeated digital subtraction angiography. However, this method has a small but significant risk of neurological complications, and many authors have advocated the use of noninvasive imaging methods for the surveillance of embolized aneurysms. METHODS: Forty-three aneurysms in 30 patients were studied consecutively between November 2009 and May 2010. Two interventional neuroradiologists rated the time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography, the contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography, and finally the digital subtraction angiography, first independently and then in consensus. The status of aneurysm occlusion was assessed according to the Raymond scale, which indicates the level of recanalization according to degrees: Class 1: excluded aneurysm; Class 2: persistence of a residual neck; Class 3: persistence of a residual aneurysm. The agreement among the analyses was assessed by applying the Kappa statistic. RESULTS: Inter-observer agreement was excellent for both methods (K = 0.93; 95 % CI: 0.84-1. Inter-technical agreement was almost perfect between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography (K = 0.98; 95 % CI: 0.93-1 and between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography (K = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.93-1. Disagreement occurred in only one case (2.3%, which was classified as Class I by time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and Class II by digital subtraction angiography. The agreement between

  1. Biomimetic three-dimensional nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and magnetically synthesized single-walled carbon nanotube chitosan nanocomposite for bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Im O

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Owen Im1, Jian Li2, Mian Wang2, Lijie Grace Zhang2,3, Michael Keidar2,31Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC; 2Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 3Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Institute for Nanotechnology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USABackground: Many shortcomings exist in the traditional methods of treating bone defects, such as donor tissue shortages for autografts and disease transmission for allografts. The objective of this study was to design a novel three-dimensional nanostructured bone substitute based on magnetically synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT, biomimetic hydrothermally treated nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite, and a biocompatible hydrogel (chitosan. Both nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and SWCNT have a biomimetic nanostructure, excellent osteoconductivity, and high potential to improve the load-bearing capacity of hydrogels.Methods: Specifically, three-dimensional porous chitosan scaffolds with different concentrations of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and SWCNT were created to support the growth of human osteoblasts (bone-forming cells using a lyophilization procedure. Two types of SWCNT were synthesized in an arc discharge with a magnetic field (B-SWCNT and without a magnetic field (N-SWCNT for improving bone regeneration.Results: Nanocomposites containing magnetically synthesized B-SWCNT had superior cytocompatibility properties when compared with nonmagnetically synthesized N-SWCNT. B-SWCNT have much smaller diameters and are twice as long as their nonmagnetically prepared counterparts, indicating that the dimensions of carbon nanotubes can have a substantial effect on osteoblast attachment.Conclusion: This study demonstrated that a chitosan nanocomposite with both B-SWCNT and 20% nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite could achieve a higher osteoblast density when compared with the other experimental groups, thus making this nanocomposite

  2. Theoretical description and numerical calculations of significant three-dimensional magnetic field configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mierau, Anna; Weiland, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (DE). Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder (TEMF); Schnizer, Pierre; Fischer, Egbert [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Akishin, Pavel [JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    The heavy ion synchrotron SIS100, the core component of the Facility of Antiproton and Ion Research will accelerate high current ion beams of up to U{sup 27+}. For operating such a machine the static and transient magnetic field quality must be fully understood. This is also necessary to keep the beam losses well below acceptable limits and to prepare a sound strategy for high resolution magnetic measurements and data analysis. Challenging preconditions to perform such work are to find a proper description for the non. Cartesian symmetry of the magnets, most important for curved dipoles with elliptical apertures. We describe the parameterisation methods using elliptic and toroidal multipoles and summarise comparing the calculated to the measured field quality.

  3. Three-dimensional MHD simulation of a loop-like magnetic cloud in the solar wind

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vandas, Marek; Odstrčil, Dušan; Watari, S.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 107, A9 (2002), s. SSH2-1 - SSH2-11 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK3012103; GA ČR GA205/99/1712; GA AV ČR IAA3003003; GA AV ČR IBS1003006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : magnetic cloud s * MHD simulations * interplanetary magnetic fields Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.245, year: 2002

  4. ALICE Time Of Flight Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Alici, A

    2013-01-01

    Charged particles in the intermediate momentum range are identified in ALICE by the Time Of Flight (TOF) detector. The time measurement with the TOF, in conjunction with the momentum and track length measured by the tracking detector, is used to calculate the particle mass.

  5. Simultaneous strain-volume analysis by three-dimensional echocardiography: validation in normal subjects with tagging cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilli, Alessio; Tessa, Carlo; Diciotti, Stefano; Croisille, Pierre; Clarysse, Patrick; Del Meglio, Jacopo; Salvatori, Luca; Vignali, Claudio; Casolo, Giancarlo

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to compare three-dimensional echocardiography strain-volume analysis with tagging cardiac magnetic resonance (cMR) measurements. Strain-volume analysis represents a noninvasive method to assess myocardial function and volumes simultaneously. It can be derived from echocardiography and speckle-tracking; however, it shows some variability that can limit clinical utilization. A three-dimensional approach partially overcomes these limitations since full-volume acquisition avoids images being foreshortened and geometrical reconstruction. In the study presented here, 23 healthy subjects were studied by three-dimensional echocardiography and cMR during the same session. Images were stored and the better cardiac cycle was chosen for simultaneous analysis of volumes and longitudinal (Long) and circumferential (Circ) strain. By means of full-volume acquisition all parameters can be calculated for each frame of the cardiac cycle using the speckle-tracking method. With cMR, left ventricle volumes were calculated as recommended; myocardial strains were computed in short-axis and long-axis views using the tagging technique. For each patient, volumes and strain values were plotted in a Cartesian system for strain-volume analysis. Data were compared between the two methods using Bland-Altman analysis based on mean difference and 95% limits of agreement (LoA). The volume as measured by three-dimensional echocardiography and cMR was comparable with the slightly higher end-diastolic volumes measured by cMR (mean difference 15.24 ml; LoA -53.6 to 26.5 ml, end-systolic volume 0.3 ml; LoA -19.9 to 20.5 ml). Long shortening was very similar in the two methods (1.5%; LoA -3.9 to 7%), whereas Circ strain was systematically lower with cMR (-8.5%; LoA -15.5 to -1.5%). Very similar values between three-dimensional echo and cMR both for Slope of strain-volume curves (-0.015; LoA -0.08 to 0.05) and ratio (-0.001; LoA -0.04 to 0.04) were observed in the

  6. Energy levels of an anisotropic three-dimensional polaron in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brancus, D. E. N.; Stan, G.

    2001-01-01

    In the context of the improved Wigner-Brillouin theory, the energy levels are found of a Frohlich polaron in a uniaxial anisotropic polar semiconductor with complex structure, placed in a magnetic field directed either along the optical axis or orthogonal to it. All sources of anisotropy that are contained in the shape of constant-energy surfaces of the bare electron, the electron - optical-phonon interaction, and the frequency spectrum of the extraordinary phonon modes are considered. Analytical results for the electron-phonon interaction correction to the Landau levels below the optical-phonon continuum are given and, numerical results for the magnetic-field dependence of the cyclotron resonance frequency at low temperature are presented for the particular case of the layered semiconductors InSe and GaSe. Although the interaction between the bare electron and quasitransverse optical-phonon modes is weak, these modes play an important role in the pinning of Landau levels. The results given by Das Sarma for a two-dimensional isotropic magnetopolaron are generalized to the anisotropic uniaxial case by taking formally m # parallel→infinity# in the expression of the perturbed Landau levels found when the magnetic field is directed along the optical axis, m # parallel# being the component of the bare-electron effective-mass tensor along the optical axis

  7. Three Dimensional Magneto-Hydrodynamics Simulations of Auto-Magnetizing Imploding Liners for ICF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolstrum, Jeff; Jennings, Chris; Shipley, Gabriel; Awe, Thomas; Slutz, Stephen; Jordan, Nicholas; Lau, Yy; Peterson, Kyle; McBride, Ryan

    2017-10-01

    AutoMag is a potential next step in the magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) program. In standard MagLIF, external coils are used to magnetize deuterium gas inside a metal cylindrical liner, which is imploded by the Z-machine at Sandia National Laboratories. In AutoMag, helical slots are cut into the liner and filled with dielectric insulator to form a solenoid, producing an axial magnetic field from the drive current and removing the need for external field coils. Alternatively with external field coils, AutoMag could produce a field-reversed configuration inside the liner. Recent work at Sandia has found that the breakdown of the dielectric material corresponds to the geometry of the liner/dielectric. We explore this finding in 3D resistive-MHD simulations, modeling geometries relevant to both the 20-MA Z facility, and to the 1-MA MAIZE facility at the University of Michigan. Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International Inc. for the U.S. DoE's NNSA under contract DE-NA0003525.

  8. High performance electrical, magnetic, electromagnetic and electrooptical devices enabled by three dimensionally ordered nanodots and nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit , Kang; Sukill, [Knoxville, TN

    2012-02-21

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate same with self-assembled nanodots and/or nanorods of a single or multicomponent material within another single or multicomponent material for use in electrical, electronic, magnetic, electromagnetic and electrooptical devices is disclosed. Self-assembled nanodots and/or nanorods are ordered arrays wherein ordering occurs due to strain minimization during growth of the materials. A simple method to accomplish this when depositing in-situ films is also disclosed. Device applications of resulting materials are in areas of superconductivity, photovoltaics, ferroelectrics, magnetoresistance, high density storage, solid state lighting, non-volatile memory, photoluminescence, thermoelectrics and in quantum dot lasers.

  9. Robustness of the filamentation instability in arbitrarily oriented magnetic field: Full three dimensional calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bret, A., E-mail: antoineclaude.bret@uclm.es [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain and Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2014-02-15

    The filamentation (Weibel) instability plays a key role in the formation of collisionless shocks which are thought to produce Gamma-Ray-Bursts and High-Energy-Cosmic-Rays in astrophysical environments. While it has been known for long that a flow-aligned magnetic field can completely quench the instability, it was recently proved in 2D that in the cold regime, such cancelation is possible if and only if the field is perfectly aligned. Here, this result is finally extended to a 3D geometry. Calculations are conducted for symmetric and asymmetric counter-streaming relativistic plasma shells. 2D results are retrieved in 3D: the instability can never be completely canceled for an oblique magnetic field. In addition, the maximum growth-rate is always larger for wave vectors lying in the plan defined by the flow and the oblique field. On the one hand, this bears consequences on the orientation of the generated filaments. On the other hand, it certifies 2D simulations of the problem can be performed without missing the most unstable filamentation modes.

  10. Study of Three-dimensional Magnetic Structure and the Successive Eruptive Nature of Active Region 12371

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemareddy, P.; Demóulin, P.

    2018-04-01

    We study the magnetic structure of a successively erupting sigmoid in active region 12371 by modeling the quasi-static coronal field evolution with nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) equilibria. Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager/Solar Dynamic Observatory vector magnetograms are used as input to the NLFFF model. In all eruption events, the modeled structure resembles the observed pre-eruptive coronal sigmoid and the NLFFF core field is a combination of double inverse-J-shaped and inverse-S field lines with dips touching the photosphere. Such field lines are formed by the flux cancellation reconnection of opposite-J field lines at bald-patch locations, which in turn implies the formation of a weakly twisted flux-rope (FR) from large-scale sheared arcade field lines. Later on, this FR undergoes coronal tether-cutting reconnection until a coronal mass ejection is triggered. The modeled structure captured these major features of sigmoid-to-arcade-to-sigmoid transformation, which is reoccuring under continuous photospheric flux motions. Calculations of the field line twist reveal a fractional increase followed by a decrease of the number of pixels having a range of twist. This traces the buildup process of a twisted core field by slow photospheric motions and the relaxation after eruption, respectively. Our study infers that the large eruptivity of this AR is due to a steep decrease of the background coronal field meeting the torus instability criteria at a low height (≈40 Mm) in contrast to noneruptive ARs.

  11. Development of fetal brain sulci and gyri: assessment through two and three-dimensional ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolo, Liliam Cristine; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Araujo, Edward; Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; de Oliveira, Patrícia Soares; Ajzen, Sérgio Aron; Moron, Antonio Fernandes

    2011-02-01

    Cerebral malformations may lead to permanent postnatal sequels. The antenatal detection of anomalous or absent fetal sulci and gyri may indicate abnormal brain development and future neurological and psychomotor problems in that infant. The prenatal diagnosis of these conditions allows genetic counseling, psychological support of the parents and optimization of obstetric management. Diagnosis is usually based on two-dimensional obstetric ultrasound (2DUS) and eventually fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to confirm findings. Fetal three-dimensional ultrasound (3DUS) using the rendering mode has been recently introduced but has not yet been extensively tested in clinical practice. This study reviewed and compared three imaging modalities, 2DUS, 3DUS, and MRI, in the analysis of the development of the main sulci and gyri of central nervous system of normal fetuses between 20 and 32 weeks' gestation.

  12. Monte Carlo study of the three-dimensional spatially anisotropic Ising superantiferromagnet in the presence of a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmon, Octavio D.R., E-mail: octaviors@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, 3000, Japiim, 69077-000 Manaus-AM (Brazil); Neto, Minos A., E-mail: minosneto@pq.cnpq.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, 3000, Japiim, 69077-000 Manaus-AM (Brazil); Viana, J. Roberto, E-mail: vianafisica@bol.com.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, 3000, Japiim, 69077-000 Manaus-AM (Brazil); Padilha, Igor T., E-mail: igorfis@ufam.edu.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, 3000, Japiim, 69077-000 Manaus-AM (Brazil); Sousa, J. Ricardo de, E-mail: jsousa@ufam.edu.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, 3000, Japiim, 69077-000 Manaus-AM (Brazil); National Institute of Science and Technology for Complex Systems, 3000, Japiim, 69077-000 Manaus-AM (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    The phase transition of the three-dimensional spatially anisotropic Ising antiferromagnetic model in the presence of an uniform longitudinal magnetic field H is studied by using the traditional Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for sizes L=16, 32 and 64. The model consists of ferromagnetic interactions J{sub z}=λ{sub 2}J{sub x} in the x(z) direction and antiferromagnetic interactions J{sub y}=λ{sub 1}J{sub x} in the y direction (Ising superantiferromagnetic). For the particular case λ{sub 1}=λ{sub 2}=1 we obtain the phase diagram in the T–H plane. Was observed first- and second-order transitions in the low and high temperature limits, respectively, with the presence of a tricritical point.

  13. Application of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Three-Dimensional Treatment Planning in the Treatment of Orbital Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudoltz, Marc S. [Department of Radiation Oncology And Nuclear Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, 19107 (United States); Ayyangar, Komanduri [Department of Radiation Therapy, Medical College of Ohio, Toledo, OH43699 (United States); Mohiuddin, Mohammed [Department of Radiation Oncology And Nuclear Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, 19107 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Radiotherapy for lymphoma of the orbit must be individualized for each patient and clinical setting. Most techniques focus on optimizing the dose to the tumor while sparing the lens. This study describes a technique utilizing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and three dimensional (3D) planning in the treatment of orbital lymphoma. A patient presented with an intermediate grade lymphoma of the right orbit. The prescribed tumor dose was 4050 cGy in 18 fractions. Three D planning was carried out and tumor volumes, retina, and lens were subsequently outlined. Dose calculations including dose volume histograms of the target, retina, and lens were then performed. Part of the retina was outside of the treatment volume while 50% of the retina received 90% or more of the prescribed dose. The patient was clinically NED when last seen 2 years following therapy with no treatment-related morbidity. Patients with lymphomas of the orbit can be optimally treated using MRI based 3D treatment planning.

  14. Application of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Three-Dimensional Treatment Planning in the Treatment of Orbital Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudoltz, Marc S.; Ayyangar, Komanduri; Mohiuddin, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy for lymphoma of the orbit must be individualized for each patient and clinical setting. Most techniques focus on optimizing the dose to the tumor while sparing the lens. This study describes a technique utilizing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and three dimensional (3D) planning in the treatment of orbital lymphoma. A patient presented with an intermediate grade lymphoma of the right orbit. The prescribed tumor dose was 4050 cGy in 18 fractions. Three D planning was carried out and tumor volumes, retina, and lens were subsequently outlined. Dose calculations including dose volume histograms of the target, retina, and lens were then performed. Part of the retina was outside of the treatment volume while 50% of the retina received 90% or more of the prescribed dose. The patient was clinically NED when last seen 2 years following therapy with no treatment-related morbidity. Patients with lymphomas of the orbit can be optimally treated using MRI based 3D treatment planning.

  15. Thermal evolution of the full three-dimensional magnetic excitations in the multiferroic BiFeO3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhijun [ORNL; Wen, Jinsheng [University of California, Berkeley; Berlijn, Tom [ORNL; Gehring, Peter M [ORNL; Stock, Christopher K [ORNL; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL; Gu, G. D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Shapiro, S. M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Birgeneau, R J [University of California, Berkeley & LBNL; Xu, Guangyong [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

    2012-01-01

    We present neutron inelastic scattering measurements of the full three-dimensional spin-wave dispersion in the multiferroic material BiFeO3 for temperatures from 5K to 700K. Despite the presence of strong electromagnetic coupling, the magnetic excitations behave like conventional magnons over all parts of the Brillouin zone. At low temperature the spin-waves are well-defined coherent modes, described by a classical model for a G-type antiferromagnet. A softening of the spin-wave velocity and broadening in energy is already present at room temperature, which is well below the N eel temperature TN 640K, and increases on heating. In addition, a strong hybridization of the Fe 3d and O 2p states is found to modify the distribution of the spin-wave spectral weight significantly, which implies that the spins are not restricted to the Fe atomic sites as previously believed.

  16. Volume rendering based on magnetic resonance imaging: advances in understanding the three-dimensional anatomy of the human knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, Giuseppe; Bramanti, Placido; Di Bella, Paolo; Favaloro, Angelo; Trimarchi, Fabio; Magaudda, Ludovico; Gaeta, Michele; Scribano, Emanuele; Bruschetta, Daniele; Milardi, Demetrio

    2007-01-01

    The choice of medical imaging techniques, for the purpose of the present work aimed at studying the anatomy of the knee, derives from the increasing use of images in diagnostics, research and teaching, and the subsequent importance that these methods are gaining within the scientific community. Medical systems using virtual reality techniques also offer a good alternative to traditional methods, and are considered among the most important tools in the areas of research and teaching. In our work we have shown some possible uses of three-dimensional imaging for the study of the morphology of the normal human knee, and its clinical applications. We used the direct volume rendering technique, and created a data set of images and animations to allow us to visualize the single structures of the human knee in three dimensions. Direct volume rendering makes use of specific algorithms to transform conventional two-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging sets of slices into see-through volume data set images. It is a technique which does not require the construction of intermediate geometric representations, and has the advantage of allowing the visualization of a single image of the full data set, using semi-transparent mapping. Digital images of human structures, and in particular of the knee, offer important information about anatomical structures and their relationships, and are of great value in the planning of surgical procedures. On this basis we studied seven volunteers with an average age of 25 years, who underwent magnetic resonance imaging. After elaboration of the data through post-processing, we analysed the structure of the knee in detail. The aim of our investigation was the three-dimensional image, in order to comprehend better the interactions between anatomical structures. We believe that these results, applied to living subjects, widen the frontiers in the areas of teaching, diagnostics, therapy and scientific research. PMID:17645453

  17. Three-Dimensional Dosimetric Validation of a Magnetic Resonance Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rankine, Leith J., E-mail: Leith_Rankine@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Mein, Stewart [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Cai, Bin; Curcuru, Austen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Juang, Titania; Miles, Devin [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Mutic, Sasa; Wang, Yuhe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Oldham, Mark [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Li, H. Harold, E-mail: hli@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To validate the dosimetric accuracy of a commercially available magnetic resonance guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (MRgIMRT) system using a hybrid approach: 3-dimensional (3D) measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. Methods and Materials: We used PRESAGE radiochromic plastic dosimeters with remote optical computed tomography readout to perform 3D high-resolution measurements, following a novel remote dosimetry protocol. We followed the intensity modulated radiation therapy commissioning recommendations of American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 119, adapted to incorporate 3D data. Preliminary tests (“AP” and “3D-Bands”) were delivered to 9.5-cm usable diameter cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters to validate the treatment planning system (TPS) for nonmodulated deliveries; assess the sensitivity, uniformity, and rotational symmetry of the PRESAGE dosimeters; and test the robustness of the remote dosimetry protocol. Following this, 4 clinical MRgIMRT plans (“MultiTarget,” “Prostate,” “Head/Neck,” and “C-Shape”) were measured using 13-cm usable diameter PRESAGE dosimeters. For all plans, 3D-γ (3% or 3 mm global, 10% threshold) passing rates were calculated and 3D-γ maps were examined. Point doses were measured with an IBA-CC01 ionization chamber for validation of absolute dose. Finally, by use of an in-house-developed, GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo algorithm (gPENELOPE), we independently calculated dose for all 6 Task Group 119 plans and compared against the TPS. Results: For PRESAGE measurements, 3D-γ analysis yielded passing rates of 98.7%, 99.2%, 98.5%, 98.0%, 99.2%, and 90.7% for AP, 3D-Bands, MultiTarget, Prostate, Head/Neck, and C-Shape, respectively. Ion chamber measurements were within an average of 0.5% (±1.1%) from the TPS dose. Monte Carlo calculations demonstrated good agreement with the TPS, with a mean 3D-γ passing rate of 98.5% ± 1.9% using a stricter 2%/2-mm criterion. Conclusions: We

  18. Three-Dimensional Dosimetric Validation of a Magnetic Resonance Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankine, Leith J.; Mein, Stewart; Cai, Bin; Curcuru, Austen; Juang, Titania; Miles, Devin; Mutic, Sasa; Wang, Yuhe; Oldham, Mark; Li, H. Harold

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To validate the dosimetric accuracy of a commercially available magnetic resonance guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (MRgIMRT) system using a hybrid approach: 3-dimensional (3D) measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. Methods and Materials: We used PRESAGE radiochromic plastic dosimeters with remote optical computed tomography readout to perform 3D high-resolution measurements, following a novel remote dosimetry protocol. We followed the intensity modulated radiation therapy commissioning recommendations of American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 119, adapted to incorporate 3D data. Preliminary tests (“AP” and “3D-Bands”) were delivered to 9.5-cm usable diameter cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters to validate the treatment planning system (TPS) for nonmodulated deliveries; assess the sensitivity, uniformity, and rotational symmetry of the PRESAGE dosimeters; and test the robustness of the remote dosimetry protocol. Following this, 4 clinical MRgIMRT plans (“MultiTarget,” “Prostate,” “Head/Neck,” and “C-Shape”) were measured using 13-cm usable diameter PRESAGE dosimeters. For all plans, 3D-γ (3% or 3 mm global, 10% threshold) passing rates were calculated and 3D-γ maps were examined. Point doses were measured with an IBA-CC01 ionization chamber for validation of absolute dose. Finally, by use of an in-house-developed, GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo algorithm (gPENELOPE), we independently calculated dose for all 6 Task Group 119 plans and compared against the TPS. Results: For PRESAGE measurements, 3D-γ analysis yielded passing rates of 98.7%, 99.2%, 98.5%, 98.0%, 99.2%, and 90.7% for AP, 3D-Bands, MultiTarget, Prostate, Head/Neck, and C-Shape, respectively. Ion chamber measurements were within an average of 0.5% (±1.1%) from the TPS dose. Monte Carlo calculations demonstrated good agreement with the TPS, with a mean 3D-γ passing rate of 98.5% ± 1.9% using a stricter 2%/2-mm criterion. Conclusions: We

  19. Reconstruction of magnetic resonance imaging by three-dimensional dual-dictionary learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ying; Zhu, Zhen; Lu, Yang; Liu, Qiegen; Zhao, Jun

    2014-03-01

    To improve the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data acquisition speed while maintaining the reconstruction quality, a novel method is proposed for multislice MRI reconstruction from undersampled k-space data based on compressed-sensing theory using dictionary learning. There are two aspects to improve the reconstruction quality. One is that spatial correlation among slices is used by extending the atoms in dictionary learning from patches to blocks. The other is that the dictionary-learning scheme is used at two resolution levels; i.e., a low-resolution dictionary is used for sparse coding and a high-resolution dictionary is used for image updating. Numerical experiments are carried out on in vivo 3D MR images of brains and abdomens with a variety of undersampling schemes and ratios. The proposed method (dual-DLMRI) achieves better reconstruction quality than conventional reconstruction methods, with the peak signal-to-noise ratio being 7 dB higher. The advantages of the dual dictionaries are obvious compared with the single dictionary. Parameter variations ranging from 50% to 200% only bias the image quality within 15% in terms of the peak signal-to-noise ratio. Dual-DLMRI effectively uses the a priori information in the dual-dictionary scheme and provides dramatically improved reconstruction quality. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Band structure of a three-dimensional topological insulator quantum wire in the presence of a magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Jiang, Liwei; Zheng, Yisong

    2016-07-13

    By means of a numerical diagonalization approach, we calculate the electronic structure of a three-dimensional topological insulator (3DTI) quantum wire (QW) in the presence of a magnetic field. The QW can be viewed as a 3DTI film with lateral surfaces, when its rectangular cross section has a large aspect ratio. Our calculation indicates that nonchiral edge states emerge because of the confined states at the lateral surfaces. These states completely cover the valence band region among the Landau levels, which reasonably account for the absence of the [Formula: see text] quantum Hall effect in the relevant experimental works. In an ultrathin 3DTI film, inversion between the electron-type and hole-type bands occurs, which leads to the so-called pseudo-spin Hall effect. In a 3DTI QW with a square cross section, a tilting magnetic field can establish well-defined Landau levels in all four surfaces. In such a case, the quantum Hall edge states are localized at the square corners, characterized by the linearly crossing one-dimensional band profile. And they can be shifted between the adjacent corners by simply rotating the magnetic field.

  1. Usefulness of three-dimensional magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography with partial maximum intensity projection for diagnosing autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Shin; Fujinaga, Yasunari; Watanabe, Takayuki; Maruyama, Masahiro; Muraki, Takashi; Takahashi, Masaaki; Fujita, Akira; Fujita, Sachie; Kurozumi, Masahiro; Ueda, Kazuhiko; Hamano, Hideaki; Kawa, Shigeyuki; Kadoya, Masumi

    To compare three-dimensional magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) with/without partial maximum intensity projection (MIP) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). Three-dimensional MRCP and ERCP images were retrospectively analyzed in 24 patients with AIP. We evaluated the narrowing length of the main pancreatic duct (NR-MPD), multiple skipped MPD narrowing (SK-MPD), and side branches arising from the narrowed portion of the MPD (SB-MPD) using four MRCP datasets: 5 original images (MIP 5 ), 10 original images (MIP 10 ), all original images (full-MIP), and a combination of these three datasets (a-MIP). The images were scored using a 3- or 5-point scale. The scores of the four MRCP datasets were statistically analyzed, and the positive rate of each finding was compared between MRCP and ERCP. The median scores for SB-MPD on MIP 5 and a-MIP were significantly higher than those on MIP 10 and full-MIP. In other words, partial MIP is superior to full-MIP for visualization of detailed structures. The positive rate for SB-MPD on full-MIP was significantly lower than that on ERCP, whereas the positive rate on MIP 5 , MIP 10 , and a-MIP was not significantly different from that on ERCP. Moreover, the positive rate for NR-MPD and SK-MPD on the MRCP images was significantly higher than that on the ERCP images. Partial MIP is useful for evaluating the MPD and is comparable with ERCP for diagnosing AIP. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Three-dimensional micro assembly of a hinged nickel micro device by magnetic lifting and micro resistance welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chun-Wei; Hsu, Wensyang

    2009-01-01

    The three-dimensional micro assembly of hinged nickel micro devices by magnetic lifting and micro resistance welding is proposed here. By an electroplating-based surface machining process, the released nickel structure with the hinge mechanism can be fabricated. Lifting of the released micro structure to different tilted angles is accomplished by controlling the positions of a magnet beneath the device. An in situ electro-thermal actuator is used here to provide the pressing force in micro resistance welding for immobilizing the tilted structure. The proposed technique is shown to immobilize micro devices at controlled angles ranging from 14° to 90° with respect to the substrate. Design parameters such as the electro-thermal actuator and welding beam width are also investigated. It is found that there is a trade-off in beam width design between large contact pressure and low thermal deformation. Different dominated effects from resistivity enhancement and contact area enlargement during the welding process are also observed in the dynamic resistance curves. Finally, a lifted and immobilized electro-thermal bent-beam actuator is shown to displace upward about 27.7 µm with 0.56 W power input to demonstrate the capability of electrical transmission at welded joints by the proposed 3D micro assembly technique

  3. Magnetic field reconnection and evolution of flux ropes in the dayside magnetosheath: A three-dimensional global hybrid simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Z.; Lin, Y.; Du, A.; Wang, X.; Lu, Q.; Wu, M.; Ge, Y. S.

    2017-12-01

    Generation and structure of magnetic reconnection in the dayside magnetosheath due to the interaction of an interplanetary tangential discontinuity (TD) with the Earth's bow shock (BS) and magnetosphere, is investigated by performing a three-dimensional (3-D) global-scale hybrid simulation. Results from several runs are presented, which are performed for solar wind TDs possessing different shapes of the magnetic field and initial half-widths and the shear angle from 120° to 180°. Our results indicate a two-step compression processes in the transmitted TD, including a shock compression as the TD passes through the quasi-perpendicular bow shock and a subsequent convective compression while the TD is moving toward the magnetopause in the magnetosheath. However, the convective compression has always takes the dominant role when the TD passes through the quasi-parallel bow shock. When the transmitted TD becomes relatively thin, 3-D patchy reconnection is initiated in it, forming flux ropes in the magnetosheath. The interaction between the magnetosheath flux ropes and the magnetopause is also discussed.

  4. RECONSTRUCTING THE SUBSURFACE THREE-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETIC STRUCTURE OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION USING SDO/HMI OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintzoglou, Georgios; Zhang Jie

    2013-01-01

    A solar active region (AR) is a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic structure formed in the convection zone, whose property is fundamentally important for determining the coronal structure and solar activity when emerged. However, our knowledge of the detailed 3D structure prior to its emergence is rather poor, largely limited by the low cadence and sensitivity of previous instruments. Here, using the 45 s high-cadence observations from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we are able for the first time to reconstruct a 3D data cube and infer the detailed subsurface magnetic structure of NOAA AR 11158, and to characterize its magnetic connectivity and topology. This task is accomplished with the aid of the image-stacking method and advanced 3D visualization. We find that the AR consists of two major bipoles or four major polarities. Each polarity in 3D shows interesting tree-like structure, i.e., while the root of the polarity appears as a single tree-trunk-like tube, the top of the polarity has multiple branches consisting of smaller and thinner flux tubes which connect to the branches of the opposite polarity that is similarly fragmented. The roots of the four polarities align well along a straight line, while the top branches are slightly non-coplanar. Our observations suggest that an active region, even appearing highly complicated on the surface, may originate from a simple straight flux tube that undergoes both horizontal and vertical bifurcation processes during its rise through the convection zone.

  5. r-Process Nucleosynthesis from Three-dimensional Jet-driven Core-Collapse Supernovae with Magnetic Misalignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevi, Goni; Mösta, Philipp

    2018-03-01

    We investigate r-process nucleosynthesis in three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of jet-driven supernovae resulting from rapidly rotating, strongly magnetized core-collapse. We explore the effect of misaligning the pre-collapse magnetic field with respect to the rotation axis by performing four simulations: one aligned model and models with 15°, 30°, and 45° misalignments. The simulations we present employ a microphysical finite-temperature equation of state and a leakage scheme that captures the overall energetics and lepton number exchange due to post-bounce neutrino emission and absorption. We track the thermodynamic properties of the ejected material with Lagrangian tracer particles and analyse its composition with the nuclear reaction network SKYNET. By using different neutrino luminosities in post-processing the tracer data with SKYNET, we constrain the impact of uncertainties in neutrino luminosities. We find that, for the aligned model considered here, the use of an approximate leakage scheme results in neutrino luminosity uncertainties corresponding to a factor of 100-1000 uncertainty in the abundance of third peak r-process elements. Our results show that for misalignments of 30° or less, r-process elements are robustly produced as long as neutrino luminosities are reasonably low (≲ 5 × 1052 erg s-1). For a more extreme misalignment of 45°, we find the production of r-process elements beyond the second peak significantly reduced. We conclude that robust r-process nucleosynthesis in magnetorotational supernovae requires a progenitor stellar core with a large poloidal magnetic field component that is at least moderately (within ˜30°) aligned with the rotation axis.

  6. Three-dimensional Measurements of Flow Field and Contaminant Dispersion in Urban Environments using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Dipak; Divito, Nicholas; Byers, Matthew; White, William; Benson, Michael; van Poppel, Bret; Elkins, Christopher; Containment Dispersion Team

    2017-11-01

    The dispersion of a scalar contaminant through an urban environment is complex to simulate and current modeling techniques lack detailed validation data necessary to assess accuracy. This work provides a detailed data set for Computational Fluid Dynamic simulations as well as an analysis of fluid flow and contaminant dispersion across two incident angles, 0 and 45 degrees from the freestream, across an array of cubical buildings, with one building in the center column three times as tall. The contaminant is injected from the base behind the tall building. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques are used to collect three-dimensional, time-averaged, three-component velocity and concentration field data. The flow is conducted in a water channel at a fully turbulent condition. The 0 degree case shows symmetrical velocity flow around each building with counter-rotating vortices immediately behind the tall building. Scalar contaminant dispersion in this array shows a rapid draw of higher concentration fluid up the back of the tall building, which is advected downstream. The 45 degree array shows similar patterns with vortices covering a larger area in the wake of the tall building. Analysis of the streamlines around the tall building indicate more `mechanical' dispersion due to the lateral spreading of the streamlines. These experiments should help improve prediction performance.

  7. Assessment of maxillary sinus volume for the sinus lift operation by three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, C F; Staff, R T; Redpath, T W; Needham, G; Renny, N M

    2000-05-01

    To calculate sinus and bone graft volumes and vertical bone heights from sequential magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations in patients undergoing a sinus lift operation. MRI scans were obtained pre-operatively and at 10 days and 10 weeks post-operatively, using a 0.95 tesla MRI scanner and a three-dimensional (3D) magnetisation prepared, rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MP-RAGE) sequence. Estimates of the bone graft volumes required for a desired vertical bone height were made from the pre-operative MRI scan. Measurements of the graft volumes and bone heights actually achieved were made from the post-operative scans. The MRI appearance of the graft changed between the 10 day and 10 week scans. We have proposed a technique which has the potential to give the surgeon an estimate of the optimum volume of graft for the sinus lift operation from the pre-operative MRI scan alone and demonstrated its application in a single patient. Changes in the sequential MRI appearance of the graft are consistent with replacement of fluid by a matrix of trabecular bone.

  8. Influence of Spatial Resolution in Three-dimensional Cine Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging on the Accuracy of Hemodynamic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Atsushi; Isoda, Haruo; Morita, Kento; Mori, Marika; Watanabe, Tomoya; Ishiguro, Kenta; Komori, Yoshiaki; Kosugi, Takafumi

    2017-10-10

    We aim to elucidate the effect of spatial resolution of three-dimensional cine phase contrast magnetic resonance (3D cine PC MR) imaging on the accuracy of the blood flow analysis, and examine the optimal setting for spatial resolution using flow phantoms. The flow phantom has five types of acrylic pipes that represent human blood vessels (inner diameters: 15, 12, 9, 6, and 3 mm). The pipes were fixed with 1% agarose containing 0.025 mol/L gadolinium contrast agent. A blood-mimicking fluid with human blood property values was circulated through the pipes at a steady flow. Magnetic resonance (MR) images (three-directional phase images with speed information and magnitude images for information of shape) were acquired using the 3-Tesla MR system and receiving coil. Temporal changes in spatially-averaged velocity and maximum velocity were calculated using hemodynamic analysis software. We calculated the error rates of the flow velocities based on the volume flow rates measured with a flowmeter and examined measurement accuracy. When the acrylic pipe was the size of the thoracicoabdominal or cervical artery and the ratio of pixel size for the pipe was set at 30% or lower, spatially-averaged velocity measurements were highly accurate. When the pixel size ratio was set at 10% or lower, maximum velocity could be measured with high accuracy. It was difficult to accurately measure maximum velocity of the 3-mm pipe, which was the size of an intracranial major artery, but the error for spatially-averaged velocity was 20% or less. Flow velocity measurement accuracy of 3D cine PC MR imaging for pipes with inner sizes equivalent to vessels in the cervical and thoracicoabdominal arteries is good. The flow velocity accuracy for the pipe with a 3-mm-diameter that is equivalent to major intracranial arteries is poor for maximum velocity, but it is relatively good for spatially-averaged velocity.

  9. Time-of-flight spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrico, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    The flight time of an ion in an inhomogeneous, oscillatory electric field (IOFE) is an m/e-dependent property of this field and is independent of the initial position and velocity. The d.c. component of the equation of motion for an ion in the IOFE describes a harmonic oscillation of constant period. When ions oscillate for many periods with one species overtaking another the motion may no longer be truly periodic although the resulting period or 'quasi-period' still remains independent of the initial conditions. This period or 'quasi-period' is used in the time-of-flight mass spectrometer described. The principle of operation is also described and both analytical and experimental results are reported. (B.D.)

  10. Three-dimensional Fourier transformation constructive interference in steady state magnetic resonance imaging of the inner ear in patients with unilateral and bilateral Meniere's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mateijsen, DJM; Van Hengel, PWJ; Krikke, AP; Van Huffelen, WM; Wit, HP; Albers, FWJ

    Objective: In this study, three-dimensional Fourier transformation constructive interference in steady state (3DFT-CISS) magnetic resonance imaging was used to quantify the distance between the vertical part of the posterior semicircular canal and the posterior fossa as a measure of the

  11. Three dimensional boundary displacement due to stable ideal kink modes excited by external n = 2 magnetic perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willensdorfer, M.; Strumberger, E.; Suttrop, W.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, R.; Birkenmeier, G.; Brida, D.; Cavedon, M.; Denk, S. S.; Igochine, V.; Giannone, L.; Kirk, A.; Kirschner, J.; Medvedeva, A.; Odstrčil, T.; Ryan, D. A.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team; The EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-11-01

    In low-collisionality (ν\\star) scenarios exhibiting mitigation of edge localized mode (ELMs), stable ideal kink modes at the edge are excited by externally applied magnetic perturbation (MP)-fields. In ASDEX Upgrade these modes can cause three-dimensional (3D) boundary displacements up to the centimeter range. These displacements have been measured using toroidally localized high resolution diagnostics and rigidly rotating n=2 MP-fields with various applied poloidal mode spectra. These measurements are compared to non-linear 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibria calculated by VMEC. Comprehensive comparisons have been conducted, which consider for instance plasma movements due to the position control system, attenuation due to internal conductors and changes in the edge pressure profiles. VMEC accurately reproduces the amplitude of the displacement and its dependencies on the applied poloidal mode spectra. Quantitative agreement is found around the low field side (LFS) midplane. The response at the plasma top is qualitatively compared. The measured and predicted displacements at the plasma top maximize when the applied spectra is optimized for ELM-mitigation. The predictions from the vacuum modeling generally fails to describe the displacement at the LFS midplane as well as at the plasma top. When the applied mode spectra is set to maximize the displacement, VMEC and the measurements clearly surpass the predictions from the vacuum modeling by a factor of four. Minor disagreements between VMEC and the measurements are discussed. This study underlines the importance of the stable ideal kink modes at the edge for the 3D boundary displacement in scenarios relevant for ELM-mitigation.

  12. Three-Dimensional Constructive Interference in Steady State Sequences and Phase-Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Arrested Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkafrawy, Fatma; Reda, Ihab; Elsirafy, Mohamed; Gawad, Mohamed Saied Abdel; Elnaggar, Alaa; Khalek Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the role of three-dimensional constructive interference in steady state (3D-CISS) sequences and phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) in patients with arrested hydrocephalus. A prospective study of 20 patients with arrested hydrocephalus was carried out. All patients underwent PC-MRI and 3D-CISS for assessment of the aqueduct. Axial (through-plane), sagittal (in-plane) PC-MRI, and sagittal 3D-CISS were applied to assess the cerebral aqueduct and the spontaneous third ventriculostomy if present. Aqueductal patency was graded using 3D-CISS and PC-MRI. Quantitative analysis of flow through the aqueduct was performed using PC-MRI. The causes of obstruction were aqueductal obstruction in 75% (n = 15), third ventricular obstruction in 5% (n = 1), and fourth ventricular obstruction in 20% (n = 4). The cause of arrest of hydrocephalus was spontaneous third ventriculostomy in 65% (n = 13), endoscopic third ventriculostomy in 10% (n = 2), and ventriculoperitoneal shunt in 5% (n = 1), and no cause could be detected in 20% of patients (n = 4). There is a positive correlation (r = 0.80) and moderate agreement (κ = 0.509) of grading with PC-MRI and 3D-CISS sequences. The mean peak systolic velocity of cerebrospinal fluid was 1.86 ± 2.48 cm/second, the stroke volume was 6.43 ± 13.81 μL/cycle, and the mean flow was 0.21 ± 0.32 mL/minute. We concluded that 3D-CISS and PC-MRI are noninvasive sequences for diagnosis of the level and cause of arrested hydrocephalus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Two iridates, two models, and two approaches: A comparative study on magnetism in three-dimensional honeycomb materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eric Kin-Ho; Rau, Jeffrey G.; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-05-01

    Two recent theoretical works studied the role of Kitaev interactions in the newly observed incommensurate magnetic order in the hyper-honeycomb (β -Li2IrO3 ) and stripy-honeycomb (γ -Li2IrO3 ) iridates. Each of these works analyzed a different model (J K Γ versus coupled zigzag chain model) using a contrasting method (classical versus soft-spin analysis). The lack of commonality between these works precludes meaningful comparisons and a proper understanding of these unusual orderings. In this study, we complete the unfinished picture initiated by these two works by solving both models with both approaches for both three-dimensional (3D) honeycomb iridates. Through comparisons between all combinations of models, techniques, and materials, we find that the bond-isotropic J K Γ model consistently predicts the experimental phase of β -Li2IrO3 regardless of the method used, while the experimental phase of γ -Li2IrO3 can be generated by the soft-spin approach with eigenmode mixing irrespective of the model used. To gain further insights, we solve a one-dimensional (1D) quantum spin-chain model related to both 3D models using the density matrix renormalization group method to form a benchmark. We discover that in the 1D model, incommensurate correlations in the classical and soft-spin analysis survive in the quantum limit only in the presence of the symmetric-off-diagonal exchange Γ found in the J K Γ model. The relevance of these results to the real materials is also discussed.

  14. Single-component molecular conductor [Cu(dmdt)2] with three-dimensionally arranged magnetic moments exhibiting a coupled electric and magnetic transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Biao; Idobata, Yuki; Kobayashi, Akiko; Cui, HengBo; Kato, Reizo; Takagi, Rina; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Kanoda, Kazushi; Kobayashi, Hayao

    2012-08-01

    Crystals of the single-component molecular conductor [Cu(dmdt)(2)] (dmdt = dimethyltetrathiafulvalenedithiolate) were prepared as a molecular system, with three-dimensionally arranged magnetic moments embedded in "sea" of π conduction electrons. [Cu(dmdt)(2)] had fairly large room-temperature conductivity (110 S cm(-1)) and exhibited weakly metallic behavior near room temperature. Below 265 K, the resistivity (R) increased very slowly with decreasing temperature and then increased rapidly, indicating a transition from a highly conducting state to an insulating state near 95 K. The magnetic susceptibility showed Curie-Weiss behavior at 100-300 K (C = 0.375 emu/mol, Θ = 180 K). The Curie constant and the high-temperature resistivity behavior indicate that conduction electrons and three-dimensionally arranged magnetic moments coexist in the crystal. The ESR intensity increased down to about 95 K. The ESR signal was broadened and decreased abruptly near 95 K, suggesting that electric and antiferromagnetic transitions occurred simultaneously near 95 K. The crystal structure was determined down to 13 K. To examine the stability of the twisted conformation of Cu complex with dithiolate ligands, the dihedral angle dependence of the conformational energy of an isolated M(L)(2)(n-) molecule was calculated, which revealed the dihedral angle dependence on the ligand (L) and the oxidation state of the molecule (n). High-pressure four-probe resistivity measurements were performed at 3.3-9.3 GPa using a diamond anvil cell. The small resistivity increase observed at 3.3 GPa below 60 K suggested that the insulating transition observed at ambient pressure near 95 K was essentially suppressed at 3.3 GPa. The intermolecular magnetic interactions were examined on the basis of simple mean field theory of antiferromagnetic transition and the calculated intermolecular overlap integrals of the singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) of Cu(dmdt)(2).

  15. Plaques of Nonstenotic Basilar Arteries with Isolated Pontine Infarction on Three-dimensional High Isotropic Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Jin Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Three-dimensional VISTA images enable detection of BA plaques not visualized by MRA. BA plaques could be found in both the IPI and non-IPI group. However, IPI group showed plaques more extensively in BA than the non-IPI group.

  16. Three-dimensional ultrasound in the diagnosis of Müllerian duct anomalies and concordance with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, C; Martínez Ten, P; Cantarero, R; Diaz, D; Pérez Pedregosa, J; Barrón, E; Labrador, E; Ruiz López, L

    2010-05-01

    To demonstrate the value of three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound in the diagnosis of uterine malformations and its concordance with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study included 286 women diagnosed with uterine malformation by 3D ultrasound, having been referred to our clinics on suspicion of uterine malformation following clinical and/or conventional two-dimensional ultrasound examination. With the exception of three with intact hymen, patients underwent both bimanual examination and speculoscopy before and/or after sonography. MRI was performed in 65 cases. We analyzed the diagnostic concordance between the techniques in the study of uterine malformations. Using 3D ultrasound we diagnosed: one case with uterine agenesis; 10 with unicornuate uterus, four of which also underwent MRI; six with didelphic uterus, one of which had MRI; 45 with bicornuate uterus, 12 of which had MRI; 125 with septate uterus (18 with two cervices), 42 of which had MRI (six with two cervices); 96 with arcuate uterus, three of which had MRI; and three with diethylstilbestrol (DES) iatrogenic uterine malformations, all of which had MRI. Among the 65 which underwent MRI, the diagnosis was: four cases with unicornuate uterus, 10 with bicornuate uterus (two with two cervices), 45 with septate uterus (five with two cervices), three with arcuate uterus and three with DES-related uterine malformations. The concordance between 3D ultrasound and MRI was very good (kappa index, 0.880 (95% CI, 0.769-0.993)). Discrepancies in diagnosis between the two techniques occurred in four cases. There was very good concordance in the diagnosis of associated findings (kappa index, 0.878 (95% CI, 0.775-0.980)), this analysis identifying differences in two cases. There is a high degree of concordance between 3D ultrasound and MRI in the diagnosis of uterine malformations, the relationship between cavity and fundus being visualized equally well with both techniques. 3D ultrasound should be complemented by

  17. User's manual for three dimensional FDTD version C code for scattering from frequency-independent dielectric and magnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggs, John H.; Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1992-01-01

    The Penn State Finite Difference Time Domain Electromagnetic Scattering Code Version C is a three-dimensional numerical electromagnetic scattering code based on the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique. The supplied version of the code is one version of our current three-dimensional FDTD code set. The manual given here provides a description of the code and corresponding results for several scattering problems. The manual is organized into 14 sections: introduction, description of the FDTD method, operation, resource requirements, Version C code capabilities, a brief description of the default scattering geometry, a brief description of each subroutine, a description of the include file (COMMONC.FOR), a section briefly discussing radar cross section computations, a section discussing some scattering results, a new problem checklist, references, and figure titles.

  18. Three-dimensional visualization and measurement of conformal dose distributions using magnetic resonance imaging of bang polymer gel dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Maryanski, Marek J.; Eastman, Peter; Holcomb, Stephen D.; Yashan, Zhang; Avison, Robin G.; Sanders, Michael; Gore, John C.

    1997-01-01

    nonlinear least-squares fit based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The program also creates a dose-to-R2 calibration function by fitting a polynomial to a set of dose and R2 data points, obtained from gels irradiated in test tubes to known doses. This function can then be applied to any other R2 map, so that a dose map can be computed and displayed. Results: Through exposure to known doses of radiation, the gel has been shown to respond linearly with dose in the range of 0 to 10 Gy, and its response is independent of the beam energy or modality. Dose distributions have been imaged in orthogonal planes, and can be displayed in a convenient form for comparison with isodose plans. The response of the gel is stable; the gel can be irradiated at any time after its manufacture, and imaging can be conducted any time following a brief interval after irradiation. Conclusion: The polymer gel dosimeter has been shown to be a valuable device for displaying three-dimensional dose distributions. The imaged dose distribution can be compared easily with calculated dose distributions, to validate a treatment planning system. In the future, gels may be prepared in anthropomorphic phantoms, to confirm unique patient dose distributions

  19. Accuracy and effectiveness of self-gating signals in free-breathing three-dimensional cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuo; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Yan-Chun; Yang, Jie; Xie, Yao-Qin; Fu, Nan; Wang, Yi; Gao, Song

    2016-12-01

    Conventional multiple breath-hold two-dimensional (2D) balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) presents many difficulties in cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Recently, a self-gated free-breathing three-dimensional (3D) SSFP technique has been proposed as an alternative in many studies. However, the accuracy and effectiveness of self-gating signals have been barely studied before. Since self-gating signals are crucially important in image reconstruction, a systematic study of self-gating signals and comparison with external monitored signals are needed. Previously developed self-gated free-breathing 3D SSFP techniques are used on twenty-eight healthy volunteers. Both electrocardiographic (ECG) and respiratory bellow signals are also acquired during the scan as external signals. Self-gating signal and external signal are compared by trigger and gating window. Gating window is proposed to evaluate the accuracy and effectiveness of respiratory self-gating signal. Relative deviation of the trigger and root-mean-square-deviation of the cycle duration are calculated. A two-tailed paired t-test is used to identify the difference between self-gating and external signals. A Wilcoxon signed rank test is used to identify the difference between peak and valley self-gating triggers. The results demonstrate an excellent correlation (P = 0, R > 0.99) between self-gating and external triggers. Wilcoxon signed rank test shows that there is no significant difference between peak and valley self-gating triggers for both cardiac (H = 0, P > 0.10) and respiratory (H = 0, P > 0.44) motions. The difference between self-gating and externally monitored signals is not significant (two-tailed paired-sample t-test: H = 0, P > 0.90). The self-gating signals could demonstrate cardiac and respiratory motion accurately and effectively as ECG and respiratory bellow. The difference between the two methods is not significant and can be explained. Furthermore, few ECG trigger errors

  20. TOFI: An isochronous time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollnik, H.

    1987-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer was constructed to measure the masses of neutron-rich recoils produced in proton-induced fragmentation reactions. This system consists of four sector magnets designed such that the overall flight time is independent of the velocity of the recoil ions and thus depends only on their mass-to-charge ratios. (orig.)

  1. Sliding time of flight: sliding time of flight MR angiography using a dynamic image reconstruction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Joonsung; Seo, Hyunseok; Lim, Yongwan; Han, Yeji; Park, HyunWook

    2015-03-01

    To obtain three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography having high contrast between vessel and stationary background tissue, a novel technique called sliding time of flight (TOF) is proposed. The proposed method relies on the property that flow-related enhancement (FRE) is maximized at the blood-entering slice in an imaging slab. For the proposed sliding TOF, a sliding stack-of-stars sampling and a dynamic MR image reconstruction algorithm were developed. To verify the performance of the proposed method, in vivo study was performed and the results were compared with multiple overlapping thin 3D slab acquisition (MOTSA) and sliding interleaved ky (SLINKY). In MOTSA and SLINKY, the variation of FRE resulted in severe venetian blind (MOTSA) or ghost (SLINKY) artifacts, while the vessel-contrast increased as the flip angle of radiofrequency (RF) pulses increased. On the other hand, the proposed method could provide high-contrast angiograms with reduced FRE-related artifacts. The sliding TOF can provide 3D angiography without image artifacts even if high flip angle RF pulses with thick slab excitation are used. Although remains of subsampling artifacts can be present in the reconstructed images, they can be reduced by MIP operation and resolved further by regularization techniques. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Amperometric carbohydrate antigen 19-9 immunosensor based on three dimensional ordered macroporous magnetic Au film coupling direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qi [College of Sciences, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Chen, Xiaojun, E-mail: chenxj_njut@126.com [College of Sciences, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Tang, Yin [Zhangjiagang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhangjiagang 215600 (China); Ge, Lingna; Guo, Buhua [College of Sciences, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Yao, Cheng, E-mail: yaochengnjut@163.com [College of Sciences, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Three dimensional ordered macroporous magnetic electrode was newly used in electrochemical immunosensor. • The large surface area of macroporous magnetic electrode could improve the immobilized amount of antibody. • Au nanoparticles functionalized SBA-15 was used to immobilize enzyme labeled Ab₂ and enzyme. • Macroporous magnetic electrode and Au nanoparticles composite facilitated the direct electron transfer of enzyme. • The immunoassay avoided adding electron transfer mediator, simplifying the procedure. Abstract: A sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) antigen based on the immobilization of primary antibody (Ab₁) on three dimensional ordered macroporous magnetic (3DOMM) electrode, and the direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) that was used as both the label of secondary antibody (Ab₂) and the blocking reagent. The 3DOMM electrode was fabricated by introducing core–shell Au–SiO₂@Fe₃O₄ nanospheres onto the surface of three dimensional ordered macroporous (3DOM) Au electrode via the application of an external magnet. Au nanoparticles functionalized SBA-15 (Au@SBA-15) was conjugated to the HRP labeled secondary antibody (HRP-Ab₂) through the Au–SH or Au–NH₃⁺ interaction, and HRP was also used as the block reagent. The formation of antigen–antibody complex made the combination of Au@SBA-15 and 3DOMM exhibit remarkable synergistic effects for accelerating direct electron transfer (DET) between HRP and the electrode. Under the optimal conditions, the DET current signal increased proportionally to CA 19-9 concentration in the range of 0.05 to 15.65 U mL⁻¹ with a detection limit of 0.01 U mL⁻¹. Moreover, the immunosensor showed high selectivity, good stability, satisfactory reproducibility and regeneration. Importantly, the developed method was used to assay clinical serum specimens, achieving a good relation with those obtained from

  3. Optimization and Evaluation of Magnetic Bead Separation Combined with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF MS for Proteins Profiling of Peritoneal Dialysis Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Peritoneal dialysis effluent (PDE potentially carries an archive of peptides relevant to pathological processes in abdominal and surrounding tissues. Magnetic beads and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry is one such approach that offers a unique tool for profiling of peptides, but this approach has not been used in the PDE analysis. In this study, we developed a strategy for screening PDE proteins <15 kDa and applied this technique to identify potential biomarkers for peritonitis. We examined four kinds of magnetic beads, including a carbon series (C3, C8, weak cation exchange (WCX and immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC-Cu beads. Samples processed with IMAC-Cu magnetic beads consistently showed more MS signals across all beads within the measured mass range. Moreover, there was no difference in the number and morphology of MS signals between concentrated and unconcentrated samples. The PDE peptidome pattern, based on a panel of 15 peaks, accurately recognized peritonitis PD patients from peritonitis-free patients with sensitivity of 90.5% and specificity of 94.7% respectively. Therefore, IMAC-Cu magnetic beads and unconcentrated samples can be used as a fast and cost-effective approach for sample preparation prior to more in-depth discovery of predictive biomarkers of disease in patients on dialysis.

  4. A novel oxalate-based three-dimensional coordination polymer showing magnetic ordering and high proton conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mon, Marta; Vallejo, Julia; Pasán, Jorge; Fabelo, Oscar; Train, Cyrille; Verdaguer, Michel; Ohkoshi, Shin-Ichi; Tokoro, Hiroko; Nakagawa, Kosuke; Pardo, Emilio

    2017-11-07

    A novel three-dimensional (3D) coordination polymer with the formula (C 3 N 2 H 5 ) 4 [MnCr 2 (ox) 6 ]·5H 2 O (2), where ox = oxalate and C 3 N 2 H 5 = imidazolium cation, is reported. Single crystal X-ray diffraction reveals that this porous coordination polymer adopts a chiral three-dimensional quartz-like architecture, with the guest imidazolium cations and water molecules being hosted in its pores. This novel multifunctional material exhibits both a ferromagnetic ordering at T C = 3.0 K, related to the host MnCr 2 network, and high proton conductivity [1.86 × 10 -3 S cm -1 at 295 K and 88% relative humidity (RH)] due to the presence of the acidic imidazolium cations and free water molecules. The similarity of the structure of compound 2 to that of the previously reported analogous compound (NH 4 ) 4 [MnCr 2 (ox) 6 ]·4H 2 O, (1), also allows us to analyse, to a certain extent, the effect of the acidity of the proton donating guest molecules on proton conduction properties. 2 hosts, in one-dimensional (1D) channels, imidazolium cations, which are more acidic than the ammonium ones in 1 and, as a consequence, 2 shows higher proton conduction than 1, highlighting the effect of the pK a of the proton donating guest molecules on proton conductivity.

  5. Diameter measurements of cerebral arteries on three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yuzhong; Zhang Xuelin; Chang Renmin; Cang Peng; Liu Xingyuan; Xia Qiong

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To measure and establish the normal values of diameters of Chinese cerebral arteries on MRA. Methods: The diameters of the cerebral arteries in 100 persons with normal findings on 3D TOF MRA were measured with projector. There were 53 males and 47 females with the mean age of 45.8 years. 12 subjects were younger than 14 years and 88 were older than 14 years. The diameter differences between the left and the right, in gender and in ages were analyzed statistically. Results: The measurements of each arterial diameter were as follows: Ophthalmic artery: (0.8 ±0.2) mm in male, (0.9±0.2) mm in female. C2 segment of internal carotid artery (ICA-C2): (3.0±0.3) mm (≤14 years) and (3.5±0.6) mm (>14 years) in male, (2.8±0.6) mm (≤14 years) and (3.1±0.5) mm (>14 years) in female. ICA-C4: (4.3±0.6) mm in male, (3.9±0.6) mm in female. A1 segment of anterior cerebral artery (ACA-A1): (2.1±0.4) mm in male, (2.1±0.4) mm in female. Anterior communicating artery (ACoA) : (1.4±0.4) mm in male, (1.3±0.4) mm in female. M1 segment of middle cerebral artery (MCA-M1) : (2.7±0.4) mm in male, (2.6±0.4) mm in female. Basilar artery (BA) : (2.9±0.5) mm in male, (2.8±0.4) mm in female. P1 segment of posterior cerebral artery (PCA-P1) : (2.1±0.5) mm on the left and (2.0±0.5) mm on the right in male, (2.0±0.3) mm on the left and (1.9±0.3) mm on the right in female. PCA-P2: (1.8±0.4) mm in male, (1.7±0.3) mm in female. Posterior communicating artery (PCoA): (1.1±0.3) mm in male, (1.2±0.4) mm in female. Among various diameters, only PCA-P1 had significant difference between the left and the right ( P=0.003); only MCA-M1 (P =0.048), PCA-P1 (P=0.012), ICA-C2 (P=0.000) and C4 segments (P=0.000) had significant differences in gender, respectively; and only ICA-C2 had significant difference in age (P=0.001). Of these significantly different diameters, the diameters in male were larger than those in female. There were significant correlation between PCA-P1 and PCA-P2 (r=0.652, P=0.000), and between ICA-C2 and ICA-C4 in female group (r=0.550, P=0.000), respectively. Conclusions: The normal values of diameter of cerebral arteries on MR angiograms may play a reference role in diagnosing cerebral vascular diseases

  6. Three-dimensional magnetic spin-echo small-angle neutron scattering and neutron depolarization: A comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekveldt, M. Theo; Dijk, Niels H. van; Grigoriev, Serguei V.; Kraan, Wicher H.; Bouwman, Wim G.

    2006-01-01

    The recently developed magnetic spin-echo small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique provides unique information about the distance correlation of the local vector magnetization as a function of the spin-echo length within a magnetic material. The technique probes the magnetic correlations on a length scale from 10 nm up to 10 μm within the bulk of a magnetic material by evaluating the Larmor precession of a polarized neutron beam in a spin-echo setup. The characteristics of the spin-echo SANS technique are discussed and compared to those of the more conventional neutron depolarization technique. Both of these techniques probe the average size of the magnetic inhomogeneities and the local magnetic texture. The magnetic spin-echo SANS technique gives information on the size distribution of these magnetic inhomogeneities perpendicular to the beam and, in principle, independent on the local magnetic induction. This information is not accessible by the neutron depolarization technique that gives the average size parallel to the beam multiplied with the square of the local magnetic induction. The basic possibilities of the magnetic spin-echo SANS technique are demonstrated by experiments on samples with a strong magnetic texture

  7. Three-dimensional analysis of the magnetic structure in Hokkaido, Japan; Hokkaido no sanjigen jiki kozo kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, M. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    The magnetic structure in Hokkaido was quantitatively analyzed by the magnetic anomaly distribution. This paper describes its characteristics. Detection of structural boundaries and 3-D analysis of double-layer structure were conducted for the regional magnetic data in a region with about 500 km square. There was not so large difference in patterns of magnetic anomaly distribution between the case that the direction of magnetization was set at 45{degree} to the west during the geomagnetic conversion according to Segawa and Oshima and the case that it was set as same as the current geomagnetic direction. The method of Blakely and Simpson was useful to detect the boundaries of magnetic structures. The structural boundaries obtained were more linear than the iso-magnetic contour lines. A new method has been conceived in which the approximation of 3-D magnetic structure analysis can be deduced, and the irregularity of magnetic basement can be determined by the repeated calculation. In practice, this method was applied to the magnetic data in the whole Hokkaido. The calculation was stably converged. It was found that the magnetic structure obtained in the Kamuikotan/Ishikari-Kitakami magnetic belt exhibited a fault structure having steep slopes accompanied by the basin structure in the western boundaries. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Feasibility and Accuracy of Automated Software for Transthoracic Three-Dimensional Left Ventricular Volume and Function Analysis: Comparisons with Two-Dimensional Echocardiography, Three-Dimensional Transthoracic Manual Method, and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, Gloria; Piazzese, Concetta; Lang, Roberto M; Muratori, Manuela; Chiorino, Elisa; Mapelli, Massimo; Fusini, Laura; Ali, Sarah Ghulam; Gripari, Paola; Pontone, Gianluca; Andreini, Daniele; Pepi, Mauro

    2017-11-01

    Recently, a new automated software package (HeartModel) was developed to obtain three-dimensional (3D) left ventricular (LV) volumes using a model-based algorithm (MBA) with a "one-button" simple system and user-adjustable slider. The aims of this study were to verify the feasibility and accuracy of the MBA in comparison with other commonly used imaging techniques in a large unselected population, to evaluate possible accuracy improvements of free operator border adjustments or changes of the slider's default position, and to identify differences in method accuracy related to specific pathologies. This prospective study included consecutive 200 patients. LV volumes and ejection fraction were obtained using the MBA and compared with the two-dimensional biplane method, the 3D full-volume (3DFV) modality, and, in 90 of 200 cases, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) measurements. To evaluate the optimal position of the slider with respect to the 3DFV and CMR modalities, a set of threefold cross-validation experiments was performed. Optimized and manually corrected LV volumes obtained using the MBA were also tested. Linear correlation and Bland-Altman analysis were used to assess intertechnique agreement. Automatic volumes were feasible in 194 patients (94.5%), with a mean processing time of 29 ± 10 sec. MBA-derived volumes correlated significantly with all evaluated methods, with slight overestimation of two-dimensional biplane and slight underestimation of CMR measurements. Higher correlations were found between MBA and 3DFV measurements, with negligible differences both in volumes (overestimation) and in LV ejection fraction (underestimation), respectively. Optimization of the user-adjustable slider position improved the correlation and markedly reduced the bias between the MBA and 3DFV or CMR. The accuracy of MBA volumes was lower in some pathologies for incorrect definition of LV endocardium. The MBA is highly feasible, reproducible, and rapid, and it correlates

  9. Common site of subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head based on three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasaki, Kenyu; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Karasuyama, Kazuyuki; Sonoda, Kazuhiko; Kubo, Yusuke; Iwamoto, Yukihide [Kyushu University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the common sites of subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head (SIF) based on three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of MR images. In 33 hips of 31 consecutive patients diagnosed with SIF, 3-D reconstruction of the bone, fracture, and acetabular edge was performed using MR images. These 3-D images were used to measure the fractured areas and clarify the positional relationship between the fracture and degree of acetabular coverage. The fractured area in the anterior portion was significantly larger than in the posterior area. In 11 cases, the fractures contacted the acetabular edge and were distributed on the lateral portion. The indices of acetabular coverage (center-edge angle and acetabular head index) in these cases were less than the normal range. In the remaining 22 cases, the fractures were apart from the acetabular edge and distributed on the mediolateral centerline of the femoral head. The majority of these cases had normal acetabular coverage. The common site of SIF is the anterior portion. In addition, two types of SIF are proposed: (1) Lateral type: the contact stress between the acetabular edge and lateral portion of the femoral head causes SIF based on the insufficient acetabular coverage, and (2) Central type: the contact stress between the acetabular surface and the mediolateral center of the femoral head causes SIF independent from the insufficiency of acetabular coverage. These findings may be useful for considering the treatment and prevention of SIF. (orig.)

  10. Three-dimensional modeling of a portable medical device for magnetic separation of particles from biological fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Haitao [Department of Neurology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bockenfeld, Danny [Department of Mechanical, Material and Aerospace Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Rempfer, Dietmar [Department of Mechanical, Material and Aerospace Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Kaminski, Michael D [Chemical Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Rosengart, Axel J [Department of Neurology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2007-09-07

    A portable separator has been developed to quantitatively separate blood-borne magnetic spheres in potentially high-flow regimes for the human detoxification purpose. In the separator design, an array of biocompatible capillary tubing and magnetizable wires is immersed in an external magnetic field that is generated by two permanent magnets. The wires are magnetized and the high magnetic field gradient from the magnetized wires helps to collect blood-borne magnetic nano/micro-spheres from the blood flow. In this study, a 3D numerical model was created and the effect of tubing-wire configurations on the capture efficiency of the system was analyzed using COMSOL Multiphysics 3.3 (registered) . The results showed that the configuration characterized by bi-directionally alternating wires and tubes was the best design with respect to the four starting configurations. Preliminary in vitro experiments verified the numerical predictions. The results helped us to optimize a prototype portable magnetic separator that is suitable for rapid sequestration of magnetic nano/micro-spheres from the human blood stream while accommodating necessary clinical boundary conditions.

  11. Three-dimensional modeling of a portable medical device for magnetic separation of particles from biological fluids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.; Bockenfeld, D.; Rempfer, D.; Kaminski, M. D.; Rosengart, A. J.; Chemical Engineering; Univ. of Chicago; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

    2007-09-07

    A portable separator has been developed to quantitatively separate blood-borne magnetic spheres in potentially high-flow regimes for the human detoxification purpose. In the separator design, an array of biocompatible capillary tubing and magnetizable wires is immersed in an external magnetic field that is generated by two permanent magnets. The wires are magnetized and the high magnetic field gradient from the magnetized wires helps to collect blood-borne magnetic nano/micro-spheres from the blood flow. In this study, a 3D numerical model was created and the effect of tubing-wire configurations on the capture efficiency of the system was analyzed using COMSOL Multiphysics 3.3{reg_sign}. The results showed that the configuration characterized by bi-directionally alternating wires and tubes was the best design with respect to the four starting configurations. Preliminary in vitro experiments verified the numerical predictions. The results helped us to optimize a prototype portable magnetic separator that is suitable for rapid sequestration of magnetic nano/micro-spheres from the human blood stream while accommodating necessary clinical boundary conditions.

  12. Image Quality of the 3 Dimensional Phase-Contrast Technique in an Intracranial Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Artifacts Caused by Orthodontic Devices: A Comparison with 3 Dimensional Time-of-Flight Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Seong Jin; Kim, Young Soo; Hong, Hyun Sook; Kim, Dong Hun

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the degree of image distortion caused by orthodontic devices during a intracranial magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and to determine the effectiveness of the 3 dimensional phase-contrast (3D PC). Subjects were divided into group A (n = 20) wearing a home-made orthodontic device, and group B (n = 10) with an actual orthodontic device. A 3.0T MR scanner was used, applying 3D time-of-flight (TOF) and 3D PC. Two board-certified radiologists evaluated images independently based on a four point scale classifying segments of the circle of Willis. Magnetic susceptibility variations and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) on maximum intensity projection images were measured. In group A, scores of the 3D TOF and 3D PC were 2.84 ± 0.1 vs. 2.88 ± 0.1 (before) and 1.8 ± 0.4 vs 2.83 ± 0.1 (after wearing device), respectively. In group B, the scores of 3D TOF and 3D PC were 1.86 ± 0.43 and 2.81 ± 0.15 (p = 0.005), respectively. Magnetic susceptibility variations showed meaningful results after wearing the device (p = 0.0001). CNRs of the 3D PC before and after wearing device were 142.9 ± 6.6 vs. 140.8 ± 7.2 (p = 0.7507), respectively. In the 3D TOF, CNRs were 324.8 ± 25.4 vs. 466.3 ± 41.7 (p = 0.0001). The 3D PC may be a solution method for distorted images by magnetic susceptibility in the intracranial MRA compared with 3D TOF.

  13. Three-Dimensional MHD Simulation of FTEs Produced by Merging at an Isolated Point in a Sheared Magnetic Field Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J. C.; Sibeck, D. G.; Buchner, J.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Ferreira, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    We present predictions for the evolution of FTEs generated by localized bursts of reconnection on a planar magnetopause that separates a magnetosheath region of high densities and weak magnetic field from a magnetospheric region of low densities and strong magnetic field. The magnetic fields present a shear angle of 105 degrees. Reconnection forms a pair of FTEs each crossing the magnetopause in the field reversal region and bulging into the magnetosphere and magnetosheath. At their initial stage they can be characterized as flux tubes since the newly reconnected magnetic field lines are not twisted. Reconnection launches Alfvenic perturbations that propagate along the FTEs generating high-speed jets, which move the pair of FTEs in opposite directions. As the FTE moves, it displaces the ambient magnetic field and plasma producing bipolar magnetic field and plasma velocity signatures normal to the nominal magnetopause in the regions surrounding the FTE. The combination of the ambient plasma with the FTE flows generates a vortical velocity pattern around the reconnected field lines. During its evolution the FTE evolves to a flux rope configuration due to the twist of the magnetic field lines. The alfvenic perturbations propagate faster along the part of the FTE bulging into the magnetosphere than in the magnetosheath, and due to the differences between the plasma and magnetic field properties the perturbations have slightly different signatures in the two regions. As a consequence, the FTEs have different signatures depending on whether the satellite encounters the part bulging into the magnetosphere or into the magnetosheath.

  14. Modeling and Inversion of Magnetic Anomalies Caused by Sediment–Basement Interface Using Three-Dimensional Cauchy-Type Integrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Hongzhu; Zhdanov, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This letter introduces a new method for the modeling and inversion of magnetic anomalies caused by crystalline basements. The method is based on the 3-D Cauchy-type integral representation of the magnetic field. Traditional methods use volume integrals over the domains occupied by anomalous...... is particularly significant in solving problems of the modeling and inversion of magnetic data for the depth to the basement. In this letter, a novel method is proposed, which only requires discretizing the magnetic contrast surface for modeling and inversion. We demonstrate the method using several synthetic...... susceptibility and on the prismatic representation of the volumes with an anomalous susceptibility distribution. Such discretization is computationally expensive, particularly in 3-D cases. The technique of Cauchy-type integrals makes it possible to represent the magnetic field as surface integrals, which...

  15. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in the substantia nigra of healthy controls and patients with Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeger, Adriane; Godau, Jana; Berg, Daniela [University of Tuebingen, Department of Neurodegeneration, Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research and German Center for Neurodegenerative Disease (DZNE), Tuebingen (Germany); Chadzynski, Grzegorz; Klose, Uwe [University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    To investigate the substantia nigra in patients with Parkinson's disease three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging with high spatial resolution at 3 Tesla was performed. Regional variations of spectroscopic data between the rostral and caudal regions of the substantia nigra as well as the midbrain tegmentum areas were evaluated in healthy controls and patients with Parkinson's disease. Nine patients with Parkinson's disease and eight age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Data were acquired by using three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging measurements. The ratios between rostral and caudal voxels of the substantia nigra as well as the midbrain tegmentum areas were calculated for the main-metabolites N-acetyl aspartate, creatine, choline, and myo-inositol. Additionally, the metabolite/creatine ratios were calculated. In all subjects spectra of acceptable quality could be obtained with a nominal voxel size of 0.252 ml. The calculated rostral-to-caudal ratios of the metabolites as well as of the metabolite/creatine ratios showed with exception of choline/creatine ratio significant differences between healthy controls and patients with Parkinson's disease. The findings from this study indicate that regional variations in N-acetyl aspartate/creatine ratios in the regions of the substantia nigra may differentiate patients with Parkinson's disease and healthy controls. (orig.)

  16. Magnetite grain shape fabric and distribution anisotropy vs rock magnetic fabric: a three-dimensional case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, V.; Darrozes, J.; Gaillot, P.; Nédélec, A.; Launeau, P.

    1998-07-01

    Shape fabric and distribution anisotropy of magnetite grains in a highly ferromagnetic ( s. l.) syenite are determined for three mutually perpendicular planes on about 600 magnetite grains. The grains are lenticular with an average aspect ratio of about 2.0. Their preferred orientation, determined by the inertia tensor method, is consistent with the principal directions of the magnetic susceptibility ellipsoid and the axial ratios of the magnetic fabric ellipses are very close to those of the shape fabric ellipses (e.g. 1.41 and 1.39 in the section plane perpendicular to the magnetic foliation and parallel to the magnetic lineation). The anisotropic wavelet transform can detect and quantify the anisotropic distribution of the magnetite grains which are located interstitially along the feldspar grain boundaries. This anisotropic distribution has no noticeable effect on the rock's anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), since only a few percent of grains are close enough to interact magnetically. Therefore, it is realistic to consider that the AMS of ferromagnetic granitic rocks originates mainly from the shape fabric of anisotropic magnetite grains and a close correlation between the magnetic fabric and the magnetite grain shape fabric is expected.

  17. Three-dimensional neuroimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toga, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on new neuroimaging technologies that are revolutionizing the study of the brain be enabling investigators to visualize its structure and entire pattern of functional activity in three dimensions. The book provides a theoretical and practical explanation of the new science of creating three-dimensional computer images of the brain. The coverage includes a review of the technology and methodology of neuroimaging, the instrumentation and procedures, issues of quantification, analytic protocols, and descriptions of neuroimaging systems. Examples are given to illustrate the use of three-dimensional enuroimaging to quantitate spatial measurements, perform analysis of autoradiographic and histological studies, and study the relationship between brain structure and function

  18. Three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of linearly polarised Alfven wave dynamics in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiklauri, David

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies (e.g., Malara et al., Astrophys. J. 533, 523 (2000)) considered small-amplitude Alfven wave (AW) packets in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) magnetic field using WKB approximation. They draw a distinction between 2D AW dissipation via phase mixing and 3D AW dissipation via exponentially divergent magnetic field lines. In the former case, AW dissipation time scales as S 1/3 and in the latter as log(S) , where S is the Lundquist number. In this work [1], linearly polarised Alfven wave dynamics in ABC magnetic field via direct 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulation is studied for the first time. A Gaussian AW pulse with length-scale much shorter than ABC domain length and a harmonic AW with wavelength equal to ABC domain length are studied for four different resistivities. While it is found that AWs dissipate quickly in the ABC field, contrary to an expectation, it is found the AW perturbation energy increases in time. In the case of the harmonic AW, the perturbation energy growth is transient in time, attaining peaks in both velocity and magnetic perturbation energies within timescales much smaller than the resistive time. In the case of the Gaussian AW pulse, the velocity perturbation energy growth is still transient in time, attaining a peak within few resistive times, while magnetic perturbation energy continues to grow. It is also shown that the total magnetic energy decreases in time and this is governed by the resistive evolution of the background ABC magnetic field rather than AW damping. On contrary, when the background magnetic field is uniform, the total magnetic energy decrease is prescribed by AW damping, because there is no resistive evolution of the background. By considering runs with different amplitudes and by analysing the perturbation spectra, possible dynamo action by AW perturbation-induced peristaltic flow and inverse cascade of magnetic energy have been excluded. Therefore, the perturbation energy growth is attributed

  19. Magnetic solid-phase extraction using nanoporous three dimensional graphene hybrid materials for high-capacity enrichment and simultaneous detection of nine bisphenol analogs from water sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Lei

    2016-09-09

    The synthesis of a magnetic nanoporous three dimensional graphene (3DG)/ZnFe2O4 composite has been achieved. Through formation of graphene hydrogel, ZnFe2O4 magnetic particles was successfully introduced into the nanoporous 3DG, resulting in a magnetic porous carbon material. The morphology, structure, and magnetic behavior of the as-prepared 3DG/ZnFe2O4 were characterized by using the techniques of SEM, XRD, BET, VSM, FTIR, Raman and TGA. The 3DG/ZnFe2O4 has a high specific surface area and super paramagnetism. Its performance was evaluated by the magnetic solid-phase extraction of nine bisphenol analogs (BPs) from water samples followed by HPLC analysis, and showed excellent adsorption capability for the nine target compounds. Under optimized condition, the lower method detection limits (0.05-0.18ngmL(-1)), the higher enrichment factors (800 fold) and good recoveries (95.1-103.8%) with relative standard deviation (RSD) values less than 6.2% were achieved. The results indicated that the developed method based on the use of 3DG/ZnFe2O4 as the magnetic adsorbent has the advantages of convenience and high efficiency, and can be successfully applied to detect the nine BPs in real water samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Three-dimensional echocardiography in the evaluation of global and regional function in patients with recent myocardial infarction: a comparison with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorstensen, Anders; Dalen, Håvard; Hala, Pavel; Kiss, Gabriel; D'hooge, Jan; Torp, Hans; Støylen, Asbjørn; Amundsen, Brage

    2013-07-01

    We aimed to compare three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography in the evaluation of patients with recent myocardial infarction (MI), using late-enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (LE-MRI) as a reference method. Echocardiography and LE-MRI were performed approximately 1 month after first-time MI in 58 patients. Echocardiography was also performed on 35 healthy controls. Left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction by 3D echocardiography (3D-LVEF), 3D wall-motion score (WMS), 2D-WMS, 3D speckle tracking-based longitudinal, circumferential, transmural and area strain, and 2D speckle tracking-based longitudinal strain (LS) were measured. The global correlations to infarct size by LE-MRI were significantly higher (P WMS and 2D-WMS compared with 3D-LVEF and the 4 different measurements of 3D strain, and 2D global longitudinal strain (GLS) was more closely correlated to LE-MRI than 3D GLS (P WMS, 2D-WMS, and 2D LS compared with the other indices. Three-dimensional WMS showed a sensitivity of 76% and a specificity of 72% for identification of LV infarct size >12%, and a sensitivity of 73% and a specificity of 95% for identification of segments with transmural infarct extension. Three-dimensional WMS and 2D gray-scale echocardiography showed the strongest correlations to LE-MRI. The tested 3D strain method suffers from low temporal and spatial resolution in 3D acquisitions and added diagnostic value could not be proven. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. ROAM: a Radial-basis-function Optimization Approximation Method for diagnosing the three-dimensional coronal magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Dalmasse

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP routinely performs coronal polarimetric measurements using the Fe XIII 10747 $AA$ and 10798 $AA$ lines, which are sensitive to the coronal magnetic field. However, inverting such polarimetric measurements into magnetic field data is a difficult task because the corona is optically thin at these wavelengths and the observed signal is therefore the integrated emission of all the plasma along the line of sight. To overcome this difficulty, we take on a new approach that combines a parameterized 3D magnetic field model with forward modeling of the polarization signal. For that purpose, we develop a new, fast and efficient, optimization method for model-data fitting: the Radial-basis-functions Optimization Approximation Method (ROAM. Model-data fitting is achieved by optimizing a user-specified log-likelihood function that quantifies the differences between the observed polarization signal and its synthetic/predicted analogue. Speed and efficiency are obtained by combining sparse evaluation of the magnetic model with radial-basis-function (RBF decomposition of the log-likelihood function. The RBF decomposition provides an analytical expression for the log-likelihood function that is used to inexpensively estimate the set of parameter values optimizing it. We test and validate ROAM on a synthetic test bed of a coronal magnetic flux rope and show that it performs well with a significantly sparse sample of the parameter space. We conclude that our optimization method is well-suited for fast and efficient model-data fitting and can be exploited for converting coronal polarimetric measurements, such as the ones provided by CoMP, into coronal magnetic field data.

  2. Integration of three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectrometry to the irradiation treatment plan for glioblastomas: definition of new target volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ken, S.; Vieillevigne, L.; Cohen-Jonathan, E.M.; Laprie, A.; Ken, S.; Franceries, X.; Lotterie, J.A.; Lubrano, V.; Catalaa, I.; Celsis, P.; Berry, I.; Laprie, A.; Lotterie, J.A.; Lubrano, V.; Berry, I.; Catalaa, I.

    2010-01-01

    Based on a clinic trial, the authors report the definition of a new reliable and reproducible method to delimit and integrate targets to the treatment plan which are specific to magnetic resonance spectrometry imagery for the radiotherapy of glioblastomas, in order to perform a treatment by intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT). A weighted conventional MRI has been performed before radiotherapy. The importation of anatomic-metabolic images into the dose planning system comprises two steps: normalization on the whole volume of magnetic resonance spectrometry imagery, and segmentation of target volumes specific to spectrometry anomalies. This integration of target volumes is thus facilitated. Short communication

  3. Propagation of Solar Energetic Particles in Three-dimensional Interplanetary Magnetic Fields: Radial Dependence of Peak Intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, H.-Q.; Zhou, G.; Wan, W.

    2017-06-01

    A functional form {I}\\max (R)={{kR}}-α , where R is the radial distance of a spacecraft, was usually used to model the radial dependence of peak intensities {I}\\max (R) of solar energetic particles (SEPs). In this work, the five-dimensional Fokker-Planck transport equation incorporating perpendicular diffusion is numerically solved to investigate the radial dependence of SEP peak intensities. We consider two different scenarios for the distribution of a spacecraft fleet: (1) along the radial direction line and (2) along the Parker magnetic field line. We find that the index α in the above expression varies in a wide range, primarily depending on the properties (e.g., location and coverage) of SEP sources and on the longitudinal and latitudinal separations between the sources and the magnetic foot points of the observers. Particularly, whether the magnetic foot point of the observer is located inside or outside the SEP source is a crucial factor determining the values of index α. A two-phase phenomenon is found in the radial dependence of peak intensities. The “position” of the break point (transition point/critical point) is determined by the magnetic connection status of the observers. This finding suggests that a very careful examination of the magnetic connection between the SEP source and each spacecraft should be taken in the observational studies. We obtain a lower limit of {R}-1.7+/- 0.1 for empirically modeling the radial dependence of SEP peak intensities. Our findings in this work can be used to explain the majority of the previous multispacecraft survey results, and especially to reconcile the different or conflicting empirical values of the index α in the literature.

  4. A transistorized 1024-channel neutron time-of-flight analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannelli, G.

    1962-01-01

    A transistorized 1024-channel neutron time-of-flight analyser is described. This instrument has been divided in two fully independent parts: the analogue-to-digital converter (ADC) that measures the time-of-flight and the 1024-channel ferrite-core memory. In this way the output signals coming from the ADC can be recorded on a magnetic tape together with the output from other ADCs which measure other physical quantities related to the same nuclear event, with an overall number of channels higher than the capacity of the memory. The AD converter is provided with a temporary memory that, by its regularizing action on the signals rate, (1) when the AD converter, directly connected to the 1024-channel memory, allows a dead time of only 0.5 μs, and (2) when the AD converter drives a magnetic tape recorder and allows a better utilization of the magnetic tape itself. The temporary memory has a capacity of four numbers of up to sixteen bits. The channel-width of the analyser is variable from 0.5 up to 48 μs. The 1024 channels can be divided in two contemporary groups of 512, each connected to two detectors. The temporary memory allows contemporary recordings of signals into the two groups. The channels can also be subdivided over the time-of-flight in two groups of which the first (of 16 channels) is used to record the true zero time of the time-of-flight, while the second group can be set in any position over the total time-of-flight interval. The number of channels used in the recording of the time-of-flight can be reduced in order to record another quantity with 1024 overall channels. The logical design of the instrument is described. In the design advantage has been taken of the possibilities offered by the transistorization and the related mechanical construction systems in order to produce a most flexible instrument and one in which future modifications or extensions, which may be required by the experimenters, are feasible. (author) [fr

  5. The properties of photonic band gap and surface plasmon modes in the three-dimensional magnetized photonic crystals as the mixed polarized modes considered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Jiang, Yu-Chi

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the properties of photonic band gap (PBG) and surface plasmon modes in the three-dimensional (3D) magnetized plasma photonic crystals (MPPCs) with face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattices are theoretically investigated based on the plane wave expansion (PWE) method, in which the homogeneous magnetized plasma spheres are immersed in the homogeneous dielectric background, as the Voigt effects of magnetized plasma are considered (the incidence electromagnetic wave vector is perpendicular to the external magnetic field at any time). The dispersive properties of all of the EM modes are studied because the PBG is not only for the extraordinary and ordinary modes but also for the mixed polarized modes. The equations for PBGs also are theoretically deduced. The numerical results show that the PBG and a flatbands region can be observed. The effects of the dielectric constant of dielectric background, filling factor, plasma frequency and plasma cyclotron frequency (the external magnetic field) on the dispersive properties of all of the EM modes in such 3D MPPCs are investigated in detail, respectively. Theoretical simulations show that the PBG can be manipulated by the parameters as mentioned above. Compared to the conventional dielectric-air PCs with similar structure, the larger PBG can be obtained in such 3D MPPCs. It is also shown that the upper edge of flatbands region cannot be tuned by the filling factor and dielectric constant of dielectric background, but it can be manipulated by the plasma frequency and plasma cyclotron frequency.

  6. Portable magnetic tweezers device enables visualization of the three-dimensional microscale deformation of soft biological materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yali; Lin, Jun; Meschewski, Ryan; Watson, Erin; Valentine, Megan T

    2011-07-01

    We have designed and built a magnetic tweezers device that enables the application of calibrated stresses to soft materials while simultaneously measuring their microscale deformation using confocal microscopy. Unlike previous magnetic tweezers designs, our device is entirely portable, allowing easy use on microscopes in core imaging facilities or in collaborators' laboratories. The imaging capabilities of the microscope are unimpaired, enabling the 3-D structures of fluorescently labeled materials to be precisely determined under applied load. With this device, we can apply a large range of forces (~1-1200 pN) over micron-scale contact areas to beads that are either embedded within 3-D matrices or attached to the surface of thin slab gels. To demonstrate the usefulness of this instrument, we have studied two important and biologically relevant materials: polyacrylamide-based hydrogel films typical of those used in cell traction force microscopy, and reconstituted networks of microtubules, essential cytoskeletal filaments.

  7. Propagation of the three-dimensional dust acoustic solitons in magnetized quantum plasmas with dust polarity effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, M.; Ali, S.; Sabry, R.

    2009-01-01

    The quantum hydrodynamical model is employed to investigate the nonlinear properties of the quantum dust acoustic waves in a magnetized dusty plasma composed of inertialess electrons, ions, and mobile positive/negative charged dust particles. For this purpose, a quantum Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation is derived and the basic features of the electrostatic excitations are investigated by applying the direct method. It is found that positive and negative bell-shaped solitary pulses become explosive pulses depending mainly upon the angles of propagation and dust polarity. Furthermore, the effects due to nondimensional quantum parameter and the external magnetic field are examined on the width of the quantum dust acoustic solitary pulses. The relevance of the present results to semiconductor quantum wells is mentioned.

  8. Three-dimensional modeling of plasma edge transport and divertor fluxes during application of resonant magnetic perturbations on ITER

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schmitz, O.; Becoulet, M.; Cahyna, Pavel; Evans, T.E.; Feng, Y.; Frerichs, H.; Loarte, A.; Pitts, R.A.; Reiser, D.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Harting, D.; Kirschner, A.; Kukushkin, A.; Lunt, T.; Saibene, G.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Wiesen, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 6 (2016), č. článku 066008. ISSN 0029-5515 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : resonant magnetic perturbations * plasma edge physics * 3D modeling * neutral particle physics * ITER * divertor heat and particle loads * ELM control Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0029-5515/56/6/066008/meta

  9. Correlation between magnetic spin structure and the three-dimensional geometry in chemically synthesized nanoscale magnetite rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eltschka, M.; Klaui, M.; Rudiger, U

    2008-01-01

    The correlation between magnetic spin structure and geometry in nanoscale chemically synthesized Fe3O4 rings has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. We find primarily the flux closure vortex states but in rings with thickness variations, an effective stray field occurs. Using t....... The interaction between exchange coupled rings leads to antiparallel vortex states and extended onion states. (c) 2008 American Institute of Physics....

  10. Three-dimensional modeling of plasma edge transport and divertor fluxes during application of resonant magnetic perturbations on ITER

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schmitz, O.; Becoulet, M.; Cahyna, Pavel; Evans, T.E.; Feng, Y.; Frerichs, H.; Loarte, A.; Pitts, R.A.; Reiser, D.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Harting, D.; Kirschner, A.; Kukushkin, A.; Lunt, T.; Saibene, G.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Wiesen, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 6 (2016), č. článku 066008. ISSN 0029-5515 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : resonant magnetic perturbations * plasma edge physics * 3D modeling * neutral particle physics * ITER * divertor heat and particle loads * ELM control Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0029-5515/56/6/066008/meta

  11. Thin Time-Of-Flight PET project

    CERN Document Server

    The pre-R&D aims at designing and producing a compact and thin Time-Of-Flight PET detector device with depth of interaction measurement capability, which employs layered silicon sensors as active material, with a readout consisting of a new generation of very-low noise and very fast electronics based on SiGe Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors (HBT) components.

  12. Detection of viable myocardium by dobutamine stress tagging magnetic resonance imaging with three-dimensional analysis by automatic trace method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Isao [Yatsu Hoken Hospital, Narashino, Chiba (Japan); Watanabe, Shigeru; Masuda, Yoshiaki

    2000-07-01

    The present study attempted to detect the viability of myocardium by quantitative automatic 3-dimensional analysis of the improvement of regional wall motion using an magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tagging method. Twenty-two subjects with ischemic heart disease who had abnormal wall motion on echocardiography at rest were enrolled. All patients underwent dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE), coronary arteriography and left ventriculography. The results were compared with those of 7 normal volunteers. MRI studies were done with myocardial tagging using the spatial modulation of magnetization technique. Automatic tracing with an original program was performed, and wall motion was compared before and during dobutamine infusion. The evaluation of myocardial viability with MRI and echocardiography had similar results in 19 (86.4%) of the 22 patients; 20 were studied by positron emission tomography or thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography for myocardial viability, or studied for improvement of wall motion following coronary intervention. The sensitivity of dobutamine stress MRI (DSMRI) with tagging was 75.9% whereas that of DSE was 65.5%. The specificity of DSMRI was 85.7% (6/7) and that of DSE was 100% (7/7). The accuracy of DSMRI was 77.8% (28/36) and that of DSE 72.2% (26/36). DSMRI was shown to be superior to DSE in terms of evaluation of myocardial viability. (author)

  13. An internal magnetic field strategy to reuse pulverized active materials for high performance: a magnetic three-dimensional ordered macroporous TiO2/CoPt/α-Fe2O3 nanocomposite anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yiping; Hong, Liang; Li, Jiquan; Hou, Guangya; Cao, Huazhen; Wu, Liankui; Zheng, Guoqu; Wu, Qingliu

    2017-05-09

    A ferromagnetic three-dimensional ordered macroporous TiO 2 /CoPt/α-Fe 2 O 3 (3DOMTCF) nanocomposite was synthesized via a sol-gel approach templated by poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microspheres. After magnetization, it exhibited an extremely high reversible capacity and a long cycle life, which were ascribed to the internal magnetic field for reusing pulverized active materials and its unique structure.

  14. Luminescence and Magnetic Properties of Two Three-Dimensional Terbium and Dysprosium MOFs Based on Azobenzene-4,4′-Dicarboxylic Linker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Fernández

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the in situ formation of two novel metal-organic frameworks based on terbium and dysprosium ions using azobenzene-4,4′-dicarboxylic acid (H2abd as ligand, synthesized by soft hydrothermal routes. Both materials show isostructural three-dimensional networks with channels along a axis and display intense photoluminescence properties in the solid state at room temperature. Textural properties of the metal-organic frameworks (MOFs have been fully characterized although no appreciable porosity was obtained. Magnetic properties of these materials were studied, highlighting the dysprosium material displays slightly frequency-dependent out of phase signals when measured under zero external field and under an applied field of 1000 Oe.

  15. Analyses of magnetic structures and nuclear-density distribution by the structure-refinement and three-dimensional visualization systems RIETAN-FP-VENUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Fujio; Momma, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    We have been developing a multi-purpose pattern-fitting system RIETAN-FP and a three-dimensional visualization system VENUS, which have been extensively used for structure refinements of various metal and inorganic materials from neutron powder diffraction data. At first, their outlines and the history of their developments are shortly looked back. The second part describes procedures for analyzing collinear magnetic structures with the combination of VESTA in the VENUS system and RIETAN-FP by taking BiCoO 3 for instance. Finally, a new C++ program, Dysnomia, for the maximum entropy method is introduced with emphasis on its new features. Dysnomia excels its predecessor, PRIMA, in computation speed, memory efficiency, scalability, and reliability. In particular, addition of a normal-distribution constraint is effective in obtaining nuclear-density distribution that is physically and chemically reasonable. (author)

  16. Anatomically oriented right ventricular volume measurements with dynamic three-dimensional echocardiography validated by 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Petra S; Pinho, Luiz; Balbach, Thomas; Galuschky, Christian; Blankenhagen, Michael; Silberbach, Michael; Broberg, Craig; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Sahn, David J

    2007-10-23

    We tested a newly developed 4-dimensional (4D) right ventricular (RV) analysis method for computing RV volumes for both 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance (MR) images. Asymmetry and the anatomical complexity of the RV make accurate determination of RV shape and volume difficult. Thirty patients, 14 with grossly normal cardiac anatomy and 16 with major congenital heart disease, were studied at the same visit with both 3D echocardiography (echo) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for RV size and function. Ultrasound images were acquired on a Philips 7500 system (Philips Medical Systems, Andover, Massachusetts) with a matrix-array transducer (real-time 3D echo) with full volume sweeps from apical and subcostal views. Sagittal, 4-chamber, and coronal views were derived for contour detection (all 12 to 24 slices). The MR images were acquired with a 3-T MRI magnet with segmented cine-loop gradient echo sequences in short- and rotated long-axis views to cover the RV inflow, body, and outflow tract. The RV volumes were analyzed with the new software applicable to 3D echo MR images. New software aided delineation of the RV free wall, tricuspid valve, RV outflow tract, and apex on 3D echo volumes. Although there was a slightly higher variability measuring right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) and volumes obtained by US compared with MRI, both imaging methods showed closely correlated results. The RVEF was measured with 4% variability for US and 5% variability for MRI with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.91. The RV end-diastolic volume was measured at 70.97 +/- 15.0 ml with 3D US and at 70.06 +/- 14.8 ml with MRI (r = 0.99), end-systolic volume measured 39.8 +/- 10.4 ml with 3D US and 39.1 +/- 10.2 ml with MRI (r = 0.98). The new RV analysis software allowed validation of the accuracy of 4D echo RV volume data compared with MRI.

  17. THREE-DIMENSIONAL ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION MODELS OF HD 189733b AND HD 209458b WITH CONSISTENT MAGNETIC DRAG AND OHMIC DISSIPATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauscher, Emily; Menou, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    We present the first three-dimensional circulation models for extrasolar gas giant atmospheres with geometrically and energetically consistent treatments of magnetic drag and ohmic dissipation. Atmospheric resistivities are continuously updated and calculated directly from the flow structure, strongly coupling the magnetic effects with the circulation pattern. We model the hot Jupiters HD 189733b (T eq ≈ 1200 K) and HD 209458b (T eq ≈ 1500 K) and test planetary magnetic field strengths from 0 to 30 G. We find that even at B = 3 G the atmospheric structure and circulation of HD 209458b are strongly influenced by magnetic effects, while the cooler HD 189733b remains largely unaffected, even in the case of B = 30 G and super-solar metallicities. Our models of HD 209458b indicate that magnetic effects can substantially slow down atmospheric winds, change circulation and temperature patterns, and alter observable properties. These models establish that longitudinal and latitudinal hot spot offsets, day-night flux contrasts, and planetary radius inflation are interrelated diagnostics of the magnetic induction process occurring in the atmospheres of hot Jupiters and other similarly forced exoplanets. Most of the ohmic heating occurs high in the atmosphere and on the dayside of the planet, while the heating at depth is strongly dependent on the internal heat flux assumed for the planet, with more heating when the deep atmosphere is hot. We compare the ohmic power at depth in our models, and estimates of the ohmic dissipation in the bulk interior (from general scaling laws), to evolutionary models that constrain the amount of heating necessary to explain the inflated radius of HD 209458b. Our results suggest that deep ohmic heating can successfully inflate the radius of HD 209458b for planetary magnetic field strengths of B ≥ 3-10 G.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided attenuation and scatter corrections in three-dimensional brain positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Zaidi, H; Slosman, D O

    2003-01-01

    Reliable attenuation correction represents an essential component of the long chain of modules required for the reconstruction of artifact-free, quantitative brain positron emission tomography (PET) images. In this work we demonstrate the proof of principle of segmented magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation and scatter corrections in 3D brain PET. We have developed a method for attenuation correction based on registered T1-weighted MRI, eliminating the need of an additional transmission (TX) scan. The MR images were realigned to preliminary reconstructions of PET data using an automatic algorithm and then segmented by means of a fuzzy clustering technique which identifies tissues of significantly different density and composition. The voxels belonging to different regions were classified into air, skull, brain tissue and nasal sinuses. These voxels were then assigned theoretical tissue-dependent attenuation coefficients as reported in the ICRU 44 report followed by Gaussian smoothing and additio...

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging tracking of human adipose derived stromal cells within three-dimensional scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Lalande

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available For bone tissue engineering, human Adipose Derived Stem Cells (hADSCs are proposed to be associated with a scaffold for promoting bone regeneration. After implantation, cellularised scaffolds require a non-invasive method for monitoring their fate in vivo. The purpose of this study was to use Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI-based tracking of these cells, labelled with magnetic agents for in vivo longitudinal assessment. hADSCs were isolated from adipose tissue and labelled with USPIO-rhodamine (Ultrasmall SuperParamagnetic Iron Oxide. USPIO internalisation, absence of toxicity towards hADSCs, and osteogenic differentiation of the labelled cells were evaluated in standard culture conditions. Labelled cells were then seeded within a 3D porous polysaccharide-based scaffold and imaged in vitro using fluorescence microscopy and MRI. Cellularised scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in nude mice and MRI analyses were performed from 1 to 28 d after implantation. In vitro, no effect of USPIO labelling on cell viability and osteogenic differentiation was found. USPIO were efficiently internalised by hADSCs and generated a high T2* contrast. In vivo MRI revealed that hADSCs remain detectable until 28 d after implantation and could migrate from the scaffold and colonise the area around it. These data suggested that this scaffold might behave as a cell carrier capable of both holding a cell fraction and delivering cells to the site of implantation. In addition, the present findings evidenced that MRI is a reliable technique to validate cell-seeding procedures in 3D porous scaffolds, and to assess the fate of hADSCs transplanted in vivo.

  20. CuFe2O4 magnetic nanocrystal clusters as a matrix for the analysis of small molecules by negative-ion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zian; Zheng, Jiangnan; Bian, Wei; Cai, Zongwei

    2015-08-07

    CuFe2O4 magnetic nanocrystal clusters (CuFe2O4 MNCs) were proposed as a new matrix for small molecule analysis by negative ion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the first time. We demonstrated its advantages over conventional organic matrices in the detection of small molecules such as amino acids, peptides, nucleobases, fatty acids, and steroid hormones. A systematic comparison of CuFe2O4 MNCs with different ionization modes revealed that MS spectra obtained for the CuFe2O4 MNC matrix in the negative ion mode was only featured by deprotonated ion peaks with a free matrix background, which was different from the complicated alkali metal adducts produced in the positive ion mode. The developed method was found relatively tolerant to salt contamination and exhibited good reproducibility. A detection limit down to the subpicomolar level was achieved when testosterone was analyzed. In addition, by comparison of the MS spectra obtained from bare Fe3O4 and MFe2O4 MNC (M = Co, Ni, Cu, Zn) matrices, two main factors of MFe2O4 MNC matrices were revealed to play a vital role in assisting the negative ion desorption/ionization (D/I) process: doping transition metals into ferrite nanocrystals favoring laser absorption and energy transfer and a good match between the UV absorption of MFe2O4 MNCs and the excitation of nitrogen laser source facilitating LDI efficiency. This work creates a new branch of application for MFe2O4 MNCs and provides an alternative solution for small molecule analysis.

  1. Supra-aortic low-dose contrast-enhanced time-resolved magnetic resonance (MR) angiography at 3 T: comparison with time-of-flight MR angiography and high-resolution contrast-enhanced MR angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youn-Joo; Kim, Bum-soo; Koo, Ja-Sung; Kim, Bom-Yi; Jang, Jinhee; Choi, Hyun Seok; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin

    2015-06-01

    Low-dose, time-resolved, contrast-enhanced, magnetic resonance angiography (TR-CEMRA) has been described previously; however, a comparative study between low dose TR-CEMRA and time-of-flight MRA (TOF-MRA) in the diagnosis of supra-aortic arterial stenosis has not yet been published. To demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of low-dose TR-CEMRA compared with TOF-MRA, using high-resolution contrast-enhanced MRA (HR-CEMRA) as the reference standard. This prospective study consisted of 30 consecutive patients. All patients underwent TOF-MRA of the neck and circle of Willis and supra-aortic HR-CEMRA, followed by supra-aortic low-dose TR-CEMRA. Gadoterate meglumine (Gd-DOTA, Dotarem(®), Guerbet, Roissy CdG Cedex, France) was injected at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg for HR-CEMRA, followed by a 0.03 mmol/kg bolus for low-dose TR-CEMRA. Three readers evaluated the assessibility and image quality, and then two readers classified each stenosis into the following categories: normal (0-30%), mild stenosis (31-50%), moderate (51-70%), severe (71-99%), and occlusion. TR-CEMRA and HR-CEMRA showed a greater number of assessable arterial segments than TOF-MRA (P supra-aortic arterial stenosis, and could be more useful option than TOF-MRA. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. Magnetic resonance cholangiography: comparison of two- and three-dimensional sequences for assessment of malignant biliary obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Se Hyung; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn; Kim, Ki Whang

    2008-01-01

    The purpose was to retrospectively compare two-dimensional (2D) magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) including breath-hold single-shot rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) and multislice half-Fourier RARE versus navigator-triggered 3D-RARE MRC in the evaluation of biliary malignancy. MRC findings were evaluated in 31 patients with malignant biliary obstruction, including biliary malignancy, gallbladder carcinoma, and ampullary cancer. Two observers independently reviewed the images to assess the overall image quality, artifacts, ductal conspicuity, extent of disease, diagnostic confidence of tumor extent, and origin of tumor. The results were compared with surgical and histopathologic findings. Studies obtained with 3D-MRC were of significantly higher technical quality than those obtained with 2D-MRC. However, the accuracy between two sequences for classification of tumor showed no statistical significance. There was no significant difference between the Az values of 2D- and 3D-MRC for overall tumor extent in bilateral second order branch, intrapancreatic common bile duct (CBD) involvement (Az = 0.889, 0.881 for 2D and Az = 0.903, 0.864 for 3D). Nor was there a significant difference between two sequences in the assessment of the origin of tumor. Although 3D-MRC has superior image quality over 2D-MRC, 3D-MRC showed no statistically significant difference in accuracy compared with 2D-MRC for evaluating the extent of disease in malignant biliary obstructions. (orig.)

  3. Age and gender assessment through three-dimensional morphometric analysis of maxillary sinus using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Sanda Usha; Rao, Guttikonda Venkateswara; Kumar, Dumpala Rakesh; Sravya, Taneeru; Sivaranjani, Yeluri; Kumar, Manchikatla Praveen

    2017-01-01

    Age and sex determinations are important tools in forensic odontology which help in the identification of an individual. Radiographic method of sex and age estimation is a noninvasive simple technique. Measurements of the maxillary sinuses can be used for the estimation of age and gender when other methods are inconclusive. Maxillary sinus dimensions were used as an important tool in the identification of unknown. This study aims to estimate age and sex using the dimensions and volume of the maxillary sinus in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study included sixty patients visiting Department of Radiology Mamata General Hospital, Khammam requiring MRI of the brain and paranasal sinuses. Maxillary sinus dimensions were measured using Siemens software, and statistical analysis was done. The volume and dimensions of the maxillary sinus were more in males when compared to the females with a statistically significant difference. The highest percentage of sexual dimorphism was seen in the volume of left maxillary sinus. Age estimated using the volume of maxillary sinus showed no statistically significant difference from the actual age of the subjects. The dimensions and volume of the maxillary sinuses were larger in males than in females, in addition to that they tend to be less with the older age. MRI measurements of maxillary sinuses may be useful to support gender and age estimation in forensic radiology.

  4. Time-resolved three-dimensional magnetic resonance velocity mapping of chronic thoracic aortic dissection. A preliminary investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yasuo; Sekine, Tetsuro; Tanaka, Keiji; Takagi, Ryo; Kumita, Shinichiro; Suzuki, Yuriko

    2011-01-01

    The blood flow patterns of chronic thoracic aortic dissection are complicated, and their clinical significance remains unknown. We evaluated the technical and clinical potentials of time-resolved 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) velocity mapping for assessing these patterns. We used data collected from time-resolved 3D phase-contrast MR imaging of 16 patients with chronic thoracic aortic dissection to generate time-resolved 3D MR velocity mapping that included 3D streamline and path line. We investigated blood flow patterns of this disease in the mapping and compared them with the morphological changes of the patent false lumen. Time-resolved 3D MR velocity mapping visualized rapid flow at the entry and in the true lumen immediately distal to the entry. We observed slower helical or laminar flow in the patent false lumen. In patients with disease progression, slower helical flow following rapid entry jet collided with the outer wall of the false lumen and was also observed in a growing ulcer-like projection. We showed the potential of time-resolved 3D MR velocity mapping for visualizing pathologic flow patterns related to chronic thoracic aortic dissection. (author)

  5. Clinical utility of optimized three-dimensional T1-, T2-, and T2*-weighted sequences in spinal magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanitame, Nobuko; Tanitame, Keizo; Awai, Kazuo

    2017-04-01

    This article reviews the clinical utility of 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences optimized for the evaluation of various intraspinal lesions. First, intraspinal tumors with hypervascular components and arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are clearly shown on contrast-enhanced (CE)-3D T1-weighted gradient-echo (GE) sequences with high spatial resolution. Second, dynamic CE-3D time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) shows delineated feeding arteries of intraspinal AVM or arteriovenous fistula (AVF), greatly aiding subsequent digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Third, 3D multiecho T2*-weighted GE sequences are used to visualize intraspinal structures and spinal cord lesions and are sensitive to the magnetic susceptibility of intraspinal hemorrhages. Three-dimensional balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) and multishot 3D balanced non-SSFP sequences produce contiguous thin images with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in short scanning times. Intraspinal cystic lesions and small nerve-root tumors in subarachnoid space can be viewed using 3D balanced SSFP. Spinal cord myelomalacia and cord compression can be evaluated on fat-suppressed multishot 3D balanced non-SSFP. Finally, a 3D T2-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) sequence with variable flip angle (FA) refocusing pulse improves through-plane spatial resolution over conventional 2D T2-weighted FSE sequences while matching image contrast.

  6. Three-dimensional interactive and stereotactic atlas of the cranial nerves and their nuclei correlated with surface neuroanatomy, vasculature and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Johnson, Aleksandra; Chua, Beng Choon; Nowinska, Natalia G

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the cranial nerves and their nuclei is critical in clinical practice, medical research and education. However to our best knowledge, a comprehensive source capturing full three-dimensional (3D) relationships of the cranial nerves along with surrounding neuroanatomy is not yet available. This work addresses the construction and validation of an atlas of the cranial nerves with their nuclei, correlated with surface neuroanatomy, vasculature, and magnetic resonance imaging. The atlas is interactive, stereotactic, 3D, detailed, fully parcellated, completely labeled, consistent in 3D, electronically dissectible, and scalable. A 3D geometrical model of the 12 pairs of cranial nerves with nuclei was created from an in vivo magnetic resonance scan exploiting in-house developed tools and methods, including tubular and iso-surface modeling, interactive editing, and mesh compression. This virtual model contains 439 objects with 121 different names, labeled based on Terminologia Anatomica. The model was integrated with a 3D atlas of structure, vasculature and tracts developed earlier, and correlated with sectional magnetic resonance anatomy. The whole model or its components can be interactively rotated, zoomed, panned, and add or removed with a simple few clicks. The studied material can be adaptively selected in an in-depth manner by using controls available in the user interface. This atlas is potentially useful for anatomy browsing, user self-testing, automatic student assessment, preparing materials, and localization in clinical neurology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Three dimensional system integration

    CERN Document Server

    Papanikolaou, Antonis; Radojcic, Riko

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) integrated circuit (IC) stacking is the next big step in electronic system integration. It enables packing more functionality, as well as integration of heterogeneous materials, devices, and signals, in the same space (volume). This results in consumer electronics (e.g., mobile, handheld devices) which can run more powerful applications, such as full-length movies and 3D games, with longer battery life. This technology is so promising that it is expected to be a mainstream technology a few years from now, less than 10-15 years from its original conception. To achieve thi

  8. Three-dimensional metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burckel, David Bruce [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-06-12

    A fabrication method is capable of creating canonical metamaterial structures arrayed in a three-dimensional geometry. The method uses a membrane suspended over a cavity with predefined pattern as a directional evaporation mask. Metallic and/or dielectric material can be evaporated at high vacuum through the patterned membrane to deposit resonator structures on the interior walls of the cavity, thereby providing a unit cell of micron-scale dimension. The method can produce volumetric metamaterial structures comprising layers of such unit cells of resonator structures.

  9. Three-Dimensional Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Araujo, Vitor; Viana, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    In this book, the authors present the elements of a general theory for flows on three-dimensional compact boundaryless manifolds, encompassing flows with equilibria accumulated by regular orbits. The book aims to provide a global perspective of this theory and make it easier for the reader to digest the growing literature on this subject. This is not the first book on the subject of dynamical systems, but there are distinct aspects which together make this book unique. Firstly, this book treats mostly continuous time dynamical systems, instead of its discrete counterpart, exhaustively treated

  10. Time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Managadze, G.G.

    1991-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer comprises an ion source consisting of a grid assembly, a drift space with a focusing system, a reflector and a detector. The grid assembly has the shape of a ring with the internal diameter equal to that of the detector, whereas the focusing system consists of two cylinders coaxially mounted in the drift space whose diameters are equal, respectively, to the internal and the external diameter of the grid assembly of the ion source. The time-of-flight mass spectrometer is intended mainly for studying the mass composition of an inert gas, of a low-energy ion flux as well as of a plasma in a vacuum. (author)

  11. Fully automated quantification of regional cerebral blood flow with three-dimensional stereotaxic region of interest template. Validation using magnetic resonance imaging. Technical note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Ryo; Katayama, Shigenori; Takeda, Naoya; Fujita, Katsuzo [Nishi-Kobe Medical Center (Japan); Yonekura, Yoshiharu [Fukui Medical Univ., Matsuoka (Japan); Konishi, Junji [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2003-03-01

    The previously reported three-dimensional stereotaxic region of interest (ROI) template (3DSRT-t) for the analysis of anatomically standardized technetium-99m-L,L-ethyl cysteinate dimer ({sup 99m}Tc-ECD) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images was modified for use in a fully automated regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) quantification software, 3DSRT, incorporating an anatomical standardization engine transplanted from statistical parametric mapping 99 and ROIs for quantification based on 3DSRT-t. Three-dimensional T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance images of 10 patients with localized infarcted areas were compared with the ROI contour of 3DSRT, and the positions of the central sulcus in the primary sensorimotor area were also estimated. All positions of the 20 lesions were in strict accordance with the ROI delineation of 3DSRT. The central sulcus was identified on at least one side of 210 paired ROIs and in the middle of 192 (91.4%) of these 210 paired ROIs among the 273 paired ROIs of the primary sensorimotor area. The central sulcus was recognized in the middle of more than 71.4% of the ROIs in which the central sulcus was identifiable in the respective 28 slices of the primary sensorimotor area. Fully automated accurate ROI delineation on anatomically standardized images is possible with 3DSRT, which enables objective quantification of rCBF and vascular reserve in only a few minutes using {sup 99m}Tc-ECD SPECT images obtained by the resting and vascular reserve (RVR) method. (author)

  12. Fully automated quantification of regional cerebral blood flow with three-dimensional stereotaxic region of interest template. Validation using magnetic resonance imaging. Technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Ryo; Katayama, Shigenori; Takeda, Naoya; Fujita, Katsuzo; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Konishi, Junji

    2003-01-01

    The previously reported three-dimensional stereotaxic region of interest (ROI) template (3DSRT-t) for the analysis of anatomically standardized technetium-99m-L,L-ethyl cysteinate dimer ( 99m Tc-ECD) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images was modified for use in a fully automated regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) quantification software, 3DSRT, incorporating an anatomical standardization engine transplanted from statistical parametric mapping 99 and ROIs for quantification based on 3DSRT-t. Three-dimensional T 2 -weighted magnetic resonance images of 10 patients with localized infarcted areas were compared with the ROI contour of 3DSRT, and the positions of the central sulcus in the primary sensorimotor area were also estimated. All positions of the 20 lesions were in strict accordance with the ROI delineation of 3DSRT. The central sulcus was identified on at least one side of 210 paired ROIs and in the middle of 192 (91.4%) of these 210 paired ROIs among the 273 paired ROIs of the primary sensorimotor area. The central sulcus was recognized in the middle of more than 71.4% of the ROIs in which the central sulcus was identifiable in the respective 28 slices of the primary sensorimotor area. Fully automated accurate ROI delineation on anatomically standardized images is possible with 3DSRT, which enables objective quantification of rCBF and vascular reserve in only a few minutes using 99m Tc-ECD SPECT images obtained by the resting and vascular reserve (RVR) method. (author)

  13. Three-dimensional balanced steady state free precession myocardial perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 3T using dual-source parallel RF transmission: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jogiya, Roy; Schuster, Andreas; Zaman, Arshad; Motwani, Manish; Kouwenhoven, Marc; Nagel, Eike; Kozerke, Sebastian; Plein, Sven

    2014-11-28

    The purpose of this study was to establish the feasibility of three-dimensional (3D) balanced steady-state-free-precession (bSSFP) myocardial perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) at 3T using local RF shimming with dual-source RF transmission, and to compare it with spoiled gradient echo (TGRE) acquisition. Dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D bSSFP perfusion imaging was performed on a 3T MRI scanner equipped with dual-source RF transmission technology. Images were reconstructed using k-space and time broad-use linear acquisition speed-up technique (k-t BLAST) and compartment based principle component analysis (k-t PCA). In phantoms and volunteers, local RF shimming with dual source RF transmission significantly improved B1 field homogeneity compared with single source transmission (P=0.01). 3D bSSFP showed improved signal-to-noise, contrast-to-noise and signal homogeneity compared with 3D TGRE (29.8 vs 26.9, P=0.045; 23.2 vs 21.6, P=0.049; 14.9% vs 12.4%, p=0.002, respectively). Image quality was similar between bSSFP and TGRE but there were more dark rim artefacts with bSSFP. k-t PCA reconstruction reduced artefacts for both sequences compared with k-t BLAST. In a subset of five patients, both methods correctly identified those with coronary artery disease. Three-dimensional bSSFP myocardial perfusion CMR using local RF shimming with dual source parallel RF transmission at 3T is feasible and improves signal characteristics compared with TGRE. Image artefact remains an important limitation of bSSFP imaging at 3T but can be reduced with k-t PCA.

  14. Three-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamical Simulations of the Morphology of Head–Tail Radio Galaxies Based on the Magnetic Tower Jet Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Zhaoming; Yuan, Feng [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai, E-mail: zmgan@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: fyuan@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: hli@lanl.gov, E-mail: sli@lanl.gov [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2017-04-10

    The distinctive morphology of head–tail radio galaxies reveals strong interactions between the radio jets and their intra-cluster environment, the general consensus on the morphology origin of head–tail sources is that radio jets are bent by violent intra-cluster weather. We demonstrate in this paper that such strong interactions provide a great opportunity to study the jet properties and also the dynamics of the intra-cluster medium (ICM). By three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations, we analyze the detailed bending process of a magnetically dominated jet, based on the magnetic tower jet model. We use stratified atmospheres modulated by wind/shock to mimic the violent intra-cluster weather. Core sloshing is found to be inevitable during the wind-cluster core interaction, which induces significant shear motion and could finally drive ICM turbulence around the jet, making it difficult for the jet to survive. We perform a detailed comparison between the behavior of pure hydrodynamical jets and the magnetic tower jet and find that the jet-lobe morphology could not survive against the violent disruption in all of our pure hydrodynamical jet models. On the other hand, the head–tail morphology is well reproduced by using a magnetic tower jet model bent by wind, in which hydrodynamical instabilities are naturally suppressed and the jet could always keep its integrity under the protection of its internal magnetic fields. Finally, we also check the possibility for jet bending by shock only. We find that shock could not bend the jet significantly, and thus could not be expected to explain the observed long tails in head–tail radio galaxies.

  15. Universal scaling of Néel temperature, staggered magnetization density, and spin-wave velocity of three-dimensional disordered and clean quantum antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, D.-R.; Jiang, F.-J.

    2017-02-01

    The Néel temperature, staggered magnetization density, as well as the spin-wave velocity of a three-dimensional (3D) quantum Heisenberg model with antiferromagnetic disorder (randomness) are calculated using first-principles nonperturbative quantum Monte Carlo simulations. In particular, we examine the validity of universal scaling relations that are related to these three studied physical quantities. These relations are relevant to experimental data and are firmly established for clean (regular) 3D dimerized spin-1/2 Heisenberg models. Remarkably, our numerical results show that the considered scaling relations remain true for the investigated model with the introduced disorder. In addition, while the presence of disorder may change the physical properties of regular dimerized models, hence leading to different critical theories, both the obtained data of Néel temperature and staggered magnetization density in our study are fully compatible with the expected critical behavior for clean dimerized systems. As a result, it is persuasive to conclude that the related quantum phase transitions of the considered disordered model and its clean analogues are governed by the same critical theory, which is not always the case in general. Finally, we also find smooth scaling curves even emerging when both the data of the investigated disordered model as well as its associated clean system are taken into account concurrently. This in turn implies that, while in a restricted sense, the considered scaling relations for 3D spin-1/2 antiferromagnets are indeed universal.

  16. Time-of-flight 3D Neutron Diffraction for Multigrain Crystallography

    OpenAIRE

    Cereser, Alberto; Hall, Stephen A.; Steuwer, Axel; Strobl, Markus; Schmidt, Søren

    2016-01-01

    This thesis presents a new technique for measuring spatially resolved microstructures in crystalline materials using pulsed neutron beams. The method, called Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Neutron Diffraction (ToF 3DND), identifies the position, shape and crystallographic orientation of the individual grains within the sample. The experiments were conducted at the single crystal diffractometer SENJU at the Japanese neutron source J-PARC. The choice of this instrument was motivated by its la...

  17. Time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, M.A.; Kozlov, B.N.; Mamyrin, B.A.; Shmikk, D.V.; Shebelin, V.G.

    1981-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer containing a pulsed ion source with an electron gun and two electrodes limiting ionization range, drift space and ion acceptor, is described. To expand functional possibilities, a slot collimator of the gas stream, two quantum generators and two diaphragms for the inlet of quantum generator radiation located on both sides of the ion source, are introduced in the ion source. The above invention enables to study details of the complex interaction process of laser radiation with molecules of the gas stream, which is actual for laser isotope separation

  18. Assessment of neurovascular compression in patients with trigeminal neuralgia with a boundary fusion three-dimensional magnetic resonance cisternogram/angiogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Toru; Omi, Megumi; Ohsako, Chika; Onoda, Keisuke; Date, Isao

    2007-01-01

    Precise assessment of the complex nerve-vessel relationship at the root entry zone (REZ) of the trigeminal nerve is useful for the planning of the microvascular decompression (MVD) in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. We have applied a boundary imaging of fusion three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) cisternogram/angiogram. The boundary imaging allows virtual assessment of the spatial relationship of the neurovascular compression at the REZ of the trigeminal nerve. The boundary images depicted complex anatomical relationship of the offending vessels to the trigeminal nerve REZ. The presence of offending vessels, compressive site, and degree of neurovascular compression were assessed from various viewpoints in the cistern and virtually through the brainstem and trigeminal nerve per se. The 3D visualization of the nerve-vessel relationship with fusion images was consistent with the intraoperative findings. The boundary fusion 3D MR cisternogram/angiogram may prove a useful adjunct for the diagnosis and decision-marking process to execute the MVD in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. (author)

  19. Construction of three-dimensional graphene interfaces into carbon fiber textiles for increasing deposition of nickel nanoparticles: flexible hierarchical magnetic textile composites for strong electromagnetic shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Xing-Ming; Liu, Lin; Li, Hai-Bing; Wang, Chan-Yuan; Xie, Qing; Zhao, Quan-Liang; Bi, Song; Hou, Zhi-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Since manipulating electromagnetic waves with electromagnetic active materials for environmental and electric engineering is a significant task, here a novel prototype is reported by introducing reduced graphene oxide (RGO) interfaces in carbon fiber (CF) networks for a hierarchical carbon fiber/reduced graphene oxide/nickel (CF-RGO-Ni) composite textile. Upon charaterizations of the microscopic morphologies, electrical and magnetic properties, the presence of three-dimensional RGO interfaces and bifunctional nickel nanoparticles substantially influences the related physical properties in the resulting hierarchical composite textiles. Eletromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding performance suggests that the hierarchical composite textiles hold a strong shielding effectiveness greater than 61 dB, showing greater advantages than conventional polymeric and foamy shielding composites. As a polymer-free lightweight structure, flexible CF-RGO-Ni composites of all electromagnetic active components offer unique understanding of the multi-scale and multiple mechanisms in electromagnetic energy consumption. Such a novel prototype of shielding structures along with convenient technology highlight a strategy to achieve high-performance EMI shielding, coupled with a universal approach for preparing advanced lightweight composites with graphene interfaces.

  20. New digital measurement methods for left ventricular volume using real-time three-dimensional echocardiography: comparison with electromagnetic flow method and magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, J. J.; Jones, M.; Shiota, T.; Greenberg, N. L.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Tsujino, H.; Zetts, A. D.; Sun, J. P.; Cardon, L. A.; Odabashian, J. A.; hide

    2000-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility and accuracy of using symmetrically rotated apical long axis planes for the determination of left ventricular (LV) volumes with real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE). METHODS AND RESULTS: Real-time 3DE was performed in six sheep during 24 haemodynamic conditions with electromagnetic flow measurements (EM), and in 29 patients with magnetic resonance imaging measurements (MRI). LV volumes were calculated by Simpson's rule with five 3DE methods (i.e. apical biplane, four-plane, six-plane, nine-plane (in which the angle between each long axis plane was 90 degrees, 45 degrees, 30 degrees or 20 degrees, respectively) and standard short axis views (SAX)). Real-time 3DE correlated well with EM for LV stroke volumes in animals (r=0.68-0.95) and with MRI for absolute volumes in patients (r-values=0.93-0.98). However, agreement between MRI and apical nine-plane, six-plane, and SAX methods in patients was better than those with apical four-plane and bi-plane methods (mean difference = -15, -18, -13, vs. -31 and -48 ml for end-diastolic volume, respectively, Pmeasurement methods of real-time 3DE correlated well with reference standards for calculating LV volumes. Balancing accuracy and required time for these LV volume measurements, the apical six-plane method is recommended for clinical use.

  1. Evolution of magnetic field and atmospheric response. I - Three-dimensional formulation by the method of projected characteristics. II - Formulation of proper boundary equations. [stellar magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Y.

    1981-01-01

    The method described as the method of nearcharacteristics by Nakagawa (1980) is renamed the method of projected characteristics. Making full use of properties of the projected characteristics, a new and simpler formulation is developed. As a result, the formulation for the examination of the general three-dimensional problems is presented. It is noted that since in practice numerical solutions must be obtained, the final formulation is given in the form of difference equations. The possibility of including effects of viscous and ohmic dissipations in the formulation is considered, and the physical interpretation is discussed. A systematic manner is then presented for deriving physically self-consistent, time-dependent boundary equations for MHD initial boundary problems. It is demonstrated that the full use of the compatibility equations (differential equations relating variations at two spatial locations and times) is required in determining the time-dependent boundary conditions. In order to provide a clear physical picture as an example, the evolution of axisymmetric global magnetic field by photospheric differential rotation is considered.

  2. Classification for the universal scaling of Néel temperature and staggered magnetization density of three-dimensional dimerized spin-1/2 antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, D.-R.; Li, C.-D.; Jiang, F.-J.

    2018-03-01

    Inspired by the recent theoretical development relevant to the experimental data of TlCuCl3, particularly those associated with the universal scaling between the Néel temperature TN and the staggered magnetization density Ms, we carry out a detailed investigation of three-dimensional (3D) dimerized quantum antiferromagnets using the first-principles quantum Monte Carlo calculations. Through this study we wish to better understand the microscopic effects on these scaling relations of TN and Ms, hence to shed light on some of the observed inconsistency between the theoretical and the experimental results. Remarkably, for the considered 3D dimerized models, we find that the established universal scaling relations are not only valid, but can each be categorized within its kind by the amount of stronger antiferromagnetic couplings connected to each spin. Convincing numerical evidence is provided to support the validity of this classification scheme. Based on all the related results known in the literature, we further argue that the proposed categorization for the universal scaling investigated in our paper should be applicable for 3D dimerized spin systems with (certain kinds of) quenched disorder and (or) on lattice geometries other than those considered here. The relevance of the outcomes presented in this investigation to the experiments of TlCuCl3 is briefly discussed as well.

  3. Effects of the volume and shape of voxels on the measurement of phantom volume using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Koichi; Tonami, Syuichi; Nakamura, Mamoru; Kuranishi, Makoto; Hagino, Hirofumi; Saitou, Osamu; Yotsutsuji, Takashi

    2002-01-01

    Recently, an increasing number of volumetric studies of the human brain have been reported, using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D-MRI). To our knowledge, however, there are few investigations on the relation of the volume and shape of voxels which constitute and MR image to the accuracy in volume measurement of an imaged object. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a different shape of voxel, that is, isotropic or anisotropic, as well as the volume of a voxel on the volume measurement based on the original image data and multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) data, respectively. In the experiment, we repeatedly acquired contiguous sagittal images of a single globe phantom with a known volume under the condition in which the volume and shape of voxels varied, on a 1.5 T MR scanner. We used a gradient echo sequence (3D FLASH). The volume of the globe phantom from both original images and MPR ones was measured on workstations employing a semi-automated local thresholding technique. As a result, the smaller volume of voxels tended to give us the more correct measurement, and an isotropic voxel reduced measurement errors as compared to an anisotropic one. Therefore, it is concluded that the setting of voxel with both an isotropic shape and small volume, e.g., a voxel of 1 mm x 1 mm x 1 mm at present, is recommended in order to get a precise volume measurement using 3D-MRI. (author)

  4. Clinical significance of three-dimensional measurement of tumour thickness on magnetic resonance imaging in patients with oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Minsu [Gyeongsang National University Hospital, School of Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Hyun; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Kim, Ji Won; Lee, Yoon-Se; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Choi, Seung-Ho [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Centre, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Hyun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Centre, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang-Yoon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Centre, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    To identify the clinical significance of primary tumour thickness (TT) and its direction in patients with oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC), we measured TT in all axial/coronal/sagittal views on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and evaluated their meaning. A total of 53 OTSCC patients were analysed who had undergone preoperative three-dimensional MRI and had been surgically treated. TT measured on axial (mediolateral direction), coronal (superoinferior direction), and sagittal (anteroposterior direction) views was compared to that in pathologic specimens. The association between TT on MRI and other pathologic parameters was also evaluated. TT on MRI in each plane showed relatively high concordance rates with the histological measurements. TT in all three planes was significantly correlated with lymph node (LN) metastasis. Occult LN metastasis was found in 15 of 39 (38.5 %) patients, and the cutoff value of TT in axial/coronal/sagittal MRI predicting occult LN metastasis was 6.7 mm, 7.2 mm, and 12.3 mm, respectively. TT on MRI did not show any significant association with recurrence and survival. TT on MRI in all three planes showed relatively high coincidence with TT on histopathology and presented a potential cut-off value as a predictive indicator for occult LN metastasis. (orig.)

  5. Diagnosing common bile duct obstruction: comparison of image quality and diagnostic performance of three-dimensional magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography with and without compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Heejin; Reid, Scott; Kim, Dongeun; Lee, Sangyun; Cho, Jinhan; Oh, Jongyeong

    2018-01-04

    This study aimed to evaluate image quality and diagnostic performance of a recently developed navigated three-dimensional magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (3D-MRCP) with compressed sensing (CS) based on parallel imaging (PI) and conventional 3D-MRCP with PI only in patients with abnormal bile duct dilatation. This institutional review board-approved study included 45 consecutive patients [non-malignant common bile duct lesions (n = 21) and malignant common bile duct lesions (n = 24)] who underwent MRCP of the abdomen to evaluate bile duct dilatation. All patients were imaged at 3T (MR 750, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) including two kinds of 3D-MRCP using 352 × 288 matrices with and without CS based on PI. Two radiologists independently and blindly assessed randomized images. CS acceleration reduced the acquisition time on average 5 min and 6 s to a total of 2 min and 56 s. The all CS cine image quality was significantly higher than standard cine MR image for all quantitative measurements. Diagnostic accuracy for benign and malignant lesions is statistically different between standard and CS 3D-MRCP. Total image quality and diagnostic accuracy at biliary obstruction evaluation demonstrates that CS-accelerated 3D-MRCP sequences can provide superior quality of diagnostic information in 42.5% less time. This has the potential to reduce motion-related artifacts and improve diagnostic efficacy.

  6. [Effects of the volume and shape of voxels on the measurement of phantom volume using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Koichi; Hagino, Hirofumi; Saitou, Osamu; Yotsutsuji, Takashi; Tonami, Syuichi; Nakamura, Mamoru; Kuranishi, Makoto

    2002-01-01

    Recently, an increasing number of volumetric studies of the human brain have been reported, using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D-MRI). To our knowledge, however, there are few investigations on the relation of the volume and shape of voxels which constitute an MR image to the accuracy in volume measurement of an imaged object. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a different shape of voxel, that is, isotropic or anisotropic, as well as the volume of a voxel on the volume measurement based on the original image data and multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) data, respectively. In the experiment, we repeatedly acquired contiguous sagittal images of a single globe phantom with a known volume under the condition in which the volume and shape of voxels varied, on a 1.5T MR scanner. We used a gradient echo sequence (3D FLASH). The volume of the globe phantom from both original images and MPR ones was measured on workstations employing a semi-automated local thresholding technique. As a result, the smaller volume of voxels tended to give us the more correct measurement, and an isotropic voxel reduced measurement errors as compared to an anisotropic one. Therefore, it is concluded that the setting of voxel with both an isotropic shape and small volume, e.g., a voxel of 1 mm x 1 mm x 1 mm at present, is recommended in order to get a precise volume measurement using 3D-MRI.

  7. Preoperative assessment of trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm using constructive interference in steady state-three-dimensional fourier transformation magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamakami, Iwao; Kobayashi, Eiichi; Hirai, Shinji; Yamaura, Akira [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-11-01

    Results of microvascular decompression (MVD) for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and hemifacial spasm (HFS) may be improved by accurate preoperative assessment of neurovascular relationships at the root entry/exit zone (REZ). Constructive interference in steady state (CISS)-three-dimensional Fourier transformation (3DFT) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was evaluated for visualizing the neurovascular relationships at the REZ. Fourteen patients with TN and eight patients with HFS underwent MR imaging using CISS-3DFT and 3D fast inflow with steady-state precession (FISP) sequences. Axial images of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) obtained by the two sequences were reviewed to assess the neurovascular relationships at the REZ of the trigeminal and facial nerves. Eleven patients subsequently underwent MVD. Preoperative MR imaging findings were related to surgical observations and results. CISS MR imaging provided excellent contrast between the cranial nerves, small vessels, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the CPA. CISS was significantly better than FISP for delineating anatomic detail in the CPA (trigeminal and facial nerves, petrosal vein) and abnormal neurovascular relationships responsible for TN and HFS (vascular contact and deformity at the REZ). Preoperative CISS MR imaging demonstrated precisely the neurovascular relationships at the REZ and identified the offending artery in all seven patients with TN undergoing MVD. CISS MR imaging has high resolution and excellent contrast between cranial nerves, small vessels, and CSF, so can precisely and accurately delineate normal and abnormal neurovascular relationships at the REZ in the CPA, and is a valuable preoperative examination for MVD. (author)

  8. The TORCH time-of-flight detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harnew, N., E-mail: Neville.Harnew@physics.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Brook, N. [University College London, Department of Physics & Astronomy, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Castillo García, L. [CERN, PH Department, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Cussans, D. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C. [CERN, PH Department, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Gao, R. [University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Gys, T.; Piedigrossi, D. [CERN, PH Department, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Rademacker, J.; Ros Garcia, A.; Dijk, M. van [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-11

    The TORCH time-of-flight detector is being developed to provide particle identification between 2 and 10 GeV/c momentum over a flight distance of 10 m. TORCH is designed for large-area coverage, up to 30 m{sup 2}, and has a DIRC-like construction. The goal is to achieve a 15 ps time-of-flight resolution per incident particle by combining arrival times from multiple Cherenkov photons produced within quartz radiator plates of 10 mm thickness. A four-year R&D programme is underway with an industrial partner (Photek, UK) to produce 53×53 mm{sup 2} Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) detectors for the TORCH application. The MCP-PMT will provide a timing accuracy of 40 ps per photon and it will have a lifetime of up to at least 5 Ccm{sup −2} of integrated anode charge by utilizing an Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) coating. The MCP will be read out using charge division with customised electronics incorporating the NINO chipset. Laboratory results on prototype MCPs are presented. The construction of a prototype TORCH module and its simulated performance are also described.

  9. The TORCH time-of-flight detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnew, N.; Brook, N.; Castillo García, L.; Cussans, D.; Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros Garcia, A.; van Dijk, M.

    2016-07-01

    The TORCH time-of-flight detector is being developed to provide particle identification between 2 and 10 GeV/c momentum over a flight distance of 10 m. TORCH is designed for large-area coverage, up to 30 m2, and has a DIRC-like construction. The goal is to achieve a 15 ps time-of-flight resolution per incident particle by combining arrival times from multiple Cherenkov photons produced within quartz radiator plates of 10 mm thickness. A four-year R&D programme is underway with an industrial partner (Photek, UK) to produce 53×53 mm2 Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) detectors for the TORCH application. The MCP-PMT will provide a timing accuracy of 40 ps per photon and it will have a lifetime of up to at least 5 Ccm-2 of integrated anode charge by utilizing an Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) coating. The MCP will be read out using charge division with customised electronics incorporating the NINO chipset. Laboratory results on prototype MCPs are presented. The construction of a prototype TORCH module and its simulated performance are also described.

  10. Doppler time-of-flight imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2015-07-30

    Over the last few years, depth cameras have become increasingly popular for a range of applications, including human-computer interaction and gaming, augmented reality, machine vision, and medical imaging. Many of the commercially-available devices use the time-of-flight principle, where active illumination is temporally coded and analyzed on the camera to estimate a per-pixel depth map of the scene. In this paper, we propose a fundamentally new imaging modality for all time-of-flight (ToF) cameras: per-pixel velocity measurement. The proposed technique exploits the Doppler effect of objects in motion, which shifts the temporal frequency of the illumination before it reaches the camera. Using carefully coded illumination and modulation frequencies of the ToF camera, object velocities directly map to measured pixel intensities. We show that a slight modification of our imaging system allows for color, depth, and velocity information to be captured simultaneously. Combining the optical flow computed on the RGB frames with the measured metric axial velocity allows us to further estimate the full 3D metric velocity field of the scene. We believe that the proposed technique has applications in many computer graphics and vision problems, for example motion tracking, segmentation, recognition, and motion deblurring.

  11. In vivo hemodynamic analysis of intracranial aneurysms obtained by magnetic resonance fluid dynamics (MRFD) based on time-resolved three-dimensional phase-contrast MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isoda, Haruo; Takeda, Hiroyasu; Yamashita, Shuhei; Takehara, Yasuo; Sakahara, Harumi; Ohkura, Yasuhide; Kosugi, Takashi; Hirano, Masaya; Hiramatsu, Hisaya; Namba, Hiroki; Alley, Marcus T.; Bammer, Roland; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2010-01-01

    Hemodynamics is thought to play a very important role in the initiation, growth, and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. The purpose of our study was to perform in vivo hemodynamic analysis of unruptured intracranial aneurysms of magnetic resonance fluid dynamics using time-resolved three-dimensional phase-contrast MRI (4D-Flow) at 1.5 T and to analyze relationships between hemodynamics and wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI). This study included nine subjects with 14 unruptured aneurysms. 4D-Flow was performed by a 1.5-T magnetic resonance scanner with a head coil. We calculated in vivo streamlines, WSS, and OSI of intracranial aneurysms based on 4D-Flow with our software. We evaluated the number of spiral flows in the aneurysms and compared the differences in WSS or OSI between the vessel and aneurysm and between whole aneurysm and the apex of the spiral flow. 3D streamlines, WSS, and OSI distribution maps in arbitrary direction during the cardiac phase were obtained for all intracranial aneurysms. Twelve aneurysms had one spiral flow each, and two aneurysms had two spiral flows each. The WSS was lower and the OSI was higher in the aneurysm compared to the vessel. The apex of the spiral flow had a lower WSS and higher OSI relative to the whole aneurysm. Each intracranial aneurysm in this study had at least one spiral flow. The WSS was lower and OSI was higher at the apex of the spiral flow than the whole aneurysmal wall. (orig.)

  12. In vivo hemodynamic analysis of intracranial aneurysms obtained by magnetic resonance fluid dynamics (MRFD) based on time-resolved three-dimensional phase-contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoda, Haruo; Ohkura, Yasuhide; Kosugi, Takashi; Hirano, Masaya; Takeda, Hiroyasu; Hiramatsu, Hisaya; Yamashita, Shuhei; Takehara, Yasuo; Alley, Marcus T; Bammer, Roland; Pelc, Norbert J; Namba, Hiroki; Sakahara, Harumi

    2010-10-01

    Hemodynamics is thought to play a very important role in the initiation, growth, and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. The purpose of our study was to perform in vivo hemodynamic analysis of unruptured intracranial aneurysms of magnetic resonance fluid dynamics using time-resolved three-dimensional phase-contrast MRI (4D-Flow) at 1.5 T and to analyze relationships between hemodynamics and wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI). This study included nine subjects with 14 unruptured aneurysms. 4D-Flow was performed by a 1.5-T magnetic resonance scanner with a head coil. We calculated in vivo streamlines, WSS, and OSI of intracranial aneurysms based on 4D-Flow with our software. We evaluated the number of spiral flows in the aneurysms and compared the differences in WSS or OSI between the vessel and aneurysm and between whole aneurysm and the apex of the spiral flow. 3D streamlines, WSS, and OSI distribution maps in arbitrary direction during the cardiac phase were obtained for all intracranial aneurysms. Twelve aneurysms had one spiral flow each, and two aneurysms had two spiral flows each. The WSS was lower and the OSI was higher in the aneurysm compared to the vessel. The apex of the spiral flow had a lower WSS and higher OSI relative to the whole aneurysm. Each intracranial aneurysm in this study had at least one spiral flow. The WSS was lower and OSI was higher at the apex of the spiral flow than the whole aneurysmal wall.

  13. Three dimensional energy profile:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowsari, Reza; Zerriffi, Hisham

    2011-01-01

    The provision of adequate, reliable, and affordable energy has been considered as a cornerstone of development. More than one-third of the world's population has a very limited access to modern energy services and suffers from its various negative consequences. Researchers have been exploring various dimensions of household energy use in order to design strategies to provide secure access to modern energy services. However, despite more than three decades of effort, our understanding of household energy use patterns is very limited, particularly in the context of rural regions of the developing world. Through this paper, the past and the current trends in the field of energy analysis are investigated. The literature on rural energy and energy transition in developing world has been explored and the factors affecting households' decisions on energy use are listed. The and the factors affecting households' decisions on energy use are listed. The gaps identified in the literature on rural household energy analysis provide a basis for developing an alternative model that can create a more realistic view of household energy use. The three dimensional energy profile is presented as a new conceptual model for assessment of household energy use. This framework acts as a basis for building new theoretical and empirical models of rural household energy use. - Highlights: ► Reviews literature on household energy, energy transitions and decision-making in developing countries. ► Identifies gaps in rural household energy analysis and develops a new conceptual framework. ► The 3-d energy profile provides a holistic view of household energy system characteristics. ► Illustrates the use of the framework for understanding household energy transitions.

  14. Three-dimensional echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Presents tips and tricks for beginners and experts Provides educational material for 3D training courses Features comprehensively illustrated cases Includes an accompanying DVD with video clips of all sample cases Three-dimensional echocardiography is the most recent fundamental advancement in echocardiography. Since real-time 3D echocardiography became commercially available in 2002, it has rapidly been accepted in echo labs worldwide. This book covers all clinically relevant aspects of this fascinating new technology, including a comprehensive explanation of its basic principles, practical aspects of clinical application, and detailed descriptions of specific uses in the broad spectrum of clinically important heart disease. The book was written by a group of well-recognized international experts in the field, who have not only been involved in the scientific and clinical evolution of 3D echocardiography since its inception but are also intensively involved in expert training courses. As a result, the clear focus of this book is on the practical application of 3D echocardiography in daily clinical routine with tips and tricks for both beginners and experts, accompanied by more than 150 case examples comprehensively illustrated in more than 800 images and more than 500 videos provided on a DVD. In addition to an in-depth review of the most recent literature on real-time 3D echocardiography, this book represents an invaluable reference work for beginners and expert users of 3D echocardiography. - Tips and tricks for beginners and experts - Educational material for 3D training courses - Comprehensively illustrated cases - DVD with video clips of all sample cases.

  15. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamyrin, B.A.

    1979-01-01

    Discussed are an applicabilities of time-of-flight mass spectrometers in various fields of science and technology. Two types of such spectrometers are considered. Double-section electrostatic reflective fields are used in the first scheme to focus ion beams, this permits to obtain the resolution of the device of about several thousands. Such mass spectrometers called mass reflectrons are successfully used to analyze heavy molecules (ReBr 3 ) and organic compounds. Besides, mass reflectrons are used for an operative control of nickel converter production. A strong magnetic focusing of ion packets and resonance between ion cyclotron frequency and modulator frequency are provided in the second scheme of time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Such magnetic-resonance mass spectrometers (MRMS) have a high resolution (from tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands) at a relatively short length of ion flight (about 1 m). Discussed are the results obtained with MRMS while studying isotopy of natural helium and gas diffusion into crystals at superlow temperatures. Comparative data of the both types of the spectrometers are presented

  16. Doppler time-of-flight imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2017-02-16

    Systems and methods for imaging object velocity are provided. In an embodiment, at least one Time-of-Flight camera is used to capture a signal representative of an object in motion over an exposure time. Illumination and modulation frequency of the captured motion are coded within the exposure time. A change of illumination frequency is mapped to measured pixel intensities of the captured motion within the exposure time, and information about a Doppler shift in the illumination frequency is extracted to obtain a measurement of instantaneous per pixel velocity of the object in motion. The radial velocity information of the object in motion can be simultaneously captured for each pixel captured within the exposure time. In one or more aspects, the illumination frequency can be coded orthogonal to the modulation frequency of the captured motion. The change of illumination frequency can correspond to radial object velocity.

  17. Navigated three-dimensional T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence for gadoxetic acid liver magnetic resonance imaging in patients with limited breath-holding capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Eun Sun; Baek, Jeehyun; Lee, Sangwoo; Iwadate, Yuji; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2015-02-01

    To determine whether a navigator-gated three-dimensional T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence (T1W-GRE, navigated LAVA) can improve diagnostic performance for the detection of focal liver lesions (FLLs) compared to standard breath-hold (BH) T1W-GRE breath-hold LAVA (BH-LAVA) during the hepatobiliary phase (HBP) of gadoxetic acid liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with limited breath-holding capacity. This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board and the requirement for informed consent was waived. We included 372 patients who underwent liver MRI including both navigated LAVA and BH-LAVA sequences. Overall image quality of the two HBP image sets was compared. In patients with limited breath-holding capacity, diagnostic performances in detecting FLLs on the two HBP images were compared using jackknife-alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis by two reviewers. There were 13 cases (13/372; 3.5%) of image acquisition failure using the navigated LAVA sequence due to severe irregular breathing, and 50 of 359 patients had limited breath-holding capacity. In these patients, overall image quality of navigated LAVA (2.78 ± 0.95) was significantly better than that of BH-LAVA (2.42 ± 0.81, P breath-holding capacity (n = 309, 3.96 ± 0.88, 3.81 ± 0.66, respectively, P breath-holding capacity during HBP of gadoxetic acid MRI.

  18. THREE-DIMENSIONAL FEATURES OF THE OUTER HELIOSPHERE DUE TO COUPLING BETWEEN THE INTERSTELLAR AND INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELDS. IV. SOLAR CYCLE MODEL BASED ON ULYSSES OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.; Suess, S. T.; Borovikov, S. N.; Ebert, R. W.; McComas, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    The solar cycle has a profound influence on the solar wind (SW) interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) on more than one timescales. Also, there are substantial differences in individual solar cycle lengths and SW behavior within them. The presence of a slow SW belt, with a variable latitudinal extent changing within each solar cycle from rather small angles to 90°, separated from the fast wind that originates at coronal holes substantially affects plasma in the inner heliosheath (IHS)—the SW region between the termination shock (TS) and the heliopause (HP). The solar cycle may be the reason why the complicated flow structure is observed in the IHS by Voyager 1. In this paper, we show that a substantial decrease in the SW ram pressure observed by Ulysses between the TS crossings by Voyager 1 and 2 contributes significantly to the difference in the heliocentric distances at which these crossings occurred. The Ulysses spacecraft is the source of valuable information about the three-dimensional and time-dependent properties of the SW. Its unique fast latitudinal scans of the SW regions make it possible to create a solar cycle model based on the spacecraft in situ measurements. On the basis of our analysis of the Ulysses data over the entire life of the mission, we generated time-dependent boundary conditions at 10 AU from the Sun and applied our MHD-neutral model to perform a numerical simulation of the SW-LISM interaction. We analyzed the global variations in the interaction pattern, the excursions of the TS and the HP, and the details of the plasma and magnetic field distributions in the IHS. Numerical results are compared with Voyager data as functions of time in the spacecraft frame. We discuss solar cycle effects which may be reasons for the recent decrease in the TS particles (ions accelerated to anomalous cosmic-ray energies) flux observed by Voyager 1.

  19. THREE-DIMENSIONAL FEATURES OF THE OUTER HELIOSPHERE DUE TO COUPLING BETWEEN THE INTERSTELLAR AND INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELDS. IV. SOLAR CYCLE MODEL BASED ON ULYSSES OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Suess, S. T. [National Space Science and Technology Center, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Borovikov, S. N. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Dr., Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Ebert, R. W.; McComas, D. J., E-mail: np0002@uah.edu [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78227 (United States)

    2013-07-20

    The solar cycle has a profound influence on the solar wind (SW) interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) on more than one timescales. Also, there are substantial differences in individual solar cycle lengths and SW behavior within them. The presence of a slow SW belt, with a variable latitudinal extent changing within each solar cycle from rather small angles to 90 Degree-Sign , separated from the fast wind that originates at coronal holes substantially affects plasma in the inner heliosheath (IHS)-the SW region between the termination shock (TS) and the heliopause (HP). The solar cycle may be the reason why the complicated flow structure is observed in the IHS by Voyager 1. In this paper, we show that a substantial decrease in the SW ram pressure observed by Ulysses between the TS crossings by Voyager 1 and 2 contributes significantly to the difference in the heliocentric distances at which these crossings occurred. The Ulysses spacecraft is the source of valuable information about the three-dimensional and time-dependent properties of the SW. Its unique fast latitudinal scans of the SW regions make it possible to create a solar cycle model based on the spacecraft in situ measurements. On the basis of our analysis of the Ulysses data over the entire life of the mission, we generated time-dependent boundary conditions at 10 AU from the Sun and applied our MHD-neutral model to perform a numerical simulation of the SW-LISM interaction. We analyzed the global variations in the interaction pattern, the excursions of the TS and the HP, and the details of the plasma and magnetic field distributions in the IHS. Numerical results are compared with Voyager data as functions of time in the spacecraft frame. We discuss solar cycle effects which may be reasons for the recent decrease in the TS particles (ions accelerated to anomalous cosmic-ray energies) flux observed by Voyager 1.

  20. Kawasaki disease-associated coronary artery lesions with navigator echo-based. Respiratory-gated three dimensional coronary magnetic resonance angiography compared with echocardiography in young children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amino, Masayuki; Teraoka, Kunihiko; Hirano, Masaharu; Kawashima, Naoshi; Kakizaki, Dai; Ookubo, Yasuo; Sasaki, Kazuyoshi; Katuyama, Hiroaki

    2004-01-01

    Navigator echo-based respiratory-gated three dimensional coronary magnetic resonance angiography (3D-CMRA) was compared with echocardiography, to determine whether 3D-CMRA was useful for the evaluation of Kawasaki disease-associated coronary artery lesions. Sixteen consecutive patients (imaging was performed 17 times in total) who were given a diagnosis of Kawasaki's disease at the pediatric department of our hospital and examined for the precise examination of complicating coronary artery lesions on MRI using a navigator-echo technique because of their incapability of holding their breath during imaging were entered into the present study. A 1.5T MRI system was used. Gd-DOTA was given at a total volume of 0.1 mmol/kg. During imaging, CMRA visualized the left coronary arteries in all 17 cases and the right coronary arteries in 16 cases, but not in one case. The left main coronary trunk segment no.5 was demonstrated in all cases with CMRA, but not in 4 cases with echocardiography. The left anterior descending branch no.6 was visualized in 11 of the 17 cases with CMRA, but only in 5 cases with echocardiography. The left circumflex branch no.11 was observed in 6 cases with CMRA, but only in 2 cases with echocardiography. As for the right coronary arteries, branches no.1 and no.2 were observed in 16 and 9 cases with CMRA, respectively, and in 13 and 3 cases with echocardiography, respectively. Vascular diameters measured on CMRA were almost identical to those on echocardiography, within the range of arteries visualized. 3D-CMRA combined with a navigator echo technique appears to be a useful tool for the observation of coronary artery lesions associated with Kawasaki's disease because it is superior in lesion visualization to echocardiography. (author)

  1. Quantitative assessment of changes in carotid plaques during cilostazol administration using three-dimensional ultrasonography and non-gated magnetic resonance plaque imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Mao; Ohba, Hideki; Mori, Kiyofumi; Narumi, Shinsuke; Katsura, Noriyuki; Ohura, Kazumasa; Terayama, Yasuo [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurology and Gerontology, Morioka (Japan); Sasaki, Makoto; Kudo, Kohsuke [Iwate Medical University, Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Morioka (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Cilostazol, an antiplatelet agent, is reported to induce the regression of atherosclerotic changes. However, its effects on carotid plaques are unknown. Hence, we quantitatively investigated the changes that occur within carotid plaques during cilostazol administration using three-dimensional (3D) ultrasonography (US) and non-gated magnetic resonance (MR) plaque imaging. We prospectively examined 16 consecutive patients with carotid stenosis. 3D-US and T1-weighted MR plaque imaging were performed at baseline and 6 months after initiating cilostazol therapy (200 mg/day). We measured the volume and grayscale median (GSM) of the plaques from 3D-US data. We also calculated the contrast ratio (CR) of the carotid plaque against the adjacent muscle and areas of the intraplaque components: fibrous tissue, lipid, and hemorrhage components. The plaque volume on US decreased significantly (median at baseline and 6 months, 0.23 and 0.21 cm{sup 3}, respectively; p = 0.03). In the group exhibiting a plaque volume reduction of more than 10%, GSM on US increased significantly (24.8 and 71.5, respectively; p = 0.04) and CR on MRI decreased significantly (1.13 and 1.04, respectively; p = 0.02). In this group, in addition, the percent area of the fibrous component on MRI increased significantly (68.6% and 79.4%, respectively; p = 0.02), while those of the lipid and hemorrhagic components decreased (24.9% and 20.5%, respectively; p = 0.12) (1.0% and 0.0%, respectively; p = 0.04). There were no substantial changes in intraplaque characteristics in either US or MRI in the other group. 3D-US and MR plaque imaging can quantitatively detect changes in the size and composition of carotid plaques during cilostazol therapy. (orig.)

  2. High-spatial-resolution isotropic three-dimensional fast-recovery fast spin-echo magnetic resonance dacryocystography combined with topical administration of sterile saline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Zhang, E-mail: hbtjzj@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Lang, Chen, E-mail: langc731@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Qiu-Xia, Wang, E-mail: guaiqiuqiu1981@163.com [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Rong, Liu, E-mail: rongr007@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Ophthalmology, Tongji Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Xin, Luo, E-mail: hoyoho2000@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Wen-Zhen, Zhu, E-mail: zhuwenzhen@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Li-Ming, Xia, E-mail: limingxia@tjh.tjmu.edu.cn [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Jian-Pin, Qi, E-mail: qijp2k01@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); He, Wang, E-mail: he.wang@ge.com [GE Healthcare, 1 Build, 2F C109, 1 Hua TuoRoad, Zhang Jiang Hi-Tech Park, Shanghai 201203 (China)

    2013-09-15

    Objective: This study aims to investigate the clinical performance of three-dimensional (3D) fast-recovery fast spin-echo (FRFSE) magnetic resonance dacryocystography (MRD) with topical administration of sterile saline solution for the assessment of the lacrimal drainage system (LDS). Methods: A total of 13 healthy volunteers underwent both 3D-FRFSE MRD and two-dimensional (2D)-impulse recovery (IR)-single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) MRD after topical administration of sterile saline solution, and 31 patients affected by primary LDS outflow impairment or postsurgical recurrent epiphora underwent 3D-FRFSE MRD and conventional T1- and T2-weighted sequences. All patients underwent lacrimal endoscopy or surgery, which served as a standard of reference for confirming the MRD findings. Results: 3D-FRFSE MRD detected more visualized superior and inferior canaliculi and nasolacrimal duct than 2D-IR-SSFSE MRD. Compared with 2D-IR-SSFSE MRD, 3D-FRFSE MRD showed more visualized segments per LDS, although the difference was not statistically significant. Significant improvements in the inferior canaliculus and nasolacrimal duct visibility grades were achieved using 3D-FRFSE MRD. 3D-FRFSE MRD had 100% sensitivity and 63.6% specificity for detecting LDS obstruction. In 51 out of the 62 LDSs that were assessed, a 90% agreement was noted between the findings of 3D-FRFSE MRD and lacrimal endoscopy in detecting the obstruction level. Conclusion: 3D-FRFSE MRD combined with topical administration of sterile saline solution is a simple and noninvasive method of obtaining detailed morphological and functional information on the LDS. Overall, 3D-FRFSE MRD could be used as a reliable diagnostic method in many patients with epiphora prior to surgery.

  3. Cavernous malformations of the brainstem: three-dimensional-constructive interference in steady-state magnetic resonance imaging for improvement of surgical approach and clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zausinger, Stefan; Yousry, Indra; Brueckmann, Hartmut; Schmid-Elsaesser, Robert; Tonn, Joerg-Christian

    2006-02-01

    The indications for resection of cavernous malformations (CMs) of the brainstem include neurological deficits, (recurrent) hemorrhage, and surgically accessible location. In particular, knowledge of the thickness of the parenchymal layer and of the CM's spatial relation to nuclei, tracts, cranial nerves, and vessels is critical for planning the surgical approach. We reviewed the operative treatment of 13 patients with 14 brainstem CMs, with special regard to refined three-dimensional (3D)-constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients were evaluated neurologically and by conventional spin-echo/fast spin-echo and 3D-CISS MRI. Surgery was performed with the use of microsurgical techniques and neurophysiological monitoring. Eleven CMs were located in the pons/pontomedullary region; 10 of the 11 were operated on via the lateral suboccipital approach. Three CMs were located near the floor of the fourth ventricle and operated on via the median suboccipital approach, with total removal of all CMs. Results were excellent or good in 10 patients; one patient transiently required tracheostomy, and two patients developed new hemipareses/ataxia with subsequent improvement. Not only did 3D-CISS sequences allow improved judgment of the thickness of the parenchymal layer over the lesion compared with spin-echo/fast spin-echo MRI, but 3D-CISS imaging also proved particularly superior in demonstrating the spatial relation of the lesion to fairly "safe" entry zones (e.g., between the trigeminal nerve and the VIIth and VIIIth nerve groups) by displaying the cranial nerves and vessels within the cerebellopontine cistern more precisely. Surgical treatment of brainstem CMs is recommended in symptomatic patients. Especially in patients with lesions situated ventrolaterally, the 3D-CISS sequence seems to be a valuable method for identifying the CM's relation to safe entry zones, thereby facilitating the surgical approach.

  4. Volume Tracking: A new method for quantitative assessment and visualization of intracardiac blood flow from three-dimensional, time-resolved, three-component magnetic resonance velocity mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Töger, Johannes; Carlsson, Marcus; Söderlind, Gustaf; Arheden, Håkan; Heiberg, Einar

    2011-01-01

    Functional and morphological changes of the heart influence blood flow patterns. Therefore, flow patterns may carry diagnostic and prognostic information. Three-dimensional, time-resolved, three-directional phase contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (4D PC-CMR) can image flow patterns with unique detail, and using new flow visualization methods may lead to new insights. The aim of this study is to present and validate a novel visualization method with a quantitative potential for blood flow from 4D PC-CMR, called Volume Tracking, and investigate if Volume Tracking complements particle tracing, the most common visualization method used today. Eight healthy volunteers and one patient with a large apical left ventricular aneurysm underwent 4D PC-CMR flow imaging of the whole heart. Volume Tracking and particle tracing visualizations were compared visually side-by-side in a visualization software package. To validate Volume Tracking, the number of particle traces that agreed with the Volume Tracking visualizations was counted and expressed as a percentage of total released particles in mid-diastole and end-diastole respectively. Two independent observers described blood flow patterns in the left ventricle using Volume Tracking visualizations. Volume Tracking was feasible in all eight healthy volunteers and in the patient. Visually, Volume Tracking and particle tracing are complementary methods, showing different aspects of the flow. When validated against particle tracing, on average 90.5% and 87.8% of the particles agreed with the Volume Tracking surface in mid-diastole and end-diastole respectively. Inflow patterns in the left ventricle varied between the subjects, with excellent agreement between observers. The left ventricular inflow pattern in the patient differed from the healthy subjects. Volume Tracking is a new visualization method for blood flow measured by 4D PC-CMR. Volume Tracking complements and provides incremental information compared to particle

  5. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score assessed with an isotropic three-dimensional true fast imaging with steady-state precession sequence at 3.0 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Goetz H; Zak, Lukas; Mamisch, Tallal C; Resinger, Christoph; Marlovits, Stefan; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2009-09-01

    Cartilage defects are common pathologies and surgical cartilage repair shows promising results. In its postoperative evaluation, the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score, using different variables to describe the constitution of the cartilage repair tissue and the surrounding structures, is widely used. High-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 3-dimensional (3D) isotropic sequences may combine ideal preconditions to enhance the diagnostic performance of cartilage imaging.Aim of this study was to introduce an improved 3D MOCART score using the possibilities of an isotropic 3D true fast imaging with steady-state precession (True-FISP) sequence in the postoperative evaluation of patients after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) as well as to compare the results to the conventional 2D MOCART score using standard MR sequences. The study had approval by the local ethics commission. One hundred consecutive MR scans in 60 patients at standard follow-up intervals of 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 60 months after MACT of the knee joint were prospectively included. The mean follow-up interval of this cross-sectional evaluation was 21.4 +/- 20.6 months; the mean age of the patients was 35.8 +/- 9.4 years. MRI was performed at a 3.0 Tesla unit. All variables of the standard 2D MOCART score where part of the new 3D MOCART score. Furthermore, additional variables and options were included with the aims to use the capabilities of isotropic MRI, to include the results of recent studies, and to adapt to the needs of patients and physician in a clinical routine examination. A proton-density turbo spin-echo sequence, a T2-weighted dual fast spin-echo (dual-FSE) sequence, and a T1-weighted turbo inversion recovery magnitude (TIRM) sequence were used to assess the standard 2D MOCART score; an isotropic 3D-TrueFISP sequence was prepared to evaluate the new 3D MOCART score. All 9 variables of the 2D MOCART score were compared

  6. Three-dimensional ICT reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Aidong; Li Ju; Chen Fa; Sun Lingxia

    2005-01-01

    The three-dimensional ICT reconstruction method is the hot topic of recent ICT technology research. In the context, qualified visual three-dimensional ICT pictures are achieved through multi-piece two-dimensional images accumulation by, combining with thresholding method and linear interpolation. Different direction and different position images of the reconstructed pictures are got by rotation and interception respectively. The convenient and quick method is significantly instructive to more complicated three-dimensional reconstruction of ICT images. (authors)

  7. Three-dimensional ICT reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Aidong; Li Ju; Chen Fa; Sun Lingxia

    2004-01-01

    The three-dimensional ICT reconstruction method is the hot topic of recent ICT technology research. In the context qualified visual three-dimensional ICT pictures are achieved through multi-piece two-dimensional images accumulation by order, combining with thresholding method and linear interpolation. Different direction and different position images of the reconstructed pictures are got by rotation and interception respectively. The convenient and quick method is significantly instructive to more complicated three-dimensional reconstruction of ICT images. (authors)

  8. Three-dimensional contrast enhanced ultrasound score and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging score in evaluating breast tumor angiogenesis: Correlation with biological factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Wan-Ru, E-mail: jiawanru@126.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chai, Wei-Min, E-mail: chai_weimin@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Tang, Lei, E-mail: jessietang1003@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Yi, E-mail: xiatian.0602@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Fei, Xiao-Chun, E-mail: xcf0222@163.com [Department of Pathology, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Han, Bao-San, E-mail: hanbaosan@126.com [Department of Comprehensive Breast Health Center, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Man, E-mail: lucyjia1370@126.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Objective: To explore the clinical value of three-dimensional contrast enhanced ultrasound (3D-CEUS) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) score systems in evaluating breast tumor angiogenesis by comparing their diagnostic efficacy and correlation with biological factors. Methods: 3D-CEUS was performed in 183 patients with breast tumors by Esaote Mylab90 with SonoVue (Bracco, Italy), DCE-MRI was performed on a dedicated breast magnetic resonance imaging (DBMRI) system (Aurora Dedicated Breast MRI Systems, USA) with a dedicated breast coil. 3D-CEUS and DCE-MRI score systems were created based on tumor perfusion and vascular characteristics. Microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) expression were measured by immunohistochemistry. Results: Pathological results showed 35 benign and 148 malignant breast tumors. MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.76), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.55), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.39) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.41) expression were all significantly different between benignity and malignancy. Regarding 3D-CEUS 4 points as cutoff value, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 85.1%, 94.3% and 86.9%, respectively, and correlated well with MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.50), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.50), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.50) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.66). Taking DCE-MRI 5 points as cutoff value, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 86.5%, 94.3% and 88.0%, respectively and also correlated well with MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.52), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.44), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.42) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.35). Conclusions: 3D-CEUS score system displays inspiring diagnostic performance and good agreement with DCE-MRI scoring. Moreover, both score systems correlate well with MVD, VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression, and thus have great potentials in tumor angiogenesis evaluation.

  9. Feasibility of three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography-fluoroscopy image fusion technique in guiding complex endovascular aortic procedures in patients with renal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwein, Adeline; Chinnadurai, Ponraj; Shah, Dipan J; Lumsden, Alan B; Bechara, Carlos F; Bismuth, Jean

    2017-05-01

    Three-dimensional image fusion of preoperative computed tomography (CT) angiography with fluoroscopy using intraoperative noncontrast cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been shown to improve endovascular procedures by reducing procedure length, radiation dose, and contrast media volume. However, patients with a contraindication to CT angiography (renal insufficiency, iodinated contrast allergy) may not benefit from this image fusion technique. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and fluoroscopy image fusion using noncontrast CBCT as a guidance tool during complex endovascular aortic procedures, especially in patients with renal insufficiency. All endovascular aortic procedures done under MRA image fusion guidance at a single-center were retrospectively reviewed. The patients had moderate to severe renal insufficiency and underwent diagnostic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging after gadolinium or ferumoxytol injection. Relevant vascular landmarks electronically marked in MRA images were overlaid on real-time two-dimensional fluoroscopy for image guidance, after image fusion with noncontrast intraoperative CBCT. Technical success, time for image registration, procedure time, fluoroscopy time, number of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) acquisitions before stent deployment or vessel catheterization, and renal function before and after the procedure were recorded. The image fusion accuracy was qualitatively evaluated on a binary scale by three physicians after review of image data showing virtual landmarks from MRA on fluoroscopy. Between November 2012 and March 2016, 10 patients underwent endovascular procedures for aortoiliac aneurysmal disease or aortic dissection using MRA image fusion guidance. All procedures were technically successful. A paired t-test analysis showed no difference between preimaging and postoperative renal function (P = .6). The mean time required for MRA-CBCT image

  10. Three dimensional moire pattern alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juday, Richard D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed for determining three dimensional positioning relative to a predetermined point utilizing moire interference patterns such that the patterns are complementary when viewed on axis from the predetermined distance. Further, the invention includes means for determining rotational positioning in addition to three dimensional translational positioning.

  11. The Three-Dimensional Sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Daniel R.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the implications of the three-dimensional sign proposed by Harris (1990) for general linguistic theory and the philosophy of language. The article places the principal characteristics of the three-dimensional sign (contextuality, cotemporality, communicational relevance, and experiential grounding) against those of the two-dimensional…

  12. Time-of-flight isochronous spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wouters, J.M.; Vieira, D.J.; Wollnik, H.

    1985-01-01

    This report is the second in a series of progress reports describing the design and construction of the time-of-flight isochronous (TOFI) spectrometer and its associated secondary beam line. TOFI, which is being constructed jointly by INC and MP Divisions, is designed to measure in a systematic fashion the ground-state masses of the light neutron-rich nuclei with A<70 that lie far from the valley of β stability. In the past year the authors ordered all the long-lead items necessary for construction of the spectrometer and installed the first half of the secondary beam line. Furthermore, a major portion of the control system for both the spectrometer and beam line was designed and installed. This annual report briefly summarizes the current status of the spectrometer and describes in some detail the design and installation of the first half of the transport line. For a summary of the scientific goals and overall design of the TOFI spectrometer, see the 1983 Progress at LAMPF report

  13. Three-dimensional broadband tunable terahertz metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Kebin; Strikwerda, Andrew; Zhang, Xin

    2013-01-01

    We present optically tunable magnetic three-dimensional (3D) metamaterials at terahertz (THz) frequencies which exhibit a tuning range of ~30% of the resonance frequency. This is accomplished by fabricating 3D array structures consisting of double-split-ring resonators (DSRRs) on silicon on sapph...... as verified through electromagnetic simulations and parameter retrieval. Our approach extends dynamic metamaterial tuning to magnetic control, and may find applications in switching and modulation, polarization control, or tunable perfect absorbers....

  14. Application of 19F magnetic resonance to study the efficacy of fluorine labeled drugs in the three-dimensional cultured breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartusik, Dorota; Tomanek, Boguslaw

    2010-01-15

    The cellular monitoring of tumor response to treatments is important for drug discovery and drug development in cancer therapy. We studied efficacy of Herceptin, a common breast cancer drug conjugated with a fluorine organic compound, perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether (PFCE) which easily forms biocompatible emulsions. Three new pharmaceutical forms of Herceptin, Herceptin/PFCE, Herceptin/PFCE/Lipoplex and Herceptin/PFCE/HydraLink were synthesized for the ex vivo study of their efficacy in breast cancer treatment. The emulsions were administered to 10(9)cells mL(-1) of HER-2 positive human adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells and the same amount of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) cultured in three-dimensional (3D) geometry using hollow fiber bioreactor (HFB) device. Following drugs administration ex vivo, fluorine-19 magnetic resonance imaging ((19)F MRI) was applied for cells imaging to measure their viability and to study drug efficacy over 72h. To ensure optimum drug tracking, HydraLink was used to provide stable binding affinity of emulsified Herceptin to receptor while cationic lipid (Lipofectamine) was used to enhance lipophilicity of the emulsions. After 72h of treatment with Herceptin, Herceptin/PFCE, Herceptin/PFCE/Lipoplex and Herceptin/PFCE/HydraLink the viability of cells was 54+/-2%, 49+/-3%, 43+/-5% and 42+/-1%, respectively, as compared with control 93+/-2%. The efficacy (EC(50)) of Herceptin conjugated with emulsions was found to be 970+/-13 microg mL(-1) for Herceptin/PFCE, 645+/-11 microg mL(-1) for Herceptin/PFCE/Lipoplex, 678+/-7 microg mL(-1) for Herceptin/PFCE/HydraLink and 1000+/-3 microg mL(-1) for Herceptin. The results show that fluorine emulsions improved the efficacy of Herceptin and (19)F signal intensity changes validated drug efficiency. The significant correlations between duration of treatments and MCF-7 cells viability were observed. While we studied breast cancer cells, the fluorine emulsions could be applied for treatment of other cancer

  15. A comparison of inner ear imaging features at different time points of sudden sensorineural hearing loss with three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Honglei; Ou, Yongkang; Fu, Jia; Zhang, Ya; Xiong, Hao; Xu, Yaodong

    2015-10-01

    It has been reported that about half of patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) show high signals in the affected inner ear on three-dimensional, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (3D-FLAIR MRI). These signals may reflect minor hemorrhage or an increased concentration of protein in the inner ear, which has passed through blood vessels with increased permeability. Our objective was to compare the positive ratio of the high signal in affected inner ears at different time points to determine the suitable imaging time point for 3D-FLAIR MRI in SSNHL. 3D-FLAIR MRI images were taken at three times, precontrast and approximately 10 min and 4 h after intravenous injection of a single dose of gadodiamide (Gd) (0.1 mmol/kg), in 46 patients with SNHL. We compared the positive findings of the high signals in the inner ear of patients with SNHL as well as the signal intensity ratio (SIR) between the affected cochleae and unaffected cochleae at three time points. The positive ratios of the high signals in the affected inner ear at the time points of precontrast and 10 min and 4 h after the intravenous Gd injection were 26.1, 32.6, and 41.3%, respectively. The high signal intensity ratios of affected inner ears at the three time points were 1.28, 1.31, and 1.48, respectively. The difference between the positive ratios precontrast and at 10 min after the intravenous Gd injection was statistically significant (P = 0.006); the differences between the positive ratios at 4 h after the intravenous Gd injection and precontrast and between the ratios at 4 h and 10 min after the intravenous Gd injection were not statistically significant. The time effects of the median value of SIR were not significant (P = 0.064). We do not recommend 4 h after intravenous Gd injection as a time point to image the inner ear in SNHL. We believe that imaging precontrast and at 10 min after the intravenous Gd injection are suitable time points.

  16. Volume Tracking: A new method for quantitative assessment and visualization of intracardiac blood flow from three-dimensional, time-resolved, three-component magnetic resonance velocity mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arheden Håkan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional and morphological changes of the heart influence blood flow patterns. Therefore, flow patterns may carry diagnostic and prognostic information. Three-dimensional, time-resolved, three-directional phase contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (4D PC-CMR can image flow patterns with unique detail, and using new flow visualization methods may lead to new insights. The aim of this study is to present and validate a novel visualization method with a quantitative potential for blood flow from 4D PC-CMR, called Volume Tracking, and investigate if Volume Tracking complements particle tracing, the most common visualization method used today. Methods Eight healthy volunteers and one patient with a large apical left ventricular aneurysm underwent 4D PC-CMR flow imaging of the whole heart. Volume Tracking and particle tracing visualizations were compared visually side-by-side in a visualization software package. To validate Volume Tracking, the number of particle traces that agreed with the Volume Tracking visualizations was counted and expressed as a percentage of total released particles in mid-diastole and end-diastole respectively. Two independent observers described blood flow patterns in the left ventricle using Volume Tracking visualizations. Results Volume Tracking was feasible in all eight healthy volunteers and in the patient. Visually, Volume Tracking and particle tracing are complementary methods, showing different aspects of the flow. When validated against particle tracing, on average 90.5% and 87.8% of the particles agreed with the Volume Tracking surface in mid-diastole and end-diastole respectively. Inflow patterns in the left ventricle varied between the subjects, with excellent agreement between observers. The left ventricular inflow pattern in the patient differed from the healthy subjects. Conclusion Volume Tracking is a new visualization method for blood flow measured by 4D PC-CMR. Volume Tracking

  17. Quantitative assessment of primary mitral regurgitation using left ventricular volumes obtained with new automated three-dimensional transthoracic echocardiographic software: A comparison with 3-Tesla cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Franck; Marechaux, Sylvestre; Iacuzio, Laura; Schouver, Elie Dan; Castel, Anne Laure; Toledano, Manuel; Rusek, Stephane; Dor, Vincent; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Dreyfus, Gilles

    2018-03-30

    Quantitative assessment of primary mitral regurgitation (MR) using left ventricular (LV) volumes obtained with three-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (3D TTE) recently showed encouraging results. Nevertheless, 3D TTE is not incorporated into everyday practice, as current LV chamber quantification software products are time consuming. To investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of new automated fast 3D TTE software (HeartModel A.I. ; Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA, USA) for the quantification of LV volumes and MR severity in patients with isolated degenerative primary MR; and to compare regurgitant volume (RV) obtained with 3D TTE with a cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) reference. Fifty-three patients (37 men; mean age 64±12 years) with at least mild primary isolated MR, and having comprehensive 3D TTE and CMR studies within 24h, were eligible for inclusion. MR RV was calculated using the proximal isovelocity surface area (PISA) method and the volumetric method (total LV stroke volume minus aortic stroke volume) with either CMR or 3D TTE. Inter- and intraobserver reproducibility of 3D TTE was excellent (coefficient of variation≤10%) for LV volumes. MR RV was similar using CMR and 3D TTE (57±23mL vs 56±28mL; P=0.22), but was significantly higher using the PISA method (69±30mL; PTTE). The PISA method consistently overestimated MR RV compared with CMR (bias 12±21mL), while no significant bias was found between 3D TTE and CMR (bias 2±14mL). Concordance between echocardiography and CMR was higher using 3D TTE MR grading (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]=0.89) than with PISA MR grading (ICC=0.78). Complete agreement with CMR grading was more frequent with 3D TTE than with the PISA method (76% vs 63%). 3D TTE RV assessment using the new generation of automated software correlates well with CMR in patients with isolated degenerative primary MR. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Time Of Flight Detectors: From phototubes to SiPM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Foschi, E.; Guandalini, C.; Quadrani, L.; Sbarra, C.; Zuffa, M.

    2008-01-01

    A sample of Silicon Photomultipliers was tested because they looked promising for future space missions: low consumption, low weight, resistance to radiation damage and insensitivity to magnetic fields. They have been studied in laboratory by means of the same characterization methods adopted to calibrate the fine mesh photomultipliers used by the Time Of Flight of the AMS-02 experiment. A detailed simulation was made to reproduce the SiPM response to the various experimental conditions. A possible counter design has been studied with front end electronics card equipped with SiPMs and Peltier cell for thermoregulation. A proper simulation based on COMSOL Multiphysics package reproduces quite well the Peltier cell nominal cooling capability

  19. Time Of Flight Detectors: From phototubes to SiPM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurenti, G. [INFN of Bologna, Viale B.Pichat 4/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Levi, G.; Foschi, E.; Guandalini, C.; Quadrani, L. [Department of Physics and INFN, Viale B.Pichat 4/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Sbarra, C. [Department of Physics and INFN, Viale B.Pichat 4/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Enrico Fermi Research Center, Via Panisperna 89, 06100 Roma (Italy)], E-mail: cristina.sbarra@bo.infn.it; Zuffa, M. [INFN of Bologna, Viale B.Pichat 4/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2008-04-01

    A sample of Silicon Photomultipliers was tested because they looked promising for future space missions: low consumption, low weight, resistance to radiation damage and insensitivity to magnetic fields. They have been studied in laboratory by means of the same characterization methods adopted to calibrate the fine mesh photomultipliers used by the Time Of Flight of the AMS-02 experiment. A detailed simulation was made to reproduce the SiPM response to the various experimental conditions. A possible counter design has been studied with front end electronics card equipped with SiPMs and Peltier cell for thermoregulation. A proper simulation based on COMSOL Multiphysics package reproduces quite well the Peltier cell nominal cooling capability.

  20. Mid-term follow-up of patients with transposition of the great arteries after atrial inversion operation using two- and three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogel, Mark A.; Weinberg, Paul M.; Hubbard, Anne

    2002-01-01

    Background: Older patients with transposition of the great arteries who have undergone an atrial inversion procedure (ATRIAL-INV) are difficult to image by echocardiography. The surgical baffles are spatially complex. Objective: To test the hypothesis that two- and three-dimensional MRI can elucidate the spatially complex anatomy in this patient population. Materials and methods; Twelve patients with ATRIAL-INV, ages 16±4.5 years, underwent routine T1-weighted spin-echo axial imaging to obtain a full cardiac volumetric data set. Postprocessing created three-dimensional shaded surface displays and allowed for multiplanar reconstruction. Routine transthoracic echocardiography was available on all patients. Results: Three-dimensional reconstruction enabled complete spatial conceptualization of the venous pathways, and allowed for precise localization of a narrowed region in the upper limb of the systemic venous pathway found in two patients. This was subsequently confirmed on angiography. Routine MRI was able to image the full extent of the venous pathways in all 12 patients. Routine transthoracic echocardiography was able to visualize proximal portions of the venous pathways in eight (67%), the distal upper limb in five (42%), and the distal lower limb in four (33%) patients, and it was able to visualize the outflow tracts in all patients. Conclusion: Three-dimensional reconstruction adds important spatial information, which can be especially important in stenotic regions. Routine MRI is superior to transthoracic echocardiography in delineation of the systemic and pulmonary venous pathway anatomy of ATRIAL-INV patients at mid-term follow-up. Although transesophageal echocardiography is an option, it is more invasive. (orig.)

  1. Single-pixel three-dimensional imaging with time-based depth resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-Jie; Edgar, Matthew P.; Gibson, Graham M.; Sun, Baoqing; Radwell, Neal; Lamb, Robert; Padgett, Miles J.

    2016-07-01

    Time-of-flight three-dimensional imaging is an important tool for applications such as object recognition and remote sensing. Conventional time-of-flight three-dimensional imaging systems frequently use a raster scanned laser to measure the range of each pixel in the scene sequentially. Here we show a modified time-of-flight three-dimensional imaging system, which can use compressed sensing techniques to reduce acquisition times, whilst distributing the optical illumination over the full field of view. Our system is based on a single-pixel camera using short-pulsed structured illumination and a high-speed photodiode, and is capable of reconstructing 128 × 128-pixel resolution three-dimensional scenes to an accuracy of ~3 mm at a range of ~5 m. Furthermore, by using a compressive sampling strategy, we demonstrate continuous real-time three-dimensional video with a frame-rate up to 12 Hz. The simplicity of the system hardware could enable low-cost three-dimensional imaging devices for precision ranging at wavelengths beyond the visible spectrum.

  2. Three-Dimensional Volumetric Assessment of Diastolic Function by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacif, Marcelo S; Almeida, Andre L C; Young, Alistair A; Cowan, Brett R; Armstrong, Anderson C; Yang, Eunice; Sibley, Christopher T; Hundley, W Gregory; Liu, Songtao; Lima, Joao Ac; Bluemke, David A

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac Magnetic Resonance is in need of a simple and robust method for diastolic function assessment that can be done with routine protocol sequences. To develop and validate a three-dimensional (3D) model-based volumetric assessment of diastolic function using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging and compare the results obtained with the model with those obtained by echocardiography. The study participants provided written informed consent and were included if having undergone both echocardiography and cine steady-state free precession (SSFP) CMR on the same day. Guide points at the septal and lateral mitral annulus were used to define the early longitudinal relaxation rate (E'), while a time-volume curve from the 3D model was used to assess diastolic filling parameters. We determined the correlation between 3D CMR and echocardiography and the accuracy of CMR in classifying the diastolic function grade. The study included 102 subjects. The E/A ratio by CMR was positively associated with the E/A ratio by echocardiography (r = 0.71, p de um método simples e robusto para a avaliação da função diastólica que pode ser feito com sequências protocolares de rotina. Desenvolver e validar a avaliação volumétrica da função diastólica através de um modelo tridimensional (3D) com utilização de imagens de ressonância magnética cardíaca (RMC) e comparar os resultados obtidos com este modelo com os obtidos por ecocardiografia. Os participantes do estudo assinaram um termo de consentimento e foram incluídos se tivessem sido submetidos no mesmo dia tanto à ecocardiografia quanto à cine RMC com precessão livre no estado estacionário (steady-state free precession, SSFP). Pontos-guia foram utilizados no anel mitral septal e lateral para definir a velocidade de estiramento no início da diástole (E'), enquanto curvas de volume-tempo do modelo 3D foram utilizadas para avaliar os parâmetros de enchimento diastólico. Foram determinadas a correlação entre

  3. Polarisation analysis on the LET time-of-flight spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, G. J.; Košata, J.; Devonport, M.; Galsworthy, P.; Bewley, R. I.; Voneshen, D. J.; Dalgliesh, R.; Stewart, J. R.

    2017-06-01

    We present a design for implementing uniaxial polarisation analysis on the LET cold neutron time-of-flight spectrometer, installed on the second target station at ISIS. The polarised neutron beam is to be produced by a transmission-based supermirror polariser with the polarising mirrors arranged in a “double-V” formation. This will be followed by a Mezei-type precession coil spin flipper, selected for its small spatial requirements, as well as a permanent magnet guide field to transport the beam polarisation to the sample position. The sample area will contain a set of holding field coils, whose purpose is to produce a highly homogenous magnetic field for the wide-angle 3He analyser cell. To facilitate fast cell changes and reduce the risk of cell failure, we intend to separate the cell and cryostat from the vacuum of the sample tank by installing both in a vessel at atmospheric pressure. When the instrument upgrade is complete, the performance of LET is expected to be commensurate with existing and planned polarised cold neutron spectrometers at other sources. Finally, we discuss the implications of performing uniaxial polarisation analysis only, and identify quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) on ionic conducting materials as an interesting area to apply the technique.

  4. Neutron Time-of-Flight Diffractometer HIPPO at LANSCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Sven; Williams, Darrick; Zhao, Yusheng; Bennett, Kristin; von Dreele, Bob; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2004-03-01

    The High-Pressure Preferred Orientation (HIPPO) neutron diffractometer is the first third-generation neutron time-of-flight powder diffractometer to be constructed in the United States. It produces extremely high intensity by virtue of a short (9 m) initial flight path on a high intensity water moderator and 1380 3He detector tubes covering 4.5 m2 of detector area from 10' to 150' in scattering angles. HIPPO was designed and manufactured as a joint effort between LANSCE and University of California with the goals of attaining world-class science and making neutron powder diffractometry an accessible and available tool to the national user community. Over two decades of momentum transfer are available (0.1-30 A-1) to support studies of amorphous solids; magnetic diffraction; small crystalline samples; and samples subjected to extreme environments such as temperature, pressure, or magnetic fields. The exceptionally high data rates of HIPPO also make it useful for time-resolved studies. In addition to the standard ancillary equipment (100-position sample/texture changer, closed-cycle He refrigerator, furnace), HIPPO has unique high-pressure cells capable of achieving pressures of 30 GPA at ambient and high (2000 K) temperature with samples up to 100 mm3 in volume.

  5. Time-of-flight 3D Neutron Diffraction for Multigrain Crystallography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cereser, Alberto

    This thesis presents a new technique for measuring spatially resolved microstructures in crystalline materials using pulsed neutron beams. The method, called Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Neutron Diffraction (ToF 3DND), identifies the position, shape and crystallographic orientation of the ind......This thesis presents a new technique for measuring spatially resolved microstructures in crystalline materials using pulsed neutron beams. The method, called Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Neutron Diffraction (ToF 3DND), identifies the position, shape and crystallographic orientation...... measurements: a time resolved imaging detector, developed at University of Berkeley, California, was fitted in the interior of SENJU in order to record the extinction spots in the transmitted beam (i.e. areas with missing intensity due to Bragg diffraction of the individual grains). The arrangement of the two...... steps have been developed in this study. The work also shows that based on the transmission data alone the orientations are not uniquely determined; however, it is possible to find an unique solution by including diffraction signals from the imaging detector. The second version uses an existing method...

  6. LVGEMS Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry on Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Federico

    2013-01-01

    NASA fs investigations of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere require measurements of composition of the neutral air and ions. NASA is able to undertake these observations, but the instruments currently in use have their limitations. NASA has extended the scope of its research in the atmosphere and now requires more measurements covering more of the atmosphere. Out of this need, NASA developed multipoint measurements using miniaturized satellites, also called nanosatellites (e.g., CubeSats), that require a new generation of spectrometers that can fit into a 4 4 in. (.10 10 cm) cross-section in the upgraded satellites. Overall, the new mass spectrometer required for the new depth of atmospheric research must fulfill a new level of low-voltage/low-power requirements, smaller size, and less risk of magnetic contamination. The Low-Voltage Gated Electrostatic Mass Spectrometer (LVGEMS) was developed to fulfill these requirements. The LVGEMS offers a new spectrometer that eliminates magnetic field issues associated with magnetic sector mass spectrometers, reduces power, and is about 1/10 the size of previous instruments. LVGEMS employs the time of flight (TOF) technique in the GEMS mass spectrometer previously developed. However, like any TOF mass spectrometer, GEMS requires a rectangular waveform of large voltage amplitude, exceeding 100 V -- that means that the voltage applied to one of the GEMS electrodes has to change from 0 to 100 V in a time of only a few nanoseconds. Such electronic speed requires more power than can be provided in a CubeSat. In the LVGEMS, the amplitude of the rectangular waveform is reduced to about 1 V, compatible with digital electronics supplies and requiring little power.

  7. TORCH: Time of Flight Identification with Cherenkov Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Charles, M J

    2010-01-01

    TORCH is a time-of-flight detector concept using Cherenkov light to provide charged particle identification up to 10 GeV/$c$. The concept and design are described and performance in simulation is quantified.

  8. TORCH: Time of flight identification with Cherenkov radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, M. J.; Forty, R.; LHCb Collaboration

    2011-05-01

    TORCH is a time-of-flight detector concept using Cherenkov light to provide charged particle identification up to 10 GeV/ c. The concept and design are described and performance in simulation is quantified.

  9. TORCH: Time of Flight Identification with Cherenkov Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Charles, M J

    2011-01-01

    TORCH is a time-of-flight detector concept using Cherenkov light to provide charged particle identification up to 10 GeV/c. The concept and design are described and performance in simulation is quantified.

  10. Three dimensional and high resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the inner ear. Normal ears and anomaly scanned with 3D-CISS sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edamatsu, Hideo [Dokkyo Univ., Saitama (Japan). Koshigaya Hospital; Uechi, Yoko; Honjyo, Shiro; Yamashita, Koichi; Tonami, Hisao

    1997-12-01

    The MRI system used in this study was a new scanning sequence, 3D-CISS (Three dimensional-constructive interference in steady state) with 1.5 Tesla. Ten normal ears and one ear with Mondini type anomaly were scanned and reconstructed. In imagings of normal inner ears, the cochlea has three spiral layers; basal, middle and apical turns. Each turn was separated into three parts; the scala vestibuli, osseous spiral lamina and scala tympani. Three semicircular ducts, utricle and saccule were also reconstructed in one frame. In the inner ear of Mondini anomaly, 3D MRI showed cochlear aplasia, hypoplasia of semicircular ducts and widely dilated vestibule. The imaging was identical with findings of ``common cavity``. The anomaly was easily recognized in 3D MRI more than in 2D imagings. The detailed and cubic imagings of the Mondini anomaly in 3D MRI could not be observed with conventional 2D MRI. 3D MRI is not invasive method and can scan a target very quickly. (author)

  11. Equilibrium: three-dimensional configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter considers toroidal MHD configurations that are inherently three-dimensional. The motivation for investigation such complicated equilibria is that they possess the potential for providing toroidal confinement without the need of a net toroidal current. This leads to a number of advantages with respect to fusion power generation. First, the attractive feature of steady-state operation becomes more feasible since such configurations no longer require a toroidal current transformer. Second, with zero net current, one potentially dangerous class of MHD instabilities, the current-driven kink modes, is eliminated. Finally, three-dimensional configurations possess nondegenerate flux surfaces even in the absence of plasma pressure and plasma current. Although there is an enormous range of possible three-dimensional equilibria, the configurations of interest are accurately described as axisymmetric tori with superimposed helical fields; furthermore, they possess no net toroidal current. Instead, two different and less obvious restoring forces are developed: the helical sideband force and the toroidal dipole current force. Each is discussed in detail in Chapter 7. A detailed discussion of the parallel current constraint, including its physical significance, is given in section 7.2. A general analysis of helical sideband equilibria, along with a detailed description of the Elmo bumpy torus, is presented in sections 7.3 and 7.4. A general description of toroidal dipole-current equilibria, including a detailed discussion of stellarators, heliotrons, and torsatrons, is given in sections 7.5 and 7.6

  12. Three-dimensional Features of the Outer Heliosphere Due to Coupling between the Interstellar and Heliospheric Magnetic Field. V. The Bow Wave, Heliospheric Boundary Layer, Instabilities, and Magnetic Reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelov, N. V.; Heerikhuisen, J. [Department of Space Science, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Roytershteyn, V. [Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Burlaga, L. F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S., E-mail: nikolai.pogorelov@uah.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2017-08-10

    The heliosphere is formed due to interaction between the solar wind (SW) and local interstellar medium (LISM). The shape and position of the heliospheric boundary, the heliopause, in space depend on the parameters of interacting plasma flows. The interplay between the asymmetrizing effect of the interstellar magnetic field and charge exchange between ions and neutral atoms plays an important role in the SW–LISM interaction. By performing three-dimensional, MHD plasma/kinetic neutral atom simulations, we determine the width of the outer heliosheath—the LISM plasma region affected by the presence of the heliosphere—and analyze quantitatively the distributions in front of the heliopause. It is shown that charge exchange modifies the LISM plasma to such extent that the contribution of a shock transition to the total variation of plasma parameters becomes small even if the LISM velocity exceeds the fast magnetosonic speed in the unperturbed medium. By performing adaptive mesh refinement simulations, we show that a distinct boundary layer of decreased plasma density and enhanced magnetic field should be observed on the interstellar side of the heliopause. We show that this behavior is in agreement with the plasma oscillations of increasing frequency observed by the plasma wave instrument onboard Voyager 1. We also demonstrate that Voyager observations in the inner heliosheath between the heliospheric termination shock and the heliopause are consistent with dissipation of the heliospheric magnetic field. The choice of LISM parameters in this analysis is based on the simulations that fit observations of energetic neutral atoms performed by Interstellar Boundary Explorer .

  13. Three-Dimensional Printing in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltorai, Adam E M; Nguyen, Eric; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is emerging as a clinically promising technology for rapid prototyping of surgically implantable products. With this commercially available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used to create graspable objects from 3D reconstructed images. Models can enhance patients' understanding of their pathology and surgeon preoperative planning. Customized implants and casts can be made to match an individual's anatomy. This review outlines 3D printing, its current applications in orthopedics, and promising future directions. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Three-dimensional cooling of muons

    CERN Document Server

    Vsevolozhskaya, T A

    2000-01-01

    The simultaneous ionization cooling of muon beams in all three - the longitudinal and two transverse - directions is considered in a scheme, based on bent lithium lenses with dipole constituent of magnetic field in them, created by a special configuration of current-carrying rod. An analysis of three-dimensional cooling is performed with the use of kinetic equation method. Results of numerical calculation for a specific beam line configuration are presented together with results of computer simulation using the Moliere distribution to describe the Coulomb scattering and the Vavilov distribution used to describe the ionization loss of energy.

  15. Fast throughput determination of 21 allergenic disperse dyes from river water using reusable three-dimensional interconnected magnetic chemically modified graphene oxide followed by liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong-Gang; Li, Xiao-Ping; Yao, Shan-Shan; Zhan, Ping-Ping; Liu, Jun-Chao; Xu, Chang-Ping; Lu, Yi-Yu; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Jin, Mi-Cong

    2016-01-29

    We report the template-free fabrication of three-dimensional hierarchical nanostructures, i.e., three-dimensional interconnected magnetic chemically modified graphene oxide (3D-Mag-CMGO), through a simple and low-cost self-assembly process using one-pot reaction based on solvothermal method. The excellent properties of the 3D-Mag-CMGO are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), FTIR, elementary analyzer (EA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The easiness-to-handle of the magnetic dispersive solid phase extraction (Mag-dSPE) procedure is developed for preconcentration of 21 allergenic disperse dyes from river water. The obtained results show the higher extraction capacity of 3D-Mag-CMGO with recoveries between 80.0-112.0%. Furthermore, an ultra-fast liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS) method for determination of 21 allergenic disperse dyes in river at sub-ppt levels has been developed with pretreatment of the samples by Mag-dSPE. The limits of quantification (LOQs) for the allergenic disperse dyes are between 0.57-34.05ng/L. Validation results on linearity, specificity, trueness and precision, as well as on application to the analysis of 21 allergenic disperse dyes in fifty real samples demonstrate the applicability to environment monitoring analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. WE-E-BRB-06: Monte Carlo Calculations of the Skin Dose for Longitudinal Linac-MR System Using Realistic Three-Dimensional Magnetic Field Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyvanloo, A; Burke, B; Tadic, T; Warkentin, B; Kirkby, C; Rathee, S; Fallone, B

    2012-06-01

    This study quantifies the effects of the magnetic field of a longitudinal linac-MR system (B-field parallel to beam direction) on skin dose due to the confinement of contaminant electrons, using Monte Carlo calculations and realistic 3-D models of the magnetic field. The complete realistic 3-D magnetic fields generated by the bi-planar Linac-MR magnet assembly are calculated with the finite element method using Opera- 3D. EGSnrc simulations are performed in the presence of ∼0.6T and IT MRI fields that have realistic rapid fall-off of the fringe field. The simulation geometry includes a Varian 600C 6MV linac, the yoke and magnetic shields of the MRIs, and features an isocentre distance of 126 cm. Phase spaces at the surface of a water phantom are scored using BEAMnrc; DOSXYZnrc is used to score the resulting CAX percent depth-doses in the phantom and the 2D skin dose distributions in the first 70 urn layer. For comparison, skin doses are also calculated in the absence of magnetic field and using a 1-D magnetic field with an unrealistic fringe field. The effects of field size and air gap (between phantom surface and magnet pole) are also examined. Analysis of the phase-space and dose distributions reveals that significant containment of electrons occurs primarily close to the uniform magnetic field region. The increase in skin dose due to the magnetic field depends on the air gap, varying from 1% to 13% for air gaps of 5 to 31 cm, respectively. The increase is also field-size dependent, varying from 3% at 20×20 cm2 to 11% at 5×5 cm2. Calculations based on various realistic MRI 3D magnetic-field maps that appropriately account for the rapid decay of the fringe field show that the increase in the patient skin dose of a longitudinal Linac-MR system is clinically insignificant. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. Real three-dimensional biquadrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnov, Vyacheslav A [P.G. Demidov Yaroslavl State University, Yaroslavl (Russian Federation)

    2010-09-07

    We find the topological types of biquadrics (complete intersections of two real four-dimensional quadrics). The rigid isotopy classes of real three-dimensional biquadrics were described long ago: there are nine such classes. We find the correspondence between the topological types of real biquadrics and their rigid isotopy classes, and show that only two rigid isotopy classes have the same topological type. One of these classes consists of real GM-varieties and the other contains no GM-varieties. We also study the sets of real lines on real biquadrics.

  18. Evaluation of engraftment of superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled mesenchymal stem cells using three-dimensional reconstruction of magnetic resonance imaging in photo thrombotic cerebral infarction models of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Jae Hyun; Kwak, Byung Kook; Jung, Ji Sung; Park, Se Rah [Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To evaluate engraftment by visualizing the location of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) three-dimensionally in photothrombotic cerebral infarction (PTCI) models of rats. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of an agarose block containing superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-labeled hBM-MSCs was performed using a 3.0-T MRI, T2-(T2WI), T2{sup *}-(T2{sup *}WI), and susceptibility-weighted images (SWI). PTCI was induced in 6 rats, and 2.5 x 10(5) SPIO-labeled hBM-MSCs were infused through the ipsilateral internal carotid artery (ICA group) or tail vein (IV group). MRI was performed on days 1, 3, 7, and 14 after stem cell injection. Dark signal regions were confirmed using histology. Three-dimensional MRI reconstruction was performed using the clinical workflow solution to evaluate the engraftment of hBM-MSCs. Volumetric analysis of the engraftment was also performed. The volumes of SPIO-labeled hBM-MSCs in the phantom MRI were 129.3, 68.4, and 25.9 microL using SWI, T2{sup *}WI, and T2WI, respectively. SPIO-labeled hBM-MSCs appeared on day 1 after injection, encircling the cerebral infarction from the ventral side. Dark signal regions matched iron positive cells and human origin (positive) cells. The volume of the engraftment was larger in the ICA group on days 1, 3, and 7, after stem cell injection (p < 0.05 on SWI). SWI was the most sensitive MRI pulse sequence (p < 0.05). The volume of infarction decreased until day 14. The engraftment of SPIO-labeled hBM-MSCs can be visualized and evaluated three-dimensionally in PTCI models of rats. The engraftment volume was larger in the ICA group than IV group on early stage within one week.

  19. Quasi-static three-dimensional magnetic field evolution in solar active region NOAA 11166 associated with an X1.5 flare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vemareddy, P. [Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory, Udaipur 313 001 (India); Wiegelmann, T., E-mail: vema@prl.res.in, E-mail: wiegelmann@mps.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-09-01

    We study the quasi-static evolution of coronal magnetic fields constructed from the non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) approximation aiming to understand the relation between the magnetic field topology and ribbon emission during an X1.5 flare in active region (AR) NOAA 11166. The flare with a quasi-elliptical and two remote ribbons occurred on 2011 March 9 at 23:13 UT over a positive flux region surrounded by negative flux at the center of the bipolar AR. Our analysis of the coronal magnetic structure with potential and NLFFF solutions unveiled the existence of a single magnetic null point associated with a fan-spine topology and is co-spatial with the hard X-ray source. The footpoints of the fan separatrix surface agree with the inner edge of the quasi-elliptical ribbon and the outer spine is linked to one of the remote ribbons. During the evolution, the slow footpoint motions stressed the field lines along the polarity inversion line and caused electric current layers in the corona around the fan separatrix surface. These current layers trigger magnetic reconnection as a consequence of dissipating currents, which are visible as cusp-shaped structures at lower heights. The reconnection process reorganized the magnetic field topology whose signatures are observed at the separatrices/quasi-separatrix layer structure in both the photosphere and the corona during the pre-to-post flare evolution. In agreement with previous numerical studies, our results suggest that the line-tied footpoint motions perturb the fan-spine system and cause null point reconnection, which eventually causes the flare emission at the footpoints of the field lines.

  20. Three-dimensional modeling of a negative ion source with a magnetic filter: impact of biasing the plasma electrode on the plasma asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fubiani, G.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2015-10-01

    The effect on the plasma characteristics of biasing positively the plasma electrode (PE) in negative ion sources with a magnetic filter is analysed using a 3D particle-in-cell model with Monte-Carlo collisions (PIC-MCC). We specialize to the one driver (i.e. one inductively coupled radio-frequency discharge) BATMAN negative ion source and the 4-drivers (large volume) ELISE device. Both are ITER prototype high power tandem-type negative ion sources developed for the neutral beam injector (NBI) system. The plasma is generated in the driver and diffuses inside the second chamber which is magnetized. Asymmetric plasma profiles originate from the formation of an electric field transverse to the electron current flowing through the magnetic filter (Hall effect). The model shows that the importance of the asymmetry increases with the PE bias potential, i.e. with the electron flow from the driver to the extraction region and depends on the shape of the magnetic filter field. We find that although the plasma density and potential profiles may be more or less asymmetric depending on the filter field configuration, the electron current to the plasma grid is always strongly asymmetric.

  1. The relation between reconnected flux, the parallel electric field, and the reconnection rate in a three-dimensional kinetic simulation of magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendel, D. E.; Olson, D. K.; Hesse, M.; Kuznetsova, M.; Adrian, M. L.; Aunai, N.; Karimabadi, H.; Daughton, W.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the distribution of parallel electric fields and their relationship to the location and rate of magnetic reconnection in a large particle-in-cell simulation of 3D turbulent magnetic reconnection with open boundary conditions. The simulation's guide field geometry inhibits the formation of simple topological features such as null points. Therefore, we derive the location of potential changes in magnetic connectivity by finding the field lines that experience a large relative change between their endpoints, i.e., the quasi-separatrix layer. We find a good correspondence between the locus of changes in magnetic connectivity or the quasi-separatrix layer and the map of large gradients in the integrated parallel electric field (or quasi-potential). Furthermore, we investigate the distribution of the parallel electric field along the reconnecting field lines. We find the reconnection rate is controlled by only the low-amplitude, zeroth and first–order trends in the parallel electric field while the contribution from fluctuations of the parallel electric field, such as electron holes, is negligible. The results impact the determination of reconnection sites and reconnection rates in models and in situ spacecraft observations of 3D turbulent reconnection. It is difficult through direct observation to isolate the loci of the reconnection parallel electric field amidst the large amplitude fluctuations. However, we demonstrate that a positive slope of the running sum of the parallel electric field along the field line as a function of field line length indicates where reconnection is occurring along the field line

  2. Application of a highly sensitive magnetic solid phase extraction for phytochemical compounds in medicinal plant and biological fluids by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wan; Yi, Ling; Ye, Li-Hong; Cao, Jun; Hu, Shuai-Shuai; Xu, Jing-Jing; Peng, Li-Qing; Zhu, Qiong-Yao; Zhang, Qian-Yun

    2015-10-01

    A highly sensitive method using reduced graphene oxide with iron oxide (rGO/Fe3 O4 ) as the sorbent in magnetic SPE has been developed for the purification of five anthraquinones (emodin, rhein, aloeemodin, physcion, and chrysophanol) in rhubarb and rat urine by ultra-HPLC coupled with quadrupole TOF/MS. The extraction was accomplished by adding trace amount rGO/Fe3 O4 suspension to 200 mL of aqueous mixture, and the excellent adsorption capacity of the nanoparticles was fully demonstrated in this procedure. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration curves were linear in the concentration range of 0.05-27.77 ng/mL with correlation coefficients varying from 0.9902 to 0.9978. The LODs ranged from 0.28 to 58.99 pg/mL. The experimental results indicated that the proposed method was feasible for the analysis of anthraquinones in rhubarb and urine samples. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Changes in susceptibility signs on serial T2*-weighted single-shot echo-planar gradient-echo images in acute embolic infarction: comparison with recanalization status on 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Yuki; Kinoshita, Toshibumi; Kinoshita, Fumiko

    2012-01-01

    The present study compares changes in susceptibility signs on follow-up single-shot echo-planar gradient-echo T2*-weighted images (GRE-EPI) with vascular status on follow-up magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in acute embolic infarction. Twenty consecutive patients with acute embolic infarction repeatedly underwent MR imaging including GRE-EPI and MRA using a 1.5-T MR superconducting system. All patients underwent initial MR examination within 24 h of onset and follow-up MR imaging within 1 month after onset. Changes in susceptibility signs on follow-up GRE-EPI were compatible with vascular status on follow-up MRA in 19 of the 20 patients. Susceptibility signs disappeared with complete recanalization in 13 patients, migrated with partial recanalization in 3, did not change together with the absence of recanalization in 2, and became extended together with the absence of recanalization in 1. Cerebral hemorrhage obscured susceptibility signs in the one remaining patient. Susceptibility signs on follow-up GRE-EPI can reflect changes in an acute embolus, such as recanalization or migration, in this study. Serial GRE-EPI in acute embolism complements the diagnostic certainty of MRA by directly detecting an embolus as a susceptibility sign. (orig.)

  4. Analytical properties of time-of-flight PET data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sanghee; Ahn, Sangtae; Li Quanzheng; Leahy, Richard M [Signal and Image Processing Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States)], E-mail: leahy@sipi.usc.edu

    2008-06-07

    We investigate the analytical properties of time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) sinograms, where the data are modeled as line integrals weighted by a spatially invariant TOF kernel. First, we investigate the Fourier transform properties of 2D TOF data and extend the 'bow-tie' property of the 2D Radon transform to the time-of-flight case. Second, we describe a new exact Fourier rebinning method, TOF-FOREX, based on the Fourier transform in the time-of-flight variable. We then combine TOF-FOREX rebinning with a direct extension of the projection slice theorem to TOF data, to perform fast 3D TOF PET image reconstruction. Finally, we illustrate these properties using simulated data.

  5. Analytical properties of time-of-flight PET data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sanghee; Ahn, Sangtae; Li, Quanzheng; Leahy, Richard M.

    2008-06-01

    We investigate the analytical properties of time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) sinograms, where the data are modeled as line integrals weighted by a spatially invariant TOF kernel. First, we investigate the Fourier transform properties of 2D TOF data and extend the 'bow-tie' property of the 2D Radon transform to the time-of-flight case. Second, we describe a new exact Fourier rebinning method, TOF-FOREX, based on the Fourier transform in the time-of-flight variable. We then combine TOF-FOREX rebinning with a direct extension of the projection slice theorem to TOF data, to perform fast 3D TOF PET image reconstruction. Finally, we illustrate these properties using simulated data.

  6. Analytical properties of time-of-flight PET data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sanghee; Ahn, Sangtae; Li Quanzheng; Leahy, Richard M

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the analytical properties of time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) sinograms, where the data are modeled as line integrals weighted by a spatially invariant TOF kernel. First, we investigate the Fourier transform properties of 2D TOF data and extend the 'bow-tie' property of the 2D Radon transform to the time-of-flight case. Second, we describe a new exact Fourier rebinning method, TOF-FOREX, based on the Fourier transform in the time-of-flight variable. We then combine TOF-FOREX rebinning with a direct extension of the projection slice theorem to TOF data, to perform fast 3D TOF PET image reconstruction. Finally, we illustrate these properties using simulated data

  7. Ion optics of a new time-of-flight mass spectrometer for quantitative surface analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veryovkin, Igor V.; Calaway, Wallis F.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A new time-of-flight instrument for quantitative surface analysis was developed and constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. It implements ion sputtering and laser desorption for probing analyzed samples and can operate in regimes of secondary neutral mass spectrometry with laser post-ionization and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The instrument incorporates two new ion optics developments: (1) 'push-pull' front end ion optics and (2) focusing and deflecting lens. Implementing these novel elements significantly enhance analytical capabilities of the instrument. Extensive three-dimensional computer simulations of the instrument were conducted in SIMION 3D (c) to perfect its ion optics. The operating principles of the new ion optical systems are described, and a scheme of the new instrument is outlined together with its operating modes

  8. The statistical chopper in the time-of-flight technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque Vieira, J. de.

    1975-12-01

    A detailed study of the 'statistical' chopper and of the method of analysis of the data obtained by this technique is made. The study includes the basic ideas behind correlation methods applied in time-of-flight techniques; comparisons with the conventional chopper made by an analysis of statistical errors; the development of a FORTRAN computer programme to analyse experimental results; the presentation of the related fields of work to demonstrate the potential of this method and suggestions for future study together with the criteria for a time-of-flight experiment using the method being studied [pt

  9. Ion focusing procedures in time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioanoviciu, D.

    1999-01-01

    The intact ionisation of big molecules by soft ionisation methods, as matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation and fast atom bombardment, paved the way of mass spectrometry to very high mass ranges (approaching the million of Daltons). This was possible by the branch of time-of-flight mass spectrometry. However, time-of-flight mass spectrometry is lagging far behind other branches as mass resolution, the highest value recently reported being of 45 000. This is a well-documented reason why in time-of-flight mass spectrometry ion packet focusing remains a hot problem. The space focusing in time in linear drift time-of-flight mass spectrometers is discussed including first and second order focusing conditions, second and third order aberrations. The resolution of such instruments is determined and compared to the real performances of some constructed instruments. The focusing conditions for delayed ion extraction are presented and examples given for presently used time of flight mass spectrometers with matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation sources. The post source ionisation method and its effect on the spectrometer mass scale are detailed. The ion energy focusing in time to first and second order in single and double staged electric field mirrors is studied. An explanation is given why time-of-flight mass spectrometers including mirrors are able of much higher resolutions than those based on flight on drift spaces only. The major interest in careful velocity focusing is expressed by the use of the delayed extraction in time of flight mass spectrometers, which include reflectrons. Again, the focusing conditions and aberrations are detailed. A special attention is focused on the possibility to obtain high order velocity focusing for ions created on the surface of hyperbolic electrodes. Also the focusing methods with perfect time focusing by hyperbolic traps and by the so-called 'curved field' were reviewed, especially as means to focus fragment ions from

  10. Neutron Time-Of-Flight (n_TOF) experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Brugger, M; Kaeppeler, F K; Jericha, E; Cortes rossell, G P; Riego perez, A; Baccomi, R; Laurent, B G; Griesmayer, E; Leeb, H; Dressler, M; Cano ott, D; Variale, V; Ventura, A; Carrillo de albornoz trillo, A; Andrzejewski, J J; Pavlik, A F; Kadi, Y; Zanni vlastou, R; Krticka, M; Kokkoris, M; Praena rodriguez, A J; Cortes giraldo, M A; Perkowski, J; Losito, R; Audouin, L; Weiss, C; Tagliente, G; Wallner, A; Woods, P J; Mengoni, A; Guerrero sanchez, C G; Tain enriquez, J L; Vlachoudis, V; Calviani, M; Junghans, A R; Reifarth, R; Mendoza cembranos, E; Quesada molina, J M; Babiano suarez, V; Schumann, M D; Tsinganis, A; Rauscher, T; Calvino tavares, F; Mingrone, F; Gonzalez romero, E M; Colonna, N; Negret, A L; Chiaveri, E; Milazzo, P M; De almeida carrapico, C A; Castelluccio, D M

    The neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN, Switzerland, operational since 2001, delivers neutrons using the Proton Synchrotron (PS) 20 GeV/c proton beam impinging on a lead spallation target. The facility combines a very high instantaneous neutron flux, an excellent time of flight resolution due to the distance between the experimental area and the production target (185 meters), a low intrinsic background and a wide range of neutron energies, from thermal to GeV neutrons. These characteristics provide a unique possibility to perform neutron-induced capture and fission cross-section measurements for applications in nuclear astrophysics and in nuclear reactor technology.

  11. Room-temperature synthesis of three-dimensional porous ZnO@CuNi hybrid magnetic layers with photoluminescent and photocatalytic properties

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero, Miguel; Zhang, Jin; Altube, Ainhoa; Garc?a-Lecina, Eva; Roldan, M?nica; Bar?, Maria Dolors; Pellicer, Eva; Sort, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A facile synthetic approach to prepare porous ZnO@CuNi hybrid films is presented. Initially, magnetic CuNi porous layers (consisting of phase separated CuNi alloys) are successfully grown by electrodeposition at different current densities using H2 bubbles as a dynamic template to generate the porosity. The porous CuNi alloys serve as parent scaffolds to be subsequently filled with a solution containing ZnO nanoparticles previously synthesized by sol-gel. The dispersed nanoparticles ...

  12. Three-dimensional open-frameworks based on Ln(III) ions and open-/closed-shell PTM ligands: synthesis, structure, luminescence, and magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datcu, Angela; Roques, Nans; Jubera, Véronique; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel; Sutter, Jean-Pascal; Rovira, Concepció; Veciana, Jaume

    2011-03-21

    A series of isostructural open-framework coordination polymers formulated as [Ln(dmf)(3)(ptmtc)] (Ln = Sm (1), Eu (2), Gd (3), Tb (4), Dy (5); PTMTC = polychlorotriphenylmethyl tricarboxylate) and [Ln(dmf)(2)H(2)O(αH-ptmtc)] (Ln = Sm (1'), Eu (2'), Gd (3'), Tb (4'), Dy (5')) have been obtained by treating Ln(III) ions with PTMTC ligands with a radical (PTMTC(3-)) or a closed-shell character (αH-PTMTC(3-)). X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that these coordination polymers possess 3D architectures that combine large channels and fairly rare lattice complex T connectivity. In addition, these compounds show selective framework dynamic sorption properties. For both classes of ligands, the ability to act as an antenna in Ln sensitization processes has been investigated. No luminescence was observed for compounds 1-5, and 3' because of the PTMTC(3-) ligand and/or Gd(III) ion characteristics. Conversely, photoluminescence measurements show that 1', 2', 4', and 5' emit dark orange, red, green, and dark cyan metal-centered luminescence. The magnetic properties of all of these compounds have been investigated. The nature of the {Ln-radical} exchange interaction in these compounds has been assessed by comparing the behavior of the radical-based coordination polymers 1-5 with those of the compounds with the diamagnetic ligand set. While antiferromagnetic {Sm-radical} interactions are found in 1, ferromagnetic {Ln-radical} interactions propagate in the 3D architectures of 3, 4, and 5 (Ln = Gd, Tb, and Dy, respectively). This procedure also provided access to information on the {Ln-Ln} exchange existing in these magnetic systems. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Left atrial volume assessment in atrial fibrillation using multimodality imaging: a comparison of echocardiography, invasive three-dimensional CARTO and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbat, Mark G; Wilber, David; Thomas, Kevin; Malick, Owais; Bashir, Atif; Agrawal, Anoop; Biswas, Santanu; Sanagala, Thriveni; Syed, Mushabbar A

    2015-06-01

    Left atrial size in atrial fibrillation is a strong predictor of successful ablation and cardiovascular events. Cardiac magnetic resonance multislice method (CMR-MSM) is the current gold standard for left atrial volume (LAV) assessment but is time consuming. We investigated whether LAV with more rapid area-length method by echocardiography (Echo-AL) or cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR-AL) and invasive measurement by 3D-CARTO mapping during ablation correlate with the CMR-MSM. We studied 250 consecutive patients prior to atrial fibrillation ablation. CMR images were acquired on 3T scanner to measure LAV by MSM and biplane area-length method. Standard echocardiography views were used to calculate LAV by biplane area-length method. LAV during ablation was measured by 3D-CARTO mapping. LAV was compared using intra-class correlation (ICC), Pearson's correlation and Bland-Altman plots. CMR-MSM was used as the reference standard. Mean LAV using CMR-MSM was 112.7 ± 36.7 ml. CMR-AL method overestimated LAV by 13.3 ± 21.8 ml (11.2%, p atrial fibrillation. CMR-AL and 3D-CARTO correlated and agreed well with CMR-MSM (r = 0.87 and 0.74, ICC = 0.80 and 0.77 respectively). However, Echo-AL had poor correlation and agreement with CMR-MSM (r = 0.66 and ICC = 0.48). Bland-Altman plots confirmed these findings. CMR-AL method may be used as an alternative to CMR-MSM, as it is non-invasive, rapid, and correlates well with CMR-MSM. LAV by different modalities should not be used interchangeably.

  14. Time-of-flight estimation based on covariance models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Tuquerres, G.; Regtien, Paulus P.L.

    We address the problem of estimating the time-of-flight (ToF) of a waveform that is disturbed heavily by additional reflections from nearby objects. These additional reflections cause interference patterns that are difficult to predict. The introduction of a model for the reflection in terms of a

  15. Cluster Tracking with Time-of-Flight Cameras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dan Witzner; Hansen, Mads; Kirschmeyer, Martin

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method for tracking people using a time-of-flight camera and apply the method for persistent authentication in a smart-environment. A background model is built by fusing information from intensity and depth images. While a geometric constraint is employed to improve pixel cluster co...

  16. Suborbital Transport Mapping with Time Of Flight (TOF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, T. H. S.

    2015-09-01

    The suborbital paradigm is examined through proxies of orbital elements eccentricity e and semi-major axis a. Time Of Flight (TOF) domain and its analytic utility emerge. Strewn/ejecta relation to impact location, etc., are examined from TOF domain.

  17. A new time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ching-Shen Su.

    1984-01-01

    A new time-of-flight mass spectrometer using a cylindrical mirror analyzer and a cylindrical sector analyzer to select ion energies was reported. The cylindrical sector acts as a flight path for ions also. An energy spread of +- 0.41% can be achieved. (orig.)

  18. Highly segmented, high resolution time-of-flight system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, T.K.; Nagamiya, S.; Vossnack, O.; Wu, Y.D.; Zajc, W.A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Miake, Y.; Ueno, S.; Kitayama, H.; Nagasaka, Y.; Tomizawa, K.; Arai, I.; Yagi, K [Univ. of Tsukuba, (Japan)

    1991-12-31

    The light attenuation and timing characteristics of time-of-flight counters constructed of 3m long scintillating fiber bundles of different shapes and sizes are presented. Fiber bundles made of 5mm diameter fibers showed good timing characteristics and less light attenuation. The results for a 1.5m long scintillator rod are also presented.

  19. A neutron time-of-flight data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, D.V.

    1983-10-01

    A neutron time-of-flight scaler system is described for use with the Harwell Linac. The equipment is sufficiently versatile to be used with several types of computers although normally used with DEC PDP 11/45 and PDP 11/34. Using a combination of different input and memory boards most types of experiments can be accommodated. (author)

  20. Three dimensional animated images of anorectal malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Shigeru; Yanagimachi, Noriharu; Muro, Isao; Komiya, Taizo; Yokoyama, Seishichi; Hirakawa, Hitoshi; Tajima, Tomoo; Mitomi, Toshio; Suto, Yasuzo.

    1996-01-01

    Accurate reconstruction of the pelvic structures is a most important factor in obtaining a desirable result after anorectoplasty for a patient with anorectal malformation. Preoperative evaluation of the anatomy is indispensable for choosing an appropriate operative method in each case. To facilitate preoperative evaluation, three dimensional animated images of the pelvic structure of patients with anorectal malformations were constructed by computer graphics based upon tomographic images obtained from magnetic resonance imaging. Axial 1-mm thick images of the pelvic portion were generated with spoiling pulse gradient echo sequences using short repetition times (13 msec TR) and short echo times (6 msec TE) with a flip angle of 25 degrees with the patient in the jack-knife position. Graphic data from MR images were transferred to a graphic work station and processed on it. The skin surface, the ano-rectum, the lower urinary tract and the sphincter musculature were segmented by thresholding images by the signal intensity. Three dimensional images were displayed by surface rendering method using the segmented data of each organ and then animation images of these organs were obtained. The anatomy of each type of anomaly was easily recognized by 3-D visualization, and animation of the pelvic viscera and the sphincter musculature made the images more realistic. Animated images of the musculature were especially useful for simulating surgical procedures and could be helpful for reviewing surgical results. (author)

  1. Electronics for a Picosecond Time-of-flight Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, Andrew Gerhart [University of Texas, Arlington; Rijssenbeek, Michael [Stony Brook

    2014-11-03

    TITLE: Electronics for a Picosecond Time-of-flight Measurement ABSTRACT: Time-of-flight (TOF) detectors have historically been used as part of the particle identification capability of multi-purpose particle physics detectors. An accurate time measurement, combined with a momentum measurement based on the curvature of the track in a magnetic field, is often sufficient to determine the particle's mass, and thus its identity. Such detectors typically have measured the particle flight time extremely precisely, with an uncertainty of one hundred trillionths of a second (also referred to as 100 picoseconds). To put this in perspective it would be like counting all the people on the Earth and getting it right within 1 person! Another use of TOFs is to measure the vertex of the event, which is the location along the beam line where the incoming particles (typically protons) collide. This vertex positon is a well measured quantity for events where the protons collide “head on” as the outgoing particles produced when you blast the proton apart can be used to trace back to a vertex point from which they originated. More frequently the protons just strike a glancing blow and remain intact—in this case they are nearly parallel to the beam and you cannot tell their vertex without this ability to precisely measure the time of flight of the protons. Occasionally both happen in the same event, that is, a central system and two protons are produced. But are they from the same collision, or just a boring background where more than one collision in the same bunch crossing conspire to fake the signal of interest? That’s where the timing of the protons comes into play. The main idea is to measure the time it takes for the two protons to reach TOF detectors positioned equidistant from the center of the main detector. If the vertex is displaced to one side than that detector will measure a shorter time while the other side detector will measure a correspondingly longer time

  2. The use of enzyme-coupled magnetic nanoparticles for studying the spectra of unusual substrates of mushroom tyrosinase by direct surface-assisted laser desorption/ionisation and high-resolution electrospray ionisation quadrupole-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salwiński, Aleksander; Da Silva, David; Delépée, Raphaël; Maunit, Benoît

    2014-09-30

    Tyrosinase-coupled magnetic particles (EMPs) were used to demonstrate that resorcinol-containing tyrosinase inhibitors are oxidised by tyrosinase only in the presence of the enzyme's classic substrate. This shows the potential for the application of EMPs as a non-organic matrix for monitoring enzymatic conversion of a novel substrate family directly on-the-spot, principally due to minimal enzyme requirement per analysis. Tyrosinase was covalently coupled to core-shell-type silica-coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (EMPs) that were applied as non-organic SALDI matrix suitable for studying low-mass compounds using a classic matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometer. Because of the dual function of the EMPs - enzyme host and non-organic matrix - we describe this ionisation method as Enzyme-coupled Nanoparticles-Assisted LDI-MS (ENALDI-MS). Supplementary studies of the enzymatic conversion of glabridin and 3-(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)propionic acid (DHPA) were conducted by high-resolution electrospray ionisation quadrupole-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-QqTOF-MS). The initial experiment involving EMPs as non-organic matrix (ENALDI-MS) showed enzymatic conversion of glabridin, a strong tyrosinase inhibitor, only in the presence of L-Tyr, the classic tyrosinase substrate. These findings were evaluated by ESI-QqTOF-MS proving that glabridin and DHPA are converted into the corresponding quinones by tyrosinase only in the presence of the auxiliary monophenol or o-diphenol substrates (L-Tyr and catechin, respectively) capable of regenerating the active site of tyrosinase. EMPs were shown to be useful as a non-organic matrix to monitor enzymatic conversion of the novel tyrosinase substrate family directly on-the-spot with a minimal enzyme consumption (6.5 pmol/spot). Results obtained by ENALDI-MS were fully confirmed by ESI-QqTOF-MS demonstrating that resorcinol-containing tyrosinase inhibitors may be oxidised

  3. Morphological evaluation of lateral ventricles of fetuses with ventriculomegaly by three-dimensional ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging: correlation with etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haratz, Karina Krajden; Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; de Oliveira, Patrícia Soares; Rolo, Liliam Cristine; Milani, Hérbene José Figuinha; de Sá Barreto, Enoch Quinderé; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Ajzen, Sérgio Aron; Moron, Antonio Fernandes

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate morphology of lateral ventricles of ventriculomegaly/hydrocephaly fetuses using 3D-sonography by virtual organ computer-aided analysis (VOCAL) technique and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and verify morphologic patterns related to etiology. Seventeen fetuses presenting with ventricular enlargement (atria > 10 mm) were evaluated. 3D datasets were acquired from a coronal reference plane and post-processed by the rotational imaging using VOCAL 30°. MRI study was analyzed in the three plans in all sequences. Morphologic aspects such as global shape, anterior, posterior and inferior horn characteristics, wall irregularities and deformities were analyzed and related to etiology factor. Twenty-nine percent of the cases were secondary to Arnold-Chiari syndrome and presented with global dilation of the three-horns. Cases related to aqueduct stenosis presented with ependymal rupture and wall irregularities in advanced cases. Corpus callosum agenesis cases presented with small ventricular volumes, thin shape, normal or slightly enlarged anterior and inferior horns with dilation restricted to posterior horn. Cases related to trisomy 18 and cytomegalovirus presented irregular ventricular walls associated with anomalous ventricular shapes, suggesting parenchymal destruction. Ventricular morphology evaluation gives important information on etiology of ventricular enlargement, supporting prognosis prediction and decision making process of the affected fetuses and their families.

  4. Feasibility of three-dimensional ultrashort echo time magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 T for the diagnosis of skull fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hao; Zhong, Yu-min; Zhang, Hong; Lin, Yi; Zhu, Ming [Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Shanghai Children' s Medical Center, Shanghai (China); Nie, Quan-min; Guo, Lie-mei; Yang, Xi [Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery Ren Ji Hospital, Shanghai (China); Chen, Wei-bo; Dai, Yong-ming [Philips Healthcare, Shanghai (China); Xu, Jian-rong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ren Ji Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2016-01-15

    To investigate the feasibility of ultrashort echo time (UTE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of skull fractures. The skull fracture models of ten Bama pigs and 364 patients with craniocerebral trauma were subjected to computed tomography (CT), UTE and conventional MRI sequences. The accuracy of UTE imaging in skull fracture diagnosis was analysed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, McNemar's test and Kappa values. Differences among CT, UTE imaging and anatomical measurement (AM) values for linear fractures (LFs) and depressed fractures (DFs) were compared using one-way ANOVA and a paired-samples t-test. UTE imaging clearly demonstrated skull structures and fractures. The accuracy, validity and reliability of UTE MRI were excellent, with no significant differences between expert readings (P > 0.05; Kappa, 0.899). The values obtained for 42 LFs and 13 DFs in the ten specimens were not significantly different among CT, UTE MRI and AMs, while those obtained for 55 LFs and ten DFs in 44 patients were not significantly different between CT and UTE MRI (P > 0.05). UTE MRI sequences are feasible for the evaluation of skull structures and fractures, with no radiation exposure, particularly for paediatric and pregnant patients. (orig.)

  5. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Ozone-Induced Injury in the Nasal Airways of Monkeys Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Morphometric Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, Stephen A.; Minard, Kevin R.; Trease, Lynn L.; Wagner, James G.; Garcia, Guilherme M.; Ballinger, Carol A.; Kimbell, Julia; Plopper, Charles G.; Corley, Rick A.; Postlewait, Ed; Harkema, Jack R.

    2007-03-01

    ABSTRACT Age-related changes in gross and microscopic structure of the nasal cavity can alter local tissue susceptibility as well as the dose of inhaled toxicant delivered to susceptible sites. This article describes a novel method for the use of magnetic resonance imaging, 3-dimensional airway modeling, and morphometric techniques to characterize the distribution and magnitude of ozone-induced nasal injury in infant monkeys. Using this method, we are able to generate age-specific, 3-dimensional, epithelial maps of the nasal airways of infant Rhesus macaques. The principal nasal lesions observed in this primate model of ozone-induced nasal toxicology were neutrophilic rhinitis, along with necrosis and exfoliation of the epithelium lining the anterior maxilloturbinate. These lesions, induced by acute or cyclic (episodic) exposures, were examined by light microscopy, quantified by morphometric techniques, and mapped on 3-dimensional models of the nasal airways. Here, we describe the histopathologic, imaging, and computational biology methods developed to efficiently characterize, localize, quantify, and map these nasal lesions. By combining these techniques, the location and severity of the nasal epithelial injury were correlated with epithelial type, nasal airway geometry, and local biochemical and molecular changes on an individual animal basis. These correlations are critical for accurate predictive modeling of exposure-dose-response relationships in the nasal airways, and subsequent extrapolation of nasal findings in animals to humans for developing risk assessment.

  6. Tetracarboxylate-based Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) three-dimensional coordination polymers: syntheses, structures and magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shengqun; Guo, Zhiyong; Li, Guanghua; Deng, Ruiping; Song, Shuyan; Qin, Chao; Pan, Chengling; Guo, Huadong; Cao, Feng; Wang, Song; Zhang, Hongjie

    2010-10-14

    Methylenediisophthalic acid (H(4)MDIP), as semi-rigid 'V'-shaped carboxylate ligands, react with CoO, NiO and Cu(NO(3))(2)·3H(2)O to give three novel coordination polymers [H(3)O](2)[Co(3)(MDIP)(2)]·2DMF (1), [Ni(2)(HMDIP)(μ(2)-OH)(H(2)O)(3)(DMF)]·4H(2)O·DMF (2) and [Cu(3)(MDIP)(μ(2)-OH)(2)(H(2)O)(4)]·6.5H(2)O (3) (DMF = N,N'-dimethylformamide). All compounds have been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, IR spectroscopy, elemental and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Complex 1 is an unusual open anionic framework that is defined as the metal-organic replica of fluorite. Both 2 and 3 features a 3D open framework with one-dimensional elliptical channels and R- and L-helical chains, and their resulting frameworks can be rationalized as crb and pts topology respectively. An interesting feature of complex 3 is the presence of the linear Cu(3) units that is formed by carboxylate and μ(2)-hydroxyl groups linking three Cu(II) metal centers. Magnetic investigations indicate that ferromagnetic couplings are dominant in the three compounds.

  7. The multipurpose time-of-flight neutron reflectometer “Platypus” at Australia's OPAL reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, M.; Nelson, A.; Holt, S. A.; Saerbeck, T.; Hamilton, W. A.; Klose, F.

    2011-03-01

    In this manuscript we describe the major components of the Platypus time-of-flight neutron reflectometer at the 20 MW OPAL reactor in Sydney, Australia. Platypus is a multipurpose spectrometer for the characterisation of solid thin films, materials adsorbed at the solid-liquid interface and free-liquid surfaces. It also has the capacity to study magnetic thin films using spin-polarised neutrons. Platypus utilises a white neutron beam ( λ=2-20 Å) that is pulsed using boron-coated disc chopper pairs; thus providing the capacity to tailor the wavelength resolution of the pulses to suit the system under investigation. Supermirror optical components are used to focus, deflect or spin-polarise the broad bandwidth neutron beams, and typical incident spectra are presented for each configuration. A series of neutron reflectivity datasets are presented, indicating the quality and flexibility of this spectrometer. Minimum reflectivity values of Platypus time-of-flight neutron reflectometer are presented.

  8. Three-Dimensional Laser Microvision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimotahira, Hiroshi; Iizuka, Keigo; Chu, Sun-Chun; Wah, Christopher; Costen, Furnie; Yoshikuni, Yuzo

    2001-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) optical imaging system offering high resolution in all three dimensions, requiring minimum manipulation and capable of real-time operation, is presented. The system derives its capabilities from use of the superstructure grating laser source in the implementation of a laser step frequency radar for depth information acquisition. A synthetic aperture radar technique was also used to further enhance its lateral resolution as well as extend the depth of focus. High-speed operation was made possible by a dual computer system consisting of a host and a remote microcomputer supported by a dual-channel Small Computer System Interface parallel data transfer system. The system is capable of operating near real time. The 3-D display of a tunneling diode, a microwave integrated circuit, and a see-through image taken by the system operating near real time are included. The depth resolution is 40 m; lateral resolution with a synthetic aperture approach is a fraction of a micrometer and that without it is approximately 10 m.

  9. Three dimensional imaging of otoliths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, B.; Markwitz, A.; David, B.

    2008-01-01

    Otoliths are small structures in fish ears made of calcium carbonate which carry a record of the environment in which the fish live. Traditionally, in order to study their microchemistry by a scanning technique such as PIXE the otoliths have been either ground down by hand or thin sectioned to expose the otolith core. However this technique is subject to human error in judging the core position. In this study we have scanned successive layers of otoliths 50 and 100 μm apart by removing the otolith material in a lapping machine which can be set to a few μm precision. In one study by comparing data from otoliths from the two ears of a freshwater species we found that polishing by hand could miss the core and thus give misleading results as to the life cycle of the fish. In another example we showed detail in a marine species which could be used to build a three dimensional picture of the Sr distribution. (author)

  10. Three dimensional three component whole heart cardiovascular magnetic resonance velocity mapping: comparison of flow measurements from 3D and 2D acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brix, Lau; Ringgaard, Steffen; Rasmusson, Allan; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Kim, W Yong

    2009-02-20

    Two-dimensional, unidirectionally encoded, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) velocity mapping is an established technique for the quantification of blood flow in large vessels. However, it requires an operator to correctly align the planes of acquisition. If all three directional components of velocity are measured for each voxel of a 3D volume through the phases of the cardiac cycle, blood flow through any chosen plane can potentially be calculated retrospectively. The initial acquisition is then more time consuming but relatively operator independent. To compare the curves and volumes of flow derived from conventional 2D and comprehensive 3D flow acquisitions in a steady state flow model, and in vivo through planes transecting the ascending aorta and pulmonary trunk in 10 healthy volunteers. Using a 1.5 T Phillips Intera CMR system, 3D acquisitions used an anisotropic 3D segmented k-space phase contrast gradient echo sequence with a short EPI readout, with prospective ECG and diaphragm navigator gating. The 2D acquisitions used segmented k-space phase contrast with prospective ECG and diaphragm navigator gating. Quantitative flow analyses were performed retrospectively with dedicated software for both the in vivo and in vitro acquisitions. Analysis of in vitro data found the 3D technique to have overestimated the continuous flow rate by approximately 5% across the entire applied flow range. In vivo, the 2D and the 3D techniques yielded similar volumetric flow curves and measurements. Aortic flow: (mean +/- SD), 2D = 89.5 +/- 13.5 ml & 3D = 92.7 +/- 17.5 ml. Pulmonary flow: 2D = 98.8 +/- 18.4 ml & 3D = 94.9 +/- 19.0 ml). Each in vivo 3D acquisition took about 8 minutes or more. Flow measurements derived from the 3D and 2D acquisitions were comparable. Although time consuming, comprehensive 3D velocity acquisition could be relatively operator independent, and could potentially yield information on flow through several retrospectively chosen planes, for

  11. Novel multipole Wien filter as three-dimensional spin manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasue, T.; Suzuki, M.; Tsuno, K.; Goto, S.; Arai, Y.; Koshikawa, T.

    2014-04-01

    Spin polarized electron beam is often used in material characterizations which relates to magnetism as well as in the high energy particle physics. The manipulation of the spin polarization toward the arbitrary direction is indispensable in such studies. In the present work, a novel multipole Wien filter is proposed as the three-dimensional spin manipulator, and a prototype 8-pole Wien filter is developed. It is applied to spin polarized low energy electron microscopy, and the variation of the magnetic contrast with managing the spin polarization is evaluated. It is confirmed that the novel multipole Wien filter can manipulate the spin polarization three-dimensionally.

  12. Novel multipole Wien filter as three-dimensional spin manipulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasue, T., E-mail: yasue@isc.osakac.ac.jp; Suzuki, M.; Koshikawa, T. [Fundamental Electronics Research Institute, Osaka Electro-Communication University, 18-8 Hatsu-cho, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8530 (Japan); Tsuno, K. [Electron Optics Solutions Tsuno, 10-11 Mihori, Akishima, Tokyo 196-0001 (Japan); Goto, S. [Sanyu Electron Co., Ltd., 1-22-6 Hyakunin-cho, Shinjyuku, Tokyo 169-0073 (Japan); Arai, Y. [Terabase Inc., Myodaiji, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8787 (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    Spin polarized electron beam is often used in material characterizations which relates to magnetism as well as in the high energy particle physics. The manipulation of the spin polarization toward the arbitrary direction is indispensable in such studies. In the present work, a novel multipole Wien filter is proposed as the three-dimensional spin manipulator, and a prototype 8-pole Wien filter is developed. It is applied to spin polarized low energy electron microscopy, and the variation of the magnetic contrast with managing the spin polarization is evaluated. It is confirmed that the novel multipole Wien filter can manipulate the spin polarization three-dimensionally.

  13. Rapid collection and identification of a novel component from Clausena lansium Skeels leaves by means of three-dimensional preparative gas chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance/infrared/mass spectrometric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciarrone, Danilo [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco e dei Prodotti per la Salute, University of Messina, Viale Annunziata, 98168, Messina (Italy); Chromaleont s.r.l. A start-up of the University of Messina, c/o University of Messina, Viale Annunziata, 98168 Messina (Italy); Pantò, Sebastiano [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco e dei Prodotti per la Salute, University of Messina, Viale Annunziata, 98168, Messina (Italy); Rotondo, Archimede [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Messina, Via D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Tedone, Laura; Tranchida, Peter Quinto [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco e dei Prodotti per la Salute, University of Messina, Viale Annunziata, 98168, Messina (Italy); Dugo, Paola [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco e dei Prodotti per la Salute, University of Messina, Viale Annunziata, 98168, Messina (Italy); Centro Integrato di Ricerca (C.I.R.), Università Campus Bio-Medico, Via Álvaro del Portillo, 21 - 00128 Roma (Italy); Mondello, Luigi, E-mail: lmondello@unime.it [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco e dei Prodotti per la Salute, University of Messina, Viale Annunziata, 98168, Messina (Italy); Centro Integrato di Ricerca (C.I.R.), Università Campus Bio-Medico, Via Álvaro del Portillo, 21 - 00128 Roma (Italy)

    2013-06-27

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A recently-developed three-dimensional prep-GC system has been applied to wampee essential oil. •The prep GC system enables the rapid collection of pure compounds from complex samples. •An isolated unknown solute was identified through NMR, IR and MS data. •The structure of an oxygenated sesquiterpene is here reported for the first time. -- Abstract: The present research reports the use of a three-dimensional preparative gas chromatography (prep GC) system, equipped with three Deans-switch devices and 5%diphenyl/wax/mid-polarity ionic liquid stationary phases, for the isolation of volatile components from a complex natural source, namely wampee essential oil (derived from Clausena lansium Skeels leaves). Collection was performed by using a simple and effective lab-constructed trapping device. Initially, an unknown (and abundant) wampee oil constituent was erroneously identified as α-sinensal, through an MS database search (a low similarity match was attained), performed after a GC-quadMS experiment., The unknown compound was then the isolated by using the novel prep GC system, in a highly pure form (at the mg level), and was correctly identified by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and mass spectrometry (MS). Both FTIR and MS data were used to confirm the NMR information. The name given to the molecule was (2E,6E)-2-methyl-6-(4-methylcyclohex-3-enylidene)hept-2-enal. The results herein described will demonstrate the need for a high-resolution GC step, prior to analyte collection, in the prep GC analysis of complex samples.

  14. Three-dimensional magnetospheric equilibrium with isotropic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1995-05-01

    In the absence of the toroidal flux, two coupled quasi two-dimensional elliptic equilibrium equations have been derived to describe self-consistent three-dimensional static magnetospheric equilibria with isotropic pressure in an optimal (Ψ,α,χ) flux coordinate system, where Ψ is the magnetic flux function, χ is a generalized poloidal angle, α is the toroidal angle, α = φ - δ(Ψ,φ,χ) is the toroidal angle, δ(Ψ,φ,χ) is periodic in φ, and the magnetic field is represented as rvec B = ∇Ψ x ∇α. A three-dimensional magnetospheric equilibrium code, the MAG-3D code, has been developed by employing an iterative metric method. The main difference between the three-dimensional and the two-dimensional axisymmetric solutions is that the field-aligned current and the toroidal magnetic field are finite for the three-dimensional case, but vanish for the two-dimensional axisymmetric case. With the same boundary flux surface shape, the two-dimensional axisymmetric results are similar to the three-dimensional magnetosphere at each local time cross section

  15. The ANTARES recoil time-of-flight spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.W.; Russell, G.J. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia); Cohen, D.D.; Dytlewski, N. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The Australian National Tandem for Applied Research (ANTARES), is a 8MV FN tandem particle accelerator at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation. Research on the accelerator is divided between two groups, Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and lon Beam Analysis (IBA). The IBA group carries out a range of research projects from nuclear physics to materials characterisation. The major IBA project on the accelerator is a recoil time-of-flight spectrometer which consists of two electrostatic time pulse generators and an ion-implanted surface barrier detector. The spectrometer is ideally suited to the profiling of layered multi-element materials, and has been used to characterise materials such as metal-germanides, optoelectronics, superconductors and catalytic converters. This paper will describe the time-of-flight system as well as some recent materials characterisation results. 1 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Status of the TORCH time-of-flight detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnew, N.; Brook, N. H.; Castillo García, L.; Cussans, D.; van Dijk, M. W. U.; Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Hancock, T. H.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros García., A.

    2017-11-01

    The TORCH time-of-flight detector is designed for large-area coverage, up to 30 m2, to provide particle identification between 2-10 GeV/c momentum over a flight distance of 10 m. The arrival times from Cherenkov photons produced within a quartz radiator plate of 10 mm thickness are combined to achieve a 15 ps time-of-flight resolution per incident particle. Micro-Channel Plate Photomultiplier Tube (MCP-PMT) detectors of 53 × 53 mm2 active area have been developed with industrial partners for the TORCH application. The MCP-PMT is read out using charge division to give a 128 × 8 effective granularity. Laboratory results of development MCP-PMTs will be described, and testbeam studies using a small-scale TORCH prototype module will be presented.

  17. TORCH: a novel time-of-flight detector concept

    CERN Document Server

    Forty, R

    2009-01-01

    A time-of-flight detector concept is described, named TORCH, that has been developed as a possible solution to the identification of low momentum hadrons in the proposed upgrade of the LHCb spectrometer. The detector consists of a quartz plate placed perpendicular to the beam axis, with photon detectors arranged around the periphery of the plate (outside the acceptance of the spectrometer). Cherenkov light produced by a charged particle traversing the plate is trapped within it by total internal reflection, and then focused onto the photodetectors. A combination of the precise measurement of the arrival time of the photons, and their position, should allow the time-of-flight of the particle to be reconstructed with a precision of ~10 ps, sufficient to satisfy the physics requirements. The R&D that would be necessary to realize this concept is outlined.

  18. The time-of-flight detector of the DIRAC experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeva, B.; Gallas, M.V.; Gomez, F.; Lopez-Agueera, A.; Nunez-Pardo, T.; Plo, M.; Rodriguez, A.M.; Rodriguez, X.M.; Saborido, J.J.; Santamarina, C.; Tobar, M.J.; Vazquez, P.

    2002-01-01

    The construction and performance of a large area time-of-flight detector for the DIRAC experiment at CERN is reported. With an average time resolution of 123 ps per counter at rates up to 1 MHz, it allows excellent separation of pπ - from π + π - pairs up to 4.6 GeV/c momentum, as well as of Coulomb-correlated pion pairs from accidentals. The optimization of scintillator material, photomultiplier performance and readout electronics is described

  19. Time coder for slow neutron time-of-flight spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grashilin, V.A.; Ofengenden, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Time coder for slow neutron time-of-flight spectrometer is described. The time coder is of modular structure, is performed in the CAMAC standard and operates on line with DVK-2 computer. The main coder units include supporting generator, timers, time-to-digital converter, memory unit and crate controller. Method for measuring background symmetrically to the effect is proposed for a more correct background accounting. 4 refs.; 1 fig

  20. Time of flight spectrometry in heavy ions backscattering analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevarier, A.; Chevarier, N.

    1983-05-01

    Time of flight spectrometry for backscattering analysis of MeV heavy ions is proposed. The capabilities and limitations of this method are investigated. Depth and mass resolution obtained in measurements of oxide films thickness as well as in GaAs layers analysis are presented. The importance of minimizing pile-up without significant loss of resolution by use of an adequate absorber set just in front of the rear detector is underlined

  1. Time of flight mass spectrometry of pharmaceutical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Armitage Nolan, Jennifer Claire

    2013-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is a widely used surface chemical analysis technique that is traditionally employed to characterise the first few molecular layers of a material interface. The ability of this technique to accurately reflect the surface chemistry of polymers, biomaterials and many other solid materials is well documented. However, the majority of research that utilises this technique is based upon a qualitative rather than quantitative assessment of th...

  2. A time of flight detector for high energy heavy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Z.; O`Connor, D.J. [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-31

    As a commonly used method to measure the energy of a particle with known mass, the flight time of the particle travelling over a certain distance is measured. A detector based on this principle is called a time-of-flight (TOF) detector which has attracted interests constantly during the last 15 years. For high energy heavy particle energy detection, TOF detector is an appropriated choice and such a system, developed recently, is described in this paper. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  3. TORCH-a Cherenkov based time-of-flight detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, M. W. U.; Brook, N. H.; Castillo García, L.; Cowie, E. N.; Cussans, D.; D`Ambrosio, C.; Fopma, J.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Keri, T.; Piedigrossi, D.

    2014-12-01

    TORCH is an innovative high-precision time-of-flight system to provide particle identification in the difficult intermediate momentum region up to 10 GeV/c. It is also suitable for large-area applications. The detector provides a time-of-flight measurement from the imaging of Cherenkov photons emitted in a 1 cm thick quartz radiator. The photons propagate by total internal reflection to the edge of the quartz plate and are then focused onto an array of photon detectors at the periphery. A time-of-flight resolution of about 10-15 ps per incident charged particle needs to be achieved to allow a three sigma kaon-pion separation up to 10 GeV/c momentum for the TORCH located 9.5 m from the interaction point. Given 30 detected photons per incident charged particle, this requires measuring the time-of-arrival of individual photons to about 70 ps. This paper will describe the design of a TORCH prototype involving a number of ground-breaking and challenging techniques.

  4. TORCH - a Cherenkov-based time-of-flight detector

    CERN Document Server

    van Dijk, M W U; Cowie, E N; Cussans, D; D' Ambrosio, C; Forty, R; Frei, C; Gys, T; Piedigrossi, D; Castillo Garcia, L; Fopma, J; Gao, R; Harnew, N; Keri, T

    2014-01-01

    TORCH is an innovative high-precision time-of-flight system to provide particle identification in the difficult intermediate momentum region up to 10 GeV/c. It is also suitable for large-area applications. The detector provides a time-of-flight measurement from the imaging of Cherenkov photons emitted in a 1 cm thick quartz radiator. The photons propagate by total internal reflection to the edge of the quartz plate, where they are focused onto an array of photon detectors at the periphery. A time-of-flight resolution of about 10–15 ps per incident charged particle needs to be achieved for a three sigma kaon–pion separation up to 10 GeV/c momentum for the TORCH located 9.5 m from the interaction point. Given ∼ 30 detected photons per incident charged particle, this requires measuring the time-of-arrival of individual photons to about 70 ps. This paper will describe the design of a TORCH prototype involving a number of ground-breaking and challenging techniques.

  5. Time of flight imaging through scattering environments (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Toan H.; Breitbach, Eric C.; Jackson, Jonathan A.; Velten, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Light scattering is a primary obstacle to imaging in many environments. On small scales in biomedical microscopy and diffuse tomography scenarios scattering is caused by tissue. On larger scales scattering from dust and fog provide challenges to vision systems for self driving cars and naval remote imaging systems. We are developing scale models for scattering environments and investigation methods for improved imaging particularly using time of flight transient information. With the emergence of Single Photon Avalanche Diode detectors and fast semiconductor lasers, illumination and capture on picosecond timescales are becoming possible in inexpensive, compact, and robust devices. This opens up opportunities for new computational imaging techniques that make use of photon time of flight. Time of flight or range information is used in remote imaging scenarios in gated viewing and in biomedical imaging in time resolved diffuse tomography. In addition spatial filtering is popular in biomedical scenarios with structured illumination and confocal microscopy. We are presenting a combination analytical, computational, and experimental models that allow us develop and test imaging methods across scattering scenarios and scales. This framework will be used for proof of concept experiments to evaluate new computational imaging methods.

  6. Molecular beam studies with a time-of-flight machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beijerinck, H.C.W.

    1975-01-01

    The study concerns the development of the time-of-flight method for the velocity analysis of molecular beams and its application to the measurement of the velocity dependence of the total cross-section of the noble gases. It reviews the elastic scattering theory, both in the framework of classical mechanics and in the quantum mechanical description. Attention is paid to the semiclassical correspondence of classical particle trajectories with the partial waves of the quantum mechanical solution. The total cross-section and the small angle differential cross-section are discussed with special emphasis on their relation. The results of this chapter are used later to derive the correction on the measured total cross-section due to the finite angular resolution of the apparatus. Reviewed also is the available information on the intermolecular potential of the Ar-Ar system. Then a discussion of the measurement of total cross-sections with the molecular beam method and the time-of-flight method is compared to other methods used. It is shown that the single burst time-of-flight method can be developed into a reliable and well-calibrated method for the analysis of the velocity distribution of molecular beams. A comparison of the single burst time-of-flight method with the cross-correlation time-of-flight method shows that the two methods are complementary and that the specific experimental circumstances determine which method is to be preferred. Molecular beam sources are discussed. The peaking factor formalism is introduced and helps to compare the performance of different types of sources. The effusive and the supersonic source are treated and recent experimental results are given. The multichannel source is treated in more detail. For the opaque mode, an experimental investigation of the velocity distribution and the angular distribution of the flow pattern is presented. Comparison of these results with Monte Carlo calculations for free molecular flow in a cylindrical

  7. Kondo effect in three-dimensional Dirac and Weyl systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitchell, Andrew K.; Fritz, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic impurities in three-dimensional Dirac and Weyl systems are shown to exhibit a fascinatingly diverse range of Kondo physics, with distinctive experimental spectroscopic signatures. When the Fermi level is precisely at the Dirac point, Dirac semimetals are in fact unlikely candidates for a

  8. Foundations of the theory of three-dimensional quadrupolar mass spectrometry. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheretov, Eh.P.

    1979-01-01

    The basic principles of the theory of three-dimensional quadrupolar mass spectrometry are developed. It is shown that the ''stretching'' of the electrode system of the sensor of a three-dimensional quadrupolar mass spectrometer in the direction of an axis (introduction of the system assymetry) leads to a sharp decrease of the high-frequency field effect on the particle trajectory in this direction. Presented are ratios determining the configuration of electrode systems of sensors of flight-type quadrupolar mass spectrometers. Specific features of the stability diagram for such analyzers are discussed. It is shown that the property detected makes it possible to develop new promising time-of-flight three-dimensional quadrupolar mass spectrometers

  9. Rapid collection and identification of a novel component from Clausena lansium Skeels leaves by means of three-dimensional preparative gas chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance/infrared/mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarrone, Danilo; Pantò, Sebastiano; Rotondo, Archimede; Tedone, Laura; Tranchida, Peter Quinto; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2013-06-27

    The present research reports the use of a three-dimensional preparative gas chromatography (prep GC) system, equipped with three Deans-switch devices and 5%diphenyl/wax/mid-polarity ionic liquid stationary phases, for the isolation of volatile components from a complex natural source, namely wampee essential oil (derived from Clausena lansium Skeels leaves). Collection was performed by using a simple and effective lab-constructed trapping device. Initially, an unknown (and abundant) wampee oil constituent was erroneously identified as α-sinensal, through an MS database search (a low similarity match was attained), performed after a GC-quadMS experiment., The unknown compound was then the isolated by using the novel prep GC system, in a highly pure form (at the mg level), and was correctly identified by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and mass spectrometry (MS). Both FTIR and MS data were used to confirm the NMR information. The name given to the molecule was (2E,6E)-2-methyl-6-(4-methylcyclohex-3-enylidene)hept-2-enal. The results herein described will demonstrate the need for a high-resolution GC step, prior to analyte collection, in the prep GC analysis of complex samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Weyl and Dirac semimetals in three-dimensional solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, N. P.; Mele, E. J.; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2018-01-01

    Weyl and Dirac semimetals are three-dimensional phases of matter with gapless electronic excitations that are protected by topology and symmetry. As three-dimensional analogs of graphene, they have generated much recent interest. Deep connections exist with particle physics models of relativistic chiral fermions, and, despite their gaplessness, to solid-state topological and Chern insulators. Their characteristic electronic properties lead to protected surface states and novel responses to applied electric and magnetic fields. The theoretical foundations of these phases, their proposed realizations in solid-state systems, and recent experiments on candidate materials as well as their relation to other states of matter are reviewed.

  11. A time-of-flight system for the external target facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xueheng; Yu Yuhong; Sun Zhiyu; Mao Ruishi; Wang Shitao; Zhou Yong; Yan Duo; Liu Longxiang

    2013-01-01

    A time-of-flight system with a plastic scintillator coupled to photomultipliers is developed for the external target facility (ETF). This system can satisfy the requirement of an ultrahigh vacuum (∼10 -9 mbar), a high counting rate (∼10 6 particles per second) and a magnetic field environment. In the beam test experiment, a total time resolution of 580 ps FWHM was obtained for the whole system, and nuclei with a mass of up to 80 could be identified using this system. (authors)

  12. Time lens for high-resolution neutron time-of-flight spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, K.; Gaehler, R.; Grigoriev, P.; Kats, E.I.

    2005-01-01

    We examine in analytic and numeric ways the imaging effects of temporal neutron lenses created by traveling magnetic fields. For fields of parabolic shape we derive the imaging equations, investigate the time magnification, the evolution of the phase-space element, the gain factor, and the effect of finite beam size. The main aberration effects are calculated numerically. The system is technologically feasible and should convert neutron time-of-flight instruments from pinhole to imaging configuration in time, thus enhancing intensity and/or time resolution. Further fields of application for high-resolution spectrometry may be opened

  13. Bakelite chambers for time-of-flight measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Cwiok, M; Górski, M; Królikowski, J

    1999-01-01

    We report on the search of composite organic materials with the volume resistivity ranging from 10 sup 8 to 10 sup 1 sup 1 OMEGA cm. Materials having resistivity in this range may be used for electrodes of thin gap Parallel Plate Avalanche Chambers. Gas detectors of such structure and operated at increased gas pressure allow, potentially, a sub-nanosecond time resolution. Using bakelite-like material with electrical properties well tuned during manufacturing opens the possibility to overcome limitations related to the semi-conductive glass employed usually for ultrafast gas detectors of parallel plate structure for time-of-flight technique.

  14. The development of a time of flight diffractometer, FIONA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodyear, A.G.; Miller, R.J.R.

    1975-11-01

    A neutron diffractometer, FIONA, has been built at AWRE in order to study structure and equation of state data of materials at high pressures and elevated temperatures. It is required that the sample should be subjected to pressures up to 60 kbar and temperatures up to 800 0 K. There is a further requirement that the diffractometer should have a multi-detector system to make the maximum use of the neutrons available from the 5 MW HERALD reactor. Both these requirements can be met by using a time of flight diffractometer. The instrument is described. (author)

  15. High resolution time-of-flight electronics system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grund, J.E.

    1979-10-01

    A new electronics system for time-of-flight measurements has been developed to meet the performance requirements of the Mark II Detector for operation at the PEP Storage Ring of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This system incorporated high resolution time measurements with the capability to correct systemic errors from the scintillator and photomultiplier tubes. The correction technique involves making three measurements on each photomultiplier signal every storage ring beam interaction. Two timing measurements are made relative to the beam interaction time with different discriminator threshold level settings. The charge integral of each photomultiplier pulse is also recorded

  16. Material Classification Using Raw Time-of-Flight Measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Su, Shuochen

    2016-12-13

    We propose a material classification method using raw time-of-flight (ToF) measurements. ToF cameras capture the correlation between a reference signal and the temporal response of material to incident illumination. Such measurements encode unique signatures of the material, i.e. the degree of subsurface scattering inside a volume. Subsequently, it offers an orthogonal domain of feature representation compared to conventional spatial and angular reflectance-based approaches. We demonstrate the effectiveness, robustness, and efficiency of our method through experiments and comparisons of real-world materials.

  17. Engineering Applications of Time-of-Flight Neutron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Bjørn; Brown, Donald W.; Noyan, I. C.

    2012-01-01

    Time-of-flight neutron diffraction is widely used in characterizing the microstructure and mechanical response of heterogeneous systems. Microstructural characterization techniques include spatial or temporal mapping of the phases and determination of grain size, dislocation structure, and grain orientations (texture) within these phases. Mechanical response analysis utilizes the crystallographic selectivity of the diffraction process to measure the partitioning of strain within the system. The microstructural and mechanical response information is then used to develop more realistic constitutive models. In this article we review some examples of such measurements, based on our experiences at the Lujan Center of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  18. Time-of-flight cameras principles, methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hansard, Miles; Choi, Ouk; Horaud, Radu

    2012-01-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) cameras provide a depth value at each pixel, from which the 3D structure of the scene can be estimated. This new type of active sensor makes it possible to go beyond traditional 2D image processing, directly to depth-based and 3D scene processing. Many computer vision and graphics applications can benefit from TOF data, including 3D reconstruction, activity and gesture recognition, motion capture and face detection. It is already possible to use multiple TOF cameras, in order to increase the scene coverage, and to combine the depth data with images from several colour came

  19. Timing properties of a time-of-flight detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Takahide; Yuasa-Nakagawa, Keiko.

    1989-01-01

    The time resolution of a time-of-flight (T.O.F.) detector which consists of a channel plate detector (CPD) with a central hole and a surface barrier detector (SBD) was measured. A time resolution of 80 psec fwhm was obtained for 8.78 MeV alpha particles. The influence on fast timing of the SBD of alpha particles was carefully studied. The plasma delay time and time resolution of the SBD were found to strongly depend on the electric field strength and properties of the SBD. (author)

  20. Time-of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography with Radiofrequency Phototube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margaryan, A.; Kakoyan, V.; Knyazyan, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper γ-detector, based on the radiofrequency (RF) phototube and recently developed fast and ultrafast scintillators, is considered for Time-of-Flight positron emission tomography applications. Timing characteristics of such a device has been investigated by means of a dedicated Monte Carlo code based on the single photon counting concept. Biexponential timing model for scintillators have been used. The calculations have shown that such a timing model is in a good agreement with recently measured data. The timing resolution of -detectors can be significantly improved by using the RF phototube. (authors)

  1. Elastocapillary fabrication of three-dimensional microstructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Honschoten, J.W.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Ondarcuhu, T.; Sanders, Remco G.P.; Sundaram, J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Tas, Niels Roelof

    2010-01-01

    We describe the fabrication of three-dimensional microstructures by means of capillary forces. Using an origami-like technique, planar silicon nitride structures of various geometries are folded to produce three-dimensional objects of 50–100 m. Capillarity is a particularly effective mechanism since

  2. A three dimensional probe positioner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Furno, I.; Dorf, L.; Lapenta, G.

    2008-01-01

    In order to sort out the physics that is important in many plasma experiments, data in three dimensions (3D) are becoming necessary. Access to the usual cylindrical vacuum vessel is typically restricted to radially or axially insertable probes that can pivot. The space that can be explored usually has significant restrictions either because probe travel must be along a travel path, or a 'wobbly' probe positioner requires one to map between a moveable coordinate system and a preferred laboratory coordinate system. This could for example introduce errors in measurements of vector quantities such as magnetic field or flow. We describe the design and implementation of a 3D probe positioner that slides in two dimensions on a double O-ring seal and radially inserts along the third dimension. The net result is that a 3D space can be explored in a laboratory Cartesian reference frame.

  3. Time-of-Flight Polarized Neutron Reflectometry on PLATYPUS: Status and Future Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saerbeck, T.; Cortie, D. L.; Brück, S.; Bertinshaw, J.; Holt, S. A.; Nelson, A.; James, M.; Lee, W. T.; Klose, F.

    Time-of-flight (ToF) polarized neutron reflectometry enables the detailed investigation of depth-resolved magnetic structures in thin film and multilayer magnetic systems. The general advantage of the time-of-flight mode of operation over monochromatic instruments is a decoupling of spectral shape and polarization of the neutron beam with variable resolution. Thus, a wide Q-range can be investigated using a single angle of incidence, with resolution and flux well-adjusted to the experimental requirement. Our paper reviews the current status of the polarization equipment of the ToF reflectometer PLATYPUS and presents first results obtained on stratified Ni80Fe20/α-Fe2O3 films, revealing the distribution of magnetic moments in an exchange bias system. An outlook on the future development of the PLATYPUS polarization system towards the implementation of a polarized 3He cell is presented and discussed with respect to the efficiency and high Q-coverage up to 1 Å-1 and 0.15 Å-1 in the vertical and lateral momentum transfer, respectively.

  4. Time of flight Laue fiber diffraction studies of perdeuterated DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, V.T.; Whalley, M.A.; Mahendrasingam, A.; Fuller, W.

    1994-01-01

    The diffractometer SXD at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS pulsed neutron source has been used to record high resolution time-of-flight Laue fiber diffraction data from DNA. These experiments, which are the first of their kind, were undertaken using fibers of DNA in the A conformation and prepared using deuterated DNA in order to minimis incoherent background scattering. These studies complement previous experiments on instrument D19 at the Institute Laue Langevin using monochromatic neutrons. Sample preparation involved drawing large numbers of these deuterated DNA fibers and mounting them in a parallel array. The strategy of data collection is discussed in terms of camera design, sample environment and data collection. The methods used to correct the recorded time-of-flight data and map it into the final reciprocal space fiber diffraction dataset are also discussed. Difference Fourier maps showing the distribution of water around A-DNA calculated on the basis of these data are compared with results obtained using data recorded from hydrogenated A-DNA on D19. Since the methods used for sample preparation, data collection and data processing are fundamentally different for the monochromatic and Laue techniques, the results of these experiments also afford a valuable opportunity to independently test the data reduction and analysis techniques used in the two methods

  5. A Time of Flight Fast Neutron Imaging System Design Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canion, Bonnie; Glenn, Andrew; Sheets, Steven; Wurtz, Ron; Nakae, Les; Hausladen, Paul; McConchie, Seth; Blackston, Matthew; Fabris, Lorenzo; Newby, Jason

    2017-09-01

    LLNL and ORNL are designing an active/passive fast neutron imaging system that is flexible to non-ideal detector positioning. It is often not possible to move an inspection object in fieldable imager applications such as safeguards, arms control treaty verification, and emergency response. Particularly, we are interested in scenarios which inspectors do not have access to all sides of an inspection object, due to interfering objects or walls. This paper will present the results of a simulation-based design parameter study, that will determine the optimum system design parameters for a fieldable system to perform time-of-flight based imaging analysis. The imaging analysis is based on the use of an associated particle imaging deuterium-tritium (API DT) neutron generator to get the time-of-flight of radiation induced within an inspection object. This design study will investigate the optimum design parameters for such a system (e.g. detector size, ideal placement, etc.), as well as the upper and lower feasible design parameters that the system can expect to provide results within a reasonable amount of time (e.g. minimum/maximum detector efficiency, detector standoff, etc.). Ideally the final prototype from this project will be capable of using full-access techniques, such as transmission imaging, when the measurement circumstances allow, but with the additional capability of producing results at reduced accessibility.

  6. The ALICE Time of Flight Readout System AFRO

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, A

    1999-01-01

    The ALICE Time of Flight Detector system comprises more than 100.000 channels and covers an area of more than 100 m2. The timing resolution should be better than 150 ps. This combination of requirements poses a major challenge to the readout system. All detector timing measurements are referenced to a unique start signal t0. This signal is generated at the time an event occurs. Timing measurements are performed using a multichannel TDC chip which requires a 40 MHz reference clock signal. The general concept of the readout system is based on a modular architecture. Detector cells are combined to modules of 1024 channels. Each of these modules can be read out and calibrated independently from each other. By distributing a reference signal, a timing relationship between the modules is established. This reference signal can either be the start signal t0 or the TDC-reference clock. The readout architecture is divided into three steps; the TDC controller, the module controller, and the time of flight controller. Th...

  7. Microlaser-based three-dimensional display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Eric B.; Bergstedt, Robert; Hargis, David E.; Higley, Paul D.

    1999-08-01

    Three dimensional (3D) displays are critical for viewing complex multi-dimensional information and for viewing representations of the three dimensional real world. A teaming arrangement between Laser Power Corporation (LPC) and Specialty Devices, Inc. (SDI) has led to the feasibility demonstration of a directly-viewed three dimensional volumetric display. LPC has developed red, green, and blue (RGB) diode pumped solid state microlaser display technology for use as a high resolution, high brightness display engine for the three dimensional display. Concurrently, SDI has developed a unique technology for viewing high resolution three dimensional volumetric images without external viewing aids (eye wear). When coupled to LPC's display engine, the resultant all solid state three dimensional display presets a true, physical three dimensionality which is directly viewable from all angles by multiple viewers without additional viewing equipment (eye wear). The resultant volumetric display will further enable applications such as the 'virtual sandbox,' visualization of radar and sonar data, air traffic control, remote surgery and diagnostics, and CAD workstations.

  8. Variations of High-Latitude Geomagnetic Pulsation Frequencies: A Comparison of Time-of-Flight Estimates and IMAGE Magnetometer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, J. K.; Yeoman, T. K.; James, M. K.; Rae, I. J.; Fear, R. C.

    2018-01-01

    The fundamental eigenfrequencies of standing Alfvén waves on closed geomagnetic field lines are estimated for the region spanning 5.9≤L relatively simplistic mass density model. An assessment of the implications of using different mass density models in the time-of-flight calculations is presented. The calculated frequencies exhibit dependences on field line footprint magnetic latitude and MLT, which are attributed to both magnetic field configuration and spatial variations in mass density. In order to assess the validity of the time-of-flight calculated frequencies, the estimates are compared to observations of FLR (Field Line Resonance) frequencies. Using IMAGE (International Monitor for Auroral Geomagnetic Effects) ground magnetometer observations obtained between 2001 and 2012, an automated FLR identification method is developed, based on the cross-phase technique. The average FLR frequency is determined, including variations with footprint latitude and MLT, and compared to the time-of-flight analysis. The results show agreement in the latitudinal and local time dependences. Furthermore, with the use of the realistic mass density model in the time-of-flight calculations, closer agreement with the observed FLR frequencies is obtained. The study is limited by the latitudinal coverage of the IMAGE magnetometer array, and future work will aim to extend the ground magnetometer data used to include additional magnetometer arrays.

  9. IceBridge Sigma Space Prototype L0 Raw Time-of-Flight Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA IceBridge Sigma Space Prototype L0 Raw Time-of-Flight Data set (ILSSP0) contains time-of-flight data captured over Antarctica using the Sigma Space Photon...

  10. IceBridge Sigma Space Prototype L0 Raw Time-of-Flight Data, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA IceBridge Sigma Space Prototype L0 Raw Time-of-Flight Data set (ILSSP0) contains time-of-flight data captured over Antarctica using the Sigma Space Photon...

  11. IceBridge Sigma Space Lidar L0 Raw Time-of-Flight Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA IceBridge Sigma Space Lidar L0 Raw Time-of-Flight Data (ILSIG0) contain raw time-of-flight values for Antarctica and Greenland using the Sigma Space Lidar....

  12. Three-dimensional reconstructed computed tomography-magnetic resonance fusion image-based preoperative planning for surgical procedures for spinal lipoma or tethered spinal cord after myelomeningocele repair. Technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamba, Yohei; Nonaka, Masahiro; Nakajima, Shin; Yamasaki, Mami

    2011-01-01

    Surgical procedures for spinal lipoma or tethered spinal cord after myelomeningocele (MMC) repair are often difficult and complicated, because the anatomical structures can be deformed in complex and unpredictable ways. Imaging helps the surgeon understand the patient's spinal anatomy. Whereas two-dimensional images provide only limited information for surgical planning, three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed computed tomography (CT)-magnetic resonance (MR) fusion images produce clearer representations of the spinal regions. Here we describe simple and quick methods for obtaining 3D reconstructed CT-MR fusion images for preoperative planning of surgical procedures using the iPlan cranial (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) neuronavigation software. 3D CT images of the vertebral bone were combined with heavily T 2 -weighted MR images of the spinal cord, lipoma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space, and nerve root through a process of fusion, segmentation, and reconstruction of the 3D images. We also used our procedure called 'Image Overlay' to directly project the 3D reconstructed image onto the body surface using an light emitting diode (LED) projector. The final reconstructed 3D images took 10-30 minutes to obtain, and provided the surgeon with a representation of the individual pathological structures, so enabled the design of effective surgical plans, even in patients with bony deformity such as scoliosis. None of the 19 patients treated based on our 3D reconstruction method has had neurological complications, except for CSF leakage. This 3D reconstructed imaging method, combined with Image Overlay, improves the visual understanding of complicated surgical situations, and should improve surgical efficiency and outcome. (author)

  13. Performance of new automated transthoracic three-dimensional echocardiographic software for left ventricular volumes and function assessment in routine clinical practice: Comparison with 3 Tesla cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Franck; Dan Schouver, Elie; Iacuzio, Laura; Civaia, Filippo; Rusek, Stephane; Dommerc, Carinne; Marechaux, Sylvestre; Dor, Vincent; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Dreyfus, Gilles

    2017-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is superior to two-dimensional Simpson's method for assessment of left ventricular (LV) volumes and LV ejection fraction (LVEF). Nevertheless, 3D TTE is not incorporated into everyday practice, as current LV chamber quantification software products are time-consuming. To evaluate the feasibility, accuracy and reproducibility of new fully automated fast 3D TTE software (HeartModel A.I. ; Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA, USA) for quantification of LV volumes and LVEF in routine practice; to compare the 3D LV volumes and LVEF obtained with a cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) reference; and to optimize automated default border settings with CMR as reference. Sixty-three consecutive patients, who had comprehensive 3D TTE and CMR examinations within 24hours, were eligible for inclusion. Nine patients (14%) were excluded because of insufficient echogenicity in the 3D TTE. Thus, 54 patients (40 men; mean age 63±13 years) were prospectively included into the study. The inter- and intraobserver reproducibilities of 3D TTE were excellent (coefficient of variationTTE compared with CMR (bias=-22±34mL; PTTE and CMR for ESV and LVEF were excellent (r=0.93 and r=0.91, respectively; PTTE using new-generation fully automated software is a feasible, fast, reproducible and accurate imaging modality for LV volumetric quantification in routine practice. Optimization of border detection settings may increase agreement with CMR for EDV assessment in dilated ventricles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Laser ionization time of flight mass spectrometer for isotope mass detection and elemental analysis of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nasar; Ahmed, Rizwan; Umar, Z. A.; Aslam Baig, M.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we present the construction and modification of a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer to improve its mass resolution. This system consists of a laser ablation/ionization section based on a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 500 mJ, 5 ns pulse duration) integrated with a one meter linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer coupled with an electric sector and a magnetic lens and outfitted with a channeltron electron multiplier for ion detection. The resolution of the system has been improved by optimizing the accelerating potential and inserting a magnetic lens after the extraction region. The isotopes of lithium, lead and cadmium samples have been resolved and detected in accordance with their natural abundance. The capability of the system has been further exploited to determine the elemental composition of a brass alloy, having a certified composition of zinc and copper. Our results are in excellent agreement with its certified composition. This setup is found to be extremely efficient and convenient for fast analyses of any solid sample.

  15. Simulation of time of flight defraction signals for reactor vessel head penetrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Tae Hun; Kim, Young Sik; Lee, Jeong Seok [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    The simulation of nondestructive testing has been used in the prediction of the signal characteristics of various defects and in the development of the procedures. CIVA, a simulation tool dedicated to nondestructive testing, has good accuracy and speed, and provides a three-dimensional graphical user interface for improved visualization and familiar data displays consistent with an NDE technique. Even though internal validations have been performed by the CIVA software development specialists, an independent validation study is necessary for the assessment of the accuracy of the software prior to practical use. In this study, time of flight diffraction signals of ultrasonic inspection of a calibration block for reactor vessel head penetrations were simulated using CIVA. The results were compared to the experimentally inspected signals. The accuracy of the simulated signals and the possible range for simulation were verified. It was found that, there is a good agreement between the CIVA simulated and experimental results in the A-scan signal, B-scan image, and measurement of depth.

  16. The time-of-flight system for CLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, E S; Distelbrink, J; Eckhause, M; Egiyan, H; Elouadrhiri, L; Ficenec, J; Guidal, M; Hancock, A D; Hersman, F W; Holtrop, M; Jenkins, D A; Kim, W; Loukachine, K; MacArthur, K; Marchand, C; Mecking, B; Mutchler, G S; Schutt, D; Smith, L C; Smith, T P; Taylor, S; Tung, T Y; Weisenberger, A; Welsh, R E

    1999-01-01

    The time of flight system for the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is described. The system, covering an area of 206 m sup 2 , is composed of scintillation counters 5.08 cm thick, 15 and 22 cm wide, and lengths which vary from 32 cm at the most forward angle to 450 cm at larger angles. All of the components of the system have been designed to optimize the time resolution. Event timing, achieved by leading-edge discrimination with time-walk correction, has been measured with cosmic rays, a laser pulser, and known particle interactions. The intrinsic time resolution varies from about 80 ps for the short counters to 160 ps for the longer counters. Reconstruction of interacting particles during the first period of operation yields an average time resolution for electrons of 163 ps. (author)

  17. Time-of-flight Fourier Spectrometry with UCN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulin, G. V.; Frank, A. I.; Goryunov, S. V.; Geltenbort, P.; Jentschel, M.; Bushuev, V. A.; Lauss, B.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, Ph.; Panzarella, A.; Fuchs, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The report presents the first experience of using a time-of-flight Fourier spectrometer of ultracold neutrons (UCN). The description of the spectrometer design and first results of its testing are presented. The results of the first experiments show that the spectrometer may be used for obtaining UCN energy spectra in the energy range of 60÷200 neV with a resolution of about 5 neV. The application of TOF Fourier spectrometry technique allowed us to obtain the energy spectra from the diffraction of monochromatic ultracold neutrons on a moving grating. Lines of 0, +1 and +2 diffraction orders were simultaneously recorded, which had previously been impossible to be done by other methods. These results have made it possible to make a comparison with the recent theoretical calculations based on the dynamical theory of neutron diffraction on a moving phase grating.

  18. Highly charged ion based time of flight emission microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Alan V.; Schenkel, Thomas; Hamza, Alex V.; Schneider, Dieter H.; Doyle, Barney

    2001-01-01

    A highly charged ion based time-of-flight emission microscope has been designed, which improves the surface sensitivity of static SIMS measurements because of the higher ionization probability of highly charged ions. Slow, highly charged ions are produced in an electron beam ion trap and are directed to the sample surface. The sputtered secondary ions and electrons pass through a specially designed objective lens to a microchannel plate detector. This new instrument permits high surface sensitivity (10.sup.10 atoms/cm.sup.2), high spatial resolution (100 nm), and chemical structural information due to the high molecular ion yields. The high secondary ion yield permits coincidence counting, which can be used to enhance determination of chemical and topological structure and to correlate specific molecular species.

  19. Tests and calibration of NIF neutron time of flight detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Z A; Glebov, V Yu; Cruz, M; Duffy, T; Stoeckl, C; Roberts, S; Sangster, T C; Tommasini, R; Throop, A; Moran, M; Dauffy, L; Horsefield, C

    2008-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) neutron time of flight (NTOF) diagnostic will measure neutron yield and ion temperature in all NIF campaigns in DD, DT, and THD(*) implosions. The NIF NTOF diagnostic is designed to measure neutron yield from 1x10(9) to 2x10(19). The NTOF consists of several detectors of varying sensitivity located on the NIF at about 5 and 20 m from the target. Production, testing, and calibration of the NIF NTOF detectors have begun at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). Operational tests of the NTOF detectors were performed on several facilities including the OMEGA laser at LLE and the Titan laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Neutron calibrations were carried out on the OMEGA laser. Results of the NTOF detector tests and calibration will be presented.

  20. Small-sized time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer with beam particle ionization by electron impact developed for the measurement of pulsed hydrogen beam parameters, is described. Duration of electron beam current pulses in the mass-spectrometer ionizer is varied within the 2-20 μs, interval electron pulse current is 0.6 mA, electron energy is 250 eV. Time resolution of the mass spectrometer is determined by the period of electron beam current pulse repetition and equals 40 μs. The ion drift range is 16 cm. Mass resolution ΔM/M=1/5 is sufficient for the determination of hydrogen beam composition. The mass spectrometer has 100% transparency in the direction of molecular beam particle movement. In this direction the mass spectrometer size is 7 cm

  1. Ultrasonic testing using time of flight diffraction technique (TOFD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khurram Shahzad; Ahmad Mirza Safeer Ahmad; Muhammad Asif Khan

    2009-04-01

    This paper describes the ultrasonic testing using Time Flight Diffraction (TOFD) Technique for welded samples having different types and sizes of defects. TOFD is a computerized ultrasonic system, able to scan, store and evaluate indications in terms of location, through thickness and length in a more easy and convenient. Time of Flight Diffraction Technique (TOFD) is more fast and easy technique for ultrasonic testing as we can examine a weld i a single scan along the length of the weld with two probes known as D-scan. It shows the image of the complete weld with the defect information. The examinations were performed on carbon steel samples used for ultrasonic testing using 70 degree probes. The images for different type of defects were obtained. (author)

  2. Ion microtomography using ion time-of-flight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, M.L.; Heikkinen, D.W.; Proctor, I.D.; Pontau, A.E.; Olona, G.T.; Felter, T.E.; Morse, D.H.; Hess, B.V.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed and are in the process of testing an ion time-of-flight (TOF) detector system for use in our ion microtomography measurements. Using TOF, ion energy is determined by measurement of the ion's flight time over a certain path length. For ion microtomography, the principle advantage of TOF analysis is that ion count rates of several hundred thousand counts per second can be achieved as compared to a limit of about ten thousand ions per second when using a solid-state silicon surface barrier detector and associated electronics. This greater than 10 fold increase in count rate correspondingly shortens sample analysis time or increases the amount of data that can be collected on a given sample. Details of the system and progress to date are described

  3. The time-of-flight system for CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, E.S. E-mail: elton@jlab.org; Carstens, T.; Distelbrink, J.; Eckhause, M.; Egiyan, H.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Ficenec, J.; Guidal, M.; Hancock, A.D.; Hersman, F.W.; Holtrop, M.; Jenkins, D.A.; Kim, W.; Loukachine, K.; MacArthur, K.; Marchand, C.; Mecking, B.; Mutchler, G.; Schutt, D.; Smith, L.C.; Smith, T.P.; Taylor, S.; Tung, T.Y.; Weisenberger, A.; Welsh, R.E

    1999-08-11

    The time of flight system for the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is described. The system, covering an area of 206 m{sup 2}, is composed of scintillation counters 5.08 cm thick, 15 and 22 cm wide, and lengths which vary from 32 cm at the most forward angle to 450 cm at larger angles. All of the components of the system have been designed to optimize the time resolution. Event timing, achieved by leading-edge discrimination with time-walk correction, has been measured with cosmic rays, a laser pulser, and known particle interactions. The intrinsic time resolution varies from about 80 ps for the short counters to 160 ps for the longer counters. Reconstruction of interacting particles during the first period of operation yields an average time resolution for electrons of 163 ps. (author)

  4. Parallelization method for three dimensional MOC calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhizhu; Li Qing; Wang Kan

    2013-01-01

    A parallelization method based on angular decomposition for the three dimensional MOC was designed. To improve the parallel efficiency, the directions were pre-grouped and the groups were assembled to minimize the communication. The improved parallelization method was applied to the three dimensional MOC code TCM. The numerical results show that the calculation results of parallelization method are agreed with serial calculation results. The parallel efficiency gets obvious increase after the communication optimized and load balance. (authors)

  5. Three-dimensional measurement system for crime scene documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Marcin; Hołowko, Elwira; Lech, Krzysztof; Michoński, Jakub; MÄ czkowski, Grzegorz; Bolewicki, Paweł; Januszkiewicz, Kamil; Sitnik, Robert

    2017-10-01

    Three dimensional measurements (such as photogrammetry, Time of Flight, Structure from Motion or Structured Light techniques) are becoming a standard in the crime scene documentation process. The usage of 3D measurement techniques provide an opportunity to prepare more insightful investigation and helps to show every trace in the context of the entire crime scene. In this paper we would like to present a hierarchical, three-dimensional measurement system that is designed for crime scenes documentation process. Our system reflects the actual standards in crime scene documentation process - it is designed to perform measurement in two stages. First stage of documentation, the most general, is prepared with a scanner with relatively low spatial resolution but also big measuring volume - it is used for the whole scene documentation. Second stage is much more detailed: high resolution but smaller size of measuring volume for areas that required more detailed approach. The documentation process is supervised by a specialised application CrimeView3D, that is a software platform for measurements management (connecting with scanners and carrying out measurements, automatic or semi-automatic data registration in the real time) and data visualisation (3D visualisation of documented scenes). It also provides a series of useful tools for forensic technicians: virtual measuring tape, searching for sources of blood spatter, virtual walk on the crime scene and many others. In this paper we present our measuring system and the developed software. We also provide an outcome from research on metrological validation of scanners that was performed according to VDI/VDE standard. We present a CrimeView3D - a software-platform that was developed to manage the crime scene documentation process. We also present an outcome from measurement sessions that were conducted on real crime scenes with cooperation with Technicians from Central Forensic Laboratory of Police.

  6. Three-dimensional effects in fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, F.G.

    1991-01-01

    An overall view of the pioneering theories and works, which enlighten the three-dimensional nature of fracture mechanics during the last years is given. the main aim is not an exhaustive reviewing but the displaying of the last developments on this scientific field in a natural way. This work attempts to envisage the limits of disregarding the three-dimensional behaviour in theories, analyses and experiments. Moreover, it tries to draw attention on the scant fervour, although increasing, this three-dimensional nature of fracture has among the scientific community. Finally, a constructive discussion is presented on the use of two-dimensional solutions in the analysis of geometries which bear a three-dimensional configuration. the static two-dimensional solutions and its applications fields are reviewed. also, the static three-dimensional solutions, wherein a comparative analysis with elastoplastic and elastostatic solutions are presented. to end up, the dynamic three-dimensional solutions are compared to the asymptotic two-dimensional ones under the practical applications point of view. (author)

  7. Study on time of flight property of electron optical systems by differential algebraic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Min; Tang Tiantong; Yao Zhenhua

    2002-01-01

    Differential algebraic method is a powerful and promising technique in computer numerical analysis. When applied to nonlinear dynamics systems, the arbitrary high-order transfer properties of the systems can be computed directly with high precision. In this paper, the principle of differential algebra is applied to study on the time of flight (TOF) property of electron optical systems and their arbitrary order TOF transfer properties can be numerically calculated out. As an example, TOF transfer properties of a uniform magnetic sector field analyzer have been studied by differential algebraic method. Relative errors of the first-order and second-order TOF transfer coefficients of the magnetic sector field analyzer are of the order 10 -11 or smaller compared with the analytic solutions. It is proved that differential algebraic TOF method is of high accuracy and very helpful for high-order TOF transfer property analysis of electron optical systems. (author)

  8. Panoramic three-dimensional CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamata, Akitoshi; Fujishita, Masami

    1998-01-01

    Panoramic radiography is a unique projection technique for producing a single image of both maxillary and mandibular arches and many other anatomical structures. To obtain a similar panoramic image without panoramic radiography system, a modified three-dimensional (3D) CT imaging technique was designed. A set of CT slice image data extending from the chin to the orbit was used for 3D reconstruction. The CT machine used in this study was the X-Vision (TOSHIBA, Japan). The helical scan technique was used. The slice thickness of reconstructed image was one or 1.5 mm. The occlusal plane or Frankfort horizontal (FH) plane was used as the reference line. The resultant slice image data was stored on a magnetic optical disk and then used to create panoramic 3D-CT images on a Macintosh computer systems (Power Macintosh 8600/250, Apple Computer Inc., USA). To create the panoramic 3D-CT image, the following procedure was designed: Design a curved panoramic 3D-CT imaging layer using the imaging layer and the movement of the x-ray beam in panoramic radiography system as a template; Cut this imaging layer from each slice image, then the trimmed image was transformed to a rectangular layer using the ''still image warping'' special effect in the Elastic Reality special effects system (Elastic Reality Inc., USA); Create panoramic 3D-CT image using the Voxel View (Vital Images Inc., USA) rendering system and volume rendering technique. Although the image quality was primitive, a panoramic view of maxillofacial region was obtained by this technique. (author)

  9. The multiple disk chopper neutron time-of-flight spectrometer at NIST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altorfer, F.B.; Cook, J.C.; Copley, J.R.D.

    1995-01-01

    A highly versatile multiple disk chopper neutron time-of-flight spectrometer is being installed at the Cold Neutron Research Facility of the National institute of Standards and Technology. This new instrument will fill an important gap in the portfolio of neutron inelastic scattering spectrometers in North America. It will be used for a wide variety of experiments such as studies of magnetic and vibrational excitations, tunneling spectroscopy, and quasielastic neutron scattering investigations of local and translational diffusion. The instrument uses disk choppers to monochromate and pulse the incident beam, and the energy changes of scattered neutrons are determined from their times-of-flight to a large array of detectors. The disks and the guide have been designed to make the instrument readily adaptable to the specific performance requirements of experimenters. The authors present important aspects of the design, as well as estimated values of the flux at the sample and the energy resolution for elastic scattering. The instrument should be operational in 1996

  10. The multipurpose time-of-flight neutron reflectometer 'Platypus' at Australia's OPAL reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.; Nelson, A.; Holt, S.A.; Saerbeck, T.; Hamilton, W.A.; Klose, F.

    2011-01-01

    In this manuscript we describe the major components of the Platypus time-of-flight neutron reflectometer at the 20 MW OPAL reactor in Sydney, Australia. Platypus is a multipurpose spectrometer for the characterisation of solid thin films, materials adsorbed at the solid-liquid interface and free-liquid surfaces. It also has the capacity to study magnetic thin films using spin-polarised neutrons. Platypus utilises a white neutron beam (λ=2-20 A) that is pulsed using boron-coated disc chopper pairs; thus providing the capacity to tailor the wavelength resolution of the pulses to suit the system under investigation. Supermirror optical components are used to focus, deflect or spin-polarise the broad bandwidth neutron beams, and typical incident spectra are presented for each configuration. A series of neutron reflectivity datasets are presented, indicating the quality and flexibility of this spectrometer. Minimum reflectivity values of -7 are observed; while maximum thickness values of 325 nm have been measured for single-component films and 483 nm for a multilayer system. Off-specular measurements have also been made to investigate in-plane features as opposed to those normal to the sample surface. Finally, the first published studies conducted using the Platypus time-of-flight neutron reflectometer are presented.

  11. Towards time-of-flight PET with a semiconductor detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariño-Estrada, Gerard; Mitchell, Gregory S.; Kwon, Sun Il; Du, Junwei; Kim, Hadong; Cirignano, Leonard J.; Shah, Kanai S.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2018-02-01

    The feasibility of using Cerenkov light, generated by energetic electrons following 511 keV photon interactions in the semiconductor TlBr, to obtain fast timing information for positron emission tomography (PET) was evaluated. Due to its high refractive index, TlBr is a relatively good Cerenkov radiator and with its wide bandgap, has good optical transparency across most of the visible spectrum. Coupling an SiPM photodetector to a slab of TlBr (TlBr-SiPM) yielded a coincidence timing resolution of 620 ps FWHM between the TlBr-SiPM detector and a LFS reference detector. This value improved to 430 ps FWHM by applying a high pulse amplitude cut based on the TlBr-SiPM and reference detector signal amplitudes. These results are the best ever achieved with a semiconductor PET detector and already approach the performance required for time-of-flight. As TlBr has higher stopping power and better energy resolution than the conventional scintillation detectors currently used in PET scanners, a hybrid TlBr-SiPM detector with fast timing capability becomes an interesting option for further development.

  12. Distance error correction for time-of-flight cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuersattel, Peter; Schaller, Christian; Maier, Andreas; Riess, Christian

    2017-06-01

    The measurement accuracy of time-of-flight cameras is limited due to properties of the scene and systematic errors. These errors can accumulate to multiple centimeters which may limit the applicability of these range sensors. In the past, different approaches have been proposed for improving the accuracy of these cameras. In this work, we propose a new method that improves two important aspects of the range calibration. First, we propose a new checkerboard which is augmented by a gray-level gradient. With this addition it becomes possible to capture the calibration features for intrinsic and distance calibration at the same time. The gradient strip allows to acquire a large amount of distance measurements for different surface reflectivities, which results in more meaningful training data. Second, we present multiple new features which are used as input to a random forest regressor. By using random regression forests, we circumvent the problem of finding an accurate model for the measurement error. During application, a correction value for each individual pixel is estimated with the trained forest based on a specifically tailored feature vector. With our approach the measurement error can be reduced by more than 40% for the Mesa SR4000 and by more than 30% for the Microsoft Kinect V2. In our evaluation we also investigate the impact of the individual forest parameters and illustrate the importance of the individual features.

  13. Time recording unit for a neutron time of flight spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puranik, Praful; Ajit Kiran, S.; Chandak, R.M.; Poudel, S.K.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    2011-01-01

    Here the architecture and design of Time Recording Unit for a Neutron Time of Flight Spectrometer have been described. The Spectrometer would have an array of 50 Nos. of one meter long linear Position Sensitive Detector (PSD) placed vertically around the sample at a distance of 2000 mm. The sample receives periodic pulsed neutron beam coming through a Fermi chopper. The time and zone of detection of a scattered neutron in a PSD gives information of its flight time and path length, which will be used to calculate its energy. A neutron event zone (position) and time detection module for each PSD provides a 2 bit position/zone code and an event timing pulse. The path length assigned to a neutron detected in a zone (Z1, Z2 etc) in the PSD is the mean path length seen by the neutrons detected in that zone of the PSD. A Time recording unit described here receives event zone code and timing pulse for all the 50 detectors, tags a proper time window code to it, before streaming it to computer for calculation of the energy distribution of neutrons scattered from the sample

  14. Time-of-flight neutron spectrometer for JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Y.; Iguchi, T.; Uritani, Akira; Kawarabayashi, Jun; Hoek, Magnus; Nishitani, T.; Morioka, A.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a 2.45 MeV neutron Double Crystal Time-of-Flight (DC-TOF) spectrometer for Deuterium plasmas in JT-60U. The DC-TOF neutron spectrometer consists of two fast plastic scintillators (BC-408 made by Bicron, 50 cm 2 and 1800 cm 2 , thickness 2 cm), located on constant TOF spheres. The constant TOF spheres have a radius of 1 m which gives a neutron flight length of 1.64 m and a TOF of 92 ns for 2.45 MeV neutrons. The calculated spectrometer efficiency and resolution are 2.8x10 -2 cm 2 and 100 keV, respectively. The energy resolution corresponds to a time resolution of 2.0 ns. The spectrometer has been installed in the basement of JT-60U, 10 m away from the plasma center with vertical line-of-sight. Neutron energy spectra have been obtained when the neutron yield from the plasma is ∼10 15 neutrons/s. (author)

  15. Towards time-of-flight PET with a semiconductor detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariño-Estrada, Gerard; Mitchell, Gregory S; Kwon, Sun Il; Du, Junwei; Kim, Hadong; Cirignano, Leonard J; Shah, Kanai S; Cherry, Simon R

    2018-02-16

    The feasibility of using Cerenkov light, generated by energetic electrons following 511 keV photon interactions in the semiconductor TlBr, to obtain fast timing information for positron emission tomography (PET) was evaluated. Due to its high refractive index, TlBr is a relatively good Cerenkov radiator and with its wide bandgap, has good optical transparency across most of the visible spectrum. Coupling an SiPM photodetector to a slab of TlBr (TlBr-SiPM) yielded a coincidence timing resolution of 620 ps FWHM between the TlBr-SiPM detector and a LFS reference detector. This value improved to 430 ps FWHM by applying a high pulse amplitude cut based on the TlBr-SiPM and reference detector signal amplitudes. These results are the best ever achieved with a semiconductor PET detector and already approach the performance required for time-of-flight. As TlBr has higher stopping power and better energy resolution than the conventional scintillation detectors currently used in PET scanners, a hybrid TlBr-SiPM detector with fast timing capability becomes an interesting option for further development.

  16. Characterizing Scintillator Response with Neutron Time-of-Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, Kevin; Visca, Hannah; Caves, Louis; Wilkinson, Corey; McClow, Hannah; Padalino, Stephen; Forrest, Chad; Katz, Joe; Sangster, Craig; Regan, Sean

    2017-10-01

    Neutron scintillator diagnostics for ICF can be characterized using the neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) line on Geneseo's 1.7 MV Tandem Pelletron Accelerator. Neutron signals can be differentiated from gamma signals by employing a coincidence method called the associated particle technique (APT). In this measurement, a 2.1 MeV beam of deuterons incident on a deuterated polyethylene target produces neutrons via the d(d,n)3He reaction. A BC-412 plastic scintillator, placed at a scattering angle of 152º, detects 1.76 MeV neutrons in coincidence with the 2.56 MeV 3He ions at an associated angle of 10º. The APT is used to identify the 1.76 MeV neutron while the nTOF line determines its energy. By gating only mono-energetic neutrons, the instrument response function of the scintillator can be determined free from background scattered neutrons and gamma rays. Funded in part by a Grant from the DOE, through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  17. Multiple-ion-beam time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrbacher, Andreas; Continetti, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    An innovative approach to increase the throughput of mass spectrometric analyses using a multiple-ion-beam mass spectrometer is described. Two sample spots were applied onto a laser desorption/ionization target and each spot was simultaneously irradiated by a beam of quadrupled Nd:YLF laser radiation (261.75 nm) to produce ions by laser-desorption ionization. Acceleration of the ions in an electric field created parallel ion beams that were focused by two parallel einzel lens systems. After a flight path of 2.34 m, the ions were detected with a microchannel plate-phosphor screen assembly coupled with a charge coupled device camera that showed two resolved ion beams. Time-of-flight mass spectra were also obtained with this detector. Experiments were performed using both metal atom cations (Ti + and Cr + ) produced by laser desorption/ionization and the molecular ions of two different proteins (myoglobin and lysozyme), created by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization using an excess of nicotinic acid as matrix

  18. Multiple-ion-beam time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbacher, Andreas; Continetti, Robert E.

    2001-08-01

    An innovative approach to increase the throughput of mass spectrometric analyses using a multiple-ion-beam mass spectrometer is described. Two sample spots were applied onto a laser desorption/ionization target and each spot was simultaneously irradiated by a beam of quadrupled Nd:YLF laser radiation (261.75 nm) to produce ions by laser-desorption ionization. Acceleration of the ions in an electric field created parallel ion beams that were focused by two parallel einzel lens systems. After a flight path of 2.34 m, the ions were detected with a microchannel plate-phosphor screen assembly coupled with a charge coupled device camera that showed two resolved ion beams. Time-of-flight mass spectra were also obtained with this detector. Experiments were performed using both metal atom cations (Ti+ and Cr+) produced by laser desorption/ionization and the molecular ions of two different proteins (myoglobin and lysozyme), created by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization using an excess of nicotinic acid as matrix.

  19. Proton Transfer Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Thomas B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTRMS) measures gas-phase compounds in ambient air and headspace samples before using chemical ionization to produce positively charged molecules, which are detected with a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. This ionization method uses a gentle proton transfer reaction method between the molecule of interest and protonated water, or hydronium ion (H3O+), to produce limited fragmentation of the parent molecule. The ions produced are primarily positively charged with the mass of the parent ion, plus an additional proton. Ion concentration is determined by adding the number of ions counted at the molecular ion’s mass-to-charge ratio to the number of air molecules in the reaction chamber, which can be identified according to the pressure levels in the reaction chamber. The PTRMS allows many volatile organic compounds in ambient air to be detected at levels from 10–100 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). The response time is 1 to 10 seconds.

  20. Towards three-dimensional optical metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takuo; Ishikawa, Atsushi

    2017-12-01

    Metamaterials have opened up the possibility of unprecedented and fascinating concepts and applications in optics and photonics. Examples include negative refraction, perfect lenses, cloaking, perfect absorbers, and so on. Since these metamaterials are man-made materials composed of sub-wavelength structures, their development strongly depends on the advancement of micro- and nano-fabrication technologies. In particular, the realization of three-dimensional metamaterials is one of the big challenges in this research field. In this review, we describe recent progress in the fabrication technologies for three-dimensional metamaterials, as well as proposed applications.

  1. Towards three-dimensional optical metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takuo; Ishikawa, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Metamaterials have opened up the possibility of unprecedented and fascinating concepts and applications in optics and photonics. Examples include negative refraction, perfect lenses, cloaking, perfect absorbers, and so on. Since these metamaterials are man-made materials composed of sub-wavelength structures, their development strongly depends on the advancement of micro- and nano-fabrication technologies. In particular, the realization of three-dimensional metamaterials is one of the big challenges in this research field. In this review, we describe recent progress in the fabrication technologies for three-dimensional metamaterials, as well as proposed applications.

  2. Development of three dimensional solid modeler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, R.M.A.

    1999-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis is aimed at developing a three dimensional solid modeler employing computer graphics techniques using C-Language. Primitives have been generated, by combination of plane surfaces, for various basic geometrical shapes including cylinder, cube and cone. Back face removal technique for hidden surface removal has also been incorporated. Various transformation techniques such as scaling, translation, and rotation have been included for the object animation. Three dimensional solid modeler has been created by the union of two primitives to demonstrate the capabilities of the developed program. (author)

  3. Three-dimensional imaging utilizing energy discrimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunter, D.L.; Hoffman, K.R.; Beck, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    An algorithm is proposed for three-dimensional image reconstruction in nuclear medicine which uses scattered radiation rather than multiple projected images to determine the source depth within the body. Images taken from numerous energy windows are combined to construct the source distribution in the body. The gamma-ray camera is not moved during the imaging process. Experiments with both Tc-99m and Ga-67 demonstrate that two channels of depth information can be extracted from the low energy images produced by scattered radiation. By combining this technique with standard SPECT reconstruction using multiple projections the authors anticipate much improved spatial resolution in the overall three-dimensional reconstruction

  4. Development of an ion time-of-flight spectrometer for neutron depth profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit

    signal. Without loss of generality, the secondary signal is obtained by the passage of the ion through a thin carbon foil, which produces ion-induced secondary electron emission (IISEE). The time-of-flight spectrometer physically acts as an ion/electron separator. The electrons that enter the active volume of the spectrometer are transported onto the microchannel plate detector to generate the secondary signal. The electron optics can be designed in variety of ways depending on the nature of the measurement and physical requirements. Two ion time-of-flight spectrometer designs are introduced: the parallel electric and magnetic (PEM) field spectrometer and the cross electric and magnetic (CEM) field spectrometer. The CEM field spectrometers have been extensively used in a wide range of applications where precise mass differentiation is required. The PEM field spectrometers have lately found interest in mass spectroscopy applications. The application of the PEM field spectrometer for energy measurements is a novel approach. The PEM field spectrometer used in the measurements employs axial electric and magnetic fields along the nominal direction of the incident ion. The secondary electrons are created by a thin carbon foil on the entrance disk and transported on the microchannel plate that faces the carbon foil. The initial angular distribution of the secondary electrons has virtually no effect on the transport time of the secondary electrons from the surface of the carbon foil to the electron microchannel plate detector. Therefore, the PEM field spectrometer can offer high-resolution energy measurement for relatively lower electric fields. The measurements with the PEM field spectrometer were made with the Tandem linear particle accelerator at the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center at Yorktown Heights, NY. The CEM field spectrometer developed for the thesis employs axial electric field along the nominal direction of the ion, and has perpendicular magnetic field. As the

  5. Recent developments in time-of-flight PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenberghe, S.; Mikhaylova, E.; D’Hoe, E.; Mollet, P. [ELIS-IMINDS-Medical IT-IBITECH Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, Blok B, Gent, 9000 (Belgium); Karp, J. S. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-02-16

    While the first time-of-flight (TOF)-positron emission tomography (PET) systems were already built in the early 1980s, limited clinical studies were acquired on these scanners. PET was still a research tool, and the available TOF-PET systems were experimental. Due to a combination of low stopping power and limited spatial resolution (caused by limited light output of the scintillators), these systems could not compete with bismuth germanate (BGO)-based PET scanners. Developments on TOF system were limited for about a decade but started again around 2000. The combination of fast photomultipliers, scintillators with high density, modern electronics, and faster computing power for image reconstruction have made it possible to introduce this principle in clinical TOF-PET systems. This paper reviews recent developments in system design, image reconstruction, corrections, and the potential in new applications for TOF-PET. After explaining the basic principles of time-of-flight, the difficulties in detector technology and electronics to obtain a good and stable timing resolution are shortly explained. The available clinical systems and prototypes under development are described in detail. The development of this type of PET scanner also requires modified image reconstruction with accurate modeling and correction methods. The additional dimension introduced by the time difference motivates a shift from sinogram- to listmode-based reconstruction. This reconstruction is however rather slow and therefore rebinning techniques specific for TOF data have been proposed. The main motivation for TOF-PET remains the large potential for image quality improvement and more accurate quantification for a given number of counts. The gain is related to the ratio of object size and spatial extent of the TOF kernel and is therefore particularly relevant for heavy patients, where image quality degrades significantly due to increased attenuation (low counts) and high scatter fractions. The

  6. Invited Article: Polarization ``Down Under'': The polarized time-of-flight neutron reflectometer PLATYPUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saerbeck, T.; Klose, F.; Le Brun, A. P.; Füzi, J.; Brule, A.; Nelson, A.; Holt, S. A.; James, M.

    2012-08-01

    This review presents the implementation and full characterization of the polarization equipment of the time-of-flight neutron reflectometer PLATYPUS at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The functionality and efficiency of individual components are evaluated and found to maintain a high neutron beam polarization with a maximum of 99.3% through polarizing Fe/Si supermirrors. Neutron spin-flippers with efficiencies of 99.7% give full control over the incident and scattered neutron spin direction over the whole wavelength spectrum available in the instrument. The first scientific experiments illustrate data correction mechanisms for finite polarizations and reveal an extraordinarily high reproducibility for measuring magnetic thin film samples. The setup is now fully commissioned and available for users through the neutron beam proposal system of the Bragg Institute at ANSTO.

  7. Time-of-flight analysis of charge-exchange neutral particles from the TORTUR II plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocken, H.J.B.M.

    1981-10-01

    A disc chopper for time-of-flight analysis of fast neutral particles was constructed for the determination of the ion energy spectrum at lower energies than can be obtained by conventional electro-magnetic analyzers. The method has been applied to the TORTUR II tokamak. The chopper and detection system are described and the measurements are presented. For the interpretation of the results of the measurements a data analysis procedure was developed. The influence of reflections of neutrals at the liner wall showed to be important in the calculations of the neutral density profile at the plasma edge. The neutral energy spectrum in the lower energy range is strongly pronounced by this effect

  8. Imaging unsteady three-dimensional transport phenomena

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-05

    Jan 5, 2014 ... The image data can be jointly analysed with the physical laws governing transport and principles of image formation. Hence, with the experiment suitably carried out, three-dimensional physical domains with unsteady processes can be accommodated. Optical methods promise to breach the holy grail of ...

  9. Three-Dimensional Printing Surgical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlAli, Ahmad B; Griffin, Michelle F; Butler, Peter E

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional printing, a technology used for decades in the industrial field, gains a lot of attention in the medical field for its potential benefits. With advancement of desktop printers, this technology is accessible and a lot of research is going on in the medical field. To evaluate its application in surgical field, which may include but not limited to surgical planning, surgical education, implants, and prosthesis, which are the focus of this review. Research was conducted by searching PubMed, Web of science, and other reliable sources. We included original articles and excluded articles based on animals, those more than 10 years old, and those not in English. These articles were evaluated, and relevant studies were included in this review. Three-dimensional printing shows a potential benefit in surgical application. Printed implants were used in patient in a few cases and show successful results; however, longer follow-up and more trials are needed. Surgical and medical education is believed to be more efficient with this technology than the current practice. Printed surgical instrument and surgical planning are also believed to improve with three-dimensional printing. Three-dimensional printing can be a very powerful tool in the near future, which can aid the medical field that is facing a lot of challenges and obstacles. However, despite the reported results, further research on larger samples and analytical measurements should be conducted to ensure this technology's impact on the practice.

  10. Imaging unsteady three-dimensional transport phenomena

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-05

    Jan 5, 2014 ... physical domains with unsteady processes can be accommodated. Optical methods promise to breach the holy grail of measurements by extracting unsteady three-dimensional data in applications related to transport phenomena. Keywords. Optical measurement; fluid flow and transport; refractive index ...

  11. Three-dimensional chiral photonic superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, M; Fischer, H; von Freymann, G; Wegener, M

    2010-01-15

    We investigate three-dimensional photonic superlattices composed of polymeric helices in various spatial checkerboard-like arrangements. Depending on the relative phase shift and handedness of the chiral building blocks, different circular-dichroism resonances appear or are suppressed. Samples corresponding to four different configurations are fabricated by direct laser writing. The measured optical transmittance spectra are in good agreement with numerical calculations.

  12. Three dimensional electrochemical system for neurobiological studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vazquez, Patricia; Dimaki, Maria; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2009-01-01

    In this work we report a novel three dimensional electrode array for electrochemical measurements in neuronal studies. The main advantage of working with these out-of-plane structures is the enhanced sensitivity of the system in terms of measuring electrochemical changes in the environment...

  13. Electron crystallography of three dimensional protein crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgieva, Dilyana

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes an investigation of the potential of electron diffraction for studying three dimensional sub-micro-crystals of proteins and pharmaceuticals. A prerequisite for using electron diffraction for structural studies is the predictable availability of tiny crystals. A method for

  14. Three-dimensional patterning methods and related devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putnam, Morgan C.; Kelzenberg, Michael D.; Atwater, Harry A.; Boettcher, Shannon W.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Spurgeon, Joshua M.; Turner-Evans, Daniel B.; Warren, Emily L.

    2016-12-27

    Three-dimensional patterning methods of a three-dimensional microstructure, such as a semiconductor wire array, are described, in conjunction with etching and/or deposition steps to pattern the three-dimensional microstructure.

  15. Separation of VX, RVX and GB Enantiomers Using Liquid ChromatographyTime-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    and GB Enantiomers Using Liquid Chromatography– Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...used for liquid chromatography–time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. For large-scale separation and quantitation, the UV absorbance at 210 nm (with...RVX, AND GB ENANTIOMERS USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY–TIME-OF-FLIGHT MASS SPECTROMETRY 1. INTRODUCTION Tetra-coordinate pentavalent

  16. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Teresa; Neelakantan, Prasanna

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome

  17. Three-dimensional Imaging, Visualization, and Display

    CERN Document Server

    Javidi, Bahram; Son, Jung-Young

    2009-01-01

    Three-Dimensional Imaging, Visualization, and Display describes recent developments, as well as the prospects and challenges facing 3D imaging, visualization, and display systems and devices. With the rapid advances in electronics, hardware, and software, 3D imaging techniques can now be implemented with commercially available components and can be used for many applications. This volume discusses the state-of-the-art in 3D display and visualization technologies, including binocular, multi-view, holographic, and image reproduction and capture techniques. It also covers 3D optical systems, 3D display instruments, 3D imaging applications, and details several attractive methods for producing 3D moving pictures. This book integrates the background material with new advances and applications in the field, and the available online supplement will include full color videos of 3D display systems. Three-Dimensional Imaging, Visualization, and Display is suitable for electrical engineers, computer scientists, optical e...

  18. Arching in three-dimensional clogging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Török János

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arching in dry granular material is a long established concept, however it remains still an open question how three-dimensional orifices clog. We investigate by means of numerical simulations and experimental data how the outflow creates a blocked configuration of particles. We define the concave surface of the clogged dome by two independent methods (geometric and density based. The average shape of the cupola for spheres is almost a hemisphere but individual samples have large holes in the structure indicating a blocked state composed of two-dimensional force chains rather than three-dimensional objects. The force chain structure justifies this assumption. For long particles the clogged configurations display large variations, and in certain cases the empty region reaches a height of 5 hole diameters. These structures involve vertical walls consisting of horizontally placed stable stacking of particles.

  19. Three dimensional digital imaging of environmental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, R.L.; Eddy, C.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Laboratory has recently acquired the computer hardware (Silicon Graphics Personal Iris Workstations) and software (Dynamic Graphics, Interactive Surface and Volume Modeling) to perform three dimensional analysis of hydrogeologic data. Three dimensional digital imaging of environmental data is a powerful technique that can be used to incorporate field, analytical, and modeling results from geologic, hydrologic, ecologic, and chemical studies into a comprehensive model for visualization and interpretation. This report covers the contamination of four different sites of the Savannah River Plant. Each section of this report has a computer graphic display of the concentration of contamination in the groundwater and/or sediments of each site

  20. Arching in three-dimensional clogging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Török, János; Lévay, Sára; Szabó, Balázs; Somfai, Ellák; Wegner, Sandra; Stannarius, Ralf; Börzsönyi, Tamás

    2017-06-01

    Arching in dry granular material is a long established concept, however it remains still an open question how three-dimensional orifices clog. We investigate by means of numerical simulations and experimental data how the outflow creates a blocked configuration of particles. We define the concave surface of the clogged dome by two independent methods (geometric and density based). The average shape of the cupola for spheres is almost a hemisphere but individual samples have large holes in the structure indicating a blocked state composed of two-dimensional force chains rather than three-dimensional objects. The force chain structure justifies this assumption. For long particles the clogged configurations display large variations, and in certain cases the empty region reaches a height of 5 hole diameters. These structures involve vertical walls consisting of horizontally placed stable stacking of particles.

  1. Three dimensional contact/impact methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    The simulation of three-dimensional interface mechanics between reactor components and structures during static contact or dynamic impact is necessary to realistically evaluate their structural integrity to off-normal loads. In our studies of postulated core energy release events, we have found that significant structure-structure interactions occur in some reactor vessel head closure designs and that fluid-structure interactions occur within the reactor vessel. Other examples in which three-dimensional interface mechanics play an important role are: (1) impact response of shipping casks containing spent fuel, (2) whipping pipe impact on reinforced concrete panels or pipe-to-pipe impact after a pipe break, (3) aircraft crash on secondary containment structures, (4) missiles generated by turbine failures or tornados, and (5) drops of heavy components due to lifting accidents. The above is a partial list of reactor safety problems that require adequate treatment of interface mechanics and are discussed in this paper

  2. THREE DIMENSIONAL GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet V. Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Quality is an important aspect for every firm in modern era of competition. Every product has tough competition in terms of market reach. The factor, which actually makes any product long run in market, is quality and hence quality is the stepping-stone for success of any firm. For everyone meaning of quality is different. We have seen several economists who have defined quality by considering different factors, but what all of them have common in them is Customer satisfaction. Customer satisfaction is the ultimate result of quality. In three-dimensional graphical representation of quality, optimum quality is obtained by using three-dimensional graph by considering some important factors governing quality of any product, limiting factor, and customer satisfaction.

  3. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Teresa; Neelakantan, Prasanna [Dept. of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Saveetha Dental College and Hospitals, Saveetha University, Chennai (India)

    2014-09-15

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome.

  4. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome. PMID:25279337

  5. Geometric actions for three-dimensional gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnich, G.; González, H. A.; Salgado-Rebolledo, P.

    2018-01-01

    The solution space of three-dimensional asymptotically anti-de Sitter or flat Einstein gravity is given by the coadjoint representation of two copies of the Virasoro group in the former and the centrally extended BMS3 group in the latter case. Dynamical actions that control these solution spaces are usually constructed by starting from the Chern–Simons formulation and imposing all boundary conditions. In this note, an alternative route is followed. We study in detail how to derive these actions from a group-theoretical viewpoint by constructing geometric actions for each of the coadjoint orbits, including the appropriate Hamiltonians. We briefly sketch relevant generalizations and potential applications beyond three-dimensional gravity.

  6. SNAP - a three dimensional neutron diffusion code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCallien, C.W.J.

    1993-02-01

    This report describes a one- two- three-dimensional multi-group diffusion code, SNAP, which is primarily intended for neutron diffusion calculations but can also carry out gamma calculations if the diffusion approximation is accurate enough. It is suitable for fast and thermal reactor core calculations and for shield calculations. SNAP can solve the multi-group neutron diffusion equations using finite difference methods. The one-dimensional slab, cylindrical and spherical geometries and the two-dimensional case are all treated as simple special cases of three-dimensional geometries. Numerous reflective and periodic symmetry options are available and may be used to reduce the number of mesh points necessary to represent the system. Extrapolation lengths can be specified at internal and external boundaries. (Author)

  7. Analysis of three-dimensional transonic compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeade, A.

    1984-01-01

    A method for computing the three-dimensional transonic flow around the blades of a compressor or of a propeller is given. The method is based on the use of the velocity potential, on the hypothesis that the flow is inviscid, irrotational and isentropic. The equation of the potential is solved in a transformed space such that the surface of the blade is mapped into a plane where the periodicity is implicit. This equation is in a nonconservative form and is solved with the help of a finite difference method using artificial time. A computer code is provided and some sample results are given in order to demonstrate the influence of three-dimensional effects and the blade's rotation.

  8. Three-dimensional display of document set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantrip, David B [Oxnard, CA; Pennock, Kelly A [Richland, WA; Pottier, Marc C [Richland, WA; Schur, Anne [Richland, WA; Thomas, James J [Richland, WA; Wise, James A [Richland, WA; York, Jeremy [Bothell, WA

    2009-06-30

    A method for spatializing text content for enhanced visual browsing and analysis. The invention is applied to large text document corpora such as digital libraries, regulations and procedures, archived reports, and the like. The text content from these sources may be transformed to a spatial representation that preserves informational characteristics from the documents. The three-dimensional representation may then be visually browsed and analyzed in ways that avoid language processing and that reduce the analysts' effort.

  9. Three-dimensional simulation of vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruvila, G.; Salas, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The integral form of the complete, unsteady, compressible, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in the conservation form, cast in generalized coordinate system, are solved, numerically, to simulate the vortex breakdown phenomenon. The inviscid fluxes are discretized using Roe's upwind-biased flux-difference splitting scheme and the viscous fluxes are discretized using central differencing. Time integration is performed using a backward Euler ADI (alternating direction implicit) scheme. A full approximation multigrid is used to accelerate the convergence to steady state.

  10. Three-Dimensional Dynamic Loading of Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    oading conditions exist at the bulk scale, and exam ples include planetary impact and crater formation, tectonic plate movement , ballistic im pact and...found further way from an impact event, where the bulk material does not necessarily experience uniform loading in excess of the Hugoniot elastic li...either as a collection of quartz spheres in a three-dimensional rectilinear dom ain for t he mesoscale simulations or as a single representative material

  11. Three-Dimensional Ocean Noise Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    realistic and complex three-dimensional bathymetry. This is achieved by using a parabolic equation [PE) propagation model and the reciprocity principle...explain the horizontal noise directionality observed in the Tonga Trench [Barclay, 2014], which was found not to be a 3D effect, but rather due to...modeled noise arriving on the axis of the canyon has significantly perturbed zero-crossings when compared to the equivalent Nx2D result. Theoretical

  12. Three-dimensional accelerating electromagnetic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandres, Miguel A; Alonso, Miguel A; Kaminer, Ido; Segev, Mordechai

    2013-06-17

    We present a general theory of three-dimensional non-paraxial spatially-accelerating waves of the Maxwell equations. These waves constitute a two-dimensional structure exhibiting shape-invariant propagation along semicircular trajectories. We provide classification and characterization of possible shapes of such beams, expressed through the angular spectra of parabolic, oblate and prolate spheroidal fields. Our results facilitate the design of accelerating beams with novel structures, broadening scope and potential applications of accelerating beams.

  13. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Sandpile Interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, G. T.

    2001-03-01

    The granular bed, or sandpile, has become one of the condensed matter physicist's favorite systems. In addition to conceptual appeal, the simplest sandpile of monodisperse hard spheres is a valuable model system for understanding powders, liquids, and metallic glasses. Any fundamental approach to the transport and mechanical properties of three-dimensional mesoscale disordered materials must follow from a thorough understanding of their structure. However, in the overwhelming majority of cases, structure measurements have been limited to the mean filling fraction and the structural autocorrelation function. This is particularly unfortunate in the ongoing sandpile renaissance, where some of the most interesting questions concern structure and the relationship between structure and dynamics. I will discuss the combination of synchrotron x-ray microtomography and computer vision algorithms to perform three-dimensional virtual reconstructions of real sandpiles. This technique is rapid and noninvasive, and is applicable to samples large enough to separate bulk and boundary properties. The resulting complete knowledge of structure can be used to calculate otherwise inaccessible correlation functions. I will present results for several measures of the bond-orientational order in three-dimensional sandpiles, including fabric tensors and nematic order parameters.

  14. Multiparallel Three-Dimensional Optical Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lam K.; Price, Jeffrey H.; Kellner, Albert L.; Bravo-Zanoquera, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Multiparallel three-dimensional optical microscopy is a method of forming an approximate three-dimensional image of a microscope sample as a collection of images from different depths through the sample. The imaging apparatus includes a single microscope plus an assembly of beam splitters and mirrors that divide the output of the microscope into multiple channels. An imaging array of photodetectors in each channel is located at a different distance along the optical path from the microscope, corresponding to a focal plane at a different depth within the sample. The optical path leading to each photodetector array also includes lenses to compensate for the variation of magnification with distance so that the images ultimately formed on all the photodetector arrays are of the same magnification. The use of optical components common to multiple channels in a simple geometry makes it possible to obtain high light-transmission efficiency with an optically and mechanically simple assembly. In addition, because images can be read out simultaneously from all the photodetector arrays, the apparatus can support three-dimensional imaging at a high scanning rate.

  15. Three-Dimensional Audio Client Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    The Three-Dimensional Audio Client Library (3DAudio library) is a group of software routines written to facilitate development of both stand-alone (audio only) and immersive virtual-reality application programs that utilize three-dimensional audio displays. The library is intended to enable the development of three-dimensional audio client application programs by use of a code base common to multiple audio server computers. The 3DAudio library calls vendor-specific audio client libraries and currently supports the AuSIM Gold-Server and Lake Huron audio servers. 3DAudio library routines contain common functions for (1) initiation and termination of a client/audio server session, (2) configuration-file input, (3) positioning functions, (4) coordinate transformations, (5) audio transport functions, (6) rendering functions, (7) debugging functions, and (8) event-list-sequencing functions. The 3DAudio software is written in the C++ programming language and currently operates under the Linux, IRIX, and Windows operating systems.

  16. Three dimensional illustrating - three-dimensional vision and deception of sensibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Gánóczy

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The wide-spread digital photography and computer use gave the opportunity for everyone to make three-dimensional pictures and to make them public. The new opportunities with three-dimensional techniques give chance for the birth of new artistic photographs. We present in detail the biological roots of three-dimensional visualization, the phenomena of movement parallax, which can be used efficiently in making three-dimensional graphics, the Zöllner- and Corridor-illusion. There are present in this paper the visual elements, which contribute to define a plane two-dimensional image in three-dimension: coherent lines, the covering, the measurement changes, the relative altitude state, the abatement of detail profusion, the shadings and the perspective effects of colors.

  17. Three-dimensional analysis of craniofacial bones using three-dimensional computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Ichiro; Ohura, Takehiko; Kimura, Chu

    1989-01-01

    Three-dimensional computer tomography (3DCT) was performed in patients with various diseases to visualize stereoscopically the deformity of the craniofacial bones. The data obtained were analyzed by the 3DCT analyzing system. A new coordinate system was established using the median sagittal plane of the face (a plane passing through sella, nasion and basion) on the three-dimensional image. Three-dimensional profilograms were prepared for detailed analysis of the deformation of craniofacial bones for cleft lip and palate, mandibular prognathia and hemifacial microsomia. For patients, asymmetry in the frontal view and twist-formed complicated deformities were observed, as well as deformity of profiles in the anteroposterior and up-and-down directions. A newly developed technique allows three-dimensional visualization of changes in craniofacial deformity. It would aid in determining surgical strategy, including crani-facial surgery and maxillo-facial surgery, and in evaluating surgical outcome. (N.K.)

  18. Three-dimensional analysis of craniofacial bones using three-dimensional computer tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Ichiro; Ohura, Takehiko; Kimura, Chu (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1989-08-01

    Three-dimensional computer tomography (3DCT) was performed in patients with various diseases to visualize stereoscopically the deformity of the craniofacial bones. The data obtained were analyzed by the 3DCT analyzing system. A new coordinate system was established using the median sagittal plane of the face (a plane passing through sella, nasion and basion) on the three-dimensional image. Three-dimensional profilograms were prepared for detailed analysis of the deformation of craniofacial bones for cleft lip and palate, mandibular prognathia and hemifacial microsomia. For patients, asymmetry in the frontal view and twist-formed complicated deformities were observed, as well as deformity of profiles in the anteroposterior and up-and-down directions. A newly developed technique allows three-dimensional visualization of changes in craniofacial deformity. It would aid in determining surgical strategy, including crani-facial surgery and maxillo-facial surgery, and in evaluating surgical outcome. (N.K.).

  19. The sensing and display of three-dimensional information with emphasis on solid modelling: Status and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, L. A.

    1985-09-01

    The sensing of three dimensional information is addressed, the display/representation of three dimensional information is considered. With respect to the sensing of three dimensional information, a variety of approaches are discussed including the use of structured light, the use of displaced sensors to develop stereo pairs, and coherence processing and time of flight measurement. Other techniques described are interpretation of object motion as a measurement of depth perception, and general methods for utilizing depth of field. The advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed and comparisons made. Three dimensional display techniques is also discussed. The appraoches covered include graphics, stereo pairs, holograms, vibrating mirrors, and other optical systems. Applications are reviewed with examples of results such as the use of vibrating mirror technology for the three dimensional display of compterized tomography. Solid modelling as an approach to the display and representation of three dimensional information is reviewed. Following a definition of solid modelling, the advantages of this generic approach are reviewed and analyzed. The relationship of solid modelling to robotics and artificial intelligence is made, and trends cited with respect to hardware costs, portability of software, computational efficiency, display resolution, and neutral data bases. The paper concludes by giving examples of some of the key applications of solid modelling in the automative industry, aircraft industry and CAM, among others.

  20. Diting: A polarized time-of-flight neutron reflectometer at CMRR reactor in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinxi; Huang, Chaoqiang; Wang, Yan; Chen, Bo; Sun, Guang'ai; Liu, Yaoguang; Gong, Jian; Kang, Wu; Liu, Hangang

    2016-11-01

    A new time-of-flight neutron reflectometer with a polarization option is developed and tested at the Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, China. Its scattering geometry is horizontal. The constructed neutron reflectometer is a multipurpose instrument that can be used for the characterization of a stratified microstructure and hidden interfaces of solid thin films. Diting is designed for both magnetic and nonmagnetic multi-layer thin films. Spin polarization and analysis are achieved by transmission magnetized supermirrors. The sample unit is equipped with an electromagnet, which can provide a vertical magnetic field range of 0-1.2 tesla. The available neutron beam is a white beam with wavelength range of 0.15-1.25 nm, which can be cut into different wavelength resolution neutron pulses by a four-disk chopper. A two-dimensional position-sensitive detector is employed to count the specular and off-specular reflected neutron beam. A minimum reflectivity of 10-6 is measured on this instrument.

  1. Three-dimensional display techniques: description and critique of methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.

    1982-01-01

    The recent advances in non invasive medical imaging of 3 dimensional spatial distribution of radionuclides, X-ray attenuation coefficients, and nuclear magnetic resonance parameters necessitate development of a general method for displaying these data. The objective of this paper is to give a systematic description and comparison of known methods for displaying three dimensional data. The discussion of display methods is divided into two major categories: 1) computer-graphics methods which use a two dimensional display screen; and 2) optical methods (such as holography, stereopsis and vari-focal systems)

  2. Three-dimensional fractional topological insulators in coupled Rashba layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpez, Yanick; Loss, Daniel; Klinovaja, Jelena

    2017-08-01

    We propose a model of three-dimensional topological insulators consisting of weakly coupled electron- and hole-gas layers with Rashba spin-orbit interaction stacked along a given axis. We show that in the presence of strong electron-electron interactions the system realizes a fractional strong topological insulator, where the rotational symmetry and condensation energy arguments still allow us to treat the problem as quasi-one-dimensional with bosonization techniques. We also show that if Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction terms are equally strong, by doping the system with magnetic impurities, one can bring it into the Weyl semimetal phase.

  3. Coherent states on horospheric three-dimensional Lobachevsky space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurochkin, Yu., E-mail: y.kurochkin@ifanbel.bas-net.by; Shoukavy, Dz., E-mail: shoukavy@ifanbel.bas-net.by [Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 68 Nezalezhnasci Ave., Minsk 220072 (Belarus); Rybak, I., E-mail: Ivan.Rybak@astro.up.pt [Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 68 Nezalezhnasci Ave., Minsk 220072 (Belarus); Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço, CAUP, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2016-08-15

    In the paper it is shown that due to separation of variables in the Laplace-Beltrami operator (Hamiltonian of a free quantum particle) in horospheric and quasi-Cartesian coordinates of three dimensional Lobachevsky space, it is possible to introduce standard (“conventional” according to Perelomov [Generalized Coherent States and Their Applications (Springer-Verlag, 1986), p. 320]) coherent states. Some problems (oscillator on horosphere, charged particle in analogy of constant uniform magnetic field) where coherent states are suitable for treating were considered.

  4. Velocity-space sensitivity of the time-of-flight neutron spectrometer at JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Salewski, Mirko; Eriksson, J.

    2014-01-01

    spectrometry (NES) are independent of the particular NES diagnostic. Here we apply these NES weight functions to the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFOR at JET. By taking the instrumental response function of TOFOR into account, we calculate time-of-flight NES weight functions that enable us to directly...

  5. Time-of-Flight Adjustment Procedure for Acoustic Measurements in Structural Timber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danbiel F. Llana; Guillermo Iñiguez-Gonzalez; Francisco Arriaga; Xiping Wang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of timber length on time-of-flight acoustic longitudinal measurements was investigated on the structural timber of four Spanish species: radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), laricio pine (Pinus nigra Arn.), and maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.). Time-of-flight longitudinal measurements were conducted on 120 specimens of...

  6. Three-dimensional analysis of magnetometer array data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, A. D.; Baumjohann, W.

    1984-01-01

    A technique is developed for mapping magnetic variation fields in three dimensions using data from an array of magnetometers, based on the theory of optimal linear estimation. The technique is applied to data from the Scandinavian Magnetometer Array. Estimates of the spatial power spectra for the internal and external magnetic variations are derived, which in turn provide estimates of the spatial autocorrelation functions of the three magnetic variation components. Statistical errors involved in mapping the external and internal fields are quantified and displayed over the mapping region. Examples of field mapping and of separation into external and internal components are presented. A comparison between the three-dimensional field separation and a two-dimensional separation from a single chain of stations shows that significant differences can arise in the inferred internal component.

  7. Three-dimensional positioning with optofluidic microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vig, Asger Laurberg; Marie, Rodolphe; Jensen, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on-chip based optical detection with three-dimensional spatial resolution by integration of an optofluidic microscope (OFM) in a microfluidic pinched flow fractionation (PFF) separation device. This setup also enables on-chip particle image velocimetry (PIV). The position...... a conventional fluorescence microscope as readout. The size separated microspheres are detected by OFM with an accuracy of ≤ 0.92 μm. The position in the height of the channel and the velocity of the separated microspheres are detected with an accuracy of 1.4 μm and 0.08 mm/s respectively. Throughout...

  8. Three-dimensional teletherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panthaleon van Eck, R.B. van.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis deals with physical/mathematical backgrounds of computerized teletherapy treatment planning. The subjects discussed in this thesis can be subdivided into three main categories: a) Three-dimensional treatment planning. A method is evaluated which can be used for the purpose of simulation and optimization of dose distributions in three dimensions. b) The use of Computed Tomography. The use of patient information obtained from Computed Tomography for the purpose of dose computations is evaluated. c) Dose computational models for photon- and electron beams. Models are evaluated which provide information regarding the way in which the radiation dose is distributed in the patient (viz. is absorbed and/or dispersed). (Auth.)

  9. Creating three-dimensional thermal maps

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Price

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Price_2011.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 30895 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Price_2011.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Creating Three...-Dimensional Thermal Maps Mathew Price Cogency cc Cape Town Email: mathew@cogency.co.za Jeremy Green CSIR Centre for Mining Innovation Johannesburg Email: jgreen@csir.co.za John Dickens CSIR Centre for Mining Innovation Johannesburg Email: jdickens...

  10. Three-dimensional radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, R.

    1989-01-01

    A major aim of radiation therapy is to deliver sufficient dose to the tumour volume to kill the cancer cells while sparing the nearby health organs to prevent complications. With the introduction of devices such as CT and MR scanners, radiation therapy treatment planners have access to full three-dimensional anatomical information to define, simulate, and evaluate treatments. There are a limited number of prototype software systems that allow 3D treatment planning currently in use. In addition, there are more advanced tools under development or still in the planning stages. They require sophisticated graphics and computation equipment, complex physical and mathematical algorithms, and new radiation treatment machines that deliver dose very precisely under computer control. Components of these systems include programs for the identification and delineation of the anatomy and tumour, the definition of radiation beams, the calculation of dose distribution patterns, the display of dose on 2D images and as three dimensional surfaces, and the generation of computer images to verify proper patient positioning in treatment. Some of these functions can be performed more quickly and accurately if artificial intelligence or expert systems techniques are employed. 28 refs., figs

  11. The Three-Dimensional Universe with Gaia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turon, C.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Perryman, M. A. C.

    2005-01-01

    "The Three-Dimensional Universe with Gaia" symposium was hosted by the Observatoire de Paris (Meudon), France, from 4 to 7 October 2004. The date chosen for this symposium corresponded to the end of the definition phase of Gaia, a cornerstone mission of the European Space Agency. The purposes of this symposium were: (1) to present to the scientific community the design chosen for the mission, the final characteristics and performances, and to update the resulting scientific case; (2) to bring to the attention of the scientific community the extraordinary potential of Gaia and to share with the younger generation of scientists the expertise acquired during the preparation phases of the Gaia mission, and during all phases of the Hipparcos mission; (3) to organise the next phase of scientific preparation of the mission, in particular the data reduction which constitutes a major challenge with a petabyte of interconnected data which has to be treated in a global and iterative manner, and to prepare for the scientific exploitation of the data. The symposium was open to scientists working on the preparation of Gaia and to the large community interested in using the data from the mission. The proceedings of the symposium are published by the European Space Agency as ESA SP-576: "The Three-Dimensional Universe with Gaia". These proceedings contain invited and contributed papers for six sessions covering technical and scientific aspects of the mission.

  12. Three-dimensional electrical impedance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metherall, P.; Barber, D. C.; Smallwood, R. H.; Brown, B. H.

    1996-04-01

    THE electrical resistivity of mammalian tissues varies widely1-5 and is correlated with physiological function6-8. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) can be used to probe such variations in vivo, and offers a non-invasive means of imaging the internal conductivity distribution of the human body9-11. But the computational complexity of EIT has severe practical limitations, and previous work has been restricted to considering image reconstruction as an essentially two-dimensional problem10,12. This simplification can limit significantly the imaging capabilities of EIT, as the electric currents used to determine the conductivity variations will not in general be confined to a two-dimensional plane13. A few studies have attempted three-dimensional EIT image reconstruction14,15, but have not yet succeeded in generating images of a quality suitable for clinical applications. Here we report the development of a three-dimensional EIT system with greatly improved imaging capabilities, which combines our 64-electrode data-collection apparatus16 with customized matrix inversion techniques. Our results demonstrate the practical potential of EIT for clinical applications, such as lung or brain imaging and diagnostic screening8.

  13. Three-dimensional turbopump flowfield analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, O. P.; Belford, K. A.; Ni, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop a flow prediction method applicable to rocket turbopumps. The complex nature of a flowfield in turbopumps is described and examples of flowfields are discussed to illustrate that physics based models and analytical calculation procedures based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are needed to develop reliable design procedures for turbopumps. A CFD code developed at NASA ARC was used as the base code. The turbulence model and boundary conditions in the base code were modified, respectively, to: (1) compute transitional flows and account for extra rates of strain, e.g., rotation; and (2) compute surface heat transfer coefficients and allow computation through multistage turbomachines. Benchmark quality data from two and three-dimensional cascades were used to verify the code. The predictive capabilities of the present CFD code were demonstrated by computing the flow through a radial impeller and a multistage axial flow turbine. Results of the program indicate that the present code operated in a two-dimensional mode is a cost effective alternative to full three-dimensional calculations, and that it permits realistic predictions of unsteady loadings and losses for multistage machines.

  14. Three-dimensional MRI with independent slab excitation and encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissa, Amir; Wilman, Alan H

    2012-02-01

    Three-dimensional MRI is typically performed with the same orientation for radiofrequency slab excitation and slab select phase encoding. We introduce independent slab excitation and encoding to create a new degree of freedom in three-dimensional MRI, which is the angular relationship between the prescribed excitation volume and the voxel encoding grid. By separating the directions of slab excitation and slab phase encoding, the independent slab excitation and encoding method allows choice of optimal voxel orientation, while maintaining volume excitation based on anatomic landmarks. The method requires simple pulse sequence modifications and uses standard image reconstruction followed by removal of aliasing and image reformatting. The independent slab excitation and encoding method enables arbitrary oblique angle imaging using fixed voxel encoding gradients to maintain similar eddy current, concomitant field, or magnetic dipole effects independent of the oblique angle of excitation. We apply independent slab excitation and encoding to phase and susceptibility-weighted imaging using fixed voxel encoding aligned with the main magnetic field to demonstrate its value in both standardizing and improving image contrast, when using arbitrary oblique imaging volumes. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Turbulence in Three Dimensional Simulations of Magnetopause Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, J. F.; Price, L.; Swisdak, M.; Burch, J. L.; Cassak, P.; Dahlin, J. T.; Ergun, R.

    2017-12-01

    We present two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the 16 October 2015 MMS magnetopause reconnection event. While the two-dimensional simulation is laminar, turbulence develops at both the x-line and along the magnetic separatrices in the three-dimensional simulation. This turbulence is electromagnetic in nature, is characterized by a wavevector k given by kρ e ˜(m_e/m_i)0.25 with ρ e the electron Larmor radius, and appears to have the ion pressure gradient as its source of free energy. Taken together, these results suggest the instability is a variant of the lower-hybrid drift instability. The turbulence produces electric field fluctuations in the out-of-plane direction (the direction of the reconnection electric field) with an amplitude of around ± 10 mV/m, which is much greater than the reconnection electric field of around 0.1 mV/m. Such large values of the out-of-plane electric field have been identified in the MMS data. The turbulence in the simulation controls the scale lengths of the density profile and current layers in asymmetric reconnection, driving them closer to √ {ρ eρ_i } than the ρ e or de scalings seen in 2D reconnection simulations, where de is the electron inertial length. The turbulence is strong enough to make the magnetic field around the reconnection island chaotic and produces both anomalous resistivity and anomalous viscosity. Each contribute significantly to breaking the frozen-in condition in the electron diffusion region. The crescent-shaped features in velocity space seen both in MMS observations and in two-dimensional simulations survive, even in the turbulent environment of the three-dimensional system. We compare and contrast these results to a three-dimensional simulation of the 8 December 2015 MMS magnetopause reconnection event in which the reconnecting and out-of-plane guide fields are comparable. LHDI is still present in this event, although its appearance is modified by the presence of the guide

  16. Energy calibration of a 5. 5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator using a time-of-flight technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, E.; Feregrino, M.; Zavala, E.P.; Pineda, J.C.; Jimenez, R.; Jaidar, A. (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City. Inst. de Fisica (Mexico))

    1990-02-01

    Energy calibration of the analysing magnet for the University of Mexico 5.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator has been carried out using a time-of-flight method. The pulsed and bunched beam produced by the accelerator was used to deduce the energy E of the beam particles from the transit time between a coaxial pickup and a charged particle detector separated by 1.5 m. The measured FWHM energy resolution of this system was about 20 keV. (orig.).

  17. Energy calibration of a 5.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator using a time-of-flight technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, E.; Feregrino, M.; Zavala, E. P.; Pineda, J. C.; Jiménez, R.; Jaidar, A.

    1990-02-01

    Energy calibration of the analysing magnet for the University of México 5.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator has been carried out using a time-of-flight method. The pulsed and bunched beam produced by the accelerator was used to deduce the energy E of the beam particles from the transit time between a coaxial pickup and a charged particle detector separated by 1.5 m. The measured FWHM energy resolution of this system was about 20 keV.

  18. A new Time-of-Flight mass measurement project for exotic nuclei and ultra-high precision detector development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Bao-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The time-of-flight (TOF mass spectrometry (MS, a high-resolution magnetic spectrometer equipped with a fast particle tracking system, is well recognized by its ability in weighing the most exotic nuclei. Currently such TOF-MS can achieve a mass resolution power of about 2×10−4. We show that the mass resolution can be further improved by one order of magnitude with augmented timing and position detectors. We report the progress in developing ultra-fast detectors to be used in TOF-MS.

  19. SENJU: a new time-of-flight single-crystal neutron diffractometer at J-PARC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohhara, Takashi; Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Oikawa, Kenichi; Kaneko, Koji; Kawasaki, Takuro; Tamura, Itaru; Nakao, Akiko; Hanashima, Takayasu; Munakata, Koji; Moyoshi, Taketo; Kuroda, Tetsuya; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Sakakura, Terutoshi; Lee, Chang-Hee; Takahashi, Miwako; Ohshima, Ken-Ichi; Kiyotani, Tamiko; Noda, Yukio; Arai, Masatoshi

    2016-02-01

    SENJU is a new single-crystal time-of-flight neutron diffractometer installed at BL18 at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of the Japan Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). The diffractometer was designed for precise crystal and magnetic structure analyses under multiple extreme sample environments such as low temperature, high pressure and high magnetic field, and for diffraction measurements of small single crystals down to 0.1 mm 3 in volume. SENJU comprises three choppers, an elliptical shape straight supermirror guide, a vacuum sample chamber and 37 scintillator area detectors. The moderator-to-sample distance is 34.8 m, and the sample-to-detector distance is 800 mm. The wavelength of incident neutrons is 0.4-4.4 Å (first frame). Because short-wavelength neutrons are available and the large solid angle around the sample position is covered by the area detectors, a large reciprocal space can be simultaneously measured. Furthermore, the vacuum sample chamber and collimator have been designed to produce a very low background level. Thus, the measurement of a small single crystal is possible. As sample environment devices, a newly developed cryostat with a two-axis (ω and φ axes) goniometer and some extreme environment devices, e.g. a vertical-field magnet, high-temperature furnace and high-pressure cell, are available. The structure analysis of a sub-millimetre size (0.1 mm 3 ) single organic crystal, taurine, and a magnetic structure analysis of the antiferromagnetic phase of MnF 2 have been performed. These results demonstrate that SENJU can be a powerful tool to promote materials science research.

  20. Fourier rebinning and consistency equations for time-of-flight PET planograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yusheng; Defrise, Michel; Matej, Samuel; Metzler, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    Due to the unique geometry, dual-panel PET scanners have many advantages in dedicated breast imaging and on-board imaging applications since the compact scanners can be combined with other imaging and treatment modalities. The major challenges of dual-panel PET imaging are the limited-angle problem and data truncation, which can cause artifacts due to incomplete data sampling. The time-of-flight (TOF) information can be a promising solution to reduce these artifacts. The TOF planogram is the native data format for dual-panel TOF PET scanners, and the non-TOF planogram is the 3D extension of linogram. The TOF planograms is five-dimensional while the objects are three-dimensional, and there are two degrees of redundancy. In this paper, we derive consistency equations and Fourier-based rebinning algorithms to provide a complete understanding of the rich structure of the fully 3D TOF planograms. We first derive two consistency equations and John's equation for 3D TOF planograms. By taking the Fourier transforms, we obtain two Fourier consistency equations and the Fourier-John equation, which are the duals of the consistency equations and John's equation, respectively. We then solve the Fourier consistency equations and Fourier-John equation using the method of characteristics. The two degrees of entangled redundancy of the 3D TOF data can be explicitly elicited and exploited by the solutions along the characteristic curves. As the special cases of the general solutions, we obtain Fourier rebinning and consistency equations (FORCEs), and thus we obtain a complete scheme to convert among different types of PET planograms: 3D TOF, 3D non-TOF, 2D TOF and 2D non-TOF planograms. The FORCEs can be used as Fourier-based rebinning algorithms for TOF-PET data reduction, inverse rebinnings for designing fast projectors, or consistency conditions for estimating missing data. As a byproduct, we show the two consistency equations are necessary and sufficient for 3D TOF planograms

  1. Fast time-of-flight camera based surface registration for radiotherapy patient positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placht, Simon; Stancanello, Joseph; Schaller, Christian; Balda, Michael; Angelopoulou, Elli

    2012-01-01

    This work introduces a rigid registration framework for patient positioning in radiotherapy, based on real-time surface acquisition by a time-of-flight (ToF) camera. Dynamic properties of the system are also investigated for future gating/tracking strategies. A novel preregistration algorithm, based on translation and rotation-invariant features representing surface structures, was developed. Using these features, corresponding three-dimensional points were computed in order to determine initial registration parameters. These parameters became a robust input to an accelerated version of the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm for the fine-tuning of the registration result. Distance calibration and Kalman filtering were used to compensate for ToF-camera dependent noise. Additionally, the advantage of using the feature based preregistration over an "ICP only" strategy was evaluated, as well as the robustness of the rigid-transformation-based method to deformation. The proposed surface registration method was validated using phantom data. A mean target registration error (TRE) for translations and rotations of 1.62 ± 1.08 mm and 0.07° ± 0.05°, respectively, was achieved. There was a temporal delay of about 65 ms in the registration output, which can be seen as negligible considering the dynamics of biological systems. Feature based preregistration allowed for accurate and robust registrations even at very large initial displacements. Deformations affected the accuracy of the results, necessitating particular care in cases of deformed surfaces. The proposed solution is able to solve surface registration problems with an accuracy suitable for radiotherapy cases where external surfaces offer primary or complementary information to patient positioning. The system shows promising dynamic properties for its use in gating/tracking applications. The overall system is competitive with commonly-used surface registration technologies. Its main benefit is the

  2. Three-dimensional morphology of the human embryonic brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Shiraishi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The morphogenesis of the cerebral vesicles and ventricles was visualized in 3D movies using images derived from human embryo specimens between Carnegie stage 13 and 23 from the Kyoto Collection. These images were acquired with a magnetic resonance microscope equipped with a 2.35-T superconducting magnet. Three-dimensional images using the same scale demonstrated brain development and growth effectively. The non-uniform thickness of the brain tissue, which may indicate brain differentiation, was visualized with thickness-based surface color mapping. A closer view was obtained of the unique and complicated differentiation of the rhombencephalon, especially with regard to the internal view and thickening of the brain tissue. The present data contribute to a better understanding of brain and cerebral ventricle development.

  3. Three-dimensional force-free looplike magnetohydrodynamic equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, John M.; Guzdar, Parvez N.; Usikov, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    Computations of three-dimensional force-free magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria, del x B = lambdaB with lambda = lambda(sub 0), a constant are presented. These equilibria are determined by boundary conditions on a surface corresponding to the solar photosphere. The specific boundary conditions used correspond to looplike magnetic fields in the corona. It is found that as lambda(sub 0) is increased, the loops of flux become kinked, and for sufficiently large lambda(sub 0), develop knots. The relationship between the kinking and knotting properties of these equilibria and the presence of a kink instability and related loss of equilibrium is explored. Clearly, magnetic reconnection must be involved for an unknotted loop equilibrium to become knotted, and speculations are made about the creation of a closed hyperbolic field line (X-line) about which this reconnection creating knotted field lines is centered.

  4. Time-of-flight experiments using a pseudo-statistical chopper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Otohiko; Kanda, Keiji

    1975-01-01

    A ''pseudo-statistical'' chopper was manufactured and used for the experiments on neutron transmission and scattering. The characteristics of the chopper and the experimental results are discussed in comparison with those in the time-of-flight technique using a conventional chopper. Which of the two methods is superior depends on the form of the time-of-flight distribution to be measured. Pseudo-statistical pulsing may be especially advantageous for scattering experiments with single or a few-line time-of-flight spectrum. (auth.)

  5. ATLAS - analysis of time-of-flight diffraction data from liquid and amorphous samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soper, A.K.; Howells, W.S.; Hannon, A.C.

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of this manual is to describe a package of data analysis routines which have been developed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory for the analysis of time-of-flight diffraction data from liquids, gases, and amorphous materials. There is no fundamental barrier to diffraction data being accurately analysed to structure factor or even pair correlation function within a very short time of the completion of the experiment. Section 1 describes the time-of-flight neutron diffraction experiment and looks at diffraction theory. Section 2 indicates the steps in data analysis of time-of-flight diffraction data and Section 3 gives details of how to run the procedures. (author)

  6. Exact solutions in three-dimensional gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Diaz, Alberto A

    2017-01-01

    A self-contained text, systematically presenting the determination and classification of exact solutions in three-dimensional Einstein gravity. This book explores the theoretical framework and general physical and geometrical characteristics of each class of solutions, and includes information on the researchers responsible for their discovery. Beginning with the physical character of the solutions, these are identified and ordered on the basis of their geometrical invariant properties, symmetries, and algebraic classifications, or from the standpoint of their physical nature, for example electrodynamic fields, fluid, scalar field, or dilaton. Consequently, this text serves as a thorough catalogue on 2+1 exact solutions to the Einstein equations coupled to matter and fields, and on vacuum solutions of topologically massive gravity with a cosmological constant. The solutions are also examined from different perspectives, enabling a conceptual bridge between exact solutions of three- and four-dimensional gravit...

  7. AAOGlimpse: Three-dimensional Data Viewer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortridge, Keith

    2011-10-01

    AAOGlimpse is an experimental display program that uses OpenGL to display FITS data (and even JPEG images) as 3D surfaces that can be rotated and viewed from different angles, all in real-time. It is WCS-compliant and designed to handle three-dimensional data. Each plane in a data cube is surfaced in the same way, and the program allows the user to travel through a cube by 'peeling off' successive planes, or to look into a cube by suppressing the display of data below a given cutoff value. It can blink images and can superimpose images and contour maps from different sources using their world coordinate data. A limited socket interface allows communication with other programs.

  8. THE THREE DIMENSIONAL THERMAL HYDRAULIC CODE BAGIRA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KALINICHENKO,S.D.; KOHUT,P.; KROSHILIN,A.E.; KROSHILIN,V.E.; SMIRNOV,A.V.

    2003-05-04

    BAGIRA - a thermal-hydraulic program complex was primarily developed for using it in nuclear power plant simulator models, but is also used as a best-estimate analytical tool for modeling two-phase mixture flows. The code models allow consideration of phase transients and the treatment of the hydrodynamic behavior of boiling and pressurized water reactor circuits. It provides the capability to explicitly model three-dimensional flow regimes in various regions of the primary and secondary circuits such as, the mixing regions, circular downcomer, pressurizer, reactor core, main primary loops, the steam generators, the separator-reheaters. In addition, it is coupled to a severe-accident module allowing the analysis of core degradation and fuel damage behavior. Section II will present the theoretical basis for development and selected results are presented in Section III. The primary use for the code complex is to realistically model reactor core behavior in power plant simulators providing enhanced training tools for plant operators.

  9. Entanglement entropy in three dimensional gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxfield, Henry [Centre for Particle Theory & Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University,South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-07

    The Ryu-Takayanagi (RT) and covariant Hubeny-Rangamani-Takayanagi (HRT) proposals relate entanglement entropy in CFTs with holographic duals to the areas of minimal or extremal surfaces in the bulk geometry. We show how, in three dimensional pure gravity, the relevant regulated geodesic lengths can be obtained by writing a spacetime as a quotient of AdS{sub 3}, with the problem reduced to a simple purely algebraic calculation. We explain how this works in both Lorentzian and Euclidean formalisms, before illustrating its use to obtain novel results in a number of examples, including rotating BTZ, the ℝℙ{sup 2} geon, and several wormhole geometries. This includes spatial and temporal dependence of single-interval entanglement entropy, despite these symmetries being broken only behind an event horizon. We also discuss considerations allowing HRT to be derived from analytic continuation of Euclidean computations in certain contexts, and a related class of complexified extremal surfaces.

  10. Three-dimensional printing physiology laboratory technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulkin, Matthew S; Widder, Emily; Shao, Connie; Holzem, Katherine M; Gloschat, Christopher; Gutbrod, Sarah R; Efimov, Igor R

    2013-12-01

    Since its inception in 19th-century Germany, the physiology laboratory has been a complex and expensive research enterprise involving experts in various fields of science and engineering. Physiology research has been critically dependent on cutting-edge technological support of mechanical, electrical, optical, and more recently computer engineers. Evolution of modern experimental equipment is constrained by lack of direct communication between the physiological community and industry producing this equipment. Fortunately, recent advances in open source technologies, including three-dimensional printing, open source hardware and software, present an exciting opportunity to bring the design and development of research instrumentation to the end user, i.e., life scientists. Here we provide an overview on how to develop customized, cost-effective experimental equipment for physiology laboratories.

  11. Electron in three-dimensional momentum space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchetta, Alessandro; Mantovani, Luca; Pasquini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    We study the electron as a system composed of an electron and a photon, using lowest-order perturbation theory. We derive the leading-twist transverse-momentum-dependent distribution functions for both the electron and photon in the dressed electron, thereby offering a three-dimensional description of the dressed electron in momentum space. To obtain the distribution functions, we apply both the formalism of the light-front wave function overlap representation and the diagrammatic approach. We perform the calculations both in light-cone gauge and Feynman gauge, and we present a detailed discussion of the role of the Wilson lines to obtain gauge-independent results. We provide numerical results and plots for many of the computed distributions.

  12. Towards microscale electrohydrodynamic three-dimensional printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Jiankang; Xu, Fangyuan; Cao, Yi; Liu, Yaxiong; Li, Dichen

    2016-01-01

    It is challenging for the existing three-dimensional (3D) printing techniques to fabricate high-resolution 3D microstructures with low costs and high efficiency. In this work we present a solvent-based electrohydrodynamic 3D printing technique that allows fabrication of microscale structures like single walls, crossed walls, lattice and concentric circles. Process parameters were optimized to deposit tiny 3D patterns with a wall width smaller than 10 μm and a high aspect ratio of about 60. Tight bonding among neighbour layers could be achieved with a smooth lateral surface. In comparison with the existing microscale 3D printing techniques, the presented method is low-cost, highly efficient and applicable to multiple polymers. It is envisioned that this simple microscale 3D printing strategy might provide an alternative and innovative way for application in MEMS, biosensor and flexible electronics. (paper)

  13. An Introduction of Three-dimensional Grammar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Xiao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces some key points of Three-dimensional Grammar. As for the structure, it can be distinguished into syntactic structure, semantic structure and pragmatic structure from the perspectives of syntax, semantics and pragmatics. And the same is true with the followings, such as grammatical constituents, grammatical functions, grammatical meanings, grammatical focuses. Sentence types which is called sentence pattern, sentence model and sentence types respectively, and analysis methods. This paper proposes that grammatical researches should be done in accordance with the four principles, that is form and meaning co-verified, static and dynamic co-referenced, structure and function co-testified and description and interpretation co-promoted.

  14. Three-dimensional echocardiography in valve disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Fiorentini

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This review covers the role of three-dimensional (3D echocardiography in the diagnosis of heart valve disease. Several factors have contributed to the evolution of this technique, which is currently a simple and routine method: rapid evolution in probe and computer technologies, demonstration that 3D data sets allowed more complete and accurate evaluation of cardiac structures, emerging clinical experience indicating the strong potential particularly in valve diseases, volume and function of the two ventricle measurements and several other fields. This report will review current and future applications of 3D echocardiography in mitral, aortic and tricuspid valve diseases underlying both qualitative (morphologic and quantitative advantages of this technique. (Heart International 2007; 3: 35-41

  15. Three dimensional thrust chamber life prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, W. H.; Brogren, E. W.

    1976-01-01

    A study was performed to analytically determine the cyclic thermomechanical behavior and fatigue life of three configurations of a Plug Nozzle Thrust Chamber. This thrust chamber is a test model which represents the current trend in nozzle design calling for high performance coupled with weight and volume limitations as well as extended life for reusability. The study involved the use of different materials and material combinations to evaluate their application to the problem of low-cycle fatigue in the thrust chamber. The thermal and structural analyses were carried out on a three-dimensional basis. Results are presented which show plots of continuous temperature histories and temperature distributions at selected times during the operating cycle of the thrust chamber. Computed structural data show critical regions for low-cycle fatigue and the histories of strain within the regions for each operation cycle.

  16. Three-dimensional detectors for neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendicino, R.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.

    2018-01-01

    Solid-state sensors fabricated with 3D technologies and coupled to different neutron converter materials have been developed by several groups as direct replacement of 3 He gas detectors, mainly for homeland security applications. Results so far achieved in terms of detection efficiency are quite good (up to ≃50%) and, combined with the intrinsic excellent position resolution of silicon sensors, could lead to high performance neutron imaging systems. In this paper, we review the state of the art in three-dimensional silicon sensors for thermal-neutron detection, addressing the most promising solutions for neutron imaging. Moreover, selected results from the developments at the University of Trento on 3D pixelated detectors having relatively low fabrication complexity and expected high neutron detection efficiency up to 30% will be reported.

  17. Structural studies at high pressure using time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgensen, J.D.

    1989-07-01

    Time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction offers unique capabilities for structural studies at high pressure. Scientific applications have included studies of compression mechanisms, new high-pressure structures, and phase transitions. 11 refs., 1 fig

  18. Miniature Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer for Space and Extraterrestrial Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The PI has developed a miniature time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), which can be op-timized for space and extraterrestrial applications, by using a...

  19. A new high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer with gridless reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhowmick, A.; Korgaonkar, A.V.; Carvalho, W.C.J.; Yakhmi, J.V.; Sahni, V.C.

    2004-01-01

    High resolution in time-of-flight mass spectrometers essentially depends upon the capacity of the machine to control the initial spatial and energy distributions of the ions from the source or of any particular ionization process. In the present scenario, high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometers are becoming more and more essential for rapid mass analysis of fairly large molecules or species e.g. large biomolecules, proteins, drugs, atomic clusters, etc. Simple mass measurements of atomic clusters have revealed major fundamental information about their electronic and geometric structures. Newer designs of time-of-flight mass spectrometers have high resolution, adaptability to multiple ionization techniques, high sensitivity, capability of addressing comparatively slower physical events etc. are, therefore, being reported regularly. A newly developed time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described

  20. Physical design of time-of-flight mass spectrometer in energetic cluster impact deposition apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Guoqing; Shi Ying; Chen Jingsheng; Zhu Dezhang; Pan Haochang; Xu Hongjie

    1999-01-01

    The principle and physical design of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer equipped in the energetic cluster impact deposition apparatus are introduced. Some problems existed in experiments and their solutions are also discussed

  1. Time-of-flight techniques applied to neutron spectra measurements in fast subcritical assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotival, Michel

    1975-04-01

    Time-of-flight measurements on Uranium-Graphite assemblies were performed using the BCMN linear accelerator. Methods to provide scalar spectra averaged over a core cell from these experimental results are described [fr

  2. Method for Parametric Design of Three-Dimensional Shapes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dick, James L

    2006-01-01

    The present invention relates to computer-aided design of three-dimensional shapes and more particularly, relates to a system and method for parametric design of three-dimensional hydrodynamic shapes...

  3. Three-dimensional (3D) analysis of the temporomandibular joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitai, N.; Kreiborg, S.; Murakami, S.

    Symposium Orthodontics 2001: Where are We Now? Where are We Going?, three-dimensional analysis, temporomandibular joint......Symposium Orthodontics 2001: Where are We Now? Where are We Going?, three-dimensional analysis, temporomandibular joint...

  4. Time-of-flight electron energy loss spectroscopy using TM110 deflection cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Verhoeven

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the use of two TM110 resonant cavities to generate ultrashort electron pulses and subsequently measure electron energy losses in a time-of-flight type of setup. The method utilizes two synchronized microwave cavities separated by a drift space of 1.45 m. The setup has an energy resolution of 12 ± 2 eV FWHM at 30 keV, with an upper limit for the temporal resolution of 2.7 ± 0.4 ps. Both the time and energy resolution are currently limited by the brightness of the tungsten filament electron gun used. Through simulations, it is shown that an energy resolution of 0.95 eV and a temporal resolution of 110 fs can be achieved using an electron gun with a higher brightness. With this, a new method is provided for time-resolved electron spectroscopy without the need for elaborate laser setups or expensive magnetic spectrometers.

  5. A time-of-flight spectrometer for detection of low energetic hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo, W. van; Bree, A.R. de; Buuren, R. van; Kluiver, H. de; Donne, A.J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Low energetic neutral hydrogen atoms that are released from wall and limiters of a tokamak as well as Franck-Condon neutrals may undergo charge exchange with plasma ions. The resulting fast neutrals are not confined to the magnetic field and thus contribute to energy losses, including those due to impurity radiation when the fast atoms sputter impurity ions from the wall. These processes determine the particle and energy transport from the plasma center and quantities as the sputtering coefficient, the reflection coefficient of the wall and the diffusivity of H or D in the wall material play a decisive role here. By detecting especially the cold neutrals from the boundary layer one gains information on the hydrogen or deuterium recycling and hence on the energy balance of the plasma. This paper shall be concerned with a time-of-flight method, that requires direct detection of hydrogen atoms and is able to detect hydrogen or deuterium atoms with an energy down to 10 eV. (author) 6 refs., 4 figs

  6. Multi-Reflection Time-of-Flight Mass Separation and Spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kreim, Susanne; Wolf, R N

    2014-01-01

    The mass of a nucleus is one of its most fundamental ground-state properties and reveals the strength of nuclear binding. Investigating the binding energy of nuclei with respect to the number of protons and neutrons in a nucleus is important for advancing nuclear theory and increases our understanding of nucleosynthesis in supernovae and neutron stars. Precision mass measurements on radioactive nuclides belong to the state-of-the-art techniques [1, 2]. Presently, four complementary techniques are applied: isochronous and Schottky mass spectrometry in storage rings (IMS and SMS, respectively), magnetic-rigidity time-of-flight (TOF-ρ) measurements, and Penning-trap mass spectrometry (PTMS). With measurement cycles in the sub-ms range, IMS and TOF-Bρ MS are well suited for very short-lived species while offering moderate relative precision on the level of 10−6. A higher precision is achieved by SMS but with the need for measurement times on the order of several seconds. As soon as masses with a relative prec...

  7. High-speed digitization readout of silicon photomultipliers for time of flight positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Martens, M.; Ramberg, E.; /Fermilab; Kim, H.; Chen, C.; Kao, C.; /Chicago U.; Niessen, K.; /SUNY, Buffalo; Zatserklyaniy, A.; /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez; Mazzillo, M.; Carbone, B.; /SGS Thomson, Catania

    2011-02-01

    We report on work to develop a system with about 100 picoseconds (ps) time resolution for time of flight positron emission tomography [TOF-PET]. The chosen photo detectors for the study were Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM's). This study was based on extensive experience in studying timing properties of SiPM's. The readout of these devices used the commercial high speed digitizer DRS4. We applied different algorithms to get the best time resolution of 155 ps Guassian (sigma) for a LYSO crystal coupled to a SiPM. We consider the work as a first step in building a prototype TOF-PET module. The field of positron-emission-tomography (PET) has been rapidly developing. But there are significant limitations in how well current PET scanners can reconstruct images, related to how fast data can be acquired, how much volume they can image, and the spatial and temporal resolution of the generated photons. Typical modern scanners now include multiple rings of detectors, which can image a large volume of the patient. In this type of scanner, one can treat each ring as a separate detector and require coincidences only within the ring, or treat the entire region viewed by the scanner as a single 3 dimensional volume. This 3d technique has significantly better sensitivity since more photon pair trajectories are accepted. However, the scattering of photons within the volume of the patient, and the effect of random coincidences limits the technique. The advent of sub-nanosecond timing resolution detectors means that there is potentially much better rejection of scattered photon events and random coincidence events in the 3D technique. In addition, if the timing is good enough, then the origin of photons pairs can be determined better, resulting in improved spatial resolution - so called 'Time-of-Flight' PET, or TOF-PET. Currently a lot of activity has occurred in applications of SiPMs for TOF-PET. This is due to the devices very good time resolution, low profile

  8. Single view reflectance capture using multiplexed scattering and time-of-flight imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Shuang; Velten, Andreas; Raskar, Ramesh; Bala, Kavita; Naik, Nikhil Deepak

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces the concept of time-of-flight reflectance estimation, and demonstrates a new technique that allows a camera to rapidly acquire reflectance properties of objects from a single view-point, over relatively long distances and without encircling equipment. We measure material properties by indirectly illuminating an object by a laser source, and observing its reflected light indirectly using a time-of-flight camera. The configuration collectively acquires dense angular, but l...

  9. Micromagnetic studies of three-dimensional pyramidal shell structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knittel, A; Franchin, M; Fischbacher, T; Fangohr, H; Nasirpouri, F; Bending, S J

    2010-01-01

    We present a systematic numerical analysis of the magnetic properties of pyramidal-shaped core-shell structures in a size range below 400 nm. These are three-dimensional structures consisting of a ferromagnetic shell which is grown on top of a non-magnetic core. The standard micromagnetic model without the magnetocrystalline anisotropy term is used to describe the properties of the shell. We vary the thickness of the shell between the limiting cases of an ultra-thin shell and a conventional pyramid and delineate different stable magnetic configurations. We find different kinds of single-domain states, which predominantly occur at smaller system sizes. In analogy to equivalent states in thin square films we term these onion, flower, C and S states. At larger system sizes, we also observe two types of vortex states, which we refer to as symmetric and asymmetric vortex states. For a classification of the observed states, we derive a phase diagram that specifies the magnetic ground state as a function of structure size and shell thickness. The transitions between different ground states can be understood qualitatively. We address the issue of metastability by investigating the stability of all occurring configurations for different shell thicknesses. For selected geometries and directions hysteresis measurements are analysed and discussed. We observe that the magnetic behaviour changes distinctively in the limit of ultra-thin shells. The study has been motivated by the recent progress made in the growth of faceted core-shell structures.

  10. Reaction mechanisms of methylene-blue degradation in three-dimensionally integrated micro-solution plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirafuji, Tatsuru; Ishida, Yodai; Nomura, Ayano; Hayashi, Yui; Goto, Motonobu

    2017-06-01

    We have performed matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) on methylene-blue aqueous solutions treated with three-dimensionally integrated micro-solution plasma, in which we have acquired the time evolution of mass spectra as a function of treatment time. The time evolution of mass spectral peak intensities for major detected species has clearly indicated that the parent methylene-blue molecules are degraded through consecutive reactions. The primary reaction is the oxidation of the parent molecules. The oxidized species still have two benzene rings in the parent molecules. The secondary reactions are the separation of the oxidized species and the formation of compounds with one benzene ring. We have also performed the numerical fitting of the time evolution of the mass spectral peak intensities, the results of which have indicated that we must assume additional primary reactions before the primary oxidation for better agreement with experimental results.

  11. Comparison of the Stereotactic Accuracies of Function-Guided Deep Brain Stimulation, Calculated Using Multitrack Target Locations Geometrically Inferred from Three-Dimensional Trajectory Rotations, and of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Deep Brain Stimulation and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Cheol; Lee, Chong Sik; Kim, Seok Min; Choi, Eu Jene; Lee, Jung Kyo

    2017-02-01

    In previous studies, multitrack trajectories in deep brain stimulation (DBS) have usually been approximated. Using a geometrically more accurate method, we compared the stereotactic accuracy of DBS with multitrack microelectrode recording and awake stimulation (function group) and MRI-guided DBS (MRI group). One hundred and seventy-two leads used in DBS between April 2014 and January 2016 were evaluated for stereotactic errors. Targets were the subthalamic nucleus (STN, 139 leads) or globus pallidus interna (GPi, 33 leads). We geometrically calculated shifted-track targets by considering the three-dimensional stereotactic ring and arc rotations. Stereotactic errors were calculated using Euclidean distances perpendicular to trajectories. Motor outcomes according to the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part III, improvement percentages by stimulations, were analyzed in 24 patients with 1 year follow-ups. Functional evaluation tended to increase stereotactic errors in the STN function group (n = 129; 1.4 ± 0.7 mm) more than in the STN MRI group (n = 10; 1.0 ± 0.6 mm; P = 0.06). Leads with higher stereotactic errors (n = 65; 1.6 ± 0.7 mm; P 2.5 mm tended to relate to a worse outcome (P = 0.087). Stereotactic errors were lower (n = 33; 0.9 ± 0.5 mm) in the GPi MRI group. Multitrack DBS using intraoperative functional evaluation resulted in worse stereotactic accuracy than did MRI-guided DBS. However, track shifts in function-guided DBS can approach MRI targets effectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Study on three dimensional seismic isolation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Masaki; Kitamura, Seiji

    2003-01-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) and Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) launched joint research programs on structural design and three-dimensional seismic isolation technologies, as part of the supporting R and D activities for the feasibility studies on commercialized fast breeder reactor cycle systems. A research project by JAPC under the auspices of the Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry (METI) with technical support by JNC is included in this joint study. This report contains the results of the research on the three-dimensional seismic isolation technologies, and the results of this year's study are summarized in the following five aspects. (1) Study on Earthquake Condition for Developing 3-dimensional Base Isolation System. The case study S2 is one of the maximum ground motions, of which the records were investigated up to this time. But a few observed near the fault exceed the case study S2 in the long period domain, depending on the fault length and conditions. Generally it is appropriate that the response spectra ratio (vertical/horizontal) is 0.6. (2) Performance Requirement for 3-dimensional Base Isolation System and Devices. Although the integrity map of main equipment/piping dominate the design criteria for the 3-dimensional base isolation system, the combined integrity map is the same as those of FY 2000, which are under fv=1Hz and over hv=20%. (3) Developing Targets and Schedule for 3-dimensional Isolation Technology. The target items for 3-dimensional base isolation system were rearranged into a table, and developing items to be examined concerning the device were also adjusted. A development plan until FY 2009 was made from the viewpoint of realization and establishment of a design guideline on 3-dimensional base isolation system. (4) Study on 3-dimensional Entire Building Base Isolation System. Three ideas among six ideas that had been proposed in FY2001, i.e., '3-dimensional base isolation system incorporating hydraulic

  13. Primary and Secondary Three Dimensional Microbatteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirigliano, Nicolas

    Today's MEMS devices are limited more so by the batteries that supply their power than the fabrication methods used to build them. Thick battery electrodes are capable of providing adequate energy, but long and tortuous diffusion pathways lead to low power capabilities. On the other hand, thin film batteries can operate at significant current densities but require large surface areas to supply practical energy. This dilemma can be solved by either developing new high capacity materials or by engineering new battery designs that decouple power and energy. Three dimensional batteries redesign traditional configurations to create nonplanar interfaces between battery components. This can be done by introducing hierarchical structures into the electrode shape. Designs such as these provide a maximum surface area over which chemical reactions can occur. Furthermore, by maintaining small feature sizes, ion diffusion and electronic transport distances can remain minimal. Manipulating these properties ensures fast kinetics that are required for high power situations. Energy density is maximized by layering material in the vertical direction, thus ensuring a minimal footprint area. Three dimensional carbon electrodes are fabricated using basic MEMS techniques. A silicon mold is anisotropically etched to produce channels of a predetermined diameter. The channels are then filled using an infiltration technique with electrode slurry. Once dried, the mold is attached to a current collector and etched using a XeF2 process. Electrodes of varying feature sizes have been fabricated using this method with aspect ratios ranging from 3.5:1 to 7:1. 3D carbon electrodes are shown to obtain capacities over 8 mAh/cm2 at 0.1 mA/cm2, or nearly 700% higher than planar carbon electrodes. When assembled with a planar cathode, the battery cell produced an average discharge capacity of 40 J/cm 2 at a current density of 0.2 mA/cm2. This places the energy density values slightly less than thick

  14. Multimodal three-dimensional dynamic signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury E. Kozlov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Reliable authentication in mobile applications is among the most important information security challenges. Today, we can hardly imagine a person who would not own a mobile device that connects to the Internet. Mobile devices are being used to store large amounts of confidential information, ranging from personal photos to electronic banking tools. In 2009, colleagues from Rice University together with their collaborators from Motorola, proposed an authentication through in-air gestures. This and subsequent work contributing to the development of the method are reviewed in our introduction. At the moment, there exists a version of the gesture-based authentication software available for Android mobile devices. This software has not become widespread yet. One of likely reasons for that is the insufficient reliability of the method, which involves similar to its earlier analogs the use of only one device. Here we discuss the authentication based on the multimodal three-dimensional dynamic signature (MTDS performed by two independent mobile devices. The MTDS-based authentication technique is an advanced version of in-air gesture authentication. We describe the operation of a prototype of MTDS-based authentication, including the main implemented algorithms, as well as some preliminary results of testing the software. We expect that our method can be used in any mobile application, provided a number of additional improvements discussed in the conclusion are made.

  15. Three-dimensional supersonic vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Kandil, Hamdy A.; Liu, C. H.

    1993-01-01

    Three-dimensional supersonic vortex-breakdown problems in bound and unbound domains are solved. The solutions are obtained using the time-accurate integration of the unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The computational scheme is an implicit, upwind, flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. Two vortex-breakdown applications are considered in the present paper. The first is for a supersonic swirling jet which is issued from a nozzle into a supersonic uniform flow at a lower Mach number than that of the swirling jet. The second is for a supersonic swirling flow in a configured circular duct. In the first application, an extensive study of the effects of grid fineness, shape and grid-point distribution on the vortex breakdown is presented. Four grids are used in this study and they show a substantial dependence of the breakdown bubble and shock wave on the grid used. In the second application, the bubble-type and helix-type vortex breakdown have been captured.

  16. Three dimensional characterization and archiving system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.; Gallman, P.

    1996-01-01

    The Three Dimensional Characterization and Archiving System (3D-ICAS) is being developed as a remote system to perform rapid in situ analysis of hazardous organics and radionuclide contamination on structural materials. Coleman Research and its subcontractors, Thermedics Detection, Inc. (TD) and the University of Idaho (UI) are in the second phase of a three phase program to develop 3D-ICAS to support Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) operations. Accurate physical characterization of surfaces and the radioactive and organic is a critical D and D task. Surface characterization includes identification of potentially dangerous inorganic materials, such as asbestos and transite. Real-time remotely operable characterization instrumentation will significantly advance the analysis capabilities beyond those currently employed. Chemical analysis is a primary area where the characterization process will be improved. The 3D-ICAS system robotically conveys a multisensor probe near the surfaces to be inspected. The sensor position and orientation are monitored and controlled using coherent laser radar (CLR) tracking. The CLR also provides 3D facility maps which establish a 3D world view within which the robotic sensor system can operate

  17. Three dimensional characterization and archiving system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.; Gallman, P.

    1995-01-01

    The Three Dimensional Characterization and Archiving System (3D-ICAS) is being developed as a remote system to perform rapid in situ analysis of hazardous organics and radionuclide contamination on structural materials. Coleman Research and its subcontractors, Thermedics Detection, Inc. (TD) and the University of Idaho (UI) are in the second phase of a three phase program to develop 3D-ICAS to support Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) operations. Accurate physical characterization of surfaces and the radioactive and organic is a critical D ampersand D task. Surface characterization includes identification of potentially dangerous inorganic materials, such as asbestos and transite. Real-time remotely operable characterization instrumentation will significantly advance the analysis capabilities beyond those currently employed. Chemical analysis is a primary area where the characterization process will be improved. Chemical analysis plays a vital role throughout the process of decontamination. Before clean-up operations can begin the site must be characterized with respect to the type and concentration of contaminants, and detailed site mapping must clarify areas of both high and low risk. During remediation activities chemical analysis provides a means to measure progress and to adjust clean-up strategy. Once the clean-up process has been completed the results of chemical analysis will verify that the site is in compliance with federal and local regulations

  18. Three-dimensional endoscopy in sinus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ameet; Saraiya, Rupali

    2013-02-01

    Surgical endoscopy revolutionized the management of disease in nearly every surgical field, including rhinology. Endoscopy offered several advantages for the surgical management of rhinologic disease. However, it had a distinct disadvantage compared to direct vision, namely loss of binocular vision. Two-dimensional (2D) endoscopy limited depth perception, widely regarded as an important parameter for accurate and efficient movements during surgery. Three-dimensional (3D) endoscopic visualization has been actively pursued for decades by endoscopic surgeons in multiple surgical specialties. However, its clinical role has been limited due to technical limitations as well as successful adaptation by endoscopic surgeons to monocular cues offered by 2D technology. Until recently, stereoscopic technology included variations of dual channel video, dual chip-on-the-tip, and shutter mechanism, as well as various 3D displays. Over the past decade a novel 3D endoscopic technology was introduced. This technology used a lenticular array of lenses in front of a single video chip at the distal end of an endoscope to generate a stereoscopic view of the surgical field. Also known as the 'insect eye' technology since it mimics the compound eye of arthropods, this endoscope has reinvigorated the field of 3D endoscopic surgery. Recent developments in 3D endoscopy hold much promise for all surgical subspecialties, particularly endoscopic sinus and skull-base surgery.

  19. Three-dimensional laparoscopy: Principles and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Y Sinha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The largest challenge for laparoscopic surgeons is the eye–hand coordination within a three-dimensional (3D scene observed on a 2D display. The 2D view on flat screen laparoscopy is cerebrally intensive. The loss of binocular vision on a 2D display causes visual misperceptions, mainly loss of depth perception and adds to the surgeon's fatigue. This compromises the safety of laparoscopy. The 3D high-definition view with great depth perception and tactile feedback makes laparoscopic surgery more acceptable, safe and cost-effective. It improves surgical precision and hand–eye coordination, conventional and all straight stick instruments can be used, capital expenditure is less and recurring cost and annual maintenance cost are less. In this article, we have discussed the physics of 3D laparoscopy, principles of depth perception, and the different kinds of 3D systems available for laparoscopy. We have also discussed our experience of using 3D laparoscopy in over 2000 surgeries in the last 4 years.

  20. Three dimensional characterization and archiving system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.; Gallman, P. [and others

    1995-12-01

    The Three Dimensional Characterization and Archiving System (3D-ICAS) is being developed as a remote system to perform rapid in situ analysis of hazardous organics and radionuclide contamination on structural materials. Coleman Research and its subcontractors, Thermedics Detection, Inc. (TD) and the University of Idaho (UI) are in the second phase of a three phase program to develop 3D-ICAS to support Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) operations. Accurate physical characterization of surfaces and the radioactive and organic is a critical D&D task. Surface characterization includes identification of potentially dangerous inorganic materials, such as asbestos and transite. Real-time remotely operable characterization instrumentation will significantly advance the analysis capabilities beyond those currently employed. Chemical analysis is a primary area where the characterization process will be improved. Chemical analysis plays a vital role throughout the process of decontamination. Before clean-up operations can begin the site must be characterized with respect to the type and concentration of contaminants, and detailed site mapping must clarify areas of both high and low risk. During remediation activities chemical analysis provides a means to measure progress and to adjust clean-up strategy. Once the clean-up process has been completed the results of chemical analysis will verify that the site is in compliance with federal and local regulations.