WorldWideScience

Sample records for thorium process solutions

  1. Uranium, thorium and rare earth extraction and separation process by processing their chloride aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabot, J.L.; Leveque, A.

    1983-01-01

    The different steps of the process are the following: uranium and iron extraction by a neutral organic phosphorus compound and thorium and rare earth recovery in an aqueous solution, iron recovery in acid aqueous phase, concentration of the thorium and rare earth aqueous solution followed by thorium extraction with a organic phosphorus compound and rare earth recovery in the aqueous phase, thorium recovery in acid aqueous phase [fr

  2. Thorium determination by X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry in simulated thorex process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaura, M.; Matsuda, H.T.

    1989-01-01

    The X-ray fluorescence method for thorium determination in aqueous and organic (TBP-n-dodecane) solutions is described. The thin film-technique for sample preparation and a suitable internal standard have been used. Some parameters as analytical line, internal standard, filter paper, paper geometry, sample volume and measurement conditions were studied. Uranium, fission products, corrosion products and thorex reagent components were studied as interfering elements in the thorium analysis, as well as the matrix effect by using the thorex process simulated solutions the method to thorium determination in irradiated thorium solutions was applied. (M.J.C.) [pt

  3. Thorium determination by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry in simulated thorex process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaura, M.; Matsuda, H.T.

    1991-11-01

    The X-ray fluorescence method for thorium determination in aqueous and organic (TBP/n-dodecane) solutions is described. The thin film technique for sample preparation and a suitable internal standard had been used. The best conditions for Thorium determination had been established studying some parameters as analytical line, internal standard, filter paper, paper geometry, sample volume and measurement conditions. With the established conditions, thorium was concentration range of to 200 g Th/L and in organic solutions (2-63g Th/L) with 1,5% of precision. The accuracy of the proposed method was 3% in aqueous and organic phases. The detection limit was 1,2μg thorium for aqueous solutions and 1,4μg for organic solutions. Uranium, fission products, corrosion products and Thorex reagent components were studied as interfering elements in the thorium analysis. The matrix effect was also studied using the Thorex process simulated solutions. Finally, the method was applied to thorium determination in irradiated thorium solutions with satisfactory results. (author)

  4. Analysis of the effects of stirring condition of separation of thorium in the elution process of monazite partial solution by solvent impregnated resin method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prassanti, R.; Putra, D. S.; Kusuma, B. P.; Nawawi, F. W.

    2018-01-01

    Monazite is a natural mineral which contains abundant valuable element such as Radioactive Element and Rare Earth Element(REE). In this experiment, it is proven that solution of residual Thorium Sulfate from Monazite mineral process, can be seperated selectively by using extracting method of Solvent Impregnated Resin(SIR), with the elutant solution HNO3. In the earlier process, Thorium solution is conditioned at PH 1 by using H2SO4. Then REE, Thorium and Uranium elements are seperated. This seperation is conducted by using adsorption method by Amberlite XAD-16 Resin, which has been impregnated by Tributhyl Phosphate extractant. It is continued with elution process, which is aimed to obtain Thorium solution of a higher level of concentration. This elution process is conducted by using HNO3, with the elution variables of the lenght of mixing and amount concentration elutant. Based on this experiment, SIR extracting method is able to dissolve Thorium solution until 63,2%grade and a higher level of %grade about 92,40%. It can be concluded that this SIR method can extracted Thorium elements selectively, improve extracting process recovery, and determine optimum stripping condition in the 45th minutes with elutant concentration of 1,0M HNO3.

  5. Resources and processing of thorium raw material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Yu.V.; Efimova, Z.I.

    1981-01-01

    Results of the estimation of thorium raw material resources, methods of thorium raw material processing as well as possibilities for thorium production and its compounds of nuclear purity making in a number of countries are considered. It is shown that thorium global resources available are sufficient to be a base for uranium-thorium fuel cycle. Technological processes of thorium raw material processing and production of thorium compounds-oxide and metal out of different forms of thorium raw material have been developed, all flowsheets permit the complex use of thorium raw material and decrease thorium production costs. Prospects for thorium use as a fuel in heavy-water and high-temperature reactors are noted [ru

  6. Extraction of thorium from solution using tribenzylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, N.E.; Ditchburn, R.G.

    1975-01-01

    A method is described for isolating thorium from solutions in a state sufficiently pure for alpha spectroscopy. It parallels the method described by Moore and Thern (Radiochemical Radioanalytical Letters 19(2), 117-125, 1974), but uses tribenzylamine instead of Adogen 364. The method involves extracting thorium from a solution in 8M nitric acid, into a 6% w/v solution of tribenzylamine in toluene. The thorium is concentrated in a third, interfacial layer which forms. This layer is isolated, diluted with chloroform, and back extracted with 10M HC1. Overall yields range between 83 and 90% for one extraction. The acidic solution is taken down to near dryness, diluted until the pH is 2 and extracted into 1.2 ml of thenoyltrifluoroacetone in toluene. This solution is evaporated onto a stainless steel disk, flamed, and the disk may be used for alpha spectroscopy of thorium isotopes. (auth.)

  7. Determination of the total nitrate content of thorium nitrate solution with a selective electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirkner, F.M.

    1979-01-01

    The nitrate content of thorium nitrate solutions is determined with a liquid membrane nitrate selective electrode utilizing the known addition method in 0.1 M potassium fluoride medium as ionic strength adjustor. It is studied the influence of pH and the presence of chloride, sulphate, phosphate, meta-silicate, thorium, rare earths, iron, titanium, uranium and zirconium at the same concentrations as for the aqueous feed solutions in the thorium purification process. The method is tested in synthetic samples and in samples proceeding from nitric dissolutions of thorium hidroxide and thorium oxicarbonate utilized as thorium concentrates to be purified [pt

  8. A study on the structure of thorium salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magini, M.; Cabrini, A.; Di Bartolomeo, A.

    1975-01-01

    The structure of highly hydrolyzed thorium salt solutions has been investigated by large and small angle X-ray scattering techniques. The diffraction data obtained with large angle measurements show the presence in solution of microcrystalline particles with the thorium oxide structure. Particles larger than those were discovered by small angle measurements. A possible shape of these colloidal particles has been discussed

  9. Sorption behaviour of uranium and thorium on cryptomelane-type hydrous manganese dioxide from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, I.M.; El-Absy, M.A.; Abdel-Hamid, M.M.; Aly, H.F.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of sorption of uranium and thorium from aqueous nitrate solutions on cryptomelane-type hydrous manganese dioxide (CRYMO) was studied. The exchange of uranium is particle diffusion controlled while that of thorium is chemical reaction at the exchange sites. Sorption of uranium and thorium by CRYMO has been also studied as a function of metal concentrations and temperature. The sorption of both cations is found to be an endothermic process and increases markedly with temperature between 30 and 60 degree C. The sorption results have been analysed by the langmuir adsorption isotherm over the entire range of uranium and thorium concentrations investigated. 35 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  10. Current extraction and separation of uranium, thorium and rare earths elements from monazite leach solution using organophosphorous extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Sujoy; Rupawate, V.H.; Hareendran, K.N.; Roy, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    A new process based on solvent extraction has been developed for separation of uranium, thorium and rare earths from monazite leach solution using organophosphorous extractants. The Thorium cake coming from monazite source was dissolved in HNO 3 medium in presence of trace amount of HF for feed preparation. The separation of U(VI) was carried out by liquid-liquid extraction using tris-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid (TEHP) in dodecane leaving thorium and rare earths elements in the raffinate. The thorium from raffinate was selectively extracted using 1M tri iso amyl phosphate (TiAP) in dodecane in organic phase leaving all rare earths elements in aqueous solution. The uranium and thorium from organic medium was quantitatively stripped using 0.05 M HNO 3 counter current mode. Results indicate the quantitative separation of uranium, thorium and rare earths from thorium cake (monazite source) using organophosphorous extractant in counter current mode

  11. SALICYLATE PROCESS FOR THORIUM SEPARATION FROM RARE EARTHS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, G.A.

    1959-08-25

    The separation of thorium from rare earths is accomplished by forming an aqueous solution of salts of thorium and rare earths and sufficient acetate buffer to provide a pH of between 2 and 5, adding an ammonium salicylate to the aqueous buffered solution, contacting the resultant solution with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent mixture of an ether and an ester, and separating the solvent extract phase containing thorium salicylate from the aqueous phase containing the rare earths.

  12. Uranium and Thorium precipitation from solution of slag II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutia Anggraini; Budi Sarono; Sugeng Waluyo; Rusydi; Sujono

    2015-01-01

    Tin smelting process produces waste in the form of large amount of slag II. Slag II still consist of major elements such as 0.0619% uranium, 0.530% thorium, 0.179% P 2 O 5 and 6.194% RE total oxide. Based on that fact, the processing of slag II is interesting to be researched, particularly in separating uranium and thorium which contained in slag II. Uranium and thorium dissolved using acid reagent (H 2 SO 4 ). Percentage recovery of uranium, thorium, phosphate and RE oxides by dissolution method are 98.52%, 83.16%, 97.22%, and 69.62% respectively. Dissolved uranium, thorium, phosphate, and RE were each precipitated. The factors which considerable affect the precipitation process are reagent, pH, temperature, and time. NH 4 OH is used as precipitation reagent, optimum condition are pH 4. Temperature and time reaction did not influence this reaction. Percentage recovery of this precipitation process at optimum condition are 93.84% uranium and 84.33% thorium. (author)

  13. Thorium: in search of a global solution

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    Last week, an international conference held at CERN brought together the world’s main experts in the field of alternative nuclear technology for the first time to discuss the use of thorium for the production of energy and the destruction of nuclear waste. Among the different technologies presented and discussed at the conference was ADS (Accelerator-Driven Systems) which relies primarily on particle accelerators.   The conference Chair (far left), the organisers and some of the distinguished participants of the ThEC13 conference held at CERN from 27 to 31 October 2013. “CERN has always been interested in finding ways in which fundamental research can help to resolve the problems of society,” says Jean-Pierre Revol, a physicist at the ALICE experiment who recently retired from CERN and is President of iThEC, the international not-for-profit organisation which promotes research and development in the field of thorium and which organised the Thorium Energy 2013 (Th...

  14. Solid solutions of uranium and thorium phosphates: synthesis, characterization and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dacheux, N.; Brandel, V.; Genet, M.; Bak, K.; Berthier, C.

    1996-01-01

    New solid solutions of uranium-thorium phosphates based on uranium-uranyl phosphate U(U O 2 )(P O 4 ) 2 and thorium phosphate-diphosphate Th 4 (P O 4 ) 4 (P 2 O 7 ) were synthesized in air or under an inert atmosphere via dry and wet chemical processes. The products were characterized by means of chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction and ultraviolet-visible and infrared absorption spectroscopies. Solid solutions of uranium-uranyl-thorium phosphates U 1-x Th x (U O 2 )(P O 4 ) 2 (with O≤ x ≤ 0.6) were obtained in air by substitution of uranium (IV) by thorium. Solid solutions of thorium-uranium phosphate-diphosphate (Th 1-y U y ) 4 (P O 4 ) 4 (P 2 O 7 ) (with Y ≤0.9) were prepared by substitution of thorium by uranium (IV) under an inert atmosphere. These new materials have been studied by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) in order to verify the oxidation states of uranium and to estimate the P/U, P/Th, P/O and U/Th ratios. (authors). 33 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Bioaccumulation of uranium and thorium from the solution containing both elements using various microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuruta, T. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Tohwa University, 1-1-1 Chikushigaoka, Fukuoka 815-8510 (Japan)]. E-mail: ttsuruta@tohwa-u.ac.jp

    2006-02-09

    The effects of proton, thorium and uranium on the bioaccumulation of thorium and uranium from the solution (pH 3.5) containing uranium and thorium using Streptomyces levoris cells were examined. The amount of thorium accumulated using the cells decreased by the pre-contact between the cells and the solution (pH 3.5) containing no metals, whereas that of uranium was almost unaffected by the treatment. The amount of thorium was almost unaffected by the existence of uranium. On the other hand, the amount of uranium accumulated was strongly affected by the thorium, especially thorium addition after uranium accumulation. The decrease of uranium accumulated by the addition of thorium after the accumulation of uranium was higher than that from the solution containing both elements. Therefore, the contribution of uranium-thorium exchange reaction was higher than that of competition reaction. Accordingly, proton-uranium-thorium exchange reaction was occurred in the accumulation of thorium from the solution containing thorium and uranium. The gram-positive bacteria, such as Micrococcus luteus, Arthrobacter nicotianae, Bacillus subtilis and B. megaterium, has a much higher separation factor as thorium/uranium than that of actinomycetes. These gram-positive bacterial strains can be used for the accumulation of thorium from the solution containing uranium and thorium.

  16. Coprecipitation of thorium and uranium peroxides from acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McTaggart, D.R.; Mailen, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    The factors affecting successful coprecipitation of thorium and uranium peroxides from acid media were studied. Variables considered in this work were H/sup +/ concentration, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ concentration, duration of contact, and rate of feed solution addition. In all experiments, stock solutions of Th(NO/sub 3/)/sub 4/ and UO/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ were fed at a controlled rate into H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ solutions with constant stirring. Samples were taken as a function of time to follow the H/sup +/ concentration of the solution, uranium precipitation, thorium precipitation, precipitant weight/volume of solution, and crystalline structure and growth. The optimum conditions for maximum coprecipitation are low H/sup +/ concentration, high H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ concentration, and extended contact time between the solutions.

  17. Thermodynamics of dehydration process of uranyl nitrate pentahydrate of thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamidov, F.A.; Mirsaidov, I.U.; Nazarov, K.M.; Nasriddinov, S.K.; Badalov, A.B.

    2010-01-01

    Present article is devoted to thermodynamics of dehydration process of uranyl nitrate pentahydrate of thorium. The results of researches of dehydration process of uranyl nitrate pentahydrate of thorium Th(NO 3 ) 4 ·5H 2 O were considered. The researches were carried out by means of tensimeter method with membrane zero-manometer under equilibrium conditions and at 300-450 K temperature ranges. The thermodynamic characteristics of dehydration process of initial crystalline hydrate was defined.

  18. On the retention of uranyl and thorium ions from radioactive solution on peat moss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humelnicu, Doina; Bulgariu, Laura; Macoveanu, Matei

    2010-02-15

    The efficiency of the radioactive uranyl and thorium ions on the peat moss from aqueous solutions has been investigated under different experimental conditions. The sorption and desorption of uranyl and thorium ions on three types (unmodified peat moss, peat moss treated with HNO(3) and peat moss treated with NaOH) of peat moss were studied by the static method. Peat moss was selected as it is available in nature, in any amount, as a cheap and accessible sorbent. Study on desorption of such ions led to the conclusion that the most favourable desorptive reagent for the uranyl ions is Na(2)CO(3) 1M while, for the thorium ions is HCl 1M. The results obtained show that the parameters here under investigation exercise a significant effect on the sorption process of the two ions. Also, the investigations performed recommend the peat moss treated with a base as a potential sorbent for the uranyl and thorium ions from a radioactive aqueous solution.

  19. Recovering of thorium contained in wastes from Thorium Purification Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao Filho, D.; Hespanhol, E.C.B.; Baba, S.; Miranda, L.E.T.; Araujo, J.A. de.

    1992-08-01

    A study has been developed in order to establish a chemical process for recovering thorium from wastes produced at the Thorium Purification Plant of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares. The recovery of thorium in this process will be made by means of solvent extraction technique. Solutions of TBP/Varsol were employed as extracting agent during the runs. The influence of thorium concentration in the solution, aqueous phase acidity, volume ratio of the phases, percentage of TBP/Varsol and the contact time of the phases on the extraction of thorium and lanthanides was determined. (author)

  20. Dissolution of thorium/uranium mixed oxide in nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filgueiras, S.A.C.

    1984-01-01

    The dissolution process of thorium oxide and mixed uranium-thorium oxide is studied, as a step of the head-end of the fuel reprocessing. An extensive bibliography was analysed, concerning the main aspects of the system, specially the most important process variables. Proposed mechanisms and models for the thorium oxide dissolution are presented. The laboratory tests were performed in two phases: at first, powdered thoria was used as the material to be dissolved. The objective was to know how changes in he concentrations of the dissolvent solution components HNO 3 , HF and Al(NO 3 ) 3 affect the dissolution rate. The tests were planned according to the fractional factorial method. Thes results showed that it is advantageous to work with powdered material, since the reaction occurs rapidly. And, if the Thorex solution (HNO 3 13M, HF 0.05M and Al(NO 3 ) 3 0.10M) is a suitable dissolvent, it was verified that it is possible to reduce the concentration of either nitric or fluoridric acid, without reducing the reaction rate to an undesirable value. It was also observed significant interaction between the components of the dissolvent solution. In the second phase of the tests, (Th, 5%U)O 2 sintered pellets were used. The main goals were to know the pellets dissolution behaviour and to compare the results for different pellets among themselves. It was observed that the metallurgical history of the material strongly influences its dissolution, specially the density and the microstructure. It was also studied how the (Th,U)O 2 mass/Thorex solution volume ratio affects the time needed to obtain an 1 M Th/liter solution. The activation energy for the reaction was obtained. (Author) [pt

  1. Some processes affecting the mobility of thorium in natural ground waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oesthols, E.

    1994-04-01

    Thorium is a useful model element for tetravalent actinides such as U(IV), Pu(IV) and Np(IV) which are important constituents of spent nuclear fuel. Thorium is also an important tracer element for particle pathways in natural environments. In order to correctly model the transport of Th in the environment, it is important to have quantitative models for processes that effect its mobility. Some of these processes have been experimentally investigated in laboratory studies, and interpreted with quantitative models where possible. The carbonate complexation in aqueous solution of Th has been investigated through solubility studies of ThO 2 in carbonate media. It is shown, that thorium carbonate complexes are likely to be predominant in many natural waters. They also increase solubility of the oxide significantly, and hence the mobility of Th. Carbonate also increases the dissolution rate of thorium oxide. This effect will only be important in environments with a pH and total carbonate alkalinity higher than those of most natural aquatic environments. Solubility studies of thorium oxide in phosphate media show that phosphate does not significantly increase the mobility of Th in aqueous media. The presence of phosphate may cause the precipitation of sparingly soluble thorium phosphates which will decrease the mobility of Th. The pentahydroxo complex for Th is shown to be significant up to pH 13. Potentiometric studies of Th sorption on amorphous colloidal silica indicate, that pure aluminosilicates will probably not be efficient scavengers of tetravalent actinides above pH values of approximately 6. In neutral to alkaline solutions, iron (hydr)oxides are likely to be the predominant sorbents. Th binds to the silica surface through corner-sharing bonds, where Th and Si share one, but not more oxygen atoms. 72 refs

  2. Global recovery process of thorium and rare earths in a nitrate medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cailly, F.; Mottot, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The aqueous solution of thorium and rare earth nitrates, obtained by leaching the ore with nitric acid, is extracted by an organic phosphorous compound (phosphate, phosphonate, phosphinate or phosphine oxide) and a cationic extractant chosen among phosphoric acid di-esters. Extraction of thorium and rare earths is possible even in presence of phosphate ions in the aqueous solution. Thorium and rare earths are separated by liquid-liquid extraction of the organic phase

  3. Solution mining process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Showalter, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    A solution mining process which may be used for uranium, thorium, vanadium, copper, nickel, molybdenum, rhenium, and selenium is claimed. During a first injection-and-production phase of between 6 months and 5 years, a leaching solution is injected through at least one well into the formation to solubilize the mineral values and form a pregnant liquor. This liquor is recovered through another well. The leaching solution contains sulfuric acid, nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, carbonic acid, an alkali metal carbonate, an alkali metal bicarbonate, ammonium carbonate or ammonium bicarbonate. Subsequently during a first production-only phase of between about 2 weeks and one year, injection of the leaching solution is suspended but pregnant liquor is still recovered. This stage is followed by a second injection-and-production phase of between 6 months and 5 years and a second production-only phase. The mineral values are separated from the pregnant liquor to form a barren liquor. The leaching agent is introduced into this liquor, and the solution is recycled. In a second claim for the solution mining of uranium, dilute carbonic acid is used as the leaching solution. The solution has a pH less than 7 and a bicarbonate ion concentration between about 380 ppm and 1000 ppm. The injection-and-production phase lasts between one and two years and the production only phase takes between one and four months. Carbon dioxide is introduced into the barren liquor to form a dilute carbonic acid solution and the solution is recycled

  4. Removal of thorium (IV) ions from aqueous solution by a novel nanoporous ZnO: Isotherms, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaynar, Ümit H; Ayvacıklı, Mehmet; Hiçsönmez, Ümran; Kaynar, Sermin Çam

    2015-12-01

    The adsorption of thorium (IV) from aqueous solutions onto a novel nanoporous ZnO particles prepared by microwave assisted combustion was studied using batch methods under different experimental conditions. The effect of contact time, solution pH, initial concentration and temperature on adsorption process was studied. The ability of this material to remove Th (IV) from aqueous solution was characterises by Langmuir, Freunlinch and Temkin adsorption isotherms. The adsorption percent and distribution coefficient for nanoporous ZnO powders in optimum conditions were 97% ± 1.02; 8080 L kg(-1)for Th (IV), respectively. Based on the Langmuir model, the maximum adsorption capacity of nanoporous ZnO for Th (IV) was found to be 1500 g kg(-1). Thermodynamic parameters were determined and discussed. The results indicated that nanoporous ZnO was suitable as sorbent material for recovery and adsorption of Th (IV) ions from aqueous solutions. The radioactive Th (VI) in surface water, sea water and waste waters from technologies producing nuclear fuels, mining (uranium and thorium) and laboratories working with radioactive materials (uranium and thorium) can be removed with this nanoporous ZnO. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of solution pH and complexing reagents on uranium and thorium desorption under saturated equilibrium conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yug-Yea; Yu, C.

    1992-01-01

    Three contaminated bulk surface soils were used for investigating the effect of solution pH and complexing reagents on uranium and thorium desorption. At a low solution pH, the major chemical species of uranium and thorium, uranyl UO 2 +2 , thorium dihydroxide Th(OH) 2 +2 , and thorium hydroxide Th(OH) +3 , tend to form complexes with acetates in the solution phase, which increases the fractions of uranium and thorium desorbed into this phase. At a high solution pH, important uranium and thorium species such as uranyl tricarbonate complex UO 2 (CO) 33 -4 and thorium tetrahydroxide complex Th(OH) 4 tend to resist complexation with acetates. The presence of complexing reagents in solution can release radionuclides such as uranium and/or thorium from the soil to the solution by forming soluble complexes. Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 ) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) are strong complex formers that released 38% to 62% of total uranium activity and 78% to 86% of total thorium activity, respectively, from the soil samples investigated. Solutions of 0.1 molar sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) and 0.1 molar sodium sulfate (Na 2 SO 4 ) were not effective complex formers with uranium and thorium under the experimental conditions. Fractions of uranium and thorium desorbed by 0.15g/200ml humic acid ranged from 4.62% to 6.17% and 1.59% to 7.09%, respectively. This work demonstrates the importance of a knowledge of solution chemistry in investigating the desorption of radionuclides

  6. Mortality among male workers at a thorium-processing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polednak, A.P.; Stehney, A.F.; Lucas, H.F. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Mortality is described in a cohort of 3039 men who were employed between 1940 and 1973 at a company involved in the production of thorium and rare earth chemicals from monazite sand. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for all causes was 1.05. SMR's were high for cancers of the lung (1,44), rectum (1.90), and pancreas (2.01), and for motor vehicle accidents (1.64). A subgroup of 592 men who worked for one year or longer in selected jobs (laborer, operator, maintenance) was followed up more intensively. SMR's were high for both lung cancer (1.62; 95% CL = 0.78 and 2.98) and pancreatic cancer (4.01; 95% CL = 1.30 and 9.34). The higher proportion of smokers in this subgroup relative to US males could have explained at least part of the excess mortality from lung cancer. Continued follow-up of the cohort in morbidity and mortality studies is needed to evaluate further these possible long-term effects of exposure to radioactivity and chemicals in the thorium extraction process

  7. Behavior of radioactive elements (uranium and thorium) in Bayer process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, C.; Kazama, S.; Sakamoto, A.; Hirayanagi, K.

    1986-01-01

    It is essential that alumina used for manufacturing electronic devices should contain an extremely low level of alpha-radiation. The principal source of alpha-radiation in alumina is uranium, a minor source being thorium. Uranium in bauxite dissolves into the liquor in the digestion process and is fixed to the red mud as the desilication reaction progresses. A part of uranium remaining in the liquor precipitates together with aluminum hydroxide in the precipitation process. The uranium content of aluminum hydroxide becomes lower as the precipitation velocity per unit surface area of the seed becomes slower. Organic matters in the Bayer liquor has an extremely significant impact on the uranium content of aluminum hydroxide. Aluminum hydroxide free of uranium is obtainable from the liquor that does not contain organic matters

  8. The development of the production process for the thorium/uranium dicarbide fuel kernels for the first charge of the Dragon Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnett, R.C.; Hankart, L.J.; Horsley, G.W.

    1965-05-01

    The development of methods of producing spheroidal sintered porous kernels of hyperstoichiometric thorium/uranium dicarbide solid solution from thorium/uranium monocarbide/carbon and thoria/urania/carbon powder mixes is described. The work has involved study of (i) Methods of preparing green kernels from UC/Th/C powder mixes using the rotary sieve technique. (ii) Methods of producing green kernels from UO2/Th02/C powder mixes using the planetary mill technique. (iii) The conversion by appropriate heat treatment of green kernels produced by both routes to sintered porous kernels of thorium/uranium carbide. (iv) The efficiency of the processes. (author)

  9. Mortality among female workers at a thorium-processing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhiyuan; Lee, Tze-San.

    1994-01-01

    The mortality patterns among a cohort of 677 female workers at a thorium-processing plant are reported for the period from 1940 to 1982. Of the 677 women, 165 were reported dead; 459 were still alive; and 53 (7.8%) were lost to follow-up. The standardized mortality ratios from all causes (0.74), all cancers (0.53), and circulatory diseases (0.66) were significantly below those for the general US population. In this cohort, 5 deaths due to lung cancer and 1 death from leukemia were observed, with 4.53 and 1.69 deaths expected, respectively. No deaths from cancer of the liver, pancreas, or bone were observed. Poisson regression analysis was used for an internal comparison within the cohort. The results of the Poisson regression analysis showed no significant effect on mortality rates of all causes and cancers from the study factors, including job classification, duration of employment, and time since first employment

  10. Flowchart evaluations of irradiated fuel treatment process of low burnup thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linardi, M.

    1987-01-01

    A literature survey has been carried out, on some versions of the acid-thorex process. Flowsheets of the different parts of the process were evaluated with mixer-settlers experiments. A low burnup thorium fuel (mass ratio Th/U∼100/1), proposed for Brazilian fast breeder reactor initial program, was considered. The behaviour of some fission products was studied by irradiated tracers techniques. Modifications in some of the process parameters were necessary to achieve low losses of 233 U and 232 U and 232 Th. A modified acid-thorex process flowsheet, evaluated in a complete operational cycle, for the treatment of low burnup thorium fuels, is presented. High decontamination factors of thorium in uranium, with reasonable decontamination of uranium in thorium, were achieved. (author) [pt

  11. Process for electroforming nickel containing dispersed thorium oxide particles therein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    Nickel electroforming is effected by passing a direct current through a bath containing a dissolved nickel salt or a mixture of such salts, such as those present in sulfamate or Watts baths, and finely divided sol-derived thorium oxide particles of 75 to 300 angstroms, preferably 100 to 200 angstroms diameters therein, at a pH in the range of 0.4 to 1.9, preferably 0.8 to 1.3. The nickel so deposited, as on a pre-shaped stainless steel cathode, may be produced in desired shape and may be removed from the cathode and upon removal, without additional working, possesses desirable engineering properties at elevated temperatures, e.g., 1,500 to 2,200 0 F. Although the material produced is of improved high temperature stability, hardness, and ductility, compared with nickel alone, it is still ductile at room temperature and has properties equivalent or superior to nickel at room temperatures up to 1,500 0 F. Further improvements in mechanical properties of the material may be obtained by working. Also disclosed are electrodeposition baths, methods for their manufacture, and products resulting from the electrodeposition process. (U.S.)

  12. Tetraphenylimidodiphosphinate as solid phase extractant for preconcentrative separation of thorium from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na Liu; Yanfei Wang; Chuhua He

    2016-01-01

    A simple and reliable method for solid phase extraction of thorium using tetraphenylimidodiphosphinate is presented. The solid phase extraction process was optimized at equilibrium time 3 h, pH = 4.5, initial concentration 30 mg L -1 and extractant dosage 0.01 g with 98.95 % of removal efficiency and 29.68 mg g -1 of adsorption capacity. The interfering ions experiments indicated that it had almost no effect on thorium adsorption. Kinetics data follow the pseudo-first-order model and equilibrium data agreed with the Langmuir isotherm model very well. FT-IR analysis indicated that imino group and phosphoryl acted as the significant roles in the solid phase extraction process. (author)

  13. Process for the separation of thorium and rare earths from a fluoride concentrate containing these elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cailly, F.; Fabre, F.

    1989-01-01

    The concentrate is attacked by a solution of sodium hydroxide in a quantity of at least 1.4 times the stoichiometry and with a concentration between 1 and 40 wt%. A precipitate of thorium hydroxide and rare earth hydroxide is obtained with a solution of sodium fluoride. Th and RE are separated by acid dissolution and selective precipitation or solvent extraction [fr

  14. Solid phase extraction of uranium and thorium on octadecyl bonded silica modified with Cyanex 302 from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilchi, A.; Shariati Dehaghan, T.; Rasouli Garmarodi, S.

    2013-01-01

    A simple and reliable method for rapid extraction and determination of uranium and thorium using octadecyl-bonded silica modified with Cyanex 302 is presented. Extraction efficiency and the influence of various parameters such as aqueous phase pH, flow rate of sample solution and amount of extractant has been investigated. The study showed that the extraction of uranium and thorium increase with increasing pH value and was found to be quantitative at pH 6; and the retention of ions was not affected significantly by the flow rate of sample solution. The extraction percent were found to be 89.55 and 86.27 % for uranium and thorium, respectively. The maximal capacity of the cartridges modified by 30 mg of Cyanex 302 was found to be 20 mg of uranium and thorium. The method was successfully applied to the extraction and determination of uranium and thorium in aqueous solutions. The percentage recovery of uranium and thorium in a number of natural as well as seawater samples of Iran were also investigated and found to be in the range of 85-95%. (author)

  15. Recovery of protactinium-231 and thorium-230 from cotter concentrate: pilot plant operatins and process development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertz, M.R.; Figgins, P.E.; Deal, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    The equipment and methods used to recover and purify 339 g of thorium-230 and 890 mg of protactinium-231 from 22 of the 1251 drums of Cotter Concentrate are described. The process developed was (1) dissolution at 100 0 C in concentrated nitric acid and dilution to 2 to 3 molar acid, (2) filtration to remove undissolved solids (mostly silica filter aid), (3) extraction of uranium with di-sec-butyl-phenyl phophonate (DSBPP) in carbon tetrachloride, (4) extraction of both thorium and protactinium with tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in carbon tetrachloride followed by selective stripping of the thorium with dilute of sulfuric acid, (5) thorium purification using oxalic acid, (6) stripping protactinium from the TOPO with oxalic acid, and (7) protactinium purification through a sequence of steps. The development of the separation procedures, the design of the pilot plant, and the operating procedures are described in detail. Analytical procedures are given in an appendix. 8 figures, 4 tables

  16. Field test of plutonium and thorium contaminated clay soils from the Mound Site using the ACT*DE*CON Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.O.; Swift, N.A.; Church, R.H.; Neff, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    A treatability test was run during the summer and fall of 1997 to demonstrate the effectiveness of ACT*DE*CON for removing plutonium and thorium from the clay soils around Mound. ACT*DE*CON is a proprietary solution patented by Selentec. The process utilized a highly selective dissolution of the contaminants by the use of a chemical wash. The pilot scale process involved pretreatment of the soil in an attrition scrubber with ACT*DE*CON solution. This blended solution was then passed through a counter-current extraction chamber where additional contact with ACT*DE*CON solution occurred, followed by a rinse cycle. During this process sand was added to aid contact of the solution with the soil particles. The sand is removed during the rinse step and reused. The chelating agent is separated from the contaminant and recycled back into the process, along with the reverse osmosis permeate. The resulting solution can be further treated to concentrate the contaminant. Three different types of environmental soils were tested -- plutonium and thorium contaminated soils with the natural clay content, and plutonium contaminated soils with a high percentage of fine clay particles. The goal of these tests was to reduce the plutonium levels from several hundreds of pCi/g to between 25 and 75 pCi/g and the thorium from a couple hundred pCi/g to less than 5 pCi/g. The results of these four tests are presented along with a discussion of the operating parameters and the lessons learned relating to full scale implementation at Mound as well as other potential applications of this process

  17. Osmotic coefficients of water for thorium nitrate solutions at 25, 37, and 50oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemire, R.J.; Sagert, N.H.; Lau, D.W.P.

    1983-01-01

    Vapor pressure osmometry was used to measure osmotic coefficients of water for thorium nitrate solutions at 25, 37, and 50 o C and at molalities up to 0.2 mol·kg -1 . The data were fitted to three- and four-parameter equations containing limiting-law terms for a 4:1 electrolyte. The variation of the osmotic coefficients as a function of temperature was found to be small. The results are compared to published values for the osmotic coefficients. (author)

  18. Synthesis, characterization and thermal expansion studies on thorium-praseodymium mixed oxide solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panneerselvam, G.; Antony, M.P.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Thorium-praseodymium mixed oxide solid solutions containing 15, 25, 40 and 55 mole percent of praseodymia were synthesized by mixing the solutions of thorium nitrate in water and praseodymium oxide (Pr 6 O 11 ) in conc. HNO 3 . Subsequently, their hydroxides were co-precipitated by the addition of aqueous ammonia. Further the precipitate was dried at 50 deg C, calcined at 600 deg C for 4 hours and sintered at 1200 deg C for 6 h in air. X-ray diffraction measurements were performed for phase identification and lattice parameter derivation. Single-phase fluorite structure was observed for all the compositions. Bulk and theoretical densities of solid solutions were also determined by immersion and X-ray techniques. Thermal expansion coefficients and percentage linear thermal expansion of the solid solutions were determined using high temperature X-ray diffraction technique in the temperature range 300 to 1700 K for the first time. The room temperature lattice constants estimated for above compositions are 0.5578, 0.5565, 0.5545 and 0.5526 nm, respectively. The mean linear thermal expansion coefficients for the solid solutions are 15.48 x 10 -6 K -1 , 18.35 x 10 -6 K -1 , 22.65 x 10 -6 K -1 and 26.95 x 10 -6 K -1 , respectively. The percentage linear thermal expansions in this temperature range are 1.68, 1.89, 2.21 and 2.51 respectively. It is seen that the solid solutions are stable up to 1700 K. It is also seen that the effect and nature of the dopant are the important parameters influencing the thermal expansion of the ThO 2 . The lattice parameter of the solid solutions exhibited a decreasing trend with respect to praseodymia addition. The percentage linear thermal expansion of the solid solutions increases steadily with increasing temperature

  19. Chlorine gas processing of oxide nuclear fuel particles containing thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knotik, K.; Bildstein, H.; Falta, G.; Wagner, H.

    Experimental studies on the chloride extraction and separation of U and Th from coated Th--U oxide particles are reported. After a description of the chlorination equipment and the experimental procedures, the results are discussed. The yield of U is determined as a function of the reaction temperature. The results of a thermogravimetric analysis of the chlorination of uranium carbide and thorium carbides are reported and used to establish the reaction mechanism for the chlorination

  20. Process specifications and standards for the 1970 thorium campaign in the Purex Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Cook, R.E.; Ritter, G.L.

    1970-01-01

    The process specifications and standards for thorium processing operations in the Purex Plant are presented. These specifications represent currently known limits within which plant processing conditions must be maintained to meet defined product requirements safely and with minimum effect on equipment service life. These specifications cover the general areas of feed, essential materials, and chemical hazards

  1. Analysis of Uranium and Thorium in Radioactive Wastes from Nuclear Fuel Cycle Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunandjar

    2008-01-01

    The assessment of analysis method for uranium and thorium in radioactive wastes generated from nuclear fuel cycle process have been carried out. The uranium and thorium analysis methods in the assessment are consist of Titrimetry, UV-VIS Spectrophotometry, Fluorimetry, HPLC, Polarography, Emission Spectrograph, XRF, AAS, Alpha Spectrometry and Mass Spectrometry methods. From the assessment can be concluded that the analysis methods of uranium and thorium content in radioactive waste for low concentration level using UV-VIS Spectrometry is better than Titrimetry method. While for very low concentration level in part per billion (ppb) can be used by Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), Alpha Spectrometry and Mass Spectrometry. Laser Fluorimetry is the best method of uranium analysis for very low concentration level. Alpha Spectrometry and ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry) methods for isotopic analysis are favourable in the precision and accuracy aspects. Comparison of the ICP-MS and Alpha Spectrometry methods shows that the both of methods have capability to determining of uranium and thorium isotopes content in the waste samples with results comparable very well, but the time of its analysis using ICP-MS method is faster than the Alpha Spectrometry, and also the cost of analysis for ICP-MS method is cheaper. NAA method can also be used to analyze the uranium and thorium isotopes, but this method needs the reactor facility and also the time of its analysis is very long. (author)

  2. Process for selectively concentrating the radioactivity of thorium containing magnesium slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.A.; Christiansen, S.H.; Simon, J.; Morin, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    In a process for separating magnesium from a magnesium slag using water and carbon dioxide, the improvement described comprises: (a) forming an aqueous magnesium slurry from the magnesium slag, which slag contains radioactive thorium and its daughters, and water; (b) solubilizing magnesium from the magnesium slurry by reacting the aqueous magnesium slurry with carbon dioxide wherein the carbon dioxide is at a pressure from greater than ambient to about 1,000 psig (about 7,000 kPa); (c) selectively concentrating by filtering the radioactive thorium and its daughters such that the radioactive thorium and its daughters are separated from the solubilized magnesium filtrate; and (d) reducing volume and/or weight of radioactive solids for disposal as radioactive waste

  3. Application of extraction chromatography to the separation of thorium and uranium dissolved in a solution of high salt concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Asako; Kameo, Yutaka; Hoshi, Akiko; Haraga, Tomoko; Nakashima, Mikio

    2007-01-26

    Extraction chromatography with commercially available UTEVA resin (for uranium and tetravalent actinide) was applied for the separation of Th and U from control solutions prepared from a multi-element control solution and from sample solutions of solidified simulated waste. Thorium and U in control solutions with 1-5mol/dm(3) HNO(3) were extracted with UTEVA resin and recovered with a solution containing 0.1mol/dm(3) HNO(3) and 0.05mol/dm(3) oxalic acid to be separated from the other metallic elements. Extraction behavior of U in the sample solutions was similar to that in the control solutions, but extraction of Th was dependent on the concentration of HNO(3). Thorium was extracted from 5mol/dm(3) HNO(3) sample solutions but not from 1mol/dm(3) HNO(3) sample solutions. We conjecture that thorium fluoride formation interferes with extraction of Th. Addition of Al(NO(3))(3) and Fe(NO(3))(3), which have higher stability constant with fluoride ion than Th, does improve extractability of Th from 1mol/dm(3) HNO(3) sample solution.

  4. Recovery of thorium from monazite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karve, V.M.; Mukherjee, T.K.

    1997-01-01

    The process practised in the monazite processing plant involves caustic soda digestion of finely ground monazite followed by aqueous processing to recover mixed rare earth chloride solution, thorium and uranium values in the form of hydroxide cake and tri sodium phosphate as a byproduct

  5. Asymmetrically deformed states of thorium isotopes during fission process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blons, J.

    1982-05-01

    Some theoretical considerations are recalled on fission barriers calculated from macroscopic, microscopic or macroscopic-microscopic and ''thorium anomaly'' problem is set. Experimental techniques used to measure fission cross sections in (n,f) reactions near the threshold are described. Fission dectector is described; stray resonance problems and retrodiffused neutrons are discussed. Results obtained in experimental study of 230 Th(n,f) and 232 Th(n,f) reactions are presented. They are compared with results obtained in other laboratories. The analysis model which allows to describe a (n,f) reaction is exposed. The compound nucleus formation cross section and transmission coefficients in neutron and gamma output channel are presented according to neutron energy for each value of angular moment and parity. Cross-section analysis and angular distribution obtained respectively in 230 Th(n,f) and 232 Th(n,f) reactions is exposed. Result interpretation show new aspects of nuclei rotational spectra and new nuclear forms [fr

  6. Process bases and specifications thorium---U-233 separations at the Purex Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, S.M.

    1965-07-26

    The Purex Plant was originally designed for the chemical processing of irradiated natural uranium. It has been used nearly exclusively for this purpose during its approximately ten-year operating lifetime. However, during the winter of 1964--1965, a special processing campaign was planned and accomplished in which approximately 6 tons of irradiated thoria targets were introduced to the plant, and the thorium-232 and uranium-233 were successfully separated and purified on a demonstration basis. For the demonstration thorium processing operation (6-ton test) of the winter of 1964--1965, process specifications were issued. These specifications were necessarily specific to the particular campaign inasmuch as a rather unusual processing scheme was required, by virtue of the small tonnage involved and the equipment limitations of the plant. Thus, for the relatively large operation subsequently planned, other process specifications are required. The purpose of this present document is to provide these specifications. Depending on the manner and extent of thorium -- uranium-233 production developments, these present specifications may have future application, at least in part. In addition to the process specifications, this document includes a section describing the flowsheet, and a section in which the technological bases for good process control are presented. In conjunction with the specifications, these sections are intended to provide the bases for the processing operations required to accomplish the processing objectives in a safe manner, and with minimum effect on equipment service life. All sections are organized in a manner to provide for relatively simple additions or revisions.

  7. Thorium and uranium determinations in rock solutions by the induced fission track method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajo, C.

    1979-01-01

    Thorium and uranium have been determined by counting induced fission tracks. While for uranium determinations no chemical separation was required, the thorium was first separated using the strongly basic anion-exchange resin, Dowex 1 x 8 in a mixed medium consisting of 5M HNO 3 and methanol. This was done by batch rather than column method. The feasibility of the method was established by analysing standard rocks. A precision of +- 5 to 10% and an accuracy of +- 10% were obtained. (author)

  8. Adsorption of thorium from aqueous solution by poly(cyclotriphosphazene-co-4,4'-sulfonyldiphenol)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juan Tan; Yanfei Wang; Mouwu Liu; Chuhua He

    2017-01-01

    The specialized poly(cyclotriphosphazene-co-4,4'-sulfonyldiphenol) (PZS) microspheres were prepared via a reliable and simple precipitation polymerization method and used adsorbent for the removal of thorium (Th) from aqueous solution. The PZS microspheres were characterized by FT-IR, XPS and SEM. The variables influencing the adsorption capacity were investigated. Adsorption experimental data showed thorium adsorption was equilibrium at time 60 min, pH 3.5, adsorbent dosage 1.0 g L -1 and initial concentration 25 mg L -1 , and the adsorption capacity reached to 17.30 mg g -1 . The experimental data followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and equilibrium data fit the Langmuir isotherm model very well. (author)

  9. Process control guidelines for CY 70 thorium campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, R.R.

    1970-01-01

    The report comprises five parts, with part I being an introduction. Part II consists of a general treatment of process control methods. Parts III through V discuss, in the flowsheet sequence, those problems pertinent to each equipment piece or system and provide operating guidelines. Specific operations that are somewhat different from those normally encountered in Purex are discussed at length. Operations routine to Purex can be found in the pertinent standard operating procedures. Part VI describes in general terms the sequence to be followed in initiating and completing a variety of transient conditions

  10. Status of thorium technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, R.K.; Raghavan, R.V.; Karve, V.M.; Narayandas, G.R.

    1977-01-01

    Although a number of studies have been conducted in various countries to evolve reactor systems based on thorium fuel cycle, its use, so far, is limited to only a few reactors. However, for countries having large reserves of thorium, its utilization is of great significance for their nuclear power programmes. Reasonably assured world resources of thorium in the lower price range have been estimated at more than 500,000 tons of ThO 2 . While most of these resources are in placer deposits in various parts of the world, some vein deposits and uranium ores are other important sources of thorium. Monazite, the most important mineral of thorium, is found in the beach sand deposits along with other heavy minerals like ilmenite, rutile, zircon, and sillimanite etc. Mining of these deposits is usually carried out by suction dredging and separation of monazite from other minerals is effected by a combination of magnetic, electrostatic and gravity separation techniques. Chemical processing of monazite is carried out either by sulphuric acid or caustic treatment, followed by separation of the rare earths and thorium by partial precipitation or leaching. The thorium concentrate is further processed to obtain mantle grade thorium nitrate by chemical purification steps whereas solvent extraction using TBP is adopted for making nuclear-grade material. The purified thorium nitrate is converted to the oxide usually by precipitation as oxalate followed by calcination. The oxide is reduced directly with calcium or converted to the chloride or fluoride and then reduced by calcium or magnesium to obtain thorium metal. Various fuel designs based on the metal or its alloys, mixed oxides or carbides, and dispersed type fuel elements have been developed and accordingly, different fabrication techniques have been employed. Work on irradiation of thorium containing fuel elements and separation of U 233 is being carried out. This paper reviews the status of thorium technology in the world with

  11. Synthesis, sintering and dissolution of thorium and uranium (IV) mixed oxide solid solutions: influence of the method of precursor preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hingant, N.

    2008-12-01

    Mixed actinide dioxides are currently considered as potential fuels for the third and fourth generations of nuclear reactors. In this context, thorium-uranium (IV) dioxide solid solutions were studied as model compounds to underline the influence of the method of preparation on their physico-chemical properties. Two methods of synthesis, both based on the initial precipitation of oxalate precursors have been developed. The first consisted in the direct precipitation ('open' system) while the second involved hydrothermal conditions ('closed' system). The second method led to a significant improvement in the crystallization of the samples especially in the field of the increase of the grain size. In these conditions, the formation of a complete solid solution Th 1-x U x (C 2 O 4 ) 2 .2H 2 O was prepared between both end-members. Its crystal structure was also resolved. Whatever the initial method considered, these compounds led to the final dioxides after heating above 400 C. The various steps associated to this transformation, involving the dehydration of precursors then the decomposition of oxalate groups have been clarified. Moreover, the use of wet chemistry methods allowed to reduce the sintering temperature of the final thorium-uranium (IV) dioxide solid solutions. Whatever the method of preparation considered, dense samples (95% to 97% of the calculated value) were obtained after only 3 hours of heating at 1500 C. Additionally, the use of hydrothermal conditions significantly increased the grain size, leading to the reduction of the occurrence of the grain boundaries and of the global residual porosity. The significant improvement in the homogeneity of cations distribution in the samples was also highlighted. Finally, the chemical durability of thorium-uranium (IV) dioxide solid solutions was evaluated through the development of leaching tests in nitric acid. The optimized homogeneity especially in terms of the cations distribution, allowed to limit the

  12. A thorium-based fuel cycle for VVERs a non proliferative solution to renew nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirani, A. S.; Shahmiri, Y.

    2002-01-01

    For several reasons such as waste disposal, expenses, proliferation and safety, global growth of the commercial nuclear power production has been effectively stagnated, since the early 1970's. A new reactor fuel cycle has been proposed which removes the concerns about proliferation and disposal of nuclear wastes that are the major obstructions in development of nuclear power production. This innovation is known as the R adkowsky Thorium Fuel ( RTF)

  13. Thermodynamics of the complex formation between thorium(IV) and some polydentate ligands in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Bernado, P.; Cassol, A.; Tomat, G.; Bismondo, A.; Magon, L.

    1983-01-01

    The changes in free energy, enthalpy, and entropy for the formation of thorium(IV)-oxydiacetate, -iminodiacetate, -thiodiacetate, and -succinate complexes have been determined by potentiometric and calorimetric titrations at 25 deg C in aqueous 1 mol dm - 3 sodium perchlorate. All the ligands form 1:1 chelate complexes with the thorium(IV) ion the stability of which is dependent on both the chelate ring dimensions and the nature of the donor group in the chain. The order of the relative stabilities (iminodiacetate > oxydiacetate > thiodiacetate > succinate) is mainly dependent on the reaction enthalpies, since the δS values are close to each other. In the thorium(IV)-oxydiacetate system the maximum number of three ligands for every metal ion was reached. Because of precipitation of solid compounds in the other systems, it was only possible to define complexes with a lower number of co-ordinated ligands: two for succinate and thiodiacetate, and one for iminodiacetate. Owing to the lower stability of the chelate ring of thiodiacetate and succinate complexes and the high basicity of the amino-group of iminodiacetate, these ligands form also unchelated protonated complexes. (author)

  14. Immobilization of thorium over fibroin by polyacrylonitrile (PAN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslani, M.A.A.; Akyil, S.; Eral, M.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes a process for immobilization of thorium over fibroin, which was used as a bio-adsorbant, by polyacrylonitrile. The amounts of thorium in aqueous solutions which may be leached in various aqueous ambients were detected by a spectrophotometer. The results show that polyacrylonitrile processes are feasible to immobilize spent fibroins. The leachability of the materials immobilized with polyacrylonitrile can meet the requirements of storage and final disposal. The leachability of thorium ions from immobilized spent fibroin was rather low for 8 months

  15. Comparative study of the efficiency of complex formation and extraction of thorium by solutions of certain alkylaromatic α-hydroxy acids in heptanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charykov, A.K.; Aleksandrova, E.A.; Vasil'eva, O.N.

    1986-01-01

    The constants for the extraction of thorium by solutions of alkylaromatic α-hydroxy acids in heptanol occur in the order log K/sub ex/ (hydroxydiphenylacetic acid) > log K/sub ex/ (phenoxyacetic acid) > log K/sub ex/ (hydroxyphenylacetic acid). For the example of extraction equilibria involving the participation of thorium carboxylate complexes an extraction efficiency parameter is introduced which enables the efficiency of extraction to be predicted on the basis of information on the formation constants of the neutral complexes and the dissociation constants of the extractant acids in the aqueous phase

  16. Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies on sorption of uranium and thorium from aqueous solutions by a selective impregnated resin containing carminic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmani-Sani, Abolfazl [Wastewater Division, Faculty of Health, Sabzevar University of Medical Sciences, PO Box 319, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini-Bandegharaei, Ahmad, E-mail: ahoseinib@yahoo.com [Wastewater Division, Faculty of Health, Sabzevar University of Medical Sciences, PO Box 319, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Engineering, Kashmar Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 161, Kashmar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, Seyyed-Hossein [Department of Engineering, Kashmar Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 161, Kashmar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kharghani, Keivan [Water Division, Department of Engineering, Torbat-e-Hydarieh Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 121, Torbat-e-Hydarieh (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zarei, Hossein [Department of Engineering, Kashmar Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 161, Kashmar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rastegar, Ayoob [Wastewater Division, Faculty of Health, Sabzevar University of Medical Sciences, PO Box 319, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Engineering, Kashmar Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 161, Kashmar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • The objective of the study is to investigate the potential application of a selective EIR for sorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions. • The effects of several physiochemical parameters were investigated. • The sorption kinetics and sorption isotherms were used to explain the sorption mechanism. • The thermodynamic studies showed the feasibility of sorption process. • The EIR beads showed a great potential for effective removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions. - Abstract: In this work, the removal of uranium and thorium ions from aqueous solutions was studied by solid–liquid extraction using an advantageous extractant-impregnated resin (EIR) prepared by loading carminic acid (CA) onto Amberlite XAD-16 resin beads. Batch sorption experiments using CA/XAD-16 beads for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions were carried out as a function of several parameters, like equilibration time, metal ion concentration, etc. The equilibrium data obtained from the sorption experiments were adjusted to the Langmuir isotherm model and the calculated maximum sorption capacities in terms of monolayer sorption were in agreement with those obtained from the experiments. The experimental data on the sorption behavior of both metal ions onto the EIR beads fitted well in both Bangham and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models, indicating that the intra-particle diffusion is the rate-controlling step. The thermodynamic studies at different temperatures revealed the feasibility and the spontaneous nature of the sorption process for both uranium and thorium ions.

  17. Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies on sorption of uranium and thorium from aqueous solutions by a selective impregnated resin containing carminic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmani-Sani, Abolfazl; Hosseini-Bandegharaei, Ahmad; Hosseini, Seyyed-Hossein; Kharghani, Keivan; Zarei, Hossein; Rastegar, Ayoob

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The objective of the study is to investigate the potential application of a selective EIR for sorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions. • The effects of several physiochemical parameters were investigated. • The sorption kinetics and sorption isotherms were used to explain the sorption mechanism. • The thermodynamic studies showed the feasibility of sorption process. • The EIR beads showed a great potential for effective removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions. - Abstract: In this work, the removal of uranium and thorium ions from aqueous solutions was studied by solid–liquid extraction using an advantageous extractant-impregnated resin (EIR) prepared by loading carminic acid (CA) onto Amberlite XAD-16 resin beads. Batch sorption experiments using CA/XAD-16 beads for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions were carried out as a function of several parameters, like equilibration time, metal ion concentration, etc. The equilibrium data obtained from the sorption experiments were adjusted to the Langmuir isotherm model and the calculated maximum sorption capacities in terms of monolayer sorption were in agreement with those obtained from the experiments. The experimental data on the sorption behavior of both metal ions onto the EIR beads fitted well in both Bangham and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models, indicating that the intra-particle diffusion is the rate-controlling step. The thermodynamic studies at different temperatures revealed the feasibility and the spontaneous nature of the sorption process for both uranium and thorium ions

  18. Process for the removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheitlin, F.M.

    1984-01-01

    Radium is removed from an inorganic-acid solution contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of 226 Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings, and thus contain thorium and uranium. The contaminated fly ash may be incorporated in a suitable matrix and stored, and the residual solutions processed to separate uranium and thorium. (author)

  19. High precision spectrophotometric analysis of thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmieri, H.E.L.

    1984-01-01

    An accurate and precise determination of thorium is proposed. Precision of about 0,1% is required for the determination of macroquantities of thorium when processed. After an extensive literature search concerning this subject, spectrophotometric titration has been chosen, using dissodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) solution and alizarin-S as indicator. In order to obtain such a precision, an amount of 0,025 M EDTA solution precisely measured has been added and the titration was completed with less than 5 ml of 0,0025 M EDTA solution. It is usual to locate the end-point graphically, by plotting added titrant versus absorbance. The non-linear minimum square fit, using the Fletcher e Powell's minimization process and a computer programme. Besides the equivalence point, other parameters of titration were determined: the indicator concentration, the absorbance of the metal-indicator complex, and the stability constants of the metal-indicator and the metal-EDTA complexes. (Author) [pt

  20. Thorium spectrophotometric analysis with high precision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmieri, H.E.L.

    1983-06-01

    An accurate and precise determination of thorium is proposed. Precision of about 0,1% is required for the determination of macroquantities of thorium processed. After an extensive literature search concerning this subject, spectrophotometric titration has been chosen, using disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) solution and alizarin S as indicator. In order to obtain such a precision, an amount of 0,025 M EDTA solution precisely measured has been added and the titration was completed with less than 5 ml of 0,0025 M EDTA solution. It is usual to locate the end-point graphically, by plotting added titrant versus absorbance. The non-linear minimum square fit, using the Fletcher e Powell's minimization process and a computer program. (author)

  1. Thorium fuel cycle management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajac, R.; Darilek, P.; Breza, J.; Necas, V.

    2010-01-01

    In this presentation author deals with the thorium fuel cycle management. Description of the thorium fuels and thorium fuel cycle benefits and challenges as well as thorium fuel calculations performed by the computer code HELIOS are presented.

  2. Determination of the elemental concentration of uranium and thorium in the products and by-products of amang tin tailings process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnour, I. A.; Wagiran, H.; Ibrahim, N.; Hamzah, S.; Elias, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    Amang or tin tailing is processed into concentrated ores and other economical valuable minerals such as monazite, zircon, xenotime, ilmenite etc. Besides that, the tailings from these ores may have a significant potential source of radiation exposure to amang plants' workers. This study was conducted to determine the elemental concentration of uranium and thorium in mineral samples collected from five amang tailing factories. The concentration of uranium and thorium was carried out by using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) relative technique. The concentration of uranium and thorium in ppm obtained in this study are as follows: raw (189-1064) and (622-4965); monazite (1076-1988) and (3467-33578); xenotime 4053 and 5540; zircon (309-3090) and (387-6339); ilmenite (104-583) and (88-1205); rutile (212-889) and (44-1119); pyrite (7-43) and (9-132); and waste (5-338) and (9-1218) respectively. The analysis results shows that the monazite, xenotime and zircon have high content of uranium and thorium, whereas ilmenite, rutile, pyrite and waste have lower concentration compare with raw materials after tailing process. The highest values of uranium and thorium concentrations (4053 ± 428 ppm and 33578 ± 873 ppm, respectively) were observed in xenotime and monazite; whereas the lowest value was 5.48 ± 0.86 ppm of uranium recorded in waste (sand) and 9 ± 0.32 ppm of thorium for waste (sand) and pyrite.

  3. Recovery of thorium-Arsenazo III complex from very dilute solutions by a bubble extraction apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallebona, G. (Istituto di Chimica dell' Accademia Navale, Livorno (Italy)); Raspi, G. (Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica e Chimica Industriale)

    1991-11-01

    A procedure is proposed for the removal and determination of Arsenazo III complexes from very dilute solutions by ion-pairing with a cationic surfactant. The method is discussed with reference to the system Th-Arsenazo III-tetradecyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride by analyzing the influence of critical parameters such as ionic strength and collector concentration. When applied to natural waters with moderate ionic strength ({approx equal} 0.15 mol/l) the procedure allows a fast and quantitative determination of 1-20 {mu}g Th from sample volumes as large as 12 l with preconcentration factors reaching up to about 1000. (orig.).

  4. Thorium in nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankevicius, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    We revise the advantages and possible problems on the use of thorium as a nuclear fuel instead of uranium. The following aspects are considered: 1) In the world there are three times more thorium than uranium 2) In spite that thorium in his natural form it is not a fisil, under neutron irradiation, is possible to transform it to uranium 233, a fisil of a high quality. 3) His ceramic oxides properties are superior to uranium or plutonium oxides. 4) During the irradiation the U 233 due to n,2n reaction produce small quantities of U 232 and his decay daughters' bismuth 212 and thallium 208 witch are strong gamma source. In turn thorium 228 and uranium 232 became, in time anti-proliferate due to there radiation intensity. 5) As it is described in here and experiments done in several countries reactors PHWR can be adapted to the use of thorium as a fuel element 6) As a problem we should mentioned that the different steps in the process must be done under strong radiation shielding and using only automatized equipment s (author)

  5. Biamperometric analysis of nonaqueous scandium solutions containing lanthanides, lead and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevorgyan, A.M.; Talipov, Sh.T.; Kostylev, V.S.; Khadeev, V.A.; Nadol'skij, M.Ya.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated was a possibility of direct scandium titration in the presence of large rare earth quantities, and also a possibility of complexonometric scandium and rare earth sum determination at their joint presence in non-aqueous acetic acid solution. The titration was carried out at electrode voltage of 0.95V, background electrolyte concentration of lithium perchlorate being 0.2M. Non-aqueous magnesium complexonate was used as titrating reagent. Th and Pb complexonates are shown to be less stable as compared to Sc complexonate, and consequently, Th and Pb ions must not interfere with biamperometric titration of Sc ion. A method applied to analysis of binary mixture, containing scandium, and a method for model alloy and thortveitite mineral was developed. Well reproducible and precise enough results are obtained in all the cases. Ions of Bi, Cu, Cd, Zn, In, Ga and Ti interfere with determination

  6. Selective biosorption of thorium (IV) from aqueous solutions by ginkgo leaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yaoyao; Hu, Yang; Chen, Lvcun; Yang, Tao; Huang, Hanfang; Shi, Runping; Lu, Peng

    2018-01-01

    Low–cost biosorbents (ginkgo leaf, osmanthus leaf, banyan leaf, magnolia leaf, holly leaf, walnut shell, and grapefruit peel) were evaluated in the simultaneous removal of La3+, Ce3+, Pr3+, Nd3+, Sm3+, Eu3+, Gd3+, Yb3+, Lu3+, UO22+, Th4+, Y3+, Co2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, and Sr2+ from aqueous solutions. In single metal systems, all adsorbents exhibited good to excellent adsorption capacities toward lanthanides and actinides. In a simulated multicomponent mixed solution study, higher selectivity and efficiency were observed for Th4+ over other metal cations, with ginkgo leaves providing the highest adsorptivity (81.2%) among the seven biosorbents. Through optimization studies, the selectivity of Th4+ biosorption on ginkgo leaf was found to be highly pH–dependent, with optimum Th4+ removal observed at pH 4. Th4+ adsorption was found to proceed rapidly with an equilibrium time of 120 min and conform to pseudo–second–order kinetics. The Langmuir isotherm model best described Th4+ biosorption, with a maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 103.8 mg g–1. Thermodynamic calculations indicated that Th4+ biosorption was spontaneous and endothermic. Furthermore, the physical and chemical properties of the adsorbent were determined by scanning electron microscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller, X-ray powder diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared analysis. The biosorption of Th from a real sample (monazite mineral) was studied and an efficiency of 90.4% was achieved from nitric acid at pH 4 using ginkgo leaves. PMID:29509801

  7. Uranium and thorium recovery in thorianite ore-preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiotte, Joao V.M. [Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil); Villegas, Raul A.S.; Fukuma, Henrique T., E-mail: rvillegas@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: htfukuma@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Pocos de Caldas

    2011-07-01

    This work presents the preliminary results of the studies aiming to develop a hydrometallurgical process to produce uranium and thorium concentrates from thorianite ore from Amapa State, Brazil. This process comprises two major parts: acid leaching and Th/U recovery using solvent extraction strategies. Thorianite ore has a typical composition of 60 - 70% of thorium, 8 - 10% lead and 7 - 10% uranium. Sulfuric acid leaching operational conditions were defined as follows: acid/ore ratio 7.5 t/t, ore size below 65 mesh (Tyler), 2 hours leaching time and temperature of 100 deg C. Leaching tests results showed that uranium and thorium recovery exceeded 95%, whereas 97% of lead ore content remained in the solid form. Uranium and thorium simultaneous solvent extraction is necessary due to high sulfate concentration in the liquor obtained from leaching, so the Primene JM-T primary anime was used for this extraction step. Aqueous raffinate from extraction containing sulfuric acid was recycled to the leaching step, reducing acid uptake around 60%, to achieve a net sulfuric acid consumption of 3 t/t of ore. Uranium and thorium simultaneous stripping was performed using sodium carbonate solution. In the aqueous stripped it was added sulfuric acid at pH 1.5, followed by a second solvent extraction step using the tertiary amine Alamine 336. The following stripping step was done with a solution of sodium chloride, resulting in a final solution of 23 g L-1 uranium. (author)

  8. Separation of uranium(V I) from binary solution mixtures with thorium(IV), zirconium(IV) and cerium(III) by foaming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakir, K.; Aziz, M.; Benyamin, K.

    1992-01-01

    Foam separation has been investigated for the removal of uranium(V I), thorium(IV), zirconium(IV) and cerium(III) from dilute aqueous solutions at pH values ranging from about I to about II. Sodium laurel sulphate (Na L S) and acetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), being a strong anionic and a strong cationic surfactants, were used as collectors. The results indicate that Na L S can efficiently remove thorium(IV), zirconium(IV) and cerium(III) but not uranium(V I). CTAB, on the other hand, can successfully float only uranium(V I) and zirconium(IV). These differences in flotation properties of the different cations could be used to establish methods for the separation of uranium(V I) from binary mixtures with thorium(IV), zirconium(IV) or cerium(III). The results are discussed in terms of the hydrolytic behaviour of the tested cations and properties of used collectors.2 fig., 1 tab

  9. A simple and fast determination of microgram thorium in organic solution containing several hundreds times amount of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Duanzhi; Cao Benhong; Yang Jinfeng

    1991-01-01

    Using spectrophotometric method, microgram thorium in 30% TBP-kerosene system containing large amount of uranium was successfully determined after one-step back-extraction with hydrochloric acid. The recovery of thorium is more than 98%, and the separation factor α U/Th is over 1 x 10 3 . Being reliable, simple and fast, the recommended method has been used in the research on spent fuel reprocessing and is expected applicable to other neutral phosphate extraction systems such as TOPO and DMHMP

  10. Adsorption of trace thorium(IV) from aqueous solution by mono-modified β-cyclodextrin polyrotaxane using response surface methodology (RSM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huijun Liu; Caixia Qi; Zhiyuan Feng; Lanlin Lei; Shanxia Deng

    2017-01-01

    The adsorption of thorium(IV) was studied using a novel supramolecular polyrotaxane based on β-cyclodextrin derivatives. The effects of pH, contact time, Th(IV) initial concentration and adsorbents dosage on the adsorption of thorium(IV) by polyrotaxane were optimized using Box-Behnken design of response surface methodology. Analysis of variance and correlation coefficients showed that the predicted model was consistent with the experimental data well. The adsorption best fitted to the Langmuir model indicated that the adsorption process happened on homogeneous surface. The thermodynamic parameters (∆G 0 < 0, ∆H 0 > 0, ∆S 0 > 0) demonstrated that the adsorption of Th(IV) ions onto polyrotaxane was spontaneous and endothermic. (author)

  11. Systematic study on Thorium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Toshikazu; Kimura, Itsuro; Iwata, Shiro; Furuya, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Susumu.

    1988-01-01

    Introduced is the activities of the Joint Research Project Team on Thorium Fuel organized by mainly university researchers in Japan and supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture for seven years since 1980. Four major groups were organized; (1) nuclear data, reactor physics and design, (2) nuclear fuel, (3) down stream and (4) biological effects of thorium. The first group covered measurements and analysis on nuclear data of thorium related nuclides, experiment and analysis on nuclear characteristics of thorium containing cores, basic engineering on a thorium molten salt reactor, and designs of several types of reactors. Fabrication and irradiation tests of thorium oxide fuel, and basic studies on new type thorium fuels (e.g. carbide and nitride) were studied by the second group. The third group covered the use of solutions in reprocessing of spent fuel, behavior of fission products, immobilization of high level radioactive waste, and continuous reprocessing for a molten salt reactor. The fourth group performed the trace study for patients who had been intravascularly injected with thorotrast for diagnosis of war injuries during the Second World War. (author)

  12. The uranium and thorium separation in the chemical reprocessing of the irradiated fuel of thorium and uranium mixed oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, E.F. de.

    1984-09-01

    A bibliographic research has been carried out for reprocessing techniques of irradiated thorium fuel from nuclear reactors. The Thorex/Hoechst process has been specially considered to establish a method for reprocessing thorium-uranium fuel from PWR. After a series of cold tests performed in laboratory it was possible to set the behavior of several parameters affecting the Thorex/Hoechst process. Some comments and suggestions are presented for modifications in the process flosheet conditions. A discussion is carried out for operational conditions such as the aqueous to organic flow ratio the acidity of strip and scrub solutions in the process steps for thorium and uranium recovery. The operation diagrams have been constructed using equilibrium experimental data which correspond to conditions observed in laboratory. (Author) [pt

  13. Candu reactors with thorium fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, J.M.; Fehrenbach, P.; Duffey, R.; Kuran, S.; Ivanco, M.; Dyck, G.R.; Chan, P.S.W.; Tyagi, A.K.; Mancuso, C.

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decade and a half AECL has established a strong record of delivering CANDU 6 nuclear power plants on time and at budget. Inherently flexible features of the CANDU type reactors, such as on-power fuelling, high neutron economy, fuel channel based heat transport system, simple fuel bundle configuration, two independent shut down systems, a cool moderator and a defence-in-depth based safety philosophy provides an evolutionary path to further improvements in design. The immediate milestone on this path is the Advanced CANDU ReactorTM** (ACRTM**), in the form of the ACR-1000TM**. This effort is being followed by the Super Critical Water Reactor (SCWR) design that will allow water-cooled reactors to attain high efficiencies by increasing the coolant temperature above 550 0 C. Adaptability of the CANDU design to different fuel cycles is another technology advantage that offers an additional avenue for design evolution. Thorium is one of the potential fuels for future reactors due to relative abundance, neutronics advantage as a fertile material in thermal reactors and proliferation resistance. The Thorium fuel cycle is also of interest to China, India, and Turkey due to local abundance that can ensure sustainable energy independence over the long term. AECL has performed an assessment of both CANDU 6 and ACR-1000 designs to identify systems, components, safety features and operational processes that may need to be modified to replace the NU or SEU fuel cycles with one based on Thorium. The paper reviews some of these requirements and the associated practical design solutions. These modifications can either be incorporated into the design prior to construction or, for currently operational reactors, during a refurbishment outage. In parallel with reactor modifications, various Thorium fuel cycles, either based on mixed bundles (homogeneous) or mixed channels (heterogeneous) have been assessed for technical and economic viability. Potential applications of a

  14. Thorium-U Recycle Facility (7930)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thorium-U Recycle Facility (7930), along with the Transuranic Processing Facility (7920). comprise the Radiochemical Engineering Development Complex. 7930 is a...

  15. Interaction of some thorium aquAatetraacido-compounds with gaseous nitrogen oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molodkin, A.K.; Ivanova, O.M.; Goeva, L.V.; Balakaeva, T.A.; Belyakova, Z.V.; Chaplya, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    Interaction of various thorium salts Th(OH) 4 xnH 2 O, ThCl 4 xnH 2 O and Th(NO 3 ) 4 xnH 2 O with gaseous nitrogen oxide has been studied, and a method for synthesizing nitrosyl thorium complexes has been developed. Nitrosation of thorium salts has been performed in various solvents (water, C 2 H 5 OH, CCl 4 , C 6 H 5 , CHCl 3 ) at different salt concentrations and with different duration of the nitrosation process. Concentration of the starting solution constitutes 5g in 100 ml of solution, nitrosation duration is 14-28 hours. Based on the data of infrared spectroscopy, the composition of compounds which form as a result of nitrosation is discussed. The thorium complexes formed have NO 3 - , NO - and N 2 O 2 -groups as ligands [ru

  16. Transformation of thorium sulfate in thorium nitrate by ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, W.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for transforming thorium sulfate into thorium nitrate by means of a strong cationic ion exchanger is presented. The thorium sulfate solution (approximately 15 g/L Th (SO 4 ) 2 ) is percolate through the resin and the column is washed first with water, with a 0,2 M N H 4 OH solution and then with a 0.2 M N H 4 NO 3 solution in order to eliminate sulfate ion. Thorium is eluted with a 2 M solution of (N H 4 ) 2 CO 3 . This eluate is treated with a solution of nitric acid in order to obtain the complete transformation into Th (NO 3 ) 4 . The proposed procedure leads to good quality thorium nitrate with high uranium decontamination. (author)

  17. Extractive spectrophotometric determination of thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesan, M.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Ramanujam, A.; Nadkarni, M.N.

    1981-01-01

    An extractive spectrophotometric method has been standardized for the analysis of 0.2 to 1.6 milligrams of thorium present in nitric acid solutions. The method involves the extraction of thorium from nitric acid solutions into 0.5 M thenoyl trifluoro acetone (HTTA) in benzene and its direct estimation from the organic extract by spectrophotometry as Thoron colour complex. In this method, interference due to iron upto 5 milligrams can be suppressed by adding ascorbic acid in the ratio of 1:2 prior to HTTA extraction. Uranium(VI) does not interefere even when present in 2000 times the amount of thorium. Plutonium and cerium do not interfere at one milligram level whereas zirconium interferes in this method. The overall error variation and precision of this method has been determined to be +- 3.5%. (author)

  18. Thorium impact on tobacco root transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazari, Kateřina; Landa, Přemysl; Přerostová, Sylva; Müller, Karel; Vaňková, Radomíra; Soudek, Petr; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2017-03-05

    Thorium is natural actinide metal with potential use in nuclear energetics. Contamination by thorium, originated from mining activities or spills, represents environmental risk due to its radioactivity and chemical toxicity. A promising approach for cleaning of contaminated areas is phytoremediation, which need to be based, however, on detail understanding of the thorium effects on plants. In this study we investigated transcriptomic response of tobacco roots exposed to 200μM thorium for one week. Thorium application resulted in up-regulation of 152 and down-regulation of 100 genes (p-value plant cadmium resistance PCR2, and ABC transporter ABCG40. This study provides the first insight at the processes in plants exposed to thorium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Equipment for the handling of thorium materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heisler, S.W. Jr.; Mihalovich, G.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) is the United States Department of Energy's storage facility for thorium. FMPC thorium handling and overpacking projects ensure the continued safe handling and storage of the thorium inventory until final disposition of the materials is determined and implemented. The handling and overpacking of the thorium materials requires the design of a system that utilizes remote handling and overpacking equipment not currently utilized at the FMPC in the handling of uranium materials. The use of remote equipment significantly reduces radiation exposure to personnel during the handling and overpacking efforts. The design system combines existing technologies from the nuclear industry, the materials processing and handling industry and the mining industry. The designed system consists of a modified fork lift truck for the transport of thorium containers, automated equipment for material identification and inventory control, and remote handling and overpacking equipment for material identification and inventory control, and remote handling and overpacking equipment for repackaging of the thorium materials

  20. Synthesis, sintering and dissolution of thorium and uranium (IV) mixed oxide solid solutions: influence of the method of precursor preparation; Synthese, frittage et caracterisation de solutions solides d'oxydes mixtes de thorium et d'uranium (IV): influence de la methode de preparation du precurseur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hingant, N

    2008-12-15

    Mixed actinide dioxides are currently considered as potential fuels for the third and fourth generations of nuclear reactors. In this context, thorium-uranium (IV) dioxide solid solutions were studied as model compounds to underline the influence of the method of preparation on their physico-chemical properties. Two methods of synthesis, both based on the initial precipitation of oxalate precursors have been developed. The first consisted in the direct precipitation ('open' system) while the second involved hydrothermal conditions ('closed' system). The second method led to a significant improvement in the crystallization of the samples especially in the field of the increase of the grain size. In these conditions, the formation of a complete solid solution Th{sub 1-x}U{sub x}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O was prepared between both end-members. Its crystal structure was also resolved. Whatever the initial method considered, these compounds led to the final dioxides after heating above 400 C. The various steps associated to this transformation, involving the dehydration of precursors then the decomposition of oxalate groups have been clarified. Moreover, the use of wet chemistry methods allowed to reduce the sintering temperature of the final thorium-uranium (IV) dioxide solid solutions. Whatever the method of preparation considered, dense samples (95% to 97% of the calculated value) were obtained after only 3 hours of heating at 1500 C. Additionally, the use of hydrothermal conditions significantly increased the grain size, leading to the reduction of the occurrence of the grain boundaries and of the global residual porosity. The significant improvement in the homogeneity of cations distribution in the samples was also highlighted. Finally, the chemical durability of thorium-uranium (IV) dioxide solid solutions was evaluated through the development of leaching tests in nitric acid. The optimized homogeneity especially in terms of the

  1. Production of thorium nitrate from uranothorianite ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, M.; Sartorius, R.; Sousseuer, Y.

    1959-01-01

    The separation of thorium and uranium from uranothorianite ores, either by precipitation or solvent-extraction methods, are discussed, and an industrial process for the manufacture of thorium nitrate is described. Reprint of a paper published in 'Progress in Nuclear Energy' Series III, Vol. 2 - Process Chemistry, 1959, p. 68-76 [fr

  2. Thorium fueled reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipaun, S.

    2017-01-01

    Current development in thorium fueled reactors shows that they can be designed to operate in the fast or thermal spectrum. The thorium/uranium fuel cycle converts fertile thorium-232 into fissile uranium-233, which fissions and releases energy. This paper analyses the characteristics of thorium fueled reactors and discusses the thermal reactor option. It is found that thorium fuel can be utilized in molten salt reactors through many configurations and designs. A balanced assessment on the feasibility of adopting one reactor technology versus another could lead to optimized benefits of having thorium resource.

  3. Thorium. Suppl. Vol. A2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, H.W.; Moebius, S.; Muenzel, H.; Ritcey, G.M.; Molnar, R.; Pouskouleli, G.

    1986-01-01

    The present volume ''Thorium'' Suppl. Vol. A2 of the Gmelin Handbook covers the history of thorium and the preparation of its scientifically and technologically important isotopes, as well as the nuclear properties (including fission properties) of all its isotopes. The thorium isotopes range from 212 Th to 236 Th. The different types of production of all of these isotopes have been described and, in the following chapter, the decay data and fission characteristics. On the other hand, chemical isolation procedures have been outlined only for the more important isotopes 227 Th to 234 Th. Special emphasis, however, was devoted to 232 Th, the only naturally occurring very long-lived isotope. Despite some other applications the specific importance of 232 Th comes from the fact that its neutron capture reaction product 233 U is a fissile nuclide, which makes 232 Th an important isotope in nuclear technology, especially for the so-called ''Thorium High Temperature Reactor'' (THTR). The other longer-lived isotopes are either used in the laboratory for tracer studies (e.g. 234 Th) or for the production of nuclides for isotope batteries (e.g. 230 Th), whereas 233 Th is the nuclide measured for the neutron activation determination of thorium. In the chapters for the isolation and purification of thorium isotopes only those extraction and other separation procedures were mentioned which are relevant to the given process. Detailed information on these topics has been given in specific volumes of this Handbook, e.g. Volume D2 for ''Extraction of Thorium''. The literature is covered to the end of 1984. In some cases, more recent data have been considered. (orig./RB)

  4. Study on removal technology for thorium in the waste gas-lamp mantle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Yucheng; Wang Chengbao; Zhang Ping; Xu Lingqi; Jiang Shangen

    1999-01-01

    The author describes thorium removal technology and its application in the handling of the waste gas-lamp mantle that produced during the production of gas-lamp process. After laboratory test, pilot test, trial run and engineering scale use, the thorium removal technology is mainly as follows: soak the waste gas-lamp mantle into the ceramic vat with the nitric acid solution twice and wash it with the tap water twice. The volume of the ceramic vat is 500 L and the concentration of the nitric acid solution is 2 mol/L. After handling, the thorium removal rate can reach 99.97% and the residual thorium will be less than 160 Bq/kg. The waste gas-lamp mantle can be buried under the ground or be handled in the other ways just as the harmless waste. The nitric acid solution, in which gas-lamp mantle has been soaked, should be extracted with TBP, then back extracted with diluted hydrochloric acid. After supplementing the thorium nitrate into the back extracted liquid, the liquid can be reused in the gas-lamp mantle production. The waste water from the handling process can be handled together with waste water from production process

  5. Radionuclide Basics: Thorium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorium is a naturally occurring radioactive metal found at trace levels in soil, rocks, plants and animals. Thorium is used very little in industry, but can be found in heat-resistant alloys and paints and optical lenses.

  6. Model Matematik Reduksi Thorium dalam Proses Elektrokoagulasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prayitno

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Thorium reduction by electrocoagulation has been conducted on radioactive waste with thorium contaminant grade of 5x10-4Kg/l through a batch system using aluminium electrodes. This study aims to determine a mathematical model of thorium reduction through speed reaction, constante reaction rate and reaction order which are affected by electrocoagulation process parameters like voltage, time, electrode distance, and pH. The research results the optimum voltage condition at 12.5 V at 1 cm electrode spacing, pH 7, and 30 minutes of processing time with 99.6 % efficiency. Prediction on thorium decline rate constante is obtained through mathematic integral method calculation. The research results thorium decline rate is following second order constante with its value at 5x10-3KgL-1min-1.

  7. Synthesis of manganese oxides and antimony silicates and their applications to take up Thorium-234

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Attar, L.; Budeir, Y.

    2009-07-01

    Birnessite, a layered manganese oxide, antimonysilicate and their corresponding cation-exchange derivatives were tested for their ability to take up thorium using a batch-type method. Sorption experiments were performed in different concentrations of acid, and sodium, potassium and calcium nitrate solutions in order to evaluate the influence of cations likely to be present in waste effluents. The results were expressed in terms of distribution coefficients. Linear regressions of the logarithmic plots enabled the elucidation of exchange mechanisms. Variation in the magnitude and mechanism of thorium sorption on the exchangers was ascribed to structural differences and the exchange properties of the materials, as well as the aqueous chemistry of the actinide element. The work expanded to included investigation of thorium solution' pH in controlling the sorption process. In nitric acid solutions, H-antimonysilicate proved to be the best sorbent. The hydrated layer structure of birnessite allows for facile mobility of the interlayer cations with fast kinetics and little structural rearrangement, making it of great importance for intercalation and ion exchange uses in salt conditions. Potassium had the most, and calcium the least, effect on thorium selectivity by birnessites, when they are present as macro components. Conversely, calcium ions did greatly inhibit the sorption behaviour of the actinide on Ca-doped antimonysilicate. Studying the effect of thorium solution' pH reflected the microcrystal modifications of birnessites occurred during experiments. (authors)

  8. Review of thorium fuel reprocessing experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooksbank, R.E.; McDuffee, W.T.; Rainey, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    The review reveals that experience in the reprocessing of irradiated thorium materials is limited. Plants that have processed thorium-based fuels were not optimized for the operations. Previous demonstrations of several viable flowsheets provide a sound technological base for the development of optimum reprocessing methods and facilities. In addition to the resource benefit by using thorium, recent nonproliferation thrusts have rejuvenated an interest in thorium reprocessing. Extensive radiation is generated as the result of 232 U-contamination produced in the 233 U, resulting in the remote operation and fabrication operations and increased fuel cycle costs. Development of the denatured thorium flowsheet, which is currently of interest because of nonproliferation concerns, represents a difficult technological challenge

  9. Decontamination of liquid radioactive waste by thorium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousselle, J.; Grandjean, S.; Dacheux, N.; Genet, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the field of the complete reexamination of the chemistry of thorium phosphate and of the improvement of the homogeneity of Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (TPD, Th 4 (PO 4 ) 4 P 2 O 7 ) prepared at high temperature, several crystallized compounds were prepared as initial powdered precursors. Due to the very low solubility products associated to these phases, their use in the field of the efficient decontamination of high-level radioactive liquid waste containing actinides (An) was carefully considered. Two main processes (called 'oxalate' and 'hydrothermal' chemical routes) were developed through a new concept combining the decontamination of liquid waste and the immobilization of the actinides in a ceramic matrix (TPD). In phosphoric media ('hydrothermal route'), the key-precursor was the Thorium Phosphate Hydrogen Phosphate hydrate (Th 2 (PO 4 ) 2 (HPO 4 ). H 2 O, TPHP, solubility product log(K S,0 0 ) ∼ - 67). The replacement of thorium by other tetravalent actinides (U, Np, Pu) in the structure, leading to the preparation of Th 2-x/2 An x/2 (PO 4 ) 2 (HPO 4 ). H 2 O solid solutions, was examined. A second method was also considered in parallel to illustrate this concept using the more well-known precipitation of oxalate as the initial decontamination step. For this method, the final transformation to single phase TPD containing actinides was purchased by heating a mixture of phosphate ions with the oxalate precipitate at high temperature. (authors)

  10. Solutions for the food processing industry; Shokuhin seizogyo solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toda, T.; Iwami, N. [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-09-10

    To improve quality control and maintain stable operation, the food processing industry requires problem solutions in total, including not only processing and operation control divisions but also quality control, design and production technology, and maintenance divisions. This paper describes solutions for HACCP (hazard analysis critical control point) support, quality control, and maintenance, in order to improve the quality level, ensure traceability and realize stable processing operations. (author)

  11. Migration of uranium process wastes from the uranium-233--thorium-232 cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fried, S.; Sabau, C.; Hines, J.; Friedman, A.

    1978-03-01

    With the advent of fuel loadings of 233 U in the Shippingport Reactor, it has become important to understand the migratory behavior of uranium. The purpose of this study is the determination of the parameters influencing the migration of U(VI), the most likely chemical form of uranium to be mobilized from a repository. Samples of rhyolite tuff were used to measure the absorption coefficients of solutions of U(VI) in ground waters. In addition, columns of tuff were used to measure the elution behavior of U(VI) at various conditions of pH, U(VI) concentration, and flow saturation. These results indicate that there are several elution peaks with values of K/sub d/ between 35 and 120. This behavior is not the same as that of Pu(VI) on tuff; and the experimental results to date have not revealed the reason for this difference. Values of K/sub d/ in this range imply that geological containment would be difficult in strata of this type. It may be possible to find more retentive strata than tuff. Rocks containing reducing components are the most likely candidates and further investigation is urgently needed if the 233 U-Th cycle is to be widely used

  12. Kinetic and isotherm analyses for thorium (IV) adsorptive removal from aqueous solutions by modified magnetite nanoparticle using response surface methodology (RSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mohammad; Milani, Saeid Alamdar; Abolgashemi, Hossein

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the ability and the adsorption capacity of magnetite/aminopropyltriethoxysilane/glutaraldehyde (Fe3O4/APTES/GA) adsorbent were evaluated for the adsorption of thorium (IV) ions from aqueous solutions. The influence of the several variables such as pH (1-5), Th (IV) initial concentration (50-300 mg L-1) and adsorbent concentration (1-5 g L-1) on the Th (IV) adsorption were investigated by response surface methodology (RSM). The results showed that the highest absorption capacity (q) was 107.23 mg g-1 with respect to pH = 4.5, initial concentration of 250 mg L-1 and adsorbent concentration of 1 g L-1 for 90 min. Modeling equilibrium sorption data with the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich models pointed out that the results were in good agreement with Langmuir model. The experimental kinetic data were well fitted to pseudo-second-order equation with R2 = 0.9739. Also thermodynamic parameters (ΔGo, ΔHo, ΔSo) declared that the Th (IV) adsorption was endothermic and spontaneous.

  13. Sustainability: role of thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stigson, Bjorn Roland

    2015-01-01

    The task to renew the world's energy infrastructure, where fossil fuels account for 80% of supply, is enormous. The two carbon neutral energy sources - renewable and nuclear - should be the base of the world's future energy mix. Nuclear, however, suffers from a bad public opinion and lack of government support in many parts of the world. We can conclude that the world needs an 'on demand' energy source that is affordable, clean, safe and scalable. Thorium energy could be that energy source. It is the most energy dense solution we know, fitting well to the modular and size-constrained requirements of an urbanizing world. No part of society can create a sustainable world on their own and markets are too slow to drive transformational changes. We need new partnerships between governments, business, civil society and academia where each part is delivering on their specific responsibilities and roles

  14. Removal of thorium(IV) from aqueous solution by biosorption onto modified powdered waste sludge. Experimental design approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunus Pamukoglu, M.; Mustafa Senyurt; Bulent Kirkan

    2017-01-01

    The biosorption of radioactive Th(IV) ions in the aqueous solutions onto the modified powdered waste sludge (MPWS) has been examined. In this context, the parameters affecting biosorption of Th(IV) from aqueous solutions has been examined by using MPWS biosorbent in Box Behnken statistical experimental design. The structure of MPWS biosorbent was characterized by using SEM and BET techniques. According to the experimental design results, MPWS and Th(IV) concentrations should be kept high to achieve the maximum efficiency in Th(IV) biosorption. On the other hand, MPWS, which is also used as a biosorbent, is an economical, effective and natural biosorbent. (author)

  15. Processing Solutions for Big Data in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillatre, L.; Lepiller, D.

    2016-09-01

    This paper gives a simple introduction to processing solutions applied to massive amounts of data. It proposes a general presentation of the Big Data paradigm. The Hadoop framework, which is considered as the pioneering processing solution for Big Data, is described together with YARN, the integrated Hadoop tool for resource allocation. This paper also presents the main tools for the management of both the storage (NoSQL solutions) and computing capacities (MapReduce parallel processing schema) of a cluster of machines. Finally, more recent processing solutions like Spark are discussed. Big Data frameworks are now able to run complex applications while keeping the programming simple and greatly improving the computing speed.

  16. THORIUM DISPERSION IN BISMUTH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryner, J.S.

    1961-07-01

    The growth of thorium bismutaide particles, which are formed when thorium is suspended in liquid bismuth, is inhibited when the liquid metal suspension is being flowed through a reactor and through a heat exchanger in sequence. It involves the addition of as little as 1 part by weight of tellurium to 100 parts of thorium. This addition is sufficient to inhibit particle growth and agglomeration.

  17. Removal of uranium and thorium from aqueous solution by ultrafiltration (UF) and PAMAM dendrimer assisted ultrafiltration (DAUF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilaiyaraja, P.; Ashish Kumar Singha Deb; Ponraju, D.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) from aqueous solution have been carried out by ultrafiltration (UF) and dendrimer assisted ultrafiltration (DAUF) using regenerated cellulose acetate membrane and PAMAM [poly(amido)amine] dendrimer chelating agent. In UF, the U(VI) and Th(IV) are removed from aqueous solution by adsorption/mass deposition on the membrane at pH > 4. In DAUF, the water soluble PAMAM dendrimer chelating agent effectively concentrates these metal ions in retentate thereby preventing the mass deposition on membrane. At acidic pH (≤3), the binding of metal ions with PAMAM dendrimer is very weak and hence PAMAM can be regenerated and reused. Electronic supplementary material. The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10967-014-3462-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. (author)

  18. Prospective thorium fuels for future nuclear energy generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lainetti, Paulo E.O.

    2017-01-01

    In the beginning of the Nuclear Era, many countries were interested on thorium, particularly during the 1950 1970 periods. Nevertheless, since its discovery almost two centuries ago, the use of thorium has been restricted to gas mantles employed in gas lighting. The future world energy needs will increase and, even if we assumed a conservative contribution of nuclear generation, it will be occur a significant increasing in the uranium prices, taking into account that uranium, as used in the present thermal reactors, is a finite resource. Nowadays approximately the worldwide yearly requirement of uranium for about 435 nuclear reactors in operation is 65,000 metric t. Therefore, alternative solutions for future must be developed. Thorium is nearly three times more abundant than uranium in The Earth's crust. Despite thorium is not a fissile material, 232 Th can be converted to 233 U (fissile) more efficiently than 238 U to 239 Pu. Besides this, thorium is an environment alternative energy source and also inherently resistant to proliferation.. Many countries had initiated research on thorium in the past, Nevertheless, the interest evanesced due new uranium resources discoveries and availability of enriched uranium at low prices from obsolete weapons. Some papers evaluate the thorium resources in Brazil over 1.200.000 metric t. Then, the thorium alternative must be seriously considered in Brazil for strategic reasons. A brief history of thorium and its utilization are presented, besides a very short discussion about prospective thorium nuclear fuels for the next generation of nuclear reactors. (author)

  19. Complexation of some trivalent lanthanides, scandium(III) and thorium(IV) by benzylidenepyruvates in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, R.N.; Moraes, M. de; Ionashiro, M.

    1997-01-01

    The protonation constants of 4-methylbenzylidenepyruvate (4Me-BP) and 4-isopropylbenzylidenepyruvate (4IP-BP) as well as the stability constants of their binary 1:1 complexes with Cu(II), La(III), Pr(III), Sm(III), Eu(III), Yb(III), Sc(III) and Th(IV) have been determined spectrophotometrically in aqueous solution at 25 C and ionic strength 0.500 M, maintained with sodium perchlorate. For all metal ions considered, the stability changes move in the same direction as the pK a of the ligands. Linear free energy relationships, as applied to oxygen donor substances, suggest the -COCOO - moiety as the metal binding site of the ligands. The results are discussed mainly taking into account that benzylidenepyruvates, besides the α-keto canonical form, may display other forms in aqueous solution with changing pH and the possible occurrence of extra intra-ligand charge polarization, induced by metal ions. (orig.)

  20. Recovery of thorium and rare earths by their peroxides precipitation from a residue produced in the thorium purification facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, Antonio Alves de

    2008-01-01

    As consequence of the operation of a Thorium purification facility, for pure Thorium Nitrate production, the IPEN (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares) has stored away a solid residue called RETOTER (REsiduo de TOrio e TErras Raras). The RETOTER is rich in Rare-Earth Elements and significant amount of Thorium-232 and minor amount of Uranium. Furthermore it contains several radionuclides from the natural decay series. Significant radioactivity contribution is generated by the Thorium descendent, mainly the Radium-228(T 1/2 =5.7y), known as meso thorium and Thorium-228(T 1/2 1.90y). An important thorium daughter is the Lead-208, a stable isotope present with an expressive quantity. After the enclosure of the operation of the Thorium purification facility, many researches have been developed for the establishment of methodologies for recovery of Thorium, Rare-Earth Elements and Lead-208 from the RETOTER. This work presents a method for RETOTER decontamination, separating and bordering upon some radioactive isotopes. The residue was digested with nitric acid and the Radium-228 was separated by the Barium Sulphate co-precipitation procedure. Finally, the Thorium was separated by the peroxide precipitation and the Rare-Earth Elements were also recovered by the Rare-Earth peroxide precipitation in the filtrate solution.(author)

  1. Thorium: An energy source for the world of tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revol J.-P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To meet the tremendous world energy needs, systematic R&D has to be pursued to replace fossil fuels. Nuclear energy, which produces no green house gases and no air pollution, should be a leading candidate. How nuclear energy, based on thorium rather than uranium, could be an acceptable solution is discussed. Thorium can be used both to produce energy and to destroy nuclear waste. The thorium conference, organized by iThEC at CERN in October 2013, has shown that thorium is seriously considered by some major developing countries as a key element of their energy strategy. However, developed countries do not seem to move fast enough in that direction, while global cooperation is highly desirable in this domain. Thorium is not fissile. Various possible ways of using thorium will be reviewed. However, an elegant option is to drive an “Accelerator Driven System (ADS” with a proton accelerator, as suggested by Nobel Prize laureate Carlo Rubbia .

  2. Thorium and uranium separation from Rare Earth complex minerals in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzmen, R.

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: • Thorium and uranium separation from a REEs solution is possible in by using simple traditional methods. • Main advantage of this method is to separate with high recovery yield uraniumand almost completely thorium which is an undesirable element due to its radioactive property in the different REEs group or individual REE. • Separation of thorium before any other step of REE’s group or individual element separation is crucial. • By using this flowsheet it would be possible to obtain uranium and other valuable elements (Zr, Ti, etc.) as coproducts of REEs. • Another important point, during REEs production, it is avoided to accumalate U and Th contaminated process wastes. • Thus, in the contrary, radioactive elements are refined and contained for safe storage.

  3. Exact solution of the hidden Markov processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saakian, David B.

    2017-11-01

    We write a master equation for the distributions related to hidden Markov processes (HMPs) and solve it using a functional equation. Thus the solution of HMPs is mapped exactly to the solution of the functional equation. For a general case the latter can be solved only numerically. We derive an exact expression for the entropy of HMPs. Our expression for the entropy is an alternative to the ones given before by the solution of integral equations. The exact solution is possible because actually the model can be considered as a generalized random walk on a one-dimensional strip. While we give the solution for the two second-order matrices, our solution can be easily generalized for the L values of the Markov process and M values of observables: We should be able to solve a system of L functional equations in the space of dimension M -1 .

  4. Thoria powder process development (LWBR Development Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchison, C.R.; Lloyd, R.

    1979-10-01

    The development program to identify the critical parameters for the process of converting thorium nitrate solution into thoria powder is described. Thorium oxalate hexahydrate is precipitated from the reaction of thorium nitrate solution with oxalic acid. The resulting thorium oxalate hexahydrate slurry is filter pressed into a cake which is air calcined to form thoria powder. Changes in the critical processing parameters such as free nitric acid content of the thorium nitrate solution, precipitation temperature, and calcining temperature altered the thoria powder characteristics, and thus its capability for being fabricated into fuel pellets. The objective of the powder preparation effort was to obtain thoria powders which could be formed by conventional ceramic fabrication techniques into thoria and thoria-urania pellets of high density and high integrity having a nearly uniform large grain structure.

  5. Thoria powder process development (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchison, C.R.; Lloyd, R.

    1979-10-01

    The development program to identify the critical parameters for the process of converting thorium nitrate solution into thoria powder is described. Thorium oxalate hexahydrate is precipitated from the reaction of thorium nitrate solution with oxalic acid. The resulting thorium oxalate hexahydrate slurry is filter pressed into a cake which is air calcined to form thoria powder. Changes in the critical processing parameters such as free nitric acid content of the thorium nitrate solution, precipitation temperature, and calcining temperature altered the thoria powder characteristics, and thus its capability for being fabricated into fuel pellets. The objective of the powder preparation effort was to obtain thoria powders which could be formed by conventional ceramic fabrication techniques into thoria and thoria-urania pellets of high density and high integrity having a nearly uniform large grain structure

  6. Thorium Energy Futures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peggs, Stephen; Roser, Thomas; Parks, G; Lindroos, Mats; Seviour, Rebecca; Henderson, Stuart; Barlow, R; Cywinski, R; Biarrote, J -L; Norlin, A; Ashley, V; Ashworth, R; Hutton, Andrew; Owen, H; McIntyre, Peter

    2012-07-01

    The potential for thorium as an alternative or supplement to uranium in fission power generation has long been recognised, and several reactors, of various types, have already operated using thorium-based fuels. Accelerator Driven Subcritical (ADS) systems have benefits and drawbacks when compared to conventional critical thorium reactors, for both solid and molten salt fuels. None of the four options - liquid or solid, with or without an accelerator - can yet be rated as better or worse than the other three, given today's knowledge. We outline the research that will be necessary to lead to an informed choice.

  7. Equipment for the handling of thorium materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heisler, S.W. Jr.; Mihalovich, G.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) is the United States Department of Energy's storage facility for thorium. FMPC thorium handling and overpacking projects ensure the continued safe handling and storge of the thorium inventory until final dispositio n of the materials is determined and implemented. The handling and overpacking of the thorium materials requires the design of a system that utilizes remote handling and overpacking equipment not currently utilized at the FMPC in the handling of uranium materials. The use of remote equipment significantly reduces radiation exposure to pesonnel during the handling and overpacking efforts. The designed system combines existing technologies from the nuclear industry, the materials processing and handling industry and the mining industry. The designed system consists of modified fork lift truck for the transport of thorium containers, automated equipment for material identification and inventory control, and remote handling and overpacking equipemnt for repackaging of the thorium materials. The radiation exposure to operations personnel using the remote handling and overpacking equipment is expected to be reduced by 98% over conventional direct durm handling practices with no dose reduction controls. 1 ref., 5 figs., 1 tab

  8. Solvent Extraction of Thorium(IV by Didodecylphoric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawwaz I. Khalili

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Solvent extraction of Thorium (VI ion from perchlorate solution using didodecylphosphoric acid, DDPA, in chloroform diluent was studied. The effects of stripping hydrochloric acid concentration, stripping time, extraction time, DDPA concentration, pH, ionic strength, supporting electrolyte and temperature on the extraction processes have been studied. From the distribution coefficient values at different temperatures,the enthalpy, the free energy and the entropy changes associated with the extraction processes were determined. The composition of the complex formed was established to be Th(ClO44-nRn(HR5-n where, n=1 or 2 and (HR2 represents the dimer of DDPA.

  9. The influence of different hydroponic conditions on thorium uptake by Brassica juncea var. foliosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dingna; Zhou, Sai; Liu, Li; Du, Liang; Wang, Jianmei; Huang, Zhenling; Ma, Lijian; Ding, Songdong; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Ruibing; Jin, Yongdong; Xia, Chuanqin

    2015-05-01

    The effects of different hydroponic conditions (such as concentration of thorium (Th), pH, carbonate, phosphate, organic acids, and cations) on thorium uptake by Brassica juncea var. foliosa were evaluated. The results showed that acidic cultivation solutions enhanced thorium accumulation in the plants. Phosphate and carbonate inhibited thorium accumulation in plants, possibly due to the formation of Th(HPO4)(2+), Th(HPO4)2, or Th(OH)3CO3 (-) with Th(4+), which was disadvantageous for thorium uptake in the plants. Organic aids (citric acid, oxalic acid, lactic acid) inhibited thorium accumulation in roots and increased thorium content in the shoots, which suggested that the thorium-organic complexes did not remain in the roots and were beneficial for thorium transfer from the roots to the shoots. Among three cations (such as calcium ion (Ca(2+)), ferrous ion (Fe(2+)), and zinc ion (Zn(2+))) in hydroponic media, Zn(2+) had no significant influence on thorium accumulation in the roots, Fe(2+) inhibited thorium accumulation in the roots, and Ca(2+) was found to facilitate thorium accumulation in the roots to a certain extent. This research will help to further understand the mechanism of thorium uptake in plants.

  10. Selective extraction of uranium (VI) and thorium (IV) ions by liquid membrane technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guey, N.; Cetisli, H.; Donat, R.

    2009-01-01

    Liquid membrane processes have a great importance for wastewater treatment, chemical engineering, and hydrometallurgy, biotechnological and biomedical applications. Liquid membrane process, one of the separation and purification techniques which are used for removal of the some metals and compounds causing environment and water pollution reduces the quantity of requirement of the solvents, prevents the environment pollution and becomes more economical as it combines extraction and stripping processes in one step. As uranium and thorium metals damage the environment and people's health, selective separation and refining processes will be useful for both the aspects of scientific and industrial applications. Because of trace amount and their radioactive structure, the industrial effects of recovering of both uranium and thorium or reducing the dangerous environmental effects, have a great importance. In this study, the function of transporting of uranium and thorium ions from aqueous solutions to the organic solutions and following, from organic solutions to aqueous solutions; the parameters of extraction technique and solvent type, solution of the pH, temperature, stirring speed, concentration of ions, concentration of reagent are investigated.The use of modelled system by supervisors is analyzed for the constant recovery application of related metals at the most effective conditions decided by the use of liquid membrane technique.

  11. Minerals yearbook, 1988: Thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedrick, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Mine production of monazite, the principal source of thorium, decreased slightly in 1988. Associated Minerals (USA) Inc. was the only domestic monazite producer. Monazite produced in the United States was exported, and the thorium products used domestically were derived from imported materials, existing company stocks, and thorium nitrate released from the National Defense Stockpile. Major nonenergy uses were in refractory applications, ceramics, and mantles for incandescent lanterns. The only energy use of thorium in the United States was in the high-temperature gas-cooled (HTGC) nuclear reactor at Fort St. Vrain, CO. Topics discussed in the report include domestic data coverage, legislation and government programs, domestic production, consumption and uses, stocks, prices, foreign trade, world capacity, and world review--(Australia, Brazil, Madagascar, Mozambique)

  12. Thorium ore deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelelli, Victorio.

    1984-01-01

    The main occurences of the thorium minerals of the Argentine Republic which have not been exploited, due to their reduced volume, are described. The thoriferous deposits have three genetic types: pegmatitic, hydrothermal and detritic, being the most common minerals: monazite, thorite and thorogummite. The most important thorium accumulations are located in Salta, being of less importance those of Cordoba, Jujuy and San Juan. (M.E.L.) [es

  13. Mise en solution et précipitation de l'uranium et du thorium dans les conditions de moyenne et haute température (résumé Solution and Precipitation of Uranium and Thorium under Average and High-Temperature (Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreau M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Les études tant analytiques qu'expérimentales réalisées au cours des vingt dernières années ont bien montré le rôle joué par les complexes d'uranylcarbonates dans le transport de l'uranium en milieu hydrothermal oxydant ou faiblement réducteur. Les travaux expérimentaux actuels sur la mobilité de U et Th, à haute température et haute pression, montrent la très grande différence de solubilité entre UO2 et ThO2, comme l'influence des ions complexants et celles de fO2 et aH+. Ces résultats expérimentaux sont comparés aux données recueillies sur les leucogranites et les granites calcoalcalins (France et divers gisements ou anomalies en uranium (Québec, Rössing, Madagascar, etc.. Dans la catazone U et Th précipitent sous forme de solutions solides d'uranothorianite dans les milieux déficitaires en silice, et sous forme d'uranothorite dans les granites et les syénites La précipitation d'uraninite non thorifère dans les leucogranites français s'explique d'abord par la faible concentration en thorium des solutions aqueuses durant la phase deutérique. Au cours du métamorphisme progressif on peut observer un retard dans la mobilisation de l'uranium en conditions relativement oxydantes, quand U est associé à Ti et OH. Dans le domaine mésozonal la brannérite stabilise l'uranium en présence de titane jusqu'à l'anatexie. Au-delà elle se dissocie en donnant de l'uraninite non thorifère et du rutile. Both analytic and experimental research done over the Iast twenty years has revealed the role played by uranylcarbonate complexes in the transfer of uranium in an oxidant or slightly reducing hydrothermal medium. Recent experimental research on the mobility of U and Th, at high temperature and high pressure, shows the great difference in solubility between UO2 and ThO2, like the influence of complexing ions and of fO2 and aH+. These experimental findings are compared to data gathered on leucogranites and colcoalkaline granites

  14. Study of field assessment methods and worker risks for processing alternatives to support principles for FUSRAP waste materials. Part 1: Treatment methods and comparative risks of thorium removal from waste residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, R.D.; Hamby, D.M.; Martin, J.E.

    1997-07-01

    This study was done to examine the risks of remediation and the effectiveness of removal methods for thorium and its associated radioactive decay products from various soils and wastes associated with DOE`s Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Its purpose was to provide information to the Environmental Management Advisory Board`s FUSRAP Committee for use in its deliberation of guiding principles for FUSRAP sites, in particular the degree to which treatment should be considered in the FUSRAP Committee`s recommendations. Treatment of FUSRAP wastes to remove thorium could be beneficial to management of lands that contain thorium if such treatment were effective and cost efficient. It must be recognized, however, that treatment methods invariably require workers to process residues and waste materials usually with bulk handling techniques. These processes expose workers to the radioactivity in the materials, therefore, workers would incur radiological risks in addition to industrial accident risks. An important question is whether the potential reduction of future radiological risks to members of the public justifies the risks that are incurred by remediation workers due to handling materials. This study examines, first, the effectiveness of treatment and then the risks that would be associated with remediation. Both types of information should be useful for decisions on whether and how to apply thorium removal methods to FUSRAP waste materials.

  15. Study of field assessment methods and worker risks for processing alternatives to support principles for FURSRAP waste materials. Part 1: Treatment methods and comparative risks of thorium removal from waste residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, R.D.; Hamby, D.M.; Martin, J.E.

    1997-07-01

    This study was done to examine the risks of remediation and the effectiveness of removal methods for thorium and its associated radioactive decay products from various soils and wastes associated with DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Its purpose was to provide information to the Environmental Management Advisory Board's FUSRAP Committee for use in its deliberation of guiding principles for FUSRAP sites, in particular the degree to which treatment should be considered in the FUSRAP Committee's recommendations. Treatment of FUSRAP wastes to remove thorium could be beneficial to management of lands that contain thorium if such treatment were effective and cost efficient. It must be recognized, however, that treatment methods invariably require workers to process residues and waste materials usually with bulk handling techniques. These processes expose workers to the radioactivity in the materials, therefore, workers would incur radiological risks in addition to industrial accident risks. An important question is whether the potential reduction of future radiological risks to members of the public justifies the risks that are incurred by remediation workers due to handling materials. This study examines, first, the effectiveness of treatment and then the risks that would be associated with remediation. Both types of information should be useful for decisions on whether and how to apply thorium removal methods to FUSRAP waste materials

  16. Determination of microquantities of zirconium and thorium in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber de D'Alessio, Ana; Zucal, Raquel.

    1975-07-01

    A method for the determination of 10 to 50 ppm of zirconium and thorium in uranium IV oxide of nuclear purity is established. Zirconium and thorium are retained in a strong cation-exchange resin Dowex 50 WX8 in 1 M HCl. Zirconium is eluted with 0,5% oxalic acid solution and thorium with 4% ammonium oxalate. The colorimetric determination of zirconium with xilenol orange is done in perchloric acid after destructtion of oxalic acid and thorium is determined with arsenazo III in 5 M HCl. 10 μg of each element were determined with a standard deviation of 2,1% for thorium and 3,4% for zirconium. (author) [es

  17. Study of temperature programmed decomposition of thorium nitrate pentahydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, F.A.; Awasthi, K.K.; Mahanty, B.N.; Karande, A.; Prakash, Amrit; Afzal, Md.; Panakkal, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Thorium based fast reactor nuclear fuel cycle envisages thorex process flow sheet operation at the back end. The product consolidation at this stage would require denitration of thorium solution. Mixed oxides like (U,Th)O 2+x can be prepared through co-denitration of respective nitrate salt solution followed by calcinations at high temperature. Various derivatives of Th(NO 3 ) 4 .5H 2 O are likely to encountered in the denitration as well as calcinations steps. Thermal decomposition of thorium nitrate pentahydrate has been studied in thermo gravimetric analyser (TGA) coupled with evolved gas analyser (EGA). TGA system has a vertical graphite furnace with PID temperature control and a microbalance of sensitivity 0.04 microgram. High-resolution quadrupole mass spectrometer has been used as a evolved gas analyser. 22.2 mg sample was taken in alumina crucible with the microbalance such that the crucible remained in the middle of the vertical tubular furnace. The sample was heated up to 700 deg C with heating rate 3 deg C/min in the ultra pure argon atmosphere. The flow rate of argon was maintained at 50ml/min.Thermogram and mass spectrum of the sample were simultaneously recorded. Thermogram of the thorium nitrate pentahydrate showed that the dehydration was started at 97 deg C and continued up to 212 deg C. The dehydration of the sample occurred in the three distinct steps, but with the help of mass spectrum of water vapour (m/e=18) it could be shown that two more steps might be involved in the dehydration. The mass spectrum of thorium nitrate pentahydrate showed that the evolution of nitric oxide (m/e=30) started at 132 deg C. It indicated that the denitration of the thorium nitrate started well before the completion of its dehydration. Nitric oxide showed three sharp peaks in the mass spectrum of the sample and the position of the peaks was at 166 deg C, 203 deg C and 333 deg C respectively. The mass spectrum of oxygen (m/e=32) and nitrogen dioxide (m

  18. Method of processing plutonium and uranium solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Katsuyuki; Kondo, Isao; Suzuki, Toru.

    1989-01-01

    Solutions of plutonium nitrate solutions and uranyl nitrate recovered in the solvent extraction step in reprocessing plants and nuclear fuel production plants are applied with low temperature treatment by means of freeze-drying under vacuum into residues containing nitrates, which are denitrated under heating and calcined under reduction into powders. That is, since complicate processes of heating, concentration and dinitration conducted so far for the plutonium solution and uranyl solution are replaced with one step of freeze-drying under vacuum, the process can be simplified significantly. In addition, since the treatment is applied at low temperature, occurrence of corrosion for the material of evaporation, etc. can be prevented. Further, the number of operators can be saved by dividing the operations into recovery of solidification products, supply and sintering of the solutions and vacuum sublimation. Further, since nitrates processed at a low temperature are powderized by heating dinitration, the powderization step can be simplified. The specific surface area and the grain size distribution of the powder is made appropriate and it is possible to obtain oxide powders of physical property easily to be prepared into pellets. (N.H.)

  19. REGENERATION OF FISSION-PRODUCT-CONTAINING MAGNESIUM-THORIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiotti, P.

    1964-02-01

    A process of regenerating a magnesium-thorium alloy contaminated with fission products, protactinium, and uranium is presented. A molten mixture of KCl--LiCl-MgCl/sub 2/ is added to the molten alloy whereby the alkali, alkaline parth, and rare earth fission products (including yttrium) and some of the thorium and uranium are chlorinated and

  20. Solution-processed polycrystalline silicon on paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trifunovic, M.; Shimoda, T.; Ishihara, R.

    2015-01-01

    Printing electronics has led to application areas which were formerly impossible with conventional electronic processes. Solutions are used as inks on top of large areas at room temperatures, allowing the production of fully flexible circuitry. Commonly, research in these inks have focused on

  1. Utilisation of thorium in reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaman, K.; Shivakumar, V.; Saha, D.

    2008-12-01

    India's nuclear programme envisages a large-scale utilisation of thorium, as it has limited deposits of uranium but vast deposits of thorium. The large-scale utilisation of thorium requires the adoption of closed fuel cycle. The stable nature of thoria and the radiological issues associated with thoria poses challenges in the adoption of a closed fuel cycle. A thorium fuel based Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is being planned to provide impetus to development of technologies for the closed thorium fuel cycle. Thoria fuel has been loaded in Indian reactors and test irradiations have been carried out with (Th-Pu) MOX fuel. Irradiated thorium assemblies have been reprocessed and the separated 233U fuel has been used for test reactor KAMINI. The paper highlights the Indian experience with the use of thorium and brings out various issues associated with the thorium cycle.

  2. Solution-Phase Processes of Macromolecular Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Minamitani, Elizabeth Forsythe

    2004-01-01

    We have proposed, for the tetragonal form of chicken egg lysozyme, that solution phase assembly processes are needed to form the growth units for crystal nucleation and growth. The starting point for the self-association process is the monomeric protein, and the final crystallographic symmetry is defined by the initial dimerization interactions of the monomers and subsequent n-mers formed, which in turn are a function of the crystallization conditions. It has been suggested that multimeric proteins generally incorporate the underlying multimers symmetry into the final crystallographic symmetry. We posed the question of what happens to a protein that is known to grow as an n-mer when it is placed in solution conditions where it is monomeric. The trypsin-treated, or cut, form of the protein canavalin (CCAN) has been shown to nucleate and grow crystals as a trimer from neutral to slightly acidic solutions. Under these conditions the solution is composed almost wholly of trimers. The insoluble protein can be readily dissolved by weakly basic solution, which results in a solution that is monomeric. There are three possible outcomes to an attempt at crystallization of the protein under monomeric (high pH) conditions: 1) we will obtain the same crystals as under trimer conditions, but at different protein concentrations governed by the self association equilibria; 2) we will obtain crystals having a different symmetry, based upon a monomeric growth unit; 3) we will not obtain crystals. Obtaining the first result would be indicative that the solution-phase self-association process is critical to the crystal nucleation and growth process. The second result would be less clear, as it may also reflect a pH-dependent shift in the trimer-trimer molecular interactions. The third result, particularly for experiments in the transition pH's between trimeric and monomeric CCAN, would indicate that the monomer does not crystallize, and that solution phase self association is not part

  3. Waste processing of chemical cleaning solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on chemical cleaning solutions containing high concentrations of organic chelating wastes that are difficult to reduce in volume using existing technology. Current methods for evaporating low-level radiative waste solutions often use high maintenance evaporators that can be costly and inefficient. The heat transfer surfaces of these evaporators are easily fouled, and their maintenance requires a significant labor investment. To address the volume reduction of spent, low-level radioactive, chelating-based chemical cleaning solutions, ECOSAFE Liquid Volume Reduction System (LVRS) has been developed. The LVRS is based on submerged combustion evaporator technology that was modified for treatment of low-level radiative liquid wastes. This system was developed in 1988 and was used to process 180,000 gallons of waste at Oconee Nuclear Station

  4. Thorium utilization in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraceno; Marcos.

    1978-10-01

    In this work the recent (prior to Aug, 1976) literature on thorium utilization is reviewed briefly and the available information is updated. After reviewing the nuclear properties relevant to the thorium fuel cycle we describe briefly the reactor systems that have been proposed using thorium as a fertile material. (author) [es

  5. Prospective thorium fuels for future nuclear energy generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lainetti, Paulo E.O., E-mail: lainetti@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    In the beginning of the Nuclear Era, many countries were interested on thorium, particularly during the 1950 1970 periods. Nevertheless, since its discovery almost two centuries ago, the use of thorium has been restricted to gas mantles employed in gas lighting. The future world energy needs will increase and, even if we assumed a conservative contribution of nuclear generation, it will be occur a significant increasing in the uranium prices, taking into account that uranium, as used in the present thermal reactors, is a finite resource. Nowadays approximately the worldwide yearly requirement of uranium for about 435 nuclear reactors in operation is 65,000 metric t. Therefore, alternative solutions for future must be developed. Thorium is nearly three times more abundant than uranium in The Earth's crust. Despite thorium is not a fissile material, {sup 232}Th can be converted to {sup 233}U (fissile) more efficiently than {sup 238}U to {sup 239}Pu. Besides this, thorium is an environment alternative energy source and also inherently resistant to proliferation.. Many countries had initiated research on thorium in the past, Nevertheless, the interest evanesced due new uranium resources discoveries and availability of enriched uranium at low prices from obsolete weapons. Some papers evaluate the thorium resources in Brazil over 1.200.000 metric t. Then, the thorium alternative must be seriously considered in Brazil for strategic reasons. A brief history of thorium and its utilization are presented, besides a very short discussion about prospective thorium nuclear fuels for the next generation of nuclear reactors. (author)

  6. Study of the sintering process and the formation of a (Th, U) O2 solid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasi, Roberto

    1979-01-01

    The effect of some variables in the (Th, U) O 2 sintering process and solid solution formation was studied. ThO 2 , U 3 O 8 and UO 2 powder were prepared. The ThO 2 powders were obtained by calcination of thorium at 500 and 750 deg C; the U 3 O 8 powders were derived from the calcination of ADU at 660 and 750 deg C; the UO 2 powder were prepared from ADU and from ATCU. The different characteristics of these materials were determined by measurements of surface area, by scanning electron microscopy, tap density tests, X-ray diffractometry and by measurements of the O/U ratios. The oxide mixtures were chosen in order to produce a final composition with 10 w/o of UO 2 . A mixture of thorium oxalate and ADU was also prepared by calcining these salts in air at 700 deg C, in order to obtain certain amount of solid solution prior to sintering. The sintering operations were developed in an argon atmosphere at temperatures between 1400 and 1700 deg C, during interval varying from 1 to 4 hours. The effect of the mixture characteristics on the sintering process and solid solution formation were studied considering the results of densification, microstructure development and X-ray diffractometry. The ThO 2 powder characteristics have a main effect on the mixtures compactability and sinterability, the higher calcining temperatures increasing the green density, but decreasing the final density of the sintered pellets. In the sintering of mixtures containing U 3 O 3 , this oxide is reduced to UO 2 and it is possible to obtain pellets with density and microstructures similar to those produced from mixtures containing UO 2 . But if oxygen in excess is present during sintering, the process is affected, occurring exaggerated grain growth. The densification results were related to the Coble's kinetics equation for second stage of sintering, valid for bulk diffusion, grain boundary acting as vacancy sinks. The sintering activation energy is independent from the powder starting

  7. Processing of waste solutions from electrochemical decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlot, L.A.; Allen, R.P.; Arrowsmith, H.W.; Hooper, J.L.

    1979-09-01

    The use of electropolishing as a decontamination technique will be effective only if we can minimize the amount of secondary waste requiring disposal and economically recycle part of the decontamination electrolyte. Consequently, a solution purification method is needed to remove the dissolved contamination and metal in the electrolyte. This report describes the selection of a purification method for a phosphoric acid electrolyte from the following possible acid reclamation processes: ion exchange, solvent extraction, precipitation, distillation, electrolysis, and membrane separation

  8. Uranium recovery process in phosphoric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginisty, Claude; Marteau, Michel; Mauborgne, Bernard.

    1982-01-01

    The description is given of a process for recovering uranium in a phosphoric acid solution by means of an organic solvent composed of a neutral phosphine oxide and an acid organophosphorated compound to the formulation R'R'' HPO 4 where R' and R'' which are identical or different, represent a linear or branched alkoxyalkyl radical comprising at least one -CH 2 -O-CH 2 - grouping or an aryloxyalkyl radical [fr

  9. Study of Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (TPD) formation in nitric medium for the decontamination of high activity actinides bearing effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousselle, Jerome

    2004-01-01

    Considering several activities in the nuclear industry and research, several low-level liquids wastes (LLLW) containing actinides in nitric medium must be decontaminated before being released in the environment. These liquid wastes mainly contain significant amounts of uranium(VI), neptunium(V) and plutonium(IV). In this work, two chemical ways were studied to decontaminate LLLW then to incorporate simultaneously uranium, neptunium and plutonium in the Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (TPD). Both ways started from a nitric solution containing thorium and the actinides considered, present at their lower stable oxidation state. The first way consisted in the initial precipitation of actinide and thorium mixed oxalate. After drying the mixture containing the powder and phosphoric acid under dried argon, a poly-phase system was obtained. It was mainly composed by a thorium-actinide oxalate-phosphate. This mixture was transformed into a TPDAn solid solution (An = U, Np and/or Pu) by heating treatment at 1200 deg. C under inert atmosphere. The second way consisted in the precipitation of a precursor of TPD, identified as the Thorium Phosphate Hydrogen Phosphate loaded with the actinides considered. The gel initially formed by mixing concentrated phosphoric acid solution with the nitric actinide solution was heated at 90 - 160 deg. C in a closed PTFE container for several weeks. It led to the TPDAn solid solutions after heating at 1100 deg. C in air or under inert argon. The efficiency of both processes was evaluated through the determination of the decontamination for each actinide considered. Considering the encouraging results obtained for both kinds of processes, some complementary studies are now required before performing the effective decontamination of real Low-Level Liquid Waste using one of the methods proposed. (author) [fr

  10. Thermodynamics of ionic processes in solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krestov, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    The present nitions about the mechanism of solvation of atomic-molecular particles and the structure of electrolyte and non electrolyte solutions are given. From common positions a wide range of interrelated problems (general and thermodynamic characteristic of ions, thermodynamic characteristic of ion solvation and various ionic reactions in solutions, structural changes of the solvent in the above processes etc...) is considered. The latest scientific data including those on the effect on the thermodynamio properties of low temperatures, various impurities (air, water), large ions, peculiarities of the structure of solvent molecules reflected. Considerable attention is given to new conceptions definitions, structural notions as well as theoretical and experimental methods of obtaining quantitative characteristics of ion solvation

  11. The thorium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merz, E.R.

    1977-01-01

    The utilization of the thorium fuel cycle has long since been considered attractive due to the excellent neutronic characteristics of 233 U, and the widespread and cheap thorium resources. Although the uranium ore as well as the separative work requirements are usually lower for any thorium-based fuel cycle in comparison to present uranium-plutonium fuel cycles of thermal water reactors, interest by nuclear industry has hitherto been marginal. Fast increasing uranium prices, public reluctance against widespread Pu-recycling and expected retardations for the market penetration of fast breeders have led to a reconsideration of the thorium fuel cycle merits. In addition, it could be learned in the meantime that problems associated with reprocessing and waste handling, but particularly with a remote refabrication of 233 U are certainly not appreciably more difficult than for Pu-recycling. This may not only be due to psychological constraints but be based upon technological as well as economical facts, which have been mostly neglected up till now. In order to diversify from uranium as a nuclear energy source it seems to be worthwhile to greatly intensify efforts in the future for closing the Th/ 233 U fuel cycle. HTGR's are particularly promising for economic application. However, further R and D activites should not be solely focussed on this reactor type alone. Light and heavy-water moderated reactors, as well as even fast breeders later on, may just as well take advantage of a demonstrated thorium fuel cycle. A summary is presented of the state-of-the-art of Th/ 233 U-recycling technology and the efforts still necessary to demonstrate this technology all the way through to its industrial application

  12. Chemical analysis used in nuclear fuels reprocessing of uranium and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schvartzman, M.M.A.M.

    1986-01-01

    An overall review of the analytical chemistry in nuclear fuel reprocessing is done. In Purex and Thorex process flowsheets, the analyses required to the control of the process, balance and accountability of fissile and fertile materials, and final product specification are pointed out. Some analytical methods applied to the determination of uranium, plutonium, thorium, nitric acid, tributylphosphate and fission products are described. Specific features of the analytical laboratories are presented. The radioactivity level of the samples requires facilities as shielded cells and glove boxes, and handling by remote control. Finally it is reported an application of one analytical method to evaluate thorium content in organic and aqueous solutions, in cold tests of Thorex process. These tests were performed at CDTN/NUCLEBRAS. (author) [pt

  13. Thorium Molten Salt Nuclear Energy Synergetic System (THORIMS-NES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Ritsuo; Mitachi, Koshi

    2013-01-01

    The authors have been promoting nuclear energy technology based on thorium molten salt as Thorium Molten Salt Nuclear Energy Synergetic System (THORIMS-NES). This system is a combination of fission power reactor of Molten Salt Reactor (MSR), and Accelerator Molten Salt Breeder (AMSB) for production of fissile 233 U with connecting chemical processing facility. In this paper, concept of THORIMS-NES, advantages of thorium and molten salt recent MSR design results such as FUJI-U3 using 233 U fuel, FUJI-Pu, large sized super-FUJI, pilot plant miniFUJI, AMSB, and chemical processing facility are described. (author)

  14. A review on the status of development in thorium-based nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Woo; Na, S. H.; Lee, Y. W.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, S. H.; Joung, C.Y

    2000-02-01

    Thorium as an alternative nuclear energy source had been widely investigated in the 1950s-1960s because it is more abundant than uranium, but the studies of thorium nuclear fuel cycle were discontinued by political and economic reasons in the 1970s. Recently, however, renewed interest was vested in thorium-based nuclear fuel cycle because it may generate less long-lived minor actinides and has a lower radiotoxicity of high level wastes after reprocessing compared with the thorium fuel cycle. In this state-of the art report, thorium-based nuclear cycle. In this state-of the art report, thorium-based nuclear fuel cycle and fuel fabrication processes developed so far with different reactor types are reviewed and analyzed to establish basic technologies of thorium fuel fabrication which could meet our situation. (author)

  15. ELECTROLYSIS OF THORIUM AND URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, W.N.

    1960-09-01

    An electrolytic method is given for obtaining pure thorium, uranium, and thorium-uranium alloys. The electrolytic cell comprises a cathode composed of a metal selected from the class consisting of zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth, an anode composed of at least one of the metals selected from the group consisting of thorium and uranium in an impure state, and an electrolyte composed of a fused salt containing at least one of the salts of the metals selected from the class consisting of thorium, uranium. zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth. Electrolysis of the fused salt while the cathode is maintained in the molten condition deposits thorium, uranium, or thorium-uranium alloys in pure form in the molten cathode which thereafter may be separated from the molten cathode product by distillation.

  16. Process for the total recovery of uranium, yttrium, thorium and rare earths contained in an organic phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollat, A.; Sabot, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    In this process the organic phase, obtained by solvent extraction, is contacted with a miscible solvent (at least partially) and a precipitating agent. A liquid phase and a precipitate containing U, Y, Th and R.E. are obtained. The process can be used for recovering these elements from wet process phosphoric acid [fr

  17. Electrochemical processing of nitrate waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genders, D.; Weinberg, N.; Hartsough, D.

    1992-01-01

    The second phase of research performed at The Electrosynthesis Co., Inc. has demonstrated the successful removal of nitrite and nitrate from a synthetic effluent stream via a direct electrochemical reduction at a cathode. It was shown that direct reduction occurs at good current efficiencies in 1,000 hour studies. The membrane separation process is not readily achievable for the removal of nitrites and nitrates due to poor current efficiencies and membrane stability problems. A direct reduction process was studied at various cathode materials in a flow cell using the complete synthetic mix. Lead was found to be the cathode material of choice, displaying good current efficiencies and stability in short and long term tests under conditions of high temperature and high current density. Several anode materials were studied in both undivided and divided cell configurations. A divided cell configuration was preferable because it would prevent re-oxidation of nitrite by the anode. The technical objective of eliminating electrode fouling and solids formation was achieved although anode materials which had demonstrated good stability in short term divided cell tests corroded in 1,000 hour experiments. The cause for corrosion is thought to be F - ions from the synthetic mix migrating across the cation exchange membrane and forming HF in the acid anolyte. Other possibilities for anode materials were explored. A membrane separation process was investigated which employs an anion and cation exchange membrane to remove nitrite and nitrate, recovering caustic and nitric acid. Present research has shown poor current efficiencies for nitrite and nitrate transport across the anion exchange membrane due to co-migration of hydroxide anions. Precipitates form within the anion exchange membranes which would eventually result in the failure of the membranes. Electrochemical processing offers a highly promising and viable method for the treatment of nitrate waste solutions

  18. Solution-Processed Light Sensors and Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Barkhouse, D. Aaron R.

    2010-04-01

    Solution processed solar cells and photodetectors have been investigated extensively due to their potential for low-cost, high throughput fabrication. Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) and conjugated polymers are two of the most promising materials systems for these applications, due to their processibility and their tunability, the latter achieved by varying their size or molecular structure. Several breakthroughs in the past year highlight the rapid progress that continues to be made in understanding these materials and engineering devices to realize their full potential. CQD photodiodes, which had already shown greater detectivity than commercially available photodetectors, have now reached MHz bandwidths. Polymer solar cells with near-perfect internal quantum efficiencies have been realized, and improved 3-D imaging of these systems has allowed theorists to link structure and function quantitatively. Organic photodetectors with sensitivities at wavelengths longer than 1 μm have been achieved, and multiexciton generation has been unambiguously observed in a functioning CQD device, indicating its viability in further improving detector sensitivity. © 2010 IEEE.

  19. Thorium content of a mineral ore from Morro do Ferro by fission track technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.A.N. de.

    1980-10-01

    The feasibility to determine thorium concentrations by fission track technique in samples of mineral ore has been demonstrated. The literature registers only the application of the fission track technique to mineral ore in the case where the fissionable element is uranium. The technique was applied to determine the thorium concentration of an ore sample from Morro do Ferro, taking advantage of the high thorium to uranium ratio in that mineral. The sample analysed presented a thorium concentration of 2467 +- 400 mg Th/Kg ore. The so called wet method was adopted by using the Bayer made Makrofol KG 10μm thick, as the detector foil, immersed in the thorium solution. The technique is also useful to determine thorium concentrations in environmental samples because of the following aspects: high sensitivity; fast chemical separation of interfering elements; low cost; and operational simplicity. (Author) [pt

  20. Ambipolar solution-processed hybrid perovskite phototransistors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Feng

    2015-09-08

    Organolead halide perovskites have attracted substantial attention because of their excellent physical properties, which enable them to serve as the active material in emerging hybrid solid-state solar cells. Here we investigate the phototransistors based on hybrid perovskite films and provide direct evidence for their superior carrier transport property with ambipolar characteristics. The field-effect mobilities for triiodide perovskites at room temperature are measured as 0.18 (0.17) cm2 V−1 s−1 for holes (electrons), which increase to 1.24 (1.01) cm2 V−1 s−1 for mixed-halide perovskites. The photoresponsivity of our hybrid perovskite devices reaches 320 A W−1, which is among the largest values reported for phototransistors. Importantly, the phototransistors exhibit an ultrafast photoresponse speed of less than 10 μs. The solution-based process and excellent device performance strongly underscore hybrid perovskites as promising material candidates for photoelectronic applications.

  1. PROCESS OF ELIMINATING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING PLUTONIUM VALUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, J.G.; Fries, B.A.

    1960-09-27

    A procedure is given for peroxide precipitation processes for separating and recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution. When plutonium peroxide is precipitated from an aqueous solution, the supernatant contains appreciable quantities of plutonium and peroxide. It is desirable to process this solution further to recover plutonium contained therein, but the presence of the peroxide introduces difficulties; residual hydrogen peroxide contained in the supernatant solution is eliminated by adding a nitrite or a sulfite to this solution.

  2. An extraction method of uranium 233 from the thorium irradiates in a reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesne, A.; Regnaut, P.

    1955-01-01

    Description of the conditions of separation of the thorium, of the uranium 233 and of the protactinium 233 in hydrochloric solution by absorption then selective elution on anion exchange resin. A precipitation of the thorium by the oxalic acid permits the recuperation of the hydrochloric acid which is recycled, the main, raw material consumed being the oxalic acid. (authors) [fr

  3. Thorium utilisation in thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, K.

    1997-01-01

    It is now more or less accepted that the best way to use thorium is in thermal reactors. This is due to the fact that U233 is a good material in the thermal spectrum. Studies of different thorium cycles in various reactor concepts had been carried out in the early days of nuclear power. After three decades of neglect, the world is once again looking at thorium with some interest. We in India have been studying thorium cycles in most of the existing thermal reactor concepts, with greater emphasis on heavy water reactors. In this paper, we report some of the work done in India on different thorium cycles in the Indian pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR), and also give a description of the design of the advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR). (author). 1 ref., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  4. A Brokering Solution for Business Process Execution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, M.; Bigagli, L.; Roncella, R.; Mazzetti, P.; Nativi, S.

    2012-12-01

    Predicting the climate change impact on biodiversity and ecosystems, advancing our knowledge of environmental phenomena interconnection, assessing the validity of simulations and other key challenges of Earth Sciences require intensive use of environmental modeling. The complexity of Earth system requires the use of more than one model (often from different disciplines) to represent complex processes. The identification of appropriate mechanisms for reuse, chaining and composition of environmental models is considered a key enabler for an effective uptake of a global Earth Observation infrastructure, currently pursued by the international geospatial research community. The Group on Earth Observation (GEO) Model Web initiative aims to increase present accessibility and interoperability of environmental models, allowing their flexible composition into complex Business Processes (BPs). A few, basic principles are at the base of the Model Web concept (Nativi, et al.): 1. Open access 2. Minimal entry-barriers 3. Service-driven approach 4. Scalability In this work we propose an architectural solution aiming to contribute to the Model Web vision. This solution applies the Brokering approach for facilitiating complex multidisciplinary interoperability. The Brokering approach is currently adopted in the new GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) as was presented at the last GEO Plenary meeting in Istanbul, November 2011. According to the Brokering principles, the designed system is flexible enough to support the use of multiple BP design (visual) tools, heterogeneous Web interfaces for model execution (e.g. OGC WPS, WSDL, etc.), and different Workflow engines. We designed and prototyped a component called BP Broker that is able to: (i) read an abstract BP, (ii) "compile" the abstract BP into an executable one (eBP) - in this phase the BP Broker might also provide recommendations for incomplete BPs and parameter mismatch resolution - and (iii) finally execute the eBP using a

  5. Dynamic Analysis of the Thorium Fuel Cycle in CANDU Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Park, Chang Je

    2006-02-01

    The thorium fuel recycle scenarios through the Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor have been analyzed for two types of thorium fuel: homogeneous ThO 2 UO 2 and ThO 2 UO 2 -DUPIC fuels. The recycling is performed through the dry process fuel technology which has a proliferation resistance. For the once-through fuel cycle model, the existing nuclear power plant construction plan was considered up to 2016, while the nuclear demand growth rate from the year 2016 was assumed to be 0%. After setting up the once-through fuel cycle model, the thorium fuel CANDU reactor was modeled to investigate the fuel cycle parameters. In this analysis, the spent fuel inventory as well as the amount of plutonium, minor actinides and fission products of the multiple recycling fuel cycle were estimated and compared to those of the once-through fuel cycle. From the analysis results, it was found that the closed or partially closed thorium fuel cycle can be constructed through the dry process technology. Also, it is known that both the homogeneous and heterogeneous thorium fuel cycles can reduce the SF accumulation and save the natural uranium resource compared with the once-through cycle. From the material balance view point, the heterogeneous thorium fuel cycle seems to be more feasible. It is recommended, however, the economic analysis should be performed in future

  6. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-06

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 4 figs.

  7. Thorium oxalate solubility and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monson, P.R. Jr.; Hall, R.

    1981-10-01

    Thorium was used as a stand-in for studying the solubility and precipitation of neptunium and plutonium oxalates. Thorium oxalate solubility was determined over a range of 0.001 to 10.0 in the concentration parameter [H 2 C 2 O 4 ]/[HNO 3 ] 2 . Morphology of thorium oxide made from the oxalate precipitates was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The different morphologies found for oxalate-lean and oxalate-rich precipitations were in agreement with predictions based on precipitation theory

  8. Uranium ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritcey, G.M.; Haque, K.E.; Lucas, B.H.; Skeaff, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The authors have developed a complete method of recovering separately uranium, thorium and radium from impure solids such as ores, concentrates, calcines or tailings containing these metals. The technique involves leaching, in at least one stage. The impure solids in finely divided form with an aqueous leachant containing HCl and/or Cl 2 until acceptable amounts of uranium, thorium and radium are dissolved. Uranium is recovered from the solution by solvent extraction and precipitation. Thorium may also be recovered in the same manner. Radium may be recovered by at least one ion exchange, absorption and precipitation. This amount of iron in the solution must be controlled before the acid solution may be recycled for the leaching process. The calcine leached in the first step is prepared in a two stage roast in the presence of both Cl 2 and a metal sulfide. The first stage is at 350-450 0 and the second at 550-700 0

  9. Solute coupled diffusion in osmotically driven membrane processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Nathan T; Cath, Tzahi Y

    2009-09-01

    Forward osmosis (FO) is an emerging water treatment technology with potential applications in desalination and wastewater reclamation. In FO, water is extracted from a feed solution using the high osmotic pressure of a hypertonic solution that flows on the opposite side of a semipermeable membrane; however, solutes diffuse simultaneously through the membrane in both directions and may jeopardize the process. In this study, we have comprehensively explored the effects of different operating conditions on the forward diffusion of solutes commonly found in brackish water and seawater, and reverse diffusion of common draw solution solutes. Results show that reverse transport of solutes through commercially available FO membranes range between 80 mg to nearly 3,000 mg per liter of water produced. Divalent feed solutes have low permeation rates (less than 1 mmol/m2-hr) while monovalent ions and uncharged solutes exhibit higher permeation. Findings have significant implications on the performance and sustainability of the FO process.

  10. Sorption of Uranium(VI and Thorium(IV by Jordanian Bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawwaz I. Khalili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purification of raw bentonite was done to remove quartz. This includes mixing the raw bentonite with water and then centrifuge it at 750 rpm; this process is repeated until white purified bentonite is obtained. XRD, XRF, FTIR, and SEM techniques will be used for the characterization of purified bentonite. The sorption behavior of purified Jordanian bentonite towards and Th4+ metal ions in aqueous solutions was studied by batch experiment as a function of pH, contact time, temperature, and column techniques at 25.0∘C and . The highest rate of metal ions uptake was observed after 18 h of shaking, and the uptake has increased with increasing pH and reached a maximum at . Bentonite has shown high metal ion uptake capacity toward uranium(VI than thorium(IV. Sorption data were evaluated according to the pseudo- second-order reaction kinetic. Sorption isotherms were studied at temperatures 25.0∘C, 35.0∘C, and 45.0∘C. The Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R sorption models equations were applied and the proper constants were derived. It was found that the sorption process is enthalpy driven for uranium(VI and thorium(IV. Recovery of uranium(VI and thorium(IV ions after sorption was carried out by treatment of the loaded bentonite with different concentrations of HNO3 1.0 M, 0.5 M, 0.1 M, and 0.01 M. The best percent recovery for uranium(VI and thorium(IV was obtained when 1.0 M HNO3 was used.

  11. Physical properties of thorium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Uitert, L.G.; Guggenheim, H.J.; O'Bryan, H.M.; Warner, A.W. Jr.; Brownlow, D.; Bernstein, J.L.; Pasteur, G.A.; Johnson, L.F.

    1976-01-01

    Thorium fluoride has many properties that make it of interest for infrared windows. It is transparent to about eleven microns, is unaffected by moisture, has a moderate hardness, and suffers little dimensional change upon heating

  12. Exploration of polyelectrolytes as draw solutes in forward osmosis processes

    KAUST Repository

    Ge, Qingchun

    2012-03-01

    The development of the forward osmosis (FO) process has been constrained by the slow development of appropriate draw solutions. Two significant concerns related to draw solutions are the draw solute leakage and intensiveenergy requirement in recycling draw solutes after the FO process. FO would be much attractive if there is no draw solute leakage and the recycle of draw solutes is easy and economic. In this study, polyelectrolytes of a series of polyacrylic acid sodium salts (PAA-Na), were explored as draw solutes in the FO process. The characteristics of high solubility in water and flexibility in structural configuration ensure the suitability of PAA-Na as draw solutes and their relative ease in recycle through pressure-driven membrane processes. The high water flux with insignificant salt leakage in the FO process and the high salt rejection in recycle processes reveal the superiority of PAA-Na to conventional ionic salts, such as NaCl, when comparing their FO performance via the same membranes. The repeatable performance of PAA-Na after recycle indicates the absence of any aggregation problems. The overall performance demonstrates that polyelectrolytes of PAA-Na series are promising as draw solutes, and the new concept of using polyelectrolytes as draw solutes in FO processes is applicable. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Competitive adsorption of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) ions from aqueous solution using triphosphate-crosslinked magnetic chitosan resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limin Zhou; Yuyan Jia; Juan Peng; Zhirong Liu; Essam Al-Zaini

    2014-01-01

    The triphosphate-crosslinked magnetic chitosan resins (TPP-MCR) with a diameter range of 200-350 nm were synthesized for the adsorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions from aqueous solutions. The adsorption experiments were conducted in both mono-component systems with pure actinide solution and bi-component systems with different U/Th mass ratios. The maximum adsorption capacities in mono-component systems determined by Langmuir model were 169.5 and 146.8 mg g -1 for U(VI) and Th(IV), respectively. In bi-component systems, U(VI) and Th(IV) adsorption capacities were reduced significantly, and the combined sorption capacities were substantially lower (almost halved) compared to those obtained by the addition of sorption capacities using mono-component solutions, indicating that U(VI) and Th(IV) compete for the same sorption sites. Adsorption-desorption experiments for five cycles illustrated the feasibility of the repeated use of TPP-MCR for the adsorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions. (author)

  14. Chemical processes during irradiated silver azide solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabykh, S.M.; Konovalova, F.I.

    1980-01-01

    Chemical processes taking place in course of irradiated AgN 3 dissolution in aqueous solutionns of ammonia, Na 2 S 23 and diluted HNO 3 are studied. Proceeding of the development reaction upon small particles of radiolytic silver resulting in the increase of the particle size is detected. Characteristics of the process are determined, sizes of the particles being evaluated

  15. Chromatographic behavior of carbonate complexes of lanthanides and of thorium in alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomida, E.K.

    1977-01-01

    The chromatographic behavior of some rare earth elements and thorium on alumina is studied in order to evaluate the possibility of separation from concentration of trace rare earths from high-purity thorium compounds. The effect of some factors on complex thorium carbonate formation and the extent of thorium solubility in sodium and potassium carbonate solutions investigated. The sorption of rare earth elements and thoriuum on alumina from alkali carbonate solution is observed, despite the reports that alumina acts as a cation exchanger in alkali media and that thorium and rare earths form stable anionic carbonate complexes. The formation of these elements between alumina and potassium carbonate solutions is studied as a function of pH, carbonate concentration and metal ion concentration. Also the elution of rare earths from alumina is studied and the best results are obtained with mineral acids and EDTA plus alkali carbonate solutions. The effect of some parameters as column aging, mixed solvents, column treatment with organic solvents, temperature, aluant concentration is investigated. Attempting to understand this sorption mechanism, some experiments with strongly basic anion exchanger and cation exchangers of strongly acid and weakly acid type are accomplished. It is observed that there are significant differences, in some conditions, between the behavior of rare earths and of thorium, pointing our the possibility of separation of one lanthanide from others and of these from thorium [pt

  16. Performance Evaluation of Absorbent Solution for Draw Solute Recovery in Forward Osmosis Desalination Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young; Lee, Jong Hoon; Lee, Kong Hoon; Kim, Yu-Chang; Oh, Dong Wook; Lee, Jungho

    2013-01-01

    Although forward osmosis desalination technology has drawn substantial attention as a next-generation desalination method, the energy efficiency of its draw solution treatment process should be improved for its commercialization. When ammonium bicarbonate is used as the draw solute, the system consists of forward-osmosis membrane modules, draw solution separation and recovery processes. Mixed gases of ammonia and carbon dioxide generated during the draws solution separation, need to be recovered to re-concentrate ammonium bicarbonate solution, for continuous operation as well as for the economic feasibility. The diluted ammonium bicarbonate solution has been proposed as the absorbent for the draw solution regeneration. In this study, experiments are conducted to investigate performance and features of the absorption corresponding to absorbent concentration. It is concluded that ammonium bicarbonate solution can be used to recover the generated ammonia and carbon dioxide. The results will be applied to design and operation of pilot-scale forward-osmosis desalination system

  17. Study of the chemical composition of waters in Morro do Ferro (MG), Brazil: transport of thorium and several tracer alements in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivetta, F.R.

    1983-01-01

    The chemical composition of surface and well waters in the Morro do Ferro (Pocos de Caldas-MG.) Brazil, because the transport in solution may represent one important way of environmental contamination is studied. Samples of one stream in the base of the hill, of perfuration wells and of one galery were analysed in the period from 1980 (October) to 1982 (May). The contents of Mn, Fe, SiO 2 , SO 2- 4 , PO 3- 4 , NO - 3 and CO 2 is analysed in situ. (M.J.C.) [pt

  18. Zirconium behaviour in purex process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, J.

    1982-01-01

    The extraction behaviour of zirconium, as fission product, in TBP/diluent- HNO 3 -H 2 O systems, simulating Purex solutions, is studied. The main purpose is to attain an increasing in the zirconium decontamination factor by adjusting the extraction parameters. Equilibrium diagram, TBP concentration, aqueous:organic ratio, salting-out effects and, uranium loading in the organic phase were the main factors studied. All these experiments had been made with zirconium in the 10 - 2 - 10 - 3 concentration range. The extractant degradation products influence uppon the zirconium behaviour was also verified. With the obtained data it was possible to introduce some modification in the standard Purex flow-sheet in order to obtain the uranium product with higher zirconium decontamination. (Author) [pt

  19. Optical metrology for advanced process control: full module metrology solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdog, Cornel; Turovets, Igor

    2016-03-01

    Optical metrology is the workhorse metrology in manufacturing and key enabler to patterning process control. Recent advances in device architecture are gradually shifting the need for process control from the lithography module to other patterning processes (etch, trim, clean, LER/LWR treatments, etc..). Complex multi-patterning integration solutions, where the final pattern is the result of multiple process steps require a step-by-step holistic process control and a uniformly accurate holistic metrology solution for pattern transfer for the entire module. For effective process control, more process "knobs" are needed, and a tighter integration of metrology with process architecture.

  20. Recovery of thorium and rare earths by their peroxides precipitation from a residue produced in the thorium purification facility; Recuperacao de torio e terras raras via peroxido do residuo originado na unidade de purificacao de torio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Antonio Alves de

    2008-07-01

    As consequence of the operation of a Thorium purification facility, for pure Thorium Nitrate production, the IPEN (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares) has stored away a solid residue called RETOTER (REsiduo de TOrio e TErras Raras). The RETOTER is rich in Rare-Earth Elements and significant amount of Thorium-232 and minor amount of Uranium. Furthermore it contains several radionuclides from the natural decay series. Significant radioactivity contribution is generated by the Thorium descendent, mainly the Radium-228(T{sub 1/2}=5.7y), known as meso thorium and Thorium-228(T{sub 1/2} 1.90y). An important thorium daughter is the Lead-208, a stable isotope present with an expressive quantity. After the enclosure of the operation of the Thorium purification facility, many researches have been developed for the establishment of methodologies for recovery of Thorium, Rare-Earth Elements and Lead-208 from the RETOTER. This work presents a method for RETOTER decontamination, separating and bordering upon some radioactive isotopes. The residue was digested with nitric acid and the Radium-228 was separated by the Barium Sulphate co-precipitation procedure. Finally, the Thorium was separated by the peroxide precipitation and the Rare-Earth Elements were also recovered by the Rare-Earth peroxide precipitation in the filtrate solution.(author)

  1. Operation of CANDU power reactor in thorium self-sufficient fuel cycle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cost of thorium mining is much less than that of uranium because the radiation danger in the process of thorium mining is. ∼100 times less than in the uranium mining. Possibilities of commercial production of 233U in nuclear reactors were discussed many times in publications in connection with thorium–uranium fuel cycle.

  2. Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Googin, John M.; Napier, John M.; Makarewicz, Mark A.; Meredith, Paul F.

    1986-01-01

    A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

  3. Electrochemical processing of nitrate waste solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genders, D.; Weinberg, N.; Hartsough, D. (Electrosynthesis Co., Inc., Cheektowaga, NY (United States))

    1992-10-07

    The second phase of research performed at The Electrosynthesis Co., Inc. has demonstrated the successful removal of nitrite and nitrate from a synthetic effluent stream via a direct electrochemical reduction at a cathode. It was shown that direct reduction occurs at good current efficiencies in 1,000 hour studies. The membrane separation process is not readily achievable for the removal of nitrites and nitrates due to poor current efficiencies and membrane stability problems. A direct reduction process was studied at various cathode materials in a flow cell using the complete synthetic mix. Lead was found to be the cathode material of choice, displaying good current efficiencies and stability in short and long term tests under conditions of high temperature and high current density. Several anode materials were studied in both undivided and divided cell configurations. A divided cell configuration was preferable because it would prevent re-oxidation of nitrite by the anode. The technical objective of eliminating electrode fouling and solids formation was achieved although anode materials which had demonstrated good stability in short term divided cell tests corroded in 1,000 hour experiments. The cause for corrosion is thought to be F[sup [minus

  4. Drying characteristics of thorium fuel corrosion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.-E. Lords

    2004-07-01

    The open literature and accessible US Department of Energy-sponsored reports were reviewed for the dehydration and rehydration characteristics of potential corrosion products from thorium metal and thorium oxide nuclear fuels. Mixed oxides were not specifically examined unless data were given for performance of mixed thorium-uranium fuels. Thorium metal generally corrodes to thorium oxide. Physisorbed water is readily removed by heating to approximately 200 °C. Complete removal of chemisorbed water requires heating above 1000 °C. Thorium oxide adsorbs water well in excess of the amount needed to cover the oxide surface by chemisorption. The adsorption of water appears to be a surface phenomenon; it does not lead to bulk conversion of the solid oxide to the hydroxide. Adsorptive capacity depends on both the specific surface area and the porosity of the thorium oxide. Heat treatment by calcination or sintering reduces the adsorption capacity substantially from the thorium oxide produced by metal corrosion.

  5. Recovery of radiogenic lead-208 from a residue of thorium and rare earths obtained during the operation of a thorium purification pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seneda, Jose Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Brazil has a long tradition in thorium technology, from mineral dressing (monazite) to the nuclear grade thorium compounds. The estimate reserves are 1200,000. ton of ThO 2 . As a consequence from the work of thorium purification pilot plant at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-CNEN/IPEN-SP, about 25 ton of a sludge containing thorium and rare earths was accumulated. It comes as a raffinate and washing solutions from thorium solvent extraction. This sludge, a crude hydroxide named RETOTER contains thorium, rare earths and minor impurities including the radiogenic lead-208, with abundance 88.34 %. This work discusses the results of the studies and main parameters for its recovery by anionic ion exchange technique in the hydrochloric system. The isotope abundance of this lead was analyzed by high resolution mass spectrometer (ICPMS) and thermoionic mass spectrometer (TIMS) and the data was used to calculate the thermal neutron capture cross section. The value of σγ 0 = 14.6±0.7 mb was found, quite different from the σγ 0 = 174.2 ± 7.0 mb measure cross section for the natural lead. Preliminary study for the thorium and rare earths separation and recovery was discussed as well. (author)

  6. Recovery of radiogenic lead-208 from a residue of thorium and rare earths obtained during the operation of a thorium nitrate purification pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seneda, Jose Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Brazil has a long tradition in thorium technology, from mineral dressing (monazite) to the nuclear grade thorium compounds. The estimate reserves are 1200,000. ton of ThO 2 . As a consequence from the work of thorium purification pilot plant at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-CNEN/SP, about 25 ton of a sludge containing thorium and rare earths was accumulated. It comes as a raffinate and washing solutions from thorium solvent extraction. This sludge, a crude hydroxide named RETOTER contains thorium, rare earths and minor impurities including the radiogenic lead-208, with abundance 88.34 %. This work discusses the results of the studies and main parameters for its recovery by anionic ion exchange technique in the hydrochloric system. The isotope abundance of this lead was analyzed by high resolution mass spectrometer (ICPMS) and thermoionic mass spectrometer (TIMS) and the data was used to calculate the thermal neutron capture cross section. The value of s ? o = 14.6 +/- 0.7 mb was found, quite different from the s ? o = 174.2 +/- 7.0 mb measure cross section for the natural lead. Preliminary study for the thorium and rare earths separation and recovery was discussed as well. (author)

  7. Thorium Energy for the World

    CERN Document Server

    Revol, Jean-Pierre; Bourquin, Maurice; Kadi, Yacine; Lillestol, Egil; De Mestral, Jean-Christophe; Samec, Karel

    2016-01-01

    The Thorium Energy Conference (ThEC13) gathered some of the world’s leading experts on thorium technologies to review the possibility of destroying nuclear waste in the short term, and replacing the uranium fuel cycle in nuclear systems with the thorium fuel cycle in the long term. The latter would provide abundant, reliable and safe energy with no CO2 production, no air pollution, and minimal waste production. The participants, representatives of 30 countries, included Carlo Rubbia, Nobel Prize Laureate in physics and inventor of the Energy Amplifier; Jack Steinberger, Nobel Prize Laureate in physics; Hans Blix, former Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Rolf Heuer, Director General of CERN; Pascal Couchepin, former President of the Swiss Confederation; and Claude Haegi, President of the FEDRE, to name just a few. The ThEC13 proceedings are a source of reference on the use of thorium for energy generation. They offer detailed technical reviews of the status of thorium energy ...

  8. Indirect complexometric determination of thorium(IV) using sodium fluoride as masking agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreekumar, N.V.; Nazareth, R.A.; Narayana, B.; Hegde, P.; Manjunatha, B.R.

    2002-01-01

    A complexometric method for the determination of thorium(IV) in presence of other metal ions based on the selective masking ability of sodium fluoride towards thorium is described. Thorium(IV) present in a given sample solution is first complexed with a known excess of EDTA and the surplus EDTA is titrated against bismuth nitrate solution at pH 2-3 using xylenol orange as indicator. A known excess of sodium fluoride (5 %) is then added and the EDTA released from the Th-EDTA complex is titrated against standard bismuth nitrate solution. Reproducible and accurate results are obtained for 5 mg to 280 mg of thorium with relative errors ±0.65 % and standard deviations /leq 0.75 mg. The interference of various ions was studied. (author)

  9. Thorium (IV) toxicity of green microalgae from Scenedesmus and Monoraphidium genera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz, Juliana Cristina de

    2009-01-01

    The toxicity of thorium by two green microalgae species, Monoraphidium sp. and Scenedesmus sp was studied. During the toxicity tests, the microalgae cultures were inoculated in ASM-I culture medium in the presence and absence of thorium (cultures at pH 8.0 and 6.0 in the absence of thorium, - control - and at pH 6.0 for thorium concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 100.0 mg/L Th). Its effect was monitored by direct counting on Fuchs-Rosenthal chamber and with the help of software developed by the group during the experiments. The difference in pH value in the culture medium did not affect the growth of the microalgae, and pH 6.0 was chosen as a reference in order not to compromise solubility and speciation of thorium in solution. The toxicity of the metal over the species was observed just for thorium concentrations over 50.0 mg/L. A Monoraphidium sp. culture containing 6.25x10 5 microorganisms/mL reached a final concentration of 5.52x10 7 microorganisms/mL in the presence of thorium in the concentration of 10.0 mg/L. If we consider the 100.0 ppm thorium solution reached a final concentration of 8.57x10 6 microorganisms/mL. Control tests indicated a final concentration of 2.51x10 7 microorganisms/mL at the end of the growth. Scenedesmus sp. cells proved to be more resistant to the presence of thorium in solution. Low concentrations of the radionuclide favored the growth of these microalgae. A culture containing 7.65x10 5 microorganisms/mL reached a final concentration of 2.25x10 6 microorganisms/mL, in the absence of thorium in the medium. Toxicological tests indicated a final culture concentration of 5.87x10 6 microorganisms/mL in the presence of 0.5 mg/L thorium. The software used for comparison of direct count method proved to be very useful for the improvement of accuracy of the results obtained and a decrease in the uncertainty in counting. Beyond these advantages it also allowed recording of the data. From the present results one can conclude, that the presence

  10. Advanced thorium cycles in LWRs and HWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radkowsky, A.

    The main aspects of advanced thorium cycles in LWRs and HWRs are reviewed. New concepts include the seed blanket close packed heavy water breeder, the light water seed blanket thorium burner and self-induced thorium cycle in CANDU type reactors. (author)

  11. Business Process Management Solutions Performance Tuning and Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra FLOREA

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Business Process Management (BPM solutions provide full integration between business and IT requirements, ensuring that the business requirement adapt more easily to the environmental changes. Given that today's business environment is characterized by ever growing dynamism, the use of BPM solutions can provide additional consistency and opportunities for rapid alignment to change. In this article we discus some of the standards and technologies for BPM solutions, we present several proposals for the lifecycle of a business process and also the main stages of our own proposal for a methodology for developing a BPM solution. Also we analyze one of the most popular BPM solutions on the market (Web Sphere Business Process Management suite and present some key tuning and deployment guidelines

  12. Effect of Thorium on Growth and Uptake of Some Elements by Maize Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shobaki, M.E.E.

    2012-01-01

    A pot experiment (sand culture) was carried out to investigate the effect of thorium on maize dry matter yield, contents and uptake of N,P ,K, Na and Fe and thorium accumulation in maize plant.The pots were contaminated by thorium as Thorium Nitrate(Th (NO 3 ) 4 ,H 2 O)at concentrations 0,5,10,11,12,13,14,15 and 50 ppm. Pots irrigated by 1/10 Hogland solution for 15 days, increased tol/4 Hogland solution after that.The results show that the dry matter (shoot, root and whole plant)decreased with increasing thorium concentration in soil up to 12 ppm and slightly increased with increasing Th to 13 ppm . The Nitrogen content and its uptake decreased with increasing thorium concentration in media growth up to 11 ppm .They were slightly increased at Th concentration between 11-14 ppm in maize shoot and root. The shoots always contained N-content and uptake more than that found in roots . P- uptake decreased in both shoots and roots with increasing in thorium concentration in media growth.

  13. Calculation of period processing solution syrup in vacuum apparatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Slavyanskii

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Important and crucial element in the management of the technological flow of production of sugar product standards is the period of time the enrichment of massecuite, since its neutralization in the process of crystal formation in vacuum apparatus, excess sugar solution. Although currently proposed and implemented in the industry, including as a front-end accompany the process, a number of ways in the real world sugar production in many cases have to resort to the services of an experienced operator. It is obvious that in any case it is necessary to have a surround-dependent glucose solution data on time for the excess sugar solution into the vacuum apparatus. With regard to the period of the enrichment of depleted sucrose solution are entered into this substance excess sucrose solution, it should be noted that this problem is theoretically still insufficiently developed. It is obvious that for practical purposes it is desirable to have a simple and convenient for engineering calculation of sugar processing time dependencies of the specified volume of water from the operating parameters of the process (the required concentration of sucrose, temperature of the solution stirring. The problem is the quantitative analysis of sucrose crystallization in vacuum apparatus, including the timing of enrichment solution to the excess syrup, period of time processing massecuite total this apparatus has been investigated in many works. However, due to its importance to the task of obtaining commercial sugar high standards this issue required further in-depth examination. In the article to support the enrichment process solution sucrose due to neutralize this solvent system in vacuum apparatus, from the standpoint of diffusion theory provides a more reasonable compared to known so far, quantitative analysis of this process. Where as sucrose crystals team are considering a system of balls, uniformly distributed in vacuum apparatus. On the basis of the solution

  14. Potential Radon-222 Emissions from the Thorium Nitrate Stockpile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, J.W.

    2003-09-04

    The Defense National Stockpile Center (DNSC), a field level activity of the Defense Logistics Agency, has stewardship of a stockpile of thorium nitrate that has been in storage for decades. The thorium nitrate stockpile was produced from 1959 to 1964 for the Atomic Energy Commission and previously has been under the control of several federal agencies. The stockpile consists of approximately 7 million pounds of thorium nitrate crystals (hydrate form) stored at two depot locations in the United States (75% by weight at Curtis Bay, Maryland, and 25% by weight at Hammond, Indiana). The material is stored in several configurations in over 21,000 drums. The U.S. Congress has declared the entire DNSC thorium nitrate stockpile to be in excess of the needs of the Department of Defense. Part of DNSC's mission is to safely manage the continued storage, future sales, and/or disposition of the thorium nitrate stockpile. Historically, DNSC has sold surplus thorium nitrate to domestic and foreign companies, but there is no demand currently for this material. Analyses conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 2001 demonstrated that disposition of the thorium nitrate inventory as a containerized waste, without processing, is the least complex and lowest-cost option for disposition. A characterization study was conducted in 2002 by ORNL, and it was determined that the thorium nitrate stockpile may be disposed of as low-level waste. The Nevada Test Site (NTS) was used as a case study for the disposal alternative, and special radiological analyses and waste acceptance requirements were documented. Among the special radiological considerations is the emission of {sup 220}Rn and {sup 222}Rn from buried material. NTS has a performance objective on the emissions of radon: 20 pCi m{sup -2} sec{sup -1} at the surface of the disposal facility. The radon emissions from the buried thorium nitrate stockpile have been modeled. This paper presents background information and

  15. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1992-03-31

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 5 figs.

  16. Radiochemical separation of thorium acetylacetonate from other thorium species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solache Rios, M.; Tenorio, D.

    1987-01-16

    A solvent extraction technique to separate different chemical species of thorium is presented. The products formed by the chemical effects of the (n,el) reaction on the Th(acac)/sub 4/ were separated by this method and the retention value was measured. 6 refs.

  17. Experiences in running solvent extraction plant for thorium compounds [Paper No. : V-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalkrishnan, C.R.; Bhatt, J.P.; Kelkar, G.K.

    1979-01-01

    Indian Rare Earths Ltd. operates a Plant using thorium concentrates as raw material, employing hydrocarbonate route, for the manufacture of thorium compounds. A small demonstration solvent extraction plant designed by the Chemical Engineering Division, B.A.R.C. is also being operated for the same purpose using a partly purified thorium hydrocarbonate as raw material. In the solvent extraction process, separation of pure thorium is done in mixer settlers using 40% mixture of tri-butyl phosphate in kerosene. Though a comparatively purer raw material of hydrocarbonate than thorium concentrate is used, heavy muck formation is encountered in the extraction stage. Production of nuclear grade thorium oxide has been successful so far as quality is concerned. The quality of thorium nitrate suffers in the yellow colouration and high phosphate content, the former being only partly controlled through the use of pretreated kerosene. When a larger solvent extraction plant is to be designed to use thorium concentrates as raw material, some of the problems encountered will be considered. (author)

  18. Thorium in occupationally exposed men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehney, A. F.

    1999-01-01

    Higher than environmental levels of 232 Th have been found in autopsy samples of lungs and other organs from four former employees of a thorium refinery. Working periods of the subjects ranged from 3 to 24 years, and times from end of work to death ranged from 6 to 31 years. Examination of the distribution of thorium among the organs revealed poor agreement with the distribution calculated from the dosimetric models in Publication 30 of the International Commission on Radioprotection (ICRP). Concentrations in the lungs relative to pulmonary lymph nodes, bone or liver were much higher than calculated from the model for class Y thorium and the exposure histories of the workers. Much better agreement was found with more recently proposed models in Publications 68 and 69 of the ICRP. Radiation doses estimated from the amounts of thorium in the autopsy samples were compatible with health studies that found no significant difference in mortality from that of the general population of men in the US

  19. Assessment of Thorium Analysis Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putra, Sugili

    1994-01-01

    The Assessment of thorium analytical methods for mixture power fuel consisting of titrimetry, X-ray flouresence spectrometry, UV-VIS spectrometry, alpha spectrometry, emission spectrography, polarography, chromatography (HPLC) and neutron activation were carried out. It can be concluded that analytical methods which have high accuracy (deviation standard < 3%) were; titrimetry neutron activation analysis and UV-VIS spectrometry; whereas with low accuracy method (deviation standard 3-10%) were; alpha spectrometry and emission spectrography. Ore samples can be analyzed by X-ray flourescnce spectrometry, neutron activation analysis, UV-VIS spectrometry, emission spectrography, chromatography and alpha spectometry. Concentrated samples can be analyzed by X-ray flourescence spectrometry; simulation samples can be analyzed by titrimetry, polarography and UV-VIS spectrometry, and samples of thorium as minor constituent can be analyzed by neutron activation analysis and alpha spectrometry. Thorium purity (impurities element in thorium samples) can be analyzed by emission spectography. Considering interference aspects, in general analytical methods without molecule reaction are better than those involving molecule reactions (author). 19 refs., 1 tabs

  20. Synthesis and characterization of a thorium phosphate-diphosphate precursor: Th2(PO4)2(HPO4) · nH2O(n = 3 - 7)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichot, E.; Brandel, V.; Dacheux, N.; Genet, M.

    1999-01-01

    Thorium phosphate-diphosphate Th 4 (PO 4 ) 4 P 2 O 7 is synthesized, at high temperature, for a given ratio r = PO/Th equal to 3/2 from a thorium compound and a phosphating reactant whatever the chemical conditions. This compound, whose solubility is very low, can be loaded in situ and used as a host matrix for radwaste storage. One of the methods of synthesis is the precipitation of a precursor, thorium phosphate-hydrogen phosphate. This precursor is used as an adsorber for low concentrations of radionuclides and, after heating in air in the range of 800 deg. C - 1200 deg. C, is transformed into doped Th 4 (PO 4 ) 4 P 2 O 7 . The optimum conditions of the precipitation process have been determined. Starting from 0.5 M - 2 M solutions of thorium nitrate or chloride and (NH 4 ) 2 HPO 4 at pH = 9 - 9.5 at the ratio r = 3/2 a compound of general formula Th 2 (PO 4 ) 2 HPO 4 · nH 2 O(n = 3 - 7) is synthesized. Its physico-chemical properties have been also studied. (authors)

  1. PROCESS FOR RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES FROM IMPURE SOLUTIONS THEREOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilner, S.B.

    1959-11-01

    A process is presented for the recovery of uraninm values from impure solutions which are obtained, for example, by washing residual uranium salt or uranium metal deposits from stainless steel surfaces using an aqueous or certain acidic aqueous solutions. The solutions include uranyl and oxidized iron, chromium, nickel, and copper ions and may contain manganese, zinc, and silver ions. In accordance with one procedure. the uranyl ions are reduced to the uranous state, and the impurity ions are complexed with cyanide under acidic conditions. The solution is then treated with ammonium hydroxide or alkali metal hydroxide to precipitate uranous hydroxide away from the complexed impurity ions in the solution. Alternatively, an excess of alkali metal cyanide is added to the reduced solution until the solution becomes sufficiently alkaline for the uranons hydroxide to precipitate. An essential feature in operating the process is in maintaining the pH of the solution sufficiently acid during the complexing operation to prevent the precipitation of the impurity metal hydroxides.

  2. Feasibility Study of 1/3 Thorium-Plutonium Mixed Oxide Core

    OpenAIRE

    Cheuk Wah Lau; Henrik Nylén; Klara Insulander Björk; Urban Sandberg

    2014-01-01

    Thorium-plutonium mixed oxide (Th-MOX) fuel has become one of the most promising solutions to reduce a large and increasing plutonium stockpile. Compared with traditional uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (U-MOX) fuels, Th-MOX fuel has higher consumption rate of plutonium in LWRs. Besides, thorium based fuels have improved thermomechanical material properties compared with traditional U-MOX fuels. Previous studies on a full Th-MOX core have shown reduced efficiency in reactivity control mechanism...

  3. Role of thorium in the industry advantage of atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Santos, M.D. de; Goldemberg, J.; Lopes, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    Based in the utilization of others fossil substances, such as plutonium and uranium 233, produzed through the thorium and natural uranium (238), it is discussed the relative merits of alternative processes: to produce U233 on Pu 239 to substitute the initial load of U235. (M.C.K.) [pt

  4. Analytical solution for soil water redistribution during evaporation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Jidong; Yasufuku, Noriyuki; Liu, Qiang; Liu, Shiyu

    2013-01-01

    Simulating the dynamics of soil water content and modeling soil water evaporation are critical for many environmental and agricultural strategies. The present study aims to develop an analytical solution to simulate soil water redistribution during the evaporation process. This analytical solution was derived utilizing an exponential function to describe the relation of hydraulic conductivity and water content on pressure head. The solution was obtained based on the initial condition of saturation and an exponential function to model the change of surface water content. Also, the evaporation experiments were conducted under a climate control apparatus to validate the theoretical development. Comparisons between the proposed analytical solution and experimental result are presented from the aspects of soil water redistribution, evaporative rate and cumulative evaporation. Their good agreement indicates that this analytical solution provides a reliable way to investigate the interaction of evaporation and soil water profile.

  5. Solution Processed Zinc Oxide Thin-Film Transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Faber, Hendrik Andreas

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis different methods to deposit inorganic materials by solution processing were investigated. The properties of the resulting layers were examined and then incorporated into thin-film transistors. Furthermore, techniques to improve their device performances were explored. The wide band gap material ZnO was selected as active n-type semiconductor. It combines several beneficial attributes such as high transparency, good electron mobilities, and the possibility for solution processi...

  6. Solution processed pentacene thin films and their structural properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Chunlan; Zhang Xuhui; Zhang Fujia; Liu Yiyang; Zhang Haoli

    2007-01-01

    The paper reported the solution process of pentacene thin films from organic solvent O-dichlorobenzene. The pentacene thin films obtained from different conditions were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and UV-vis spectroscopy. The result shows that the pentacene solution was successfully obtained at a minimum temperature of 40 deg. C. The optimum temperature of forming pentacene thin films was 100 deg. C

  7. Analysis of Uranium and Thorium in Waste Water from Rare Earth Research and Development by ICP Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichestapong, Pipat; Injareon, Uthaiwan

    2007-08-01

    Full text: Waste water from Rare Earth Research and Development Center (RRDC) was analyzed to determine uranium and thorium concentration using ICP spectrometry. RRDC processes monazite ore to separate uranium, thorium and rare earth elements from the ore. Water samples from the ditch surrounding the center and from the canal nearby were also analyzed. Matrix spike technique was applied in this analysis. It was found that the highest concentration of uranium and thorium in the waste water samples were 3028±11 and 439±7 ppb, respectively. The concentration of uranium and thorium in the waste water samples were higher than those in water samples from the ditch and canal

  8. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR PROTACTINIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, E.K.; Katzin, L.I.; Wolf, M.J.

    1961-04-01

    A process is described for separating protactinium from thorium present together as the nitrates in a 0.1 to 10 N nitric acid solution. The separation is carried out by extraction with an aliphatic alcohol, ketone, and/or ester having at least six carbon atoms, such as n-amyl acetate, 2-ethyl hexanol, and diisopropyl ketone.

  9. Thorium: Issues and prospects in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AL-Areqi, Wadeeah M.; Majid, Amran Ab.; Sarmani, Sukiman; Bahri, Che Nor Aniza Che Zainul [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Malaysia. walareqi@yahoo.com (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    In Malaysia, thorium exists in minerals and rare earth elements production residue. The average range of thorium content in Malaysian monazite and xenotime minerals was found about 70,000 and 15,000 ppm respectively. About 2,636 tonnes of Malaysian monazite was produced for a period of 5 years (2006-2010) and based on the above data, it can be estimated that Malaysian monazite contains about 184.5 tonnes of thorium. Although thorium can become a major radiological problem to our environment, but with the significant deposit of thorium in Malaysian monazite, it has a prospect as a future alternative fuel in nuclear technology. This paper will discuss the thorium issues in Malaysia especially its long term radiological risks to public health and environment at storage and disposal stages, the prospect of exploring and producing high purity thorium from our rare earth elements minerals for future thorium based reactor. This paper also highlights the holistic approach in thorium recovery from Malaysian rare earth element production residue to reduce its radioactivity and extraction of thorium and rare earth elements from the minerals with minimum radiological impact to health and environment.

  10. Abundant thorium as an alternative nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker Schaffer, Marvin

    2013-01-01

    It has long been known that thorium-232 is a fertile radioactive material that can produce energy in nuclear reactors for conversion to electricity. Thorium-232 is well suited to a variety of reactor types including molten fluoride salt designs, heavy water CANDU configurations, and helium-cooled TRISO-fueled systems. Among contentious commercial nuclear power issues are the questions of what to do with long-lived radioactive waste and how to minimize weapon proliferation dangers. The substitution of thorium for uranium as fuel in nuclear reactors has significant potential for minimizing both problems. Thorium is three times more abundant in nature than uranium. Whereas uranium has to be imported, there is enough thorium in the United States alone to provide adequate grid power for many centuries. A well-designed thorium reactor could produce electricity less expensively than a next-generation coal-fired plant or a current-generation uranium-fueled nuclear reactor. Importantly, thorium reactors produce substantially less long-lived radioactive waste than uranium reactors. Thorium-fueled reactors with molten salt configurations and very high temperature thorium-based TRISO-fueled reactors are both recommended for priority Generation IV funding in the 2030 time frame. - Highlights: • Thorium is an abundant nuclear fuel that is well suited to three advanced reactor configurations. • Important thorium reactor configurations include molten salt, CANDU, and TRISO systems. • Thorium has important nuclear waste disposal advantages relative to pressurized water reactors. • Thorium as a nuclear fuel has important advantages relative to weapon non-proliferation

  11. Process for disposal of aqueous solutions containing radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombo, P.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Becker, W.W.

    1979-01-01

    A process for disposing of radioactive aqueous waste solutions whereby the waste solution is utilized as the water of hydration to hydrate densified powdered portland cement in a leakproof container; said waste solution being dispersed without mechanical inter-mixing in situ in said bulk cement, thereafter the hydrated cement body is impregnated with a mixture of a monomer and polymerization catalyst to form polymer throughout the cement body. The entire process being carried out while maintaining the temperature of the components during the process at a temperature below 99 0 C. The container containing the solid polymer-impregnated body is thereafter stored at a radioactive waste storage dump such as an underground storage dump

  12. Process for disposal of aqueous solutions containing radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombo, P.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Becker, W.W.

    1979-01-01

    A process for disposing of radioactive aqueous waste solution in which the waste solution is utilized as the water of hydration to hydrate densified powdered portland cement in a leakproof container is described. The waste solution is dispersed without mechanical inter-mixing in situ in the bulk cement. Thereafter the hydrated cement body is impregnated with a mixture of a monomer and polymerization catalyst to form polymer throughout the cement body. The entire process is carried out while the temperature of the components during the process is maintained at a temperature below 99 0 C. The container containing the solid polymerimpregnated body is thereafter stored at a radioactive waste storage dump such as an underground storage dump

  13. Actinide solution processing at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1039, for radioactive solution removal and processing at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado. The proposal for solution removal and processing is in response to independent safety assessments and an agreement with the State of Colorado to remove mixed residues at Rocky Flats and reduce the risk of future accidents. Monthly public meetings were held during the scoping and preparation of the EA. The scope of the EA included evaluations of alternative methods and locations of solution processing. A comment period from February 20, 1995 through March 21, 1995 was provided to the public and the State of Colorado to offer written comment on the EA. Comments were received from the State of Colorado and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. A response to the agency comments is included in the Final EA

  14. Conformal transistor arrays based on solution-processed organic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoli; Zhang, Bing; Tang, Qingxin; Ding, Xueyan; Wang, Shuya; Zhou, Yuying; Tong, Yanhong; Liu, Yichun

    2017-11-13

    Conformal transistor array based on solution-processed organic crystals, which can provide sensory and scanning features for monitoring, biofeedback, and tracking of physiological function, presents one of the most promising technologies for future large-scale low-cost wearable and implantable electronics. However, it is still a huge challenge for the integration of solution-processed organic crystals into conformal FETs owing to a generally existing swelling phenomenon of the elastic materials and the lack of the corresponding device fabrication technology. Here, we present a promising route to fabricate a conformal field-effect transistor (FET) array based on solution-processed TIPS-pentacene single-crystal micro/nanowire array. By simply drop-casting the organic solution on an anti-solvent photolithography-compatible electrode with bottom-contact coplanar configuration, the transistor array can be formed and can conform onto uneven objects. Excellent electrical properties with device yield as high as 100%, field-effect mobility up to 0.79 cm 2 V -1 s -1 , low threshold voltage, and good device uniformity are demonstrated. The results open up the capability of solution-processed organic crystals for conformal electronics, suggesting their substantial promise for next-generation wearable and implantable electronics.

  15. All-solution-processed flexible thin film piezoelectric nanogenerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Sung Yun; Kim, Sunyoung; Kim, Kyongjun [Program in Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju-Hyuck; Kim, Sang-Woo [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology, School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chong-Yun; Yoon, Seok-Jin [Electronic Materials Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Youn Sang [Program in Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, 864-1 Iui-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-27

    An all-solution-processed flexible thin film piezoelectric nanogenerator is demonstrated using reactive zinc hydroxo-condensation and a screen-printing method. The highly elastic thin film allows the piezoelectric energy to be generated through the mechanical rolling and muscle stretching of the piezoelectric unit. This flexible all solution-processed nanogenerator is promising for use in future energy harvesters such as wearable human patches and mobile electronics. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Molecular solution processing of metal chalcogenide thin film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenbing

    The barrier to utilize solar generated electricity mainly comes from their higher cost relative to fossil fuels. However, innovations with new materials and processing techniques can potentially make cost effective photovoltaics. One such strategy is to develop solution processed photovoltaics which avoid the expensive vacuum processing required by traditional solar cells. The dissertation is mainly focused on two absorber material system for thin film solar cells: chalcopyrite CuIn(S,Se)2 (CISS) and kesterite Cu2ZnSn(S,Se) 4 organized in chronological order. Chalcopyrite CISS is a very promising material. It has been demonstrated to achieve the highest efficiency among thin film solar cells. Scaled-up industry production at present has reached the giga-watt per year level. The process however mainly relies on vacuum systems which account for a significant percentage of the manufacturing cost. In the first section of this dissertation, hydrazine based solution processed CISS has been explored. The focus of the research involves the procedures to fabricate devices from solution. The topics covered in Chapter 2 include: precursor solution synthesis with a focus on understanding the solution chemistry, CISS absorber formation from precursor, properties modification toward favorable device performance, and device structure innovation toward tandem device. For photovoltaics to have a significant impact toward meeting energy demands, the annual production capability needs to be on TW-level. On such a level, raw materials supply of rare elements (indium for CIS or tellurium for CdTe) will be the bottleneck limiting the scalability. Replacing indium with zinc and tin, earth abundant kesterite CZTS exhibits great potential to reach the goal of TW-level with no limitations on raw material availability. Chapter 3 shows pioneering work towards solution processing of CZTS film at low temperature. The solution processed devices show performances which rival vacuum

  17. Organic electronic devices with multiple solution-processed layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lassiter, Brian E.; Zimmerman, Jeramy D.

    2015-08-04

    A method of fabricating a tandem organic photosensitive device involves depositing a first layer of an organic electron donor type material film by solution-processing of the organic electron donor type material dissolved in a first solvent; depositing a first layer of an organic electron acceptor type material over the first layer of the organic electron donor type material film by a dry deposition process; depositing a conductive layer over the interim stack by a dry deposition process; depositing a second layer of the organic electron donor type material over the conductive layer by solution-processing of the organic electron donor type material dissolved in a second solvent, wherein the organic electron acceptor type material and the conductive layer are insoluble in the second solvent; depositing a second layer of an organic electron acceptor type material over the second layer of the organic electron donor type material film by a dry deposition process, resulting in a stack.

  18. Thorium fuel cycle - Potential benefits and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-05-01

    There has been significant interest among Member States in developing advanced and innovative technologies for safe, proliferation resistant and economically efficient nuclear fuel cycles, while minimizing waste and environmental impacts. This publication provides an insight into the reasons for renewed interest in the thorium fuel cycle, different implementation scenarios and options for the thorium cycle and an update of the information base on thorium fuels and fuel cycles. The present TECDOC focuses on the upcoming thorium based reactors, current information base, front and back end issues, including manufacturing and reprocessing of thorium fuels and waste management, proliferation-resistance and economic issues. The concluding chapter summarizes future prospects and recommendations pertaining to thorium fuels and fuel cycles

  19. Use of thorium as tracer on study of groundwater of Botucatu sandstone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porto, Paulo Augusto d' A.; Menezes, Maria Angela B.C. de; Moreira, Rubens Martins; Reis Junior, Aluisio Souza; Kastner, Geraldo Frederico, E-mail: paap@cdtn.br, E-mail: menezes@cdtn.br, E-mail: rubens@cdtn.br, E-mail: reisas@cdtn.br, E-mail: gfk@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Thorium in some mineral compounds is very difficult to be dissolved in aqueous medium. To study the mobility of thorium in water, one alternative is to complex this element with EDTA, becoming possible to follow the behavior of thorium this medium. This way, in groundwater with low natural radioactivity and low {sup 232}Th activity, thorium can be used as a tracer. This paper describes the application of the complex Th-EDTA as a tracer applying the solution trough a sandstone sample made by rock from Botucatu Sandstone. The objective was to simulate the flow of groundwater inside the original rock aiming at future use of rare-earth elements complexed with EDTA as tracer. Alpha spectrometry technique was used to determine {sup 232}Th in the water samples with {sup 230}Th as inner-standard. (author)

  20. Kinetic study of the thorium phosphate - diphosphate dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dacheux, N.; Thomas, A.C.; Brandel, V.; Genet, M.

    2000-01-01

    The thorium phosphate-diphosphate Th 4 (PO 4 ) 4 P 2 O 7 (TPD) structure allows the replacement of large amounts of thorium by tetravalent actinides leading to the formation of solid solutions. This compound was obtained in powdered or sintered form after pressing at room temperature at 300-800 MPa then heating at 1250 deg. C for 10-30 hours. The resistance of this material to aqueous corrosion was determined by varying several parameters such as surface, leaching flow, acidity or temperature. It was thus possible to independently determine the influence of each parameter on the leaching rate provided that the saturation of the solution was not obtained. In acidic media, the partial order related to [H 3 O + ] was found to be in the 0.31-0.35 range while, in basic media, the partial order related to [OH - ] was almost the same (0.45). The activation energy (42 kJ/mol) was determined between 4 deg. C and 120 deg. C. Moreover, the addition of phosphate in the leachate slightly increased the TPD dissolution rate. When the saturation of the solution is reached, a gelatinous precipitate controls the thorium and phosphate concentrations. The complete characterization of this solid led to the proposed general formula Th 2 (PO 4 ) 2 (HPO 4 ). n H 2 O which conventional solubility product (at I = 0 M) is very low: K * S,0 10 -66.6±1.2 even in very acidic media. (authors)

  1. The evolutionary adoption of thorium beginning with its application in niche LWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drera, Saleem

    2015-01-01

    Since the inception of nuclear energy, the use of thorium as a nuclear fuel has been envisioned. Thorium boasts benefits, however, drawbacks which are both economic and technical including its the lack of a naturally occurring fissile isotope implies that its utility is inherently more difficult. The implementation of thorium as a nuclear fuel requires that it must provide sound technical advantages in combination with attractive economics as compared to standard uranium fuel. Revolutionary thorium concepts such as molten salt reactors and accelerator driven systems may provide theoretical merit, however, their exotic nature and associated technical challenges label them as long-term solutions at best. A near-to-medium term solution for thorium must be based on an evolutionary approach utilizing light/heavy water reactor platforms. While thorium does not provide a near-to-medium term complete replacement of uranium, it does provide substantial benefit within niche applications. To license and bring to market these niche fuels, Thor Energy and an international consortium of entities (including: Fortum, KAERI, Westinghouse, NNL, ITU, IFE, and a few other minor entities) have initiated a fuel development and irradiation test program to characterize the performance of these thoria-containing fuels. (author)

  2. All-solution-processed organic solar cells with conventional architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franeker, J.J. van; Voorthuijzen, W.P.; Gorter, H.; Hendriks, K.H.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Hadipour, A.; Andriessen, H.A.J.M.; Galagan, Y.O.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract All-solution processed organic solar cells with a conventional device structure were demonstrated. The evaporated low work function LiF/Al electrode was replaced by a printed high work function silver electrode combined with an additional electron transport layer (ETL). Two electron

  3. All-solution processed organic solar cells with top illumination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, B.R.; Shanmugam, S.; Teunissen, J.P.; Galagan, Y.

    2015-01-01

    All-solution processed organic solar cells with inverted device architecture were demonstrated. Devices contain opaque bottom electrodes and semitransparent top electrodes, resulting in top illuminated devices. Nanoparticles-based Ag ink was used for inkjet printing both top and bottom electrodes.

  4. On thorium and plutonium cocrystallization with calcium oxalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basalaeva, L.N.; Bekyasheva, T.A.; Popov, D.K.

    1987-01-01

    Study of possibility of 239 Pu and 234 Th concentration from bone ashe (calcium phosphate) hydrochloric acid solutions by coprecipitation with nonisotopic medium (CaC 2 O 4 ) for their further radiometry or alpha-spectrometry is carried out. Thorium and plutonium distribution coefficients in calcium oxalate precipitate - solution system, as well as coefficients of Th and Pu cocrystallization with CaC 2 O 4 and cocrystallization type are determined. Possibility of Pu and Th concentration from bone tissue solutions is demonstrated on small oxalate amount containing 25% of Ca total amount in bone tissue

  5. Minerals yearbook, 1991: Thorium. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedrick, J.B.

    1992-10-01

    Domestic mine production data for thorium-bearing monazite are developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines from a voluntary survey of U.S. operations entitled, 'Rare Earths, Thorium, and Scandium.' The one mine to which a survey form was sent responded, representing 100% of domestic production. Mine production data for thorium are withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary data. Statistics on domestic thorium consumption are developed by surveying various processors and end users, evaluating import-export data, and analyzing Government stockpile shipments

  6. Spectrophotometric determination of uranium and thorium with arsenazo III in the flow injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, M. das G.M. de.

    1986-12-01

    A simple system for flow injection analysis (FIA) with double confluence was built using a filter photocolorimeter, an analogic potentiometer, 'plexiglass' flow cuvettes, polyethylene colls and tubes, 'plexiglass' commuter and peristaltic pump to introduce solutions and gravity as flow source. The system was dimensioned and studied using only Arsenazo III solutions. Spectrophotometric methods for uranium and thorium using Arsenazo III were studied using a scanning spectrophotometer and after chosing adequate red filter, adapted to photocolorimetry using flow cuvettes and FIA. Synthetic samples, phosphate rock, and process samples from uranium recovery of dolomites were analysed. Rocks of Morro do Ferro (MG, Brazil), Caldasite (Baddeleyte + Zirconite), Zirconite, Monazite from a program for certification and certified rocks (Dunite DC-1, CANMET) were analysed without chemical separation of Th (IV) and with ion exchange separation in semi-micro columns of cation exchange resin (Dowex 50). (Author) [pt

  7. Combination of monthly gravity field solutions from different processing centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Yoomin; Meyer, Ulrich; Jäggi, Adrian

    2015-04-01

    Currently, the official GRACE Science Data System (SDS) monthly gravity field solutions are generated independently by the Centre for Space Research (CSR) and the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ). Additional GRACE SDS monthly fields are provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for validation and outside the SDS by a number of other institutions worldwide. Although the adopted background models and processing standards have been harmonized more and more by the various processing centers during the past years, notable differences still exist and the users are more or less left alone with a decision which model to choose for their individual applications. Combinations are well-established in the area of other space geodetic techniques, such as the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), where regular comparisons and combinations of space-geodetic products have tremendously increased the usefulness of the products in a wide range of disciplines and scientific applications. In the frame of the recently started Horizon 2020 project European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management (EGSIEM), a scientific combination service shall therefore be established to deliver the best gravity products for applications in Earth and environmental science research based on the unified knowledge of the European GRACE community. In a first step the large variety of available monthly GRACE gravity field solutions shall be mutually compared spatially and spectrally. We assess the noise of the raw as well as filtered solutions and compare the secular and seasonal periodic variations fitted to the monthly solutions. In a second step we will explore ways to generate combined solutions, e.g., based on a weighted average of the individual solutions using empirical weights derived from pair-wise comparisons. We will also assess the quality of such a combined solution and discuss the

  8. Fabrication of thorium nitrate at the factory at the Bouchet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, C.; Lorrain, Ch.; Mahut, R.; Mariette, R.; Muller, J.; Prugnard, J.

    1958-01-01

    A urano-thorianite mineral from Madagascar is industrially treated at the factory of the Bouchet in order to obtain pure thorium in the form of the nitrate and a uranium concentrate in the form of uranate. The required factory was designed and constructed in 1955 and 1956 by the firm Potasse et Engrais Chimiques (P.E.C.) on behalf of the French Atomic Energy authority. The mineral which has previously undergone a gravimetric sorting and enrichment at the mine, is in the form of a heavy rock (the density can be as high as 10), having a cubic structure. It consists principally of a mixture of thorium oxide and uranium oxide and contains between 50 and 75 per cent thorium and between 5 and 20 per cent of uranium. On the same sample a high content in either thorium or uranium in general corresponds to a low content in the other of the two metals; this rule is not however always obeyed absolutely. Among other elements present we shall only mention the Pb, Fe, Ce, Ra and other radioactive elements, since their presence influences the treatment of the mineral. We shall first briefly describe the process, which has already been described in previous publications, we consider to be worthy of attention. (author) [fr

  9. Complexation of thorium with pyridine monocarboxylates: A thermodynamic study by experiment and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rama Mohana Rao, D.; Rawat, Neetika; Manna, D.; Sawant, R.M.; Ghanty, T.K.; Tomar, B.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The thermodynamic parameters have been determined for the first time. ► The Th-picolinate complexation was exothermic in nature. ► The complexation of Th(IV) with the other two isomers was endothermic process. ► Isonicotinate forms stronger complexes than nicotinate with Th(IV). ► The theoretically calculated values are in line with the experimental results. -- Abstract: Complexation of thorium with pyridine monocarboxylates namely picolinic acid (pyridine-2-carboxylic acid), nicotinic acid (pyridine-3-carboxylic acid) and isonicotinic acid (pyridine-4-carboxylic acid) has been studied by potentiometry and calorimetry to determine the thermodynamic parameters (log K, ΔG, ΔH and ΔS) of complexation. All the studies were carried out at 1.0 M ionic strength adjusted by NaClO 4 and at a temperature of 298 K. The detailed analysis of potentiometric data by Hyperquad confirmed the formation of four complexes, ML i (i = 1–4) in case of picolinate but only one complex (ML) in case of nicotinate and isonicotinate. The stepwise formation constant for ML complex (log K ML ) of thorium-picolinate is higher than those of thorium-nicotinate and thorium-isonicotinate complexes. Further the changes in enthalpy during formation of thorium-picolinate complexes are negative whereas the same for the complexes of thorium with the other two isomers was positive. This difference in the complexation process is attributed to chelate formation in case of thorium-picolinate complexes in which the thorium ion is bound to the picolinate through both the nitrogen in the pyridyl ring and one of the carboxylate oxygen atoms. The complexation process of thorium-nicotinate and thorium-isonicotinate are found to be endothermic in nature and are entropy driven confirming the similar binding nature as in simple carboxylate complexes of thorium. The complexation energies, bond lengths and charges on each atom in the complexes of various possible geometries were calculated

  10. A solution process for inverted tandem solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen-Olsen, Thue Trofod; Bundgaard, Eva; Sylvester-Hvid, Kristian O.

    2011-01-01

    Tandem solar cells with normal and inverted device geometries were prepared by a solution process. Both device types were based on the use of zinc(II)oxide as the electron transporting layer (ETL). The hole transporting layer (HTL) was either PEDOT:PSS for normal geometry tandem solar cells...... or vanadium(V)oxide in the case of inverted tandem cells. It was found that the inverted tandem solar cells performed comparable or better than the normal geometry devices, showing that the connection structure of vanadium(V)oxide, Ag nanoparticles and zinc(II)oxide functions both as a good recombination...... layer, ensuring serial connection, and as a solvent barrier, protecting the first photoactive layer from processing of the second layer. This successfully demonstrates a tandem solar cell fabrication process fully compatible with state-of-the-art solution based automated production procedures....

  11. Colloidal quantum dot solids for solution-processed solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Mingjian

    2016-02-29

    Solution-processed photovoltaic technologies represent a promising way to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of solar energy harvesting. Among these, colloidal semiconductor quantum dot photovoltaics have the advantage of a spectrally tuneable infrared bandgap, which enables use in multi-junction cells, as well as the benefit of generating and harvesting multiple charge carrier pairs per absorbed photon. Here we review recent progress in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics, focusing on three fronts. First, we examine strategies to manage the abundant surfaces of quantum dots, strategies that have led to progress in the removal of electronic trap states. Second, we consider new device architectures that have improved device performance to certified efficiencies of 10.6%. Third, we focus on progress in solution-phase chemical processing, such as spray-coating and centrifugal casting, which has led to the demonstration of manufacturing-ready process technologies.

  12. Ruthenium speciation in model nuclear fuel process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koster, Anne L.; May, Iain; Sharrad, Clint A.; Wright, Des; Owens, Ivan F.; Charnock, John M.; Hennig, Christoph

    2004-01-01

    Ru speciation is being investigated systematically from models of high level waste solutions right through to the calcination process and the vitrified glass product. The characterisation of these species is complicated due to the fact that a wide range of ruthenium nitrosyl/nitrite/nitrate complexes can be present in nitric acid waste solutions. The general formula for these complexes is RuNO(NO 3 ) x (NO 2 ) y (OH) z (H 2 O) 5-x-y-z +3-x-y-z . A range of different techniques has been used for the characterisation of these species in solution, including electron absorption spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, multi-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. (authors)

  13. Neutron irradiation effects on the mechanical properties of thorium and thorium--carbon alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.C.P.

    1978-04-01

    The effects of neutron exposure to 3.0 x 10 18 neutrons/cm 2 on the mechanical properties of thorium and thorium-carbon alloy are described. Tensile measurements were done at six different test temperatures from 4 0 K to 503 0 K and at two strain rates. Thorium and thorium-carbon alloy are shown to display typical radiation hardening like other face-centered cubic metals. The yield drop phenomenon of the thorium-carbon alloy is unchanged after irradiation. The variation of shear stress and effective shear stress with test temperature was fitted to Seeger's and Fleischer's equations for irradiated and unirradiated thorium and thorium-carbon alloy. Neutron irradiation apparently contributes an athermal component to the yield strength. However, some thermal component is detected in the low temperature range. Strain-rate parameter is increased and activation volume is decreased slightly for both kinds of metal after irradiation

  14. Materials interface engineering for solution-processed photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Graetzel, Michael

    2012-08-15

    Advances in solar photovoltaics are urgently needed to increase the performance and reduce the cost of harvesting solar power. Solution-processed photovoltaics are cost-effective to manufacture and offer the potential for physical flexibility. Rapid progress in their development has increased their solar-power conversion efficiencies. The nanometre (electron) and micrometre (photon) scale interfaces between the crystalline domains that make up solution-processed solar cells are crucial for efficient charge transport. These interfaces include large surface area junctions between photoelectron donors and acceptors, the intralayer grain boundaries within the absorber, and the interfaces between photoactive layers and the top and bottom contacts. Controlling the collection and minimizing the trapping of charge carriers at these boundaries is crucial to efficiency. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  15. Reducing uranium and thorium level in Zircon: effect of heat treatment on rate of leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meor Yusoff Meor Sulaiman

    2002-01-01

    Considerable amount of uranium and thorium are found in Malaysian zircon and the level is much higher than the minimum value adopted by many importing countries. Selective leaching had been applied as an important technique to reduce these elements. An initial study was carried out using hydrochloric acid leaching system but the result was not favourable. The rate of uranium and thorium leached can be further improved by introducing a heat pretreatment process prior to leaching (Author)

  16. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON THORIUM (IV) SORPTION ONTO SODIC BENTONITE AND MAGNETIC BENTONITE

    OpenAIRE

    Didi, Mohamed A.; Miraoui, Abdelkader

    2017-01-01

    In thispaper, the liquid-solid extraction of Thorium (IV) is made by Sodic bentoniteand Magnetic bentonite. Magnetic adsorbent can be quickly separated from amedium by a simple magnetic process, in view of these properties; someparameters were studied to assess the performance of maghemite nanocompositeclay for the removal of Thorium ions. The operating variables studied areinitial La(III) concentration, pH, ionic strength, temperature and contacttime. The time needed for magnetic bentonite t...

  17. A contribution to the study of thorium and neptunium (IV) complexes in acidic phosphoric media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafar, M.

    1995-01-01

    The thorium and neptunium (IV) phosphate complexes formation in acidic media has been investigated, essentially at the indicator's level with 227 Th, 234 Th, 235 Np and 239 Np. Solvent extraction, a commonly used method for determining stability constants in solutions, was used with HDEHP in toluene. In order to get a better understanding of inorganic transparent gels formation in phosphoric aqueous solutions, the effect of the thorium concentration is also studied. Specific experimental conditions have been chosen in order to avoid the formation of chelate and hydrolysis in the aqueous solution. The equilibrium constants and stability constants are calculated, and the results are compared with literature. The results show that increasing the thorium concentration does not lead to polymer forms. refs., 42 figs., 19 tabs

  18. Some applications of x-ray fluorescence spectrography to the determination of uranium and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.W.

    1959-04-01

    Several methods for the determination of uranium and thorium by X-ray fluorescence spectrography are described. In pure solutions the sensitivity for these elements is 5-10 ppm. For solutions containing gross concentrations of impurities, strontium is added as an internal standard. Precision and accuracy of the determinations are about 1% when working in the optimum concentration range. (author)

  19. The processes of creating solutions in the context of uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butler, Ivan

    problems in developing countries, profitably. The thesis is a process study of commercial companies in order to learn how they make sense and organize solutions over time. Three cases taken from the access2innovation program are studied. The hypothesis guiding the research suggests that companies who...... are particularly relevant for other programs looking to leverage the capabilities of commercial companies as part of the overall agenda of solving complex social problems in developing countries....

  20. Solution-Processed Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Tandem Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Joshua J.

    2011-06-03

    Solution-processed tandem solar cells created from nanocrystal quantum dots with size-tuned energy levels are demonstrated. Prototype devices featuring interconnected quantum dot layers of cascaded energy gaps exhibit IR sensitivity and an open circuit voltage, V oc, approaching 1 V. The tandem solar cell performance depends critically on the optical and electrical properties of the interlayer. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Thorium and health: state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiterer, A.; Berard, Ph.; Menetrier, F.

    2010-01-01

    This report reviews data available in the literature on the subject: 'thorium and health'. Thorium is a natural radioactive element of the actinide series. It is widely distributed in the earth's crust and 99% is found as isotope thorium-232. Its various uses are explained by its chemical, physical, and nuclear properties. As a potential nuclear fuel, thorium is still in demonstration in pilot scale reactors. But thorium has already multiple and sometimes unknown industrial uses. Some mass market products are concerned like light bulb. This raises the issue of wastes, and of exposures of workers and public. Environmental exposure via food and drink of the general population is low, where as workers can be exposed to significant doses, especially during ore extraction. Data on bio-monitoring of workers and biokinetic of thorium, in particular those provided by ICRP, are gathered here. Studies on health effects and toxicity of thorium are scarce and mostly old, except outcomes of its previous medical use. Studies on other forms of thorium should be undertaken to provide substantial data on its toxicity. Concerning treatment, Ca-DTPA is the recommended drug even if its efficacy is moderate. LiHOPO molecule shows interesting results in animals, and further research on chelating agents is needed. (authors)

  2. Thorium Molten-Salt Nuclear Energy Synergetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo; Lecocq, A.; Kato, Yoshio; Mitachi, Kohshi.

    1990-01-01

    In the next century, the 'fission breeder' concept will not be practical to solve the global energy problems, including environmental and North-South problems. As a new measure, a simple rational Th molten salt breeding fuel cycle system, named 'Thorium Molten-Salt Nuclear Energy Synergetics (THORIMS-NES)', which composed of simple power stations and fissile producers, is proposed. This is effective to establish the essential improvement in issues of resources, safety, power-size flexibility, anti-nuclear proliferation and terrorism, radiowaste, economy, etc. securing the simple operation, maintenance, chemical processing, and rational breeding fuel cycle. As examples, 155 MWe fuel self-sustaining power station 'FUJI-II', 7 MWe pilot-plant 'miniFUJI-II', 1 GeV-300 mA proton Accelerator Molten-Salt Breeder 'AMSB', and their combined fuel cycle system are explained. (author)

  3. Solution-Processed Carbon Nanotube True Random Number Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaviria Rojas, William A; McMorrow, Julian J; Geier, Michael L; Tang, Qianying; Kim, Chris H; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C

    2017-08-09

    With the growing adoption of interconnected electronic devices in consumer and industrial applications, there is an increasing demand for robust security protocols when transmitting and receiving sensitive data. Toward this end, hardware true random number generators (TRNGs), commonly used to create encryption keys, offer significant advantages over software pseudorandom number generators. However, the vast network of devices and sensors envisioned for the "Internet of Things" will require small, low-cost, and mechanically flexible TRNGs with low computational complexity. These rigorous constraints position solution-processed semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as leading candidates for next-generation security devices. Here, we demonstrate the first TRNG using static random access memory (SRAM) cells based on solution-processed SWCNTs that digitize thermal noise to generate random bits. This bit generation strategy can be readily implemented in hardware with minimal transistor and computational overhead, resulting in an output stream that passes standardized statistical tests for randomness. By using solution-processed semiconducting SWCNTs in a low-power, complementary architecture to achieve TRNG, we demonstrate a promising approach for improving the security of printable and flexible electronics.

  4. Fisson product control by gamma spectrometry in Purex process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Maria A.; Matsuda, H.T.

    1982-01-01

    A radiometric method for fission product analysis by gamma spectrometry, to be applied for fission product control at an irradiated material processing facility, is described. Counting geometry was defined taking into account the activities of process solutions to be analysed, the remotely operated aliquotation device of the analytical cell and the available detection system. Natural and 19,91% enriched uranium samples were irradiated in order to simulate the composition of Purex process solutions. After a short decay time the samples were dissolved with HNO 3 and then conditioned in standard flasks with defined geometry. The spectra were obtained by a Ge(Li) semiconductor detector and analysed by the GELIGAM software system, using a floppy-disk connected to a PDP-11/05 computer. Libraries were prepared and calibrations were made with standard sources to fit the analysis of fission products in irradiated uranium solutions. It was possible to choose the best program to be used in routine analysis with the obtained data. (Author) [pt

  5. Transmutation Strategy Using Thorium-Reprocessed Fuel ADS for Future Reactors in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh Mai Vu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear power is believed to be a key to the energy security for a developing country like Vietnam where the power demanding increases rapidly every year. Nevertheless, spent nuclear fuel from nuclear power plants is the source of radiotoxic and proliferation risk. A conceptual design of ADS utilizing thorium fuel as a based fuel and reprocessed fuel as a seed for nuclear waste transmutation and energy production is proposed as one of the clean, safe, and economical solutions for the problem. In the design, 96 seed assemblies and 84 blanket assemblies were inserted into the core to make a heterogeneous subcritical core configuration. Introducing thorium fuel into the core offers an effective way to transmute plutonium and minor actinide (MA and gain energy from this process. Transmutation rate as a function of burnup is estimated using MCNPX 2.7.0 code. Results show that by using the seed-blanket designed ADS, at 40 GWd/t burnup, 192 kg of plutonium and 156 kg of MA can be eliminated. Equivalently, 1  ADS can be able to transmute the transuranic (TRU waste from 2  LWRs. 14 units of ADS would be required to eliminate TRUs from the future reactors to be constructed in Vietnam.

  6. Homogeneous Thorium Fuel Cycles in Candu Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyland, B.; Dyck, G.R.; Edwards, G.W.R.; Magill, M.

    2009-01-01

    The CANDU R reactor has an unsurpassed degree of fuel-cycle flexibility, as a consequence of its fuel-channel design, excellent neutron economy, on-power refueling, and simple fuel bundle [1]. These features facilitate the introduction and full exploitation of thorium fuel cycles in Candu reactors in an evolutionary fashion. Because thorium itself does not contain a fissile isotope, neutrons must be provided by adding a fissile material, either within or outside of the thorium-based fuel. Those same Candu features that provide fuel-cycle flexibility also make possible many thorium fuel-cycle options. Various thorium fuel cycles can be categorized by the type and geometry of the added fissile material. The simplest of these fuel cycles are based on homogeneous thorium fuel designs, where the fissile material is mixed uniformly with the fertile thorium. These fuel cycles can be competitive in resource utilization with the best uranium-based fuel cycles, while building up a 'mine' of U-233 in the spent fuel, for possible recycle in thermal reactors. When U-233 is recycled from the spent fuel, thorium-based fuel cycles in Candu reactors can provide substantial improvements in the efficiency of energy production from existing fissile resources. The fissile component driving the initial fuel could be enriched uranium, plutonium, or uranium-233. Many different thorium fuel cycle options have been studied at AECL [2,3]. This paper presents the results of recent homogeneous thorium fuel cycle calculations using plutonium and enriched uranium as driver fuels, with and without U-233 recycle. High and low burnup cases have been investigated for both the once-through and U-233 recycle cases. CANDU R is a registered trademark of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). 1. Boczar, P.G. 'Candu Fuel-Cycle Vision', Presented at IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on 'Fuel Cycle Options for LWRs and HWRs', 1998 April 28 - May 01, also Atomic Energy of Canada Report, AECL-11937. 2. P

  7. Determination of TBP in nitric solutions of process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuada, T.A.; Carvalho, E.I. de; Araujo, I. da C. de; Cohen, V.H.

    1988-01-01

    Heavy organic phases have been observed on some occasions during TBP extraction process. These products, described as red oils, were considered as the main cause for process failures, specially in evaporators and concentrators. In view of safety aspects it is necessary to control organic concentration in product and waste solutions. The proposed method involves the organic removal by chloroform as a first step, followed by purification onto a silica gel column. The results are given from analysing TBP and its degradation product (DBP) by gas chromatography. (author) [pt

  8. TBP determination in nitric acid solutions from solvent extraction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuada, T.A.; Carvalho, E.I. de; Araujo, I. da C.; Cohen, V.H.

    1988-07-01

    Heavy organic phases have been observed on some occasions during TBP extraction process. These products, described as red oils, were considered as the main cause for process failures, specially in evaporators and concentrators. In view of safety aspects it is necessary to control organic concentration in product and waste solutions. The proposed method involves the organic removal by chloroform as a first step, followed by purification onto a silica gel column. The results are given from analysing TBP and its degradation product (DBP) by gas chromatography. (author) [pt

  9. Multifunctional Ceramic Nanostructure Thin Films Prepared by Solution Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jong Hyun

    Oxide semiconductor coatings have been studied for the development of their nanostructures that can be tailored for multifunctional surface properties. We employed solution processing methods such as chemical bath deposition and hydrothermal process to deposit TiO2 and ZnO thin film nanostructures on various substrates including transparent conductive oxides (TCOs), polymers (polycarbonate, Teflon), and metals (stainless steels, Ti). In particular, low dimensional nanostructures (1D, 2D) were tailored by different solution process conditions. Especially, the 1D TiO2 nanorod structure were shown to grow via a non-classical crystallization way. The performances of vertically aligned TiO2 (rutile) nanorod thin films were evaluated for its use as a photoanode in dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) and as a photocatalytic surface for organic dye degradation. In addition, densely packed 2-dimensional rutile nanoblade structure was examined for a high-k dielectric layer. And the vertically aligned ZnO nanorod thin films were grown as photocatalytic coatings and antimicrobial surfaces. The latter aspect resulted from the strong photocatalytic behavior, as well as the nanoshape effects. To control the nano- and microstructures of TiO2 and ZnO through process parameters, we used the degree of 'supersaturation' that was calculated from aqueous thermodynamics. When the thermodynamics data were not available, it was obtained through experimental measurements. In an effort to maximize the photo-responsive capacity, the hybrid structures consisting of TiO2/ZnO and ZnO/P3HT[Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl)] were investigated for further enhancement of the photoanode properties and photocurrent generation, respectively. This work shows that highly multifunctional oxide surface properties can be made possible through the developments of low-temperature, solution-grown nanostructures with precise process controls.

  10. Passivation process of X80 pipeline steel in bicarbonate solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian-Long; Li, Xiao-Gang; Du, Cui-Wei; Pan, Ying; Li, Tao; Liu, Qian

    2011-04-01

    The passivation process of X80 pipeline steel in bicarbonate solutions was investigated using potentiodynamic, dynamic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (DEIS), and Mott-Schottky measurements. The results show that the shape of polarization curves changes with HCO{3/-} concentration. The critical `passive' concentration is 0.009 mol/L HCO{3/-} for X80 pipeline steel in bicarbonate solutions. No anodic current peak exists in HCO3/- solutions when the concentration is lower than 0.009 mol/L, whereas there are one and two anodic current peaks when the HCO3/- concentration ranges from 0.009 to 0.05 mol/L and is higher than 0.1 mol/L, respectively. DEIS measurements show that there exist active dissolution range, transition range, pre-passive range, passive layer formation range, passive range, and trans-passive range for X80 pipeline steel in the 0.1 mol/L HCO{3/-} solutions. The results of DEIS measurements are in complete agreement with the potentiodynamic diagram. An equivalent circuit containing three sub-layers is used to explain the Nyquist plots in the passive range. Analyses are well made for explaining the corresponding fitted capacitance and impedance. The Mott-Schottky plots show that the passive film of X80 pipeline steel is an n-type semiconductor, and capacitance measurements are in good accordance with the results of DEIS experiment.

  11. Fastest Formation Routes of Nanocarbons in Solution Plasma Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Tetsunori; Ueno, Tomonaga; Panomsuwan, Gasidit; Hieda, Junko; Yoshida, Akihito; Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Saito, Nagahiro

    2016-11-01

    Although solution-plasma processing enables room-temperature synthesis of nanocarbons, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We investigated the routes of solution-plasma-induced nanocarbon formation from hexane, hexadecane, cyclohexane, and benzene. The synthesis rate from benzene was the highest. However, the nanocarbons from linear molecules were more crystalline than those from ring molecules. Linear molecules decomposed into shorter olefins, whereas ring molecules were reconstructed in the plasma. In the saturated ring molecules, C-H dissociation proceeded, followed by conversion into unsaturated ring molecules. However, unsaturated ring molecules were directly polymerized through cation radicals, such as benzene radical cation, and were converted into two- and three-ring molecules at the plasma-solution interface. The nanocarbons from linear molecules were synthesized in plasma from small molecules such as C2 under heat; the obtained products were the same as those obtained via pyrolysis synthesis. Conversely, the nanocarbons obtained from ring molecules were directly synthesized through an intermediate, such as benzene radical cation, at the interface between plasma and solution, resulting in the same products as those obtained via polymerization. These two different reaction fields provide a reasonable explanation for the fastest synthesis rate observed in the case of benzene.

  12. Rare earths and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towner, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    In Australia, which is by far the Western world's largest producer of monazite, production is a by-product of the mineral-sands industry, mainly in the Midlands (Eneabba) and Southwest mineral-sands mining areas of Western Australia, and to a lesser extent on the east coast. Relatively small amounts of xenotime concentrate are a by-product of ilmenite mining in the Capel area of Western Australia. In 1987 a total of 12 813 t commercial-grade monazite was produced. At present monazite is not processed in Australia and all production is exported. In 1987 the Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources reassessed Australia's demonstrated resources of monazite upwards to 1.02 Mt, of which 237 800 t is regarded as economic at current prices for monazite, rutile, ilmenite and zircon. Production of rare-earth minerals in other countries is briefly reviewed. 4 tabs

  13. Cosolvent approach for solution-processable electronic thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhaoyang; He, Qiyuan; Yin, Anxiang; Xu, Yuxi; Wang, Chen; Ding, Mengning; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Papandrea, Benjamin; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2015-04-28

    Low-temperature solution-processable electronic materials are of considerable interest for large-area, low-cost electronics, thermoelectrics, and photovoltaics. Using a soluble precursor and suitable solvent to formulate a semiconductor ink is essential for large-area fabrication of semiconductor thin films. To date, it has been shown that hydrazine can be used as a versatile solvent to process a wide range of inorganic semiconductors. However, hydrazine is highly toxic and not suitable for large-scale manufacturing. Here we report a binary mixed solvent of amine and thiol for effective dispersion and dissolution of a large number of inorganic semiconductors including Cu2S, Cu2Se, In2S3, In2Se3, CdS, SnSe, and others. The mixed solvent is significantly less toxic and safer than hydrazine, while at the same time offering the comparable capability of formulating diverse semiconductor ink with a concentration as high as >200 mg/mL. We further show that such ink material can be readily processed into high-performance semiconducting thin films (Cu2S and Cu2Se) with the highest room-temperature conductivity among solution-based materials. Furthermore, we show that complex semiconductor alloys with tunable band gaps, such as CuIn(S(x)Se(1-x))2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1), can also be readily prepared by simply mixing Cu2S, Cu2Se, In2S3, and In2Se3 ink solutions in a proper ratio. Our study outlines a general strategy for the formulation of inorganic semiconductor ink for low-temperature processing of large-area electronic thin films on diverse substrates and can greatly impact diverse areas including flexible electronics, thermoelectrics, and photovoltaics.

  14. Perovskite/polymer solar cells prepared using solution process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, E. S.; Shobih; Nursam, N. M.; Saputri, D. G.

    2016-01-01

    We report a simple solution-based process to fabricate a perovskite/polymer tandem solar cell using inorganic CH 3 NH 3 PM 3 as an absorber and organic PCBM (6,6 phenyl C61- butyric acid methyl ester) as an electron transport layer. The absorber solution was prepared by mixing the CH 3 NH 3 I (methyl ammonium iodide) with PbI 2 (lead iodide) in DMF (N,N- dimethyl formamide) solvent. The absorber and electron transport layer were deposited by spin coating method. The electrical characteristics generated from the cell under 50 mW/cm 2 at 25 °C comprised of an open circuit voltage of 0. 3 1 V, a short circuit current density of 2.53 mA/cm 2 , and a power conversion efficiency of 0.42%. (paper)

  15. Thorium oxide dissolution: kinetics and mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonnet, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Studies of new energy sources are necessary to meet the rising global demand. In the nuclear area, Th-U cycle has been reinvestigated to supplement or replace the currently used U-Pu cycle. This project though needs further improvement to be operated in an industrial plant, especially on the reprocessing process, which consists in fuel dissolution in nitric acid medium, followed by liquid-liquid extraction. Still, unlike uranium, thorium oxide does not dissolve in concentrated nitric acid. Small amounts of fluoride are required to achieve the dissolution. The dissolution is rather slow and HNO 3 -HF mixture is very corrosive. The aim of this project is thus to find an efficient dissolution method which both decreases corrosion and improves dissolution rate. The synthesized thorium oxide powder has been dissolved in chosen conditions. Effects of solid parameters, dissolution method and dissolution medium have been studied. Results show a strong dependence on oxide crystallinity. No improvement on dissolution rate was observed with power ultrasounds, except for the temperature increase, which greatly enhances dissolution rate. No other complexing agents than fluoride allows total dissolution. Rising HNO 3 and HF concentrations increases dissolution rate until the amount of fluorides is so high that a precipitate forms at the surface. This study led to the proposal of a dissolution mechanism whose limiting step is the formation of an activated complex. Based on kinetics and equilibrium equations, initial dissolution rate was then written as a function of the different studied parameters. Experimental results were finally fitted by this relation to find kinetics and thermodynamics constants, proving the accuracy of the proposed mechanism. (author)

  16. Thorium isotopes in human tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehney, A.F.; Lucas, H.F.

    1991-12-31

    Concentrations of {sup 232}Th and activity ratios of {sup 228}Th to {sup 232}Th and {sup 230}Th to {sup 232}Th were determined in autopsy samples from five former employees of a thorium refinery. The ranges of {sup 232}Th activity concentrations (mBq g{sup {minus}1}) were 0.17--94 in lungs, 3.9--1210 in pulmonary lymph nodes, 0.14--1.19 in bones, 0.015--0.68 in liver, 0.97--5.8 in spleen, and 0.009--0.068 in kidneys. These concentrations are 10 to 1000 times greater than have been reported for persons not occupationally exposed to Th. In most of the samples, the ratios of {sup 230}Th to {sup 232}Th and {sup 228}Th to {sup 232}Th activity at death of the subject were 0.1--0.2 and 0.2--0.4, respectively. Thorium-228 to {sup 228}Ra activity ratios ({plus_minus} standard errors) of 0.86 {plus_minus} 0.11 in lungs and 1.18 {plus_minus} 0.13 in lymph nodes of one subject were obtained by calculation from ratios of {sup 228}Th to {sup 232}Th.

  17. Business Process Reengineering, a Crisis Solution or a Necessity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela GHEORGHE

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This case study shows that the company decided to implement Business Process Reengineering (BPR not only because external environment had changed, but also due to its obsolete business processes and organizational structure. The article will highlight the importance of the organizations' focusing on sub-goals, in order to finally reach the desired result in the organization's main goals. When rapid evolution has become the fundamental contemporary coordinate, reengineering is a form of company innovative reaction in terms of intensifying competition and globalization. Remodeling the Company in phases of crisis, when time pressure reduces the type and number of solutions that can be adopted, without effective leadership, can lead in most cases to failure. The effect of redesigning the business processes depends on how well it is implemented, coordinated and monitored.

  18. Business Process Reengineering, a Crises Solution or a Necessity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela GHEORGHE

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This case study shows that the company decided to implement Business Process Reengineering (BPR not only because external environment had changed, but also due to its obsolete business processes and organizational structure. The article will highlight the importance of the organizations' focusing on sub-goals, in order to finally reach the desired result in the organization's main goals. When rapid evolution has become the fundamental contemporary coordinate, reengineering is a form of company innovative reaction in terms of intensifying competition and globalization. Remodelling the Company in phases of crisis, when time pressure reduces the type and number of solutions that can be adopted, without effective leadership can lead in most cases to failure. The effect of redesigning the business processes depends on how well it is implemented, coordinated and monitored.

  19. Solution processing of next-generation nanocrystal solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Embden, J.; Chesman, A. S. R.; Duffy, N. W.; Della Gaspera, E.; Jasieniak, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Next-generation solar cells will be fabricated from low-cost and earth abundant elements, using processes that are amenable to printing on a variety of light-weight substrates. The utilization of compositionally and structurally controlled colloidal nanocrystals as building blocks for such devices fulfills these criteria. Our recent efforts in developing kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanocrystals, one of the most promising materials to emerge in this area, enable the deposition of CZTS thin-films directly from a variety of solution-processed methods. Nanocrystalline thin films possess poor electronic properties, which precludes their use in solar cell devices. In order to overcome this, thermal treatment steps under an atmosphere of vaporous selenium are applied to induce large scale crystallite growth and the production of selenized CZTSSe films. This process results in a highly photoactive p-type layer. The n-type cadmium sulfide layer is also deposited from solution using chemical bath deposition. We will discuss each of these accomplishments in detail, highlighting the significant challenges that need to be overcome in order to fabricate working CZTSSe thin film solar cells.

  20. Quantifying solute transport processes: are chemically "conservative" tracers electrically conservative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Kamini; Li, Li; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Regberg, Aaron B.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of a nonreactive or conservative tracer, commonly invoked in investigations of solute transport, requires additional study in the context of electrical geophysical monitoring. Tracers that are commonly considered conservative may undergo reactive processes, such as ion exchange, thus changing the aqueous composition of the system. As a result, the measured electrical conductivity may reflect not only solute transport but also reactive processes. We have evaluated the impacts of ion exchange reactions, rate-limited mass transfer, and surface conduction on quantifying tracer mass, mean arrival time, and temporal variance in laboratory-scale column experiments. Numerical examples showed that (1) ion exchange can lead to resistivity-estimated tracer mass, velocity, and dispersivity that may be inaccurate; (2) mass transfer leads to an overestimate in the mobile tracer mass and an underestimate in velocity when using electrical methods; and (3) surface conductance does not notably affect estimated moments when high-concentration tracers are used, although this phenomenon may be important at low concentrations or in sediments with high and/or spatially variable cation-exchange capacity. In all cases, colocated groundwater concentration measurements are of high importance for interpreting geophysical data with respect to the controlling transport processes of interest.

  1. Fission products control by gamma spectrometry in purex process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Maria Augusta

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with a radiometric method for fission products analysisby gamma spectrometry. This method will be applied for fission productscontrol at the irradiated material processing facility, under construction inthe Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, SP, Brazil. Countinggeometry was defined taking into account the activities of process solutionsto be analysed, the remotely operated aliquotation device of analytical celland the available detection system. Natural and 19,91% enriched uraniumsamples were irradiated at IEAR-1 reactor in order to simulate thecomposition of Purex process solutions. After a short decay time, the sampleswere dissolved with HNO 3 and then, conditioned in standard flasks withdefined geometry. The spectra were obtained by a Ge(Li) semiconductordetector and analysed by the GELIGAM software system, losing a floppy-diskconnected to a PDP-11/05 computer. Libraries were prepared and calibrationswere made with standard sources to fit the programs to the analysis offission products in irradiated uranium solutions. It was possible to choosethe best program to be used in routine analysis with the obtained data.(author)

  2. Pressurized water reactor thorium fuel cycle studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aktogu, Ali.

    1981-06-01

    The use of a thorium fuel cycle in a PWR is studied. The thorium has no fissile isotope and a fissile nuclide must be added to the thorium fuel. This nuclide can be uranium 235, plutonium 239 or uranium 233. In this work we have kept the fuel assembly geometry and the control rod system of an usual PWR. Cell calculations showed that the moderation ratio of an usual PWR can be used with uranium 235 and plutonium 239 fuels. But this moderation ratio must be decreased and accordingly the pumping power must be increased in the case of a uranium 233 fuel. The three fuels can be controlled with soluble boron. The power distribution inside an assembly agrees with the safety rules and the worth of the control rods is sufficient. To be interesting the thorium fuels must be recycled. Because the activity and the residual power are higher for a thorium fuel than for a uranium fuel the shielding of the shipping casks and storage pools must be increased. The Uranium 235-Thorium fuel is the best even if it needs expensive enrichment work. With this type of fuel more natural uranium is saved. The thorium fuel would become very interesting if we observe again in the future an increase of the uranium cost [fr

  3. Cellulosic fibers and nonwovens from solutions: Processing and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Atul

    Cellulose is a renewable and bio-based material source extracted from wood that has the potential to generate value added products such as composites, fibers, and nonwoven textiles. This research was focused on the potential of cellulose as the raw material for fiber spinning and melt blowing of nonwovens. The cellulose was dissolved in two different benign solvents: the amine oxide 4-N-methyl morpholine oxide monohydrate (NMMO•H2O) (lyocell process); and the ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C 4MIM]Cl). The solvents have essentially no vapor pressure and are biologically degradable, making them environmentally advantageous for manufacturing processes. The objectives of this research were to: (1) characterize solutions of NMMO and [C4MIM]Cl; (2) develop processing techniques to melt blow nonwoven webs from cellulose using NMMO as a solvent; (3) electrospin cellulosic fibers from the [C4MIM]Cl solvent; (4) spin cellulosic single fibers from the [C4MIM]Cl solvent. Different concentration solutions of cellulose in NMMO and [C4MIM]Cl were initially characterized rheologically and thermally to understand their behavior under different conditions of stress, strain, and temperature. Results were used to determine processing conditions and concentrations for the melt blowing, fiber spinning, and electrospinning experiments. The cellulosic nonwoven webs and fibers were characterized for their physical and optical properties such as tensile strength, water absorbency, fiber diameter, and fiber surface. Thermal properties were also measured by thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. Lyocell webs were successfully melt blown from the 14% cellulose solution. Basis weights of the webs were 27, 79, and 141 g/m2 and thicknesses ranged from 0.3-0.9 mm, depending on die temperatures and die to collector distance. The average fiber diameter achieved was 2.3 microns. The 6% lyocell solutions exhibited

  4. Uranium removal from organic solutions of PUREX process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Occhio, L.A.; Dupetit, G.A.; Pascale, A.A.; Vicens, H.E.

    1987-01-01

    During the uranium extraction process with tributyl phosphate (TBP) in nitric medium, a bi solvated, non hydrated complex is formed, of formula UO2(NO3)2TBP, which is soluble in the diluent, a paraffin hydrocarbon. As it is known that some uranium salts, for instance the nitrate, when dissolved in organic solvents, like isopropanol, can be discharged as complex molecules at the cathode of an electrodeposition cell, it was decided to apply this technique to uranium loaded TBP solutions. From preliminary experiments resulted a practical possibility for the analytical control through the alpha measurement of electro deposits. This technique could be applied as well to the treatment of depleted organic streams carrying undesirable alpha activity, because the so treated solutions become deprived of uranium. This work presents the curves obtained working at constant voltage with uranium-loaded TBP solutions, the determination of the optimal operation voltage in these conditions, the electrodeposition yield for electro polished copper and stainless steel cathodes and the tests of reproducibility of deposits. A summary of the results obtained operating the high voltage supply at constant power is also presented. (Author)

  5. Synthesis and characterization of a thorium phosphate-diphosphate precursor: Th{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(HPO{sub 4}) {center_dot} nH{sub 2}O(n = 3 - 7); Synthese et caracterisation d`un precurseur du phosphate-diphosphate de thorium: Th{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(HPO{sub 4}) {center_dot} nH{sub 2}O(n = 3 - 7)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichot, E.; Brandel, V.; Dacheux, N.; Genet, M. [Experimental Research Division, Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-11-01

    Thorium phosphate-diphosphate Th{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} is synthesized, at high temperature, for a given ratio r = PO/Th equal to 3/2 from a thorium compound and a phosphating reactant whatever the chemical conditions. This compound, whose solubility is very low, can be loaded in situ and used as a host matrix for radwaste storage. One of the methods of synthesis is the precipitation of a precursor, thorium phosphate-hydrogen phosphate. This precursor is used as an adsorber for low concentrations of radionuclides and, after heating in air in the range of 800 deg. C - 1200 deg. C, is transformed into doped Th{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}. The optimum conditions of the precipitation process have been determined. Starting from 0.5 M - 2 M solutions of thorium nitrate or chloride and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4} at pH = 9 - 9.5 at the ratio r = 3/2 a compound of general formula Th{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4} {center_dot} nH{sub 2}O(n = 3 - 7) is synthesized. Its physico-chemical properties have been also studied. (authors)

  6. The importance of thorium in the context of the generation in advanced reactors and the IPEN's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lainetti, Paulo E.O.; Mindrisz, Ana C.; Freitas, Antonio A.

    2011-01-01

    thorium compounds and IPEN accumulated since the 60's a wide experience in the purification of thorium, obtained primarily from the monazite processing. Studies were also conducted on obtaining nuclear fuel based on thorium, the reduction of ThF 4 to metallic thorium, neutronic studies and proposition of reactor concepts based on the element. It should also be recorded that there was at IPEN, during this period, the production in pilot scale of over one hundred and seventy metric tons of thorium nitrate with high purity. In this paper, we present briefly the experience accumulated at IPEN-CNEN/SP-Brazil and the different areas that comprise the Thorium Fuel Cycle, and the possibilities and advantages of thorium use in the IV Generation Advanced Reactors. (author)

  7. Performance Analysis Review of Thorium TRISO Coated Particles during Manufacture, Irradiation and Accident Condition Heating Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-03-01

    Thorium, in combination with high enriched uranium, was used in all early high temperature reactors (HTRs). Initially, the fuel was contained in a kernel of coated particles. However, particle quality was low in the 1960s and early 1970s. Modern, high quality, tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles with thorium oxide and uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) had been manufactured since 1978 and were successfully demonstrated in irradiation and accident tests. In 1980, HTR fuels changed to low enriched uranium UO 2 TRISO fuels. The wide ranging development and demonstration programme was successful, and it established a worldwide standard that is still valid today. During the process, results of the thorium work with high quality TRISO fuel particles had not been fully evaluated or documented. This publication collects and presents the information and demonstrates the performance of thorium TRISO fuels.This publication is an outcome of the technical contract awarded under the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on Near Term and Promising Long Term Options for Deployment of Thorium Based Nuclear Energy, initiated in 2012. It is based on the compilation and analysis of available results on thorium TRISO coated particle performance in manufacturing and during irradiation and accident condition heating tests

  8. Synthesis of Diopside by Solution Combustion Process Using Glycine Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherikar, Baburao N.; Umarji, A. M.

    Nano ceramic Diopside (CaMgSi2O6) powders are synthesized by Solution Combustion Process(SCS) using Calcium nitrate, Magnesium nitrate as oxidizer and glycine as fuel, fumed silica as silica source. Ammonium nitrate (AN) is used as extra oxidizer. Effect of AN on Diopside phase formation is investigated. The adiabatic flame temperatures are calculated theoretically for varying amount of AN according to thermodynamic concept and correlated with the observed flame temperatures. A “Multi channel thermocouple setup connected to computer interfaced Keithley multi voltmeter 2700” is used to monitor the thermal events during the process. An interpretation based on maximum combustion temperature and the amount of gases produced during reaction for various AN compositions has been proposed for the nature of combustion and its correlation with the characteristics of as synthesized powder. These powders are characterized by XRD, SEM showing that the powders are composed of polycrystalline oxides with crystallite size of 58nm to 74nm.

  9. Sequentially solution-processed, nanostructured polymer photovoltaics using selective solvents

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Do Hwan

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate high-performance sequentially solution-processed organic photovoltaics (OPVs) with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 5% for blend films using a donor polymer based on the isoindigo-bithiophene repeat unit (PII2T-C10C8) and a fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C[71]-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM). This has been accomplished by systematically controlling the swelling and intermixing processes of the layer with various processing solvents during deposition of the fullerene. We find that among the solvents used for fullerene deposition that primarily swell but do not re-dissolve the polymer underlayer, there were significant microstructural differences between chloro and o-dichlorobenzene solvents (CB and ODCB, respectively). Specifically, we show that the polymer crystallite orientation distribution in films where ODCB was used to cast the fullerene is broad. This indicates that out-of-plane charge transport through a tortuous transport network is relatively efficient due to a large density of inter-grain connections. In contrast, using CB results in primarily edge-on oriented polymer crystallites, which leads to diminished out-of-plane charge transport. We correlate these microstructural differences with photocurrent measurements, which clearly show that casting the fullerene out of ODCB leads to significantly enhanced power conversion efficiencies. Thus, we believe that tuning the processing solvents used to cast the electron acceptor in sequentially-processed devices is a viable way to controllably tune the blend film microstructure. © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  10. Plutonium(IV) and thorium(IV) hydrous polymer chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.L.; Toth, L.M.

    1978-05-01

    The recent attention given to Pu(IV) polymers has warranted a review of plutonium and thorium hydrolysis chemistry with respect to the various experimental approaches and insights gained therein. Differing terminologies used in the experimental procedures have often confused the understanding of the chemical processes which occur between the first hydrolysis reaction of the tetravalent actinide and its final dehydration to form the crystalline oxide. This report focuses on the polymer aging reaction which is defined here in terms of A. W. Thomas' ol to oxo conversion reaction and involves simply the conversion of hydroxyl-bridged polymer links to oxygen-bridged linkages. Thorium(IV) hydrolytic reactions are included because they are analogous in many respects to those of Pu(IV) and offer a simpler chemical system for experimental study. Future work using spectroscopic techniques should significantly improve the description of this aging phenomenon

  11. Solution-Based Processing of Monodisperse Two-Dimensional Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joohoon; Sangwan, Vinod K; Wood, Joshua D; Hersam, Mark C

    2017-04-18

    Exfoliation of single-layer graphene from bulk graphite and the subsequent discovery of exotic physics and emergent phenomena in the atomically thin limit has motivated the isolation of other two-dimensional (2D) layered nanomaterials. Early work on isolated 2D nanomaterial flakes has revealed a broad range of unique physical and chemical properties with potential utility in diverse applications. For example, the electronic and optical properties of 2D nanomaterials depend strongly on atomic-scale variations in thickness, enabling enhanced performance in optoelectronic technologies such as light emitters, photodetectors, and photovoltaics. Much of the initial research on 2D nanomaterials has relied on micromechanical exfoliation, which yields high-quality 2D nanomaterial flakes that are suitable for fundamental studies but possesses limited scalability for real-world applications. In an effort to overcome this limitation, solution-processing methods for isolating large quantities of 2D nanomaterials have emerged. Importantly, solution processing results in 2D nanomaterial dispersions that are amenable to roll-to-roll fabrication methods that underlie lost-cost manufacturing of thin-film transistors, transparent conductors, energy storage devices, and solar cells. Despite these advantages, solution-based exfoliation methods typically lack control over the lateral size and thickness of the resulting 2D nanomaterial flakes, resulting in polydisperse dispersions with heterogeneous properties. Therefore, post-exfoliation separation techniques are needed to achieve 2D nanomaterial dispersions with monodispersity in lateral size, thickness, and properties. In this Account, we survey the latest developments in solution-based separation methods that aim to produce monodisperse dispersions and thin films of emerging 2D nanomaterials such as graphene, boron nitride, transition metal dichalcogenides, and black phosphorus. First, we motivate the need for precise thickness

  12. Contributions to the thorium occupational exposure in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, Kenya Moore de Almeida Dias da

    1997-01-01

    There are around 15.000 workers in Brazil involved in the mining and milling processes of thorium bearing minerals. It is necessary to estimate the exposure of workers to airborne particulate containing thorium to estimate the risk associated with the inhalation of aerosols. The aims of this study were: - to develop a national cascade impactor and - to characterize the exposure of workers to airborne particulate containing Th in two plants and one industry that were chosen. Plant A and Pant B process niobium ore and industry C uses thorium nitrate to manufacture gas mantle. The national cascade impactor - ICN was developed to collect particulate in the range of 0,64 up to 19,4 μm. Its advantage over commercially available cascade impactors is the selections of particulate in the respirable and inhalable fractions of aerosol. The experimental calibration of the ICN agreed with the theoretical calibration. The results obtained with the ICN were compared to the ones obtained with other selective air samplers, in 3 plants. The particle size distribution and the Th mass concentration were determined in those plants. The size distribution of particulate containing Nb. U Zr, Pb. Fe, Y and Sr, and the elemental mass concentration was determined. A group of workers in installations B and C were also monitored through bioassay analysis of Th excreted in urine and feces. Air and bioassay results have shown that the systemic incorporation of Th is not significant. (author)

  13. Denatured thorium cycle: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sege, C.A.; Strauch, S.; Omberg, R.P.; Spiewak, I.

    1979-01-01

    We performed a scenario evaluation that delineates the potential role of denatured uranium/thorium-fueled reactors, including breeders, in symbiotic systems. In this study, reactors fueled with plutonium were built in secure centers, while reactors at dispersed sites were fueled with natural, low-enriched, or denatured uranium (12% 233 U or 20% 235 U in 238 U). The installed nuclear capacity is assumed to be 350 MW(electric) in the year 2000, with a net increase of 15 GW(electric)/y permitted through the year 2050. The U.S. Department of Energy Division of Uranium Resources and Enrichment projected the two bounding cases of uranium recoverable at a marginal cost of $160/lb U 3 O 8 or less used in this study. The marginal cost of $160/lb U 3 O 8 occurs at 3 million short tons (ST) for the high-cost supply and at 6 million ST for the intermediate-cost supply. For the assumed high-cost U 3 O 8 supply (3 million ST U 3 O 8 ), thermal recycle with denatured light water reactors (LWRs) will achieve the same incremental increase in maximum achievable nuclear capacity as U/Pu recycle in LWRs [approx. 200 GW(electric) more than once-through cycles]. Introduction of a breeder is required for the system to achieve the projected nuclear demand [1100 GW(clectric) in 2049]. For all denatured systems, including those with breeders, a significantly larger fraction of the installed capacity can be located at dispersed sites, compared with U/Pu systems. For the assumed intermediate-cost U 3 O 8 supply (6 million ST U 3 O 8 ), thermal recycle with advanced converters will permit projected nuclear demand to be met for both the Pu/U and denatured uranium--thorium cycles

  14. Determination of uranium and thorium in complex samples using chromatographic separation, ICP-MS and spectrophotometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozmarić, Martina; Ivsić, Astrid Gojmerac; Grahek, Zeljko

    2009-11-15

    The paper describes a research of possible application of UTEVA and TRU resins and anion exchanger AMBERLITE CG-400 in nitrate form for the isolation of uranium and thorium from natural samples. The results of determination of distribution coefficient have shown that uranium and thorium bind on TRU and UTEVA resins from the solutions of nitric and hydrochloric acids, and binding strength increases proportionally to increase the concentration of acids. Uranium and thorium bind rather strongly to TRU resin from the nitric acid in concentration ranging from 0.5 to 5 mol L(-1), while large quantities of other ions present in the sample do not influence on the binding strength. Due to the difference in binding strength in HCl and HNO(3) respectively, uranium and thorium can be easily separated from each other on the columns filled with TRU resin. Furthermore, thorium binds to anion exchanger in nitrate form from alcohol solutions of nitric acid very strongly, while uranium does not, so they can be easily separated. Based on these results, we have created the procedures of preconcentration and separation of uranium and thorium from the soil, drinking water and seawater samples by using TRU and UTEVA resins and strong base anion exchangers in nitrate form. In one of the procedures, uranium and thorium bind directly from the samples of drinking water and seawater on the column filled with TRU resin from 0.5 mol L(-1) HNO(3) in a water sample. After binding, thorium is separated from uranium with 0.5 mol L(-1) HCl, and uranium is eluted with deionised water. By applying the described procedure, it is possible to achieve the concentration factor of over 1000 for the column filled with 1g of resin and splashed with 2L of the sample. Spectrophotometric determination with Arsenazo III, with this concentration factor results in detection limits below 1 microg L(-1) for uranium and thorium. In the second procedure, uranium and thorium are isolated from the soil samples with TRU

  15. Parametric study of a thorium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lourenco, M.C.; Lipsztein, J.L.; Szwarcwald, C.L.

    2002-01-01

    Models for radionuclides distribution in the human body and dosimetry involve assumptions on the biokinetic behavior of the material among compartments representing organs and tissues in the body. One of the most important problem in biokinetic modeling is the assignment of transfer coefficients and biological half-lives to body compartments. In Brazil there are many areas of high natural radioactivity, where the population is chronically exposed to radionuclides of the thorium series. The uncertainties of the thorium biokinetic model are a major cause of uncertainty in the estimates of the committed dose equivalent of the population living in high background areas. The purpose of this study is to discuss the variability in the thorium activities accumulated in the body compartments in relation to the variations in the transfer coefficients and compartments biological half-lives of a thorium-recycling model for continuous exposure. Multiple regression analysis methods were applied to analyze the results. (author)

  16. New development of spectrophotometric analysis of thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiangzhen

    1992-01-01

    This review covers new development of spectrophotometric determination of thorium since 1980's. The methods include general spectrophotometry, double wavelength spectrophotometry, catalytic spectrophotometry, total differential spectrophotometry, derivative spectrophotometry and fluorescent spectrophotometry, etc

  17. Processes for working-up an aqueous fluosilicic acid solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alpha O. Toure

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous fluosilicic acid solutions were once considered to be only adverse by-products of phosphoric acid production, which required treatment to prevent ecosystem destruction when discharged into the sea. However, a range of chemicals can be generated by the transformation of this industrial waste product. Through experiments undertaken in the laboratory, we have shown the possibility of caustic soda production. Volumetric analysis showed caustic soda to be present as a 6%– 7%solution with yields of about 70% – 80%by weight. Two processes were investigated for the caustification of sodium fluoride, using different precipitates: sodium chloride and ethanol and are described by modelling caustification curves. The activation energies of precipitation determined by semi-empirical correlations showed that precipitation by ethanol (EA = 933.536 J/mol was more successful than precipitation by sodium chloride (EA = 7452.405 J/mol. Analyses performed on the precipitates highlighted compositions that are essential and useful constituents in the cement industry.

  18. Solution processable organic/inorganic hybrid ultraviolet photovoltaic detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Guo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV photodetector is a kind of important optoelectronic device which can be widely used in scientific and engineering fields including astronomical research, environmental monitoring, forest-fire prevention, medical analysis, and missile approach warning etc. The development of UV detector is hindered by the acquirement of stable p-type materials, which makes it difficult to realize large array, low-power consumption UV focal plane array (FPA detector. Here, we provide a novel structure (Al/Poly(9,9-di-n-octylfuorenyl-2,7-diyl(PFO/ZnO/ITO to demonstrate the UV photovoltaic (PV response. A rather smooth surface (RMS roughness: 0.28 nm may be reached by solution process, which sheds light on the development of large-array, light-weight and low-cost UV FPA detectors.

  19. Degradation of malachite green in aqueous solution by Fenton process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, B H; Lee, T W

    2009-05-30

    In this study, advanced oxidation process utilizing Fenton's reagent was investigated for degradation of malachite green (MG). The effects of different reaction parameters such as the initial MG concentration, initial pH, the initial hydrogen peroxide concentration, the initial ferrous concentration and the reaction temperature on the oxidative degradation of MG have been investigated. The optimal reacting conditions were experimentally found to be pH 3.40, initial hydrogen peroxide concentration=0.50mM and initial ferrous concentration=0.10mM for initial MG concentration of 20mg/L at 30 degrees C. Under optimal conditions, 99.25% degradation efficiency of dye in aqueous solution was achieved after 60 min of reaction.

  20. Analysis of benzoquinone decomposition in solution plasma process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratescu, M. A.; Saito, N.

    2016-01-01

    The decomposition of p-benzoquinone (p-BQ) in Solution Plasma Processing (SPP) was analyzed by Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) by monitoring the change of the anti-Stokes signal intensity of the vibrational transitions of the molecule, during and after SPP. Just in the beginning of the SPP treatment, the CARS signal intensities of the ring vibrational molecular transitions increased under the influence of the electric field of plasma. The results show that plasma influences the p-BQ molecules in two ways: (i) plasma produces a polarization and an orientation of the molecules in the local electric field of plasma and (ii) the gas phase plasma supplies, in the liquid phase, hydrogen and hydroxyl radicals, which reduce or oxidize the molecules, respectively, generating different carboxylic acids. The decomposition of p-BQ after SPP was confirmed by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and liquid chromatography.

  1. Analysis of benzoquinone decomposition in solution plasma process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratescu, M.A.; Saito, N.

    2016-01-01

    The decomposition of p-benzoquinone (p-BQ) in Solution Plasma Processing (SPP) was analyzed by Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) by monitoring the change of the anti-Stokes signal intensity of the vibrational transitions of the molecule, during and after SPP. Just in the beginning of the SPP treatment, the CARS signal intensities of the ring vibrational molecular transitions increased under the influence of the electric field of plasma. The results show that plasma influences the p-BQ molecules in two ways: (i) plasma produces a polarization and an orientation of the molecules in the local electric field of plasma and (ii) the gas phase plasma supplies, in the liquid phase, hydrogen and hydroxyl radicals, which reduce or oxidize the molecules, respectively, generating different carboxylic acids. The decomposition of p-BQ after SPP was confirmed by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and liquid chromatography

  2. Stepwise hydrochloric acid extraction of monazite hydroxides for the recovery of cerium lean rare earths, cerium, uranium and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaminathan, T.V.; Nair, V.R.; John, C.V.

    1988-01-01

    Monazite sand is normally processed by the caustic soda route to produce mixed rare earth chloride, thorium hydroxide and trisodium phosphate. Bulk of the mixed rare earth chloride is used for the preparation of FC catalysts. Recently some of the catalyst producers have shown preference to cerium depleted (lanthanum enriched) rare earth chloride rather than the natural rare earth chloride obtained from monazite. Therefore, a process for producing cerium depleted rare earth chloride, cerium, thorium and uranium from rare earth + thorium hydroxide obtained by treating monazite, based on stepwise hydrochloric acid extraction, was developed in the authors laboratory. The process involves drying of the mixed rare earth-thorium hydroxide cake obtained by monazite-caustic soda process followed by stepwise extraction of the dried cake with hydrochloric acid under specified conditions

  3. High performance photovoltaic applications using solution-processed small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongsheng; Wan, Xiangjian; Long, Guankui

    2013-11-19

    Energy remains a critical issue for the survival and prosperity of humancivilization. Many experts believe that the eventual solution for sustainable energy is the use of direct solar energy as the main energy source. Among the options for renewable energy, photovoltaic technologies that harness solar energy offer a way to harness an unlimited resource and minimum environment impact in contrast with other alternatives such as water, nuclear, and wind energy. Currently, almost all commercial photovoltaic technologies use Si-based technology, which has a number of disadvantages including high cost, lack of flexibility, and the serious environmental impact of the Si industry. Other technologies, such as organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, can overcome some of these issues. Today, polymer-based OPV (P-OPV) devices have achieved power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) that exceed 9%. Compared with P-OPV, small molecules based OPV (SM-OPV) offers further advantages, including a defined structure for more reproducible performance, higher mobility and open circuit voltage, and easier synthetic control that leads to more diversified structures. Therefore, while largely undeveloped, SM-OPV is an important emerging technology with performance comparable to P-OPV. In this Account, we summarize our recent results on solution-processed SM-OPV. We believe that solution processing is essential for taking full advantage of OPV technologies. Our work started with the synthesis of oligothiophene derivatives with an acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) structure. Both the backbone conjugation length and electron withdrawing terminal groups play an important role in the light absorption, energy levels and performance of the devices. Among those molecules, devices using a 7-thiophene-unit backbone and a 3-ethylrhodanine (RD) terminal unit produced a 6.1% PCE. With the optimized conjugation length and terminal unit, we borrowed from the results with P-OPV devices to optimize the backbone. Thus we

  4. Solution-Processed Smart Window Platforms Based on Plasmonic Electrochromics

    KAUST Repository

    Abbas, Sara

    2018-04-30

    Electrochromic smart windows offer a viable route to reducing the consumption of buildings energy, which represents about 30% of the worldwide energy consumption. Smart windows are far more compelling than current static windows in that they can dynamically modulate the solar spectrum depending on climate and lighting conditions or simply to meet personal preferences. The latest generation of smart windows relies on nominally transparent metal oxide nanocrystal materials whose chromism can be electrochemically controlled using the plasmonic effect. Plasmonic electrochromic materials selectively control the near infrared (NIR) region of the solar spectrum, responsible for solar heat, without affecting the visible transparency. This is in contrast to conventional electrochromic materials which block both the visible and NIR and thus enables electrochromic devices to reduce the energy consumption of a building or a greenhouse in warm climate regions due to enhancements of both visible lighting and heat blocking. Despite this edge, this technology can benefit from important developments, including low-cost solution-based manufacturing on flexible substrates while maintaining durability and coloration efficiency, demonstration of independent control in the NIR and visible spectra, and demonstration of self-powering capabilities. This thesis is focused on developing low-temperature and all-solution processed plasmonic electrochromic devices and dual-band electrochromic devices. We demonstrate new device fabrication approaches in terms of materials and processes which enhance electrochromic performance all the while maintaining low processing temperatures. Scalable fabrication methods are used to highlight compatibility with high throughput, continuous roll-to-roll fabrication on flexible substrates. In addition, a dualband plasmonic electrochromic device was developed by combining the plasmonic layer with a conventional electrochromic ion storage layer. This enables

  5. Automatic photometric titration of fluoride with thorium nitrate and alizarin S as indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliefert, C.; Sobek, M.

    1978-01-01

    The photometric titration of fluoride with thorium nitrate and Alizarin S as indicator has been automated and optimized for fluoride levels between 1 and 20mg/85ml solution. The interference of several ions has been investigated. This procedure is particularly useful for the determination of fluoride after fusion with peroxides as fluxing agents. (orig.) [de

  6. A rapid method of extraction of uranium and thorium from granite for alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gascoyne, M.; Larocque, J.P.A.

    1984-01-01

    The lithium metaborate fusion technique for analysis of rock samples has been adapted for the alpha spectrometric determination of uranium and thorium isotope abundances in granite. Powdered granite is spiked with a solution of a uranium-thorium isotope tracer, mixed with LiBO 2 in a 1: 3 ratio and fused at 950 o C in a graphite crucible. The mixture is poured into 1 M HNO 3 and stirred until dissolved. Uranium and thorium are simultaneously extracted with 10% tributylphosphate(TBP) in amyl acetate using AI(NO 3 ) 3 as the salting agent, and then back-extracted into 1 M H 2 SO 4 . Uranium is separated from thorium using anion exchange resin and, after further purification, each is plated onto steel discs for alpha counting. Overall chemical yields are adequate at present (generally 20 to 60%). Preliminary tests show the TBP extraction step to be almost quantitative for both elements, in spite of the presence of silicon and high concentrations of aluminium. This procedure is much faster than the usual acid digestion technique, and uranium and thorium discs for counting can be prepared in approximately eight hours, starting from rock powder. (author)

  7. A rapid method of extraction of uranium and thorium from granite for alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gascoyne, M.; Larocque, J.P.A.

    1984-01-01

    The lithium metaborate fusion technique for analysis of rock samples has been adapted for the alpha spectrometric determination of uranium and thorium isotope abundances in granite. Powdered granite is spiked with a solution of a uranium-thorium isotope tracer, mixed with LiBO 2 in a 1:3 ratio and fused at 950 0 C in a graphite crucible. The mixture is poured into 1 M HNO 3 and stirred until dissolved. Uranium and thorium are simultaneously extracted with 10% tributylphosphate (TBP) in amyl acetate using Al(NO 3 ) 3 as the salting agent, and then back-extracted into 1 M H 2 SO 4 . Uranium is separated from thorium using anion exchange resin and, after further purification, each is plated onto steel discs for alpha counting. Overall chemical yields are adequate at present (generally 20 to 60%). Preliminary tests show the TBP extraction step to be almost quantitative for both elements, in spite of the presence of silicon and high concentrations of aluminium. This procedure is much faster than the usual digestion technique, and uranium and thorium discs for counting can be prepared in approximately eight hours, starting from rock powder. (orig.)

  8. A rapid method of extraction of uranium and thorium from granite for alpha spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascoyne, M.; Larocque, J. P. A.

    1984-06-01

    The lithium metaborate fusion technique for analysis of rock samples has been adapted for the alpha spectrometric determination of uranium and thorium isotope abundances in granite. Powdered granite is spiked with a solution of a uranium-thorium isotope tracer, mixed with LiBO 2 in a 1:3 ratio and fused at 950°C in a graphite crucible. The mixture is poured into 1 M HNO 3 and stirred until dissolved. Uranium and thorium are simultaneously extracted with 10% tributylphosphate (TBP) in amyl acetate using Al(NO 3) 3 as the salting agent, and then back-extracted into 1 M H 2SO 4. Uranium is separated from thorium using anion exchange resin and, after further purification, each is plated onto steel discs for alpha counting. Overall chemical yields are adequate at present (generally 20 to 60%). Preliminary tests show the TBP extraction step to be almost quantitative for both elements, in spite of the presence of silicon and high concentrations of aluminium. This procedure is much faster than the usual acid digestion technique, and uranium and thorium discs for counting can be prepared in approximately eight hours, starting from rock powder.

  9. Electrochemical processing of nitrate waste solutions. Phase 2, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genders, D.; Weinberg, N.; Hartsough, D. [Electrosynthesis Co., Inc., Cheektowaga, NY (US)

    1992-10-07

    The second phase of research performed at The Electrosynthesis Co., Inc. has demonstrated the successful removal of nitrite and nitrate from a synthetic effluent stream via a direct electrochemical reduction at a cathode. It was shown that direct reduction occurs at good current efficiencies in 1,000 hour studies. The membrane separation process is not readily achievable for the removal of nitrites and nitrates due to poor current efficiencies and membrane stability problems. A direct reduction process was studied at various cathode materials in a flow cell using the complete synthetic mix. Lead was found to be the cathode material of choice, displaying good current efficiencies and stability in short and long term tests under conditions of high temperature and high current density. Several anode materials were studied in both undivided and divided cell configurations. A divided cell configuration was preferable because it would prevent re-oxidation of nitrite by the anode. The technical objective of eliminating electrode fouling and solids formation was achieved although anode materials which had demonstrated good stability in short term divided cell tests corroded in 1,000 hour experiments. The cause for corrosion is thought to be F{sup {minus}} ions from the synthetic mix migrating across the cation exchange membrane and forming HF in the acid anolyte. Other possibilities for anode materials were explored. A membrane separation process was investigated which employs an anion and cation exchange membrane to remove nitrite and nitrate, recovering caustic and nitric acid. Present research has shown poor current efficiencies for nitrite and nitrate transport across the anion exchange membrane due to co-migration of hydroxide anions. Precipitates form within the anion exchange membranes which would eventually result in the failure of the membranes. Electrochemical processing offers a highly promising and viable method for the treatment of nitrate waste solutions.

  10. Thermodynamic studies of thorium carbide fuel preparation and fuel-clad comptability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besmann, T.M.; Beahm, E.C.

    1979-01-01

    The carbothermic reduction of thorium and uranium-thorium dioxide to monocarbide has been assessed. Equilibrium calculations have yielded Th-C-O and U-Th-C-O phase equilibria and (CO) pressures generated during reduction. The (CO) pressures were found to be at least five orders of magnitude greater than any of the other 15 gaseous species considered. This confirms that the monocarbide can successfully be prepared by carbothermic reduction. The chemical compatibility of thorium carbides with the Cr-Fe-Ni content of clad alloys has been thermodynamically avaluated. Solid solutions of 5 > and 5 > and of 7 C 3 > and 7 C 3 > were the principal reaction products. The Cr-Fe-Ni content of 316 stainless steel showed much less reaction product than that for any of the other six alloys considered. (orig.) [de

  11. Dense CO2 as a Solute, Co-Solute or Co-Solvent in Particle Formation Processes: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana V. M. Nunes

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The application of dense gases in particle formation processes has attracted great attention due to documented advantages over conventional technologies. In particular, the use of dense CO2 in the process has been subject of many works and explored in a variety of different techniques. This article presents a review of the current available techniques in use in particle formation processes, focusing exclusively on those employing dense CO2 as a solute, co-solute or co-solvent during the process, such as PGSS (Particles from gas-saturated solutions®, CPF (Concentrated Powder Form®, CPCSP (Continuous Powder Coating Spraying Process, CAN-BD (Carbon dioxide Assisted Nebulization with a Bubble Dryer®, SEA (Supercritical Enhanced Atomization, SAA (Supercritical Fluid-Assisted Atomization, PGSS-Drying and DELOS (Depressurization of an Expanded Liquid Organic Solution. Special emphasis is given to modifications introduced in the different techniques, as well as the limitations that have been overcome.

  12. New properties of thorium tetrabromide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genet, M.; Carlier, R.; Hussonnois, M.; Krupa, J.C.; Delamoye, P.; Guillaumont, R.

    1977-01-01

    Most of already known chemical and physical properties of ThBr 4 have been reviewed and a survey of new properties investigated at I.P.N. and dealing more with nuclear and spectroscopy field is presented. ThBr 4 preparation, single crystal production as well as fluorescent properties are described. Then, nuclear aspect is studied mainly for ThBr 4 response to various charged particles versus energy. Attention is drawn on ThBr 4 performances and limits in heavy ion detection. Self-excited α spectrum of ThBr 4 induced by natural thorium radioactivity is reported. Specific properties of ThBr 4 as a matrix for spectroscopic studies are discussed. Preliminary results about absorption and emission spectra at 4K of ThBr 4 crystal doped with U +4 (1 per mille) are presented. The projects in spectroscopy field using ThBr 4 and other tetravalent actinide dopants (Pa +4 , Np +4 , Pu +4 , etc) are described. Then, theoretical support needed for spectrum interpretation is briefly given. Finally, bibliography about 5 f element spectroscopy in various matrixes is included [fr

  13. Effect of ecological conditions on migration of thorium isotopes isotopes in the soil-plant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuktomova, I.I.; Titaeva, N.A.; Kochan, I.G.

    1994-01-01

    Two territories (zones of central taiga and mountainous tundra) with a high natural content of thorium in soil forming rock and soil were examined in comparative analysis of fixed state and behavior of thorium isotopes ( 232 Th, 230 Th, 228 Th, 227 Th) in the soil layer and rock including evaluation and nature of distribution and forms of presence of isotopes in soil profiles; the extent of participance of isotopes in soil-forming processes is discussed and several conclusions are made regarding the role of genesis of isotopes and parameters of the migration medium for the direction and rate of migration processes. It was found that both climatic zones are characterized by the inclusion of all thorium isotopes in the biological cycle in the soil--plant systems. Characterizing as a whole the build up up thorium isotopes in all examined vegetation of the tundra, it may be noted that it is characterized by a slightly different dependence of mobility of these isotopes in comparison with the vegetation of the taiga zone. In addition, the intensity of inclusion of these thorium isotopes in the biological cycles of migration in the taiga zones is higher than in the tundra zone. 3 refs., 4 tabs

  14. Pointo - a Low Cost Solution to Point Cloud Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshiar, H.; Winkler, S.

    2017-11-01

    With advance in technology access to data especially 3D point cloud data becomes more and more an everyday task. 3D point clouds are usually captured with very expensive tools such as 3D laser scanners or very time consuming methods such as photogrammetry. Most of the available softwares for 3D point cloud processing are designed for experts and specialists in this field and are usually very large software packages containing variety of methods and tools. This results in softwares that are usually very expensive to acquire and also very difficult to use. Difficulty of use is caused by complicated user interfaces that is required to accommodate a large list of features. The aim of these complex softwares is to provide a powerful tool for a specific group of specialist. However they are not necessary required by the majority of the up coming average users of point clouds. In addition to complexity and high costs of these softwares they generally rely on expensive and modern hardware and only compatible with one specific operating system. Many point cloud customers are not point cloud processing experts or willing to spend the high acquisition costs of these expensive softwares and hardwares. In this paper we introduce a solution for low cost point cloud processing. Our approach is designed to accommodate the needs of the average point cloud user. To reduce the cost and complexity of software our approach focuses on one functionality at a time in contrast with most available softwares and tools that aim to solve as many problems as possible at the same time. Our simple and user oriented design improve the user experience and empower us to optimize our methods for creation of an efficient software. In this paper we introduce Pointo family as a series of connected softwares to provide easy to use tools with simple design for different point cloud processing requirements. PointoVIEWER and PointoCAD are introduced as the first components of the Pointo family to provide a

  15. Photon attenuation properties of some thorium, uranium and plutonium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, V. P.; Badiger, N. M. [Karnatak University, Department of Physics, Dharwad-580003, Karnataka (India); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: kudphyvps@rediffmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers, effective electron densities for nuclear materials; thorium, uranium and plutonium compounds have been studied. The photon attenuation properties for the compounds have been investigated for partial photon interaction processes by photoelectric effect, Compton scattering and pair production. The values of these parameters have been found to change with photon energy and interaction process. The variations of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number and electron density with energy are shown graphically. Moreover, results have shown that these compounds are better shielding and suggesting smaller dimensions. The study would be useful for applications of these materials for gamma ray shielding requirement. (Author)

  16. Vil løyse global energikrise med thorium

    CERN Multimedia

    Aure, Gyri

    2007-01-01

    A professor from Bergen claims thorium can contribute to save the world from a global energy crisis. He wants Norway to construct the first accelerator driven reactor in the world powered by thorium. (5 pages)

  17. Determination of boron spectrophotometry in thorium sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federgrun, L.; Abrao, A.

    1976-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of microquantities of boron in nuclear grade thorium sulfate is described. The method is based on the extraction of BF - 4 ion associated to monomethylthionine (MMT) in 1,2 - dichloroethane. The extraction of the colored BF - 4 -MMT complex does not allow the presence of sulfuric and phosphoric acids; other anions interfere seriously. This fact makes the dissolution of the thorium sulfate impracticable, since it is insoluble in both acids. On the other hand, the quantitative separation of thorium is mandatory, to avoid the precipitation of ThF 4 . To overcome this difficulty, the thorium sulfate is dissolved using a strong cationic ion exchanger, Th 4+ being totally retained into the resin. Boron is then analysed in the effluent. The procedure allows the determination of 0.2 to 10.0 microgramas of B, with a maximum error of 10%. Thorium sulfate samples with contents of 0.2 to 2.0μg B/gTh have being analysed [pt

  18. Status and development of the thorium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Weijing; Wei Renjie

    2003-01-01

    A perspective view of the thorium fuel cycle is provided in this paper. The advantages and disadvantages of the thorium fuel cycle are given and the development of thorium fuel cycle in several types of reactors is introduced. The main difficulties in developing the thorium fuel cycle lie in the reprocessing and disposal of the waste and its economy, and the ways tried by foreign countries to solve the problems are presented in the paper

  19. Process for iron separation from an organic solution containing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Textoris, A.; Lyaudet, G.; Bathelier, A.

    1987-01-01

    Iron is separated from an organic solution of U and Fe in a phosphine oxide and an acid organic phosphorus compound by reaction on oxalic acid or a mixture of sulfuric and phosphoric acid or phosphoric acid. Uranium stays in the initial organic solution and iron is transferred to the aqueous phase [fr

  20. Thorium (IV) toxicity of green microalgae from Scenedesmus and Monoraphidium genera; Toxicidade do torio (IV) para microalgas verdes dos generos Monoraphidium e Scenedesmus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, Juliana Cristina de

    2009-07-01

    The toxicity of thorium by two green microalgae species, Monoraphidium sp. and Scenedesmus sp was studied. During the toxicity tests, the microalgae cultures were inoculated in ASM-I culture medium in the presence and absence of thorium (cultures at pH 8.0 and 6.0 in the absence of thorium, - control - and at pH 6.0 for thorium concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 100.0 mg/L Th). Its effect was monitored by direct counting on Fuchs-Rosenthal chamber and with the help of software developed by the group during the experiments. The difference in pH value in the culture medium did not affect the growth of the microalgae, and pH 6.0 was chosen as a reference in order not to compromise solubility and speciation of thorium in solution. The toxicity of the metal over the species was observed just for thorium concentrations over 50.0 mg/L. A Monoraphidium sp. culture containing 6.25x10{sup 5} microorganisms/mL reached a final concentration of 5.52x10{sup 7} microorganisms/mL in the presence of thorium in the concentration of 10.0 mg/L. If we consider the 100.0 ppm thorium solution reached a final concentration of 8.57x10{sup 6} microorganisms/mL. Control tests indicated a final concentration of 2.51x10{sup 7} microorganisms/mL at the end of the growth. Scenedesmus sp. cells proved to be more resistant to the presence of thorium in solution. Low concentrations of the radionuclide favored the growth of these microalgae. A culture containing 7.65x10{sup 5} microorganisms/mL reached a final concentration of 2.25x10{sup 6} microorganisms/mL, in the absence of thorium in the medium. Toxicological tests indicated a final culture concentration of 5.87x10{sup 6} microorganisms/mL in the presence of 0.5 mg/L thorium. The software used for comparison of direct count method proved to be very useful for the improvement of accuracy of the results obtained and a decrease in the uncertainty in counting. Beyond these advantages it also allowed recording of the data. From the present results

  1. Uses of extraction and ion exchange chromatography in the thorium and rare earths separation from industrial residue generated in thorium purification unity at IPEN. Application of rare earths as catalysts for generation of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zini, Josiane

    2010-01-01

    In the 70's a pilot plant for studies of different concentrates processing obtained from the chemical processing of monazite was operated at IPEN / CNEN-SP, with a view to obtaining thorium of nuclear purity. This unity was operated on an industrial scale since 1985, generating around 25 metric tons of residue and was closed in 2002. This waste containing thorium and rare earths was named Retoter (Rejeito de Torio e Terras Raras, in portuguese) and stored in the IPEN Safeguards shed. This paper studies the treatment of the waste, aimed at environmental, radiological and technology. Were studied two cases for the chromatographic separation of thorium from rare earths. One of them was the chromatographic extraction, where the extracting agent tributyl phosphate was supported on polymeric resins Amberlite XAD16. The other method is studied for comparison purposes, since the material used in chromatographic extraction is unprecedented with regard to the separation of thorium, was the ion-exchange chromatography using DOWEX 1-X8 strong cationic resin. Was studied also the chromatographic process of extraction with the extracting agent DEHPA supported on Amberlite XAD16 for the fractionation in groups of rare earths elements. Thorium was separated with high purity for strategic purposes and rare earths recovered free from thorium, were tested as a catalyst for ethanol reforming to hydrogen obtaining which is used in fuel cells for power generation. (author)

  2. A survey of thorium utilization in thermal power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    The present status of thorium utilization in thermal reactors HTGR's, HWR's and LWR's has been reviewed. Physics considerations are made to obtain the optimum use of thorium. Existing information on reprocessing and refabrication is given together with the properties of thorium metal and thoria

  3. Determination of thorium and uranium contents in soil samples ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vol. 67, No. 2. — journal of. August 2006 physics pp. 269–276. Determination of thorium and uranium contents in soil samples using SSNTD's passive method ... measure α-tracks activity [1], where SSNTDs have been used in geology [2–6] and ... thorium concentrations in ppm and activities of both uranium and thorium.

  4. Synthesis of uranyl acetylacetonate free of thorium 234

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Rendon, R.; Solache R, M.; Tenorio, D. (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Mexico City)

    1983-01-01

    A technique is described for synthesizing uranyl acetylacetonate free of thorium-234, and the method utilized in identifying it. The aim in the preparation of the thorium-234 free compound was to study the chemical effects produced by U-238 decay by means of detection only of the thorium-234 decay product.

  5. Alpha spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry of thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strisovska, Jana; Kuruc, Jozef; Galanda, Dusan; Matel, Lubomir; Velic, Dusan; Aranyosiova, Monika

    2009-01-01

    A sample of thorium content on steel discs was prepared by electrodeposition with a view to determining the natural thorium isotope. Thorium was determined by alpha spectrometry and by secondary ion mass spectrometry and the results of the two methods were compared

  6. Advances in process overlay: alignment solutions for future technology nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megens, Henry; van Haren, Richard; Musa, Sami; Doytcheva, Maya; Lalbahadoersing, Sanjay; van Kemenade, Marc; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Hinnen, Paul; van Bilsen, Frank

    2007-03-01

    Semiconductor industry has an increasing demand for improvement of the total lithographic overlay performance. To improve the level of on-product overlay control the number of alignment measurements increases. Since more mask levels will be integrated, more alignment marks need to be printed when using direct-alignment (also called layer-to-layer alignment). Accordingly, the alignment mark size needs to become smaller, to fit all marks into the scribelane. For an in-direct alignment scheme, e.g. a scheme that aligns to another layer than the layer to which overlay is being measured, the number of needed alignment marks can be reduced. Simultaneously there is a requirement to reduce the size of alignment mark sub-segmentations without compromising the alignment and overlay performance. Smaller features within alignment marks can prevent processing issues like erosion, dishing and contamination. However, when the sub-segmentation size within an alignment mark becomes comparable to the critical dimension, and thus smaller than the alignment-illuminating wavelength, polarization effects might start to occur. Polarization effects are a challenge for optical alignment systems to maintain mark detectability. Nevertheless, this paper shows how to actually utilize those effects in order to obtain enhanced alignment and overlay performance to support future technology nodes. Finally, another challenge to be met for new semiconductor product technologies is the ability to align through semi-opaque materials, like for instance new hard-mask materials. Enhancement of alignment signal strength can be reached by adapting to new alignment marks that generate a higher alignment signal. This paper provides a description of an integral alignment solution that meets with these emerging customer application requirements. Complying with these requirements will significantly enhance the flexibility in production strategies while maintaining or improving the alignment and overlay

  7. Southern complex: geology, geochemistry, mineralogy, and mineral chemistry of selected uranium- and thorium-rich granites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Four major rock groups are defined in the Southern Complex: the Bell Creek Granite (BCG), the Clotted Granitoids (CGR), the Albite Granite (AGR), and the Migmatite Complex. Metatexites of the Migmatite Complex are the oldest rocks and include paleosome of a metasedimentary and metavolcanic protolith represented by Banded Iron Formation, Banded Amphibolite, and Banded Gneisses, and interlayered or crosscutting leucogranites. The CGR span the range from metatexite to diatexite and represent in-situ partial melting of metapelitic layers in the protolith during intrusion of the BCG. The BCG cuts the migmatites, is locally cut by the CGR, and was derived by partial melting of a dominantly metasedimentary protolith at some depth below the presently exposed migmatites during a regional tectonothermal event. The Albite Granite is a 2km diameter, muscovite-fluorite-columbite-bearing intrusive stock that cuts all other major units. The thorium history of the BCG is a function of the history of monazite. The thorium history of the CGR is also dominated by monazite but the thorium content of this unit cannot be entirely accounted for by original restite monazite. The uranium history of the BCG and CGR was dominated by magmatic differentiation and post magmatic, metamorphic and supergene redistributions and is largely independent of the thorium history. The thorium and uranium history of the AGR was dominated by magmatic/deuteric processes unlike the BCG and CGR

  8. SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM THORIUM AND PROTACTINIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrave, W.K.R.

    1959-06-30

    This patent relates to the separation of uranium from thorium and protactinium; such mixtures of elements usually being obtained by neutron irradiation of thorium. The method of separating the constituents has been first to dissolve the mixture of elements in concertrated nitric acid and then to remove the protactinium by absorption on manganese dioxide and the uranium by solvent extraction with ether. Prior to now, comparatively large amounts of thorium were extracted with the uranium. According to the invention this is completely prevented by adding sodium diethyldithiocarbamate to the mixture of soluble nitrate salts. The organic salt has the effect of reacting only with the uranyl nitrate to form the corresponding uranyl salt which can then be selectively extracted from the mixture with amyl acetate.

  9. SOLUTIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Hoyos Guajardo, Ph.D. Candidate, M.Sc., B.Eng.

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The theory that is presented below aims to conceptualise how a group of undergraduate students tackle non-routine mathematical problems during a problem-solving course. The aim of the course is to allow students to experience mathematics as a creative process and to reflect on their own experience. During the course, students are required to produce a written ‘rubric’ of their work, i.e., to document their thoughts as they occur as well as their emotionsduring the process. These ‘rubrics’ were used as the main source of data.Students’ problem-solving processes can be explained as a three-stage process that has been called ‘solutioning’. This process is presented in the six sections below. The first three refer to a common area of concern that can be called‘generating knowledge’. In this way, generating knowledge also includes issues related to ‘key ideas’ and ‘gaining understanding’. The third and the fourth sections refer to ‘generating’ and ‘validating a solution’, respectively. Finally, once solutions are generated and validated, students usually try to improve them further before presenting them as final results. Thus, the last section deals with‘improving a solution’. Although not all students go through all of the stages, it may be said that ‘solutioning’ considers students’ main concerns as they tackle non-routine mathematical problems.

  10. Optimization of process and solution parameters in electrospinning polyethylene oxide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacobs, V

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available , applied voltage and polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH) concentration in the spinning solution and its influence on nanofiber diameter. The selected parameters were varied at three levels using Box and Behnken factorial design. The interaction effect...

  11. Simultaneous determinations of uranium, thorium, and plutonium in soft tissues by solvent extraction and alpha-spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, N.P.; Zimmerman, C.J.; Lewis, L.L.; Wrenn, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    A radiochemical procedure for the simultaneous determination of uranium, thorium, and plutonium, in soft tissues has been developed. The weighed amounts of tissues, spiked with 232 U, 242 Pu, and 229 th tracers, are wet ashed. Uranium, thorium, and plutonium are coprecipitated with iron as hydroxides, dissolved in concentrated HCl and the acidity adjusted to 10 M. Uranium and plutonium are extracted into 20% TLA solution in xylene, leaving thorium in the aqueous phase. Plutonium is back-extracted by reducing to the trivalent state with 0.05 M NH 4 I solution in 8 M HCl, and uranium is back-extracted with 0.1 M HCl. Thorium is extracted into 20% TLA solution from 4 M HNO 3 and back-extracted with 10 M HCl. Uranium, thorium and plutonium are electrodeposited separately onto platinum discs and counted alpha-spectrometrically using surface barrier silicon diodes and a multichannel analyzer. The method was developed using bovine liver and applied to dog and human tissues. The mean radiochemical recoveries of these actinides in different organs were better than 70%. 6 references, 2 tables

  12. Determination of thorium 230Th in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, A.; Palomares, J.

    1988-01-01

    A method for the determination of 230 Th in environmental soils is described. Hydroxides formed, previous fusion with sodium peroxide are dissolved with HNO 3 8N. The thorium is coprecipitated with F 3 La and purified by anion exchange (AG 1x8 50-100 mesh). Thorium is electroplated onto a stainless steel disc, 230 Th is counted by alpha spectrometry and 234 Th used as a tracer by beta counting. The chemical yield for 1g of soil sample is 60-80%. Minimum detectable activities are about 2 mBq/g. (Author)

  13. Reprocessing in the thorium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merz, E.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the authors personal view is presented on open questions in regard to still required research and development work for the thorium fuel cycle before its application in a technical-industrial scale may be tackled. For a better understanding, all stations of the back-end of the thorium fuel cycle are briefly illustrated and their special features discussed. They include storage and transportation measures, all steps of reprocessing, as well as the entire radioactive waste treatment. Knowledge gaps are, as far as they are obvious, identified and proposals put forward for additional worthwile investigations. (orig.) [de

  14. Comparison of the Environment, Health, And Safety Characteristics of Advanced Thorium- Uranium and Uranium-Plutonium Fuel Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, Timothy M.

    The environment, health, and safety properties of thorium-uranium-based (''thorium'') fuel cycles are estimated and compared to those of analogous uranium-plutonium-based (''uranium'') fuel cycle options. A structured assessment methodology for assessing and comparing fuel cycle is refined and applied to several reference fuel cycle options. Resource recovery as a measure of environmental sustainability for thorium is explored in depth in terms of resource availability, chemical processing requirements, and radiological impacts. A review of available experience and recent practices indicates that near-term thorium recovery will occur as a by-product of mining for other commodities, particularly titanium. The characterization of actively-mined global titanium, uranium, rare earth element, and iron deposits reveals that by-product thorium recovery would be sufficient to satisfy even the most intensive nuclear demand for thorium at least six times over. Chemical flowsheet analysis indicates that the consumption of strong acids and bases associated with thorium resource recovery is 3-4 times larger than for uranium recovery, with the comparison of other chemical types being less distinct. Radiologically, thorium recovery imparts about one order of magnitude larger of a collective occupational dose than uranium recovery. Moving to the entire fuel cycle, four fuel cycle options are compared: a limited-recycle (''modified-open'') uranium fuel cycle, a modified-open thorium fuel cycle, a full-recycle (''closed'') uranium fuel cycle, and a closed thorium fuel cycle. A combination of existing data and calculations using SCALE are used to develop material balances for the four fuel cycle options. The fuel cycle options are compared on the bases of resource sustainability, waste management (both low- and high-level waste, including used nuclear fuel), and occupational radiological impacts. At steady-state, occupational doses somewhat favor the closed thorium option while low

  15. A sequential method for the determination of 210Pb, 226Ra, and uranium and thorium radioisotopes by LSC and alpha-spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, J C; Tomé, F Vera; Rodríguez, P Blanco; Prieto, C

    2010-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of (210)Pb, and alpha-emitting radioisotopes of uranium, thorium, and radium from the same aliquot of a sample has been proposed. The key step consisted in the recovery of Pb(II) and Ra by precipitation of insoluble Pb(NO(3))(2), the uranium and thorium radioisotopes remaining in solution. Afterwards, the fractions were handled by specific, well consolidated procedures. Lead-210 was determined by the LSC technique while the uranium, thorium, and radium radioisotopes were measured with silicon alpha-spectrometers. The procedure was applied to a reference sample and several environmental samples obtaining satisfactory results. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Uranium and thorium phosphate based matrices; syntheses, characterizations and lixiviation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dacheux, N.

    1995-03-01

    In the framework of the search for a ceramic material usable in the radioactive waste storage, uranium and thorium phosphates have been investigated. Their experimental synthesis conditions have been entirely reviewed, they lead to the preparation of four new compounds: U(UO 2 )(PO 4 ) 2 , U 2 O(PO 4 ) 2 , UC1PO 4 ,H 2 O, and Th 4 (PO 4 ) 4 , U 2 O 3 P 2 O 7 and Th 3 (PO 4 ) 4 . Characterization by several techniques (X-rays and neutron powder diffractions, UV-Visible and Infra-red spectroscopies, XPS,...) were performed. The ab initio structure determination of U(UO 2 )(PO 4 ) 2 has been achieved by X-rays and refined by neutron diffractions. Through its physico-chemical analysis, we found that this compound was a new mixed valence uranium phosphate in which U 4+ and UO 2 2+ ions are ordered in pairs along parallel chains according to a new type of arrangement. Reaction mechanism, starting from UC1PO 4 , 4H 2 O and based on redox processes of uranium in solid state was set up. From two main matrices U(UO 2 )(PO 4 ) 2 and Th 4 (PO 4 ) 4 P 2 O 7 , solid solutions were studied. They consist of replacement of U(IV) by Th(IV) and reversely. The leaching tests on pure, loaded and doped matrices were performed in terms of storage time, pH of solutions, and determined by the use of solids labelled with 230 U or by the measurement of uranyl concentration by Laser-Induced Time-Resolved Spectrofluorometry. Average concentration of uranium in the liquid phase is around 10 -4 M to 10 -6 M. Taking into account the very low solubilities of the studied phosphate ceramics, we estimated their chemical performances promising as an answer to the important nuclear waste problem, if we compare them to the glasses used at the present time. (author). 47 figs., 23 tabs., 6 appendixes

  17. Uranium and thorium based phosphate matrix: synthesis, characterizations and lixiviation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dacheux, N.

    1995-03-01

    In the framework of the search for a ceramic material usable in the radioactive waste storage, uranium and thorium phosphates have been investigated. Their experimental synthesis conditions have been entirely reviewed, they lead to the preparation of four new compounds: U(UO 2 )(PO 4 ) 2 , U 2 O(PO 4 ) 2 , UCIPO 4 , 4H 2 O, and Th 4 (PO 4 ) 4 P 2 O 7 . Experimental evidenced are advanced for non existent compounds such as: U 3 (PO 4 ) 4 , U 2 O 3 P 2 O 7 and Th 3 (PO 4 ) 4 . Characterization by several techniques (X-rays and neutron powder diffractions, UV-Visible and Infra-red spectroscopies, XPS,...) were performed. The ab initio structure determination of U(UO 2 )(PO 4 ) 2 has been achieved by X-rays and refined by neutron diffractions. Through its physico-chemical analysis, we found that this compound was a new mixed valence uranium phosphate in which U 4+ and UO 2 2+ ions are ordered in pairs along parallel chains according to a new type of arrangement. Reaction mechanism, starting from UCIPO 4 , 4H 2 O and based on redox processes of uranium in solid state was set up. From two main matrices U(UO 2 )(PO 4 ) 2 and Th 4 (PO 4 ) 4 P 2 O 7 , solid solutions were studied. They consist of replacement of U(IV) by Th(IV) and reversely. The leaching tests on pure, loaded and doped matrices were performed in terms of storage time, pH of solutions, and determined by the use of solids labelled with 230 U or by the measurement of uranyl concentration by Laser-Induced Time-Resolved Spectro-fluorimetry. Average concentration of uranium in the liquid phase is around 10 -4 M to 10 -6 M. Taking into account the very low solubilities of the studied phosphate ceramics, we estimated their chemical performances promising as an answer to the important nuclear waste problem, if we compare them to the glasses used at the present time. (author)

  18. Small molecule host materials for solution processed phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yook, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2014-07-02

    Solution processed phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been actively developed due to merits of high quantum efficiency of phosphorescent materials and simple fabrication processes of solution processed OLEDs. The device performances of the solution processed phosphorescent OLEDs have been greatly improved in the last 10 years and the progress of the device performances was made by the development of small molecule host materials for solution processes. A hybrid host of polymer and small molecules, a single small molecule host and a mixed host of small molecule hosts have effectively enhanced the quantum efficiency of the solution processed phosphorescent OLEDs. Therefore, this paper reviews recent developments in small molecule host materials for solution processed phosphorescent OLEDs and provides future directions for the development of the small molecule host materials. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Promises and Challenges of Thorium Implementation for Transuranic Transmutation - 13550

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franceschini, F.; Lahoda, E.; Wenner, M. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Township, PA (United States); Lindley, B. [University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Fiorina, C. [Polytechnic of Milan (Italy); Phillips, C. [Energy Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This paper focuses on the challenges of implementing a thorium fuel cycle for recycle and transmutation of long-lived actinide components from used nuclear fuel. A multi-stage reactor system is proposed; the first stage consists of current UO{sub 2} once-through LWRs supplying transuranic isotopes that are continuously recycled and burned in second stage reactors in either a uranium (U) or thorium (Th) carrier. The second stage reactors considered for the analysis are Reduced Moderation Pressurized Water Reactors (RMPWRs), reconfigured from current PWR core designs, and Fast Reactors (FRs) with a burner core design. While both RMPWRs and FRs can in principle be employed, each reactor and associated technology has pros and cons. FRs have unmatched flexibility and transmutation efficiency. RMPWRs have higher fuel manufacturing and reprocessing requirements, but may represent a cheaper solution and the opportunity for a shorter time to licensing and deployment. All options require substantial developments in manufacturing, due to the high radiation field, and reprocessing, due to the very high actinide recovery ratio to elicit the claimed radiotoxicity reduction. Th reduces the number of transmutation reactors, and is required to enable a viable RMPWR design, but presents additional challenges on manufacturing and reprocessing. The tradeoff between the various options does not make the choice obvious. Moreover, without an overarching supporting policy in place, the costly and challenging technologies required inherently discourage industrialization of any transmutation scheme, regardless of the adoption of U or Th. (authors)

  20. Promises and Challenges of Thorium Implementation for Transuranic Transmutation - 13550

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franceschini, F.; Lahoda, E.; Wenner, M.; Lindley, B.; Fiorina, C.; Phillips, C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the challenges of implementing a thorium fuel cycle for recycle and transmutation of long-lived actinide components from used nuclear fuel. A multi-stage reactor system is proposed; the first stage consists of current UO 2 once-through LWRs supplying transuranic isotopes that are continuously recycled and burned in second stage reactors in either a uranium (U) or thorium (Th) carrier. The second stage reactors considered for the analysis are Reduced Moderation Pressurized Water Reactors (RMPWRs), reconfigured from current PWR core designs, and Fast Reactors (FRs) with a burner core design. While both RMPWRs and FRs can in principle be employed, each reactor and associated technology has pros and cons. FRs have unmatched flexibility and transmutation efficiency. RMPWRs have higher fuel manufacturing and reprocessing requirements, but may represent a cheaper solution and the opportunity for a shorter time to licensing and deployment. All options require substantial developments in manufacturing, due to the high radiation field, and reprocessing, due to the very high actinide recovery ratio to elicit the claimed radiotoxicity reduction. Th reduces the number of transmutation reactors, and is required to enable a viable RMPWR design, but presents additional challenges on manufacturing and reprocessing. The tradeoff between the various options does not make the choice obvious. Moreover, without an overarching supporting policy in place, the costly and challenging technologies required inherently discourage industrialization of any transmutation scheme, regardless of the adoption of U or Th. (authors)

  1. Conceptual design of a commercial accelerator driven thorium reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, C. G.; Ashworth, R. W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the substantial work done in underpinning and developing the concept design for a commercial 600 MWe, accelerator driven, thorium fuelled, lead cooled, power producing, fast reactor. The Accelerator Driven Thorium Reactor (ADTR TM) has been derived from original work by Carlo Rubbia. Over the period 2007 to 2009 Aker Solutions commissioned this concept design work and, in close collaboration with Rubbia, developed the physics, engineering and business model. Much has been published about the Energy Amplifier concept and accelerator driven systems. This paper concentrates on the unique physics developed during the concept study of the ADTR TM power station and the progress made in engineering and design of the system. Particular attention is paid to where the concept design has moved significantly beyond published material. Description of challenges presented for the engineering and safety of a commercial system and how they will be addressed is included. This covers the defining system parameters, accelerator sizing, core and fuel design issues and, perhaps most importantly, reactivity control. The paper concludes that the work undertaken supports the technical viability of the ADTR TM power station. Several unique features of the reactor mean that it can be deployed in countries with aspirations to gain benefit from nuclear power and, at 600 MWe, it fits a size gap for less mature grid systems. It can provide a useful complement to Generation III, III+ and IV systems through its ability to consume actinides whilst at the same time providing useful power. (authors)

  2. Transport processes in space physics and astrophysics problems and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Dosch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

     This is the problems and solution manual for the graduate text with the same title and published as Lecture Notes in Physics Vol 877 which provides the necessary mathematical and physics background to understand the transport of gases, charged particle gases, energetic charged particles, turbulence, and radiation in an astrophysical and space physics context. The very detailed and self-contained problems and solutions will be an essential part of the training of any graduate student wishing to enter and pursuing research in this field. .

  3. Mixing of Process Heels, Process Solutions and Recycle Streams: Small-Scale Simulant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2001-01-01

    The overall objective of this small-scale simulant mixing study was to identify the processes within the Hanford Site River Protection Project - Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) that may generate precipitates and to identify the types of precipitates formed. This information can be used to identify where mixtures of various solutions will cause precipitation of solids, potentially causing operational problems such as fouling equipment or increasing the amount of High Level Waste glass produced. Having this information will help guide protocols for flushing or draining tanks, mixing internal recycle streams, and mixing waste tank supernates. This report contains the discussion and thermodynamic chemical speciation modeling of the raw data

  4. Separation and continuous determination of the light rare earth elements and thorium in Baotou Iron Ore by a micro-column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, G.; Luo, M.; Xu, J.; Wang, T.; Hua, R.; Sun, Y.

    2009-01-01

    A method for continuous determination of the light rare earth elements (LREEs) and thorium in Baotou Iron Ore was established. The light rare earths and thorium were adsorbed on a micro-column packed with HD-8 cation exchange resins. The light rare earth elements were eluted with 4 mol L -1 HCl-2 mol L -1 NH 4 Cl solution and determined with tribromo-arsenzao by a 721-E spectrophotometry at 630 nm; thorium was eluted with 5% potassium oxalate solution and determined with Arsenazo III by a 721-E spectrophotometry at 660 nm. The measured values by the proposed method were in close agreement with the certified values (Baotou main ore standard sample, Baotou ore R-715 standard sample and GSD-2 standard sample). The RSD of the light rare earths and thorium in Baotou Iron Ore were of < 1.70% and < 1.99%, respectively. (author)

  5. Future perspective of thorium based nuclear fuels and thorium potential of Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unak, T.; Yildirim, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Today's nuclear technology has principally been based on the use of fissile U-235 and Pu-239. he existence of thorium in the nature and its potential use in the nuclear technology were not unfortunately into account with a sufficient importance. The global distributions of thorium and uranium reserves indicate that in general some developed countries such as the USA, Canada, Australia, France have considerable uranium reserves, and contrarily only some developing countries such as Turkey, Brazil, India, Egypt have considerable thorium reserves. The studies carried out on the thorium during the last 50 years have clearly showed that the thorium based nuclear fuels have the potential easily use in most of reactor types actually operated with the classical uranium based nuclear fuels without any considerable modification. In the case of the use of thorium based nuclear fuels in future nuclear energy production systems, the serious problems such as the excess of Pu-239, the proliferation potential of nuclear weapons, and also the anxious of nuclear terrorism will probably be resolved, and sustainable nuclear energy production will be realized in the next new century. (authors)

  6. Future perspective of thorium based nuclear fuels and thorium potential of Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unak, T.; Yildirim, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Today's nuclear technology has principally been based on the use of fissile U-235 and Pu-239. The existence of thorium in the nature and its potential use in the nuclear technology were not unfortunately into account with a sufficient importance. The global distributions of thorium and uranium reserves indicate that in general some developed countries such as the USA, Canada, Australia, France have considerable uranium reserves, and contrarily only some developing countries such as Turkey, Brazil, India, Egypt have considerable thorium reserves. The studies carried out on the thorium during the last 50 years have clearly showed that the thorium based nuclear fuels have the potential easily use in most of reactor types actually operated with the classical uranium based nuclear fuels without any considerable modification. In the case of the use of thorium based nuclear fuels in future nuclear energy production systems, the serious problems such as the excess of Pu-239, the proliferation potential of nuclear weapons, and also the anxious of nuclear terrorism will probably be resolved, and sustainable nuclear energy production will be realized in the next new century. (authors)

  7. Process for extracting uranium from phosphoric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The description is given of a method for extracting uranium from phosphoric acid solutions whereby the previously oxided acid is treated with an organic solvent constituted by a mixture of dialkylphosphoric acid and trialkylphosphine oxide in solution in a non-reactive inert solvent so as to obtain de-uraniated phosphoric acid and an organic extract constituted by the solvent containing most of the uranium. The uranium is then separated from the extract as uranyl ammonium tricarbonate by reaction with ammonia and ammonium carbonate and the extract de-uraniated at the extraction stage is recycled. The extract is treated in a re-extraction apparatus comprising not less than two stages. The extract to be treated is injected at the top of the first stage. At the bottom of the first stage, ammonia is introduced counter current as gas or as an aqueous solution whilst controlling the pH of the first stage so as to keep it to 8.0 or 8.5 and at the bottom of the last stage an ammonium carbonate aqueous solution is injected in a quantity representing 50 to 80% of the stoichiometric quantity required to neutralize the dialkylphosphoric acid contained in the solvent and transform the uranium into uranyl ammonium tricarbonate [fr

  8. Scaling and predicting solute transport processes in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. González-Pinzón; R. Haggerty; M. Dentz

    2013-01-01

    We investigated scaling of conservative solute transport using temporal moment analysis of 98 tracer experiments (384 breakthrough curves) conducted in 44 streams located on five continents. The experiments span 7 orders of magnitude in discharge (10-3 to 103 m3/s), span 5 orders of magnitude in...

  9. Process for electrospinning chitin fibers from chitinous biomass solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swatloski, Richard P.; Barber, Patrick S.; Opichka, Terrance; Bonner, Jonathan R.; Gurau, Gabriela; Griggs, Christopher Scott; Rogers, Robin D.

    2017-06-20

    Disclosed are methods for electrospinning chitinous biomass solution to form chitin fibers, using ionic liquids or other ion-containing liquids as solvent. Chitin fibers produced thereby and articles containing such chitin fibers are also disclosed. The chitin fiber thus obtained has very high surface area and improved strength over currently commercially available chitin materials.

  10. Utilization of thorium in PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, F.

    1977-01-01

    Uranium 235 consumption is comparatively evaluated with thorium cycle for a PWR type reactor. Modifications are only made in fuels components. U-235 consumption is pratically unchanged in both cycles. Some good results are promised to the mixed U-238/Th-232 fuel cycle in 1/1 proportion [pt

  11. Solvent Extraction of Thorium Using 5,11,17,23-Tetra[(2-ethyl acetoethoxyphenyl(azophenyl]calix[4]arene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quang Hieu Tran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid, sensitive, and selective method for determination of thorium based on the complex with ortho-ester tetra-azophenylcalix[4]arene (TEAC was described. In the presence of pH of 4–6, TEAC-Th(IV complex is extracted from an acidic aqueous solution into chloroform layer. The absorbance intensity of complex was measured by UV-Vis spectrometer at 525 nm and the molar absorptivity was found to be 2.4 × 104. Beer’s law was obeyed in the range of 1.0 to 25 × 10−5 M thorium(IV. The effects of pH, TEAC concentration, and shaking time were also studied. The tolerance limits for several metal ions were calculated. The proposed method was applied to the determination of thorium in synthetic solution and in the monazite sand samples with good results.

  12. Thorium cycle and molten salt reactors: field parameters and field constraints investigations toward 'thorium molten salt reactor' definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, L.

    2005-09-01

    Producing nuclear energy in order to reduce the anthropic CO 2 emission requires major technological advances. Nuclear plants of 4. generation have to respond to several constraints, as safety improvements, fuel breeding and radioactive waste minimization. For this purpose, it seems promising to use Thorium Cycle in Molten Salt Reactors. Studies on this domain have already been carried out. However, the final concept suffered from serious issues and was discontinued. A new reflection on this topic is being led in order to find acceptable solutions, and to design the Thorium Molten Salt Reactor concept. A nuclear reactor is simulated by the coupling of a neutron transport code with a materials evolution code. This allows us to reproduce the reactor behavior and its evolution all along its operation. Thanks to this method, we have studied a large number of reactor configurations. We have evaluated their efficiency through a group of constraints they have to satisfy. This work leads us to a better understanding of many physical phenomena controlling the reactor behavior. As a consequence, several efficient configurations have been discovered, allowing the emergence of new points of view in the research of Molten Salt Reactors. (author)

  13. Studi Pemisahan Thorium dari Besi dan Logam Tanah Jarang dalam Larutan Asam Nitrat dengan Ekstraksi Pelarut Menggunakan Ekstraktan Trioctylphosphine Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briliant

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of solvent extraction experiment to separate thorium(Th from iron (Fe and rare earth metals (REE using trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO conducted with variations of nitric acid concentration, extraction time, ratio between exctractan and diluent (g/mL, and ratio between organic solution and aqueous solution volumes (O/A, and variation of nictric acid concentration in stripping process. Thorium, iron and rare earth metals early concentration in solution feed were measured by using Inductively Coupling Plasma (ICP, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS, dan Ultraviolet Visible Spectroscopy (UV-VIS Spectro respectively. The nitric acid concentration was varied at 1M, 2M, 3M, 4M, and 5M. The extraction time was varied at 2, 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes, meanwhile the ratio between extractan and diluent (g/mL was varied at 2:100, 3:100, 4:100, 5:100, and 6:100 with O/A ratio at 1:3, 1:2, 1:1, 2:1, and 3:1. At stripping stage, the nitric acid concentration was varied at 0.1M; 0.2M; 0.3M; 0.4M; and 0.5M. The result of the experiments show that the best condition was obtained on 3M nitric acid concentration, 10 minutes extraction time, 5:100 (g/mL extractan and diluent ratio, and 1:1 O/A ratio, that resulted in 97.26% Th extraction, 7.97% Fe extraction, and 62.15% rare earth metals extraction with βTh-Fe and βTh-REE value 273.62 and 14.43 respectively. On the stripping experiment, the highest Th stripping percentage obtained as much as 51.37% at 0.3M nitric acid concentration with Fe and REE stripping percentage up to 2.72% and 2.55% respectively.

  14. Solution processing of back electrodes for organic solar cells with inverted architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galagan, Y.; Shanmugam, S.; Teunissen, J.P.; Eggenhuisen, T.M.; Biezemans, A.F.K.V.; Van Gijseghem, T.; Groen, W.A.; Andriessen, R.

    2014-01-01

    Solution processing of the electrodes is a big challenge towards scaling up and R2R processing of organic solar cells. Inkjet printing is a non-contact printing method, it can be realized by solution processing at ambient condition and provides freedom of shape in the electrode pattern. The inkjet

  15. Review of experience gained in fabricating nuclear grade uranium and thorium compounds and their analytical quality control at the Instituto de Energia Atomica, Sao Paulo, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrao, A.; Franca, J.M. Jr.; Ikuta, A.; Pueschel, C.R.; Federgruen, L.; Lordello, A.R.; Tomida, E.K.; Moraes, S.; Brito, J. de; Gomes, R.P.; Araujo, J.A.; Floh, B.; Matsuda, H.T.

    1977-01-01

    This paper summarizes the main activities dealing with the fabrication of nuclear grade uranium and thorium compounds at the Instituto de Energia Atomica, Sao Paulo. Identification of problems and their resolutions, the experience gained in plant operation, the performance characteristics of an ion-exchange facility and a solvent extraction unit (a demonstration plant based on pulsed columns for purification of uranium and production of ammonium diuranate) are described. A moving-bed facility for UF 4 preparation and its operation is discussed. A pilot plant for uranium and thorium oxide microsphere preparation based on internal gelation for HTGR fuel type is also described. A solvent extraction pilot plant for thorium purification based on a compound extraction-scrubbing column and a mixer-settler battery and the involved technology for thorium purification are commented. The main products, namely ammonium diuranate, uranyl amonium tricarbonate, uranium trioxide, uranium tetrafluoride, thorium nitrate and thorium oxalate and their quality are commented. The development of necessary analytical procedures for the quality control of the mentioned nuclear grade products is summarized. A great majority of such procedures was particularly suitable for analyzing traces impurities. Designed for installation are the units for denitration of uranyl nitrate solutions and pilot plants for elemental fluorine and UF 6 . The installation of a laboratory-scale plant designed for reprocessing irradiated uranium and an experimental unit for the recovery of protactinium from irradiated thorium is in progress

  16. Determination of ultratrace concentrations of uranium and thorium in natural waters by x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.H. Jr.; Brooksbank, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    An x-ray fluorescence method for the simultaneous determination of uranium and thorium at the less than 1 ppM level in natural waters is described. Uranium and thorium are coprecipitated with an internal standard, yttrium, and incorporated into an iron-aluminum hydroxide carrier. The hydroxide precipitate is filtered, and the filter disk is analyzed by the energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence technique. Matrix interferences caused by the presence of unpredictable anions and cations are compensated for by the internal standard. The U/Y and Th/Y ratios are linear over the 5- to 100-μg range of interest, and the detection limit of each element on the filter disk is 2 μg (3 sigma). Relative standard deviation was 17% at the 15-μg and 4% at the 100-μg level for thorium and 11% at the 11-μg and 2% at the 100-μg level for uranium. Analysis of spiked solutions showed a recovery of 19.6 +- 0.3 μg for uranium and 19.8 +- 0.3 μg for thorium at the 20-μg level, and the normal lower reporting limit is 5 μg. Fifty disks can be routinely measured during a normal working day

  17. Development of a freeze-drying process of waste-solution, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Isao; Kawasaki, Takeshi

    1988-01-01

    The waste solution treatment process in Plutonium Conversion Development Facility (PCDF) consists of Evaporation-Condensation and Neutrazation-Agglometation-Precipitation process, which produces the distillate as recovered acid at first step and separates Pu-U element from condenced solution at second step. This process needs many stages to get high decontamination efficiency and then the Evaporator is in very corrosive state because the nitric acid solution is heated over 100 degrees C to be evaporated. So, in PCDF, it was started the development of Freeze-Drying process to waste solution treatment. This process is suitable for a little quantity of the solution including nitric acid as produced in the Microwave Heating method. Moreover the process has high decontamination efficiency and has good performance of equipment. The result of the cold test of Freeze-Drying process with nitric acid is discribed in this paper. (author)

  18. Process for final storage of high level radioactive fission product solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.R.B.; Fries, B.A.

    1984-01-01

    In this process for the storage of an aqueous solution of radioactive nuclides, the solution is diluted with system water, which is obtained from a reservoir below the bottom of the sea in a porous geological stratum. After dilution, the diluted solution is injected into the same geological stratum under the bottom of the sea. (orig.) [de

  19. Method of solution preparation of polyolefin class polymers for electrospinning processing included

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabolt, John F. (Inventor); Lee, Keun-Hyung (Inventor); Givens, Steven R. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A process to make a polyolefin fiber which has the following steps: mixing at least one polyolefin into a solution at room temperature or a slightly elevated temperature to form a polymer solution and electrospinning at room temperature said polymer solution to form a fiber.

  20. The Complex Sol–Gel Process for producing small ThO{sub 2} microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brykala, Marcin, E-mail: m.brykala@ichtj.waw.pl; Rogowski, Marcin

    2016-05-15

    Thorium based fuels offer several benefits compared to uranium based fuels thus they might be an attractive alternative to conventional fuel types. This study is devoted to the synthesis and the characterization of small thorium dioxide microspheres (Ø <50 μm). Their application involves using powder-free process, called the Complex Sol–Gel Process. The source sols used for the processes were prepared by the method where in the starting ascorbic acid solution the solid thorium nitrate was dissolved and partially neutralized by aqueous ammonia under pH control. The microspheres of thorium-ascorbate gel were obtained using the ICHTJ Process (INCT in English). Studies allowed to determine an optimal heat treatment with calcination temperature of 700 °C and temperature rate not higher than 2 °C/min which enabled us to obtain a crack-free surface of microspheres. The main parameters which have a strong influence on the synthesis method and features of the spherical particles of thorium dioxide are described in this article. - Highlights: • ThO{sub 2} were prepared for the first time using combination of ICHTJ methods. • The homogeneous thorium-ascorbate sol was used as starting solutions in CSGP method. • The gelation by IChTJ Process to microspheres (Ø <50 μm) with 100% efficiency was used. • ThO{sub 2} microspheres exhibit a high sphericity, crack-free surface and microstructure. • The cubic crystalline structure of ThO{sub 2} was produced at 700 °C.

  1. The Delphi process: a solution for reviewing novel grant applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cath Holliday

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Cath Holliday1, Monica Robotin1,21Cancer Council New South Wales, Sydney; 2University of Sydney, School of Public Health, Sydney, New South Wales, AustraliaIntroduction: Traditional scientific review processes are not well suited for evaluating the merits of research in situations where the available scientific evidence is limited and if review panels have widely divergent opinions. This study tested whether a Delphi process is useful in grant selection.Materials and method: A Delphi process prioritized novel research proposals in pancreatic cancer. Five reviewers holding similar grants overseas ranked research applications by scientific merit, innovativeness, and level of risk.Result: Three rounds of voting evaluated the best 10 applications received. In the first round of the Delphi process, scores ranged from 5.0 to 8.3. After the second round, the cumulative scores of the eight remaining applications ranged from 10 to 12.6. At the end of the third round, the final cumulative scores of the remaining six applications ranged from 13.6 to 18.2. The four highest ranking applications were recommended for funding, with agreement from reviewers.Conclusion: A modified Delphi process proved to be an efficient, transparent, and equitable method of reviewing novel grant applications in a specialized field of research, where no local expertise was available. This process may also be useful for other peer review processes, particularly where there is limited access to local experts.Keywords: delphi process, research grant selection, consensus

  2. Thorium and its future importance for nuclear energy generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lainetti, Paulo E.O.

    2015-01-01

    Thorium was discovered in 1828 by the Swedish chemist Jons J. Berzelius. Despite some advantages over uranium for use in nuclear reactors, its main use, in the almost two centuries since its discovery, the use of thorium was restricted to use for gas mantles, especially in the early twentieth century. In the beginning of the Nuclear Era, many countries had interested on thorium, particularly during the 1950-1970 period. There are about 435 nuclear reactors in the world nowadays. They need more than 65.000 tons of uranium yearly. The future world energy needs will increase and, even if we assumed a conservative contribution of nuclear generation, it will be occur a significant increasing in the uranium prices, taking into account that uranium, as used in the present thermal reactors, is a finite resource. Thorium is nearly three times more abundant than uranium in the Earth's crust. Despite thorium is not a fissile material, 232 Th can be converted to 233 U (fissile) more efficiently than 238 U to 239 Pu. Besides this, since it is possible to convert thorium waste into nonradioactive elements, thorium is an environment-friendly alternative energy source. Thorium fuel cycle is also inherently resistant to proliferation. Some papers evaluate the thorium resources in Brazil over 1.200.000 metric t. Then, the thorium alternative must be seriously considered in Brazil for strategic reasons. In this paper a brief history of thorium is presented, besides a review of the world thorium utilization and a discussion about advantages and restrictions of thorium use. (author)

  3. Safety and Regulatory Issues of the Thorium Fuel Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, Brian [ORNL; Worrall, Andrew [ORNL; Powers, Jeffrey [ORNL; Bowman, Steve [ORNL; Flanagan, George [ORNL; Gehin, Jess [ORNL

    2014-02-01

    Thorium has been widely considered an alternative to uranium fuel because of its relatively large natural abundance and its ability to breed fissile fuel (233U) from natural thorium (232Th). Possible scenarios for using thorium in the nuclear fuel cycle include use in different nuclear reactor types (light water, high temperature gas cooled, fast spectrum sodium, molten salt, etc.), advanced accelerator-driven systems, or even fission-fusion hybrid systems. The most likely near-term application of thorium in the United States is in currently operating light water reactors (LWRs). This use is primarily based on concepts that mix thorium with uranium (UO2 + ThO2), add fertile thorium (ThO2) fuel pins to LWR fuel assemblies, or use mixed plutonium and thorium (PuO2 + ThO2) fuel assemblies. The addition of thorium to currently operating LWRs would result in a number of different phenomenological impacts on the nuclear fuel. Thorium and its irradiation products have nuclear characteristics that are different from those of uranium. In addition, ThO2, alone or mixed with UO2 fuel, leads to different chemical and physical properties of the fuel. These aspects are key to reactor safety-related issues. The primary objectives of this report are to summarize historical, current, and proposed uses of thorium in nuclear reactors; provide some important properties of thorium fuel; perform qualitative and quantitative evaluations of both in-reactor and out-of-reactor safety issues and requirements specific to a thorium-based fuel cycle for current LWR reactor designs; and identify key knowledge gaps and technical issues that need to be addressed for the licensing of thorium LWR fuel in the United States.

  4. Solution Processed Silver Nanoparticles in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Berginc

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A plasmonic effect of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs is studied. The solutions of silver nitrate in isopropanol, ethylene glycol, or in TiO2 sol were examined as possible precursors for Ag NPs formation. The solutions were dip-coated on the top of the porous TiO2 layer. The results of optical measurements confirmed the formation of Ag NPs throughout the porous TiO2 layer after the heat treatment of the layers above 100°C. Heat treatment at 220°C was found to be optimal regarding the formation of the Ag NPs. The porous TiO2 layers with Ag NPs have been evaluated also in DSSC by measuring current-voltage characteristics and the external quantum efficiency of the cells. In addition, the amount of adsorbed dye has been determined to prove the plasmonic effect in the cells. The I-V characterization of the DSSCs revealed an increase of the short circuit current in the presence of Ag NPs although the amount of the attached dye molecules decreased. These results confirm that the performance enhancement is related to the plasmonic effect. However, neither a thin sol-gel TiO2 layer nor poly(4-vinylpyridine shells provide effective protection for the long term stability of the Ag NPs against the corrosion of I3-/I- based electrolyte.

  5. The thorium phosphate diphosphate as a ceramic for the actinides immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dacheux, N.; Thomas, A.C.; Chassigneux, B.; Brandel, V.; Genet, M. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire

    1999-07-01

    Considering that phosphate matrices like apatites or monazites could be potential candidates for the immobilization of actinides, the thorium phosphates chemistry has been completely reexamined. Among the solids synthesized, the Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (namely TPD) was obtained after heating at 1250 degrees Celsius for 10 hours whatever the chemical way of synthesis using dry or wet chemistry methods, whatever the thorium salt and the phosphating reagent used in the condition to respect the initial mole ratio Th/PO{sub 4}=2/3. The ab initio structure determination was achieved on powder and single crystal and led to an orthorhombic unit cell. In this structure, the thorium atoms are eightfold coordinated. The substitution of thorium atoms by tetravalent actinides leading to the formation of Th{sub 4-x}M{sub x}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} (M=U, Np, Pu) solid solutions (respectively TUPD, TNPD, TPPD) was also investigated. For each actinide, several solid solutions were synthesized. The linear decrease of the unit cell parameters and volume refined as a function of the x value has been observed. It confirms that solid solutions are well formed. The equations obtained by linear regression are in very good agreement with the ionic radii reported in the literature for U{sup 4+}, Np{sup 4+} and Pu{sup 4+} in the eightfold coordination. The maximum substitution of Th{sup 4+} by each tetravalent actinide has been determined as well as the corresponding Maximum Mole Loading (MML) and Maximum Weight Loading (MWL). It appeared that the TPD structure allows the replacement of thorium by large amounts of tetravalent uranium, neptunium and plutonium. Pellets of TPD and TUPD solid solutions were prepared and the corresponding densities determined. They correspond to 95-99 % of the values calculated from crystallographic data. In order to study the resistance of these materials (TPD, TUPD, TPPD) to aqueous alteration, leaching tests were achieved in distilled water and

  6. Aqueous biphasic extraction of uranium and thorium from contaminated soils. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaiko, D.J.; Gartelmann, J.; Henriksen, J.L.; Krause, T.R.; Deepak; Vojta, Y.; Thuillet, E.; Mertz, C.J.

    1995-07-01

    The aqueous biphasic extraction (ABE) process for soil decontamination involves the selective partitioning of solutes and fine particulates between two immiscible aqueous phases. The biphase system is generated by the appropriate combination of a water-soluble polymer (e.g., polyethlene glycol) with an inorganic salt (e.g., sodium carbonate). Selective partitioning results in 99 to 99.5% of the soil being recovered in the cleaned-soil fraction, while only 0.5 to 1% is recovered in the contaminant concentrate. The ABE process is best suited to the recovery of ultrafine, refractory material from the silt and clay fractions of soils. During continuous countercurrent extraction tests with soil samples from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site (Fernald, OH), particulate thorium was extracted and concentrated between 6- and 16-fold, while the uranium concentration was reduced from about 500 mg/kg to about 77 mg/kg. Carbonate leaching alone was able to reduce the uranium concentration only to 146 mg/kg. Preliminary estimates for treatment costs are approximately $160 per ton of dry soil. A detailed flowsheet of the ABE process is provided

  7. A numerical solution for a closed die forging process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Dorin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the manufacturing processes that can be permanent improved is plastic deformation of metallic materials, as incorporating reserves on the manufacture of products with reduced material and energy consumptions. This paper presents finite element analysis for a closed die forging process, showing the stresses, strains and temperature into deformed part and stresses in the working tools. The analysis of obtained results for different flash dimensions of the working tools has enabled optimization of the forging process studied. To be able to validate the numerical results obtained, experimental tests were conducted. The compared data series show a good agreement between the numerical and experimental data.

  8. Sorption behavior of thorium onto montmorillonite and illite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Yoshihisa; Barr, Logan; Yamaguchi, Tetsuji; Hemmi, Ko

    2016-01-01

    Thorium (Th)-229 is one of the important radionuclides for the performance assessment calculations for high-level radioactive waste repositories. The sorption behavior of Th onto montmorillonite and illite were investigated by batch sorption experiments. Experiments were carried out under variable pH and carbonate concentrations. The sorbability of montmorillonite was higher than that of illite. Distribution coefficients, K d (m 3 kg -1 ), decreased with increased carbonate concentrations and showed the minimal value at around pH 10. The sorption behaviors of Th were analyzed by the non-electrostatic surface complex model with PHREEQC computer program. The model calculations were able to explain the experimental results reasonably well. The decreases of K d was likely due to the stabilization of aqueous species by hydroxo-carbonate complexations in the solutions. (author) [ja

  9. Business Process Management Integration Solution in Financial Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is vital for financial services companies to ensure the rapid implementation of new processes to meet speed-to-market, service quality and compliance requirements. This has to be done against a background of increased complexity. An integrated approach to business processes allows products, processes, systems, data and the applications that underpin them to evolve quickly. Whether it’s providing a loan, setting up an insurance policy, or executing an investment instruction, optimizing the sale-to-fulfillment process will always win new business, cement customer loyalty, and reduce costs. Lack of integration across lending, payments and trading, on the other hand, simply presents competitors who are more efficient with a huge profit opportunity.

  10. Draw solutions for forward osmosis processes: Developments, challenges, and prospects for the future

    KAUST Repository

    Ge, Qingchun

    2013-09-01

    Forward osmosis (FO) has emerged as one of potential technologies to mitigate clean water and energy shortage. Not only can it produce clean water but also energy by employing draw solutes to induce osmotic gradients across semipermeable membranes as the driving force for water production and power generation. Ideally, the semipermeable membrane performs as a barrier that allows only water to pass through but rejects all others. However, in reality, depending on draw solute\\'s chemistry property and physical structure, the reverse flux of draw solutes may take place across FO membranes which not only results in a lower effective osmotic driving force but also facilitates fouling. In addition, the asymmetric structure of FO membranes and the transport resistance of draw solutes within the FO membranes cause concentration polarization and lower the water flux. Furthermore, the regeneration of draw solutes from diluted draw solutions and the production of clean water might be energy-intensive if inappropriate draw solutes and recycle processes are utilized. Therefore, in this work we aim to give a comprehensive review on the progress of draw solution for FO processes. An assessment on the advantages and limitations of the existing draw solutes are made. Various FO integrated processes for water production and draw solute regeneration are exemplified. We also highlight the challenges and future research directions for the molecular design of better draw solutes. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  11. The influence of surface roughness and solution concentration on pool boiling process in Diethanolamine aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshechin, Mohsen; Salimi, Farhad; Jahangiri, Alireza

    2018-04-01

    In this research, the effect of surface roughness and concentration of solution on bubble departing frequency and nucleation site density for pool boiling of water/diethanolamine (DEA) binary solution were investigated experimentally. In this investigation, boiling heat transfer coefficient, bubble departing frequency and nucleation site density have been experimentally investigated in various concentrations and heat fluxes. Microstructured surfaces with a wide range of well-defined surface roughness were fabricated, and a heat flux between 1.5-86 kW/m2 was achieved under atmospheric conditions. The Results indicated that surface roughness and concentration of solution increase the bubble departing frequency and nucleation site density with increasing heat flux. The boiling heat transfer coefficient in mixtures of water/DEA increases with increasing concentration of DEA in water. The experimental results were compared with predictions of several used correlations in the literatures. Results showed that the boiling heat transfer coefficients of this case study are much higher than the predicted values by major existing correlations and models. The excellent agreement for bubble departing frequency found between the models of Jackob and Fritz (1966) and experimental data and also the nucleation site density were in close agreement with the model of Paul (1983) data. f bubble departure frequency, 1/s or Hz N Number of nucleation sites per area per time R c Minimum cavity size, m D c critical diameter, m g gravitational acceleration, m/s2 ρ density, kg/m3 T temperature, °c ΔT temperature difference, °c d d vapor bubble diameter, m h fg enthalpy of vaporization, J/kg R Roughness, μm Ja Jakob number cp specific heat, J/kg °c Pr Prandtl number Ar Archimedes number h Heat transfer coefficient, J/(m2 °c) tg time it takes to grow a bubble, s q/A heat flux (kW/m2) tw time required to heat the layer, s gc Correction coefficient of incompatible units R a Surface

  12. Study of the irradiation effects on thorium phosphate diphosphate ({beta}-TPD): consequences on its chemical durability; Etude des effets d'irradiation sur le phosphate diphosphate de thorium ({beta}-PDT): consequences sur la durabilite chimique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamain, C

    2005-12-15

    Since Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (beta-TPD) can be considered as a potential host matrix for long-term storage in underground repository, it is necessary to study the irradiation effects on the structure of this ceramics and the consequences on its chemical durability. Sintered samples of beta-TPD and of associated solid solutions of beta-TUPD were irradiated under ion beams and then altered in aqueous solutions. Depending on the electronic LET value, beta-TPD can be completely or partly amorphized. Furthermore, the ability of recrystallization of the amorphous material by thermal annealing was also demonstrated. Some leaching tests, realized on these irradiated samples, have shown a significant effect of the amorphous fraction on the normalized dissolution rate which was increased by a factor of 10 from the crystallized to the fully amorphized material. Correlatively, the amorphous fraction also modified the delay to reach the saturation conditions associated to the thermodynamic equilibria involved. On the other hand, it exhibited no influence neither on other kinetic parameters, such as activation energy of the dissolution process or partial order related to the proton concentration, nor on the nature of the neo-formed phase formed at the saturation of the leachate and identified as Thorium Phosphate Hydrogeno-Phosphate Hydrate (TPHPH). Beta-TUPD samples were also irradiated by gamma and alpha rays during leaching tests to study the effects of radiolysis in the leaching medium on the normalized leaching rate. It appeared that the radiolytic species occurring in the dissolution mechanism were unstable, disappearing quickly when stopping the irradiation. (author)

  13. Accelerator molten-salt breeding and thorium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo; Nakahara, Yasuaki; Kato, Yoshio; Ohno, Hideo; Mitachi, Kohshi.

    1990-01-01

    The recent efforts at the development of fission energy utilization have not been successful in establishing fully rational technology. A new philosophy should be established on the basis of the following three principles: (1) thorium utilization, (2) molten-salt fuel concept, and (3) separation of fissile-breeding and power-generating functions. Such philosophy is called 'Thorium Molten-Salt Nuclear Energy Synergetics [THORIMS-NES]'. The present report first addresses the establishment of 233 U breeding fuel cycle, focusing on major features of the Breeding and Chemical Processing Centers and a small molten-salt power station (called FUJI-II). The development of fissile producing breeders is discussed in relation to accelerator molten-salt breeder (AMSB), impact fusion molten-salt breeder, and inertial-confined fusion hybrid molten-salt breeder. Features of the accelerator molten-salt breeder are described, focusing on technical problems with accelerator breeders (or spallators), design principle of the accelerator molten-salt breeder, selection of molten salt compositions, and nuclear- and reactor-chemical aspects of AMSB. Discussion is also made of further research and development efforts required in the future for AMSB. (N.K.)

  14. Neutron activation analysis of airborne thorium liberated during welding operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Typically, reactive metals such as aluminum are welded using a thoriated tungsten welding electrode which is attached to a source of argon gas such that the local atmosphere around the weld is inert. The metal is heated by the arc formed between the electrode and the grounded component to be welded. During this process, some of the electrode is vaporized in the arc and is potentially liberated to the surrounding air. This situation may result in a hazardous airborne thorium level. Because the electrode is consumed during welding, the electrode tip must be repeatedly dressed by grinding the tip to a fine point so that the optimal welding conditions are maintained. These grinding activities may also release thorium to the air. Data generated in the 1950s suggested that these electrodes posed no significant health hazard and seemed to justify their exemption from licensing requirements for source material. Since that time, other studies have been performed and present conflicting results as to the level of risk. Values both above and below the health protection limit in use in the United States, have been reported in the literature recently. This study is being undertaken to provide additional data which may be useful in evaluating both the chemical toxicity risk and radiological dose assessment criteria associated with thoriated tungsten welding operations

  15. The LOMOsup(R) process: a solution for residual monomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derbyshire, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Regulatory activity over the last several years has addressed the potential problems associated with the migration of residual monomers from a number of commodity food packages. Regardless of the outcome of current debates, it will always be desirable to reduce monomer levels to as low a level as economically practicable so that they do not become indirect additives. The LOMO process is a body of technology inclusive of an ionizing radiation treatment which can result in sharp reduction of residual monomer levels in commodity plastic resins. The process may be applicable to factory intermediates, raw resins, or finished articles. Depending upon the individual system and its monomers, LOMO treatment can result in reductions to levels which press today's analytical test capability. Industrial radiation processing is normally accomplished with electron beam accelerators. Electron beam processing continues to gain in understanding and acceptance as one of the very few basic methods by which energy can be imparted to an industrial process system. Typically, whole factories are constructed around one accelerator. (author)

  16. Sorption behaviour of uranium and thorium on hydrous tin oxide from aqueous and mixed-solvent HNO3 media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misak, N.Z.; Salama, H.N.; El-Naggar, I.M.

    1983-01-01

    In aqueous nitric acid, uranyl and thorium ions seem to be sorbed on hydrous tin oxide mainly by a cation exchange mechanism. In 10 - 3 M aqueous solutions, the hydrous oxide prefers thorium to uranium at the relative low pH values, while the reverse is true at the higher pH values. The exchange of uranium is particle diffusion controlled while that of thorium is chemically controlled, and the isotherms point to the presence of different-energy sites in the hydrous oxide. Except for the solutions containing 80% of methanol, ethanol, or acetone, cation exchange is probably still the main mechanism of sorption of uranium. Anionic sorption of thorium seems to occur in all the mixed-solvent solutions and is perhaps the main mechanism in 80% ethanol. The equilibrium distribution coefficient K sub (d) increases almost in all cases with organic solvent content, probably due to dehydration of sorbed ions and to increasing superposition on anionic sorption. Unlike the aqueous medium, large U/Th separation factors are achieved in many of the mixed-solvent solutions and separation schemes are suggested. (Authors)

  17. Thorium: An energy source for the world of tomorrow ?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    To meet the tremendous world energy needs, systematic R&D has to be pursued to replace fossil fuels. The ThEC13 conference organized by iThEC at CERN last October has shown that thorium is seriously considered by developing countries as a key element of their energy strategy. Developed countries are also starting to move in the same direction. How thorium could make nuclear energy (based on thorium) acceptable to society will be discussed. Thorium can be used both to produce energy and to destroy nuclear waste. As thorium is not fissile, one elegant option is to use an accelerator, in so-called “Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS)”, as suggested by Carlo Rubbia. CERN’s important contributions to R&D on thorium related issues will be mentioned as well as the main areas where CERN could contribute to this field in the future.

  18. LFTR: in search of the ideal pathway to thorium utilization-development program and current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soon, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Thorium has gained substantial attention as a potential energy source that could rival and eventually replace fossil fuels as humanity's primary energy source. This could not have come at a more opportune time as concerns about global climate change from CO 2 emissions and the approaching spectre of finite fossil fuel resources create serious challenges for the continuation of our advanced industrial societies, which are reliant on readily available and affordable energy. Thorium also potentially represents the catalyst with which the nuclear industry could reinvent itself and finally gain widespread public acceptance. There are many opinions on how to utilize thorium as a fuel, but the question of what constitutes an 'ideal' pathway has mostly been under-emphasized. Many specific characteristics of the thorium fuel cycle can differ significantly depending on the conditions and methodologies of utilization; characteristics such as safety, efficiency, waste profile and volume, and fissile protection can vary greatly according to reactor design and utilization philosophy. With thorium, we have been given an opportunity to start over, a blank slate. Therefore, in imagining the 'Thorium Economy' to come, it behoves the scientific and engineering communities to consider the most 'elegant' solution physically possible-what constitutes the 'ideal' and is it possible to reconcile it with what is both economically and technically practical? The characteristics desired of an 'ideal' nuclear reactor, in the areas of safety, efficiency, economy, and sustainability, and the 5 key design choices that could enable such a reactor will be discussed. This will be followed by an overview of the Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor, a 2-fluid Molten Salt Reactor currently under development by Flibe Energy in the United States. LFTR is a direct descendant of the MSRE, which was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the

  19. Prevention of short circuits in solution-processed OLED devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jolt Oostra, A.; Blom, P.W.M.; Michels, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Pinholes in the emitting layer of an organic light emitting diode (OLED), e.g. induced by particle contamination or processing flaws, lead to direct contact between the hole-injection layer (HIL) and the cathode. The resulting short circuits give rise to catastrophic device failure. We demonstrate

  20. Incorporation of Thorium in the Zircon Structure Type through the Th1-xErx(SiO4)1-x(PO4)xThorite-Xenotime Solid Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah, Adel; Clavier, Nicolas; Lozano-Rodriguez, M Janeth; Szenknect, Stephanie; Dacheux, Nicolas

    2016-11-07

    Pure powdered compounds with a general formula Th 1-x Er x (SiO 4 ) 1-x (PO 4 ) x belonging to the zircon-xenotime family were successfully synthesized under hydrothermal conditions (250 °C, 7 days) as recently reported for the preparation of coffinite. Therefore, a thorough, combined PXRD, EDX, EXAFS, Raman, and FTIR analysis showed the formation of a solid solution in agreement with Vegard's law. Moreover, the examination of the local structure shows that the Th-O distances remain close to those found in ThSiO 4 , whereas the Er-O distances show a significant decrease from 2.38(14) to 2.34(7) Å when increasing the erbium content from x = 0.2 to x = 1. The variation of the local structure also affects the PO 4 3- groups that are surely distorted in the structure.

  1. Computer simulations for thorium doped tungsten crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhard, Bernd

    2009-07-17

    Tungsten has the highest melting point among all metals in the periodic table of elements. Furthermore, its equilibrium vapor pressure is by far the lowest at the temperature given. Thoria, ThO{sub 2}, as a particle dopant, results in a high temperature creep resistant material. Moreover, thorium covered tungsten surfaces show a drastically reduced electronic work function. This results in a tremendous reduction of tip temperatures of cathodes in discharge lamps, and, therefore, in dramatically reduced tungsten vapor pressures. Thorium sublimates at temperatures below those of a typical operating cathode. For proper operation, a diffusional flow of thorium atoms towards the surface has to be maintained. This atomic flux responds very sensitively on the local microstructure, as grain boundaries as well as dislocation cores offer ''short circuit paths'' for thorium atoms. In this work, we address some open issues of thoriated tungsten. A molecular dynamics scheme (MD) is used to derive static as well as dynamic material properties which have their common origin in the atomistic behavior of tungsten and thorium atoms. The interatomic interactions between thorium and tungsten atoms are described within the embedded atom model (EAM). So far, in literature no W-Th interaction potentials on this basis are described. As there is no alloying system known between thorium and tungsten, we have determined material data for the fitting of these potentials using ab-initio methods. This is accomplished using the full potential augmented plane wave method (FLAPW), to get hypothetical, i.e. not occurring in nature, ''alloy'' data of W-Th. In order to circumvent the limitations of classical (NVE) MD schemes, we eventually couple our model systems to external heat baths or volume reservoirs (NVT, NPT). For the NPT ensemble, we implemented a generalization of the variable cell method in combination with the Langevin piston, which results in a

  2. Uranium and thorium deposits of Northern Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.; Gould, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    This, the second edition of the uranium-thorium deposit inventory, describes briefly the deposits of uranium and/or thorium in northern Ontario, which for the purposes of this circular is defined as that part of Ontario lying north and west of the Grenville Front. The most significant of the deposits described are fossil placers lying at or near the base of the Middle Precambrian Huronian Supergroup. These include the producing and past-producing mines of the Elliot Lake - Agnew Lake area. Also included are the pitchblende veins spatially associated with Late Precambrian (Keweenawan) diabase dikes of the Theano Point - Montreal River area. Miscellaneous Early Precambrian pegmatite, pitchblende-coffinite-sulphide occurrences near the Middle-Early Precambrian unconformity fringing the Lake Superior basin, and disseminations in diabase, granitic rocks, alkalic complexes and breccias scattered throughout northern Ontario make up the rest of the occurrences

  3. Computer simulations for thorium doped tungsten crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten has the highest melting point among all metals in the periodic table of elements. Furthermore, its equilibrium vapor pressure is by far the lowest at the temperature given. Thoria, ThO 2 , as a particle dopant, results in a high temperature creep resistant material. Moreover, thorium covered tungsten surfaces show a drastically reduced electronic work function. This results in a tremendous reduction of tip temperatures of cathodes in discharge lamps, and, therefore, in dramatically reduced tungsten vapor pressures. Thorium sublimates at temperatures below those of a typical operating cathode. For proper operation, a diffusional flow of thorium atoms towards the surface has to be maintained. This atomic flux responds very sensitively on the local microstructure, as grain boundaries as well as dislocation cores offer ''short circuit paths'' for thorium atoms. In this work, we address some open issues of thoriated tungsten. A molecular dynamics scheme (MD) is used to derive static as well as dynamic material properties which have their common origin in the atomistic behavior of tungsten and thorium atoms. The interatomic interactions between thorium and tungsten atoms are described within the embedded atom model (EAM). So far, in literature no W-Th interaction potentials on this basis are described. As there is no alloying system known between thorium and tungsten, we have determined material data for the fitting of these potentials using ab-initio methods. This is accomplished using the full potential augmented plane wave method (FLAPW), to get hypothetical, i.e. not occurring in nature, ''alloy'' data of W-Th. In order to circumvent the limitations of classical (NVE) MD schemes, we eventually couple our model systems to external heat baths or volume reservoirs (NVT, NPT). For the NPT ensemble, we implemented a generalization of the variable cell method in combination with the Langevin piston, which results in a set of Langevin equations, i.e. stochastic

  4. Long term radiological impact of thorium extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menard, S.; Schapira, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Thorium extraction produces a certain amount of radioactive wastes. Potential long term radiological impact of these residues has been calculated using the recent ICRP-68 ingestion dose factors in connection with the computing code DECAY, developed at Orsay and described in this work. This code solves the well known Bateman's equations which govern the time dependence of a set of coupled radioactive nuclei. Monazites will be very likely the minerals to be exploited first, in case of an extensive use of thorium as nuclear fuel. Because monazites contain uranium as well, mining residues will contain not only the descendants of 232 Th and a certain proportion of non-extracted thorium (taken here to be 5%), but also this uranium, if left in the wastes for economical reasons. If no uranium would be present at all in the mineral, the potential radiotoxicity would strongly decrease in approximately 60 years, at the pace of the 5.8 years period of 228 Ra, which becomes the longest-lived radionuclide of the 4n radioactive family in the residues. Moreover, there is no risk due to radon exhalation, because of the very short period of 220 Rn. These significant differences between uranium and thorium mining have to be considered in view of some estimated long term real radiological impacts due to uranium residues, which could reach a value of the order of 1 mSv/year, the dose limit recommended for the public by the recent ICRP-60. (authors). 15 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs., 43 appendices

  5. Thorium dioxide: properties and nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belle, J.; Berman, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    This is the sixth book on reactor materials published under sponsorship of the Naval Reactors Office of the United States Department of Energy, formerly the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This book presents a comprehensive compilation of the most significant properties of thorium dioxide, much like the book Uranium Dioxide: Properties and Nuclear Applications presented information on the fuel material used in the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor core

  6. Thorium dioxide: properties and nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belle, J.; Berman, R.M. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    This is the sixth book on reactor materials published under sponsorship of the Naval Reactors Office of the United States Department of Energy, formerly the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This book presents a comprehensive compilation of the most significant properties of thorium dioxide, much like the book Uranium Dioxide: Properties and Nuclear Applications presented information on the fuel material used in the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor core.

  7. Gastrointestinal absorption and distribution of thorium in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.P.; Oldham, R.D.; Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Moretti, E.S.

    1984-01-01

    The retention of thorium in liver, bone, and other tissues subsequent to its gastrointestinal absorption has been determined in fasted mice. The value obtained for fractional retention was 1.0 x 10 -3 , which is about a factor of two lower than the values for plutonium and neptunium. The tissue distribution and the value for fractional excretion of absorbed thorium were the same as those for intravenously injected thorium. 5 references, 1 table

  8. Analysis and synthesis of solutions for the agglomeration process modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babuk, V. A.; Dolotkazin, I. N.; Nizyaev, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The present work is devoted development of model of agglomerating process for propellants based on ammonium perchlorate (AP), ammonium dinitramide (ADN), HMX, inactive binder, and nanoaluminum. Generalization of experimental data, development of physical picture of agglomeration for listed propellants, development and analysis of mathematical models are carried out. Synthesis of models of various phenomena taking place at agglomeration implementation allows predicting of size and quantity, chemical composition, structure of forming agglomerates and its fraction in set of condensed combustion products. It became possible in many respects due to development of new model of agglomerating particle evolution on the surface of burning propellant. Obtained results correspond to available experimental data. It is supposed that analogical method based on analysis of mathematical models of particular phenomena and their synthesis will allow implementing of the agglomerating process modeling for other types of metalized solid propellants.

  9. Highly simplified small molecular phosphorescent organic light emitting devices with a solution-processed single layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaokui Wang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A highly simplified single layer solution-processed phosphorescent organic light emitting device (PHOLED with the maximum ηP 11.5 lm/W corresponding to EQE 9.6% has been demonstrated. The solution-processed device is shown having comparable even exceeding device performance to vacuum-processed PHOLED. The simplified device design strategy represents a pathway toward large area, low cost and high efficiency OLEDs in the future. The charge injection and conduction mechanisms in two solution- and vacuum-processed devices are also investigated by evaluating the temperature dependence of current density – voltage characteristics.

  10. Self-Sustaining Thorium Boiling Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, Ehud; Gorman, Phillip M.; Bogetic, Sandra; Seifried, Jeffrey E.; Zhang, Guanheng; Varela, Christopher R.; Fratoni, Massimiliano; Vijic, Jasmina J.; Downar, Thomas; Hall, Andrew; Ward, Andrew; Jarrett, Michael; Wysocki, Aaron; Xu, Yunlin; Kazimi, Mujid; Shirvan, Koroush; Mieloszyk, Alexander; Todosow, Michael; Brown, Nicolas; Cheng, Lap

    2015-01-01

    The primary objectives of this project are to: Perform a pre-conceptual design of a core for an alternative to the Hitachi proposed fuel-self- sustaining RBWR-AC, to be referred to as a RBWR-Th. The use of thorium fuel is expected to assure negative void coefficient of reactivity (versus positive of the RBWR-AC) and improve reactor safety; Perform a pre-conceptual design of an alternative core to the Hitachi proposed LWR TRU transmuting RBWR-TB2, to be referred to as the RBWR-TR. In addition to improved safety, use of thorium for the fertile fuel is expected to improve the TRU transmutation effectiveness; Compare the RBWR-Th and RBWR-TR performance against that of the Hitachi RBWR core designs and sodium cooled fast reactor counterparts - the ARR and ABR; and, Perform a viability assessment of the thorium-based RBWR design concepts to be identified along with their associated fuel cycle, a technology gap analysis, and a technology development roadmap. A description of the work performed and of the results obtained is provided in this Overview Report and, in more detail, in the Attachments. The major findings of the study are summarized.

  11. A PWR Thorium Pin Cell Burnup Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Kevan Dean; Zhao, X.; Pilat, E. E; Hejzlar, P.

    2000-05-01

    As part of work to evaluate the potential benefits of using thorium in LWR fuel, a thorium fueled benchmark comparison was made in this study between state-of-the-art codes, MOCUP (MCNP4B + ORIGEN2), and CASMO-4 for burnup calculations. The MOCUP runs were done individually at MIT and INEEL, using the same model but with some differences in techniques and cross section libraries. Eigenvalue and isotope concentrations were compared on a PWR pin cell model up to high burnup. The eigenvalue comparison as a function of burnup is good: the maximum difference is within 2% and the average absolute difference less than 1%. The isotope concentration comparisons are better than a set of MOX fuel benchmarks and comparable to a set of uranium fuel benchmarks reported in the literature. The actinide and fission product data sources used in the MOCUP burnup calculations for a typical thorium fuel are documented. Reasons for code vs code differences are analyzed and discussed.

  12. Self-Sustaining Thorium Boiling Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, Ehud [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Gorman, Phillip M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bogetic, Sandra [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Seifried, Jeffrey E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Zhang, Guanheng [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Varela, Christopher R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Fratoni, Massimiliano [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Vijic, Jasmina J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Downar, Thomas [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hall, Andrew [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ward, Andrew [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Jarrett, Michael [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Wysocki, Aaron [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Xu, Yunlin [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kazimi, Mujid [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Shirvan, Koroush [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Mieloszyk, Alexander [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Todosow, Michael [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brown, Nicolas [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cheng, Lap [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The primary objectives of this project are to: Perform a pre-conceptual design of a core for an alternative to the Hitachi proposed fuel-self- sustaining RBWR-AC, to be referred to as a RBWR-Th. The use of thorium fuel is expected to assure negative void coefficient of reactivity (versus positive of the RBWR-AC) and improve reactor safety; Perform a pre-conceptual design of an alternative core to the Hitachi proposed LWR TRU transmuting RBWR-TB2, to be referred to as the RBWR-TR. In addition to improved safety, use of thorium for the fertile fuel is expected to improve the TRU transmutation effectiveness; Compare the RBWR-Th and RBWR-TR performance against that of the Hitachi RBWR core designs and sodium cooled fast reactor counterparts - the ARR and ABR; and, Perform a viability assessment of the thorium-based RBWR design concepts to be identified along with their associated fuel cycle, a technology gap analysis, and a technology development roadmap. A description of the work performed and of the results obtained is provided in this Overview Report and, in more detail, in the Attachments. The major findings of the study are summarized.

  13. Recovery of radiogenic lead-208 from a residue of thorium and rare earths obtained during the operation of a thorium purification pilot plant; Separacao e recuperacao de chumbo-208 dos residuos de torio terras raras gerados na unidade piloto de purificacao de nitrato de torio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seneda, Jose Antonio

    2006-07-01

    Brazil has a long tradition in thorium technology, from mineral dressing (monazite) to the nuclear grade thorium compounds. The estimate reserves are 1200,000. ton of ThO{sub 2}. As a consequence from the work of thorium purification pilot plant at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-CNEN/IPEN-SP, about 25 ton of a sludge containing thorium and rare earths was accumulated. It comes as a raffinate and washing solutions from thorium solvent extraction. This sludge, a crude hydroxide named RETOTER contains thorium, rare earths and minor impurities including the radiogenic lead-208, with abundance 88.34 %. This work discusses the results of the studies and main parameters for its recovery by anionic ion exchange technique in the hydrochloric system. The isotope abundance of this lead was analyzed by high resolution mass spectrometer (ICPMS) and thermoionic mass spectrometer (TIMS) and the data was used to calculate the thermal neutron capture cross section. The value of {sigma}{gamma}{sup 0} = 14.6{+-}0.7 mb was found, quite different from the {sigma}{gamma}{sup 0} = 174.2 {+-} 7.0 mb measure cross section for the natural lead. Preliminary study for the thorium and rare earths separation and recovery was discussed as well. (author)

  14. Nuclear and materials aspects of the thorium fuel cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, P.; Sundaram, C. V.

    1981-09-01

    This paper is an attempt to assess and review the materials aspects of the thorium fuel cycle. It starts with an examination of the nuclear aspects of the thorium fuel cycle, meant as an introduction for materials scientists and engineers who may not normally be familiar with the concepts and terms involved. After defining and describing the thorium and uranium fuel cycles, the reasons for the resurgence of interest in the thorium fuel cycle and the technical and economic considerations that support its early adoption are examined. The reactor physics and fissile economics aspects of the thorium and uranium cycles are then compared. The specific reactor types suitable for the adoption of the thorium cycle are briefly examined and described. Subsequent sections of the paper are devoted to a detailed discussion of the materials aspects of the thorium fuel cycle. Available information on fabrication, refabrication and irradiation performance of thorium-based fuels for light water reactors, heavy water reactors, high temperature gas-cooled reactors, molten salt breeder reactors and fast breeder reactors is critically reviewed and analysed. Materials problems related to cladding and structural materials are also discussed whenever these are unique to the thorium cycle.

  15. Health status and body radioactivity of former thorium workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehney, A.F.; Polednak, A.P.; Rundo, J.; Brues, A.M.; Lucas, H.F. Jr.; Patten, B.C.; Rowland, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    The objectives of the study are: (1) to assess possible health effects of employment in the thorium milling industry by comparison of mortality and morbidity characteristics of former thorium workers with those of suitable general populations; (2) to examine disease outcomes by estimated exposure levels of thorium and thoron daughter products for possible radiation-related effects; and (3) to determine the body distribution of inhaled thorium (and daughters) and rare earths in humans by radioactivity measurements in vivo and by analysis of autopsy samples. The principal end points for investigation are respiratory disease and cancers of lung, liver, bone, and bone marrow

  16. A newly developed accelerator to convert thorium to uranium-233

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamei, T.

    2014-01-01

    For constructing a sustainable society, low-carbon energy sources and low-carbon automobiles are required. In addition to the use of nuclear power, renewable energy such as wind-mills and solar power are used as low-carbon energy sources. Electric vehicle (EV) and hybrid vehicle (HV) are expected to be used as low-carbon automobiles. Essential raw material in order to fabricate these machineries is rare-earth elements (REE). In these few years, rare-earth supply has been unstable due to China’s monopoly in its production. China’s monopoly of rare-earth production was caused by loss of market competitiveness of other countries that needed to spend cost for taking care of “thorium” which occurred as by-product of rare-earth refining. Thorium can be used as nuclear fuel but thorium is merely fertile. Therefore, additional supply of fissile material is necessary to use thorium. As a result, there are no countries that separate and store thorium as valuable except India. The authors have studied (1) molten-salt reactor (MSR) as a utilizing technology of thorium, (2) implementation capacity of thorium MSR supported by a supply of plutonium from spent uranium fuel and (3) international framework to protect environment from thorium which occurs as by-product of rare-earth refining. Available implementation capacity of thorium MSR by using all plutonium based on the prediction of IEA’s uranium fuel cycle is only 392 GW at 2050. This capacity of thorium MSR requires 76 thousand tonnes of thorium but total amount of thorium occurring as by-product of rare-earth reaches to 444 thousand tonnes. If there is no use of thorium, it could be abandoned to environment illegally. The authors are considering a new framework to protect environment by giving an incentive of storing thorium by adding value to these excess thorium. A newly developed accelerator neutron source is a method to add value to thorium. Spallation reaction has been known as neutron source which uses high

  17. Spectrochemical carriers and the matrix effect: contribution to the spectrographic analysis study of general impurities at trace level in nuclearly pure thorium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lordello, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    The relative effectiveness of twenty spectrochemical carriers related to the volatilization behavior of twenty seven general impurities from thorium oxide matrices was studied by means of the moving plate technique. Each carrier was employed in three different concentrations, 2%, 4% and 6%. The relative areas of the volatilization curves have been used for comparing the results. Many experiments were also done to demonstrate the 'matrix effect' in samples having the same chemical composition. The importance of chemical and physical treatments, prior and during the preparation of the thorium oxide, was investigated through a large number of samples by submitting them to spectrochemical analysis. Thorium nitrate and two different thorium oxalate samples, one of which dried in a medium of pH 10, were ignited to ThO 2 according to a temperature versus time program. The presence of nitric acid in thorium nitrate solutions was also studied in connection with the matrix effect. A carrier-distillation method for the determination of twenty five trace elements in thorium compounds was also suggested. Several types of standards had been investigated but the best results were achieved with those prepared from thorium nitrate solutions. Some elements can be determined only by standards synthesized by the dry-mixing technique. The suggested carriers are: 2% NaF (for Ba, Cr, Mg, Sn, V, Cu, Ti, Sr, Mn, Al, Pb, Bi, Ca, Ag, Be, Sb, As, Si, and B), 4% NaCl (for Cd, Co, Fe, Zn and Ni) and 4% KCi (for Na). The method fulfils the requirements of sensitivity for the analysis of trace elements in nuclear grade thorium compounds. (Author) [pt

  18. Solution-processed copper-nickel nanowire anodes for organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ian E.; Rathmell, Aaron R.; Yan, Liang; Ye, Shengrong; Flowers, Patrick F.; You, Wei; Wiley, Benjamin J.

    2014-05-01

    This work describes a process to make anodes for organic solar cells from copper-nickel nanowires with solution-phase processing. Copper nanowire films were coated from solution onto glass and made conductive by dipping them in acetic acid. Acetic acid removes the passivating oxide from the surface of copper nanowires, thereby reducing the contact resistance between nanowires to nearly the same extent as hydrogen annealing. Films of copper nanowires were made as oxidation resistant as silver nanowires under dry and humid conditions by dipping them in an electroless nickel plating solution. Organic solar cells utilizing these completely solution-processed copper-nickel nanowire films exhibited efficiencies of 4.9%.This work describes a process to make anodes for organic solar cells from copper-nickel nanowires with solution-phase processing. Copper nanowire films were coated from solution onto glass and made conductive by dipping them in acetic acid. Acetic acid removes the passivating oxide from the surface of copper nanowires, thereby reducing the contact resistance between nanowires to nearly the same extent as hydrogen annealing. Films of copper nanowires were made as oxidation resistant as silver nanowires under dry and humid conditions by dipping them in an electroless nickel plating solution. Organic solar cells utilizing these completely solution-processed copper-nickel nanowire films exhibited efficiencies of 4.9%. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01024h

  19. Process for the removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheitlin, F.M.

    The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of /sup 226/Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

  20. Progress in high-efficient solution process organic photovoltaic devices fundamentals, materials, devices and fabrication

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Gang

    2015-01-01

    This book presents an important technique to process organic photovoltaic devices. The basics, materials aspects and manufacturing of photovoltaic devices with solution processing are explained. Solution processable organic solar cells - polymer or solution processable small molecules - have the potential to significantly reduce the costs for solar electricity and energy payback time due to the low material costs for the cells, low cost and fast fabrication processes (ambient, roll-to-roll), high material utilization etc. In addition, organic photovoltaics (OPV) also provides attractive properties like flexibility, colorful displays and transparency which could open new market opportunities. The material and device innovations lead to improved efficiency by 8% for organic photovoltaic solar cells, compared to 4% in 2005. Both academic and industry research have significant interest in the development of this technology. This book gives an overview of the booming technology, focusing on the solution process fo...

  1. Analytical Characterization of the Thorium Nitrate Stockpile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattus, CH

    2003-12-30

    For several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been supporting the Defense Logistics Agency-Defense National Stockpile Center with stewardship of a thorium nitrate (ThN) stockpile. The effort for fiscal year 2002 was to prepare a sampling and analysis plan and to use the activities developed in the plan to characterize the ThN stockpile. The sampling was performed in June and July 2002 by RWE NUKEM with oversight by ORNL personnel. The analysis was performed by Southwest Research Institute of San Antonio, Texas, and data validation was performed by NFT, Inc., of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Of the {approx} 21,000 drums in the stockpile, 99 were sampled and 53 were analyzed for total metals composition, radiological constituents (using alpha and gamma spectrometry), and oxidizing characteristics. Each lot at the Curtis Bay Depot was sampled. Several of the samples were also analyzed for density. The average density of the domestic ThN was found to be 1.89 {+-} 0.08 g/cm{sup 3}. The oxidizer test was performed following procedures issued by the United Nations in 1999. Test results indicated that none of the samples tested was a Division 5.1 oxidizer per Department of Transportation definition. The samples were analyzed for total metals following the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency methods SW-846-6010B and 6020 (EPA 2003) using a combination of inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma--mass spectroscopy techniques. The results were used to compare the composition of the eight Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals present in the sample (arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, and silver) to regulatory limits. None of the samples was found to be hazardous for toxicity characteristics. The radiological analyses confirmed, when possible, the results obtained by the inductively coupled plasma analyses. These results--combined with the historical process knowledge acquired on the material

  2. Experimental study and new three-dimensional kinetic modeling of foamy solution-gas drive processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaofei; Zhang, Yanyu; Wang, Shilin; Song, Zhaoyao; Li, Peng; Wang, Changfa

    2018-03-12

    Foamy solution-gas drive processes in heavy oil reservoirs are very complex. The influence of some microscopic factors on this process is not fully understood due to limitations of traditional depletion tests. This study aims to investigate foamy solution-gas drive by experiments and simulations. First, the effects of the pressure depletion rate on critical gas saturation and foamy solution-gas drive processes were investigated by laboratory experiments. Second, a new three-dimensional foamy oil model that captures many important characteristics of foamy solution-gas drive, such as non-equilibrium behavior, gas evolution kinetics, and the effect of viscous forces on gas mobility, was developed. Last, the effects of some important parameters on foamy solution-gas drive were systematically investigated,and a model application was conducted in a typical foamy oil reservoir. The results indicate that the new model is capble of simulating many of the unusual behaviors observed in foamy solution-gas drive on a laboratory and field scales. High oil recoveries were obtained with a high oil viscosity, high depletion rate, long sandpack, and low solution gas-oil ratio. Foamy solution-gas drive processes are sensitive to the depletion rate, length, and critical gas saturation. The oil viscosity, solution GOR and diffusion coefficient are not sensitive factors.

  3. Quantitative analysis of thorium-containing materials using an Industrial XRF analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasikova, J.; Titov, V.; Sokolov, A.

    2014-01-01

    Thorium (Th) as nuclear fuel is clean and safe and offers significant advantages over uranium. The technology for several types of thorium reactors is proven but still must be developed on a commercial scale. In the case of commercialization of thorium nuclear reactor thorium raw materials will be on demand. With this, mining and processing companies producing Th and rare earth elements will require prompt and reliable methods and instrumentation for Th quantitative on-line analysis. Potential applicability of X-ray fluorescence conveyor analyzer CON-X series is discussed for Th quantitative or semi-quantitative on-line measurement in several types of Th-bearing materials. Laboratory study of several minerals (zircon sands and limestone as unconventional Th resources; monazite concentrate as Th associated resources and uranium ore residues after extraction as a waste product) was performed and analyzer was tested for on-line quantitative measurements of Th contents along with other major and minor components. Th concentration range in zircon sand is 50-350 ppm; its detection limit at this level is estimated at 25- 50 ppm in 5 minute measurements depending on the type of material. On-site test of the CON-X analyzer for continuous analysis of thorium traces along with other elements in zircon sand showed that accuracy of Th measurements is within 20% relative. When Th content is higher than 1% as in the concentrate of monazite ore (5-8% ThO 2 ) accuracy of Th determination is within 1% relative. Although preliminary on-site test is recommended in order to address system feasibility at a large scale, provided results show that industrial conveyor XRF analyzer CON-X series can be effectively used for analytical control of mining and processing streams of Th-bearing materials. (author)

  4. Review of Brazilian activities related to the thorium fuel cycle and production of thorium compounds at IPEN-CNEN/SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lainetti, Paulo E.O.; Freitas, Antonio A.; Mindrisz, Ana C.

    2013-01-01

    The Brazilian's interest in the nuclear utilization of thorium has started in the 50's as a consequence of the abundant occurrence of monazite sands. Since the sixties, IPEN-CNEN/SP has performed some developments related to the thorium fuel cycle. The production and purification of thorium compounds was carried out at IPEN for about 18 years and the main product was the thorium nitrate with high purity, having been produced over 170 metric tons of this material in the period, obtained through solvent extraction. The thorium nitrate was supplied to the domestic industry and used for gas portable lamps (Welsbach mantle). Although the thorium compounds produced have not been employed in the nuclear area, several studies were conducted. Therefore, those activities and the accumulated experience are of strategic importance, on one hand due to huge Brazilian thorium reserves, on the other hand by the resurgence of the interest of thorium for the Generation IV Advanced Reactors. This paper presents a review of the Brazilian research and development activities related to thorium technology. (author)

  5. A Membrane Process for Recycling Die Lube from Wastewater Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric S. Peterson; Jessica Trudeau; Bill Cleary; Michael Hackett; William A. Greene

    2003-04-01

    An active-surface membrane technology was used to separate a die lube manufacturing wastewater stream consisting of various oils, hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and silicones. The ultrafiltration membranes reduced organics from initial oil and grease contents by 20–25X, carbon oxygen demand (COD) by 1.5 to 2X, and total organic carbon (TOC) by 0.6, while the biological oxygen demand (BOD) remained constant. The active-surface membranes were not fouled as badly as non-active-surface systems and the active-surface membrane flux levels were consistently higher and more stable than those of the non-active-surface membranes tested. Field testing demonstrated that the rotary microfilter can concentrate the die lube, i.e. remove the glycerin component, and produce a die lube suitable for recycling. The recycling system operated for six weeks with only seven cleaning cycles and no mechanical or electrical failures. Test data and quality records indicate that the die casting scrap was reduced from 8.4 to 7.8%. There is no doubt that this test yielded tremendous results. This separation process presents significant opportunities that can be evaluated further.

  6. A Membrane Process for Recycling Die Lube from Wastewater Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, E. S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Trudeau, J. [Metaldyne, Inc., Twinsburg, OH (United States); Cleary, B. [Metaldyne, Inc., Twinsburg, OH (United States); Hackett, M. [Metaldyne, Inc., Twinsburg, OH (United States); Greene, W. A. [SpinTek FIltrations, LLC, Los Alamitos, CA (United States)

    2003-04-30

    An active-surface membrane technology was used to separate a die lube manufacturing wastewater stream consisting of various oils, hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and silicones. The ultrafiltration membranes reduced organics from initial oil and grease contents by 20-25X, carbon oxygen demand (COD) by 1.5 to 2X, and total organic carbon (TOC) by 0.6, while the biological oxygen demand (BOD) remained constant. The active-surface membranes were not fouled as badly as non-active-surface systems and the active-surface membrane flux levels were consistently higher and more stable than those of the non-active-surface membranes tested. Field testing demonstrated that the rotary microfilter can concentrate the die lube, i.e. remove the glycerin component, and produce a die lube suitable for recycling. The recycling system operated for six weeks with only seven cleaning cycles and no mechanical or electrical failures. Test data and quality records indicate that the die casting scrap was reduced from 8.4 to 7.8%. There is no doubt that this test yielded tremendous results. This separation process presents significant opportunities that can be evaluated further.

  7. A review on the recent developments of solution processes for oxide thin film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Ahn, Byung; Jeon, Hye-Ji; Sheng, Jiazhen; Park, Jozeph; Park, Jin-Seong

    2015-06-01

    This review article introduces the recent advances in the development of oxide semiconductor materials based on solution processes and their potential applications. In the early stage, thin film transistors based on oxide semiconductors fabricated by solution processes used to face critical problems such as high annealing temperatures (>400 °C) required to obtain reasonable film quality, and the relatively low field effect mobility (biosensors, and non-volatile memory devices. As such, further innovations in the solution process methods of oxide semiconductor devices are anticipated to allow the realization of cost effective, large area electronics in the near future.

  8. Colour stainability of indirect CAD-CAM processed composites vs. conventionally laboratory processed composites after immersion in staining solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arocha, Mariana A; Basilio, Juan; Llopis, Jaume; Di Bella, Enrico; Roig, Miguel; Ardu, Stefano; Mayoral, Juan R

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine, by using a spectrophotometer device, the colour stainability of two indirect CAD/CAM processed composites in comparison with two conventionally laboratory-processed composites after being immersed 4 weeks in staining solutions such as coffee, black tea and red wine, using distilled water as control group. Two indirect CAD/CAM composites (Lava Ultimate and Paradigm MZ100) and two conventionally laboratory-processed composites (SR Adoro and Premise Indirect) of shade A2 were selected (160 disc samples). Colour stainability was measured after 4 weeks of immersion in three staining solutions (black tea, coffee, red wine) and distilled water. Specimen's colour was measured each week by means of a spectrophotometer (CIE L*a*b* system). Statistical analysis was carried out performing repeated ANOVA measurements and Tukey's HSD test to evaluate differences in ΔE00 measurements between groups; the interactions among composites, staining solutions and time duration were also evaluated. All materials showed significant discoloration (pcolour stability compared with CAD/CAM resin blocks. CAD/CAM processed composites immersed in staining solutions showed lower colour stability when compared to conventionally laboratory-processed resin composites. The demand for CAD/CAM restorations has been increasing; however, colour stainability for such material has been insufficiently studied. Moreover, this has not been performed comparing CAD/CAM processed composites versus laboratory-processed indirect composites by immersing in staining solutions for long immersion periods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Experiments for quick and accurate thorium assay by means of potentiometric end point determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mainka, E.; Coerdt, W.

    1978-10-01

    Two methods are described which allow quick thorium assay easily to be automated. In the potentiometric titration with NaF the ion sensitive fluoride electrode is used as the indicator. The analysis can be performed for pH values 3 to 4. Th(OH) 4 precipitation must be avoided although the acidity of the solution must not be too high since otherwise erroneous measurements will be obtained. In the complexometric thorium assay EDTA is used for titration and the indicator is the copper sensitive electrode. This method offers the advantage that the analysis can be performed in the presence of large amounts of uranium, which is excluded under the NaF method. (orig.) [de

  10. Depletion Analysis of Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Loaded with LEU/Thorium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonat Sen; Gilles Youinou

    2013-02-01

    Thorium based fuel has been considered as an option to uranium-based fuel, based on considerations of resource utilization (Thorium is more widely available when compared to Uranium). The fertile isotope of Thorium (Th-232) can be converted to fissile isotope U-233 by neutron capture during the operation of a suitable nuclear reactor such as High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR). However, the fertile Thorium needs a fissile supporter to start and maintain the conversion process such as U-235 or Pu-239. This report presents the results of a study that analyzed the thorium utilization in a prismatic HTGR, namely Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) that was designed by General Atomics (GA). The collected for the modeling of this design come from Chapter 4 of MHTGR Preliminary Safety Information Document that GA sent to Department of Energy (DOE) on 1995. Both full core and unit cell models were used to perform this analysis using SCALE 6.1 and Serpent 1.1.18. Because of the long mean free paths (and migration lengths) of neutrons in HTRs, using a unit cell to represent a whole core can be non-trivial. The sizes of these cells were set to match the spectral index between unit cell and full core domains. It was found that for the purposes of this study an adjusted unit cell model is adequate. Discharge isotopics and one-group cross-sections were delivered to the transmutation analysis team. This report provides documentation for these calculations

  11. The Influence of the Osmotic Dehydration Process on Physicochemical Properties of Osmotic Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Lech

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The osmotic dehydration (OD process consists of the removal of water from a material during which the solids from the osmotic solution are transported to the material by osmosis. This process is commonly performed in sucrose and salt solutions. Taking into account that a relatively high consumption of those substances might have a negative effect on human health, attempts have been made to search for alternatives that can be used for osmotic dehydration. One of these is an application of chokeberry juice with proven beneficial properties to human health. This study aimed to evaluate the physicochemical properties of the OD solution (chokeberry juice concentrate before and after the osmotic dehydration of carrot and zucchini. The total polyphenolics content, antioxidant capacity (ABTS, FRAP, dynamic viscosity, density, and water activity were examined in relation to the juice concentration used for the osmotic solution before and after the OD process. During the osmotic dehydration process, the concentration of the chokeberry juice decreased. Compounds with lower molecular weight and lower antioxidant capacity present in concentrated chokeberry juice had a stronger influence on the exchange of compounds during the OD process in carrot and zucchini. The water activity of the osmotic solution increased after the osmotic dehydration process. It was concluded that the osmotic solution after the OD process might be successfully re-used as a product with high quality for i.e. juice production.

  12. The Influence of the Osmotic Dehydration Process on Physicochemical Properties of Osmotic Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Krzysztof; Michalska, Anna; Wojdyło, Aneta; Nowicka, Paulina; Figiel, Adam

    2017-12-16

    The osmotic dehydration (OD) process consists of the removal of water from a material during which the solids from the osmotic solution are transported to the material by osmosis. This process is commonly performed in sucrose and salt solutions. Taking into account that a relatively high consumption of those substances might have a negative effect on human health, attempts have been made to search for alternatives that can be used for osmotic dehydration. One of these is an application of chokeberry juice with proven beneficial properties to human health. This study aimed to evaluate the physicochemical properties of the OD solution (chokeberry juice concentrate) before and after the osmotic dehydration of carrot and zucchini. The total polyphenolics content, antioxidant capacity (ABTS, FRAP), dynamic viscosity, density, and water activity were examined in relation to the juice concentration used for the osmotic solution before and after the OD process. During the osmotic dehydration process, the concentration of the chokeberry juice decreased. Compounds with lower molecular weight and lower antioxidant capacity present in concentrated chokeberry juice had a stronger influence on the exchange of compounds during the OD process in carrot and zucchini. The water activity of the osmotic solution increased after the osmotic dehydration process. It was concluded that the osmotic solution after the OD process might be successfully re-used as a product with high quality for i.e. juice production.

  13. Behavior of cationic, anionic and colloidal species of titanium, zirconium and thorium in presence of ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Filho, G. de; Abrao, A.

    1976-01-01

    The distribution of titanium, zirconium and thorium is aqueous and resin phases has been studied using strong cationic resin in the R-NH 4 form. Solutions of the above elements in perchloric, nitric, hydrochloric and suphuric media were used. Each set of experiments was made by separately varying one of the five parameters - type of anion present, acidity of solution, temperature of percolation, age of solution and concentration of the element. It was found that, depending on the particular balance of these parameters, the elements investigated may be found in acidic solutions either as cationic, anionic or colloidal species. It is emphasized that the colloidal species of titanium, zirconium or thorium are not retained by the ion exchangers, and from this property a method for the separation and purification of the above elements has been outlined [pt

  14. Evaluation of neutralization treatment processes and their use for uranium tailings solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.R.; Opitz, B.E.; Serne, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The potential for groundwater contamination from the typically acidic mill wastes that are disposed of in tailings impoundments is of primary concern at uranium mill sites in the US. Solution-treatment processes provide a system for limiting the environmental impact from acidic seepage. Treatment of uranium tailings solutions from evaporation ponds, underdrains, and surface seeps could aid in decommissioning active sites or be used as an emergency measure to avert possible uncontrolled discharges. At present, neutralization processes appear to be best suited for treating uranium mill tailings solution because they can, at a reasonable cost, limit the solution concentration of many contaminants and thus reduce the potential for groundwater contamination. However, the effectiveness of the neutralization process depends on the reagent used as well as the chemistry of the waste stream. This article provides a description of neutralization processes, an assessment of their performance on acidic uranium tailings leachates, and recommendations for their use at US uranium mill sites

  15. A Thermodynamical Approach for Evaluating Energy Consumption of the Forward Osmosis Process Using Various Draw Solutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan-mu Zeng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The forward-osmosis (FO processes have received much attention in past years as an energy saving desalination process. A typical FO process should inclu de a draw solute recovery step which contributes to the main operation costs of the process. Therefore, investigating the energy consumption is very important for the development and employment of the forward osmosis process. In this work, NH3-CO2, Na2SO4, propylene glycol mono-butyl ether, and dipropylamine were selected as draw solutes. The FO processes of different draw solute recovery approaches were simulated by Aspen PlusTM with a customized FO unit model. The electrolyte Non-Random Two-Liquid (Electrolyte-NRTL and Universal Quasi Chemical (UNIQUAC models were employed to calculate the thermodynamic properties of the feed and draw solutions. The simulation results indicated that the FO performance decreased under high feed concentration, while the energy consumption was improved at high draw solution concentration. The FO process using Na2SO4 showed the lowest energy consumption, followed by NH3-CO2, and dipropylamine. The propylene glycol mono-butyl ether process exhibited the highest energy consumption due to its low solubility in water. Finally, in order to compare the equivalent work of the FO processes, the thermal energy requirements were converted to electrical work.

  16. Mixing of process heels, process solutions, and recycle streams: Results of the small-scale radioactive tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GJ Lumetta; JP Bramson; OT Farmer III; LR Greenwood; FV Hoopes; MA Mann; MJ Steele; RT Steele; RG Swoboda; MW Urie

    2000-05-17

    Various recycle streams will be combined with the low-activity waste (LAW) or the high-level waste (HLW) feed solutions during the processing of the Hanford tank wastes by BNFL, Inc. In addition, the LAW and HLW feed solutions will also be mixed with heels present in the processing equipment. This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of mixing specific process streams. Observations were made regarding adverse reactions (mainly precipitation) and effects on the Tc oxidation state (as indicated by K{sub d} measurements with SuperLig{reg_sign} 639). The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-023, Rev. 0, Small Scale Mixing of Process Heels, Solutions, and Recycle Streams. The test went according to plan, with only minor deviations from the test plan. The deviations from the test plan are discussed in the experimental section.

  17. Studi Ekstraksi Bijih Thorit dengan Metode Digesti Asam dan Pemisahan Thorium dari Logam Tanah Jarang dengan Metode Oksidasi-Presipitasi Selektif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moch Iqbal Nur Said

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Thorium (Th is a radioactive metal that can be formed along with uranumand rare earth metals (REM. Minerals contain radioactive elements are monazite ((Ce,La,Y,U/ThPO4, thorianite ((Th,UO2, and thorite (ThSiO4. Mamuju Area is containing radioactive minerals, thorite is one of them. To separate REM from radioactive elements can be conducted by exctracting thorium from thorite ore by acid digestion method using sulphuric acid (H2SO4, followed by leaching and thorium recovery in the form of thorium hydroxide by chemical precipitation using ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH. The experimental results showed that the optimum conditions of acid digestion that give the highest Th extraction percentage on solid to liquid ratio are obtained at 1:2 (g/mL in 60 minutes with extraction percentages of Th, iron (Fe and REM are 82.47%, 80.08%, and 83.31% respectively. The highest thorium precipitation percentage, as much as 95.47% , was obtained at pH 4.5 on room temperature (26 ± 1°C. At higher temperature (70°C, a lower percentage of thorium precipitation is obtained, as much as 83.69%. Pre-oxidation by using H2O2 solution with two times stoichiometry for 1.5 hours at room temperature is increasing Fe precipitation percentage from 93.08% to 99.93%.

  18. Automated methods for thorium determination in liquids, solids and aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.; Stuart, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Methodology for determining trace thorium levels in a variety of sample types for compliance purposes was developed. Thorium in filtered water samples is concentrated by ferric hydroxide co-precipitation. Aerosols on glass-fibre, cellulose ester or teflon filters are acid digested and thorium is concentrated by lanthanum fluoride co-precipitation. Chemical separation and measurement are then done on a Technicon AAII-C auto-analyzer via TTA-solvent extraction and colorimetry using the thorium-arsenazo III colour complex. Solid samples are acid digested and thorium is concentrated and separated using lanthanum fluoride co-precipitation followed by anion-exchange chromatography. Measurement is then carried out on the autoanalyzer by direct development of the thorium-arsenazo III colour complex. Chemical yields are determined through the addition of thorium-234 tracer with assay by gamma-ray spectrometry. The sensitivities of the methods for liquids, aerosols and solids are approximately 1μg/L,0.5μg and 0.5 μg/g respectively. At thorium levels about ten times the detection limits, accuracy and reproducibility are typically +-10 percent for liquids and aerosols and +- 15 percent for solid samples

  19. Rays Emitted by Compounds of Uranium and of Thorium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    glass, and paper of slight thickness. Here are the fractions of radiation transmitted through a sheet of aluminum of thickness 0.01 mm: mm [sic]. 0.2. 0.33. 0.4. 0.7 for uranium, ammonium uranate, uranous oxide, artificial chalcolite for pitchblende and natural chalcolite for thorium oxide and thorium sulfate in a O.S-mm layer.

  20. Evaluation of thorium based nuclear fuel. Chemical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konings, R.J.M.; Blankenvoorde, P.J.A.M.; Cordfunke, E.H.P.; Bakker, K.

    1995-07-01

    This report describes the chemical aspects of a thorium-based fuel cycle. It is part of a series devoted to the study of thorium-based fuel as a means to achieve a considerable reduction of the radiotoxicity of the waste from nuclear power production. Therefore special emphasis is placed on fuel (re-)fabrication and fuel reprocessing in the present work. (orig.)

  1. Economics and utilization of thorium in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-05-01

    Information on thorium utilization in power reactors is presented concerning the potential demand for nuclear power, the potential supply for nuclear power, economic performance of thorium under different recycle policies, ease of commercialization of the economically preferred cases, policy options to overcome institutional barriers, and policy options to overcome technological and regulatory barriers.

  2. Present state and perspective of research on thorium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Itsuro

    1994-01-01

    For the prosperity of Japan and the welfare of mankind in the world, enormous quantity of energy is required in 21st century, and the general circumstances of energy and nuclear power are described. In addition to the present nuclear power using mostly 235 U and the plutonium produced from 238 U, it is the thorium cycle that 233 U produced from the third nuclear fuel, thorium, is used for electric power generation as an energy source. In this report, the 'General research on thorium cycle as a promising energy source in and after 21st century' is outlined, which has been advanced by accepting the subsidy of scientific research expense of the Ministry of Education. The features of the thorium cycle and the nuclear data and the nuclear characteristics in comparison with uranium-plutonium reactors are described. The trend of the research and development in the world and in Japan is reported. Two general researches were carried out for five years from fiscal year 1988 to 1992 on the thorium cycle. The results of the research on the nuclear data, the design of thorium reactors, the criticality experiment and analysis, thorium hybrid, thorium fuel, molten salt, fuel reprocessing and radiation safety are reported. (K.I.)

  3. Economics and utilization of thorium in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    Information on thorium utilization in power reactors is presented concerning the potential demand for nuclear power, the potential supply for nuclear power, economic performance of thorium under different recycle policies, ease of commercialization of the economically preferred cases, policy options to overcome institutional barriers, and policy options to overcome technological and regulatory barriers

  4. 264 - 267_Uduma_thorium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    2017-06-01

    Jun 1, 2017 ... range is even wider, from Berllium to uranium (Be to. U). The elemental concentration detection ... toys for lead (Pb) content, sorting scrap metals and measuring the lead content of residential paint. They ... associated with metal ore mining and processing in. Nigeria and provides a robust tool for economic.

  5. Formation of solid solution during mutual diffusion of tungsten and molybdenum in the process of sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timofeeva, A.A.; Bulat, I.B.; Voronin, Yu.V.; Fedoseev, G.K.; Karasev, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    A process of a solid solution homogenization during sintering of W-15Mo and W-5Mo alloys is studied by the methods of density measurements, analysis of the X-ray lines physical broadening and determination of crystalline lattice constant. Study of the process of solid solution formation under conditions of powder composite sintering is shown to be conducted with account of peculiarities of tungsten and molybdenum mutual diffusion in the investigated temperature range of concentrations

  6. A comparative study of thorium activity in NORM and high background radiation area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, S.K.; Ishikawa, T.; Tokonami, S.; Sorimachi, A.; Kranrod, C.; Janik, M.; Hosoda, M.; Hassan, N.M.; Chanyotha, S.; Parami, V.K.; Yonehara, H.; Ramola, R.C. [National Institute of Radiological Science, Chiba (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    Several industrial processes are known to enrich naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). To assess such processes with respect to their radiological relevance, characteristic parameters describing this enrichment will lead to interesting information useful to UNSCEAR. In case of mineral treatment plants, the high temperatures used in smelting and refining processes lead to high concentrations of U-238 and Th-232. Also due to thermal power combustion, concentration of U and Th in the fly ash increases manifold. NORM samples were collected from a Thailand mineral treatment plant and Philippine coal-fired thermal power plants for investigation. Some studies are initiated from a high background radiation area near Gopalpur of Orissa state in India. These NORM samples were analysed by gamma-ray spectrometry as well as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The radioactivity in case of Orissa soil samples is found to be mainly contributed from thorium. This study attempts to evaluate levels of thorium activity in NORM samples.

  7. Compilation of criticality data involving thorium or 233U and light water moderation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gore, B.F.

    1978-07-01

    The literature has been searched for criticality data for light water moderated systems which contain thorium or /sup 233/U, and data found are compiled herein. They are from critical experiments, extrapolations, and exponential experiments performed with homogeneous solutions and metal spheres of /sup 233/U; with lattices of fuel rods containing highly enriched /sup 235/UO/sub 2/ - ThO/sub 2/ and /sup 233/UO/sub 2/ - ThO/sub 2/; and with arrays of cyclinders of /sup 233/U solutions. The extent of existing criticality data has been compared with that necessary to implement a thorium-based fuel cycle. No experiments have been performed with any solutions containing thorium. Neither do data exist for homogeneous /sup 233/U systems with H/U < 34, except for solid metal systems. Arrays of solution cylinders up to 3 x 3 x 3 have been studied. Data for solutions containing fixed or soluble poisons are very limited. All critical lattices using /sup 233/UO/sub 2/ - ThO/sub 2/ fuels (LWBR program) were zoned radially, and in most cases axially also. Only lattice experiments using /sup 235/UO/sub 2/ - ThO/sub 2/ fuels have been performed using a single fuel rod type. Critical lattices of /sup 235/UO/sub 2/ - ThO/sub 2/ rods poisoned with boron have been measured, but only exponential experiments have been performed using boron-poisoned lattices of /sup 233/UO/sub 2/ - ThO/sub 2/ rods. No criticality data exist for denatured fuels (containing significant amounts of /sup 238/U) in either solution or lattice configurations.

  8. Simulation an Accelerator driven Subcritical Reactor core with thorium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirmohammadi, L.; Pazirandeh, A.

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is simulation An Accelerator driven Subcritical core with Thorium as a new generation nuclear fuel. In this design core , A subcritical core coupled to an accelerator with proton beam (E p =1 GeV) is simulated by MCNPX code .Although the main purpose of ADS systems are transmutation and use MA (Minor Actinides) as a nuclear fuel but another use of these systems are use thorium fuel. This simulated core has two fuel assembly type : (Th-U) and (U-Pu) . Consequence , Neutronic parameters related to ADS core are calculated. It has shown that Thorium fuel is use able in this core and less nuclear waste ,Although Iran has not Thorium reserves but study on Thorium fuel cycle can open a new horizontal in use nuclear energy as a clean energy and without nuclear waste

  9. Light water reactors with a denatured thorium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    Discussed in this paper is the performance of denatured thorium fuel cycles in PWR plants of conventional design, such as those currently in operation or under construction. Although some improvement in U 3 O 8 utilization is anticipated in PWRs optimized explicitly for the denatured thorium fuel cycle, this paper is limited to a discussion of the performance of denatured thorium fuels in conventional PWRs and consequently the data presented is representative of the use of thorium fuel in existing PWRs or those presently under construction. In subsequent sections of this paper, the design of the PWR, its performance on the denatured thorium fuel cycle, safety, accident and environmental considerations, and technological status and R and D requirements are discussed

  10. High-quality thorium TRISO fuel performance in HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, Karl [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Allelein, Hans-Josef [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany); Nabielek, Heinz; Kania, Michael J.

    2013-11-01

    Thorium as a nuclear fuel has received renewed interest, because of its widespread availability and the good irradiation performance of Th and mixed (Th,U) oxide compounds as fuels in nuclear power systems. Early HTGR development employed thorium together with high-enriched uranium (HEU). After 1980, HTGR fuel systems switched to low-enriched uranium (LEU). After completing fuel development for the AVR and the THTR with BISO coated particles, the German program expanded its efforts utilizing thorium and HEU TRISO coated particles in advanced HTGR concepts for process heat applications (PNP) and direct-cycle electricity production (HHT). The combination of a low-temperature isotropic (LTI) inner and outer pyrocarbon layers surrounding a strong, stable SiC layer greatly improved manufacturing conditions and the subsequent contamination and defective particle fractions in production fuel elements. In addition, this combination provided improved mechanical strength and a higher degree of solid fission product retention, not known previously with high-temperature isotropic (HTI) BISO coatings. The improved performance of the HEU (Th, U)O{sub 2} TRISO fuel system was successfully demonstrated in three primary areas of development: manufacturing, irradiation testing under normal operating conditions, and accident simulation testing. In terms of demonstrating performance for advanced HTGR applications, the experimental failure statistic from manufacture and irradiation testing are significantly below the coated particle requirements specified for PNP and HHT designs at the time. Covering a range to 1300 C in normal operations and 1600 C in accidents, with burnups to 13% FIMA and fast fluences to 8 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (E> 16 fJ), the performance results exceed the design limits on manufacturing and operational requirements for the German HTR-Modul concept, which are 6.5 x 10{sup -5} for manufacturing, 2 x 10{sup -4} for normal operating conditions, and 5 x 10{sup -4

  11. High-quality thorium TRISO fuel performance in HTGRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, Karl; Allelein, Hans-Josef; Nabielek, Heinz; Kania, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Thorium as a nuclear fuel has received renewed interest, because of its widespread availability and the good irradiation performance of Th and mixed (Th,U) oxide compounds as fuels in nuclear power systems. Early HTGR development employed thorium together with high-enriched uranium (HEU). After 1980, HTGR fuel systems switched to low-enriched uranium (LEU). After completing fuel development for the AVR and the THTR with BISO coated particles, the German program expanded its efforts utilizing thorium and HEU TRISO coated particles in advanced HTGR concepts for process heat applications (PNP) and direct-cycle electricity production (HHT). The combination of a low-temperature isotropic (LTI) inner and outer pyrocarbon layers surrounding a strong, stable SiC layer greatly improved manufacturing conditions and the subsequent contamination and defective particle fractions in production fuel elements. In addition, this combination provided improved mechanical strength and a higher degree of solid fission product retention, not known previously with high-temperature isotropic (HTI) BISO coatings. The improved performance of the HEU (Th, U)O 2 TRISO fuel system was successfully demonstrated in three primary areas of development: manufacturing, irradiation testing under normal operating conditions, and accident simulation testing. In terms of demonstrating performance for advanced HTGR applications, the experimental failure statistic from manufacture and irradiation testing are significantly below the coated particle requirements specified for PNP and HHT designs at the time. Covering a range to 1300 C in normal operations and 1600 C in accidents, with burnups to 13% FIMA and fast fluences to 8 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E> 16 fJ), the performance results exceed the design limits on manufacturing and operational requirements for the German HTR-Modul concept, which are 6.5 x 10 -5 for manufacturing, 2 x 10 -4 for normal operating conditions, and 5 x 10 -4 for accident conditions. These

  12. Study Of Thorium As A Nuclear Fuel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Humane

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Conventional fuel sources for power generation are to be replacing by nuclear power sources like nuclear fuel Uranium. But Uranium-235 is the only fissile fuel which is in 0.72 found in nature as an isotope of Uranium-238. U-238 is abundant in nature which is not fissile while U-239 by alpha decay naturally converted to Uranium- 235. For accompanying this nuclear fuel there is another nuclear fuel Thorium is present in nature is abundant can be used as nuclear fuel and is as much as safe and portable like U-235.

  13. Electronic States in Thorium under Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Jan, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    We have used the local-density formalism and the atomic-sphere approximation to calculate self-consistently the electronic properties of thorium at pressures up to 400 kbar. The derived equation of state agrees very well with static pressure experiments and shock data. Below the Fermi level (EF......) the electronic band structure is formed by 7s and 6d states while the bottom of a relatively broad 5f band is positioned 0.07 Ry above EF. The calculated extremal areas of the Fermi surface and their calculated pressure dependence agree with earlier calculations and with de Haas-van Alphen measurements...

  14. Thorium impact on tobacco root transcriptome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mazari, Kateřina; Landa, Přemysl; Přerostová, Sylva; Müller, Karel; Vaňková, Radomíra; Soudek, Petr; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 325, MAR 5 (2017), s. 163-169 ISSN 0304-3894 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD11073; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13029 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : arabidopsis-thaliana roots * juncea var. foliosa * cadmium accumulation * deficiency responses * mineral-nutrition * gene-expression * plant transfer * iron uptake * uranium * soil * Microarray * Thorium * Gene expression * Toxicity * Nicotiana tabacum Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 6.065, year: 2016

  15. Evaluation of the radiographic process using a experimental monobath solution compared with normal (Kodak) and rapid (RAY) developer solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baratieri, N.M.M.

    1985-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of the radiographic image quality of two dental X-ray films (Kodak's EP-21 and Agfa-Gevaert DOS-1) when processed in a normal (Kodak) a rapid (Ray) and a experimental monobath solutions, is presented. These films, processed in those solutions had their time of development, temperature and agitation performances checked by sensitometry; pH and color by routine methods and hipo rests by spectrophotometry. The radiographies were also analysed by able professionals regarding the best development time. The data so obtained allowed the conclusions that the best development time for the monobath was 3 minutes at 20 0 C but 25 or 30 0 C give also acceptable results at shorter times. The agitation of 10 seconds every minute is an important factor concerning image quality. pH and color do alter rapidally but with little influence in the final result. We found a certain amount of residual chemical compounds which were not identified but that are not hipo components, and being important to note that they seem not act upon the emulsion at least during one year after processing. (author) [pt

  16. Application of hollow cylindrical wheat stem for electromembrane extraction of thorium in water samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khajeh, Mostafa; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Barkhordar, Afsaneh

    2015-01-01

    In this study, wheat stem was used for electromembrane extraction (EME) for the first time. The EME technique involved the use of a wheat stem whose channel was filled with 3 M HCl, immersed in 10 mL of an aqueous sample solution. Thorium migrated from aqueous samples, through a thin layer of 1......-octanol and 5%v/v Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (DEHP) immobilized in the pores of a porous stem, and into an acceptor phase solution present inside the lumen of the stem. The pH of donor and acceptor phases, extraction time, voltage, and stirring speed were optimized. At the optimum conditions...

  17. Amperometric titration of thorium and some lanthanoids in acetic-acid medium using two indicator electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadeev, V.A.; Gevorgyan, A.M.; Talipov, Sh.T.; Kostylev, V.S.

    1979-01-01

    The votammetric behaviour of nitriletrimethylphosphonic acid (NTMP) in the medium of anhydrous acetic acid with different backgrounds in the anode region of polarization of a platinum microdisk electrode, is studied. The optimal conditions are found for the amperometric titration with two indicator electrodes of thorium and same lanthanides by a NTMP solution in anhydrous acetic medium. The influence of foreign anions and cations on the results of titration by the NTPM solution in anhydrous acetic acid is studied. The selectivity of titration in anhydrous medium is higher than in aqueous

  18. Analytical solutions for transport processes fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Brenn, Günter

    2017-01-01

    This book provides analytical solutions to a number of classical problems in transport processes, i.e. in fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer. Expanding computing power and more efficient numerical methods have increased the importance of computational tools. However, the interpretation of these results is often difficult and the computational results need to be tested against the analytical results, making analytical solutions a valuable commodity. Furthermore, analytical solutions for transport processes provide a much deeper understanding of the physical phenomena involved in a given process than do corresponding numerical solutions. Though this book primarily addresses the needs of researchers and practitioners, it may also be beneficial for graduate students just entering the field. .

  19. Studies on the mechanical performance of the steel containers intended as storage casks for thorium oxalate disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzig, J.; Liewers, P.

    1995-08-01

    The tests have shown that the steel containers give considerable protection against mechanical impacts from the top if emplaced as a stack (3 containers in a vertical stack, on a stacking pallet). Even in the worst case, only relatively low amounts of thorium oxalate will escape from the casks. Care has to be taken that the material used for fixing the casks on the pallet is fire resistant (non-shrinking subject to heat for example), so that in the case of mechanical plus fire impacts, the containers in the stack will not turn over or tip out of the stack. There is no danger of containers bursting under fire impacts due to volume increase of contents as a result of transformation processes. The early, design-based failure of the container lid sealing observed in all tests will prevent the buildup of pressure. No thorium will be released, but the thorium emanation can be blown out. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Development of Three-Layer Simulation Model for Freezing Process of Food Solution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminishi, Koji; Araki, Tetsuya; Shirakashi, Ryo; Ueno, Shigeaki; Sagara, Yasuyuki

    A numerical model has been developed for simulating freezing phenomena of food solution systems. The cell model was simplified to apply to food solution systems, incorporating with the existence of 3 parts such as unfrozen, frozen and moving boundary layers. Moreover, the moving rate of freezing front model was also introduced and calculated by using the variable space network method proposed by Murray and Landis (1957). To demonstrate the validity of the model, it was applied to the freezing processes of coffee solutions. Since the model required the phase diagram of the material to be frozen, the initial freezing temperatures of 1-55 % coffee solutions were measured by the DSC method. The effective thermal conductivity for coffee solutions was determined as a function of temperature and solute concentration by using the Maxwell - Eucken model. One-dimensional freezing process of 10 % coffee solution was simulated based on its phase diagram and thermo-physical properties. The results were good agreement with the experimental data and then showed that the model could accurately describe the change in the location of the freezing front and the distributions of temperature as well as ice fraction during a freezing process.

  1. Phthalocyaninato complexes of thorium, protactinium and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, O.F.

    1985-01-01

    For the preparation of Bis(phthalocyaninato)-actinoid(IV) complexes, AnPc 2 , a new optimizing synthesis procedure was developed, with which it was possible to prepare spectrally pure, that is, H 2 Pc-free, ThPc 2 , UPc 2 and the isostructurally similar 231 PaPc 2 .PaPc 2 . This was verified with the help of electron spectra, which were compared to preparations which were synthesized in another manner. The corresponding perfluorinated compounds were also produced for thorium and uranium by use of tetrafluorophthalic acid nitrile instead of phthalic acid nitrile as initial product. Electron and infrared spectra show the typical bands of the non-substituted complexes. By the attempt to produce a mono(phthalocyaninato)-thorium complex with the use of ThI 4 as initial material a pyridine-extracted pure ThPcI 2 (py) 2 was obtained with a typical mono(phthalocyaninato) complex electron spectrum, an extremely moisture sensitive compound which in water or acids decomposes and produces H 2 Pc. (orig./RB) [de

  2. Photoluminescent nano-sized ternary and quaternary complexes of thorium(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranwal, B.P.; Jain, A.K.; Varma, A.; Singh, A.K.; Fatma, T.

    2011-01-01

    Some ternary and quaternary complexes of thorium(IV) with the general formula [Th(OOCCH 3 ) 2-n (SB) n (OOCC 15 H 31 ) 2 ] (HSB=Schiff bases and n=1 or 2) have been synthesized by the stepwise substitutions of acetate ions from thorium(IV) acetate, first with straight chain carboxylic acid and then with Schiff bases. The complexes are characterized by elemental analyses, spectral (electronic, infrared, 1 H NMR, FAB mass, photoluminescence and powder XRD) and TEM studies. Conductance measurements indicated non-conducting behaviour of the complexes. Structural parameters from powder XRD data for complexes 5 and 6 which indicate poorly crystalline nano-sized triclinic particles. Electronic absorption spectra of the complexes showed π → π * and n → π * charge transfer transitions. All complexes displayed fluorescence and a correlation was sought between luminescence spectra of complexes in solution at room temperature. On the basis of physico-chemical studies, coordination number 8 was assigned for thorium(IV) in the complexes. The morphology and microstructure of the complexes were examined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the selected area electron diffraction (SAED). (orig.)

  3. Minimization of the fission product waste by using thorium based fuel instead of uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galahom, A. Abdelghafar, E-mail: Agalahom@yahoo.com

    2017-04-01

    This research discusses the neutronic characteristics of VVER-1200 assembly fueled with five different fuel types based on thorium. These types of fuel based on mixing thorium as a fertile material with different fissile materials. The neutronic characteristics of these fuels are investigated by comparing their neutronic characteristics with the conventional uranium dioxide fuel using the MCNPX code. The objective of this study is to reduce the production of long-lived actinides, get rid of plutonium component and to improve the fuel cycle economy while maintaining acceptable values of the neutronic safety parameters such as moderator temperature coefficient, Doppler coefficient and effective delayed neutrons (β). The thorium based fuel has a more negative Doppler coefficient than uranium dioxide fuel. The moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) has been calculated for the different proposed fuels. Also, the fissile inventory ratio has been calculated at different burnup step. The use of Th-232 as a fertile material instead of U-238 in a nuclear fuel is the most promising fuel in VVER-1200 as it is the ideal solution to avoid the production of more plutonium components and long-lived minor actinides. The reactor grade plutonium accumulated in light water reactor with burnup can be recycled by mixing it with Th-232 to fuel the VVER-1200 assembly. The concentrations of Xe-135 and Sm-151 have been investigated, due to their high thermal neutron absorption cross section.

  4. Solution-processed flexible NiO resistive random access memory device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Jung; Lee, Heon; Hong, Sung-Hoon

    2018-04-01

    Non-volatile memories (NVMs) using nanocrystals (NCs) as active materials can be applied to soft electronic devices requiring a low-temperature process because NCs do not require a heat treatment process for crystallization. In addition, memory devices can be implemented simply by using a patterning technique using a solution process. In this study, a flexible NiO ReRAM device was fabricated using a simple NC patterning method that controls the capillary force and dewetting of a NiO NC solution at low temperature. The switching behavior of a NiO NC based memory was clearly observed by conductive atomic force microscopy (c-AFM).

  5. Recent Progress on Solution-Processed CdTe Nanocrystals Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hao Xue; Rongfang Wu; Ya Xie; Qiongxuan Tan; Donghuan Qin; Hongbin Wu; Wenbo Huang

    2016-01-01

    Solution-processed CdTe nanocrystals (NCs) photovoltaic devices have many advantages, both in commercial manufacture and daily operation, due to the low-cost fabrication process, which becomes a competitive candidate for next-generation solar cells. All solution-processed CdTe NCs solar cells were first reported in 2005. In recent years, they have increased over four-fold in power conversion efficiency. The latest devices achieve AM 1.5 G power conversion efficiency up to 12.0%, values compar...

  6. Reactionary - electrodiffusion equations of transport processes of electrolyte solutions of radioelements through porous clayey structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V.Shymchuk

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The statistical model of the water solution of radioactive elements and the porous clayey matrix is proposed. The generalized transport equations for the description of diffusion, sorption,radiative processes and chemical reactions are obtained taking into account the electromagnetic processes.

  7. Adlerian "Encouragement" and the Therapeutic Process of Solution-Focused Brief Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Richard E.; Pietrzak, Dale

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the overlooked similarities between the therapeutic process of solution-focused brief therapy (SFBT) and the Adlerian process of therapeutic encouragement. SFBT and Adlerian therapy share common perspectives, albeit using different nomenclature, on maladjustment, the client-counselor relationship, and methods of facilitating change.…

  8. Optimization Solutions for Improving the Performance of the Parallel Reduction Algorithm Using Graphics Processing Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion LUNGU

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we research, analyze and develop optimization solutions for the parallel reduction function using graphics processing units (GPUs that implement the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA, a modern and novel approach for improving the software performance of data processing applications and algorithms. Many of these applications and algorithms make use of the reduction function in their computational steps. After having designed the function and its algorithmic steps in CUDA, we have progressively developed and implemented optimization solutions for the reduction function. In order to confirm, test and evaluate the solutions' efficiency, we have developed a custom tailored benchmark suite. We have analyzed the obtained experimental results regarding: the comparison of the execution time and bandwidth when using graphic processing units covering the main CUDA architectures (Tesla GT200, Fermi GF100, Kepler GK104 and a central processing unit; the data type influence; the binary operator's influence.

  9. An evaluation of once-through homogeneous thorium fuel cycle for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, H. K.; Noh, J. M.; Yoo, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    The other ways enhancing the economic potential of thorium fuel has been assessed ; the utilization of lower enriched uranium in thorium-uranium fuel, duplex thorium fuel concept, thorium utilization in the mixed core with uranium fuel assembly and thorium blanket utilization in the uranium core. The fuel economics of the proposed ways of thorium fuel increased compared to the previous homogeneous thorium fuel cycle. Compared to uranium fuel cycle, however, they do not show any economic incentives. From the view of proliferation resistance potential, thorium fuel option has the advantage to reduce the inventory of plutonium production. Any of proposed thorium options are less economical than uranium fuel option, the thorium fuel option has the potential to be utilized in the future for the sake of the effective consumption of excessive plutonium and the preparation against the using up of uranium resource

  10. A guide to the licensing of uranium and thorium mine and mill waste management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This document is issued to assist industry and the public in understanding the licensing process used by the Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), and do describe and consolidate the requirements, criteria and guidelines the AECB uses in the regulation of uranium and thorium mine and mill waste management systems. All phases of these systems are addressed, including pre-development activities, siting and construction, operation, and decommissioning and abandonment

  11. Morphology Development in Solution-Processed Functional Organic Blend Films: An In Situ Viewpoint

    KAUST Repository

    Richter, Lee J.

    2017-04-17

    Solution-processed organic films are a facile route to high-speed, low cost, large-area deposition of electrically functional components (transistors, solar cells, emitters, etc.) that can enable a diversity of emerging technologies, from Industry 4.0, to the Internet of things, to point-of-use heath care and elder care. The extreme sensitivity of the functional performance of organic films to structure and the general nonequilibrium nature of solution drying result in extreme processing-performance correlations. In this Review, we highlight insights into the fundamentals of solution-based film deposition afforded by recent state-of-the-art in situ measurements of functional film drying. Emphasis is placed on multimodal studies that combine surface-sensitive X-ray scattering (GIWAXS or GISAXS) with optical characterization to clearly define the evolution of solute structure (aggregation, crystallinity, and morphology) with film thickness.

  12. Thorium-based nuclear fuel: current status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    Until the present time considerable efforts have already been made in the area of fabrication, utilization and reprocessing of Th-based fuels for different types of reactors, namely: by FRG and USA - for HTRs; FRG and Brazil, Italy - for LWRs; India - for HWRs and FBRs. Basic research of thorium fuels and thorium fuel cycles are also being undertaken by Australia, Canada, China, France, FRG, Romania, USSR and other countries. Main emphasis has been given to the utilization of thorium fuels in once-through nuclear fuel cycles, but in some projects closed thorium-uranium or thorium-plutonium fuel cycles are also considered. The purpose of the Technical Committee on the Utilization of Thorium-Based Nuclear Fuel: Current Status and Perspective was to review the world thorium resources, incentives for further exploration, obtained experience in the utilization of Th-based fuels in different types of reactors, basic research, fabrication and reprocessing of Th-based fuels. As a result of the panel discussion the recommendations on future Agency activities and list of major worldwide activities in the area of Th-based fuel were developed. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 9 papers in this proceedings series

  13. Solution processed organic light-emitting diodes using the plasma cross-linking technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Kongduo [Department of Light Sources and Illuminating Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Liu, Yang [Department of Light Sources and Illuminating Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Engineering Research Center of Advanced Lighting Technology, Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200433 (China); Gong, Junyi; Zeng, Pan; Kong, Xun; Yang, Xilu; Yang, Cheng; Yu, Yan [Department of Light Sources and Illuminating Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Liang, Rongqing [Department of Light Sources and Illuminating Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Engineering Research Center of Advanced Lighting Technology, Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200433 (China); Ou, Qiongrong, E-mail: qrou@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Light Sources and Illuminating Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Engineering Research Center of Advanced Lighting Technology, Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2016-09-30

    Highlights: • Mixed acetylene and Ar plasma treatment makes the organic film surface cross-linked. • The plasma treatment for 30 s does not affect the performance of OLEDs. • Cross-linking surface can resist rinsing and corrosion of organic solvent. • The surface morphology is nearly unchanged after plasma treatment. • The plasma cross-linking method can realize solution processed multilayer OLEDs. - Abstract: Solution processed multilayer organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) present challenges, especially regarding dissolution of the first layer during deposition of a second layer. In this work, we first demonstrated a plasma cross-linking technology to produce a solution processed OLED. The surfaces of organic films can be cross-linked after mixed acetylene and Ar plasma treatment for several tens of seconds and resist corrosion of organic solvent. The film thickness and surface morphology of emissive layers (EMLs) with plasma treatment and subsequently spin-rinsed with chlorobenzene are nearly unchanged. The solution processed triple-layer OLED is successfully fabricated and the current efficiency increases 50% than that of the double-layer OLED. Fluorescent characteristics of EMLs are also observed to investigate factors influencing the efficiency of the triple-layer OLED. Plasma cross-linking technology may open up a new pathway towards fabrication of all-solution processed multilayer OLEDs and other soft electronic devices.

  14. Solution processed organic light-emitting diodes using the plasma cross-linking technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Kongduo; Liu, Yang; Gong, Junyi; Zeng, Pan; Kong, Xun; Yang, Xilu; Yang, Cheng; Yu, Yan; Liang, Rongqing; Ou, Qiongrong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Mixed acetylene and Ar plasma treatment makes the organic film surface cross-linked. • The plasma treatment for 30 s does not affect the performance of OLEDs. • Cross-linking surface can resist rinsing and corrosion of organic solvent. • The surface morphology is nearly unchanged after plasma treatment. • The plasma cross-linking method can realize solution processed multilayer OLEDs. - Abstract: Solution processed multilayer organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) present challenges, especially regarding dissolution of the first layer during deposition of a second layer. In this work, we first demonstrated a plasma cross-linking technology to produce a solution processed OLED. The surfaces of organic films can be cross-linked after mixed acetylene and Ar plasma treatment for several tens of seconds and resist corrosion of organic solvent. The film thickness and surface morphology of emissive layers (EMLs) with plasma treatment and subsequently spin-rinsed with chlorobenzene are nearly unchanged. The solution processed triple-layer OLED is successfully fabricated and the current efficiency increases 50% than that of the double-layer OLED. Fluorescent characteristics of EMLs are also observed to investigate factors influencing the efficiency of the triple-layer OLED. Plasma cross-linking technology may open up a new pathway towards fabrication of all-solution processed multilayer OLEDs and other soft electronic devices.

  15. Solution Synthesis and Processing of PZT Materials for Neutron Generator Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M.A.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Montoya, T.V.; Moore, R.H.; Sipola, D.L.; Tuttle, B.A.; Voigt, J.A.

    1998-12-01

    A new solution synthesis route has been developed for the preparation of lead-based ferroelectric materials (patent filed). The process produces controlled stoichiometry precursor powders by non-aqueous precipitation. For a given ferroelectric material to be prepared, a metal acetate/alkoxide solution containing constituent metal species in the appropriate ratio is mixed with an oxalic acid/n-propanol precipitant solution. An oxalate coprecipitate is instantly fonned upon mixing that quantitatively removes the metals from solution. Most of the process development was focused on the synthesis and processing of niobium-substituted lead zirconate titanate with a Zr-to-Ti ratio of 95:5 (PNZT 95/5) that has an application in neutron generator power supplies. The process was scaled to produce 1.6 kg of the PNZT 95/5 powder using either a sen-ii-batch or a continuous precipitation scheme. Several of the PNZT 95/5 powder lots were processed into ceramic slug form. The slugs in turn were processed into components and characterized. The physical properties and electrical performance (including explosive functional testing of the components met the requirements set for the neutron generator application. Also, it has been demonstrated that the process is highly reproducible with respect to the properties of the powders it produces and the properties of the ceramics prepared from its powders. The work described in this report was funded by Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

  16. Multi-solution processes of small molecule for flexible white organic light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Yu-Sheng, E-mail: ystsai@nfu.edu.tw [Institute of Electro-optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Yunlin 63201, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chittawanij, Apisit; Hong, Lin-Ann; Guo, Siou-Wei [Institute of Electro-optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Yunlin 63201, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Ching-Chiun [Department of Solid State Lighting Technology, Mechanical and Systems Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 31040, Taiwan, ROC (China); Juang, Fuh-Shyang [Institute of Electro-optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Yunlin 63201, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lai, Shih-Hsiang [Department of Solid State Lighting Technology, Mechanical and Systems Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 31040, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Yang-Ching [Institute of Electro-optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Yunlin 63201, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2016-04-01

    Most small molecule organic light emitting diode (SM-OLED) device structures are made in one layer using solution-based processing because the solution is usually a high dissolvent material that easily attacks the layer below it. We demonstrate a simple and reliable stamping technique for fabricating multi-solution process flexible white SM-OLEDs. The structure is anode/spin-hole injection layer/spin-emitting layer/stamping-electron transport layer/cathode. Poly(di-methyl silane) (PDMS) stamp is used for transferring electron transport layer. An intermediate ultraviolet-ozone surface treatment is introduced to temporarily modify the PDMS stamp surface. Then, the solution-based electron transport layer film can therefore be uniformly formed on top of the PDMS surface. After that the electron transport layer film on the PDMS stamp is transfer-printed onto the emitting layer with suitable heating and pressing. A solution-based processing is successfully established to efficiently fabricate flexible white SM-OLEDs. The SM-OLEDs were obtained at the current density of 20 mA/cm{sup 2}, luminance of 1062 cd/m{sup 2}, current efficiency of 5.57 cd/A, and Commission internationale de l'éclairage coordinate of (0.32, 0.35). - Highlights: • All solution-processed small molecule materials (emitting layer, electron transport layer). • Poly(di-methylsilane) (PDMS) stamp is subsequently used for stamping transfer. • The flexible white SM-OLEDs are based on solution-processes with a low-cost method.

  17. Multi-solution processes of small molecule for flexible white organic light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Yu-Sheng; Chittawanij, Apisit; Hong, Lin-Ann; Guo, Siou-Wei; Wang, Ching-Chiun; Juang, Fuh-Shyang; Lai, Shih-Hsiang; Lin, Yang-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Most small molecule organic light emitting diode (SM-OLED) device structures are made in one layer using solution-based processing because the solution is usually a high dissolvent material that easily attacks the layer below it. We demonstrate a simple and reliable stamping technique for fabricating multi-solution process flexible white SM-OLEDs. The structure is anode/spin-hole injection layer/spin-emitting layer/stamping-electron transport layer/cathode. Poly(di-methyl silane) (PDMS) stamp is used for transferring electron transport layer. An intermediate ultraviolet-ozone surface treatment is introduced to temporarily modify the PDMS stamp surface. Then, the solution-based electron transport layer film can therefore be uniformly formed on top of the PDMS surface. After that the electron transport layer film on the PDMS stamp is transfer-printed onto the emitting layer with suitable heating and pressing. A solution-based processing is successfully established to efficiently fabricate flexible white SM-OLEDs. The SM-OLEDs were obtained at the current density of 20 mA/cm 2 , luminance of 1062 cd/m 2 , current efficiency of 5.57 cd/A, and Commission internationale de l'éclairage coordinate of (0.32, 0.35). - Highlights: • All solution-processed small molecule materials (emitting layer, electron transport layer). • Poly(di-methylsilane) (PDMS) stamp is subsequently used for stamping transfer. • The flexible white SM-OLEDs are based on solution-processes with a low-cost method.

  18. On the radiology of thorium-uranium electro breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, E.V.; Rabotnov, N.S.; Shubin, Y.N.

    1995-01-01

    Radiological problems arising in thorium-uranium electro-breeding with thorium accelerator target are discussed. Following radiological problems are discussed and evaluated in simplified model calculations: U-232 formation, accumulation of light Th isotopes in (n, xn) reactions on thorium target: accumulation of the same nuclides in final repository after alpha-decay of uranium isotopes. The qualitative comparison of U-Pu and U-Th fuel cycles is performed. The problems seem to be serious enough to justify detailed quantitative investigation. (authors)

  19. Spectrophotometric Determination of Thorium in Low Grade Minerals and Ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnfelt, A.L.; Edmundsson, I.

    1960-08-01

    The following method is intended for the determination of microgram quantities of thorium in samples of minerals and ores. The mineral sample is decomposed by repeated sintering with sodium peroxide. After digestion with water thorium peroxide hydrate is recovered by centrifugation and dissolved in hydrochloric acid. Thorium is determined spectrophotometrically with naphtarson after its separation from metals forming chloro complexes which are adsorbed on a strongly basic anion exchange resin. Interferences from a few different ions have been studied. The time required for the analysis of one sample is about 4 hours, when analysing 12 samples simultaneously

  20. Heavy water reactors on the denatured thorium cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    This paper presents preliminary technical and economic data to INFCE on the denatured U-233/Thorium fuel cycle for use in early comparisons of alternate nuclear systems. The once-through uranium fuel cycle is discussed in a companion paper. In presenting this preliminary information at this time, it is recognized that there are several other denatured thorium fuel cycles of potential interest, such as the U-235/thorium cycle which could be implemented at an earlier date. Information on these alternate cycles is currently being developed, and will be provided to INFCE when available

  1. Solution-processed small-molecule solar cells: breaking the 10% power conversion efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongsheng; Chen, Chun-Chao; Hong, Ziruo; Gao, Jing; Yang, Yang Michael; Zhou, Huanping; Dou, Letian; Li, Gang; Yang, Yang

    2013-11-28

    A two-dimensional conjugated small molecule (SMPV1) was designed and synthesized for high performance solution-processed organic solar cells. This study explores the photovoltaic properties of this molecule as a donor, with a fullerene derivative as an acceptor, using solution processing in single junction and double junction tandem solar cells. The single junction solar cells based on SMPV1 exhibited a certified power conversion efficiency of 8.02% under AM 1.5 G irradiation (100 mW cm(-2)). A homo-tandem solar cell based on SMPV1 was constructed with a novel interlayer (or tunnel junction) consisting of bilayer conjugated polyelectrolyte, demonstrating an unprecedented PCE of 10.1%. These results strongly suggest solution-processed small molecular materials are excellent candidates for organic solar cells.

  2. Experimental studies of thorium ion implantation from pulse laser plasma into thin silicon oxide layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisyuk, P. V.; Chubunova, E. V.; Lebedinskii, Yu Yu; Tkalya, E. V.; Vasilyev, O. S.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Strugovshchikov, E.; Mamedov, D.; Pishtshev, A.; Karazhanov, S. Zh

    2018-05-01

    We report the results of experimental studies related to implantation of thorium ions into thin silicon dioxide by pulsed plasma flux expansion. Thorium ions were generated by laser ablation from a metal target, and the ionic component of the laser plasma was accelerated in an electric field created by the potential difference (5, 10 and 15 kV) between the ablated target and a SiO2/Si (0 0 1) sample. The laser ablation system installed inside the vacuum chamber of the electron spectrometer was equipped with a YAG:Nd3  +  laser having a pulse energy of 100 mJ and time duration of 15 ns in the Q-switched regime. The depth profile of thorium atoms implanted into the 10 nm thick subsurface areas together with their chemical state as well as the band gap of the modified silicon oxide at different conditions of implantation processes were studied by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and reflected electron energy loss spectroscopy methods. Analysis of the chemical composition showed that the modified silicon oxide film contains complex thorium silicates. Depending on the local concentration of thorium atoms, the experimentally established band gaps were located in the range 6.0–9.0 eV. Theoretical studies of the optical properties of the SiO2 and ThO2 crystalline systems were performed by ab initio calculations within hybrid functional. The optical properties of the SiO2/ThO2 composite were interpreted on the basis of the Bruggeman effective medium approximation. A quantitative assessment of the yield of isomeric nuclei in ‘hot’ laser plasma at the early stages of expansion was performed. The estimates made with experimental results demonstrated that the laser implantation of thorium ions into the SiO2 matrix can be useful for further research of low-lying isomeric transitions in a 229Th isotope with energy of 7.8 +/- 0.5 eV.

  3. Recovery of valuable products in the raffinate of the uranium and thorium pilot-plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardim, E.A.; Abrao, A.

    1988-11-01

    IPEN-CNEN/SP has being very active in refining yellowcake to pure ammonium diuranate which is converted to uranium trioxide, uranium dioxide, tetra - and hexafluoride in a sequential way. The technology of the thorium purification and its conversion to nuclear grade products has been a practice since several years as well. For both elements the major to be worked is the raffinate from the solvent extraction colum where and thorium are purified via TBP-varsol in pulsed columns. In this paper the actual processing technology is reviewed with special emphasis on the recovery of valuable products, mainly nitric acid and ammonium nitrate. Distilled nitric acid and the final sulfuric acid as residue are recycle. Ammonium nitrate from the precipitation of uranium diuranate is of good quality, being radioactivity and uranium - free, and recommended to be applied as fertilizer. In conclusion the main effort is to maximize the recycle and reuse of the above mentioned chemicals. (author) [pt

  4. Recovery of valuable products in liquid effluents from uranium and thorium pilot units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardim, E.A.; Abrao, A.

    1988-01-01

    IPEN-CNEN/SP has being very active in refining yellowcake to pure ammonium diuranate which is converted to uranium trioxide, uranium dioxide, uranium tetra- and hexafluoride in a sequential way. The technology of the thorium purification and its conversion to nuclear grade products has been a practice since several years as well. For both elements the major waste to be worked is the refinate from the solvent extraction column where uranium and thorium are purified via TBP-varsol in pulsed columns. In this paper the actual processing technology is reviewed with special emphasis on the recovery of valuable products, mainly nitric acid and ammonium nitrate. Distilled nitric acid and the final sulfuric acid as residue are recycle. Ammonium nitrate from the precipitation of uranium diuranate is of good quality, being radioactivity and uranium-free, and recommended to be applied as fertilizer. In conclusion the main effort is to maximise the recycle and reuse of the abovementioned chemicals. (author) [pt

  5. Recovery of valuable products from the raffinate of uranium and thorium pilot-plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, E.A.J.

    1990-01-01

    IPEN-CNEN/SP has being very active in refining yellow cake to pure ammonium diuranate which is converted to uranium trioxide, uranium dioxide, uranium tetra-and hexa-fluoride in sequential way. The technology of the thorium purification and its conversion to nuclear grade products has been a practice since several years as well. For both elements the major waste to be worked is the raffinate from purification via TBP-varsol in pulsed columns. In this paper the actual processing technology is reviewed with special emphasis on the recovery of valuable products, mainly nitric acid, ammonium nitrate, uranium, thorium and rare earth elements. Ammonium nitrate from the precipitation of uranium diuranate is of good quality, being radioactivity and uranium-free, and recommended to be applied as fertilizer. In conclusion the main effort is to maximize the recycle and reuse of the above mentioned chemicals. (author)

  6. Thorium valency in molten alkali halides in equilibrium with metallic thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, M.V.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.

    1983-01-01

    Metallic thorium is shown to corrode in molten alkali halides even in the absence of external oxidizing agents, alkali cations acting as oxidizing agents. Its corrosion rate grows in the series of alkali chlorides from LiCl to CsCl at constant temperature. Substituting halide anions for one another exerts a smaller influence, the rate rising slightly in going from chlorides to bromides and iodides, having the same alkali cations. Thorium valency is determined coulometrically, the metal being dissolved anodically in molten alkali halides and their mixtures. In fluoride melts it is equal to 4 but in chloride, bromide and iodide ones, as a rule, it has non-integral values between 4 and 2 which diminish as the temperature is raised, as the thorium concentration is lowered, as the radii of alkali cations decrease and those of halide anions increase. The emf of cells Th/N ThHlsub(n) + (1-N) MHl/MHl/C, Hlsub(2(g)) where Hl is Cl, Br or I, M is Li, Na, K, Cs or Na + K, and N < 0.05, is measured as a function of concentration at several temperatures. Expressions are obtained for its concentration dependence. The emf grows in the series of alkali chlorides from LiCl to CsCl, other conditions being equal. (author)

  7. Full-solution processed flexible organic solar cells using low-cost printable copper electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kan; Zhen, Hongyu; Niu, Liyong; Fang, Xu; Zhang, Yaokang; Guo, Ruisheng; Yu, You; Yan, Feng; Li, Haifeng; Zheng, Zijian

    2014-11-12

    Full-solution-processed flexible organic solar cells (OSCs) are fabricated using low-cost and high-quality printable Cu electrodes, which achieve a power conversion efficiency as high as 2.77% and show remarkable stability upon 1000 bending cycles. This device performance is thought to be the best among all full-solution-processed OSCs reported in the literature using the same active materials. This printed Cu electrode is promising for application in roll-to-roll fabrication of flexible OSCs. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Solution-processed white phosphorescent tandem organic light-emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Takayuki; Pu, Yong-Jin; Kido, Junji

    2015-08-26

    Solution-processed phosphorescent tandem organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) exhibit extremely high efficiencies (94 cd A(-1) ) and 26% external quantum efficiency (EQE) at 5000 cd m(-2) for green phosphorescent devices and 69 cd A(-1) and 28% EQE at 5000 cd m(-2) for white phosphorescent devices. Development of these highly efficient solution-processed tandem-OLEDs with inverted device structure paves the way to printable, low-cost, and large-area white lighting. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Solution processed phosphorescent white organic light emitting diodes using a small molecule host material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yook, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Jun Yeob, E-mail: leej17@dankook.ac.kr

    2013-11-15

    Highly efficient phosphorescent white organic light-emitting diodes (PHWOLEDs) were developed using a solution processed 9-(3-(dibenzo[b,d]furan-2-yl)phenyl)-9H-carbazole (CzDBF) host material. Blue and orange phosphorescent emitters were doped into the CzDBF host and balanced blue and orange emission was obtained. High quantum efficiency of 13.2% was achieved in the solution processed PHWOLEDs using the CzDBF host material. Highlights: • Balanced hole and electron densities at optimized composition. • Large change of hole current density according to mixed host composition. • Little change of electron current density according to mixed host composition.

  10. Evaluation of the Magnesium Hydroxide Treatment Process for Stabilizing PFP Plutonium/Nitric Acid Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Mark A.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Baker, Aaron B.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2000-09-28

    This document summarizes an evaluation of the magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] process to be used at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for stabilizing plutonium/nitric acid solutions to meet the goal of stabilizing the plutonium in an oxide form suitable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99. During the treatment process, nitric acid solutions bearing plutonium nitrate are neutralized with Mg(OH)2 in an air sparge reactor. The resulting slurry, containing plutonium hydroxide, is filtered and calcined. The process evaluation included a literature review and extensive laboratory- and bench-scale testing. The testing was conducted using cerium as a surrogate for plutonium to identify and quantify the effects of key processing variables on processing time (primarily neutralization and filtration time) and calcined product properties.

  11. On the new type of thorium-rare metal mineralization related to carbonatite complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargasarov, Yu.A.; Ginzburg, A.I.; Frolov, A.A.

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of a new type of thorium-rare metal mineralization which is genetically associated with alkaline-ultrabasic carbonate complexes and controlled by the same fractured zones as these plutons. Deposits of this type occur over non-outcropping masses of ultrabasic alkaline rocks and carbonatites or on their continuations and are regarded as typical supraintrusive formations, highly characteristic regions in which elements from these rock masses are deposited. Here are concentrated those elements which are removed from the ultrabasic alkaline rocks when carbonatites devlop in them, viz. sodium, silicon, rare earths, thorium, barium, scandium, etc. Such deposits are formed in several stages; the early stages are characterized by intensive processes of silicification (outer aureoles of fenitization) and albitization, with which thorite-xenotime mineralization is associated. The later stages are very similar in composition to the ankerite carbonatites. The localization of all stages of the hydrothermal process along the same tectonic zones is responsible for the development of telescopic phenomena and the highly characteristic nature of such deposits. The occurrence of mineralized zones with rare-earth and thorium mineralization in a number of cases may indicate the presence of deep hidden carbonatite rock masses which have no outcrop, a fact which should be taken into account during prospective work. (author)

  12. Thorium Occurrences, Geological Deposits and Resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthel, F.H.; Tulsidas, H.

    2014-01-01

    Availability of Thorium: • Monazite production can be used as a measure for Th availability. • Without commercial rare earth requirements recovery of Th from monazite is not economic. • Extraction of Th from deposits containing e.g. Nb,Ta, may become economic by-product once commercial Th requirements progress.• Monazite is extracted in India, Brazil, Malaysia. • Annually 6 300 to 7 400 t monazite between 2004 and 2008. • Largest producer: India, ~5 000 t monazite /a. • Later figures are not available (Chinese competition on the rare earth market?). • Other monazite producers (unknown amounts): China, Indonesia, Nigeria, North and South Korea, CIS. • Theoretical content of Th in the above reported monazite: 300 to 600 t Th. • Th production reported: Brazil, Canada, India and others, details are not available.

  13. Mass transfer processes and field-scale transport of organic solutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusseau, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of mass transfer processes, such as sorption/desorption and mass transfer between immiscible liquids and water, on the transport of organic solutes is discussed. Rate-limited sorption of organic solutes caused by a diffusion-constrained mechanism is shown to be significant under laboratory conditions. The significance of the impact of nonequilibrium sorption on field-scale transport is scale dependent. The impact of organic liquids on mass transfer and transport of organic solutes depends upon the nature of the solute and the nature and form of the organic liquid. For example, while retardation of nonionic solutes is decreased in mixed-solvent systems, (i.e. systems comprised of water and a miscible organic liquid or an immiscible liquid present in concentrations below phase separation), the retardation of organic acids may, in some cases, increase with addition of a cosolvent. While the presence of an immiscible liquid existing as a mobile phase will reduce retention of organic solutes, the presence of residual saturation of an immiscible liquid can significantly increase retention. A model is presented that incorporates the effects of retention resulting from residual saturation, as well as nonequilibrium sorption, on the transport of organic solutes. (Author) (70 refs., 3 figs.)

  14. ELECTRODIALYSIS IN THE CONVERSION STEP OF THE CONCENTRATED SALT SOLUTIONS IN THE PROCESS OF BATTERY SCRAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Niftaliev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The concentrated sodium sulfate solution is formed during the processing of waste battery scrap. A promising way to further treatment of the concentrated salt solution could be the conversion of these salts into acid and bases by electrodialysis, that can be reused in the same technical process cycle. For carrying out the process of conversion of salts into the corresponding acid and base several cells schemes with different combinations of cation, anion and bipolar membranes are used. At this article a comparative analysis of these cells is carried out. In the cells there were used the membranes МC-40, МА-41 and МB-2I. Acid and base solutions with higher concentration may be obtained during the process of electrodialysis in the circulation mode, when a predetermined amount of salt in the closed loop is run through a set of membranes to obtain the desired concentration of the product. The disadvantages of this method are the high cost of buffer tanks and the need to work with small volumes of treated solutions. In industrial applications it is advisable to use continuous electrodialysis with bipolar membranes, since this configuration allows to increase the number of repeating sections, which is necessary to reduce the energy costs. The increase of the removal rate of salts can be achieved by increasing the process steps, and to produce a more concentrated products after the conversion step can be applied electrodialysis-concentrator or evaporator.

  15. Spectrographic analysis of thorium and its compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grampurohit, S.V.; Saksena, M.D.; Kaimal, V.N.P.; Kapoor, S.K.; Murty, P.S.

    1980-01-01

    A spectrographic method, which employs the principle of carrier-distillation technique, is described for the analysis of high purity thoria. Two carriers, AgCl and NaF were used in determining 27 trace elements in ThO 2 . The elements were divided into three groups, A, B and C. In group A, 15 elements, viz. Al, B, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Si and Sn were included since it was possible to choose sensitive lines of these elements in one spectral region, 220 - 285 nm. Group B covered 8 elements, viz. Ag, Bi, Ca, Ga, Mo, Ti, V and Zn, which could be determined in the spectral region 290 - 352.5 nm. Group C consisted 4 elements, viz. Ba, K, Li and Na which could be determined in the spectral region 440 - 820 nm. 5% AgCl was used as the carrier for the determination of groups A and C elements and 4% NaF was used as the carrier for the estimation of group B elements. One hundred milligrammes of the sample (in the form of ThO 2 ) containing the carrier were taken in a carrier-distillation electrode and excited in a d.c. arc (10 amps for groups A and C; 15 amps for group B). The spectra of sample and synthetic standards were photographed on Hilger's large quartz, JACO 3.4 m Ebert plane grating and Higler's large glass spectrographs respectively for determining group A, B and C elements. The detection limit obtained for B and Cd was 0.1 ppm. Thorium metal and thorium nitrate samples were converted to ThO 2 prior to analysis. (auth.)

  16. Purex process operation and performance: 1970 thoria campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walser, R.L.

    1978-02-01

    The Hanford Purex Plant has demonstrated suitability for reprocessing irradiated thoria (ThO 2 ) target elements on a campaign basis. A 1965 process test and major production campaigns conducted in 1966 and 1970 recovered nitrate solution form products totaling approximately 565 tons of thorium and 820 kilograms of 233 U. The overall recoveries for the 1970 campaign based on reactor input data were 94.9 percent for thorium and 95.2 percent for uranium. The primary function of the Hanford Purex Plant is reprocessing of irradiated uranium fuel elements to separate and purify uranium, plutonium and neptunium. Converting the plant to thoria reprocessing required major process development work and equipment modifications. The operation and performance of the Plant during the 1970 thoria reprocessing campaign is discussed in this report. The discussion includes background information on the process and equipment, problems encountered, and changes recommended for future campaigns

  17. Potentiometric determination of uranium in simulated Purex Process solutions by acidiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, V.H.; Matsuda, H.T.; Araujo, B.F. de; Araujo, J.A. de

    1983-01-01

    A potentiometric methods for sequential free acidity and uranium determination in simulated Purex Process solutions is described. An oxalate solution or a mixture of fluoride-oxalate pellets were used as complexing agent for free titration. Following this first equivalent point, uranium is determined-by indirect titration of H + liberated in the peruanate reaction. Some elements present in the standard fuel elements with a burn-up of 33.000 Mwd/t, neutron flux of 3,2 x 10 13 n.cm -2 .s -1 and cooling time of two years were considered as interfering elements in uranium analyses. As a substitute of Pu-IV, Th(NO 3 ) 4 solution was used. The method can be applied to aqueous and organic (TBP/diluent) solutions with 2% precision and 2% accuracy. (Autor) [pt

  18. Rapid processing method for solution deposited YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawley, J.T.; Clem, P.G.; Boyle, T.J.; Ottley, L.M.; Overmyer, D.L.; Siegal, M.P.

    2004-01-01

    YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ (YBCO) films, deposited on buffered metal substrates, are the primary candidate for second-generation superconducting (SC) wires, with applications including expanded power grid transmission capability, compact motors, and enhanced sensitivity magnetic resonance imaging. Feasibility of manufacturing such superconducting wires is dependent on high processing speed, often a limitation of vapor and solution-based YBCO deposition processes. In this work, YBCO films were fabricated via a new diethanolamine-modified trifluoroacetic film solution deposition method. Modifying the copper chemistry of the YBCO precursor solution with diethanolamine enables a hundredfold decrease in the organic pyrolysis time required for MA/cm 2 current density (J c ) YBCO films, from multiple hours to ∼20 s in atmospheric pressure air. High quality, ∼0.2 μm thick YBCO films with J c (77 K) values ≥2 MA/cm 2 at 77 K are routinely crystallized from these rapidly pyrolyzed films deposited on LaAlO 3 . This process has also enabled J c (77 K)=1.1 MA/cm 2 YBCO films via 90 m/h dip-coating on Oak Ridge National Laboratory RABiTS textured metal tape substrates. This new YBCO solution deposition method suggests a route toward inexpensive and commercializable ∼$10/kA m solution deposited YBCO coated conductor wires

  19. S.210: A Bill to establish the United States Enrichment Corporation to operate the Federal uranium enrichment program on a profitable and efficient basis in order to maximize the long term economic value to the United States, to provide assistance to the domestic uranium industry and to provide a Federal contribution for the reclamation of mill tailings generated pursuant to Federal defense contracts at active uranium and thorium processing sites, introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, January 15, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The bill would amend the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 to establish the US Enrichment Corporation to operate the Federal uranium enrichment program on a profitable and efficient basis in order to maximize the long term economic value to the US, would provide a Federal contribution for the reclamation of mill tailings generated as a result of Federal defense contracts at active uranium and thorium processing sites, and would provide assistance to the domestic uranium industry

  20. Thorium, UNFC (3,3,3) In Brasil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villas-Bôas, Roberto C.

    2014-01-01

    Types of thorium UNFC (3,3,3) in Brasil: • Placer, shoreline; • Placer, alluvial; • Carbonatite with residual enrichment (Barreiro,Catalao); • Carbonatite (Salitre, MG); • Pitinga granites (AM); • Alkalic Igneous

  1. Investigation of colourless complexes of thorium, hafnium and zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiciak, S.; Stefanowicz, T.; Gontarz, H.; Swit, Z.

    1980-01-01

    The investigations conducted in the Institute of General Chemistry of Poznan Technical University in partial cooperation with Kharkhof Technical University related with thorium, hafnium and zirconium complexes are reviewed. (author)

  2. Thorium fuel cycle: a nuclear strategy and fuel recycle technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Dahlberg, R.C.; Wymer, R.G.

    1978-01-01

    Use of thorium fuel cycles in thermal reactors appears to permit a moderate rate of introduction of fast breeder reactors into the nuclear economy and helps maintain a relatively low ratio of FBRs to thermal reactors in the future. To implement the benefits of thorium fuel cycles, however, will require fuel recycle research and development. Fuel recycle technology developed for uranium and plutonium cycles will be beneficial to thorium fuel cycle development; however, significant additional R and D is required to implement either the HEUTH or the DUTH cycles. The metal-clad reactors in general have relatively common generic technology development requirements, although there are significant differences between fast and thermal reactor fuel recycle needs. The thorium fuel recycle R and D requirements of HTGRs are more reactor-specific than of the other reactor types; however, some specific efforts will be required for all the different reactor types.

  3. Spectral shift controlled reactors, denatured U-233/thorium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    This paper presents technical and economic data on the SSCR which may be of use in the International Fuel Cycle Evaluation Program to intercompare alternative nuclear systems. Included in this paper are data on the denatured U-233/thorium cycle. This cycle shows a proliferation advantage over more classical thorium fuel cycle (e.g., highly-enriched U-235/thorium or plutonium/thorium) due to the elimination of chemically-separable, concentrated fissile material from unirradiated nuclear fuel. The U-233 is denatured by mixing with depleted uranium to a concentration no greater than 12 w/o. An exogenous source of U-233 is assumed in this paper, since U-233 does not occur in nature and only a limited supply has been produced to date for research and development work

  4. Implementation of thorium fuel cycle in Indian nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnani, P.D.; Srivenkatesan, R.

    2004-01-01

    To ensure long term availability of nuclear energy in a sustainable manner, taking cognisance of its resource position, India has followed a closed fuel cycle option and chalked out a three-stage nuclear power programme based on uranium and thorium. The three stages of this programme comprise: - Natural uranium fuelled Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors - Fast Breeder Reactors utilising plutonium based fuel - Advanced nuclear power systems for utilization of thorium The technology for the first stage has already reached a level of maturity, and a commercial fast breeder reactor programme, comprising of the second stage, is due to start soon with the construction of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (Pbr). A large amount of research and development is going on for utilizing thorium. In this respect, an Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (A HWR) is being designed in India. The R and D work on thorium fuel cycle is discussed

  5. Contribution to the study of thorium phosphate gels and xerogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iroulart, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    The physico-chemical and optical properties of transparent thorium phosphate gels and xerogels are studied. The gels are obtained by mixing 3/4 or 1/1 parts of Th (NO 3 ) 4 (or Th Cl 4 ) and H 3 PO 4 (from 0.02 to 0.2 M) water solutions of 0.5 to 1 pH. Xerogels are obtained by a liquid phase drying at 50C. The 31 P and 1 H NMR, the Raman and EXAFS experiments are performed. The gel structural model is proposed: inorganic polymers from [Th (OH) 2 PO 4 H 2 (H 2 O 8 ] 2 2+ dimers. Xerogel is a transparent material having a wide optical window, which allows applications in ions detection. The X ray experiments on 4 hours heated xerogels, at different temperatures, showed the amorphe-crystal transition at 300C. A Th 3 (PO 4 ) 4 crystallized phase is obtained by xerogel heating at 850C, during 72 hours. It is a new synthesis method to obtain such a compound from an amorphous material [fr

  6. Separation of uranium from (Th,U)O.sub.2 solid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiotti, Premo; Jha, Mahesh Chandra

    1976-09-28

    Uranium is separated from mixed oxides of thorium and uranium by a pyrometallurgical process in which the oxides are mixed with a molten chloride salt containing thorium tetrachloride and thorium metal which reduces the uranium oxide to uranium metal which can then be recovered from the molten salt. The process is particularly useful for the recovery of uranium from generally insoluble high-density sol-gel thoria-urania nuclear reactor fuel pellets.

  7. Separation of uranium from (Th,U)O2 solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiotti, P.; Jha, M.C.

    1976-01-01

    Uranium is separated from mixed oxides of thorium and uranium by a pyrometallurgical process in which the oxides are mixed with a molten chloride salt containing thorium tetrachloride and thorium metal which reduces the uranium oxide to uranium metal which can then be recovered from the molten salt. The process is particularly useful for the recovery of uranium from generally insoluble high-density sol-gel thoria-urania nuclear reactor fuel pellets. 7 claims

  8. Fully solution-processed organic solar cells on metal foil substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Gaynor, Whitney

    2009-08-19

    We demonstrate fully solution-processed organic photovoltaic cells on metal foil substrates with power conversion efficiencies similar to those obtained in devices on transparent substrates. The cells are based on the regioregular poly- (3-hexylthiophene) and C61 butyric acid methyl ester bulk heterojunction system. The bottom electrode is a silver film whose workfunction is lowered by Cs2CO3 using spin-coating to serve as a cathode. The transparent top anode consists of a conductive polymer in combination with a solution-processed silver nanowire mesh that is laminated onto the devices. Each layer of the device, including the transparent electrode, is fabricated from solution, giving rise to the possibility of completely printed solar cells on low-cost substrates.

  9. [Enhancement effect of double-beam laser processed aqueous solution on ICP emission spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-zhong; Xu, Li-jing; Su, Hong-xin; Li, Xu; Wang, Shu-fang

    2015-01-01

    In order to change the physical properties of aqueous solution and improve the radiation intensity of the ICP emission spectrum, the effects of different laser power density and irradiation time on the surface tension and viscosity of aqueous solution were investigated by using near infrared laser at 976 nm and CO2 laser at 10. 6 µm to irradiate aqueous solution orthogonally, then the enhancement of ICP spectral intensity with processed solution was discussed. The results showed that the surface tension and viscosity of aqueous solution reduced by 42. 13% and 14. 03% compared with the untreated, and the atomization efficiency increased by 51.26% at the laser power density 0. 265 7 W . cm-2 of 976 nm and 0. 206 9 W . cm-2 of CO2 laser with 40 min irradiation time. With the optimized aqueous solution introduced into the ICP source, the spectral line intensity of sample elements As, Cd, Cr, Hg and Pb was enhanced by 46.29%, 94. 65%, 30. 76%, 33.07% and 94. 58% compared to the untreated aqueous solution, while the signal-to-background ratio increased by 43. 84%, 85. 35%, 28. 71%, 34. 37% and 90. 91%, respectively. Plasma temperature and electron density also increased by 5. 94% and 1. 18% respectively. It is obvious that the method of double-beam laser orthogonal irradiation on solution can reduce the surface tension and viscosity of aqueous solution significantly, and raise the radiationintensity of ICP source, and will provide a better condition for detecting the trace heavy metal elements in water samples.

  10. All-Solution-Processed, Ambient Method for ITO-Free, Roll-Coated Tandem Polymer Solar Cells using Solution- Processed Metal Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angmo, Dechan; Dam, Henrik Friis; Andersen, Thomas Rieks

    2014-01-01

    A solution-processed silver film is employed in the processing of top-illuminated indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-free polymer solar cells in single- and double-junction (tandem) structures. The nontransparent silver film fully covers the substrate and serves as the bottom electrode whereas a PEDOT......:PSS/Ag grid forms the semitransparent top electrode. All layers are roll-coated/printed on a flexible substrate by using only two techniques: slot–die coating for up to 11 consecutive layers and flexo-printing for the last Ag grid layer. The slot–die coated Ag film is compared to an evaporated Ag film...... in terms of surface morphological and topographical properties and to ITO in terms of flexibility. The slot–die coated Ag film demonstrates extremely low roughness (a root-meansquare roughness of 3 nm was measured over 240_320 mm2 area), is highly conductive (

  11. Separation of Protactinium from Neutron Irradiated Thorium Oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, G.; Gutierrez, L.; Ropero, M.

    1983-01-01

    The chemical separation of thorium and protactinium can be carried out by leaching most of the last one, about 95%, with aqueous HF from neutron irradiated thorium oxide. This leaching reaction la highly favored by the transformation reaction of the ThO 2 material into ThF 4 . For both reactions, leaching and transformation, the reagents concentration, agitation speed and temperature influences were studied and the activation energies were found. (Author) 18 refs

  12. The use of thorium as an alternative nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.J.

    1982-04-01

    The use of thorium as an alternative or supplementary nuclear fuel is examined and compared with uranium. A description of various reactor types and their suitability to thorium fuel, and a description of various aspects of the fuel cycle from mining to waste disposal, are included. Comments are made on the safety and economics of each aspect of the fuel cycle and the extension of the lifetime of nuclear fuel

  13. Assessment of the thorium fuel cycle in power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Homan, F.J.; Allen, E.J.

    1977-01-01

    A study was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to evaluate the role of thorium fuel cycles in power reactors. Three thermal reactor systems were considered: Light Water Reactors (LWRs); High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs); and Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs) of the Canadian Deuterium Uranium Reactor (CANDU) type; most of the effort was on these systems. A summary comparing thorium and uranium fuel cycles in Fast Breeder Reactors (FBRs) was also compiled.

  14. The comparative distribution of thorium and plutonium in human tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Narayani P.; Shawki Amin Ibrahim; Cohen, Norman; Wrenn, McDonald E.

    1978-01-01

    Thorium is the most chemically and biologically similar natural element to the manmade element plutonium. Both are actinides, and for both the most stable valency state is +4, and solubility in natural body fluids is low. They are classified together in ICRP Lung Model. The present paper deals with the question of whether or not the analogy between the two actinides in terms of deposition and retention in human tissues is a good one. Preliminary results on the thorium contents ( 228,230 Th and 232 Th) of three sets of human tissues from a western U.S. town containing a uranium tailings pile are compared with the reported values of plutonium content of human tissues from the general populations who are exposed to environmental plutonium from fallout of nuclear detonations. Samples were taken at autopsy where sudden death had occurred. For the three isotopes of thorium, the ratio of the content of each (pCi/organ, normalized by organ weight to ICRP Reference Man) in lung to lymph nodes varies from 2-25 for individuals with a mean of 8; this is similar to that we infer from the literature for 239 , 240 Pu which suggests a ratio of lung to lymph nodes with a mean of approximately 7. However, the relative thorium contents of lung and liver are dissimilar, lung/liver for thorium being 3.5 and for plutonium 0.2 to 0.1. Similarly, the ratios of thorium and plutonium content of liver and bone vary significantly; the ratio for thorium is 0.1 and for plutonium 0.8 to 0.5. The most significant observation at this stage is that the relative accumulation of thorium in human liver is much less than that of plutonium. Some of the plausible reasons will be discussed. (author)

  15. An assessment of once-through homogeneous thorium fuel economics for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Noh, Jae Man; Yoo, Jae Woon

    2001-01-01

    The fuel economics of an once-through homogeneous thorium fuel concept for PWR was assessed by doing a detailed core analysis. In addition to this, the fuel economics assessment was also performed for two other ways enhancing the economic potential of thorium fuel; thorium utilization in the mixed core with uranium fuel assembly and Duplex thorium fuel concepts. As a results of fuel economics assessment, the thorium fuel cycle does not show any economic incentives in preference to uranium fuel cycle under the 18-months fuel cycle for PWR. However, the utilization of thorium is the mixed core with uranium fuel assembly and Duplex thorium fuel cycle and show superior fuel economics to uranium fuel under the longer fuel cycle scheme. The economic potential of once-through thorium fuel cycle is expected to be increased further by utilizing the Duplex thorium fuel in the mixed core with uranium fuel assembly

  16. All solution processed tandem polymer solar cells based on thermocleavable materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagemann, Ole; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2008-01-01

    Multilayer tandem polymer solar cells were prepared by solution processing using thermocleavable polymer materials that allow for conversion to an insoluble state through a short thermal treatment. The problems associated with solubility during application of subsequent layers in the stack were...

  17. Solution-processed organic tandem solar cells with embedded optical spacers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadipour, Afshin; de Boer, Bert; Blom, Paul W. M.

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate a solution-processed polymer tandem solar cell in which the two photoactive single cells are separated by an optical spacer. The use of an optical spacer allows for an independent optimization of both the electronic and optical properties of the tandem cell. The optical transmission

  18. X-ray imaging sensor arrays on foil using solution processed organic photodiodes and organic transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, A.; Moet, D.; Steen, J.L. van der; Tripathi, A.K.; Rodriguez, F.G.; Maas, J.; Simon, M.; Reutten, W.; Douglas, A.; Raaijmakers, R.; Malinowski, P.E.; Myny, K.; Shafique, U.; Andriessen, R.; Heremans, P.; Gelinck, G.H.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate organic imaging sensor arrays fabricated on flexible plastic foil with the solution processing route for both photodiodes and thin film transistors. We used the photovoltaic P3HT:PCBM blend for fabricating the photodiodes using spin coating and pentacene as semiconductor material for

  19. Ambipolar organic field-effect transistors based on a solution-processed methanofullerene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anthopoulos, Thomas D.; Tanase, Cristina; Setayesh, Sepas; Meijer, Eduard J.; Hummelen, Jan C.; Blom, Paul W.M.; de Leeuw, Dagobert

    2004-01-01

    Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs, see Figure), based on the solution-processible methanofullerene [6,6]-phenyl-C-61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), have been fabricated in a bottom-contact device configuration using gold electrodes. The OFET functions either as a p- or n-channel device,

  20. Failure analysis in ITO-free all-solution processed organic solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galagan, Y.; Eggenhuisen, T.M.; Coenen, M.J.J.; Biezemans, A.F.K.V.; Verhees, W.J.H.; Veenstra, S.C.; Groen, W.A.; Andriessen, R.; Janssen, R.A.J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a problem-solving methodology and present guidance for troubleshooting defects in ITO-free all-solution processed organic solar cells with an inverted cell architecture. A systematic approach for identifying the main causes of failures in devices is presented. Comprehensive

  1. All-solution processed polymer light-emitting diodes with air stable metal-oxide electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, P. de; Moet, D.J.D.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    We present an all-solution processed polymer light-emitting diode (PLED) using spincoated zinc oxide (ZnO) and vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) as electron and hole injecting contact, respectively. We compare the performance of these devices to the standard PLED design using PEDOT:PSS as anode and Ba/Al as

  2. Flexible, low-temperature, solution processed ZnO-based perovskite solid state solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mulmudi Hemant; Yantara, Natalia; Dharani, Sabba; Graetzel, Michael; Mhaisalkar, Subodh; Boix, Pablo P; Mathews, Nripan

    2013-12-07

    A ZnO compact layer formed by electrodeposition and ZnO nanorods grown by chemical bath deposition (CBD) allow the processing of low-temperature, solution based and flexible solid state perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 solar cells. Conversion efficiencies of 8.90% were achieved on rigid substrates while the flexible ones yielded 2.62%.

  3. Approximating solution of nonlinear variational inclusions by Ishikawa iterative process with errors in Banach spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan George Xian-Zhi

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce and study the existence of solutions and convergence of Ishikawa iterative processes with errors for a class of nonlinear variational inclusions with accretive type mappings in Banach spaces. The results presented in this paper extend and improve the corresponding results of [4–9, 11, 16–17,19].

  4. Existence of Global Martingale Solutions to Stochastic Hyperbolic Equations Driven by a Spatially Homogeneous Wiener Process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondreját, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2006), s. 23-52 ISSN 0219-4937 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA201/01/1197 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : stochastic wave equation * spatially homogeneous Wiener process * martingale solution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  5. All-solution processed polymer light-emitting diodes with air stable metal-oxide electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruyn, P.; Moet, D. J. D.; Blom, P. W. M.

    We present an all-solution processed polymer light-emitting diode (PLED) using spincoated zinc oxide (ZnO) and vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) as electron and hole injecting contact, respectively. We compare the performance of these devices to the standard PLED design using PEDOT:PSS as anode and Ba/Al as

  6. All solution processing of ITO-free organic solar cell modules directly on barrier foil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angmo, Dechan; Hösel, Markus; Krebs, Frederik C

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate fully solution processed semi-transparent silver electrodes on flexible substrates having a sheet resistance as low as 5Ω/□ and transmittance of ∼30% at 550nm. We demonstrate the use of this electrode as a substitute for ITO in an inverted organic solar cell (OSC...... and processing cost and is a cost-effective alternative to ITO for low-cost organic solar cells....

  7. Method of reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fission products of the uranium, plutonium and thorium group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, G.

    1970-01-01

    A solvent extraction is used to separate irradiated nuclear fission materials of the group uranium, plutonium, thorium from radioactive fission products which are present together in an aqueous solution. An improvement on the known mehod is proposed in which a carboxylic nitrile, carboxylic ester, carboxylic amide, or a mixture of these substances is added to the organic phase which is mixed with a non-polar diluting agent as a polar modificator, where the modificators are derived from mono- or polycarboxylic acids or also from substituted carboxylic acids. Amyl acetate, N-N dimethyl caprylic acid amide, and adiponitrile are particularly suitable. (UW/LH) [de

  8. Evaluation of thorium based nuclear fuel. Extended summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franken, W.M.P.; Bultman, J.H.; Konings, R.J.M.; Wichers, V.A.

    1995-04-01

    Application of thorium based nuclear fuels has been evaluated with emphasis on possible reduction of the actinide waste. As a result three ECN-reports are published, discussing in detail: - The reactor physics aspects, by comparing the operation characteristics of the cores of Pressurized Water Reactors and Heavy Water Reactors with different fuel types, including equilibrium thorium/uranium free, once-through uranium fuel and equilibrium uranium/plutonium fuel, - the chemical aspects of thorium based fuel cycles with emphasis on fuel (re)fabrication and fuel reprocessing, - the possible reduction in actinide waste as analysed for Heavy Water Reactors with various types of thorium based fuels in once-through operation and with reprocessing. These results are summarized in this report together with a short discussion on non-proliferation and uranium resource utilization. It has been concluded that a substantial reduction of actinide radiotoxicity of the disposed waste may be achieved by using thorium based fuels, if very efficient partitioning and multiple recycling of uranium and thorium can be realized. This will, however, require large efforts to develop the technology to the necessary industrial scale of operation. (orig.)

  9. Survey of thorium utilization in power reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, M.H.; Schleifer, P.; Dahlberg, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    It is clear that thorium-fueled thermal power reactor systems based on current technology can play a vital role in serving present and long-term energy needs. Advanced thorium converters and thermal breeders can provide an expanded resource base from which the world's growing energy demands can be met. Utilization of a symbiotic system of fast breeders and thorium-fueled thermal reactors can be particularly effective in providing low cost power while conserving uranium resources. Breeder reactors are characterized by high capital costs and very low fuel costs since they produce more fuel than they consume. This excess fuel can be used to fuel thermal converter reactors whose capital costs are low. This symbiosis is optimized when 233 U is bred in the fast breeders and then used to fuel high-conversion-ratio thermal converter reactors operating on the thorium-uranium fuel cycle. The thorium-cycle HTGR, after undergoing more than fifteen years of development in both the United States and Europe, provides for the optimum utilization of our limited uranium resources. Other thermal reactor systems, previously operating on the uranium cycle, also show potential in their capability to utilize the thorium cycle effectively

  10. Neutronics assessment of thorium-based fuel assembly in SCWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shichang; Cai, Jiejin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel thorium-based fuel assembly for SCWR has been introduced and investigated. • Neutronic properties of three thorium fuels have been studied, compared with UO 2 fuel. • The thorium-based fuel has advantages on fuel utilization and lower MAs generation. -- Abstract: Aiming to take advantage of neutron spectrum of SCWR, a novel thorium-based fuel assembly for SCWR is introduced in this paper. The neutronic characteristics of the introduced fuel assembly with three different thorium fuel types have been investigated using the “dragon” codes. The parameters in different working conditions, such as infinite multiplication factors, radial power peaking factor, temperature coefficient of reactivity and their relation with the operation period have been assessed by comparing with conventional uranium assembly. Moreover, the moderator-to-fuel ratio (MFR) was changed in order to investigate its influence on the neutronic characteristics of fuel assembly. Results show that the thorium-based fuel has advantages on both efficient fuel utilization and lower minor actinide generation, with some similar neutronic properties to the uranium fuel

  11. Solution processing of chalcogenide materials using thiol-amine "alkahest" solvent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Carrie L; Brutchey, Richard L

    2017-05-02

    Macroelectronics is a major focus in electronics research and is driven by large area applications such as flat panel displays and thin film solar cells. Innovations for these technologies, such as flexible substrates and mass production, will require efficient and affordable semiconductor processing. Low-temperature solution processing offers mild deposition methods, inexpensive processing equipment, and the possibility of high-throughput processing. In recent years, the discovery that binary "alkahest" mixtures of ethylenediamine and short chain thiols possess the ability to dissolve bulk inorganic materials to yield molecular inks has lead to the wide study of such systems and the straightforward recovery of phase pure crystalline chalcogenide thin films upon solution processing and mild annealing of the inks. In this review, we recount the work that has been done toward elucidating the scope of this method for the solution processing of inorganic materials for use in applications such as photovoltaic devices, electrocatalysts, photodetectors, thermoelectrics, and nanocrystal ligand exchange. We also take stock of the wide range of bulk materials that can be used as soluble precursors, and discuss the work that has been done to reveal the nature of the dissolved species. This method has provided a vast toolbox of over 65 bulk precursors, which can be utilized to develop new routes to functional chalcogenide materials. Future studies in this area should work toward a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the dissolution and recovery of bulk materials, as well as broadening the scope of soluble precursors and recoverable functional materials for innovative applications.

  12. Analysing student written solutions to investigate if problem-solving processes are evident throughout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Regina; McLoughlin, Eilish; Finlayson, Odilla E.

    2016-07-01

    An interdisciplinary science course has been implemented at a university with the intention of providing students the opportunity to develop a range of key skills in relation to: real-world connections of science, problem-solving, information and communications technology use and team while linking subject knowledge in each of the science disciplines. One of the problems used in this interdisciplinary course has been selected to evaluate if it affords students the opportunity to explicitly display problem-solving processes. While the benefits of implementing problem-based learning have been well reported, far less research has been devoted to methods of assessing student problem-solving solutions. A problem-solving theoretical framework was used as a tool to assess student written solutions to indicate if problem-solving processes were present. In two academic years, student problem-solving processes were satisfactory for exploring and understanding, representing and formulating, and planning and executing, indicating that student collaboration on problems is a good initiator of developing these processes. In both academic years, students displayed poor monitoring and reflecting (MR) processes at the intermediate level. A key impact of evaluating student work in this way is that it facilitated meaningful feedback about the students' problem-solving process rather than solely assessing the correctness of problem solutions.

  13. Demonstration of new handling equipment configurations for the overpacking of thorium materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalovich, G.S.; Heisler, S.W. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A remote handling system has been designed for the removal and overpacking of thorium materials currently stored at the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC). The FMPC is the Department of Energy (DOE) designated interim storage location for thorium materials. The nature of thorium materials indicated that a system to reduce exposure, assure environmental protection, and provide positive identification of the materials be devised. The result of this was the development and implementation of a remote handling system utilizing existing technologies but integrating them into a system that had previously not been used. The equipment used involves: remote controlled cranes, conveyers, sensing equipment and overpacks; a computer based central control and processing system that also provides cross data correlation; a shielded handling unit with multiple articulation capability and an environmentally isolated work area; and significant shielding at the operators station while the operator works in an enclosed, but mobile environment. These measures were prompted by both As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) considerations for the employees and protection for the environment. The overpacking is required due to the environmental deterioration that is occurring to both the building and containers resulting in the need for this operation to be initiated to assure the continued safe storage of these materials

  14. Ultratrace analysis of uranium and thorium in glass. Pt. 2; Classical photometry - renaissance of a challenge in economically difficult times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohr, U. (Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, Technical Univ. of Darmstadt (Germany)); Meckel, L. (Schott Glaswerke, Zentrale Chemische Analytik, Mainz (Germany)); Ortner, H.M. (Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, Technical Univ. of Darmstadt (Germany))

    1994-06-01

    Ultratrace analyses for quality control often have to be carried out in industrial laboratories far from optimum conditions. Against this setting the development of a method for the photometric determination of uranium- and thorium-traces in glasses with arsenazo III was envisaged. The method basically consists of a digestion with HF/HClO[sub 4]/H[sub 3]BO[sub 3], an extractive preseparation of interfering Ti- and Zr-traces with TTFA/hexanol/CCl[sub 4], an extractive separation of U- and Th-traces with TTFA/TBP/toluene and a final determination of thorium alone (in the presence of photometrically inactive) U(VI) and the sum of Th+U(IV) with arsenazo III. The concentration of uranium is calculated from the difference of the sum of both traces minus the thorium content. Uranium can be determined with nearly the same sensitivity as thorium after reduction to uranium(IV). The most suitable reducing agent for uranium(VI) to uranium(IV) is a mixture of Na[sub 2]S[sub 2]O[sub 4]/CH[sub 2]O. An optimization of the arsenazo III concentration for the determination of thorium and uranium yielded an optimal concentration of 80 mg/L arsenazo III: For the reduction of uranium concentrations of 2 g/L of Na[sub 2]S[sub 2]O[sub 4] and 3.2 g/L CH[sub 2]O proved to be optimal. Interferences of this photometric end determination by titanium, zirconium and scandium were investigated quantitatively. The permissible excess for these elements was found to be so low that a trace-trace separation method proved to be necessary. Separation methods were checked for the separation of the matrix components of the investigated glasses from thorium and uranium. One of these methods was suitable after optimization: Thorium and uranium are extracted with TTFA/TBP/toluene from a solution containing hydrochloric acid. Back-extraction is carried out with HCl/KMnO[sub 4]. For the separation of titanium- and zirconium-cotraces an extra separation method had to be developed.

  15. Polymeric hydrogels containing complexant agents for retention of pollutants containing thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Maria Jose A.; Carreiro, Julio C.; Parra, Duclerc F.; Lugao, Ademar B.

    2005-01-01

    The hydrogels of poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP), constituted of around 90% of water , show properties of retaining great amount of water and consequently can also retain substances that were made soluble, with either particular or specific reactive properties. In the light of this, these matrixes can be used as support for both capture and retention of radioactive substances of contaminated surfaces. Modified hydrogels containing complexant agents had been obtained in solution, in order to capture contaminated substances. The study of the ionizing radiation effect in polymer is of great interest not only to the development of materials which operate in conditions of radiation but also to the usage of the technique with purpose of both polymeric structure modification and acquisition of new materials. Membranes of hydrogels have been obtained with poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)-PVP, polyethyleneglycol (PEG), Agar and several concentrations of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and sodium citrate. Theses samples were irradiated in 60 Co source, 15 kGy/h dose and submitted to thermal characterization in a Mettler-Toledo SDTA/851 equipment. The hydrogels membranes polymerized by radiation were put in contact with thorium nitrate solution, dehydrated and calcined, after that their ashes were analyzed. In the case of solution containing thorium were analyzed by spectrophotometric. (author)

  16. Solvent extraction of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) from nitrate media by carboxylic acid amides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston, J.S.; Preez, A.C. du

    1995-01-01

    A series of nineteen N-alkyl carboxylic acid amides (R.CO.NHR') has been prepared, in which the alkyl groups R and R' have been varied in order to introduce different degrees of steric complexity into the compounds. A smaller number of N,N-dialkyl amides (R.CO.NR 2 ') and non-substituted amides (R.CO.NH 2 ) has also been prepared for comparison purposes. These amides were characterized by measurement of their boiling points, melting points, refractive indices and densities. The solvent extraction of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) from sodium nitrate media by solutions of the amides in toluene was studied. Increasing steric bulk of the alkyl groups R and R' was found to cause a marked decrease in the extraction of thorium, with a much smaller effect on the extraction of uranium, thus considerably enhancing the separation between these metals. Vapour pressure osmometry studies indicate that the N-alkyl amides are self-associated in toluene solution, with aggregation numbers up to about 2.5 for 0.6 M solutions at 35 degree C. In contrast, the N,N-dialkyl amides behave as monomers under these conditions. The distribution ratios for the extraction of uranium and thorium show second- and third-order dependences, respectively, on the extractant concentration for both the N-alkyl and N,N-dialkyl amides. 15 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs

  17. Modeling of thorium (IV) ions adsorption onto a novel adsorbent material silicon dioxide nano-balls using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaynar, Ümit H; Şabikoğlu, Israfil; Kaynar, Sermin Çam; Eral, Meral

    2016-09-01

    The silicon dioxide nano-balls (nano-SiO2) were prepared for the adsorption of thorium (IV) ions from aqueous solution. The synthesized silicon dioxide nano-balls were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray, X-ray Diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared and BET surface area measurement spectroscopy. The effects of pH, concentration, temperature and the solid-liquid ratio on the adsorption of thorium by nano-balls were optimized using central composite design of response surface methodology. The interaction between four variables was studied and modelled. Furthermore, the statistical analysis of the results was done. Analysis of variance revealed that all of the single effects found statistically significant on the sorption of Th(IV). Probability F-values (F=4.64-14) and correlation coefficients (R(2)=0.99 for Th(IV)) indicate that model fit the experimental data well. The ability of this material to remove Th(IV) from aqueous solution was characterized by Langmuir, Freunlinch and Temkin adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacity of thorium (IV) achieved 188.2mgg(-1). Thermodynamic parameters were determined and discussed. The batch adsorption condition with respect to interfering ions was tested. The results indicated that silicon dioxide nano-balls were suitable as sorbent material for adsorption and recovery of Th(IV) ions from aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Patterning technology for solution-processed organic crystal field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Sun, Huabin; Shi, Yi; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito

    2014-01-01

    Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are fundamental building blocks for various state-of-the-art electronic devices. Solution-processed organic crystals are appreciable materials for these applications because they facilitate large-scale, low-cost fabrication of devices with high performance. Patterning organic crystal transistors into well-defined geometric features is necessary to develop these crystals into practical semiconductors. This review provides an update on recentdevelopment in patterning technology for solution-processed organic crystals and their applications in field-effect transistors. Typical demonstrations are discussed and examined. In particular, our latest research progress on the spin-coating technique from mixture solutions is presented as a promising method to efficiently produce large organic semiconducting crystals on various substrates for high-performance OFETs. This solution-based process also has other excellent advantages, such as phase separation for self-assembled interfaces via one-step spin-coating, self-flattening of rough interfaces, and in situ purification that eliminates the impurity influences. Furthermore, recommendations for future perspectives are presented, and key issues for further development are discussed. PMID:27877656

  19. Patterning technology for solution-processed organic crystal field-effect transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs are fundamental building blocks for various state-of-the-art electronic devices. Solution-processed organic crystals are appreciable materials for these applications because they facilitate large-scale, low-cost fabrication of devices with high performance. Patterning organic crystal transistors into well-defined geometric features is necessary to develop these crystals into practical semiconductors. This review provides an update on recent development in patterning technology for solution-processed organic crystals and their applications in field-effect transistors. Typical demonstrations are discussed and examined. In particular, our latest research progress on the spin-coating technique from mixture solutions is presented as a promising method to efficiently produce large organic semiconducting crystals on various substrates for high-performance OFETs. This solution-based process also has other excellent advantages, such as phase separation for self-assembled interfaces via one-step spin-coating, self-flattening of rough interfaces, and in situ purification that eliminates the impurity influences. Furthermore, recommendations for future perspectives are presented, and key issues for further development are discussed.

  20. The cost of alkaline solutions in ambulatory hemodialysis: an analysis about wasteful from the processes control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes Junior, Celso Souza; de Mendonça, Ricardo Rodrigues Silveira; Hatem, Raquel Oliveira Rocha de Freitas; Souza, André Luiz Sampaio; Chaves, Adriana Rodrigues; Bastos, Marcus Gomes; Colugnati, Fernando Antônio Basile

    2014-01-01

    There are few studies about costs of inputs used in hemodialysis and among these expenditures, the compounds that make up the dialysate are one of the values considered as representative of this therapy. However, there aren't costs studies that guiding solutions. The objective of this article is discuss whether there is wasteful of alkaline solutions in ambulatory hemodialysis and hence the possibility of reduction in cost from the standardization process simulation of establishment of dialysate flow in periods between shifts in hemodialysis outpatients. Starting from an observational analytic, a simulation was performed twenty case scenarios, which ten cases established by standardizing processes control on the dialysate flow in recession. The combination of data was performed using as a basis the prices of three suppliers of alkali liquid or powder. It was observed among the scenarios with standardized processes, ranging between 7.7% and 33.3% savings in the alkaline solution cost (powder or liquid), by reducing waste. It is possible to restrain the wasteful use of alkaline solutions, both powder and liquid. Consequently, its cost from the patterning on reducing the flow of dialysate during the intervals between shifts observed in the outpatient hemodialysis. However, these results are conditional upon the commitment of health professionals, mainly to supervision exercise and control of activities in quality function deployment.

  1. 3,3'-Bicarbazole-Based Host Molecules for Solution-Processed Phosphorescent OLEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungwoon; Lee, Suhan; Lee, Jaemin; Lim, Eunhee; Jung, Byung Jun

    2018-04-08

    Solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are attractive due to their low-cost, large area displays, and lighting features. Small molecules as well as polymers can be used as host materials within the solution-processed emitting layer. Herein, we report two 3,3'-bicarbazole-based host small molecules, which possess a structural isomer relationship. 9,9'-Di-4-n-butylphenyl-9 H ,9' H -3,3'-bicarbazole ( BCz-nBuPh ) and 9,9'-di-4-t-butylphenyl-9 H ,9' H -3,3'-bicarbazole ( BCz-tBuPh ) exhibited similar optical properties within solutions but different photoluminescence within films. A solution-processed green phosphorescent OLED with the BCz-tBuPh host exhibited a high maximum current efficiency and power efficiency of 43.1 cd/A and 40.0 lm/W, respectively, compared to the device with the BCz-nBuPh host.

  2. Improved process for the production of cellulose sulfate using sulfuric acid/ethanol solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Jun; Chen, Hongwen

    2013-06-05

    An improved process for production of cellulose sulfate (CS) was developed by using sulfuric acid/ethanol solution as sulfonating agent and Na2SO4 as water absorbent. The FTIR, SEM and TG analysis were used to characterize the CS prepared. The total degree of substitution and viscosity of the product solution (2%, w/v) were ranging from 0.28 to 0.77 and from 115 to 907 mPa s, respectively, by changing the process parameters such as the amount of Na2SO4, the reaction time, the temperature, the sulfuric acid/alcohol ratio and liquid/solid ratio. The results indicated that the product with DS (0.28-0.77) and η2% (115-907) mPa s could be produced by using this improved process and more cellulose sulfate could be produced when cellulose was sulfonated for 3-4 h at -2 °C in sulfuric acid/ethanol (1.4-1.6) solution with addition of 0.8 g Na2SO4. The (13)C NMR indicated that the sulfate group of CS produced using sulfuric acid/ethanol solution was at C6 position. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Viability analysis of heat recovery solution for industrial process of roasting coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kljajić Miroslav V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Every industrial heat recovery solution is specific engineering challenge but not because predicted energy rationalization or achieved energy savings but potential unavoidable technological deviations and consequences on related processes and for sure, high investment because of delicate design and construction. Often, the energy savings in a particular segment of the industrial process is a main goal. However, in the food industry, especially roasting coffee, additional criteria has to be strictly observed and fulfilled. Such criteria may include prescribed and uniform product quality, compliance with food safety standards, stability of the processes etc., and all in the presence of key process parameters variability, inconsistency of raw material composition and quality, complexity of measurement and analytical methods etc. The paper respects all circumstances and checks viability of proposed recovery solution. The paper analyzes the possibility of using waste heat from the roasting process to ensure shortening of roasting cycle, reduction of fuel consumption and increasing capacity of roasting lines on daily basis. Analysis concludes that effects are valuable and substantial, although the complete solution is on the threshold of economic sustainability with numerous opportunities to improve of both technical and economic indicators. The analysis combines measuring and analytical methods with standard cost-benefit analysis. Conclusions are derived from measurements and calculations of key parameters in the operating conditions and checked by experimental methods. Test results deviate from 10 to 15%, in relation with parameters in main production line.

  4. Leaching process of nuclear fuel in leaching solution at sub-boiling temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qinfen; Chen Yongqing; Liao Yuanzong; Sun Shuyun

    1990-03-01

    Effects of the leaching temperature and concentration of the nitric acid on the solubility of nuclear fuel have been investigated. Fuels were fed into the solution in simulation of continuous and batch mode and the effects of leaching temperature, nitric acid concentration and soluble neutron poison on the leaching rate were studied. The results showed that the increase of nitric acid concentration and leaching temperature can accelerate the fuel leaching rate. The releasing off-gas increased with the increase of feeding fuels. There was no effect of concentration Gd up to 3g/L in the nitric acid on the fuel leaching. It also demonstrated that the simulation of continuous leaching process at the Sub-boiling temperature of leaching solution was a suitable process beacause it could keep the leaching rate and off-gas flow not only rapidly but also smoothly and no gas peak appeared. The total volume of off-gas after the leaching process was calculated

  5. Organic semiconductors for solution-processable field-effect transistors (OFETs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Sybille; Forster, Michael; Souharce, Benjamin; Thiem, Heiko; Scherf, Ullrich

    2008-01-01

    The cost-effective production of flexible electronic components will profit considerably from the development of solution-processable, organic semiconductor materials. Particular attention is focused on soluble semiconductors for organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). The hitherto differentiation between "small molecules" and polymeric materials no longer plays a role, rather more the ability to process materials from solution to homogeneous semiconducting films with optimal electronic properties (high charge-carrier mobility, low threshold voltage, high on/off ratio) is pivotal. Key classes of materials for this purpose are soluble oligoacenes, soluble oligo- and polythiophenes and their respective copolymers, and oligo- and polytriarylamines. In this context, micro- or nanocrystalline materials have the general advantage of somewhat higher charge-carrier mobilities, which, however, could be offset in the case of amorphous, glassy materials by simpler and more reproducible processing.

  6. Solution-processed organic field-effect transistors based on dinaphthothienothiophene precursor with chemically modified electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, Takashi; Abe, Souichiro; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kimura, Yu; Hamaguchi, Azusa; Ikeda, Yoshinori; Naito, Hiroyoshi

    2017-11-01

    Bottom-gate organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) based on a soluble precursor of dinaphtho[2,3-b:2’,3’-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (DNTT) with bottom-contact source-drain electrodes chemically modified with pentafluorobenzenethiol (PFBT) have been fabricated. The preparation of DNTT films using CYTOP overcoat layers allows the solution processing of bottom-gate/bottom-contact DNTT FETs with good electrical contacts between the PFBT-treated Au electrodes and the DNTT molecules. The DNTT FETs processed using CYTOP overcoat layers exhibit the field-effect mobilities of up to 0.37 cm2 V‑1 s‑1. High maximum mobility of 0.29 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 has been achieved in solution-processed DNTT FETs with channel length of 5 μm.

  7. Fully Solution-Processed Inverted Polymer Solar Cells with Laminated Nanowire Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Gaynor, Whitney

    2010-01-26

    We demonstrate organic photovoltaic cells in which every layer is deposited by solution processing on opaque metal substrates, with efficiencies similar to those obtained in conventional device structures on transparent substrates. The device architecture is enabled by solution-processed, laminated silver nanowire films serving as the top transparent anode. The cells are based on the regioregular poly(3- hexylthiophene) and C 61 butyric acid methyl ester bulk heterojunction and reach an efficiency of 2.5% under 100 mW/cm 2 of AM 1.5G illumination. The metal substrates are adequate barriers to moisture and oxygen, in contrast to transparent plastics that have previously been used, giving rise to the possibility of roll-to-roll solutionprocessed solar cells that are packaged by lamination to glass substrates, combining the cost advantage of roll-toroll processing with the barrier properties of glass and metal foil. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  8. Recent Progress on Solution-Processed CdTe Nanocrystals Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Xue

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Solution-processed CdTe nanocrystals (NCs photovoltaic devices have many advantages, both in commercial manufacture and daily operation, due to the low-cost fabrication process, which becomes a competitive candidate for next-generation solar cells. All solution-processed CdTe NCs solar cells were first reported in 2005. In recent years, they have increased over four-fold in power conversion efficiency. The latest devices achieve AM 1.5 G power conversion efficiency up to 12.0%, values comparable to those of commercial thin film CdTe/CdS solar cells fabricated by the close-space sublimation (CSS method. Here we review the progress and prospects in this field, focusing on new insights into CdTe NCs synthesized, device fabrication, NC solar cell operation, and how these findings give guidance on optimizing solar cell performance.

  9. Separation of Cu, In, Fe and Sn from nuclear grade thorium by tri-n-octyl amine-5 M HCI and their determination by atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, S. de; Cipriani, M.; Abrao, A.

    1976-01-01

    The results of solvent extraction separation of a group of metal traces in high pure thorium with the aid of tri-n-octyl amine-benzene from ThCL 4 HCI are summarized. ThCl 4 HCI-KI solutions Cu,In,Fe and Sn are extracted together and determined by atomic absoprtion spectrophotometry, burning directly the organic phase. The behavior of Cu,In,Fe and Sn toward direct burn of the organic phase using hydrogen-air mixture was studied, and an absorption enhancement was observed. The procedure is being used ot perform the quality control of nuclear grade thorium and its compounds. The calibration curves have provided precisions in the range 1 to 10% in analysis of thorium

  10. All solution processed organic thin film transistor-backplane with printing technology for electrophoretic display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung W.; Song, C.K.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, solution processes were developed for backplane using an organic thin film transistor (OTFT) as a driving device for an electrophoretic display (EPD) panel. The processes covered not only the key device of OTFTs but also interlayer and pixel electrodes. The various materials and printing processes were adopted to achieve the requirements of devices and functioning layers. The performance of OTFT of the backplane was sufficient to drive EPD sheet by producing a mobility of 0.12 cm2/v x sec and on/off current ratio of 10(5).

  11. Degradation of dyes from aqueous solution by Fenton processes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidheesh, Puthiya Veetil; Gandhimathi, Rajan; Ramesh, Srikrishnaperumal Thanga

    2013-04-01

    Several industries are using dyes as coloring agents. The effluents from these industries are increasingly becoming an environmental problem. The removal of dyes from aqueous solution has a great potential in the field of environmental engineering. This paper reviews the classification, characteristics, and problems of dyes in detail. Advantages and disadvantages of different methods used for dye removal are also analyzed. Among these methods, Fenton process-based advanced oxidation processes are an emerging prospect in the field of dye removal. Fenton processes have been classified and represented as "Fenton circle". This paper analyzes the recent studies on Fenton processes. The studies include analyzing different configurations of reactors used for dye removal, its efficiency, and the effects of various operating parameters such as pH, catalyst concentration, H2O2 concentration, initial dye concentration, and temperature of Fenton processes. From the present study, it can be conclude that Fenton processes are very effective and environmentally friendly methods for dye removal.

  12. Fully solution-processed transparent electrodes based on silver nanowire composites for perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Areum; Lee, Hongseuk; Kwon, Hyeok-Chan; Jung, Hyun Suk; Park, Nam-Gyu; Jeong, Sunho; Moon, Jooho

    2016-03-01

    We report all-solution-processed transparent conductive electrodes based on Ag nanowire (AgNW)-embedded metal oxide composite films for application in organometal halide perovskite solar cells. To address the thermal instability of Ag nanowires, we used combustive sol-gel derived thin films to construct ZnO/ITO/AgNW/ITO composite structures. The resulting composite configuration effectively prevented the AgNWs from undergoing undesirable side-reactions with halogen ions present in the perovskite precursor solutions that significantly deteriorate the optoelectrical properties of Ag nanowires in transparent conductive films. AgNW-based composite electrodes had a transmittance of ~80% at 550 nm and sheet resistance of 18 Ω sq-1. Perovskite solar cells fabricated using a fully solution-processed transparent conductive electrode, Au/spiro-OMeTAD/CH3NH3PbI3 + m-Al2O3/ZnO/ITO/AgNW/ITO, exhibited a power conversion efficiency of 8.44% (comparable to that of the FTO/glass-based counterpart at 10.81%) and were stable for 30 days in ambient air. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using AgNWs as a transparent bottom electrode in perovskite solar cells produced by a fully printable process.We report all-solution-processed transparent conductive electrodes based on Ag nanowire (AgNW)-embedded metal oxide composite films for application in organometal halide perovskite solar cells. To address the thermal instability of Ag nanowires, we used combustive sol-gel derived thin films to construct ZnO/ITO/AgNW/ITO composite structures. The resulting composite configuration effectively prevented the AgNWs from undergoing undesirable side-reactions with halogen ions present in the perovskite precursor solutions that significantly deteriorate the optoelectrical properties of Ag nanowires in transparent conductive films. AgNW-based composite electrodes had a transmittance of ~80% at 550 nm and sheet resistance of 18 Ω sq-1. Perovskite solar cells fabricated using a fully solution-processed

  13. Thorium as an energy source. Opportunities for Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Final Recommendations of the Thorium Report Committee: 1) No technology should be idolized or demonized. All carbon-dioxide (Co2) emission-free energy production technologies should be considered. The potential contribution of nuclear energy to a sustainable energy future should be recognized. 2) An investigation into the resources in the Fen Complex and other sites in Norway should be performed. It is essential to assess whether thorium in Norwegian rocks can be defined as an economical asset for the benefit of future generations. Furthermore, the application of new technologies for the extraction of thorium from the available mineral sources should be studied. 3) Testing of thorium fuel in the Halden Reactor should be encouraged, taking benefit of the well recognized nuclear fuel competence in Halden. 4) Norway should strengthen its participation in international collaborations by joining the EURATOM fission program and the GIF program on Generation IV reactors suitable for the use of thorium. 5) The development of an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) using thorium is not within the capability of Norway working alone. Joining the European effort in this field should be considered. Norwegian research groups should be encouraged to participate in relevant international projects, although these are currently focused on waste management. 6) Norway should bring its competence in waste management up to an international standard and collaboration with Sweden and Finland could be beneficial. 7) Norway should bring its competence with respect to dose assessment related to the thorium cycle up to an international standard. 8) Since the proliferation resistance of uranium-233 depends on the reactor and reprocessing technologies, this aspect will be of key concern should any thorium reactor be built in Norway. 9) Any new nuclear activities in Norway, e.g. thorium fuel cycles, would need strong international pooling of human resources, and in the case of thorium, a strong long

  14. Thorium as an energy source. Opportunities for Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-01-15

    Final Recommendations of the Thorium Report Committee: 1) No technology should be idolized or demonized. All carbon-dioxide (Co2) emission-free energy production technologies should be considered. The potential contribution of nuclear energy to a sustainable energy future should be recognized. 2) An investigation into the resources in the Fen Complex and other sites in Norway should be performed. It is essential to assess whether thorium in Norwegian rocks can be defined as an economical asset for the benefit of future generations. Furthermore, the application of new technologies for the extraction of thorium from the available mineral sources should be studied. 3) Testing of thorium fuel in the Halden Reactor should be encouraged, taking benefit of the well recognized nuclear fuel competence in Halden. 4) Norway should strengthen its participation in international collaborations by joining the EURATOM fission program and the GIF program on Generation IV reactors suitable for the use of thorium. 5) The development of an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) using thorium is not within the capability of Norway working alone. Joining the European effort in this field should be considered. Norwegian research groups should be encouraged to participate in relevant international projects, although these are currently focused on waste management. 6) Norway should bring its competence in waste management up to an international standard and collaboration with Sweden and Finland could be beneficial. 7) Norway should bring its competence with respect to dose assessment related to the thorium cycle up to an international standard. 8) Since the proliferation resistance of uranium-233 depends on the reactor and reprocessing technologies, this aspect will be of key concern should any thorium reactor be built in Norway. 9) Any new nuclear activities in Norway, e.g. thorium fuel cycles, would need strong international pooling of human resources, and in the case of thorium, a strong long

  15. Thorium utilization program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending November 30, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The development program for HTGR fuel reprocessing continues to emphasize the design and construction of a prototype head-end line. Design work on the multistage crushing system, the primary and secondary fluidized bed burners, the pneumatic transfer systems, and the ancillary fixtures for semiremote assembly and disassembly is essentially complete. Fabrication and receipt of all major components is under way, and auxiliary instrumentation and support systems are being installed. Studies of flow characteristics of granular solids in pneumatic transfer systems are continuing and data are being collected for use in design of systems for solids handling. Experimental work on the 20-cm primary fluidized bed burner verified the fines recycle operating mode in runs of greater than 24 hr. Twelve leaching runs were performed during the quarter using crushed, burned-back TRISO coated ThC 2 particles and burned-back BISO coated sol gel ThO 2 particles to examine the effect of varying the Thorex-to-thoria ratio to give product solutions ranging from 0.25M to 1M in thorium. Only minor effects were observed and reference values for facility operations were specified. Two-stage leaching runs with burned-back ThC 2 indicate there are no measurable differences in total dissolution time as compared to single-stage leaching. Bench-scale tests on oxidation of HTGR fuel boron carbide at 900 0 C indicates that most if not all of the carbide will be converted to boron oxide in the fluidized bed burner. Eight solvent extraction runs were completed during the quarter. These runs represented the first cycle and second uranium cycle of the acid-Thorex flowsheet. A detailed calculation of spent fuel compositions by fuel block and particle type is being performed for better definition of process streams in a fuel reprocessing facility

  16. Solution-processed single-wall carbon nanotube transistor arrays for wearable display backplanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeong-Cheol Kang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate solution-processed single-wall carbon nanotube thin-film transistor (SWCNT-TFT arrays with polymeric gate dielectrics on the polymeric substrates for wearable display backplanes, which can be directly attached to the human body. The optimized SWCNT-TFTs without any buffer layer on flexible substrates exhibit a linear field-effect mobility of 1.5cm2/V-s and a threshold voltage of around 0V. The statistical plot of the key device metrics extracted from 35 SWCNT-TFTs which were fabricated in different batches at different times conclusively support that we successfully demonstrated high-performance solution-processed SWCNT-TFT arrays which demand excellent uniformity in the device performance. We also investigate the operational stability of wearable SWCNT-TFT arrays against an applied strain of up to 40%, which is the essential for a harsh degree of strain on human body. We believe that the demonstration of flexible SWCNT-TFT arrays which were fabricated by all solution-process except the deposition of metal electrodes at process temperature below 130oC can open up new routes for wearable display backplanes.

  17. Solution-processed single-wall carbon nanotube transistor arrays for wearable display backplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Ha, Tae-Jun

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate solution-processed single-wall carbon nanotube thin-film transistor (SWCNT-TFT) arrays with polymeric gate dielectrics on the polymeric substrates for wearable display backplanes, which can be directly attached to the human body. The optimized SWCNT-TFTs without any buffer layer on flexible substrates exhibit a linear field-effect mobility of 1.5cm2/V-s and a threshold voltage of around 0V. The statistical plot of the key device metrics extracted from 35 SWCNT-TFTs which were fabricated in different batches at different times conclusively support that we successfully demonstrated high-performance solution-processed SWCNT-TFT arrays which demand excellent uniformity in the device performance. We also investigate the operational stability of wearable SWCNT-TFT arrays against an applied strain of up to 40%, which is the essential for a harsh degree of strain on human body. We believe that the demonstration of flexible SWCNT-TFT arrays which were fabricated by all solution-process except the deposition of metal electrodes at process temperature below 130oC can open up new routes for wearable display backplanes.

  18. Incorporation of tetravalent actinides in three phosphated matrices: britholite, monazite/brabandite and thorium phosphate diphosphate (β-TPD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terra, O.

    2005-03-01

    Three phosphate based ceramics were studied for the immobilization of tri- and tetravalent actinides: britholite Ca 9 Nd 1-x An x IV (PO 4 ) 5-x (SiO 4 ) 1+x F 2 , monazite/brabantite solid solutions Ln 1-2x III Ca x An x IP O 4 and Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (β-TPD) Th 4- xAn x IV (PO 4 ) 4 P 2 O 7 . For each material, the incorporation of thorium and uranium (IV) was studied as a surrogate of plutonium. This work was the early beginning of the incorporation of 239 Pu and/or 238 Pu in order to evaluate the effects of α-decay on the three crystallographic structures. The incorporation of tetravalent cations was carried out by dry chemistry methods, using mechanical grinding to improve the reactivity of the initial mixture then the homogeneity of final solid prepared after calcination at high temperature (1200-1400 deg C). For britholites, the thorium incorporation was complete for weight loading up to 20 wt.%, leading to the preparation of homogeneous and single phase solid solutions when using the coupled substitution (Nd 3+ , PO 4 3- ) ↔ (Th 4+ , SiO 4 4- ). Due to redox problems, the incorporation of uranium was limited to 5 to 8 wt.% and always led to a two-phase mixture of U-britholite and CaU 2 O 5+y . The preparation of homogeneous solid solutions of β-TUPD and of brabantites containing thorium and uranium samples was successfully obtained using three steps of mechanical grinding/calcination. For each matrix, dense pellets were prepared prior to the study of their chemical behaviour during leaching tests. The chemical durability of brabantites and β-TUPD were found to be close to that reported in literature. The formation of neo-formed phases was also evidenced onto the surface of Th-britholite samples. (author)

  19. Heterogeneous nucleation promotes carrier transport in solution-processed organic field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ruipeng

    2012-09-04

    A new way to investigate and control the growth of solution-cast thin films is presented. The combination of in situ quartz crystal microbalance measurements with dissipation capabilities (QCM-D) and in situ grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) in an environmental chamber provides unique quantitative insights into the time-evolution of the concentration of the solution, the onset of nucleation, and the mode of growth of the organic semiconductor under varied drying conditions. It is demonstrated that careful control over the kinetics of solution drying enhances carrier transport significantly by promoting phase transformation predominantly via heterogeneous nucleation and sustained surface growth of a highly lamellar structure at the solid-liquid interface at the expense of homogeneous nucleation. A new way to investigate and control the growth of drop-cast thin films is presented. The solution-processing of small-molecule thin films of TIPS-pentacene is investigated using time-resolved techniques to reveal the mechanisms of nucleation and growth leading to solid film formation. By tuning the drying speed of the solution, the balance between surface and bulk growth modes is altered, thereby controlling the lamellar formation and tuning the carrier mobility in organic field-effect transistors Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Titrimetric determination of thiocyanate in solutions of the hafnium-zirconium separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Cristina; Botbol, Moises; Hernandez, M.H.

    1980-01-01

    The control of the thiocyanate concentration is necessary during the process of separating hafnium from zirconium by the hexone-thiocyanate method. Said control is carried out by titrimetric determination of thiocyanate in aqueous and organic solutions containing hydrochloric acid and ammonium thiocyanate in presence or absence of zirconium and/or hafnium. The method consists in a redox volumetric analysis using a cerium (IV) salt as titrating agent, and ferroine as the final point indicator. Owing to the instability of thiocyanate in an acid medium it is necessary to know previously if the decomposition of solutions with different concentration of ammonium thiocyanate and hydrochloric acid may have an influence upon the analytic results or may even invalidate them. In order to obtain reliable results, it must be taken into account that the stability of the solutions depends on the thiocyanate concentration, the acidity and the time elapsed from the moment the sample is taken until the test is performed. The decomposition process can be slowed down by cooling the solutions. This method allows to control the plant and does not require any special equipment. (M.E.L) [es