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Sample records for thoracolumbar spine surgery

  1. Inpatient costs and blood transfusion rates of sarcopenic patients following thoracolumbar spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokshan, Steven L; Han, Alex; DePasse, J Mason; Marcaccio, Stephen E; Eltorai, Adam E M; Daniels, Alan H

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Sarcopenia, the muscle atrophy associated with aging and disease progression, accounts for nearly $18.5 billion in health care expenditures annually. Given the high prevalence of sarcopenia in patients undergoing orthopedic surgery, the goal of this study was to assess the impact of sarcopenia on inpatient costs following thoracolumbar spine surgery. METHODS Patients older than 55 years undergoing thoracolumbar spine surgery from 2003 to 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Sarcopenia was measured using total psoas area at the L-4 vertebra on perioperative CT scans. Hospital billing data were used to compare inpatient costs, transfusion rate, and rate of advanced imaging utilization. RESULTS Of the 50 patients assessed, 16 were sarcopenic. Mean total hospital costs were 1.75-fold greater for sarcopenic patients compared with nonsarcopenic patients ($53,128 vs $30,292, p = 0.04). Sarcopenic patients were 2.1 times as likely to require a blood transfusion (43.8% vs 20.6%, p = 0.04). Sarcopenic patients had a 2.6-fold greater usage of advanced imaging (68.8% vs 26.5%, p = 0.002) with associated higher diagnostic imaging costs ($2452 vs $801, p = 0.01). Sarcopenic patients also had greater pharmacy, laboratory, respiratory care, and emergency department costs. CONCLUSIONS This study is the first to show that sarcopenia is associated with higher postoperative costs and rates of blood transfusion following thoracolumbar spine surgery. Measuring the psoas area may represent a strategy for predicting perioperative costs in spine surgery patients.

  2. Direct medical costs of traumatic thoracolumbar spine fractures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Roer, N.; de Bruyne, M.C.; Bakker, F.C.; van Tulder, M.; Boers, M.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The costs and cost-effectiveness of treatment of thoracolumbar fractures are poorly known. Methods: We estimated the costs of hospital care and outpatient visits for patients with traumatic thoracolumbar spine fractures. Results: Stable fractures without neurological deficits were

  3. Direct medical costs of traumatic thoracolumbar spine fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Roer, N.; de Bruyne, M.C.; Bakker, F.C.; van Tulder, M.; Boers, M.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The costs and cost-effectiveness of treatment of thoracolumbar fractures are poorly known. Methods: We estimated the costs of hospital care and outpatient visits for patients with traumatic thoracolumbar spine fractures. Results: Stable fractures without neurological deficits were

  4. Prospective derivation of a clinical decision rule for thoracolumbar spine evaluation after blunt trauma: An American Association for the Surgery of Trauma Multi-Institutional Trials Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Kenji; Nosanov, Lauren; Menaker, Jay; Bosarge, Patrick; Williams, Lashonda; Turay, David; Cachecho, Riad; de Moya, Marc; Bukur, Marko; Carl, Jordan; Kobayashi, Leslie; Kaminski, Stephen; Beekley, Alec; Gomez, Mario; Skiada, Dimitra

    2015-03-01

    Unlike the cervical spine (C-spine), where National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study (NEXUS) and the Canadian C-spine Rules can be used, evidence-based thoracolumbar spine (TL-spine) clearance guidelines do not exist. The aim of this study was to develop a clinical decision rule for evaluating the TL-spine after injury. Adult (≥15 years) blunt trauma patients were prospectively enrolled at 13 US trauma centers (January 2012 to January 2014). Exclusion criteria included the following: C-spine injury with neurologic deficit, preexisting paraplegia/tetraplegia, and unevaluable examination. Remaining evaluable patients underwent TL-spine imaging and were followed up to discharge. The primary end point was a clinically significant TL-spine injury requiring TL-spine orthoses or surgical stabilization. Regression techniques were used to develop a clinical decision rule. Decision rule performance in identifying clinically significant fractures was tested. Of 12,479 patients screened, 3,065 (24.6%) met inclusion criteria (mean [SD] age, 43.5 [19.8] years [range, 15-103 years]; male sex, 66.3%; mean [SD] Injury Severity Score [ISS], 8.8 [7.5]). The majority underwent computed tomography (93.3%), 6.3% only plain films, and 0.2% magnetic resonance imaging exclusively. TL-spine injury was identified in 499 patients (16.3%), of which 264 (8.6%) were clinically significant (29.2% surgery, 70.8% TL-spine orthosis). The majority was AO Type A1 282 (56.5%), followed by 67 (13.4%) A3, 43 (8.6%) B2, and 32 (6.4%) A4 injuries. The predictive ability of clinical examination (pain, midline tenderness, deformity, neurologic deficit), age, and mechanism was examined; positive clinical examination finding resulted in a sensitivity of 78.4% and a specificity of 72.9%. Addition of age of 60 years or older and high-risk mechanism (fall, crush, motor vehicle crash with ejection/rollover, unenclosed vehicle crash, auto vs. pedestrian) increased sensitivity to 98.9% with specificity of

  5. 78 FR 68906 - Agency Information Collection (Back (Thoracolumbar Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... (Thoracolumbar Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire). Type of Review: New data collection... (Thoracolumbar Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits... Control No. 2900- NEW (Back (Thoracolumbar Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any...

  6. Thoracolumbar spine trauma: Evaluation and surgical decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei F Joaquim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Thoracolumbar spine trauma is the most common site of spinal cord injury, with clinical and epidemiological importance. Materials and Methods: We performed a comprehensive literature review on the management and treatment of TLST. Results: Currently, computed tomography is frequently used as the primary diagnostic test in TLST, with magnetic resonance imaging used in addition to assess disc, ligamentous, and neurological injury. The Thoracolumbar Injury Classification System is a new injury severity score created to help the decision-making process between conservative versus surgical treatment. When decision for surgery is made, early procedures are feasible, safe, can improve outcomes, and reduce healthcare costs. Surgical treatment is individualized based on the injury characteristics and surgeon′s experience, as there is no evidence-based for the superiority of one technique over the other. Conclusions: The correct management of TLST involves multiple steps, such as a precise diagnosis, classification, and treatment. The TLICS can improve care and communication between spine surgeons, resulting in a more standardized treatment.

  7. 78 FR 36308 - Proposed Information Collection: (Back (Thoracolumbar Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ...-NEW (Back (Thoracolumbar Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire). Type of Review: New... (Thoracolumbar Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans... comments on information needed to adjudicate the claim for VA disability benefits related to a claimant's...

  8. Laparoscopic Spine Surgery

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    ... Global Affairs and Humanitarian Efforts Log In Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Patient Information from SAGES Download PDF Find a SAGES Surgeon Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Your spine surgeon has determined that you ...

  9. Radiological outcome of transpedicular screws fixation in the management of thoracolumbar spine injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, M.I.U.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic fracture of the spine is a serious neurosurgical condition that has serious impact on the patient's quality of life. Thoracolumbar junction is the most common site of spinal injuries. The aims of management of thoracolumbar spinal fractures are to restore vertebral column stability, and to obtain spinal canal decompression. This ultimately leads to early mobilization of the patients. This study was conducted to compare preoperative and post-operative vertebral height, kyphotic angle and sagittal index in patients treated with pedicle screws and rods in thoracolumbar spine fractures. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the department of Neurosurgery, Hayatabad Medical Complex, Peshawar from 1st February 2010 to 31st July 2011. A total 161 patients with unstable thoracolumber spine fracture were included in this study. In these patients fixation was done through transpedicle screws with rods. Anteroposterior and lateral views X-rays of thoraco-lumbar spine were done pre and post operatively. Results: Out of 161 patients, 109 (67.7%) were males and 52 (32.3%) females. The age of patients ranged from 20 to 70 years (mean 42.2 years) with 71 (44.1%) in the age range of 31-40 years. Preoperative average vertebral height was 9.4194 mm while postoperative average was 19.642 mm. The mean kyphosis was 23.06 degree preoperatively. Immediately after surgery the average correction of kyphosis was 9.45 degree. The pre-operative average sagittal index was 19.38 degree, which was reduced to an average 5.41 degree post operatively. Conclusions: Transpedicular fixation for unstable thoraco-lumbar spinal fractures achieves a stable fracture segment with improvement of vertebral height, kyphotic angle and sagittal index. Hence, preventing the secondary spinal deformities. (author)

  10. Concordance in the radiological diagnosis of thoracolumbar spine fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, M; Rodriguez, M; Cerván, A M; Ortega, J A; Rivas-Ruiz, F; Guerado, E

    2015-01-01

    Thoracolumbar spine fractures are frequent and severe. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment to obtain good clinical results is essential, with many classifications being proposed for this purpose. To determine the external validity of radiographic and computed tomography (CT) measurements for the most used classifications, and decide on the type of treatment required. The working hypothesis is the existence of external validity of radiographic measurements. A sample of patients with thoracolumbar fracture was selected. Three spine specialists and a resident performed measurements on anteroposterior and lateral radiographic images as well as coronal, sagittal and axial CT slices. Fractures were classified as stable or unstable, evaluating the degree of intra-and interobserver agreement based on a standard observer. Sagittal index of Farcy, lateral wedging, Beck Index, traumatic regional angulation and channel occupancy were studied. All indicators studied, except the lateral wedging, showed a high degree of concordance. Instability determinants studied with radiographs and CT, which had obtained statistical significance, are reliable and accurate for the classification of thoracolumbar fractures and, therefore, to indicate an appropriate treatment. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Radiologic abnormalities of the thoraco-lumbar spine in athletes

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    Hellstroem, M.; Jacobsson, B.; Swaerd, L.; Peterson, L. (Sahlgrenska Sjukhuset, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Radiology Oestra Sjukhuset, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Orthopedics King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Radiology)

    1990-03-01

    A radiologic study of the thoraco-lumbar spine was performed in 143 (117 male and 26 female) athletes (wrestlers, gymnasts, soccer players and tennis players), aged 14 to 25 years and 30 male nonathletes, aged 19 to 25 years. Film interpretation was made after mixing the films from all groups and without knowledge of the individual's identity. Various types of radiologic abnormalities occured in both athletes and non-athletes but were more common among athletes, especially male-gymnasts and wrestlers. Abnormalities of the vertebral ring apophysis occurred exclusively in athletes. Combinations of different types of abnormalities were most common in male gymnasts and wrestlers. (orig.).

  12. Monosegmental fixation for the treatment of fractures of the thoracolumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Defino Helton

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : A short vertebral arthrodesis has been one of the objectives of the surgical treatment of fractures of the thoracolumbar spine. We present here clinical, functional and radiographic outcome obtained after monosegmental fixation (single posterior or combined anterior and posterior of specific types of unstable thoracolumbar fractures. Materials and Methods : Twenty four patients with fractures of the thoracolumbar spine submitted to monosegmental surgical treatment (Group I - 18 single posterior monosegmental fixations and Group II - 6 combined anterior and posterior fixations were retrospectively evaluated according to clinical, radiographic and functional parameters. The indication for surgery was instability or neurological deficit. All the procedures were indicated and performed by the senior surgeon (Helton LA Defino. Results : The patients from group I were followed-up from 2 to 12 years (mean: 6.65±2.96. The clinical, functional and radiographic results show that a single posterior monosegmental fixation is adequate and a satisfactory procedure to be used in specific types of thoracolumbar spine fractures, The patients from group II were followed-up from 9 to 15 years (mean: 13 ± 2,09 years. On group II the results of clinical evaluation showed moderate indices of residual pain and of satisfaction with the final result. The values obtained by functional evaluation showed that 66.6% of the patients were unable to return to their previous job and presented a moderate disability index (Oswestry = 16.6 and a significant reduction of quality of life based on the SF-36 questionnaire. Radiographic evaluation showed increased kyphosis of the fixed vertebral segment during the late postoperative period, accompanied by a reduction of the height of the intervertebral disk. Conclusion : It is possible to stabilize the fractures which have an anterior good load-bearing capacity by a standalone posterior monosegmental fixation. However

  13. Motion in the unstable thoracolumbar spine when spine boarding a prone patient

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    Conrad, Bryan P.; Marchese, Diana L.; Rechtine, Glenn R.; Horodyski, MaryBeth

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Previous research has found that the log roll (LR) technique produces significant motion in the spinal column while transferring a supine patient onto a spine board. The purpose of this project was to determine whether log rolling a patient with an unstable spine from prone to supine with a pulling motion provides better thoracolumbar immobilization compared to log rolling with a push technique. Methods A global instability was surgically created at the L1 level in five cadavers. Two spine-boarding protocols were tested (LR Push and LR Pull). Both techniques entailed performing a 180° LR rotation of the prone patient from the ground to the supine position on the spine board. An electromagnetic tracking device registered motion between the T12 and L2 vertebral segments. Six motion parameters were tracked. Repeated-measures statistical analysis was performed to evaluate angular and translational motion. Results Less motion was produced during the LR Push compared to the LR Pull for all six motion parameters. The difference was statistically significant for three of the six parameters (flexion–extension, axial translation, and anterior–posterior (A–P) translation). Conclusions Both the LR Push and LR Pull generated significant motion in the thoracolumbar spine during the prone to supine LR. The LR Push technique produced statistically less motion than the LR Pull, and should be considered when a prone patient with a suspected thoracolumbar injury needs to be transferred to a long spine board. More research is needed to identify techniques to further reduce the motion in the unstable spine during prone to supine LR. PMID:22330191

  14. Posterior instrumented fusion without neural decompression for incomplete neurological deficits following vertebral collapse in the osteoporotic thoracolumbar spine

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    Ataka, Hiromi; Tanno, Takaaki

    2008-01-01

    Previous reports have emphasized the importance of neural decompression through either an anterior or posterior approach when reconstruction surgery is performed for neurological deficits following vertebral collapse in the osteoporotic thoracolumbar spine. However, the contribution of these decompression procedures to neurological recovery has not been fully established. In the present study, we investigated 14 consecutive patients who had incomplete neurological deficits following vertebral collapse in the osteoporotic thoracolumbar spine and underwent posterior instrumented fusion without neural decompression. They were radiographically and neurologically assessed during an average follow-up period of 25 months. The mean local kyphosis angle was 14.6° at flexion and 4.1° at extension preoperatively, indicating marked instability at the collapsed vertebrae. The mean spinal canal occupation by bone fragments was 21%. After surgery, solid bony fusion was obtained in all patients. The mean local kyphosis angle became 5.8° immediately after surgery and 9.9° at the final follow-up. There was no implant dislodgement, and no additional surgery was required. In all patients, back pain was relieved, and neurological improvement was obtained by at least one modified Frankel grade. The present series demonstrate that the posterior instrumented fusion without neural decompression for incomplete neurological deficits following vertebral collapse in the osteoporotic thoracolumbar spine can provide neurological improvement and relief of back pain without major complications. We suggest that neural decompression is not essential for the treatment of neurological impairment due to osteoporotic vertebral collapse with dynamic mobility. PMID:19005689

  15. Reliability assessment of AOSpine thoracolumbar spine injury classification system and Thoracolumbar Injury Classification and Severity Score (TLICS) for thoracolumbar spine injuries: results of a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Rahul; Chhabra, Harvinder Singh; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Abel, Rainer; Tuli, Sagun; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad; Das, Kali Dutta; Mohapatra, Bibhudendu; Nanda, Ankur; Sangondimath, Gururaj M; Bansal, Murari Lal; Patel, Nishit

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this multicentre study was to determine whether the recently introduced AOSpine Classification and Injury Severity System has better interrater and intrarater reliability than the already existing Thoracolumbar Injury Classification and Severity Score (TLICS) for thoracolumbar spine injuries. Clinical and radiological data of 50 consecutive patients admitted at a single centre with a diagnosis of an acute traumatic thoracolumbar spine injury were distributed to eleven attending spine surgeons from six different institutions in the form of PowerPoint presentation, who classified them according to both classifications. After time span of 6 weeks, cases were randomly rearranged and sent again to same surgeons for re-classification. Interobserver and intraobserver reliability for each component of TLICS and new AOSpine classification were evaluated using Fleiss Kappa coefficient (k value) and Spearman rank order correlation. Moderate interrater and intrarater reliability was seen for grading fracture type and integrity of posterior ligamentous complex (Fracture type: k = 0.43 ± 0.01 and 0.59 ± 0.16, respectively, PLC: k = 0.47 ± 0.01 and 0.55 ± 0.15, respectively), and fair to moderate reliability (k = 0.29 ± 0.01 interobserver and 0.44+/0.10 intraobserver, respectively) for total score according to TLICS. Moderate interrater (k = 0.59 ± 0.01) and substantial intrarater reliability (k = 0.68 ± 0.13) was seen for grading fracture type regardless of subtype according to AOSpine classification. Near perfect interrater and intrarater agreement was seen concerning neurological status for both the classification systems. Recently proposed AOSpine classification has better reliability for identifying fracture morphology than the existing TLICS. Additional studies are clearly necessary concerning the application of these classification systems across multiple physicians at different level of training and trauma centers to evaluate not

  16. Thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis with unilateral subluxation of the spine and postoperative lumbar spondylolisthesis in Hunter syndrome.

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    Roberts, Simon B; Tsirikos, Athanasios I

    2016-03-01

    Surgical correction for kyphoscoliosis is increasingly being performed for patients with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS). Reported case series have predominantly included patients with Type I (Hurler) and Type IV (Morquio) MPS. To their knowledge, the authors describe the first case report of surgical management of thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis in Hunter syndrome (MPS Type II) and the rare occurrence of lumbar spondylolisthesis following surgical stabilization. A 12-year-old boy with Hunter syndrome presented with severe thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis and no associated symptoms. Spinal radiographs demonstrated kyphosis of 48° (T11-L3) and scoliosis of 22° (T11-L3) with an anteriorly hypoplastic L-1 vertebra. The deformity progressed to kyphosis of 60° and scoliosis of 42° prior to surgical intervention. Spinal CT scans identified left T12-L1 facet subluxation, causing anterior rotatory displacement of the spine proximal to L-1 and bilateral L-5 isthmic spondylolysis with no spondylolisthesis. A combined single-stage anterior and posterior instrumented spinal arthrodesis from T-9 to L-4 was performed. Kyphosis and scoliosis were corrected to 4° and 0°, respectively. Prolonged ventilator support and nasogastric feedings were required for 3 months postoperatively. At 2.5 years following surgery, the patient was asymptomatic, mobilizing independently, and had achieved a solid spinal fusion. However, he had also developed a Grade II spondylolisthesis at L4-5; this was managed nonoperatively in the absence of symptoms or further deterioration of the spondylolisthesis to the 3.5-year postoperative follow-up visit. Satisfactory correction of thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis in Hunter syndrome can be achieved by combined anterior/posterior instrumented arthrodesis. The risk of developing deformity or instability in motion segments adjacent to an instrumented fusion may be greater in patients with MPS related to the underlying connective tissue disorder.

  17. The influence of spine surgeons' experience on the classification and intraobserver reliability of the novel AOSpine thoracolumbar spine injury classification system : an international study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadiqi, Said; Oner, F. Cumhur; Dvorak, Marcel F.; Aarabi, Bizhan; Schroeder, Gregory D.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design. International validation study. Objective. To investigate the influence of the spine surgeons' level of experience on the intraobserver reliability of the novel AOSpine Thoracolumbar Spine Injury Classification system, and the appropriate classification according to this system.

  18. Thoracolumbar spine clearance: Clinical examination for patients with distracting injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Ben; Rostas, Jack; Simmons, Jon; Frotan, Mohammed A; Brevard, Sidney B; Gonzalez, Richard P

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively assess the sensitivity of clinical examination to screen for thoracolumbar spine (TLS) injury in awake and alert blunt trauma patients with distracting injuries. From December 2012 to June 2014, all blunt trauma patients older than 13 years were prospectively evaluated as per standard TLS examination protocol at a Level 1 trauma center. Awake and alert patients with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 14 or greater underwent clinical examination of the TLS. Clinical examination was performed regardless of distracting injuries. Patients with no complaints of pain or tenderness on examination of the TLS were considered clinically cleared of injury. Patients with distracting injuries, including those clinically cleared and those with complaints of TLS pain or tenderness, underwent computed tomographic scan of the entire TLS. Patients with minor distracting injuries were not considered to have a distracting injury. A total of 950 blunt trauma patients were entered, 530 (56%) of whom had at least one distracting injury. Two hundred nine patients (40%) with distracting injuries had a positive TLS clinical examination result, of whom 50 (25%) were diagnosed with TLS injury. Three hundred twenty-one patients (60%) with distracting injuries were initially clinically cleared, in whom 17 (5%) TLS injuries were diagnosed. There were no missed injuries that required surgical intervention, with only four injuries receiving TLS orthotic bracing. This yielded an overall clinical clearance sensitivity for injury of 75% and sensitivity for clinically significant injury of 89%. In awake and alert blunt trauma patients with distracting injuries, clinical examination is a sensitive screening method for significant TLS injury. Radiologic assessment may be unnecessary for safe clearance of the asymptomatic TLS in patients with distracting injuries. These findings suggest significant potential reduction of both health care cost and patient

  19. Operative and nonoperative adverse events in the management of traumatic fractures of the thoracolumbar spine: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobrial, George M; Maulucci, Christopher M; Maltenfort, Mitchell; Dalyai, Richard T; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Fehlings, Michael G; Street, John; Arnold, Paul M; Harrop, James S

    2014-01-01

    and 20.75 in the nonoperative group. The incidence of all complications in the operative and nonoperative groups was 300 (32.6%) and 21 (4.8%), respectively (p = 0.1065). There was no significant difference between the 2 groups with respect to the incidence of pulmonary, thromboembolic, cardiac, and gastrointestinal complications. However, the incidence of infections (pneumonia, urinary tract infection, wound infection, and sepsis) was significantly higher in the operative group (p = 0.000875). The incidence of instrumentation failure and need for revision surgery was 4.35% (40 of 919), a significant morbidity, and an event unique to the operative category (p = 0.00396). Due to the limited number of high-quality studies, conclusions related to complication rates of operative and nonoperative management of thoracolumbar traumatic injuries cannot be definitively made. Further prospective, randomized studies of operative versus nonoperative management of thoracolumbar and lumbar spine trauma, with standardized definitions of complications and matched patient cohorts, will aid in properly defining the risk-benefit ratio of surgery for thoracolumbar spine fractures.

  20. Trauma of the lumbar spine and the thoracolumbar junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reith, W.; Harsch, N.; Kraus, C.

    2016-01-01

    Patients who have experienced high energy trauma have a particularly high risk of suffering from fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine. The detection of spinal injuries and the correct classification of fractures before surgery are not only absolute requirements for the implementation of appropriate surgical treatment but they are also decisive for the choice of surgical procedure. By the application of spiral computed tomography (CT) crucial additional information on the morphology of the fracture can be gained in order to estimate the fracture type and possibly the indications for specific surgical treatment options. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ideally suited to provide valuable additional information regarding injuries to the discoligamentous structures of the spine. Magerl et al. developed a comprehensive classification especially for injuries of the thoracic and lumbar spine, which was adopted by the working group for osteosynthesis (AO). This is based on a 2-pillar model of the spinal column. The classification is based on the pathomorphological characteristics of fractures recognizable by imaging. The injury pattern is of particular importance. In spinal trauma a distinction is made between stable and unstable fractures. The treatment of spinal injuries depends on the severity of the overall injury pattern. Besides adequate initial treatment at the scene, a trauma CT should be immediately carried out in order that no injuries are overlooked and to ensure a rapid decision on the treatment procedure. (orig.) [de

  1. The efficacy of a percutaneous expandable titanium device in anatomical reduction of vertebral compression fractures of the thoracolumbar spine

    OpenAIRE

    Baeesa, Saleh S.; Krueger, Antonio; Arag?n, Francisco A.; Noriega, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility of a minimally invasive technique using a titanium expandable device to achieve anatomical restoration of vertebral compression fractures (VCF) of the thoracolumbar spine. Methods: This prospective study included 27 patients diagnosed with VCF (Magerl classification A.1.2, A.1.3, and A.3.1) of the thoracolumbar spine treated with percutaneous cement augmentation using the SpineJack? device. The study was conducted in Valladolid University Hospital, Vall...

  2. Reliability of smartphone-based teleradiology for evaluating thoracolumbar spine fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Ido; Dreyfuss, Daniel; Ofir, Dror; Merom, Lior; Raichel, Michael; Hous, Nir; Norman, Doron; Haddad, Elias

    2017-02-01

    Timely interpretation of computed tomography (CT) scans is of paramount importance in diagnosing and managing spinal column fractures, which can be devastating. Out-of-hospital, on-call spine surgeons are often asked to evaluate CT scans of patients who have sustained trauma to the thoracolumbar spine to make diagnosis and to determine the appropriate course of urgent treatment. Capturing radiographic scans and video clips from computer screens and sending them as instant messages have become common means of communication between physicians, aiding in triaging and transfer decision-making in orthopedic and neurosurgical emergencies. The present study aimed to compare the reliability of interpreting CT scans viewed by orthopedic surgeons in two ways for diagnosing, classifying, and treatment planning for thoracolumbar spine fractures: (1) captured as video clips from standard workstation-based picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and sent via a smartphone-based instant messaging application for viewing on a smartphone; and (2) viewed directly on a PACS. Reliability and agreement study. Thirty adults with thoracolumbar spine fractures who had been consecutively admitted to the Division of Orthopedic Surgery of a Level I trauma center during 2014. Intraobserver agreement. CT scans were captured by use of an iPhone 6 smartphone from a computer screen displaying PACS. Then by use of the WhatsApp instant messaging application, video clips of the scans were sent to the personal smartphones of five spine surgeons. These evaluators were asked to diagnose, classify, and determine the course of treatment for each case. Evaluation of the cases was repeated 4 weeks later, this time using the standard method of workstation-based PACS. Intraobserver agreement was interpreted based on the value of Cohen's kappa statistic. The study did not receive any outside funding. Intraobserver agreement for determining fracture level was near perfect (κ=0.94). Intraobserver

  3. Treatment of traumatic thoracolumbar spine fractures : A multicenter prospective randomized study of operative versus nonsurgical treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siebenga, Jan; Leferink, Vincent J. M.; Segers, Michiel J. M.; Elzinga, Matthijs J.; Bakker, Fred C.; Haarman, Henk J. Th. M.; Rommens, Pol M.; ten Duis, Henk-Jan; Patka, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Study Design. Multicenter prospective randomized trial. Objective. To test the hypotheses that thoracolumbar AO Type A spine fractures without neurologic deficit, managed with short-segment posterior stabilization will show an improved radiographic outcome and at least the same functional outcome as

  4. Fractures of the thoracolumbar spine sustained by soldiers in vehicles attacked by improvised explosive devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragel, Brian T; Allred, C Dain; Brevard, Sid; Davis, Richard T; Frank, Edmund H

    2009-10-15

    Retrospective analysis. To analyze the types of orthopedic spine fractures sustained by North Atlantic Treaty Organization soldiers when vehicles are attacked by improvised explosive devices (IEDs), with specific focus on the flexion-distraction type thoracolumbar fracture (Chance fracture). Operation Enduring Freedom is the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's effort in Afghanistan. IED attacks on armored vehicles are common and account for high proportion of soldiers' deaths and injuries. Retrospective record review was accomplished on soldiers admitted to a military hospital with orthopedic spine fractures after IED attacks on vehicles from January 1, 2008 to May 15, 2008. Thoracolumbar fractures were classified using the McAfee classification system. Twelve male patients with 16 thoracolumbar fractures were identified (3 patients with multiple fractures). The 16 thoracolumbar fractures included 6 flexion-distraction fractures in 5 patients (38%, 6/16: two T12, two L1, one L3, and one L4), 7 compression fractures in 5 patients (44%, 5/16; one T7, one T8, two L1, one L2, one L3, and one L4), and 3 burst fractures (19%, 3/16; two L1 and one L2). The incidence of flexion-distraction thoracolumbar (Chance) fractures has been reported to be between 1.0% and 2.5% in most spine fracture series. In this small study, Chance fractures represented 38% of all tho-racolumbar fractures sustained after IED attack on armored vehicles. The blast pattern associated with IED explosion may be responsible for the high rate of these injuries in vehicle occupants.

  5. [Computer-aided discectomy and corpectomy in anterior reconstruction of the injured thoracolumbar spine. A prospective, controlled clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blattert, T R; Springwald, J; Glasmacher, S; Siekmann, H; Josten, C

    2008-11-01

    In anterior reconstruction of the unstable thoracolumbar spine, discectomy and corpectomy are technically demanding steps requiring maximal surgical precision. This study investigated the feasibility of computer-aided guidance for discectomy and corpectomy. It also analysed the precision, advantages, and disadvantages of the procedure. Vertebral body fractures of the non-osteoporotic thoracolumbar spine addressed by discectomy/corpectomy and subsequent implant interposition (cage, tricortical strut graft) for anterior reconstruction were included. All surgical steps were done under endoscopic assistance. In the trial group, discectomy and corpectomy were performed with computer-aided guidance; in the control group, no computer navigation was used. The time required for surgery was noted. To assess surgical precision, decentralization of the implant in the frontal plane was measured in postoperative x-rays and computed tomography. Additionally, parallel alignment of vertebral body end plates with the implant was evaluated. The trial group (TG) consisted of 16 patients, and the control group (CG) of 10 patients. Fractures were localized between T10 and L1 in TG, and between T9 and L1 in CG. Operating time was significantly shorter in CG: 104+/-28 min compared with 229+/-64 min in TG (pComputer-aided guidance for anterior reconstruction of the thoracolumbar spine is a technically feasible option that may help in performing discectomy and corpectomy. However, this technique significantly prolongs the operating time. There were no differences in the precision of implant positioning between the groups. However, during discectomy the use of computer navigation may possibly add to the protection of adjacent end plates.

  6. Minimal Invasive Circumferential Management of Thoracolumbar Spine Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pesenti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. While thoracolumbar fractures are common lesions, no strong consensus is available at the moment. Objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of a minimal invasive strategy using percutaneous instrumentation and anterior approach in the management of thoracolumbar unstable fractures. Methods. 39 patients were included in this retrospective study. Radiologic evaluation was based on vertebral and regional kyphosis, vertebral body height restoration, and fusion rate. Clinical evaluation was based on Visual Analogic Score (VAS. All evaluations were done preoperatively and at 1-year follow-up. Results. Both vertebral and regional kyphoses were significantly improved on postoperative evaluation (13° and 7° versus −1° and −9°  P<0.05, resp. as well as vertebral body height (0.92 versus 1.16, P<0.05. At 1-year follow-up, mean loss of correction was 1°. A solid fusion was visible in all the cases, and mean VAS was significantly reduced form 8/10 preoperatively to 1/10 at the last follow-up. Conclusion. Management of thoracolumbar fractures using percutaneous osteosynthesis and minimal invasive anterior approach (telescopic vertebral body prosthesis is a valuable strategy. Results of this strategy offer satisfactory and stable results in time.

  7. Reliability and reproducibility analysis of the AOSpine thoracolumbar spine injury classification system by Chinese spinal surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Liu, Peng; Sun, Dong; Qin, Tingzheng; Ma, Zikun; Liu, Jingpei

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility of the new AOSpine thoracolumbar spine injury classification system in young Chinese orthopedic surgeons with different levels of experience in spinal trauma. Previous reports suggest that the new AOSpine thoracolumbar spine injury classification system demonstrates acceptable interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility. However, there are few studies in Asia, especially in China. The AOSpine thoracolumbar spine injury classification system was applied to 109 patients with acute, traumatic thoracolumbar spinal injuries by two groups of spinal surgeons with different levels of clinical experience. The Kappa coefficient was used to determine interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility. The overall Kappa coefficient for all cases was 0.362, which represents fair reliability. The Kappa statistic was 0.385 for A-type injuries and 0.292 for B-type injuries, which represents fair reliability, and 0.552 for C-type injuries, which represents moderate reliability. The Kappa coefficient for intraobserver reproducibility was 0.442 for A-type injuries, 0.485 for B-type injuries, and 0.412 for C-type injuries. These values represent moderate reproducibility for all injury types. The raters in Group A provided significantly better interobserver reliability than Group B (P < 0.05). There were no between-group differences in intraobserver reproducibility. This study suggests that the new AO spine injury classification system may be applied in day-to-day clinical practice in China following extensive training of healthcare providers. Further prospective studies in different healthcare providers and clinical settings are essential for validation of this classification system and to assess its utility.

  8. [Three-dimensional finite element model of thoracolumbar spine with osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Qi; Li, Qiu-jun; Yang, Yong; Li, Dong; Tang, Hai; Li, Jin-jun; Wang, Bing-qiang; Wang, Yi-peng

    2010-11-09

    To build a three-dimensional finite element model of thoracolumbar spine with osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (OVCF) and analyze its biomechanical change. The T10-L2 segment data were obtained from computed tomography (CT) scans of an elderly female with a single T12 OVCF. A three-dimensional finite element model of thoracolumbar spine was constructed with the MIMICS and ABAQUS software. The model was composed of bony vertebrae, articulating facets, intervertebral disc and associated ligaments. The basic stress analysis of T10-L2 motion segment was made for different material properties of bone, ligaments and facet joints contacting frictional property. The stress on the annulus fiber, nucleus pulposus, endplate and facet joints under axial pressure (0.3 MPa, 1.0 MPa, 4.0 MPa) were analyzed. A three-dimensional finite element model of human T12-L2 motion segment had 617468 elements. And the stress was higher in vertebral body than posterior structure. The distribution of pressure stresses in intervertebral disc was asymmetrical. The stress increased with a rising axial pressure. 3D finite element model of thoracolumbar OVCF and adjacent segments are successfully established. The results of stress analysis are both feasible and reliable.

  9. Simultaneous posterior and anterior approaches with posterior vertebral wall preserved for rigid post-traumatic kyphosis in thoracolumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Xiu, Peng; Zhong, Dejun; Wang, Gaoju; Wang, Song

    2012-08-01

    A retrospective study. To evaluate the radiological and clinical results of simultaneous surgery with preservation of the posterior vertebral wall for rigid post-traumatic kyphosis in the thoracolumbar spine. Management of rigid post-traumatic kyphosis has been a challenge for surgeons. Current widely used posterior osteotomy procedures have the disadvantages of significant invasiveness, spinal column shortening, and instrumentation-related complications. From 2004 to 2009, 21 patients with rigid post-traumatic kyphosis in the thoracolumbar spine (T11-L2) were managed in our hospital. Average kyphotic angle was 45.2° ± 11.2° (range, 31°-67°). The surgical technique used was posterior and anterior circumferential release and anterior corpectomy with posterior vertebral wall preservation and short segmental instrumentation. Preoperative and postoperative kyphotic angle was measured to assess the degree of kyphosis correction and maintenance. Changes in low back pain were assessed by Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores. All patients were successfully managed with this procedure without major complications. Most patients (19 of 21) were instrumented with anterior-only fixation, while posterior interspinal wire was added in 2 patients with osteoporosis. The mean blood loss was 470 mL (range, 300-700 mL). Patients were followed for an average of 32 months (range, 6-70 mo) postoperatively. Back pain was relieved to some degree in all patients and the improvement in Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores was 76.9% ± 7.9. Average kyphotic angle was 6.0° ± 5.7° (range, -2 to 17) immediately after surgery and 7.2° ± 5.8° (range, -3 to 17) at final follow-up. Average of 1° of correction loss was documented and all patients obtained solid fusion uneventfully. This technique is indicated for most patients with rigid post-traumatic kyphosis in the thoracolumbar spine and can yield satisfactory clinical results not only in terms of pain relief, kyphosis

  10. The efficacy of a percutaneous expandable titanium device in anatomical reduction of vertebral compression fractures of the thoracolumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeesa, Saleh S; Krueger, Antonio; Aragón, Francisco A; Noriega, David C

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a minimally invasive technique using a titanium expandable device to achieve anatomical restoration of vertebral compression fractures (VCF) of the thoracolumbar spine. This prospective study included 27 patients diagnosed with VCF (Magerl classification A.1.2, A.1.3, and A.3.1) of the thoracolumbar spine treated with percutaneous cement augmentation using the SpineJack® device. The study was conducted in Valladolid University Hospital, Valladolid, Spain from January to December 2012, with a minimum one-year follow up. Preoperative evaluation included visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, and radiological assessment of the VCF using 3-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scans for measurements of vertebral heights and angles. The patients were followed at 3, 6, and 12 months with clinical VAS and radiological assessments. The procedure was performed in 27 patients with a mean age of 55.9 ± 17.3 years, 55.6% females. All patients underwent surgery within 6 weeks from time of injury. No procedure related complications occurred. Pain measured by VAS score decreased from 7.0 preoperatively to 3.2 within 24 hours, and remained 2.2 at 3 months, 2.1 at 6 months, and 1.5 at 12-months follow-up (p<0.05). Mean height restorations for the anterior was 3.56 mm, central was 2.49, and posterior vertebral was 1.28 mm, and maintained at 12-months follow-up (p=0.001). This new percutaneous technique for VCF has shown good clinical results in pain control and the possibility to reduce both vertebral kyphosis angles and fractured endplates seen in 3D-CT scans assessment method. Further studies are needed to confirm those results on larger cohorts with long-term follow up. 

  11. The efficacy of a percutaneous expandable titanium device in anatomical reduction of vertebral compression fractures of the thoracolumbar spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeesa, Saleh S.; Krueger, Antonio; Aragón, Francisco A.; Noriega, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility of a minimally invasive technique using a titanium expandable device to achieve anatomical restoration of vertebral compression fractures (VCF) of the thoracolumbar spine. Methods: This prospective study included 27 patients diagnosed with VCF (Magerl classification A.1.2, A.1.3, and A.3.1) of the thoracolumbar spine treated with percutaneous cement augmentation using the SpineJack® device. The study was conducted in Valladolid University Hospital, Valladolid, Spain from January to December 2012, with a minimum one-year follow up. Preoperative evaluation included visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, and radiological assessment of the VCF using 3-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scans for measurements of vertebral heights and angles. The patients were followed at 3, 6, and 12 months with clinical VAS and radiological assessments. Results: The procedure was performed in 27 patients with a mean age of 55.9 ± 17.3 years, 55.6% females. All patients underwent surgery within 6 weeks from time of injury. No procedure related complications occurred. Pain measured by VAS score decreased from 7.0 preoperatively to 3.2 within 24 hours, and remained 2.2 at 3 months, 2.1 at 6 months, and 1.5 at 12-months follow-up (pvertebral was 1.28 mm, and maintained at 12-months follow-up (p=0.001). Conclusion: This new percutaneous technique for VCF has shown good clinical results in pain control and the possibility to reduce both vertebral kyphosis angles and fractured endplates seen in 3D-CT scans assessment method. Further studies are needed to confirm those results on larger cohorts with long-term follow up. PMID:25630005

  12. Residual mobility of instrumented and non-fused segments in thoracolumbar spine fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Yurac, Ratko; Marré, Bartolomé; Urzua, Alejandro.; Munjin, Milan; Lecaros, Miguel A.

    2006-01-01

    The surgical management of thoracolumbar fractures presents potential benefits. However, the surgery solve the instability by fusion of mobile segments. We incorporate in our treatment algorithms, the use of restricted arthrodesis at injured levels, regardless of longer instrumentations, as well as the use of non-fused transitory stabilizations, based on the conviction that in non-fused segments without traumatic disc injury, mobility persists once the instrumentation is removed. The goals of...

  13. Robotic systems in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onen, Mehmet Resid; Naderi, Sait

    2014-01-01

    Surgical robotic systems have been available for almost twenty years. The first surgical robotic systems were designed as supportive systems for laparoscopic approaches in general surgery (the first procedure was a cholecystectomy in 1987). The da Vinci Robotic System is the most common system used for robotic surgery today. This system is widely used in urology, gynecology and other surgical disciplines, and recently there have been initial reports of its use in spine surgery, for transoral access and anterior approaches for lumbar inter-body fusion interventions. SpineAssist, which is widely used in spine surgery, and Renaissance Robotic Systems, which are considered the next generation of robotic systems, are now FDA approved. These robotic systems are designed for use as guidance systems in spine instrumentation, cement augmentations and biopsies. The aim is to increase surgical accuracy while reducing the intra-operative exposure to harmful radiation to the patient and operating team personnel during the intervention. We offer a review of the published literature related to the use of robotic systems in spine surgery and provide information on using robotic systems.

  14. Thoracolumbar spine model with articulated ribcage for the prediction of dynamic spinal loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignasiak, Dominika; Dendorfer, Sebastian; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2016-04-11

    Musculoskeletal modeling offers an invaluable insight into the spine biomechanics. A better understanding of thoracic spine kinetics is essential for understanding disease processes and developing new prevention and treatment methods. Current models of the thoracic region are not designed for segmental load estimation, or do not include the complex construct of the ribcage, despite its potentially important role in load transmission. In this paper, we describe a numerical musculoskeletal model of the thoracolumbar spine with articulated ribcage, modeled as a system of individual vertebral segments, elastic elements and thoracic muscles, based on a previously established lumbar spine model and data from the literature. The inverse dynamics simulations of the model allow the prediction of spinal loading as well as costal joints kinetics and kinematics. The intradiscal pressure predicted by the model correlated well (R(2)=0.89) with reported intradiscal pressure measurements, providing a first validation of the model. The inclusion of the ribcage did not affect segmental force predictions when the thoracic spine did not perform motion. During thoracic motion tasks, the ribcage had an important influence on the predicted compressive forces and muscle activation patterns. The compressive forces were reduced by up to 32%, or distributed more evenly between thoracic vertebrae, when compared to the predictions of the model without ribcage, for mild thoracic flexion and hyperextension tasks, respectively. The presented musculoskeletal model provides a tool for investigating thoracic spine loading and load sharing between vertebral column and ribcage during dynamic activities. Further validation for specific applications is still necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Influence of Spine Surgeons' Experience on the Classification and Intraobserver Reliability of the Novel AOSpine Thoracolumbar Spine Injury Classification System-An International Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiqi, Said; Oner, F Cumhur; Dvorak, Marcel F; Aarabi, Bizhan; Schroeder, Gregory D; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2015-12-01

    International validation study. To investigate the influence of the spine surgeons' level of experience on the intraobserver reliability of the novel AOSpine Thoracolumbar Spine Injury Classification system, and the appropriate classification according to this system. Wide variability has been demonstrated for intraobserver reliability of the AOSpine classification system. The spine surgeons' level of experience may play a crucial role in the appropriate classification of thoracolumbar fractures, and the degree of reproducibility of the same observer on separate occasions. However, this has not been previously investigated. After a training on the classification system, high quality CT images together with clinical data from 25 patients with thoracolumbar fractures were independently assessed by 100 spine surgeons from across the world on 2 different occasions, 1 month apart from each other. The spine surgeons were allocated to a subgroup, according to their years of experience. Intraobserver reliability was calculated for each individual surgeon and for each subgroup, using the Kappa statistics (κ). Descriptive statistics was used to describe any differences between the subgroups. Analysis of any misclassifications was performed by calculating sensitivity and specificity estimates. Almost all surgeons demonstrated at least moderate intraobserver reliability. All surgeon subgroups demonstrated substantial reliability (κ = 0.67-0.69) for fracture subtype grading, and almost all subgroups demonstrated excellent reliability (κ = 0.79-0.83) for fracture morphology type regardless of subtype identified. In general, the fractures were most frequently misclassified by the most experienced surgeons. No major differences were observed among the subgroups when comparing the sensitivity and specificity rates. This international study demonstrated that the spine surgeons' level of experience does not substantially influence the classification and intraobserver

  16. Burst fracture of the thoracolumbar spine: correlation between kyphosis and clinical result of the treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Arnold Tisot

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the correlation between kyphosis due to burst fractures of thoracic and lumbar spine and clinical outcome in patients undergoing conservative or surgical treatment.METHODS: A retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted with 29 patients with thoracolumbar burst fractures treated by the Spine Group in a trauma reference hospital between the years 2002 and 2011. Patients were followed-up as outpatients for a minimum of 24 months. All cases were clinically evaluated by Oswestry and SF-36 quality of life questionnaires and the visual analogue scale (VAS of pain. They were also evaluated by X-ray examinations and CT scans of the lumbosacral spine at the time of hospitalization and subsequently as outpatients by Cobb method for measuring the degree of kyphosis.RESULTS: There was no statistically significant correlation between the degree of initial kyphosis and clinical outcome measured by VAS and by most of the SF-36 domains in both patients treated conservatively and the surgically treated. The Oswestry questionnaire showed benefits for patients who received conservative treatment (p=0.047 compared to those surgically treated (p=0.335. The analysis of difference between initial and final kyphosis and final kyphosis alone in relation to clinical outcome showed no statistical correlation in any of the scores used.CONCLUSION: The clinical outcome of treatment of the thoracic and lumbar burst fractures was not influenced by a greater or lesser degree of initial or residual kyphosis, regardless of the type of treatment.

  17. Two-Nation Comparison of Classification and Treatment of Thoracolumbar Fractures: An Internet-Based Multicenter Study Among Spine Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishnamaz, Miguel; Curfs, Inez; Balosu, Stephan; Willems, Paul; van Hemert, Wouter; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Kobbe, Philipp

    2015-11-01

    Web-based multicenter study. The aim of the study was to assess and compare the management strategy for traumatic thoracolumbar fractures between German and Dutch spine surgeons. To date, there is no evidence-based treatment algorithm for thoracolumbar spine fractures, thereby an international controversy concerning optimal treatment exists. In this web-based multicenter study (www.spine.hostei.com), computed tomography scans of traumatic thoracolumbar fractures (T12-L2) were evaluated by German and Dutch spine surgeons. Supplementary case-specific information such as age, sex, height, weight, neurological status, and injury mechanism were provided.By using a questionnaire, fractures were classified according to the AO-Magerl Classification, followed by 6 questions concerning the treatment algorithm. Data were analyzed using SPSS (Version 21, 76, Chicago, IL). The interobserver agreement was determined by using Cohen κ. Statistical significance was defined as P spine surgeons was found. Overall German spine surgeons had a lower threshold concerning the indication for surgical treatment (Ger 87% vs. NL 30%; P < 0.05). There was a consensus about operative stabilization of AO Type B and C injuries and injuries with neurologic deficit, whereas a discrepancy in the therapeutic algorithm for AO Type A fractures was observed. This difference was most pronounced regarding the indication for posterior (Ger 96.6%; NL 41.2%; P < 0.05) and circumferential stabilization (Ger 53.4%; NL 0%; P < 0.05) for burst fractures. There is a consensus to stabilize AO Type B and C fractures, whereas country-specific differences in the treatment of Type A fractures, especially in case of burst fractures, occur. Prospective, controlled multicenter outcome studies may provide more evidence in optimal treatment for thoracolumbar fractures. 2.

  18. Performance Indicators in Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Pierre, Godefroy Hardy; Yang, Michael H; Bourget-Murray, Jonathan; Thomas, Ken C; Hurlbert, Robin John; Matthes, Nikolas

    2018-02-15

    Systematic review. To elucidate how performance indicators are currently used in spine surgery. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has given significant traction to the idea that healthcare must provide value to the patient through the introduction of hospital value-based purchasing. The key to implementing this new paradigm is to measure this value notably through performance indicators. MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus, EMBASE, and Google Scholar were searched for studies reporting the use of performance indicators specific to spine surgery. We followed the Prisma-P methodology for a systematic review for entries from January 1980 to July 2016. All full text articles were then reviewed to identify any measure of performance published within the article. This measure was then examined as per the three criteria of established standard, exclusion/risk adjustment, and benchmarking to determine if it constituted a performance indicator. The initial search yielded 85 results among which two relevant studies were identified. The extended search gave a total of 865 citations across databases among which 15 new articles were identified. The grey literature search provided five additional reports which in turn led to six additional articles. A total of 27 full text articles and reports were retrieved and reviewed. We were unable to identify performance indicators. The articles presenting a measure of performance were organized based on how many criteria they lacked. We further examined the next steps to be taken to craft the first performance indicator in spine surgery. The science of performance measurement applied to spine surgery is still in its infancy. Current outcome metrics used in clinical settings require refinement to become performance indicators. Current registry work is providing the necessary foundation, but requires benchmarking to truly measure performance. 1.

  19. [Intra-operative myelography in treatment of fractures of thoracolumbar spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomčovčík, L; Cuha, R; Raši, R

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the results of intra-operative myelography as the method used to assess the reduction of bone fragments from the posterior margin of the vertebral body. Forty patients with 42 comminuted fractures of the thoracolumbar spine were included in the study. The pre-operative spinal stenosis caused by bone fragments from the posterior margin of the vertebral body, as detected by CT scanning, ranged from 25 % to 85 %. Neurological deficit was due to injury in 19 patients and in one it developed post-operatively after the patient stood and walked. After ligamentotaxis and internal fixation, intra-operative myelography was used to show decompression of the spinal canal. A spinal block or severe constriction of contrast flow was an indication for hemilaminectomy (laminectomy) and direct decompression of the spinal canal. In the patients with neurological deficit and severe spinal stenosis persisting after ligamentotaxis and detectable by skiascopy, hemilaminectomy (laminectomy) and direct spinal decompression followed by intra-operative myelography were carried out. Intra-operative myelography was used 46 -times (20-times in 20 patients free from neurological deficit and 26-times in 20 patients with neurological deficit). In 38 cases (82.6 %) dural sac compression was not present (patients with neurological deficit, 13-times after ligamentotaxis, eight-times after ligamentotaxis and hemilaminectomy with direct decompression, twi- ce at repeat surgeryúúú patients without neurological deficit, 15-times). On two occasions (4.4 %) the contrast agent injected into the dural sac did not make the interior body part visible, on three occasions (6.5 %) contrast medium was injected extradurally, and dural sac compression following ligamentotaxis requiring hemilaminectomy (laminectomy) and direct decompression occurred in three cases (6.5 %). In the patients without neurological deficit, dural sac compression was not recorded. No

  20. Is extended antibiotic prophylaxis necessary after penetrating trauma to the thoracolumbar spine with concomitant intraperitoneal injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasupuleti, Latha V; Sifri, Ziad C; Mohr, Alicia M

    2014-02-01

    Prolonged courses of broad-spectrum antibiotics are often cited as standard care for the prevention of infectious complications in thoracolumbar or sacral (TLS) fractures following penetrating abdominal trauma. Perforation of a hollow viscus in addition to a TLS fracture is believed to be associated with a high incidence of spine infection. Because over use of antibiotics is associated with an increasing prevalence of multi-drug-resistant organisms, this study seeks to define the actual risk of infection of the spine and need for antibiotics in patients with TLS fractures and intraperitoneal injuries following penetrating trauma. A retrospective review of 67 patients with penetrating abdominal trauma and concomitant TLS fracture was performed. Demographics, level of TLS fracture, associated spinal cord injury (SCI), need for operative intervention, presence of concomitant hollow viscus injury, and type and duration of antibiotic coverage were collected. In addition, associated infectious complications were reviewed. Spine infections were defined as spinal or paraspinal abscess, osteomyelitis of the spine, or meningitis. Intraabdominal infections were defined with imaging studies or positive peritoneal cultures. Sixty-seven patients (mean age of 27 ± 9 years) had an exploratory laparotomy and one or more TLS fractures. Four patients died within 24 h and were excluded from further study. Thirty-eight patients (60%) had one or more hollow viscus injuries, 13 (21%) had solid organ injuries alone and 12 (19%) had a non-therapeutic laparotomy. All patients received perioperative antibiotics; 92% received 48 h or less of antibiotic prophylaxis and 62% received only 24 h of antibiotics. In one patient with an isolated solid organ injury there was a spine infection (1%). In this study, 92% of patients received antibiotics for 48 h or less with no increased incidence of spine infections. Bacterial colonization of the vertebrae was not higher in patients with penetrating

  1. Advocating "spine damage control" as a safe and effective treatment modality for unstable thoracolumbar fractures in polytrauma patients: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahel, Philip F; Flierl, Michael A; Moore, Ernest E; Smith, Wade R; Beauchamp, Kathryn M; Dwyer, Anthony

    2009-05-11

    The "ideal" timing and modality of fracture fixation for unstable thoracolumbar spine fractures in multiply injured patients remains controversial. The concept of "damage control orthopedics" (DCO), which has evolved globally in the past decade, provides a safe guidance for temporary external fixation of long bone or pelvic fractures in multisystem trauma. In contrast, "damage control" concepts for unstable spine injuries have not been widely implemented, and the scarce literature in the field remains largely anecdotal. The current practice standards are reflected by two distinct positions, either (1) immediate "early total care" or (2) delayed spine fixation after recovery from associated injuries. Both concepts have inherent risks which may contribute to adverse outcome. We hypothesize that the concept of "spine damage control" - consisting of immediate posterior fracture reduction and instrumentation, followed by scheduled 360 degrees completion fusion during a physiological "time-window of opportunity" - will be associated with less complications and improved outcomes of polytrauma patients with unstable thoracolumbar fractures, compared to conventional treatment strategies. We propose a prospective multicenter trial on a large cohort of multiply injured patients with an associated unstable thoracolumbar fracture. Patients will be assigned to one of three distinct study arms: (1) Immediate definitive (anterior and/or posterior) fracture fixation within 24 hours of admission; (2) Delayed definitive (anterior and/or posterior) fracture fixation at > 3 days after admission; (3) "Spine damage control" procedure by posterior reduction and instrumentation within 24 hours of admission, followed by anterior 360 degrees completion fusion at > 3 days after admission, if indicated. The primary and secondary endpoints include length of ventilator-free days, length of ICU and hospital stay, mortality, incidence of complications, neurological status and functional recovery

  2. Adjuvant analgesics for spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Rikke Vibeke

    2018-03-01

    Increasing evidence indicate that pain is insufficiently treated following surgical procedures. It is essential that pain treatment is effective with a minimum of side effects in order to promote postoperative rehabilitation. Multimodal analgesia is most likely an important strategy in reducing postoperative pain. Combinations of different analgesics with different mechanisms of action may have an additive analgesic effect with fewer side effects compared to using a single drug. However, there is still a pronounced lack of documentation for the effect and side effects of these multimodal analgesic regimes. More than 6,000 spine surgeries are performed annually in Denmark and spine surgery has been associated with high levels of pain compared to other surgical procedures. Therefore, we considered spine surgery to pose a group of well-defined surgical procedures and we used this model to investigate the efficacy of 3 adjuvant analgesics aiming to improve the multimodal approach in pain management.
 
In study I and II we hypothesized that preoperative IV dexamethasone 16 mg would reduce acute postoperative pain, opioid consumption and persistent pain after lumbar disk surgery. We found that dexamethasone significantly reduced acute pain during mobilization. The clinical relevance is however debatable and we could not demonstrate an opioid sparing effect. Further, we discovered significantly higher pain levels in the dexamethasone group compared to placebo 1 year postoperatively.
 
In study III we explored the effect of 500 mg of oral chlorzoxazone on acute postoperative pain and opioid consumption in patients with moderate to severe pain after spine surgery and found no effect of chlorzoxazone compared to placebo.
 
In study IV we hypothesized that intraoperative ketamine would reduce postoperative opioid consumption and persistent pain after spinal fusion surgery in chronic pain patients with opioid dependency. We found a significantly reduced opioid

  3. [Building an effective nonlinear three-dimensional finite-element model of human thoracolumbar spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhi-Li; Cheng, Li-Ming; Zhu, Rui; Wang, Jian-Jie; Yu, Yan

    2011-08-23

    To build an effective nonlinear three-dimensional finite-element (FE) model of T(11)-L(3) segments for a further biomechanical study of thoracolumbar spine. The CT (computed tomography) scan images of healthy adult T(11)-L(3) segments were imported into software Simpleware 2.0 to generate a triangular mesh model. Using software Geomagic 8 for model repair and optimization, a solid model was generated into the finite element software Abaqus 6.9. The reasonable element C3D8 was selected for bone structures. Created between bony endplates, the intervertebral disc was subdivided into nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus (44% nucleus, 56% annulus). The nucleus was filled with 5 layers of 8-node solid elements and annulus reinforced by 8 crisscross collagenous fiber layers. The nucleus and annulus were meshed by C3D8RH while the collagen fibers meshed by two node-truss elements. The anterior (ALL) and posterior (PLL) longitudinal ligaments, flavum (FL), supraspinous (SSL), interspinous (ISL) and intertransverse (ITL) ligaments were modeled with S4R shell elements while capsular ligament (CL) was modeled with 3-node shell element. All surrounding ligaments were represented by envelope of 1 mm uniform thickness. The discs and bone structures were modeled with hyper-elastic and elasto-plastic material laws respectively while the ligaments governed by visco-elastic material law. The nonlinear three-dimensional finite-element model of T(11)-L(3) segments was generated and its efficacy verified through validating the geometric similarity and disc load-displacement and stress distribution under the impact of violence. Using ABAQUS/ EXPLICIT 6.9 the explicit dynamic finite element solver, the impact test was simulated in vitro. In this study, a 3-dimensional, nonlinear FE model including 5 vertebrae, 4 intervertebral discs and 7 ligaments consisted of 78 887 elements and 71 939 nodes. The model had good geometric similarity under the same conditions. The results of FEM

  4. The value of CT and MRI in the classification and surgical decision-making among spine surgeons in thoracolumbar spinal injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Kanna, Rishi Mugesh; Schroeder, Gregory D; Oner, Frank Cumhur; Vialle, Luiz; Chapman, Jens; Dvorak, Marcel; Fehlings, Michael; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad; Schnake, Klaus; Maheshwaran, Anupama; Kandziora, Frank

    2017-05-01

    Although imaging has a major role in evaluation and management of thoracolumbar spinal trauma by spine surgeons, the exact role of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in addition to radiographs for fracture classification and surgical decision-making is unclear. Spine surgeons (n = 41) from around the world classified 30 thoracolumbar fractures. The cases were presented in a three-step approach: first plain radiographs, followed by CT and MRI images. Surgeons were asked to classify according to the AOSpine classification system and choose management in each of the three steps. Surgeons correctly classified 43.4 % of fractures with plain radiographs alone; after, additionally, evaluating CT and MRI images, this percentage increased by further 18.2 and 2.2 %, respectively. AO type A fractures were identified in 51.7 % of fractures with radiographs, while the number of type B fractures increased after CT and MRI. The number of type C fractures diagnosed was constant across the three steps. Agreement between radiographs and CT was fair for A-type (k = 0.31), poor for B-type (k = 0.19), but it was excellent between CT and MRI (k > 0.87). CT and MRI had similar sensitivity in identifying fracture subtypes except that MRI had a higher sensitivity (56.5 %) for B2 fractures (p change after an MRI (p = 0.77). For accurate classification, radiographs alone were insufficient except for C-type injuries. CT is mandatory for accurately classifying thoracolumbar fractures. Though MRI did confer a modest gain in sensitivity in B2 injuries, the study does not support the need for routine MRI in patients for classification, assessing instability or need for surgery.

  5. Microscope sterility during spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jesse E; O'Neill, Kevin R; Crosby, Colin G; Schoenecker, Jonathan G; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2012-04-01

    Prospective study. Assess the contamination rates of sterile microscope drapes after spine surgery. The use of the operating microscope has become more prevalent in certain spine procedures, providing superior magnification, visualization, and illumination of the operative field. However, it may represent an additional source of bacterial contamination and increase the risk of developing a postoperative infection. This study included 25 surgical spine cases performed by a single spine surgeon that required the use of the operative microscope. Sterile culture swabs were used to obtain samples from 7 defined locations on the microscope drape after its use during the operation. The undraped technician's console was sampled in each case as a positive control, and an additional 25 microscope drapes were swabbed immediately after they were applied to the microscope to obtain negative controls. Swab samples were assessed for bacterial growth on 5% sheep blood Columbia agar plates using a semiquantitative technique. No growth was observed on any of the 25 negative control drapes. In contrast, 100% of preoperative and 96% of postoperative positive controls demonstrated obvious contamination. In the postoperative group, all 7 sites of evaluation were found to be contaminated with rates of 12% to 44%. Four of the 7 evaluated locations were found to have significant contamination rates compared with negative controls, including the shafts of the optic eyepieces on the main surgeon side (24%, P = 0.022), "forehead" portion on both the main surgeon (24%, P = 0.022) and assistant sides (28%, P = 0.010), and "overhead" portion of the drape (44%, P = 0.0002). Bacterial contamination of the operative microscope was found to be significant after spine surgery. Contamination was more common around the optic eyepieces, likely due to inadvertent touching of unsterile portions. Similarly, all regions above the eyepieces also have a propensity for contamination because of unknown contact

  6. Complete fracture-dislocation of the thoracolumbar spine without neurological deficit: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Junfeng; Gong, Quan; Liu, Hao; Rong, Xin; Ding, Chen

    2018-03-01

    Traumatic fracture of the thoracolumbar junction (T10-L2) is the most common fracture of the spinal column. Due to the disruption of the entire vertebrae column, the fracture-dislocation of the thoracolumbar spine is almost invariably associated with neurological injury. A complete fracture-dislocation of the thoracolumbar spine without neurological deficit is a rare entity. A 38-year-old man presented with severe low back pain after an accident when he was building a house. Comprehensive neurological examinations revealed intact neurological function. The plain X-ray and computed tomography revealed a complete facture-dislocation of the L1 to L2 vertebrae. The patient underwent posterior reduction and internal fixation with screws and rods. The neurological function was preserved postoperatively. The patient returned to work after 6 months. Early diagnosis is important before performing any dangerous maneuvers. Given the results of this case and the relevant literature, the prognosis of these patients is promising following surgical intervention.

  7. Combined Anterior-Posterior Surgery Versus Posterior Surgery for Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P. Oprel (Pim); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); P. Patka (Peter); D. den Hartog (Dennis)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: Study Design: A systematic quantitative review of the literature. Objective: To compare combined anterior-posterior surgery versus posterior surgery for thoracolumbar fractures in order to identify better treatments. Summary of Background Data: Axial load of the anterior and

  8. Malpractice litigation following spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Alan H; Ruttiman, Roy; Eltorai, Adam E M; DePasse, J Mason; Brea, Bielinsky A; Palumbo, Mark A

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Adverse events related to spine surgery sometimes lead to litigation. Few studies have evaluated the association between spine surgical complications and medical malpractice proceedings, outcomes, and awards. The aim of this study was to identify the most frequent causes of alleged malpractice in spine surgery and to gain insight into patient demographic and clinical characteristics associated with medical negligence litigation. METHODS A search for "spine surgery" spanning February 1988 to May 2015 was conducted utilizing the medicolegal research service VerdictSearch (ALM Media Properties, LLC). Demographic data for the plaintiff and defendant in addition to clinical data for the procedure and legal outcomes were examined. Spinal cord injury, anoxic/hypoxic brain injury, and death were classified as catastrophic complications; all other complications were classified as noncatastrophic. Both chi-square and t-tests were used to evaluate the effect of these variables on case outcomes and awards granted. RESULTS A total of 569 legal cases were examined; 335 cases were excluded due to irrelevance or insufficient information. Of the 234 cases included in this investigation, 54.2% (127 cases) resulted in a defendant ruling, 26.1% (61) in a plaintiff ruling, and 19.6% (46) in a settlement. The awards granted for plaintiff rulings ranged from $134,000 to $38,323,196 (mean $4,045,205 ± $6,804,647). Awards for settlements ranged from $125,000 to $9,000,000 (mean $1,930,278 ± $2,113,593), which was significantly less than plaintiff rulings (p = 0.022). Compared with cases without a delay in diagnosis of the complication, the cases with a diagnostic delay were more likely to result in a plaintiff verdict or settlement (42.9% vs 72.7%, p = 0.007) than a defense verdict, and were more likely to settle out of court (17.5% vs 40.9%, p = 0.008). Similarly, compared with cases without a delay in treatment of the complication, those with a therapeutic delay were more

  9. Total motion generated in the unstable thoracolumbar spine during management of the typical trauma patient: a comparison of methods in a cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasarn, Mark L; Zhou, Haitao; Dubose, Dewayne; Rossi, Gianluca Del; Conrad, Bryan P; Horodyski, Marybeth; Rechtine, Glenn R

    2012-05-01

    The proper prehospital and inpatient management of patients with unstable spinal injuries is critical for prevention of secondary neurological compromise. The authors sought to analyze the amount of motion generated in the unstable thoracolumbar spine during various maneuvers and transfers that a trauma patient would typically be subjected to prior to definitive fixation. Five fresh cadavers with surgically created unstable L-1 burst fractures were tested. The amount of angular motion between the T-12 and L-2 vertebral segments was measured using a 3D electromagnetic motion analysis device. A complete sequence of maneuvers and transfers was then performed that a patient would be expected to go through from the time of injury until surgical fixation. These maneuvers and transfers included spine board placement and removal, bed transfers, lateral therapy, and turning the patient prone onto the operating table. During each of these, the authors performed what they believed to be the most commonly used versus the best techniques for preventing undesirable motion at the injury level. When placing a spine board there was more motion in all 3 planes with the log-roll technique, and this difference reached statistical significance for axial rotation (p = 0.018) and lateral bending (p = 0.003). Using logrolling for spine board removal resulted in increased motion again, and this was statistically significant for flexion-extension (p = 0.014). During the bed transfer and lateral therapy, the log-roll technique resulted in more motion in all 3 planes (p ≤ 0.05). When turning the cadavers prone for surgery there was statistically more angular motion in each plane for manually turning the patient versus the Jackson table turn (p ≤ 0.01). The total motion was decreased by almost 50% in each plane when using an alternative to the log-roll techniques during the complete sequence (p ≤ 0.007). Although it is unknown how much motion in the unstable spine is necessary to cause

  10. Surgical Site Infection Following Posterior Instrumented Surgery for Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zulkefli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To study the prevalence and the risk factors for surgical site infection in patients who underwent posterior instrumented surgery for thoracolumbar burst fractures. METHODOLOGY: Retrospective review of cases operated between year 2006 and 2007. The final end point is the detection of surgical site infection within one year. RESULTS: A total of 38 cases were reviewed. Surgical site infection occurred in 5 cases. Only one had deep infection. The onset of infection occurred within one month in all cases. The risk factors studied were smoking, timing of surgery, duration of surgery, neurological deficit, associated injuries and high dose methylprednisolone administration. None of them were statistically significant as risk factors for surgical site infection. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of surgical site infection in patients who underwent posterior instrumented surgery for thoracolumbar burst fractures was 13%.

  11. Morbidity and mortality of complex spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstensen, Sven; Bari, Tanvir; Gehrchen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Most literature on complications in spine surgery has been retrospective or based on national databases with few variables. The Spine AdVerse Events Severity (SAVES) system has been found reliable and valid in two Canadian centers, providing precise information regarding all...

  12. Estimating the effective radiation dose imparted to patients by intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography in thoracolumbar spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Jeffrey; Karellas, Andrew; Street, John; Eck, Jason C; Lapinsky, Anthony; Connolly, Patrick J; Dipaola, Christian P

    2013-03-01

    Observational. To estimate the radiation dose imparted to patients during typical thoracolumbar spinal surgical scenarios. Minimally invasive techniques continue to become more common in spine surgery. Computer-assisted navigation systems coupled with intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography (CT) represent one such method used to aid in instrumented spinal procedures. Some studies indicate that cone-beam CT technology delivers a relatively low dose of radiation to patients compared with other x-ray-based imaging modalities. The goal of this study was to estimate the radiation exposure to the patient imparted during typical posterior thoracolumbar instrumented spinal procedures, using intraoperative cone-beam CT and to place these values in the context of standard CT doses. Cone-beam CT scans were obtained using Medtronic O-arm (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN). Thermoluminescence dosimeters were placed in a linear array on a foam-plastic thoracolumbar spine model centered above the radiation source for O-arm presets of lumbar scans for small or large patients. In-air dosimeter measurements were converted to skin surface measurements, using published conversion factors. Dose-length product was calculated from these values. Effective dose was estimated using published effective dose to dose-length product conversion factors. Calculated dosages for many full-length procedures using the small-patient setting fell within the range of published effective doses of abdominal CT scans (1-31 mSv). Calculated dosages for many full-length procedures using the large-patient setting fell within the range of published effective doses of abdominal CT scans when the number of scans did not exceed 3. We have demonstrated that single cone-beam CT scans and most full-length posterior instrumented spinal procedures using O-arm in standard mode would likely impart a radiation dose within the range of those imparted by a single standard CT scan of the abdomen. Radiation dose increases

  13. A prospective cohort study comparing the VAS spine score and Roland-Morris disability questionnaire in patients with a type a traumatic thoracolumbar spinal fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Siebenga, Joukje; Leferink, Vincent; Segers, Michiel; Elzinga, Matthijs; Bakker, Fred; Duis, D.H.J.; Rommens, Pol; Patka, Peter

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ-24) and the VAS spine score have been regularly used to measure functional outcome in patients with back pain. The RMDQ-24 is primarily used in degenerative disease of the spine and the VAS Spine is used in trauma patients. The aim of this study is to compare these scores and to see if there is a correlation in patients with a traumatic thoracolumbar spinal fracture. Prospective cohort study comparing the RMDQ-24 and the VAS spine s...

  14. 6-Year follow-up of ventral monosegmental spondylodesis of incomplete burst fractures of the thoracolumbar spine using three cortical iliac crest bone grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegl, Ulrich; Hauck, Stefan; Merkel, Patricia; Bühren, Volker; Gonschorek, Oliver

    2012-10-01

    Autologous bone graft is the gold standard for vertebral body replacement. Currently, after modern implants for vertebral body replacement are available, controversies exist regarding the optimal implant strategy. Between 2002 and 2003, 17 patients were included in this study, all suffering from incomplete burst fractures of the thoracolumbar spine. All of them were treated by ventral monosegmental spondylodesis using iliac crest bone graft. The individual treatment strategy depended on the fracture situation and patient's condition. After an average of 74 months (range 66-84) a clinical and computer tomographic follow-up examination was performed in 14 patients (average age, 35.2 years) including VAS spine score and SF 36 score. Nine patients were treated ventral only five patients dorsoventrally. Complete osseous consolidation was visible in nine, partial consolidation (>30 %) in four, and lysis in one patient, without any significant differences between ventral only or dorsoventral approach. After removal of the fixateur interne the level of consolidation improved in all patients, treated dorsoventrally. There was no significant correlation between percentage of osseous consolidation and the clinical follow-up parameters. After 6 years, 71 % of the patients suffered from persistent pain associated with the approach to the iliac crest. Two revision surgeries have been necessary. High rates of osseous consolidation are visible 6 years after ventral spondylodesis by iliac crest bone grafts. A further improvement of consolidation can be expected after dorsal implant removal. But the surgical approach to the iliac crest is accompanied with a relevant complication rate.

  15. The posterior layer of the thoracolumbar fascia. Its function in load transfer from spine to legs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool-Goudzwaard, A.L.; Vleeming, A; Stoeckart, R.; Wingerden, Jan Paul; Snijders, Chris

    1996-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: The superficial and deep lamina of the posterior layer of the thoracolumbar fascia have been studied anatomically and biomechanically. In embalmed human specimens, the posterior layer has been loaded by simulating the action of various muscles. The effect has been studied using raster

  16. Minimally invasive mini open split-muscular percutaneous pedicle screw fixation of the thoracolumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Ulutaş

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We prospectively assessed the feasibility and safety of a new percutaneous pedicle screw (PPS fixation technique for instrumentation of the thoracic and lumbar spine in this study. All patients were operated in the prone position under general anesthesia. A 6 to 8 cm midline skin incision was made and wide sub-cutaneous dissection was performed. The paravertebral muscles were first dissected subperiosteally into the midline incision of the fascia for lumbar microdiscectomy with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion cage implantation. After the secondary paramedian incisions on the fascia, the PPSs were inserted via cleavage of the multifidus muscles directly into the pedicles under fluoroscopy visualization. A total of 35 patients underwent surgery with this new surgical technique. The control group for operative time, blood loss and analgesic usage consisted of 35 randomly selected cases from our department. The control group underwent surgery via conventional pedicle screw instrumentation with paramedian fusion. All patients in the minimal invasive surgery series were ambulatory with minimal pain on the first postoperative day. The operation time and blood loss and the postoperative analgesic consumption were significantly less with this new technique. In conclusion, the minimal invasive mini open split-muscular percutaneous pedicle screw fixation technique is safe and feasible. It can be performed via a short midline skin incision and can also be combined with interbody fusion, causing minimal pain without severe muscle damage.

  17. Brachial Plexopathy After Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, Khoi D; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective, multicenter case-series study and literature review. To determine the prevalence of brachial plexopathy after cervical spine surgery and to review the literature to better understand the etiology and risk factors of brachial plexopathy after cervical spine surgery. A retrospective case-series study of 12 903 patients at 21 different sites was performed to analyze the prevalence of several different complications, including brachial plexopathy. A literature review of the US National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health (PubMed) database was conducted to identify articles pertaining to brachial plexopathy following cervical spine surgery. In our total population of 12 903 patients, only 1 suffered from postoperative brachial plexopathy. The overall prevalence rate was thus 0.01%, but the prevalence rate at the site where this complication occurred was 0.07%. Previously reported risk factors for postoperative brachial plexopathy include age, anterior surgical procedures, and a diagnosis of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. The condition can also be due to patient positioning during surgery, which can generally be detected via the use of intraoperative neuromonitoring. Brachial plexopathy following cervical spine surgery is rare and merits further study.

  18. Accuracy of robot-guided versus freehand fluoroscopy-assisted pedicle screw insertion in thoracolumbar spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molliqaj, Granit; Schatlo, Bawarjan; Alaid, Awad; Solomiichuk, Volodymyr; Rohde, Veit; Schaller, Karl; Tessitore, Enrico

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The quest to improve the safety and accuracy and decrease the invasiveness of pedicle screw placement in spine surgery has led to a markedly increased interest in robotic technology. The SpineAssist from Mazor is one of the most widely distributed robotic systems. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of robot-guided and conventional freehand fluoroscopy-guided pedicle screw placement in thoracolumbar surgery. METHODS This study is a retrospective series of 169 patients (83 women [49%]) who underwent placement of pedicle screw instrumentation from 2007 to 2015 in 2 reference centers. Pathological entities included degenerative disorders, tumors, and traumatic cases. In the robot-assisted cohort (98 patients, 439 screws), pedicle screws were inserted with robotic assistance. In the freehand fluoroscopy-guided cohort (71 patients, 441 screws), screws were inserted using anatomical landmarks and lateral fluoroscopic guidance. Patients treated before 2009 were included in the fluoroscopy cohort, whereas those treated since mid-2009 (when the robot was acquired) were included in the robot cohort. Since then, the decision to operate using robotic assistance or conventional freehand technique has been based on surgeon preference and logistics. The accuracy of screw placement was assessed based on the Gertzbein-Robbins scale by a neuroradiologist blinded to treatment group. The radiological slice with the largest visible deviation from the pedicle was chosen for grading. A pedicle breach of 2 mm or less was deemed acceptable (Grades A and B) while deviations greater than 2 mm (Grades C, D, and E) were classified as misplacements. RESULTS In the robot-assisted cohort, a perfect trajectory (Grade A) was observed for 366 screws (83.4%). The remaining screws were Grades B (n = 44 [10%]), C (n = 15 [3.4%]), D (n = 8 [1.8%]), and E (n = 6 [1.4%]). In the fluoroscopy-guided group, a completely intrapedicular course graded as A was found in 76% (n = 335). The

  19. Trauma of the lumbar spine and the thoracolumbar junction; Trauma der Lendenwirbelsaeule und des thorakolumbalen Uebergangs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reith, W.; Harsch, N.; Kraus, C. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Patients who have experienced high energy trauma have a particularly high risk of suffering from fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine. The detection of spinal injuries and the correct classification of fractures before surgery are not only absolute requirements for the implementation of appropriate surgical treatment but they are also decisive for the choice of surgical procedure. By the application of spiral computed tomography (CT) crucial additional information on the morphology of the fracture can be gained in order to estimate the fracture type and possibly the indications for specific surgical treatment options. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ideally suited to provide valuable additional information regarding injuries to the discoligamentous structures of the spine. Magerl et al. developed a comprehensive classification especially for injuries of the thoracic and lumbar spine, which was adopted by the working group for osteosynthesis (AO). This is based on a 2-pillar model of the spinal column. The classification is based on the pathomorphological characteristics of fractures recognizable by imaging. The injury pattern is of particular importance. In spinal trauma a distinction is made between stable and unstable fractures. The treatment of spinal injuries depends on the severity of the overall injury pattern. Besides adequate initial treatment at the scene, a trauma CT should be immediately carried out in order that no injuries are overlooked and to ensure a rapid decision on the treatment procedure. (orig.) [German] Insbesondere bei Patienten, die Hochenergie- oder Rasanztraumata erfahren haben, besteht ein erhoehtes Risiko, Frakturen der BWS und LWS zu erleiden. Die Erkennung von Verletzungen der Wirbelsaeule und die korrekte Klassifikation der Frakturen vor der Operation sind nicht nur unbedingte Voraussetzungen fuer die Einleitung einer adaequaten, ggf. operativen Therapie, sondern mitentscheidend fuer die Wahl des operativen Verfahrens. Bei

  20. Epidural Hematoma Following Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Hilibrand, Alan S; Arnold, Paul M; Fish, David E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Gum, Jeffrey L; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Isaacs, Robert E; Kanter, Adam S; Mroz, Thomas E; Nassr, Ahmad; Sasso, Rick C; Fehlings, Michael G; Buser, Zorica; Bydon, Mohamad; Cha, Peter I; Chatterjee, Dhananjay; Gee, Erica L; Lord, Elizabeth L; Mayer, Erik N; McBride, Owen J; Nguyen, Emily C; Roe, Allison K; Tortolani, P Justin; Stroh, D Alex; Yanez, Marisa Y; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A multicentered retrospective case series. To determine the incidence and circumstances surrounding the development of a symptomatic postoperative epidural hematoma in the cervical spine. Patients who underwent cervical spine surgery between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, at 23 institutions were reviewed, and all patients who developed an epidural hematoma were identified. A total of 16 582 cervical spine surgeries were identified, and 15 patients developed a postoperative epidural hematoma, for a total incidence of 0.090%. Substantial variation between institutions was noted, with 11 sites reporting no epidural hematomas, and 1 site reporting an incidence of 0.76%. All patients initially presented with a neurologic deficit. Nine patients had complete resolution of the neurologic deficit after hematoma evacuation; however 2 of the 3 patients (66%) who had a delay in the diagnosis of the epidural hematoma had residual neurologic deficits compared to only 4 of the 12 patients (33%) who had no delay in the diagnosis or treatment ( P = .53). Additionally, the patients who experienced a postoperative epidural hematoma did not experience any significant improvement in health-related quality-of-life metrics as a result of the index procedure at final follow-up evaluation. This is the largest series to date to analyze the incidence of an epidural hematoma following cervical spine surgery, and this study suggest that an epidural hematoma occurs in approximately 1 out of 1000 cervical spine surgeries. Prompt diagnosis and treatment may improve the chance of making a complete neurologic recovery, but patients who develop this complication do not show improvements in the health-related quality-of-life measurements.

  1. Vertebral artery injuries in cervical spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunardini, David J; Eskander, Mark S; Even, Jesse L; Dunlap, James T; Chen, Antonia F; Lee, Joon Y; Ward, Timothy W; Kang, James D; Donaldson, William F

    2014-08-01

    Vertebral artery injuries (VAIs) are rare but serious complications of cervical spine surgery, with the potential to cause catastrophic bleeding, permanent neurologic impairment, and even death. The present literature regarding incidence of this complication largely comprises a single surgeon or small multicenter case series. We sought to gather a large sample of high-volume surgeons to adequately characterize the incidence and risk factors for VAI, management strategies used, and patient outcomes after VAI. The study was constructed as a cross-sectional study comprising all cervical spine patients operated on by the members of the international Cervical Spine Research Society (CSRS). All patients who have undergone cervical spine surgery by a current member of CSRS as of the spring of 2012. For each surgeon surveyed, we collected self-reported measures to include the number of cervical cases performed in the surgeon's career, the number of VAIs encountered, the stage of the case during which the injury occurred, the management strategies used, and the overall patient outcome after injury. An anonymous 10-question web-based survey was distributed to the members of the CSRS. Statistical analysis was performed using Student t tests for numerical outcomes and chi-squared analysis for categorical variables. One hundred forty-one CSRS members (of 195 total, 72%) responded to the survey, accounting for a total of 163,324 cervical spine surgeries performed. The overall incidence of VAI was 0.07% (111/163,324). Posterior instrumentation of the upper cervical spine (32.4%), anterior corpectomy (23.4%), and posterior exposure of the cervical spine (11.7%) were the most common stages of the case to result in an injury to the vertebral artery. Discectomy (9%) and anterior exposure of the spine (7.2%) were also common time points for an arterial injury. One-fifth (22/111) of all VAI involved an anomalous course of the vertebral artery. The most common management of VAI was by

  2. Patterns of spine surgeries at Mulago Hospital | Kigera | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Spine surgery is a specialised area of orthopaedics that is still in its formative stages in Africa. It may be done to relieve symptoms, or stabilise the spine to allow rehabilitation of patients. This review analyses spine surgeries done in the period 2005-2009 in a National Referral Hospital. Objectives: Patterns of ...

  3. Spine surgery practice in Nigeria: present perceptions and future ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Spine surgery is an emerging orthopaedic surgery subspecialty in Nigeria. There are about 2 designated spine surgeons and about 10 other orthopaedic surgeons and neurosurgeons that operate on the spine for 140 million Nigerians. This study is an evaluation of the perception of the health workers in the ...

  4. Rare Complications of Cervical Spine Surgery: Pseudomeningocoele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailon, Tamir; Smith, Justin S; Nassr, Ahmad; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Fehlings, Michael G; Fish, David E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Hilibrand, Alan S; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Chou, Dean; Sasso, Rick C; Traynelis, Vincent C; Arnold, Paul M; Mroz, Thomas E; Buser, Zorica; Lord, Elizabeth L; Massicotte, Eric M; Sebastian, Arjun S; Than, Khoi D; Steinmetz, Michael P; Smith, Gabriel A; Pace, Jonathan; Corriveau, Mark; Lee, Sungho; Riew, K Daniel; Shaffrey, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    This study was a retrospective, multicenter cohort study. Rare complications of cervical spine surgery are inherently difficult to investigate. Pseudomeningocoele (PMC), an abnormal collection of cerebrospinal fluid that communicates with the subarachnoid space, is one such complication. In order to evaluate and better understand the incidence, presentation, treatment, and outcome of PMC following cervical spine surgery, we conducted a multicenter study to pool our collective experience. This study was a retrospective, multicenter cohort study of patients who underwent cervical spine surgery at any level(s) from C2 to C7, inclusive; were over 18 years of age; and experienced a postoperative PMC. Thirteen patients (0.08%) developed a postoperative PMC, 6 (46.2%) of whom were female. They had an average age of 48.2 years and stayed in hospital a mean of 11.2 days. Three patients were current smokers, 3 previous smokers, 5 had never smoked, and 2 had unknown smoking status. The majority, 10 (76.9%), were associated with posterior surgery, whereas 3 (23.1%) occurred after an anterior procedure. Myelopathy was the most common indication for operations that were complicated by PMC (46%). Seven patients (53%) required a surgical procedure to address the PMC, whereas the remaining 6 were treated conservatively. All PMCs ultimately resolved or were successfully treated with no residual effects. PMC is a rare complication of cervical surgery with an incidence of less than 0.1%. They prolong hospital stay. PMCs occurred more frequently in association with posterior approaches. Approximately half of PMCs required surgery and all ultimately resolved without residual neurologic or other long-term effects.

  5. Thyroid storm following anterior cervical spine surgery for tuberculosis of cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjiv Huzurbazar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The primary objective was to report this rare case and discuss the probable mechanism of thyroid storm following anterior cervical spine surgery for Kochs cervical spine.

  6. Revision Rate of Misplaced Pedicle Screws of the Thoracolumbar Spine-Comparison of Three-Dimensional Fluoroscopy Navigation with Freehand Placement: A Systematic Analysis and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Jens; Hofmann, Nicole; Rienmüller, Anna; Buchmann, Niels; Gempt, Jens; Kirschke, Jan S; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard; Ryang, Yu-Mi

    2018-01-01

    Recent studies have shown higher accuracy rates of image-guided pedicle screw placement compared to freehand (FH) placement. However, data focusing on the impact of spinal navigation on the rate of revision surgeries caused by misplaced pedicle screws (PS) are scarce. This study is aimed at identifying the rate of revision surgeries for misplaced PS comparing three-dimensional (3D) fluoroscopy navigation (3DFL) with FH PS placement. A retrospective analysis was conducted of 2232 patients (mean age, 65.3 ± 13.5 years) with 13,703 implanted PS who underwent instrumentation of the thoracolumbar spine between 2007 and 2015. Group 1 received surgery with use of 3DFL (January 2011 to December 2015), group 2 received surgery in the FH technique (April 2007 to December 2015). Because the use of 3DFL was initiated in January 2011, the examined period for 3DFL-navigated surgeries is shorter. Patients routinely received postoperative computed tomography scans and/or intraoperative control 3D scans. There was an overall rate of revision surgeries for malpositioned PS of 2.9%. In the 3DFL group, the rate of secondary revision surgeries was significantly lower with 1.35% (15/1112 patients) compared to 4.38% (49/1120 patients) in the FH group, respectively (odds ratio, 3.35; P revision surgery (P revision surgeries after posterior spinal instrumentation compared to freehand PS placement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Preoperative narcotic use and its relation to depression and anxiety in patients undergoing spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaghani, Sheyan J; Lee, Dennis S; Bible, Jesse E; Archer, Kristin R; Shau, David N; Kay, Harrison; Zhang, Chi; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2013-12-01

    Prospective review of registry data at a single institution from October 2010 to June 2012. To assess whether the amount of preoperative narcotic use is associated with preoperative depression and anxiety in patients undergoing spine surgery for a structural lesion. Previous work suggests that narcotic use and psychiatric comorbidities are significantly related. Among other psychological considerations, depression and anxiety may be associated with the amount of preoperative narcotic use in patients undergoing spine surgery. Five hundred eighty-three patients undergoing lumbar (60%), thoracolumbar (11%), or cervical spine (29%) were included. Self-reported preoperative narcotic consumption was obtained at the initial preoperative visit and converted to daily morphine equivalent amounts. Preoperative Zung Depression Scale (ZDS) and Modified Somatic Perception Questionnaire (MSPQ) scores were also obtained at the initial preoperative visit and recorded as measures of depression and anxiety, respectively. Resistant and robust bootstrapped multivariable linear regression analysis was performed to determine the association between ZDS and MSPQ scores and preoperative narcotics, controlling for clinically important covariates. Mann-Whitney U tests examined preoperative narcotic use in patients who were categorized as depressed (ZDS ≥ 33) or anxious (MSPQ ≥ 12). Multivariable analysis controlling for age, sex, smoking status, preoperative employment status, and prior spinal surgery demonstrated that preoperative ZDS (P = 0.006), prior spine surgery (P = 0.007), and preoperative pain (0.014) were independent risk factors for preoperative narcotic use. Preoperative MSPQ (P = 0.083) was nearly a statistically significant risk factor. Patients who were categorized as depressed or anxious on the basis of ZDS and MSPQ scores also showed higher preoperative narcotic use than those who were not (P spine surgery.

  8. Osteoporotic vertebral body fractures of the thoracolumbar spine: indications and techniques of a 360°-stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegl, Ulrich; Jarvers, J-S; Heyde, C-E; Josten, C

    2017-02-01

    Unstable vertebral body fragility fractures of the thoracolumbar spine can occur with or without relevant trauma. Initially, a standardized diagnostic algorithm including magnetic resonance tomography is recommended to detect accompanied further vertebral body fractures, to interpret the individual fracture stability, and to screen for relevant traumatic intervertebral disc lesions. Aim of the therapy is to assure fast mobilization and to maintain spinal alignment. Unstable fracture morphology is defined by vertebral body fractures including a relevant defect of the posterior vertebral cortex as well as type B or C fractures. With respect of type A fractures, a combined anterior-posterior approach including a primary cement-augmented posterior stabilization and anterior spondylodesis is indicated in those patients with relevant intervertebral lesions or in those suffering from high-energy accidents resulting in unstable burst-type fractures. The others will benefit from hybrid stabilizations including cement-augmented posterior stabilizations and cement augmentation (kyphoplasty) of the fractured level to gain a ventral transosseous stability. In addition, individually adapted antiosteoporotic therapy is essential.

  9. Optimal patient positioning for ligamentotaxis during balloon kyphoplasty of the thoracolumbar and lumbar spine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cawley, D T

    2011-06-01

    Percutaneous balloon kyphoplasty aims to restore vertebral height, correct angular deformity and stabilize the spine in the setting of vertebral compression fractures. The patient is positioned prone with supports under the iliac crests and upper thorax to allow gravity to extend the spine. In the treatment of lumbar fractures, we evaluated patient positioning with the contribution of hip extension to increase anterior ligamentotaxis, thus facilitating restoration of vertebral height. Our positioning technique created a mean anterior height increase from 72% to 78% of the average height of the cranial and caudal vertebrae (p=0.037). Balloon inflation did not significantly further increase anterior or posterior vertebral height, or Cobb angle.

  10. First performance evaluation of software for automatic segmentation, labeling and reformation of anatomical aligned axial images of the thoracolumbar spine at CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholtz, Jan-Erik, E-mail: janerikscholtz@gmail.com; Wichmann, Julian L.; Kaup, Moritz; Fischer, Sebastian; Kerl, J. Matthias; Lehnert, Thomas; Vogl, Thomas J.; Bauer, Ralf W.

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •Automatic segmentation and labeling of the thoracolumbar spine. •Automatically generated double-angulated and aligned axial images of spine segments. •High grade of accurateness for the symmetric depiction of anatomical structures. •Time-saving and may improve workflow in daily practice. -- Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate software for automatic segmentation, labeling and reformation of anatomical aligned axial images of the thoracolumbar spine on CT in terms of accuracy, potential for time savings and workflow improvement. Material and methods: 77 patients (28 women, 49 men, mean age 65.3 ± 14.4 years) with known or suspected spinal disorders (degenerative spine disease n = 32; disc herniation n = 36; traumatic vertebral fractures n = 9) underwent 64-slice MDCT with thin-slab reconstruction. Time for automatic labeling of the thoracolumbar spine and reconstruction of double-angulated axial images of the pathological vertebrae was compared with manually performed reconstruction of anatomical aligned axial images. Reformatted images of both reconstruction methods were assessed by two observers regarding accuracy of symmetric depiction of anatomical structures. Results: In 33 cases double-angulated axial images were created in 1 vertebra, in 28 cases in 2 vertebrae and in 16 cases in 3 vertebrae. Correct automatic labeling was achieved in 72 of 77 patients (93.5%). Errors could be manually corrected in 4 cases. Automatic labeling required 1 min in average. In cases where anatomical aligned axial images of 1 vertebra were created, reconstructions made by hand were significantly faster (p < 0.05). Automatic reconstruction was time-saving in cases of 2 and more vertebrae (p < 0.05). Both reconstruction methods revealed good image quality with excellent inter-observer agreement. Conclusion: The evaluated software for automatic labeling and anatomically aligned, double-angulated axial image reconstruction of the thoracolumbar spine on CT is time

  11. Corpectomy in destructive thoracolumbar spine disease: Cost-effectiveness of 3 different techniques and implications for cost reduction of delivered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archavlis, Eleftherios; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Ulrich, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To give some insight in balancing cost and effectiveness of 3 different techniques of corpectomy in destructive thoracolumbar spine disease. Although there are several accepted methods of surgical treatment of single-level corpectomy in destructive metastatic thoracolumbar spine disease, the choice depends on the surgeon's preference. The techniques may vary in perioperative morbidity and short- and long-term outcome, but no study so far has analyzed their cost-effectiveness. Seventy-five consecutive patients, mean age of 57 years (range: 39-72 yr) with single-level destructive thoracolumbar lesion underwent surgical treatment with 3 different techniques in 2 centers from 2009 to 2013. The 3 groups were (1) mini open transpedicular corpectomy, (2) conventional open transpedicular corpectomy, and (3) the combined posterior-anterior approach. The data were collected prospectively according to our protocol and subsequently analyzed. The clinical outcome was assessed comparing visual analogue scale score of back pain and the short form 12 (SF-12) questionnaire both pre- and postoperatively. The cost analysis was done calculating the operative time, hospital stay, and the implant cost. The mean follow-up period was 25 months (range: 24-30 mo). The clinical outcome in terms of visual analogue scale score of thoracolumbar pain and SF-12 physical and mental score improvement (P < 0.005) were comparable with all 3 techniques. The radiological outcome was comparable with current available data. As the intensive care unit stay (average: 7 d) and the hospital stay were longer (average: 15 d) with combined posterior-anterior approach, the total cost was maximum (average: €20,952) with this group. Using the posterior approach only was the most cost-effective technique, but the mini open was comparable with the conventional open transpedicular approach. 3.

  12. Disparities in Rates of Spine Surgery for Degenerative Spine Disease Between HIV Infected and Uninfected Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Joseph T.; Gordon, Adam J.; Perkal, Melissa F.; Crystal, Stephen; Rosenthal, Ronnie A.; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Butt, Adeel A.; Gibert, Cynthia L.; Rimland, David; Simberkoff, Michael S.; Justice, Amy C.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of nationwide Veterans Health Administration (VA) clinical and administrative data. Objective Examine the association between HIV infection and the rate of spine surgery for degenerative spine disease. Summary of Background Data Combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) has prolonged survival in patients with HIV/AIDS, increasing the prevalence of chronic conditions such as degenerative spine disease that may require spine surgery. Methods We studied all HIV infected patients under care in the VA from 1996–2008 (n=40,038) and uninfected comparator patients (n=79,039) matched on age, gender, race, year, and geographic region. The primary outcome was spine surgery for degenerative spine disease defined by ICD-9 procedure and diagnosis codes. We used a multivariate Poisson regression to model spine surgery rates by HIV infection status, adjusting for factors that might affect suitability for surgery (demographics, year, comorbidities, body mass index, cART, and laboratory values). Results Two-hundred twenty eight HIV infected and 784 uninfected patients underwent spine surgery for degenerative spine disease during 700,731 patient-years of follow-up (1.44 surgeries per 1,000 patient-years). The most common procedures were spinal decompression (50%), and decompression and fusion (33%); the most common surgical sites were the lumbosacral (50%), and cervical (40%) spine. Adjusted rates of surgery were lower for HIV infected patients (0.86 per 1,000 patient-years of follow-up) than for uninfected patients (1.41 per 1,000 patient-years; IRR 0.61, 95% CI: 0.51, 0.74, Pdegenerative spine disease. Possible explanations include disease prevalence, emphasis on treatment of non-spine HIV-related symptoms, surgical referral patterns, impact of HIV on surgery risk-benefit ratio, patient preferences, and surgeon bias. PMID:21697770

  13. Insufficient pain management after spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rikke Vibeke; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A prospective observational quality assurance study was performed at Glostrup Hospital, Denmark, to describe patients undergoing spine surgery with regard to perioperative analgesic management, post-operative pain, opioid consumption and side effects. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients...... patients were included. For instrumented lumbar fusion patients (n = 24), the VAS pain scores at 1, 4 and 24 h after surgery were (median (interquartile range)) 5 (0-7), 2.5 (0-8) and 5.5 (0-9) at rest and 5 (0-8), 3 (0-9) and 7 (3-9) during mobilisation, respectively. The other surgical subgroups...... generally experienced VAS ≤ 3. For instrumented lumbar fusion, the total 0-24 h consumption of intravenous morphine equivalents was 39.1 (27.5-62.7) mg. Only eight of 87 patients received the entire scheduled standard post-operative pain treatment. Adverse events were rare. CONCLUSION: Most patients...

  14. Adjacent segment disease following cervical spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Samuel K; Riew, K Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Cervical spine surgery is broadly divided into fusion and nonfusion procedures. Anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a common procedure, although adjacent segment disease following the surgery is an ongoing clinical concern. Adjacent segment cervical disease occurs in approximately 3% of patients per year, with an expected incidence of 25% within the first 10 years following fusion. Nonfusion procedures such as anterior diskectomy and posterior foraminotomy do not decrease the rate of adjacent segment disease compared with ACDF. Recently, enthusiasm has developed for artificial disk replacement as a motion-sparing alternative to fusion. To date, however, multiple clinical trials and subsequent follow-up studies have failed to demonstrate significant reduction of adjacent segment disease when artificial disk replacement is performed instead of fusion.

  15. Predictors of Recovery After Conservative Treatment of AO-Type A Thoracolumbar Spine Fractures Without Neurological Deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorlat, Peter; Leirs, Geert; Tajdar, Farhad; Hulsmans, Heinz; De Boeck, Hugo; Vaes, Peter

    2018-01-15

    Prospective, correlational, exploratory, clinical research. To identify the factors determining a patient's recovery after conservative treatment of compression fractures of the thoracolumbar spine. The reported results of compression fractures are poor. These results are not influenced by the severity of compression, the fracture site, or the residual deformity. Otherwise, the factors that determine a patient's recovery are unknown. In 48 conservatively treated patients the preinjury versus the 12-month follow-up differences (Δ) in back pain (visual analogue scale for pain), Oswestry disability index (ODI), and the Greenough and Fraser low back outcome scale were prospectively recorded. For these differences and for time lost from work and satisfaction, multiple linear regressions with combinations of 16 factors were performed. At 1 year, patients with an income-insurance were 9% (P = 0.096) more disabled than those without. They reported a 15% less favorable global outcome and 27% less participation. Smokers were 13% (P = 0.010) more disabled and 11% (P = 0.044) less satisfied. With each increase of the AO-fracture type from A1 to A3 the disability was 8% worse. Patients with pre-existent chronic low back pain (CLBP) returned two points (on a visual analogue scale [VAS] pain total of 10) more closely (P = 0.041) to their preinjury pain level than those without but were 21% (P = 0.001) less satisfied. Our model offers an explanation for more than 25% of the variability of ΔODI and of the satisfaction. For sick leave, no significant predictors were found. Smoking and insurance status are the strongest negative predictors for recovery. LBP patients returned more closely to their preinjury back pain level, but were less satisfied. The AO fracture type had a marked influence on disability, the sagittal deformity had not. The time lost from work did not depend on patient or injury-related factors. N/A.

  16. Patterns of spine surgeries at Mulago Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diagnoses were categorised to aid analysis. The level of the lesion was determined and categorised. Injuries spanning the cervical and thoracic regions were labeled cervico-thoracic while those spanning the thoracic and lumbar regions and the lumbar and sacral regions thoraco-lumbar and lumbo-sacral respectively.

  17. Blood-loss Management in Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jesse E; Mirza, Muhammad; Knaub, Mark A

    2018-01-15

    Substantial blood loss during spine surgery can result in increased patient morbidity and mortality. Proper preoperative planning and communication with the patient, anesthesia team, and operating room staff can lessen perioperative blood loss. Advances in intraoperative antifibrinolytic agents and modified anesthesia techniques have shown promising results in safely reducing blood loss. The surgeon's attention to intraoperative hemostasis and the concurrent use of local hemostatic agents also can lessen intraoperative bleeding. Conversely, the use of intraoperative blood salvage has come into question, both for its potential inability to reduce the need for allogeneic transfusions as well as its cost-effectiveness. Allogeneic blood transfusion is associated with elevated risks, including surgical site infection. Thus, desirable transfusion thresholds should remain restrictive.

  18. Insufficient pain management after spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rikke Vibeke; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A prospective observational quality assurance study was performed at Glostrup Hospital, Denmark, to describe patients undergoing spine surgery with regard to perioperative analgesic management, post-operative pain, opioid consumption and side effects. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients...... experienced acceptable pain levels, but instrumented lumbar fusion leads to moderate to severe pain levels and a relatively high opioid consumption. The scheduled standard pain management protocols were sparsely followed. Challenges exist in post-operative pain management as observed in previous surveys...... eligible for the study were identified consecutively from the operation chart. The following data were registered: post-operative visual analogue (VAS) pain score at rest and during mobilisation, opioid consumption for the first 24 h, other analgesics administered and side effects. RESULTS: A total of 87...

  19. Pedicle measurement of the thoracolumbar spine: a cadaveric, radiographic, and CT scan study in Filipinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molano, A.M.V.; Sison, A.B.; Fong, H.C.; Lim, N.T.; Sabile, K.

    1994-01-01

    With the popular usage of spinal pedicular screw fixation, it is essential to have a knowledge of the morphometry of the pedicles of the spine of particular populations. This study compared the direct pedicle measurements of ten cadavers in an institution, with their respective radiographic and computerized tomographic (CT) scan values, and also compared the effective pedicle diameter (EPD) with the conventional outer pedicle diameter (OPD) measurements. A compilation of pedicle values was also made in X-ray and CT scan plates of a Filipino population. A statistical analysis made on the 2,760 pedicle measurements taken from cadaveric T6-L5 vertebrae showed that direct measurements were significantly different from X-ray and CT scan values. The mean values of the EPD differed from those of the OPD, but not statistically significant. Comparison with previous foreign studies revealed significant differences in these pedicle dimensions. Pedicle measurements in a living Filipino population were found to be significantly different statistically between sexes. Accurate measurement of the pedicle diameters and lengths are indeed critical for the success of a spinal stabilization procedure using pedicular screws. (author). 8 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  20. Determinants and heterogeneity of mechanical competence throughout the thoracolumbar spine of elderly women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Felix; Fischbeck, Markus; Kuhn, Volker; Link, Thomas M; Priemel, Matthias; Lochmüller, Eva-Maria

    2004-08-01

    Vertebral fractures represent the hallmark of osteoporosis. Here, we test the hypotheses that (sub)cortical bone strength and density predict failure better than trabecular core strength and density, and that elderly women display lower failure stress of thoracic vertebrae than men. We examined the vertebral bodies T3 to L5 in 39 spines from elderly donors (23 women; 16 men; age 79 +/- 11 years). Peripheral quantitative computed tomography was used to measure total, trabecular, and (sub)cortical bone density. Mechanical tests were performed in functional spinal units, planoparallel sections of vertebrae, trabecular cores, and (sub)cortical ring specimens. The failure stress decreased with descending vertebral level. Failure stress was highest for the (sub)cortical rings and planoparallel sections and lowest for the trabecular core. The failure stress did not differ significantly between men and women. Mechanical strength of the functional unit was more strongly correlated with the strength of the (sub)cortical ring (r = 0.78) than with that of the trabecular core (r = 0.62). However, total density was more highly correlated with mechanical strength of the same and remote vertebrae (r = 0.63) than trabecular (r = 0.50) or (sub)cortical density (r = 0.36), respectively. The results show that vertebral strength is similar in elderly women and men. Strength of (sub)cortical bone provides significantly better prediction of strength of functional spinal units than that of the trabecular core. However, total density predicts functional segment failure stress with higher accuracy than (sub)cortical or trabecular density and is thus recommended for predicting fracture strength clinically.

  1. Preoperative Opioid Use as a Predictor of Adverse Postoperative Self-Reported Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dennis; Armaghani, Sheyan; Archer, Kristin R; Bible, Jesse; Shau, David; Kay, Harrison; Zhang, Chi; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton

    2014-06-04

    Opioids are commonly used for preoperative pain management in patients undergoing spine surgery. The objective of this investigation was to assess whether preoperative opioid use predicts worse self-reported outcomes in patients undergoing spine surgery. Five hundred and eighty-three patients undergoing lumbar, thoracolumbar, or cervical spine surgery to treat a structural lesion were included in this prospective cohort study. Self-reported preoperative opioid consumption data were obtained at the preoperative visit and were converted to the corresponding daily morphine equivalent amount. Patient-reported outcome measures were assessed at three and twelve months postoperatively via the 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey and the EuroQol-5D questionnaire, as well as, when appropriate, the Oswestry Disability Index and the Neck Disability Index. Separate multivariable linear regression analyses were then performed. At the preoperative evaluation, of the 583 patients, 56% (326 patients) reported some degree of opioid use. Multivariable analyses controlling for age, sex, diabetes, smoking, surgery invasiveness, revision surgery, preoperative Modified Somatic Perception Questionnaire score, preoperative Zung Depression Scale score, and baseline outcome score found that increased preoperative opioid use was a significant predictor (p complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2014 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  2. A pilot study to record visual evoked potentials during prone spine surgery using the SightSaver™ photic visual stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffin, E M; Emerson, R G; Cheng, J; Mercado, K; Smith, K; Beckman, J D

    2017-12-20

    This is a pilot study to assess the clinical safety and efficacy of recording real-time flash visual evoked potentials (VEPs) using the SightSaver TM Visual Stimulator mask during prone spine surgery. A prospective, observational pilot study. Twenty patients presenting for spine surgery (microdiscectomy, 1-2 level lumbar fusion, or > 2 levels thoraco-lumbar fusion) were enrolled. The SightSaver™ Visual Stimulator™ was used to elicit VEPs throughout surgery. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) were simultaneously recorded. All patients underwent general anesthesia with a combination of intravenous and inhaled agents. The presence, absence, and changes in VEP were qualitatively analyzed. Reproducible VEPs were elicited in 18/20 patients (36/40 eyes). VEPs were exquisitely sensitive to changes in anesthesia and decayed with rising MAC of isoflurane and/or N 2 O. Decrements in VEPs were observed without concomitant changes in SSEPs. The mask was simple to apply and use and was not associated with adverse effects. The SightSaver™ mask represents an emerging technology for monitoring developing visual insults during surgery. The definitive applications remain to be determined, but likely include use in select patients and/or surgeries. Here, we have validated the device as safe and effective, and show that VEPs can be recorded in real time under general anesthesia in the prone position. Future studies should be directed towards understanding the ideal anesthetic regimen to facilitate stable VEP recording during prone spine surgery.

  3. A new distractable implant for vertebral body replacement: biomechanical testing of four implants for the thoracolumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, M; Schmoelz, W; Canto, F; Krappinger, D; Blauth, M; Knop, Christian

    2009-10-01

    Expandable titanium implants for vertebral body replacement in the thoracolumbar spine have been well established in the reconstruction of the anterior spinal column. Load transfer at the bone-implant interface remains a point of concern. The purpose of the study was to compare the performance in axial load transfer from the implant to the vertebral body in four different implants, all of them in clinical use to date. We tested a second generation implant (Synex II) in comparison to three different expandable titanium cages: Synex I, Obelisc and X-Tenz. Twenty-four intact fresh frozen human lumbar vertebrae (L1-L4) were distributed into four identical groups according to bone mineral density (BMD). The BMD was determined by quantitative computed tomography (qCT). Specimens were loaded in craniocaudal direction with a material testing machine (Mini Bionix II) at a constant speed of 5 mm/min. Load displacement curves were continuously recorded for each specimen until failure (diminishment of compressive force (F) and/or obvious implant migration through the vertebral body end plate). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc tests (Bonferroni) were applied to detect differences at 1, 2, 3, and 4 mm displacement (F (1-4 mm)) between implant groups. No significant differences were observed with regard to maximum compression force (F (max)) and displacement (d (max)) until failure: Synex II (1,782.3 N/4.67 mm); Synex I (1,645.3 N/4.72 mm); Obelisc (1,314.0 N/4.24 mm); X-Tenz (1470.3 N/6.92 mm). However, the mean compression force at 1-4 mm displacement (F (1-4 mm): 300-1,600 N) was highest for Synex II. The difference at 2 mm displacement was significant (p = 0.028) between Synex II (F (2 mm) = 879 N) and X-Tenz (F (2 mm) = 339 N). The modified end plate design of Synex II was found to perform comparably at least with regard to the compressive performance at the implant-bone interface. The risk of the new implant for collapse into the vertebral body might be

  4. Historical contributions from the Harvard system to adult spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andrew J

    2011-10-15

    Literature review. To document the historical contributions from the Harvard Medical School system to the field of adult spine surgery. Despite the fact that significant contributions to the discipline of spinal surgery have derived from the Harvard system, no prior study documents the history of the Harvard spine services in a cohesive narrative. This historical perspective reviews the history of adult spine surgery within the Harvard system and outlines the significant contributions made by orthopedic and neurosurgical practitioners to the field. Literature reviews were performed from historical works, as well as scientific publications to fashion a cohesive review covering the history of spine surgery at Harvard from the early 19th century to the present. The development of the spine surgical services at the three main Harvard hospitals, and significant spine surgical personalities within the system, are discussed, including W. Jason Mixter, MD, Joseph S. Barr Sr., MD, and Marius N. Smith-Petersen, MD. Substantial developments that have arisen from the Harvard teaching hospitals include the recognition of disc herniation as the cause of radicular symptoms in the lower extremities, the description of lumbar discectomy as a surgical treatment for radicular pain, osteotomy for the correction of spinal deformity, and the first attempt to create a systematic algorithm capable of informing treatment for cervical spine trauma. Despite humble beginnings, the surgeons and scientists at Harvard have influenced nearly every facet of spine surgery over the course of the last two centuries.

  5. Lumbar Spine Surgery in Patients with Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Joshua E; Hughes, Alexander; Sama, Andrew; Weinstein, Joseph; Kaplan, Leon; Cammisa, Frank P; Girardi, Federico P

    2015-10-21

    Parkinson disease is the second most common neurodegenerative condition. The literature on patients with Parkinson disease and spine surgery is limited, but increased complications have been reported. All patients with Parkinson disease undergoing lumbar spine surgery between 2002 and 2012 were identified. Patients' charts, radiographs, and outcome questionnaires were reviewed. Parkinson disease severity was assessed with use of the modified Hoehn and Yahr staging scale. Complications and subsequent surgeries were analyzed. Risk for reoperation was assessed. Ninety-six patients underwent lumbar spine surgery. The mean patient age was 63.0 years. The mean follow-up duration was 30.1 months. The Parkinson disease severity stage was Parkinson disease severity stage of ≥3 (p Parkinson disease is good, with improvement of spine-related pain. A larger prospective study is warranted. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  6. The effect of chlorzoxazone on acute pain after spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, R V; Fomsgaard, J S; Siegel, M H

    2016-01-01

    after spine surgery. METHODS: One hundred and ten patients were randomly assigned to 500 mg oral chlorzoxazone or placebo in this blinded study of patients having spine surgery under general anaesthesia. In the 4 h trial period analgesia consisted of IV patient-controlled analgesia (morphine bolus 2...... morphine use 0-4 h: median 10 (7-21) vs. 13 (5-19) mg in the chlorzoxazone and placebo groups, respectively, P = 0.82. We found no significant difference in adverse effects. CONCLUSION: No analgesic effect of single-dose chlorzoxazone was demonstrated in patients with acute pain after spine surgery. Based...

  7. Surgical site infection in posterior spine surgery | Ojo | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Surgical site infections (SSIs) in spine surgery remain a significant cause of morbidity and prolonged hospitalization. Factors affecting SSI includes patient's comorbidities, duration of surgery, type and indication for surgery among others. We intend to document our experience in our center and highlight ...

  8. Variation in the management of thoracolumbar trauma and postoperative infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepler, Christopher K; Vroome, Colin; Goldfarb, Matthew; Nyirjesy, Sarah; Millhouse, Paul; Lonjon, Guillaume; Koerner, John D; Harrop, James; Vialle, Luiz R; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2015-05-01

    Multinational survey of spine trauma surgeons. To survey spine trauma surgeons, examine the variety of management practices for thoracolumbar fractures, and investigate the need for future areas of study. Attempts to develop a universal thoracolumbar classification system represent the first step in standardizing treatment of thoracolumbar injuries, but there is little consensus regarding diagnosis and management of these injuries. A survey questionnaire regarding a fictional neurologically intact patient with a burst fracture was administered to 46 spine surgeons. The questionnaire consisted of 2 domains: management of thoracolumbar fractures and management of postoperative infection. Survey results were compiled and evaluated and consensus arbitrarily assumed when the majority of surgeons agreed on a single question answer. Although majority consensus was reached on most questions, the interobserver reliability was poor. Consensus was achieved that magnetic resonance imaging should be performed during initial imaging. The majority would also operate regardless of magnetic resonance imaging findings, and would not operate at night. The favored technique was a posterior approach with decompression. Percutaneous fusion was considered a viable option by the majority of surgeons. No consensus was reached regarding instrumentation levels or construct length. The majority would use posterolateral bone grafting, and would not remove instrumentation nor perform an anterior reconstruction. Consensus was reached that postoperative bracing is unnecessary. Regarding management of infection, consensus was reached to use intraoperative vancomycin powder but not culture the nares before surgery. The majority used a set time period for antibiotic treatment when a drain was required, and would not apply supplementary bone graft at the time of final debridement and closure. There is lack of consensus regarding the appropriate management of thoracolumbar fractures. In the future

  9. Advantages and disadvantages of nonfusion technology in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Russel C; Girardi, Federico P; Lim, Moe R; Cammisa, Frank P

    2005-07-01

    Nonfusion technology in spine surgery may improve outcomes by reducing surgical morbidity and the incidence of adjacent level degeneration; however, new technologies also introduce new short- and long-term complications. There is currently no evidence that nonfusion implants are superior to fusion in mid- to long-term follow-up. Understanding the potential risks and benefits of nonfusion technology is essential for spine surgeons and their patients. This article reviews the current evidence relating to the potential risks and benefits of nonfusion technology in spine surgery.

  10. Morbidity of Early Spine Surgery in the Multiply Injured Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-31

    chest trauma 9 30 % Exploratory laparotomy 8 27 % Lactate [ 2.5 mEq/L 6 20 % Platelet \\110,000/mm3 4 13 % 10 U PRBCs pre-spine surgery 4 13 % ISS...ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY Morbidity of early spine surgery in the multiply injured patient J. W. Galvin • B. A. Freedman • A. J. Schoenfeld • A. P. Cap • J... surgery for multiply injured patients with operative spinal injuries remains unknown. The purported benefits of early intervention must be weighed

  11. Automatic Localization of Target Vertebrae in Spine Surgery: Clinical Evaluation of the LevelCheck Registration Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Sheng-fu L.; Otake, Yoshito; Puvanesarajah, Varun; Wang, Adam S.; Uneri, Ali; De Silva, Tharindu; Vogt, Sebastian; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Elder, Benjamin D; Goodwin, C. Rory; Kosztowski, Thomas A.; Liauw, Jason A.; Groves, Mari; Bydon, Ali; Sciubba, Daniel M.; Witham, Timothy F.; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Aygun, Nafi; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A 3D-2D image registration algorithm, “LevelCheck,” was used to automatically label vertebrae in intraoperative mobile radiographs obtained during spine surgery. Accuracy, computation time, and potential failure modes were evaluated in a retrospective study of 20 patients. Objective To measurethe performance of the LevelCheck algorithm using clinical images acquired during spine surgery. Summary of Background Data In spine surgery, the potential for wrong level surgery is significant due to the difficulty of localizing target vertebrae based solely on visual impression, palpation, and fluoroscopy. To remedy this difficulty and reduce the risk of wrong-level surgery, our team introduced a program (dubbed LevelCheck) to automatically localize target vertebrae in mobile radiographs using robust 3D-2D image registration to preoperative CT. Methods Twenty consecutive patients undergoing thoracolumbar spine surgery, for whom both a preoperative CT scan and an intraoperative mobile radiograph were available, were retrospectively analyzed. A board-certified neuroradiologist determined the “true” vertebra levels in each radiograph. Registration of the preoperative CT to the intraoperative radiographwere calculated via LevelCheck, and projection distance errors were analyzed. Five hundred random initializations were performed for eachpatient, andalgorithm settings (viz., the number of robust multi-starts, ranging 50 to 200) were varied to evaluate the tradeoff between registration error and computation time. Failure mode analysis was performed by individually analyzing unsuccessful registrations (>5 mm distance error) observed with 50 multi-starts. Results At 200 robust multi-starts (computation time of ∼26 seconds), the registration accuracy was 100% across all 10,000 trials. As the number of multi-starts (and computation time) decreased, the registration remained fairly robust, down to 99.3% registration accuracy at 50 multi-starts (computation time

  12. The top 100 classic papers in lumbar spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, Jeremy; Skovrlj, Branko; Caridi, John M; Cho, Samuel K

    2015-05-15

    Bibliometric review of the literature. To analyze and quantify the most frequently cited papers in lumbar spine surgery and to measure their impact on the entire lumbar spine literature. Lumbar spine surgery is a dynamic and complex field. Basic science and clinical research remain paramount in understanding and advancing the field. While new literature is published at increasing rates, few studies make long-lasting impacts. The Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge was searched for citations of all papers relevant to lumbar spine surgery. The number of citations, authorship, year of publication, journal of publication, country of publication, and institution were recorded for each paper. The most cited paper was found to be the classic paper from 1990 by Boden et al that described magnetic resonance imaging findings in individuals without back pain, sciatica, and neurogenic claudication showing that spinal stenosis and herniated discs can be incidentally found when scanning patients. The second most cited study similarly showed that asymptomatic patients who underwent lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging frequently had lumbar pathology. The third most cited paper was the 2000 publication of Fairbank and Pynsent reviewing the Oswestry Disability Index, the outcome-measure questionnaire most commonly used to evaluate low back pain. The majority of the papers originate in the United States (n=58), and most were published in Spine (n=63). Most papers were published in the 1990s (n=49), and the 3 most common topics were low back pain, biomechanics, and disc degeneration. This report identifies the top 100 papers in lumbar spine surgery and acknowledges those individuals who have contributed the most to the advancement of the study of the lumbar spine and the body of knowledge used to guide evidence-based clinical decision making in lumbar spine surgery today. 3.

  13. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi [Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  14. The Technological Development of Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Laura A.; O'Toole, John; Eichholz, Kurt M.; Perez-Cruet, Mick J.; Fessler, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive spine surgery has its roots in the mid-twentieth century with a few surgeons and a few techniques, but it has now developed into a large field of progressive spinal surgery. A wide range of techniques are now called “minimally invasive,” and case reports are submitted constantly with new “minimally invasive” approaches to spinal pathology. As minimally invasive spine surgery has become more mainstream over the past ten years, in this paper we discuss its history and development. PMID:24967347

  15. Subsequent, unplanned spine surgery and life survival of patients operated for neuropathic spine deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Marc A; Lai, Sue-Min; Burton, Douglas C

    2012-01-01

    Retrospective study of a prospectively assembled cohort. To characterize the survival from subsequent spine surgery and the life survival of patients treated surgically for severe spinal deformity due to neuropathic diseases. Survivorship analysis is widely used to study the natural history of disease processes and of treatments provided, but has very seldom been used to study patients' course after surgery for spinal deformity associated with neuropathic diseases. Patients with neuropathic spinal deformity treated with primary posterior instrumentation and arthrodesis from 1989 through 2002 were identified and studied by review of charts and radiographs, and by mail survey. Subsequent spine surgery and death events, and the time interval from surgery were identified. Fifteen variables possibly influencing survivorship were studied. There were no perioperative deaths, spinal cord injuries, or acute wound infections in the 117 eligible patients. Reoperation and life survival statuses were available for 110 patients (94%) at an average follow-up of 11.89 years (±5.3; range: 2-20.9 yr). Twelve patients (11%) had subsequent spine surgery. Survival from subsequent spine surgery was 91% at 5 years, 90% at 10 and 15 years, and 72% at 20 years. Proximal fixation problems occurred in 4 patients. Twenty-two patients (20%) had died from 4 to 20 years postoperative. Life survival was 98% at 5 years, 89% at 10 years, 81% at 15 years, and 56% at 20 years. The only variable associated with life survival was the occurrence of one or more perioperative complications, P = 0.0032. The younger half of the series at operation (spine operation was similar to adolescent idiopathic scoliosis series studied in the same manner. Life survival decline began at 4 years postoperative and was significantly associated with the occurrence of one or more perioperative complications. Even after successful spine deformity surgery, this population's health status is often precarious.

  16. On the controversies of spine surgery research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, W.C.H.

    1974-01-01

    This thesis is about effectiveness of surgical interventions in the spine and the value of different methodologies for providing a valid answer. In the first part five systematic reviews were performed. One reviewed cervical degenerative disc disease comparing the different anterior fusion

  17. Mortality Caused by Surgery for Degenerative Lumbar Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmenkivi, Jyrki; Sund, Reijo; Paavola, Mika; Ruuth, Iiris; Malmivaara, Antti

    2017-07-15

    Register study. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety of lumbar spine surgery for degenerative disorders and to assess the predictive factors for mortality and causes of death. Growing numbers and relative indications of spine surgery emphasize the importance of patient safety. We assessed the incidence of mortality related to surgery, overall case fatality and factors predicting mortality in elective spinal surgery. A national database was utilized to assess patient characteristics, surgical procedures, and outcomes of degenerative spinal surgery in Finland. Patients were classified into four diagnostic categories: disc herniation, spinal stenosis, degenerative disc disease, and spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis. The mortality related to surgery and overall mortality in each diagnostic group was analyzed at 7 days, 30 days, 90 days, and 1 year after surgery. We categorized the deaths into medical errors, sequelae of surgery, surgery probably a contributing factor, and deaths not associated with surgery. Age, sex, comorbid conditions, and hospital characteristics were considered as potential risk factors for mortality. Out of 408 deaths (0.67% of total of 61,166 patients) deaths that occurred during the 1-year follow up, 49 deaths (12% of deaths, 0.08% of patients) were classified as having an association with surgery: two deaths by medical errors, 28 deaths by complications after surgery and 19 deaths related to the surgery. The surgery-related 1-year mortality was 0.08%. Age >75 years, male sex, diabetes, and hypertension showed an association with increased risk of death related to surgery. Mortality caused by elective spinal surgery is rare. Cardiovascular incidents are the most common reasons for deaths occurring soon after surgery. Consideration of expected gains and risks of surgery, prevention of unintended errors during surgery and recognition and treatment of complications once they occur are recommended. 3.

  18. Comparison of polymethylmethacrylate versus expandable cage in anterior vertebral column reconstruction after posterior extracavitary corpectomy in lumbar and thoraco-lumbar metastatic spine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleraky, Mohammed; Papanastassiou, Ioannis; Tran, Nam D; Dakwar, Elias; Vrionis, Frank D

    2011-08-01

    Single-stage posterior corpectomy for the management of spinal tumors has been well described. Anterior column reconstruction has been accomplished using polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or expandable cages (EC). The aim of this retrospective study was to compare PMMA versus ECs in anterior vertebral column reconstruction after posterior corpectomy for tumors in the lumbar and thoracolumbar spine. Between 2006 and 2009 we identified 32 patients that underwent a single-stage posterior extracavitary tumor resection and anterior reconstruction, 16 with PMMA and 16 with EC. There were no baseline differences in regards to age (mean: 58.2 years) or performance status. Differences between groups in terms of survival, estimated blood loss (EBL), kyphosis reduction (decrease in Cobb's angle), pain, functional outcomes, and performance status were evaluated. Mean overall survival and EBL were 17 months and 1165 ml, respectively. No differences were noted between the study groups in regards to survival (p = 0.5) or EBL (p = 0.8). There was a trend for better Kyphosis reduction in favor of the EC group (10.04 vs. 5.45, p = 0.16). No difference in performance status or VAS improvements was observed (p > 0.05). Seven patients had complications that led to reoperation (5 infections). PMMA or ECs are viable options for reconstruction of the anterior vertebral column following tumor resection and corpectomy. Both approaches allow for correction of the kyphotic deformity, and stabilization of the anterior vertebral column with similar functional and performance status outcomes in the lumbar and thoracolumbar area.

  19. Injuries Associated with Thoracolumbar Fractures | Montshiwa | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: A total of 32 cases had been admitted with fractures of the thoracolumbar spine over the study period. Neurologic injury was associated with a thoracolumbar fracture in two-thirds of cases. An associated non-spinal injury was found in 37.5% of cases. Most of these injuries (77%) involved the extremities. The

  20. Characteristics of Hemorrhagic Stroke following Spine and Joint Surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic stroke can occur after spine and joint surgeries such as laminectomy, lumbar spinal fusion, tumor resection, and total joint arthroplasty. Although this kind of stroke rarely happens, it may cause severe consequences and high mortality rates. Typical clinical symptoms of hemorrhagic stroke after spine and joint surgeries include headache, vomiting, consciousness disturbance, and mental disorders. It can happen several hours after surgeries. Most bleeding sites are located in cerebellar hemisphere and temporal lobe. A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage caused by surgeries may be the key to intracranial hemorrhages happening. Early diagnosis and treatments are very important for patients to prevent the further progression of intracranial hemorrhages. Several patients need a hematoma evacuation and their prognosis is not optimistic.

  1. Characteristics of Hemorrhagic Stroke following Spine and Joint Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Zhao, Jianning; Xu, Haidong

    2017-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke can occur after spine and joint surgeries such as laminectomy, lumbar spinal fusion, tumor resection, and total joint arthroplasty. Although this kind of stroke rarely happens, it may cause severe consequences and high mortality rates. Typical clinical symptoms of hemorrhagic stroke after spine and joint surgeries include headache, vomiting, consciousness disturbance, and mental disorders. It can happen several hours after surgeries. Most bleeding sites are located in cerebellar hemisphere and temporal lobe. A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage caused by surgeries may be the key to intracranial hemorrhages happening. Early diagnosis and treatments are very important for patients to prevent the further progression of intracranial hemorrhages. Several patients need a hematoma evacuation and their prognosis is not optimistic.

  2. An analysis of causes of readmission after spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Richard A; Hunter, Tracey; Ramos, Nicholas; Michels, Ryan; Hutzler, Lorraine; Bosco, Joseph A

    2012-06-15

    Retrospective review of medical records. We reviewed all early readmissions after elective spine surgery at a single orthopedic specialty hospital to analyze the causes of unplanned readmissions. Recent advances in techniques and instrumentation have made more complex spinal surgeries possible, although sometimes with more complications. Early readmission rate is being used as a marker to evaluate quality of care. There is little data available regarding the causes of early readmissions after spine surgery. Using the hospital's administrative database of patient records from 2007 to 2009, all patients who underwent spine surgery and were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days were identified and broadly categorized as planned (a staged or rescheduled procedure or a direct transfer) or unplanned. Unplanned readmissions were defined to have occurred as a result of either a surgical or a nonsurgical complication. Analysis was focused on 12 common spine procedures based on the principle procedure International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code for the patient's initial admission. The readmission rate was calculated for each procedure. A total of 156 early readmissions were identified, of which 141 were unplanned. Of the unplanned readmissions, the most common causes were infection or a concern for an infection (45 patients, 32% of unplanned readmissions), nonsurgical complications (31 patients, 22% of readmissions), complications requiring surgical revision (21 patients, 15% of readmissions), and wound drainage (12 patients, 9% of readmissions). Fifty-seven percent of unplanned readmissions required a return to the operating room (76% of infections or concern for infection). The average length of stay for the unplanned readmissions was 6.5 days. When using the 12 most common procedures based on the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, the early readmission rate was 3.8% (141 early

  3. [Current status of thoracoscopic surgery for thoracic and lumbar spine. Part 2: treatment of the thoracic disc hernia, spinal deformities, spinal tumors, infections and miscellaneous].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdú-López, Francisco; Beisse, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery or video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) of the thoracic and lumbar spine has evolved greatly since it appeared less than 20 years ago. It is currently used in a large number of processes and injuries. The aim of this article, in its two parts, is to review the current status of VATS of the thoracic and lumbar spine in its entire spectrum. After reviewing the current literature, we developed each of the large groups of indications where VATS takes place, one by one. This second part reviews and discusses the management, treatment and specific thoracoscopic technique in thoracic disc herniation, spinal deformities, tumour pathology, infections of the spine and other possible indications for VATS. Thoracoscopic surgery is in many cases an alternative to conventional open surgery. The transdiaphragmatic approach has made endoscopic treatment of many thoracolumbar junction processes possible, thus widening the spectrum of therapeutic indications. These include the treatment of spinal deformities, spinal tumours, infections and other pathological processes, as well as the reconstruction of injured spinal segments and decompression of the spinal canal if lesion placement is favourable to antero-lateral approach. Good clinical results of thoracoscopic surgery are supported by growing experience reflected in a large number of articles. The degree of complications in thoracoscopic surgery is comparable to open surgery, with benefits in regard to morbidity of the approach and subsequent patient recovery. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of perioperative resuscitation status on postoperative spine surgery complications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Skolasky, R.L.; Ross, H.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Restrictive transfusion criteria have led to decreased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Their use has been extended to other patient groups. In adult spine surgery, ongoing postoperative blood losses and soft-tissue trauma may make these patients not

  5. Assessing the evolution and level of evidence of spine surgery research in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Baeesa

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: This first study, for the analysis of spine surgery literature in Saudi Arabia, shows that Saudi publications in spine surgery have little impact on the global spine surgery research. The LOE was low and that there is insignificant change throughout 25 years. A national multicentre or international collaborative research is recommended to produce high LOE research.

  6. Spine surgery in Nepal: the 2015 earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutterlin, Chester E

    2015-12-01

    At noon on Saturday, 25 April 2015, a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal. It was centered in the Himalaya northwest of Kathmandu, the capital of over 1 million people. The violent tremors were felt as far away as New Delhi, India 1,000 km from the epicenter, but the worst of its destructive force was experienced in the heavily populated Kathmandu valley and in the remote mountainous villages of the Himalaya. Ancient temples crumbled; poorly constructed buildings collapsed; men, women, and children were trapped and injured, sometimes fatally. Avalanches killed mountain climbers, Sherpa guides, and porters at Everest base camp (EBC). The death toll to date exceeds 8,600 with as many as 20,000 injured. Spinal Health International (SHI), a nonprofit volunteer organization, has been active in Nepal in past years and responded to requests by Nepali spine surgeons for assistance with traumatic spine injury victims following the earthquake. SHI volunteers were present during the 2(nd) major earthquake of magnitude 7.3 on 12 May 2015. Past and current experiences in Nepal will be presented.

  7. Vertebral stabilisation and selective decompression for the management of triple thoracolumbar disc protrusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, W M; Downes, C J

    2008-10-01

    Triple adjacent thoracolumbar disc protrusions causing moderate to severe spinal cord compression were diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging in two German shepherd dogs with marked paraparesis and pelvic limb ataxia. Both cases were managed by selective hemilaminectomy, partial annulectomy and bilateral quadruple vertebral body stabilisation using novel canine locking fixation plates (SOP). The stabilisation of multiple vertebrae in the thoracolumbar spine was possible because the plates could be contoured with six degrees of freedom. Spinal pain resolved and neurological function improved in both dogs. Screw breakage was evident in one dog five months following surgery.

  8. The Top 50 Articles on Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virk, Sohrab S; Yu, Elizabeth

    2017-04-01

    Bibliometric study of current literature. To catalog the most important minimally invasive spine (MIS) surgery articles using the amount of citations as a marker of relevance. MIS surgery is a relatively new tool used by spinal surgeons. There is a dynamic and evolving field of research related to MIS techniques, clinical outcomes, and basic science research. To date, there is no comprehensive review of the most cited articles related to MIS surgery. A systematic search was performed over three widely used literature databases: Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar. There were four searches performed using the terms "minimally invasive spine surgery," "endoscopic spine surgery," "percutaneous spinal surgery," and "lateral interbody surgery." The amount of citations included was averaged amongst the three databases to rank each article. The query of the three databases was performed in November 2015. Fifty articles were selected based upon the amount of citations each averaged amongst the three databases. The most cited article was titled "Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusion (XLIF): a novel surgical technique for anterior lumbar interbody fusion" by Ozgur et al and was credited with 447, 239, and 279 citations in Google Scholar, Web of Science, and Scopus, respectively. Citations ranged from 27 to 239 for Web of Science, 60 to 279 for Scopus, and 104 to 462 for Google Scholar. There was a large variety of articles written spanning over 14 different topics with the majority dealing with clinical outcomes related to MIS surgery. The majority of the most cited articles were level III and level IV studies. This is likely due to the relatively recent nature of technological advances in the field. Furthermore level I and level II studies are required in MIS surgery in the years ahead. 5.

  9. Osteoporotic compression fracture of the thoracolumbar spine and sacral insufficiency fracture: incidence and analysis of the relationship according to the clinical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Jeong Hwa; Park, Ji Sun; Ryu, Kyung Nam

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of sacral insufficiency fracture in osteoporotic patient with compression fracture of the thoracolumbar (T-L) spine on magnetic resonance image (MRI), and to analyze the correlation of variable clinical factors and the incidence of sacral insufficiency fracture. We retrospectively reviewed 160 patients (27 men, 133 women; age range of 50 to 89 years) who underwent spinal MRI and had compression fracture of the T-L spine. Compression fractures due to trauma or tumor were excluded. We evaluated the incidence of sacral insufficiency fracture according to the patients' age, sex, number of compression fractures, and the existence of bone marrow edema pattern of compression fracture. During the same period, we evaluated the incidence of spinal compression fracture in the patients of pelvic insufficiency fracture. Out of the 160 patients who had compression fracture in the T-L spine, 17 (10.6%) had insufficiency fracture of the sacrum. Compression fracture occurred almost 5 times more frequently in women (27:133), but the incidence of sacral insufficiency fracture was 2/27 for men (7.4%) and 15/133 for women (11.3%), with no statistically significant difference (ρ = 0.80). According to age, the ratio of insufficiency fracture to compression fracture was 0% (0/23) in the 50's, 10.6% (7/66) in the 60's, 12.5% (7/56) in the 70's, and 20.0% (3/15) in the 80's. In respect of single and multiple compression fracture, the incidence of sacral insufficiency fracture was 8/65 for men (12.3%) and 9/95 for women (9.5%), showing no significant difference (ρ = 0.37). In the patients with and without compression fracture with bone marrow edema, insufficiency fracture occurred in 5/76 (6.6%) and 12/84 (14.3%), respectively. On the other hand, of the 67 patients who had pelvic insufficiency fracture, 27 (40.3%) also had spinal compression fracture. About 10% of the patients with osteoporotic compression fracture in the T/L spine also had pelvic sacral

  10. Osteoporotic compression fracture of the thoracolumbar spine and sacral insufficiency fracture: incidence and analysis of the relationship according to the clinical factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Jeong Hwa; Park, Ji Sun; Ryu, Kyung Nam [Kyunghee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-11-15

    To evaluate the incidence of sacral insufficiency fracture in osteoporotic patient with compression fracture of the thoracolumbar (T-L) spine on magnetic resonance image (MRI), and to analyze the correlation of variable clinical factors and the incidence of sacral insufficiency fracture. We retrospectively reviewed 160 patients (27 men, 133 women; age range of 50 to 89 years) who underwent spinal MRI and had compression fracture of the T-L spine. Compression fractures due to trauma or tumor were excluded. We evaluated the incidence of sacral insufficiency fracture according to the patients' age, sex, number of compression fractures, and the existence of bone marrow edema pattern of compression fracture. During the same period, we evaluated the incidence of spinal compression fracture in the patients of pelvic insufficiency fracture. Out of the 160 patients who had compression fracture in the T-L spine, 17 (10.6%) had insufficiency fracture of the sacrum. Compression fracture occurred almost 5 times more frequently in women (27:133), but the incidence of sacral insufficiency fracture was 2/27 for men (7.4%) and 15/133 for women (11.3%), with no statistically significant difference ({rho} = 0.80). According to age, the ratio of insufficiency fracture to compression fracture was 0% (0/23) in the 50's, 10.6% (7/66) in the 60's, 12.5% (7/56) in the 70's, and 20.0% (3/15) in the 80's. In respect of single and multiple compression fracture, the incidence of sacral insufficiency fracture was 8/65 for men (12.3%) and 9/95 for women (9.5%), showing no significant difference ({rho} = 0.37). In the patients with and without compression fracture with bone marrow edema, insufficiency fracture occurred in 5/76 (6.6%) and 12/84 (14.3%), respectively. On the other hand, of the 67 patients who had pelvic insufficiency fracture, 27 (40.3%) also had spinal compression fracture. About 10% of the patients with osteoporotic compression fracture in the T/L spine

  11. History of cervical spine surgery: from nihilism to advanced reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dweik, A; Van den Brande, E; Kossmann, T; Maas, A I R

    2013-11-01

    Review of literature. To review and analyze the evolution of cervical spine surgery from ancient times to current practice. The aim is to present an accessible overview, primarily intended for a broad readership. Descriptive literature review and analysis of the development of cervical spine surgery from the prehistoric era until today. The first evidence for surgical treatment of spinal disorders dates back to approximately 1500 BC. Conservative approaches to treatment have been the hallmark for thousands of years, but over the past 50 years progress has been rapid. We illustrate how nations have added elements to this complex subject and how knowledge has surpassed borders and language barriers. Transferral of knowledge occurred from Babylon (Bagdad) to Old Egypt, to the Greek and Roman empires and finally via the Middle East (Bagdad and Damascus) back to Europe. Recent advances in the field of anesthesia, imaging and spinal instrumentation have changed long-standing nihilism in the treatment of cervical spine pathologies to the current practice of advanced reconstructive surgery of the cervical spine. A critical approach to the evaluation of benefits and complications of these advanced surgical techniques for treatment of cervical spine disorders is required. Advances in surgery now permit full mechanical reconstruction of the cervical spine. However, despite substantial experimental progress, spinal cord repair and restoration of lost functions remain a challenge. Modern surgeons are still looking for the best way to manage spine disorders.

  12. Rare Complications of Cervical Spine Surgery: Horner's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynelis, Vincent C; Malone, Hani R; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Kanter, Adam S; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Cho, Samuel K; Baird, Evan O; Isaacs, Robert E; Rahman, Ra'Kerry K; Polevaya, Galina; Smith, Justin S; Shaffrey, Christopher; Tortolani, P Justin; Stroh, D Alex; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A multicenter retrospective case series. Horner's syndrome is a known complication of anterior cervical spinal surgery, but it is rarely encountered in clinical practice. To better understand the incidence, risks, and neurologic outcomes associated with Horner's syndrome, a multicenter study was performed to review a large collective experience with this rare complication. We conducted a retrospective multicenter case series study involving 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network. Medical records for 17 625 patients who received subaxial cervical spine surgery from 2005 to 2011 were reviewed to identify occurrence of 21 predefined treatment complications. Descriptive statistics were provided for baseline patient characteristics. Paired t test was used to analyze changes in clinical outcomes at follow-up compared to preoperative status. In total, 8887 patients who underwent anterior cervical spine surgery at the participating institutions were screened. Postoperative Horner's syndrome was identified in 5 (0.06%) patients. All patients experienced the complication following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. The sympathetic trunk appeared to be more vulnerable when operating on midcervical levels (C5, C6), and most patients experienced at least a partial recovery without further treatment. This collective experience suggests that Horner's syndrome is an exceedingly rare complication following anterior cervical spine surgery. Injury to the sympathetic trunk may be limited by maintaining a midline surgical trajectory when possible, and performing careful dissection and retraction of the longus colli muscle when lateral exposure is necessary, especially at caudal cervical levels.

  13. Disease-Specific Care: Spine Surgery Program Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerner, Katie; Franker, Lauren; Douglas, Barbara; Medero, Edgardo; Bromeland, Jennifer

    2017-10-01

    Minimal literature exists describing the process for development of a Joint Commission comprehensive spine surgery program within a community hospital health system. Components of a comprehensive program include structured communication across care settings, preoperative education, quality outcomes tracking, and patient follow-up. Organizations obtaining disease-specific certification must have clear knowledge of the planning, time, and overall commitment, essential to developing a successful program. Health systems benefit from disease-specific certification because of their commitment to a higher standard of service. Certification standards establish a framework for organizational structure and management and provide institutions a competitive edge in the marketplace. A framework for the development of a spine surgery program is described to help guide organizations seeking disease-specific certification. In developing a comprehensive program, it is critical to define the program's mission and vision, identify key stakeholders, implement clinical practice guidelines, and evaluate program outcomes.

  14. Prediction of Deformity Correction by Pedicle Screw Instrumentation in Thoracolumbar Scoliosis Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriyama, Yoshimori; Yamazaki, Nobutoshi; Nagura, Takeo; Matsumoto, Morio; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    In segmental pedicle screw instrumentation, the relationship between the combinations of pedicle screw placements and the degree of deformity correction was investigated with a three-dimensional rigid body and spring model. The virtual thoracolumbar scoliosis (Cobb’s angle of 47 deg.) was corrected using six different combinations of pedicle-screw placements. As a result, better correction in the axial rotation was obtained with the pedicle screws placed at or close to the apical vertebra than with the screws placed close to the end vertebrae, while the correction in the frontal plane was better with the screws close to the end vertebrae than with those close to the apical vertebra. Additionally, two screws placed in the convex side above and below the apical vertebra provided better correction than two screws placed in the concave side. Effective deformity corrections of scoliosis were obtained with the proper combinations of pedicle screw placements.

  15. Worldwide survey on the use of navigation in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härtl, Roger; Lam, Khai Sing; Wang, Jeffrey; Korge, Andreas; Kandziora, Frank; Audigé, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Computer-assisted surgery (CAS) can improve the accuracy of screw placement and decrease radiation exposure, yet this is not widely accepted among spine surgeons. The current viewpoint of spine surgeons on navigation in their everyday practice is an important issue that has not been studied. A survey-based study assessed opinions on CAS to describe the current global attitudes of surgeons on the use of navigation in spine surgery. A 12-item questionnaire focusing on the number and type of surgical cases, the type of equipment available, and general opinions toward CAS was distributed to 3348 AOSpine surgeons (a specialty group within the AO [Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen] Foundation). Latent class analysis was used to investigate the existence of specific groups based on the respondent opinion profiles. A response rate of 20% was recorded. Despite a widespread distribution of navigation systems in North America and Europe, only 11% of surgeons use it routinely. High-volume procedure surgeons, neurological surgeons, and surgeons with a busy minimal invasive surgery practice are more likely to use CAS. "Routine users" consider the accuracy, potential of facilitating complex surgery, and reduction in radiation exposure as the main advantages. The lack of equipment, inadequate training, and high costs are the main reasons that "nonusers" do not use CAS. Spine surgeons acknowledge the value of CAS, yet current systems do not meet their expectations in terms of ease of use and integration into the surgical work flow. To increase its use, CAS has to become more cost efficient and scientific data are needed to clarify its potential benefits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Initial Experience With Real-Time Continuous Physical Activity Monitoring in Patients Undergoing Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Justin K; Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Keefe, Malla K; Lafage, Virginie; Bess, Shay; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Burton, Douglas C; Hart, Robert A; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Schwab, Frank; Smith, Justin S; Smith, Zachary A; Koski, Tyler R; Ames, Christopher P

    2017-12-01

    Multicenter prospective pilot study. To evaluate if continuous physical activity monitoring by a personal electronic 3-dimensional accelerometer device is feasible and can provide objective data that correlates with patient-reported outcomes following spine surgery. Self-reported health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) metrics are inherently limited by being very subjective, having a low frequency of data collection, and inconsistent follow-up. Inclusion criteria: adults (18+), thoracolumbar deformity or degenerative disease, and regular access to a computer with internet connection. Physical activity parameters included: number of daily steps, maximum hourly steps, and activity intensity. Patients completed the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), the Short-Form Health Survey 36 (SF-36), and the Scoliosis Research Society-22r (SRS22) preoperatively and postoperatively at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. Thirty-two patients were enrolled, 8 (25%) withdrew, 1 (3.1%) died, and 1 (3.1%) did not end up undergoing surgery resulting in 22 (68.8%) available patients. Mean preoperative and postoperative step ranges were 1278±767 to 17,800±6464 and 891±587 to 12,655±7038, respectively. Eleven patients improved in mean total daily steps at the final postoperative month with 2 having significant improvements (P0.05) and 6 patients had significantly lower mean total daily steps at 6 months (PPhysical Component Summary, SRS Activity, SRS Appearance, SRS Mental, SRS Satisfaction, and SRS Total score at 6 months postoperative (PPhysical Component Summary were significantly correlated with preoperative average total daily steps (r=-0.61, P=0.0058 and r=0.60, P=0.0114, respectively). No other HRQOL metrics were significantly correlated at baseline or at 6 months postoperative (P>0.05). A prospective pilot study for continuous real-time physical activity monitoring was successfully completed. This is the first study of its kind and demonstrates a foundation to continuous physical

  17. Depression as an independent predictor of postoperative delirium in spine deformity patients undergoing elective spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Adogwa, Owoicho; Lydon, Emily; Sergesketter, Amanda; Kaakati, Rayan; Mehta, Ankit I; Vasquez, Raul A; Cheng, Joseph; Bagley, Carlos A; Karikari, Isaac O

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Depression is the most prevalent affective disorder in the US, and patients with spinal deformity are at increased risk. Postoperative delirium has been associated with inferior surgical outcomes, including morbidity and mortality. The relationship between depression and postoperative delirium in patients undergoing spine surgery is relatively unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if depression is an independent risk factor for the development of postoperative delirium in patients undergoing decompression and fusion for deformity. METHODS The medical records of 923 adult patients (age ≥ 18 years) undergoing elective spine surgery at a single major academic institution from 2005 through 2015 were reviewed. Of these patients, 255 (27.6%) patients had been diagnosed with depression by a board-certified psychiatrist and constituted the Depression group; the remaining 668 patients constituted the No-Depression group. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and intra- and postoperative complication rates were collected for each patient and compared between groups. The primary outcome investigated in this study was rate of postoperative delirium, according to DSM-V criteria, during initial hospital stay after surgery. The association between depression and postoperative delirium rate was assessed via multivariate logistic regression analysis. RESULTS Patient demographics and comorbidities other than depression were similar in the 2 groups. In the Depression group, 85.1% of the patients were taking an antidepressant prior to surgery. There were no significant between-group differences in intraoperative variables and rates of complications other than delirium. Postoperative complication rates were also similar between the cohorts, including rates of urinary tract infection, fever, deep and superficial surgical site infection, pulmonary embolism, deep vein thrombosis, urinary retention, and proportion of patients transferred to the intensive care unit. In

  18. Dorsal spondylodesis of unstable thoracolumbar fractures by a far-lateral approach to the disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, A; Rainov, N G; Sanchin, L; Burkert, W

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes a modified and less traumatic approach to the thoracolumbar spine and compares it with standard techniques for instrumented spinal fusion. Ten patients with unstable fractures of the thoracolumbar spine were included in the open prospective investigation, and were treated by a surgical technique consisting of a dorsolateral approach to the injured segment, filling the disk space and the fractured vertebra with autologous bone, and transpedicular fixation with an AO internal fixator. All patients were followed for 6 to 12 months after surgery by clinical tests and spinal X-rays. Excellent short-term and long-term results were obtained. A stable bony fusion was achieved in all cases, and a minimal mean decrease of 2 degrees in the kyphosis angle was found at late follow-up. No major complications related to the procedure were encountered, and no worsening of neurological deficits occurred after surgery. In conclusion, the far-lateral approach to the thoracolumbar spine yields results which are equivalent or better than those of standard techniques. Major advantages of our procedure, as evaluated in this rather small group of patients, are selective immobilization of the injured segment without involvement of functionally intact spinal levels, no manipulations within the spinal canal boundaries, and relatively limited exposure of the spine.

  19. The use of local vancomycin powder in degenerative spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Josh E; Girardi, Fredrico P; Sandhu, Harvinder; Weinstein, Joseph; Cammisa, Frank P; Sama, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Wound infection after spine surgery is a debilitating complication. Local placement of vancomycin powder into the surgical wounds prior to closing of the fascia has been introduced as a method to reduce deep infection rates. The infection rates of all the patients who were treated with intra-operative local vancomycin between June 2012 and June 2013 were compared to all cases that were not treated with vancomycin between January 2009 and December 2010. Patients for both groups were operated by four senior, fellowship-trained spine surgeons with a combined experience of 55 years of practice at a referral orthopedic center. Patients' charts and microbiology reports were reviewed. 1224 cases were performed with the use of vancomycin. The average age was 56.3 years (SD -13.2; NS). The male to female ratio was 1:1.12 (NS). 2253 cases were performed without the use of vancomycin. The average patient age was 57.1 years (SD 14.5). The male to female ratio was 1:1.14. There were 30 cases of deep infections needing a surgical irrigation and debridement without vancomycin versus 5 when vancomycin was used (P = 0.04). Infections in patients treated with vancomycin were not vancomycin-resistant bacteria. In conclusion, the use of vancomycin reduces the rate of deep wound infections and irrigation and debridement procedures after spine surgery in a referral center among surgeons with a high surgical volume.

  20. The value of intraoperative Gram stain in revision spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifflett, Grant D; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Bjerke-Kroll, Benjamin T; Kueper, Janina; Koltsov, Jayme B; Sama, Andrew A; Girardi, Federico P; Cammisa, Frank P; Hughes, Alexander P

    2015-10-01

    Intraoperative cultures and Gram stains are often obtained in cases of revision spine surgery even when clinical signs of infection are not present. The clinical utility and cost-effectiveness of this behavior remain unproven. The aim was to evaluate the clinical utility and cost-effectiveness of routine intraoperative Gram stains in revision spine surgery. This was a retrospective clinical review performed at an academic center in an urban setting. One hundred twenty-nine consecutive adult revision spine surgeries were performed. The outcome measures included intraoperative Gram stains. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 594 consecutive revision spine surgeries performed by four senior surgeons between 2008 and 2013 to identify patients who had operative cultures and Gram stains performed. All revision cases including cervical, thoracic, and lumbar fusion and non-fusion, with and without instrumentation were reviewed. One hundred twenty-nine (21.7%) patients had operative cultures obtained and were included in the study. The most common primary diagnosis code at the time of revision surgery was pseudarthrosis, which was present in 41.9% of cases (54 of 129). Infection was the primary diagnosis in 10.1% (13 of 129) of cases. Operative cultures were obtained in 129 of 595 (21.7%) cases, and 47.3% (61 of 129) were positive. Gram stains were performed in 98 of 129 (76.0%) cases and were positive in 5 of 98 (5.1%) cases. Overall, there was no correlation between revision diagnosis and whether or not a Gram stain was obtained (p=.697). Patients with a history of prior instrumentation were more likely to have a positive Gram stain (pGram staining was found to have a sensitivity of 10.9% (confidence interval [CI] 3.9%-23.6%) and specificity of 100% (CI 93.1%-100%). The positive and negative predictive values were 100% (CI 48.0%-100%) and 57.3% (CI 45.2%-66.2%), respectively. Kappa coefficient was calculated to be 0.1172 (CI 0.0194-0.2151). The cost per discrepant

  1. What Is the State of Quality Measurement in Spine Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Chase; Xiong, Grace; Hu, Serena; Wood, Kirkham; Kamal, Robin N

    2018-04-01

    Value-based healthcare models rely on quality measures to evaluate the efficacy of healthcare delivery and to identify areas for improvement. Quality measure research in other areas of health care has generally shown that there is a limited number of available quality measures and that those that exist disproportionately focus on processes as opposed to outcomes. The purpose of this study was to assess the current state of quality measures and candidate quality measures in spine surgery. (1) How many quality measures and candidate quality measures are currently available? (2) According to Donabedian domains and National Quality Strategy (NQS) priorities, what aspects or domains of care do the present quality measures and candidate quality measures represent? We systematically reviewed the National Quality Forum, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the Physician Quality Reporting System for quality measures relevant to spine surgery. A systematic search for candidate quality measures was also performed using MEDLINE/PubMed and Embase as well as publications from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and the North American Spine Society. Clinical practice guidelines were included as candidate quality measures if their development was in accordance with Institute of Medicine criteria for the development of clinical practice guidelines, they were based on consistent clinical evidence including at least one Level I study, and they carried the strongest possible recommendation by the developing body. Quality measures and candidate quality measures were then pooled for analysis and categorized by clinical focus, NQS priority, and Donabedian domain. Our initial search yielded a total of 3940 articles, clinical practice guidelines, and quality measures, 74 of which met criteria for inclusion in this study. Of the 74 measures studied, 29 (39%) were quality measures and 45 (61%) were candidate quality measures. Fifty

  2. Comparison of harmonic blade versus traditional approach in canine patients undergoing spinal decompressive surgery for naturally occurring thoracolumbar disk extrusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca F Hettlich

    Full Text Available To assess feasibility of the harmonic Osteovue blade (HOB for use in the soft tissue approach for dogs undergoing hemilaminectomy and to compare outcomes between dogs undergoing HOB or traditional approach (TRAD.A prospective randomized clinical trial was performed using 20 client-owned dogs with thoracolumbar intervertebral disk extrusion requiring hemilaminectomy. Dogs were randomly assigned to HOB or TRAD. Neurologic function and pain scores were assessed pre-operatively. Intraoperative blood loss and surgical approach time as well as postoperative pain and wound healing scores were recorded. Additionally, neurologic recovery and owner perceived quality of life were recorded at day 10 and 30 postoperative.There was no significant difference in sex distribution, weight, age, preoperative neurological grade and pain score, and perioperative outcome measures between groups. Intraoperative total blood loss was minimal for HOB and TRAD (median: 0 ml (range 0-9 and 2.2 ml (range 0-6.8, respectively; p = 0.165 and approach times were similar (median: 7 min (range 5-12 and 8 min (range 5-13, respectively; p = 0.315. While changes in wound healing scores were similar, changes in postoperative pain scores and neurological function were significantly improved in the HOB compared to the TRAD group. Postoperative complications in the HOB group consisted of automutilation of part of the incision and development of a small soft, non-painful subcutaneous swelling in 1 dog each.The HOB is a safe and effective tool for the soft tissue approach for routine spinal surgery in dogs and is associated with decreased pain and increased neurological function post-surgery.

  3. MRI interrReader and intra-reader reliabilities for assessing injury morphology and posterior ligamentous complex integrity of the spine according to the thoracolumbar injury classification system and severity score

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Guen Young; Lee, Joon Woo; Choi, Seung Woo; Lim, Hyun Jin; Sun, Hye Young; Kang, Yu Suhn; Kang, Heung Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Chai, Jee Won; Kim, Su Jin [Dept. of Radiology, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    To evaluate spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inter-reader and intra-reader reliabilities using the thoracolumbar injury classification system and severity score (TLICS) and to analyze the effects of reader experience on reliability and the possible reasons for discordant interpretations. Six radiologists (two senior, two junior radiologists, and two residents) independently scored 100 MRI examinations of thoracolumbar spine injuries to assess injury morphology and posterior ligamentous complex (PLC) integrity according to the TLICS. Inter-reader and intra-reader agreements were determined and analyzed according to the number of years of radiologist experience. Inter-reader agreement between the six readers was moderate (k = 0.538 for the first and 0.537 for the second review) for injury morphology and fair to moderate (k = 0.440 for the first and 0.389 for the second review) for PLC integrity. No significant difference in inter-reader agreement was observed according to the number of years of radiologist experience. Intra-reader agreements showed a wide range (k = 0.538-0.822 for injury morphology and 0.423-0.616 for PLC integrity). Agreement was achieved in 44 for the first and 45 for the second review about injury morphology, as well as in 41 for the first and 38 for the second review of PLC integrity. A positive correlation was detected between injury morphology score and PLC integrity. The reliability of MRI for assessing thoracolumbar spinal injuries according to the TLICS was moderate for injury morphology and fair to moderate for PLC integrity, which may not be influenced by radiologist' experience.

  4. Mitigating adverse event reporting bias in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Joshua D; McGowan, Kevin B; Halevi, Marci; Gerling, Michael C; Sharan, Alok D; Whang, Peter G; Maislin, Greg

    2013-08-21

    Recent articles in the lay press and literature have raised concerns about the ability to report honest adverse event data from industry-sponsored spine surgery studies. To address this, clinical trials may utilize an independent Clinical Events Committee (CEC) to review adverse events and readjudicate the severity and relatedness accordingly. We are aware of no prior study that has quantified either the degree to which investigator bias is present in adverse event reporting or the effect that an independent CEC has on mitigating this potential bias. The coflex Investigational Device Exemption study is a prospective randomized controlled trial comparing coflex (Paradigm Spine) stabilization with lumbar spinal fusion to treat spinal stenosis and spondylolisthesis. Investigators classified the severity of adverse events (mild, moderate, or severe) and their relationship to the surgery and device (unrelated, unlikely, possibly, probably, or definitely). An independent CEC, composed of three spine surgeons without affiliation to the study sponsor, reviewed and reclassified all adverse event reports submitted by the investigators. The CEC reclassified the level of severity, relation to the surgery, and/or relation to the device in 394 (37.3%) of 1055 reported adverse events. The proportion of adverse events that underwent reclassification was similar in the coflex and fusion groups (37.9% compared with 36.0%, p = 0.56). The CEC was 5.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.6 to 10.7) times more likely to upgrade than downgrade the adverse event. The CEC was 7.3 (95% CI, 5.1 to 10.6) times more likely to upgrade than downgrade the relationship to the surgery and 11.6 (95% CI, 7.5 to 18.8) times more likely to upgrade than downgrade the relationship to the device. The status of the investigator's financial interest in the company had little effect on the reclassification of adverse events. Thirty-seven percent of adverse events were reclassified by the CEC; the large majority

  5. Technical consideration of transforaminal endoscopic spine surgery for central herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish P Datar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lumbar disc prolapse is most common between 30 and 50 years of age and is associated with severe disability and pain. It commonly occurs at L4/5 and L5/S1. Transforaminal endoscopic discectomy is an emerging technique for treatment of degenerative disc disease. Literature has shown clinical outcomes, comparable to classical open and micro lumbar discectomy. Central disc herniations in lumbar spine pose technical challenge for transforaminal endoscopic decompression due to its location. Existing techniques to access central herniations and ventral epidural space have trajectory related challenges due to the proximity of the retroperitoneal space and abdominal organs and technically difficult for the less experienced surgeon. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients – 19 males and 11 females – with central, multifocal, central-paracentral disc herniations in the lumbar spine operated in 2015 and 2016 were considered in this study. All patients underwent selective endoscopic discectomy under monitored care anesthesia and local anesthesia with modification of the classical technique, medialization of annulotomy, undercutting the nonarticular part of superior articular process (foraminotomy and use of articulating and long jaw instruments either alone or in combination. Results: In all the thirty patients, we were able to achieve adequate decompression with neurological recovery. All patients improved in their neurological status. Postoperatively, visual analog scale dropped from 7.8 to 1.8 and ODI dropped from 73.46% to 32. 90% of the patients reported excellent and good results. One patient had recurrent herniation and was treated with transforaminal surgery. One patient had persistent back pain and reported poor outcome. Three patients underwent medial branch block for facet joint pain followed by medial branch rhizotomy and reported excellent and good results. Conclusion: Transforaminal endoscopic spine surgery with modifications

  6. Standardizing care for high-risk patients in spine surgery: the Northwestern high-risk spine protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Ryan J; Sugrue, Patrick A; Gould, Robert W; Kallas, Peter G; Schafer, Michael F; Ondra, Stephen L; Koski, Tyler R

    2010-12-01

    Review article of current literature on the preoperative evaluation and postoperative management of patients undergoing high-risk spine operations and a presentation of a multidisciplinary protocol for patients undergoing high-risk spine operation. To provide evidence-based outline of modifiable risk factors and give an example of a multidisciplinary protocol with the goal of improving outcomes. Protocol-based care has been shown to improve outcomes in many areas of medicine. A protocol to evaluate patients undergoing high-risk procedures may ultimately improve patient outcomes. The English language literature to date was reviewed on modifiable risk factors for spine surgery. A multidisciplinary team including hospitalists, critical care physicians, anesthesiologists, and spine surgeons from neurosurgery and orthopedics established an institutional protocol to provide comprehensive care in the pre-, peri-, and postoperative periods for patients undergoing high-risk spine operations. An example of a comprehensive pre-, peri-, and postoperative high-risk spine protocol is provided, with focus on the preoperative assessment of patients undergoing high-risk spine operations and modifiable risk factors. Standardizing preoperative risk assessment may lead to better outcomes after major spine operations. A high-risk spine protocol may help patients by having dedicated physicians in multiple specialties focusing on all aspects of a patients care in the pre-, intra-, and postoperative phases.

  7. Which is the ideal point of time to perform intraoperative 3D imaging in dorsal stabilisation of thoracolumbar spine fractures? A matched pair analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, M; Mittlmeier, T; Gierer, P; Rotter, R; Harms, C; Gradl, G

    2010-10-01

    After dorsal stabilisation of vertebral fractures by an internal fixateur the postoperative computed tomography is a standard procedure to control the positions of the pedicle screws, the success of the reposition, the clearance of the spinal canal and to plane an additive secondary ventral stabilisation. An intraoperative scan with a 3D image intensifier may clarify these questions directly after the implantation with the possibility of an immediate correction of the implants. The aim of this study was to find out the optimal point of time to perform an intraoperative 3D scan and if a postoperative computed tomography is dispensable. Intraoperative 3D scans were carried out on 33 patients with thoracolumbar spine fractures (T11-L5) after bi-segmental fixateur interne montage (Group 1). A matched pair group of 33 patients (Group 2) with a 3D scan after implantation of pedicle screws was built. A postoperative computed tomography of the instrumented spinal section was done in all patients. The following measurements were done in sagittal and axial reconstruction planes and were compared: classification of screw positions, maximal axial diameter of pedicles, cortical perforation of the screws. Additionally in Group 1 the distance between the upper and lower end plates of the injured section, the height of posterior vertebral body wall, the dislocation of the posterior wall and the minimal diameter of the spinal canal were measured. The intraoperative scoring of pedicle screws positions and the measurement of pedicle width showed in both groups a significant accordance with the computed tomography determinations. The measurements "posterior wall dislocation" and "diameter of spinal canal" were only possible in 24 3D scans and showed a significant difference compared with the CT data. The picture quality in Group 2 was scored significantly better than for Group 1 with the complete assembly of the fixateur. The ideal point of time for an intraoperative 3D imaging with

  8. Surgeon specialty and outcomes after elective spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seicean, Andreea; Alan, Nima; Seicean, Sinziana; Neuhauser, Duncan; Benzel, Edward C; Weil, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    Retrospective cohort analysis of prospectively collected clinical data. To compare outcomes of elective spine fusion and laminectomy when performed by neurological and orthopedic surgeons. The relationship between primary specialty training and outcome of spinal surgery is unknown. We analyzed the 2006 to 2012 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database of 50,361 patients, 33,235 (66%) of which were operated on by a neurosurgeon. We eliminated all differences in preoperative and intraoperative risk factors between surgical specialties by matching 17,126 patients who underwent orthopedic surgery (OS) to 17,126 patients who underwent neurosurgery (NS) on propensity scores. Regular and conditional logistic regressions were used to predict adverse postoperative outcomes in the full sample and matched sample, respectively. The effect of perioperative transfusion on outcomes was further assessed in the matched sample. Diagnosis and procedure were the only factors that were found to be significantly different between surgical subspecialties in the full sample. We found that compared with patients who underwent NS, patients who underwent OS were more than twice as likely to experience prolonged length of stay (LOS) (odds ratio: 2.6, 95% confidence interval: 2.4-2.8), and significantly more likely to receive a transfusion perioperatively, have complications, and to require discharge with continued care. After matching, patients who underwent OS continued to have slightly higher odds for prolonged LOS, and twice the odds for receiving perioperative transfusion compared with patients who underwent NS. Taking into account perioperative transfusion did not eliminate the difference in LOS between patients who underwent OS and those who underwent NS. Patients operated on by OS have twice the odds for undergoing perioperative transfusion and slightly increased odds for prolonged LOS. Other differences between surgical specialties in 30-day

  9. A comparative analysis of minimally invasive and open spine surgery patient education resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nitin; Feghhi, Daniel P; Gupta, Raghav; Hansberry, David R; Quinn, John C; Heary, Robert F; Goldstein, Ira M

    2014-09-01

    The Internet has become a widespread source for disseminating health information to large numbers of people. Such is the case for spine surgery as well. Given the complexity of spinal surgeries, an important point to consider is whether these resources are easily read and understood by most Americans. The average national reading grade level has been estimated to be at about the 7th grade. In the present study the authors strove to assess the readability of open spine surgery resources and minimally invasive spine surgery resources to offer suggestions to help improve the readability of patient resources. Online patient education resources were downloaded in 2013 from 50 resources representing either traditional open back surgery or minimally invasive spine surgery. Each resource was assessed using 10 scales from Readability Studio Professional Edition version 2012.1. Patient education resources representing traditional open back surgery or minimally invasive spine surgery were all found to be written at a level well above the recommended 6th grade level. In general, minimally invasive spine surgery materials were written at a higher grade level. The readability of patient education resources from spine surgery websites exceeds the average reading ability of an American adult. Revisions may be warranted to increase quality and patient comprehension of these resources to effectively reach a greater patient population.

  10. Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery: Analyzing Internet-based Education Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Jessica; Mohan, Rohith; Koottappillil, Brian; Wong, Kevin; Yi, Paul H

    2018-04-01

    This is a cross-sectional study. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the content of information available on the Internet regarding minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS). Patients look to the Internet for quick and accessible information on orthopedic procedures to help guide their personal decision making process regarding the care they receive. However, the quality of internet-based orthopedic education material varies significantly with respect to accuracy and readability. The top 50 results were generated from each of 3 search engines (Google, Yahoo!, and Bing) using the search term "minimally invasive spine surgery." Results were categorized by authorship type and evaluated for their description of key factors such as procedural benefits, risks, and techniques. Comparisons between search engines and between authorship types were done using the Freeman-Halton extension for the Fisher exact test. The content of websites certified by Health on the Net Foundation (HONcode) was compared with those not HONcode certified. Of the 150 websites and videos, only 26% were authored by a hospital or university, whereas 50% were by a private physician or clinic. Most resources presented some benefits of MISS (84%, 126/150), but only 17% presented risks of the procedure (26/150). Almost half of all resources described the technique of MISS, but only 27% had thorough descriptions that included visual representations while 26% failed to describe the procedure. Only 12 results were HONcode certified, and 10 (83%) of these were authored by a medical industry company. Internet-based resources on MISS provide inconsistent content and tend to emphasize benefits of MISS over risks.

  11. Surgical management of contiguous multilevel thoracolumbar tuberculous spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Muhammad Asad; Khalique, Ahmed Bilal; Afzal, Waseem; Pasha, Ibrahim Farooq; Aebi, Max

    2013-06-01

    Tuberculous spondylitis (TBS) is the most common form of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis. The mainstay of TBS management is anti-tuberculous chemotherapy. Most of the patients with TBS are treated conservatively; however in some patients surgery is indicated. Most common indications for surgery include neurological deficit, deformity, instability, large abscesses and necrotic tissue mass or inadequate response to anti-tuberculous chemotherapy. The most common form of TBS involves a single motion segment of spine (two adjoining vertebrae and their intervening disc). Sometimes TBS involves more than two adjoining vertebrae, when it is called multilevel TBS. Indications for correct surgical management of multilevel TBS is not clear from literature. We have retrospectively reviewed 87 patients operated in 10 years for multilevel TBS involving the thoracolumbar spine at our spine unit. Two types of surgeries were performed on these patients. In 57 patients, modified Hong Kong operation was performed with radical debridement, strut grafting and anterior instrumentation. In 30 patients this operation was combined with pedicle screw fixation with or without correction of kyphosis by osteotomy. Patients were followed up for correction of kyphosis, improvement in neurological deficit, pain and function. Complications were noted. On long-term follow-up (average 64 months), there was 9.34 % improvement in kyphosis angle in the modified Hong Kong group and 47.58 % improvement in the group with pedicle screw fixation and osteotomy in addition to anterior surgery (p multilevel thoracolumbar tuberculous spondylitis undergoing radical debridement and anterior column reconstruction.

  12. Intraoperative evaluation of device placement in spine surgery using known-component 3D-2D image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uneri, A.; De Silva, T.; Goerres, J.; Jacobson, M. W.; Ketcha, M. D.; Reaungamornrat, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Khanna, A. J.; Osgood, G. M.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-04-01

    Intraoperative x-ray radiography/fluoroscopy is commonly used to assess the placement of surgical devices in the operating room (e.g. spine pedicle screws), but qualitative interpretation can fail to reliably detect suboptimal delivery and/or breach of adjacent critical structures. We present a 3D-2D image registration method wherein intraoperative radiographs are leveraged in combination with prior knowledge of the patient and surgical components for quantitative assessment of device placement and more rigorous quality assurance (QA) of the surgical product. The algorithm is based on known-component registration (KC-Reg) in which patient-specific preoperative CT and parametric component models are used. The registration performs optimization of gradient similarity, removes the need for offline geometric calibration of the C-arm, and simultaneously solves for multiple component bodies, thereby allowing QA in a single step (e.g. spinal construct with 4-20 screws). Performance was tested in a spine phantom, and first clinical results are reported for QA of transpedicle screws delivered in a patient undergoing thoracolumbar spine surgery. Simultaneous registration of ten pedicle screws (five contralateral pairs) demonstrated mean target registration error (TRE) of 1.1  ±  0.1 mm at the screw tip and 0.7  ±  0.4° in angulation when a prior geometric calibration was used. The calibration-free formulation, with the aid of component collision constraints, achieved TRE of 1.4  ±  0.6 mm. In all cases, a statistically significant improvement (p  surgery demonstrated TRE of 2.7  ±  2.6 mm and 1.5  ±  0.8°. The KC-Reg algorithm offers an independent check and quantitative QA of the surgical product using radiographic/fluoroscopic views acquired within standard OR workflow. Such intraoperative assessment could improve quality and safety, provide the opportunity to revise suboptimal constructs in the OR, and reduce the

  13. A prospective cohort study comparing the VAS spine score and Roland-Morris disability questionnaire in patients with a type A traumatic thoracolumbar spinal fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siebenga, J.; Leferink, V.J.M.; Segers, M.J.M.; Elzinga, M.J.; Bakker, F.C.; Ten, D.H.J.; Rommens, P.M.; Patka, P.

    2008-01-01

    The Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ-24) and the VAS spine score have been regularly used to measure functional outcome in patients with back pain. The RMDQ-24 is primarily used in degenerative disease of the spine and the VAS Spine is used in trauma patients. The aim of this study is to

  14. A prospective cohort study comparing the VAS spine score and Roland-Morris disability questionnaire in patients with a type a traumatic thoracolumbar spinal fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Siebenga (Joukje); V.J.M. Leferink (Vincent); M.J.M. Segers (Michiel); M.J. Elzinga (Matthijs); F.C. Bakker (Fred); D.H.J. ten Duis; P.M. Rommens (Pol); P. Patka (Peter)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ-24) and the VAS spine score have been regularly used to measure functional outcome in patients with back pain. The RMDQ-24 is primarily used in degenerative disease of the spine and the VAS Spine is used in trauma patients. The aim of this

  15. Adjacent level disease following lumbar spine surgery: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Instrumented lumbar spine surgery is associated with an increased risk of adjacent segment disease (ASD). Multiple studies have explored the various risk factors contributing to ASD that include; fusion length (especially, three or more levels), sagittal malalignment, facet injury, advanced age, and prior cephalad degenerative disease. Methods: In this selective review of ASD, following predominantly instrumented fusions for lumbar degenerative disease, patients typically underwent open versus minimally invasive surgery (MIS), transforaminal lumbar interbody fusions (TLIFs), posterior lumbar interbody fusions (PLIFs), or rarely posterolateral lumbar instrumented or noninstrumented fusions (posterolateral lumbar fusion). Results: The incidence of ASD, following open or MI lumbar instrumented fusions, ranged up to 30%; notably, the addition of instrumentation in different series did not correlate with improved outcomes. Alternatively, in one series, at 164 postoperative months, noninstrumented lumbar fusions reduced the incidence of ASD to 5.6% versus 18.5% for ASD performed with instrumentation. Of interest, dynamic instrumented/stabilization techniques did not protect patients from ASD. Furthermore, in a series of 513 MIS TLIF, there was a 15.6% incidence of perioperative complications that included; a 5.1% frequency of durotomy and a 2.3% instrumentation failure rate. Conclusions: The incidence of postoperative ASD (up to 30%) is greater following either open or MIS instrumented lumbar fusions (e.g., TLIF/PLIF), while decompressions with noninstrumented fusions led to a much smaller 5.6% risk of ASD. Other findings included: MIS instrumented fusions contributed to higher perioperative complication rates, and dynamic stabilization did not protect against ASD. PMID:26693387

  16. Current spine surgery in North America: progress or violation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, D L

    1994-07-01

    We physicians are the drivers, the people who select the patients, the people who do the operations, and the people who encourage the instrument companies; it is our responsibility to oversee both the effectiveness of treatment and its cost. The resources available to neurosurgery for improving care, controlling cost, and promoting research include the following. 1. The outstanding spinal neurosurgeons actively participating in excellent clinical care and research, neurosurgeons in training, and neurosurgeons committed to excellence. 2. A commitment by neurosurgery to improve the plight of the patients with spinal disorders. 3. Support from instrument and drug companies and national funding. 4. A medical wave of support for outcome studies and clinical trials. 5. A proven track record in doing clinical trials and a clear indication that others are in process. 6. The knowledge, abilities, and energies of neurosurgeons. Our liabilities include the following. 1. Irresponsible behavior by a few professionals. 2. The negative effects of competition with non-neurosurgical spinal surgeons. We must obtain their support in many of these clinical trials. 3. Inertia. It is much easier to take the path of least resistance, much easier to choose the course of economic incentive. Perhaps, out of all of this, spinal neurosurgery will lead the way to developing a better understanding of the natural history of degenerative diseases of the spine and the way to selecting patients properly on the basis of studies of the efficacy of appropriate surgery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Wound infiltration with local anesthetics for post-operative pain relief in lumbar spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, M; Møiniche, S; Olsen, K S

    2012-01-01

    In this systematic review, we evaluated double-blind, randomized and controlled trials on the effect of wound infiltration with local anesthetics compared with the effect of placebo on post-operative pain after lumbar spine surgery.......In this systematic review, we evaluated double-blind, randomized and controlled trials on the effect of wound infiltration with local anesthetics compared with the effect of placebo on post-operative pain after lumbar spine surgery....

  18. Positioning patients for spine surgery: Avoiding uncommon position-related complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Ihab; Barnette, Rodger

    2014-01-01

    Positioning patients for spine surgery is pivotal for optimal operating conditions and operative-site exposure. During spine surgery, patients are placed in positions that are not physiologic and may lead to complications. Perioperative peripheral nerve injury (PPNI) and postoperative visual loss (POVL) are rare complications related to patient positioning during spine surgery that result in significant patient disability and functional loss. PPNI is usually due to stretch or compression of the peripheral nerve. PPNI may present as a brachial plexus injury or as an isolated injury of single nerve, most commonly the ulnar nerve. Understanding the etiology, mechanism and pattern of injury with each type of nerve injury is important for the prevention of PPNI. Intraoperative neuromonitoring has been used to detect peripheral nerve conduction abnormalities indicating peripheral nerve stress under general anesthesia and to guide modification of the upper extremity position to prevent PPNI. POVL usually results in permanent visual loss. Most cases are associated with prolonged spine procedures in the prone position under general anesthesia. The most common causes of POVL after spine surgery are ischemic optic neuropathy and central retinal artery occlusion. Posterior ischemic optic neuropathy is the most common cause of POVL after spine surgery. It is important for spine surgeons to be aware of POVL and to participate in safe, collaborative perioperative care of spine patients. Proper education of perioperative staff, combined with clear communication and collaboration while positioning patients in the operating room is the best and safest approach. The prevention of uncommon complications of spine surgery depends primarily on identifying high-risk patients, proper positioning and optimal intraoperative management of physiological parameters. Modification of risk factors extrinsic to the patient may help reduce the incidence of PPNI and POVL. PMID:25232519

  19. Complications in lumbar spine surgery: A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Proietti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical treatment of adult lumbar spinal disorders is associated with a substantial risk of intraoperative and perioperative complications. There is no clearly defined medical literature on complication in lumbar spine surgery. Purpose of the study is to retrospectively evaluate intraoperative and perioperative complications who underwent various lumbar surgical procedures and to study the possible predisposing role of advanced age in increasing this rate. Materials and Methods: From 2007 to 2011 the number and type of complications were recorded and both univariate, (considering the patients′ age and a multivariate statistical analysis was conducted in order to establish a possible predisposing role. 133 were lumbar disc hernia treated with microdiscetomy, 88 were lumbar stenosis, treated in 36 cases with only decompression, 52 with decompression and instrumentation with a maximum of 2 levels. 26 patients showed a lumbar fracture treated with percutaneous or open screw fixation. 12 showed a scoliotic or kyphotic deformity treated with decompression, fusion and osteotomies with a maximum of 7.3 levels of fusion (range 5-14. 70 were spondylolisthesis treated with 1 or more level of fusion. In 34 cases a fusion till S1 was performed. Results: Of the 338 patients who underwent surgery, 55 showed one or more complications. Type of surgical treatment ( P = 0.004, open surgical approach (open P = 0.001 and operative time ( P = 0.001 increased the relative risk (RR of complication occurrence of 2.3, 3.8 and 5.1 respectively. Major complications are more often seen in complex surgical treatment for severe deformities, in revision surgery and in anterior approaches with an occurrence of 58.3%. Age greater than 65 years, despite an increased RR of perioperative complications (1.5, does not represent a predisposing risk factor to complications ( P = 0.006. Conclusion: Surgical decision-making and exclusion of patients is not justified only

  20. The illness trajectory experienced by patients having spine fusion surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Janne Brammer; Bastrup, Lene; Norlyk, Annelise

    are internalised as a sense of doubt and powerlessness, resulting in spine fusion patients experiencing that they are ”disappearing” as a person; losing their identity. Conclusion To conclude, the biomedical perspective obscures spine fusion patients’ horizon of meaning, which is existentially rooted in the areas...

  1. TREATMENT OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURES FIXED WITH INTERMEDIATE PINS BY THE POSTERIOR APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Motizuki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Radiographic evaluation of patients with thoracolumbar burst fractures treated with unconvencional transpedicular fixation, which includes additional fixation of the fractured vertebra associated with transverse connector - Crosslink clamp.Methods:Retrospective study evaluating a total of 68 patients operated at the Hospital do Trabalhador de Curitiba, Orthopedics Service, of which 15 were eligible for the study. All patients were treated with posterior pedicle fixation and intermediate screw. The assessment by the Cobb angle method was performed on preoperative, immediate postoperative and one year after surgery radiographs.Results:It was observed an average reduction of kyphosis of 8.3o (77%, with a loss of 1.34o in late postoperative compared to the immediate postoperative period.Conclusion:The method of fixation of burst-type fractures of the thoracolumbar spine by the posterior approach with intermediate screw was effective in maintaining the reduction achieved in the immediate postoperative period and after one year of evolution.

  2. Preoperative and postoperative anesthetic and analgesic techniques for minimally invasive surgery of the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buvanendran, Asokumar; Thillainathan, Vijay

    2010-12-15

    A review of methods to optimize anesthesia and analgesia for minimally invasive spine procedures. To provide information to surgeons and anesthesiologists of methods to provide optimal anesthesia and pain control for minimally invasive spine surgery with an emphasis on preoperative planning. Postoperative pain management in patients undergoing minimally invasive spine surgery is a challenge for the perioperative anesthesiologist. In addition to the incisional pain, trauma to deeper tissues, such as ligaments, muscles, intervertebral discs, and periosteum are reasons for significant pain. The increasing number of minimally invasive surgeries and the need for improved and rapid return of the patient of functionality have brought the perioperative anesthesiologist and the surgeon closer. We undertook a review of the literature currently available on anesthesia and analgesia for minimally invasive spine surgery with an emphasis on preoperative planning. A large number of reports of randomized controlled clinical trials with respect to perioperative anesthetic and postoperative pain management for minimally invasive spine surgery are reviewed and the applicability of some of the principles and protocols used for other types of minimally invasive surgical procedures are placed in the context of spine surgery. It is important to understand and implement a multimodal analgesic therapy during a patient's preoperative visits. Perioperative multimodal analgesia with a fast-track anesthetic protocol is also important and provided in the manuscript. This protocol poses a challenge to the anesthesiologist with respect to neurophysiologic monitoring, which requires further study. The postoperative analgesic management should be a continuance of the multimodal analgesia provided before surgery. Some drugs are not appropriate for patients undergoing fusion surgery because of their effect on bone healing. An optimal preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative anesthesia and

  3. Electromyographic monitoring and its anatomical implications in minimally invasive spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Juan S; Vale, Fernando L; Dakwar, Elias

    2010-12-15

    Literature review. The objective of this article is to examine current intraoperative electromyography (EMG) neurophysiologic monitoring methods and their application in minimally invasive techniques. We will also discuss the recent application of EMG and its anatomic implications to the minimally invasive lateral transpsoas approach to the spine. Minimally invasive techniques require that the same goals of surgery be achieved, with the hope of decreased morbidity to the patient. Unlike standard open procedures, direct visualization of the anatomy is decreased. To increase the safety of minimally invasive spine surgery, neurophysiological monitoring techniques have been developed. Review of the literature was performed using the National Center for Biotechnology Information databases using PUBMED/MEDLINE. All articles in the English language discussing the use of intraoperative EMG monitoring and minimally invasive spine surgery were reviewed. The role of EMG monitoring in special reference to the minimally invasive lateral transpsoas approach is also described. In total, 76 articles were identified that discussed the role of neuromonitoring in spine surgery. The majority of articles on EMG and spine surgery discuss the use of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) for safe and accurate pedicle screw placement. In general, there is a paucity of literature that pertains to intraoperative EMG neuromonitoring and minimally invasive spine surgery. Recently, EMG has been used during minimally invasive lateral transpsoas approach to the lumbar spine for interbody fusion. The addition of EMG to the lateral approach has contributed to decrease the complication rate from 30% to less than 1%. In minimally invasive approaches to the spine, the use of EMG IOM might provide additional safety, such as percutaneous pedicle screw placement, where visualization is limited compared with conventional open procedures. In addition to knowledge of the anatomy and image

  4. Observational evaluation of outcomes and resource utilization from hemostatic matrices in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J Scott; Tackett, Scott; Patel, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Studies have indicated that outcomes may differ by choice of flowable hemostat, but there is limited evidence in spine surgery. The objective of this study was to conduct a comparison of outcomes following use of advanced flowable hemostatic matrices in a large spine surgery population. This is an observational retrospective cohort analysis using Premier's US Perspective Hospital Database. Two commonly-used hemostatic matrices (Floseal and Surgiflo kitted with thrombin) were compared in cases categorized as either major or severe spine surgery. Outcomes included complications, blood product administration, hospital length of stay (LOS), surgery time, and amount of matrix used in surgery. Major spine surgery patients treated with Surgiflo were associated with increased risk of blood product transfusion (OR = 2.56, 95% CI = 1.79-3.65, p group. Severe spine surgery patients treated with Surgiflo were associated with longer surgical time (+26.9 min, p transfusion and LOS did not differ by choice of matrix in this patient group. Inherent to limitations associated with database analysis, this study did not evaluate potential physician differences such as skill and experience, assess long-term outcomes, nor include cases with missing data. The results from this analysis indicated that surgery time, risk of blood transfusion, and amount of matrix used are greater with Surgiflo patients, compared to Floseal patients. Choice of matrix did not appear to impact hospital LOS or risk of surgical complications. Future research should evaluate the cost consequences of increased clinical and resource utilization by choice of hemostatic matrix in spine surgery.

  5. The past, present and future of minimally invasive spine surgery: a review and speculative outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetzger, Uwe; Von Schilling, Andrej; Winkler, Gerd; Wahrburg, Jürgen; König, Alexander

    2013-08-01

    In the last 25 years of spinal surgery, tremendous improvements have been made. The development of smart technologies with the overall aim of reducing surgical trauma has resulted in the concept of minimally invasive surgical techniques. Enhancements in microsurgery, endoscopy and various percutaneous techniques, as well as improvement of implant materials, have proven to be milestones. The advancement of training of spine surgeons and the integration of image guidance with precise intraoperative imaging, computer- and robot-assisted treatment modalities constitute the era of reducing treatment morbidity in spinal surgery. This progress has led to the present era of preserving spinal function. The promise of the continuing evolution of spinal surgery, the era of restoring spinal function, already appears on the horizon. The current state of minimally invasive spine surgery is the result of a long-lasting and consecutive development of smart technologies, along with stringent surgical training practices and the improvement of instruments and techniques. However, much effort in research and development is still mandatory to establish, maintain and evolve minimally invasive spine surgery. The education and training of the next generation of highly specialized spine surgeons is another key point. This paper will give an overview of surgical techniques and methods of the past 25 years, examine what is in place today, and suggest a projection for spine surgery in the coming 25 years by drawing a connection from the past to the future.

  6. Pulmonary embolism in spine surgery: a comparison of combined anterior/posterior approach versus posterior approach surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Jo; Kepler, Christopher; Cunningham, Matthew; Rawlins, Bernard; Boachie-Adjei, Oheneba

    2011-01-15

    retrospective review. to determine if Anterior/Posterior Combined approach spine surgery is associated with an increased risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) compared to Posterior Only approach surgery. combined anterior/posterior approach spine surgery is associated with a significantly increased risk for PE. However, it is uncertain if there is any difference in risk between combined approaches versus a posterior-only approach. a prospective cohort of patients who underwent anterior/posterior combined approach spine surgery from January 2002 to January 2006 was compared to a retrospective cohort of consecutive patients who underwent posterior only approach spine surgery from September2007 to September 2008. Patient demographics, medical history, body-mass indexes, type of surgery, length of surgery, transfusions, and instrumented vertebral levels were collected from hospital and office records. Hospital records were used to identify patients who developed PE based on diagnosis by spiral CT scan. CT scans were only performed when a patient's clinical picture raised suspicion of PE. Fisher exact test for significance, χ test and odds ratios were used for analysis. a total of 119 patients were included in the study: 63 patients underwent posterior approach spine surgery and 66 patients underwent combined anterior/posterior approach surgery. One patient (1.6%) developed PE after posterior approach surgery while 5 patients (7.5%) developed PE in the combined approach group. Those undergoing combined approaches were 5.08 times more likely to suffer from PE, but this increase was not significant (P = 0.208). Overall, increased risk for PE was associated with the number of levels fused (P = 0.006), total blood loss (P = 0.029), and number of units transfused (P = 0.030). The combined approach was associated with older age (P spine surgery is associated with an increased risk for pulmonary embolism compared to posterior only approaches. However, regardless of the surgical

  7. Technical advancements and utilization of spine surgery. International disparities in trend-dynamics between Japan, Korea, and the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Phyo; Kurokawa, Ryu; Itoki, Kazushige

    2010-01-01

    Spine surgery has made radical advancements in the last two decades and provision has expanded a great deal. The history of the technical development is briefly reviewed. To analyze trends in utilization and to assess the macroeconomic demand for spine surgery, the incidence of all spine surgery per capita is estimated referring to diverse statistical data from the USA, Korea and Japan. When compared internationally, there is a great disparity in the utilization of spine surgery, especially for fusion/instrumentation. Medico-socioeconomic conditions underlying the variations are discussed. Adequate surgeon training has to be supplied in a matched volume, and the number of surgeons to balance the need is estimated. (author)

  8. Esophageal Perforation Following Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershman, Stuart H; Kunkle, William A; Kelly, Michael P; Buchowski, Jacob M; Ray, Wilson Z; Bumpass, David B; Gum, Jeffrey L; Peters, Colleen M; Singhatanadgige, Weerasak; Kim, Jin Young; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Nassr, Ahmad; Currier, Bradford L; Rahman, Ra'Kerry K; Isaacs, Robert E; Smith, Justin S; Shaffrey, Christopher; Thompson, Sara E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Lord, Elizabeth L; Buser, Zorica; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Multicenter retrospective case series and review of the literature. To determine the rate of esophageal perforations following anterior cervical spine surgery. As part of an AOSpine series on rare complications, a retrospective cohort study was conducted among 21 high-volume surgical centers to identify esophageal perforations following anterior cervical spine surgery. Staff at each center abstracted data from patients' charts and created case report forms for each event identified. Case report forms were then sent to the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network Methodological Core for data processing and analysis. The records of 9591 patients who underwent anterior cervical spine surgery were reviewed. Two (0.02%) were found to have esophageal perforations following anterior cervical spine surgery. Both cases were detected and treated in the acute postoperative period. One patient was successfully treated with primary repair and debridement. One patient underwent multiple debridement attempts and expired. Esophageal perforation following anterior cervical spine surgery is a relatively rare occurrence. Prompt recognition and treatment of these injuries is critical to minimizing morbidity and mortality.

  9. Surgical site infections in spine surgery: identification of microbiologic and surgical characteristics in 239 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Jabbar, Amir; Berven, Sigurd H; Hu, Serena S; Chou, Dean; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Takemoto, Steven; Ames, Christopher; Deviren, Vedat; Tay, Bobby; Weinstein, Phil; Burch, Shane; Liu, Catherine

    2013-10-15

    Retrospective analysis. The objective of this study was to describe the microbiology of surgical site infection (SSI) in spine surgery and relationship with surgical management characteristics. SSI is an important complication of spine surgery that results in significant morbidity. A comprehensive and contemporary understanding of the microbiology of postoperative spine infections is valuable to direct empiric antimicrobial treatment and prophylaxis and other infection prevention strategies. All cases of spinal surgery associated with SSI between July 2005 and November 2010 were identified by the hospital infection control surveillance program using Centers for Disease Control National Health Safety Network criteria. Surgical characteristics and microbiologic data for each case were gathered by direct medical record review. Of 7529 operative spine cases performed between July 2005 and November 2010, 239 cases of SSI were identified. The most commonly isolated pathogen was Staphylococcus aureus (45.2%), followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (31.4%). Methicillin-resistant organisms accounted for 34.3% of all SSIs and were more common in revision than in primary surgical procedures (47.4% vs. 28.0%, P = 0.003). Gram-negative organisms were identified in 30.5% of the cases. Spine surgical procedures involving the sacrum were significantly associated with gram-negative organisms (P spine. Cefazolin-resistant gram-negative organisms accounted for 61.6% of all gram-negative infections and 18.8% of all SSIs. Although gram-positive organisms predominated, gram-negative organisms accounted for a sizeable portion of SSI, particularly among lower lumbar and sacral spine surgical procedures. Nearly half of infections in revision surgery were due to a methicillin-resistant organism. These findings may help guide choice of empiric antibiotics while awaiting culture data and antimicrobial prophylaxis strategies in specific spine surgical procedures. 3.

  10. Remote Hemorrhage in the Cerebellum and Temporal Lobe after Lumbar Spine Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shotaro Watanabe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar hemorrhage remote from the site of surgery can complicate neurosurgical procedures. However, this complication after lumbar surgery is rare. Furthermore, hemorrhage in both the cerebellum and the temporal lobe after spine surgery is rarer still. Herein we present a case of remote hemorrhage in both the cerebellum and the temporal lobe after lumbar spine surgery. A 79-year-old woman with a Schwannoma at the L4 level presented with low back and bilateral leg pain refractory to conservative management. Surgery was undertaken to remove the Schwannoma and to perform posterior fusion. During the surgery, the dura mater was removed in order to excise the Schwannoma. Reconstruction of the dura mater was performed; postoperatively the patient had a cerebrospinal fluid leak. Five days after surgery, clouding of consciousness started gradually, and hemorrhage in the cerebellum and the temporal lobe was revealed by computed tomography. Emergent evacuation of the hemorrhage was performed and the patient recovered consciousness after the surgery. Leakage of cerebrospinal fluid may have induced this hemorrhage. While rare, intracranial hemorrhage after spine surgery can occur, sometimes requiring emergent intervention.

  11. spine deformity surgery at the kenyatta national hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A. Fazal, MBBS, FCPS (Orth), Orthopaedic and Spine Surgeon, Firm II, Kenyatta National Hospital, P.O. Box. 20723, Nairobi, Kenya. Email: akilfazal@gmail.com. ABSTRACT. Objective:To evaluate the radiological and clinical outcome of surgical treatment of spinal deformity. Design: Case series. Setting: Kenyatta National ...

  12. Evidence for surgery in degenerative lumbar spine disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, W.C.; Rubinstein, S.M.; Koes, B.; van Tulder, M.W.; Peul, W.C.

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the available evidence on the effectiveness of surgical interventions for a number of conditions resulting in low back pain (LBP) or spine-related irradiating leg pain. We searched the Cochrane databases and PubMed up to June 2013. We included systematic reviews and randomised

  13. Evolving minimally invasive spine surgery: a surgeon's perspective on technological convergence and digital or control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, John C; Maziad, Ali M; Rappard, George; Thacker, James T; Liu, Brent; Documet, Jorge

    2010-04-01

    Degenerated spinal disc and spinal stenosis are common problems requiring decompressive spinal surgery. Traditional open spinal discectomy is associated with significant tissue trauma, greater morbidity/complications, scarring, often longer term of convalescence, and even destabilization of the spine. Therefore, the pursuit of less traumatic minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) began. The trend of spinal surgery is rapidly moving toward MISS. MISS is a technologically dependent surgery, and requires increased utilization of advanced endoscopic surgical instruments, imaging-video technology, and tissue modulation technology for performing spinal surgery in a digital operating room (DOR). It requires seamless connectivity and control to perform the surgical procedures in a precise and orchestrated manner. A new integrated DOR, the technological convergence and control system SurgMatix(R), was created in response to the need and to facilitate MISS with "organized control instead of organized chaos" in the endoscopic OR suite. It facilitates the performance, training, and further development of MISS.

  14. Multi-stage 3D-2D registration for correction of anatomical deformation in image-guided spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketcha, M. D.; De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Jacobson, M. W.; Goerres, J.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-06-01

    A multi-stage image-based 3D-2D registration method is presented that maps annotations in a 3D image (e.g. point labels annotating individual vertebrae in preoperative CT) to an intraoperative radiograph in which the patient has undergone non-rigid anatomical deformation due to changes in patient positioning or due to the intervention itself. The proposed method (termed msLevelCheck) extends a previous rigid registration solution (LevelCheck) to provide an accurate mapping of vertebral labels in the presence of spinal deformation. The method employs a multi-stage series of rigid 3D-2D registrations performed on sets of automatically determined and increasingly localized sub-images, with the final stage achieving a rigid mapping for each label to yield a locally rigid yet globally deformable solution. The method was evaluated first in a phantom study in which a CT image of the spine was acquired followed by a series of 7 mobile radiographs with increasing degree of deformation applied. Second, the method was validated using a clinical data set of patients exhibiting strong spinal deformation during thoracolumbar spine surgery. Registration accuracy was assessed using projection distance error (PDE) and failure rate (PDE  >  20 mm—i.e. label registered outside vertebra). The msLevelCheck method was able to register all vertebrae accurately for all cases of deformation in the phantom study, improving the maximum PDE of the rigid method from 22.4 mm to 3.9 mm. The clinical study demonstrated the feasibility of the approach in real patient data by accurately registering all vertebral labels in each case, eliminating all instances of failure encountered in the conventional rigid method. The multi-stage approach demonstrated accurate mapping of vertebral labels in the presence of strong spinal deformation. The msLevelCheck method maintains other advantageous aspects of the original LevelCheck method (e.g. compatibility with standard clinical workflow, large

  15. Non-opioid analgesics: Novel approaches to perioperative analgesia for major spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Lauren K; Durieux, Marcel E; Nemergut, Edward C

    2016-03-01

    Perioperative pain management is a significant challenge following major spine surgery. Many pathways contribute to perioperative pain, including nociceptive, inflammatory, and neuropathic sources. Although opioids have long been a mainstay for perioperative analgesia, other non-opioid therapies have been increasingly used as part of a multimodal analgesic regimen to provide improved pain control while minimizing opioid-related side effects. Here we review the evidence supporting the use of novel analgesic approaches as an alternative to intravenous opioids for major spine surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Intradural spine surgery may not carry an increased risk of shunt revision compared with extradural spine surgery in pediatric patients with myelomeningocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Elizabeth N; Hopson, Betsy; Conklin, Michael J; Blount, Jeffrey P

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Patients with myelomeningocele are often affected by scoliosis and tethered cord syndrome, and frequently require spine surgery. Intradural spine surgeries may carry an inherently higher risk of inducing shunt malfunction due to entry into the subarachnoid space. In this study, the authors sought to compare rates of shunt malfunction after intradural and extradural spine surgeries among pediatric patients with myelomeningocele. METHODS The authors reviewed records of the National Spina Bifida Program Registry for Children's Hospital of Alabama. The Exago reporting function was used to identify patients who had received at least one of the following procedures: shunt revision, tethered cord release (TCR), or spinal fusion for deformity. The registry records were reviewed for all identified patients to determine if a shunt revision was performed within the 1st year after TCR or spinal fusion. RESULTS Final analyses included 117 patients, of whom 39 underwent spinal fusion and 78 underwent TCR. Among patients who underwent spinal fusion, shunt revision was performed within 30 days in 2 patients (5.1%), within 60 days in 2 (5.1%), within 90 days in 4 (10.3%), and within 1 year in 5 (12.8%). Among patients who underwent TCR, shunt revision was performed within 30 days in 7 patients (9.0%), within 60 days in 10 (12.8%), within 90 days in 11 (14.1%), and within 1 year in 17 (21.8%). Using the log-rank test, there was no significant difference in Kaplan-Meier curves between intradural and extradural groups (p = 0.59). CONCLUSIONS In a review of single-institution registry data, the authors found no statistically significant difference in the risk of shunt malfunction after intradural and extradural spine surgeries.

  17. The increased prevalence of cervical spondylosis in patients with adult thoracolumbar spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, William W; Carrer, Alexandra; Lu, Michael; Hu, Serena S

    2014-12-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To assess the concomitance of cervical spondylosis and thoracolumbar spinal deformity. Patients with degenerative cervical spine disease have higher rates of degeneration in the lumbar spine. In addition, degenerative cervical spine changes have been observed in adult patients with thoracolumbar spinal deformities. However, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no studies quantifying the association between cervical spondylosis and thoracolumbar spinal deformity in adult patients. Patients seen by a spine surgeon or spine specialist at a single institution were assessed for cervical spondylosis and/or thoracolumbar spinal deformity using an administrative claims database. Spinal radiographic utilization and surgical intervention were used to infer severity of spinal disease. The relative prevalence of each spinal diagnosis was assessed in patients with and without the other diagnosis. A total of 47,560 patients were included in this study. Cervical spondylosis occurred in 13.1% overall, but was found in 31.0% of patients with thoracolumbar spinal deformity (OR=3.27, Pspondylosis (OR=3.26, Pspondylosis or thoracolumbar spinal deformity had significantly higher rates of the other spinal diagnosis. This correlation was increased with increased severity of disease. Patients with both diagnoses were significantly more likely to have received a spine fusion. Further research is warranted to establish the cause of this correlation. Clinicians should use this information to both screen and counsel patients who present for cervical spondylosis or thoracolumbar spinal deformity.

  18. A Multicenter Review of Superior Laryngeal Nerve Injury Following Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, Zachary J; Smith, Justin S; Shaffrey, Christopher; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel; Kanter, Adam S

    2017-04-01

    A retrospective multicenter case-series study; case report and review of the literature. The anatomy and function of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) are well described; however, the consequences of SLN injury remain variable and poorly defined. The prevalence of SLN injury as a consequence of cervical spine surgery is difficult to discern as its clinical manifestations are often inconstant and frequently of a subclinical degree. A multicenter study was performed to better delineate the risk factors, prevalence, and outcomes of SLN injury. A retrospective multicenter case-series study involving 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AO Spine North America Clinical Research Network. Medical records for 17 625 patients who received subaxial cervical spine surgery from 2005 to 2011 were reviewed to identify occurrence of 21 predefined treatment complications. Descriptive statistics were provided for baseline patient characteristics. A retrospective review of the neurosurgical literature on SLN injury was also performed. A total of 8887 patients who underwent anterior cervical spine surgery at the participating institutions were screened, and 1 case of SLN palsy was identified. The prevalence ranged from 0% to 1.25% across all centers. The patient identified underwent a C4 corpectomy. The SLN injury was identified after the patient demonstrated difficulty swallowing postoperatively. He underwent placement of a percutaneous gastrostomy tube and his SLN palsy resolved by 6 weeks. This multicenter study demonstrates that identification of SLN injury occurs very infrequently. Symptomatic SLN injury is an exceedingly rare complication of anterior cervical spine surgery. The SLN is particularly vulnerable when exposing the more rostral levels of the cervical spine. Careful dissection and retraction of the longus coli may decrease the risk of SLN injury during anterior cervical surgery.

  19. Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide Pedersen, Peter; Petersen, Asger Greval; Eiskjær, Søren Peter

    2016-01-01

    Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery. A study on anthropomorphic phantoms describing patient radiation exposure in full spine examinations. Authors: Peter Heide Pedersen, Asger Greval Petersen, Søren Peter Eiskjær. Background: Ionizing radiation potentially...... quality images while at the same time reducing radiation dose. At our institution we use the EOS for pre- and postoperative full spine examinations. Purpose: The purpose of the study is to make first time organ dose and effective dose evaluations with micro-dose settings in full spine examinations. Our...... hypothesis is that organ dose and effective doses can be reduced 5-10 times compared to standard settings, without too high image-quality trade off, resulting in a theoretical reduction of radiation induced cancer. Methods: Patient dosimetry is performed on anthropomorphic child phantoms, representing a 5...

  20. [Nursing Care of Lumbar Spine Fusion Surgery Using a Semi-Rigid Device (ISOBAR)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Shan; Su, Shu-Fen

    2016-04-01

    Aging frequently induces degenerative changes in the spine. Patients who suffer from lumbar degenerative disease tend to have lower back pain, neurological claudication, and neuropathy. Furthermore, incontinence may be an increasing issue as symptoms become severe. Lumbar spine fusion surgery is necessary if clinical symptoms continue to worsen or if the patient fails to respond to medication, physical therapy, or alternative treatments. However, this surgical procedure frequently induces adjacent segment disease (ASD), which is evidenced by the appearance of pathological changes in the upper and lower sections of the spinal surgical sites. In 1997, ISOBAR TTL dynamic rod stabilization was developed for application in spinal fusion surgery to prevent ASD-related complications. The device has proven effective in reducing pain in the lower back and legs, decreasing functional disability, improving quality of life, and retarding disc degeneration. However, the effectiveness of this intervention in decreasing the incidence of ASD requires further research investigation, and relevant literature and research in Taiwan is still lacking. This article discusses lumbar degenerative disease, its indications, the contraindications of lumbar spine fusion surgery using ISOBAR, and related postoperative nursing care. We hope this article provides proper and new knowledge to clinical nurses for the care of patients undergoing lumbar spine fusion surgery with ISOBAR.

  1. Surgery-related complications and sequelae in management of tuberculosis of spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Myung-Sang; Kim, Sung-Soo; Moon, Young-Wan; Moon, Hanlim; Kim, Sung-Sim

    2014-08-01

    Medical record-based survey. To survey the overall incidence of the intra- and postoperative complications and sequelae, and to propose the preventive measures to reduce complications in the spinal tuberculosis surgery. There is no study focused on the surgery-related complications and sequelae, with some touching lightly on the clinical problems. There were 901 patients in this study, including 92 paraplegics. One hundred eighty-six patients had no visible deformity, while those of 715 patients were visible. Six hundred fifty-nine patients had slight to moderate non-rigid kyphosis, and 56 had severe rigid kyphosis. Sixty-seven out of 92 paraplegics had slight to moderate non-rigid kyphosis, and 25 had severe kyphosis. There were 134 cervical and cervicodorsal lesions, 518 thoracic and thoracolumbar lesions, and 249 lumbar and lumbosacral lesions. Seven hundred sixty-four patients had primarily anterior surgeries, and 137 had posterior surgeries. Instrumentation surgery was combined in 174 patients. There were intra- and postoperative complications: direct large vessel and neurological injuries (cord, roots, nerves), late thrombophlebitis, various thoracic cavity problems, esophagus and ureter injuries, peritoneum perforation, ileus, wound infections, stabilization failure, increase of deformity and late adjacent joint and bone problems. Thrombophlebitis and sympatheticolysis symptoms and signs in the lower limbs were the most common complications related with anterior lumbar and lumbosacral surgeries. Kyphosis increased in 31.5% of the non-instrumented anterior surgery cases (42% in children and 21% in adults). The safe, effective and most familiar surgical procedure should be adopted to minimize complications and sequelae. Cosmetic spinal surgery should be withheld if functional improvement could not be expected.

  2. Paraspinal approach for thoracolumbar fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIANG Rui

    2011-02-01

    pedicle screws. As a minimally invasive approach, it can be widely used in thoracolumbar spine surgery. Key words: Fractures, bone; Lumbar vertebrae; Thoracic vertebrae; Surgical procedures, operative

  3. Intrathecal Morphine in Spine Surgery: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendi, Arif; Acosta, Frank L; Tuchman, Alexander; Movahedi, Rana; Sivasundaram, Lakshmanan; Arif, Ibraheem; Gucev, Gligor

    2017-06-15

    Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of intrathecal morphine (ITM) in reducing postoperative pain and opioid analgesic consumption following spine surgery. The use of ITM following adult spine surgery is of particular interest because of the ease of access to the thecal sac and the potential to provide adequate analgesia at low doses. However, previous studies of ITM have been limited by small sample sizes and conflicting results. A comprehensive search of PubMed, Web of Science, Clinicaltrials.gov, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for prospective RCTs was performed by two independent reviewers. Postoperative opioid consumption, pain scores, and complications were documented from the identified studies. Standard mean differences (SMDs) were applied to continuous outcomes and odds ratios were determined for dichotomous outcomes. Eight RCTs involving 393 subjects met inclusion criteria and were included in this meta-analysis. Patients receiving ITM (ITM group) as an adjunct to postoperative opioid analgesic were compared to patients receiving postoperative opioids only (control group). Postoperative morphine equivalent consumption was significantly lower during the first 24 hours postoperative in the ITM group (P spine surgery in those who received ITM (P spine surgery, use of ITM significantly reduced opioid analgesic consumption and Visual Analogue Schores pain scores compared to controls within the first 24 hours postoperatively. High-quality, follow-up RCTs with large sample sizes are recommended to determine the potential of supplementary ITM in spine surgery and complete the side effects profile. 1.

  4. Medicaid status is associated with higher complication rates after spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacquebord, Jacques; Cizik, Amy M; Malempati, Sree Harsha; Konodi, Mark A; Bransford, Richard J; Bellabarba, Carlo; Chapman, Jens; Lee, Michael J

    2013-07-15

    Multivariate analysis of prospectively collected registry data. To determine the effect of payor status on complication rates after spine surgery. Understanding the risk of perioperative complications is an essential aspect in improving patient outcomes. Previous studies have looked at complication rates after spine surgery and factors related to increased perioperative complications. In other areas of medicine, there has been a growing body of evidence gathered to evaluate the role of payor status on outcomes and complications. Several studies have found increased complication rates and inferior outcomes in the uninsured and Medicaid insured. The Spine End Results Registry (2003-2004) is a collection of prospectively collected data on all patients who underwent spine surgery at our 2 institutions. Extensive demographic data, including payor status, and medical information were prospectively recorded as described previously by Mirza et al. Medical complications were defined in detail a priori and were prospectively recorded for at least 2 years after surgery. Using univariate and multivariate analysis, we determined risk of postoperative medical complications dependent on payor status. A total of 1591 patients underwent spine surgery in 2003 and 2004 that met our criteria and were included in our analysis. With the multivariate analysis and by controlling for age, patients whose insurer was Medicaid had a 1.68 odds ratio (95% confidence interval: 1.23-2.29; P = 0.001) of having any adverse event when compared with the privately insured. After univariate and multivariate analyses, Medicaid insurance status was found to be a risk factor for postoperative complications. This corresponds to an ever-growing body of medical literature that has shown similar trends and raises the concern of underinsurance.

  5. Obesity is associated with an increased rate of incidental durotomy in lumbar spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Christopher A; Werner, Brian C; Yang, Scott; Shimer, Adam L

    2015-04-01

    Retrospective database analysis. To determine the impact of obesity on the rate of incidental durotomy in lumbar spine surgery. There is a paucity of data on the overall impact of obesity on the rate of incidental durotomy in lumbar spine surgery, specifically with regard to the type of procedure performed. A large administrative database was queried for all patients who underwent lumbar spine surgery for decompression and/or fusion. They were then stratified into separate cohorts on the basis of body mass index and by procedural codes. Documentation of incidental durotomy was noted. Patient demographics and associated comorbidities were assessed. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated and χ test was used to assess for statistical significance. The incidental durotomy ranged from 0.5% to 2.6%, with the highest rates observed in multilevel laminectomies and revision decompressions in the obese and morbidly obese groups. For patients who underwent decompression only procedures, nonobese patients had a significantly lower rate of durotomy than the obese and morbidly obese cohorts. For patients who underwent fusion with or without decompression, there was a significantly increased rate of durotomy in obese patients compared with nonobese patients. The morbidly obese cohort also had significantly higher rates of incidental durotomy than the nonobese cohort in both revision decompression and revision fusion procedures. This analysis of a large administrative database demonstrates that obesity is associated with increased rates of incidental durotomy in lumbar spine surgery. Furthermore, obesity, in association with increasing complexity of the procedure, increases the rate of incidental durotomy in lumbar spine surgery. Surgeons must be aware of these increased risks as the rate of obesity increases in the population. 3.

  6. Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Palsy After Cervical Spine Surgery: A Multicenter AOSpine Clinical Research Network Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokaslan, Ziya L; Bydon, Mohamad; De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Cho, Samuel K; Baird, Evan O; Mroz, Thomas E; Fehlings, Michael; Arnold, Paul M; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Multicenter retrospective study. To investigate the risk of symptomatic recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy (RLNP) following cervical spine surgery, to examine risk factors for its development, and to report its treatment and outcomes. A multicenter study from 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network was performed. Each center screened for rare complications following cervical spine surgery, including RLNP. Patients were included if they underwent cervical spine surgery (levels from C2 to C7) between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2011. Data were analyzed with regard to complication treatment and outcome. Cases were compared to a control group from the AOSpine CSM and CSM-I studies. Three centers reported 19 cases of RLNP from a cohort of 1345 patients. The reported incidence of RLNP ranged from 0.6% to 2.9% between these 3 centers. Fifteen patients (79%) in the RLNP group were approached from the left side. Ten patients (52.6%) required treatment for RLNP-6 required medical therapy (steroids), 1 interventional treatment (injection laryngoplasty), and 3 conservative therapy (speech therapy). When examining outcomes, 73.7% (14/19) of cases resolved completely, 15.8% (3/19) resolved with residual effects, and in 10.5% (2/19) of cases this could not be determined. In this multicenter study examining rare complications following cervical spine surgery, the risk of RLNP after cervical spine surgery ranged from 0.6% to 2.9% between centers. Though rare, it was found that 16% of patients may experience partial resolution with residual effects, and 74% resolve completely.

  7. Spine surgery cost reduction at a specialized treatment center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Dan Carai Maia; Lenza, Mario; de Almeida, Suze Luize Ferraz; dos Santos, Oscar Fernando Pavão; Cendoroglo, Miguel; Lottenberg, Claudio Luiz; Ferretti, Mario

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To compare the estimated cost of treatment of spinal disorders to those of this treatment in a specialized center. Methods An evaluation of average treatment costs of 399 patients referred by a Health Insurance Company for evaluation and treatment at the Spine Treatment Reference Center of Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein. All patients presented with an indication for surgical treatment before being referred for assessment. Of the total number of patients referred, only 54 underwent surgical treatment and 112 received a conservative treatment with motor physical therapy and acupuncture. The costs of both treatments were calculated based on a previously agreed table of values for reimbursement for each phase of treatment. Results Patients treated non-surgically had an average treatment cost of US$ 1,650.00, while patients treated surgically had an average cost of US$ 18,520.00. The total estimated cost of the cohort of patients treated was US$ 1,184,810.00, which represents a 158.5% decrease relative to the total cost projected for these same patients if the initial type of treatment indicated were performed. Conclusion Treatment carried out within a center specialized in treating spine pathologies has global costs lower than those regularly observed. PMID:23579752

  8. Posterior tension band wiring and instrumentation for thoracolumbar flexion-distraction injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasankhani, E G; Omidi-Kashani, F

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate treatment outcome of tension band wiring followed by posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation for thoracolumbar flexiondistraction injury (FDI). 36 men and 12 women aged 21 to 56 (mean, 36) years underwent tension band wiring followed by posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation using pedicular screws for FDI of the thoracolumbar spine. The injured vertebral levels were T11 (n=2), T12 (n=12), T11-T12 (n=1), T12-L1 (n=1), L1 (n=28), and L2 (n=4). Anterior vertebral body height and kyphosis were measured before and after surgery. Neurologic status was assessed using the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale. The Oswestry Disability Index questionnaire and visual analogue scale for pain were also used. The mean follow-up was 38 (range, 26-72) months. At final follow-up, the mean visual analogue scale for pain was 1.7, and the median Oswestry Disability Index was 4% (range, 0-32%). The mean anterior vertebral body height improved from 20.5 to 38.8 mm (pwiring followed by posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation for thoracolumbar FDIs achieved good outcome.

  9. Intraoperative waste in spine surgery: incidence, cost, and effectiveness of an educational program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroceanu, Alex; Canacari, Elena; Brown, Eric; Robinson, Adam; McGuire, Kevin J

    2011-09-01

    Prospective observational study. This study aims to quantify the incidence of intraoperative waste in spine surgery and to examine the efficacy of an educational program directed at surgeons to induce a reduction in the intraoperative waste. Spine procedures are associated with high costs. Implants are a main contributor of these costs. Intraoperative waste further exacerbates the high cost of surgery. Data were collected during a 25-month period from one academic medical center (15-month observational period, 10-month post-awareness program). The total number of spine procedures and the incidence of intraoperative waste were recorded prospectively. Other variables recorded included the type of product wasted, cost associated with the product or implant wasted, and reason for the waste. Intraoperative waste occurred in 20.2% of the procedures prior to the educational program and in 10.3% of the procedures after the implementation of the program (P waste were, on average, $17680 prior to the awareness intervention and $5876 afterwards (P = 0.0006). Prior to the intervention, surgical waste represented 4.3% of total operative spine budget. After the awareness program this proportion decrease to an average of 1.2% (P = 0.003). Intraoperative waste in spine surgery exacerbates the already costly procedures. Extrapolation of this data to the national level leads to an annual estimate of $126,722,000 attributable to intraoperative spine waste. A simple educational program proved to be and continues to be effective in making surgeons aware of the import of their choices and the costs related to surgical waste.

  10. Towards standardized measurement of adverse events in spine surgery: conceptual model and pilot evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyo Richard A

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Independent of efficacy, information on safety of surgical procedures is essential for informed choices. We seek to develop standardized methodology for describing the safety of spinal operations and apply these methods to study lumbar surgery. We present a conceptual model for evaluating the safety of spine surgery and describe development of tools to measure principal components of this model: (1 specifying outcome by explicit criteria for adverse event definition, mode of ascertainment, cause, severity, or preventability, and (2 quantitatively measuring predictors such as patient factors, comorbidity, severity of degenerative spine disease, and invasiveness of spine surgery. Methods We created operational definitions for 176 adverse occurrences and established multiple mechanisms for reporting them. We developed new methods to quantify the severity of adverse occurrences, degeneration of lumbar spine, and invasiveness of spinal procedures. Using kappa statistics and intra-class correlation coefficients, we assessed agreement for the following: four reviewers independently coding etiology, preventability, and severity for 141 adverse occurrences, two observers coding lumbar spine degenerative changes in 10 selected cases, and two researchers coding invasiveness of surgery for 50 initial cases. Results During the first six months of prospective surveillance, rigorous daily medical record reviews identified 92.6% of the adverse occurrences we recorded, and voluntary reports by providers identified 38.5% (surgeons reported 18.3%, inpatient rounding team reported 23.1%, and conferences discussed 6.1%. Trained observers had fair agreement in classifying etiology of 141 adverse occurrences into 18 categories (kappa = 0.35, but agreement was substantial (kappa ≥ 0.61 for 4 specific categories: technical error, failure in communication, systems failure, and no error. Preventability assessment had moderate agreement (mean weighted

  11. Predicting complication risk in spine surgery: a prospective analysis of a novel risk assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeravagu, Anand; Li, Amy; Swinney, Christian; Tian, Lu; Moraff, Adrienne; Azad, Tej D; Cheng, Ivan; Alamin, Todd; Hu, Serena S; Anderson, Robert L; Shuer, Lawrence; Desai, Atman; Park, Jon; Olshen, Richard A; Ratliff, John K

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The ability to assess the risk of adverse events based on known patient factors and comorbidities would provide more effective preoperative risk stratification. Present risk assessment in spine surgery is limited. An adverse event prediction tool was developed to predict the risk of complications after spine surgery and tested on a prospective patient cohort. METHODS The spinal Risk Assessment Tool (RAT), a novel instrument for the assessment of risk for patients undergoing spine surgery that was developed based on an administrative claims database, was prospectively applied to 246 patients undergoing 257 spinal procedures over a 3-month period. Prospectively collected data were used to compare the RAT to the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) and the American College of Surgeons National Surgery Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) Surgical Risk Calculator. Study end point was occurrence and type of complication after spine surgery. RESULTS The authors identified 69 patients (73 procedures) who experienced a complication over the prospective study period. Cardiac complications were most common (10.2%). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated to compare complication outcomes using the different assessment tools. Area under the curve (AUC) analysis showed comparable predictive accuracy between the RAT and the ACS NSQIP calculator (0.670 [95% CI 0.60-0.74] in RAT, 0.669 [95% CI 0.60-0.74] in NSQIP). The CCI was not accurate in predicting complication occurrence (0.55 [95% CI 0.48-0.62]). The RAT produced mean probabilities of 34.6% for patients who had a complication and 24% for patients who did not (p = 0.0003). The generated predicted values were stratified into low, medium, and high rates. For the RAT, the predicted complication rate was 10.1% in the low-risk group (observed rate 12.8%), 21.9% in the medium-risk group (observed 31.8%), and 49.7% in the high-risk group (observed 41.2%). The ACS NSQIP calculator consistently

  12. The use of antifibrinolytic agents in spine surgery. A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, J Brian; Chin, Yoona; Levin, Andrew; Feng, Du

    2008-11-01

    Antifibrinolytic agents have been shown to decrease the blood loss associated with major orthopaedic surgical procedures. Spine surgery, particularly procedures performed for deformity correction and procedures involving long arthrodesis constructs, can be associated with a large amount of blood loss requiring blood transfusions. The purpose of the present study was to determine if antifibrinolytic agents reduced blood transfusions in patients managed with spine surgery and to see if one agent had a greater effect than another. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the available literature were performed to investigate the efficacy of aprotinin, tranexamic acid, and epsilon-aminocaproic acid in terms of reducing blood loss and blood transfusions in patients undergoing spine surgery. This meta-analysis was focused on the role of these agents in major spine operations as reported in eighteen clinical trials that included information on the drug dosage, the age of the patient, blood loss, blood transfusions, surgery complexity, and complications. Compared with control groups, the treatment groups for all three antifibrinolytic agents maintained lower levels of total blood loss and transfusions associated with spine surgery. The effect size (d) of the differences in total blood loss between the treatment and control groups ranged from -0.668 (95% confidence interval, -0.971 to -0.365) to -0.936 (95% confidence interval, -1.240 to -0.632) across all three agents. The effect size (d) of the differences in total blood transfusions between the treatment and control groups ranged from -0.466 (95% confidence interval, -0.764 to -0.167) to -0.749 (95% confidence interval, -1.046 to -0.453) across all three agents. Aprotinin, tranexamic acid, and epsilon-aminocaproic acid are effective for reducing blood loss and transfusions in patients managed with spine surgery. With the exception of aprotinin, the side-effect profiles of these agents have not been shown to cause any

  13. Vertebral artery injury during foraminal decompression in "low-risk" cervical spine surgery: incidence and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermüller, Thomas; Wostrack, Maria; Shiban, Ehab; Pape, Haiko; Harmening, Kathrin; Friedrich, Benjamin; Prothmann, Sascha; Meyer, Bernhard; Ringel, Florian

    2015-11-01

    Vertebral artery injury (VAI) during foraminal decompression in cervical spine surgery in the absence of repositioning or screw stabilization is rare. Without immediate recognition and treatment, it may have disastrous consequences. We aimed to describe the incidence and management of iatrogenic VAI in low-risk cervical spine surgery. The records of all patients who underwent surgical procedures of the cervical spine between January 2007 and May 2012 were retrospectively consecutively evaluated. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion or arthroplasty as well as dorsal foraminal decompression through the Frykholm approach in degenerative diseases were defined as low-risk surgeries (n = 992). VAI occurred in 0.3 % (n = 3) of 992 procedures: in one case during a dorsal foraminal decompression, and in two cases during the anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) of two or four levels, respectively. In the first case, the VAI was intraoperatively misdiagnosed. Despite an initially uneventful course, the patient suffered hemorrhage from a pseudoaneurysm of the injured VA 1 month after surgery. The aneurysm was successfully occluded by endovascular coiling. In both ACDF cases, angiography and endovascular stenting of the lacerated segment proceeded immediately after the surgery. All three patients suffered no permanent deterioration. In a high-volume surgical center, the incidence of VAI during low-risk cervical spine surgery is extremely low, comprising 0.3 % of all cases. The major risks are delayed sequels of the vessel wall laceration. In cases of VAI, immediate angiographic diagnostics and generous indications for endovascular treatment are obligatory.

  14. The value of intraoperative three dimensional fluoroscopy in anterior decompressive surgery of the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldauf, J; Müller, J-U; Fleck, S; Hinz, P; Chiriac, A; Schroeder, H W S

    2008-02-01

    Intraoperative use of the mobile Siremobil Iso-C3D C-arm (Siemens AG, Medical Solutions, Erlangen) considerably improves the information available during cervical spine surgery. We report our experiences with the Iso-C3D fluoroscopic unit during anterior decompressive surgery of the cervical spine. We used the mobile Siremobil Iso-C3D C-arm during decompressive cervical spine surgery. The study included 25 patients (22 males, 3 females) with degenerative cervical stenosis. Mean age was 55.9 years (42-73 years). Eighteen patients were surgically treated for one-level, six for two-level and one for three-level disease. Intraoperative 3D imaging was performed to evaluate the extent of bony decompression and to assist correct positioning of the cages when the surgeon believed that sufficient decompression had been achieved. Visualization of the extent of bone removal was good in all patients. In 3 patients, insufficient bony decompression with persisting dorsal osteophytic spurs was noticed on sagittal and axial images. In these patients, surgery had to be continued. Successful decompression was proved thereafter by a second scan. The quality of the images of the cervical spine was sufficient, although slightly inferior to that of a CT scan. The Siremobil Iso-C3D provides intraoperative 3D images of bony structures of the cervical spine. Although the imagine quality is inferior to that of a CT, in our series surgical revisions could be avoided in 12.5% of the patients on the basis of these intraoperative images of incomplete bony decompression. This means a reduction of additional costs which would arise with surgical revision.

  15. Thoracolumbar fracture with listhesis - an uncommon manifestation of child abuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, Terry L.; Blitman, Netta M. [Department of Radiology, Montefiore Medical Center, 111 E. 210th Street, Bronx, New York, NY 10467-2490 (United States); Berdon, Walter E. [Department of Radiology, Babies Hospital, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York (United States); Cassell, Ian [Department of Radiology, Phoenix Children' s Hospital, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2003-05-01

    Thoracolumbar fracture with listhesis (FL) is an uncommon manifestation of child abuse (increasingly known as nonaccidental trauma), with only six prior reports in the literature. This article seeks to call attention to FL of the thoracolumbar spine in abused children and infants. We reviewed plain films, CT and MR images in seven new cases of FL of the thoracolumbar spine in abused children ages 6 months to 7 years, two of whom became paraplegic from their injuries. Findings varied from subtle listhesis of one vertebra on another to frank vertebral dislocation, most commonly at L1/2. Paravertebral calcification was present in all but one case. In two children, thoracolumbar FL was the only radiographic sign of abuse. Radiographic findings of FL of the thoracolumbar spine may be subtle and may be erroneously interpreted as due to a congenital or neoplastic cause. While other signs of child abuse should be sought, spinal injury may be the sole sign of abuse. Recognition of this entity is important to pursue the diagnosis of abuse. (orig.)

  16. Thoracolumbar fracture with listhesis - an uncommon manifestation of child abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, Terry L.; Blitman, Netta M.; Berdon, Walter E.; Cassell, Ian

    2003-01-01

    Thoracolumbar fracture with listhesis (FL) is an uncommon manifestation of child abuse (increasingly known as nonaccidental trauma), with only six prior reports in the literature. This article seeks to call attention to FL of the thoracolumbar spine in abused children and infants. We reviewed plain films, CT and MR images in seven new cases of FL of the thoracolumbar spine in abused children ages 6 months to 7 years, two of whom became paraplegic from their injuries. Findings varied from subtle listhesis of one vertebra on another to frank vertebral dislocation, most commonly at L1/2. Paravertebral calcification was present in all but one case. In two children, thoracolumbar FL was the only radiographic sign of abuse. Radiographic findings of FL of the thoracolumbar spine may be subtle and may be erroneously interpreted as due to a congenital or neoplastic cause. While other signs of child abuse should be sought, spinal injury may be the sole sign of abuse. Recognition of this entity is important to pursue the diagnosis of abuse. (orig.)

  17. Thoraco-lumbar fractures with blunt traumatic aortic injury in adult patients: correlations and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Giorgio; Ramieri, Alessandro; Chiarella, Vito; Vigliotta, Massimo; Domenicucci, Maurizio

    2018-04-16

    Traumatic thoraco-lumbar spine fracture spine with a concomitant blunt aortic injury is uncommon but potentially a fatal association. Our aim was to clarify: morphology of spinal fractures related to vascular damages and vice versa, diagnostic procedures and decision-making process for the best treatment options for spine and vessels. We enrolled 42 cases culled from the literature and five personal ones, reviewing in detail by AO Spine Classification, Society of Vascular Surgery classification and Abbreviated Injury Scale for neurological evaluation. Most fractures were at T11-L2 (29 cases; 62%) and type C (17; 70%). 17 (38%) were neurological. Most common vascular damage was the rupture (20; 43%), followed by intimal tear (13; 28%) and pseudoaneurysm (9; 19%). Vascular injury often required open or endovascular repair before spinal fixation. Distraction developed aortic intimal damage until rupture, while flexion-distraction lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm and rotation-torsion full laceration of collateral branches. CT and angio-CT were investigations of choice, followed by angiography. Neurological condition remained unchanged in 28 cases (90%). Overall mortality was 30%, but it was higher in AIS A. Relationship between thoraco-lumbar fracture and vascular lesion is rare, but potentially fatal. Comprehension of spinal biomechanics and vascular damages could be crucial to avoid poor results or decrease mortality. Frequently, traction of the aorta and its vessels is realized by C-dislocated fractures. CT and angio-CT are recommended. Spine stabilization should always follow the vascular repair. Early severe deficits worse the prognosis related to neurological recovery and survival. These slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.

  18. Risk of adjacent-segment disease requiring surgery after short lumbar fusion: results of the French Spine Surgery Society Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scemama, Caroline; Magrino, Baptiste; Gillet, Philippe; Guigui, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Adjacent-segment disease (ASD) is an increasingly problematic complication following lumbar fusion surgery. The purpose of the current study was to determine the risk of ASD requiring surgical treatment after short lumbar or lumbosacral fusion. Primary spinal disease and surgical factors associated with an increased risk of revision were also investigated. METHODS This was a retrospective cohort study using the French Spine Surgery Society clinical data that included 3338 patients, with an average follow-up duration of 7 years (range 4-10 years). Clinical ASD requiring surgery was the principal judgment criterion; the length of follow-up time and initial spinal disease were also recorded. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed. The correlation between primary spinal disease and surgery with an increased risk of revision was investigated. RESULTS During the follow-up period, 186 patients required revision surgery for ASD (5.6%). The predicted risk of ASD requiring revision surgery was 1.7% (95% CI 1.3%-2.2%) at 2 years, 3.8% (95% CI 4.9%-6.7%) at 4 years, 5.7% (95% CI 4.9%-6.7%) at 6 years, and 9% (95% CI 8.7%-10.6%) at 8 years. Initial spinal disease affected the risk of ASD requiring surgery (p = 0.0003). The highest risk was observed for degenerative spondylolisthesis. CONCLUSIONS ASD requiring revision surgery was predicted in 5.6% of patients 7 years after index short lumbar spinal fusion in the French Spine Surgery Society retrospective series. An increased risk of ASD requiring revision surgery associated with initial spinal disease showed the significance of the influence of natural degenerative history on adjacent-segment pathology.

  19. Lumbar spine fusion surgery and stroke: a national cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jau-Ching; Chen, Yu-Chun; Liu, Laura; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Thien, Peck-Foong; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Cheng, Henrich; Lo, Su-Shun

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the incidence and risk of stroke after lumbar spinal fusion surgery. Study subjects were identified from a nationwide cohort of 1 million people from 2000 to 2005 and were divided into the lumbar spinal fusion group (n = 2,015), who received posterior lumbar spinal fusion surgery, and the comparison group (n = 16,120) composed of age-, sex-, and propensity score-matched control subjects. The matching process was intended to adjust for demographics, comorbidities, and other immeasurable covariates to minimize selection bias. All subjects were followed up for 3 years for stroke, including hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were performed. The overall incidence rate of stroke in the cohort was 9.99 per 1,000 person-year. The lumbar spinal fusion group was less likely to have any stroke (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 0.83, p = 0.293), hemorrhagic stroke (adjusted HR = 0.74, p = 0.739) and ischemic stroke (adjusted HR = 0.81, p = 0.250) than the comparison group, but without significance. Three years post-operatively, patients who received lumbar spinal fusion had stroke incidence rates similar to those without surgery. Posterior lumbar spinal fusion surgery is not associated with increased risks for any kind of stroke.

  20. Technical Aspects on the Use of Ultrasonic Bone Shaver in Spine Surgery: Experience in 307 Patients

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    Derya Burcu Hazer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. We discuss technical points, the safety, and efficacy of ultrasonic bone shaver in various spinal surgeries within our own series. Methods. Between June 2010 and January 2014, 307 patients with various spinal diseases were operated on with the use of an ultrasonic bone curette with microhook shaver (UBShaver. Patients’ data were recorded and analyzed retrospectively. The technique for the use of the device is described for each spine surgery procedure. Results. Among the 307 patients, 33 (10.7% cases had cervical disorder, 17 (5.5% thoracic disorder, 3 (0.9% foramen magnum disorder, and 254 (82.7% lumbar disorders. Various surgical techniques were performed either assisted or alone by UBShaver. The duration of the operations and the need for blood replacement were relatively low. The one-year follow-up with Neck Disability Index (NDI and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI scores were improved. We had 5 cases of dural tears (1.6% in patients with lumbar spinal disease. No neurological deficit was found in any patients. Conclusion. We recommend this device as an assistant tool in various spine surgeries and as a primary tool in foraminotomies. It is a safe device in spine surgery with very low complication rate.

  1. C5 Palsy After Cervical Spine Surgery: A Multicenter Retrospective Review of 59 Cases.

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    Thompson, Sara E; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Nassr, Ahmad; Mroz, Thomas E; Fish, David E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Fehlings, Michael G; Tannoury, Chadi A; Tannoury, Tony; Tortolani, P Justin; Traynelis, Vincent C; Gokaslan, Ziya; Hilibrand, Alan S; Isaacs, Robert E; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Chou, Dean; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Cho, Samuel K; Baird, Evan O; Sasso, Rick C; Arnold, Paul M; Buser, Zorica; Bydon, Mohamad; Clarke, Michelle J; De Giacomo, Anthony F; Derakhshan, Adeeb; Jobse, Bruce; Lord, Elizabeth L; Lubelski, Daniel; Massicotte, Eric M; Steinmetz, Michael P; Smith, Gabriel A; Pace, Jonathan; Corriveau, Mark; Lee, Sungho; Cha, Peter I; Chatterjee, Dhananjay; Gee, Erica L; Mayer, Erik N; McBride, Owen J; Roe, Allison K; Yanez, Marisa Y; Stroh, D Alex; Than, Khoi D; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A multicenter, retrospective review of C5 palsy after cervical spine surgery. Postoperative C5 palsy is a known complication of cervical decompressive spinal surgery. The goal of this study was to review the incidence, patient characteristics, and outcome of C5 palsy in patients undergoing cervical spine surgery. We conducted a multicenter, retrospective review of 13 946 patients across 21 centers who received cervical spine surgery (levels C2 to C7) between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, inclusive. P values were calculated using 2-sample t test for continuous variables and χ 2 tests or Fisher exact tests for categorical variables. Of the 13 946 cases reviewed, 59 patients experienced a postoperative C5 palsy. The incidence rate across the 21 sites ranged from 0% to 2.5%. At most recent follow-up, 32 patients reported complete resolution of symptoms (54.2%), 15 had symptoms resolve with residual effects (25.4%), 10 patients did not recover (17.0%), and 2 were lost to follow-up (3.4%). C5 palsy occurred in all surgical approaches and across a variety of diagnoses. The majority of patients had full recovery or recovery with residual effects. This study represents the largest series of North American patients reviewed to date.

  2. Hip and spine surgery is of questionable value in spina bifida: an evidence-based review.

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    Wright, James G

    2011-05-01

    Although many children with spina bifida and associated scoliosis or dislocated hips undergo spine or hip surgery, the benefits are uncertain. The purpose was to perform an evidence-based review on the benefits and risks of surgery for dislocated hips and scoliosis in spina bifida. I performed a Medline(®) and Embase(®) search from 1950 to 2009 for Level I to Level III studies investigating the benefits and risks of surgery for scoliosis and hip dislocation in patients with spina bifida. When available, I extracted types of surgery, complication rates, functional outcomes of seating, walking, and overall physical function. All treatment recommendations received a Grade of Recommendation: Grade A (consistent Level I studies); Grade B (consistent Level II and III studies); Grade C (consistent level IV and V studies); or Grade I (insufficient or contradictory studies). Combined anterior and posterior surgery had lower rates of nonunion for scoliosis. Although there may be some benefit in seating, overall physical function measured in a different and nonstandardized fashion was not much changed and major complication rates, including nonunion and infections for scoliosis surgery, exceed 50% in several studies. For dislocated hips, the impact on walking ability appears related to contracture (not dislocation). Surgery for hip dislocation did not improve walking ability. The literature provides no guidance on the best treatment for unilateral dislocation. The benefits of scoliosis surgery are uncertain (Grade I). Spine surgery, if performed, should be anterior and posterior (Grade B). An all-pedicle approach for scoliosis surgery may be effective (Level I). Hip reduction surgery did not improve walking (Grade B) but may be appropriate in low-level unilateral dislocation (Level I).

  3. Surgical site infections following spine surgery: eliminating the controversies in the diagnosis.

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    Chahoud, Jad; Kanafani, Zeina; Kanj, Souha S

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) following spine surgery is a dreaded complication with significant morbidity and economic burden. SSIs following spine surgery can be superficial, characterized by obvious wound drainage or deep-seated with a healed wound. Staphylococcus aureus remains the principal causal agent. There are certain pre-operative risk factors that increase the risk of SSI, mainly diabetes, smoking, steroids, and peri-operative transfusions. Additionally, intra-operative risk factors include surgical invasiveness, type of fusion, implant use, and traditional instead of minimally invasive approach. A high level of suspicion is crucial to attaining an early definitive diagnosis and initiating appropriate management. The most common presenting symptom is back pain, usually manifesting 2-4 weeks and up to 3 months after a spinal procedure. Scheduling a follow-up visit between weeks 2 and 4 after surgery is therefore necessary for early detection. Inflammatory markers are important diagnostic tools, and comparing pre-operative with post-operative levels should be done when suspecting SSIs following spine surgery. Particularly, serum amyloid A is a novel inflammatory marker that can expedite the diagnosis of SSIs. Magnetic resonance imaging remains the diagnostic modality of choice when suspecting a SSI following spine surgery. While 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography is not widely used, it may be useful in challenging cases. Despite their low yield, blood cultures should be collected before initiating antibiotic therapy. Samples from wound drainage should be sent for Gram stain and cultures. When there is a high clinical suspicion of SSI and in the absence of superficial wound drainage, computed tomography-guided aspiration of paraspinal collections is warranted. Unless the patient is hemodynamically compromised, antibiotics should be deferred until proper specimens for culture are secured.

  4. Surgical Site Infections Following Spine Surgery: Eliminating the Controversies in the Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jad eChahoud

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infection (SSI following spine surgery is a dreaded complication with significant morbidity and economic burden. SSIs following spine surgery can be superficial, characterized by obvious wound drainage, or deep-seated with a healed wound. Staphylococcus aureus remains the principal causal agent. There are certain pre-operative risk factors that increase the risk of SSI, mainly diabetes, smoking, steroids, and peri-operative transfusions. Additionally, intra-operative risk factors include surgical invasiveness, type of fusion, implant use, and traditional instead of minimally invasive approach. A high level of suspicion is crucial to attaining an early definitive diagnosis and initiating appropriate management. The most common presenting symptom is back pain, usually manifesting 2 to 4 weeks and up to 3 months after a spinal procedure. Scheduling a follow-up visit between weeks 2 to 4 after surgery is therefore necessary for early detection. Inflammatory markers are important diagnostic tools, and comparing pre-operative with post-operative levels should be done when suspecting SSIs following spine surgery. Particularly, Serum Amyloid A (SAA is a novel inflammatory marker that can expedite the diagnosis of SSIs. Magnetic resonance imaging remains the diagnostic modality of choice when suspecting a SSI following spine surgery. While 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography is not widely used, it may be useful in challenging cases. Despite their low yield, blood cultures should be collected before initiating antibiotic therapy. Samples from wound drainage should be sent for Gram stain and cultures. When there is a high clinical suspicion of SSI and in the absence of superficial wound drainage, CT guided aspiration of paraspinal collections is warranted. Unless the patient is hemodynamically compromised, antibiotics should be deferred until proper specimens for culture are secured.

  5. "Hardware breakage in spine surgery (A retrospective clinical study "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Sadat MM

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available This was a retrospective review of a consecutive series of patients with spinal disease in year 2000, who underwent posterior fusion and instrumentation with Harrington distraction and Cotrel-Dobousset system to evaluate causes of hardware failure. Many cases of clinical failure has been observed in spinal instrumentation used in spinal disorder like spondylolisthesis, fractures, deformities, … . Thirty six cases that were operated because of spinal disorders like spondylolisthesis, fractures, deformities, …, were included in this study. Seventeen of this cases had breakage of device. Factors like age at surgery, type of instrumentation, angles before and after surgery and …, were compared in two groups of patients. The most common instrument breakage was pedicle screw breakage. Pseudoarthrosis was the main factor that was presented in failure group (P value<0.001. Other important causes were, age of patient at surgery (P value=0.04, pedicle screw placement off center in the sagittal or coronal plane of the pedicle (P value=0.04. Instrumentation loads increased significantly as a direct result of variations in surgical technique that produce pseudoarthrosis, pedicle screw placement off center in the sagittal plane of the pedicle, or using less than 6 mm diameter screw. This factor can be prevented with meticulous surgical technique and using proper devices.

  6. Description and Results of a Comprehensive Care Protocol for Overnight-Stay Spine Surgery in Adults.

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    Bednar, Drew A

    2017-07-15

    This is a prospective cohort study. The aim of this study was to define the probability of successful morning-after discharge after adult spine surgery achieved with a standard care protocol as applied to patients with a large variety of common degenerative spine disorders. Qualifying criteria for ambulatory or overnight-stay adult spine surgery are not well defined in either the spine or anesthesia literature. Most reports simply go to American Society of Anesthesiology risk classification or surgical technique alternatives and do not present a clearly defined patient care and case management protocol. A standardized protocol of patient preparation, preoperative comorbidities optimization, and perioperative care was applied in a prospective cohort of 126 patients including 83 lumbar and 41 cervical procedures. Office and hospital chart records were reviewed for relevant outcomes. Fully 122 of 124 appropriately selected cases were able to successfully achieve uneventful same-day discharge without any need for readmission, unscheduled early emergency room or clinic visits, or other major complications. Both failures were for urinary retention in senior males and resolved after a single-day admission to the main hospital. A wide variety of common degenerative spinal pathology in adults can be routinely and safely managed on an overnight-stay basis without requirement for formal hospital inpatient admission in patients appropriately selected and pre-educated to the experience and whose major comorbidities are preoperatively optimized. N/A.

  7. Thoracolumbar Injury Classification and Severity Score in children: a reliability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Ross L; Miller, Joseph H; Ramadan, Omar I; Lysek, Michael C; Kuhn, Elizabeth N; Rocque, Brandon G; Conklin, Michael J; Tubbs, R Shane; Walters, Beverly C; Agee, Bonita S; Rozzelle, Curtis J

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE There are many classification systems for injuries of the thoracolumbar spine. The recent Thoracolumbar Injury Classification and Severity Score (TLICS) has been shown to be a reliable tool for adult patients. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of the TLICS system in pediatric patients. The validity of the TLICS system is assessed in a companion paper. METHODS The medical records of pediatric patients with acute, traumatic thoracolumbar fractures at a single Level 1 trauma center were retrospectively reviewed. A TLICS was calculated for each patient using CT and MRI, along with the neurological examination recorded in the patient's medical record. TLICSs were compared with the type of treatment received. Five raters scored all patients separately to assess interrater reliability. RESULTS TLICS calculations were completed for 81 patients. The mean patient age was 10.9 years. Girls represented 51.8% of the study population, and 80% of the study patients were white. The most common mechanisms of injury were motor vehicle accidents (60.5%), falls (17.3%), and all-terrain vehicle accidents (8.6%). The mean TLICS was 3.7 ± 2.8. Surgery was the treatment of choice for 33.3% of patients. The agreement between the TLICS-suggested treatment and the actual treatment received was statistically significant (p reliability of the TLICS system ranged from moderate to very good, with a Fleiss' generalized kappa (κ) value of 0.69 for the TLICS treatment suggestion among all patients; however, interrater reliability decreased when MRI was used to contribute to the TLICS. The κ value decreased from 0.73 to 0.57 for patients with CT only vs patients with CT/MRI or MRI only, respectively (p reliability among physicians assessing thoracolumbar fracture treatment in pediatric patients. Physicians should be cautious when using MRI to aid in the surgical decision-making process.

  8. Spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion for thoracolumbar kyphosis in an adult with achondroplasia

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    Miyazaki, Masashi; Kanezaki, Shozo; Notani, Naoki; Ishihara, Toshinobu; Tsumura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Fixed thoracolumbar kyphosis with spinal stenosis in adult patients with achondroplasia presents a challenging issue. We describe the first case in which spondylectomy and minimally invasive lateral access interbody arthrodesis were used for the treatment of fixed severe thoracolumbar kyphosis and lumbar spinal canal stenosis in an adult with achondroplasia. Patient concerns: A 61-year-old man with a history of achondroplastic dwarfism presented with low back pain and radiculopathy and neurogenic claudication. Diagnoses: Plain radiographs revealed a high-grade thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity with diffuse degenerative changes in the lumbar spine. The apex was located at L2, the local kyphotic angle from L1 to L3 was 105°, and the anterior area was fused from the L1 to L3 vertebrae. MRI revealed significant canal and lateral recess stenosis secondary to facet hypertrophy. Interventions: We planned a front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements. We first performed anterior release at the fused part from L1 to L3 and XLIF at L3/4 and L4/5. Next, the patient was placed in the prone position. Spondylectomy at the L2 vertebra and posterior fusion from T10 to L5 were performed. Postoperative radiographs revealed L1 to L3 kyphosis of 32°. Outcomes: No complications occurred during or after surgery. Postoperatively, the patient's low back pain and neurological claudication were resolved. No worsening of kyphosis was observed 24 months postoperatively. Lessons: Circumferential decompression of the spinal cord at the apical vertebral level and decompression of lumbar canal stenosis were necessary. Front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements via spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a reasonable surgical option for thoracolumbar kyphosis and developmental canal stenosis in patients with achondroplasia. PMID:29245270

  9. An evidence-based clinical guideline for the use of antithrombotic therapies in spine surgery.

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    Bono, Christopher M; Watters, William C; Heggeness, Michael H; Resnick, Daniel K; Shaffer, William O; Baisden, Jamie; Ben-Galim, Peleg; Easa, John E; Fernand, Robert; Lamer, Tim; Matz, Paul G; Mendel, Richard C; Patel, Rajeev K; Reitman, Charles A; Toton, John F

    2009-12-01

    The objective of the North American Spine Society (NASS) Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline on antithrombotic therapies in spine surgery was to provide evidence-based recommendations to address key clinical questions surrounding the use of antithrombotic therapies in spine surgery. The guideline is intended to address these questions based on the highest quality clinical literature available on this subject as of February 2008. The goal of the guideline recommendations was to assist in delivering optimum, efficacious treatment with the goal of preventing thromboembolic events. To provide an evidence-based, educational tool to assist spine surgeons in minimizing the risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). Systematic review and evidence-based clinical guideline. This report is from the Antithrombotic Therapies Work Group of the NASS Evidence-Based Guideline Development Committee. The work group was composed of multidisciplinary spine care specialists, all of whom were trained in the principles of evidence-based analysis. Each member of the group was involved in formatting a series of clinical questions to be addressed by the group. The final questions agreed on by the group are the subject of this report. A literature search addressing each question and using a specific search protocol was performed on English language references found in MEDLINE, EMBASE (Drugs and Pharmacology), and four additional, evidence-based databases. The relevant literature was then independently rated by at least three reviewers using the NASS-adopted standardized levels of evidence. An evidentiary table was created for each of the questions. Final grades of recommendation for the answers to each clinical question were arrived at via Web casts among members of the work group using standardized grades of recommendation. When Level I to IV evidence was insufficient to support a recommendation to answer a specific clinical question, expert consensus was arrived at by

  10. A Review of Current Clinical Applications of Three-Dimensional Printing in Spine Surgery.

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    Cho, Woojin; Job, Alan Varkey; Chen, Jing; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2018-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a transformative technology with a potentially wide range of applications in the field of orthopaedic spine surgery. This article aims to review the current applications, limitations, and future developments of 3D printing technology in orthopaedic spine surgery. Current preoperative applications of 3D printing include construction of complex 3D anatomic models for improved visual understanding, preoperative surgical planning, and surgical simulations for resident education. Intraoperatively, 3D printers have been successfully used in surgical guidance systems and in the creation of patient specific implantable devices. Furthermore, 3D printing is revolutionizing the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, allowing construction of biocompatible scaffolds suitable for cell growth and vasculature. Advances in printing technology and evidence of positive clinical outcomes are needed before there is an expansion of 3D printing applied to the clinical setting.

  11. Patient-Reported Outcomes and Costs Associated With Revision Surgery for Degenerative Cervical Spine Diseases.

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    Kim, Elliott J; Chotai, Silky; Wick, Joseph B; Stonko, David P; Sivaganesan, Ahilan; Devin, Clinton J

    2018-04-01

    A retrospective review of a prospective database. The aim of this study was to determine cost and outcomes of revision cervical spine surgery. Revision rates for cervical spine surgery are steadily increasing. It is important to counsel patients on expected results following a revision procedure. However, outcomes and cost of these procedures are poorly defined in the literature. Patients undergoing revision cervical spine surgery at a single institution were included between October 2010 and January 2016 in a prospective registry database. Patients were divided into three cohorts depending on their etiology for revision, including recurrent disease, pseudoarthrosis, or adjacent segment disease. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs), including Neck Disability Index (NDI), EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D), modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) score, numeric rating scale-neck pain (NRS-NP), and numeric rating scale-arm pain (NRS-AP), were measured at baseline and 12 months following revision surgery. Mean costs at 12 months following revision surgery were also calculated. Satisfaction was determined by the NASS patient satisfaction index. Variables were compared using Student t test. A total of 115 patients underwent cervical revision surgery for recurrent disease (n = 21), pseudoarthrosis (n = 45), and adjacent segment disease (n = 49). There was significant improvement in all patient-reported outcomes at 12 months following surgery regardless of etiology (P revision surgery ranged between 21,294 ± 8614 and 23,914 ± 15,396 depending on pathology. No significant differences were seen between costs among different revision groups (P = 0.53). Satisfaction was met in 75.5% to 85.7% (P = 0.21) of patients depending on the etiology of the revision need. Complication rates were between 4% and 9%. This is one of the first studies to determine costs and outcome measures in the setting of cervical spine revision surgery. On the basis of our analysis

  12. Causes and risk factors for postoperative fever in spine surgery patients.

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    Walid, M Sami; Woodall, M Neal; Nutter, Jonathan P; Ajjan, Mohammed; Robinson, Joe Sam

    2009-03-01

    Postoperative fever is a common dilemma faced by neurosurgeons. To study this problem, we prospectively collected patients who developed fever after spine surgery during the academic year 2007-2008 for whom the internist's consultation was requested. Eighty-five (85) patients were identified, of which 17 had an identifiable infectious cause for their febrile reaction (20%) - fever was attributed to urinary tract infection in 8 cases, pneumonia in 5 cases, wound infection in 3 cases (all lumbar), and cholecystitis in 1 case. The remaining 68 patients (80%) had no definitive diagnosis and fever was attributed to a peripheral venous line which, in this case, was replaced or discontinued. In 32 (37.6%) of the patients, the fever developed on postoperative day (POD) 2 or later. There was no statistically significant relationship between day of fever appearance and whether the fever was due to definite infection (P = 0.737). Comparing the basic group with another group of 456 spine surgery patients from 2006-2007 who might or might not have developed fever postoperatively using ANOVA, we found a significant difference in age (P = 0.011) and a very significant difference in hemoglobin level (P = 0.000) and HbA1c level (P = 0.000), but not in body mass index (BMI) (P = 0.289). Thus, most of the postoperative fever cases after spine surgery have no identifiable infectious focus and develop mainly in older patients with anemia and inadequately controlled HbA1c. A meticulous investigation of the source of fever including laboratory and radiological studies remains essential. Early mobilization is recommended for individuals undergoing lower spine surgery in order to decrease bacterial contamination from the gluteal cleavage.

  13. Analysis of Incident and Accident Reports and Risk Management in Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Imagama, Shiro; Ando, Kei; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Kenyu; Tsushima, Mikito; Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Matsumoto, Akiyuki; Morozumi, Masayoshi; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Nagao, Yoshimasa; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-08-01

    A review of accident and incident reports. To analyze prevalence, characteristics, and details of perioperative incidents and accidents in patients receiving spine surgery. In our institution, a clinical error that potentially results in an adverse event is usually submitted as an incident or accident report through a web database, to ensure anonymous and blame-free reporting. All reports are analyzed by a medical safety management group. These reports contain valuable data for management of medical safety, but there have been no studies evaluating such data for spine surgery. A total of 320 incidents and accidents that occurred perioperatively in 172 of 415 spine surgeries were included in the study. Incidents were defined as events that were "problematic, but with no damage to the patient," and accidents as events "with damage to the patient." The details of these events were analyzed. There were 278 incidents in 137 surgeries and 42 accidents in 35 surgeries, giving prevalence of 33% (137/415) and 8% (35/415), respectively. The proportion of accidents among all events was significantly higher for doctors than non-doctors [68.0% (17/25) vs. 8.5% (25/295), P < 0.01] and in the operating room compared with outside the operating room [40.5% (15/37) vs. 9.5% (27/283), P < 0.01]. There was no significant difference in years of experience among personnel involved in all events. The major types of events were medication-related, line and tube problems, and falls and slips. Accidents also occurred because of a long-term prone position, with complications such as laryngeal edema, ulnar nerve palsy, and tooth damage. Surgery and procedures in the operating room always have a risk of complications. Therefore, a particular effort is needed to establish safe management of this environment and to provide advice on risk to the doctor and medical care team. 4.

  14. Diabetes Is Related to Worse Patient-Reported Outcomes at Two Years Following Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaghani, Sheyan J; Archer, Kristin R; Rolfe, RenaClayton; Demaio, David N; Devin, Clinton J

    2016-01-06

    Diabetes has been associated with poor outcomes following elective spine surgery. The purpose of our study was to determine if diabetes predicts worse patient-reported outcomes at two years postoperatively and to evaluate the effect of perioperative blood glucose levels and control on patient-reported outcomes in patients with diabetes. One thousand and five patients undergoing elective spine surgery were included in this prospective cohort study. The presence of diabetes and baseline and one and two-year patient-reported outcomes (Short Form-12 [SF-12], EuroQol-5D [EQ-5D], Oswestry Disability Index [ODI] or Neck Disability Index [NDI], and Numeric Rating Scale [NRS] pain scores) were recorded. The mean blood glucose measurements in patients with diabetes were collected during the postoperative period. Multivariable linear regression analyses were performed to determine predictors of one and two-year outcomes as well as the relationship between perioperative blood glucose and patient-reported outcomes in patients with diabetes. Four hundred and thirty-four patients (43%) had diabetes. When compared with patients without diabetes at two years, patients with diabetes had lower SF-12 Physical Component Summary scores (34.4 points for the diabetic group compared with 38.6 points for the non-diabetic group), lower EQ-5D scores (0.67 for the diabetic group compared with 0.74 for the non-diabetic group), higher ODI or NDI scores (32.1 points for the diabetic group compared with 26.8 points for the non-diabetic group), and higher NRS scores (5.1 points for the diabetic group compared with 4.3 points for the non-diabetic group) (p two years. Perioperative blood glucose control did not predict outcomes at either one or two years in patients with diabetes. Diabetes was associated with worse patient-reported outcomes when patients with diabetes were compared with patients without diabetes at two years following elective spine surgery. Although patients with diabetes improved

  15. Risk factors for surgical site infection and urinary tract infection after spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Hiroyuki; Setoguchi, Takao; Ishidou, Yasuhiro; Nagano, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Takuya; Komiya, Setsuro

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to identify and compare risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) and non-surgical site infections (non-SSIs), particularly urinary tract infection (UTI), after spine surgery. We retrospectively reviewed 825 patients (median age 59.0 years (range 33-70 years); 442 males) who underwent spine surgery at Kagoshima University Hospital from January 2009 to December 2014. Patient parameters were compared using the Mann-Whitney U and Fisher's exact tests. Risk factors associated with SSI and UTI were analyzed via the multiple logistic regression analysis. P operation time (P = 0.0019 and 0.0162, respectively) and ASA classification 3 (P = 0.0132 and 0.0356, respectively). The 1 week post-operative C-reactive protein (CRP) level was a risk factor for UTI (P = 0.0299), but not for SSI (P = 0.4996). There was no relationship between SSI and symptomatic UTI after spine surgery. Risk factors for post-operative SSI and UTI were operative time and ASA classification 3; 1 week post-operative CRP was a risk factor for UTI only.

  16. Multiple hemorrhages in brain after spine surgery supra- and infra-tentorial components together

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baran Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after cranial and spinal surgeries is a well-documented entity, so far concomitant supra- and infra-tentorial hemorrhage after spine surgery has rarely been reported in the literature. A 57-year-old woman presented with intractable low back pain and severely impaired mobility. One year ago, she underwent lumbar laminectomy and fusion with posterior spinal instrumentation between L2 and S1. She developed adjacent segment disease at the upper level of the instrumented vertebra. She had a revision surgery and underwent posterior laminectomy and fusion with bilateral transpedicular instrumentation between T10 and S1. She had severe headache, somnolence, and left hemiparesia 48 h after the surgery. Her emergent head computed tomography depicted intra-parenchymal hemorrhage in the right parietal lobe accompanying with subarachnoid hemorrhage, bilateral symmetrical cerebellar hemorrhages and pneumocephalus. She was treated nonsurgically and she got better despite some residual deficits. Symptoms including constant headache, nausea, vomiting, impaired consciousness, new onset seizure, and focal neurological deficit after spine surgeries should raise suspicion for intracranial intra-parenchymal hemorrhage.

  17. Subsequent Vertebral Fractures Post Cement Augmentation of the Thoracolumbar Spine: Does it Correlate With Level-specific Bone Mineral Density Scores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, Hwee Weng Dennis; Hwee Weng, Dennis Hey; Tan, Jun Hao; Jun, Hao Tan; Tan, Chuen Seng; Chuen, Seng Tan; Tan, Hsi Ming Bryan; Ming, Bryan Tan Hsi; Lau, Puang Huh Bernard; Huh, Bernard Lau Puang; Hee, Hwan Tak; Hwan, Tak Hee

    2015-12-01

    A case-control study. In this study, we investigated the correlation between level-specific preoperative bone mineral density and subsequent vertebral fractures. We also identified factors associated with subsequent vertebral fractures. Complications of cement augmentation of the spine include subsequent vertebral fractures, leading to unnecessary morbidity and more treatment. Ability to predict at-risk vertebra will help guide management. We studied all patients with osteoporotic compression fractures who underwent cement augmentation in a single institution from November 2001 to December 2010 by a single surgeon. Association between level-specific bone mineral density T-scores and subsequent fractures was assessed. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify significant factors associated with subsequent vertebral fractures. 93 patients followed up for a mean duration of 25.1 months (12-96) had a mean age of 76.8 years (47-99). Vertebroplasty was performed in 58 patients (62.4%) on 68 levels and kyphoplasty in 35 patients (37.6%) on 44 levels. Refracture was seen in 16 patients (17.2%). The time to subsequent fracture post cement augmentation was 20.5 months (2-90). For refracture cases, 43.8% (7/16) fractured in the adjacent vertebrae. Subsequently fractured vertebra had a mean T-score of -2.860 (95% confidence interval -3.268 to -2.452) and nonfractured vertebra had a mean T-score of -2.180 (95% confidence interval -2.373 to -1.986). A T-score of -2.2 or lower is predictive of refracture at that vertebra (P = 0.047). Odds ratio increases with decreasing T-scores from -2.2 or lower to -2.6 or lower. A T-score of -2.6 or lower gives no additional predictive advantage. After multivariable analysis, age (P = 0.049) and loss of preoperative anterior vertebral height (P = 0.017) are associated with refracture. Level-specific T-scores are predictive of subsequent fractures and the odds ratio increases with lower T-scores from -2.2 or less to -2.6 or less. They

  18. Impact of preoperative diagnosis on patient satisfaction following lumbar spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Charles H; Carreon, Leah Y; Bydon, Mohamad; Asher, Anthony L; Glassman, Steven D

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Patient satisfaction is a commonly used metric in the current health care environment. While factors that affect patient satisfaction following spine surgery are complex, the authors of this study hypothesized that specific diagnostic groups of patients are more likely to be satisfied after spine surgery and that this is reflected in patient-reported outcome measures. The purpose of this study was to determine if the preoperative diagnosis-disc herniation, stenosis, spondylolisthesis, adjacent segment degeneration, or mechanical disc collapse-would impact patient satisfaction following surgery. METHODS Patients enrolled in the Quality Outcomes Database, formerly known as the National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database (N 2 QOD), completed patient-reported outcome measures, including the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for back pain (NRS-BP) and leg pain (NRS-LP) preoperatively and 1-year postoperatively. Patients were stratified by diagnosis and by their response to the satisfaction question: 1) surgery met my expectations; 2) I did not improve as much as I hoped, but I would undergo the same operation for the same results; 3) surgery helped, but I would not undergo the same operation for the same results; or 4) I am the same or worse as compared with before surgery. RESULTS A greater proportion of patients with primary disc herniation or spondylolisthesis reported that surgery met expectations (66% and 67%, respectively), followed by recurrent disc herniation and stenosis (59% and 60%, respectively). A smaller proportion of patients who underwent surgery for adjacent segment degeneration or mechanical disc collapse had their expectations met (48% and 41%, respectively). The percentage of patients that would undergo the same surgery again, by diagnostic group, was as follows: disc herniation 88%, recurrent disc herniation 79%, spondylolisthesis 86%, stenosis 82%, adjacent segment disease 75%, and mechanical collapse

  19. Ninety-day readmissions after degenerative cervical spine surgery: A single-center administrative database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamnonu, Chibuikem; Cheriyan, Thomas; Goldstein, Jeffrey A; Errico, Thomas J; Bendo, John A

    2015-01-01

    Unplanned hospital readmissions result in significant clinical and financial burdens to patients and the healthcare system. Readmission rates and causes have been investigated using large administrative databases which have certain limitations in data reporting and coding. The objective of this study was to provide a description of 90 day post-discharge readmissions following surgery for common degenerative cervical spine pathologies at a large-volume tertiary hospital. The study also compared the readmission rates of patients who underwent anterior- and posterior-approach procedures. The administrative records from a single-center, high-volume tertiary institution were queried using ICD-9 codes for common cervical pathology over a three year period to determine the rate and causes of readmissions within the 90 days following the index surgery. A total of 768 patients underwent degenerative cervical spine surgery during the three year study period. Within 90 days of discharge, 24 (3.13%) patients were readmitted; 16 (2.06%) readmissions were planned for lumbar surgery; 8 (1.04%) readmissions were unplanned. 640 patients underwent procedures involving an anterior approach and 128 patients underwent procedures involving a posterior approach. There were 14 (2.17%) planned readmissions in the anterior group and 2 (1.5%) in the posterior group. The unplanned readmission rate was 0.63% (4 patients) and 3.13% (4 patients) in the anterior and posterior groups, respectively. (p=0.0343). The 90 day post-discharge unplanned readmission rate that followed elective degenerative cervical spine surgery was 1.04%. The unplanned readmission rate associated with posterior-approach procedures (3.13%) was significantly higher than that of anterior-approach procedures (0.63%). IV.

  20. Effects of Conflicts of Interest on Practice Patterns and Complication Rates in Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ralph W; Weiner, Joseph A; Schallmo, Michael S; Chun, Danielle S; Barth, Kathryn A; Singh, Sameer K; Hsu, Wellington K

    2017-09-01

    Retrospective cohort study. We sought to determine whether financial relationships with industry had any impact on operative and/or complication rates of spine surgeons performing fusion surgeries. Recent actions from Congress and the Institute of Medicine have highlighted the importance of conflicts of interest among physicians. Orthopedic surgeons and neurosurgeons have been identified as receiving the highest amount of industry payments among all specialties. No study has yet investigated the potential effects of disclosed industry payments with quality and choices of patient care. A comprehensive database of spine surgeons in the United States with compiled data of industry payments, operative fusion rates, and complication rates was created. Practice pattern data were derived from a publicly available Medicare-based database generated from selected CPT codes from 2011 to 2012. Complication rate data from 2009 to 2013 were extracted from the ProPublica-Surgeon-Scorecard database, which utilizes postoperative inhospital mortality and 30-day-readmission for designated conditions as complications of surgery. Data regarding industry payments from 2013 to 2014 were derived from the Open Payments website. Surgeons performing rate, and/or complication rate. A total of 2110 surgeons met the inclusion criteria for our database. The average operative fusion rate was 8.8% (SD 4.8%), whereas the average complication rate for lumbar and cervical fusion was 4.1% and 1.9%, respectively. Pearson correlation analysis revealed a statistically significant but negligible relationship between disclosed payments/transactions and both operative fusion and complication rates. Our findings do not support a strong correlation between the payments a surgeon receives from industry and their decisions to perform spine fusion or associated complication rates. Large variability in the rate of fusions performed suggests a poor consensus for indications for spine fusion surgery. 3.

  1. Frailty and postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing surgery for degenerative spine disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Alana M; Charest-Morin, Raphaële; Stobart, Liam; Street, John; Ryerson, Christopher J

    2016-11-01

    Frailty is defined as a state of decreased reserve and susceptibility to stressors. The relationship between frailty and postoperative outcomes after degenerative spine surgery has not been studied. This study aimed to (1) determine prevalence of frailty in the degenerative spine population; (2) describe patient characteristics associated with frailty; and (3) determine the association between frailty and postoperative complications, mortality, length of stay, and discharge disposition. This is a retrospective analysis on a prospectively collected cohort from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP). A total of 53,080 patients who underwent degenerative spine surgery between 2006 and 2012 were included in the study. A modified frailty index (mFI) with 11 variables derived from the NSQIP dataset was used to determine prevalence of frailty and its correlation with a composite outcome of perioperative complications as well as hospital length of stay, mortality, and discharge disposition. After calculating the mFI for each patient, the prevalence and predictors of frailty were determined for our cohort. The association of frailty with postoperative outcomes was determined after adjusting for known and suspected confounders using multivariate logistic regression. Frailty was present in 2,041 patients within the total population (4%) and in 8% of patients older than 65 years. Frailty severity increased with increasing age, male sex, African American race, higher body mass index, recent weight loss, paraplegia or quadriplegia, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, and preadmission residence in a care facility. Frailty severity was an independent predictor of major complication (OR 1.15 for every 0.10 increase in mFI, 95%CI 1.09-1.21, pdegenerative spine surgery. Preoperative recognition of frailty may be useful for perioperative optimization, risk stratification, and patient counseling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Design-Based Comparison of Spine Surgery Simulators: Optimizing Educational Features of Surgical Simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Won Hyung A; Mostafa, Ahmed E; Dharampal, Navjit; Sharlin, Ehud; Kopp, Gail; Jacobs, W Bradley; Hurlbert, R John; Chan, Sonny; Sutherland, Garnette R

    2017-10-01

    Simulation-based education has made its entry into surgical residency training, particularly as an adjunct to hands-on clinical experience. However, one of the ongoing challenges to wide adoption is the capacity of simulators to incorporate educational features required for effective learning. The aim of this study was to identify strengths and limitations of spine simulators to characterize design elements that are essential in enhancing resident education. We performed a mixed qualitative and quantitative cohort study with a focused survey and interviews of stakeholders in spine surgery pertaining to their experiences on 3 spine simulators. Ten participants were recruited spanning all levels of training and expertise until qualitative analysis reached saturation of themes. Participants were asked to perform lumbar pedicle screw insertion on 3 simulators. Afterward, a 10-item survey was administrated and a focused interview was conducted to explore topics pertaining to the design features of the simulators. Overall impressions of the simulators were positive with regards to their educational benefit, but our qualitative analysis revealed differing strengths and limitations. Main design strengths of the computer-based simulators were incorporation of procedural guidance and provision of performance feedback. The synthetic model excelled in achieving more realistic haptic feedback and incorporating use of actual surgical tools. Stakeholders from trainees to experts acknowledge the growing role of simulation-based education in spine surgery. However, different simulation modalities have varying design elements that augment learning in distinct ways. Characterization of these design characteristics will allow for standardization of simulation curricula in spinal surgery, optimizing educational benefit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A novel index for quantifying the risk of early complications for patients undergoing cervical spine surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passias, Peter G; Diebo, Bassel G; Marascalchi, Bryan J; Jalai, Cyrus M; Horn, Samantha R; Zhou, Peter L; Paltoo, Karen; Bono, Olivia J; Worley, Nancy; Poorman, Gregory W; Challier, Vincent; Dixit, Anant; Paulino, Carl; Lafage, Virginie

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE It is becoming increasingly necessary for surgeons to provide evidence supporting cost-effectiveness of surgical treatment for cervical spine pathology. Anticipating surgical risk is critical in accurately evaluating the risk/benefit balance of such treatment. Determining the risk and cost-effectiveness of surgery, complications, revision procedures, and mortality rates are the most significant limitations. The purpose of this study was to determine independent risk factors for medical complications (MCs), surgical complications (SCs), revisions, and mortality rates following surgery for patients with cervical spine pathology. The most relevant risk factors were used to structure an index that will help quantify risk and anticipate failure for such procedures. METHODS The authors of this study performed a retrospective review of the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database for patients treated surgically for cervical spine pathology between 2001 and 2010. Multivariate models were performed to calculate the odds ratio (OR) of the independent risk factors that led to MCs and repeated for SCs, revisions, and mortality. The models controlled for age ( 65 years old), sex, race, revision status (except for revision analysis), surgical approach, number of levels fused/re-fused (2-3, 4-8, ≥ 9), and osteotomy utilization. ORs were weighted based on their predictive category: 2 times for revision surgery predictors and 4 times for mortality predictors. Fifty points were distributed among the predictors based on their cumulative OR to establish a risk index. RESULTS Discharges for 362,989 patients with cervical spine pathology were identified. The mean age was 52.65 years, and 49.47% of patients were women. Independent risk factors included medical comorbidities, surgical parameters, and demographic factors. Medical comorbidities included the following: pulmonary circulation disorder, coagulopathy, metastatic cancer, renal failure, congestive heart failure

  4. Success in esophageal perforation repair with open-wound management after revision cervical spine surgery: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hongquan; Liu, Dandan; You, Weitao; Zhou, Fang; Liu, Zhongjun

    2015-02-01

    Case report. To share our successful experience in treating 1 case of esophageal perforation after anterior revision cervical spine surgery with open-wound management. Early diagnosis and surgical treatment is widely adopted in the management of esophageal complications after anterior cervical spine surgery, but the management of wound after surgical repair of esophageal perforation is rarely discussed. One patient underwent revision anterior cervical spine surgery because of displaced hardware and poor alignment of cervical spine. Esophageal perforation was incurred intraoperatively and found on the first postoperative day. Repair surgery was carried out immediately afterward. During the surgery, esophageal perforation was closed with a suture, and reinforced with a sternocleidomastoid muscle flap. The wound was loosely closed with aspirating drainage. Two days after the surgery, the patient began to show signs of recurrent esophageal leakage and severe secondary wound infection. The wound was then reopened completely before a continuous irrigation and drainage system was positioned in place. In 12 weeks, the esophageal perforation healed without complications or loosening of instrumentation. Open-wound management succeeded in this patient after surgical repair of esophageal perforation caused by revision anterior cervical spine surgery. 4.

  5. The impact of the 2006 Massachusetts health care reform law on spine surgery patient payer-mix status and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villelli, Nicolas W; Yan, Hong; Zou, Jian; Barbaro, Nicholas M

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Several similarities exist between the Massachusetts health care reform law of 2006 and the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The authors' prior neurosurgical research showed a decrease in uninsured surgeries without a significant change in surgical volume after the Massachusetts reform. An analysis of the payer-mix status and the age of spine surgery patients, before and after the policy, should provide insight into the future impact of the ACA on spine surgery in the US. METHODS Using the Massachusetts State Inpatient Database and spine ICD-9-CM procedure codes, the authors obtained demographic information on patients undergoing spine surgery between 2001 and 2012. Payer-mix status was assigned as Medicare, Medicaid, private insurance, uninsured, or other, which included government-funded programs and workers' compensation. A comparison of the payer-mix status and patient age, both before and after the policy, was performed. The New York State data were used as a control. RESULTS The authors analyzed 81,821 spine surgeries performed in Massachusetts and 248,757 in New York. After 2008, there was a decrease in uninsured and private insurance spine surgeries, with a subsequent increase in the Medicare and "other" categories for Massachusetts. Medicaid case numbers did not change. This correlated to an increase in surgeries performed in the age group of patients 65-84 years old, with a decrease in surgeries for those 18-44 years old. New York showed an increase in all insurance categories and all adult age groups. CONCLUSIONS After the Massachusetts reform, spine surgery decreased in private insurance and uninsured categories, with the majority of these surgeries transitioning to Medicare. Moreover, individuals who were younger than 65 years did not show an increase in spine surgeries, despite having greater access to health insurance. In a health care system that requires insurance, the decrease in private insurance is primarily due to an increasing elderly

  6. Anterior Spinal Artery Syndrome: Reversible Paraplegia after Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bredow

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Context. Percutaneous balloon kyphoplasty is an established minimally invasive technique to treat painful vertebral compression fractures, especially in the context of osteoporosis with a minor complication rate. Purpose. To describe the heparin anticoagulation treatment of paraplegia following balloon kyphoplasty. Study Design. We report the first case of an anterior spinal artery syndrome with a postoperative reversible paraplegia following a minimally invasive spine surgery (balloon kyphoplasty without cement leakage. Methods. A 75-year-old female patient underwent balloon kyphoplasty for a fresh fracture of the first vertebra. Results. Postoperatively, the patient developed an acute anterior spinal artery syndrome with motor paraplegia of the lower extremities as well as loss of pain and temperature sensation with retained proprioception and vibratory sensation. Complete recovery occurred six hours after bolus therapy with 15.000 IU low-molecular heparin. Conclusion. Spine surgeons should consider vascular complications in patients with incomplete spinal cord syndromes after balloon kyphoplasty, not only after more invasive spine surgery. High-dose low-molecular heparin might help to reperfuse the Adamkiewicz artery.

  7. Feasibility and Accuracy of Thoracolumbar Minimally Invasive Pedicle Screw Placement With Augmented Reality Navigation Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmi-Terander, Adrian; Nachabe, Rami; Skulason, Halldor; Pedersen, Kyrre; Söderman, Michael; Racadio, John; Babic, Drazenko; Gerdhem, Paul; Edström, Erik

    2017-12-19

    Cadaveric laboratory study. To assess the feasibility and accuracy of minimally invasive thoracolumbar pedicle screw placement using augmented reality (AR) surgical navigation SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: Minimally invasive spine (MIS) surgery has increasingly become the method of choice for a wide variety of spine pathologies. Navigation technology based on AR has been shown to be feasible, accurate and safe in open procedures. AR technology may also be used for MIS surgery. The AR surgical navigation was installed in a hybrid operating room (OR). The hybrid OR includes a surgical table, a motorized flat detector C-arm with intraoperative 2D/3D imaging capabilities, integrated optical cameras for AR navigation and patient motion tracking using optical markers on the skin. Navigation and screw placement was without any X-ray guidance. Two neurosurgeons placed 66 Jamshidi needles (2 cadavers) and 18 cannulated pedicle screws (1 cadaver) in the thoracolumbar spine. Technical accuracy was evaluated by measuring the distance between the tip of the actual needle position and the corresponding planned path as well as the angles between the needle and the desired path. Time needed for navigation along the virtual planned path was measured. An independent reviewer assessed the postoperative scans for the pedicle screws' clinical accuracy. Navigation time per insertion was 90 ± 53 seconds with an accuracy of 2.2 ± 1.3 mm. Accuracy was not dependent on operator. There was no correlation between navigation time and accuracy. The mean error angle between the Jamshidi needles and planned paths was 0.9 ± 0.8°. No screw was misplaced outside the pedicle. Two screws breached 2 to 4 mm yielding an overall accuracy of 89% (16/18). MIS screw placement directed by AR with intraoperative 3D imaging in a hybrid OR is accurate and efficient, without any fluoroscopy or X-ray imaging during the procedure. 4.

  8. Improvement in Pain After Lumbar Spine Surgery: The Role of Preoperative Expectations of Pain Relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Carol A; Reid, M C; Duculan, Roland; Girardi, Federico P

    2017-02-01

    Improvement in pain is a major expectation of patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Among 422 patients, the goal of this prospective study was to measure 2-year postoperative pain and to determine whether this outcome varied according to patient and clinical characteristics, including amount of pain relief expected preoperatively. Before surgery patients completed valid questionnaires that addressed clinical characteristics and expectations for pain improvement. Two years after surgery patients reported how much pain improvement they actually received. The mean age was 56 years old and 55% were men. Two years after surgery 11% of patients reported no improvement in pain, 28% reported a little to moderate improvement, 44% reported a lot of improvement, and 17% reported complete improvement. In multivariable analysis, patients reported less pain improvement if, before surgery, they expected greater pain improvement (odds ratio [OR] 1.4), had a positive screen for depression (OR 1.7), were having revision surgery (OR 1.6), had surgery at L4 or L5 (OR 2.5), had a degenerative diagnosis (OR 1.6), and if, after surgery, they had another surgery (OR 2.8) and greater back (OR 1.3) and leg (OR 1.1) pain (all variables P≤0.05). Pain is not uncommon after lumbar surgery and is associated with a network of clinical, surgical, and psychological variables. This study provides evidence that patients' expectations about pain are an independent variable in this network. Because expectations are potentially modifiable this study supports addressing pain-related expectations with patients before surgery through discussions with surgeons and through formal preoperative patient education.

  9. Simultaneously anterior decompression and posterior instrumentation by extrapleural retroperitoneal approach in thoracolumbar lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Anil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anterior decompression with posterior instrumentation when indicated in thoracolumbar spinal lesions if performed simultaneously in single-stage expedites rehabilitation and recovery. Transthoracic, transdiaphragmatic approach to access the thoracolumbar junction is associated with significant morbidity, as it violates thoracic cavity; requires cutting of diaphragm and a separate approach, for posterior instrumentation. We evaluated the clinical outcome morbidity and feasibility of extrapleural retroperitoneal approach to perform anterior decompression and posterior instrumentation simultaneously by single "T" incision outcome in thoracolumbar spinal trauma and tuberculosis. Patients and Methods: Forty-eight cases of tubercular spine (n = 25 and fracture of the spine (n = 23 were included in the study of which 29 were male and 19 female. The mean age of patients was 29.1 years. All patients underwent single-stage anterior decompression, fusion, and posterior instrumentation (except two old traumatic cases via extrapleural retroperitoneal approach by single "T" incision. Tuberculosis cases were operated in lateral position as they were stabilized with Hartshill instrumentation. For traumatic spine initially posterior pedicle screw fixation was performed in prone position and then turned to right lateral position for anterior decompression by same incision and approach. They were evaluated for blood loss, duration of surgery, superficial and deep infection of incision site, flap necrosis, correction of the kyphotic deformity, and restoration of anterior and posterior vertebral body height. Results: In traumatic spine group the mean duration of surgery was 269 minutes (range 215-315 minutes including the change over time from prone to lateral position. The mean intraoperative blood loss was 918 ml (range 550-1100 ml. The preoperative mean ASIA motor, pin prick and light touch score improved from 63.3 to 74.4, 86 to 94.4 and 86 to 96 at

  10. Medicaid status is associated with higher surgical site infection rates after spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoso, Mark W; Cizik, Amy M; Bransford, Richard J; Bellabarba, Carlo; Chapman, Jens; Lee, Michael J

    2014-09-15

    The Spine End Results Registry (2003-2004) is a registry of prospectively collected data of all patients undergoing spinal surgery at the University of Washington Medical Center and Harborview Medical Center. Insurance data were prospectively collected and used in multivariate analysis to determine risk of perioperative complications. Given the negative financial impact of surgical site infections (SSIs) and the higher overall complication rates of patients with a Medicaid payer status, we hypothesized that a Medicaid payer status would have a significantly higher SSI rate. The medical literature demonstrates lesser outcomes and increased complication rates in patients who have public insurance than those who have private insurance. No one has shown that patients with a Medicaid payer status compared with Medicare and privately insured patients have a significantly increased SSI rate for spine surgery. The prospectively collected Spine End Results Registry provided data for analysis. SSI was defined as treatment requiring operative debridement. Demographic, social, medical, and the surgical severity index risk factors were assessed against the exposure of payer status for the surgical procedure. The population included Medicare (N = 354), Medicaid (N = 334), the Veterans' Administration (N = 39), private insurers (N = 603), and self-pay (N = 42). Those patients whose insurer was Medicaid had a 2.06 odds (95% confidence interval: 1.19-3.58, P = 0.01) of having a SSI compared with the privately insured. The study highlights the increased cost of spine surgical procedures for patients with a Medicaid payer status with the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 provisions could cause a reduction in reimbursement to the hospital for taking care of patients with Medicaid insurance due to their higher complication rates and higher costs. This very issue could inadvertently lead to access

  11. Anterior column reconstruction in thoracolumbar injuries utilizing a computer-assisted navigation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blattert, T R; Jarvers, J-S; Schmidt, C; Riesner, H-J; Josten, C

    2011-04-01

    Discectomy, corpectomy, and resection of isolated posterior wall fragments are technically demanding steps requiring maximum surgical precision during anterior reconstruction of the unstable thoracolumbar spine. This study investigates the feasibility of computer-aided guidance for these steps. It also analyzes the precision, advantages, and disadvantages of the procedure. Controlled clinical trial. 21 patients were included in the trial group; the control group consisted of 10 patients. Total time for surgery was noted. To assess surgical precision, decentralization of the cage was measured in postoperative X-rays. Additionally, parallel alignment of vertebral body endplates with the cage was evaluated in postoperative CT scans. Vertebral body fractures of the thoracolumbar spine addressed by disc-/corpectomy and subsequent cage interposition for anterior reconstruction were included. All surgical steps were performed under endoscopic assistance. In the trial group, disc- and corpectomy were performed under computer-aided guidance; in the control group, no computer navigation was utilized. In cases of initial neurological deficit after trauma, the patients underwent emergency laminectomy during the initial posterior stabilization procedure. During the second-stage anterior procedure, resection of the posterior wall fragment with the aid of computer-aided navigation was performed. Fractures were localized between Th9 and L1 in the trial group, and Th10 and L1 in the control group. Time for surgery was significantly shorter in the control group: 1.7 h ± 0.5, as opposed to 3.8 h ± 1.0 in the trial group (p Computer-aided guidance in anterior reconstruction of the thoracolumbar spine is a technically feasible option that may aid in the performance of disc- and corpectomy, as well as the resection of isolated posterior wall fragments in cases with initial neurological compromise. However, total time for surgery is significantly prolongated by this technique

  12. Surgery and subsequent rehabilitation for cervical spine tumours compressing neural structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiwerski, Jerzy E

    2008-01-01

    Bone malignancies account for merely about 1.5% of all cancers, with a small percentage of these tumours developing in the cervical spine. However, the cervical spine is also the site of benign tumours and neoplasms involving not only bony tissue. Benign tumours do not metastasize but pose a threat to the spinal cord when located intrathecally. Even though such tumours do not represent malignancy, they are considered to be locally malignant. The most common cervical spine neoplasms are intradural tumours, usually extramedullary: neurofibromas, meningiomas or gliomas.Indications for surgery depend of the nature and location of the tumour and the consequences of tumour growth. Surgery is obviously necessary for intrathecal tumours compressing the spinal cord. The choice of surgical approach and manner of stabilisation depend primarily on the location of the lesion and the presence of spinal cord compression.Rehabilitation is indicated in all patients, but is particularly important, and at the same time difficult, when the growth of the tumour has resulted in neurological disturbances. The task is all the more difficult when in the presence of a massive and high spinal cord damage. Rehabilitation programmes should be designed individually for each patient and should account for the degree of paresis, stage of the underlying malignant disease, survival prognosis, disturbances in the function of other systems, apart from musculoskeletal apparatus, age of the patient, his or her commitment to treatment and other factors.The treatment of malignant neoplasms is usually associated with an unfavourable outcome. However, combination drug treatments, radiation therapy and surgery with subsequent rehabilitation will often prolong survival, ameliorate suffering and improve patients' quality of life.

  13. Defining the "Critical Elements" for the Most Common Procedures in Spine Surgery: A Consensus of Orthopedic and Neurosurgical Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laratta, Joseph Lawrence; Shillingford, Jamal N; Cohen-Tanugi, Samuel Jeffrey; Lombardi, Joseph M; Lenke, Lawrence G; Riew, K Daniel; Lehman, Ronald A; Ludwig, Steven C

    2018-05-01

    Survey. To define the critical elements of common spine surgeries. Despite significant relevance to the field of spine surgery, the term "critical element" of surgery has not been clearly defined. Every surgical procedure involves numerous steps, each with its own potential for complications and harm to the patient. Despite its crucial role in surgical training, billing, and the ethicality of concurrent surgery, the term "critical element" of surgery has not been defined. A survey was administered to surgeons associated with AO Spine North America and the Society for Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery to determine the critical elements for four common spine procedures: open lumbar laminectomy and fusion, microdiscectomy, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), and posterior cervical laminectomy and fusion. Respondents were asked which steps necessitated their direct supervision. Surgical subspecialty, level of experience, and practice demographics were also recorded. For all applicable procedures, decompression, instrumentation, and fusion were designated as critical elements. Patient positioning and fascial closure were not. Radiographic localization was considered critical for all procedures, except posterior cervical laminectomy and fusion. Exposure was not considered critical for any procedures, except ACDF. Certain substeps of decompression in ACDF and open lumbar laminectomy and fusion were not considered critical. Orthopaedic surgeons considered exposure and fusion in ACDF procedures to be critical whereas neurosurgeons did not. Surgeons operating in private practice considered every step of these common procedures to be critical elements. Decompression, instrumentation, and fusion were considered critical elements of common spine surgeries. There were significant differences in responses according to surgical specialty and practice setting. Future research is necessary to determine the implications of these findings and guide the definition of the

  14. Avaliação do tratamento cirúrgico das fraturas da coluna toracolombar com material de terceira geração tipo fixador interno Evaluation of surgical treatment of fractures of thoracolumbar spine with third-generation material for internal fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Bortoletto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o resultado funcional dos pacientes com fratura da coluna toracolombar cirúrgica. MÉTODO: Foi feito um estudo prospectivo incluindo 100 pacientes portadores de fratura da coluna vertebral nos segmentos torácico e lombar. As lesões foram classificadas conforme a sistemática da AO e os pacientes foram tratados com cirurgia. Avaliou-se a presença de cifose inicial e sua evolução após a intervenção cirúrgica, a presença de dor pós-operatória e sua evolução até 24 semanas do ato cirúrgico. Comparando nossos dados com a literatura. RESULTADOS: Analisados 100 pacientes cirúrgicos, sendo 37 do tipo A, 46 do tipo B e 17 do tipo C, observamos que os pacientes que se apresentavam com Frankel A mantiveram o quadro, porém, os pacientes com Frankel B ou mais, evoluíram com alguma melhora do quadro; a média da melhora da dor baseada na escala visual analógica (EVA foi acima de 4 pontos, e o retorno às atividades de rotina diária constatado em todos os pacientes, sendo que o retorno ao trabalho não foi considerado por nós como critério de avaliação. CONCLUSÃO: Apesar da controvérsia quanto à indicação da cirurgia nas fraturas da coluna, consideramos o método por nós utilizado como satisfatório, com bons resultados e baixo índice de complicações, porém mais estudos prospectivos e randomizados, com um seguimento mais longo, são necessários para uma avaliação deste tipo de fixação.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the functional results from patients with surgical fractures in the thoracolumbar spine. METHOD: A prospective study including 100 patients with spinal fractures in the thoracic and lumbar segments was conducted. The lesions were classified in accordance with the AO system, and the patients were treated surgically. The presence of early kyphosis and its evolution after the surgical intervention, and the presence of postoperative pain and its evolution up to the 24th week after the surgery, were

  15. Pain Sensitivity and Pain Catastrophizing are Associated with Persistent Pain and Disability after Lumbar Spine Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Rogelio A.; George, Steven Z.; Devin, Clinton J.; Wegener, Stephen T.; Archer, Kristin R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine whether pain sensitivity and pain catastrophizing are associated with persistent pain and disability after lumbar spine surgery. Design Prospective observational cohort study. Setting Academic medical center. Participants Patients (N = 68, mean ± SD age = 57.9 ± 13.1 years, N female = 40 (58.8%)) undergoing spine surgery for a degenerative condition from March 1, 2012 to April 30, 2013 were assessed 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s) The main outcome measures were persistent back pain intensity, pain interference, and disability. Patients with persistent back pain intensity, pain interference, or disability were identified as those patients reporting Brief Pain Inventory scores ≥ 4 and Oswestry Disability Index scores ≥ 21 at all postoperative time points. Results From 6 weeks to 6 months after surgery, approximately 12.9%, 24.2%, and 46.8% of patients reported persistent back pain intensity, pain interference, or disability, respectively. Increased pain sensitivity at 6 weeks was associated with having persistent back pain intensity (OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.0; 4.1) after surgery. Increased pain catastrophizing at 6 weeks was associated with having persistent back pain intensity (OR = 1.1, 95% CI = 1.0; 1.2), pain interference (OR = 1.1, 95% CI = 1.0; 1.2), and disability (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.1; 1.4). An interaction effect was not found between pain sensitivity and pain catastrophizing on persistent outcomes (p > 0.05). Conclusion(s) Findings suggest the importance of early postoperative screening for pain sensitivity and pain catastrophizing in order to identify patients at-risk for poor postoperative pain intensity, interference, and/or disability outcomes. Future research should consider the benefit of targeted therapeutic strategies for patients with these postoperative prognostic factors. PMID:26101845

  16. A COMPARISON OF TWO DIFFERENT DOSES OF DEXMEDETOMIDINE INFUSION DURING MAINTENANCE OF GENERAL ANAESTHESIA IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING SPINE SURGERIES, FUNCTIONAL ENDOSCOPIC SINUS SURGERY AND MIDDLE EAR SURGERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijay

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND This study is undertaken to compare the hemodynamic effects and reduction in the doses of volatile anaesthetics and muscle relaxants using two different doses of dexmedetomidine infusion during maintenance of anaesthesia in spine, functional endoscopic sinus surgery and middle ear surgeries. METHODS Sixty patients are randomly divided into 2 groups of 30 each. After shifting to the operation theatre baseline vitals were recorded. Anesthesia induced with thiopentone sodium and intubation done with the help of succinylcholine and maintained with oxygen, nitrous oxide and isoflurane. After 1 min of intubation, maintenance infusion of dexmedetomidine (0.4 mcg/kg/hr and 0.7 mcg/kg/hr for patients allotted in 2 separate groups was started and stopped 15 min before end of surgery. Hemodynamic parameters and any reduction in the doses of volatile anaesthetics and muscle relaxants was noted. RESULTS Dexmedetomidine infusion (0.4 mcg/kg/hr and 0.7 mcg/kg/hr in both groups reduced the requirements of muscle relaxants and volatile anaesthetics. Hemodynamic stability was better in the group receiving 0.4 mcg/kg/hr. Patients receiving 0.7 mcg/kg/hr had higher incidence of hypotension, bradycardia and delayed emergence from anaesthesia. CONCLUSION Dexmedetomidine infusion at 0.4 mcg/kg/hr during maintenance of anaesthesia in spine surgery, FESS and middle ear surgery would be good option to reduce the requirements of volatile anaesthetics, muscle relaxants and for better hemodynamic stability. OBJECTIVE OF STUDY: Primary Objective To compare and evaluate the hemodynamic effects and reduction in requirements of volatile anaesthetics and muscle relaxants with two different doses of dexmedetomidine infusion during maintenance of general anaesthesia in patients undergoing spine, FESS and middle ear surgeries.

  17. THE EXPERIENCE OF DECOMPRESSION-AND-STABILIZING SURGERIES IN PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE MALIGNANT TUMORS OF THORACIC AND LUMBAR SPINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Shapovalov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors have analyzed the surgical treatment of 34 patients with multiple malignant, mainly metastases tumors of thorax and lumbar spine, using spinal implants. The results of the estimation of life quality, neurological status and survival after the surgery have shown the effectiveness of decompress and stabilization technologies at any variants of malignant tumor spine injuries, especially involving specific therapy. 27 patients were observed during the period from 10 months to 5 years.

  18. Risk Factors Associated With 30-day Readmissions After Instrumented Spine Surgery in 14,939 Patients: 30-day readmissions after instrumented spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akins, Paul T; Harris, Jessica; Alvarez, Julie L; Chen, Yuexin; Paxton, Elizabeth W; Bernbeck, Johannes; Guppy, Kern H

    2015-07-01

    A retrospective review of instrumented spine registry from an integrated US healthcare system. Investigate the 30-day readmission rate and risk factors after instrumented spine surgery. Published readmission rates range from 2% to over 20%. We were interested in learning which patients were at greatest risk, when did readmissions occur, and why. 30-day readmission rates were determined for 14,939 patients after an index spine procedure between 1/2009 and 3/2013. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, univariate, and multivariate logistic regression analysis. The average age of the cohort was 59 (SD = 13.4) and 52% were female. The 30-day readmission rate was 5.5% (821/14,939). The temporal pattern for readmission was: 17% (140) at week 1, 48% (394) at week 2, 72% (591) at week 3, and 100% (821) at week 4. The leading causes were wound complications (infection, hematoma, dehiscence, seroma), sepsis, pain management, pneumonia, and pulmonary emboli/deep venous thrombosis. In a multivariate model, readmission risk factors were: malignancy (OR 2.99, 95% CI: 1.56, 5.73), operative time more than 400 minutes (OR 2.59, 95% CI: 1.66, 4.02), operative time 300-399 minutes (OR 2.33, 95% CI: 1.54-3.52), hospital stay 6-10 days (OR 2.03, 95% CI: 1.31-3.14), hospital stay more than 10 days (OR 1.85, 95% CI: 1.1, -3.08), surgical complications (OR 1.67, 95% CI: 1.18, 2.36), operative time 200-299 (OR 1.52, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.22), depression (OR 1.48, 95% CI: 1.14, 1.93), rheumatoid arthritis (OR 1.45, 95% CI: 1.05, 2.01), deficiency anemia (OR 1.30, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.61), and hypothyroidism (OR 1.29, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.64). Surgical complications (dural tear, deep infections, superficial infections, epidural hematoma), malignancy, lengthy operative times, and lengthy initial hospitalizations are all risk factors for 30-day readmission. These findings should be considered during preoperative assessment and surgical planning. 3.

  19. Anterior cervical spine surgery-associated complications in a retrospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasiou, Anastasia; Giannis, Theofanis; Brotis, Alexandros G; Siasios, Ioannis; Georgiadis, Iordanis; Gatos, Haralampos; Tsianaka, Eleni; Vagkopoulos, Konstantinos; Paterakis, Konstantinos; Fountas, Kostas N

    2017-09-01

    Anterior cervical spine procedures have been associated with satisfactory outcomes. However, the occurrence of troublesome complications, although uncommon, needs to be taken into consideration. The purpose of our study was to assess the actual incidence of anterior cervical spine procedure-associated complications and identify any predisposing factors. A total of 114 patients undergoing anterior cervical procedures over a 6-year period were included in our retrospective, case-control study. The diagnosis was cervical radiculopathy, and/or myelopathy due to degenerative disc disease, cervical spondylosis, or traumatic cervical spine injury. All our participants underwent surgical treatment, and complications were recorded. The most commonly performed procedure (79%) was anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Fourteen patients (12.3%) underwent anterior cervical corpectomy and interbody fusion, seven (6.1%) ACDF with plating, two (1.7%) odontoid screw fixation, and one anterior removal of osteophytes for severe Forestier's disease. Mean follow-up time was 42.5 months (range, 6-78 months). The overall complication rate was 13.2%. Specifically, we encountered adjacent intervertebral disc degeneration in 2.7% of our cases, dysphagia in 1.7%, postoperative soft tissue swelling and hematoma in 1.7%, and dural penetration in 1.7%. Additionally, esophageal perforation was observed in 0.9%, aggravation of preexisting myelopathy in 0.9%, symptomatic recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy in 0.9%, mechanical failure in 0.9%, and superficial wound infection in 0.9%. In the vast majority anterior cervical spine surgery-associated complications are minor, requiring no further intervention. Awareness, early recognition, and appropriate management, are of paramount importance for improving the patients' overall functional outcome.

  20. The role of minimally invasive spine surgery in the management of pyogenic spinal discitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turel, Mazda K; Kerolus, Mena; Deutsch, Harel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diagnostic yields for spondylodiscitis from CT guided biopsy is low. In the recent years, minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has shown to have a low morbidity and faster recovery. For spinal infections, MIS surgery may offer an opportunity for early pain control while obtaining a higher diagnostic yield than CT-guided biopsies. The aim of this study was to review our patients who underwent MIS surgery for spinal infection and report outcomes. Methods: A retrospective review of seven patients who underwent MIS decompression and/or discectomy in the setting of discitis, osteomyelitis, spondylodiscitis, and/or an epidural abscess was identified. Patient data including symptoms, visual analog score (VAS), surgical approach, antibiotic regimen, and postoperative outcomes were obtained. Results: Of the 7 patients, 5 patients had lumbar infections and two had thoracic infections. All seven patients improved in VAS immediately after surgery and at discharge. The average VAS improved by 4.4 ± 1.9 points. An organism was obtained in 6 of the 7 (85%) patients by the operative cultures. All patients made an excellent clinical recovery without the need for further spine surgery. All patients who received postoperative imaging on follow-up showed complete resolution or dramatically improved magnetic resonance imaging changes. The follow-up ranged from 2 to 9 months. Conclusions: MIS surgery provides an opportunity for early pain relief in patients with discitis, osteomyelitis, spondylodiscitis, and/or epidural abscess by directly addressing the primary cause of pain. MIS surgery for discitis provides a higher diagnostic yield to direct antibiotic treatment. MIS surgery results in good long-term recovery. PMID:28250635

  1. CRP and leukocyte-count after lumbar spine surgery: fusion vs. nucleotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Clayton N; Krüger, Tobias; Westhoff, Jörn; Lüring, Christian; Weber, Oliver; Wirtz, Dieter C; Pennekamp, Peter H

    2011-08-01

    Despite the fact that C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and white blood cell (WBC) count are routine blood chemistry parameters for the early assessment of wound infection after surgical procedures, little is known about the natural history of their serum values after major and minimally invasive spinal procedures. Pre- and postoperative CRP serum levels and WBC count in 347 patients were retrospectively assessed after complication-free, single-level open posterior lumbar interlaminar fusion (PLIF) (n = 150) for disc degeneration and spinal stenosis and endoscopically assisted lumbar discectomy (n = 197) for herniated lumbar disc. Confounding variables such as overweight, ASA classification, arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and perioperative antibiotics were recorded to evaluate their influence on the kinetics of CRP values and WBC count postoperatively. In both procedures, CRP peaked 2-3 days after surgery. The maximum CRP level was significantly higher after fusion: mean 127 (SD 57) (p 25 and long duration of surgery were associated with higher peak CRP values. WBC count did not show a typical and therefore interpretable profile. CRP is a predictable and responsive serum parameter in postoperative monitoring of inflammatory responses in patients undergoing spine surgery, whereas WBC kinetics is unspecific. We suggest that CRP could be measured on the day before surgery, on day 2 or 3 after surgery, and also between days 4 and 6, to aid in early detection of infectious complications.

  2. Development of an Animal Model of Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture-Induced Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    spinal cord impactor and sustained balloon compression. 2. Keywords Spinal cord injury, spine trauma , burst fracture, large animal model 3...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0013 TITLE: DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE-INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE-INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY 5b. GRANT

  3. Collaboration with an infection control team for patients with infection after spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Imagama, Shiro; Kato, Daizo; Ando, Kei; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Kenyu; Tsushima, Mikito; Matsumoto, Akiyuki; Morozumi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Yagi, Tetsuya; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-07-01

    The risk of infection, including surgical site infection (SSI), after spine surgery has increased due to aging and more immunocompromised hosts. An infection control team (ICT) is responsible for management of health care-associated infections at our institution. The study subjects were 40 patients (18 men and 22 women with an average age of 54 years) referred to the ICT after spine surgery since 2010. Pathogenic bacteria and treatment in these cases were reviewed. Collaboration with the ICT involved guidance on use of antibiotics for infection in 30 patients (16 SSI and 14 non-SSI) and a search for the infection focus for fever of unknown origin in 10 patients (7 patients were found to have urinary tract infections and 2 patients were found to have pneumonia). The detection rate of causative bacteria in ICT consultation was 88% (35 out of 40 patients). SSI patients with instrumentation involved had a significantly higher rate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection compared with those without instrumentation (42% vs 13%; P < .05). All cases of SSI with instrumentation involved were cured by ICT support without removal of instrumentation. Early assistance from the ICT was important for prevention of worsening of methicillin-resistant S aureus infection. Collaboration with the ICT was helpful for detection of pathogenic bacteria and allowed appropriate use of antibiotics at an early stage. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Repeated sugammadex reversal of muscle relaxation during lumbar spine surgery with intraoperative neurophysiological multimodal monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errando, C L; Blanco, T; Díaz-Cambronero, Ó

    2016-11-01

    Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during spine surgery is usually acomplished avoiding muscle relaxants. A case of intraoperative sugammadex partial reversal of the neuromuscular blockade allowing adequate monitoring during spine surgery is presented. A 38 year-old man was scheduled for discectomy and vertebral arthrodesis throughout anterior and posterior approaches. Anesthesia consisted of total intravenous anesthesia plus rocuronium. Intraoperatively monitoring was needed, and the muscle relaxant reverted twice with low dose sugammadex in order to obtain adequate responses. The doses of sugammadex used were conservatively selected (0.1mg/kg boluses increases, total dose needed 0.4mg/kg). Both motor evoqued potentials, and electromyographic responses were deemed adequate by the neurophysiologist. If muscle relaxation was needed in the context described, this approach could be useful to prevent neurological sequelae. This is the first study using very low dose sugammadex to reverse rocuronium intraoperatively and to re-establish the neuromuscular blockade. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Pelvic Fixation in Adult and Pediatric Spine Surgery: Historical Perspective, Indications, and Techniques: AAOS Exhibit Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amit; Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Strike, Sophia A; Menga, Emmanuel N; Sponseller, Paul D; Kebaish, Khaled M

    2015-09-16

    Achieving solid osseous fusion across the lumbosacral junction has historically been, and continues to be, a challenge in spine surgery. Robust pelvic fixation plays an integral role in achieving this goal. The goals of this review are to describe the history of and indications for spinopelvic fixation, examine conventional spinopelvic fixation techniques, and review the newer S2-alar-iliac technique and its outcomes in adult and pediatric patients with spinal deformity. Since the introduction of Harrington rods in the 1960s, spinal instrumentation has evolved substantially. Indications for spinopelvic fixation as a means to achieve lumbosacral arthrodesis include a long arthrodesis (five or more vertebral levels) or use of three-column osteotomies in the lower thoracic or lumbar spine, surgical treatment of high-grade spondylolisthesis, and correction of lumbar deformity and pelvic obliquity. A variety of techniques have been described over the years, including Galveston iliac rods, Jackson intrasacral rods, the Kostuik transiliac bar, iliac screws, and S2-alar-iliac screws. Modern iliac screws and S2-alar-iliac screws are associated with relatively low rates of pseudarthrosis. S2-alar-iliac screws have the advantages of less implant prominence and inline placement with proximal spinal anchors. Collectively, these techniques provide powerful methods for obtaining control of the pelvis in facilitating lumbosacral arthrodesis. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  6. The use of locally harvested bone chips as a graft in spine fusion surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Muhammad; Khan, Bahdar Ali; Wazir, Zahid; Inam, Mohammad; Satar, Abdul

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the outcome of local corticocancellous bone chips used for fusion in various kinds of spine surgeries. The observational prospective study was conducted at the Hayatabad Medical Complex, Peshawar, and Aman Hospital, Peshawar, from April 2011 to April 2013, and comprised cases in which locally harvested bone chips removed during decompression were used as bone graft for arthodesis. All cases were successfully followed up for at least one year. SPSS 16 was used for statistical analysis. Of the80 patients in the study, 44(55%) were female and 36(45%) were male. The overall mean age was 39.5±12.7 years (range: 13-75 years). Besides, 34(42.5%) were operated for spine surgery, 22(27.5%) for spondylolisthesis, 12(15.0%) for disc degeneration and 12 (15%) for spinal stenosis. In 54(67.5%) patients posterio-lateral fusion with decompression was done, while in 26(32.5%) transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion was done. Oswestry Disability Index scoreat last follow-up ranged from 4 to 56 with a mean of 17.7±10.7. Locally harvested bone chips are reasonable alternative to iliac crest bone graft, having comparable results while avoiding donor site morbidity associated with iliac crest bone grafts.

  7. Heart rate variability in sciatica patients referred to spine surgery: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Södervall, Jarmo; Karppinen, Jaro; Puolitaival, Jukka; Kyllönen, Eero; Kiviniemi, Antti M; Tulppo, Mikko P; Hautala, Arto J

    2013-04-26

    A chronic pain condition may result in altered autonomic nervous system regulation in various patient populations. We evaluated whether autonomic regulation differs between sciatica patients referred to spine surgery and age-matched healthy controls analyzed with heart rate variability techniques (HRV). HRV of patients (n = 201) and healthy controls (n = 138) were measured in standing conditions (5 min). High frequency (HF) power as an index of cardiac vagal modulation and the low-to-high-frequency (LF/HF) ratio and short-term fractal scaling exponent α1 as indices of sympathovagal balance were analyzed. Pain intensity was assessed on a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and perceived disability with Oswestry Disability Index. The Oswestry and VAS scores were higher in the patients than in the controls (p Sciatica patients referred to spine surgery had altered cardiac autonomic regulation expressed as decreased vagal activity and an increased sympathovagal balance toward sympathetic dominance when compared with age-matched healthy controls.

  8. Preoperative opioid use and its association with perioperative opioid demand and postoperative opioid independence in patients undergoing spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaghani, Sheyan J; Lee, Dennis S; Bible, Jesse E; Archer, Kristin R; Shau, David N; Kay, Harrison; Zhang, Chi; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2014-12-01

    Prospective cohort. To assess whether preoperative opioid use is associated with increased perioperative opioid demand and postoperative opioid independence in patients undergoing spine surgery. Previous work has demonstrated increased opioid requirements during the intraoperative and immediate postoperative period in patients with high levels of preoperative opioid use. Despite this, they remain a common agent class used for the management of pain in patients prior to spine surgery. A total of 583 patients were included. Self-reported daily opioid consumption was obtained preoperatively and converted into morphine equivalent amounts and opioid use was recorded at the 12-month postoperative time. Intraoperative and immediate postoperative opioid demand was calculated. Linear regression analyses for intraoperative and immediate postoperative opioid demand while logistic regression analyses for opioid independence at 12 months including relevant covariates such as depression and anxiety were performed. The median preoperative morphine equivalent amount for the cohort was 8.75 mg, with 55% of patients reporting some degree of opioid use. Younger age, more invasive surgery, anxiety, and primary surgery were significantly associated with increased intraoperative opioid demand (P spine surgery predicts increased immediate postoperative opioid demand and decreased incidence of postoperative opioid independence. Psychiatric diagnoses in those using preoperative opioids were predictors of continued opioid use at 12 months. Patients may benefit from preoperative counseling that emphasizes minimizing opioid use prior to undergoing spine surgery. 2.

  9. Spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion for thoracolumbar kyphosis in an adult with achondroplasia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Masashi; Kanezaki, Shozo; Notani, Naoki; Ishihara, Toshinobu; Tsumura, Hiroshi

    2017-12-01

    Fixed thoracolumbar kyphosis with spinal stenosis in adult patients with achondroplasia presents a challenging issue. We describe the first case in which spondylectomy and minimally invasive lateral access interbody arthrodesis were used for the treatment of fixed severe thoracolumbar kyphosis and lumbar spinal canal stenosis in an adult with achondroplasia. A 61-year-old man with a history of achondroplastic dwarfism presented with low back pain and radiculopathy and neurogenic claudication. Plain radiographs revealed a high-grade thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity with diffuse degenerative changes in the lumbar spine. The apex was located at L2, the local kyphotic angle from L1 to L3 was 105°, and the anterior area was fused from the L1 to L3 vertebrae. MRI revealed significant canal and lateral recess stenosis secondary to facet hypertrophy. We planned a front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements. We first performed anterior release at the fused part from L1 to L3 and XLIF at L3/4 and L4/5. Next, the patient was placed in the prone position. Spondylectomy at the L2 vertebra and posterior fusion from T10 to L5 were performed. Postoperative radiographs revealed L1 to L3 kyphosis of 32°. No complications occurred during or after surgery. Postoperatively, the patient's low back pain and neurological claudication were resolved. No worsening of kyphosis was observed 24 months postoperatively. Circumferential decompression of the spinal cord at the apical vertebral level and decompression of lumbar canal stenosis were necessary. Front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements via spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a reasonable surgical option for thoracolumbar kyphosis and developmental canal stenosis in patients with achondroplasia.

  10. Range of motion after thoracolumbar corpectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gehrchen, Martin; Hegde, Sajan K; Moldavsky, Mark

    2017-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: An in vitro biomechanical study. OBJECTIVES: To compare the biomechanical stability of traditional and low-profile thorocolumbar anterior instrumentation after a corpectomy with cross-connectors. Dual-rod anterior thoracolumbar lateral plates (ATLP) have been used clinically...... to stabilize the thorocolumbar spine. METHODS: The stability of a low-profile dual-rod system (LP DRS) and a traditional dual-rod system (DRS) was compared using a calf spine model. Two groups of seven specimens were tested intact and then in the following order: (1) ATLP with two cross-connectors and spacer......; (2) ATLP with one cross-connector and spacer; (3) ATLP with spacer. Data were normalized to intact (100 %) and statistical analysis was used to determine between-group significances. RESULTS: Both constructs reduced motion compared to intact in flexion-extension and lateral bending. Axial rotation...

  11. Results of Database Studies in Spine Surgery Can Be Influenced by Missing Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basques, Bryce A; McLynn, Ryan P; Fice, Michael P; Samuel, Andre M; Lukasiewicz, Adam M; Bohl, Daniel D; Ahn, Junyoung; Singh, Kern; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2017-12-01

    National databases are increasingly being used for research in spine surgery; however, one limitation of such databases that has received sparse mention is the frequency of missing data. Studies using these databases often do not emphasize the percentage of missing data for each variable used and do not specify how patients with missing data are incorporated into analyses. This study uses the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database to examine whether different treatments of missing data can influence the results of spine studies. (1) What is the frequency of missing data fields for demographics, medical comorbidities, preoperative laboratory values, operating room times, and length of stay recorded in ACS-NSQIP? (2) Using three common approaches to handling missing data, how frequently do those approaches agree in terms of finding particular variables to be associated with adverse events? (3) Do different approaches to handling missing data influence the outcomes and effect sizes of an analysis testing for an association with these variables with occurrence of adverse events? Patients who underwent spine surgery between 2005 and 2013 were identified from the ACS-NSQIP database. A total of 88,471 patients undergoing spine surgery were identified. The most common procedures were anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, lumbar decompression, and lumbar fusion. Demographics, comorbidities, and perioperative laboratory values were tabulated for each patient, and the percent of missing data was noted for each variable. These variables were tested for an association with "any adverse event" using three separate multivariate regressions that used the most common treatments for missing data. In the first regression, patients with any missing data were excluded. In the second regression, missing data were treated as a negative or "reference" value; for continuous variables, the mean of each variable's reference range

  12. A New Classification System to Report Complications in Growing Spine Surgery: A Multicenter Consensus Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, John T; Johnston, Charles; Skaggs, David; Flynn, John; Vitale, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The use of growth-sparing instrumentation in pediatric spinal deformity is associated with a significant incidence of adverse events. However, there is no consistent way to report these complications, allowing for meaningful comparison of different growth-sparing techniques and strategies. The purpose of this study is to develop consensus for a new classification system to report these complications. The authors, who represent lead surgeons from 5 major pediatric spine centers, collaborated to develop a classification system to report complications associated with growing spine surgery. Following IRB approval, this system was then tested using a minimum of 10 patients from each center with at least 2-year follow-up after initial implantation of growing instrumentation to assess ease of use and consistency in reporting complications. Inclusion criteria were only patients who had surgical treatment of early onset scoliosis and did not include casting or bracing.Complications are defined as an unplanned medical event in the course of treatment that may or may not affect final outcome. Severity refers to the level of care and urgency required to treat the complication, and can be classified as device related or disease related. Severity grade (SV) I is a complication that does not require unplanned surgery, and can be corrected at the next scheduled surgery. SVII requires an unplanned surgery, with SVIIA requiring a single trip and SVIIB needing multiple trips for resolution. SVIII is a complication that substantially alters the planned course of treatment. Disease-related complications are classified as grade SVI if no hospitalization is required and grade SVII if hospitalization is required. SVIV was defined as death, either disease or device related. A total of 65 patients from 5 institutions met enrollment criteria for the study; 56 patients had at least 1 complication and 9 had no complications. There were 14 growing rods, 47 VEPTRs, ,and 4 hybrid constructs. The

  13. The perception of complications in pediatric spine surgery: a comparative survey of surgeons, caregivers and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulkerson, Daniel H; Vachhrajani, Shobhan; Brayton, Alison; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Jea, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The perception of a surgical complication may differ between surgeons and patients. In pediatric spine surgery, the perception of the parent or primary caregiver may also differ. In order to better define these relationships, we performed a pilot study surveying a convenience sample of pediatric spinal surgeons, patients and their parent or primary caregiver. We hope to use this initial pilot study as a starting point for future research into this incompletely defined, yet increasingly relevant topic. A survey of case vignettes describing a potential perioperative complication was administered to 14 pediatric spine surgeons at the Texas Children's Hospital Pediatric NeuroSpine Clinic from June 1 to July 31, 2009. The same survey, with modified language, was presented to a group of 13 pediatric patients (age range: 12-18 years). In addition, the surveys were separately presented to 34 primary caregivers of pediatric patients evaluated in a spine surgery clinic. The 61 respondents were asked to evaluate the cases and determine if there was a minor, a major or no complication present. Fisher's exact test was employed to evaluate associations of respondent groups and complication severity. There were no statistically significant differences in the proportion of patients and caregivers rating the presence of complications. In 8 of 13 cases, a majority of surgeons and a majority of patients/caregivers felt a complication was present (all p > 0.06). A greater proportion of surgeons than patients/caregivers felt a complication was present in 2 cases of transient neurological deficit/paraparesis (6 weeks to 6 months; p < 0.04) and 1 case of cosmetically significant pressure sores to the face (p = 0.0002). A greater proportion of patients/caregivers identified a complication in a loss of range of motion after occipitocervical fusion (p < 0.0001) and a loss of motor evoked potentials without a neurological deficit. Amongst those who identified a complication, a greater

  14. Complications in pediatric spine surgery using the vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib: the French experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Grégory; Bollini, Gérard; Jouve, Jean-Luc; de Gauzy, Jérome Sales; Accadbled, Franck; Lascombes, Pierre; Journeau, Pierre; Karger, Claude; Mallet, Jean François; Neagoe, Petre; Cottalorda, Jérome; De Billy, Benoit; Langlais, Jean; Herbaux, Bernard; Fron, Damien; Violas, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    Multicenter retrospective study of 54 children. To describe the complication rate of the French vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib (VEPTR) series involving patients treated between August 2005 and January 2012. Congenital chest wall and spine deformities in children are complex entities. Most of the affected patients have severe scoliosis often associated with a thoracic deformity. Orthopedic treatment is generally ineffective, and surgical treatment is very challenging. These patients are good candidates for VEPTR expansion thoracoplasty. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential complications of VEPTR surgery. Of the 58 case files, 54 were available for analysis. The series involved 33 girls and 21 boys with a mean age of 7 years (range, 20 mo-14 yr and 2 mo) at primary VEPTR surgery. During the follow-up period, several complications occurred. Mean follow-up was 22.5 months (range, 6-64 mo). In total, 184 procedures were performed, including 56 VEPTR implantations, 98 expansions, and 30 nonscheduled procedures for different types of complications: mechanical complications (i.e., fracture, device migration), device-related and infectious complications, neurological disorders, spine statics disturbances. Altogether, there were 74 complications in 54 patients: a complication rate of 137% per patient and 40% per surgery. Comparison of the complications in this series with those reported in the literature led the authors to suggest solutions that should help decrease their incidence. The complication rate is consistent with that reported in the literature. Correct determination of the levels to be instrumented, preoperative improvement of nutritional status, and better evaluation of the preoperative and postoperative respiratory function are important factors in minimizing the potential complications of a technique that is used in weak patients with complex deformities.

  15. Design and Fabrication of a Precision Template for Spine Surgery Using Selective Laser Melting (SLM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to meet the clinical requirements of spine surgery, this paper proposes the fabrication of the customized template for spine surgery through computer-aided design. A 3D metal printing-selective laser melting (SLM technique was employed to directly fabricate the 316L stainless steel template, and the metal template with tiny locating holes was used as an auxiliary tool to insert spinal screws inside the patient’s body. To guarantee accurate fabrication of the template for cervical vertebra operation, the contact face was placed upwards to improve the joint quality between the template and the cervical vertebra. The joint surface of the printed template had a roughness of Ra = 13 ± 2 μm. After abrasive blasting, the surface roughness was Ra = 7 ± 0.5 μm. The surgical metal template was bound with the 3D-printed Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS plastic model. The micro-hardness values determined at the cross-sections of SLM-processed samples varied from HV0.3 250 to HV0.3 280, and the measured tensile strength was in the range of 450 MPa to 560 MPa, which showed that the template had requisite strength. Finally, the metal template was clinically used in the patient’s surgical operation, and the screws were inserted precisely as the result of using the auxiliary template. The geometrical parameters of the template hole (e.g., diameter and wall thickness were optimized, and measures were taken to optimize the key geometrical units (e.g., hole units in metal 3D printing. Compared to the traditional technology of screw insertion, the use of the surgical metal template enabled the screws to be inserted more easily and accurately during spinal surgery. However, the design of the high-quality template should fully take into account the clinical demands of surgeons, as well as the advice of the designing engineers and operating technicians.

  16. Design and Fabrication of a Precision Template for Spine Surgery Using Selective Laser Melting (SLM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Di; Wang, Yimeng; Wang, Jianhua; Song, Changhui; Yang, Yongqiang; Zhang, Zimian; Lin, Hui; Zhen, Yongqiang; Liao, Suixiang

    2016-07-22

    In order to meet the clinical requirements of spine surgery, this paper proposes the fabrication of the customized template for spine surgery through computer-aided design. A 3D metal printing-selective laser melting (SLM) technique was employed to directly fabricate the 316L stainless steel template, and the metal template with tiny locating holes was used as an auxiliary tool to insert spinal screws inside the patient's body. To guarantee accurate fabrication of the template for cervical vertebra operation, the contact face was placed upwards to improve the joint quality between the template and the cervical vertebra. The joint surface of the printed template had a roughness of Ra = 13 ± 2 μm. After abrasive blasting, the surface roughness was Ra = 7 ± 0.5 μm. The surgical metal template was bound with the 3D-printed Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) plastic model. The micro-hardness values determined at the cross-sections of SLM-processed samples varied from HV0.3 250 to HV0.3 280, and the measured tensile strength was in the range of 450 MPa to 560 MPa, which showed that the template had requisite strength. Finally, the metal template was clinically used in the patient's surgical operation, and the screws were inserted precisely as the result of using the auxiliary template. The geometrical parameters of the template hole (e.g., diameter and wall thickness) were optimized, and measures were taken to optimize the key geometrical units (e.g., hole units) in metal 3D printing. Compared to the traditional technology of screw insertion, the use of the surgical metal template enabled the screws to be inserted more easily and accurately during spinal surgery. However, the design of the high-quality template should fully take into account the clinical demands of surgeons, as well as the advice of the designing engineers and operating technicians.

  17. Current applications of robotics in spine surgery: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jacob R; Smith, Brandon W; Liu, Xilin; Park, Paul

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgical robotics has demonstrated utility across the spectrum of surgery. Robotics in spine surgery, however, remains in its infancy. Here, the authors systematically review the evidence behind robotic applications in spinal instrumentation. METHODS This systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. Relevant studies (through October 2016) that reported the use of robotics in spinal instrumentation were identified from a search of the PubMed database. Data regarding the accuracy of screw placement, surgeon learning curve, radiation exposure, and reasons for robotic failure were extracted. RESULTS Twenty-five studies describing 2 unique robots met inclusion criteria. Of these, 22 studies evaluated accuracy of spinal instrumentation. Although grading of pedicle screw accuracy was variable, the most commonly used method was the Gertzbein and Robbins system of classification. In the studies using the Gertzbein and Robbins system, accuracy (Grades A and B) ranged from 85% to 100%. Ten studies evaluated radiation exposure during the procedure. In studies that detailed fluoroscopy usage, overall fluoroscopy times ranged from 1.3 to 34 seconds per screw. Nine studies examined the learning curve for the surgeon, and 12 studies described causes of robotic failure, which included registration failure, soft-tissue hindrance, and lateral skiving of the drill guide. CONCLUSIONS Robotics in spine surgery is an emerging technology that holds promise for future applications. Surgical accuracy in instrumentation implanted using robotics appears to be high. However, the impact of robotics on radiation exposure is not clear and seems to be dependent on technique and robot type.

  18. Is Traditional Closed Thoracic Drainage Necessary to Treat Pleural Tears After Posterior Approach Thoracic Spine Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guo-Li; Zhou, Hao; Zhou, Xiao-Gang; Lin, Hong; Li, Xi-Lei; Dong, Jian

    2018-02-01

    A prospective study. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes and efficacy of using a 10Fr elastic tube with a regular negative pressure ball to treat the operative pleural tear in the complicated single-stage posterior approach thoracic spine surgeries. In some complicated single-stage posterior approach thoracic spine surgeries, such as total en bloc spondylectomy, pleural tear is quite inevitable. Traditional chest tube with a water-sealed bottle has many shortcomings, as pain, inconvenience, and other complications. In many thoracic surgeries, a smaller-caliber elastic tube has been used to avoid such complications and achieve quick recovery. However, there are concerns about the efficacy and safety of the smaller-caliber elastic tube. A prospective trial was performed in 72 patients between April 2008 and March 2012. Pleural tear occurred in 19 patients, among whom 10 patients were inserted a 10Fr elastic tube with a regular negative pressure ball (Group I), and nine were inserted a 28Fr chest tube with a water-sealed bottle (Group II). Comparative evaluation of the clinical and radiographic data was carried out. The basic condition of two groups did not differ significantly. The oxygen saturation monitor, hospital length of stay, average volume, and failure rate of drainage between two groups were not statistically significant. The difference of the visual analog score was significant (1.10 ± 0.35 vs. 3.89 ± 0.59, P tube with a regular negative pressure ball experienced less pain and a tendency of quicker recovery than those who received a 28Fr chest tube with a water-sealed bottle. The complication rate in Group I was not higher than Group II, indicating an equally good drainage efficacy. 2.

  19. Is it safe to perform lumbar spine surgery on patients over eighty five?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouloussa, Houssam; Alzakri, Abdulmajeed; Ghailane, Soufiane; Vergari, Claudio; Mazas, Simon; Vital, Jean-Marc; Coudert, Pierre; Gille, Olivier

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and tolerance of lumbar spine surgery in patients over 85. Patients over 85 years of age with LSS who underwent decompression surgery with or without fusion between February 2011 and July 2014 were included. Comorbidities, autonomy (Activities of Daily Life and Braden scales), surgical parameters and complications (Clavien-Dindo classification) were collected. A telephone survey was performed to assess survival and patients' satisfaction at last follow-up. Mean follow-up was 27.4 ± 7.6 months (range, 18-65). Mean age was 87.5 ± 2.7 years (range, 85-97). Mean ADLs and Braden scores were, respectively, 4.3 ± 1.2 and 20.2 ± 1.4. Fifteen patients had associated spondylolisthesis. Nineteen minor complications (grade I and II, 38.7%), five moderate complications (grade III, 10.2%) and six major complications (grade IV and V, 12.2%) occurred. The perioperative mortality rate was 0.02%. At last follow-up, 41 patients were very satisfied (83.7%), five patients were satisfied (10.2%) and three patients were not satisfied (6.1%). Fusion did not affect the incidence of complications (p = 0.3) nor the average number of complications per patient (p = 0.2). Advanced age should not be a contraindication to lumbar spine surgery provided careful preoperative selection is performed. This study reported a high satisfaction rate and a low mortality rate at the price of a high number of complications, most of which being minor.

  20. Are patient-reported outcomes predictive of patient satisfaction 5 years after anterior cervical spine surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Coric, Dom; Kim, Han Jo; Albert, Todd J; Radcliff, Kris E

    2017-07-01

    Patient satisfaction is becoming an increasing common proxy for surgical quality; however, the correlation between patient satisfaction and surgical outcomes 2 and 5 years after anterior cervical surgery has not been evaluated. The study aimed to determine if patient satisfaction is predicted by improvement in patient-reported outcomes (PRO) 2 and 5 years after anterior cervical spine surgery. This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. The sample included patients enrolled in the Food and Drug Administration investigational device exemption clinical trial comparing total disc replacement with Mobi-C cervical artificial disc and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. The outcome measures were visual analog scale (VAS) neck pain score, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and Short-Form 12-Item scores, as well as patient satisfaction. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine if improvement in different PRO metrics can accurately identify patient satisfaction. Additionally, a logistic regression analysis was performed on the results at 24 months and 60 months to identify independent predictors of patient satisfaction. This research was supported by LDR (Zimmer Biomet) 13785 Research Boulevard - Suite 200 Austin, TX 78750. Data were available for 512 patients at 60 months. At 24 months postoperatively, NDI score improvement (area under the curve [AUC]=0.806), absolute NDI score (AUC=0.823), and absolute VAS neck pain score (AUC=0.808) were all excellent predictors of patient satisfaction. At 60 months postoperatively, NDI score improvement (AUC=0.815), absolute NDI score (AUC=0.839), VAS neck pain score improvement (AUC=0.803), and absolute VAS neck pain score (AUC=0.861) were all excellent predictors of patient satisfaction. In patients undergoing one- and two-level anterior cervical spine surgery, between 2 and 5 years postoperatively, patient satisfaction is significantly predicted by PROs, including the VAS neck score and the

  1. Dermal Discolorations and Burns at Neuromonitoring Electrodes in Pediatric Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Austin; Andras, Lindsay; Lehman, Alison; Bridges, Nancy; Skaggs, David L

    2017-01-01

    Prospective review of consecutive patients. To evaluate the incidence and raise awareness of electrode discoloration that can occur in the operating room when using neuromonitoring. To our knowledge there are no articles that discuss dermal discolorations following spine surgery. Following recognition of dermal discolorations in some patients, a prospective evaluation of all patients undergoing spine surgery with somatosensory-evoked potential and motor-evoked potential neuromonitoring using subdermal needle electrodes was carried out over a 16-month period for quality assurance and improvement. A total of 201 consecutive patients with mean age of 14 years (4-25) were prospectively evaluated. Sixteen percent (33/201) had dermal discolorations associated with neuromonitoring. There were no significant differences in mean age (P = 0.624), height (P = 0.308), weight (P = 0.899), or body mass index (P = 0.571) between the patients with and without dermal discolorations. There was also no difference in prevalence of dermal discoloration by diagnosis (P = 0.490) or location of grounding pad and occurrence of dermal discoloration between groups (P = 0.268). The only difference noted was that patients without dermal discoloration had an average monopolar cautery setting of 46.8 W compared to 40.5 W for patients with dermal discolorations (P = 0.042). Of the 33 patients with a dermal discoloration, 27% (9/33) of these were on both the upper and lower extremities, 21% (7/33) on only the upper extremities, and 52% (17/33) on only the lower extremities. None of the dermal discolorations were painful or tender, and all resolved by 6-month follow-up. One patient did not have any dermal discoloration but did experience two full-thickness burns around the electrodes in one leg. The incidence of burns in this series was 0.5% (1/201). Dermal discolorations occurred in 16% of patients undergoing neuromonitoring for spine surgery. These common

  2. Classificação das fraturas tóraco-lombares baseada em investigação por imagem: avaliação de 33 casos Classification of thoracolumbar spine fractures based on a complete imaging investigation in 33 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleyson M. Rios

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available As fraturas das regiões torácica e lombar da coluna vertebral constituem amplo espectro de diferentes tipos de lesões resultantes de mecanismos fisiopatológicos distintos. A fim de se reduzir as controvérsias existentes a respeito da conduta destas lesões é necessária a utilização de uma classificação que permita a sua correta caracterização. Neste estudo avaliamos retrospectivamente 33 pacientes portadores de fraturas tóraco-lombares com o objetivo de categorizar e avaliar os fatores relacionados a esta patologia. O mecanismo de trauma mais freqüente foi queda de altura, presente em 24 casos. Na maioria dos pacientes (57,6% as fraturas localizaram-se na transição tóraco-lombar (T12-L1 e o quadro neurológico mais freqüente foi o déficit sensitivo-motor completo abaixo da lesão, em 45,45% dos casos. A apresentação neurológica foi mais grave nos pacientes com lesões torácicas em relação às lesões lombares (teste de Fischer, p=0,039. Uma correlação positiva foi observada entre a severidade do quadro neurológico e a gravidade da lesão segundo a classificação de Magerl (r de Pearson=0,85, pThe thoracolumbar spine fractures constitute a wide spectrum of resultant lesions, with distinct injury mechanisms. In order to reduce the controversies concerning about the management of these fractures, a universally accepted classification is necessary. In this study we evaluated retrospectively 33 patients with thoracolumbar spine fracture, with the goal of categorize and evaluate the factors related to this pathology. A complete radiological investigation, complaining of plain radiography, computed tomography and magnetic ressonance imaging, was used to classify these fractures. Fall was the more common mechanism, present in 24 cases. In 57.6% of the patients, the fractures located at thoracolumbar transition (T12-L1 and the more frequent neurological presentation was total deficit, present in 45.45%. The neurological

  3. COMPARISON OF INTRAOPERATIVE KETAMINE VS. FENTANYL USE DECREASES POSTOPERATIVE OPIOID REQUIREMENTS IN TRAUMA PATIENTS UNDERGOING CERVICAL SPINE SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Aviva C; Ginsburg, Aryeh M; Pesso, Raymond M; Angus, George L D; Kang, Amiee; Ginsburg, Dov B

    2016-02-01

    Postoperative airway compromise following cervical spine surgery is a potentially serious adverse event. Residual effects of anesthesia and perioperative opioids that can cause both sedation and respiratory depression further increase this risk. Ketamine is an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist that provides potent analgesia without noticeable respiratory depression. We investigated whether intraoperative ketamine administration could decrease perioperative opioid requirements in trauma patients undergoing cervical spine surgery. We retrospectively reviewed anesthesia records identifying cervical spine surgeries performed between March 2014 and February 2015. All patients received a balanced anesthetic technique utilizing sevoflurane 0.5 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) and propofol infusion (50-100 mcg/kg/min). For intraoperative analgesia, one group of patients received ketamine (N=25) and a second group received fentanyl (N=27). Cumulative opioid doses in the recovery room and until 24 hours postoperatively were recorded. Fewer patients in the ketamine group (11/25 [44%] vs. 20/27 [74%], respectively; p = 0.03) required analgesics in the recovery room. Additionally, the total cumulative opioid requirements in the ketamine group decreased postoperatively at both 3 and 6 hours (p = 0.01). Ketamine use during cervical spine surgery decreased opioid requirements in both the recovery room and in the first 6 hours postoperatively. This may have the potential to minimize opioid induced respiratory depression in a population at increased risk of airway complications related to the surgical procedure.

  4. Tension Pneumothorax During Surgery for Thoracic Spine Stabilization in Prone Position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demicha Rankin MD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The intraoperative progression of a simple or occult pneumothorax into a tension pneumothorax can be a devastating clinical scenario. Routine use of prophylactic thoracostomy prior to anesthesia and initiation of controlled ventilation in patients with simple or occult pneumothorax remains controversial. We report the case of a 75-year-old trauma patient with an insignificant pneumothorax on the right who developed an intraoperative tension pneumothorax on the left side while undergoing thoracic spine stabilization surgery in the prone position. Management of an intraoperative tension pneumothorax requires prompt recognition and treatment; however, the prone position presents an additional challenge of readily accessing the standard anatomic sites for pleural puncture and air drainage.

  5. The 'nightmare' of wrong level in spine surgery: a critical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irace Claudio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The recent article published in the Journal by Lindley and colleagues (Patient Saf. Surg. 2011, 5:33 reported the successful surgical treatment of a persistent thoracic pain following a T7-8 microdiscectomy, truly performed at the ‘level immediately above’. The wrong level in spine surgery is a multi-factorial matter and several strategies have been designed and adopted to try decreasing its occurrence. We think that three of these factors are crucial: global strategy, attention, precision in level identification; and the actors we identified are the surgeon, the assistant nurse and the (neuroradiologist respectively. Basing upon our experience, the role of the radiologist pre- and intraoperatively and the importance of the assistant nurse are briefly described.

  6. Instruments used in the assessment of expectation toward a spine surgery: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Nepomuceno

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify and describe the instruments used to assess patients' expectations toward spine surgery. METHOD An integrative review was carried out in the databases PubMed, CINAHL, LILACS and PsycINFO. RESULTS A total of 4,402 publications were identified, of which 25 met the selection criteria. Of the studies selected, only three used tools that had confirmed validity and reliability to be applied; in five studies, clinical scores were used, and were modified for the assessment of patients' expectations, and in 17 studies the researchers developed scales without an adequate description of the method used for their development and validation. CONCLUSION The assessment of patients' expectations has been methodologically conducted in different ways. Until the completion of this integrative review, only two valid and reliable instruments had been used in three of the selected studies.

  7. MR imaging of the pediatric spine: Comparison of myelography, MCT, and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, P.C.; Hoffman, J.C.; Ball, T.I.; Wyly, J.B.; Braun, I.F.; Fry, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    Results of MR imaging of 53 pediatric patients with suspected spinal abnormalities were compared findings on metrizamide myelography, MCT, and surgery. Prototype surface coil studies with multisection multiplanar imaging (0.5 and 1.5 T) using T1-weighted sequences were optimum for anatomic definition, while T2-weighted sequences were utilized for intramedullary pathology. Diseases studied included neoplasia, infection, trauma, scoliosis, and dysrhaphsium. Surface coils were essential for imaging the thoracic and lumbar spine. MR imaging yielded approximately equivalent information to that obtained on myelography or MCT in 25 of 31 patients. Limitations to MR imaging included bony spurs, small eccentric lesions, tumor seeding, metal artifacts, postoperative scarring, and motion. With further refinements, MR imaging may replace more invasive techniques for pediatric spinal imaging

  8. Basic concepts in metal work failure after metastatic spine tumour surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naresh; Patel, Ravish; Wadhwa, Anshuja Charvi; Kumar, Aravind; Milavec, Helena Maria; Sonawane, Dhiraj; Singh, Gurpal; Benneker, Lorin Michael

    2018-04-01

    The development of spinal implants marks a watershed in the evolution of metastatic spine tumour surgery (MSTS), which has evolved from standalone decompressive laminectomy to instrumented stabilization and decompression with reconstruction when necessary. Fusion may not be feasible after MSTS due to poor quality of graft host bed along with adjunct chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy postoperatively. With an increase in the survival of patients with spinal tumours, there is a probability of an increase in the rate of implant failure. This review aims to help establish a clear understanding of implants/constructs used in MSTS and to highlight the fundamental biomechanics of implant/construct failures. Published literature on implant failure after spine surgery and MSTS has been reviewed. The evolution of spinal implants and their role in MSTS has been briefly described. The review defines implant/construct failures using radiological parameters that are practical, feasible, and derived from historical descriptions. We have discussed common modes of implant/construct failure after MSTS to allow further understanding, interception, and prevention of catastrophic failure. Implant failure rates in MSTS are in the range of 2-8%. Variability in patterns of failure has been observed based on anatomical region and the type of constructs used. Patients with construct/implant failures may or may not be symptomatic and present either as early (failures (> 3months). It has been noted that not all the implant failures after MSTS result in revisions. Based on the observed radiological criteria and clinical presentations, we have proposed a clinico-radiological classification for implant/construct failure after MSTS.

  9. The efficacy of bipolar sealer on blood loss in spine surgery: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Tao; Hu, Shi-Yu; Yang, Xin-Jian; Chen, Yang; Qiu, Yi-Yan; Guo, Wei-Zhuang; Lin, Jian-Ze; Ren, Kai

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs was to gather data to evaluate the efficacy and safety of bipolar sealer versus standard electrocautery in the management of spinal disease. The electronic databases including Embase, PubMed and Cochrane library were searched to identify relevant studies published from the time of the establishment of these databases up to January 2017. The primary outcomes were total blood loss, requirement of transfusion (rate and amount), and operation time. The secondary outcomes were length of hospital stay and postoperative wound infection. Data analysis was conducted with RevMan 5.3 software. A total of five studies involving 500 patients (261 patients in the BS group and 239 in the control group) were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled results revealed that application of bipolar sealer could decrease the total blood loss in spine surgery [WMD = -467.49, 95% CI (685.47 to -249.51); p SMD = -0.36, 95% CI (-0.60 to -0.13), p infection [OR = 0.88, 95% CI (0.31-2.48), p = 0.81; I 2  = 0.0%] between both groups. The available evidence suggests that bipolar sealer is superior to standard electrocautery with less blood loss, shorter operation time and less transfusion requirement. There is no significant difference between both groups regarding length of hospitalization and wound infection. Hence, bipolar sealer is recommended in spine surgery. Because of the limitation of our study, more well-designed RCTs with large sample are required to provide further evidence of safety and efficacy between bipolar sealer and standard electrocautery in the treatment of spinal disease.

  10. A Minimally Invasive Endoscopic Surgery for Infectious Spondylodiscitis of the Thoracic and Upper Lumbar Spine in Immunocompromised Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Chuan Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the safety and effectiveness of computed tomography- (CT- assisted endoscopic surgery in the treatment of infectious spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and upper lumbar spine in immunocompromised patients. From October 2006 to March 2014, a total of 41 patients with infectious spondylodiscitis underwent percutaneous endoscopic surgery under local anesthesia, and 13 lesions from 13 patients on the thoracic or upper lumbar spine were selected for evaluation. A CT-guided catheter was placed before percutaneous endoscopic surgery as a guide to avoid injury to visceral organs, major vessels, and the spinal cord. All 13 patients had quick pain relief after endoscopic surgery without complications. The bacterial culture rate was 77%. Inflammatory parameters returned to normal after adequate antibiotic treatment. Postoperative radiographs showed no significant kyphotic deformity when compared with preoperative films. As of the last follow-up visit, no recurrent infections were noted. Traditional transthoracic or diaphragmatic surgery with or without posterior instrumentation is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, especially in elderly patients, patients with multiple comorbidities, or immunocompromised patients. Percutaneous endoscopic surgery assisted by a CT-guided catheter provides a safe and effective alternative treatment for infectious spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and upper lumbar spine.

  11. Deformable image registration with local rigidity constraints for cone-beam CT-guided spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaungamornrat, S.; Wang, A. S.; Uneri, A.; Otake, Y.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-07-01

    Image-guided spine surgery (IGSS) is associated with reduced co-morbidity and improved surgical outcome. However, precise localization of target anatomy and adjacent nerves and vessels relative to planning information (e.g., device trajectories) can be challenged by anatomical deformation. Rigid registration alone fails to account for deformation associated with changes in spine curvature, and conventional deformable registration fails to account for rigidity of the vertebrae, causing unrealistic distortions in the registered image that can confound high-precision surgery. We developed and evaluated a deformable registration method capable of preserving rigidity of bones while resolving the deformation of surrounding soft tissue. The method aligns preoperative CT to intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) using free-form deformation (FFD) with constraints on rigid body motion imposed according to a simple intensity threshold of bone intensities. The constraints enforced three properties of a rigid transformation—namely, constraints on affinity (AC), orthogonality (OC), and properness (PC). The method also incorporated an injectivity constraint (IC) to preserve topology. Physical experiments involving phantoms, an ovine spine, and a human cadaver as well as digital simulations were performed to evaluate the sensitivity to registration parameters, preservation of rigid body morphology, and overall registration accuracy of constrained FFD in comparison to conventional unconstrained FFD (uFFD) and Demons registration. FFD with orthogonality and injectivity constraints (denoted FFD+OC+IC) demonstrated improved performance compared to uFFD and Demons. Affinity and properness constraints offered little or no additional improvement. The FFD+OC+IC method preserved rigid body morphology at near-ideal values of zero dilatation ({ D} = 0.05, compared to 0.39 and 0.56 for uFFD and Demons, respectively) and shear ({ S} = 0.08, compared to 0.36 and 0.44 for uFFD and Demons

  12. Management of Esophageal and Pharyngeal Perforation as Complications of Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Moo Sung; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Park, Jeong Yoon; Kuh, Sung Uk; Chin, Dong Kyu; Jin, Byung Ho; Kim, Keun Su; Cho, Yong Eun

    2017-06-01

    To describe our experience in treating esophageal and pharyngeal perforation after anterior cervical spine surgery. Six patients with esophageal injury and one patient with pharyngeal injury after anterior cervical spinal surgery, managed at our department between 2000 and 2015, were analyzed retrospectively. During the study period, 7 patients (6 male and 1 female; mean age, 45 years) presented with esophageal perforation. The original anterior cervical spinal surgery was performed due to trauma in 2 patients and because of a degenerative cervical disorder in 5. Early esophageal perforation was diagnosed in 2 patients, and delayed esophageal injury due to chronic irritation with the cervical implants was noted in 5. Three of the five delayed perforation cases were related to cervical instrument displacement. Two patients showed no definite signs of infection, whereas 5 patients had various symptoms, including fever, neck pain, odynophagia, neck swelling, and upper extremity weakness. Two patients with a large defect underwent surgical repair and three with minimal perforation due to chronic irritation from the implants underwent instrument removal without direct repair of defect. Two asymptomatic patients received no intervention. Six patients with infection completely recovered from esophageal injury after treatment for a mean duration of 5.2 weeks (range, 4-8 weeks). One patient died because of postoperative pneumonia and sepsis after implant removal. Esophageal and pharyngeal injury after cervical spinal surgery may occur either directly due to spinal trauma and vigorous intraoperative retraction or due to chronic irritation with cervical implants. In cases of perforation associated with infection, various surgical modalities, including primary closure and reinforcement with a flap, could be considered depending on factors such as esophageal defect size, infection severity, and timing of recognition of injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Unusual spine anatomy contributing to wrong level spine surgery: a case report and recommendations for decreasing the risk of preventable 'never events'

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    Lindley Emily M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wrong site surgery is one of five surgical "Never Events," which include performing surgery on the incorrect side or incorrect site, performing the wrong procedure, performing surgery on the wrong patient, unintended retention of a foreign object in a patient, and intraoperative/immediate postoperative death in an ASA Class I patient. In the spine, wrong site surgery occurs when a procedure is performed on an unintended vertebral level. Despite the efforts of national safety protocols, literature suggests that the risk for wrong level spine surgery remains problematic. Case Presentation A 34-year-old male was referred to us to evaluate his persistent thoracic pain following right-sided microdiscectomy at T7-8 at an outside institution. Postoperative imaging showed the continued presence of a herniated disc at T7-8 and evidence of a microdiscectomy at the level immediately above. The possibility that wrong level surgery had occurred was discussed with the patient and revision surgery was planned. During surgery, the site of the previous laminectomy was clearly visualized; however, we also experienced confusion when verifying the level of the previous surgery. We ultimately used the previous laminectomy site as a landmark for identifying and treating the correct pathologic level. Postoperative consultation with Musculoskeletal Radiology revealed the patient had two abnormalities in his spinal anatomy that made intraoperative counting of levels inaccurate, including a pair of cervical ribs at C7 and the absence of a pair of thoracic ribs. Conclusion This case highlights the importance of strict adherence to a preoperative method of vertebral labeling that focuses on the landmarks used to label a pathologic disc space, rather than simply relying on the reference to a particular level. That is, by designating the pathological level as the disc space associated with the fourth rib up from the last rib-bearing vertebrae, rather than

  14. Use of next generation sequencing to detect biofilm bacteria in a patient with pedicle screw loosening after spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yijuan; Thomsen, Trine Rolighed; Lorenzen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    implant-related infection is believed to be linked to pedicle screw loosening after spine surgery. Low-grade bacterial infection can be hard to diagnose and may be undetected by conventional culture based methods. Next generation sequencing (NGS) could help to uncover hidden bacterial infections...... (v.1.20).” Results: “Clinically there were no signs of local or general infection. Serum parameters were normal (C-reactive protein 0.7 mg/L, WBC 6.2 Gpt/L) at revision surgery. No other infectious foci were noticed. Histology showed no signs of infection. Routine microbial culturing was negative......Title: Use of next generation sequencing to detect biofilm bacteria in a patient with pedicle screw loosening after spine surgery: a case report Yijuan Xu1, Trine Rolighed Thomsen1,2, Jan Lorenzen1, Kathrin Chamaon3, Per Trobisch4, Steffen Drange3 1. Danish Technological Institute, Aarhus, Denmark...

  15. Proximal junctional vertebral fracture-subluxation after adult spine deformity surgery. Does vertebral augmentation avoid this complication? A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Baíllo Nicomedes

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report to the orthopedic community a case of vertebral fracture and adjacent vertebral subluxation through the upper instrumented vertebra after thoracolumbar fusion with augmentation of the cranial level. Methods This report reviewed the patient`s medical record, her imaging studies and related literature. The possible factors contributing to this fracture are hypothesized. Results A 70-year-old woman underwent decompressive surgery and posterolateral fusion for adult lumbar scoliosis. We used pedicular screws from T10 to S1 and iliac screw at the right side, augmented with cement at T10, T11, L1, L5 and S1; and prophylactic vertebroplasty at T9 to avoid the "topping-off syndrome". Thirty days after discharge, without recognizable inciting trauma, the patient complained of pain in the lower thoracic area. The exam revealed overall neurological deficit below the level of fracture. CT scan and MRI demonstrated a T10 vertebral collapse and T9 vertebral subluxation with morphologic features of flexion-distraction fracture through the upper edge of the screw. At this point, the authors performed posterior decompression at T9 to T10 and extended posterolateral arthrodesis from T2 to T10. To our knowledge, this is an unreported fracture. Conclusions Augmentation of the cranial level in a long thoracolumbar fusion has been developed to avoid the junctional kyphosis and compression fractures at that level. We alert the orthopedic community that this augmentation may lead to further and more severe fractures, although this opinion requires investigation for confirmation.

  16. Effect of liberal blood transfusion on clinical outcomes and cost in spine surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, Taylor E; Goodwin, C Rory; De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Ahmed, A Karim; Lafage, Virginie; Neuman, Brian J; Passias, Peter G; Kebaish, Khaled M; Frank, Steven M; Sciubba, Daniel M

    2017-09-01

    Blood transfusions in spine surgery are shown to be associated with increased patient morbidity. The association between transfusion performed using a liberal hemoglobin (Hb) trigger-defined as an intraoperative Hb level of ≥10 g/dL, a postoperative level of ≥8 g/dL, or a whole hospital nadir between 8 and 10 g/dL-and perioperative morbidity and cost in spine surgery patients is unknown and thus was investigated in this study. This study aimed to describe the perioperative outcomes and economic cost associated with liberal Hb trigger transfusion among spine surgery patients. This is a retrospective study. The surgical billing database at our institution was queried for inpatients discharged between 2008 and 2015 after the following procedures: atlantoaxial fusion, anterior cervical fusion, posterior cervical fusion, anterior lumbar fusion, posterior lumbar fusion, lateral lumbar fusion, other procedures, and tumor-related surgeries. In total, 6,931 patients were included for analysis. The primary outcome was composite morbidity, which was composed of (1) infection (sepsis, surgical-site infection, Clostridium difficile infection, or drug-resistant infection); (2) thrombotic event (pulmonary embolus, deep venous thrombosis, or disseminated intravascular coagulation); (3) kidney injury; (4) respiratory event; and (5) ischemic event (transient ischemic attack, myocardial infarction, or cerebrovascular accident). Data on intraoperative transfusion were obtained from an automated, prospectively collected anesthesia data management system. Data on postoperative hospital transfusion were obtained through a Web-based intelligence portal. Based on previous research, we analyzed the data using three definitions of a liberal transfusion trigger in patients who underwent red blood cell transfusion: a liberal intraoperative Hb trigger as a nadir Hb level of 10 g/dL or greater, a liberal postoperative Hb trigger as a nadir Hb level of 8 g/dL or greater, or a whole

  17. Do Patient Demographics and Patient-Reported Outcomes Predict 12-Month Loss to Follow-Up After Spine Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielatycki, J Alex; Parker, Scott L; Godil, Saniya S; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of patients in a prospective registry. To determine the association between patient demographics, outcomes, and loss to follow-up 12 months after spine surgery. Obtaining outcomes 12 months after spine surgery remains a challenge. Loss to follow-up is believed to introduce biases and portend poor outcomes. Associations between follow-up, patient demographics, and outcomes in the degenerative spine population have not been studied. Patients undergoing surgery for degenerative spine disease at a single institution over a 2-year period were enrolled in a prospective registry. Patient demographics, comorbidities, treatment variables, readmissions/reoperations, and all 90-day surgical morbidity were collected. Patient-reported outcomes were recorded at baseline, 3-months, and 12-months after surgery. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was done to identify predictors of loss to follow-up. A total of 1484 patients with baseline and 3-month outcomes were included. Two hundred thirty-three (15.7%) patients were lost to follow-up at 12 months. There was no difference in the baseline demographics (Sex: P = 0.46) and comorbidities (American Society of Anesthesiologists Grade: P = 0.06) of patients who had follow-up at 12-months versus those who did not, except age and employment status. Patients lost to follow-up at 12 months were younger (51.0 vs. 57.1 years; P 0.05). There was no difference in 90-day morbidity (17.2% vs. 16.2%; P = 0.70) and 3-month pain, disability, quality of life, and patient satisfaction (85.0% vs. 88.3%; P = 0.63) (P > 0.05). In multivariate model, only younger age (P spine registry the 12-month loss to follow-up rate is approximately 15%. The only independent predictor of loss to follow-up is younger age and preoperative employment. 3.

  18. Surgical treatment of congenital thoracolumbar spondyloptosis in a 2-year-old child with vertebral column resection and posterior-only circumferential reconstruction of the spine column: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressot, Loyola V; Mata, Javier A; Luerssen, Thomas G; Jea, Andrew

    2015-02-01

    Spondyloptosis refers to complete dislocation of a vertebral body onto another. The L5-S1 level is frequently affected. As this condition is rare, few published reports describing its clinical features and surgical outcomes exist, especially in the pediatric patient population. The authors report the presentation, pathological findings, and radiographic studies of a 2-year-old girl who presented to Texas Children's Hospital with a history since birth of progressive spastic paraparesis. Preoperative CT and MRI showed severe spinal cord compression associated with T11-12 spondyloptosis. The patient underwent a single-stage posterior approach for complete resection of the dysplastic vertebral bodies at the apex of the spinal deformity with reconstruction and stabilization of the vertebral column using a titanium expandable cage and pedicle screws. At the 12-month follow-up, the patient remained neurologically stable without any radiographic evidence of instrumentation failure or loss of alignment. To the best of the authors' knowledge, there have been only 2 other children with congenital thoracolumbar spondyloptosis treated with the above-described strategy. The authors describe their case and review the literature to discuss the aggregate clinical features, surgical strategies, and operative outcomes for congenital thoracolumbar spondyloptosis.

  19. Risk Factors Associated with Readmission and Reoperation in Patients Undergoing Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Keaton; DeAndrea-Lazarus, Ian; Algattas, Hanna; Kimmell, Kristopher T; Towner, James; Li, Yan M; Walter, Kevin; Vates, George E

    2018-02-01

    Reoperation and readmission are often avoidable, costly, and difficult to predict. We sought to identify risk factors for readmission and reoperation after spine surgery and to use these factors to develop a scoring system predictive of readmission and reoperation. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database for years 2012 to 2014 was reviewed for patients undergoing spinal surgery, and 68 perioperative characteristics were analyzed. A total of 111,892 patients who underwent spinal surgery were identified. The rate of reoperation was 3.1%, the rate of readmission was 5.2%, and the occurrence of either was 6.6%. Multivariate analysis found 20 perioperative factors significantly associated with both readmission and reoperation. Preoperative and operative factors found significant included age >60 years, African-American race, recent weight loss, chronic steroid use, on dialysis, blood transfusion required, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification ≥3, contaminated wound, >10% probability of experiencing morbidity, and operative time >3 hours. Postoperative associations identified included urinary tract infection, stroke, dehiscence, pulmonary embolism, sepsis, septic shock, deep and superficial surgical site infection, reintubation, and failure to wean from ventilator. An unweighted and weighted risk score were generated that yielded receiver operating characteristic curves with areas under the curve of 0.707 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.701-0.713) and 0.743 (95% CI: 0.736-0.749) 0.708 (95% CI: 0.702-0.715), respectively. Patients with an unweighted score ≥7 had a more than 20-fold increased risk of reoperation or readmission and a more than 1000-fold increased risk of mortality than did patients with a score of 0. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Managing spine surgery referrals: The consultation of neurosurgery and its nuances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debono, B; Sabatier, P; Koudsie, A; Buffenoir, K; Hamel, O

    2017-09-01

    Spinal disorders, particularly low back pain, are among the most common reasons for general practitioner (GP) consultation and can sometimes be a source of professional friction. Despite their frequency and published guidelines, many patients are still mistakenly referred by their GP to specialists for spinal surgery consultation which can create colleague relationship problems, suboptimal or unnessary delayed care, as well as the financial implications for patients. To assess the management of GP lumbar spine referrals made to 4 neurosurgeons from 3 neurosurgical teams specialized in spinal surgery. All patient's medical records relating to 672 primary consultants over a period of two months (January and February 2015) at three institutions were retrospectively reviewed. Medical referral letters, clinical evidence and imaging data were analyzed and the patients were classified according the accuracy of surgical assessment. The final decisions of the surgeons were also considered. Of the 672 patients analyzed, 198 (29.5%) were considered unsuitable for surgical assessment: no spinal pathology=10.6%, no surgical conditions=35.4%, suboptimal medical treatment=31.3%, suboptimal radiology=18.2% and asymptomatic patients=4.5%. Unnecessary referrals to our consultation centers highlight the gap between the reason for the consultation and the indications for spinal surgery. Compliance with the guidelines, the creation of effective multidisciplinary teams, as well as the "hands on" involvement of surgeons in primary and continuing education of physicians are the best basis for a reduction in inappropriate referrals and effective patient care management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficacy, safety, and economics of bracing after spine surgery: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mary P; Tetreault, Lindsay A; Sorefan-Mangou, Fatimah; Garwood, Philip; Wilson, Jefferson R

    2018-01-31

    Bracing is often used after spinal surgery to immobilize the spine, improve fusion, and relieve pain. However, controversy exists regarding the efficacy, necessity, and safety of various bracing techniques in the postsurgical setting. In this systematic review, we aimed to compare the effectiveness, safety, and cost-effectiveness of postoperative bracing versus no postoperative bracing after spinal surgery in patients with several common operative spinal pathologies. A systematic review was carried out to compare postoperative bracing and no postoperative bracing. A systematic search was conducted of MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Collaboration Library from 1970 to May 2017, supplemented by manual searching of the reference list of relevant studies and previously published reviews. Studies were included if they compared disability, quality of life, functional impairment, radiographic outcomes, cost-effectiveness, or complications between patients treated with postoperative bracing and patients not receiving any postoperative bracing. Each article was critically appraised independently by two reviewers, and the overall body of evidence was rated using guidelines outlined by the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group. Of the 858 retrieved citations, 5 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review, consisting of 4 randomized controlled trials and 1 prospective cohort study. Low to moderate evidence suggests that there are no significant differences in most measures of disability, pain, quality of life, functional impairment, radiographic outcomes, and safety between groups. Isolated studies reported statistically significant and inconsistent differences between groups with respect to Neck Disability Index at 6 weeks postoperatively or Short Form-36 Physical Component Score at 1.5, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Based on limited evidence, postoperative bracing does not result in improved

  2. The "shadow sign": a radiographic differentiation of stainless steel versus titanium spinal instrumentation in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Quaidoo, Sean M; Novicoff, Wendy; Park, Andrew; Arlet, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    Stainless steel spinal instrumentation has been supplanted in recent years by titanium instrumentation. Knowing whether stainless steel or titanium was used in a previous surgery can guide clinical decision making processes, but frequently the clinician has no way to know what type of metal was used. We describe the radiographic "shadow sign," in which superimposed titanium rods and screws remain radiolucent enough that the contour of the underlying components can be seen on a lateral radiograph, whereas superimposed stainless steel rods and screws are completely radiopaque. This technique was evaluated using a retrospective, randomized, and blinded radiographic comparison of titanium and stainless steel spinal instrumentation. The objective was to determine whether the "shadow sign" can reliably differentiate titanium from stainless steel spinal instrumentation. Lateral radiographs from 16 cases of posterior spinal instrumentation (6 titanium, 6 stainless steel, and 2 replicates of each to assess intraobserver reliability) were randomly selected from a database of cases performed for pediatric scoliosis in a university setting from 2005 to 2009. The cases were randomized then shown to 19 orthopaedic surgery residents, 1 spine fellow, and 2 spine attendings. After the "shadow sign" was described, the surgeons were asked to determine what type of metal each implant was made of. The κ value for both stainless steel and titanium versus the gold standard was 0.83 [standard error (SE) = 0.053], indicating excellent agreement. The κ value for agreement between raters was 0.71 (SE = 0.016) and the κ value for agreement within raters was 0.70 (SE = 0.016), both of which indicated substantial agreement. The "shadow sign" can help a clinician differentiate titanium from stainless steel spinal instrumentation based on radiographic appearance alone. Furthermore, our study reveals that the level of experience in diagnosing spinal lateral radiographs also enhances the use of

  3. Preliminary experience with SpineEOS, a new software for 3D planning in AIS surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Emmanuelle; Mazda, Keyvan; Simon, Anne-Laure; Ilharreborde, Brice

    2018-04-24

    Preoperative planning of scoliosis surgery is essential in the effective treatment of spine pathology. Thus, precontoured rods have been recently developed to avoid iatrogenic sagittal misalignment and rod breakage. Some specific issues exist in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), such as a less distal lower instrumented level, a great variability in the location of inflection point (transition from lumbar lordosis to thoracic kyphosis), and sagittal correction is limited by both bone-implant interface. Since 2007, stereoradiographic imaging system is used and allows for 3D reconstructions. Therefore, a software was developed to perform preoperative 3D surgical planning and to provide rod's shape and length. The goal of this preliminary study was to assess the feasibility, reliability, and the clinical relevance of this new software. Retrospective study on 47 AIS patients operated with the same surgical technique: posteromedial translation through posterior approach with lumbar screws and thoracic sublaminar bands. Pre- and postoperatively, 3D reconstructions were performed on stereoradiographic images (EOS system, Paris, France) and compared. Then, the software was used to plan the surgical correction and determine rod's shape and length. Simulated spine and rods were compared to postoperative real 3D reconstructions. 3D reconstructions and planning were performed by an independent observer. 3D simulations were performed on the 47 patients. No difference was found between the simulated model and the postoperative 3D reconstructions in terms of sagittal parameters. Postoperatively, 21% of LL were not within reference values. Postoperative SVA was 20 mm anterior in 2/3 of the cases. Postoperative rods were significantly longer than precontoured rods planned with the software (mean 10 mm). Inflection points were different on the rods used and the planned rods (2.3 levels on average). In this preliminary study, the software based on 3D stereoradiography low

  4. Post-operative delirium is an independent predictor of 30-day hospital readmission after spine surgery in the elderly (≥65years old): A study of 453 consecutive elderly spine surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Wang, Timothy Y; Back, Adam G; Lydon, Emily; Reddy, Gireesh B; Karikari, Isaac O; Gottfried, Oren N

    2017-07-01

    In the last decade, costs of U.S. healthcare expenditures have been soaring, with billions of dollars spent on hospital readmissions. Identifying causes and risk factors can reduce soaring readmission rates and help lower healthcare costs. The aim of this is to determine if post-operative delirium in the elderly is an independent risk factor for 30-day hospital readmission after spine surgery. The medical records of 453 consecutive elderly (≥65years old) patients undergoing spine surgery at Duke University Medical Center from 2008 to 2010 were reviewed. We identified 17 (3.75%) patients who experienced post-operative delirium according to DSM-V criteria. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and post-operative complication rates were collected for each patient. Elderly patients experiencing post-operative delirium had an increased length of hospital stay (10.47days vs. 5.70days, p=0.009). Complication rates were similar between the cohorts with the post-operative delirium patients having increased UTI and superficial surgical site infections. In total, 12.14% of patients were re-admitted within 30-days of discharge, with post-operative delirium patients experiencing approximately a 4-fold increase in 30-day readmission rates (Delirium: 41.18% vs. No Delirium: 11.01%, p=0.002). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, post-operative delirium is an independent predictor of 30-day readmission after spine surgery in the elderly (p=0.03). Elderly patients experiencing post-operative delirium after spine surgery is an independent risk factor for unplanned readmission within 30-days of discharge. Preventable measures and early awareness of post-operative delirium in the elderly may help reduce readmission rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional recovery in lumbar spine surgery: a controlled trial of health behavior change counseling to improve outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolasky, Richard L; Riley, Lee H; Maggard, Anica M; Bedi, Saaniya; Wegener, Stephen T

    2013-09-01

    In 2001, the Institute of Medicine issued a challenge to the American health care system to improve the quality of care by focusing on six major areas: safety, effectiveness, patient-centeredness, timeliness, efficiency, and equity. The patient-centered model of care directly addresses important limits of surgical care of the lumbar spine, i.e., the lack of effective methods for increasing patient participation and engagement in post-operative follow-up. Recent evidence indicates that post-surgical outcomes are better among those with higher patient activation. We therefore developed an intervention based on the principles of motivational interviewing to increase patient activation: the Functional Recovery in Lumbar Spine Surgery Health Behavior Change Counseling (HBCC) intervention. The HBCC was designed to maximize post-operative engagement and participation in physical therapy and home exercise, to improve functional recovery, and to decrease pain in individuals undergoing elective lumbar spine surgery. From December 2009 through October 2012, 120 participants were recruited and divided into two groups: those receiving (intervention group, 60) and not receiving (control group, 60) the HBCC intervention. The current manuscript provides a detailed description of the theoretical framework and study design of the HBCC and describes the implementation of this health behavior intervention in a university-based spine service. The HBCC provides a model for conducting health behavioral research in a real-world setting. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Incidence and predictive factors of spinal cord stimulation treatment after lumbar spine surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vakkala M

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Merja Vakkala,1 Voitto Järvimäki,1 Hannu Kautiainen,2,3 Maija Haanpää,4,5 Seppo Alahuhta1 1Department of Anaesthesiology, Medical Research Center Oulu (MRC Oulu, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Oulu, 2Primary Health Care Unit, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, 3Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, 4Department of Neurosurgery, Helsinki University Hospital, 5Mutual Insurance Company Etera, Helsinki, Finland Introduction: Spinal cord stimulation (SCS is recommended for the treatment of postsurgical chronic back and leg pain refractory to other treatments. We wanted to estimate the incidence and predictive factors of SCS treatment in our lumbar surgery cohort.Patients and methods: Three questionnaires (a self-made questionnaire, the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire, and the Beck Depression Inventory were sent to patients aged 18–65 years with no contraindications for the use of SCS, and who had undergone non-traumatic lumbar spine surgery in the Oulu University Hospital between June 2005 and May 2008. Patients who had a daily pain intensity of ≥5/10 with predominant radicular component were interviewed by telephone.Results: After exclusions, 814 patients remained in this cohort. Of those, 21 patients had received SCS by the end of June 2015. Fifteen (71% of these received benefit and continued with the treatment. Complications were rare. The number of patients who replied to the postal survey were 537 (66%. Eleven of them had undergone SCS treatment after their reply. Features predicting SCS implantation were daily or continuous pain, higher intensities of pain with predominant radicular pain, more severe pain-related functional disability, a higher prevalence of depressive symptoms, and reduced benefit from pain medication. The mean waiting time was 65 months (26–93 months. One hundred patients were interviewed by telephone. Fourteen seemed to be potential SCS candidates. From the eleven patients who

  7. Metastatic spine tumor surgery: does perioperative blood transfusion influence postoperative complications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaw, Aye Sandar; Kantharajanna, Shashidhar B; Maharajan, Karthikeyan; Tan, Barry; Saparamadu, Amarasinghe A; Kumar, Naresh

    2017-11-01

    The question of independent association between allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) and postoperative complications in cancer surgeries has been controversial and remains so. In metastatic spine tumor surgery (MSTS), previous studies investigated the influence of ABT on survival, but not on postoperative complications. We aimed to evaluate the influence of perioperative ABT on postoperative complications and infections in patients undergoing MSTS. This retrospective study included 247 patients who underwent MSTS at a single tertiary institution between 2005 and 2014. The outcome measures were postoperative complications and infections within 30 days after MSTS. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess influence of blood transfusion on the outcomes after adjusting for potential confounders. Of 247 patients, 133 (54%) received ABT with overall median (range) of 2 (0-10) units. The adjusted odds of developing any postoperative complication was 2.27 times higher in patients with transfusion (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17-4.38; p = 0.01) and 1.24 times higher odds per every unit increase in blood transfusion (95% CI, 1.05-1.46; p blood transfusion also increased the odds of having overall postoperative infections (odds ratio, 3.58; 95% CI, 1.15-11.11; p = 0.02) and there were 1.24 times higher odds per every unit increase in transfusion (95% CI, 1.01-1.54; p = 0.04). This study adds evidence to the literature implicating ABT to be influential on postoperative complications and infections in patients undergoing MSTS. Appropriate blood management measures should, therefore, be given a crucial place in the care of these patients so as to reduce any putative effect of blood transfusion. © 2017 AABB.

  8. Incidental durotomy in lumbar spine surgery - incidence, risk factors and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Incidental durotomy is a common complication of lumbar spine operations for degenerative disorders. Its incidence varies depending on several risk factors and regarding the intra and postoperative management, there is no consensus. Our objective was to report our experience with incidental durotomy in patients who were operated on for lumbar disc herniation, lumbar spinal stenosis and revision surgeries. Between 2009 and 2012, 1259 patients were operated on for degenerative lumbar disorders. For primary operations, the surgical approach was mino-open, interlamar, uni- or bilateral, as for recurrences, the removal of the compressive element was intended: the epidural scar and the disc fragment. 863 patients (67,7% were operated on for lumbar disc herniation, 344 patients (27,3% were operated on for lumbar spinal stenosis and 52 patients (5% were operated for recurrences. The operations were performed by neurosurgeons with the same professional degree but with different operative volume. Unintentional durotomy occurred in 20 (2,3% of the patients with herniated disc, in 14 (4,07% of the patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and in 12 (23% of the patients who were operated on for recurrences. The most frequent risk factors were: obesity, revised surgery and the physician’s low operative volume. Intraoperative dural fissures were repaired through suture (8 cases, by applying muscle, fat graft or by applying curaspon, tachosil. There existed 4 CSF fistulas which were repaired at reoperation. Incidental dural fissures during operations for degenerative lumbar disorders must be recognized and immediately repaired to prevent complications such as CSF fistula, osteodiscitis and increased medical costs. Preventing, identifying and treating unintentional durotomies can be best achieved by respecting a neat surgical technique and a standardized treatment protocol.

  9. Impact of robot-assisted spine surgery on health care quality and neurosurgical economics: A systemic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiani, Brian; Quadri, Syed A; Farooqui, Mudassir; Cathel, Alessandra; Berman, Blake; Noel, Jerry; Siddiqi, Javed

    2018-04-03

    Whenever any new technology is introduced into the healthcare system, it should satisfy all three pillars of the iron triangle of health care, which are quality, cost-effectiveness, and accessibility. There has been quite advancement in the field of spine surgery in the last two decades with introduction of new technological modalities such as CAN and surgical robotic devices. MAZOR SpineAssist/Renaissance was the first robotic system to be approved for the use in spine surgeries in the USA in 2004. In this review, the authors sought to determine if the current literature supports this technology to be cost-effective, accessible, and improve the quality of care for individuals and populations by increasing the likelihood of desired health outcomes. Robotic-assisted surgery seems to provide perfection in surgical ergonomics and surgical dexterity, consequently improving patient outcomes. A lot of data is present on the accuracy, effectiveness, and safety of the robotic-guided technology which reflects remarkable improvements in quality of care, making its utility convincingly undisputable. The technology has been claimed to be cost-effective but there seems to be lack of data in the literature on this topic to validate this claim. Apart from just the outcome parameters, there is an immense need of studies on real-time cost-efficacy, patient perspective, surgeon and resident learning curve, and their experience with this new technology. Furthermore, new studies looking into increased utilities of this technology, such as brain and spine tumor resection, deep brain stimulation procedures, and osteotomies in deformity surgery, might authenticate the cost of the equipment.

  10. Planning and performing spine surgery with CT/MPR: A primer for radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, P.; Kerber, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    Few things are more discouraging to a surgeon than the patient who has continued bitter complaints after spine surgery. We often show our discouragement by refusing even to name these patients;instead we depersonalize them, calling them ''failed backs.'' The most common cause of the failed-back syndrome is probably an error in the original decision to operate. Many patients have unsolved psychosocial problems that the surgeon may not recognize. Even though we are critical of this lapse in surgical judgment, the most experienced and cautious physician occasionally makes these mistakes. Not all failed backs are psychosocial in origin. The advent of computerized tomography with multiplanar reconstruction (CT/MPR) has demonstrated several large and important subsets of patients whose operation has failed not for psychosocial reasons but for a lack of appreciation of unrecognized pathology. In a small minority of cases, the surgeon has operated on the wrong interspace. In most, though, important pathology was overlooked and not operated on because the technology to see it was unavailable. In order that the radiologist can better understand the problems encountered by the surgeon, the authors now review the most common of these problems and outline how specific abnormalities are diagnosed and treated. The evaluation of back disease is a complex undertaking, and the partnership between radiologist and surgeon is an essential one

  11. Lower cervical levels: Increased risk of early dysphonia following anterior cervical spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ji-Huan; Li, Xiao-Dan; Deng, Liang; Xiao, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to re-evaluate the incidence of early dysphonia after anterior cervical spine surgery (ACSS) and to determine the related risk factors. Patients underwent ACSS between January 2011 and December 2013 at two sites were identified retrospectively from hospital's patient databases. A total of 233 cases were included in this study. Dysphonia developed 1 month postoperatively was recorded. Follow-up was conducted in all positive-response patients. Those reporting severe or persistent voice symptoms were referred to otolaryngologists for further assessments and (or) treatments. Pre and intraoperative factors were collected to determine their relationships with dysphonia one month postoperatively. 45 patients developed dysphonia at one month, including 23 males and 22 females, yielding to an incidence of 19.3%. 34 cases resolved themselves in 3 months, leaving the remaining 11 patients considered to be severe or persistent cases. However, 10 of them recovered spontaneously in the next 9 months, while the last case received vocal cord medialization and returned to almost normal speech function at 18 months. In univariate analysis, only approaching level involving C6-C7 or (and) C7-T1 was significantly associated with postoperative dysphonia (Pdysphonia following ACSS was relatively high and approaching at lower cervical levels was an independent predictive factor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Costs and quality of life for prehabilitation and early rehabilitation after surgery of the lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreasen Jakob

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the recent years improved operation techniques and administrative procedures have been developed for early rehabilitation. At the same time preoperative lifestyle intervention (prehabilitation has revealed a large potential for additional risk reduction. The aim was to assess the quality of life and to estimate the cost-effectiveness of standard care versus an integrated programme including prehabilitation and early rehabilitation. Methods The analyses were based on the results from 60 patients undergoing lumbar fusion for degenerative lumbar disease; 28 patients were randomised to the integrated programme and 32 to the standard care programme. Data on cost and health related quality of life was collected preoperatively, during hospitalisation and postoperatively. The cost was estimated from multiplication of the resource consumption and price per unit. Results Overall there was no difference in health related quality of life scores. The patients from the integrated programme obtained their postoperative milestones sooner, returned to work and soaked less primary care after discharge. The integrated programme was 1,625€ (direct costs 494€ + indirect costs 1,131€ less costly per patient compared to the standard care programme. Conclusion The integrated programme of prehabilitation and early rehabilitation in spine surgery is more cost-effective compared to standard care programme alone.

  13. [Impact of obesity in the pathophysiology of degenerative disk disease and in the morbidity and outcome of lumbar spine surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-López, Pedro David; Castilla-Díez, José Manuel

    Obesity (BMI>30Kg/m 2 ) is a pandemic with severe medical and financial implications. There is growing evidence that relates certain metabolic processes within the adipose tissue, preferentially abdominal fat, with a low-intensity chronic inflammatory state mediated by adipokines and other substances that favor disk disease and chronic low back pain. Obesity greatly conditions both the preoperative evaluation and the spinal surgical technique itself. Some meta-analyses have confirmed an increase of complications following lumbar spine surgery (mainly infections and venous thrombosis) in obese subjects. However, functional outcomes after lumbar spine surgery are favorable although inferior to the non-obese population, acknowledging that obese patients present with worse baseline function levels and the prognosis of conservatively treated obese cohorts is much worse. The impact of preoperative weight loss in spine surgery has not been prospectively studied in these patients. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Intrathecal Baclofen Injection to Avoid Withdrawal in a Multiple Sclerosis Patient Undergoing Lumbar Spine Surgery: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupanovic, Mirsad; Devine, Robert P; Jackson, Sean R; Lynch, Sharon G

    2017-11-09

    Spasticity of spinal or cerebral origin is frequently treated with baclofen. Treatment interruption initially results in rebound spasticity; life-threatening withdrawal symptoms may follow. Severe rebound spasticity of leg muscles occurred in a multiple sclerosis patient after a 10-hour long perioperative pause of oral baclofen intake. In a subsequent spine surgery, recurrence was prevented by substituting a cumulative 12-hour oral baclofen dose with an intraoperative intrathecal injection. Administration of intrathecal baclofen during prolonged surgery in patients dependent on oral baclofen may improve patient comfort and prevent early withdrawal symptoms. The most optimal conversion ratio from oral to intrathecal baclofen is still undetermined.

  15. The epidemiology of thoracolumbar trauma: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuura, Yoshihiro; Osborn, James Michael; Cason, Garrick Wayne

    2016-12-01

    To describe the epidemiology of thoracolumbar fractures and associated injuries in blunt trauma patients. A systematic review and metaanalysis was performed based on a MEDLINE database search using MeSH terms for studies matching our inclusion criteria. The search yielded 21 full-length articles, each sub-grouped according to content. Data extraction and multiple analyses were performed on descriptive data. The rate of thoracolumbar fracture in blunt trauma patients was 6.90% (±3.77, 95% CI). The rate of spinal cord injury was 26.56% (±10.70), and non-contiguous cervical spine fracture occurred in 10.49% (±4.17). Associated injury was as follows: abdominal trauma 7.63% (±9.74), thoracic trauma 22.64% (±13.94), pelvic trauma 9.39% (±6.45), extremity trauma 18.26% (±5.95), and head trauma 12.96% (±2.01). Studies that included cervical spine fracture with thoracolumbar fracture had the following rates of associated trauma: 3.78% (±5.94) abdominal trauma, 21.65% (±16.79) thoracic trauma, 3.62% (±1.07) pelvic trauma, 18.36% (±4.94) extremity trauma, and 15.45% (±11.70) head trauma. A subgroup of flexion distraction injuries showed an associated intra-abdominal injury rate of 38.70% (±13.30). The most common vertebra injured was L1 at a rate of 34.40% (±15.90). T7 was the most common non-junctional vertebra injured at 3.90% (±1.09). Burst/AO type A3 fractures were the most common morphology 39.50% (±16.30) followed by 33.60% (±15.10) compression/AO type A1, 14.20% (±8.08) fracture dislocation/AO type C, and 6.96% (±3.50) flexion distraction/AO type B. The most common etiology for a thoracolumbar fracture was motor vehicle collision 36.70% (±5.35), followed by high-energy fall 31.70% (±6.70). Here we report the incidence of thoracolumbar fracture in blunt trauma and the spectrum of associated injuries. To our knowledge, this paper provides the first epidemiological road map for blunt trauma thoracolumbar injuries.

  16. Prevalence of adjacent segment disease following cervical spine surgery: A PRISMA-compliant systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingde; Cao, Junming; Wang, Linfeng; Shen, Yong

    2016-07-01

    Prevalence estimates of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) following cervical spine surgery varied greatly in current studies. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize the point prevalence of ASD after cervical spine surgery. Comprehensive electronic searches of PubMed, Embase, Web of Knowledge, and Cochrane Library databases were conducted to identify any study published from initial state to January 2016. Those reporting the prevalence of ASD after cervical surgery were included. A random-effects model was used to estimate the prevalence of radiographic ASD, symptomatic ASD, and reoperation ASD. Univariate meta-regression analyses were conducted to explore the potential associations between prevalence and length of follow-up. All analyses were performed using R version 3.2.3 (R Foundation for Statistical Computing). A total of 83 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The prevalence of radiographic ASD, symptomatic ASD, and reoperation ASD after cervical surgery was 28.28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 20.96-36.96), 13.34% (95% CI, 11.06-16.00), and 5.78% (95% CI, 4.99-6.69), respectively, in a general analysis. It was found 2.79%, 1.43%, and 0.24% additions per year of follow-up in the incidence of radiographic ASD, symptomatic ASD, and reoperation ASD, respectively. This meta-analysis provides some details about the prevalence of radiographic ASD, symptomatic ASD, and reoperation ASD after cervical spine surgery. However, the results of this meta-analysis should be interpreted with caution because of the heterogeneity among the studies.

  17. Complications Associated With Spine Surgery in Patients Aged 80 Years or Older: Japan Association of Spine Surgeons with Ambition (JASA) Multicenter Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Ando, Kei; Ishiguro, Naoki; Yamashita, Masaomi; Eguchi, Yawara; Matsumoto, Morio; Ishii, Ken; Hikata, Tomohiro; Seki, Shoji; Terai, Hidetomi; Suzuki, Akinobu; Tamai, Koji; Aramomi, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Kimura, Atsushi; Inoue, Hirokazu; Inoue, Gen; Miyagi, Masayuki; Saito, Wataru; Yamada, Kei; Hongo, Michio; Nishimura, Hirosuke; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Nakano, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuyuki; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Ohya, Junichi; Aoki, Yasuchika; Shimizu, Masayuki; Futatsugi, Toshimasa; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Hasegawa, Masaichi; Kiyasu, Katsuhito; Iizuka, Haku; Iizuka, Yoichi; Kobayashi, Ryoichi; Nishida, Kotaro; Kakutani, Kenichiro; Nakajima, Hideaki; Murakami, Hideki; Demura, Satoru; Kato, Satoshi; Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Namikawa, Takashi; Watanabe, Kei; Nakanishi, Kazuyoshi; Nakagawa, Yukihiro; Yoshimoto, Mitsunori; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Nishida, Norihiro; Imajo, Yasuaki; Yamazaki, Masashi; Sakane, Masataka; Abe, Tetsuya; Fujii, Kengo; Kaito, Takashi; Furuya, Takeo; Orita, Sumihisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: Retrospective study of registry data. Objectives: Aging of society and recent advances in surgical techniques and general anesthesia have increased the demand for spinal surgery in elderly patients. Many complications have been described in elderly patients, but a multicenter study of perioperative complications in spinal surgery in patients aged 80 years or older has not been reported. Therefore, the goal of the study was to analyze complications associated with spine surgery in patients aged 80 years or older with cervical, thoracic, or lumbar lesions. Methods: A multicenter study was performed in patients aged 80 years or older who underwent 262 spinal surgeries at 35 facilities. The frequency and severity of complications were examined for perioperative complications, including intraoperative and postoperative complications, and for major postoperative complications that were potentially life threatening, required reoperation in the perioperative period, or left a permanent injury. Results: Perioperative complications occurred in 75 of the 262 surgeries (29%) and 33 were major complications (13%). In multivariate logistic regression, age over 85 years (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.007, P = 0.025) and estimated blood loss ≥500 g (HR = 3.076, P = .004) were significantly associated with perioperative complications, and an operative time ≥180 min (HR = 2.78, P = .007) was significantly associated with major complications. Conclusions: Elderly patients aged 80 years or older with comorbidities are at higher risk for complications. Increased surgical invasion, and particularly a long operative time, can cause serious complications that may be life threatening. Therefore, careful decisions are required with regard to the surgical indication and procedure in elderly patients. PMID:28989842

  18. Comparison of three different surgical approaches for treatment of thoracolumbar burst fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Han

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: The main treatment method used for thoracolumbar fractures is open reduction and in-ternal fixation. Commonly there are three surgical approaches: anterior, posterior and paraspinal. We attempt to compare the three approaches based on our clinical data analysis. Methods: A group of 94 patients with Denis type A or B thoracolumbar burst fracture between March 2008 and September 2010 were recruited in this study. These patients were treated by anterior-, posterior- or paraspinal-approach reduction with or without decompression. The fracture was fixed with titanium mesh and Z-plate via anterior approach (24 patients, screw and rod system via posterior approach (38 patients or paraspinal approach (32 patients. Clinical evaluations included operation duration, blood loss, inci-sion length, preoperative and postoperative Oswestry dis-ability index (ODI. Results: The average operation duration (94.1 min±13.7 min, blood loss (86.7 ml±20.0 ml, length of incision (9.3 mm± 0.7 mm and postoperative ODI (6±0.5 were signifi-cantly lower (P<0.05 in paraspinal approach group than in traditional posterior approach group (operation duration 94.1 min±13.7 min, blood loss 143.3 ml±28.3 ml, length of incision 15.4 cm±2.1 cm and ODI 12±0.7 and anterior approach group (operation duration 176.3 min±20.7 min, blood loss 255.1 ml±38.4 ml, length of incision 18.6 cm±2.4 cm and ODI 13±2.4. There was not statistical difference in terms of Cobb angle on radiographs among the three approaches. Conclusion: The anterior approach surgery is conve-nient for resection of the vertebrae and reconstruction of vertebral height, but it is more complicated and traumatic. Hence it is mostly used for severe Denis type B fracture. The posterior approach is commonly applied to most thora-columbar fractures and has fewer complications compared with the anterior approach, but it has some shortcomings as well. The paraspinal approach has great advantages

  19. Is the Thoracolumbar Injury Classification and Severity Score (TLICS) Superior to the AO Thoracolumbar Injury Classification System for Guiding the Surgical Management of Unstable Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures without Neurological Deficit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Mehmet Onur; Gurbuz, Mehmet Sabri; Is, Merih; Somay, Hakan

    2018-01-01

    To determine whether the Thoracolumbar Injury Classification and Severity Score (TLICS) and the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) Spine Thoracolumbar Injury Classification System have any superiority to each other regarding the reliability of their recommendations in the surgical management of unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures. Fifty-five consecutive patients with thoracolumbar burst fractures undergoing instrumentation between 2010 and 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. TLICS and AO systems were compared based on patients" American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scores and they were analyzed for their safety and reliability. A total of 55 patients were studied. Neurological deficits were detected in 18 patients and the remaining 37 patients had normal neurological functions. All the patients with neurological deficits received > 4 points according to TLICS. There were 14 patients with incomplete spinal cord injury and all of them received > 4 points according to TLICS (p AO system. None of the 37 patients without neurological deficit received AO points, to whom AO recommends conservative treatment despite the fact that they had unstable burst fractures (p AO particularly for guiding the surgical management of unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures without neurological deficit. However, this conclusion needs to be verified with further multicenter prospective studies.

  20. Comparison of propofol based anaesthesia to conventional inhalational general anaesthesia for spine surgery

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    L D Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Often conventional Inhalational agents are used for maintenance of anaesthesia in spine surgery. This study was undertaken to compare propofol with isoflurane anaesthesia with regard to haemodynamic stability, early emergence, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV and early assessment of neurological functions. Patients & Methods: Eighty ASA grade I &II adult patients were randomly allocated into two groups. Patients in study group received inj propofol for induction as well as for maintenance along with N 2O+O2 and the control group patients received inj thiopentone for induction and N 2 O+O 2 +isoflurane for maintenance. BIS monitoring was used for titrating the anaesthetic dose adjustments in all patients. All patients received fentanyl boluses for intraoperative analgesia and atracurium as muscle relaxant. Statistical data containing haemodynamic parameters, PONV, emergence time, dose of drug consumed & quality of surgical field were recorded and compared using student t′ test and Chi square test. Results: The haemodynamic stability was coparable in both the groups. The quality of surgical field were better in study group. Though there was no significant difference in the recovery profile (8.3% Vs 9.02% between both the groups, the postoperative nausea and vomiting was less in propofol group than isoflurane group (25%Vs60%. The anaesthesia cost was nearly double for propofol than isoflurane anaesthesia. Conclusion: Haemodynamic stability was comparable in both the groups. There was no significant difference in the recovery time between intravenous and inhalational group. Patients in propofol group were clear headed at awakening and were better oriented to place than inhalational group.

  1. Instruments used in the assessment of expectation toward a spine surgery: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepomuceno, Eliane; Silveira, Renata Cristina de Campos Pereira; Dessotte, Carina Aparecida Marosti; Furuya, Rejane Kiyomi; Arantes, Eliana De Cássia; Cunha, Débora Cristine Prévide Teixeira da; Dantas, Rosana Aparecida Spadoti

    2016-01-01

    To identify and describe the instruments used to assess patients' expectations toward spine surgery. An integrative review was carried out in the databases PubMed, CINAHL, LILACS and PsycINFO. A total of 4,402 publications were identified, of which 25 met the selection criteria. Of the studies selected, only three used tools that had confirmed validity and reliability to be applied; in five studies, clinical scores were used, and were modified for the assessment of patients' expectations, and in 17 studies the researchers developed scales without an adequate description of the method used for their development and validation. The assessment of patients' expectations has been methodologically conducted in different ways. Until the completion of this integrative review, only two valid and reliable instruments had been used in three of the selected studies. Identificar e descrever os instrumentos usados para avaliar a expectativa dos pacientes diante do tratamento cirúrgico da coluna vertebral. Revisão Integrativa realizada nas bases de dados PubMed, CINAHL, LILACS e PsycINFO. Identificamos 4.402 publicações, das quais 25 atenderam aos critérios de seleção. Dos estudos selecionados, apenas em três os autores utilizaram instrumentos que possuíam validade e confiabilidade confirmadas para serem aplicados; em cinco estudos foram utilizados escores clínicos, modificados para a avaliação das expectativas dos pacientes, e em dezessete os pesquisadores elaboraram escalas sem adequada descrição do método usado para o seu desenvolvimento e validação. A avaliação das expectativas dos pacientes tem sido metodologicamente conduzida de diferentes maneiras. Até a finalização desta revisão integrativa, apenas dois instrumentos, válidos e confiáveis, haviam sido utilizados em três dos estudos selecionados.

  2. Music Therapy Increases Comfort and Reduces Pain in Patients Recovering From Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondanaro, John F; Homel, Peter; Lonner, Baron; Shepp, Jennifer; Lichtensztein, Marcela; Loewy, Joanne V

    The treatment of pain continues to gain in saliency as a component of defining best practice in medical care. Music therapy is an integrative treatment modality that impacts patient outcomes in the treatment of spinal pain. At Mount Sinai Beth Israel, we conducted a mixed-methods study addressing the effects of music therapy interventions on the recovery of patients after spine surgery. The study combined standard medical approaches and integrative music therapy. Sixty patients (35 female, 25 male) ranging in age from 40 to 55 years underwent anterior, posterior, or anterior-posterior spinal fusion and were randomly assigned to either music therapy plus standard care (medical and nursing care with scheduled pharmacologic pain intervention) or standard care only. Measurements for both groups were completed before and after the intervention. Music therapy involved the use of patient-preferred live music that supported tension release/relaxation through incentive-based clinical improvisation, singing, and/or rhythmic drumming or through active visualization supported by live music that encompasses tension resolution. The control and music groups showed significant differences in degree and direction of change in the visual analog scale (VAS) pain ratings from before to after intervention (P = .01). VAS pain levels increased slightly in the control group (to 5.87 from 5.20) but decreased by more than 1 point in the music group (to 5.09 from 6.20). The control and music therapy groups did not differ in the rate of change in scores on Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) Anxiety (P = .62), HADS Depression (P = .85), or Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (P = .93). Both groups had slight increases in HADS Anxiety, comparable decreases in HADS Depression, and minimal changes in fear-related movement (Tampa scale).

  3. Role of major revision spine surgery in recurrent adjacent segment osteoporotic vertebral body fracture: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Imtiaz; Kroeber, Markus

    2012-08-01

    Case report. To report the beneficial effects of kyphoplasty, cement augmentation and extension of posterior instrumentation in a patient with recurrent adjacent segment osteoporotic vertebral body fracture. A 72-year-old lady underwent multiple revision spine surgeries for recurrent adjacent segment osteoporotic vertebral body fracture. The patient underwent four surgeries in 6 years: (1) in 2005, posterior lumbar interbody fusion with stabilization (L4-S1) was done; (2) in August 2010, implants from L4-S1 were removed and revised, transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion was done at L2/L3 and L3/L4 along with pedicle screw stabilization from T12-S1; (3) in September 2011, revision surgery was attempted, wherein a kyphoplasty was done at T12 and the stabilization was extended to T4; (4) again in October 2011, a revision surgery was attempted, wherein a kyphoplasty was done at T5 along with stabilization using pedicular screws in the T2 and T3 vertebrae and lateral mass screws in the C6 vertebra. To current date, the patient is stable with good sagittal and coronal balance and walking pain free without support. The current case demonstrates the need for posterior spinal reconstruction in osteoporotic vertebral collapse. Cement augmentation and extension of posterior instrumentation are both viable techniques that could be used to improve stabilization in the elderly spine.

  4. Variation in outcomes across centers after surgery for lumbar stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis in the spine patient outcomes research trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Atman; Bekelis, Kimon; Ball, Perry A; Lurie, Jon; Mirza, Sohail K; Tosteson, Tor D; Zhao, Wenyan; Weinstein, James N

    2013-04-15

    Retrospective review of a prospectively collected database. To examine whether short- and long-term outcomes after surgery for lumbar stenosis (SPS) and degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) vary across centers. Surgery has been shown to be of benefit for both SPS and DS. For both conditions, surgery often consists of laminectomy with or without fusion. Potential differences in outcomes of these overlapping procedures across various surgical centers have not yet been investigated. Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial cohort participants with a confirmed diagnosis of SPS or DS undergoing surgery were followed from baseline at 6 weeks, 3, 6, and 12 months, and yearly thereafter, at 13 spine clinics in 11 US states. Baseline characteristics and short- and long-term outcomes were analyzed. A total of 793 patients underwent surgery. Significant differences were found between centers with regard to patient race, body mass index, treatment preference, neurological deficit, stenosis location, severity, and number of stenotic levels. Significant differences were also found in operative duration and blood loss, the incidence of durotomy, the length of hospital stay, and wound infection. When baseline differences were adjusted for, significant differences were still seen between centers in changes in patient functional outcome (Short Form-36 bodily pain and physical function, and Oswestry Disability Index) at 1 year after surgery. In addition, the cumulative adjusted change in the Oswestry Disability Index Score at 4 years significantly differed among centers, with Short Form-36 scores trending toward significance. There is a broad and statistically significant variation in short- and long-term outcomes after surgery for SPS and DS across various academic centers, when statistically significant baseline differences are adjusted for. The findings suggest that the choice of center affects outcome after these procedures, although further studies are required to investigate which

  5. Cognitive-Behavioral-Based Physical Therapy for Patients With Chronic Pain Undergoing Lumbar Spine Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Kristin R; Devin, Clinton J; Vanston, Susan W; Koyama, Tatsuki; Phillips, Sharon E; George, Steven Z; McGirt, Matthew J; Spengler, Dan M; Aaronson, Oran S; Cheng, Joseph S; Wegener, Stephen T

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral-based physical therapy (CBPT) program for improving outcomes in patients after lumbar spine surgery. A randomized controlled trial was conducted on 86 adults undergoing a laminectomy with or without arthrodesis for a lumbar degenerative condition. Patients were screened preoperatively for high fear of movement using the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia. Randomization to either CBPT or an education program occurred at 6 weeks after surgery. Assessments were completed pretreatment, posttreatment and at 3-month follow-up. The primary outcomes were pain and disability measured by the Brief Pain Inventory and Oswestry Disability Index. Secondary outcomes included general health (SF-12) and performance-based tests (5-Chair Stand, Timed Up and Go, 10-Meter Walk). Multivariable linear regression analyses found that CBPT participants had significantly greater decreases in pain and disability and increases in general health and physical performance compared with the education group at the 3-month follow-up. Results suggest a targeted CBPT program may result in significant and clinically meaningful improvement in postoperative outcomes. CBPT has the potential to be an evidence-based program that clinicians can recommend for patients at risk for poor recovery after spine surgery. This study investigated a targeted cognitive-behavioral-based physical therapy program for patients after lumbar spine surgery. Findings lend support to the hypothesis that incorporating cognitive-behavioral strategies into postoperative physical therapy may address psychosocial risk factors and improve pain, disability, general health, and physical performance outcomes. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Interaction of demographic factors with the results of the surgery for degenerative disease of the cervical spine: a retrospective evaluation

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    Celso Garreta Prats Dias

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Degenerative disease of the cervical spine is a frequent source of intermittent neck pain, where the predominant symptom is axial neck pain. The indications for surgical treatment are reserved for the cases where the conservative treatment has not relieved the symptoms or the patient presents progressive neurological impairment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the prognostic factors involved in patients submitted to surgical treatment of the cervical spine, Methods: The study analyzed data from patients submitted to cervical spine surgery between July 2011 and November 2015 (n= 58. The evaluated data included smoking habits, hypertension, diabetes, overweight, surgical technique, and number of levels of fusion. The primary outcome was defined as pain and the secondary outcomes were quality of life and disability., Results: A statistically significant difference was found between baseline and the 12-month post-operative results regarding pain in favor of non-hypertensive patients (p= 0.009 and discectomy plus instrumentation (, p= 0.004. There was also significant difference between the results of neck disability in favor of non-hypertensive patients (p= 0.028 and patients with body mass index lower than 25, kg/m2 (p= 0.005. There was no significant interaction between any analyzed data and the quality of life score results. Conclusions: Non-hypertensive patients, those with body mass index lower than 25 kg/m2, and those submitted to discectomy combined with arthrodesis of the cervical spine are the most benefited by cervical degenerative disease surgery.

  7. Interaction of demographic factors with the results of the surgery for degenerative disease of the cervical spine: a retrospective evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Celso Garreta Prats; Roberto, Bruno Braga; Basaglia, Lucas; Lenza, Mario; Nicolau, Rodrigo Junqueira; Ferretti, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Degenerative disease of the cervical spine is a frequent source of intermittent neck pain, where the predominant symptom is axial neck pain. The indications for surgical treatment are reserved for the cases where the conservative treatment has not relieved the symptoms or the patient presents progressive neurological impairment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the prognostic factors involved in patients submitted to surgical treatment of the cervical spine. The study analyzed data from patients submitted to cervical spine surgery between July 2011 and November 2015 ( n  = 58). The evaluated data included smoking habits, hypertension, diabetes, overweight, surgical technique, and number of levels of fusion. The primary outcome was defined as pain and the secondary outcomes were quality of life and disability. A statistically significant difference was found between baseline and the 12-month post-operative results regarding pain in favor of non-hypertensive patients ( p  = 0.009) and discectomy plus instrumentation ( p  = 0.004). There was also significant difference between the results of neck disability in favor of non-hypertensive patients ( p  = 0.028) and patients with body mass index lower than 25 kg/m 2 ( p  = 0.005). There was no significant interaction between any analyzed data and the quality of life score results. Non-hypertensive patients, those with body mass index lower than 25 kg/m 2 , and those submitted to discectomy combined with arthrodesis of the cervical spine are the most benefited by cervical degenerative disease surgery.

  8. [Surgery for degenerative spondylolisthesis of the lumbar spine using intra-articular fusion. A prospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabálek, L; Wanek, T; Adamus, M; Cecháková, E; Buřval, S; Langová, K; Vaverka, M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to present our surgical method of treating degenerative spondylolisthesis, which includes radical bilateral laminectomy to relieve compression on the spinal cord, transpedicular fixation of the segment and arthrodesis by bilateral intra-articular fusion. This surgery was indicated in patients with grade I or grade II of degenerative sponylolisthesis with a 4-mm or more slippage. Our prospectively studied group consisted of 46 patients (17 men, 29 women; average age, 64.2 years; range, 39-84 years). Before surgery and at 1 year after the procedure, the intensity of axial pain and that of radicular pain were each assessed using the visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Difficulty in performing daily living activities was measured by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). The surgical procedure included laminectomy, partial medial facetectomy, foraminotomy to relieve pressure on the spinal nerve roots and transpedicular fixation to provide stability. Using a cutter, cartilage was separated off the cortical bone and, in order to facilitate fusion, bone cavities thus produced were filed with corticospongious grafts harvested from the removed vertebral arch with Kerrison forceps. At 1-year follow-up, dynamic X-ray was used to evaluate spine alignment and, on a CT scan, the degree of intra-articular fusion was assessed. Fusion was achieved when bone density measurement showed more than 350 Hounsfield Units (HU). For the measurements, the authors used their own modified method by means of a Region of Interest (ROI) analysis. The clinical and radiographic results were statistically evaluated. At 1 year after surgery, lumbar flexion-extension bending X-ray films revealed stability of the treated segments in all patients (100%). CT examination showed bone density higher than 350 HU at both joints, i.e., complete bone fusion, also in all 46 patients. The mean post-operative ODI score was significantly lower than its mean pre-operative value (23.6 vs 55.4), which

  9. Non-instrumented extradural lumbar spine surgery under low-dose acetylsalicylic acid: a comparative risk analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleman, Jehuda; Baumgarten, Peter; Perrig, Wolfgang Nicolas; Fandino, Javier; Fathi, Ali-Reza

    2016-03-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) affects over one-third of adults and is the leading cause of overall mortality and morbidity. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is widely used in the prevention of CAD. As the population continues to mature, the number of patients presenting for spinal surgery that are under ASA treatment is rising. Studies investigating the outcome of lumbar spine surgeries without discontinuation of ASA therapy are lacking. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the peri- and postoperative bleeding and cardiovascular complication rates of patients undergoing non-instrumented, extradural, lumbar spine surgery with or without discontinuation of low-dose ASA. We retrospectively compared the intra- and postoperative blood loss, morbidity, mortality, blood transfusion requirements and hematologic findings in the ASA group (40 patients) and the control group (62 patients). The diagnosis in all patients was either lumbar disc herniation or spinal canal stenosis. Intraoperative blood loss was 221 ml in the ASA group and 140.16 ml in the control group, showing no statistical difference (p = 0.08). Postoperative blood loss was 146.58 and 167.97 ml in the ASA and control groups, respectively, also without statistical difference (p = 0.76). In the ASA group one patient developed a postoperative epidural hematoma needing revision surgery, while in the control group no postoperative epidural hematomas were seen (p = 0.40). In addition, blood transfusion requirements, hematologic findings, morbidity and mortality showed no significant difference. The continuation of ASA treatment in patients undergoing non-instrumented extradural lumbar spinal surgery seems to be safe and its perioperative continuation might therefore be recommended. Further studies confirming these results are needed.

  10. Effects of Aroma Gargling, Cold Water Gargling, and Wet Gauze Application on Thirst, Halitosis, and Sore Throat of Patients After Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Kyung Eun; Song, Ae Ran; Sok, Sohyune R

    This study compared and examined the effects of aroma gargling, cold water gargling, and wet gauze application on thirst, halitosis, and sore throat in patients after spine surgery. A quasiexperimental pretest/posttest control group design was employed. Samples were total 70 patients (aroma gargling: 24 samples, cold gargling: 24 samples, and wet gauze: 22 samples) after spine surgery in K Hospital in Seoul, Korea. The aroma gargle solution as an experimental intervention was prepared by blending peppermint, tea tree, and lemon oils at a ratio of 1:2:2. A 60 cc of aroma gargle solution was used 3 times for 15 to 20 seconds. The visual analog scale was used to measure the degrees of thirst and sore throat, and a portable device was used to examine the degree of halitosis. There were significant differences in the degrees of thirst, halitosis, and sore throat according to interaction between group and duration. In the comparison among 3 groups, aroma gargling provided better oral health by decreasing thirst, halitosis, and sore throat for patients with spine surgery. Aroma gargling can be utilized as an effective nursing intervention for decreasing thirst, halitosis, and sore throat for patients with spine surgery in clinical practice. Results suggest, therefore, that health professionals should consider an array of methods including aroma gargling for patients after spine surgery.

  11. Deformable registration for image-guided spine surgery: preserving rigid body vertebral morphology in free-form transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaungamornrat, S.; Wang, A. S.; Uneri, A.; Otake, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Deformable registration of preoperative and intraoperative images facilitates accurate localization of target and critical anatomy in image-guided spine surgery. However, conventional deformable registration fails to preserve the morphology of rigid bone anatomy and can impart distortions that confound high-precision intervention. We propose a constrained registration method that preserves rigid morphology while allowing deformation of surrounding soft tissues. Method: The registration method aligns preoperative 3D CT to intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) using free-form deformation (FFD) with penalties on rigid body motion imposed according to a simple intensity threshold. The penalties enforced 3 properties of a rigid transformation - namely, constraints on affinity (AC), orthogonality (OC), and properness (PC). The method also incorporated an injectivity constraint (IC) to preserve topology. Physical experiments (involving phantoms, an ovine spine, and a human cadaver) as well as digital simulations were performed to evaluate the sensitivity to registration parameters, preservation of rigid body morphology, and overall registration accuracy of constrained FFD in comparison to conventional unconstrained FFD (denoted uFFD) and Demons registration. Result: FFD with orthogonality and injectivity constraints (denoted FFD+OC+IC) demonstrated improved performance compared to uFFD and Demons. Affinity and properness constraints offered little or no additional improvement. The FFD+OC+IC method preserved rigid body morphology at near-ideal values of zero dilatation (D = 0.05, compared to 0.39 and 0.56 for uFFD and Demons, respectively) and shear (S = 0.08, compared to 0.36 and 0.44 for uFFD and Demons, respectively). Target registration error (TRE) was similarly improved for FFD+OC+IC (0.7 mm), compared to 1.4 and 1.8 mm for uFFD and Demons. Results were validated in human cadaver studies using CT and CBCT images, with FFD+OC+IC providing excellent preservation

  12. AOSpine subaxial cervical spine injury classification system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaccaro, Alexander R.; Koerner, John D.; Radcliff, Kris E.; Oner, F. Cumhur; Reinhold, Maximilian; Schnake, Klaus J.; Kandziora, Frank; Fehlings, Michael G.; Dvorak, Marcel F.; Aarabi, Bizhan; Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan; Schroeder, Gregory D.; Kepler, Christopher K.; Vialle, Luiz R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This project describes a morphology-based subaxial cervical spine traumatic injury classification system. Using the same approach as the thoracolumbar system, the goal was to develop a comprehensive yet simple classification system with high intra- and interobserver reliability to be used

  13. Treatment of nocturnal leg cramps by blockade of the medial branch of the deep peroneal nerve after lumbar spine surgery

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    Imura, Takayuki; Inoue, Gen; Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Miyagi, Masayuki; Saito, Wataru; Uchida, Kentaro; Namba, Takanori; Shirasawa, Eiki; Takahira, Naonobu; Takaso, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients with lumbar spine disease sometimes complain of nocturnal leg cramps. We sought to investigate the effectiveness of blocking the medial branch of the deep peroneal nerve as treatment for nocturnal leg cramps after spinal surgery for lumbar spine disease. Methods We evaluated 66 postoperative patients in this prospective comparative study of a group of patients with a nerve block (n = 41) and a control group without (n = 25). In the block group, the medial branch of the deep peroneal nerve was blocked at the distal two-thirds of the interspace between the first and second metatarsals using 5.0 mL of 1.0% lidocaine. Results Two weeks after the block, the frequency of nocturnal leg cramps was reduced to less than a quarter of pretreatment baseline frequency in 61.0% of patients (n = 25) and less than half in 80.5% (n = 33). In the control group, the frequency of the leg cramps was reduced from baseline in 32.0% of patients (n = 8), and was unchanged or increased in 68.0% (n = 17) at 2 weeks. Cramp frequency was reduced to less than a quarter or less than half of baseline frequency in a significantly (P cramp was less in about two-thirds of patients (63.4%; n = 26) in the block group and was unchanged in one-third (31.7%; n = 13). Conclusions Blocking the medial branch of the peroneal nerve can be an effective, long-lasting, and simple treatment with low risk for nocturnal cramps sustained after lumbar spine surgery. PMID:26445706

  14. How Safe Is High-Speed Burring in Spine Surgery? An In Vitro Study on the Effect of Rotational Speed and Heat Generation in the Bovine Spine.

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    Singh, Taran Singh Pall; Yusoff, Abdul Halim; Chian, Yap Keat

    2015-08-01

    In vitro animal cadaveric study. To identify the appropriate rotational speed and safe bone distance from neural tissue during bone burring in spinal surgery. Bone burring is a common step in spinal surgery. Unwanted frictional heat produced during bone burring may result in thermal injury to the bone and adjacent neural structure. One of the important parameters influencing the bone temperature rise during bone burring is rotational speed. This laboratory-based animal study used bovine spine bones, and the tests were conducted using a steel round burr. The bone temperature was measured simultaneously with thermocouple at the distances of 1 mm, 3 mm, and 5 mm from the burring site during the burring process. The bone burring was done with 4 different rotational speeds of 35,000 revolutions per minute (rpm), 45,000 rpm, 65,000 rpm, and 75,000 rpm. This study showed that increasing the rotational speed significantly elevated bone temperature. The threshold temperature of 47°C was reached when bone was burred for 10 seconds, with a rotational speed of 45,000 rpm. The mean bone temperature measured at a distance 1 mm from the burring site for all 4 rotational speeds was always higher than that measured at a distance of 3 mm and 5 mm and this difference was statistically significant (P 0.05). Taking 47°C as the threshold temperature for causing significant impairment to the regenerative capacity of bone, a rotational speed of lower than 45,000 rpm is preferable so as to minimize thermal injury to bone tissue. We also concluded that a 3-mm distance between the site of burring and the neural tissue is a safe distance. N/A.

  15. The Effect of Severity of Illness on Spine Surgery Costs Across New York State Hospitals: An Analysis of 69,831 Cases.

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    Kaye, I David; Adrados, Murillo; Karia, Raj J; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Bosco, Joseph A

    2017-11-01

    Observational database review. To determine the effect of patient severity of illness (SOI) on the cost of spine surgery among New York state hospitals. National health care spending has risen at an unsustainable rate with musculoskeletal care, and spine surgery in particular, accounting for a significant portion of this expenditure. In an effort towards cost-containment, health care payers are exploring novel payment models some of which reward cost savings but penalize excessive spending. To mitigate risk to health care institutions, accurate cost forecasting is essential. No studies have evaluated the effect of SOI on costs within spine surgery. The New York State Hospital Inpatient Cost Transparency Database was reviewed to determine the costs of 69,831 hospital discharges between 2009 and 2011 comprising the 3 most commonly performed spine surgeries in the state. These costs were then analyzed in the context of the specific all patient refined diagnosis-related group (DRG) SOI modifier to determine this index's effect on overall costs. Overall, hospital-reported cost increases with the patient's SOI class and patients with worse baseline health incur greater hospital costs (Pcosts are increasingly variable for each worsening SOI class (Pcosts is persistent for all 3 DRGs across all 3 years studied (2009-2011), within each of the 7 New York state regions, and occurs irrespective of the hospital's teaching status or size. Using the 3M all patient refined-DRG SOI index as a measure of patient's health status, a significant increase in cost for spine surgery for patients with higher SOI index was found. This study confirms the greater cost and variability of spine surgery for sicker patients and illustrates the inherent unpredictability in cost forecasting and budgeting for these same patients.

  16. Can acetabular orientation be restored by lumbar pedicle subtraction osteotomy in ankylosing spondylitis patients with thoracolumbar kyphosis?

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    Hu, Jun; Qian, Bang-Ping; Qiu, Yong; Wang, Bin; Yu, Yang; Zhu, Ze-Zhang; Jiang, Jun; Mao, Sai-Hu; Qu, Zhe; Zhang, Yun-Peng

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate whether acetabular orientation (abduction and anteversion) can be restored by lumbar pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients with thoracolumbar kyphosis. A total of 33 consecutive AS patients with thoracolumbar kyphosis undergoing one-level lumbar PSO were retrospectively reviewed. Radiographical measurements included sagittal vertical axis, global kyphosis, thoracic kyphosis, local kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence, sacral slope, and pelvic tilt. Acetabular abduction and anteversion were measured on CT scans of the pelvis before and after lumbar PSO. The preoperative and postoperative parameters were compared by the paired samples t test. Pearson's correlation analysis was conducted to determine the correlations between the changes in acetabular abduction and anteversion and the changes in sagittal spinopelvic parameters. After lumbar PSO, sagittal vertical axis, global kyphosis, and pelvic tilt were corrected from 15.7 ± 6.7 cm, 66.8° ± 17.5°, and 38.6° ± 9.0° to 2.9 ± 4.9 cm, 21.3° ± 8.2°, and 23.2° ± 8.2°, respectively (p < 0.001). Of note, acetabular abduction and anteversion decreased from 59.6° ± 4.6° to 31.4° ± 6.5° before surgery to 51.4° ± 6.5° and 20.2° ± 4.4° after surgery, respectively (p < 0.001). Moreover, the changes in acetabular abduction and anteversion were observed significantly correlated with the change in pelvic tilt (r = 0.527, p = 0.002; r = 0.586, p < 0.001). Abnormal acetabular abduction and anteversion could be corrected by lumbar PSO in AS patients with thoracolumbar kyphosis. Consequently, a relatively normal acetabular orientation could be achieved after lumbar PSO, which might decrease the potential risk of dislocation in AS patients with spine and hip deformities requiring subsequent THR surgery.

  17. The role of minimally invasive spine surgery in the management of pyogenic spinal discitis

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    Mazda K Turel

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: MIS surgery provides an opportunity for early pain relief in patients with discitis, osteomyelitis, spondylodiscitis, and/or epidural abscess by directly addressing the primary cause of pain. MIS surgery for discitis provides a higher diagnostic yield to direct antibiotic treatment. MIS surgery results in good long-term recovery.

  18. Validation of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) computerized adaptive tests in cervical spine surgery.

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    Boody, Barrett S; Bhatt, Surabhi; Mazmudar, Aditya S; Hsu, Wellington K; Rothrock, Nan E; Patel, Alpesh A

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS), which is funded by the National Institutes of Health, is a set of adaptive, responsive assessment tools that measures patient-reported health status. PROMIS measures have not been validated for surgical patients with cervical spine disorders. The objective of this project is to evaluate the validity (e.g., convergent validity, known-groups validity, responsiveness to change) of PROMIS computer adaptive tests (CATs) for pain behavior, pain interference, and physical function in patients undergoing cervical spine surgery. METHODS The legacy outcome measures Neck Disability Index (NDI) and SF-12 were used as comparisons with PROMIS measures. PROMIS CATs, NDI-10, and SF-12 measures were administered prospectively to 59 consecutive tertiary hospital patients who were treated surgically for degenerative cervical spine disorders. A subscore of NDI-5 was calculated from NDI-10 by eliminating the lifting, headaches, pain intensity, reading, and driving sections and multiplying the final score by 4. Assessments were administered preoperatively (baseline) and postoperatively at 6 weeks and 3 months. Patients presenting for revision surgery, tumor, infection, or trauma were excluded. Participants completed the measures in Assessment Center, an online data collection tool accessed by using a secure login and password on a tablet computer. Subgroup analysis was also performed based on a primary diagnosis of either cervical radiculopathy or cervical myelopathy. RESULTS Convergent validity for PROMIS CATs was supported with multiple statistically significant correlations with the existing legacy measures, NDI and SF-12, at baseline. Furthermore, PROMIS CATs demonstrated known-group validity and identified clinically significant improvements in all measures after surgical intervention. In the cervical radiculopathy and myelopathic cohorts, the PROMIS measures demonstrated similar responsiveness to the

  19. The efficacy and hemodynamic response to Dexmedetomidine as a hypotensive agent in posterior fixation surgery following traumatic spine injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramila H Jamaliya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of dexmedetomidine (DEX as a hypotensive agent in comparison to nitroglycerin (NTG in posterior fixation surgery for traumatic spine injury. Materials and Methods: Forty patients ASA I or II aged 18-65 years scheduled for posterior fixation surgery were randomly assigned to receive either DEX 1 μg/kg over 10 min before induction of anesthesia followed by 0.2-0.7 μg/kg/h infusion during maintenance in DEX group or NTG 3-5 μg/kg/min infusion after induction of anesthesia in NTG group to maintain mean arterial blood pressure (MAP between 65 and 70 mmHg. The two groups were compared for achievement of target MAP, intraoperative blood loss, and reversibility of hypotensive state.Student′s t-test was used for continuous variables and chi-square test for categorical variables. P-value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Patients in DEX group achieved the target MAP with better heart rate (HR control, as compared to NTG group during the period of observation. The blood loss was significantly lesser in the DEX group (422.11 ± 149.34 ml than the NTG group (564.51 ± 160.88 ml, P = 0.01. The time to hypotension reversal in NTG group (5.63 ± 1.93 min was lesser compared to DEX group (9.15 ± 2.16 min, P = 0.65. Conclusion: DEX is an effective and safe agent in achieving controlled hypotension in adults undergoing posterior fixation spine surgery.

  20. The Clinical Features, Risk Factors, and Surgical Treatment of Cervicogenic Headache in Patients With Cervical Spine Disorders Requiring Surgery.

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    Shimohata, Keiko; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Onodera, Osamu; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Shimohata, Takayoshi

    2017-07-01

    To clarify the clinical features and risk factors of cervicogenic headache (CEH; as diagnosed according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders-Third Edition beta) in patients with cervical spine disorders requiring surgery. CEH is caused by cervical spine disorders. The pathogenic mechanism of CEH is hypothesized to involve a convergence of the upper cervical afferents from the C1, C2, and C3 spinal nerves and the trigeminal afferents in the trigeminocervical nucleus of the upper cervical cord. According to this hypothesis, functional convergence of the upper cervical and trigeminal sensory pathways allows the bidirectional (afferent and efferent) referral of pain to the occipital, frontal, temporal, and/or orbital regions. Previous prospective studies have reported an 86-88% prevalence of headache in patients with cervical myelopathy or radiculopathy requiring anterior cervical surgery; however, these studies did not diagnose headache according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria. Therefore, a better understanding of the prevalence rate, clinical features, risk factors, and treatment responsiveness of CEH in patients with cervical spine disorders requiring surgery is necessary. We performed a single hospital-based prospective cross-sectional study and enrolled 70 consecutive patients with cervical spine disorders such as cervical spondylotic myelopathy, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, cervical spondylotic radiculopathy, and cervical spondylotic myeloradiculopathy who had been scheduled to undergo anterior cervical fusion or dorsal cervical laminoplasty between June 2014 and December 2015. Headache was diagnosed preoperatively according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders-Third Edition beta. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire, Neck Disability Index, and a 0-100 mm visual analog scale (VAS) were used to evaluate clinical

  1. Intramuscular Local Anesthetic Infiltration at Closure for Postoperative Analgesia in Lumbar Spine Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

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    Perera, Andrea P; Chari, Aswin; Kostusiak, Milosz; Khan, Akbar Ali; Luoma, Astri Mv; Casey, Adrian T H

    2017-07-15

    Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis OBJECTIVE.: To identify whether intramuscular local anesthetic infiltration prior to wound closure was effective in reducing postoperative pain and facilitating early discharge following lumbar spine surgery. Local anesthetic infiltration prior to wound closure may form part of the multimodal strategy for postoperative analgesia, facilitating early mobilization and discharge. Although there are a number of small studies investigating its utility, a quantitative meta-analysis of the data has never been performed. This review was conducted according the PRISMA statement and was registered with the PROSPERO database. Only randomized controlled trials were eligible for inclusion. Key outcomes of interest included time to first analgesic demand, total postoperative opiate usage in the first 24 hours, visual analogue score (VAS) at 1, 12 and 24 hours and postoperative length of stay. Eleven publications fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A total of 438 patients were include; 212 in the control group and 226 in the intervention group. Local anesthetic infiltration resulted in a prolonged time to first analgesic demand (mean difference (MD) 65.88 minutes, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 23.70 to 108.06, P.0.002) as well as a significantly reduced postoperative opiate demand (M.D. -9.71 mg, 95% CI -15.07, -4.34, p = 0.0004). There was a small but statistically significant reduction in postoperative visual analogue score (VAS) at 1 hour (M.D. -0.87 95%CI -1.55, -0.20, p = 0.01), but no significant reduction at 12 or 24 hours (p = 0.93 and 0.85 respectively). This systematic review and meta-analysis provides evidence that postoperative intramuscular local anaesthetic infiltration reduces postoperative analgesic requirements and the time to first analgesic demands for patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Key research priorities include optimization of the choice and strength of local anaesthetic agent and health

  2. Efficacy and safety of instrumentation in caries spine

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    Basu Saumyajit

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spinal instrumentation may be used in tuberculosis of spine for prevention or correction of deformity. Methods: Thirty eight patients of caries spine underwent surgery with spinal instrumentation in the last 3 years. Out of these patients, 30 cases have completed a minimum follow-up of 9 months (Range 9 to 39 months, mean 12.8 months. The regional distribution was 1 in the craniocervical junction, 7 in the subaxial cervical spine, 3 in the cervicothoracic junction, 3 in the thoracic region, 4 in the thoracolumbar junction and 8 in the lumbar region and 1 in the lumbosacral junction. All the cases had anterior lesions except one, which had both anterior and posterior lesions. All of them had decompression, debridement of the lesion and instrumented fusion. Indication of surgery was caries spine with neurodeficit and /or osseous destruction and deformity, which was not responding to conservative treatment of one month. Results: Results were analyzed keeping in mind the clinical and radiological criteria. The former included recovery of pain, and neural deficit with a feeling of general well being. The latter included correction of deformity and evidence of fusion. There was no case which had wound healing/infection related problems. Complications included one case of implant failure and one case of transient neurological deterioration. Results were excellent in 20, good in 5, fair in one and poor in one patient. Majority of the patients were very satisfied with the surgery and all the patients had full anti-tubercular chemotherapy for one year. Conclusions: In properly selected patients, spinal instrumentation is justified because of its safety and efficacy in achieving deformity correction and solid fusion.

  3. Functional extra-adrenal paraganglioma of the retroperitoneum giving thoracolumbar spine metastases after a five-year disease-free follow-up: a rare malignant condition with challenging management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Chourmouzi, Danai; Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Katsaridis, Vasileios; Eleftheriadis, Eleftherios; Givissis, Panagiotis

    2017-01-01

    Paragangliomas are benign neoplasms that arise from the autonomic nervous system and the associated paraganglia. Although benign, they have been shown to possess metastatic potential. Extra-adrenal retroperitoneal paraganglioma with vertebral metastasis is considered very uncommon. Here, we present a case of a functional extra-adrenal paraganglioma of the retroperitoneum giving metastasis to T4 vertebra after five years of follow-up in a 48-year-old man who had been initially treated with complete resection of the primary tumor. The condition of the patient improved significantly after radiosurgery and somatostatin analogs treatment, until lumbar spine lesions appeared six months later. Our case demonstrates that retroperitoneal paraganglioma is a rare condition which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a retroperitoneal mass combined with vertebral lesions. Additionally, increased physician awareness and long-term follow-up is mandatory for all patients with history of retroperitoneal paraganglioma since metastases may occur after long latent intervals from the initial diagnosis.

  4. Spine Surgery Outcomes in Elderly Patients Versus General Adult Patients in the United States: A MarketScan Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagman, Carlito; Ugiliweneza, Beatrice; Boakye, Maxwell; Drazin, Doniel

    2017-07-01

    To compare spine surgery outcomes in elderly patients (80-103 years old) versus general adult patients (18-79 years-old) in the United States. Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Research Databases (2000-2012) were queried. Patients with a diagnosis of degenerative disease of the spine without concurrent spinal stenosis, spinal stenosis without concurrent degenerative disease, or degenerative disease with concurrent spinal stenosis and who had undergone decompression without fusion, fusion without decompression, or decompression with fusion procedures were included. Indirect outcome measures included length of stay, in-hospital mortality, in-hospital and 30-day complications, and discharge disposition. Patients (N = 155,720) were divided into elderly (n = 10,232; 6.57%) and general adult (n = 145,488; 93.4%) populations. Mean length of stay was longer in elderly patients versus general adult patients (3.62 days vs. 3.11 days; P adult patients (0.31% vs. 0.06%; P adult patients (11.3% vs. 7.15% and 17.8% vs. 12.6%; P adult patients (33.7% vs. 16.2%; P < 0.0001). Our results revealed significantly longer hospital stays, more in-hospital mortalities, and more in-hospital and 30-day complications after decompression without fusion, fusion without decompression, or decompression with fusion procedures in elderly patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. In-Hospital Complications and Resource Utilization Following Lumbar Spine Surgery in Patients with Parkinson Disease: Evaluation of the National Inpatient Sample Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Joseph F; McClelland, Shearwood; Line, Breton G; Smith, Justin S; Hart, Robert A; Ames, Christopher P; Shaffrey, Chris; Bess, Shay

    2017-10-01

    Previous reports suggest that patients with Parkinson disease (PD) have elevated rates of complications following spine surgery; however, these reports are limited by small patient series. In this study, we used the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database to compare in-hospital complications following elective lumbar spine surgery in patients with a diagnosis of PD and patients without PD. The NIS database was accessed to identify patients with PD and those without PD who underwent lumbar spine surgery. All patients identified had a diagnosis code consistent with degenerative lumbar spine pathology. The patients were evaluated for the presence or absence of PD and divided into 4 lumbar spine procedure groups: decompression alone, lateral fusion, posterior fusion, and anterior fusion technique. Propensity score matching (PSM) was performed for the PD versus non-PD patients in each procedure group to control for confounding demographic variables, and in-hospital complications were compared between the 2 groups. Between 2001 and 2012, a total of 613,522 lumbar spine surgery patient episodes were identified, of which 4492 (0.7%) involved a diagnosis of PD. Following PSM for patient age, sex, and race, the patients with PD were at increased risk for acute postoperative hemorrhagic anemia, increased blood transfusion requirements, and increased genitourinary, neurologic, and cardiac complications compared with the patients without PD. PSM analysis of the NIS database demonstrated that patients with PD are at increased risk for acute in-hospital complications and greater blood transfusion requirements than those without PD. Surgeons should be aware of the increased risks and differing requirements when treating spinal pathology in patients with PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence and Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Reintubation After Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: Results From the AOSpine North America Multicenter Study on 8887 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagoshi, Narihito; Fehlings, Michael G; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Tetreault, Lindsay; Gum, Jeffrey L; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Tannoury, Chadi A; Tannoury, Tony; Traynelis, Vincent C; Arnold, Paul M; Mroz, Thomas E; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Bydon, Mohamad; De Giacomo, Anthony F; Jobse, Bruce C; Massicotte, Eric M; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A multicenter, retrospective cohort study. To evaluate clinical outcomes in patients with reintubation after anterior cervical spine surgery. A total of 8887 patients undergoing anterior cervical spine surgery were enrolled in the AOSpine North America Rare Complications of Cervical Spine Surgery study. Patients with or without complications after surgery were included. Demographic and surgical information were collected for patients with reintubation. Patients were evaluated using a variety of assessment tools, including the modified Japanese Orthopedic Association scale, Nurick score, Neck Disability Index, and Short Form-36 Health Survey. Nine cases of postoperative reintubation were identified. The total prevalence of this complication was 0.10% and ranged from 0% to 0.59% across participating institutions. The time to development of airway symptoms after surgery was within 24 hours in 6 patients and between 5 and 7 days in 3 patients. Although 8 patients recovered, 1 patient died. At final follow-up, patients with reintubation did not exhibit significant and meaningful improvements in pain, functional status, or quality of life. Although the prevalence of reintubation was very low, this complication was associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Clinicians should identify their high-risk patients and carefully observe them for up to 2 weeks after surgery.

  7. Prevalence of Scoliosis and Thoracolumbar Kyphosis in Patients With Achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Bilal I; Yost, Mary T; Badkoobehi, Haleh; Ain, Michael C

    2016-03-01

    Retrospective chart review, case series. To determine the prevalence of scoliosis and kyphosis in patients with achondroplasia. There is little published research on the prevalence of scoliosis and thoracolumbar kyphosis in patients with achondroplasia. The authors retrospectively reviewed charts of 459 patients with achondroplasia who were seen by the senior author, an orthopedic surgeon, from 1999 through 2013, at a tertiary referral center. After excluding patients who presented after spinal surgery and those who were referred for specific non-spinal issues, 326 patients were included (71%). Cobb angles were measured on lateral and posteroanterior radiographs. Scoliosis was defined as curvature on posteroanterior radiographs greater than 10°; thoracolumbar kyphosis was defined as any kyphotic curvature with an apex between T11 and L2. These data were then stratified by sex, age group (0-2, 3-12, 13-19, 20-40, and >40 years), and severity: within normal limits (≤10°), mild (>10°-25°), moderate (26°-50°), and severe (>50°). The study population consisted of 176 males and 150 females with a mean age of 18 years. Scoliosis was observed in 60%. Thoracolumbar kyphosis was observed in 79%, with 52% exhibiting moderate to severe curvature. In these patients, the rates of scoliosis and kyphosis were 60% and 79%, respectively, which are much higher than the rates reported in the literature for the general population of children. Level 3 or 4. Copyright © 2016 Scoliosis Research Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Determination of the Oswestry Disability Index score equivalent to a "satisfactory symptom state" in patients undergoing surgery for degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine-a Spine Tango registry-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooff, Miranda L; Mannion, Anne F; Staub, Lukas P; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; Fairbank, Jeremy C T

    2016-10-01

    The achievement of a given change score on a valid outcome instrument is commonly used to indicate whether a clinically relevant change has occurred after spine surgery. However, the achievement of such a change score can be dependent on baseline values and does not necessarily indicate whether the patient is satisfied with the current state. The achievement of an absolute score equivalent to a patient acceptable symptom state (PASS) may be a more stringent measure to indicate treatment success. This study aimed to estimate the score on the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI, version 2.1a; 0-100) corresponding to a PASS in patients who had undergone surgery for degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine. This is a cross-sectional study of diagnostic accuracy using follow-up data from an international spine surgery registry. The sample includes 1,288 patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorders who had undergone elective spine surgery, registered in the EUROSPINE Spine Tango Spine Surgery Registry. The main outcome measure was the ODI (version 2.1a). Surgical data and data from the ODI and Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI) were included to determine the ODI threshold equivalent to PASS at 1 year (±1.5 months; n=780) and 2 years (±2 months; n=508) postoperatively. The symptom-specific well-being item of the COMI was used as the external criterion in the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to determine the ODI threshold equivalent to PASS. Separate sensitivity analyses were performed based on the different definitions of an "acceptable state" and for subgroups of patients. JF is a copyright holder of the ODI. The ODI threshold for PASS was 22, irrespective of the time of follow-up (area under the curve [AUC]: 0.89 [sensitivity {Se}: 78.3%, specificity {Sp}: 82.1%] and AUC: 0.91 [Se: 80.7%, Sp: 85.6] for the 1- and 2-year follow-ups, respectively). Sensitivity analyses showed that the absolute ODI-22 threshold for the two follow-up time-points were

  9. Wound infiltration with local anesthetics for post-operative pain relief in lumbar spine surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjærgaard, M; Møiniche, S; Olsen, K S

    2012-03-01

    In this systematic review, we evaluated double-blind, randomized and controlled trials on the effect of wound infiltration with local anesthetics compared with the effect of placebo on post-operative pain after lumbar spine surgery. Medline, the Cochrane Library and Google Scholar were searched for appropriate trials. Qualitative analysis of post-operative effectiveness was evaluated by assessment of significant difference (P local anesthetic infiltration was observed averaging between 8 and 40 mm on a 100 mm visual analog scale. In six out of 12 comparisons, the local anesthetic infiltration significantly reduced the supplemental opioid consumption after surgery. Observed reductions in analgesic consumption over the first 24 h averaged between 2.5 mg and approximately 15 mg of morphine. Data on opioid-related adverse effects were incomplete and difficult to interpret. Interpretation of the results was difficult because of diversity of the studies. However, clinical significance was in general questionable, with only a few trials showing a small or a modest reduction in pain intensity, which was observed mainly immediately after the operation. Similarly, although more frequently observed, only a minor and probably not clinically relevant reduction in opioid consumption was shown. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2012 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  10. Failure to Launch: What the Rejection of Lumbar Total Disk Replacement Tells us About American Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert A; DePasse, J Mason; Daniels, Alan H

    2017-07-01

    Spine surgeon survey. The objective was to investigate the failure of widespread adoption of lumbar total disk replacement (L-TDR) in the United States. L-TDR has been available for use in the United States since 2005. L-TDR has not gained wide acceptance as a treatment for degenerative disk disease despite substantial investments in product development and positive results in randomized controlled trials. Estimates of the number of L-TDR procedures performed in the United States from 2005 to 2010 were calculated using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. Insurance policies were assessed for L-TDR coverage through Internet search. Finally, an 18-question survey regarding surgeons' opinions toward L-TDR was distributed to the members of North American Spine Society. The estimated number of primary L-TDR procedures performed in the United States decreased from 3650 in 2005 to 1863 in 2010, whereas revision L-TDR procedures increased from 420 to 499. Of 14 major insurers, 11 (78.6%) do not cover L-TDR. In total, 613 spine surgeons responded to the survey. Over half of respondents (51.1%, 313/612) have performed L-TDR, although only 44.6% (136/305) of initial adopters currently perform the surgery. However, 81.5% (106/130) of those currently performing L-TDR have been satisfied with the results. When asked about their perceptions of L-TDR, 65.0% (367/565) indicated a lack of insurance coverage for L-TDR in their region, 54.9% (310/565) worry about long-term complications, and 52.7% (298/565) worry about the technical challenges of revision. Despite early enthusiasm for L-TDR, wide adoption has not occurred. A primary reason for this failure seems to be a lack of insurance coverage, despite intermediate-term clinical success. In addition, surgeons continue to express concerns regarding long-term outcomes and the technical difficulties of revision. This case study of a failed surgical innovation may signal increasing involvement of payers in clinical decision

  11. Comparison of standard fusion with a "topping off" system in lumbar spine surgery: a protocol for a randomized controlled trial

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    Kaulhausen Thomas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fusion of lumbar spine segments is a well-established therapy for many pathologies. The procedure changes the biomechanics of the spine. Initial clinical benefits may be outweighed by ensuing damage to the adjacent segments. Various surgical devices and techniques have been developed to prevent this deterioration. "Topping off" systems combine rigid fusion with a flexible pedicle screw system to prevent adjacent segment disease (ASD. To date, there is no convincing evidence that these devices provide any patient benefits. Methods/Design The study is designed as a randomized, therapy-controlled trial in a clinical care setting at a university hospital. Patients presenting to the outpatient clinic with degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis will be assessed against study inclusion and exclusion criteria. After randomization, the control group will undergo conventional fusion. The intervention group will undergo fusion with a supplemental flexible pedicle screw system to protect the adjacent segment ("topping off". Follow-up examination will take place immediately after treatment during hospital stay, after 6 weeks, and then after 6, 12, 24 and 36 months. Subsequently, ongoing assessments will be performed annually. Outcome measurements will include quality of life and pain assessments using questionnaires (SF-36™, ODI, COMI. In addition, clinical and radiologic ASD, work-related disability, and duration of work disability will be assessed. Inpatient and 6-month mortality, surgery-related data (e.g., intraoperative complications, blood loss, length of incision, surgical duration, postoperative complications, adverse events, and serious adverse events will be documented and monitored throughout the study. Cost-effectiveness analysis will also be provided. Discussion New hybrid systems might improve the outcome of lumbar spine fusion. To date, there is no convincing published data on effectiveness or safety of these

  12. Do Modic changes have an impact on clinical outcome in lumbar spine surgery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Aske Foldbjerg; Bech-Azeddine, Rachid

    2016-01-01

    = 607), 1 fusion versus discectomy (n = 91), 3 fusion surgery (n = 454), and 4 total disc replacement (TDR, n = 500). A trend toward less improvement in low back pain or Oswestry Disability Index score was found in the discectomy studies, and a trend toward increased improvement was demonstrated...

  13. Outcomes and Complications of the Midline Anterior Approach 3 Years after Lumbar Spine Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charla R. Fischer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new questionnaire to assess outcomes related to the midline anterior lumbar approach and to identify risk factors for negative patient responses. Methods. A retrospective review of 58 patients who underwent anterior lumbar surgery at a single institution for either degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis in 2009 was performed. The outcome measures included our newly developed Anterior Lumbar Surgery Questionnaire (ALSQ, ODI, and EQ-5D. Results. There were 58 patients available for followup, 27 women and 31 men. The average age at surgery was 50.8 years, with an average followup of 2.92 years. The average change in ODI was 34.94 (22.7 and EQ-5D was 0.28 (0.29. The rate of complications with the anterior approach was 10.3% and there was one male patient (3.2% with retrograde ejaculation. Determination of the effectiveness of the new ALSQ revealed that it significantly correlated to the EQ-5D and ODI (P<0.05. Smoking was associated with a negative response on thirteen questions. BMP use was not associated with a negative response on any sexual function questions. Conclusions. Our new Anterior Lumbar Surgery Questionnaire determines patient perceived complications related to the midline anterior lumbar surgical approach.

  14. Impact of cost valuation on cost-effectiveness in adult spine deformity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gum, Jeffrey L; Hostin, Richard; Robinson, Chessie; Kelly, Michael P; Carreon, Leah Yacat; Polly, David W; Bess, R Shay; Burton, Douglas C; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Smith, Justin S; LaFage, Virginie; Schwab, Frank J; Ames, Christopher P; Glassman, Steven D

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, the number of adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgeries has more than doubled in the United States. The complex surgeries needed to manage ASD are associated with significant resource utilization and high cost, making them a primary target for increased scrutiny. Accordingly, it is important to not only demonstrate value in ASD surgery as clinical effectiveness but also to translate outcome assessment to cost-effectiveness. To compare the difference between Medicare allowable rates and the actual, direct hospital costs for ASD surgeries. Longitudinal cohort. Consecutive patients enrolled in an ASD database from a single institution. Short Form (SF)-6D. Consecutive patients enrolled in an ASD database from a single institution from 2008 to 2013 were identified. Direct hospital costs were collected from hospital administrative records for the entire inpatient episode of surgical care. Medicare allowable rates were calculated for the same inpatient stays using the year-appropriate Center for Medicare-Medicaid Services Inpatient Pricer Payment System Tool. The SF-6D, a utility index derived from the SF-36v1, was used to determine quality-adjusted life years (QALY). Costs and QALYs were discounted at 3.5% annually. Of 580 surgical ASD patients eligible for 2-year follow up, 346 (60%) had complete baseline and 2-year data, and 60 were Medicare beneficiaries comprising the cohort for the present study. Mean SF-6D gained is 0.10 during year 1 after surgery and 0.02 at year 2, resulting in a cumulative SF-6D gain of 0.12 over 2 years. Mean Medicare allowable rate over the 2 years is $82,050 (range $42,383 to $220,749) and mean direct cost is $99,114 (range $28,447 to $217,717). Mean cost per QALY over 2 years is $683,750 using Medicare allowable rates and $825,950 using direct costs. This difference of $17,181 between the 2 cost calculation represents a 17% difference, which was statistically significant (p<.001). There is a significant difference in

  15. Virtual reality-based simulators for spine surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfandler, Michael; Lazarovici, Marc; Stefan, Philipp; Wucherer, Patrick; Weigl, Matthias

    2017-09-01

    Virtual reality (VR)-based simulators offer numerous benefits and are very useful in assessing and training surgical skills. Virtual reality-based simulators are standard in some surgical subspecialties, but their actual use in spinal surgery remains unclear. Currently, only technical reviews of VR-based simulators are available for spinal surgery. Thus, we performed a systematic review that examined the existing research on VR-based simulators in spinal procedures. We also assessed the quality of current studies evaluating VR-based training in spinal surgery. Moreover, we wanted to provide a guide for future studies evaluating VR-based simulators in this field. This is a systematic review of the current scientific literature regarding VR-based simulation in spinal surgery. Five data sources were systematically searched to identify relevant peer-reviewed articles regarding virtual, mixed, or augmented reality-based simulators in spinal surgery. A qualitative data synthesis was performed with particular attention to evaluation approaches and outcomes. Additionally, all included studies were appraised for their quality using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI) tool. The initial review identified 476 abstracts and 63 full texts were then assessed by two reviewers. Finally, 19 studies that examined simulators for the following procedures were selected: pedicle screw placement, vertebroplasty, posterior cervical laminectomy and foraminotomy, lumbar puncture, facet joint injection, and spinal needle insertion and placement. These studies had a low-to-medium methodological quality with a MERSQI mean score of 11.47 out of 18 (standard deviation=1.81). This review described the current state and applications of VR-based simulator training and assessment approaches in spinal procedures. Limitations, strengths, and future advancements of VR-based simulators for training and assessment in spinal surgery were explored. Higher-quality studies with

  16. Comparative Study of C-arms for Intraoperative 3-dimensional Imaging and Navigation in Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery Part I: Applicability and Image Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, Jan-Helge; Sircar, Ronen; Scheiwe, Christian; Kogias, Evangelos; Volz, Florian; Krüger, Marie T; Hubbe, Ulrich

    2017-07-01

    This was a retrospective analysis. This study compares 2 different 3-dimensional (3D) C-arm devices for intraoperative imaging and navigation with regard to clinical applicability and image quality. Minimally invasive spine surgery requires intraoperative imaging techniques to adequately visualize the unexposed spine. For this purpose, mobile 3D C-arms became available along with the evolution of intraoperative navigation techniques. The C-arm devices Siremobil Iso-C 3D (Siemens) and Vision FD Vario 3D (Ziehm) perform an automated orbital rotation around the patient acquiring a 3D image set out of multiple successive fluoroscopic images. We report on technical specifications of the C-arms and our daily experience regarding clinical applicability. Furthermore, 5 spine surgeons evaluated blinded triplanar planes of 40 cervical, thoracic, and lumbar 3D scans that were obtained during routine surgery regarding usability for navigation. We assessed the delineation of cortical bone, artifacts, and overall image quality using a 0-10 numeric rating scale. The Siremobil Iso-C 3D requires 128 seconds for its 190-degree scanning arc with equidistant isocenter. The Vision FD Vario 3D performs an elliptical scanning arc and completes its 135-degree scan in 64 seconds; furthermore, it features a flat panel detector and fully digital imaging. The smaller dimensions of the Vision FD Vario 3D made it easier to maneuver in the operating room compared with the more bulky Siremobil Iso-C 3D. With respect to image quality in cervical 3D scans, the Siremobil Iso-C 3D reached significantly higher scores in all categories. The Vision FD Vario 3D revealed less artifacts in lumbar 3D scans. The Siremobil Iso-C 3D provides high-quality 3D scans in slender spine regions (eg, cervical spine), whereas the Vision FD Vario 3D appears to have advantages in the lumbar spine. Further evolution and novel devices are needed to optimize image quality and handling.

  17. Impact of the Economic Downturn on Elective Lumbar Spine Surgery in the United States: A National Trend Analysis, 2003 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, David N; Brodell, David; Li, Yue; Rubery, Paul T; Mesfin, Addisu

    2017-05-01

    Retrospective database analysis. The impact of the 2008-2009 economic downtown on elective lumbar spine surgery is unknown. Our objective was to investigate the effect of the economic downturn on the overall trends of elective lumbar spine surgery in the United States. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) was used in conjunction with US Census and macroeconomic data to determine historical trends. The economic downturn was defined as 2008 to 2009. Codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM), were used in order to identify appropriate procedures. Confidence intervals were determined using subgroup analysis techniques. From 2003 to 2012, there was a 19.8% and 26.1% decrease in the number of lumbar discectomies and laminectomies, respectively. Over the same time period, there was a 56.4% increase in the number of lumbar spinal fusions. The trend of elective lumbar spine surgeries per 100 000 persons in the US population remained consistent from 2008 to 2009. The number of procedures decreased by 4.5% from 2010 to 2011, 7.6% from 2011 to 2012, and 3.1% from 2012 to 2013. The R 2 value between the number of surgeries and the S&P 500 Index was statistically significant ( P ≤ .05). The economic downturn did not affect elective lumbar fusions, which increased in total from 2003 to 2013. The relationship between the S&P 500 Index and surgical trends suggests that during recessions, individuals may utilize other means, such as insurance, to cover procedural costs and reduce out-of-pocket expenditures, accounting for no impact of the economic downturn on surgical trends. These findings can assist multiple stakeholders in better understanding the interconnectedness of macroeconomics, policy, and elective lumbar spine surgery trends.

  18. A technical case report on use of tubular retractors for anterior cervical spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Arvind G; Patel, Ankit; Ankith, N V

    2017-12-19

    The authors put-forth this technical report to establish the feasibility of performing an anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) and a two-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using a minimally invasive approach with tubular retractors. First case: cervical spondylotic myelopathy secondary to a large postero-inferiorly migrated disc treated with corpectomy and reconstruction with a mesh cage and locking plate. Second case: cervical disc herniation with radiculopathy treated with a two-level ACDF. Both cases were operated with minimally invasive approach with tubular retractor using a single incision. Technical aspects and clinical outcomes have been reported. No intra or post-operative complications were encountered. Intra-operative blood loss was negligible. The patients had a cosmetic scar on healing. Standard procedure of placement of tubular retractors is sufficient for adequate surgical exposure with minimal invasiveness. Minimally invasive approach to anterior cervical spine with tubular retractors is feasible. This is the first report on use of minimally invasive approach for ACCF and two-level ACDF.

  19. Internal jugular phlebectasia as an incidental finding in cervical spine surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulasiraman V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic internal jugular phlebectasia, occurs either unilaterally or bilaterally affecting the internal jugular vein is a rare congenital variation often diagnosed during childhood. It usually presents with a benign swelling over the lateral side of neck on the affected side, seen on exertion. A-30-year old male was operated for anterior cervical dissectomy from right lateral approach and was diagnosed per-operatively as internal jugular phlebectasia.The surgery was abandoned at this stage on the advice of cardiothoracic surgeon to investigate the patient for the secondary etiological factors for internal jugular vein dilatation. The patient was reassured without any active intervention for the phlebectasia and cervical dissectomy was performed in the second surgery through the lateral approach from left side. This case is presented in view of rarity and suggested that during preoperative workup the nearby structures like carotid sheath should be evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging to avoid such per-operative surprises.

  20. Comparison of minimally invasive spine surgery using intraoperative computed tomography integrated navigation, fluoroscopy, and conventional open surgery for lumbar spondylolisthesis: a prospective registry-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Huang; Dubey, Navneet Kumar; Li, Yen-Yao; Lee, Ching-Yu; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Shi, Chung-Sheng; Huang, Tsung-Jen

    2017-08-01

    To date, the surgical approaches for the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) using minimally invasive spine surgery assisted with intraoperative computed tomography image-integrated navigation (MISS-iCT), fluoroscopy (MISS-FS), and conventional open surgery (OS) are debatable. This study compared TLIF using MISS-iCT, MISS-FS, and OS for treatment of one-level lumbar spondylolisthesis. This is a prospective, registry-based cohort study that compared surgical approaches for patients who underwent surgical treatment for one-level lumbar spondylolisthesis. One hundred twenty-four patients from January 2010 to March 2012 in a medical center were recruited. The outcome measures were clinical assessments, including Short-Form 12, visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index, Core Outcome Measurement Index, and patient satisfaction, and blood loss, hospital stay, operation time, postoperative pedicle screw accuracy, and superior-level facet violation. All surgeries were performed by two senior surgeons together. Ninety-nine patients (40M, 59F) who had at least 2 years' follow-up were divided into three groups according to the operation methods: MISS-iCT (N=24), MISS-FS (N=23), and OS (N=52) groups. Charts and surgical records along with postoperative CT images were assessed. MISS-iCT and MISS-FS demonstrated a significantly lowered blood loss and hospital stay compared with OS group (p2 mm) was found. However, a lower superior-level facet violation rate was observed in the MISS-iCT and OS groups (p=.049). MISS-iCT TLIF demonstrated reduced operation time, blood loss, superior-level facet violation, hospital stay, and improved functional outcomes compared with the MISS-FS and OS approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Using Lean Process Improvement to Enhance Safety and Value in Orthopaedic Surgery: The Case of Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Rajiv; Yanamadala, Vijay; Burton, Douglas C; Bess, Robert Shay

    2017-11-01

    Lean methodology was developed in the manufacturing industry to increase output and decrease costs. These labor organization methods have become the mainstay of major manufacturing companies worldwide. Lean methods involve continuous process improvement through the systematic elimination of waste, prevention of mistakes, and empowerment of workers to make changes. Because of the profit and productivity gains made in the manufacturing arena using lean methods, several healthcare organizations have adopted lean methodologies for patient care. Lean methods have now been implemented in many areas of health care. In orthopaedic surgery, lean methods have been applied to reduce complication rates and create a culture of continuous improvement. A step-by-step guide based on our experience can help surgeons use lean methods in practice. Surgeons and hospital centers well versed in lean methodology will be poised to reduce complications, improve patient outcomes, and optimize cost/benefit ratios for patient care.

  2. Virtual reality spine surgery simulation: an empirical study of its usefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasco, Jaime; Patel, Achal; Ortega-Barnett, Juan; Branch, Daniel; Desai, Sohum; Kuo, Yong Fan; Luciano, Cristian; Rizzi, Silvio; Kania, Patrick; Matuyauskas, Martin; Banerjee, Pat; Roitberg, Ben Z

    2014-11-01

    This study explores the usefulness of virtual simulation training for learning to place pedicle screws in the lumbar spine. Twenty-six senior medical students anonymously participated and were randomized into two groups (A = no simulation; B = simulation). Both groups were given 15 minutes to place two pedicle screws in a sawbones model. Students in Group A underwent traditional visual/verbal instruction whereas students in Group B underwent training on pedicle screw placement in the ImmersiveTouch simulator. The students in both groups then placed two pedicle screws each in a lumbar sawbones models that underwent triplanar thin slice computerized tomography and subsequent analysis based on coronal entry point, axial and sagittal deviations, length error, and pedicle breach. The average number of errors per screw was calculated for each group. Semi-parametric regression analysis for clustered data was used with generalized estimating equations accommodating a negative binomial distribution to determine any statistical difference of significance. A total of 52 pedicle screws were analyzed. The reduction in the average number of errors per screw after a single session of simulation training was 53.7% (P  =  0.0067). The average number of errors per screw in the simulation group was 0.96 versus 2.08 in the non-simulation group. The simulation group outperformed the non-simulation group in all variables measured. The three most benefited measured variables were length error (86.7%), coronal error (71.4%), and pedicle breach (66.7%). Computer-based simulation appears to be a valuable teaching tool for non-experts in a highly technical procedural task such as pedicle screw placement that involves sequential learning, depth perception, and understanding triplanar anatomy.

  3. [Postoperative visual loss due to conversion disorder after spine surgery: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Dailson Mamede; Bezerra, Eglantine Mamede; Silva Junior, Antonio Jorge; Amorim, Marco Aurélio Soares; Miranda, Denismar Borges de

    Patients undergoing spinal surgeries may develop postoperative visual loss. We present a case of total bilateral visual loss in a patient who, despite having clinical and surgical risk factors for organic lesion, evolved with visual disturbance due to conversion disorder. A male patient, 39 years old, 71kg, 1.72 m, ASA I, admitted to undergo fusion and discectomy at L4-L5 and L5-S1. Venoclysis, cardioscopy, oximetry, NIBP; induction with remifentanil, propofol and rocuronium; intubation with ETT (8.0mm) followed by capnography and urinary catheterization for diuresis. Maintenance with full target-controlled intravenous anesthesia. During fixation and laminectomy, the patient developed severe bleeding and hypovolemic shock. After 30minutes, hemostasis and hemodynamic stability was achieved with infusion of norepinephrine, volume expansion, and blood products. In the ICU, the patient developed mental confusion, weakness in the limbs, and bilateral visual loss. It was not possible to identify clinical, laboratory or image findings of organic lesion. He evolved with episodes of anxiety, emotional lability, and language impairment; the hypothesis of conversion syndrome with visual component was raised after psychiatric evaluation. The patient had complete resolution of symptoms after visual education and introduction of low doses of antipsychotic, antidepressant, and benzodiazepine. Other symptoms also regressed, and the patient was discharged 12 days after surgery. After 60 days, the patient had no more symptoms. Conversion disorders may have different signs and symptoms of non-organic origin, including visual component. It is noteworthy that the occurrence of this type of visual dysfunction in the postoperative period of spinal surgery is a rare event and should be remembered as a differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Postoperative visual loss due to conversion disorder after spine surgery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dailson Mamede Bezerra

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objective Patients undergoing spinal surgeries may develop postoperative visual loss. We present a case of total bilateral visual loss in a patient who, despite having clinical and surgical risk factors for organic lesion, evolved with visual disturbance due to conversion disorder. Case report A male patient, 39 years old, 71 kg, 1.72 m, ASA I, admitted to undergo fusion and discectomy at L4-L5 and L5-S1. Venoclysis, cardioscopy, oximetry, NIBP; induction with remifentanil, propofol and rocuronium; intubation with ETT (8.0 mm followed by capnography and urinary catheterization for diuresis. Maintenance with full target-controlled intravenous anesthesia. During fixation and laminectomy, the patient developed severe bleeding and hypovolemic shock. After 30 min, hemostasis and hemodynamic stability was achieved with infusion of norepinephrine, volume expansion, and blood products. In the ICU, the patient developed mental confusion, weakness in the limbs, and bilateral visual loss. It was not possible to identify clinical, laboratory or image findings of organic lesion. He evolved with episodes of anxiety, emotional lability, and language impairment; the hypothesis of conversion syndrome with visual component was raised after psychiatric evaluation. The patient had complete resolution of symptoms after visual education and introduction of low doses of antipsychotic, antidepressant, and benzodiazepine. Other symptoms also regressed, and the patient was discharged 12 days after surgery. After 60 days, the patient had no more symptoms. Conclusions Conversion disorders may have different signs and symptoms of non-organic origin,including visual component. It is noteworthy that the occurrence of this type of visual dysfunc-tion in the postoperative period of spinal surgery is a rare event and should be remembered asa differential diagnosis.

  5. Morbidly obese patient with obstructive sleep apnoea for major spine surgery: An anaesthetic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Redhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Morbidly obese patients with clinical features of obstructive sleep apnoea can present a myriad of challenges to the anaesthesiologists which must be addressed to minimise the perioperative risks. Initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP therapy early in the pre- and post-operative period along with appropriate anaesthetic planning is of paramount importance in such patients. This case report emphasises the usefulness of CPAP therapy, even for a short duration, to minimise morbidity, improve recovery and hasten early discharge from the hospital after major surgery.

  6. MIS lateral spine surgery: a systematic literature review of complications, outcomes, and economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmen, Jeff A; Gerber, Edward J

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decade, the minimally disruptive lateral transpsoas approach for lumbar interbody fusion (MI-LIF) is increasingly being used as an alternative to conventional surgical approaches. The purpose of this review was to evaluate four primary questions as they relate to MI-LIF: (1) Is there an anatomical justification for MI-LIF at L4-5? (2) What are the complication and outcome profiles of MI-LIF and are they acceptable with respect to conventional approaches? (3) Given technical and neuromonitoring differences between various MI-LIF procedures, are there any published clinical differences? And, (4) are modern minimally disruptive procedures (e.g., MI-LIF) economically viable? Through a MEDLINE and Google Scholar search, a total of 237 articles that discussed MI-LIF were identified. Of those, topical areas included anatomy (22), biomechanics/testing (17), technical descriptions (11), case reports (40), complications (30), clinical and radiographic outcomes (43), deformity (23), trauma or thoracic applications (10), and review articles (41). In answer to the questions posed, (1) there is a high strength of evidence showing MI-LIF to be anatomically justified at all levels of the lumbar spine from L1-2 to L4-5. The evidence also supports the use of advanced neuromonitoring modalities. (2) There is moderate strength evidence in support of reproducible and reasonable complication, side effect, and outcome profiles following MI-LIF which may be technique dependent. (3) There is low-strength evidence that shows elevated neural complication rates in non-traditional (e.g., shallow-docking approaches and/or those without specialized neuromonitoring) MI-LIF, and (4) there is low- to moderate-strength evidence that modern minimally disruptive surgical approaches are cost-effective. There is considerable published evidence to support MI-LIF in spinal fusion and advanced applications, though the results of some reports, especially concerning complications, vary greatly

  7. Predictors of extended length of stay, discharge to inpatient rehab, and hospital readmission following elective lumbar spine surgery: introduction of the Carolina-Semmes Grading Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGirt, Matthew J; Parker, Scott L; Chotai, Silky; Pfortmiller, Deborah; Sorenson, Jeffrey M; Foley, Kevin; Asher, Anthony L

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Extended hospital length of stay (LOS), unplanned hospital readmission, and need for inpatient rehabilitation after elective spine surgery contribute significantly to the variation in surgical health care costs. As novel payment models shift the risk of cost overruns from payers to providers, understanding patient-level risk of LOS, readmission, and inpatient rehabilitation is critical. The authors set out to develop a grading scale that effectively stratifies risk of these costly events after elective surgery for degenerative lumbar pathologies. METHODS The Quality and Outcomes Database (QOD) registry prospectively enrolls patients undergoing surgery for degenerative lumbar spine disease. This registry was queried for patients who had undergone elective 1- to 3-level lumbar surgery for degenerative spine pathology. The association between preoperative patient variables and extended postoperative hospital LOS (LOS ≥ 7 days), discharge status (inpatient facility vs home), and 90-day hospital readmission was assessed using stepwise multivariate logistic regression. The Carolina-Semmes grading scale was constructed using the independent predictors for LOS (0-12 points), discharge to inpatient facility (0-18 points), and 90-day readmission (0-6 points), and its performance was assessed using the QOD data set. The performance of the grading scale was then confirmed separately after using it in 2 separate neurosurgery practice sites (Carolina Neurosurgery & Spine Associates [CNSA] and Semmes Murphey Clinic). RESULTS A total of 6921 patients were analyzed. Overall, 290 (4.2%) patients required extended LOS, 654 (9.4%) required inpatient facility care/rehabilitation on hospital discharge, and 474 (6.8%) were readmitted to the hospital within 90 days postdischarge. Variables that remained as independently associated with these unplanned events in multivariate analysis included age ≥ 70 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Classification System

  8. Iatrogenic Vertebral Artery Injury During Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Qing; Chen, Long; Long, Ye; Xiang, Zhou

    2017-10-01

    Iatrogenic vertebral artery injury (VAI) during anterior cervical surgery is rare but potentially catastrophic. Causes, presentation, diagnosis, management, prognosis, and prevention of VAI were reviewed following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. English language studies and case reports published from 1980 to 2017 were retrieved. Data on diagnosis, surgical procedures and approach, site and cause of VAI, management, outcomes, and vertebral artery (VA) status were extracted. In 25 articles including 54 patients, VAI was diagnosed during or after surgery commonly indicated for cervical degenerative diseases (64%), tumors (14%), and trauma (9%). The incidence of VAI for each side was similar regardless of approach. Common presentations were unexpected copious surgical bleeding, delayed hemorrhage of pseudoaneurysm with neck swelling, dyspnea, hypotension, and cervical bruits caused by arteriovenous fistula. Causes included drilling (61%), instrumentation (16%), and soft tissue retraction (8%). Direct exposure or angiography confirmed VAI. Ten patients had VA anomalies; collateral status was verified in 9 before definitive treatment. Tamponade was adopted for urgent hemostasis in most cases but with a high incidence of pseudoaneurysm (48%). Unknown VA status increased occlusion risk and neurologic sequelae (41%). VA repair and stent placement had excellent outcomes. Extensive lateral decompression, loss of landmarks, and anatomic variations or pathologic status of VA increased VAI risk. Evaluation of collateral vessels before definitive treatment helped determine appropriate management and avoid neurologic sequelae. Tamponade was not recommended as definitive treatment. Meticulous preoperative evaluation, cautious intraoperative manipulation, and real-time radiographic guidance reduced VAI risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The thoracolumbar fascia: anatomy, function and clinical considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, F H; Vleeming, A; Schuenke, M D; Danneels, L; Schleip, R

    2012-01-01

    In this overview, new and existent material on the organization and composition of the thoracolumbar fascia (TLF) will be evaluated in respect to its anatomy, innervation biomechanics and clinical relevance. The integration of the passive connective tissues of the TLF and active muscular structures surrounding this structure are discussed, and the relevance of their mutual interactions in relation to low back and pelvic pain reviewed. The TLF is a girdling structure consisting of several aponeurotic and fascial layers that separates the paraspinal muscles from the muscles of the posterior abdominal wall. The superficial lamina of the posterior layer of the TLF (PLF) is dominated by the aponeuroses of the latissimus dorsi and the serratus posterior inferior. The deeper lamina of the PLF forms an encapsulating retinacular sheath around the paraspinal muscles. The middle layer of the TLF (MLF) appears to derive from an intermuscular septum that developmentally separates the epaxial from the hypaxial musculature. This septum forms during the fifth and sixth weeks of gestation. The paraspinal retinacular sheath (PRS) is in a key position to act as a ‘hydraulic amplifier’, assisting the paraspinal muscles in supporting the lumbosacral spine. This sheath forms a lumbar interfascial triangle (LIFT) with the MLF and PLF. Along the lateral border of the PRS, a raphe forms where the sheath meets the aponeurosis of the transversus abdominis. This lateral raphe is a thickened complex of dense connective tissue marked by the presence of the LIFT, and represents the junction of the hypaxial myofascial compartment (the abdominal muscles) with the paraspinal sheath of the epaxial muscles. The lateral raphe is in a position to distribute tension from the surrounding hypaxial and extremity muscles into the layers of the TLF. At the base of the lumbar spine all of the layers of the TLF fuse together into a thick composite that attaches firmly to the posterior superior iliac spine

  10. Bone graft extenders and substitutes in the thoracolumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arner, Justin W; Daffner, Scott D

    2012-05-01

    Autologous iliac crest bone graft remains the gold standard for lumbar fusion. The potential for complications has led to the development of alternative bone graft materials and enhancers, including autologous growth factors, demineralized bone matrix products, osteoinductive agents, and ceramic products. The current literature centers mainly on preclinical studies, which, further complicating the situation, evaluate these products in different clinical scenarios or surgical techniques. Autologous growth factors and demineralized bone matrix products have had promising results in preclinical studies, but few strong clinical studies have been conducted. Ceramic extenders were evaluated with other substances and had good but often inconsistent results. Bone morphogenetic proteins have been extensively studied and may have benefits as osteoinductive agents. Category comparisons are difficult to make, and there are differences even between products within the same category. The surgeon must be knowledgeable about products and their advantages, disadvantages, indications, contraindications, and possible applications so that they can make the best choice for each patient.

  11. Surgical management of coronal and sagittal imbalance of the spine without PSO: a multicentric cohort study on compensated adult degenerative deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramieri, Alessandro; Miscusi, Massimo; Domenicucci, Maurizio; Raco, Antonino; Costanzo, Giuseppe

    2017-10-01

    Sagittal imbalance of severe adult degenerative deformities requires surgical correction to improve pain, mobility and quality of life. Our aim was a harmonic and balanced spine, treating a series of adult degenerative thoracolumbar and lumbar kyphoscoliosis by a non posterior subtraction osteotomy technique. We operated 22 painful thoracolumbar and lumbar compensated degenerative deformities by anterior (ALIF), extreme lateral (XLIF) and transforaminal (TLIF) interbody fusion and grade 2 osteotomy (SPO) to restore lumbar lordosis and mobilize the coronal curve. Two-stage surgery, first anterior and after 2 or 3 weeks posterior, was proposed when the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was equal to or greater than 50% and VAS more than 5. All patients were submitted to X-ray and clinical screening during pre, post-operative and follow-up periods. We performed 5 ALIFs, 39 XLIFs, 8 TLIFs, 32 SPOs. No major complications were recorded and complication rate was 18% after lateral fusion and 22.7% after posterior approach. Pelvic tilt, lumbar lordosis, sagittal vertical axis and thoracic kyphosis improved (p < 0.05). Clinical follow-up (mean 20.5; range 18-24) was satisfactory in all cases, except for two due to sacroiliac pain. Mean preoperative VAS was 7.7 (range 6-10), while ODI was 67% on average (range 50-78). After two-stage surgery, VAS and ODI decreased, respectively, to 2.4 (range 2-4) and 31% (range 25-45), while their values were 4 (range 2-6) and 35% (range 20-55) at the final follow-up. Current follow-up does not allow definitive conclusions. However, the surgical approach adopted in this study seems promising, improving balance and clinical condition of adult patients with a compensated sagittal degenerative imbalance of the thoracolumbar spine.

  12. Acute Thoracolumbar Spinal Cord Injury: Relationship of Cord Compression to Neurological Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeers, Peta; Battistuzzo, Camila R; Clark, Jillian M; Bernard, Stephen; Freeman, Brian J C; Batchelor, Peter E

    2018-02-21

    Spinal cord injury in the cervical spine is commonly accompanied by cord compression and urgent surgical decompression may improve neurological recovery. However, the extent of spinal cord compression and its relationship to neurological recovery following traumatic thoracolumbar spinal cord injury is unclear. The purpose of this study was to quantify maximum cord compression following thoracolumbar spinal cord injury and to assess the relationship among cord compression, cord swelling, and eventual clinical outcome. The medical records of patients who were 15 to 70 years of age, were admitted with a traumatic thoracolumbar spinal cord injury (T1 to L1), and underwent a spinal surgical procedure were examined. Patients with penetrating injuries and multitrauma were excluded. Maximal osseous canal compromise and maximal spinal cord compression were measured on preoperative mid-sagittal computed tomography (CT) scans and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by observers blinded to patient outcome. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grades from acute hospital admission (≤24 hours of injury) and rehabilitation discharge were used to measure clinical outcome. Relationships among spinal cord compression, canal compromise, and initial and final AIS grades were assessed via univariate and multivariate analyses. Fifty-three patients with thoracolumbar spinal cord injury were included in this study. The overall mean maximal spinal cord compression (and standard deviation) was 40% ± 21%. There was a significant relationship between median spinal cord compression and final AIS grade, with grade-A patients (complete injury) exhibiting greater compression than grade-C and D patients (incomplete injury) (p compression as independently influencing the likelihood of complete spinal cord injury (p compression. Greater cord compression is associated with an increased likelihood of severe neurological deficits (complete injury) following

  13. Use of an operating microscope during spine surgery is associated with minor increases in operating room times and no increased risk of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basques, Bryce A; Golinvaux, Nicholas S; Bohl, Daniel D; Yacob, Alem; Toy, Jason O; Varthi, Arya G; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2014-10-15

    Retrospective database review. To evaluate whether microscope use during spine procedures is associated with increased operating room times or increased risk of infection. Operating microscopes are commonly used in spine procedures. It is debated whether the use of an operating microscope increases operating room time or confers increased risk of infection. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, which includes data from more than 370 participating hospitals, was used to identify patients undergoing elective spinal procedures with and without the use of an operating microscope for the years 2011 and 2012. Bivariate and multivariate linear regressions were used to test the association between microscope use and operating room times. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were similarly conducted to test the association between microscope use and infection occurrence within 30 days of surgery. A total of 23,670 elective spine procedures were identified, of which 2226 (9.4%) used an operating microscope. The average patient age was 55.1±14.4 years. The average operative time (incision to closure) was 125.7±82.0 minutes.Microscope use was associated with minor increases in preoperative room time (+2.9 min, P=0.013), operative time (+13.2 min, Pmicroscope and nonmicroscope groups for occurrence of any infection, superficial surgical site infection, deep surgical site infection, organ space infection, or sepsis/septic shock, regardless of surgery type. We did not find operating room times or infection risk to be significant deterrents for use of an operating microscope during spine surgery. 3.

  14. Perioperative blood transfusion: does it influence survival and cancer progression in metastatic spine tumor surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaw, Aye Sandar; Kantharajanna, Shashidhar B; Maharajan, Karthikeyan; Tan, Barry; Vellayappan, Balamurugan; Kumar, Naresh

    2017-02-01

    Despite advances in surgical techniques for spinal metastases, there is often substantial blood loss, resulting in patients requiring blood transfusion during the perioperative period. Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) has been the main replenishment method for lost blood. However, the impact of ABT on cancer-related outcomes has been controversial in various studies. We aimed to evaluate the influence of perioperative ABT on disease progression and survival in patients undergoing metastatic spinal tumor surgery (MSTS). We conducted a retrospective study that included 247 patients who underwent MSTS at a single tertiary institution between 2005 and 2014. The impact of using perioperative ABT (either exposure to or quantities of transfusion) on disease progression and survival was assessed using Cox regression analyses while adjusting for potential confounding variables. Of 247 patients, 133 (54%) received ABT. The overall median number of blood units transfused was 2 (range, 0-10 units). Neither blood transfusion exposure nor quantities of transfusion were associated with overall survival (hazard ratio [HR], 1.15 [p = 0.35] and 1.10 [p = 0.11], respectively) and progression-free survival (HR, 0.87 [p = 0.18] and 0.98 [p = 0.11], respectively). The factors that influenced overall survival were primary tumor type and preoperative Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, whereas primary tumor type was the only factor that had an impact on progression-free survival. This is the first study providing evidence that disease progression and survival in patients who undergo MSTS are less likely to be influenced by perioperative ABT. The worst oncologic outcomes are more likely to be caused by the clinical circumstances necessitating blood transfusion, but not transfusion itself. However, because ABT can have a propensity toward developing postoperative infections, including surgical site infection, the use of patient blood management

  15. Significant reduction of fluoroscopy repetition with lumbar localization system in minimally invasive spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guoxin; Zhang, Hailong; Gu, Xin; Wang, Chuanfeng; Guan, Xiaofei; Fan, Yunshan; He, Shisheng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The conventional location methods for minimally invasive spinal surgery (MISS) were mainly based on repeated fluoroscopy in a trial-and-error manner preoperatively and intraoperatively. Localization system mainly consisted of preoperative applied radiopaque frame and intraoperative guiding device, which has the potential to minimize fluoroscopy repetition in MISS. The study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a novel lumbar localization system in reducing radiation exposure to patients. Included patients underwent minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MISTLIF) or percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (PTED). Patients treated with novel localization system were regarded as Group A, and patients treated without novel localization system were regarded as Group B. For PTED, The estimated effective dose was 0.41 ± 0.13 mSv in Group A and 0.57 ± 0.14 mSv in Group B (P fluoroscopy exposure time of PTED was 22.18 ± 7.30 seconds in Group A and 30.53 ± 7.56 seconds in Group B (P fluoroscopy exposure time was 25.41 ± 5.52 seconds in Group A and 32.82 ± 5.03 seconds in Group B (P < .001); The estimated cancer risk was 24.90 ± 5.15 (10–6) in Group A and 31.96 ± 5.04 (10–6) in Group B (P < .001). There were also significant differences in localization time and operation time between the 2 groups either for MISTLIF or PTED. The lumbar localization system could be a potential protection strategy for minimizing radiation hazards. PMID:28538369

  16. The Qualification of Outcome after Cervical Spine Surgery by Patients Compared to the Neck Disability Index.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Donk

    Full Text Available The Neck Disability Index (NDI is a patient self-assessed outcome measurement tool to assess disability, and that is frequently used to evaluate the effects of the treatment of neck-related problems. In individualized medicine it is mandatory that patients can interpret data in order to choose a treatment. A change of NDI or an absolute NDI is generally meaningless to a patient. Therefore, a correlation between the qualification of the clinical situation rated by the patient and the NDI score was evaluated.Patients who completed an NDI after anterior surgery because of symptomatic single level degenerative cervical disc disease were asked one month after completion of the NDI to qualify their clinical situation of a 5-item Likert scale varying from excellent to bad. Since a clear distinction between the categories was not possible based on the total NDI score, a ROC-curve was built, and the AUC computed in order to estimate best dichotomization in qualification of the clinical situation. The best corresponding cut-off point for the NDI total score was found by studying sensitivity and specificity for all possible cut-off points.102 patients were included. The highest AUC was obtained by dichotomizing the qualification into a group with good outcome and less-good outcome. The highest sensitivity and specificity for the dichotomized qualification as good outcome corresponded to a NDI ≤ 7. Sensitivity was 81.08% and specificity was 78.57%.This is the first study that correlated the qualification of the situation by the patients themselves and NDI. An NDI ≤ 7 corresponded to a good outcome according to the patients. This is valuable information to inform patients in their decision for any treatment.

  17. Surgical outcome of posterior decompression, posterolateral fusion and stabilization by pedicle screw and rod in thoracolumbar tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Anowarul Islam

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal tuberculosis causes severe complications like neurological and spinal deformity which may lead to respiratory distress, costo-pelvic impingement, paraplegia and consequent reduction in the quality and longevity of life. The aim of the present treatment is to avoid the consequence of neural complications and gain near-normal spine. Mechanical factor causes pathological fracture or dislocation of an affected vertebral body. Surgical decompression ensues further instability. Reconstruction of spinal column by pedicle screw and rod provide stability and prevents secondary neural damage and deformity thereby helps in early mobilization. Prospective study was done to evaluate the results in 20 cases of spinal tuberculosis in thoracolumbar region associated with neurological deficit. We operated our cases (12 males and 8 females by posterolateral decompression, fusion and stabilization by pedicle screw and rod along with antitubercular drug treatment. All patients were with neurological deficit, single level involvement and 10 to 30 degree of mild kyphosis. After surgery, kyphosis improved from 20.7 ± 5.5 degrees to 12.5 ± 3.9 degree. Bony fusion was in 65.0% cases. Neurological improvement and pain subsided in all the patients.

  18. Inadequacy of 3-month Oswestry Disability Index outcome for assessing individual longer-term patient experience after lumbar spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Anthony L; Chotai, Silky; Devin, Clinton J; Speroff, Theodore; Harrell, Frank E; Nian, Hui; Dittus, Robert S; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Knightly, John J; Glassman, Steven D; Bydon, Mohamad; Archer, Kristin R; Foley, Kevin T; McGirt, Matthew J

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Prospective longitudinal outcomes registries are at the center of evidence-driven health care reform. Obtaining real-world outcomes data at 12 months can be costly and challenging. In the present study, the authors analyzed whether 3-month outcome measurements sufficiently represent 12-month outcomes for patients with degenerative lumbar disease undergoing surgery. METHODS Data from 3073 patients undergoing elective spine surgery for degenerative lumbar disease were entered into a prospective multicenter registry (N(2)QOD). Baseline, 3-month, and 12-month follow-up Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores were recorded. The absolute differences between actual 12- and 3-month ODI scores was evaluated. Additionally, the authors analyzed the absolute difference between actual 12-month ODI scores and a model-predicted 12-month ODI score (the model used patients' baseline characteristics and actual 3-month scores). The minimal clinically important difference (MCID) for ODI of 12.8 points and the substantial clinical benefit (SCB) for ODI of 18.8 points were used based on the previously published values. The concordance rate of achieving MCID and SCB for ODI at 3-and 12-months was computed. RESULTS The 3-month ODI scores differed from 12-month scores by an absolute difference of 11.9 ± 10.8, and predictive modeling estimations of 12-month ODI scores differed from actual 12-month scores by a mean (± SD) of 10.7 ± 9.0 points (p = 0.001). Sixty-four percent of patients (n = 1982) achieved an MCID for ODI at 3 months in comparison with 67% of patients (n = 2088) by 12 months; 51% (n = 1731) and 61% (n = 1860) of patients achieved SCB for ODI at 3 months and 12 months, respectively. Almost 20% of patients had ODI scores that varied at least 20 points (the point span of an ODI functional category) between actual 3- and 12-month values. In the aggregate analysis of achieving MCID, 77% of patients were concordant and 23% were discordant in achieving or not achieving

  19. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on intraoperative core temperature in patients undergoing posterior spine surgery: prospective randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyungseok; Do Son, Je; Lee, Hyung-Chul; Oh, Hyung-Min; Jung, Chul-Woo; Park, Hee-Pyoung

    2018-03-01

    Objective Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) causes carotid baroreceptor unloading, which leads to thermoregulatory peripheral vasoconstriction. However, the effects of PEEP on intraoperative thermoregulation in the prone position remain unknown. Methods Thirty-seven patients undergoing spine surgery in the prone position were assigned at random to receive either 10 cmH 2 O PEEP (Group P) or no PEEP (Group Z). The primary endpoint was core temperature 180 minutes after intubation. Secondary endpoints were delta core temperature (difference in core temperature between 180 minutes and immediately after tracheal intubation), incidence of intraoperative hypothermia (core temperature of peripheral vasoconstriction-related data. Results The median [interquartile range] core temperature 180 minutes after intubation was 36.1°C [35.9°C-36.2°C] and 36.0°C [35.9°C-36.4°C] in Groups Z and P, respectively. The delta core temperature and incidences of intraoperative hypothermia and peripheral vasoconstriction were not significantly different between the two groups. The peripheral vasoconstriction threshold (36.2°C±0.5°C vs. 36.7°C±0.6°C) was lower and the onset of peripheral vasoconstriction (66 [60-129] vs. 38 [28-70] minutes) was slower in Group Z than in Group P. Conclusions Intraoperative PEEP did not reduce the core temperature decrease in the prone position, although it resulted in an earlier onset and higher threshold of peripheral vasoconstriction.

  20. The effect of the grade of degenerative changes in the spine on the outcomes of surgery for lumbar discopathy with a radicular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styczyński, Tadeusz; Pyskło, Bohdan; Gasik, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was an evaluation of the influence of coexisting degenerative changes on surgical outcomes on patients with lumbar disc hernias (DH). A total of randomly selected 132 patients undergoing surgery for DH (classic discectomy with fenestration of the yellow ligament) were examined. Radiographic and MRI scans of the lumbar spine were obtained in all patients, who were subsequently divided into 6 groups depending on the grade and/or extent of degenerative changes. The patients self-evaluated treatment outcomes using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The attending doctors carried out a more detailed assessment of the outcomes by separately determining pain intensity (using a 4-grade scale), motor weakness (using a 3-grade scale) and range of lumbar spine movement (using a 3-grade scale). In general, patient self-evaluation of treatment outcomes did not reveal statistically significant differences between subgroups. In doctors' detailed assessment, treatment outcomes related to pain and motor weakness were not significantly different between groups with and without spondylosis. The range of motion in the lumbar spine was greater in patients without spondylosis (p<0.05). According to both subjective and objective assessments of the therapeutic effects of surgery for lumbar disc hernias, even severe degenerative changes do not worsen the treatment outcome.

  1. Primary acquired spondylodiscitis shows a more severe course than spondylodiscitis following spine surgery: a single-center retrospective study of 159 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschugg, Anja; Lener, Sara; Hartmann, Sebastian; Rietzler, Andreas; Neururer, Sabrina; Thomé, Claudius

    2018-01-01

    Spondylodiscitis may arise primarily via hematogenous spread or direct inoculation of virulent organisms during spine surgery. To date, no comparative data investigating the differences between primary and postoperative spondylodiscitis is available. Thus, the purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate differences between these two etiologies. One hundred fifty-nine patients that were treated at our department were included in the retrospective analysis. The patients were categorized into two groups based on the etiology of spondylodiscitis: group NS, primary spondylodiscitis without prior spinal surgery; group S, spondylodiscitis following spinal surgery. Evaluation included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), laboratory values, clinical outcome, and operative or conservative management. Preoperative MRI showed higher rates of epidural and paraspinal abscess in patients with primary spondylodiscitis (p < 0.005). Vertebral bone destruction was more severe in group NS (p < 0.05). Survival rate in group S (98.2%) was higher than in group NS (87.5%, p = 0.024). The extent of the operative procedure in patients who were surgically treated (n = 116) differed between the two groups (p < 0.005). In conclusion, spondylodiscitis is a life-threatening and serious disease and requires long-term treatment. Primary spondylodiscitis is frequently associated with epidural and paraspinal abscess, vertebral bone destruction and has a higher mortality rate than postoperative spondylodiscitis. Therefore, primary spondylodiscitis shows a more severe course than spondylodiscitis following spine surgery.

  2. Pain and functional improvement effects of methylene blue injection on the soft tissue around fusion site after traumatic thoracolumbar fixation: A double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Majid Reza; Yazdanpanah, Hamed; Gholami, Mehrnaz; Farrokhi, Farnaz; Mesbahi, Amir Reza

    2016-11-01

    Fractures of the thoracolumbar spine can cause pain, long-term reductions in quality of life (QOL), and neural deficits. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of methylene blue (MB) on preventing postoperative pain and improving QOL in patients with throracolumbar fractures undergoing posterior pedicle screw fixation. Fifty patients underwent standard posterior pedicular screw fixation for stabilization of the thoracolumbar fractures: 25 received 1ml of MB solution at a concentration of 0.5% and 25 received normal saline on the soft tissue around fusion site. Primary outcomes were the control of pain, evaluated at 48h, 2 and 6 months after surgery with the use of a visual analog scale (VAS), and the improvement of QOL, assessed 2 and 6 months postoperatively by means of Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) questionnaire. The mean VAS scores for pain were significantly lower in the MB group compared with the control group at 2 months (1.30±0.45 vs. 2.60±1.19, P<0.001) and 6 months (1.17±0.37 vs. 1.60±0.87; P=0.028) after treatment. At 2 months after the surgery, the mean ODI score was significantly lower in the MB-treated patients than the control group (20.4±10.92 vs. 34.8±15.11; P=0.001). The ODI score in the MB-treated patients was better than the control group at 6 months after the surgery (12.2±11.66 vs. 20.8±11.14; P=0.016). A single dose of MB on the soft tissue around fusion site shows promising results in terms of safety, reduction of postoperative pain, and functional results when compared with placebo 6 months after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of the predictors of postoperative aggravation of shoulder imbalance in severe and rigid thoracic or thoracolumbar scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Lei; Fan, Ning; Hai, Yong; Lu, S B; Su, Q J; Yang, J C; Guan, Li; Kang, Nan; Meng, X L; Liu, Y Z

    2016-10-01

    To study the predictors of postoperative aggravation of shoulder imbalance in severe and rigid thoracic or thoracolumbar scoliosis. In this study, 49 patients with severe and rigid thoracic or thoracolumbar scoliosis were analyzed retrospectively. The patients underwent whole-spine anteroposterior and lateral radiography preoperatively and postoperatively. On the radiographs, we measured parameters, including T1 tilt, radiographic shoulder height (RSH), proximal curve, middle curve, distal curve, apical vertebral translation (AVT) of the middle curve, thoracic trunk shift (TTS), coronal balance, and sagittal balance. We regarded RSH and T1 tilt as postoperative shoulder balance parameters and divided the patients into improved and aggravated groups of shoulder imbalance. Univariate analysis, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used in the statistical analyses. The RSH was -17.01 ± 21.85 mm before surgery and 4.76 ± 18.11 mm at follow-up. The T1 tilt angle was -10.20° ± 19.53° before surgery and -2.72° ± 13.48° at follow-up. The results of the univariate analysis suggest that preoperative RSH and proximal to middle curve change ratio were significantly higher in the patients in the improved RSH group (p < 0.01). In addition, preoperative RSH, preoperative T1 tilt, and apical vertebral translation of the middle curve were significantly higher, and preoperative proximal curve, postoperative proximal curve, and preoperative distal curve were significantly lower in the patients with improved T1 tilt group (p < 0.01). In a binary logistic regression analysis, preoperative RSH [B = -0.120, odds ratio (OR) = 0.887, p = 0.006] was found to be an independent predictor of postoperative aggravation of RSH. Similarly, preoperative T1 tilt (B = -0.488, OR = 0.614, p = 0.001) was found to be an independent predictor of postoperative aggravation of T1 tilt. Moreover, the relationship

  4. Epidemiology and Outcomes of Vertebral Artery Injury in 16 582 Cervical Spine Surgery Patients: An AOSpine North America Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wellington K; Kannan, Abhishek; Mai, Harry T; Fehlings, Michael G; Smith, Zachary A; Traynelis, Vincent C; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Hilibrand, Alan S; Nassr, Ahmad; Arnold, Paul M; Mroz, Thomas E; Bydon, Mohamad; Massicotte, Eric M; Ray, Wilson Z; Steinmetz, Michael P; Smith, Gabriel A; Pace, Jonathan; Corriveau, Mark; Lee, Sungho; Isaacs, Robert E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Lord, Elizabeth L; Buser, Zorica; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A multicenter retrospective case series was compiled involving 21 medical institutions. Inclusion criteria included patients who underwent cervical spine surgery between 2005 and 2011 and who sustained a vertebral artery injury (VAI). To report the frequency, risk factors, outcomes, and management goals of VAI in patients who have undergone cervical spine surgery. Patients were evaluated on the basis of condition-specific functional status using the Neck Disability Index (NDI), modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) score, the Nurick scale, and the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). VAIs were identified in a total of 14 of 16 582 patients screened (8.4 per 10 000). The mean age of patients with VAI was 59 years (±10) with a female predominance (78.6%). Patient diagnoses included myelopathy, radiculopathy, cervical instability, and metastatic disease. VAI was associated with substantial blood loss (770 mL), although only 3 cases required transfusion. Of the 14 cases, 7 occurred with an anterior-only approach, 3 cases with posterior-only approach, and 4 during circumferential approach. Fifty percent of cases of VAI with available preoperative imaging revealed anomalous vessel anatomy during postoperative review. Average length of hospital stay was 10 days (±8). Notably, 13 of the 14 (92.86%) cases resolved without residual deficits. Compared to preoperative baseline NDI, Nurick, mJOA, and SF-36 scores for these patients, there were no observed changes after surgery ( P = .20-.94). Vertebral artery injuries are potentially catastrophic complications that can be sustained from anterior or posterior cervical spine approaches. The data from this study suggest that with proper steps to ensure hemostasis, patients recover function at a high rate and do not exhibit residual deficits.

  5. Posterior instrumentation, anterior column reconstruction with single posterior approach for treatment of pyogenic osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorensek, M; Kosak, R; Travnik, L; Vengust, R

    2013-03-01

    Surgical treatment of thoracolumbar osteomyelitis consists of radical debridement, reconstruction of anterior column either with or without posterior stabilization. The objective of present study is to evaluate a case series of patients with osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine treated by single, posterior approach with posterior instrumentation and anterior column reconstruction. Seventeen patients underwent clinical and radiological evaluation pre and postoperatively with latest follow-up at 19 months (8-56 months) after surgery. Parameters assessed were site of infection, causative organism, angle of deformity, blood loss, duration of surgery, ICU stay, deformity correction, time to solid bony fusion, ambulatory status, neurologic status (ASIA impairment scale), and functional outcome (Kirkaldy-Willis criteria). Mean operating time was 207 min and average blood loss 1,150 ml. Patients spent 2 (1-4) days in ICU and were able to walk unaided 1.6 (1-2) days after surgery. Infection receded in all 17 patients postoperatively. Solid bony fusion occurred in 15 out of 17 patients (88 %) on average 6.3 months after surgery. Functional outcome was assessed as excellent or good in 82 % of cases. Average deformity correction was 8 (1-18) degrees, with loss of correction of 4 (0-19) degrees at final follow-up. Single, posterior approach addressing both columns poses safe alternative in treatment of pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine. It proved to be less invasive resulting in faster postoperative recovery.

  6. Periscopic Spine Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    osteoporosis, long- term steroid use, or cancer. In this therapy, a trocar (large bore hollow needle) is inserted through the pedicle of the vertebral body...produce high muscular endurance [1]. Until the 1970s, free weights (e.g. barbells and dumbells) and Universal Gyms utilizing weight stacks driven by cable...vertebral body that has been weakened by osteoporosis, long-term steroid use, or cancer. In this therapy, a trocar (large bore hollow needle) is inserted

  7. Spine surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the first 5 to 7 days. The first time you shower, have someone help you. Cover the incision with plastic wrap. DO NOT allow water from the shower head to spray the ... Smoking and using tobacco products slows the healing process.

  8. Laparoscopic Spine Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Training Guidelines, Statements, and Standards of Practice TAVAC – Technology and Value Assessments Surgical Endoscopy and Other Journal Information SAGES Manuals SCOPE – The SAGES Newsletter Troubleshooting Guides ...

  9. Periscopic Spine Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    All procedures were completed successfully including injections at the sympathetic chain, sciatic nerve and coeliac plexus. The direct MRI control...biopsy robot. Minimally Invasive Therapy & Allied Technologies 2005;14(1):23 - 31. 21. Melzer A, Seibel R. MR guided therapy of spinal disease

  10. Dysphagia after anterior cervical spine surgery: a prospective study using the swallowing-quality of life questionnaire and analysis of patient comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siska, Peter A; Ponnappan, Ravi K; Hohl, Justin B; Lee, Joon Y; Kang, James D; Donaldson, William F

    2011-08-01

    Prospective study of 29 patients who underwent anterior cervical (AC) or posterior lumbar (PL) spinal surgery. A validated measure of dysphagia, the Swallowing-Quality of Life (SWAL-QOL) survey, was used to assess the degree of postoperative dysphagia. To determine the degree of dysphagia preoperatively and postoperatively in patients undergoing AC surgery compared with a control group that underwent PL surgery. Dysphagia is a well-known complication of AC spine surgery and has been shown to persist for up to 24 months or longer. A total of 18 AC patients and a control group of 11 PL patients were prospectively enrolled in this study and were assessed preoperatively and at 3 weeks and 1.5 years postoperatively using a 14-item questionnaire from the SWAL-QOL survey to determine degree of dysphagia. Other patient factors and anesthesia records were examined to evaluate their relationship to dysphagia. There were no significant differences between the AC and PL groups with respect to age, sex, body mass index, or length of surgery. The SWAL-QOL scores at 3 weeks were significantly lower for the AC group than for the PL group (76 vs. 96; P = 0.001), but there were no differences between the groups preoperatively or at final follow-up. Smokers, patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and women had lower SWAL-QOL scores at one or more time point. Patients undergoing AC surgery had a significant increase in the degree of dysphagia 3 weeks after surgery compared with patients undergoing PL surgery. By final follow-up, swallowing in the AC group recovered to a level similar to preoperative and comparable to that in patients undergoing lumbar surgery at 1.5 years. Smoking, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and female sex are possible factors in the development of postoperative dysphagia.

  11. Building consensus: development of a Best Practice Guideline (BPG) for surgical site infection (SSI) prevention in high-risk pediatric spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Michael G; Riedel, Matthew D; Glotzbecker, Michael P; Matsumoto, Hiroko; Roye, David P; Akbarnia, Behrooz A; Anderson, Richard C E; Brockmeyer, Douglas L; Emans, John B; Erickson, Mark; Flynn, John M; Lenke, Lawrence G; Lewis, Stephen J; Luhmann, Scott J; McLeod, Lisa M; Newton, Peter O; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Richards, B Stephens; Shah, Suken A; Skaggs, David L; Smith, John T; Sponseller, Paul D; Sucato, Daniel J; Zeller, Reinhard D; Saiman, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Perioperative surgical site infection (SSI) after pediatric spine fusion is a recognized complication with rates between 0.5% and 1.6% in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and up to 22% in "high risk" patients. Significant variation in the approach to infection prophylaxis has been well documented. The purpose of this initiative is to develop a consensus-based "Best Practice" Guideline (BPG), informed by both the available evidence in the literature and expert opinion, for high-risk pediatric patients undergoing spine fusion. For the purpose of this effort, high risk was defined as anything other than a primary fusion in a patient with idiopathic scoliosis without significant comorbidities. The ultimate goal of this initiative is to decrease the wide variability in SSI prevention strategies in this area, ultimately leading to improved patient outcomes and reduced health care costs. An expert panel composed of 20 pediatric spine surgeons and 3 infectious disease specialists from North America, selected for their extensive experience in the field of pediatric spine surgery, was developed. Using the Delphi process and iterative rounds using a nominal group technique, participants in this panel were as follows: (1) surveyed for current practices; (2) presented with a detailed systematic review of the relevant literature; (3) given the opportunity to voice opinion collectively; and (4) asked to vote regarding preferences privately. Round 1 was conducted using an electronic survey. Initial results were compiled and discussed face-to-face. Round 2 was conducted using the Audience Response System, allowing participants to vote for (strongly support or support) or against inclusion of each intervention. Agreement >80% was considered consensus. Interventions without consensus were discussed and revised, if feasible. Repeat voting for consensus was performed. Consensus was reached to support 14 SSI prevention strategies and all participants agreed to implement the BPG in their

  12. A Levering Technique Using Small Parallel Rods for Open Reduction of High-Grade Thoracolumbar Dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadgaonkar, Shailesh; Shah, Kunal; Khurjekar, Ketan; Krishnan, Vibhu; Shyam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag

    2017-06-01

    Technical report. Dorsolumbar vertebral dislocations, with or without associated fractures, occur secondary to very high velocity trauma. The reduction procedures and techniques, which may be adopted in these situations, have been multifariously discussed in the literature. Our objective was to assess the outcome of a novel reduction maneuver, using parallel rods which we have employed in reduction of high-grade thoracolumbar fractures to achieve precise sagittal balance as well as accurate vertebral alignment with minimal soft tissue damage. The study included a total of 11 cases of thoracolumbar dislocations, who had presented to our emergency spine services following high-velocity trauma. After appropriate systemic stabilization and necessary investigations, all patients were surgically treated using the described technique. There were no surgical complications at 2-year follow-up. Radiographs showed good reduction and maintained sagittal balance. We believe that this technique is an excellent means of achieving safer, easier, and accurate reduction for restoration of sagittal/coronal balance and alignment in high-grade thoracolumbar dislocations. It is easily reproducible and predictable.

  13. Efficacy of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss in posterior lumbar spine surgery for degenerative spinal stenosis with instability: a retrospective case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endres Stefan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Degenerative spinal stenosis and instability requiring multilevel spine surgery has been associated with large blood losses. Factors that affect perioperative blood loss include time of surgery, surgical procedure, patient height, combined anterior/posterior approaches, number of levels fused, blood salvage techniques, and the use of anti-fibrinolytic medications. This study was done to evaluate the efficacy of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss in spine surgery. Methods This retrospective case control study includes 97 patients who had to undergo surgery because of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and instability. All operations included spinal decompression, interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation (4-5 segments. Forty-six patients received 1 g tranexamic acid intravenous, preoperative and six hours and twelve hours postoperative; 51 patients without tranexamic acid administration were evaluated as a control group. Based on the records, the intra- and postoperative blood losses were measured by evaluating the drainage and cell saver systems 6, 12 and 24 hours post operation. Additionally, hemoglobin concentration and platelet concentration were reviewed. Furthermore, the number of red cell transfusions given and complications associated with tranexamic acid were assessed. Results The postoperative hemoglobin concentration demonstrated a statistically significant difference with a p value of 0.0130 showing superiority for tranexamic acid use (tranexamic acid group: 11.08 g/dl, SD: 1.68; control group: 10.29 g/dl, SD: 1.39. The intraoperative cell saver volume and drainage volume after 24 h demonstrated a significant difference as well, which indicates a less blood loss in the tranexamic acid group than the control group. The postoperative drainage volume at12 hours showed no significant differences; nor did the platelet concentration Allogenic blood transfusion (two red cell units was needed for eight patients

  14. Clinical characterization of thoracolumbar and lumbar intervertebral disk extrusions in English Cocker Spaniels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardy, Thomas J A; Tzounos, Caitlin E; Volk, Holger A; De Decker, Steven

    2016-02-15

    To assess the anatomic distribution of thoracolumbar and lumbar intervertebral disk extrusions (IVDEs) in English Cocker Spaniels as compared with findings in Dachshunds and to characterize clinical findings in English Cocker Spaniels with thoracolumbar or lumbar IVDEs affecting various regions of the vertebral column. Retrospective observational study. 81 English Cocker Spaniels and 81 Dachshunds with IVDEs. Signalment, clinical signs, neurologic examination findings, and affected intervertebral disk spaces (IVDSs) were recorded for both breeds. Management methods and outcomes were recorded for English Cocker Spaniels. Lesions were categorized as thoracolumbar (IVDSs T9-10 through L1-2), midlumbar (L2-3 through L4-5), or caudal lumbar (L5-6 through L7-S1). Midlumbar and caudal lumbar IVDEs were significantly more common in English Cocker Spaniels than in Dachshunds. English Cocker Spaniels with caudal lumbar IVDEs had a longer median duration of clinical signs before evaluation and more commonly had unilateral pelvic limb lameness or spinal hyperesthesia as the predominant clinical sign than did those with IVDEs at other sites. Those with caudal lumbar IVDEs less commonly had neurologic deficits and had a higher median neurologic grade (indicating lesser severity), shorter mean postoperative hospitalization time, and faster mean time to ambulation after surgery than those with other sites affected. These variables did not differ between English Cocker Spaniels with thoracolumbar and midlumbar IVDEs. Caudal and midlumbar IVDEs were more common in English Cocker Spaniels than in Dachshunds. English Cocker Spaniels with caudal lumbar IVDE had clinical signs and posttreatment responses that differed from those in dogs with midlumbar or thoracolumbar IVDE.

  15. Spread of dye after single thoracolumbar paravertebral injection in infants. A cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albokrinov, Andrew A; Fesenko, Ulbolgan A

    2014-06-01

    Thoracolumbar paravertebral block (PVB) is one method of providing regional anaesthesia for abdominal wall surgery in children. It is common practice when performing a PVB for abdominal wall anaesthesia to inject a certain volume of local anaesthetic solution in the paravertebral space at several levels. This increases the duration of the procedure and makes it more invasive. To determine the character of dye spread in infants' paravertebral space, to check the feasibility of single injection PVB and to determine the optimal volume of injectate necessary to cover the paravertebral segments responsible for sensation of the lower abdomen. Experimental study. Single centre, University Hospital, April 2013 to August 2013. Twenty infant cadavers. Ultrasound-guided, single thoracolumbar paravertebral injections were performed on infant cadavers. The total number of paravertebral segments stained after dye injection and specific vertebral levels of cephalad and caudad spread of dye in the paravertebral space. Dye was present in the paravertebral spaces of all cadavers. Spread of dye within the paravertebral space was different depending on dye volume. Strong correlation was found between the volume of injectate and the number of paravertebral segments involved. The number of spinal nerve roots surrounded with dye corresponded with the number of paravertebral segments involved. T11, T12 and L1 nerve roots were stained in all cadavers. The optimal injectate volume to involve T10-L1 segments was defined as 0.2 to 0.3  ml  kg(-1). Single thoracolumbar paravertebral injection at T12-L1 level leads to caudad and cephalad spread of injectate in a dose-dependent manner. Single injection thoracolumbar paravertebral injections could be performed for lower abdomen anaesthesia in infants. We suggest that a single injection of 0.2 to 0.3  ml  kg(-1) of local anaesthetic in the thoracolumbar paravertebral space could provide adequate coverage of the dermatomes of the lower

  16. Operative strategy for different types of thoracolumbar stress fractures in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, WenSheng; Zheng, MinQian

    2014-12-01

    There are no accurate guidelines on the operative treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS)-related thoracolumbar stress fractures. For this reason, we categorized such bone fractures into 2 types: vertebral body type and intervertebral space type, according to the damage mechanism, cross-section spot, and iconography, and devised a targeted surgical plan based on the characteristics of each fracture type. To investigate the types and surgical treatment of thoracolumbar stress fractures in AS. Thoracolumbar stress fractures are complications of AS. The patients with AS have a higher fracture risk that is approximately 3.5 times than the healthy. As the mechanism of injury, clinical manifestations, imaging characteristics, and principles of treatment of these fractures differ from those of general spinal fractures, the surgical approach is different from that of AS kyphosis orthopedic surgery. In this study, we summarize the clinical data of 11 AS patients with thoracolumbar fractures and discuss the clinical efficacy of the surgical approach based on the mechanism of injury and radiographic features. We reviewed the data of 11 patients who underwent surgery for AS-related thoracolumbar stress fractures. Five patients with vertebral body-type fractures underwent vertebral wedge osteotomy through the pedicle and posterior internal fixation, whereas 6 patients with intervertebral space-type fractures underwent anterior spinal decompression with strut grafting and posterior internal fixation. The follow-up period was 2-4 years. After surgery, all kyphosis deformities were corrected, low back pain was relieved immediately, and scores on the visual analog scale improved by >70%. At the final follow-up, kyphosis correction had no significant loss. In the radiographic images, neither nonunion signs of pseudarthrosis plane nor neurologic or infectious complications were observed. Choosing an anterior or posterior surgical approach based on the type of AS

  17. Risks for Vascular Injury During Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: Prevalence of a Medial Loop of Vertebral Artery and Internal Carotid Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakao, Norimitsu; Takeuchi, Mikinobu; Nishimura, Manabu; Riew, K Daniel; Kamiya, Mitsuhiro; Hirasawa, Atsuhiko; Imagama, Shiro; Kawanami, Katsuhisa; Murotani, Kenta; Takayasu, Masakazu

    2016-02-01

    Observational study using a retrospective single-institute database. To investigate the prevalence of a medial loop (ML) of the vertebral artery (VA) and internal carotid artery (ICA), which might be an anatomical risk factor for arterial injury in anterior cervical surgeries. Anterior cervical spine surgeries are generally considered to be safe and effective. VA injury is one of the most serious complications during anterior procedures. Several articles have reported this complication, which might be because of the anomalous course of VA at V2 segment. The prevalence and anatomical features of those high-risk cases were, however, not investigated. Consecutive Japanese subjects, who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) or computed tomographic angiography (CTA) for reasons other than evaluation of cervical artery disease from November 2011 to October 2012 in our institution, were reviewed. Exclusion criteria included poor images, past surgery, and endovascular intervention of cervical spine and its vessels. The definition of ML was set as the course of VA and ICA extended medially inside the uncovertebral joint. We also investigated whether those anomalous courses were detectable by plain CT. A total of 1251 subjects with age ranging from 14 to 93 years with a mean of 56.1 years were surveyed. Among them, 1054 subjects were eligible and the others were excluded. A total of 421 subjects were male, and 633 were female. There were 10 cases (1%) with an ML of the VA, and 2 (0.2%) cases with a medial loop of internal carotid artery. Five of the 10 cases with a medial loop of vertebral artery were aberrant into the vertebral body, which were detectable by plain CT. Importantly, the other five cases could not be seen on the CT. One percent of all subjects showed higher anatomical risk for VA and ICA injury during anterior surgery, half of which were undetectable by plain CT. Preoperative evaluation for vascular anatomy may be necessary for safer surgical

  18. [TREATMENT OF POST-SPONDYLODESIS, ADJACENT-SEGMENT DISEASE WITH MINIMALLY INVASIVE, ANTEROLATERAL SURGERY ON THE LUMBAR SPINE: IS THERE IS NO NEED FOR DORSAL OPERATION?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarcz, Attila; Szakály, Péter; Büki, András; Dóczi, Tamás

    2015-07-30

    Adjacent segment disease (ASD) occurs with a probability of 30% in the lumbar spine following spinal fusion surgery. Usually advanced degenerative changes happen cranially to the fused lumbar segment. Thus, secondary spinal instability, stenosis, spodylolisthesis, foraminal stenosis can lead to the recurrence of the pain not always amenable to conservative measures. A typical surgical solution to treat ASD consists of posterior revision surgery including decompression, change or extension of the instrumentation and fusion to the rostral level. It results in a larger operation with considerable risk of complications. We present a typical case of ASD treated surgically with a new minimally invasive method not yet performed in Hungary. We use anterolateral abdominal muscle splitting approach to reach the lumbar spine through the retroperitoneum. A discectomy is performed by retracting the psoas muscle dorsally. The intervertebral bony fusion is achieved by implanting a cage with large volume that is stuffed with autologous bone or tricalcium phosphate. A cage with large volume results in excellent annulus fibrosus tension, immediate stability and provides large surface for bony fusion. A stand-alone cage construct can be supplemented with lateral screw/rod/plate fixation. The advantage of the new technique for the treatment of ASD includes minimal blood loss, short operation time, significantly less postoperative pain and much lower complication rate.

  19. The role of C2-C7 and O-C2 angle in the development of dysphagia after cervical spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wei; Yu, Jie

    2013-06-01

    Dysphagia is a known complication of cervical surgery and may be prolonged or occasionally serious. A previous study showed that dysphagia after occipitocervical fusion was caused by oropharyngeal stenosis resulting from O-C2 (upper cervical lordosis) fixation in a flexed position. However, there have been few reports analyzing the association between the C2-C7 angle (middle-lower cervical lordosis) and postoperative dysphagia. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between cervical lordosis and the development of dysphagia after anterior and posterior cervical spine surgery (AC and PC). Three hundred fifty-four patients were reviewed in this retrospective clinical study, including 172 patients who underwent the AC procedure and 182 patients who had the PC procedure between June 2007 and May 2010. The presence and duration of postoperative dysphagia were recorded via face-to-face questioning or telephone interview performed at least 1 year after the procedure. Plain cervical radiographs before and after surgery were collected. The O-C2 angle and the C2-C7 angle were measured. Changes in the O-C2 angle and the C2-C7 angle were defined as dO-C2 angle = postoperative O-C2 angle - preoperative O-C2 angle and dC2-C7 angle = postoperative C2-C7 angle - preoperative C2-C7 angle. The association between postoperative dysphagia with dO-C2 angle and dC2-C7 angle was studied. Results showed that 12.8 % of AC and 9.4 % of PC patients reported dysphagia after cervical surgery. The dC2-C7 angle has considerable impact on postoperative dysphagia. When the dC2-C7 angle is greater than 5°, the chance of developing postoperative dysphagia is significantly greater. The dO-C2 angle, age, gender, BMI, operative time, blood loss, procedure type, revision surgery, most cephalic operative level, and number of operative levels did not significantly influence the incidence of postoperative dysphagia. No relationship was found between the dC2-C7 angle and the degree of

  20. Validity of the three-column theory of thoracolumbar fractures. A biomechanic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjabi, M M; Oxland, T R; Kifune, M; Arand, M; Wen, L; Chen, A

    1995-05-15

    This study validated the three-column theory of fractures by correlating the multidirectional instabilities and the vertebral injuries to each of the three columns, using a biomechanic trauma model. The objective was to validate the three-column theory as applied to the thoracolumbar fractures. The widely used three-column theory of fractures for classification and evaluation was based on retrospective analysis of radiographs. No biomechanic study, using realistic spinal fractures and multidirectional instability measurements, was available. Using 16 fresh cadaveric thoracolumbar human spine specimens, two groups of burst fractures were produced by either simple axial compression or flexion-compression, using a high-speed trauma model. Multidirectional flexibility was measured before and after the trauma, thus quantifying the instability of the burst fracture. Computed tomography scans were taken after the fracture, and a newly developed injury scoring scheme quantified the injuries to the anterior, middle, and posterior columns. Statistical correlations were obtained between the flexibility parameters and injuries to each of the three columns. In the axial compression group, the middle column injury, compared with the other two columns, showed the highest correlations to eight of the nine flexibility parameters (average R2 = 0.77). In the flexion-compression group, again the middle column injury showed the highest correlations to eight of the nine flexibility parameters (average R2 = 0.85). The results of this study supported the three-column theory of the thoracolumbar fractures and bolstered the concept of the middle column being the primary determinant of mechanical stability of this region of the spine.

  1. Role of allografts in spinal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz Nather

    1999-01-01

    With development of more tissue banks in the region and internationally, allografts are increasingly being used in orthopaedic surgery including spinal surgery. Two groups of patients will particularly benefit from the use of allografts. The first group is young children in whom iliac crest is cartilaginous and cannot provide sufficient quantity of autografts. The second is the elderly where bones from iliac crest are porotic and fatty. Allografts are used to fulfill two distinct functions in Spinal Surgery. One is to act as a buttress for anterior spinal surgery using cortical allografts. The other is to enhance fusion for posterior spinal surgery. Up to December 1997, 71 transplantations have been performed using allografts from NUH Tissue Bank. Anterior Spinal Surgery has been performed in 15 cases. The indications are mainly Trauma-Burst Fractures and Spinal Secondaries to the Spine. All cases are in thoracic and thoracolumbar region. Allografts used are deep frozen and freeze-dried cortical allografts. Femur is used for thoraco-lumbar region and humerus for upper thoracic region. Instrumentation used ranged from anterior devices (Canada, DCP, Synergy etc) to posterior devices (ISOLA). Deep frozen allografts and more recently freeze-dried allografts are preferred especially for osteoporotic spines. Cortical allografts are packed with autografts from ribs in the medullary canal. Allograft-autograft composites are always used to ensure better incorporation. Postero-lateral fusion has been performed for 56 cases. The indications include congenital and idiopathic scoliosis, degenerative stenosis, degenerative spondylolisthesis, spondylolytic spondylolisthesis, fracture-dislocation, osteoporotic burst fracture, spinal secondaries with cord compression and traumatic spondylolisthesis. Deep frozen bone allografts are used in combination with patient's own autografts from spinous processes to provide a 50% mix. Instrumentation used include Hartshill, Steffee, Isola

  2. WE-AB-BRA-07: Operating Room Quality Assurance (ORQA) for Spine Surgery Using Known-Component 3D-2D Image Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uneri, A; De Silva, T; Goerres, J; Jacobson, M; Ketcha, M; Reaungamornrat, S; Siewerdsen, J; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Khanna, A; Wolinsky, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative x-ray radiography/fluoroscopy is commonly used to qualitatively assess delivery of surgical devices (e.g., spine pedicle screws) but can fail to reliably detect suboptimal placement (e.g., breach of adjacent critical structures). We present a method wherein prior knowledge of the patient and surgical components is leveraged to match preoperative CT and intraoperative radiographs for quantitative assessment of 3D pose. The method presents a new means of operating room quantitative quality assurance (ORQA) that could improve quality and safety, and reduce the frequency of revision surgeries. Methods: The algorithm (known-component registration, KC-Reg) uses patient-specific preoperative CT and parametrically defined surgical component models within a robust 3D-2D registration method to iteratively optimize gradient similarity using the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy. Advances from previous work address key challenges to clinical translation: i) absolving the need for offline geometric calibration of the C-arm; and ii) solving multiple component bodies simultaneously, thereby allowing QA in a single step (e.g., spinal construct with 4–20 screws), rather than sequential QA of each component. Performance was tested in a spine phantom with 10 pedicle screws, and first results from clinical studies are reported. Results: Phantom experiments demonstrated median target registration error (TRE) of (1.0±0.3) mm at the screw tip and (0.7°±0.4°) in angulation. The simultaneous multi-body registration approach improved TRE from the previous (sequential) method by 42%, reduced outliers, and fits into the natural workflow. Initial application of KC-Reg in clinical data shows TRE of (2.5±4.5) mm and (4.7°±0.5°). Conclusion: The KC-Reg algorithm offers a potentially valuable method for quantitative QA of the surgical product, using radiographic systems that are already within the surgical arsenal. For spine surgery, the method

  3. WE-AB-BRA-07: Operating Room Quality Assurance (ORQA) for Spine Surgery Using Known-Component 3D-2D Image Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uneri, A; De Silva, T; Goerres, J; Jacobson, M; Ketcha, M; Reaungamornrat, S; Siewerdsen, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kleinszig, G [Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Bayern (Germany); Vogt, S [Siemens Healthcare, Malvern, PA (United States); Khanna, A [Johns Hopkins Health Care and Surgery Center, Bethesda, MD (United States); Wolinsky, J [The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Intraoperative x-ray radiography/fluoroscopy is commonly used to qualitatively assess delivery of surgical devices (e.g., spine pedicle screws) but can fail to reliably detect suboptimal placement (e.g., breach of adjacent critical structures). We present a method wherein prior knowledge of the patient and surgical components is leveraged to match preoperative CT and intraoperative radiographs for quantitative assessment of 3D pose. The method presents a new means of operating room quantitative quality assurance (ORQA) that could improve quality and safety, and reduce the frequency of revision surgeries. Methods: The algorithm (known-component registration, KC-Reg) uses patient-specific preoperative CT and parametrically defined surgical component models within a robust 3D-2D registration method to iteratively optimize gradient similarity using the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy. Advances from previous work address key challenges to clinical translation: i) absolving the need for offline geometric calibration of the C-arm; and ii) solving multiple component bodies simultaneously, thereby allowing QA in a single step (e.g., spinal construct with 4–20 screws), rather than sequential QA of each component. Performance was tested in a spine phantom with 10 pedicle screws, and first results from clinical studies are reported. Results: Phantom experiments demonstrated median target registration error (TRE) of (1.0±0.3) mm at the screw tip and (0.7°±0.4°) in angulation. The simultaneous multi-body registration approach improved TRE from the previous (sequential) method by 42%, reduced outliers, and fits into the natural workflow. Initial application of KC-Reg in clinical data shows TRE of (2.5±4.5) mm and (4.7°±0.5°). Conclusion: The KC-Reg algorithm offers a potentially valuable method for quantitative QA of the surgical product, using radiographic systems that are already within the surgical arsenal. For spine surgery, the method

  4. Minimum clinically important difference in lumbar spine surgery patients: a choice of methods using the Oswestry Disability Index, Medical Outcomes Study questionnaire Short Form 36, and pain scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copay, Anne G; Glassman, Steven D; Subach, Brian R; Berven, Sigurd; Schuler, Thomas C; Carreon, Leah Y

    2008-01-01

    The impact of lumbar spinal surgery is commonly evaluated with three patient-reported outcome measures: Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), the physical component summary (PCS) of the Short Form of the Medical Outcomes Study (SF-36), and pain scales. A minimum clinically important difference (MCID) is a threshold used to measure the effect of clinical treatments. Variable threshold values have been proposed as MCID for those instruments despite a lack of agreement on the optimal MCID calculation method. This study has three purposes. First, to illustrate the range of values obtained by common anchor-based and distribution-based methods to calculate MCID. Second, to determine a statistically sound and clinically meaningful MCID for ODI, PCS, back pain scale, and leg pain scale in lumbar spine surgery patients. Third, to compare the discriminative ability of two anchors: a global health assessment and a rating of satisfaction with the results of the surgery. This study is a review of prospectively collected patient-reported outcomes data. A total of 454 patients from a large database of surgeries performed by the Lumbar Spine Study Group with a 1-year follow-up on either ODI or PCS were included in the study. Preoperative and 1-year postoperative scores for ODI, PCS, back pain scale, leg pain scale, health transition item (HTI) of the SF-36, and Satisfaction with Results scales. ODI, SF-36, and pain scales were administered before and 1 year after spinal surgery. Several candidate MCID calculation methods were applied to the data and the resulting values were compared. The HTI of the SF-36 was used as the anchor and compared with a second anchor (Satisfaction with Results scale). Potential MCID calculations yielded a range of values: fivefold for ODI, PCS, and leg pain, 10-fold for back pain. Threshold values obtained with the two anchors were very similar. The minimum detectable change (MDC) appears as a statistically and clinically appropriate MCID value. MCID values

  5. Temporary Percutaneous Instrumentation and Selective Anterior Fusion for Thoracolumbar Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Yann Philippe; Walter, Axel; Schuller, Sébastien; Steib, Jean-Paul

    2017-05-01

    Prospective clinical trial in thoracolumbar trauma with 5-year follow-up. To analyze clinical and radiographic outcomes of minimal invasive surgery, and the rational of circumferential fracture treatment with regard to age, degenerative changes, bone mineral density, and global sagittal balance. Non-neurologic fractures with anterior column defect can be treated by posterior percutaneous instrumentation and selective anterior fusion. After consolidation, instrumentation can be removed at 1 year to provide mobility in non-fused segments. Fifty-one patients, 47 (18-75) years, were operated for A2, A3, or B-type fractures. Visual analog scale (VAS) for back pain and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were assessed. Radiographic measurements were: sagittal index, regional kyphosis, T4-T12 kyphosis, L1-S1 lordosis, pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, sacral slope, and T9 tilt. Anterior fusion and facet joints were analyzed on computed tomography (CT) at 1 year. The ODI was 8.8 before accident, 35.4 at 3 months, 17.8 at 2 years, 14.4 at 5 years. The VAS was 2.0 at 3 months and 1.0 at 5 years. The sagittal index was 18.0° preoperatively and 1.0° at 3 months (P fractured vertebra fused regularly. Spontaneous facet joint fusions were observed in two patients at the fracture level in B-type injuries. Percutaneous instrumentation and selective anterior fusion using autologous bone and mesh cages lead to high fusion rates, which provided good long-term clinical results in younger patients with thoracolumbar fractures. Sagittal alignment was maintained after instrumentation removal without damaging paravertebral muscles. Outcomes were worse in elderly patients presenting osteopenia or osteoporosis. 3.

  6. CT in diagnosis of thoracolumbar region diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, I.; Karadjova, M.

    2003-01-01

    The lumbalgia caused by affected thoracolumbar transition (Th 11 -L 2 ) imitates the clinical symptomatic of disc lesions in the lower lumbar segments. The syndrome is presented by a pain projected in the area of the three branchings of the spinal nerves, coming from thoracolumbar segments. The aim of this study is to determine the pathological processes, causing the clinical symptoms of this syndrome, using computer tomography. 51 patients are studied with clinically proved thoracolumbar transition syndrome: 14 men and 37 women. CT slices of 96 vertebral segments are made. Two patient are scanned at Th 11 -Th 12 and L 1 -L 2 . Only Th 12 -L 1 scans are made on 10 patients and 42 are made on two neighbouring segments (41 of them on Th 11 -Th 12 and Th 12 -L 1 and one on Th 11 -L 1 and L 1 -L 2 ). An asymmetry (facet tropism) has been found at 59 levels, 21 if them are with spondiloarthrosis. Spondiloarthrosis has been found in 24 segments - 21 of them with osteochondrosis, one with disc prolapse, and 2 with disc protrusion. It is also found osteoporotic changes osteolysis in multiple myeloma, metastasis etc. During the 3 level examination no evidence for either of the mentioned changes is obtained. The CT slices of two neighbouring segments showed an unexpected change from thoracic to lumbar type of the intervertebral joints in 34 patients. The results from this study support the hypothesis about joints origin of the clinical symptoms of the thoracolumbar transition and demonstrate the importance of the computer tomography as a diagnostic method in this disease

  7. Thoracolumbar intradural disc herniation in eight dogs: clinical, low-field magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomographic myelography findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Shinji; Doi, Shoko; Tamura, Yumiko; Takahashi, Kuniaki; Enomoto, Hirokazu; Ozawa, Tsuyoshi; Uchida, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Intradural disc herniation is a rarely reported cause of neurologic deficits in dogs and few published studies have described comparative imaging characteristics. The purpose of this retrospective cross sectional study was to describe clinical and imaging findings in a group of dogs with confirmed thoracolumbar intradural disc herniation. Included dogs were referred to one of four clinics, had acute mono/paraparesis or paraplegia, had low field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or computed tomographic myelography, and were diagnosed with thoracolumbar intradural disc herniation during surgery. Eight dogs met inclusion criteria. The prevalence of thoracolumbar intradural disc herniation amongst the total population of dogs that developed a thoracolumbar intervertebral disc herniation and that were treated with a surgical procedure was 0.5%. Five dogs were examined using low-field MRI. Lesions that were suspected to be intervertebral disc herniations were observed; however, there were no specific findings indicating that the nucleus pulposus had penetrated into the subarachnoid space or into the spinal cord parenchyma. Thus, the dogs were misdiagnosed as having a conventional intervertebral disc herniation. An intradural extramedullary disc herniation (three cases) or intramedullary disc herniation (two cases) was confirmed during surgery. By using computed tomographic myelography (CTM) for the remaining three dogs, an intradural extramedullary mass surrounded by an accumulation of contrast medium was observed and confirmed during surgery. Findings from this small sample of eight dogs indicated that CTM may be more sensitive for diagnosing canine thoracolumbar intradural disc herniation than low-field MRI. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  8. Open versus percutaneous instrumentation in thoracolumbar fractures: magnetic resonance imaging comparison of paravertebral muscles after implant removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntilikina, Yves; Bahlau, David; Garnon, Julien; Schuller, Sébastien; Walter, Axel; Schaeffer, Mickaël; Steib, Jean-Paul; Charles, Yann Philippe

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Percutaneous instrumentation in thoracolumbar fractures is intended to decrease paravertebral muscle damage by avoiding dissection. The aim of this study was to compare muscles at instrumented levels in patients who were treated by open or percutaneous surgery. METHODS Twenty-seven patients underwent open instrumentation, and 65 were treated percutaneously. A standardized MRI protocol using axial T1-weighted sequences was performed at a minimum 1-year follow-up after implant removal. Two independent observers measured cross-sectional areas (CSAs, in cm 2 ) and region of interest (ROI) signal intensity (in pixels) of paravertebral muscles by using OsiriX at the fracture level, and at cranial and caudal instrumented pedicle levels. An interobserver comparison was made using the Bland-Altman method. Reference ROI muscle was assessed in the psoas and ROI fat subcutaneously. The ratio ROI-CSA/ROI-fat was compared for patients treated with open versus percutaneous procedures by using a linear mixed model. A linear regression analyzed additional factors: age, sex, body mass index (BMI), Pfirrmann grade of adjacent discs, and duration of instrumentation in situ. RESULTS The interobserver agreement was good for all CSAs. The average CSA for the entire spine was 15.7 cm 2 in the open surgery group and 18.5 cm 2 in the percutaneous group (p = 0.0234). The average ROI-fat and ROI-muscle signal intensities were comparable: 497.1 versus 483.9 pixels for ROI-fat and 120.4 versus 111.7 pixels for ROI-muscle in open versus percutaneous groups. The ROI-CSA varied between 154 and 226 for open, and between 154 and 195 for percutaneous procedures, depending on instrumented levels. A significant difference of the ROI-CSA/ROI-fat ratio (0.4 vs 0.3) was present at fracture levels T12-L1 (p = 0.0329) and at adjacent cranial (p = 0.0139) and caudal (p = 0.0100) instrumented levels. Differences were not significant at thoracic levels. When adjusting based on age, BMI, and Pfirrmann

  9. Thoracic spine CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. CT Scans Read more Spinal Cord Injuries Read more Spine ...

  10. Evaluating the correlation and responsiveness of patient-reported pain with function and quality-of-life outcomes after spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVine, John; Norvell, Daniel C; Ecker, Erika; Fourney, Daryl R; Vaccaro, Alex; Wang, Jeff; Andersson, Gunnar

    2011-10-01

    Systematic review. To determine the correlation of patient-reported pain with physical function and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) after spine surgery and to determine the responsiveness of pain, physical function, and HRQoL after spine surgery. Several validated outcome instruments are available to assess the success of treatment for chronic low back pain. These patient-centered tools include measurements for pain based on numeric scales, validated condition-specific functional outcomes measures, and HRQoL outcomes measures. It is unclear whether these three types of patient-reported outcomes are measuring different constructs and whether all three should be measured after spine surgery. In addition, it is unclear which of these outcomes measures is most sensitive to change after spine surgery for low back pain. A systematic search was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Collaboration Library for literature published through December 2010. The correlation between pain (visual analog scale, VAS), physical function (Oswestry Disability Index, ODI), and HRQoL (36-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF-36] and European Quality of Life [EQ-5D]) change scores was performed using the Spearman rank correlation coefficients. To compare the responsiveness of pain, function, and HRQoL scores after spine surgery, we calculated effect sizes by dividing change scores by the SD of the baseline scores. This standardized method allowed us to compare the responsiveness of each outcome measure directly and reported an effect size of 0.2 to 0.3 as a "small" effect, around 0.5 a "medium" effect and 0.8 to infinity, a "large" effect. To determine whether the differences in effect sizes measuring responsiveness were significantly different, we conducted a Wilcoxon signed-rank test between each of the three measurements of pain, function, and HRQoL scores when there was enough data to perform the test. None of the correlations exceeded 0.70 using the Spearman rank

  11. Neurologic improvement after thoracic, thoracolumbar, and lumbar spinal cord (conus medullaris) injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, James S; Naroji, Swetha; Maltenfort, Mitchell Gil; Ratliff, John K; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula I; Frank, Brian; Anderson, D Greg; Albert, Todd; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2011-01-01

    Retrospective. With approximately 10,000 new spinal cord injury (SCI) patients in the United States each year, predicting public health outcomes is an important public health concern. Combining all regions of the spine in SCI trials may be misleading if the lumbar and sacral regions (conus) have a neurologic improvement at different rates than the thoracic or thoracolumbar spinal cord. Over a 10-year period between January 1995 to 2005, 1746 consecutive spinal injured patients were seen, evaluated, and treated through a level 1 trauma referral center. A retrospective analysis was performed on 150 patients meeting the criteria of T4 to S5 injury, excluding gunshot wounds. One-year follow-up data were available on 95 of these patients. Contingency table analyses (chi-squared statistics) and multivariate logistic regression. Variables of interest included level of injury, initial American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA), age, race, and etiology. A total of 92.9% of lumbar (conus) patients neurologically improved one ASIA level or more compared with 22.4% of thoracic or thoracolumbar spinal cord-injured patients. Only 7.7% of ASIA A patients showed neurologic improvement, compared with 95.2% of ASIA D patients; ASIA B patients demonstrated a 66.7% improvement rate, whereas ASIA C had a 84.6% improvement rate. When the two effects were considered jointly in a multivariate analysis, ASIA A and thoracic/thoracolumbar patients had only a 4.1% rate of improvement, compared with 96% for lumbar (conus) and incomplete patients (ASIA B-D) and 66.7% to 72.2% for the rest of the patients. All of these relationships were significant to P spinal cord have a greater neurologic improvement rate, which might be related to a greater proportion of lower motor neurons. Thus, defining the exact region of injury and potential for neurologic improvement should be considered in future clinical trial design. Combining all anatomic regions of the spine in SCI trials may be misleading if

  12. Cortical somatosensory-evoked potentials during spine surgery in patients with neuromuscular and idiopathic scoliosis under propofol-remifentanil anaesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanns, H.; Lipfert, P.; Meier, S.; Jetzek-Zader, M.; Krauspe, R.; Stevens, M. F.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intraoperative monitoring of the spinal cord via cortical somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEP) is a routine during spinal surgery. However, especially in neuromuscular scoliosis, the reliability of cortical SSEP has been questioned. Therefore, we compared the feasibility of cortical

  13. An observational study on the outcome after surgery for lumbar disc herniation in adolescents compared with adults based on the Swedish Spine Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerbäck, Tobias; Elkan, Peter; Möller, Hans; Grauers, Anna; Diarbakerli, Elias; Gerdhem, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Disc-related sciatica has a prevalence of about 2% in adults, but is rare in adolescents. If conservative treatment is unsuccessful, surgery is an option. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of surgery for lumbar disc herniation in adolescents with adults in the Swedish Spine Register. This is a prospective observational study: National Quality Register. This study included 151 patients, 18 years or younger, 4,386 patients, 19-39 years, and 6,078 patients, 40 years or older, followed for 1-2 years after surgery. The primary outcomes were patient satisfaction and global assessment of leg and back pain. Secondary outcomes were Visual Analog Scale (VAS) leg pain, VAS back pain, Oswestry disability index (ODI), and EuroQol-5 dimensions (EQ-5D). Statistical analyses were performed with the Welch F test, the chi-square test, and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. At follow-up, 86% of the adolescents were satisfied compared with 78% in the younger adults and 76% in the older adults group (p<.001). According to the global assessment, significantly decreased leg pain was experienced by 87% of the adolescents, 78% of the younger adults, and 71% of the older adults (p<.001). Corresponding figures for back pain were 88%, 73%, and 70%, respectively (p<.001). All groups experienced significant postoperative improvement of VAS leg pain, VAS back pain, ODI, and EQ-5D (all p<.001). The adolescent age group was more satisfied with the treatment than the adult groups. There was a significant improvement in all age groups after surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The 100 most cited spine articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Michael R; Wang, Tianyi; Schroeder, Gregory D; Hsu, Wellington K

    2012-10-01

    Spine-related research has evolved dramatically during the last century. Significant contributions have been made by thousands of authors. A citation rank list has historically been used within a particular field to measure the importance of an article. The purpose of this article is to report on the 100 most cited articles in the field of spine. Science Citation Index Expanded was searched for citations in 27 different journals (as of 30 November 2010) chosen based on the relevance for all cited spine publications. The top 100 most cited articles were identified. Important information such as journal, date, country of origin, author, subspecialty, and level of evidence (for clinical research) were compiled. The top 100 publications ranged from 1,695 to 240 citations. Fifty-three articles were of the lumbar, 17 were of the thoracolumbar, and 15 of the cervical spine. Eighty-one of the articles were clinical and 19 were basic science in nature. Level of evidence varied for the clinical papers, however, was most commonly level IV (34 of 81 articles). Notably, the 1990-1999 decade was the most productive period with 43 of the top 100 articles published during this time. Identification of the most cited articles within the field of spine recognizes some of the most important contributions in the peer-reviewed literature. Current investigators may utilize the aspects of their work to guide and direct future spine-related research.

  15. High-frequency stimulation restored motor-evoked potentials to the baseline level in the upper extremities but not in the lower extremities under sevoflurane anesthesia in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shida, Yoshiteru; Shida, Chikami; Hiratsuka, Norihiko; Kaji, Kozo; Ogata, Junichi

    2012-04-01

    Volatile anesthetics attenuate medium-frequency (250 to 500 Hz) pulse train transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) better than propofol. High-frequency (1000 Hz) TES may restore hand MEP amplitude under volatile anesthesia, but its effect on leg MEPs critical for spine surgery monitoring is unknown. The effects of sevoflurane and propofol and modulation of the stimulation frequencies on MEPs elicited by TES in the anterior tibial, abductor hallucis, and abductor pollicic brevis muscles were investigated in 31 patients undergoing spine surgery. MEPs elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation were also obtained before the surgeries and compared with the TES MEPs. Sevoflurane attenuated the MEP amplitudes significantly. The MEP amplitudes increased with the TES frequency in the case of the arms, but not the legs, under sevoflurane anesthesia. The MEPs recorded under propofol anesthesia did not differ from those elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation before the surgery (control). Sevoflurane is inadvisable for MEP monitoring in the legs during spine surgery as modulation of the TES frequency did not eliminate the suppressive effect of sevoflurane on the MEPs in the legs. Clinicians should be forewarned of the greater risk of unmonitorable MEPs, especially in the legs, under sevoflurane anesthesia.

  16. Metastatic tumor of thoracic and lumbar spine: prospective study comparing the surgery and radiotherapy vs external immobilization with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Ioppi, Ana Elisa Empinotti; Grasselli, Juliana

    2007-01-01

    Bone metastases at the thoracic and lumbar segment of the spine are usually presented with painful sensation and medullar compression. The treatment is based on the clinical and neurological conditions of the patient and the degree of tumor invasion. In the present study, 32 patients with spinal metastasis of thoracic and lumbar segment were prospectively analyzed. These patients were treated by decompression and internal stabilization followed by radiotherapy or irradiation with external immobilization. The election of the groups was in accordance with the tumor radiotherapy sensitivity, clinical conditions, spinal stability, medullar or nerve compression and patient's decision. The Frankel scale and pain visual test were applied at the moment of diagnosis and after 1 and 6 months. The surgical group had better results with preserving the ambulation longer and significant reduction of pain.(author)

  17. Comparison of thoracolumbar motion produced by manual and Jackson-table-turning methods. Study of a cadaveric instability model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, Christian P; DiPaola, Matthew J; Conrad, Bryan P; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Del Rossi, Gianluca; Sawers, Andrew; Rechtine, Glenn R

    2008-08-01

    Patients who have sustained a spinal cord injury remain at risk for further neurologic deterioration until the spine is adequately stabilized. To our knowledge, no study has previously addressed the effects of different bed-to-operating room table transfer techniques on thoracolumbar spinal motion in an instability model. We hypothesized that the conventional logroll technique used to transfer patients from a supine position to a prone position on the operating room table has the potential to confer significantly more motion to the unstable thoracolumbar spine than the Jackson technique. Three-column instability was surgically created at the L1 level in seven cadavers. Two protocols were tested. The manual technique entailed performing a standard logroll of a supine cadaver to a prone position on an operating room Jackson table. The Jackson technique involved sliding the supine cadaver to the Jackson table, securing it to the table, and then rotating it into a prone position. An electromagnetic tracking device measured motion--i.e., angular motion (flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation) and linear translation (axial, medial-lateral, and anterior-posterior) between T12 and L2. The logroll technique created significantly more motion than the Jackson technique as measured with all six parameters. Manual logroll transfers produced an average of 13.8 degrees to 18.1 degrees of maximum angular displacement and 16.6 to 28.3 mm of maximum linear translation. The Jackson technique resulted in an average of 3.1 degrees to 5.8 degrees of maximum angular displacement (p patient safety. Performing the Jackson turn requires approximately half as many people as required for a manual logroll. This study suggests that the Jackson technique should be considered for supine-to-prone transfer of patients with known or suspected instability of the thoracolumbar spine.

  18. Effectiveness of surgery for lumbar stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis in the octogenarian population: analysis of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihn, Jeffrey A; Hilibrand, Alan S; Zhao, Wenyan; Lurie, Jon D; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Albert, Todd J; Weinstein, James

    2015-02-04

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether surgery is an effective option for the treatment of stenosis of the lumbar spine and degenerative spondylolisthesis in the octogenarian population. An as-treated analysis of patients with lumbar stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis enrolled in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) was performed. Patients who were at least eighty years of age (n = 105) were compared with those younger than eighty years (n = 1130). Baseline patient and clinical characteristics were noted, and the difference in improvement from baseline between operative and nonoperative treatment was determined for each group at each follow-up time period up to four years. There were no significant baseline differences in the primary or secondary patient-reported clinical outcome measures between the two patient age groups. Patients at least eighty years of age had higher prevalences of multilevel stenosis, severe stenosis, and asymmetric motor weakness. Patients at least eighty years of age also had higher prevalences of hypertension, heart disease, osteoporosis, and joint problems at baseline, but they had a lower body mass index and lower prevalences of depression and smoking. Fifty-eight of the 105 patients at least eighty years of age and 749 of the 1130 younger patients underwent operative management. There were no differences in the rates of intraoperative or postoperative complications, reoperation, or postoperative mortality between the older and younger groups. Averaged over a four-year follow-up period, operatively treated patients at least eighty years of age had significantly greater improvement in all primary and secondary outcome measures compared with nonoperatively treated patients. The treatment effects in patients at least eighty years of age were similar to those in younger patients for all primary and secondary measures except the SF-36 (Short Form-36) bodily pain domain and the percentage who self-rated their

  19. 3D–2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, T; Uneri, A; Ketcha, M D; Reaungamornrat, S; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Aygun, N; Lo, S-F; Wolinsky, J-P; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-01-01

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D–2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D–2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE > 30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE 14%; however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE = 5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved runtime (29.3 s). The GO metric improved the registration accuracy and robustness in the presence of strong image content mismatch. This capability could offer valuable assistance and decision support in spine level localization in a manner consistent with clinical workflow. PMID:26992245

  20. A High Preoperative Pain and Symptom Profile Predicts Worse Pain Outcomes for Children After Spine Fusion Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voepel-Lewis, Terri; Caird, Michelle S; Tait, Alan R; Malviya, Shobha; Farley, Frances A; Li, Ying; Abbott, Matthew D; van Veen, Tara; Hassett, Afton L; Clauw, Daniel J

    2017-05-01

    Preoperative pain predicts persistent pain after spine fusion, yet little is understood about the nature of that pain, related symptoms, and how these symptoms relate to postoperative pain outcomes. This prospective study examined children's baseline pain and symptom profiles and the association between a high symptom profile and postoperative outcomes. Seventy children (aged 10-17 years) scheduled for correction of idiopathic scoliosis completed pain and symptom surveys during their preoperative visit (ie, pain intensity [0-10 numeric rating scores], a pediatric version of the 2011 fibromyalgia survey criteria [including pain locations and symptom severity scale], neuropathic pain symptoms [painDETECT], and Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement System measures of fatigue, depression, function, pain interference, and pain catastrophizing). Pain intensity and total analgesic use were recorded daily postoperatively and for 2 weeks after discharge. A 2-step cluster analysis differentiated a high and low pain and symptom profile at baseline, and a multivariate main effects regression model examined the association between pain profile and posthospital discharge pain and analgesic outcomes. The cluster analysis differentiated 2 groups of children well characterized by their baseline symptom reporting. Thirty percent (95% confidence interval [CI], 20.2%-41.8%) had a high symptom profile with higher depression, fatigue, pain interference, a pediatric version of the fibromyalgia survey criteria symptoms, neuropathic pain, and catastrophizing. Girls were more likely than boys to be clustered in the high symptom profile (odds ratio [OR], 5.76 [95% CI, 1.20-27.58]; P = .022) as were those with preoperative pain lasting >3 months (OR, 3.42 [95% CI, 1.21-9.70]; P = .018). Adjusting for sex, age, and total in-hospital opioid consumption, high cluster membership was independently associated with higher self-reported pain after discharge (mean difference +1.13 point [97.5% CI, 0

  1. Early recurrence of thoracolumbar intervertebral disc extrusion after surgical decompression: a report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jäderlund Karin H

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thoracolumbar disc extrusions were diagnosed in three chondrodystrophic dogs with paraparesis of up to three days duration. All cases were managed by hemilaminectomy and removal of extruded disc material. In one dog, fenestration of the herniated disc space was also performed. Initially neurological function improved or was unchanged, but from two to ten days postoperatively clinical signs of deterioration became apparent. In all the dogs, recurrence of disc extrusion at the same location as the initial extrusion was diagnosed by computer tomography and at a second surgery abundant disc material was found at the hemilaminectomy site between the dura and an implanted graft of autogenous fat.

  2. Postoperative analgesia after major spine surgery: patient-controlled epidural analgesia versus patient-controlled intravenous analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Michael R; Putzier, Michael; Kügler, Bjoern; Tohtz, Stephan; Voigt, Kristina; Schink, Tania; Kox, Wolfgang J; Spies, Claudia; Volk, Thomas

    2006-11-01

    Spinal fusion surgery causes severe postoperative pain, hampering reconvalescense. We investigated the efficacy of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) in a prospective, double-blind, randomized, controlled comparison with patient-controlled IV analgesia (PCIA). After lumbar anterior-posterior fusion receiving an epidural catheter intraoperatively, 72 patients were given either PCEA (ropivacaine 0.125% and sufentanil 1.0 microg/mL at 14 mL/h; bolus: 5 mL; lockout time: 15 min) and IV placebo or PCIA (morphine 2.0 mg/mL; bolus: 3 mg; lockout time: 15 min) and epidural placebo. Pain levels (visual analog scale 0-10), functional capabilities (turning in bed, standing, and walking), analgesic consumption, and side effects were evaluated until 72 h after surgery. Fourteen patients were excluded by predetermined criteria, leaving 58 patients for data analysis. Pain levels at rest and during mobilization were significantly lower in the PCEA when compared with that in the PCIA group throughout the study period (P turn in bed was achieved earlier in the PCEA group (P Patients in the PCEA group were significantly more satisfied with pain therapy (P patient satisfaction when compared with PCIA after spinal fusion surgery.

  3. [Biomechanical effect on adjacent vertebra after percutaneous kyphoplasty with cement leakage into disc: a finite element analysis of thoracolumbar osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Qi; Li, Qiu-Jun; Li, Dong; Yang, Yong; Tang, Hai; Li, Jin-Jun; Wang, Bing-Qiang; Wang, Yi-Peng

    2011-01-04

    To explore the biomechanical effects on adjacent vertebra of thoracolumbar osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (OVCF) after percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP) with cement leakage into the disc by using finite element analysis. T10-L2 segment data were obtained from computed tomography (CT) scans of an elder female with single T12 OVCF undergoing a cement leakage into the T12-L1 disc after PKP. A three-dimensional finite element Model of thoracolumbar spine (T10-L2) was built in the Mimics and the ABAQUS software. The stress on annulus fiber, nucleus pulposus, endplate and facet joints under axial pressure (0.3, 1.0, 4.0 MPa) were analyzed. The 3D finite element after percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP) with cement leakage into the disc may be strongly related with the changes of biomechanical effects on adjacent vertebra of thoracolumbar OVCF. Models of thoracolumbar OVCF before and after PVP with a cement leakage into the T12-L1 disc were successfully established. The stresses increased with a rising axial pressure in the model of cement leakage into the disc after PVP, the stress augmentation scope on adjacent end plates(T11 low plate & L1 top plate) and intervertebral disc (T11-12 & T12-L1) increased. The maximal Von Mises stress on adjacent vertebra (T11 & L1) increased while but the maximal Von Mises stress on end vertebra (T10 & L2) decreased. Postoperative adjacent vertebral fracture.

  4. Osteoporosis and Your Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Movement › Osteoporosis and Your Spine Osteoporosis and Your Spine Your spine is made up of small bones ... called kyphosis. Kyphosis and Bone Breaks in the Spine The bones in the spine are called vertebrae. ...

  5. May "Dubel" be a solution for pullout problem of the pedicle screws at osteoporotic spine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Ertugrul; Eyuboglu, Eylem Eren; Yazar, Ugur; Gazioglu, Gurkan; Guvercin, Ali Riza; Baykal, Suleyman

    2014-01-01

    To improve the strength of stabilization systems currently used in osteoporotic spinal fractures, essentially by increasing the fixation force of pedicle screws. Six human cadaveric vertebrae were used. Bone mineral densities of the specimens were measured with Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry in order to assess the osteoporosis. All vertebrae were found to be severely osteoporotic. Standard pedicle screws were applied to left pedicles of vertebrae. Pedicle screws reinforced by fixing plugs "Dubel" were applied to right pedicles of vertebrae. Afterwards the vertebrae were embedded in acrylic casts to prevent possible fracture of the osteoporotic vertebrae and to obtain a correct vertical pull-out vector. The biomechanical pullout tests were performed with biomechanical testing machine. Pullout forces in each group were recorded and compared with Mann-Whitney U test. The pedicle screws strengthened by "Dubel" were found to be four times stronger than the standard pedicle screws, in the osteoporotic human cadaveric vertebrae. "Dubel"-augmented pedicle screws may contribute to developing better stabilization systems for osteoporotic thoracolumbar fractures needing surgery and in the revision of the previous fusion surgeries of the spine.

  6. Role of early minimal-invasive spine fixation in acute thoracic and lumbar spine trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Polytraumatized patients following a severe trauma suffer from substantial disturbances of the immune system. Secondary organ dysfunction syndromes due to early hyperinflammation and late immunparalysis contribute to adverse outcome. Consequently the principle of damage control surgery / orthopedics developed in the last two decades to limit secondary iatrogenic insult in these patients. New percutaneous internal fixators provide implants for a damage control approach of spinal trauma in polytraumatized patients. The goal of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of minimal-invasive instrumentation in the setting of minor and major trauma and to discuss the potential benefits and drawbacks of this procedure. Materials and Methods: The present study is a prospective analysis of 76 consecutive patients (mean age 53.3 years with thoracolumbar spine fractures following major or minor trauma from August 2003 to January 2007 who were subjected to minimal-invasive dorsal instrumentation using CD Horizon ® Sextant TM Rod Insertion System and Longitude TM Rod Insertion System (Medtronic ® Sofamor Danek. Perioperative and postoperative outcome measures including e.g. local and systemic complications were assessed and discussed. Results: Forty-nine patients (64.5% suffered from minor trauma (Injury Severity Score < 16. Polytraumatized patients (n=27; 35.5% had associated chest (n=20 and traumatic brain injuries (n=22. For mono- and bisegmental dorsal instrumentation the Sextant TM was used in 60 patients, whereas in 16 longer ranging instrumentations the (prototype Longitude TM system was implanted. Operation time was substantially lower than in conventional approach at minimum 22.5 min for Sextant and 36.2 min for Longitude TM , respectively. Geriatric patients with high perioperative risk according to ASA classification benefited from the less invasive approach and lack of approach-related complications including no substantial blood loss

  7. Acute compartment syndrome of the forearm and hand in a patient of spine surgery -A case report-

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jung-Ah; Jeon, Yeon Soo; Jung, Hong Soo; Kim, Hyung-Gun; Kim, Yong Shin

    2010-01-01

    A 38-year-old woman underwent a 4-hour operation in the prone position for a laminectomy at C4-7 and posterior cervical decompressive fusion at C7-T1 under general anesthesia. After undraping at the end of surgery, considerable swelling with many blisters of the left forearm and hand was observed. The chest roll at the left side had moved cephalad into the axilla and compressed the axillary structures. An emergency fasciotomy to decompress the compartments of the forearm and dorsal surface of...

  8. EUROSPINE 2017 FULL PAPER AWARD: Time to remove our rose-tinted spectacles: a candid appraisal of the relative success of surgery in over 4500 patients with degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine, hip or knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, Anne F; Impellizzeri, Franco M; Leunig, Michael; Jeszenszy, Dezsö; Becker, Hans-Jürgen; Haschtmann, Daniel; Preiss, Stefan; Fekete, Tamas F

    2018-02-19

    Studies comparing the outcome of spine surgery with that of large-joint replacement report equivocal findings. The patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) used in such studies are typically generic and may not be sufficiently sensitive to the successes/failures of treatment. This study compared different indices of "success" in patients undergoing surgery for degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine, hip, or knee, using a validated, multidimensional, and joint-specific PROM. Preoperatively and 12 months postoperatively, 4594 patients (3937 lumbar spine, 368 hip, 269 knee) undergoing first-time surgery completed a PROM that included the Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI) for the affected joint. The latter comprises a set of single items on pain, function, symptom-specific well-being, quality of life, and disability-all in relation to the specified joint problem. Other single-item ratings of treatment success were made 12 months postoperatively. In multiple regression analyses, controlling for confounders, the mean improvement in COMI at 12 months was greatest for the hip patients and lowest for those with degenerative spinal deformity (= the statistical reference group) (p hip (OR 4.6; 95% CI 2.5-8.5) and knee (OR 4.0; 95% CI 2.1-7.7) (no difference between spine subgroups) for "satisfaction with care"; higher for hip (OR 16.9; 95% CI 7.3-39.6), knee (OR 6.3; 95% CI 3.4-11.6), degenerative spondylolisthesis (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.2-2.2), and herniated disc (OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.2-2.4) for "global treatment outcome"; and higher for hip (OR 13.8; 95% CI 8.8-21.6), knee (OR 5.3; 95% CI 3.6-7.8), degenerative spondylolisthesis (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.3-2.1), and herniated disc (1.5; 95% CI 1.1-2.0) for "patient-acceptable symptom state". Patient-rated complications were the greatest in degenerative spinal deformity (29%) and the lowest in hip (18%). The current study is the largest of its kind and the first to use a common, but joint-specific instrument to report patient

  9. Robot-assisted vs freehand pedicle screw fixation in spine surgery - a systematic review and a meta-analysis of comparative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lingjia; Chen, Xi; Margalit, Adam; Peng, Huiming; Qiu, Guixing; Qian, Wenwei

    2018-02-19

    Medical robotics has progressively become more compelling in modern orthopaedic surgery. Several studies comparing robot-assisted (RA) and freehand (FH) conventional techniques for pedicle screw fixation have been published, but the results are unclear. Here, we assessed current evidence regarding the efficiency, safety and accuracy of RA compared with FH techniques. A literature search of PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library and Web of Science was performed to compare the differences between RA and FH in spine surgery. Two reviewers independently reviewed included studies, conducted a risk of bias assessment, and extracted data. Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and six retrospective comparative studies included a total of 750 patients (3625 pedicle screws). No significant differences were noted between RA and FH in pedicle screw accuracy (95.5% compared with 92.9%; odds ratio: 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.55 to 3.30; P=0.51), overall complication rate (1.33% compared with 3.45%; odds ratio: 0.46; 95% CI, 0.15 to 1.43; P=0.18) and radiation exposure time (weighted mean difference [WMD]:8.49; 95% CI, -15.43 to 32.40; P=0.49). While RA was associated with a longer operative time (WMD: 39.63; 95% CI, 5.27 to 73.99; P= 0.02), percutaneous or minimal robot-assisted pedicle screw fixation (M-RA) had a shorter radiation exposure time than FH (WMD: -33.10; 95% CI, -38.18 to -28.02; P=0.00) CONCLUSIONS: The current literature did not prove that RA supersedes FH, although several studies are more optimistic about this procedure. Future well-designed RCTs assessing RA and FH are needed to confirm and update the findings of this analysis. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Acute compartment syndrome of the forearm and hand in a patient of spine surgery -A case report-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Ah; Jeon, Yeon Soo; Jung, Hong Soo; Kim, Hyung-Gun; Kim, Yong Shin

    2010-07-01

    A 38-year-old woman underwent a 4-hour operation in the prone position for a laminectomy at C4-7 and posterior cervical decompressive fusion at C7-T1 under general anesthesia. After undraping at the end of surgery, considerable swelling with many blisters of the left forearm and hand was observed. The chest roll at the left side had moved cephalad into the axilla and compressed the axillary structures. An emergency fasciotomy to decompress the compartments of the forearm and dorsal surface of the hand was performed. In the post anesthesia care unit, the radial pulse of the left hand was palpable and the level of oxygen saturation was normal. Forearm and hand edema subsided gradually over several days and the patient was discharged with full function of her left arm. This compartment syndrome suggests careful attention should be paid to the position of the chest roll when the prone position is established for a long duration.

  11. [Usefulness of botulinum toxin injections in the treatment of postoperative pain after cervical spine surgery: Preliminary results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finiels, P-J; Batifol, D

    2010-10-01

    Postoperative neck pain after cervical spinal surgery is a common occurrence, the prevalence of which can reach up to 60%. Since 2005 a prospective study, still in progress, is attempting to show the efficacy of botulinum toxin injections in its treatment. Two hundred and fifteen patients operated on in the same institution for cervical spondylotic myelopathy were prospectively followed-up; 38 of them presented postoperative neck pain and were enrolled either in a course of botulinum toxin injections (19) or in conservative treatment (19). The muscles injected, in descending order, were: trapezius, supraspinalis, splenius capitis, and rhomboids. Injections were made using Type A-botulinum toxin (Botox*-Allergan Pharmaceuticals, Westport, Ireland), increasing from 20 to 100U Botox* without exceeding 300U once in the same patient, performed every 3 months if necessary. The conservative treatment consisted of a course of thiocolchicoside (16mg/day) and physical rehabilitation. The lordosis angle was calculated on lateral sitting radiographs in the neutral position immediately postoperatively and 1.5 months after injection and correlated to pain improvement evaluated by the visual analogic scale (VAS). No visible improvement was found on x-rays in three patients after injection, and in 11 after conservative treatment. In 16 cases, after an average of three injections, the gain in lordosis averaged 11.3° and the VAS score was decreased by 4.6 points versus 4.7° and a decrease of 0.6 points after conservative treatment. Regardless of its limitations, the present study would seem to show potential value in the use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of postoperative pain after cervical spinal surgery. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. HISTOMORPHOLOGICAL STUDY OF THORACOLUMBAR FASCIA IN PATIENTS WITH LUMBOSACRAL DISCOPATHY

    OpenAIRE

    Z BEHDADIPOOR; SH RAISI; F BAHMANI; H MOIN

    2000-01-01

    Introduction. Thoracolumbar fascia has neural ends in normal positions. It has sensory role and by inhibitory and or excitatory reflexes helps to protect vertebral column. In this research, it has been studied neural ends in thoracolumbar fascia in 42 cases. Our aim was to compare the presence of neural ends in normal individuals and those with lumbosacral discopathy. Methods. The samples were taken from one centimeter of midline at the level of L4-L5 vertebrae, since in this region the ...

  13. 3D-2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Ketcha, M. D.; Reaungamornrat, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Aygun, N.; Lo, S.-F.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D-2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D-2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE  >  30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE  interquartile range (IQR)) and a median runtime of 84 s (plus upwards of 1-2 min for manual masking). Excluding manual polygonal masks and decreasing the number of multistarts to 50 caused the GC-based registration to fail at a rate of  >14% however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE  =  5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved runtime (29.3 s). The GO metric

  14. Varicella-Zoster-Mediated Radiculitis Reactivation following Cervical Spine Surgery: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doniel Drazin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Varicella-zoster virus and herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 are neurotropic viruses that can be reactivated after a surgical or stressful intervention. Although such cases are uncommon, consequences can be debilitating, and variable treatment responses merit consideration. We describe a 41-year-old male with a history of varicella-mediated skin eruptions, who presented with continuing right arm pain, burning, and numbness in a C6 dermatomal distribution following a C5-6 anterior cervical discectomy and fusion and epidural steroid injections. The operative course was uncomplicated and he was discharged home on postoperative day 1. Approximately ten days after surgery, the patient presented to the emergency department complaining of severe pain in his right upper extremity and a vesicular rash from his elbow to his second digit. He was started on Acyclovir and discharged home. On outpatient follow-up, his rash had resolved though his pain continued. The patient was started on a neuromodulating agent for chronic pain. This case adds to the limited literature regarding this rare complication, brings attention to the symptoms for proper diagnosis and treatment, and emphasizes the importance of prompt antiviral therapy. We suggest adding a neuromodulating agent to prevent long-term sequelae and resolve acute symptoms.

  15. Evaluation of the safety and reliability of the newly-proposed AO spine injury classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoub, Alexandre Rd; Joaquim, Andrei F; Ghizoni, Enrico; Tedeschi, Helder; Patel, Alpesh A

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and reliability of the new AO Classification, a recent classification system for Thoraco-Lumbar Spine Trauma (TLST). Retrospective study. We applied the new AO system in patients with TLST treated according to the TLICS. Two researchers classified injuries independently. Eight weeks later, the classification was repeated for intra and inter-observer agreement evaluation. To evaluate safety, we correlated the treatment performed based on the TLICS with the newer AO classification obtained. Fifty-four patients were included in this study, with a mean follow-up of 363.8 days. Twenty-three neurologically intact patients were initially treated conservatively. Their mean TLICS was 1.78 (1-4 points). Four patients underwent late surgery. Thirty-one patients were treated surgically. Their average TLICS was 7.22 points (4-10 points). Agreements in the four independent evaluations according to AO groups and subgroups were of 64.8% (35/54) and 55.5% (30/54) respectively. Kappa index for groups A, B and C was 0.75, 0.7 and 0.85 respectively. Kappa index for subgroups ranged from 0.16 to 0.85. Regarding safety, thirty (57.6%) patients with total subgroups agreement were analyzed. All patients with fracture in groups B and C underwent surgical treatment and patients in group A received surgery according to neurological status or failure of conservative treatment. The newer AO spine classification demonstrated good reliability at the level of groups. Subgroups demonstrated worse and varying reliability. Although the safety analysis was limited due to the low level of total concordance among all evaluations, patients from group A can be treated conservatively or surgically, whereas those from groups B and C are treated surgically.

  16. Significant reduction of fluoroscopy repetition with lumbar localization system in minimally invasive spine surgery: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guoxin; Zhang, Hailong; Gu, Xin; Wang, Chuanfeng; Guan, Xiaofei; Fan, Yunshan; He, Shisheng

    2017-05-01

    The conventional location methods for minimally invasive spinal surgery (MISS) were mainly based on repeated fluoroscopy in a trial-and-error manner preoperatively and intraoperatively. Localization system mainly consisted of preoperative applied radiopaque frame and intraoperative guiding device, which has the potential to minimize fluoroscopy repetition in MISS. The study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a novel lumbar localization system in reducing radiation exposure to patients.Included patients underwent minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MISTLIF) or percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (PTED). Patients treated with novel localization system were regarded as Group A, and patients treated without novel localization system were regarded as Group B.For PTED, The estimated effective dose was 0.41 ± 0.13 mSv in Group A and 0.57 ± 0.14 mSv in Group B (P fluoroscopy exposure time of PTED was 22.18 ± 7.30 seconds in Group A and 30.53 ± 7.56 seconds in Group B (P fluoroscopy exposure time was 25.41 ± 5.52 seconds in Group A and 32.82 ± 5.03 seconds in Group B (P < .001); The estimated cancer risk was 24.90 ± 5.15 (10) in Group A and 31.96 ± 5.04 (10) in Group B (P < .001). There were also significant differences in localization time and operation time between the 2 groups either for MISTLIF or PTED.The lumbar localization system could be a potential protection strategy for minimizing radiation hazards.

  17. Concomitant lower thoracic spine disc disease in lumbar spine MR imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Estanislao; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Dosdá, Rosa; Mollá, Enrique

    2002-11-01

    Our objective was to study the coexistence of lower thoracic-spine disc changes in patients with low back pain using a large field of view (FOV) in lumbar spine MR imaging. One hundred fifty patients with low back pain were referred to an MR examination. All patients were studied with a large FOV (27 cm), covering from the coccyx to at least the body of T11. Discs were coded as normal, protrusion, and extrusion (either epiphyseal or intervertebral). The relationship between disc disease and level was established with the Pearson chi(2) test. The T11-12 was the most commonly affected level of the lower thoracic spine with 58 disc cases rated as abnormal. Abnormalities of T11-12 and T12-L1 discs were significantly related only to L1-L2 disease ( p=0.001 and p=0.004, respectively) but unrelated to other disc disease, patient's gender, and age. No correlation was found between other discs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine can detect a great amount of lower thoracic disease, although its clinical significance remains unknown. A statistically significant relation was found within the thoracolumbar junctional region (T11-L2), reflecting common pathoanatomical changes. The absence of relation with lower lumbar spine discs is probably due to differences in their pathomechanisms.

  18. Concomitant lower thoracic spine disc disease in lumbar spine MR imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arana, Estanislao; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Dosda, Rosa; Molla, Enrique

    2002-01-01

    Our objective was to study the coexistence of lower thoracic-spine disc changes in patients with low back pain using a large field of view (FOV) in lumbar spine MR imaging. One hundred fifty patients with low back pain were referred to an MR examination. All patients were studied with a large FOV (27 cm), covering from the coccyx to at least the body of T11. Discs were coded as normal, protrusion, and extrusion (either epiphyseal or intervertebral). The relationship between disc disease and level was established with the Pearson χ 2 test. The T11-12 was the most commonly affected level of the lower thoracic spine with 58 disc cases rated as abnormal. Abnormalities of T11-12 and T12-L1 discs were significantly related only to L1-L2 disease (p=0.001 and p=0.004, respectively) but unrelated to other disc disease, patient's gender, and age. No correlation was found between other discs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine can detect a great amount of lower thoracic disease, although its clinical significance remains unknown. A statistically significant relation was found within the thoracolumbar junctional region (T11-L2), reflecting common pathoanatomical changes. The absence of relation with lower lumbar spine discs is probably due to differences in their pathomechanisms. (orig.)

  19. Concomitant lower thoracic spine disc disease in lumbar spine MR imaging studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arana, Estanislao; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Dosda, Rosa; Molla, Enrique [Department of Radiology, Quiron Clinic, Avd. Blasco Ibanez, 14, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2002-11-01

    Our objective was to study the coexistence of lower thoracic-spine disc changes in patients with low back pain using a large field of view (FOV) in lumbar spine MR imaging. One hundred fifty patients with low back pain were referred to an MR examination. All patients were studied with a large FOV (27 cm), covering from the coccyx to at least the body of T11. Discs were coded as normal, protrusion, and extrusion (either epiphyseal or intervertebral). The relationship between disc disease and level was established with the Pearson {chi}{sup 2} test. The T11-12 was the most commonly affected level of the lower thoracic spine with 58 disc cases rated as abnormal. Abnormalities of T11-12 and T12-L1 discs were significantly related only to L1-L2 disease (p=0.001 and p=0.004, respectively) but unrelated to other disc disease, patient's gender, and age. No correlation was found between other discs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine can detect a great amount of lower thoracic disease, although its clinical significance remains unknown. A statistically significant relation was found within the thoracolumbar junctional region (T11-L2), reflecting common pathoanatomical changes. The absence of relation with lower lumbar spine discs is probably due to differences in their pathomechanisms. (orig.)

  20. A Prospective Outcomes Study of Proton Therapy for Chordomas and Chondrosarcomas of the Spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indelicato, Daniel J., E-mail: dindelicato@floridaproton.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Rotondo, Ronny L.; Begosh-Mayne, Dustin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Scarborough, Mark T.; Gibbs, C. Parker [Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, William M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of definitive or adjuvant external beam proton therapy on survival in patients with chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the spine. Methods and Materials: Between March 2007 and May 2013, 51 patients with a median age of 58 years (range, 22-83 years) with chordoma (n=34) or chondrosarcomas (n=17) of the sacrum (n=21), the cervical spine (n=20), and the thoracolumbar spine (n=10) were treated with external beam proton therapy to a median dose of 70.2 Gy(RBE) [range, 64.2-75.6 Gy(RBE)] at our institution. Distant metastases, overall survival, cause-specific survival, local control, and disease-free survival were calculated. Results: The mean follow-up time was 3.7 years (range, 0.3-7.7 years). Across all time points, 25 patients experienced disease recurrence: 18 local recurrences, 6 local and distant recurrences, and 1 distant metastasis. The 4-year rates of overall survival and cause-specific survival were 72%; disease-free survival was 57%, local control was 58%, and freedom from distant metastases was 86%. The median time to local progression was 1.7 years (range, 0.2-6.0 years), and the median time to distant progression was 1.6 years (range, 0.2-6.0 years). The risk factors for local recurrence were age ≤58 years (62% vs 26%; P=.04) and recurrence after prior surgery (29% vs 81%; P=.01). Secondary cancers developed in 2 patients: B-cell lymphoma 5.5 years after treatment and bladder cancer 2 years after treatment. We observed the following toxicities: sacral soft tissue necrosis requiring surgery (n=2), T1 vertebral fracture requiring fusion surgery (n=1), chronic urinary tract infections (n=1), surgery for necrotic bone cyst (n=1), and grade 2 bilateral radiation nephritis (n=1). Conclusion: High-dose proton therapy controls more than half of spinal chordomas and chondrosarcomas and compares favorably with historic photon data. Local progression is the dominant mode of treatment failure and may be reduced by

  1. Análise comparativa de técnicas de fixação para fraturas da coluna toracolombar Análisis comparativo de técnicas para la fijación de fracturas de columna toracolumbar Comparative analysis of techniques for fixing fractures of the thoracolumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Rafael Hübner

    2011-01-01

    observó un promedio de 2,7 en la escala de dolor y de 11,2 en la escala de Owestry. CONCLUSIÓN: No hubo diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre las dos técnicas.OBJECTIVE: The study evaluates patients affected by thoracolumbar fractures, and treated by posterior instrumentation and arthrodesis. A comparative analysis of two different fixation techniques using pedicle screw fixation associated with short and long instrumentation were carried out. METHODS: Patients evaluation were performed by pain scale (VAS, visual analog scale, functional scale (Oswestry and by clinical and radiographic criteria. RESULT: It was observed 70.3% men and 29.7% women, with mean age of 43 years and average follow-up of 39 months. Most patients had Frankel E grade at the time of data collection (83.8%. The majority of patients had A3 (63.6% fractures at L1 (51.4%. Short instrumentation was performed in 62.2% of cases. An average of 2.7 on the pain scale and 11.2 for the Owestry was obtained in the analysis. CONCLUSION: Evaluation of techniques did not present any statistically significance.

  2. An analysis from the Quality Outcomes Database, Part 1. Disability, quality of life, and pain outcomes following lumbar spine surgery: predicting likely individual patient outcomes for shared decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGirt, Matthew J; Bydon, Mohamad; Archer, Kristin R; Devin, Clinton J; Chotai, Silky; Parker, Scott L; Nian, Hui; Harrell, Frank E; Speroff, Theodore; Dittus, Robert S; Philips, Sharon E; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Foley, Kevin T; Asher, Anthony L

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Quality and outcomes registry platforms lie at the center of many emerging evidence-driven reform models. Specifically, clinical registry data are progressively informing health care decision-making. In this analysis, the authors used data from a national prospective outcomes registry (the Quality Outcomes Database) to develop a predictive model for 12-month postoperative pain, disability, and quality of life (QOL) in patients undergoing elective lumbar spine surgery. METHODS Included in this analysis were 7618 patients who had completed 12 months of follow-up. The authors prospectively assessed baseline and 12-month patient-reported outcomes (PROs) via telephone interviews. The PROs assessed were those ascertained using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), EQ-5D, and numeric rating scale (NRS) for back pain (BP) and leg pain (LP). Variables analyzed for the predictive model included age, gender, body mass index, race, education level, history of prior surgery, smoking status, comorbid conditions, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, symptom duration, indication for surgery, number of levels surgically treated, history of fusion surgery, surgical approach, receipt of workers' compensation, liability insurance, insurance status, and ambulatory ability. To create a predictive model, each 12-month PRO was treated as an ordinal dependent variable and a separate proportional-odds ordinal logistic regression model was fitted for each PRO. RESULTS There was a significant improvement in all PROs (p disability, QOL, and pain outcomes following lumbar spine surgery were employment status, baseline NRS-BP scores, psychological distress, baseline ODI scores, level of education, workers' compensation status, symptom duration, race, baseline NRS-LP scores, ASA score, age, predominant symptom, smoking status, and insurance status. The prediction discrimination of the 4 separate novel predictive models was good, with a c-index of 0.69 for ODI, 0.69 for EQ-5

  3. Incidence and mechanism of neurological deficit after thoracolumbar fractures sustained in motor vehicle collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sourabh; Beck, Chad; Yoganandan, Narayan; Rao, Raj D

    2015-10-09

    OBJECT To determine the incidence of and assess the risk factors associated with neurological injury in motor vehicle occupants who sustain fractures of the thoracolumbar spine. METHODS In this study, the authors queried medical, vehicle, and crash data elements from the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN), a prospectively gathered multicenter database compiled from Level I trauma centers. Subjects had fractures involving the T1-L5 vertebral segments, an Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score of ≥ 3, or injury to 2 body regions with an AIS score of ≥ 2 in each region. Demographic parameters obtained for all subjects included age, sex, height, body weight, and body mass index. Clinical parameters obtained included the level of the injured vertebra and the level and type of spinal cord injury. Vehicular crash data included vehicle make, seatbelt type, and usage and appropriate use of the seatbelt. Crash data parameters included the principal direction of force, change in velocity on impact (ΔV), airbag deployment, and vehicle rollover. The authors performed a univariate analysis of the incidence and the odds of sustaining spinal neurological injury associated with major thoracolumbar fractures with respect to the demographic, clinical, and crash parameters. RESULTS Neurological deficit associated with thoracolumbar fracture was most frequent at extremes of age; the highest rates were in the 0- to 10-year (26.7% [4 of 15]) and 70- to 80-year (18.4% [7 of 38]) age groups. Underweight occupants (OR 3.52 [CI 1.055-11.7]) and obese occupants (OR 3.27 [CI 1.28-8.31]) both had higher odds of sustaining spinal cord injury than occupants with a normal body mass index. The highest risk of neurological injury existed in crashes in which airbags deployed and the occupant was not restrained by a seatbelt (OR 2.35 [CI 0.087-1.62]). Reduction in the risk of neurological injuries occurred when 3-point seatbelts were used correctly in conjunction with the

  4. [Radiologic examination of the spine in "back problems" of the standing horse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranner, W; Schill, W; Gerhards, H

    1999-04-01

    The radiological examination of the thoracolumbar spine of a horse with a potential back problem is most important in order to come to a diagnosis and the imaging method of choice. The use of parallel grid-cassettes, appropriate films, rare earth screens and aluminium filters requires radiographic equipment with an output of 60-120 kV and 25-90 mAs. By use of this technique in the standing horse it is possible to obtain radiographs of the summits of the dorsal spinal processes of the thoracolumbar spine from the first thoracic (T1) to approximately the third of fourth lumbar vertebrae (L3/4). Since the thickness of soft tissue is increasing from distal to proximal it is necessary to increase the output to image the processus articulares craniales et caudales. Therefore additional radiographs have to be taken.

  5. Radiologic findings consistent with kissing spines syndrome in Chilean thoroughbreds horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Infante

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the thoracolumbar spine of racehorses are frequent and often significantly decrease their athletic performance. The most common thoracolumbar alteration in thoroughbred horses is kissing spines syndrome (KSS. The narrowing of the interespinous space, generally located between T14-T15 and T15-T16, produces this syndrome. A radiographic study was performed to 30 thoroughbred horses on the segment between T12 and T18. Two latero-lateral views from digital equipment were obtained of the T12 to T18 segment of each horse, the images were analyze and the radiographic findings established the KSS according to a grading scale. The study sample was homogeneous and the results were similar to other radiographic findings of KSS occurring in segments T14-T15 and T15-16.

  6. Surgical Disorders of the Spine in Adults: Aetiology and Outcome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There has been steady and progressive advancement in spine surgery in Nigeria with the increase in spine surgeons, availability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), intraoperative fluoroscopy and some spinal titanium implants. We decided to study the frequency of various spine pathologies requiring ...

  7. Maxillofacial trauma - Underestimation of cervical spine injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Waldemar; Surov, Alexey; Eckert, Alexander Walter

    2016-09-01

    Undiagnosed cervical spine injury can have devastating results. The aim of this study was to analyse patients with primary maxillofacial trauma and a concomitant cervical spine injury. It is hypothetised that cervical spine injury is predictable in maxillofacial surgery. A monocentric clinical study was conducted over a 10-year period to analyse patients with primary maxillofacial and associated cervical spine injuries. Demographic data, mechanism of injury, specific trauma and treatments provided were reviewed. Additionally a search of relevant international literature was conducted in PubMed by terms "maxillofacial" AND "cervical spine" AND "injury". Of 3956 patients, n = 3732 (94.3%) suffered from craniomaxillofacial injuries only, n = 174 (4.4%) from cervical spine injuries only, and n = 50 (1.3%) from both craniomaxillofacial and cervical spine injuries. In this study cohort the most prevalent craniofacial injuries were: n = 41 (44%) midfacial and n = 21 (22.6%) skull base fractures. Cervical spine injuries primarily affected the upper cervical spine column: n = 39 (58.2%) vs. n = 28 (41.8%). Only in 3 of 50 cases (6%), the cervical spine injury was diagnosed coincidentally, and the cervical spine column was under immobilised. The operative treatment rate for maxillofacial injuries was 36% (n = 18), and for cervical spine injuries 20% (n = 10). The overall mortality rate was 8% (n = 4). The literature search yielded only 12 papers (11 retrospective and monocentric cohort studies) and is discussed before our own results. In cases of apparently isolated maxillofacial trauma, maxillofacial surgeons should be aware of a low but serious risk of underestimating an unstable cervical spine injury. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect on pain relief and inflammatory response following addition of tenoxicam to intravenous patient-controlled morphine analgesia: a double-blind, randomized, controlled study in patients undergoing spine fusion surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Kuei; Wu, Hsin-Lun; Yang, Chang-Sue; Chang, Kuang-Yi; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chan, Kwok-Hon; Sung, Chun-Sung

    2013-05-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that adding tenoxicam (T) to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) with morphine (M) would improve postoperative pain relief and wound inflammatory responses compared with M alone after spine surgery. Randomized, prospective, double-blind, controlled study. Ninety-four patients eligible for elective spine surgery. Teaching hospital. Patients were randomized to one of three groups: the M group (PCA regimen with M), the TM group (PCA regimen with T and M), or the T+TM group (20 mg T administered 30 minutes before wound closure in addition to the TM regimen). The primary end point was the numeric rating scale score for pain intensity, and secondary end points pertaining to postoperative pain management included M consumption, PCA demand/delivery, use of rescue analgesics, adverse events, and levels of inflammatory mediators in wound drainages. PCA demand was reduced in both the TM and T+TM groups compared with the M group (both P ≤ 0.001). The incidence of skin itching was significantly reduced in the T+TM group compared with the other groups (both P ≤ 0.05). PGE2 and interleukin-6 levels in wound drainages were reduced in the TM and T+TM groups compared with the M group (both P ≤ 0.001). The combination of T and M for IV-PCA was not more efficacious than IV-PCA with M alone in reducing postoperative pain after spine surgery but reduced PCA demand and suppressed local inflammation at the surgical site. Administration of T before wound closure may ameliorate IV-PCA M-induced skin itching. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Characteristics and clinical aspects of patients with spinal cord injury undergoing surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Simão de Melo-Neto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To identify the characteristics of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI undergoing surgery. METHODS: Previously, 321 patients with SCI were selected. Clinical and socio-demographic variables were collected. RESULTS: A total of 211 patients were submitted to surgery. Fall and injuries in the upper cervical and lumbosacral regions were associated with conservative treatment. Patients with lesions in the lower cervical spine, worse neurological status, and unstable injuries were associated with surgery. Individuals undergoing surgery were associated with complications after treatment. The authors assessed whether age influenced the characteristics of patients submitted to surgery. Subjects with <60 years of age were associated with motorcycle accidents and the morphologies of injury were fracture-dislocation. Elderly individuals were associated to fall, SCI in the lower cervical spine and the morphology of injury was listhesis. Subsequently, the authors analyzed the gender characteristics in these patients. Women who suffered car accidents were associated to surgery. Women were associated with paraparesis and the morphologic diagnosis was fracture-explosion, especially in the thoracolumbar transition and lumbosacral regions. Men who presented traumatic brain injury and thoracic trauma were related to surgery. These individuals had a worse neurological status and were associated to complications. Men and the cervical region were most affected, thereby, these subjects were analyzed separately (n= 92. The presence of complications increased the length of hospital stay. The simultaneous presence of morphological diagnosis, worst neurological status, tetraplegia, sensory, and motor alterations were associated with complications. Pneumonia and chest trauma were associated with mortality. CONCLUSION: These factors enable investments in prevention, rehabilitation, and treatment.

  10. Postoperative quality-of-life assessment in patients with spine metastases treated with long-segment pedicle-screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Florian; Lemée, Jean-Michel; Lucas, Olivier; Menei, Philippe

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE In recent decades, progress in the medical management of cancer has been significant, resulting in considerable extension of survival for patients with metastatic disease. This has, in turn, led to increased attention to the optimal surgical management of bone lesions, including metastases to the spine. In addition, there has been a shift in focus toward improving quality of life and reducing hospital stay for these patients, and many minimally invasive techniques have been introduced with the aim of reducing the morbidity associated with more traditional open approaches. The goal of this study was to assess the efficacy of long-segment percutaneous pedicle screw stabilization for the treatment of instability associated with thoracolumbar spine metastases in neurologically intact patients. METHODS This study was a retrospective review of data from a prospective database. The authors analyzed cases in which long-segment percutaneous pedicle screw fixation was performed for the palliative treatment of thoracolumbar spinal instability due to spinal metastases in neurologically intact patients. All of the patients included in the study underwent surgery between January 2014 and May 2015 at the authors' institution. Postoperative radiation therapy was planned within 10 days following the stabilization in all cases. Clinical and radiological follow-up assessments were planned for 3 days, 3 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after surgery. Outcome was assessed by means of standard postoperative evaluation and oncological and spinal quality of life measures (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Version 3.0 [EORTC QLQ-C30] and Oswestry Disability Index [ODI], respectively). Moreover, 5 patients were given an activity monitoring device for recording the distance walked daily; preoperative and postoperative daily distances were compared. RESULTS Data from 17 cases were analyzed. There were no

  11. Is the early percutaneous spine total care to treat the polytrauma patient a good way?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Falzarano

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The “ideal“ timing and modality of fracture fixation for unstable thoracolumbar spine fractures in multiply injured patients remains controversial. The concept of “damage control orthopedics” is expressed. We presented a case report of a 27 years' old male who sustained a multilevel spine fractures associated a floating knee (Fraser's Type A, ulna fracture and carpal scaphoid fracture in July 2014 after car accident (very high energy trauma. All these fractures were treated in early total care. We reported a case control to discuss about the early spinal total care associated at orthopedic total care in patients with multiple trauma.

  12. Consequences of intraoperative spinal cord manipulation in dogs with thoracolumbar intervertebral disc extrusion

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    C.C. Diogo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of the present study was to evaluate if extradural contact during hemilaminectomy would cause neurological deterioration in the early and/or late postoperative period in dogs with intervertebral disc extrusion. Nineteen dogs with thoracolumbar intervertebral disc extrusion underwent hemilaminectomy for spinal cord decompression and removal of extruded disc material. Meningeal contacts during surgery were quantified. Paraplegia (with nociception and paraparesis were observed in 11/19 and 8/19 of dogs, respectively, before surgery. At the end of our study, only two (2/19 had paraplegia and one (1/19, paraparesis. There were more extradural contacts when extruded intervertebral disc material was at a ventrolateral position. Extradural contacts during surgery had no influence on neurological progression nor on time to recovery of motor function. Immediately (24 and 48 hours after surgery, 13/19 dogs had the same neurological stage before surgery. At 7 and 90 days, 13/19 and 17/19 dogs, respectively, showed neurological improvement, compared with their preoperative stage. There was no influence of the number of extradural contacts on neurological recovery. These findings indicate that a careful inspection of the vertebral canal for removal of as much extruded disc material as possible does not cause neurologic deterioration.

  13. Audit of blood transfusion practice during anaesthesia for spine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Blood loss during spine surgery is often considerable, necessitating blood transfusion. The elective nature and other peculiarities of most spine surgeries, however, make them amenable to several blood conservation techniques, such that reduction in allogeneic blood transfusion is considered high priority in ...

  14. HISTOMORPHOLOGICAL STUDY OF THORACOLUMBAR FASCIA IN PATIENTS WITH LUMBOSACRAL DISCOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z BEHDADIPOOR

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Thoracolumbar fascia has neural ends in normal positions. It has sensory role and by inhibitory and or excitatory reflexes helps to protect vertebral column. In this research, it has been studied neural ends in thoracolumbar fascia in 42 cases. Our aim was to compare the presence of neural ends in normal individuals and those with lumbosacral discopathy. Methods. The samples were taken from one centimeter of midline at the level of L4-L5 vertebrae, since in this region the posterior layer of thoracolumbar fascia is thicker. Seven of the cases were normal and 35 were patients with lumbosacral discopathy. The samples were processed and serial sections were prepared. Six hundred and thirty sections from the serial sections were selected and 90 percent of these were stained with H&E and the rest of them were stained with Bielschowsky method. The sections were studied by light microscopy. Findings. Unlike the normal individuals, nerve corpuscles were not seen in none of our patients with lumbosacraldiscopathy.UsingBielschowsky,nerveendingswerepresentin normal individuals but they were not visible in patients with discopathy. Conclusion. It is concluded that thoracolumbar fascia in patients with discopathy had insufficient neural ends. Loss of these neural ends may be cause of decreasing proprioceptive information to nervous system and can be an initiating factor to damage the bones, ligaments and muscles.

  15. Correlation of plain radiographic and lumbar myelographic findings with surgical findings in thoracolumbar disc disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldby, N.J.; Dyce, J.; Houlton, J.E.F.

    1994-01-01

    The results of a prospective study to compare the plain radiographic and lumbar myelographic findings with the surgical findings in 70 cases of suspected thoracolumbar disc protrusion in the dog are reported. The aim was to assess the relative accuracy of disc lesion localisation using plain and contrast radiography. From the plain radiographs, the affected disc space was correctly identified in 40 cases (57.1 per cent), and incorrectly identified in seven. More than one site was identified in 11; in eight of these dogs, the affected disc space was strongly suspected. It was not possible to identify an affected disc in 12 cases. The site of disc protrusion was accurately identified by myelography in 60 dogs (85.7 per cent). In four dogs, myelography was helpful in identifying an adjacent disc and, in a further two, cord swelling was found at surgery. In one dog, neither disc material nor cord swelling was identified. Three myelograms were non-diagnostic

  16. Multiplanar CT of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, S.L.G.; Glenn, W.V. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This is an illustrated text on computed tomography (CT) of the lumbar spine with an emphasis on the role and value of multiplanar imaging for helping determine diagnoses. The book has adequate discussion of scanning techniques for the different regions, interpretations of various abnormalities, degenerative disk disease, and different diagnoses. There is a 50-page chapter on detailed sectional anatomy of the spine and useful chapters on the postoperative spine and the planning and performing of spinal surgery with CT multiplanar reconstruction. There are comprehensive chapters on spinal tumors and trauma. The final two chapters of the book are devoted to CT image processing using digital networks and CT applications of medical computer graphics

  17. Cervical spine trauma: Radiologic manifestations and imaging algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonakdarpour, A.

    1987-01-01

    Cervical spine trauma is very critical injury that is incurred most frequently in automobile accidents, mining incidents, and war. Injuries of the cervical spine produce neurologic damage in approximately 40% of cases, whereas injuries of the thoracolumbar junction produce neurologic damage in 4% and injuries of the thoracic spine do so in 10%. Radiology has a fundamental role in the recognition and follow-up of patients. Radiologists should be quite familiar with the imaging algorithms and various radiologic manifestations of cervical spine injuries. In this paper, techniques of examining severely injured patients as well as those with slight or questionable injuries are demonstrated. Indications and limitations of various diagnostic procedures (plain film radiography, tomography, CT, and MR imaging) are discussed. A systematic plan for the study of the cervical spine with an emphasis on joints, bones, ligaments and soft tissues (JO-B-LI-ST) is introduced. Mechanisms of injury and the stability or instability of the injuries are presented. Plain radiography as well as other imaging modalities are used to demonstrate the most important forms of injuries at various levels. Follow-up of some of the treated cases is shown. The late complications of spinal cord damage in closed injuries and open wounds (urinary stones, myositis, ossificans, contractures, fractures, disuse atrophy, and bone infections) are presented at the end

  18. THE IMPACT OF CLASSICAL MASSAGE ON SPINE MOBILITY

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    Agnieszka Radzimińska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Irregularities in movable property of the spine affect a large part of society and the problem affects the people at an increasingly younger age. Classical massage is a form of mechanotherapy that affects the regulation of the work of muscles, joints, tendons and ligaments. Aim of work: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of classical massage section of thoracolumbar spine to increase the mobility in these segments. Material: The study was carried out on 36 healthy volunteers (20 women and 16 men aged 21 to 27 years old (average age - 23.8 who were subjected to a series of five classical massages (according to strictly established protocol. In order to objectify the effects in all subjects before and after a series of treatments the following measurements were made: the fingers-floor test; the Otto -Wurna test; the straightening of the spine; lateral flexion of the spine; twist of the spine. Results A statistically important difference has been shown in the results of all tested variables before the first and after the last treatment of classical massage. Conclusions The results of personal research apply to young, healthy volunteers. It is worth to continue research into the effects of this form of therapy in the case of restrictions of movable tangible property, resulting from spinal pain syndromes.

  19. Anatomy and biomechanics of gluteus maximus and the thoracolumbar fascia at the sacroiliac joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, P J; Hapuarachchi, K S; Ross, J A; Sambaiew, E; Ranger, T A; Briggs, C A

    2014-03-01

    Biomechanical models predict that recruitment of gluteus maximus (GMax) will exert a compressive force across the sacroiliac joint (SIJ), yet this muscle requires morphologic assessment. The aims of this study were to document GMax's proximal attachments and assess their capacity to generate forces including compressive force at the SIJ. In 11 embalmed cadaver limbs, attachments of GMax crossing the SIJ were dissected and their fascicle orientation, length and attachment volume documented. The physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) of each attachment was calculated along with its estimated maximum force at the SIJ and lumbar spine. GMax fascicles originated from the gluteus medius fascia, ilium, thoracolumbar fascia, erector spinae aponeurosis, sacrum, coccyx, dorsal sacroiliac and sacrotuberous ligaments in all specimens. Their mean fascicle orientation ranged from 32 to 45° below horizontal and mean length from 11 to 18 cm. The mean total PCSA of GMax was 26 cm(2) (range 16-36), of which 70% crossed the SIJ. The average maximum force predicted to be generated by GMax's total attachments crossing each SIJ was 891 N (range 572-1,215), of which 70% (702 N: range 450-1,009) could act perpendicular to the plane of the SIJ. The capacity of GMax to generate an extensor moment at lower lumbar segments was estimated at 4 Nm (range 2-9.5). GMax may generate compressive forces at the SIJ through its bony and fibrous attachments. These may assist effective load transfer between lower limbs and trunk. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Anatomy of the Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Osteoporosis Back Pain Basics Book RESOURCES Patient Information Feature Articles Patient Q&A Success Stories Definitions Anatomy of the Spine Definitions A-Z Spine Specialists Videos 9 for Spine Epidur