WorldWideScience

Sample records for thoracolumbar spine indications

  1. Osteoporotic vertebral body fractures of the thoracolumbar spine: indications and techniques of a 360°-stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegl, Ulrich; Jarvers, J-S; Heyde, C-E; Josten, C

    2017-02-01

    Unstable vertebral body fragility fractures of the thoracolumbar spine can occur with or without relevant trauma. Initially, a standardized diagnostic algorithm including magnetic resonance tomography is recommended to detect accompanied further vertebral body fractures, to interpret the individual fracture stability, and to screen for relevant traumatic intervertebral disc lesions. Aim of the therapy is to assure fast mobilization and to maintain spinal alignment. Unstable fracture morphology is defined by vertebral body fractures including a relevant defect of the posterior vertebral cortex as well as type B or C fractures. With respect of type A fractures, a combined anterior-posterior approach including a primary cement-augmented posterior stabilization and anterior spondylodesis is indicated in those patients with relevant intervertebral lesions or in those suffering from high-energy accidents resulting in unstable burst-type fractures. The others will benefit from hybrid stabilizations including cement-augmented posterior stabilizations and cement augmentation (kyphoplasty) of the fractured level to gain a ventral transosseous stability. In addition, individually adapted antiosteoporotic therapy is essential.

  2. Direct medical costs of traumatic thoracolumbar spine fractures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Roer, N.; de Bruyne, M.C.; Bakker, F.C.; van Tulder, M.; Boers, M.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The costs and cost-effectiveness of treatment of thoracolumbar fractures are poorly known. Methods: We estimated the costs of hospital care and outpatient visits for patients with traumatic thoracolumbar spine fractures. Results: Stable fractures without neurological deficits were

  3. Direct medical costs of traumatic thoracolumbar spine fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Roer, N.; de Bruyne, M.C.; Bakker, F.C.; van Tulder, M.; Boers, M.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The costs and cost-effectiveness of treatment of thoracolumbar fractures are poorly known. Methods: We estimated the costs of hospital care and outpatient visits for patients with traumatic thoracolumbar spine fractures. Results: Stable fractures without neurological deficits were

  4. 78 FR 68906 - Agency Information Collection (Back (Thoracolumbar Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... (Thoracolumbar Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire). Type of Review: New data collection... (Thoracolumbar Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits... Control No. 2900- NEW (Back (Thoracolumbar Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any...

  5. Concordance in the radiological diagnosis of thoracolumbar spine fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, M; Rodriguez, M; Cerván, A M; Ortega, J A; Rivas-Ruiz, F; Guerado, E

    2015-01-01

    Thoracolumbar spine fractures are frequent and severe. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment to obtain good clinical results is essential, with many classifications being proposed for this purpose. To determine the external validity of radiographic and computed tomography (CT) measurements for the most used classifications, and decide on the type of treatment required. The working hypothesis is the existence of external validity of radiographic measurements. A sample of patients with thoracolumbar fracture was selected. Three spine specialists and a resident performed measurements on anteroposterior and lateral radiographic images as well as coronal, sagittal and axial CT slices. Fractures were classified as stable or unstable, evaluating the degree of intra-and interobserver agreement based on a standard observer. Sagittal index of Farcy, lateral wedging, Beck Index, traumatic regional angulation and channel occupancy were studied. All indicators studied, except the lateral wedging, showed a high degree of concordance. Instability determinants studied with radiographs and CT, which had obtained statistical significance, are reliable and accurate for the classification of thoracolumbar fractures and, therefore, to indicate an appropriate treatment. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. 78 FR 36308 - Proposed Information Collection: (Back (Thoracolumbar Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ...-NEW (Back (Thoracolumbar Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire). Type of Review: New... (Thoracolumbar Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans... comments on information needed to adjudicate the claim for VA disability benefits related to a claimant's...

  7. Radiologic abnormalities of the thoraco-lumbar spine in athletes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellstroem, M.; Jacobsson, B.; Swaerd, L.; Peterson, L. (Sahlgrenska Sjukhuset, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Radiology Oestra Sjukhuset, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Orthopedics King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Radiology)

    1990-03-01

    A radiologic study of the thoraco-lumbar spine was performed in 143 (117 male and 26 female) athletes (wrestlers, gymnasts, soccer players and tennis players), aged 14 to 25 years and 30 male nonathletes, aged 19 to 25 years. Film interpretation was made after mixing the films from all groups and without knowledge of the individual's identity. Various types of radiologic abnormalities occured in both athletes and non-athletes but were more common among athletes, especially male-gymnasts and wrestlers. Abnormalities of the vertebral ring apophysis occurred exclusively in athletes. Combinations of different types of abnormalities were most common in male gymnasts and wrestlers. (orig.).

  8. Thoracolumbar spine trauma: Evaluation and surgical decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei F Joaquim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Thoracolumbar spine trauma is the most common site of spinal cord injury, with clinical and epidemiological importance. Materials and Methods: We performed a comprehensive literature review on the management and treatment of TLST. Results: Currently, computed tomography is frequently used as the primary diagnostic test in TLST, with magnetic resonance imaging used in addition to assess disc, ligamentous, and neurological injury. The Thoracolumbar Injury Classification System is a new injury severity score created to help the decision-making process between conservative versus surgical treatment. When decision for surgery is made, early procedures are feasible, safe, can improve outcomes, and reduce healthcare costs. Surgical treatment is individualized based on the injury characteristics and surgeon′s experience, as there is no evidence-based for the superiority of one technique over the other. Conclusions: The correct management of TLST involves multiple steps, such as a precise diagnosis, classification, and treatment. The TLICS can improve care and communication between spine surgeons, resulting in a more standardized treatment.

  9. Monosegmental fixation for the treatment of fractures of the thoracolumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Defino Helton

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : A short vertebral arthrodesis has been one of the objectives of the surgical treatment of fractures of the thoracolumbar spine. We present here clinical, functional and radiographic outcome obtained after monosegmental fixation (single posterior or combined anterior and posterior of specific types of unstable thoracolumbar fractures. Materials and Methods : Twenty four patients with fractures of the thoracolumbar spine submitted to monosegmental surgical treatment (Group I - 18 single posterior monosegmental fixations and Group II - 6 combined anterior and posterior fixations were retrospectively evaluated according to clinical, radiographic and functional parameters. The indication for surgery was instability or neurological deficit. All the procedures were indicated and performed by the senior surgeon (Helton LA Defino. Results : The patients from group I were followed-up from 2 to 12 years (mean: 6.65±2.96. The clinical, functional and radiographic results show that a single posterior monosegmental fixation is adequate and a satisfactory procedure to be used in specific types of thoracolumbar spine fractures, The patients from group II were followed-up from 9 to 15 years (mean: 13 ± 2,09 years. On group II the results of clinical evaluation showed moderate indices of residual pain and of satisfaction with the final result. The values obtained by functional evaluation showed that 66.6% of the patients were unable to return to their previous job and presented a moderate disability index (Oswestry = 16.6 and a significant reduction of quality of life based on the SF-36 questionnaire. Radiographic evaluation showed increased kyphosis of the fixed vertebral segment during the late postoperative period, accompanied by a reduction of the height of the intervertebral disk. Conclusion : It is possible to stabilize the fractures which have an anterior good load-bearing capacity by a standalone posterior monosegmental fixation. However

  10. Motion in the unstable thoracolumbar spine when spine boarding a prone patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Bryan P.; Marchese, Diana L.; Rechtine, Glenn R.; Horodyski, MaryBeth

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Previous research has found that the log roll (LR) technique produces significant motion in the spinal column while transferring a supine patient onto a spine board. The purpose of this project was to determine whether log rolling a patient with an unstable spine from prone to supine with a pulling motion provides better thoracolumbar immobilization compared to log rolling with a push technique. Methods A global instability was surgically created at the L1 level in five cadavers. Two spine-boarding protocols were tested (LR Push and LR Pull). Both techniques entailed performing a 180° LR rotation of the prone patient from the ground to the supine position on the spine board. An electromagnetic tracking device registered motion between the T12 and L2 vertebral segments. Six motion parameters were tracked. Repeated-measures statistical analysis was performed to evaluate angular and translational motion. Results Less motion was produced during the LR Push compared to the LR Pull for all six motion parameters. The difference was statistically significant for three of the six parameters (flexion–extension, axial translation, and anterior–posterior (A–P) translation). Conclusions Both the LR Push and LR Pull generated significant motion in the thoracolumbar spine during the prone to supine LR. The LR Push technique produced statistically less motion than the LR Pull, and should be considered when a prone patient with a suspected thoracolumbar injury needs to be transferred to a long spine board. More research is needed to identify techniques to further reduce the motion in the unstable spine during prone to supine LR. PMID:22330191

  11. Reliability assessment of AOSpine thoracolumbar spine injury classification system and Thoracolumbar Injury Classification and Severity Score (TLICS) for thoracolumbar spine injuries: results of a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Rahul; Chhabra, Harvinder Singh; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Abel, Rainer; Tuli, Sagun; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad; Das, Kali Dutta; Mohapatra, Bibhudendu; Nanda, Ankur; Sangondimath, Gururaj M; Bansal, Murari Lal; Patel, Nishit

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this multicentre study was to determine whether the recently introduced AOSpine Classification and Injury Severity System has better interrater and intrarater reliability than the already existing Thoracolumbar Injury Classification and Severity Score (TLICS) for thoracolumbar spine injuries. Clinical and radiological data of 50 consecutive patients admitted at a single centre with a diagnosis of an acute traumatic thoracolumbar spine injury were distributed to eleven attending spine surgeons from six different institutions in the form of PowerPoint presentation, who classified them according to both classifications. After time span of 6 weeks, cases were randomly rearranged and sent again to same surgeons for re-classification. Interobserver and intraobserver reliability for each component of TLICS and new AOSpine classification were evaluated using Fleiss Kappa coefficient (k value) and Spearman rank order correlation. Moderate interrater and intrarater reliability was seen for grading fracture type and integrity of posterior ligamentous complex (Fracture type: k = 0.43 ± 0.01 and 0.59 ± 0.16, respectively, PLC: k = 0.47 ± 0.01 and 0.55 ± 0.15, respectively), and fair to moderate reliability (k = 0.29 ± 0.01 interobserver and 0.44+/0.10 intraobserver, respectively) for total score according to TLICS. Moderate interrater (k = 0.59 ± 0.01) and substantial intrarater reliability (k = 0.68 ± 0.13) was seen for grading fracture type regardless of subtype according to AOSpine classification. Near perfect interrater and intrarater agreement was seen concerning neurological status for both the classification systems. Recently proposed AOSpine classification has better reliability for identifying fracture morphology than the existing TLICS. Additional studies are clearly necessary concerning the application of these classification systems across multiple physicians at different level of training and trauma centers to evaluate not

  12. Two-Nation Comparison of Classification and Treatment of Thoracolumbar Fractures: An Internet-Based Multicenter Study Among Spine Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishnamaz, Miguel; Curfs, Inez; Balosu, Stephan; Willems, Paul; van Hemert, Wouter; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Kobbe, Philipp

    2015-11-01

    Web-based multicenter study. The aim of the study was to assess and compare the management strategy for traumatic thoracolumbar fractures between German and Dutch spine surgeons. To date, there is no evidence-based treatment algorithm for thoracolumbar spine fractures, thereby an international controversy concerning optimal treatment exists. In this web-based multicenter study (www.spine.hostei.com), computed tomography scans of traumatic thoracolumbar fractures (T12-L2) were evaluated by German and Dutch spine surgeons. Supplementary case-specific information such as age, sex, height, weight, neurological status, and injury mechanism were provided.By using a questionnaire, fractures were classified according to the AO-Magerl Classification, followed by 6 questions concerning the treatment algorithm. Data were analyzed using SPSS (Version 21, 76, Chicago, IL). The interobserver agreement was determined by using Cohen κ. Statistical significance was defined as P spine surgeons was found. Overall German spine surgeons had a lower threshold concerning the indication for surgical treatment (Ger 87% vs. NL 30%; P < 0.05). There was a consensus about operative stabilization of AO Type B and C injuries and injuries with neurologic deficit, whereas a discrepancy in the therapeutic algorithm for AO Type A fractures was observed. This difference was most pronounced regarding the indication for posterior (Ger 96.6%; NL 41.2%; P < 0.05) and circumferential stabilization (Ger 53.4%; NL 0%; P < 0.05) for burst fractures. There is a consensus to stabilize AO Type B and C fractures, whereas country-specific differences in the treatment of Type A fractures, especially in case of burst fractures, occur. Prospective, controlled multicenter outcome studies may provide more evidence in optimal treatment for thoracolumbar fractures. 2.

  13. The influence of spine surgeons' experience on the classification and intraobserver reliability of the novel AOSpine thoracolumbar spine injury classification system : an international study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadiqi, Said; Oner, F. Cumhur; Dvorak, Marcel F.; Aarabi, Bizhan; Schroeder, Gregory D.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design. International validation study. Objective. To investigate the influence of the spine surgeons' level of experience on the intraobserver reliability of the novel AOSpine Thoracolumbar Spine Injury Classification system, and the appropriate classification according to this system.

  14. Thoracolumbar spine clearance: Clinical examination for patients with distracting injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Ben; Rostas, Jack; Simmons, Jon; Frotan, Mohammed A; Brevard, Sidney B; Gonzalez, Richard P

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively assess the sensitivity of clinical examination to screen for thoracolumbar spine (TLS) injury in awake and alert blunt trauma patients with distracting injuries. From December 2012 to June 2014, all blunt trauma patients older than 13 years were prospectively evaluated as per standard TLS examination protocol at a Level 1 trauma center. Awake and alert patients with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 14 or greater underwent clinical examination of the TLS. Clinical examination was performed regardless of distracting injuries. Patients with no complaints of pain or tenderness on examination of the TLS were considered clinically cleared of injury. Patients with distracting injuries, including those clinically cleared and those with complaints of TLS pain or tenderness, underwent computed tomographic scan of the entire TLS. Patients with minor distracting injuries were not considered to have a distracting injury. A total of 950 blunt trauma patients were entered, 530 (56%) of whom had at least one distracting injury. Two hundred nine patients (40%) with distracting injuries had a positive TLS clinical examination result, of whom 50 (25%) were diagnosed with TLS injury. Three hundred twenty-one patients (60%) with distracting injuries were initially clinically cleared, in whom 17 (5%) TLS injuries were diagnosed. There were no missed injuries that required surgical intervention, with only four injuries receiving TLS orthotic bracing. This yielded an overall clinical clearance sensitivity for injury of 75% and sensitivity for clinically significant injury of 89%. In awake and alert blunt trauma patients with distracting injuries, clinical examination is a sensitive screening method for significant TLS injury. Radiologic assessment may be unnecessary for safe clearance of the asymptomatic TLS in patients with distracting injuries. These findings suggest significant potential reduction of both health care cost and patient

  15. Advocating "spine damage control" as a safe and effective treatment modality for unstable thoracolumbar fractures in polytrauma patients: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahel, Philip F; Flierl, Michael A; Moore, Ernest E; Smith, Wade R; Beauchamp, Kathryn M; Dwyer, Anthony

    2009-05-11

    The "ideal" timing and modality of fracture fixation for unstable thoracolumbar spine fractures in multiply injured patients remains controversial. The concept of "damage control orthopedics" (DCO), which has evolved globally in the past decade, provides a safe guidance for temporary external fixation of long bone or pelvic fractures in multisystem trauma. In contrast, "damage control" concepts for unstable spine injuries have not been widely implemented, and the scarce literature in the field remains largely anecdotal. The current practice standards are reflected by two distinct positions, either (1) immediate "early total care" or (2) delayed spine fixation after recovery from associated injuries. Both concepts have inherent risks which may contribute to adverse outcome. We hypothesize that the concept of "spine damage control" - consisting of immediate posterior fracture reduction and instrumentation, followed by scheduled 360 degrees completion fusion during a physiological "time-window of opportunity" - will be associated with less complications and improved outcomes of polytrauma patients with unstable thoracolumbar fractures, compared to conventional treatment strategies. We propose a prospective multicenter trial on a large cohort of multiply injured patients with an associated unstable thoracolumbar fracture. Patients will be assigned to one of three distinct study arms: (1) Immediate definitive (anterior and/or posterior) fracture fixation within 24 hours of admission; (2) Delayed definitive (anterior and/or posterior) fracture fixation at > 3 days after admission; (3) "Spine damage control" procedure by posterior reduction and instrumentation within 24 hours of admission, followed by anterior 360 degrees completion fusion at > 3 days after admission, if indicated. The primary and secondary endpoints include length of ventilator-free days, length of ICU and hospital stay, mortality, incidence of complications, neurological status and functional recovery

  16. Posterior instrumented fusion without neural decompression for incomplete neurological deficits following vertebral collapse in the osteoporotic thoracolumbar spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataka, Hiromi; Tanno, Takaaki

    2008-01-01

    Previous reports have emphasized the importance of neural decompression through either an anterior or posterior approach when reconstruction surgery is performed for neurological deficits following vertebral collapse in the osteoporotic thoracolumbar spine. However, the contribution of these decompression procedures to neurological recovery has not been fully established. In the present study, we investigated 14 consecutive patients who had incomplete neurological deficits following vertebral collapse in the osteoporotic thoracolumbar spine and underwent posterior instrumented fusion without neural decompression. They were radiographically and neurologically assessed during an average follow-up period of 25 months. The mean local kyphosis angle was 14.6° at flexion and 4.1° at extension preoperatively, indicating marked instability at the collapsed vertebrae. The mean spinal canal occupation by bone fragments was 21%. After surgery, solid bony fusion was obtained in all patients. The mean local kyphosis angle became 5.8° immediately after surgery and 9.9° at the final follow-up. There was no implant dislodgement, and no additional surgery was required. In all patients, back pain was relieved, and neurological improvement was obtained by at least one modified Frankel grade. The present series demonstrate that the posterior instrumented fusion without neural decompression for incomplete neurological deficits following vertebral collapse in the osteoporotic thoracolumbar spine can provide neurological improvement and relief of back pain without major complications. We suggest that neural decompression is not essential for the treatment of neurological impairment due to osteoporotic vertebral collapse with dynamic mobility. PMID:19005689

  17. The efficacy of a percutaneous expandable titanium device in anatomical reduction of vertebral compression fractures of the thoracolumbar spine

    OpenAIRE

    Baeesa, Saleh S.; Krueger, Antonio; Arag?n, Francisco A.; Noriega, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility of a minimally invasive technique using a titanium expandable device to achieve anatomical restoration of vertebral compression fractures (VCF) of the thoracolumbar spine. Methods: This prospective study included 27 patients diagnosed with VCF (Magerl classification A.1.2, A.1.3, and A.3.1) of the thoracolumbar spine treated with percutaneous cement augmentation using the SpineJack? device. The study was conducted in Valladolid University Hospital, Vall...

  18. Treatment of traumatic thoracolumbar spine fractures : A multicenter prospective randomized study of operative versus nonsurgical treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siebenga, Jan; Leferink, Vincent J. M.; Segers, Michiel J. M.; Elzinga, Matthijs J.; Bakker, Fred C.; Haarman, Henk J. Th. M.; Rommens, Pol M.; ten Duis, Henk-Jan; Patka, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Study Design. Multicenter prospective randomized trial. Objective. To test the hypotheses that thoracolumbar AO Type A spine fractures without neurologic deficit, managed with short-segment posterior stabilization will show an improved radiographic outcome and at least the same functional outcome as

  19. Fractures of the thoracolumbar spine sustained by soldiers in vehicles attacked by improvised explosive devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragel, Brian T; Allred, C Dain; Brevard, Sid; Davis, Richard T; Frank, Edmund H

    2009-10-15

    Retrospective analysis. To analyze the types of orthopedic spine fractures sustained by North Atlantic Treaty Organization soldiers when vehicles are attacked by improvised explosive devices (IEDs), with specific focus on the flexion-distraction type thoracolumbar fracture (Chance fracture). Operation Enduring Freedom is the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's effort in Afghanistan. IED attacks on armored vehicles are common and account for high proportion of soldiers' deaths and injuries. Retrospective record review was accomplished on soldiers admitted to a military hospital with orthopedic spine fractures after IED attacks on vehicles from January 1, 2008 to May 15, 2008. Thoracolumbar fractures were classified using the McAfee classification system. Twelve male patients with 16 thoracolumbar fractures were identified (3 patients with multiple fractures). The 16 thoracolumbar fractures included 6 flexion-distraction fractures in 5 patients (38%, 6/16: two T12, two L1, one L3, and one L4), 7 compression fractures in 5 patients (44%, 5/16; one T7, one T8, two L1, one L2, one L3, and one L4), and 3 burst fractures (19%, 3/16; two L1 and one L2). The incidence of flexion-distraction thoracolumbar (Chance) fractures has been reported to be between 1.0% and 2.5% in most spine fracture series. In this small study, Chance fractures represented 38% of all tho-racolumbar fractures sustained after IED attack on armored vehicles. The blast pattern associated with IED explosion may be responsible for the high rate of these injuries in vehicle occupants.

  20. Trauma of the lumbar spine and the thoracolumbar junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reith, W.; Harsch, N.; Kraus, C.

    2016-01-01

    Patients who have experienced high energy trauma have a particularly high risk of suffering from fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine. The detection of spinal injuries and the correct classification of fractures before surgery are not only absolute requirements for the implementation of appropriate surgical treatment but they are also decisive for the choice of surgical procedure. By the application of spiral computed tomography (CT) crucial additional information on the morphology of the fracture can be gained in order to estimate the fracture type and possibly the indications for specific surgical treatment options. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ideally suited to provide valuable additional information regarding injuries to the discoligamentous structures of the spine. Magerl et al. developed a comprehensive classification especially for injuries of the thoracic and lumbar spine, which was adopted by the working group for osteosynthesis (AO). This is based on a 2-pillar model of the spinal column. The classification is based on the pathomorphological characteristics of fractures recognizable by imaging. The injury pattern is of particular importance. In spinal trauma a distinction is made between stable and unstable fractures. The treatment of spinal injuries depends on the severity of the overall injury pattern. Besides adequate initial treatment at the scene, a trauma CT should be immediately carried out in order that no injuries are overlooked and to ensure a rapid decision on the treatment procedure. (orig.) [de

  1. Radiological outcome of transpedicular screws fixation in the management of thoracolumbar spine injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, M.I.U.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic fracture of the spine is a serious neurosurgical condition that has serious impact on the patient's quality of life. Thoracolumbar junction is the most common site of spinal injuries. The aims of management of thoracolumbar spinal fractures are to restore vertebral column stability, and to obtain spinal canal decompression. This ultimately leads to early mobilization of the patients. This study was conducted to compare preoperative and post-operative vertebral height, kyphotic angle and sagittal index in patients treated with pedicle screws and rods in thoracolumbar spine fractures. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the department of Neurosurgery, Hayatabad Medical Complex, Peshawar from 1st February 2010 to 31st July 2011. A total 161 patients with unstable thoracolumber spine fracture were included in this study. In these patients fixation was done through transpedicle screws with rods. Anteroposterior and lateral views X-rays of thoraco-lumbar spine were done pre and post operatively. Results: Out of 161 patients, 109 (67.7%) were males and 52 (32.3%) females. The age of patients ranged from 20 to 70 years (mean 42.2 years) with 71 (44.1%) in the age range of 31-40 years. Preoperative average vertebral height was 9.4194 mm while postoperative average was 19.642 mm. The mean kyphosis was 23.06 degree preoperatively. Immediately after surgery the average correction of kyphosis was 9.45 degree. The pre-operative average sagittal index was 19.38 degree, which was reduced to an average 5.41 degree post operatively. Conclusions: Transpedicular fixation for unstable thoraco-lumbar spinal fractures achieves a stable fracture segment with improvement of vertebral height, kyphotic angle and sagittal index. Hence, preventing the secondary spinal deformities. (author)

  2. Minimal Invasive Circumferential Management of Thoracolumbar Spine Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pesenti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. While thoracolumbar fractures are common lesions, no strong consensus is available at the moment. Objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of a minimal invasive strategy using percutaneous instrumentation and anterior approach in the management of thoracolumbar unstable fractures. Methods. 39 patients were included in this retrospective study. Radiologic evaluation was based on vertebral and regional kyphosis, vertebral body height restoration, and fusion rate. Clinical evaluation was based on Visual Analogic Score (VAS. All evaluations were done preoperatively and at 1-year follow-up. Results. Both vertebral and regional kyphoses were significantly improved on postoperative evaluation (13° and 7° versus −1° and −9°  P<0.05, resp. as well as vertebral body height (0.92 versus 1.16, P<0.05. At 1-year follow-up, mean loss of correction was 1°. A solid fusion was visible in all the cases, and mean VAS was significantly reduced form 8/10 preoperatively to 1/10 at the last follow-up. Conclusion. Management of thoracolumbar fractures using percutaneous osteosynthesis and minimal invasive anterior approach (telescopic vertebral body prosthesis is a valuable strategy. Results of this strategy offer satisfactory and stable results in time.

  3. Inpatient costs and blood transfusion rates of sarcopenic patients following thoracolumbar spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokshan, Steven L; Han, Alex; DePasse, J Mason; Marcaccio, Stephen E; Eltorai, Adam E M; Daniels, Alan H

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Sarcopenia, the muscle atrophy associated with aging and disease progression, accounts for nearly $18.5 billion in health care expenditures annually. Given the high prevalence of sarcopenia in patients undergoing orthopedic surgery, the goal of this study was to assess the impact of sarcopenia on inpatient costs following thoracolumbar spine surgery. METHODS Patients older than 55 years undergoing thoracolumbar spine surgery from 2003 to 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Sarcopenia was measured using total psoas area at the L-4 vertebra on perioperative CT scans. Hospital billing data were used to compare inpatient costs, transfusion rate, and rate of advanced imaging utilization. RESULTS Of the 50 patients assessed, 16 were sarcopenic. Mean total hospital costs were 1.75-fold greater for sarcopenic patients compared with nonsarcopenic patients ($53,128 vs $30,292, p = 0.04). Sarcopenic patients were 2.1 times as likely to require a blood transfusion (43.8% vs 20.6%, p = 0.04). Sarcopenic patients had a 2.6-fold greater usage of advanced imaging (68.8% vs 26.5%, p = 0.002) with associated higher diagnostic imaging costs ($2452 vs $801, p = 0.01). Sarcopenic patients also had greater pharmacy, laboratory, respiratory care, and emergency department costs. CONCLUSIONS This study is the first to show that sarcopenia is associated with higher postoperative costs and rates of blood transfusion following thoracolumbar spine surgery. Measuring the psoas area may represent a strategy for predicting perioperative costs in spine surgery patients.

  4. Reliability and reproducibility analysis of the AOSpine thoracolumbar spine injury classification system by Chinese spinal surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Liu, Peng; Sun, Dong; Qin, Tingzheng; Ma, Zikun; Liu, Jingpei

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility of the new AOSpine thoracolumbar spine injury classification system in young Chinese orthopedic surgeons with different levels of experience in spinal trauma. Previous reports suggest that the new AOSpine thoracolumbar spine injury classification system demonstrates acceptable interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility. However, there are few studies in Asia, especially in China. The AOSpine thoracolumbar spine injury classification system was applied to 109 patients with acute, traumatic thoracolumbar spinal injuries by two groups of spinal surgeons with different levels of clinical experience. The Kappa coefficient was used to determine interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility. The overall Kappa coefficient for all cases was 0.362, which represents fair reliability. The Kappa statistic was 0.385 for A-type injuries and 0.292 for B-type injuries, which represents fair reliability, and 0.552 for C-type injuries, which represents moderate reliability. The Kappa coefficient for intraobserver reproducibility was 0.442 for A-type injuries, 0.485 for B-type injuries, and 0.412 for C-type injuries. These values represent moderate reproducibility for all injury types. The raters in Group A provided significantly better interobserver reliability than Group B (P < 0.05). There were no between-group differences in intraobserver reproducibility. This study suggests that the new AO spine injury classification system may be applied in day-to-day clinical practice in China following extensive training of healthcare providers. Further prospective studies in different healthcare providers and clinical settings are essential for validation of this classification system and to assess its utility.

  5. [Three-dimensional finite element model of thoracolumbar spine with osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Qi; Li, Qiu-jun; Yang, Yong; Li, Dong; Tang, Hai; Li, Jin-jun; Wang, Bing-qiang; Wang, Yi-peng

    2010-11-09

    To build a three-dimensional finite element model of thoracolumbar spine with osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (OVCF) and analyze its biomechanical change. The T10-L2 segment data were obtained from computed tomography (CT) scans of an elderly female with a single T12 OVCF. A three-dimensional finite element model of thoracolumbar spine was constructed with the MIMICS and ABAQUS software. The model was composed of bony vertebrae, articulating facets, intervertebral disc and associated ligaments. The basic stress analysis of T10-L2 motion segment was made for different material properties of bone, ligaments and facet joints contacting frictional property. The stress on the annulus fiber, nucleus pulposus, endplate and facet joints under axial pressure (0.3 MPa, 1.0 MPa, 4.0 MPa) were analyzed. A three-dimensional finite element model of human T12-L2 motion segment had 617468 elements. And the stress was higher in vertebral body than posterior structure. The distribution of pressure stresses in intervertebral disc was asymmetrical. The stress increased with a rising axial pressure. 3D finite element model of thoracolumbar OVCF and adjacent segments are successfully established. The results of stress analysis are both feasible and reliable.

  6. Simultaneous posterior and anterior approaches with posterior vertebral wall preserved for rigid post-traumatic kyphosis in thoracolumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Xiu, Peng; Zhong, Dejun; Wang, Gaoju; Wang, Song

    2012-08-01

    A retrospective study. To evaluate the radiological and clinical results of simultaneous surgery with preservation of the posterior vertebral wall for rigid post-traumatic kyphosis in the thoracolumbar spine. Management of rigid post-traumatic kyphosis has been a challenge for surgeons. Current widely used posterior osteotomy procedures have the disadvantages of significant invasiveness, spinal column shortening, and instrumentation-related complications. From 2004 to 2009, 21 patients with rigid post-traumatic kyphosis in the thoracolumbar spine (T11-L2) were managed in our hospital. Average kyphotic angle was 45.2° ± 11.2° (range, 31°-67°). The surgical technique used was posterior and anterior circumferential release and anterior corpectomy with posterior vertebral wall preservation and short segmental instrumentation. Preoperative and postoperative kyphotic angle was measured to assess the degree of kyphosis correction and maintenance. Changes in low back pain were assessed by Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores. All patients were successfully managed with this procedure without major complications. Most patients (19 of 21) were instrumented with anterior-only fixation, while posterior interspinal wire was added in 2 patients with osteoporosis. The mean blood loss was 470 mL (range, 300-700 mL). Patients were followed for an average of 32 months (range, 6-70 mo) postoperatively. Back pain was relieved to some degree in all patients and the improvement in Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores was 76.9% ± 7.9. Average kyphotic angle was 6.0° ± 5.7° (range, -2 to 17) immediately after surgery and 7.2° ± 5.8° (range, -3 to 17) at final follow-up. Average of 1° of correction loss was documented and all patients obtained solid fusion uneventfully. This technique is indicated for most patients with rigid post-traumatic kyphosis in the thoracolumbar spine and can yield satisfactory clinical results not only in terms of pain relief, kyphosis

  7. Bone graft extenders and substitutes in the thoracolumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arner, Justin W; Daffner, Scott D

    2012-05-01

    Autologous iliac crest bone graft remains the gold standard for lumbar fusion. The potential for complications has led to the development of alternative bone graft materials and enhancers, including autologous growth factors, demineralized bone matrix products, osteoinductive agents, and ceramic products. The current literature centers mainly on preclinical studies, which, further complicating the situation, evaluate these products in different clinical scenarios or surgical techniques. Autologous growth factors and demineralized bone matrix products have had promising results in preclinical studies, but few strong clinical studies have been conducted. Ceramic extenders were evaluated with other substances and had good but often inconsistent results. Bone morphogenetic proteins have been extensively studied and may have benefits as osteoinductive agents. Category comparisons are difficult to make, and there are differences even between products within the same category. The surgeon must be knowledgeable about products and their advantages, disadvantages, indications, contraindications, and possible applications so that they can make the best choice for each patient.

  8. Thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis with unilateral subluxation of the spine and postoperative lumbar spondylolisthesis in Hunter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Simon B; Tsirikos, Athanasios I

    2016-03-01

    Surgical correction for kyphoscoliosis is increasingly being performed for patients with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS). Reported case series have predominantly included patients with Type I (Hurler) and Type IV (Morquio) MPS. To their knowledge, the authors describe the first case report of surgical management of thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis in Hunter syndrome (MPS Type II) and the rare occurrence of lumbar spondylolisthesis following surgical stabilization. A 12-year-old boy with Hunter syndrome presented with severe thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis and no associated symptoms. Spinal radiographs demonstrated kyphosis of 48° (T11-L3) and scoliosis of 22° (T11-L3) with an anteriorly hypoplastic L-1 vertebra. The deformity progressed to kyphosis of 60° and scoliosis of 42° prior to surgical intervention. Spinal CT scans identified left T12-L1 facet subluxation, causing anterior rotatory displacement of the spine proximal to L-1 and bilateral L-5 isthmic spondylolysis with no spondylolisthesis. A combined single-stage anterior and posterior instrumented spinal arthrodesis from T-9 to L-4 was performed. Kyphosis and scoliosis were corrected to 4° and 0°, respectively. Prolonged ventilator support and nasogastric feedings were required for 3 months postoperatively. At 2.5 years following surgery, the patient was asymptomatic, mobilizing independently, and had achieved a solid spinal fusion. However, he had also developed a Grade II spondylolisthesis at L4-5; this was managed nonoperatively in the absence of symptoms or further deterioration of the spondylolisthesis to the 3.5-year postoperative follow-up visit. Satisfactory correction of thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis in Hunter syndrome can be achieved by combined anterior/posterior instrumented arthrodesis. The risk of developing deformity or instability in motion segments adjacent to an instrumented fusion may be greater in patients with MPS related to the underlying connective tissue disorder.

  9. Thoracolumbar spine model with articulated ribcage for the prediction of dynamic spinal loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignasiak, Dominika; Dendorfer, Sebastian; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2016-04-11

    Musculoskeletal modeling offers an invaluable insight into the spine biomechanics. A better understanding of thoracic spine kinetics is essential for understanding disease processes and developing new prevention and treatment methods. Current models of the thoracic region are not designed for segmental load estimation, or do not include the complex construct of the ribcage, despite its potentially important role in load transmission. In this paper, we describe a numerical musculoskeletal model of the thoracolumbar spine with articulated ribcage, modeled as a system of individual vertebral segments, elastic elements and thoracic muscles, based on a previously established lumbar spine model and data from the literature. The inverse dynamics simulations of the model allow the prediction of spinal loading as well as costal joints kinetics and kinematics. The intradiscal pressure predicted by the model correlated well (R(2)=0.89) with reported intradiscal pressure measurements, providing a first validation of the model. The inclusion of the ribcage did not affect segmental force predictions when the thoracic spine did not perform motion. During thoracic motion tasks, the ribcage had an important influence on the predicted compressive forces and muscle activation patterns. The compressive forces were reduced by up to 32%, or distributed more evenly between thoracic vertebrae, when compared to the predictions of the model without ribcage, for mild thoracic flexion and hyperextension tasks, respectively. The presented musculoskeletal model provides a tool for investigating thoracic spine loading and load sharing between vertebral column and ribcage during dynamic activities. Further validation for specific applications is still necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Influence of Spine Surgeons' Experience on the Classification and Intraobserver Reliability of the Novel AOSpine Thoracolumbar Spine Injury Classification System-An International Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiqi, Said; Oner, F Cumhur; Dvorak, Marcel F; Aarabi, Bizhan; Schroeder, Gregory D; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2015-12-01

    International validation study. To investigate the influence of the spine surgeons' level of experience on the intraobserver reliability of the novel AOSpine Thoracolumbar Spine Injury Classification system, and the appropriate classification according to this system. Wide variability has been demonstrated for intraobserver reliability of the AOSpine classification system. The spine surgeons' level of experience may play a crucial role in the appropriate classification of thoracolumbar fractures, and the degree of reproducibility of the same observer on separate occasions. However, this has not been previously investigated. After a training on the classification system, high quality CT images together with clinical data from 25 patients with thoracolumbar fractures were independently assessed by 100 spine surgeons from across the world on 2 different occasions, 1 month apart from each other. The spine surgeons were allocated to a subgroup, according to their years of experience. Intraobserver reliability was calculated for each individual surgeon and for each subgroup, using the Kappa statistics (κ). Descriptive statistics was used to describe any differences between the subgroups. Analysis of any misclassifications was performed by calculating sensitivity and specificity estimates. Almost all surgeons demonstrated at least moderate intraobserver reliability. All surgeon subgroups demonstrated substantial reliability (κ = 0.67-0.69) for fracture subtype grading, and almost all subgroups demonstrated excellent reliability (κ = 0.79-0.83) for fracture morphology type regardless of subtype identified. In general, the fractures were most frequently misclassified by the most experienced surgeons. No major differences were observed among the subgroups when comparing the sensitivity and specificity rates. This international study demonstrated that the spine surgeons' level of experience does not substantially influence the classification and intraobserver

  11. Burst fracture of the thoracolumbar spine: correlation between kyphosis and clinical result of the treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Arnold Tisot

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the correlation between kyphosis due to burst fractures of thoracic and lumbar spine and clinical outcome in patients undergoing conservative or surgical treatment.METHODS: A retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted with 29 patients with thoracolumbar burst fractures treated by the Spine Group in a trauma reference hospital between the years 2002 and 2011. Patients were followed-up as outpatients for a minimum of 24 months. All cases were clinically evaluated by Oswestry and SF-36 quality of life questionnaires and the visual analogue scale (VAS of pain. They were also evaluated by X-ray examinations and CT scans of the lumbosacral spine at the time of hospitalization and subsequently as outpatients by Cobb method for measuring the degree of kyphosis.RESULTS: There was no statistically significant correlation between the degree of initial kyphosis and clinical outcome measured by VAS and by most of the SF-36 domains in both patients treated conservatively and the surgically treated. The Oswestry questionnaire showed benefits for patients who received conservative treatment (p=0.047 compared to those surgically treated (p=0.335. The analysis of difference between initial and final kyphosis and final kyphosis alone in relation to clinical outcome showed no statistical correlation in any of the scores used.CONCLUSION: The clinical outcome of treatment of the thoracic and lumbar burst fractures was not influenced by a greater or lesser degree of initial or residual kyphosis, regardless of the type of treatment.

  12. Reliability of smartphone-based teleradiology for evaluating thoracolumbar spine fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Ido; Dreyfuss, Daniel; Ofir, Dror; Merom, Lior; Raichel, Michael; Hous, Nir; Norman, Doron; Haddad, Elias

    2017-02-01

    Timely interpretation of computed tomography (CT) scans is of paramount importance in diagnosing and managing spinal column fractures, which can be devastating. Out-of-hospital, on-call spine surgeons are often asked to evaluate CT scans of patients who have sustained trauma to the thoracolumbar spine to make diagnosis and to determine the appropriate course of urgent treatment. Capturing radiographic scans and video clips from computer screens and sending them as instant messages have become common means of communication between physicians, aiding in triaging and transfer decision-making in orthopedic and neurosurgical emergencies. The present study aimed to compare the reliability of interpreting CT scans viewed by orthopedic surgeons in two ways for diagnosing, classifying, and treatment planning for thoracolumbar spine fractures: (1) captured as video clips from standard workstation-based picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and sent via a smartphone-based instant messaging application for viewing on a smartphone; and (2) viewed directly on a PACS. Reliability and agreement study. Thirty adults with thoracolumbar spine fractures who had been consecutively admitted to the Division of Orthopedic Surgery of a Level I trauma center during 2014. Intraobserver agreement. CT scans were captured by use of an iPhone 6 smartphone from a computer screen displaying PACS. Then by use of the WhatsApp instant messaging application, video clips of the scans were sent to the personal smartphones of five spine surgeons. These evaluators were asked to diagnose, classify, and determine the course of treatment for each case. Evaluation of the cases was repeated 4 weeks later, this time using the standard method of workstation-based PACS. Intraobserver agreement was interpreted based on the value of Cohen's kappa statistic. The study did not receive any outside funding. Intraobserver agreement for determining fracture level was near perfect (κ=0.94). Intraobserver

  13. Is extended antibiotic prophylaxis necessary after penetrating trauma to the thoracolumbar spine with concomitant intraperitoneal injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasupuleti, Latha V; Sifri, Ziad C; Mohr, Alicia M

    2014-02-01

    Prolonged courses of broad-spectrum antibiotics are often cited as standard care for the prevention of infectious complications in thoracolumbar or sacral (TLS) fractures following penetrating abdominal trauma. Perforation of a hollow viscus in addition to a TLS fracture is believed to be associated with a high incidence of spine infection. Because over use of antibiotics is associated with an increasing prevalence of multi-drug-resistant organisms, this study seeks to define the actual risk of infection of the spine and need for antibiotics in patients with TLS fractures and intraperitoneal injuries following penetrating trauma. A retrospective review of 67 patients with penetrating abdominal trauma and concomitant TLS fracture was performed. Demographics, level of TLS fracture, associated spinal cord injury (SCI), need for operative intervention, presence of concomitant hollow viscus injury, and type and duration of antibiotic coverage were collected. In addition, associated infectious complications were reviewed. Spine infections were defined as spinal or paraspinal abscess, osteomyelitis of the spine, or meningitis. Intraabdominal infections were defined with imaging studies or positive peritoneal cultures. Sixty-seven patients (mean age of 27 ± 9 years) had an exploratory laparotomy and one or more TLS fractures. Four patients died within 24 h and were excluded from further study. Thirty-eight patients (60%) had one or more hollow viscus injuries, 13 (21%) had solid organ injuries alone and 12 (19%) had a non-therapeutic laparotomy. All patients received perioperative antibiotics; 92% received 48 h or less of antibiotic prophylaxis and 62% received only 24 h of antibiotics. In one patient with an isolated solid organ injury there was a spine infection (1%). In this study, 92% of patients received antibiotics for 48 h or less with no increased incidence of spine infections. Bacterial colonization of the vertebrae was not higher in patients with penetrating

  14. Performance Indicators in Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Pierre, Godefroy Hardy; Yang, Michael H; Bourget-Murray, Jonathan; Thomas, Ken C; Hurlbert, Robin John; Matthes, Nikolas

    2018-02-15

    Systematic review. To elucidate how performance indicators are currently used in spine surgery. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has given significant traction to the idea that healthcare must provide value to the patient through the introduction of hospital value-based purchasing. The key to implementing this new paradigm is to measure this value notably through performance indicators. MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus, EMBASE, and Google Scholar were searched for studies reporting the use of performance indicators specific to spine surgery. We followed the Prisma-P methodology for a systematic review for entries from January 1980 to July 2016. All full text articles were then reviewed to identify any measure of performance published within the article. This measure was then examined as per the three criteria of established standard, exclusion/risk adjustment, and benchmarking to determine if it constituted a performance indicator. The initial search yielded 85 results among which two relevant studies were identified. The extended search gave a total of 865 citations across databases among which 15 new articles were identified. The grey literature search provided five additional reports which in turn led to six additional articles. A total of 27 full text articles and reports were retrieved and reviewed. We were unable to identify performance indicators. The articles presenting a measure of performance were organized based on how many criteria they lacked. We further examined the next steps to be taken to craft the first performance indicator in spine surgery. The science of performance measurement applied to spine surgery is still in its infancy. Current outcome metrics used in clinical settings require refinement to become performance indicators. Current registry work is providing the necessary foundation, but requires benchmarking to truly measure performance. 1.

  15. [Building an effective nonlinear three-dimensional finite-element model of human thoracolumbar spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhi-Li; Cheng, Li-Ming; Zhu, Rui; Wang, Jian-Jie; Yu, Yan

    2011-08-23

    To build an effective nonlinear three-dimensional finite-element (FE) model of T(11)-L(3) segments for a further biomechanical study of thoracolumbar spine. The CT (computed tomography) scan images of healthy adult T(11)-L(3) segments were imported into software Simpleware 2.0 to generate a triangular mesh model. Using software Geomagic 8 for model repair and optimization, a solid model was generated into the finite element software Abaqus 6.9. The reasonable element C3D8 was selected for bone structures. Created between bony endplates, the intervertebral disc was subdivided into nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus (44% nucleus, 56% annulus). The nucleus was filled with 5 layers of 8-node solid elements and annulus reinforced by 8 crisscross collagenous fiber layers. The nucleus and annulus were meshed by C3D8RH while the collagen fibers meshed by two node-truss elements. The anterior (ALL) and posterior (PLL) longitudinal ligaments, flavum (FL), supraspinous (SSL), interspinous (ISL) and intertransverse (ITL) ligaments were modeled with S4R shell elements while capsular ligament (CL) was modeled with 3-node shell element. All surrounding ligaments were represented by envelope of 1 mm uniform thickness. The discs and bone structures were modeled with hyper-elastic and elasto-plastic material laws respectively while the ligaments governed by visco-elastic material law. The nonlinear three-dimensional finite-element model of T(11)-L(3) segments was generated and its efficacy verified through validating the geometric similarity and disc load-displacement and stress distribution under the impact of violence. Using ABAQUS/ EXPLICIT 6.9 the explicit dynamic finite element solver, the impact test was simulated in vitro. In this study, a 3-dimensional, nonlinear FE model including 5 vertebrae, 4 intervertebral discs and 7 ligaments consisted of 78 887 elements and 71 939 nodes. The model had good geometric similarity under the same conditions. The results of FEM

  16. Operative and nonoperative adverse events in the management of traumatic fractures of the thoracolumbar spine: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobrial, George M; Maulucci, Christopher M; Maltenfort, Mitchell; Dalyai, Richard T; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Fehlings, Michael G; Street, John; Arnold, Paul M; Harrop, James S

    2014-01-01

    Thoracolumbar spine injuries are commonly encountered in patients with trauma, accounting for almost 90% of all spinal fractures. Thoracolumbar burst fractures comprise a high percentage of these traumatic fractures (45%), and approximately half of the patients with this injury pattern are neurologically intact. However, a debate over complication rates associated with operative versus nonoperative management of various thoracolumbar fracture morphologies is ongoing, particularly concerning those patients presenting without a neurological deficit. A MEDLINE search for pertinent literature published between 1966 and December 2013 was conducted by 2 authors (G.G. and R.D.), who used 2 broad search terms to maximize the initial pool of manuscripts for screening. These terms were "operative lumbar spine adverse events" and "nonoperative lumbar spine adverse events." In an advanced MEDLINE search of the term "operative lumbar spine adverse events" on January 8, 2014, 1459 results were obtained. In a search of "nonoperative lumbar spine adverse events," 150 results were obtained. After a review of all abstracts for relevance to traumatic thoracolumbar spinal injuries, 62 abstracts were reviewed for the "operative" group and 21 abstracts were reviewed for the "nonoperative" group. A total of 14 manuscripts that met inclusion criteria for the operative group and 5 manuscripts that met criteria for the nonoperative group were included. There were a total of 919 and 436 patients in the operative and nonoperative treatment groups, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups with respect to age, sex, and length of stay. The mean ages were 43.17 years in the operative and 34.68 years in the nonoperative groups. The majority of patients in both groups were Frankel Grade E (342 and 319 in operative and nonoperative groups, respectively). Among the studies that reported the data, the mean length of stay was 14 days in the operative group

  17. [Intra-operative myelography in treatment of fractures of thoracolumbar spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomčovčík, L; Cuha, R; Raši, R

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the results of intra-operative myelography as the method used to assess the reduction of bone fragments from the posterior margin of the vertebral body. Forty patients with 42 comminuted fractures of the thoracolumbar spine were included in the study. The pre-operative spinal stenosis caused by bone fragments from the posterior margin of the vertebral body, as detected by CT scanning, ranged from 25 % to 85 %. Neurological deficit was due to injury in 19 patients and in one it developed post-operatively after the patient stood and walked. After ligamentotaxis and internal fixation, intra-operative myelography was used to show decompression of the spinal canal. A spinal block or severe constriction of contrast flow was an indication for hemilaminectomy (laminectomy) and direct decompression of the spinal canal. In the patients with neurological deficit and severe spinal stenosis persisting after ligamentotaxis and detectable by skiascopy, hemilaminectomy (laminectomy) and direct spinal decompression followed by intra-operative myelography were carried out. Intra-operative myelography was used 46 -times (20-times in 20 patients free from neurological deficit and 26-times in 20 patients with neurological deficit). In 38 cases (82.6 %) dural sac compression was not present (patients with neurological deficit, 13-times after ligamentotaxis, eight-times after ligamentotaxis and hemilaminectomy with direct decompression, twi- ce at repeat surgeryúúú patients without neurological deficit, 15-times). On two occasions (4.4 %) the contrast agent injected into the dural sac did not make the interior body part visible, on three occasions (6.5 %) contrast medium was injected extradurally, and dural sac compression following ligamentotaxis requiring hemilaminectomy (laminectomy) and direct decompression occurred in three cases (6.5 %). In the patients without neurological deficit, dural sac compression was not recorded. No

  18. Complete fracture-dislocation of the thoracolumbar spine without neurological deficit: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Junfeng; Gong, Quan; Liu, Hao; Rong, Xin; Ding, Chen

    2018-03-01

    Traumatic fracture of the thoracolumbar junction (T10-L2) is the most common fracture of the spinal column. Due to the disruption of the entire vertebrae column, the fracture-dislocation of the thoracolumbar spine is almost invariably associated with neurological injury. A complete fracture-dislocation of the thoracolumbar spine without neurological deficit is a rare entity. A 38-year-old man presented with severe low back pain after an accident when he was building a house. Comprehensive neurological examinations revealed intact neurological function. The plain X-ray and computed tomography revealed a complete facture-dislocation of the L1 to L2 vertebrae. The patient underwent posterior reduction and internal fixation with screws and rods. The neurological function was preserved postoperatively. The patient returned to work after 6 months. Early diagnosis is important before performing any dangerous maneuvers. Given the results of this case and the relevant literature, the prognosis of these patients is promising following surgical intervention.

  19. [Computer-aided discectomy and corpectomy in anterior reconstruction of the injured thoracolumbar spine. A prospective, controlled clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blattert, T R; Springwald, J; Glasmacher, S; Siekmann, H; Josten, C

    2008-11-01

    In anterior reconstruction of the unstable thoracolumbar spine, discectomy and corpectomy are technically demanding steps requiring maximal surgical precision. This study investigated the feasibility of computer-aided guidance for discectomy and corpectomy. It also analysed the precision, advantages, and disadvantages of the procedure. Vertebral body fractures of the non-osteoporotic thoracolumbar spine addressed by discectomy/corpectomy and subsequent implant interposition (cage, tricortical strut graft) for anterior reconstruction were included. All surgical steps were done under endoscopic assistance. In the trial group, discectomy and corpectomy were performed with computer-aided guidance; in the control group, no computer navigation was used. The time required for surgery was noted. To assess surgical precision, decentralization of the implant in the frontal plane was measured in postoperative x-rays and computed tomography. Additionally, parallel alignment of vertebral body end plates with the implant was evaluated. The trial group (TG) consisted of 16 patients, and the control group (CG) of 10 patients. Fractures were localized between T10 and L1 in TG, and between T9 and L1 in CG. Operating time was significantly shorter in CG: 104+/-28 min compared with 229+/-64 min in TG (pComputer-aided guidance for anterior reconstruction of the thoracolumbar spine is a technically feasible option that may help in performing discectomy and corpectomy. However, this technique significantly prolongs the operating time. There were no differences in the precision of implant positioning between the groups. However, during discectomy the use of computer navigation may possibly add to the protection of adjacent end plates.

  20. A prospective cohort study comparing the VAS spine score and Roland-Morris disability questionnaire in patients with a type a traumatic thoracolumbar spinal fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Siebenga, Joukje; Leferink, Vincent; Segers, Michiel; Elzinga, Matthijs; Bakker, Fred; Duis, D.H.J.; Rommens, Pol; Patka, Peter

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ-24) and the VAS spine score have been regularly used to measure functional outcome in patients with back pain. The RMDQ-24 is primarily used in degenerative disease of the spine and the VAS Spine is used in trauma patients. The aim of this study is to compare these scores and to see if there is a correlation in patients with a traumatic thoracolumbar spinal fracture. Prospective cohort study comparing the RMDQ-24 and the VAS spine s...

  1. The efficacy of a percutaneous expandable titanium device in anatomical reduction of vertebral compression fractures of the thoracolumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeesa, Saleh S; Krueger, Antonio; Aragón, Francisco A; Noriega, David C

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a minimally invasive technique using a titanium expandable device to achieve anatomical restoration of vertebral compression fractures (VCF) of the thoracolumbar spine. This prospective study included 27 patients diagnosed with VCF (Magerl classification A.1.2, A.1.3, and A.3.1) of the thoracolumbar spine treated with percutaneous cement augmentation using the SpineJack® device. The study was conducted in Valladolid University Hospital, Valladolid, Spain from January to December 2012, with a minimum one-year follow up. Preoperative evaluation included visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, and radiological assessment of the VCF using 3-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scans for measurements of vertebral heights and angles. The patients were followed at 3, 6, and 12 months with clinical VAS and radiological assessments. The procedure was performed in 27 patients with a mean age of 55.9 ± 17.3 years, 55.6% females. All patients underwent surgery within 6 weeks from time of injury. No procedure related complications occurred. Pain measured by VAS score decreased from 7.0 preoperatively to 3.2 within 24 hours, and remained 2.2 at 3 months, 2.1 at 6 months, and 1.5 at 12-months follow-up (p<0.05). Mean height restorations for the anterior was 3.56 mm, central was 2.49, and posterior vertebral was 1.28 mm, and maintained at 12-months follow-up (p=0.001). This new percutaneous technique for VCF has shown good clinical results in pain control and the possibility to reduce both vertebral kyphosis angles and fractured endplates seen in 3D-CT scans assessment method. Further studies are needed to confirm those results on larger cohorts with long-term follow up. 

  2. The efficacy of a percutaneous expandable titanium device in anatomical reduction of vertebral compression fractures of the thoracolumbar spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeesa, Saleh S.; Krueger, Antonio; Aragón, Francisco A.; Noriega, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility of a minimally invasive technique using a titanium expandable device to achieve anatomical restoration of vertebral compression fractures (VCF) of the thoracolumbar spine. Methods: This prospective study included 27 patients diagnosed with VCF (Magerl classification A.1.2, A.1.3, and A.3.1) of the thoracolumbar spine treated with percutaneous cement augmentation using the SpineJack® device. The study was conducted in Valladolid University Hospital, Valladolid, Spain from January to December 2012, with a minimum one-year follow up. Preoperative evaluation included visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, and radiological assessment of the VCF using 3-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scans for measurements of vertebral heights and angles. The patients were followed at 3, 6, and 12 months with clinical VAS and radiological assessments. Results: The procedure was performed in 27 patients with a mean age of 55.9 ± 17.3 years, 55.6% females. All patients underwent surgery within 6 weeks from time of injury. No procedure related complications occurred. Pain measured by VAS score decreased from 7.0 preoperatively to 3.2 within 24 hours, and remained 2.2 at 3 months, 2.1 at 6 months, and 1.5 at 12-months follow-up (pvertebral was 1.28 mm, and maintained at 12-months follow-up (p=0.001). Conclusion: This new percutaneous technique for VCF has shown good clinical results in pain control and the possibility to reduce both vertebral kyphosis angles and fractured endplates seen in 3D-CT scans assessment method. Further studies are needed to confirm those results on larger cohorts with long-term follow up. PMID:25630005

  3. The posterior layer of the thoracolumbar fascia. Its function in load transfer from spine to legs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool-Goudzwaard, A.L.; Vleeming, A; Stoeckart, R.; Wingerden, Jan Paul; Snijders, Chris

    1996-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: The superficial and deep lamina of the posterior layer of the thoracolumbar fascia have been studied anatomically and biomechanically. In embalmed human specimens, the posterior layer has been loaded by simulating the action of various muscles. The effect has been studied using raster

  4. Residual mobility of instrumented and non-fused segments in thoracolumbar spine fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Yurac, Ratko; Marré, Bartolomé; Urzua, Alejandro.; Munjin, Milan; Lecaros, Miguel A.

    2006-01-01

    The surgical management of thoracolumbar fractures presents potential benefits. However, the surgery solve the instability by fusion of mobile segments. We incorporate in our treatment algorithms, the use of restricted arthrodesis at injured levels, regardless of longer instrumentations, as well as the use of non-fused transitory stabilizations, based on the conviction that in non-fused segments without traumatic disc injury, mobility persists once the instrumentation is removed. The goals of...

  5. Trauma of the lumbar spine and the thoracolumbar junction; Trauma der Lendenwirbelsaeule und des thorakolumbalen Uebergangs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reith, W.; Harsch, N.; Kraus, C. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Patients who have experienced high energy trauma have a particularly high risk of suffering from fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine. The detection of spinal injuries and the correct classification of fractures before surgery are not only absolute requirements for the implementation of appropriate surgical treatment but they are also decisive for the choice of surgical procedure. By the application of spiral computed tomography (CT) crucial additional information on the morphology of the fracture can be gained in order to estimate the fracture type and possibly the indications for specific surgical treatment options. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ideally suited to provide valuable additional information regarding injuries to the discoligamentous structures of the spine. Magerl et al. developed a comprehensive classification especially for injuries of the thoracic and lumbar spine, which was adopted by the working group for osteosynthesis (AO). This is based on a 2-pillar model of the spinal column. The classification is based on the pathomorphological characteristics of fractures recognizable by imaging. The injury pattern is of particular importance. In spinal trauma a distinction is made between stable and unstable fractures. The treatment of spinal injuries depends on the severity of the overall injury pattern. Besides adequate initial treatment at the scene, a trauma CT should be immediately carried out in order that no injuries are overlooked and to ensure a rapid decision on the treatment procedure. (orig.) [German] Insbesondere bei Patienten, die Hochenergie- oder Rasanztraumata erfahren haben, besteht ein erhoehtes Risiko, Frakturen der BWS und LWS zu erleiden. Die Erkennung von Verletzungen der Wirbelsaeule und die korrekte Klassifikation der Frakturen vor der Operation sind nicht nur unbedingte Voraussetzungen fuer die Einleitung einer adaequaten, ggf. operativen Therapie, sondern mitentscheidend fuer die Wahl des operativen Verfahrens. Bei

  6. Optimal patient positioning for ligamentotaxis during balloon kyphoplasty of the thoracolumbar and lumbar spine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cawley, D T

    2011-06-01

    Percutaneous balloon kyphoplasty aims to restore vertebral height, correct angular deformity and stabilize the spine in the setting of vertebral compression fractures. The patient is positioned prone with supports under the iliac crests and upper thorax to allow gravity to extend the spine. In the treatment of lumbar fractures, we evaluated patient positioning with the contribution of hip extension to increase anterior ligamentotaxis, thus facilitating restoration of vertebral height. Our positioning technique created a mean anterior height increase from 72% to 78% of the average height of the cranial and caudal vertebrae (p=0.037). Balloon inflation did not significantly further increase anterior or posterior vertebral height, or Cobb angle.

  7. First performance evaluation of software for automatic segmentation, labeling and reformation of anatomical aligned axial images of the thoracolumbar spine at CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholtz, Jan-Erik, E-mail: janerikscholtz@gmail.com; Wichmann, Julian L.; Kaup, Moritz; Fischer, Sebastian; Kerl, J. Matthias; Lehnert, Thomas; Vogl, Thomas J.; Bauer, Ralf W.

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •Automatic segmentation and labeling of the thoracolumbar spine. •Automatically generated double-angulated and aligned axial images of spine segments. •High grade of accurateness for the symmetric depiction of anatomical structures. •Time-saving and may improve workflow in daily practice. -- Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate software for automatic segmentation, labeling and reformation of anatomical aligned axial images of the thoracolumbar spine on CT in terms of accuracy, potential for time savings and workflow improvement. Material and methods: 77 patients (28 women, 49 men, mean age 65.3 ± 14.4 years) with known or suspected spinal disorders (degenerative spine disease n = 32; disc herniation n = 36; traumatic vertebral fractures n = 9) underwent 64-slice MDCT with thin-slab reconstruction. Time for automatic labeling of the thoracolumbar spine and reconstruction of double-angulated axial images of the pathological vertebrae was compared with manually performed reconstruction of anatomical aligned axial images. Reformatted images of both reconstruction methods were assessed by two observers regarding accuracy of symmetric depiction of anatomical structures. Results: In 33 cases double-angulated axial images were created in 1 vertebra, in 28 cases in 2 vertebrae and in 16 cases in 3 vertebrae. Correct automatic labeling was achieved in 72 of 77 patients (93.5%). Errors could be manually corrected in 4 cases. Automatic labeling required 1 min in average. In cases where anatomical aligned axial images of 1 vertebra were created, reconstructions made by hand were significantly faster (p < 0.05). Automatic reconstruction was time-saving in cases of 2 and more vertebrae (p < 0.05). Both reconstruction methods revealed good image quality with excellent inter-observer agreement. Conclusion: The evaluated software for automatic labeling and anatomically aligned, double-angulated axial image reconstruction of the thoracolumbar spine on CT is time

  8. Corpectomy in destructive thoracolumbar spine disease: Cost-effectiveness of 3 different techniques and implications for cost reduction of delivered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archavlis, Eleftherios; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Ulrich, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To give some insight in balancing cost and effectiveness of 3 different techniques of corpectomy in destructive thoracolumbar spine disease. Although there are several accepted methods of surgical treatment of single-level corpectomy in destructive metastatic thoracolumbar spine disease, the choice depends on the surgeon's preference. The techniques may vary in perioperative morbidity and short- and long-term outcome, but no study so far has analyzed their cost-effectiveness. Seventy-five consecutive patients, mean age of 57 years (range: 39-72 yr) with single-level destructive thoracolumbar lesion underwent surgical treatment with 3 different techniques in 2 centers from 2009 to 2013. The 3 groups were (1) mini open transpedicular corpectomy, (2) conventional open transpedicular corpectomy, and (3) the combined posterior-anterior approach. The data were collected prospectively according to our protocol and subsequently analyzed. The clinical outcome was assessed comparing visual analogue scale score of back pain and the short form 12 (SF-12) questionnaire both pre- and postoperatively. The cost analysis was done calculating the operative time, hospital stay, and the implant cost. The mean follow-up period was 25 months (range: 24-30 mo). The clinical outcome in terms of visual analogue scale score of thoracolumbar pain and SF-12 physical and mental score improvement (P < 0.005) were comparable with all 3 techniques. The radiological outcome was comparable with current available data. As the intensive care unit stay (average: 7 d) and the hospital stay were longer (average: 15 d) with combined posterior-anterior approach, the total cost was maximum (average: €20,952) with this group. Using the posterior approach only was the most cost-effective technique, but the mini open was comparable with the conventional open transpedicular approach. 3.

  9. Predictors of Recovery After Conservative Treatment of AO-Type A Thoracolumbar Spine Fractures Without Neurological Deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorlat, Peter; Leirs, Geert; Tajdar, Farhad; Hulsmans, Heinz; De Boeck, Hugo; Vaes, Peter

    2018-01-15

    Prospective, correlational, exploratory, clinical research. To identify the factors determining a patient's recovery after conservative treatment of compression fractures of the thoracolumbar spine. The reported results of compression fractures are poor. These results are not influenced by the severity of compression, the fracture site, or the residual deformity. Otherwise, the factors that determine a patient's recovery are unknown. In 48 conservatively treated patients the preinjury versus the 12-month follow-up differences (Δ) in back pain (visual analogue scale for pain), Oswestry disability index (ODI), and the Greenough and Fraser low back outcome scale were prospectively recorded. For these differences and for time lost from work and satisfaction, multiple linear regressions with combinations of 16 factors were performed. At 1 year, patients with an income-insurance were 9% (P = 0.096) more disabled than those without. They reported a 15% less favorable global outcome and 27% less participation. Smokers were 13% (P = 0.010) more disabled and 11% (P = 0.044) less satisfied. With each increase of the AO-fracture type from A1 to A3 the disability was 8% worse. Patients with pre-existent chronic low back pain (CLBP) returned two points (on a visual analogue scale [VAS] pain total of 10) more closely (P = 0.041) to their preinjury pain level than those without but were 21% (P = 0.001) less satisfied. Our model offers an explanation for more than 25% of the variability of ΔODI and of the satisfaction. For sick leave, no significant predictors were found. Smoking and insurance status are the strongest negative predictors for recovery. LBP patients returned more closely to their preinjury back pain level, but were less satisfied. The AO fracture type had a marked influence on disability, the sagittal deformity had not. The time lost from work did not depend on patient or injury-related factors. N/A.

  10. Pedicle measurement of the thoracolumbar spine: a cadaveric, radiographic, and CT scan study in Filipinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molano, A.M.V.; Sison, A.B.; Fong, H.C.; Lim, N.T.; Sabile, K.

    1994-01-01

    With the popular usage of spinal pedicular screw fixation, it is essential to have a knowledge of the morphometry of the pedicles of the spine of particular populations. This study compared the direct pedicle measurements of ten cadavers in an institution, with their respective radiographic and computerized tomographic (CT) scan values, and also compared the effective pedicle diameter (EPD) with the conventional outer pedicle diameter (OPD) measurements. A compilation of pedicle values was also made in X-ray and CT scan plates of a Filipino population. A statistical analysis made on the 2,760 pedicle measurements taken from cadaveric T6-L5 vertebrae showed that direct measurements were significantly different from X-ray and CT scan values. The mean values of the EPD differed from those of the OPD, but not statistically significant. Comparison with previous foreign studies revealed significant differences in these pedicle dimensions. Pedicle measurements in a living Filipino population were found to be significantly different statistically between sexes. Accurate measurement of the pedicle diameters and lengths are indeed critical for the success of a spinal stabilization procedure using pedicular screws. (author). 8 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  11. Minimally invasive mini open split-muscular percutaneous pedicle screw fixation of the thoracolumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Ulutaş

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We prospectively assessed the feasibility and safety of a new percutaneous pedicle screw (PPS fixation technique for instrumentation of the thoracic and lumbar spine in this study. All patients were operated in the prone position under general anesthesia. A 6 to 8 cm midline skin incision was made and wide sub-cutaneous dissection was performed. The paravertebral muscles were first dissected subperiosteally into the midline incision of the fascia for lumbar microdiscectomy with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion cage implantation. After the secondary paramedian incisions on the fascia, the PPSs were inserted via cleavage of the multifidus muscles directly into the pedicles under fluoroscopy visualization. A total of 35 patients underwent surgery with this new surgical technique. The control group for operative time, blood loss and analgesic usage consisted of 35 randomly selected cases from our department. The control group underwent surgery via conventional pedicle screw instrumentation with paramedian fusion. All patients in the minimal invasive surgery series were ambulatory with minimal pain on the first postoperative day. The operation time and blood loss and the postoperative analgesic consumption were significantly less with this new technique. In conclusion, the minimal invasive mini open split-muscular percutaneous pedicle screw fixation technique is safe and feasible. It can be performed via a short midline skin incision and can also be combined with interbody fusion, causing minimal pain without severe muscle damage.

  12. Determinants and heterogeneity of mechanical competence throughout the thoracolumbar spine of elderly women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Felix; Fischbeck, Markus; Kuhn, Volker; Link, Thomas M; Priemel, Matthias; Lochmüller, Eva-Maria

    2004-08-01

    Vertebral fractures represent the hallmark of osteoporosis. Here, we test the hypotheses that (sub)cortical bone strength and density predict failure better than trabecular core strength and density, and that elderly women display lower failure stress of thoracic vertebrae than men. We examined the vertebral bodies T3 to L5 in 39 spines from elderly donors (23 women; 16 men; age 79 +/- 11 years). Peripheral quantitative computed tomography was used to measure total, trabecular, and (sub)cortical bone density. Mechanical tests were performed in functional spinal units, planoparallel sections of vertebrae, trabecular cores, and (sub)cortical ring specimens. The failure stress decreased with descending vertebral level. Failure stress was highest for the (sub)cortical rings and planoparallel sections and lowest for the trabecular core. The failure stress did not differ significantly between men and women. Mechanical strength of the functional unit was more strongly correlated with the strength of the (sub)cortical ring (r = 0.78) than with that of the trabecular core (r = 0.62). However, total density was more highly correlated with mechanical strength of the same and remote vertebrae (r = 0.63) than trabecular (r = 0.50) or (sub)cortical density (r = 0.36), respectively. The results show that vertebral strength is similar in elderly women and men. Strength of (sub)cortical bone provides significantly better prediction of strength of functional spinal units than that of the trabecular core. However, total density predicts functional segment failure stress with higher accuracy than (sub)cortical or trabecular density and is thus recommended for predicting fracture strength clinically.

  13. The value of CT and MRI in the classification and surgical decision-making among spine surgeons in thoracolumbar spinal injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Kanna, Rishi Mugesh; Schroeder, Gregory D; Oner, Frank Cumhur; Vialle, Luiz; Chapman, Jens; Dvorak, Marcel; Fehlings, Michael; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad; Schnake, Klaus; Maheshwaran, Anupama; Kandziora, Frank

    2017-05-01

    Although imaging has a major role in evaluation and management of thoracolumbar spinal trauma by spine surgeons, the exact role of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in addition to radiographs for fracture classification and surgical decision-making is unclear. Spine surgeons (n = 41) from around the world classified 30 thoracolumbar fractures. The cases were presented in a three-step approach: first plain radiographs, followed by CT and MRI images. Surgeons were asked to classify according to the AOSpine classification system and choose management in each of the three steps. Surgeons correctly classified 43.4 % of fractures with plain radiographs alone; after, additionally, evaluating CT and MRI images, this percentage increased by further 18.2 and 2.2 %, respectively. AO type A fractures were identified in 51.7 % of fractures with radiographs, while the number of type B fractures increased after CT and MRI. The number of type C fractures diagnosed was constant across the three steps. Agreement between radiographs and CT was fair for A-type (k = 0.31), poor for B-type (k = 0.19), but it was excellent between CT and MRI (k > 0.87). CT and MRI had similar sensitivity in identifying fracture subtypes except that MRI had a higher sensitivity (56.5 %) for B2 fractures (p change after an MRI (p = 0.77). For accurate classification, radiographs alone were insufficient except for C-type injuries. CT is mandatory for accurately classifying thoracolumbar fractures. Though MRI did confer a modest gain in sensitivity in B2 injuries, the study does not support the need for routine MRI in patients for classification, assessing instability or need for surgery.

  14. Prospective derivation of a clinical decision rule for thoracolumbar spine evaluation after blunt trauma: An American Association for the Surgery of Trauma Multi-Institutional Trials Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Kenji; Nosanov, Lauren; Menaker, Jay; Bosarge, Patrick; Williams, Lashonda; Turay, David; Cachecho, Riad; de Moya, Marc; Bukur, Marko; Carl, Jordan; Kobayashi, Leslie; Kaminski, Stephen; Beekley, Alec; Gomez, Mario; Skiada, Dimitra

    2015-03-01

    Unlike the cervical spine (C-spine), where National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study (NEXUS) and the Canadian C-spine Rules can be used, evidence-based thoracolumbar spine (TL-spine) clearance guidelines do not exist. The aim of this study was to develop a clinical decision rule for evaluating the TL-spine after injury. Adult (≥15 years) blunt trauma patients were prospectively enrolled at 13 US trauma centers (January 2012 to January 2014). Exclusion criteria included the following: C-spine injury with neurologic deficit, preexisting paraplegia/tetraplegia, and unevaluable examination. Remaining evaluable patients underwent TL-spine imaging and were followed up to discharge. The primary end point was a clinically significant TL-spine injury requiring TL-spine orthoses or surgical stabilization. Regression techniques were used to develop a clinical decision rule. Decision rule performance in identifying clinically significant fractures was tested. Of 12,479 patients screened, 3,065 (24.6%) met inclusion criteria (mean [SD] age, 43.5 [19.8] years [range, 15-103 years]; male sex, 66.3%; mean [SD] Injury Severity Score [ISS], 8.8 [7.5]). The majority underwent computed tomography (93.3%), 6.3% only plain films, and 0.2% magnetic resonance imaging exclusively. TL-spine injury was identified in 499 patients (16.3%), of which 264 (8.6%) were clinically significant (29.2% surgery, 70.8% TL-spine orthosis). The majority was AO Type A1 282 (56.5%), followed by 67 (13.4%) A3, 43 (8.6%) B2, and 32 (6.4%) A4 injuries. The predictive ability of clinical examination (pain, midline tenderness, deformity, neurologic deficit), age, and mechanism was examined; positive clinical examination finding resulted in a sensitivity of 78.4% and a specificity of 72.9%. Addition of age of 60 years or older and high-risk mechanism (fall, crush, motor vehicle crash with ejection/rollover, unenclosed vehicle crash, auto vs. pedestrian) increased sensitivity to 98.9% with specificity of

  15. A new distractable implant for vertebral body replacement: biomechanical testing of four implants for the thoracolumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, M; Schmoelz, W; Canto, F; Krappinger, D; Blauth, M; Knop, Christian

    2009-10-01

    Expandable titanium implants for vertebral body replacement in the thoracolumbar spine have been well established in the reconstruction of the anterior spinal column. Load transfer at the bone-implant interface remains a point of concern. The purpose of the study was to compare the performance in axial load transfer from the implant to the vertebral body in four different implants, all of them in clinical use to date. We tested a second generation implant (Synex II) in comparison to three different expandable titanium cages: Synex I, Obelisc and X-Tenz. Twenty-four intact fresh frozen human lumbar vertebrae (L1-L4) were distributed into four identical groups according to bone mineral density (BMD). The BMD was determined by quantitative computed tomography (qCT). Specimens were loaded in craniocaudal direction with a material testing machine (Mini Bionix II) at a constant speed of 5 mm/min. Load displacement curves were continuously recorded for each specimen until failure (diminishment of compressive force (F) and/or obvious implant migration through the vertebral body end plate). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc tests (Bonferroni) were applied to detect differences at 1, 2, 3, and 4 mm displacement (F (1-4 mm)) between implant groups. No significant differences were observed with regard to maximum compression force (F (max)) and displacement (d (max)) until failure: Synex II (1,782.3 N/4.67 mm); Synex I (1,645.3 N/4.72 mm); Obelisc (1,314.0 N/4.24 mm); X-Tenz (1470.3 N/6.92 mm). However, the mean compression force at 1-4 mm displacement (F (1-4 mm): 300-1,600 N) was highest for Synex II. The difference at 2 mm displacement was significant (p = 0.028) between Synex II (F (2 mm) = 879 N) and X-Tenz (F (2 mm) = 339 N). The modified end plate design of Synex II was found to perform comparably at least with regard to the compressive performance at the implant-bone interface. The risk of the new implant for collapse into the vertebral body might be

  16. Total motion generated in the unstable thoracolumbar spine during management of the typical trauma patient: a comparison of methods in a cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasarn, Mark L; Zhou, Haitao; Dubose, Dewayne; Rossi, Gianluca Del; Conrad, Bryan P; Horodyski, Marybeth; Rechtine, Glenn R

    2012-05-01

    The proper prehospital and inpatient management of patients with unstable spinal injuries is critical for prevention of secondary neurological compromise. The authors sought to analyze the amount of motion generated in the unstable thoracolumbar spine during various maneuvers and transfers that a trauma patient would typically be subjected to prior to definitive fixation. Five fresh cadavers with surgically created unstable L-1 burst fractures were tested. The amount of angular motion between the T-12 and L-2 vertebral segments was measured using a 3D electromagnetic motion analysis device. A complete sequence of maneuvers and transfers was then performed that a patient would be expected to go through from the time of injury until surgical fixation. These maneuvers and transfers included spine board placement and removal, bed transfers, lateral therapy, and turning the patient prone onto the operating table. During each of these, the authors performed what they believed to be the most commonly used versus the best techniques for preventing undesirable motion at the injury level. When placing a spine board there was more motion in all 3 planes with the log-roll technique, and this difference reached statistical significance for axial rotation (p = 0.018) and lateral bending (p = 0.003). Using logrolling for spine board removal resulted in increased motion again, and this was statistically significant for flexion-extension (p = 0.014). During the bed transfer and lateral therapy, the log-roll technique resulted in more motion in all 3 planes (p ≤ 0.05). When turning the cadavers prone for surgery there was statistically more angular motion in each plane for manually turning the patient versus the Jackson table turn (p ≤ 0.01). The total motion was decreased by almost 50% in each plane when using an alternative to the log-roll techniques during the complete sequence (p ≤ 0.007). Although it is unknown how much motion in the unstable spine is necessary to cause

  17. 6-Year follow-up of ventral monosegmental spondylodesis of incomplete burst fractures of the thoracolumbar spine using three cortical iliac crest bone grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegl, Ulrich; Hauck, Stefan; Merkel, Patricia; Bühren, Volker; Gonschorek, Oliver

    2012-10-01

    Autologous bone graft is the gold standard for vertebral body replacement. Currently, after modern implants for vertebral body replacement are available, controversies exist regarding the optimal implant strategy. Between 2002 and 2003, 17 patients were included in this study, all suffering from incomplete burst fractures of the thoracolumbar spine. All of them were treated by ventral monosegmental spondylodesis using iliac crest bone graft. The individual treatment strategy depended on the fracture situation and patient's condition. After an average of 74 months (range 66-84) a clinical and computer tomographic follow-up examination was performed in 14 patients (average age, 35.2 years) including VAS spine score and SF 36 score. Nine patients were treated ventral only five patients dorsoventrally. Complete osseous consolidation was visible in nine, partial consolidation (>30 %) in four, and lysis in one patient, without any significant differences between ventral only or dorsoventral approach. After removal of the fixateur interne the level of consolidation improved in all patients, treated dorsoventrally. There was no significant correlation between percentage of osseous consolidation and the clinical follow-up parameters. After 6 years, 71 % of the patients suffered from persistent pain associated with the approach to the iliac crest. Two revision surgeries have been necessary. High rates of osseous consolidation are visible 6 years after ventral spondylodesis by iliac crest bone grafts. A further improvement of consolidation can be expected after dorsal implant removal. But the surgical approach to the iliac crest is accompanied with a relevant complication rate.

  18. Comparison of polymethylmethacrylate versus expandable cage in anterior vertebral column reconstruction after posterior extracavitary corpectomy in lumbar and thoraco-lumbar metastatic spine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleraky, Mohammed; Papanastassiou, Ioannis; Tran, Nam D; Dakwar, Elias; Vrionis, Frank D

    2011-08-01

    Single-stage posterior corpectomy for the management of spinal tumors has been well described. Anterior column reconstruction has been accomplished using polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or expandable cages (EC). The aim of this retrospective study was to compare PMMA versus ECs in anterior vertebral column reconstruction after posterior corpectomy for tumors in the lumbar and thoracolumbar spine. Between 2006 and 2009 we identified 32 patients that underwent a single-stage posterior extracavitary tumor resection and anterior reconstruction, 16 with PMMA and 16 with EC. There were no baseline differences in regards to age (mean: 58.2 years) or performance status. Differences between groups in terms of survival, estimated blood loss (EBL), kyphosis reduction (decrease in Cobb's angle), pain, functional outcomes, and performance status were evaluated. Mean overall survival and EBL were 17 months and 1165 ml, respectively. No differences were noted between the study groups in regards to survival (p = 0.5) or EBL (p = 0.8). There was a trend for better Kyphosis reduction in favor of the EC group (10.04 vs. 5.45, p = 0.16). No difference in performance status or VAS improvements was observed (p > 0.05). Seven patients had complications that led to reoperation (5 infections). PMMA or ECs are viable options for reconstruction of the anterior vertebral column following tumor resection and corpectomy. Both approaches allow for correction of the kyphotic deformity, and stabilization of the anterior vertebral column with similar functional and performance status outcomes in the lumbar and thoracolumbar area.

  19. Injuries Associated with Thoracolumbar Fractures | Montshiwa | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: A total of 32 cases had been admitted with fractures of the thoracolumbar spine over the study period. Neurologic injury was associated with a thoracolumbar fracture in two-thirds of cases. An associated non-spinal injury was found in 37.5% of cases. Most of these injuries (77%) involved the extremities. The

  20. Translaminar screw fixation in the lumbar spine: technique, indications, results

    OpenAIRE

    Grob, D.; Humke, T.

    1998-01-01

    Translaminar screw fixation of the lumbar spine represents a simple and effective technique for short segment fusion in the degenerative spine. Clinical experience with 173 patients who underwent translaminar screw fixation revealed a fusion rate of 94%. The indications for translaminar screw fixation as a primary fixation procedure are: segmental dysfunction, lumbar spinal stenosis with painful degenerative changes, segmental revision surgery after discectomies, and painful disc-related synd...

  1. Osteoporotic compression fracture of the thoracolumbar spine and sacral insufficiency fracture: incidence and analysis of the relationship according to the clinical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Jeong Hwa; Park, Ji Sun; Ryu, Kyung Nam

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of sacral insufficiency fracture in osteoporotic patient with compression fracture of the thoracolumbar (T-L) spine on magnetic resonance image (MRI), and to analyze the correlation of variable clinical factors and the incidence of sacral insufficiency fracture. We retrospectively reviewed 160 patients (27 men, 133 women; age range of 50 to 89 years) who underwent spinal MRI and had compression fracture of the T-L spine. Compression fractures due to trauma or tumor were excluded. We evaluated the incidence of sacral insufficiency fracture according to the patients' age, sex, number of compression fractures, and the existence of bone marrow edema pattern of compression fracture. During the same period, we evaluated the incidence of spinal compression fracture in the patients of pelvic insufficiency fracture. Out of the 160 patients who had compression fracture in the T-L spine, 17 (10.6%) had insufficiency fracture of the sacrum. Compression fracture occurred almost 5 times more frequently in women (27:133), but the incidence of sacral insufficiency fracture was 2/27 for men (7.4%) and 15/133 for women (11.3%), with no statistically significant difference (ρ = 0.80). According to age, the ratio of insufficiency fracture to compression fracture was 0% (0/23) in the 50's, 10.6% (7/66) in the 60's, 12.5% (7/56) in the 70's, and 20.0% (3/15) in the 80's. In respect of single and multiple compression fracture, the incidence of sacral insufficiency fracture was 8/65 for men (12.3%) and 9/95 for women (9.5%), showing no significant difference (ρ = 0.37). In the patients with and without compression fracture with bone marrow edema, insufficiency fracture occurred in 5/76 (6.6%) and 12/84 (14.3%), respectively. On the other hand, of the 67 patients who had pelvic insufficiency fracture, 27 (40.3%) also had spinal compression fracture. About 10% of the patients with osteoporotic compression fracture in the T/L spine also had pelvic sacral

  2. Osteoporotic compression fracture of the thoracolumbar spine and sacral insufficiency fracture: incidence and analysis of the relationship according to the clinical factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Jeong Hwa; Park, Ji Sun; Ryu, Kyung Nam [Kyunghee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-11-15

    To evaluate the incidence of sacral insufficiency fracture in osteoporotic patient with compression fracture of the thoracolumbar (T-L) spine on magnetic resonance image (MRI), and to analyze the correlation of variable clinical factors and the incidence of sacral insufficiency fracture. We retrospectively reviewed 160 patients (27 men, 133 women; age range of 50 to 89 years) who underwent spinal MRI and had compression fracture of the T-L spine. Compression fractures due to trauma or tumor were excluded. We evaluated the incidence of sacral insufficiency fracture according to the patients' age, sex, number of compression fractures, and the existence of bone marrow edema pattern of compression fracture. During the same period, we evaluated the incidence of spinal compression fracture in the patients of pelvic insufficiency fracture. Out of the 160 patients who had compression fracture in the T-L spine, 17 (10.6%) had insufficiency fracture of the sacrum. Compression fracture occurred almost 5 times more frequently in women (27:133), but the incidence of sacral insufficiency fracture was 2/27 for men (7.4%) and 15/133 for women (11.3%), with no statistically significant difference ({rho} = 0.80). According to age, the ratio of insufficiency fracture to compression fracture was 0% (0/23) in the 50's, 10.6% (7/66) in the 60's, 12.5% (7/56) in the 70's, and 20.0% (3/15) in the 80's. In respect of single and multiple compression fracture, the incidence of sacral insufficiency fracture was 8/65 for men (12.3%) and 9/95 for women (9.5%), showing no significant difference ({rho} = 0.37). In the patients with and without compression fracture with bone marrow edema, insufficiency fracture occurred in 5/76 (6.6%) and 12/84 (14.3%), respectively. On the other hand, of the 67 patients who had pelvic insufficiency fracture, 27 (40.3%) also had spinal compression fracture. About 10% of the patients with osteoporotic compression fracture in the T/L spine

  3. MRI interrReader and intra-reader reliabilities for assessing injury morphology and posterior ligamentous complex integrity of the spine according to the thoracolumbar injury classification system and severity score

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Guen Young; Lee, Joon Woo; Choi, Seung Woo; Lim, Hyun Jin; Sun, Hye Young; Kang, Yu Suhn; Kang, Heung Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Chai, Jee Won; Kim, Su Jin [Dept. of Radiology, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    To evaluate spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inter-reader and intra-reader reliabilities using the thoracolumbar injury classification system and severity score (TLICS) and to analyze the effects of reader experience on reliability and the possible reasons for discordant interpretations. Six radiologists (two senior, two junior radiologists, and two residents) independently scored 100 MRI examinations of thoracolumbar spine injuries to assess injury morphology and posterior ligamentous complex (PLC) integrity according to the TLICS. Inter-reader and intra-reader agreements were determined and analyzed according to the number of years of radiologist experience. Inter-reader agreement between the six readers was moderate (k = 0.538 for the first and 0.537 for the second review) for injury morphology and fair to moderate (k = 0.440 for the first and 0.389 for the second review) for PLC integrity. No significant difference in inter-reader agreement was observed according to the number of years of radiologist experience. Intra-reader agreements showed a wide range (k = 0.538-0.822 for injury morphology and 0.423-0.616 for PLC integrity). Agreement was achieved in 44 for the first and 45 for the second review about injury morphology, as well as in 41 for the first and 38 for the second review of PLC integrity. A positive correlation was detected between injury morphology score and PLC integrity. The reliability of MRI for assessing thoracolumbar spinal injuries according to the TLICS was moderate for injury morphology and fair to moderate for PLC integrity, which may not be influenced by radiologist' experience.

  4. Which is the ideal point of time to perform intraoperative 3D imaging in dorsal stabilisation of thoracolumbar spine fractures? A matched pair analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, M; Mittlmeier, T; Gierer, P; Rotter, R; Harms, C; Gradl, G

    2010-10-01

    After dorsal stabilisation of vertebral fractures by an internal fixateur the postoperative computed tomography is a standard procedure to control the positions of the pedicle screws, the success of the reposition, the clearance of the spinal canal and to plane an additive secondary ventral stabilisation. An intraoperative scan with a 3D image intensifier may clarify these questions directly after the implantation with the possibility of an immediate correction of the implants. The aim of this study was to find out the optimal point of time to perform an intraoperative 3D scan and if a postoperative computed tomography is dispensable. Intraoperative 3D scans were carried out on 33 patients with thoracolumbar spine fractures (T11-L5) after bi-segmental fixateur interne montage (Group 1). A matched pair group of 33 patients (Group 2) with a 3D scan after implantation of pedicle screws was built. A postoperative computed tomography of the instrumented spinal section was done in all patients. The following measurements were done in sagittal and axial reconstruction planes and were compared: classification of screw positions, maximal axial diameter of pedicles, cortical perforation of the screws. Additionally in Group 1 the distance between the upper and lower end plates of the injured section, the height of posterior vertebral body wall, the dislocation of the posterior wall and the minimal diameter of the spinal canal were measured. The intraoperative scoring of pedicle screws positions and the measurement of pedicle width showed in both groups a significant accordance with the computed tomography determinations. The measurements "posterior wall dislocation" and "diameter of spinal canal" were only possible in 24 3D scans and showed a significant difference compared with the CT data. The picture quality in Group 2 was scored significantly better than for Group 1 with the complete assembly of the fixateur. The ideal point of time for an intraoperative 3D imaging with

  5. A prospective cohort study comparing the VAS spine score and Roland-Morris disability questionnaire in patients with a type A traumatic thoracolumbar spinal fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siebenga, J.; Leferink, V.J.M.; Segers, M.J.M.; Elzinga, M.J.; Bakker, F.C.; Ten, D.H.J.; Rommens, P.M.; Patka, P.

    2008-01-01

    The Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ-24) and the VAS spine score have been regularly used to measure functional outcome in patients with back pain. The RMDQ-24 is primarily used in degenerative disease of the spine and the VAS Spine is used in trauma patients. The aim of this study is to

  6. A prospective cohort study comparing the VAS spine score and Roland-Morris disability questionnaire in patients with a type a traumatic thoracolumbar spinal fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Siebenga (Joukje); V.J.M. Leferink (Vincent); M.J.M. Segers (Michiel); M.J. Elzinga (Matthijs); F.C. Bakker (Fred); D.H.J. ten Duis; P.M. Rommens (Pol); P. Patka (Peter)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ-24) and the VAS spine score have been regularly used to measure functional outcome in patients with back pain. The RMDQ-24 is primarily used in degenerative disease of the spine and the VAS Spine is used in trauma patients. The aim of this

  7. Spinal hyperostosis as an important sign indicating spine injuries on postmortem computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Toru; Hayashida, Mitsumasa; Ohtani, Maki; Hashimoto, Manabu; Takahashi, Satoshi; Ishiyama, Koichi; Otani, Takahiro; Koga, Makoto; Sugawara, Makoto; Mimasaka, Sohtaro

    2014-07-01

    Although spine injuries are not always detectable on postmortem computed tomography (PMCT), spinal hyperostosis, an important risk factor for spine injury, is relatively easily detectable on PMCT. We therefore examined the utility of the detection of spinal hyperostosis on PMCT as an indicator of spine injury. Full-body PMCT images of 88 autopsy cases with a bruise on the face or forehead but no identifiable skull fracture were reviewed prior to autopsy for the identification and classification of spinal hyperostosis. Spine injuries were observed in 56.0% of cases with spinal hyperostosis and 1.6% of cases without spinal hyperostosis. Among the cases with spinal hyperostosis, spine injuries were observed in 66.7% of cases at stage 2 or 3 and in 88.9% of cases at stage 3. Spine injuries were diagnosed on PMCT in 33.3% of cases prior to autopsy. A significant association was found between spinal hyperostosis and presence of spine injury that cannot be detected on PMCT, indicating that the identification of spinal hyperostosis on PMCT may assist in detecting spine injuries. This finding suggests that investigation of the presence of spine injury based on the identification of spinal hyperostosis on PMCT may assist in determining the correct cause of death by autopsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Revision Rate of Misplaced Pedicle Screws of the Thoracolumbar Spine-Comparison of Three-Dimensional Fluoroscopy Navigation with Freehand Placement: A Systematic Analysis and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Jens; Hofmann, Nicole; Rienmüller, Anna; Buchmann, Niels; Gempt, Jens; Kirschke, Jan S; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard; Ryang, Yu-Mi

    2018-01-01

    Recent studies have shown higher accuracy rates of image-guided pedicle screw placement compared to freehand (FH) placement. However, data focusing on the impact of spinal navigation on the rate of revision surgeries caused by misplaced pedicle screws (PS) are scarce. This study is aimed at identifying the rate of revision surgeries for misplaced PS comparing three-dimensional (3D) fluoroscopy navigation (3DFL) with FH PS placement. A retrospective analysis was conducted of 2232 patients (mean age, 65.3 ± 13.5 years) with 13,703 implanted PS who underwent instrumentation of the thoracolumbar spine between 2007 and 2015. Group 1 received surgery with use of 3DFL (January 2011 to December 2015), group 2 received surgery in the FH technique (April 2007 to December 2015). Because the use of 3DFL was initiated in January 2011, the examined period for 3DFL-navigated surgeries is shorter. Patients routinely received postoperative computed tomography scans and/or intraoperative control 3D scans. There was an overall rate of revision surgeries for malpositioned PS of 2.9%. In the 3DFL group, the rate of secondary revision surgeries was significantly lower with 1.35% (15/1112 patients) compared to 4.38% (49/1120 patients) in the FH group, respectively (odds ratio, 3.35; P revision surgery (P revision surgeries after posterior spinal instrumentation compared to freehand PS placement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The increased prevalence of cervical spondylosis in patients with adult thoracolumbar spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, William W; Carrer, Alexandra; Lu, Michael; Hu, Serena S

    2014-12-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To assess the concomitance of cervical spondylosis and thoracolumbar spinal deformity. Patients with degenerative cervical spine disease have higher rates of degeneration in the lumbar spine. In addition, degenerative cervical spine changes have been observed in adult patients with thoracolumbar spinal deformities. However, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no studies quantifying the association between cervical spondylosis and thoracolumbar spinal deformity in adult patients. Patients seen by a spine surgeon or spine specialist at a single institution were assessed for cervical spondylosis and/or thoracolumbar spinal deformity using an administrative claims database. Spinal radiographic utilization and surgical intervention were used to infer severity of spinal disease. The relative prevalence of each spinal diagnosis was assessed in patients with and without the other diagnosis. A total of 47,560 patients were included in this study. Cervical spondylosis occurred in 13.1% overall, but was found in 31.0% of patients with thoracolumbar spinal deformity (OR=3.27, Pspondylosis (OR=3.26, Pspondylosis or thoracolumbar spinal deformity had significantly higher rates of the other spinal diagnosis. This correlation was increased with increased severity of disease. Patients with both diagnoses were significantly more likely to have received a spine fusion. Further research is warranted to establish the cause of this correlation. Clinicians should use this information to both screen and counsel patients who present for cervical spondylosis or thoracolumbar spinal deformity.

  10. Surgical management of contiguous multilevel thoracolumbar tuberculous spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Muhammad Asad; Khalique, Ahmed Bilal; Afzal, Waseem; Pasha, Ibrahim Farooq; Aebi, Max

    2013-06-01

    Tuberculous spondylitis (TBS) is the most common form of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis. The mainstay of TBS management is anti-tuberculous chemotherapy. Most of the patients with TBS are treated conservatively; however in some patients surgery is indicated. Most common indications for surgery include neurological deficit, deformity, instability, large abscesses and necrotic tissue mass or inadequate response to anti-tuberculous chemotherapy. The most common form of TBS involves a single motion segment of spine (two adjoining vertebrae and their intervening disc). Sometimes TBS involves more than two adjoining vertebrae, when it is called multilevel TBS. Indications for correct surgical management of multilevel TBS is not clear from literature. We have retrospectively reviewed 87 patients operated in 10 years for multilevel TBS involving the thoracolumbar spine at our spine unit. Two types of surgeries were performed on these patients. In 57 patients, modified Hong Kong operation was performed with radical debridement, strut grafting and anterior instrumentation. In 30 patients this operation was combined with pedicle screw fixation with or without correction of kyphosis by osteotomy. Patients were followed up for correction of kyphosis, improvement in neurological deficit, pain and function. Complications were noted. On long-term follow-up (average 64 months), there was 9.34 % improvement in kyphosis angle in the modified Hong Kong group and 47.58 % improvement in the group with pedicle screw fixation and osteotomy in addition to anterior surgery (p multilevel thoracolumbar tuberculous spondylitis undergoing radical debridement and anterior column reconstruction.

  11. Thoracolumbar fracture with listhesis - an uncommon manifestation of child abuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, Terry L.; Blitman, Netta M. [Department of Radiology, Montefiore Medical Center, 111 E. 210th Street, Bronx, New York, NY 10467-2490 (United States); Berdon, Walter E. [Department of Radiology, Babies Hospital, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York (United States); Cassell, Ian [Department of Radiology, Phoenix Children' s Hospital, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2003-05-01

    Thoracolumbar fracture with listhesis (FL) is an uncommon manifestation of child abuse (increasingly known as nonaccidental trauma), with only six prior reports in the literature. This article seeks to call attention to FL of the thoracolumbar spine in abused children and infants. We reviewed plain films, CT and MR images in seven new cases of FL of the thoracolumbar spine in abused children ages 6 months to 7 years, two of whom became paraplegic from their injuries. Findings varied from subtle listhesis of one vertebra on another to frank vertebral dislocation, most commonly at L1/2. Paravertebral calcification was present in all but one case. In two children, thoracolumbar FL was the only radiographic sign of abuse. Radiographic findings of FL of the thoracolumbar spine may be subtle and may be erroneously interpreted as due to a congenital or neoplastic cause. While other signs of child abuse should be sought, spinal injury may be the sole sign of abuse. Recognition of this entity is important to pursue the diagnosis of abuse. (orig.)

  12. Thoracolumbar fracture with listhesis - an uncommon manifestation of child abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, Terry L.; Blitman, Netta M.; Berdon, Walter E.; Cassell, Ian

    2003-01-01

    Thoracolumbar fracture with listhesis (FL) is an uncommon manifestation of child abuse (increasingly known as nonaccidental trauma), with only six prior reports in the literature. This article seeks to call attention to FL of the thoracolumbar spine in abused children and infants. We reviewed plain films, CT and MR images in seven new cases of FL of the thoracolumbar spine in abused children ages 6 months to 7 years, two of whom became paraplegic from their injuries. Findings varied from subtle listhesis of one vertebra on another to frank vertebral dislocation, most commonly at L1/2. Paravertebral calcification was present in all but one case. In two children, thoracolumbar FL was the only radiographic sign of abuse. Radiographic findings of FL of the thoracolumbar spine may be subtle and may be erroneously interpreted as due to a congenital or neoplastic cause. While other signs of child abuse should be sought, spinal injury may be the sole sign of abuse. Recognition of this entity is important to pursue the diagnosis of abuse. (orig.)

  13. Paraspinal approach for thoracolumbar fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIANG Rui

    2011-02-01

    pedicle screws. As a minimally invasive approach, it can be widely used in thoracolumbar spine surgery. Key words: Fractures, bone; Lumbar vertebrae; Thoracic vertebrae; Surgical procedures, operative

  14. Subsequent Vertebral Fractures Post Cement Augmentation of the Thoracolumbar Spine: Does it Correlate With Level-specific Bone Mineral Density Scores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, Hwee Weng Dennis; Hwee Weng, Dennis Hey; Tan, Jun Hao; Jun, Hao Tan; Tan, Chuen Seng; Chuen, Seng Tan; Tan, Hsi Ming Bryan; Ming, Bryan Tan Hsi; Lau, Puang Huh Bernard; Huh, Bernard Lau Puang; Hee, Hwan Tak; Hwan, Tak Hee

    2015-12-01

    A case-control study. In this study, we investigated the correlation between level-specific preoperative bone mineral density and subsequent vertebral fractures. We also identified factors associated with subsequent vertebral fractures. Complications of cement augmentation of the spine include subsequent vertebral fractures, leading to unnecessary morbidity and more treatment. Ability to predict at-risk vertebra will help guide management. We studied all patients with osteoporotic compression fractures who underwent cement augmentation in a single institution from November 2001 to December 2010 by a single surgeon. Association between level-specific bone mineral density T-scores and subsequent fractures was assessed. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify significant factors associated with subsequent vertebral fractures. 93 patients followed up for a mean duration of 25.1 months (12-96) had a mean age of 76.8 years (47-99). Vertebroplasty was performed in 58 patients (62.4%) on 68 levels and kyphoplasty in 35 patients (37.6%) on 44 levels. Refracture was seen in 16 patients (17.2%). The time to subsequent fracture post cement augmentation was 20.5 months (2-90). For refracture cases, 43.8% (7/16) fractured in the adjacent vertebrae. Subsequently fractured vertebra had a mean T-score of -2.860 (95% confidence interval -3.268 to -2.452) and nonfractured vertebra had a mean T-score of -2.180 (95% confidence interval -2.373 to -1.986). A T-score of -2.2 or lower is predictive of refracture at that vertebra (P = 0.047). Odds ratio increases with decreasing T-scores from -2.2 or lower to -2.6 or lower. A T-score of -2.6 or lower gives no additional predictive advantage. After multivariable analysis, age (P = 0.049) and loss of preoperative anterior vertebral height (P = 0.017) are associated with refracture. Level-specific T-scores are predictive of subsequent fractures and the odds ratio increases with lower T-scores from -2.2 or less to -2.6 or less. They

  15. Variation in the management of thoracolumbar trauma and postoperative infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepler, Christopher K; Vroome, Colin; Goldfarb, Matthew; Nyirjesy, Sarah; Millhouse, Paul; Lonjon, Guillaume; Koerner, John D; Harrop, James; Vialle, Luiz R; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2015-05-01

    Multinational survey of spine trauma surgeons. To survey spine trauma surgeons, examine the variety of management practices for thoracolumbar fractures, and investigate the need for future areas of study. Attempts to develop a universal thoracolumbar classification system represent the first step in standardizing treatment of thoracolumbar injuries, but there is little consensus regarding diagnosis and management of these injuries. A survey questionnaire regarding a fictional neurologically intact patient with a burst fracture was administered to 46 spine surgeons. The questionnaire consisted of 2 domains: management of thoracolumbar fractures and management of postoperative infection. Survey results were compiled and evaluated and consensus arbitrarily assumed when the majority of surgeons agreed on a single question answer. Although majority consensus was reached on most questions, the interobserver reliability was poor. Consensus was achieved that magnetic resonance imaging should be performed during initial imaging. The majority would also operate regardless of magnetic resonance imaging findings, and would not operate at night. The favored technique was a posterior approach with decompression. Percutaneous fusion was considered a viable option by the majority of surgeons. No consensus was reached regarding instrumentation levels or construct length. The majority would use posterolateral bone grafting, and would not remove instrumentation nor perform an anterior reconstruction. Consensus was reached that postoperative bracing is unnecessary. Regarding management of infection, consensus was reached to use intraoperative vancomycin powder but not culture the nares before surgery. The majority used a set time period for antibiotic treatment when a drain was required, and would not apply supplementary bone graft at the time of final debridement and closure. There is lack of consensus regarding the appropriate management of thoracolumbar fractures. In the future

  16. Development of an Animal Model of Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture-Induced Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    spinal cord impactor and sustained balloon compression. 2. Keywords Spinal cord injury, spine trauma , burst fracture, large animal model 3...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0013 TITLE: DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE-INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE-INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY 5b. GRANT

  17. Range of motion after thoracolumbar corpectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gehrchen, Martin; Hegde, Sajan K; Moldavsky, Mark

    2017-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: An in vitro biomechanical study. OBJECTIVES: To compare the biomechanical stability of traditional and low-profile thorocolumbar anterior instrumentation after a corpectomy with cross-connectors. Dual-rod anterior thoracolumbar lateral plates (ATLP) have been used clinically...... to stabilize the thorocolumbar spine. METHODS: The stability of a low-profile dual-rod system (LP DRS) and a traditional dual-rod system (DRS) was compared using a calf spine model. Two groups of seven specimens were tested intact and then in the following order: (1) ATLP with two cross-connectors and spacer......; (2) ATLP with one cross-connector and spacer; (3) ATLP with spacer. Data were normalized to intact (100 %) and statistical analysis was used to determine between-group significances. RESULTS: Both constructs reduced motion compared to intact in flexion-extension and lateral bending. Axial rotation...

  18. Classificação das fraturas tóraco-lombares baseada em investigação por imagem: avaliação de 33 casos Classification of thoracolumbar spine fractures based on a complete imaging investigation in 33 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleyson M. Rios

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available As fraturas das regiões torácica e lombar da coluna vertebral constituem amplo espectro de diferentes tipos de lesões resultantes de mecanismos fisiopatológicos distintos. A fim de se reduzir as controvérsias existentes a respeito da conduta destas lesões é necessária a utilização de uma classificação que permita a sua correta caracterização. Neste estudo avaliamos retrospectivamente 33 pacientes portadores de fraturas tóraco-lombares com o objetivo de categorizar e avaliar os fatores relacionados a esta patologia. O mecanismo de trauma mais freqüente foi queda de altura, presente em 24 casos. Na maioria dos pacientes (57,6% as fraturas localizaram-se na transição tóraco-lombar (T12-L1 e o quadro neurológico mais freqüente foi o déficit sensitivo-motor completo abaixo da lesão, em 45,45% dos casos. A apresentação neurológica foi mais grave nos pacientes com lesões torácicas em relação às lesões lombares (teste de Fischer, p=0,039. Uma correlação positiva foi observada entre a severidade do quadro neurológico e a gravidade da lesão segundo a classificação de Magerl (r de Pearson=0,85, pThe thoracolumbar spine fractures constitute a wide spectrum of resultant lesions, with distinct injury mechanisms. In order to reduce the controversies concerning about the management of these fractures, a universally accepted classification is necessary. In this study we evaluated retrospectively 33 patients with thoracolumbar spine fracture, with the goal of categorize and evaluate the factors related to this pathology. A complete radiological investigation, complaining of plain radiography, computed tomography and magnetic ressonance imaging, was used to classify these fractures. Fall was the more common mechanism, present in 24 cases. In 57.6% of the patients, the fractures located at thoracolumbar transition (T12-L1 and the more frequent neurological presentation was total deficit, present in 45.45%. The neurological

  19. Pelvic Fixation in Adult and Pediatric Spine Surgery: Historical Perspective, Indications, and Techniques: AAOS Exhibit Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amit; Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Strike, Sophia A; Menga, Emmanuel N; Sponseller, Paul D; Kebaish, Khaled M

    2015-09-16

    Achieving solid osseous fusion across the lumbosacral junction has historically been, and continues to be, a challenge in spine surgery. Robust pelvic fixation plays an integral role in achieving this goal. The goals of this review are to describe the history of and indications for spinopelvic fixation, examine conventional spinopelvic fixation techniques, and review the newer S2-alar-iliac technique and its outcomes in adult and pediatric patients with spinal deformity. Since the introduction of Harrington rods in the 1960s, spinal instrumentation has evolved substantially. Indications for spinopelvic fixation as a means to achieve lumbosacral arthrodesis include a long arthrodesis (five or more vertebral levels) or use of three-column osteotomies in the lower thoracic or lumbar spine, surgical treatment of high-grade spondylolisthesis, and correction of lumbar deformity and pelvic obliquity. A variety of techniques have been described over the years, including Galveston iliac rods, Jackson intrasacral rods, the Kostuik transiliac bar, iliac screws, and S2-alar-iliac screws. Modern iliac screws and S2-alar-iliac screws are associated with relatively low rates of pseudarthrosis. S2-alar-iliac screws have the advantages of less implant prominence and inline placement with proximal spinal anchors. Collectively, these techniques provide powerful methods for obtaining control of the pelvis in facilitating lumbosacral arthrodesis. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  20. Avaliação do tratamento cirúrgico das fraturas da coluna toracolombar com material de terceira geração tipo fixador interno Evaluation of surgical treatment of fractures of thoracolumbar spine with third-generation material for internal fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Bortoletto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o resultado funcional dos pacientes com fratura da coluna toracolombar cirúrgica. MÉTODO: Foi feito um estudo prospectivo incluindo 100 pacientes portadores de fratura da coluna vertebral nos segmentos torácico e lombar. As lesões foram classificadas conforme a sistemática da AO e os pacientes foram tratados com cirurgia. Avaliou-se a presença de cifose inicial e sua evolução após a intervenção cirúrgica, a presença de dor pós-operatória e sua evolução até 24 semanas do ato cirúrgico. Comparando nossos dados com a literatura. RESULTADOS: Analisados 100 pacientes cirúrgicos, sendo 37 do tipo A, 46 do tipo B e 17 do tipo C, observamos que os pacientes que se apresentavam com Frankel A mantiveram o quadro, porém, os pacientes com Frankel B ou mais, evoluíram com alguma melhora do quadro; a média da melhora da dor baseada na escala visual analógica (EVA foi acima de 4 pontos, e o retorno às atividades de rotina diária constatado em todos os pacientes, sendo que o retorno ao trabalho não foi considerado por nós como critério de avaliação. CONCLUSÃO: Apesar da controvérsia quanto à indicação da cirurgia nas fraturas da coluna, consideramos o método por nós utilizado como satisfatório, com bons resultados e baixo índice de complicações, porém mais estudos prospectivos e randomizados, com um seguimento mais longo, são necessários para uma avaliação deste tipo de fixação.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the functional results from patients with surgical fractures in the thoracolumbar spine. METHOD: A prospective study including 100 patients with spinal fractures in the thoracic and lumbar segments was conducted. The lesions were classified in accordance with the AO system, and the patients were treated surgically. The presence of early kyphosis and its evolution after the surgical intervention, and the presence of postoperative pain and its evolution up to the 24th week after the surgery, were

  1. Simultaneously anterior decompression and posterior instrumentation by extrapleural retroperitoneal approach in thoracolumbar lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Anil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anterior decompression with posterior instrumentation when indicated in thoracolumbar spinal lesions if performed simultaneously in single-stage expedites rehabilitation and recovery. Transthoracic, transdiaphragmatic approach to access the thoracolumbar junction is associated with significant morbidity, as it violates thoracic cavity; requires cutting of diaphragm and a separate approach, for posterior instrumentation. We evaluated the clinical outcome morbidity and feasibility of extrapleural retroperitoneal approach to perform anterior decompression and posterior instrumentation simultaneously by single "T" incision outcome in thoracolumbar spinal trauma and tuberculosis. Patients and Methods: Forty-eight cases of tubercular spine (n = 25 and fracture of the spine (n = 23 were included in the study of which 29 were male and 19 female. The mean age of patients was 29.1 years. All patients underwent single-stage anterior decompression, fusion, and posterior instrumentation (except two old traumatic cases via extrapleural retroperitoneal approach by single "T" incision. Tuberculosis cases were operated in lateral position as they were stabilized with Hartshill instrumentation. For traumatic spine initially posterior pedicle screw fixation was performed in prone position and then turned to right lateral position for anterior decompression by same incision and approach. They were evaluated for blood loss, duration of surgery, superficial and deep infection of incision site, flap necrosis, correction of the kyphotic deformity, and restoration of anterior and posterior vertebral body height. Results: In traumatic spine group the mean duration of surgery was 269 minutes (range 215-315 minutes including the change over time from prone to lateral position. The mean intraoperative blood loss was 918 ml (range 550-1100 ml. The preoperative mean ASIA motor, pin prick and light touch score improved from 63.3 to 74.4, 86 to 94.4 and 86 to 96 at

  2. Surgical treatment of congenital thoracolumbar spondyloptosis in a 2-year-old child with vertebral column resection and posterior-only circumferential reconstruction of the spine column: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressot, Loyola V; Mata, Javier A; Luerssen, Thomas G; Jea, Andrew

    2015-02-01

    Spondyloptosis refers to complete dislocation of a vertebral body onto another. The L5-S1 level is frequently affected. As this condition is rare, few published reports describing its clinical features and surgical outcomes exist, especially in the pediatric patient population. The authors report the presentation, pathological findings, and radiographic studies of a 2-year-old girl who presented to Texas Children's Hospital with a history since birth of progressive spastic paraparesis. Preoperative CT and MRI showed severe spinal cord compression associated with T11-12 spondyloptosis. The patient underwent a single-stage posterior approach for complete resection of the dysplastic vertebral bodies at the apex of the spinal deformity with reconstruction and stabilization of the vertebral column using a titanium expandable cage and pedicle screws. At the 12-month follow-up, the patient remained neurologically stable without any radiographic evidence of instrumentation failure or loss of alignment. To the best of the authors' knowledge, there have been only 2 other children with congenital thoracolumbar spondyloptosis treated with the above-described strategy. The authors describe their case and review the literature to discuss the aggregate clinical features, surgical strategies, and operative outcomes for congenital thoracolumbar spondyloptosis.

  3. The epidemiology of thoracolumbar trauma: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuura, Yoshihiro; Osborn, James Michael; Cason, Garrick Wayne

    2016-12-01

    To describe the epidemiology of thoracolumbar fractures and associated injuries in blunt trauma patients. A systematic review and metaanalysis was performed based on a MEDLINE database search using MeSH terms for studies matching our inclusion criteria. The search yielded 21 full-length articles, each sub-grouped according to content. Data extraction and multiple analyses were performed on descriptive data. The rate of thoracolumbar fracture in blunt trauma patients was 6.90% (±3.77, 95% CI). The rate of spinal cord injury was 26.56% (±10.70), and non-contiguous cervical spine fracture occurred in 10.49% (±4.17). Associated injury was as follows: abdominal trauma 7.63% (±9.74), thoracic trauma 22.64% (±13.94), pelvic trauma 9.39% (±6.45), extremity trauma 18.26% (±5.95), and head trauma 12.96% (±2.01). Studies that included cervical spine fracture with thoracolumbar fracture had the following rates of associated trauma: 3.78% (±5.94) abdominal trauma, 21.65% (±16.79) thoracic trauma, 3.62% (±1.07) pelvic trauma, 18.36% (±4.94) extremity trauma, and 15.45% (±11.70) head trauma. A subgroup of flexion distraction injuries showed an associated intra-abdominal injury rate of 38.70% (±13.30). The most common vertebra injured was L1 at a rate of 34.40% (±15.90). T7 was the most common non-junctional vertebra injured at 3.90% (±1.09). Burst/AO type A3 fractures were the most common morphology 39.50% (±16.30) followed by 33.60% (±15.10) compression/AO type A1, 14.20% (±8.08) fracture dislocation/AO type C, and 6.96% (±3.50) flexion distraction/AO type B. The most common etiology for a thoracolumbar fracture was motor vehicle collision 36.70% (±5.35), followed by high-energy fall 31.70% (±6.70). Here we report the incidence of thoracolumbar fracture in blunt trauma and the spectrum of associated injuries. To our knowledge, this paper provides the first epidemiological road map for blunt trauma thoracolumbar injuries.

  4. Is the Thoracolumbar Injury Classification and Severity Score (TLICS) Superior to the AO Thoracolumbar Injury Classification System for Guiding the Surgical Management of Unstable Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures without Neurological Deficit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Mehmet Onur; Gurbuz, Mehmet Sabri; Is, Merih; Somay, Hakan

    2018-01-01

    To determine whether the Thoracolumbar Injury Classification and Severity Score (TLICS) and the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) Spine Thoracolumbar Injury Classification System have any superiority to each other regarding the reliability of their recommendations in the surgical management of unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures. Fifty-five consecutive patients with thoracolumbar burst fractures undergoing instrumentation between 2010 and 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. TLICS and AO systems were compared based on patients" American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scores and they were analyzed for their safety and reliability. A total of 55 patients were studied. Neurological deficits were detected in 18 patients and the remaining 37 patients had normal neurological functions. All the patients with neurological deficits received > 4 points according to TLICS. There were 14 patients with incomplete spinal cord injury and all of them received > 4 points according to TLICS (p AO system. None of the 37 patients without neurological deficit received AO points, to whom AO recommends conservative treatment despite the fact that they had unstable burst fractures (p AO particularly for guiding the surgical management of unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures without neurological deficit. However, this conclusion needs to be verified with further multicenter prospective studies.

  5. Vertebral stabilisation and selective decompression for the management of triple thoracolumbar disc protrusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, W M; Downes, C J

    2008-10-01

    Triple adjacent thoracolumbar disc protrusions causing moderate to severe spinal cord compression were diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging in two German shepherd dogs with marked paraparesis and pelvic limb ataxia. Both cases were managed by selective hemilaminectomy, partial annulectomy and bilateral quadruple vertebral body stabilisation using novel canine locking fixation plates (SOP). The stabilisation of multiple vertebrae in the thoracolumbar spine was possible because the plates could be contoured with six degrees of freedom. Spinal pain resolved and neurological function improved in both dogs. Screw breakage was evident in one dog five months following surgery.

  6. AOSpine subaxial cervical spine injury classification system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaccaro, Alexander R.; Koerner, John D.; Radcliff, Kris E.; Oner, F. Cumhur; Reinhold, Maximilian; Schnake, Klaus J.; Kandziora, Frank; Fehlings, Michael G.; Dvorak, Marcel F.; Aarabi, Bizhan; Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan; Schroeder, Gregory D.; Kepler, Christopher K.; Vialle, Luiz R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This project describes a morphology-based subaxial cervical spine traumatic injury classification system. Using the same approach as the thoracolumbar system, the goal was to develop a comprehensive yet simple classification system with high intra- and interobserver reliability to be used

  7. Cervical spine trauma: Radiologic manifestations and imaging algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonakdarpour, A.

    1987-01-01

    Cervical spine trauma is very critical injury that is incurred most frequently in automobile accidents, mining incidents, and war. Injuries of the cervical spine produce neurologic damage in approximately 40% of cases, whereas injuries of the thoracolumbar junction produce neurologic damage in 4% and injuries of the thoracic spine do so in 10%. Radiology has a fundamental role in the recognition and follow-up of patients. Radiologists should be quite familiar with the imaging algorithms and various radiologic manifestations of cervical spine injuries. In this paper, techniques of examining severely injured patients as well as those with slight or questionable injuries are demonstrated. Indications and limitations of various diagnostic procedures (plain film radiography, tomography, CT, and MR imaging) are discussed. A systematic plan for the study of the cervical spine with an emphasis on joints, bones, ligaments and soft tissues (JO-B-LI-ST) is introduced. Mechanisms of injury and the stability or instability of the injuries are presented. Plain radiography as well as other imaging modalities are used to demonstrate the most important forms of injuries at various levels. Follow-up of some of the treated cases is shown. The late complications of spinal cord damage in closed injuries and open wounds (urinary stones, myositis, ossificans, contractures, fractures, disuse atrophy, and bone infections) are presented at the end

  8. Dorsal spondylodesis of unstable thoracolumbar fractures by a far-lateral approach to the disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, A; Rainov, N G; Sanchin, L; Burkert, W

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes a modified and less traumatic approach to the thoracolumbar spine and compares it with standard techniques for instrumented spinal fusion. Ten patients with unstable fractures of the thoracolumbar spine were included in the open prospective investigation, and were treated by a surgical technique consisting of a dorsolateral approach to the injured segment, filling the disk space and the fractured vertebra with autologous bone, and transpedicular fixation with an AO internal fixator. All patients were followed for 6 to 12 months after surgery by clinical tests and spinal X-rays. Excellent short-term and long-term results were obtained. A stable bony fusion was achieved in all cases, and a minimal mean decrease of 2 degrees in the kyphosis angle was found at late follow-up. No major complications related to the procedure were encountered, and no worsening of neurological deficits occurred after surgery. In conclusion, the far-lateral approach to the thoracolumbar spine yields results which are equivalent or better than those of standard techniques. Major advantages of our procedure, as evaluated in this rather small group of patients, are selective immobilization of the injured segment without involvement of functionally intact spinal levels, no manipulations within the spinal canal boundaries, and relatively limited exposure of the spine.

  9. Percutaneous aspiration biopsy in cervical spine lytic lesions. Indications and technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tampieri, D.; Weill, A.; Melanson, D.; Ethier, R. (Montreal Neurological Inst. and Hospital, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Neuroradiology)

    1991-02-01

    We describe the technique and the results of the percutaneous aspiration biopsy (PAB) in a series of 9 patients presenting with neck pain and different degrees of myelopathy, in whom the cervical spine X-ray demonstrated lytic lesions of unknown origin. PAB is a useful, relatively safe technique, and leads to histological diagnosis between metastatic and inflammatory processes. Furthermore, in inflammatory lesions with negative hemoculture, PAB may help in detecting the micro-organism responsible and therefore allow a better antibiotic treatment. (orig.).

  10. Non-destructive pollution exposure assessment in the European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus): II. Hair and spines as indicators of endogenous metal and As concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Have, Helga; Scheirs, Jan; Mubiana, Valentine Kayawe; Verhagen, Ron; Blust, Ronny; Coen, Wim de

    2006-01-01

    The role of hair and spines of the European hedgehog as non-destructive monitoring tools of metal (Ag, Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Zn) and As pollution in terrestrial ecosystems was investigated. Our results showed that mean pollution levels of a random sample of hedgehogs in Flanders are low to moderate. Yet, individual hedgehogs may be at risk for metal toxicity. Tissue distribution analyses (hair, spines, liver, kidney, muscle and fat tissue) indicated that metals and As may reach considerable concentrations in external tissues, such as hair and spines. Positive relationships were observed between concentrations in hair and those in liver, kidney and muscle for Al, Co, Cr, Cu, and Pb (0.43 < r < 0.85). Spine concentrations were positively related to liver, kidney and muscle concentrations for Cd, Co, Cr, Cu and Pb (0.37 < r < 0.62). Hair Ag, As, Fe and Zn and spine Ag, Al, As and Fe were related to metal concentrations in one or two of the investigated internal tissues (0.31 < r < 0.45). The regression models presented here may be used to predict metal and As concentrations in internal tissues of hedgehogs when concentrations in hair or spines are available. The present study demonstrated the possibility of using hair and spines for non-destructive monitoring of metal and As pollution in hedgehogs. - Hedgehog hair and spines are promising non-destructive biomonitoring tools of terrestrial metal pollution

  11. Incorporation of CT-based measurements of trunk anatomy into subject-specific musculoskeletal models of the spine influences vertebral loading predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Alexander G; Mokhtarzadeh, Hossein; Allaire, Brett T; Velie, Kelsey R; De Paolis Kaluza, M Clara; Anderson, Dennis E; Bouxsein, Mary L

    2017-10-01

    We created subject-specific musculoskeletal models of the thoracolumbar spine by incorporating spine curvature and muscle morphology measurements from computed tomography (CT) scans to determine the degree to which vertebral compressive and shear loading estimates are sensitive to variations in trunk anatomy. We measured spine curvature and trunk muscle morphology using spine CT scans of 125 men, and then created four different thoracolumbar spine models for each person: (i) height and weight adjusted (Ht/Wt models); (ii) height, weight, and spine curvature adjusted (+C models); (iii) height, weight, and muscle morphology adjusted (+M models); and (iv) height, weight, spine curvature, and muscle morphology adjusted (+CM models). We determined vertebral compressive and shear loading at three regions of the spine (T8, T12, and L3) for four different activities. Vertebral compressive loads predicted by the subject-specific CT-based musculoskeletal models were between 54% lower to 45% higher from those estimated using musculoskeletal models adjusted only for subject height and weight. The impact of subject-specific information on vertebral loading estimates varied with the activity and spinal region. Vertebral loading estimates were more sensitive to incorporation of subject-specific spinal curvature than subject-specific muscle morphology. Our results indicate that individual variations in spine curvature and trunk muscle morphology can have a major impact on estimated vertebral compressive and shear loads, and thus should be accounted for when estimating subject-specific vertebral loading. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2164-2173, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Functional extra-adrenal paraganglioma of the retroperitoneum giving thoracolumbar spine metastases after a five-year disease-free follow-up: a rare malignant condition with challenging management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Chourmouzi, Danai; Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Katsaridis, Vasileios; Eleftheriadis, Eleftherios; Givissis, Panagiotis

    2017-01-01

    Paragangliomas are benign neoplasms that arise from the autonomic nervous system and the associated paraganglia. Although benign, they have been shown to possess metastatic potential. Extra-adrenal retroperitoneal paraganglioma with vertebral metastasis is considered very uncommon. Here, we present a case of a functional extra-adrenal paraganglioma of the retroperitoneum giving metastasis to T4 vertebra after five years of follow-up in a 48-year-old man who had been initially treated with complete resection of the primary tumor. The condition of the patient improved significantly after radiosurgery and somatostatin analogs treatment, until lumbar spine lesions appeared six months later. Our case demonstrates that retroperitoneal paraganglioma is a rare condition which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a retroperitoneal mass combined with vertebral lesions. Additionally, increased physician awareness and long-term follow-up is mandatory for all patients with history of retroperitoneal paraganglioma since metastases may occur after long latent intervals from the initial diagnosis.

  13. Estimating the effective radiation dose imparted to patients by intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography in thoracolumbar spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Jeffrey; Karellas, Andrew; Street, John; Eck, Jason C; Lapinsky, Anthony; Connolly, Patrick J; Dipaola, Christian P

    2013-03-01

    Observational. To estimate the radiation dose imparted to patients during typical thoracolumbar spinal surgical scenarios. Minimally invasive techniques continue to become more common in spine surgery. Computer-assisted navigation systems coupled with intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography (CT) represent one such method used to aid in instrumented spinal procedures. Some studies indicate that cone-beam CT technology delivers a relatively low dose of radiation to patients compared with other x-ray-based imaging modalities. The goal of this study was to estimate the radiation exposure to the patient imparted during typical posterior thoracolumbar instrumented spinal procedures, using intraoperative cone-beam CT and to place these values in the context of standard CT doses. Cone-beam CT scans were obtained using Medtronic O-arm (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN). Thermoluminescence dosimeters were placed in a linear array on a foam-plastic thoracolumbar spine model centered above the radiation source for O-arm presets of lumbar scans for small or large patients. In-air dosimeter measurements were converted to skin surface measurements, using published conversion factors. Dose-length product was calculated from these values. Effective dose was estimated using published effective dose to dose-length product conversion factors. Calculated dosages for many full-length procedures using the small-patient setting fell within the range of published effective doses of abdominal CT scans (1-31 mSv). Calculated dosages for many full-length procedures using the large-patient setting fell within the range of published effective doses of abdominal CT scans when the number of scans did not exceed 3. We have demonstrated that single cone-beam CT scans and most full-length posterior instrumented spinal procedures using O-arm in standard mode would likely impart a radiation dose within the range of those imparted by a single standard CT scan of the abdomen. Radiation dose increases

  14. Neurophysiological changes in the afferent somatosensory system indices in the case of vertebrogenic spine pathology in miners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battakova, Sharbanu; Shraimanov, Bekkair

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the paper was to prove that job conditions impact the state of the afferent part of the somatosensory system in miners. Data analysis of the electrophysiological examination of the syndrome in 148 patients, aged from 28 to 55 years, with a mild, moderate and severe degree of the pain syndrome was performed. The control group included 28 people without any pain symptoms. The method used was that of somatosensory stimulated potential (SSP) with the potentials amplitude and latency main components taken into consideration. It was proven that the true decrease of the somatosensory stimulated potential SSP N22 (p system structures and allow to reveal the subclinical slowdown of impulse conductibility, which indicates that the conducting system is changed even under a mild pain syndrome. It was found that the data obtained allow for the better understanding of how the neuropathological pain syndrome under vertebral spine pathology is formed.

  15. Measurement of kyphosis and vertebral body height loss in traumatic spine fractures: an international study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiqi, Said; Verlaan, Jorrit-Jan; Lehr, A Mechteld; Chapman, Jens R; Dvorak, Marcel F; Kandziora, Frank; Rajasekaran, S; Schnake, Klaus J; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Oner, F Cumhur

    2017-05-01

    To investigate whether wide variations are seen in the measurement techniques preferred by spine surgeons around the world to assess traumatic fracture kyphosis and vertebral body height loss (VBHL). An online survey was conducted at two time points among an international community of spine trauma experts from all world regions. The first survey (TL-survey) focused on the thoracic, thoracolumbar and lumbar spine, the second survey (C-survey) on the subaxial cervical spine. Participants were asked to indicate which measurement technique(s) they used for measuring kyphosis and VBHL. Descriptive statistics, frequency analysis and the Fisher exact test were used to analyze the responses. Of the 279 invited experts, 107 (38.4 %) participated in the TL-survey, and 108 (38.7 %) in the C-survey. The Cobb angle was the most frequently used for all spine regions to assess kyphosis (55.6-75.7 %), followed by the wedge angle and adjacent endplates method. Concerning VBHL, the majority of the experts used the vertebral body compression ratio in all spine regions (51.4-54.6 %). The most frequently used combination for kyphosis was the Cobb and wedge angles. Considerable differences were observed between the world regions, while fewer differences were seen between surgeons with different degrees of experience. This study identified worldwide variations in measurement techniques preferred by treating spine surgeons to assess fracture kyphosis and VBHL in spine trauma patients. These results establish the importance of standardizing assessment parameters in spine trauma care, and can be taken into account to further investigate these radiographic parameters.

  16. The thoracolumbar fascia: anatomy, function and clinical considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, F H; Vleeming, A; Schuenke, M D; Danneels, L; Schleip, R

    2012-01-01

    In this overview, new and existent material on the organization and composition of the thoracolumbar fascia (TLF) will be evaluated in respect to its anatomy, innervation biomechanics and clinical relevance. The integration of the passive connective tissues of the TLF and active muscular structures surrounding this structure are discussed, and the relevance of their mutual interactions in relation to low back and pelvic pain reviewed. The TLF is a girdling structure consisting of several aponeurotic and fascial layers that separates the paraspinal muscles from the muscles of the posterior abdominal wall. The superficial lamina of the posterior layer of the TLF (PLF) is dominated by the aponeuroses of the latissimus dorsi and the serratus posterior inferior. The deeper lamina of the PLF forms an encapsulating retinacular sheath around the paraspinal muscles. The middle layer of the TLF (MLF) appears to derive from an intermuscular septum that developmentally separates the epaxial from the hypaxial musculature. This septum forms during the fifth and sixth weeks of gestation. The paraspinal retinacular sheath (PRS) is in a key position to act as a ‘hydraulic amplifier’, assisting the paraspinal muscles in supporting the lumbosacral spine. This sheath forms a lumbar interfascial triangle (LIFT) with the MLF and PLF. Along the lateral border of the PRS, a raphe forms where the sheath meets the aponeurosis of the transversus abdominis. This lateral raphe is a thickened complex of dense connective tissue marked by the presence of the LIFT, and represents the junction of the hypaxial myofascial compartment (the abdominal muscles) with the paraspinal sheath of the epaxial muscles. The lateral raphe is in a position to distribute tension from the surrounding hypaxial and extremity muscles into the layers of the TLF. At the base of the lumbar spine all of the layers of the TLF fuse together into a thick composite that attaches firmly to the posterior superior iliac spine

  17. TREATMENT OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURES FIXED WITH INTERMEDIATE PINS BY THE POSTERIOR APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Motizuki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Radiographic evaluation of patients with thoracolumbar burst fractures treated with unconvencional transpedicular fixation, which includes additional fixation of the fractured vertebra associated with transverse connector - Crosslink clamp.Methods:Retrospective study evaluating a total of 68 patients operated at the Hospital do Trabalhador de Curitiba, Orthopedics Service, of which 15 were eligible for the study. All patients were treated with posterior pedicle fixation and intermediate screw. The assessment by the Cobb angle method was performed on preoperative, immediate postoperative and one year after surgery radiographs.Results:It was observed an average reduction of kyphosis of 8.3o (77%, with a loss of 1.34o in late postoperative compared to the immediate postoperative period.Conclusion:The method of fixation of burst-type fractures of the thoracolumbar spine by the posterior approach with intermediate screw was effective in maintaining the reduction achieved in the immediate postoperative period and after one year of evolution.

  18. Acute Thoracolumbar Spinal Cord Injury: Relationship of Cord Compression to Neurological Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeers, Peta; Battistuzzo, Camila R; Clark, Jillian M; Bernard, Stephen; Freeman, Brian J C; Batchelor, Peter E

    2018-02-21

    Spinal cord injury in the cervical spine is commonly accompanied by cord compression and urgent surgical decompression may improve neurological recovery. However, the extent of spinal cord compression and its relationship to neurological recovery following traumatic thoracolumbar spinal cord injury is unclear. The purpose of this study was to quantify maximum cord compression following thoracolumbar spinal cord injury and to assess the relationship among cord compression, cord swelling, and eventual clinical outcome. The medical records of patients who were 15 to 70 years of age, were admitted with a traumatic thoracolumbar spinal cord injury (T1 to L1), and underwent a spinal surgical procedure were examined. Patients with penetrating injuries and multitrauma were excluded. Maximal osseous canal compromise and maximal spinal cord compression were measured on preoperative mid-sagittal computed tomography (CT) scans and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by observers blinded to patient outcome. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grades from acute hospital admission (≤24 hours of injury) and rehabilitation discharge were used to measure clinical outcome. Relationships among spinal cord compression, canal compromise, and initial and final AIS grades were assessed via univariate and multivariate analyses. Fifty-three patients with thoracolumbar spinal cord injury were included in this study. The overall mean maximal spinal cord compression (and standard deviation) was 40% ± 21%. There was a significant relationship between median spinal cord compression and final AIS grade, with grade-A patients (complete injury) exhibiting greater compression than grade-C and D patients (incomplete injury) (p compression as independently influencing the likelihood of complete spinal cord injury (p compression. Greater cord compression is associated with an increased likelihood of severe neurological deficits (complete injury) following

  19. Neurophysiological changes in the afferent somatosensory system indices in the case of vertebrogenic spine pathology in miners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharbanu Battakova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the paper was to prove that job conditions impact the state of the afferent part of the somatosensory system in miners. Materials and Methods: Data analysis of the electrophysiological examination of the syndrome in 148 patients, aged from 28 to 55 years, with a mild, moderate and severe degree of the pain syndrome was performed. The control group included 28 people without any pain symptoms. The method used was that of somatosensory stimulated potential (SSP with the potentials amplitude and latency main components taken into consideration. Results: It was proven that the true decrease of the somatosensory stimulated potential SSP N22 (p < 0.05 component amplitudes by 41%; N30 component amplitude tend to decrease by 26%. This proves that the true N22 (p < 0.01 component latency increase by 63.8% corresponds to afferent excitation wave conductibility under the pain syndrome of vertebral pathology through sensitivity pathways mainly in the posterior spinal cord columns and then, through the parts of the brain stem, involving the cerebral cortex, which is confirmed by the fact that the P38 and P46 components amplitudes tend to decrease. In addition to this, the proven N10–N13 (p < 0.05, N13–N20 (p < 0.05, N10–N20 (p < 0.05 intervals increases by 43.5–41.8–38.7%, respectively, correspond to the nervous impulse conductibility through the peripheral nervous system structures and allow to reveal the subclinical slowdown of impulse conductibility, which indicates that the conducting system is changed even under a mild pain syndrome. Conclusions: It was found that the data obtained allow for the better understanding of how the neuropathological pain syndrome under vertebral spine pathology is formed.

  20. Posterior tension band wiring and instrumentation for thoracolumbar flexion-distraction injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasankhani, E G; Omidi-Kashani, F

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate treatment outcome of tension band wiring followed by posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation for thoracolumbar flexiondistraction injury (FDI). 36 men and 12 women aged 21 to 56 (mean, 36) years underwent tension band wiring followed by posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation using pedicular screws for FDI of the thoracolumbar spine. The injured vertebral levels were T11 (n=2), T12 (n=12), T11-T12 (n=1), T12-L1 (n=1), L1 (n=28), and L2 (n=4). Anterior vertebral body height and kyphosis were measured before and after surgery. Neurologic status was assessed using the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale. The Oswestry Disability Index questionnaire and visual analogue scale for pain were also used. The mean follow-up was 38 (range, 26-72) months. At final follow-up, the mean visual analogue scale for pain was 1.7, and the median Oswestry Disability Index was 4% (range, 0-32%). The mean anterior vertebral body height improved from 20.5 to 38.8 mm (pwiring followed by posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation for thoracolumbar FDIs achieved good outcome.

  1. A Levering Technique Using Small Parallel Rods for Open Reduction of High-Grade Thoracolumbar Dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadgaonkar, Shailesh; Shah, Kunal; Khurjekar, Ketan; Krishnan, Vibhu; Shyam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag

    2017-06-01

    Technical report. Dorsolumbar vertebral dislocations, with or without associated fractures, occur secondary to very high velocity trauma. The reduction procedures and techniques, which may be adopted in these situations, have been multifariously discussed in the literature. Our objective was to assess the outcome of a novel reduction maneuver, using parallel rods which we have employed in reduction of high-grade thoracolumbar fractures to achieve precise sagittal balance as well as accurate vertebral alignment with minimal soft tissue damage. The study included a total of 11 cases of thoracolumbar dislocations, who had presented to our emergency spine services following high-velocity trauma. After appropriate systemic stabilization and necessary investigations, all patients were surgically treated using the described technique. There were no surgical complications at 2-year follow-up. Radiographs showed good reduction and maintained sagittal balance. We believe that this technique is an excellent means of achieving safer, easier, and accurate reduction for restoration of sagittal/coronal balance and alignment in high-grade thoracolumbar dislocations. It is easily reproducible and predictable.

  2. Thoraco-lumbar fractures with blunt traumatic aortic injury in adult patients: correlations and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Giorgio; Ramieri, Alessandro; Chiarella, Vito; Vigliotta, Massimo; Domenicucci, Maurizio

    2018-04-16

    Traumatic thoraco-lumbar spine fracture spine with a concomitant blunt aortic injury is uncommon but potentially a fatal association. Our aim was to clarify: morphology of spinal fractures related to vascular damages and vice versa, diagnostic procedures and decision-making process for the best treatment options for spine and vessels. We enrolled 42 cases culled from the literature and five personal ones, reviewing in detail by AO Spine Classification, Society of Vascular Surgery classification and Abbreviated Injury Scale for neurological evaluation. Most fractures were at T11-L2 (29 cases; 62%) and type C (17; 70%). 17 (38%) were neurological. Most common vascular damage was the rupture (20; 43%), followed by intimal tear (13; 28%) and pseudoaneurysm (9; 19%). Vascular injury often required open or endovascular repair before spinal fixation. Distraction developed aortic intimal damage until rupture, while flexion-distraction lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm and rotation-torsion full laceration of collateral branches. CT and angio-CT were investigations of choice, followed by angiography. Neurological condition remained unchanged in 28 cases (90%). Overall mortality was 30%, but it was higher in AIS A. Relationship between thoraco-lumbar fracture and vascular lesion is rare, but potentially fatal. Comprehension of spinal biomechanics and vascular damages could be crucial to avoid poor results or decrease mortality. Frequently, traction of the aorta and its vessels is realized by C-dislocated fractures. CT and angio-CT are recommended. Spine stabilization should always follow the vascular repair. Early severe deficits worse the prognosis related to neurological recovery and survival. These slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.

  3. Thoracolumbar Injury Classification and Severity Score in children: a reliability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Ross L; Miller, Joseph H; Ramadan, Omar I; Lysek, Michael C; Kuhn, Elizabeth N; Rocque, Brandon G; Conklin, Michael J; Tubbs, R Shane; Walters, Beverly C; Agee, Bonita S; Rozzelle, Curtis J

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE There are many classification systems for injuries of the thoracolumbar spine. The recent Thoracolumbar Injury Classification and Severity Score (TLICS) has been shown to be a reliable tool for adult patients. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of the TLICS system in pediatric patients. The validity of the TLICS system is assessed in a companion paper. METHODS The medical records of pediatric patients with acute, traumatic thoracolumbar fractures at a single Level 1 trauma center were retrospectively reviewed. A TLICS was calculated for each patient using CT and MRI, along with the neurological examination recorded in the patient's medical record. TLICSs were compared with the type of treatment received. Five raters scored all patients separately to assess interrater reliability. RESULTS TLICS calculations were completed for 81 patients. The mean patient age was 10.9 years. Girls represented 51.8% of the study population, and 80% of the study patients were white. The most common mechanisms of injury were motor vehicle accidents (60.5%), falls (17.3%), and all-terrain vehicle accidents (8.6%). The mean TLICS was 3.7 ± 2.8. Surgery was the treatment of choice for 33.3% of patients. The agreement between the TLICS-suggested treatment and the actual treatment received was statistically significant (p reliability of the TLICS system ranged from moderate to very good, with a Fleiss' generalized kappa (κ) value of 0.69 for the TLICS treatment suggestion among all patients; however, interrater reliability decreased when MRI was used to contribute to the TLICS. The κ value decreased from 0.73 to 0.57 for patients with CT only vs patients with CT/MRI or MRI only, respectively (p reliability among physicians assessing thoracolumbar fracture treatment in pediatric patients. Physicians should be cautious when using MRI to aid in the surgical decision-making process.

  4. Spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion for thoracolumbar kyphosis in an adult with achondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Masashi; Kanezaki, Shozo; Notani, Naoki; Ishihara, Toshinobu; Tsumura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Fixed thoracolumbar kyphosis with spinal stenosis in adult patients with achondroplasia presents a challenging issue. We describe the first case in which spondylectomy and minimally invasive lateral access interbody arthrodesis were used for the treatment of fixed severe thoracolumbar kyphosis and lumbar spinal canal stenosis in an adult with achondroplasia. Patient concerns: A 61-year-old man with a history of achondroplastic dwarfism presented with low back pain and radiculopathy and neurogenic claudication. Diagnoses: Plain radiographs revealed a high-grade thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity with diffuse degenerative changes in the lumbar spine. The apex was located at L2, the local kyphotic angle from L1 to L3 was 105°, and the anterior area was fused from the L1 to L3 vertebrae. MRI revealed significant canal and lateral recess stenosis secondary to facet hypertrophy. Interventions: We planned a front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements. We first performed anterior release at the fused part from L1 to L3 and XLIF at L3/4 and L4/5. Next, the patient was placed in the prone position. Spondylectomy at the L2 vertebra and posterior fusion from T10 to L5 were performed. Postoperative radiographs revealed L1 to L3 kyphosis of 32°. Outcomes: No complications occurred during or after surgery. Postoperatively, the patient's low back pain and neurological claudication were resolved. No worsening of kyphosis was observed 24 months postoperatively. Lessons: Circumferential decompression of the spinal cord at the apical vertebral level and decompression of lumbar canal stenosis were necessary. Front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements via spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a reasonable surgical option for thoracolumbar kyphosis and developmental canal stenosis in patients with achondroplasia. PMID:29245270

  5. Efficacy and safety of instrumentation in caries spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basu Saumyajit

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spinal instrumentation may be used in tuberculosis of spine for prevention or correction of deformity. Methods: Thirty eight patients of caries spine underwent surgery with spinal instrumentation in the last 3 years. Out of these patients, 30 cases have completed a minimum follow-up of 9 months (Range 9 to 39 months, mean 12.8 months. The regional distribution was 1 in the craniocervical junction, 7 in the subaxial cervical spine, 3 in the cervicothoracic junction, 3 in the thoracic region, 4 in the thoracolumbar junction and 8 in the lumbar region and 1 in the lumbosacral junction. All the cases had anterior lesions except one, which had both anterior and posterior lesions. All of them had decompression, debridement of the lesion and instrumented fusion. Indication of surgery was caries spine with neurodeficit and /or osseous destruction and deformity, which was not responding to conservative treatment of one month. Results: Results were analyzed keeping in mind the clinical and radiological criteria. The former included recovery of pain, and neural deficit with a feeling of general well being. The latter included correction of deformity and evidence of fusion. There was no case which had wound healing/infection related problems. Complications included one case of implant failure and one case of transient neurological deterioration. Results were excellent in 20, good in 5, fair in one and poor in one patient. Majority of the patients were very satisfied with the surgery and all the patients had full anti-tubercular chemotherapy for one year. Conclusions: In properly selected patients, spinal instrumentation is justified because of its safety and efficacy in achieving deformity correction and solid fusion.

  6. Validity of the three-column theory of thoracolumbar fractures. A biomechanic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjabi, M M; Oxland, T R; Kifune, M; Arand, M; Wen, L; Chen, A

    1995-05-15

    This study validated the three-column theory of fractures by correlating the multidirectional instabilities and the vertebral injuries to each of the three columns, using a biomechanic trauma model. The objective was to validate the three-column theory as applied to the thoracolumbar fractures. The widely used three-column theory of fractures for classification and evaluation was based on retrospective analysis of radiographs. No biomechanic study, using realistic spinal fractures and multidirectional instability measurements, was available. Using 16 fresh cadaveric thoracolumbar human spine specimens, two groups of burst fractures were produced by either simple axial compression or flexion-compression, using a high-speed trauma model. Multidirectional flexibility was measured before and after the trauma, thus quantifying the instability of the burst fracture. Computed tomography scans were taken after the fracture, and a newly developed injury scoring scheme quantified the injuries to the anterior, middle, and posterior columns. Statistical correlations were obtained between the flexibility parameters and injuries to each of the three columns. In the axial compression group, the middle column injury, compared with the other two columns, showed the highest correlations to eight of the nine flexibility parameters (average R2 = 0.77). In the flexion-compression group, again the middle column injury showed the highest correlations to eight of the nine flexibility parameters (average R2 = 0.85). The results of this study supported the three-column theory of the thoracolumbar fractures and bolstered the concept of the middle column being the primary determinant of mechanical stability of this region of the spine.

  7. CT in diagnosis of thoracolumbar region diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, I.; Karadjova, M.

    2003-01-01

    The lumbalgia caused by affected thoracolumbar transition (Th 11 -L 2 ) imitates the clinical symptomatic of disc lesions in the lower lumbar segments. The syndrome is presented by a pain projected in the area of the three branchings of the spinal nerves, coming from thoracolumbar segments. The aim of this study is to determine the pathological processes, causing the clinical symptoms of this syndrome, using computer tomography. 51 patients are studied with clinically proved thoracolumbar transition syndrome: 14 men and 37 women. CT slices of 96 vertebral segments are made. Two patient are scanned at Th 11 -Th 12 and L 1 -L 2 . Only Th 12 -L 1 scans are made on 10 patients and 42 are made on two neighbouring segments (41 of them on Th 11 -Th 12 and Th 12 -L 1 and one on Th 11 -L 1 and L 1 -L 2 ). An asymmetry (facet tropism) has been found at 59 levels, 21 if them are with spondiloarthrosis. Spondiloarthrosis has been found in 24 segments - 21 of them with osteochondrosis, one with disc prolapse, and 2 with disc protrusion. It is also found osteoporotic changes osteolysis in multiple myeloma, metastasis etc. During the 3 level examination no evidence for either of the mentioned changes is obtained. The CT slices of two neighbouring segments showed an unexpected change from thoracic to lumbar type of the intervertebral joints in 34 patients. The results from this study support the hypothesis about joints origin of the clinical symptoms of the thoracolumbar transition and demonstrate the importance of the computer tomography as a diagnostic method in this disease

  8. Clinical characterization of thoracolumbar and lumbar intervertebral disk extrusions in English Cocker Spaniels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardy, Thomas J A; Tzounos, Caitlin E; Volk, Holger A; De Decker, Steven

    2016-02-15

    To assess the anatomic distribution of thoracolumbar and lumbar intervertebral disk extrusions (IVDEs) in English Cocker Spaniels as compared with findings in Dachshunds and to characterize clinical findings in English Cocker Spaniels with thoracolumbar or lumbar IVDEs affecting various regions of the vertebral column. Retrospective observational study. 81 English Cocker Spaniels and 81 Dachshunds with IVDEs. Signalment, clinical signs, neurologic examination findings, and affected intervertebral disk spaces (IVDSs) were recorded for both breeds. Management methods and outcomes were recorded for English Cocker Spaniels. Lesions were categorized as thoracolumbar (IVDSs T9-10 through L1-2), midlumbar (L2-3 through L4-5), or caudal lumbar (L5-6 through L7-S1). Midlumbar and caudal lumbar IVDEs were significantly more common in English Cocker Spaniels than in Dachshunds. English Cocker Spaniels with caudal lumbar IVDEs had a longer median duration of clinical signs before evaluation and more commonly had unilateral pelvic limb lameness or spinal hyperesthesia as the predominant clinical sign than did those with IVDEs at other sites. Those with caudal lumbar IVDEs less commonly had neurologic deficits and had a higher median neurologic grade (indicating lesser severity), shorter mean postoperative hospitalization time, and faster mean time to ambulation after surgery than those with other sites affected. These variables did not differ between English Cocker Spaniels with thoracolumbar and midlumbar IVDEs. Caudal and midlumbar IVDEs were more common in English Cocker Spaniels than in Dachshunds. English Cocker Spaniels with caudal lumbar IVDE had clinical signs and posttreatment responses that differed from those in dogs with midlumbar or thoracolumbar IVDE.

  9. Neurologic improvement after thoracic, thoracolumbar, and lumbar spinal cord (conus medullaris) injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, James S; Naroji, Swetha; Maltenfort, Mitchell Gil; Ratliff, John K; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula I; Frank, Brian; Anderson, D Greg; Albert, Todd; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2011-01-01

    Retrospective. With approximately 10,000 new spinal cord injury (SCI) patients in the United States each year, predicting public health outcomes is an important public health concern. Combining all regions of the spine in SCI trials may be misleading if the lumbar and sacral regions (conus) have a neurologic improvement at different rates than the thoracic or thoracolumbar spinal cord. Over a 10-year period between January 1995 to 2005, 1746 consecutive spinal injured patients were seen, evaluated, and treated through a level 1 trauma referral center. A retrospective analysis was performed on 150 patients meeting the criteria of T4 to S5 injury, excluding gunshot wounds. One-year follow-up data were available on 95 of these patients. Contingency table analyses (chi-squared statistics) and multivariate logistic regression. Variables of interest included level of injury, initial American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA), age, race, and etiology. A total of 92.9% of lumbar (conus) patients neurologically improved one ASIA level or more compared with 22.4% of thoracic or thoracolumbar spinal cord-injured patients. Only 7.7% of ASIA A patients showed neurologic improvement, compared with 95.2% of ASIA D patients; ASIA B patients demonstrated a 66.7% improvement rate, whereas ASIA C had a 84.6% improvement rate. When the two effects were considered jointly in a multivariate analysis, ASIA A and thoracic/thoracolumbar patients had only a 4.1% rate of improvement, compared with 96% for lumbar (conus) and incomplete patients (ASIA B-D) and 66.7% to 72.2% for the rest of the patients. All of these relationships were significant to P spinal cord have a greater neurologic improvement rate, which might be related to a greater proportion of lower motor neurons. Thus, defining the exact region of injury and potential for neurologic improvement should be considered in future clinical trial design. Combining all anatomic regions of the spine in SCI trials may be misleading if

  10. The 100 most cited spine articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Michael R; Wang, Tianyi; Schroeder, Gregory D; Hsu, Wellington K

    2012-10-01

    Spine-related research has evolved dramatically during the last century. Significant contributions have been made by thousands of authors. A citation rank list has historically been used within a particular field to measure the importance of an article. The purpose of this article is to report on the 100 most cited articles in the field of spine. Science Citation Index Expanded was searched for citations in 27 different journals (as of 30 November 2010) chosen based on the relevance for all cited spine publications. The top 100 most cited articles were identified. Important information such as journal, date, country of origin, author, subspecialty, and level of evidence (for clinical research) were compiled. The top 100 publications ranged from 1,695 to 240 citations. Fifty-three articles were of the lumbar, 17 were of the thoracolumbar, and 15 of the cervical spine. Eighty-one of the articles were clinical and 19 were basic science in nature. Level of evidence varied for the clinical papers, however, was most commonly level IV (34 of 81 articles). Notably, the 1990-1999 decade was the most productive period with 43 of the top 100 articles published during this time. Identification of the most cited articles within the field of spine recognizes some of the most important contributions in the peer-reviewed literature. Current investigators may utilize the aspects of their work to guide and direct future spine-related research.

  11. Feasibility and Accuracy of Thoracolumbar Minimally Invasive Pedicle Screw Placement With Augmented Reality Navigation Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmi-Terander, Adrian; Nachabe, Rami; Skulason, Halldor; Pedersen, Kyrre; Söderman, Michael; Racadio, John; Babic, Drazenko; Gerdhem, Paul; Edström, Erik

    2017-12-19

    Cadaveric laboratory study. To assess the feasibility and accuracy of minimally invasive thoracolumbar pedicle screw placement using augmented reality (AR) surgical navigation SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: Minimally invasive spine (MIS) surgery has increasingly become the method of choice for a wide variety of spine pathologies. Navigation technology based on AR has been shown to be feasible, accurate and safe in open procedures. AR technology may also be used for MIS surgery. The AR surgical navigation was installed in a hybrid operating room (OR). The hybrid OR includes a surgical table, a motorized flat detector C-arm with intraoperative 2D/3D imaging capabilities, integrated optical cameras for AR navigation and patient motion tracking using optical markers on the skin. Navigation and screw placement was without any X-ray guidance. Two neurosurgeons placed 66 Jamshidi needles (2 cadavers) and 18 cannulated pedicle screws (1 cadaver) in the thoracolumbar spine. Technical accuracy was evaluated by measuring the distance between the tip of the actual needle position and the corresponding planned path as well as the angles between the needle and the desired path. Time needed for navigation along the virtual planned path was measured. An independent reviewer assessed the postoperative scans for the pedicle screws' clinical accuracy. Navigation time per insertion was 90 ± 53 seconds with an accuracy of 2.2 ± 1.3 mm. Accuracy was not dependent on operator. There was no correlation between navigation time and accuracy. The mean error angle between the Jamshidi needles and planned paths was 0.9 ± 0.8°. No screw was misplaced outside the pedicle. Two screws breached 2 to 4 mm yielding an overall accuracy of 89% (16/18). MIS screw placement directed by AR with intraoperative 3D imaging in a hybrid OR is accurate and efficient, without any fluoroscopy or X-ray imaging during the procedure. 4.

  12. Comparison of thoracolumbar motion produced by manual and Jackson-table-turning methods. Study of a cadaveric instability model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, Christian P; DiPaola, Matthew J; Conrad, Bryan P; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Del Rossi, Gianluca; Sawers, Andrew; Rechtine, Glenn R

    2008-08-01

    Patients who have sustained a spinal cord injury remain at risk for further neurologic deterioration until the spine is adequately stabilized. To our knowledge, no study has previously addressed the effects of different bed-to-operating room table transfer techniques on thoracolumbar spinal motion in an instability model. We hypothesized that the conventional logroll technique used to transfer patients from a supine position to a prone position on the operating room table has the potential to confer significantly more motion to the unstable thoracolumbar spine than the Jackson technique. Three-column instability was surgically created at the L1 level in seven cadavers. Two protocols were tested. The manual technique entailed performing a standard logroll of a supine cadaver to a prone position on an operating room Jackson table. The Jackson technique involved sliding the supine cadaver to the Jackson table, securing it to the table, and then rotating it into a prone position. An electromagnetic tracking device measured motion--i.e., angular motion (flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation) and linear translation (axial, medial-lateral, and anterior-posterior) between T12 and L2. The logroll technique created significantly more motion than the Jackson technique as measured with all six parameters. Manual logroll transfers produced an average of 13.8 degrees to 18.1 degrees of maximum angular displacement and 16.6 to 28.3 mm of maximum linear translation. The Jackson technique resulted in an average of 3.1 degrees to 5.8 degrees of maximum angular displacement (p patient safety. Performing the Jackson turn requires approximately half as many people as required for a manual logroll. This study suggests that the Jackson technique should be considered for supine-to-prone transfer of patients with known or suspected instability of the thoracolumbar spine.

  13. Anterior column reconstruction in thoracolumbar injuries utilizing a computer-assisted navigation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blattert, T R; Jarvers, J-S; Schmidt, C; Riesner, H-J; Josten, C

    2011-04-01

    Discectomy, corpectomy, and resection of isolated posterior wall fragments are technically demanding steps requiring maximum surgical precision during anterior reconstruction of the unstable thoracolumbar spine. This study investigates the feasibility of computer-aided guidance for these steps. It also analyzes the precision, advantages, and disadvantages of the procedure. Controlled clinical trial. 21 patients were included in the trial group; the control group consisted of 10 patients. Total time for surgery was noted. To assess surgical precision, decentralization of the cage was measured in postoperative X-rays. Additionally, parallel alignment of vertebral body endplates with the cage was evaluated in postoperative CT scans. Vertebral body fractures of the thoracolumbar spine addressed by disc-/corpectomy and subsequent cage interposition for anterior reconstruction were included. All surgical steps were performed under endoscopic assistance. In the trial group, disc- and corpectomy were performed under computer-aided guidance; in the control group, no computer navigation was utilized. In cases of initial neurological deficit after trauma, the patients underwent emergency laminectomy during the initial posterior stabilization procedure. During the second-stage anterior procedure, resection of the posterior wall fragment with the aid of computer-aided navigation was performed. Fractures were localized between Th9 and L1 in the trial group, and Th10 and L1 in the control group. Time for surgery was significantly shorter in the control group: 1.7 h ± 0.5, as opposed to 3.8 h ± 1.0 in the trial group (p Computer-aided guidance in anterior reconstruction of the thoracolumbar spine is a technically feasible option that may aid in the performance of disc- and corpectomy, as well as the resection of isolated posterior wall fragments in cases with initial neurological compromise. However, total time for surgery is significantly prolongated by this technique

  14. [Biomechanical effect on adjacent vertebra after percutaneous kyphoplasty with cement leakage into disc: a finite element analysis of thoracolumbar osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Qi; Li, Qiu-Jun; Li, Dong; Yang, Yong; Tang, Hai; Li, Jin-Jun; Wang, Bing-Qiang; Wang, Yi-Peng

    2011-01-04

    To explore the biomechanical effects on adjacent vertebra of thoracolumbar osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (OVCF) after percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP) with cement leakage into the disc by using finite element analysis. T10-L2 segment data were obtained from computed tomography (CT) scans of an elder female with single T12 OVCF undergoing a cement leakage into the T12-L1 disc after PKP. A three-dimensional finite element Model of thoracolumbar spine (T10-L2) was built in the Mimics and the ABAQUS software. The stress on annulus fiber, nucleus pulposus, endplate and facet joints under axial pressure (0.3, 1.0, 4.0 MPa) were analyzed. The 3D finite element after percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP) with cement leakage into the disc may be strongly related with the changes of biomechanical effects on adjacent vertebra of thoracolumbar OVCF. Models of thoracolumbar OVCF before and after PVP with a cement leakage into the T12-L1 disc were successfully established. The stresses increased with a rising axial pressure in the model of cement leakage into the disc after PVP, the stress augmentation scope on adjacent end plates(T11 low plate & L1 top plate) and intervertebral disc (T11-12 & T12-L1) increased. The maximal Von Mises stress on adjacent vertebra (T11 & L1) increased while but the maximal Von Mises stress on end vertebra (T10 & L2) decreased. Postoperative adjacent vertebral fracture.

  15. Osteoporosis and Your Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Movement › Osteoporosis and Your Spine Osteoporosis and Your Spine Your spine is made up of small bones ... called kyphosis. Kyphosis and Bone Breaks in the Spine The bones in the spine are called vertebrae. ...

  16. Spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion for thoracolumbar kyphosis in an adult with achondroplasia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Masashi; Kanezaki, Shozo; Notani, Naoki; Ishihara, Toshinobu; Tsumura, Hiroshi

    2017-12-01

    Fixed thoracolumbar kyphosis with spinal stenosis in adult patients with achondroplasia presents a challenging issue. We describe the first case in which spondylectomy and minimally invasive lateral access interbody arthrodesis were used for the treatment of fixed severe thoracolumbar kyphosis and lumbar spinal canal stenosis in an adult with achondroplasia. A 61-year-old man with a history of achondroplastic dwarfism presented with low back pain and radiculopathy and neurogenic claudication. Plain radiographs revealed a high-grade thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity with diffuse degenerative changes in the lumbar spine. The apex was located at L2, the local kyphotic angle from L1 to L3 was 105°, and the anterior area was fused from the L1 to L3 vertebrae. MRI revealed significant canal and lateral recess stenosis secondary to facet hypertrophy. We planned a front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements. We first performed anterior release at the fused part from L1 to L3 and XLIF at L3/4 and L4/5. Next, the patient was placed in the prone position. Spondylectomy at the L2 vertebra and posterior fusion from T10 to L5 were performed. Postoperative radiographs revealed L1 to L3 kyphosis of 32°. No complications occurred during or after surgery. Postoperatively, the patient's low back pain and neurological claudication were resolved. No worsening of kyphosis was observed 24 months postoperatively. Circumferential decompression of the spinal cord at the apical vertebral level and decompression of lumbar canal stenosis were necessary. Front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements via spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a reasonable surgical option for thoracolumbar kyphosis and developmental canal stenosis in patients with achondroplasia.

  17. Effects of vertebral mobilization and manipulation on kinematics of the thoracolumbar region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haussler, Kevin K; Hill, Ashley E; Puttlitz, Christian M; McIlwraith, C Wayne

    2007-05-01

    To measure passive spinal movements induced during dorsoventral mobilization and evaluate effects of induced pain and spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) on passive vertebral mobility in standing horses. 10 healthy adult horses. Baseline vertical displacements, applied force, stiffness, and frequency of the oscillations were measured during dorsoventral spinal mobilization at 5 thoracolumbar intervertebral sites. As a model for back pain, fixation pins were temporarily implanted into the dorsal spinous processes of adjacent vertebrae at 2 of the intervertebral sites. Vertebral variables were recorded again after pin placement and treadmill locomotion. In a randomized crossover study, horses were allocated to control and treatment interventions, separated by a 7-day washout period. The SMT consisted of high-velocity, low-amplitude thrusts applied to the 3 non-pin-placement sites. Control horses received no treatment. The amplitudes of vertical displacement increased from cranial to caudal in the thoracolumbar portion of the vertebral column. Pin implantation caused no immediate changes at adjacent intervertebral sites, but treadmill exercise caused reductions in most variables. The SMT induced a 15% increase in displacement and a 20% increase in applied force, compared with control measurements. The passive vertical mobility of the trunk varied from cranial to caudal. At most sites, SMT increased the amplitudes of dorsoventral displacement and applied force, indicative of increased vertebral flexibility and increased tolerance to pressure in the thoracolumbar portion of the vertebral column.

  18. HISTOMORPHOLOGICAL STUDY OF THORACOLUMBAR FASCIA IN PATIENTS WITH LUMBOSACRAL DISCOPATHY

    OpenAIRE

    Z BEHDADIPOOR; SH RAISI; F BAHMANI; H MOIN

    2000-01-01

    Introduction. Thoracolumbar fascia has neural ends in normal positions. It has sensory role and by inhibitory and or excitatory reflexes helps to protect vertebral column. In this research, it has been studied neural ends in thoracolumbar fascia in 42 cases. Our aim was to compare the presence of neural ends in normal individuals and those with lumbosacral discopathy. Methods. The samples were taken from one centimeter of midline at the level of L4-L5 vertebrae, since in this region the ...

  19. Thoracolumbar intradural disc herniation in eight dogs: clinical, low-field magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomographic myelography findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Shinji; Doi, Shoko; Tamura, Yumiko; Takahashi, Kuniaki; Enomoto, Hirokazu; Ozawa, Tsuyoshi; Uchida, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Intradural disc herniation is a rarely reported cause of neurologic deficits in dogs and few published studies have described comparative imaging characteristics. The purpose of this retrospective cross sectional study was to describe clinical and imaging findings in a group of dogs with confirmed thoracolumbar intradural disc herniation. Included dogs were referred to one of four clinics, had acute mono/paraparesis or paraplegia, had low field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or computed tomographic myelography, and were diagnosed with thoracolumbar intradural disc herniation during surgery. Eight dogs met inclusion criteria. The prevalence of thoracolumbar intradural disc herniation amongst the total population of dogs that developed a thoracolumbar intervertebral disc herniation and that were treated with a surgical procedure was 0.5%. Five dogs were examined using low-field MRI. Lesions that were suspected to be intervertebral disc herniations were observed; however, there were no specific findings indicating that the nucleus pulposus had penetrated into the subarachnoid space or into the spinal cord parenchyma. Thus, the dogs were misdiagnosed as having a conventional intervertebral disc herniation. An intradural extramedullary disc herniation (three cases) or intramedullary disc herniation (two cases) was confirmed during surgery. By using computed tomographic myelography (CTM) for the remaining three dogs, an intradural extramedullary mass surrounded by an accumulation of contrast medium was observed and confirmed during surgery. Findings from this small sample of eight dogs indicated that CTM may be more sensitive for diagnosing canine thoracolumbar intradural disc herniation than low-field MRI. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  20. [Current status of thoracoscopic surgery for thoracic and lumbar spine. Part 2: treatment of the thoracic disc hernia, spinal deformities, spinal tumors, infections and miscellaneous].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdú-López, Francisco; Beisse, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery or video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) of the thoracic and lumbar spine has evolved greatly since it appeared less than 20 years ago. It is currently used in a large number of processes and injuries. The aim of this article, in its two parts, is to review the current status of VATS of the thoracic and lumbar spine in its entire spectrum. After reviewing the current literature, we developed each of the large groups of indications where VATS takes place, one by one. This second part reviews and discusses the management, treatment and specific thoracoscopic technique in thoracic disc herniation, spinal deformities, tumour pathology, infections of the spine and other possible indications for VATS. Thoracoscopic surgery is in many cases an alternative to conventional open surgery. The transdiaphragmatic approach has made endoscopic treatment of many thoracolumbar junction processes possible, thus widening the spectrum of therapeutic indications. These include the treatment of spinal deformities, spinal tumours, infections and other pathological processes, as well as the reconstruction of injured spinal segments and decompression of the spinal canal if lesion placement is favourable to antero-lateral approach. Good clinical results of thoracoscopic surgery are supported by growing experience reflected in a large number of articles. The degree of complications in thoracoscopic surgery is comparable to open surgery, with benefits in regard to morbidity of the approach and subsequent patient recovery. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Concomitant lower thoracic spine disc disease in lumbar spine MR imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Estanislao; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Dosdá, Rosa; Mollá, Enrique

    2002-11-01

    Our objective was to study the coexistence of lower thoracic-spine disc changes in patients with low back pain using a large field of view (FOV) in lumbar spine MR imaging. One hundred fifty patients with low back pain were referred to an MR examination. All patients were studied with a large FOV (27 cm), covering from the coccyx to at least the body of T11. Discs were coded as normal, protrusion, and extrusion (either epiphyseal or intervertebral). The relationship between disc disease and level was established with the Pearson chi(2) test. The T11-12 was the most commonly affected level of the lower thoracic spine with 58 disc cases rated as abnormal. Abnormalities of T11-12 and T12-L1 discs were significantly related only to L1-L2 disease ( p=0.001 and p=0.004, respectively) but unrelated to other disc disease, patient's gender, and age. No correlation was found between other discs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine can detect a great amount of lower thoracic disease, although its clinical significance remains unknown. A statistically significant relation was found within the thoracolumbar junctional region (T11-L2), reflecting common pathoanatomical changes. The absence of relation with lower lumbar spine discs is probably due to differences in their pathomechanisms.

  2. Concomitant lower thoracic spine disc disease in lumbar spine MR imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arana, Estanislao; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Dosda, Rosa; Molla, Enrique

    2002-01-01

    Our objective was to study the coexistence of lower thoracic-spine disc changes in patients with low back pain using a large field of view (FOV) in lumbar spine MR imaging. One hundred fifty patients with low back pain were referred to an MR examination. All patients were studied with a large FOV (27 cm), covering from the coccyx to at least the body of T11. Discs were coded as normal, protrusion, and extrusion (either epiphyseal or intervertebral). The relationship between disc disease and level was established with the Pearson χ 2 test. The T11-12 was the most commonly affected level of the lower thoracic spine with 58 disc cases rated as abnormal. Abnormalities of T11-12 and T12-L1 discs were significantly related only to L1-L2 disease (p=0.001 and p=0.004, respectively) but unrelated to other disc disease, patient's gender, and age. No correlation was found between other discs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine can detect a great amount of lower thoracic disease, although its clinical significance remains unknown. A statistically significant relation was found within the thoracolumbar junctional region (T11-L2), reflecting common pathoanatomical changes. The absence of relation with lower lumbar spine discs is probably due to differences in their pathomechanisms. (orig.)

  3. Concomitant lower thoracic spine disc disease in lumbar spine MR imaging studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arana, Estanislao; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Dosda, Rosa; Molla, Enrique [Department of Radiology, Quiron Clinic, Avd. Blasco Ibanez, 14, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2002-11-01

    Our objective was to study the coexistence of lower thoracic-spine disc changes in patients with low back pain using a large field of view (FOV) in lumbar spine MR imaging. One hundred fifty patients with low back pain were referred to an MR examination. All patients were studied with a large FOV (27 cm), covering from the coccyx to at least the body of T11. Discs were coded as normal, protrusion, and extrusion (either epiphyseal or intervertebral). The relationship between disc disease and level was established with the Pearson {chi}{sup 2} test. The T11-12 was the most commonly affected level of the lower thoracic spine with 58 disc cases rated as abnormal. Abnormalities of T11-12 and T12-L1 discs were significantly related only to L1-L2 disease (p=0.001 and p=0.004, respectively) but unrelated to other disc disease, patient's gender, and age. No correlation was found between other discs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine can detect a great amount of lower thoracic disease, although its clinical significance remains unknown. A statistically significant relation was found within the thoracolumbar junctional region (T11-L2), reflecting common pathoanatomical changes. The absence of relation with lower lumbar spine discs is probably due to differences in their pathomechanisms. (orig.)

  4. Análise comparativa de técnicas de fixação para fraturas da coluna toracolombar Análisis comparativo de técnicas para la fijación de fracturas de columna toracolumbar Comparative analysis of techniques for fixing fractures of the thoracolumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Rafael Hübner

    2011-01-01

    observó un promedio de 2,7 en la escala de dolor y de 11,2 en la escala de Owestry. CONCLUSIÓN: No hubo diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre las dos técnicas.OBJECTIVE: The study evaluates patients affected by thoracolumbar fractures, and treated by posterior instrumentation and arthrodesis. A comparative analysis of two different fixation techniques using pedicle screw fixation associated with short and long instrumentation were carried out. METHODS: Patients evaluation were performed by pain scale (VAS, visual analog scale, functional scale (Oswestry and by clinical and radiographic criteria. RESULT: It was observed 70.3% men and 29.7% women, with mean age of 43 years and average follow-up of 39 months. Most patients had Frankel E grade at the time of data collection (83.8%. The majority of patients had A3 (63.6% fractures at L1 (51.4%. Short instrumentation was performed in 62.2% of cases. An average of 2.7 on the pain scale and 11.2 for the Owestry was obtained in the analysis. CONCLUSION: Evaluation of techniques did not present any statistically significance.

  5. Incidence and mechanism of neurological deficit after thoracolumbar fractures sustained in motor vehicle collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sourabh; Beck, Chad; Yoganandan, Narayan; Rao, Raj D

    2015-10-09

    OBJECT To determine the incidence of and assess the risk factors associated with neurological injury in motor vehicle occupants who sustain fractures of the thoracolumbar spine. METHODS In this study, the authors queried medical, vehicle, and crash data elements from the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN), a prospectively gathered multicenter database compiled from Level I trauma centers. Subjects had fractures involving the T1-L5 vertebral segments, an Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score of ≥ 3, or injury to 2 body regions with an AIS score of ≥ 2 in each region. Demographic parameters obtained for all subjects included age, sex, height, body weight, and body mass index. Clinical parameters obtained included the level of the injured vertebra and the level and type of spinal cord injury. Vehicular crash data included vehicle make, seatbelt type, and usage and appropriate use of the seatbelt. Crash data parameters included the principal direction of force, change in velocity on impact (ΔV), airbag deployment, and vehicle rollover. The authors performed a univariate analysis of the incidence and the odds of sustaining spinal neurological injury associated with major thoracolumbar fractures with respect to the demographic, clinical, and crash parameters. RESULTS Neurological deficit associated with thoracolumbar fracture was most frequent at extremes of age; the highest rates were in the 0- to 10-year (26.7% [4 of 15]) and 70- to 80-year (18.4% [7 of 38]) age groups. Underweight occupants (OR 3.52 [CI 1.055-11.7]) and obese occupants (OR 3.27 [CI 1.28-8.31]) both had higher odds of sustaining spinal cord injury than occupants with a normal body mass index. The highest risk of neurological injury existed in crashes in which airbags deployed and the occupant was not restrained by a seatbelt (OR 2.35 [CI 0.087-1.62]). Reduction in the risk of neurological injuries occurred when 3-point seatbelts were used correctly in conjunction with the

  6. [Radiologic examination of the spine in "back problems" of the standing horse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranner, W; Schill, W; Gerhards, H

    1999-04-01

    The radiological examination of the thoracolumbar spine of a horse with a potential back problem is most important in order to come to a diagnosis and the imaging method of choice. The use of parallel grid-cassettes, appropriate films, rare earth screens and aluminium filters requires radiographic equipment with an output of 60-120 kV and 25-90 mAs. By use of this technique in the standing horse it is possible to obtain radiographs of the summits of the dorsal spinal processes of the thoracolumbar spine from the first thoracic (T1) to approximately the third of fourth lumbar vertebrae (L3/4). Since the thickness of soft tissue is increasing from distal to proximal it is necessary to increase the output to image the processus articulares craniales et caudales. Therefore additional radiographs have to be taken.

  7. Radiologic findings consistent with kissing spines syndrome in Chilean thoroughbreds horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Infante

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the thoracolumbar spine of racehorses are frequent and often significantly decrease their athletic performance. The most common thoracolumbar alteration in thoroughbred horses is kissing spines syndrome (KSS. The narrowing of the interespinous space, generally located between T14-T15 and T15-T16, produces this syndrome. A radiographic study was performed to 30 thoroughbred horses on the segment between T12 and T18. Two latero-lateral views from digital equipment were obtained of the T12 to T18 segment of each horse, the images were analyze and the radiographic findings established the KSS according to a grading scale. The study sample was homogeneous and the results were similar to other radiographic findings of KSS occurring in segments T14-T15 and T15-16.

  8. Comparison of three different surgical approaches for treatment of thoracolumbar burst fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Han

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: The main treatment method used for thoracolumbar fractures is open reduction and in-ternal fixation. Commonly there are three surgical approaches: anterior, posterior and paraspinal. We attempt to compare the three approaches based on our clinical data analysis. Methods: A group of 94 patients with Denis type A or B thoracolumbar burst fracture between March 2008 and September 2010 were recruited in this study. These patients were treated by anterior-, posterior- or paraspinal-approach reduction with or without decompression. The fracture was fixed with titanium mesh and Z-plate via anterior approach (24 patients, screw and rod system via posterior approach (38 patients or paraspinal approach (32 patients. Clinical evaluations included operation duration, blood loss, inci-sion length, preoperative and postoperative Oswestry dis-ability index (ODI. Results: The average operation duration (94.1 min±13.7 min, blood loss (86.7 ml±20.0 ml, length of incision (9.3 mm± 0.7 mm and postoperative ODI (6±0.5 were signifi-cantly lower (P<0.05 in paraspinal approach group than in traditional posterior approach group (operation duration 94.1 min±13.7 min, blood loss 143.3 ml±28.3 ml, length of incision 15.4 cm±2.1 cm and ODI 12±0.7 and anterior approach group (operation duration 176.3 min±20.7 min, blood loss 255.1 ml±38.4 ml, length of incision 18.6 cm±2.4 cm and ODI 13±2.4. There was not statistical difference in terms of Cobb angle on radiographs among the three approaches. Conclusion: The anterior approach surgery is conve-nient for resection of the vertebrae and reconstruction of vertebral height, but it is more complicated and traumatic. Hence it is mostly used for severe Denis type B fracture. The posterior approach is commonly applied to most thora-columbar fractures and has fewer complications compared with the anterior approach, but it has some shortcomings as well. The paraspinal approach has great advantages

  9. Amyloid plaque formation precedes dendritic spine loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Tobias; Burgold, Steffen; Dorostkar, Mario M; Fuhrmann, Martin; Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M; Schmidt, Boris; Kretzschmar, Hans; Herms, Jochen

    2012-12-01

    Amyloid-beta plaque deposition represents a major neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. While numerous studies have described dendritic spine loss in proximity to plaques, much less is known about the kinetics of these processes. In particular, the question as to whether synapse loss precedes or follows plaque formation remains unanswered. To address this question, and to learn more about the underlying kinetics, we simultaneously imaged amyloid plaque deposition and dendritic spine loss by applying two-photon in vivo microscopy through a cranial window in double transgenic APPPS1 mice. As a result, we first observed that the rate of dendritic spine loss in proximity to plaques is the same in both young and aged animals. However, plaque size only increased significantly in the young cohort, indicating that spine loss persists even many months after initial plaque appearance. Tracking the fate of individual spines revealed that net spine loss is caused by increased spine elimination, with the rate of spine formation remaining constant. Imaging of dendritic spines before and during plaque formation demonstrated that spine loss around plaques commences at least 4 weeks after initial plaque formation. In conclusion, spine loss occurs, shortly but with a significant time delay, after the birth of new plaques, and persists in the vicinity of amyloid plaques over many months. These findings hence give further hope to the possibility that there is a therapeutic window between initial amyloid plaque deposition and the onset of structural damage at spines.

  10. Vertebral body spread in thoracolumbar burst fractures can predict posterior construct failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Iure, Federico; Lofrese, Giorgio; De Bonis, Pasquale; Cultrera, Francesco; Cappuccio, Michele; Battisti, Sofia

    2017-10-23

    The load sharing classification (LSC) laid foundations for a scoring system able to indicate which thoracolumbar fractures, after short-segment posterior-only fixations, would need longer instrumentations or additional anterior supports. We analyzed surgically treated thoracolumbar fractures, quantifying the vertebral body's fragment displacement with the aim of identifying a new parameter that could predict the posterior-only construct failure. This is a retrospective cohort study from a single institution. One hundred twenty-one consecutive patients were surgically treated for thoracolumbar burst fractures. Grade of kyphosis correction (GKC) expressed radiological outcome; Oswestry Disability Index and visual analog scale were considered. One hundred twenty-one consecutive patients who underwent posterior fixation for unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures were retrospectively evaluated clinically and radiologically. Supplementary anterior fixations were performed in 34 cases with posterior instrumentation failure, determined on clinic-radiological evidence or symptomatic loss of kyphosis correction. Segmental kyphosis angle and GKC were calculated according to the Cobb method. The displacement of fracture fragments was obtained from the mean of the adjacent end plate areas subtracted from the area enclosed by the maximum contour of vertebral fragmentation. The "spread" was derived from the ratio between this subtraction and the mean of the adjacent end plate areas. Analysis of variance, Mann-Whitney, and receiver operating characteristic were performed for statistical analysis. The authors report no conflict of interest concerning the materials or methods used in the present study or the findings specified in this paper. No funds or grants have been received for the present study. The spread revealed to be a helpful quantitative measurement of vertebral body fragment displacement, easily reproducible with the current computed tomography (CT) imaging technologies

  11. Is the early percutaneous spine total care to treat the polytrauma patient a good way?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Falzarano

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The “ideal“ timing and modality of fracture fixation for unstable thoracolumbar spine fractures in multiply injured patients remains controversial. The concept of “damage control orthopedics” is expressed. We presented a case report of a 27 years' old male who sustained a multilevel spine fractures associated a floating knee (Fraser's Type A, ulna fracture and carpal scaphoid fracture in July 2014 after car accident (very high energy trauma. All these fractures were treated in early total care. We reported a case control to discuss about the early spinal total care associated at orthopedic total care in patients with multiple trauma.

  12. Radiological diagnosis of chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyanagi, Izumi; Isu, Toyohiko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Akino, Minoru; Abe, Hiroshi; Tashiro, Kunio; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Abe, Satoru; Kaneda, Kiyoshi

    1988-01-01

    Radiological findings in five cases with chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction were reported. Three cases had spondylosis and two cases had ossification of yellow ligament (OYL). The levels of the lesions were T12/L1 in three cases and T11/12 in two cases. Two out of three spondylotic patients had also OYL at the same level. The five cases consisted of three men and two women. The ages ranged from 42 to 60 years old with a mean age of 53 years old. Neurologically, every patient showed flaccid paresis and sensory disturbance of the legs. Two cases had sensory disturbance of stocking type. The intervals from the onset of the symptoms to the final diagnosis were 6 months, 7 years, 8 years, 11 years and 12 years. Myelography showed anterior spinal cord compression by bony spur in spondylotic patients, and posterior compression by OYL in other cases. Myelography in flexion posture disclosed the cord compression by bony spur more clearly in two out of three spondylotic patients. Delayed CT-myelography showed intramedullary filling of contrast material in two cases, which indicated degenerative change or microcavitation due to long term compression of the spinal cord. MRI was taken in three spondylotic patients and could directly show compression of the spinal cord. Difficulty in detecting abnormality at thoraco-lumbar junction on plain roentgenogram, and similarity of the symptoms to peripheral nerve disease often lead to a delay in diagnosis. The significance of dynamic myelography and delayed CT-myelography when dealing with such a lesion was discussed here. MRI is also a useful method for diagnosing a compressive lesion at the thoraco-lumbar junction. (author)

  13. Characteristic of thoracolumbar burst fracture with mid column injury and analysis of relative surgical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Binhui; Zhang Bo; Ouyang Zhen; Sun Maomin; Xia Chunlin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: By analyzing the pathologic characteristics of the thoracolumbar burst fracture with mid column injury to explore the value of surgical treatment and the relationship between the spinal cord injury and the burst fracture. Methods: With the combination of X-ray film, CT, MRI examination, in 97 patients with thoracolumbar burst fracture, the rate of spinal canal stenosis was measured. For the fracture fragments morphology, translocation, and intervertebral disc, posterior longitudinal ligament injuries, a different surgical method was selected, the percentage of wound vertebral body compression, kyphosis Cobb angle and the rate of spinal canal stenosis, spinal cord nerve function recovery were compared between preoperation and postoperation. Results: After operation, all patients were reseted. Followed-up was performed from 6 to 28 months, in 88 cases bone graft fusion was obtained after 4 to 6 months, 1 ∼ 3 levels were restored in Frankel grade of spinal cord nerve function recovery. Between preoperation and postoperation, the percentage of wounded vertebral body compression, kyphosis Cobb angle and the rate of spinal canal stenosis were significantly different (P <0. 01). For the 9 cases of combined intervertebral disc injury, fusion was not achieved in the 6 cases there were loss in vertebral body height and Cobb angle in various extent. Conclusion: There is an interrelationship between thoracolumbar burst fracture caused by the reduction of spinal canal diameter and the spinal cord injury. Different forms of occupation of intraspinal bone fragments indicate different degrees of moment of violence and spinal cord primary injury. It is important to select the appropriate surgical method for clinic. The potential impact should be sufficient attention on the stability of intervertebral disc injury. (authors)

  14. Radiological diagnosis of chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi; Isu, Toyohiko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Akino, Minoru; Abe, Hiroshi; Tashiro, Kunio; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Abe, Satoru; Kaneda, Kiyoshi

    1988-10-01

    Radiological findings in five cases with chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction were reported. Three cases had spondylosis and two cases had ossification of yellow ligament (OYL). The levels of the lesions were T12/L1 in three cases and T11/12 in two cases. Two out of three spondylotic patients had also OYL at the same level. The five cases consisted of three men and two women. The ages ranged from 42 to 60 years old with a mean age of 53 years old. Neurologically, every patient showed flaccid paresis and sensory disturbance of the legs. Two cases had sensory disturbance of stocking type. The intervals from the onset of the symptoms to the final diagnosis were 6 months, 7 years, 8 years, 11 years and 12 years. Myelography showed anterior spinal cord compression by bony spur in spondylotic patients, and posterior compression by OYL in other cases. Myelography in flexion posture disclosed the cord compression by bony spur more clearly in two out of three spondylotic patients. Delayed CT-myelography showed intramedullary filling of contrast material in two cases, which indicated degenerative change or microcavitation due to long term compression of the spinal cord. MRI was taken in three spondylotic patients and could directly show compression of the spinal cord. Difficulty in detecting abnormality at thoraco-lumbar junction on plain roentgenogram, and similarity of the symptoms to peripheral nerve disease often lead to a delay in diagnosis. The significance of dynamic myelography and delayed CT-myelography when dealing with such a lesion was discussed here. MRI is also a useful method for diagnosing a compressive lesion at the thoraco-lumbar junction.

  15. HISTOMORPHOLOGICAL STUDY OF THORACOLUMBAR FASCIA IN PATIENTS WITH LUMBOSACRAL DISCOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z BEHDADIPOOR

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Thoracolumbar fascia has neural ends in normal positions. It has sensory role and by inhibitory and or excitatory reflexes helps to protect vertebral column. In this research, it has been studied neural ends in thoracolumbar fascia in 42 cases. Our aim was to compare the presence of neural ends in normal individuals and those with lumbosacral discopathy. Methods. The samples were taken from one centimeter of midline at the level of L4-L5 vertebrae, since in this region the posterior layer of thoracolumbar fascia is thicker. Seven of the cases were normal and 35 were patients with lumbosacral discopathy. The samples were processed and serial sections were prepared. Six hundred and thirty sections from the serial sections were selected and 90 percent of these were stained with H&E and the rest of them were stained with Bielschowsky method. The sections were studied by light microscopy. Findings. Unlike the normal individuals, nerve corpuscles were not seen in none of our patients with lumbosacraldiscopathy.UsingBielschowsky,nerveendingswerepresentin normal individuals but they were not visible in patients with discopathy. Conclusion. It is concluded that thoracolumbar fascia in patients with discopathy had insufficient neural ends. Loss of these neural ends may be cause of decreasing proprioceptive information to nervous system and can be an initiating factor to damage the bones, ligaments and muscles.

  16. Laparoscopic Spine Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Global Affairs and Humanitarian Efforts Log In Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Patient Information from SAGES Download PDF Find a SAGES Surgeon Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Your spine surgeon has determined that you ...

  17. THE IMPACT OF CLASSICAL MASSAGE ON SPINE MOBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Radzimińska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Irregularities in movable property of the spine affect a large part of society and the problem affects the people at an increasingly younger age. Classical massage is a form of mechanotherapy that affects the regulation of the work of muscles, joints, tendons and ligaments. Aim of work: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of classical massage section of thoracolumbar spine to increase the mobility in these segments. Material: The study was carried out on 36 healthy volunteers (20 women and 16 men aged 21 to 27 years old (average age - 23.8 who were subjected to a series of five classical massages (according to strictly established protocol. In order to objectify the effects in all subjects before and after a series of treatments the following measurements were made: the fingers-floor test; the Otto -Wurna test; the straightening of the spine; lateral flexion of the spine; twist of the spine. Results A statistically important difference has been shown in the results of all tested variables before the first and after the last treatment of classical massage. Conclusions The results of personal research apply to young, healthy volunteers. It is worth to continue research into the effects of this form of therapy in the case of restrictions of movable tangible property, resulting from spinal pain syndromes.

  18. Stabilization of the lower thoracic and lumbar spine with the internal spinal skeletal fixation system. Indications, techniques, and first results of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aebi, M; Etter, C; Kehl, T; Thalgott, J

    1987-01-01

    Since 1984, 30 patients with burst fractures of the lower thoracic and lumbar spine were treated with AO internal spinal skeletal fixation system. All patients in this series had a minimum follow-up of 12 months. This new instrumentation is a posterior intrapedicular system developed by Dick in 1982. It allows stable fixation that is limited only to adjacent spinal segments. The internal fixator permits reduction in all three planes. Independently, it is possible to add distraction or compression to the involved segments. It also is able to reduce effectively the "middle column" which is thought to be accomplished by "ligamentotaxis." In this series there were 16 neurologically intact patients and 14 with partial or complete neurologic injury. There were two minor instrumentation loosenings early in the series. Most patients in this series had a near-anatomic reduction of all three columns in the involved segment. It was also possible to re-establish the normal lordosis of the lumbar spine. The device provided sufficient rigid fixation for rapid postoperative mobilization in a light external orthosis.

  19. Anatomy and biomechanics of gluteus maximus and the thoracolumbar fascia at the sacroiliac joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, P J; Hapuarachchi, K S; Ross, J A; Sambaiew, E; Ranger, T A; Briggs, C A

    2014-03-01

    Biomechanical models predict that recruitment of gluteus maximus (GMax) will exert a compressive force across the sacroiliac joint (SIJ), yet this muscle requires morphologic assessment. The aims of this study were to document GMax's proximal attachments and assess their capacity to generate forces including compressive force at the SIJ. In 11 embalmed cadaver limbs, attachments of GMax crossing the SIJ were dissected and their fascicle orientation, length and attachment volume documented. The physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) of each attachment was calculated along with its estimated maximum force at the SIJ and lumbar spine. GMax fascicles originated from the gluteus medius fascia, ilium, thoracolumbar fascia, erector spinae aponeurosis, sacrum, coccyx, dorsal sacroiliac and sacrotuberous ligaments in all specimens. Their mean fascicle orientation ranged from 32 to 45° below horizontal and mean length from 11 to 18 cm. The mean total PCSA of GMax was 26 cm(2) (range 16-36), of which 70% crossed the SIJ. The average maximum force predicted to be generated by GMax's total attachments crossing each SIJ was 891 N (range 572-1,215), of which 70% (702 N: range 450-1,009) could act perpendicular to the plane of the SIJ. The capacity of GMax to generate an extensor moment at lower lumbar segments was estimated at 4 Nm (range 2-9.5). GMax may generate compressive forces at the SIJ through its bony and fibrous attachments. These may assist effective load transfer between lower limbs and trunk. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Anatomy of the Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Osteoporosis Back Pain Basics Book RESOURCES Patient Information Feature Articles Patient Q&A Success Stories Definitions Anatomy of the Spine Definitions A-Z Spine Specialists Videos 9 for Spine Epidural Steroid Injections Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment ... Bones Vertebrae Each individual vertebra has unique features depending on the region in which it is ...

  1. Effects of acceleration level on lumbar spine injuries in military populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Stemper, Brian D; Baisden, Jamie L; Pintar, Frank A; Paskoff, Glenn R; Shender, Barry S

    2015-06-01

    Clinical studies have indicated that thoracolumbar trauma occurs in the civilian population at its junction. In contrast, injury patterns in military populations indicate a shift to the inferior vertebral levels of the lumbar spine. Controlled studies offering an explanation for such migrations and the associated clinical biomechanics are sparse in literature. The goals of this study were to investigate the potential roles of acceleration loading on the production of injuries and their stability characteristics using a human cadaver model for applications to high-speed aircraft ejection and helicopter crashes. Biomechanical laboratory study using unembalmed human cadaver lumbar spinal columns. Thoracolumbar columns from post-mortem human surrogates were procured, x-rays taken, intervertebral joints and bony components evaluated for degeneration, and fixed using polymethylmethacrylate. The inferior end was attached to a platform via a load cell and uniaxial accelerometer. The superior end was attached to the upper metal platform via a semi-circular cylinder. The pre-flexed specimen was preloaded to simulate torso mass. The ends of the platform were connected to the vertical post of a custom-designed drop tower. The specimen was dropped inducing acceleration loading to the column. Axial force and acceleration data were gathered at high sampling rates, filtered, and peak accelerations and inertia-compensated axial forces were obtained during the loading phase. Computed tomography images were used to identify and classify injuries using the three-column concept (stable vs. unstable trauma). The mean age, total body mass, and stature of the five healthy degeneration-free specimens were 42 years, 73 kg, and 167 cm. The first two specimens subjected to peak accelerations of approximately 200 m/sec(2) were classified as belonging to high-speed aircraft ejection-type and the other three specimens subjected to greater amplitudes (347-549 m/sec(2)) were classified as

  2. Evolutionary allometry of the thoracolumbar centra in felids and bovids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Katrina E

    2015-07-01

    Mammals have evolved a remarkable range of body sizes, yet their overall body plan remains unaltered. One challenge of evolutionary biology is to understand the mechanisms by which this size diversity is achieved, and how the mechanical challenges associated with changing body size are overcome. Despite the importance of the axial skeleton in body support and locomotion, and much interest in the allometry of the appendicular skeleton, little is known about vertebral allometry outside primates. This study compares evolutionary allometry of the thoracolumbar centra in two families of quadrupedal running mammals: Felidae and Bovidae. I test the hypothesis that, as size increases, the thoracolumbar region will resist increasing loads by becoming a) craniocaudally shorter, and b) larger in cross-sectional area, particularly in the sagittal plane. Length, width, and height of the thoracolumbar centra of 23 felid and 34 bovid species were taken. Thoracic, prediaphragmatic, lumbar, and postdiaphragmatic lengths were calculated, and diameters were compared at three equivalent positions: the midthoracic, the diaphragmatic and the midlumbar vertebra. Allometric slopes were calculated using a reduced major axis regression, on both raw and independent contrasts data. Slopes and elevations were compared using an ANCOVA. As size increases the thoracolumbar centra become more robust, showing preferential reinforcement in the sagittal plane. There was less allometric shortening of the thoracic than the lumbar region, perhaps reflecting constraints due to its connection with the respiratory apparatus. The thoracic region was more robust in bovids than felids, whereas the lumbar region was longer and more robust in felids than bovids. Elongation of lumbar centra increases the outlever of sagittal bending at intervertebral joints, increasing the total pelvic displacement during dorsomobile running. Both locomotor specializations and functional regionalization of the axial skeleton

  3. Biologics in spine arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Abhishek; Dodwad, Shah-Nawaz M; Hsu, Wellington K

    2015-06-01

    Spine fusion is a tool used in the treatment of spine trauma, tumors, and degenerative disorders. Poor outcomes related to failure of fusion, however, have directed the interests of practitioners and scientists to spinal biologics that may impact fusion at the cellular level. These biologics are used to achieve successful arthrodesis in the treatment of symptomatic deformity or instability. Historically, autologous bone grafting, including iliac crest bong graft harvesting, had represented the gold standard in spinal arthrodesis. However, due to concerns over potential harvest site complications, supply limitations, and associated morbidity, surgeons have turned to other bone graft options known for their osteogenic, osteoinductive, and/or osteoconductive properties. Current bone graft selection includes autograft, allograft, demineralized bone matrix, ceramics, mesenchymal stem cells, and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein. Each pose their respective advantages and disadvantages and are the focus of ongoing research investigating the safety and efficacy of their use in the setting of spinal fusion. Rh-BMP2 has been plagued by issues of widespread off-label use, controversial indications, and a wide range of adverse effects. The risks associated with high concentrations of exogenous growth factors have led to investigational efforts into nanotechnology and its application in spinal arthrodesis through the binding of endogenous growth factors. Bone graft selection remains critical to successful fusion and favorable patient outcomes, and orthopaedic surgeons must be educated on the utility and limitations of various biologics in the setting of spine arthrodesis.

  4. Prevalence of Scoliosis and Thoracolumbar Kyphosis in Patients With Achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Bilal I; Yost, Mary T; Badkoobehi, Haleh; Ain, Michael C

    2016-03-01

    Retrospective chart review, case series. To determine the prevalence of scoliosis and kyphosis in patients with achondroplasia. There is little published research on the prevalence of scoliosis and thoracolumbar kyphosis in patients with achondroplasia. The authors retrospectively reviewed charts of 459 patients with achondroplasia who were seen by the senior author, an orthopedic surgeon, from 1999 through 2013, at a tertiary referral center. After excluding patients who presented after spinal surgery and those who were referred for specific non-spinal issues, 326 patients were included (71%). Cobb angles were measured on lateral and posteroanterior radiographs. Scoliosis was defined as curvature on posteroanterior radiographs greater than 10°; thoracolumbar kyphosis was defined as any kyphotic curvature with an apex between T11 and L2. These data were then stratified by sex, age group (0-2, 3-12, 13-19, 20-40, and >40 years), and severity: within normal limits (≤10°), mild (>10°-25°), moderate (26°-50°), and severe (>50°). The study population consisted of 176 males and 150 females with a mean age of 18 years. Scoliosis was observed in 60%. Thoracolumbar kyphosis was observed in 79%, with 52% exhibiting moderate to severe curvature. In these patients, the rates of scoliosis and kyphosis were 60% and 79%, respectively, which are much higher than the rates reported in the literature for the general population of children. Level 3 or 4. Copyright © 2016 Scoliosis Research Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Transpedicular fixation for fractures treatment of the thoracolumbar and lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrieta Maria, Victor Elias; Nino Caicedo, Jose Maria

    2003-01-01

    Roy Camille first reported this technique in the 60's, but it became popular in the late 90's. This technique itself has a great biomechanical stability since it involve the anterior, medium and posterior columns of Denis, which is valuable in traumatic, deforming and degenerative pathologies. Fifty patients were reviewed in a time span from 1992 to 2002; average age 32 years, average follow up 53 months. The analyzed variables were diagnostic, mechanism of trauma, neurological deficit, additional injuries, decompressive procedures, anatomic level, number of screws used and complications. There were 30 (60%) cases of burst fractures, 17 (34%) luxofractures, two wedge fractures and one flexion-distraction fracture. the causes of the injuries found were 25 (50%) cases of vehicular motor accidents and 21 (42%) falls. the most compromised level was l1: 23 (46%) cases. eight patients required posterior decompression and five (10%) anterior decompression and five (10%) anterior decompression. 200 transpedicular screws were placed without intraoperative complications. the complications presented were: deep infection 4% material breakdown 2% bone failure 2%. there were not pseudoarthrosis

  6. Diagnostic Approach to Pediatric Spine Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Andrea; Martinetti, Carola; Morana, Giovanni; Severino, Mariasavina; Tortora, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the developmental features of the pediatric spine and spinal cord, including embryologic steps and subsequent growth of the osteocartilaginous spine and contents is necessary for interpretation of the pathologic events that may affect the pediatric spine. MR imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients suspected of harboring spinal abnormalities, whereas computed tomography and ultrasonography play a more limited, complementary role. This article discusses the embryologic and developmental anatomy features of the spine and spinal cord, together with some technical points and pitfalls, and the most common indications for pediatric spinal MR imaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Correlation between thoracolumbar curvatures and respiratory function in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman NNAA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nor Najwatul Akmal Ab Rahman,1 Devinder Kaur Ajit Singh,1 Raymond Lee2 1Physiotherapy Programme, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2School of Applied Sciences, London South Bank University, London, UK Abstract: Aging is associated with alterations in thoracolumbar curvatures and respiratory function. Research information regarding the correlation between thoracolumbar curvatures and a comprehensive examination of respiratory function parameters in older adults is limited. The aim of the present study was to examine the correlation between thoracolumbar curvatures and respiratory function in community-dwelling older adults. Thoracolumbar curvatures (thoracic and lumbar were measured using a motion tracker. Respiratory function parameters such as lung function, respiratory rate, respiratory muscle strength and respiratory muscle thickness (diaphragm and intercostal were measured using a spirometer, triaxial accelerometer, respiratory pressure meter and ultrasound imaging, respectively. Sixty-eight community-dwelling older males and females from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, with mean (standard deviation age of 66.63 (5.16 years participated in this cross-sectional study. The results showed that mean (standard deviation thoracic curvature angle and lumbar curvature angles were -46.30° (14.66° and 14.10° (10.58°, respectively. There was a significant negative correlation between thoracic curvature angle and lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second: r=-0.23, P<0.05; forced vital capacity: r=-0.32, P<0.05, quiet expiration intercostal thickness (r=-0.22, P<0.05 and deep expiration diaphragm muscle thickness (r=-0.21, P<0.05. The lumbar curvature angle had a significant negative correlation with respiratory muscle strength (r=-0.29, P<0.05 and diaphragm muscle thickness at deep inspiration (r=-0.22, P<0.05. However, respiratory rate

  8. Combined posteroanterior fusion versus transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in thoracolumbar burst fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Rene; Lindtner, Richard Andreas; Lill, Markus; Blauth, Michael; Krappinger, Dietmar; Kammerlander, Christian

    2012-04-01

    The optimal treatment strategy for burst fractures of the thoracolumbar junction is discussed controversially in the literature. Whilst 360° fusion has shown to result in better radiological outcome, recent studies have failed to show its superiority concerning clinical outcome. The morbidity associated with the additional anterior approach may account for these findings. The aim of this prospective observational study was therefore to compare two different techniques for 360° fusion in thoracolumbar burst fractures using either thoracoscopy or a transforaminal approach (transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF)) to support the anterior column. Posterior reduction and short-segmental fixation using angular stable pedicle screw systems were performed in all patients as a first step. Monocortical strut grafts were used for the anterior support in the TLIF group, whilst tricortical grafts or titanium vertebral body replacing implants of adjustable height were used in the combined posteroanterior group. At final follow-up, the radiological outcome was assessed by performing X-rays in a standing position. The clinical outcome was measured using five validated outcome scores. The morbidity associated with the approaches and the donor site was assessed as well. There were 21 patients in the TLIF group and 14 patients in the posteroanterior group included. The postoperative loss of correction was higher in the TLIF group (4.9°±8.3° versus 3.4°±6.4°, p>0.05). There were no significant differences regarding the outcome scores between the two groups. There were no differences in terms of return to employment, leisure activities and back function either. More patients suffered from donor-site morbidity in the TLIF group, whilst the morbidity associated with the surgical approach was higher in the posteroanterior group. The smaller donor-site morbidity in the posteroanterior group is counterbalanced by an additional morbidity associated with the anterior approach

  9. Single-image hard-copy display of the spine utilizing digital radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artz, Dorothy S.; Janchar, Timothy; Milzman, David; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    1997-04-01

    Regions of the entire spine contain a wide latitude of tissue densities within the imaged field of view presenting a problem for adequate radiological evaluation. With screen/film technology, the optimal technique for one area of the radiograph is sub-optimal for another area. Computed radiography (CR) with its inherent wide dynamic range, has been shown to be better than screen/film for lateral cervical spine imaging, but limitations are still present with standard image processing. By utilizing a dynamic range control (DRC) algorithm based on unsharp masking and signal transformation prior to gradation and frequency processing within the CR system, more vertebral bodies can be seen on a single hard copy display of the lateral cervical, thoracic, and thoracolumbar examinations. Examinations of the trauma cross-table lateral cervical spine, lateral thoracic spine, and lateral thoracolumbar spine were collected on live patient using photostimulable storage phosphor plates, the Fuji FCR 9000 reader, and the Fuji AC-3 computed radiography reader. Two images were produced from a single exposure; one with standard image processing and the second image with the standard process and the additional DRC algorithm. Both sets were printed from a Fuji LP 414 laser printer. Two different DRC algorithms were applied depending on which portion of the spine was not well visualized. One algorithm increased optical density and the second algorithm decreased optical density. The resultant image pairs were then reviewed by a panel of radiologists. Images produced with the additional DRC algorithm demonstrated improved visualization of previously 'under exposed' and 'over exposed' regions within the same image. Where lung field had previously obscured bony detail of the lateral thoracolumbar spine due to 'over exposure,' the image with the DRC applied to decrease the optical density allowed for easy visualization of the entire area of interest. For areas of the lateral cervical spine

  10. Spine Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your backbone, or spine, is made up of 26 bone discs called vertebrae. The vertebrae protect your spinal cord and allow you to ... of problems can change the structure of the spine or damage the vertebrae and surrounding tissue. They ...

  11. [Comparison of effectiveness between two surgical methods in treatment of thoracolumbar brucella spondylitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinming; Zuo, Xianhong; Jia, Yongli; Chang, Yuefei; Zhang, Peng; Ren, Yixing

    2014-10-01

    there were 1 case of grade C, 11 cases of grade D, and 58 cases of grade E in group B; and difference was not significant (Z = 0.168, P = 0.682). The grafting bone fusion was observed in both groups. The fusion time was (8.7 ± 0.3) months in group A and (8.6 ± 0.4) months in group B, showing no significant difference (t = 0.591, P = 0.601) was found. At last follow-up, no loosening or fracture of internal fixation was found. Based on regular medicine therapy, the effectiveness of the two methods is satisfactory in the treatment of thoracolumbar brucella spondylitis as long as the operation indications should be controlled strictly.

  12. Detailed analysis of the clinical effects of cell therapy for thoracolumbar spinal cord injury: an original study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Alok Sharma,1 Nandini Gokulchandran,1 Hemangi Sane,2 Prerna Badhe,1 Pooja Kulkarni,2 Mamta Lohia,3 Anjana Nagrajan,3 Nancy Thomas3 1Department of Medical Services and Clinical Research, 2Department of Research and Development, 3Department of Neurorehabilitation, NeuroGen Brain and Spine Institute, Surana Sethia Hospital and Research Centre, Chembur, Mumbai, India Background: Cell therapy is amongst the most promising treatment strategies in spinal cord injury (SCI because it focuses on repair. There are many published animal studies and a few human trials showing remarkable results with various cell types. The level of SCI determines whether paraplegia or quadriplegia is present, and greatly influences recovery. The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of the clinical effects and long-term safety of intrathecal administration of autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells, along with changes in functional independence and quality of life in patients with thoracolumbar SCI. Methods: We undertook a retrospective analysis of a clinical study in which a nonrandomized sample of 110 patients with thoracolumbar SCI underwent autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cell transplantation intrathecally and subsequent neurorehabilitation, with a mean follow-up of 2 years ± 1 month. Changes on any parameters were recorded at follow-up. The data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon's signed-rank test and McNemar's test. Functional Independence Measure and American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA scores were recorded, and a detailed neurological assessment was performed. Results: Overall improvement was seen in 91% of patients, including reduction in spasticity, partial sensory recovery, and improvement in trunk control, postural hypotension, bladder management, mobility, activities of daily living, and functional independence. A significant association of these symptomatic improvements with the cell therapy intervention was established

  13. Can acetabular orientation be restored by lumbar pedicle subtraction osteotomy in ankylosing spondylitis patients with thoracolumbar kyphosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Qian, Bang-Ping; Qiu, Yong; Wang, Bin; Yu, Yang; Zhu, Ze-Zhang; Jiang, Jun; Mao, Sai-Hu; Qu, Zhe; Zhang, Yun-Peng

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate whether acetabular orientation (abduction and anteversion) can be restored by lumbar pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients with thoracolumbar kyphosis. A total of 33 consecutive AS patients with thoracolumbar kyphosis undergoing one-level lumbar PSO were retrospectively reviewed. Radiographical measurements included sagittal vertical axis, global kyphosis, thoracic kyphosis, local kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence, sacral slope, and pelvic tilt. Acetabular abduction and anteversion were measured on CT scans of the pelvis before and after lumbar PSO. The preoperative and postoperative parameters were compared by the paired samples t test. Pearson's correlation analysis was conducted to determine the correlations between the changes in acetabular abduction and anteversion and the changes in sagittal spinopelvic parameters. After lumbar PSO, sagittal vertical axis, global kyphosis, and pelvic tilt were corrected from 15.7 ± 6.7 cm, 66.8° ± 17.5°, and 38.6° ± 9.0° to 2.9 ± 4.9 cm, 21.3° ± 8.2°, and 23.2° ± 8.2°, respectively (p < 0.001). Of note, acetabular abduction and anteversion decreased from 59.6° ± 4.6° to 31.4° ± 6.5° before surgery to 51.4° ± 6.5° and 20.2° ± 4.4° after surgery, respectively (p < 0.001). Moreover, the changes in acetabular abduction and anteversion were observed significantly correlated with the change in pelvic tilt (r = 0.527, p = 0.002; r = 0.586, p < 0.001). Abnormal acetabular abduction and anteversion could be corrected by lumbar PSO in AS patients with thoracolumbar kyphosis. Consequently, a relatively normal acetabular orientation could be achieved after lumbar PSO, which might decrease the potential risk of dislocation in AS patients with spine and hip deformities requiring subsequent THR surgery.

  14. Biomechanical comparison of mono-segment transpedicular fixation with short-segment fixation for treatment of thoracolumbar fractures: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guijun; Fu, Xin; Du, Changling; Ma, Jianxiong; Li, Zhijun; Tian, Peng; Zhang, Tao; Ma, Xinlong

    2014-10-01

    Mono-segment transpedicular fixation is a method for the treatment of certain types of thoracolumbar spinal fracture. Finite element models were constructed to evaluate the biomechanics of mono-segment transpedicular fixation of thoracolumbar fracture. Spinal motion (T10-L2) was scanned and used to establish the models. The superior half of the cortical bone of T12 was removed and the superior half of the cancellous bone of the T12 body was assigned the material properties of injured bone to mimic vertebral fracture. Transpedicular fixation of T11 and T12 was performed to produce a mono-segment fixation model; T11 and L1 were fixed to produce a short-segment fixation model. Motion differences between functional units and von Mises stress on the spine and implants were measured under axial compression, anterior bending, extensional bending, lateral bending and axial rotation. We found no significant difference between mono- and short-segment fixations in the motion of any functional unit. Stress on the T10/T11 nucleus pulposus and T10/T11 and L1/L2 annulus fibrosus increased significantly by about 75% on anterior bending, extensional bending and lateral bending. In the fracture model, stress was increased by 24% at the inferior endplate of T10 and by 43% at the superior endplate of L2. All increased stresses were reduced after fixation and lower stress was observed with mono-segment fixation. In summary, the biomechanics of mono-segment pedicle screw instrumentation was similar to that of conventional short-segment fixation. As a minimally invasive treatment, mono-segment fixation would be appropriate for the treatment of selected thoracolumbar spinal fractures. © IMechE 2014.

  15. Correlation between thoracolumbar curvatures and respiratory function in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nor Najwatul Akmal Ab; Singh, Devinder Kaur Ajit; Lee, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Aging is associated with alterations in thoracolumbar curvatures and respiratory function. Research information regarding the correlation between thoracolumbar curvatures and a comprehensive examination of respiratory function parameters in older adults is limited. The aim of the present study was to examine the correlation between thoracolumbar curvatures and respiratory function in community-dwelling older adults. Thoracolumbar curvatures (thoracic and lumbar) were measured using a motion tracker. Respiratory function parameters such as lung function, respiratory rate, respiratory muscle strength and respiratory muscle thickness (diaphragm and intercostal) were measured using a spirometer, triaxial accelerometer, respiratory pressure meter and ultrasound imaging, respectively. Sixty-eight community-dwelling older males and females from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, with mean (standard deviation) age of 66.63 (5.16) years participated in this cross-sectional study. The results showed that mean (standard deviation) thoracic curvature angle and lumbar curvature angles were -46.30° (14.66°) and 14.10° (10.58°), respectively. There was a significant negative correlation between thoracic curvature angle and lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second: r =-0.23, P <0.05; forced vital capacity: r =-0.32, P <0.05), quiet expiration intercostal thickness ( r =-0.22, P <0.05) and deep expiration diaphragm muscle thickness ( r =-0.21, P <0.05). The lumbar curvature angle had a significant negative correlation with respiratory muscle strength ( r =-0.29, P <0.05) and diaphragm muscle thickness at deep inspiration ( r =-0.22, P <0.05). However, respiratory rate was correlated neither with thoracic nor with lumbar curvatures. The findings of this study suggest that increase in both thoracic and lumbar curvatures is correlated with decrease in respiratory muscle strength, respiratory muscle thickness and some parameters of lung function. Clinically, both thoracic and

  16. Spatial and Working Memory Is Linked to Spine Density and Mushroom Spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Refaat Mahmmoud

    Full Text Available Changes in synaptic structure and efficacy including dendritic spine number and morphology have been shown to underlie neuronal activity and size. Moreover, the shapes of individual dendritic spines were proposed to correlate with their capacity for structural change. Spine numbers and morphology were reported to parallel memory formation in the rat using a water maze but, so far, there is no information on spine counts or shape in the radial arm maze (RAM, a frequently used paradigm for the evaluation of complex memory formation in the rodent.24 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups, 8 were trained, 8 remained untrained in the RAM and 8 rats served as cage controls. Dendritic spine numbers and individual spine forms were counted in CA1, CA3 areas and dentate gyrus of hippocampus using a DIL dye method with subsequent quantification by the Neuronstudio software and the image J program.Working memory errors (WME and latency in the RAM were decreased along the training period indicating that animals performed the task. Total spine density was significantly increased following training in the RAM as compared to untrained rats and cage controls. The number of mushroom spines was significantly increased in the trained as compared to untrained and cage controls. Negative significant correlations between spine density and WME were observed in CA1 basal dendrites and in CA3 apical and basal dendrites. In addition, there was a significant negative correlation between spine density and latency in CA3 basal dendrites.The study shows that spine numbers are significantly increased in the trained group, an observation that may suggest the use of this method representing a morphological parameter for memory formation studies in the RAM. Herein, correlations between WME and latency in the RAM and spine density revealed a link between spine numbers and performance in the RAM.

  17. Spatial and Working Memory Is Linked to Spine Density and Mushroom Spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmmoud, Rasha Refaat; Sase, Sunetra; Aher, Yogesh D; Sase, Ajinkya; Gröger, Marion; Mokhtar, Maher; Höger, Harald; Lubec, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Changes in synaptic structure and efficacy including dendritic spine number and morphology have been shown to underlie neuronal activity and size. Moreover, the shapes of individual dendritic spines were proposed to correlate with their capacity for structural change. Spine numbers and morphology were reported to parallel memory formation in the rat using a water maze but, so far, there is no information on spine counts or shape in the radial arm maze (RAM), a frequently used paradigm for the evaluation of complex memory formation in the rodent. 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups, 8 were trained, 8 remained untrained in the RAM and 8 rats served as cage controls. Dendritic spine numbers and individual spine forms were counted in CA1, CA3 areas and dentate gyrus of hippocampus using a DIL dye method with subsequent quantification by the Neuronstudio software and the image J program. Working memory errors (WME) and latency in the RAM were decreased along the training period indicating that animals performed the task. Total spine density was significantly increased following training in the RAM as compared to untrained rats and cage controls. The number of mushroom spines was significantly increased in the trained as compared to untrained and cage controls. Negative significant correlations between spine density and WME were observed in CA1 basal dendrites and in CA3 apical and basal dendrites. In addition, there was a significant negative correlation between spine density and latency in CA3 basal dendrites. The study shows that spine numbers are significantly increased in the trained group, an observation that may suggest the use of this method representing a morphological parameter for memory formation studies in the RAM. Herein, correlations between WME and latency in the RAM and spine density revealed a link between spine numbers and performance in the RAM.

  18. Short-Term Changes in Algometry, Inclinometry, Stabilometry, and Urinary pH Analysis After a Thoracolumbar Junction Manipulation in Patients with Kidney Stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva Pascual-Vaca, Ángel; Punzano-Rodríguez, Ramón; Escribá-Astaburuaga, Pablo; Fernández-Domínguez, Juan Carlos; Ricard, François; Franco-Sierra, Maria Angeles; Rodríguez-Blanco, Cleofás

    2017-08-01

    To determine the efficacy of a high-velocity low-amplitude manipulation of the thoracolumbar junction in different urologic and musculoskeletal parameters in subjects suffering from renal lithiasis. Randomized, controlled blinded clinical study. The Nephrology departments of two hospitals and one private consultancy of physiotherapy in Valencia (Spain). Forty-six patients suffering from renal lithiasis. The experimental group (EG, n = 23) received a spinal manipulation of the thoracolumbar junction, and the control group (CG, n = 23) received a sham procedure. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) of both quadratus lumborum and spinous processes from T10 to L1, lumbar flexion range of motion, stabilometry, and urinary pH were measured before and immediately after the intervention. A comparison between pre- and postintervention phases was performed and an analysis of variance for repeated measures using time (pre- and postintervention) as intrasubject variable and group (CG or EG) as intersubject variable. Intragroup comparison showed a significant improvement for the EG in the lumbar flexion range of motion (p pain sensitivity, as well as to increase the lumbar spine flexion.

  19. Single- versus dual-rod anterior instrumentation of thoracolumbar curves in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Mithun; Yang, Yi; Liew, Susan; Turner, Peter L; Torode, Ian P

    2016-10-01

    Single or dual-rod instrumentation can be used for the anterior fixation of the spine in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). We aim to compare the complications, radiographic and functional outcomes of patients with AIS who have undergone single and dual-rod instrumentation. This is a multi-centre study involving the Royal Children's, Royal Melbourne and Epworth hospitals. Three primary surgeons were involved to ensure homogeneity of surgical technique and implants. Patients with AIS and thoracolumbar curves (Lenke 5 and 6) undergoing anterior instrumentation from 1st January 2000 to 30th June 2013 were included. Radiographic data were collected from X-rays. The functional outcome was measured through the Scoliosis Research Society questionnaire (SRS-30). The study included 58 patients (38 single-rod and 20 dual-rod patients). Thirty-nine patients were classified with Lenke 5 curves, while 19 patients had Lenke 6 curves. Structural interbody supports were used in 95 % of cases. In the preoperative to postoperative period, patients with single rods had an improvement of 75 and 51 % for primary and secondary curves, respectively, while patients with dual rods had an improvement of 70 and 38 % for primary and secondary curves, respectively. There were no cases of pseudoarthrosis or metalware failure in either group. Two patients (one single-rod and one dual-rod patient) required further unplanned posterior fusion. 91 % of patients were satisfied with the results of their back management. Pseudoarthrosis and metalware failure are rare complications of anterior instrumentation. Our study found no significant difference in functional or radiographic outcome between single and dual-rod instrumentation. Level III.

  20. Conspicuous carotenoid-based pelvic spine ornament in three-spined stickleback populations—occurrence and inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CR Amundsen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Reports on reddish carotenoid-based ornaments in female three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus are few, despite the large interest in the species’ behaviour, ornamentation, morphology and evolution. We sampled sticklebacks from 17 sites in north-western Europe in this first extensive study on the occurrence of carotenoid-based female pelvic spines and throat ornaments. The field results showed that females, and males, with reddish spines were found in all 17 populations. Specimens of both sexes with conspicuous red spines were found in several of the sites. The pelvic spines of males were more intensely red compared to the females’ spines, and large specimens were more red than small ones. Fish infected with the tapeworm (Schistocephalus solidus had drabber spines than uninfected fish. Both sexes had red spines both during and after the spawning period, but the intensity of the red colour was more exaggerated during the spawning period. As opposed to pelvic spines, no sign of red colour at the throat was observed in any female from any of the 17 populations. A rearing experiment was carried out to estimate a potential genetic component of the pelvic spine ornament by artificial crossing and rearing of 15 family groups during a 12 months period. The results indicated that the genetic component of the red colour at the spines was low or close to zero. Although reddish pelvic spines seem common in populations of stickleback, the potential adaptive function of the reddish pelvic spines remains largely unexplained.

  1. Accuracy of robot-guided versus freehand fluoroscopy-assisted pedicle screw insertion in thoracolumbar spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molliqaj, Granit; Schatlo, Bawarjan; Alaid, Awad; Solomiichuk, Volodymyr; Rohde, Veit; Schaller, Karl; Tessitore, Enrico

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The quest to improve the safety and accuracy and decrease the invasiveness of pedicle screw placement in spine surgery has led to a markedly increased interest in robotic technology. The SpineAssist from Mazor is one of the most widely distributed robotic systems. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of robot-guided and conventional freehand fluoroscopy-guided pedicle screw placement in thoracolumbar surgery. METHODS This study is a retrospective series of 169 patients (83 women [49%]) who underwent placement of pedicle screw instrumentation from 2007 to 2015 in 2 reference centers. Pathological entities included degenerative disorders, tumors, and traumatic cases. In the robot-assisted cohort (98 patients, 439 screws), pedicle screws were inserted with robotic assistance. In the freehand fluoroscopy-guided cohort (71 patients, 441 screws), screws were inserted using anatomical landmarks and lateral fluoroscopic guidance. Patients treated before 2009 were included in the fluoroscopy cohort, whereas those treated since mid-2009 (when the robot was acquired) were included in the robot cohort. Since then, the decision to operate using robotic assistance or conventional freehand technique has been based on surgeon preference and logistics. The accuracy of screw placement was assessed based on the Gertzbein-Robbins scale by a neuroradiologist blinded to treatment group. The radiological slice with the largest visible deviation from the pedicle was chosen for grading. A pedicle breach of 2 mm or less was deemed acceptable (Grades A and B) while deviations greater than 2 mm (Grades C, D, and E) were classified as misplacements. RESULTS In the robot-assisted cohort, a perfect trajectory (Grade A) was observed for 366 screws (83.4%). The remaining screws were Grades B (n = 44 [10%]), C (n = 15 [3.4%]), D (n = 8 [1.8%]), and E (n = 6 [1.4%]). In the fluoroscopy-guided group, a completely intrapedicular course graded as A was found in 76% (n = 335). The

  2. POSTERIOR STABILISATION OF BURST FRACTURES OF DORSOLUMBAR SPINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukharjee

    2016-05-01

    admission. Postoperatively, 4 patients remained in grade A, 5 patients had grade C, 6 patients had grade D and 10 had grade E. All the patients had neurogenic bladder at the time of admission, nine remained neurogenic post-operatively and 16 patients attained normal bladder status. Pain showed an average of 4.73 pre-operative value and an average post-operative value of 1.13 on VAS scale. Radiologically, the mean pre-operative Cobb’s angle was 14.26 degrees and post- operative mean was 3.63 degrees. The mean improvement in Cobb’s angle was 10.63 degrees. The mean vertebral body compression (height ratio was 60.83 and mean post-operative ratio was 81.66. Improvement was a mean 20.83 in VBHR post operatively justifying the procedure. The mean preoperative sagittal index was 20.43 degrees and mean postoperative sagittal index was 14.6 degrees. Functional outcome was assessed by Spinal Cord Independence Measure score. The mean pre and post-operative scores were 32.26 and 81.53 respectively. Mean improvement in SCIM score was 49.27. This was done at three weekly intervals up to 31 weeks from admission. Bed sores occurred in 5 patients, 8 patients developed UTI, two patients developed upper respiratory infection and two suffered fever in the post-operative period. CONCLUSION Incidence of thoracolumbar spine fractures has a single peak in young adult age group irrespective of the sex of the patient. Incidence is higher in males with almost equal distribution in rural and urban areas. Unlike western hemisphere, the major cause of thoracolumbar spine fracture is fall from height (not the road traffic accidents. Incidence of thoracolumbar spine has got significant relation to the patient’s occupation, especially people working as tree climbers, construction workers. Most common level of fracture of thoracolumbar spine is thoracolumbar junction (T12-L1. Surgical stabilisation of unstable thoracolumbar spine fractures with short segment posterior spinal instrumentation with

  3. Kinematics of rising from a chair: image-based analysis of the sagittal hip-spine movement pattern in elderly people who are healthy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotoohabadi, Mohammad R; Tully, Elizabeth A; Galea, Mary P

    2010-04-01

    Rehabilitation of elderly patients with sit-to-stand (STS) dysfunction includes retraining coordinated movement among participating body segments. Although trunk position is considered important, spinal movement has not been measured. The aim of this study was to describe the sagittal thoracolumbar kinematics and hip-lumbar interaction during the STS task in elderly people who were healthy in order to guide physical therapists in developing treatment strategies. This was an observational study. Ten retroreflective markers were attached to the midline thoracolumbar spine, pelvis, and right lower limb of 41 elderly people who were healthy. A 2-dimensional video analysis system was used to measure sagittal thoracic, lumbar, hip, and knee joint angles during the STS task. Maximal available flexion-extension angles in these joints and regions also were determined. Prior to buttocks lift-off, forward trunk lean comprised concurrent hip and lumbar flexion and thoracic extension. Hip flexion dominated, with a hip/lumbar ratio of 4.7:1 and a thoracic/lumbar ratio of 1.7:1. The hip and lumbar spine contributed 90% and 23% of their maximal available flexion angle, respectively, and the thoracic spine contributed 86% of its maximal extension range of movement. After lift-off, the hips and lumbar spine extended (ratio of 5.2:1), and the thoracic spine flexed (thoracic/lumbar ratio of 0.4:1). At lift-off, the hips and knees were similarly flexed (96 degrees ) and then locked together in a linear pattern of extension. Following lift-off, there was a brief transition phase (5% of STS duration) in which, although the hips, knees, and lumbar spine were extending, the trunk continued to flex forward a few degrees. Results may differ in elderly people who are less active. The revised model for image-based analysis demonstrated concurrent hip and thoracolumbar movement during the STS task. Close to full available hip flexion and thoracic extension were needed for optimal STS

  4. Cervical Sagittal Alignment Limited Adjustment After Selective Posterior Thoracolumbar/Lumbar Curve Correction in Patients With Lenke Type 5C Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Zhou, Xiao-Yi; Xu, Xi-Ming; Yang, Yi-Lin; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Bai, Yu-Shu; Li, Ming; Wei, Xian-Zhao

    2017-05-01

    A retrospective clinical and radiographic study. The aim of this study was to analyze the radiographic change in cervical sagittal alignment (CSA) and identify the possible factors influencing the postoperative CSA in selective posterior thoracolumbar/lumbar (TL/L) curve correction. The correlation between the CSA and thoracic sagittal alignment (TSA) is a well-recognized phenomenon in patients with thoracic idiopathic scoliosis. However, little has been published about the influence of TL/L curve instrumentation on CSA. Thirty patients with Lenke type 5C adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) received the selective posterior TL/L curves fusion by pedicle screws. Preoperative and postoperative radiographic and clinical parameters were analyzed. C2-C7 lordosis less than 0 was considered a lordotic cervical spine (LCS), whereas more than 0 was considered a kyphotic cervical spine (KCS). Preoperatively, 43% of patients showed a KCS, whereas the remaining 57% showed a LCS. C2-C7 lordosis was correlated with T1-slope, thoracic kyphosis (TK), and global-TK (Gl-TK) (P 5C AIS was related to the global TSA rather than TK and proximal TK. As time progresses, spontaneous adjustment of CSA is limited because of the inherent rigidity of the cervical spine. 4.

  5. An Upper and Middle Cervical Spine Posterior Arch Defect Leading to Myelopathy and a Thoracic Spine Posterior Arch Defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Dong-Ju; Hwang, Byeong-Wook; Kim, Dae Jin; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-09-01

    Abnormalities of the posterior arches of the upper and middle cervical spine that can cause myelopathy are rare, and no reports of such defects at the thoracic spinal level have been published. A 29-year-old male patient reported right arm weakness and pain for 1 year. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed spinal canal stenosis at the C3-4 and C4-5 levels, as well as a posterior arch defect at the C2, 3, and 4 levels that was compressing the spinal cord. Three-dimensional cervical computed tomography (CT) showed that the spinous process and a piece of lamina were fused at each of the posterior C2, 3, and 4 levels, producing a free-floating bony structure. Spina bifida occulta was observed at C1. Osseous formation had failed between the lateral mass and spinous process at the C2 and C3 levels bilaterally, and the C4 level unilaterally. Three-dimensional thoracolumbar CT showed blocked vertebrae and spinous process fusion at T11 and T12. Osseous formation had failed between the lamina and spinous process at the T11 level unilaterally, and the T12 level bilaterally. The free-floating bony structure was successfully removed surgically. A posterior arch defect of the upper and middle cervical spine leading to myelopathy combined with the same defect at the thoracic spine is a rare disease. If this congenital defect is detected at any spinal level, whole-spine CT can be helpful for accurately diagnosing the congenital anomaly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The radiological diagnosis of thoracolumbar disc disease in the Dachshund

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirberger, R.M.; Roos, C.J.; Lubbe, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    The accuracy of survey radiographs in the diagnosis of acute thoracolumbar disc disease in 36 Dachshunds was determined by comparison with lumbar myelographic findings using iohexol. The value of making radiographs immediately after injection of contrast medium and the effectiveness of oblique radiographs in determining the exact circumferential distribution of extruding or protruding disc material were assessed. The presence of a double contrast medium column, resistance to injection and the presence of cerebrospinal fluid flow during needle placement was also evaluated. The location of the affected disc was accurately determined on survey radiographs in only 26 dogs. The myelographic technique used in this study resulted in the correct intervertebral space being identified, together with the exact circumferential distribution of disc material, in 35 dogs. Survey radiographs alone are inadequate for localization of protruding or extruding disc material

  7. Temporary Percutaneous Instrumentation and Selective Anterior Fusion for Thoracolumbar Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Yann Philippe; Walter, Axel; Schuller, Sébastien; Steib, Jean-Paul

    2017-05-01

    Prospective clinical trial in thoracolumbar trauma with 5-year follow-up. To analyze clinical and radiographic outcomes of minimal invasive surgery, and the rational of circumferential fracture treatment with regard to age, degenerative changes, bone mineral density, and global sagittal balance. Non-neurologic fractures with anterior column defect can be treated by posterior percutaneous instrumentation and selective anterior fusion. After consolidation, instrumentation can be removed at 1 year to provide mobility in non-fused segments. Fifty-one patients, 47 (18-75) years, were operated for A2, A3, or B-type fractures. Visual analog scale (VAS) for back pain and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were assessed. Radiographic measurements were: sagittal index, regional kyphosis, T4-T12 kyphosis, L1-S1 lordosis, pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, sacral slope, and T9 tilt. Anterior fusion and facet joints were analyzed on computed tomography (CT) at 1 year. The ODI was 8.8 before accident, 35.4 at 3 months, 17.8 at 2 years, 14.4 at 5 years. The VAS was 2.0 at 3 months and 1.0 at 5 years. The sagittal index was 18.0° preoperatively and 1.0° at 3 months (P fractured vertebra fused regularly. Spontaneous facet joint fusions were observed in two patients at the fracture level in B-type injuries. Percutaneous instrumentation and selective anterior fusion using autologous bone and mesh cages lead to high fusion rates, which provided good long-term clinical results in younger patients with thoracolumbar fractures. Sagittal alignment was maintained after instrumentation removal without damaging paravertebral muscles. Outcomes were worse in elderly patients presenting osteopenia or osteoporosis. 3.

  8. Surgical outcome of posterior decompression, posterolateral fusion and stabilization by pedicle screw and rod in thoracolumbar tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Anowarul Islam

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal tuberculosis causes severe complications like neurological and spinal deformity which may lead to respiratory distress, costo-pelvic impingement, paraplegia and consequent reduction in the quality and longevity of life. The aim of the present treatment is to avoid the consequence of neural complications and gain near-normal spine. Mechanical factor causes pathological fracture or dislocation of an affected vertebral body. Surgical decompression ensues further instability. Reconstruction of spinal column by pedicle screw and rod provide stability and prevents secondary neural damage and deformity thereby helps in early mobilization. Prospective study was done to evaluate the results in 20 cases of spinal tuberculosis in thoracolumbar region associated with neurological deficit. We operated our cases (12 males and 8 females by posterolateral decompression, fusion and stabilization by pedicle screw and rod along with antitubercular drug treatment. All patients were with neurological deficit, single level involvement and 10 to 30 degree of mild kyphosis. After surgery, kyphosis improved from 20.7 ± 5.5 degrees to 12.5 ± 3.9 degree. Bony fusion was in 65.0% cases. Neurological improvement and pain subsided in all the patients.

  9. North American Spine Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advertise SpineLine Browse Issues Editorial Board Author Instructions Advertise Press Room Press Releases Resources Find a Spokesperson In the News More Member Resources Blog NASS on Spine Books & Other Resources Member-Authored Publications Mobile App Policy & Practice Coding ICD-10-CM AMA ...

  10. Thoracic spine pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey Ivanovich Isaikin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic spine pain, or thoracalgia, is one of the common reasons for seeking for medical advice. The epidemiology and semiotics of pain in the thoracic spine unlike in those in the cervical and lumbar spine have not been inadequately studied. The causes of thoracic spine pain are varied: diseases of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and renal systems, injuries to the musculoskeletal structures of the cervical and thoracic portions, which require a thorough differential diagnosis. Facet, costotransverse, and costovertebral joint injuries and myofascial syndrome are the most common causes of musculoskeletal (nonspecific pain in the thoracic spine. True radicular pain is rarely encountered. Traditionally, treatment for thoracalgia includes a combination of non-drug and drug therapies. The cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor meloxicam (movalis may be the drug of choice in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain.

  11. Intraoperative Computed Tomography Navigation for Transpedicular Screw Fixation to Treat Unstable Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Yu; Wu, Meng-Huang; Li, Yen-Yao; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Hsu, Chu-Hsiang; Huang, Tsung-Jen; Hsu, Robert Wen-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Transpedicular screw (TPS) fixation in unstable thoracic and lumbar (TL) spine fractures remains technically difficult because of destroyed anatomical landmarks, unstable gross segments, and discrepancies in anatomic orientation using conventional anatomic landmarks, fluoroscopic guidance, or computed tomography (CT)-based navigation. In this study, we evaluated the safety and accuracy of TPS placement under intraoperative computed tomography (iCT) navigation in managing unstable TL spine fractures. From 2010 to 2013, we retrospectively reviewed the Spine Operation Registry records of patients who underwent posterior instrumented fusion to treat unstable TL spine fractures via the iCT navigation system. An unstable spine fracture was identified as AO/Magerl classification type B or type C. In all, 316 screws in 37 patients with unstable TL spine fractures were evaluated and involved 7 thoracic, 23 thoracolumbar junctional, and 7 lumbar fractures. The accuracy of TPS positioning in the pedicle without breach was 98% (310/316). The average number of iCT scans per patient was 2.1 (range 2–3). The average total radiation dose to patients was 15.8 mSv; the dose per single level exposure was 2.7 mSv. The TPS intraoperative revision rate was 0.6% (2/316) and no neurovascular sequela was observed. TPS fixation using the iCT navigation system obtained a 98% accuracy in stabilizing unstable TL spine fractures. A malplaced TPS could be revised during real-time confirmation of the TPS position, and no secondary operation was required to revise malplaced screws. The iCT navigation system provides accurate and safe management of unstable TL spine fractures. In addition, operating room personnel, including surgeons and nurses, did not need to wear heavy lead aprons as they were not exposed to radiation. PMID:25997042

  12. Reduced thoracolumbar fascia shear strain in human chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konofagou Elisa E

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role played by the thoracolumbar fascia in chronic low back pain (LBP is poorly understood. The thoracolumbar fascia is composed of dense connective tissue layers separated by layers of loose connective tissue that normally allow the dense layers to glide past one another during trunk motion. The goal of this study was to quantify shear plane motion within the thoracolumbar fascia using ultrasound elasticity imaging in human subjects with and without chronic low back pain (LBP. Methods We tested 121 human subjects, 50 without LBP and 71 with LBP of greater than 12 months duration. In each subject, an ultrasound cine-recording was acquired on the right and left sides of the back during passive trunk flexion using a motorized articulated table with the hinge point of the table at L4-5 and the ultrasound probe located longitudinally 2 cm lateral to the midline at the level of the L2-3 interspace. Tissue displacement within the thoracolumbar fascia was calculated using cross correlation techniques and shear strain was derived from this displacement data. Additional measures included standard range of motion and physical performance evaluations as well as ultrasound measurement of perimuscular connective tissue thickness and echogenicity. Results Thoracolumbar fascia shear strain was reduced in the LBP group compared with the No-LBP group (56.4% ± 3.1% vs. 70.2% ± 3.6% respectively, p Conclusion Thoracolumbar fascia shear strain was ~20% lower in human subjects with chronic low back pain. This reduction of shear plane motion may be due to abnormal trunk movement patterns and/or intrinsic connective tissue pathology. There appears to be some sex-related differences in thoracolumbar fascia shear strain that may also play a role in altered connective tissue function.

  13. Ischiovertebral dysplasia: a retrospective analysis of 30 consecutive cases pointing out the specifics and risks of the spine management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurégan, Jean-Charles; Odent, Thierry; Coyle, Ryan M; Miladi, Lotfi; Wicart, Philippe; Dubousset, Jean; Le Merrer, Martine; Padovani, Jean-Paul; Glorion, Christophe

    2014-04-20

    A review of clinical publications, current knowledge, and recent developments regarding the etiology of ischiovertebral dysplasia was combined with a clinical review of the condition. To acquaint orthopedic spine surgeons with identification patterns of ischiovertebral dysplasia in order to provide them with guidelines about spine management and which complications to expect. Ischiovertebral dysplasia is a rare skeletal dysplasia that may appear in a sporadic fashion or be inherited with an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. It is defined by the association of an ischiopubic ramus hypoplasia and a vertebral dysplasia. It leads to a specific spine deformity whose management and complications should be clarified. Thirty consecutive patients from 0 to 31 years of age with ischiovertebral dysplasia were included from 5 centers specialized in congenital spinal deformities. Frontal and sagittal Cobb angles before treatment, natural history of the curves, therapeutic options, and their complications were systematically analyzed. All the patients had a vertebral dysplasia and 28 of them developed a spinal deformity. This deformity was an extremely severe thoracic kyphoscoliosis in 25 cases. The other deformities were a thoracolumbar scoliosis in 1 case and a thoracolumbar kyphosis in 2 cases. The management of the thoracic kyphoscoliosis was always challenging and complications included death by respiratory failure (3 cases) and neurological impairment (9 cases). Recognizing the occurrence of ischioverterbral dysplasia is very important to allow for dedicated treatment. The authors advocate preoperative distraction and circumferential fusion to prevent progression of the curve and to avoid the potentially fatal sequelae associated with this disorder. 4.

  14. Evaluation of the predictors of postoperative aggravation of shoulder imbalance in severe and rigid thoracic or thoracolumbar scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Lei; Fan, Ning; Hai, Yong; Lu, S B; Su, Q J; Yang, J C; Guan, Li; Kang, Nan; Meng, X L; Liu, Y Z

    2016-10-01

    To study the predictors of postoperative aggravation of shoulder imbalance in severe and rigid thoracic or thoracolumbar scoliosis. In this study, 49 patients with severe and rigid thoracic or thoracolumbar scoliosis were analyzed retrospectively. The patients underwent whole-spine anteroposterior and lateral radiography preoperatively and postoperatively. On the radiographs, we measured parameters, including T1 tilt, radiographic shoulder height (RSH), proximal curve, middle curve, distal curve, apical vertebral translation (AVT) of the middle curve, thoracic trunk shift (TTS), coronal balance, and sagittal balance. We regarded RSH and T1 tilt as postoperative shoulder balance parameters and divided the patients into improved and aggravated groups of shoulder imbalance. Univariate analysis, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used in the statistical analyses. The RSH was -17.01 ± 21.85 mm before surgery and 4.76 ± 18.11 mm at follow-up. The T1 tilt angle was -10.20° ± 19.53° before surgery and -2.72° ± 13.48° at follow-up. The results of the univariate analysis suggest that preoperative RSH and proximal to middle curve change ratio were significantly higher in the patients in the improved RSH group (p < 0.01). In addition, preoperative RSH, preoperative T1 tilt, and apical vertebral translation of the middle curve were significantly higher, and preoperative proximal curve, postoperative proximal curve, and preoperative distal curve were significantly lower in the patients with improved T1 tilt group (p < 0.01). In a binary logistic regression analysis, preoperative RSH [B = -0.120, odds ratio (OR) = 0.887, p = 0.006] was found to be an independent predictor of postoperative aggravation of RSH. Similarly, preoperative T1 tilt (B = -0.488, OR = 0.614, p = 0.001) was found to be an independent predictor of postoperative aggravation of T1 tilt. Moreover, the relationship

  15. Tratamento das lesões traumáticas instáveis da coluna torácica e lombar com retângulo de Hartshill Treatment of unstable thotacic spine traumatic injuries using Hartshill rectangle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio César Pereira da Cunha

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Foram avaliados 14 pacientes com lesão instável da coluna torácica e lombar, tratados com instrumentação de Hartshill. De uma forma geral, obtivemos bons resultados com a técnica proposta.Fourteen patients with unstable thoracolumbar spine injuries treated with Hartshill's instrumentation have been evaluated. Good results were generally achieved using this technique.

  16. Correlation between radiographic parameters and functional scores in degenerative lumbar and thoracolumbar scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J; Longis, P-M; Passuti, N

    2017-04-01

    Adult scoliosis is a condition in which the spinal deformity occurs because of degeneration. Although various studies have agreed on the importance of restoring the sagittal balance, few have evaluated the relationship between functional scores and radiological parameters. The primary objective of this retrospective study was to demonstrate the correlation between radiographic parameters and functional outcomes in adult patients with lumbar or thoracolumbar degenerative scoliosis. The secondary objective was to assess the long-term effects of posterolateral fusion for treating this deformity. This single-centre retrospective study included 47 patients over 50years of age who had degenerative lumbar scoliosis treated with an instrumented posterolateral fusion; the mean follow-up was 6.4years (range 2 to 20). Radiographic analysis of A/P and lateral full spine standing radiographs was carried out with the KEOPS software. Three pelvic parameters (pelvic tilt, pelvic incidence, sacral slope), two spinal parameters (lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis) and three sagittal balance parameters (C7 sagittal tilt, C7 Barrey's ratio and spinosacral angle) were calculated. The functional outcomes were evaluated through three self-assessment questionnaires: Oswestry Disability Index, SRS-30 and SF-36. The correlation between clinical and radiographic parameters was calculated with Spearman's correlation test. There was a significant correlation between the SF-36 (PCS) and the following three sagittal parameters: sacral slope (r=-0.31453; P=0.04), lumbar lordosis (r=-0.30198; P=0.0491) and spinosacral angle (r=-0.311967; P=0.0366). The mean ODI score was 33.61, which corresponds to minimal to moderate disability. The mean physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) component summary scores of the SF-36 were 37.70 and 38.40, respectively. The mean SRS-30 score was 3.07. It is essential that the sagittal balance be restored when treating degenerative lumbar scoliosis to generate better

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the removal of fluid from a localized infection ( abscess ). In patients with narrowing ( stenosis ) of the spine ... Survey Images × Image Gallery Computed Tomography (CT or CAT scan) equipment View full size with caption Do ...

  18. SpineData

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Kongsted, Alice; Jensen, Tue Secher

    2015-01-01

    Background: Large-scale clinical registries are increasingly recognized as important resources for quality assurance and research to inform clinical decision-making and health policy. We established a clinical registry (SpineData) in a conservative care setting where more than 10,000 new cases...... of spinal pain are assessed each year. This paper describes the SpineData registry, summarizes the characteristics of its clinical population and data, and signals the availability of these data as a resource for collaborative research projects. Methods: The SpineData registry is an Internet-based system...... that captures patient data electronically at the point of clinical contact. The setting is the government-funded Medical Department of the Spine Centre of Southern Denmark, Hospital Lillebaelt, where patients receive a multidisciplinary assessment of their chronic spinal pain. Results: Started in 2011...

  19. Lumbar Spine CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scanners can perform the exam without stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the spine area, called ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  20. [Aneurysmal bone cyst of the spine. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Olivares, Luis Miguel; Baena-Ocampo, Leticia del Carmen; Miramontes-Martínez, Victor Paul; Alpízar-Aguirre, Armando; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro

    2006-01-01

    The aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is a fast-growing tumor of undefined neoplastic nature. It is occasionally an aggressive benign lesion whose treatment of choice is a complete resection, even though the risk of profuse transoperative bleeding exists. We present a female patient with thoracic spine deformity, with progressive paresthesias and muscle weakness of lower extremities that evolved to paralysis of both lower extremities and sphincter incontinence. Based on radiographic films, lytic lesions were identified at T7 to T9 vertebrae as well as medullary space invasion. In electrophysiologic tests, a complete somatosensorial pathway block was reported. Prior to resection of the neoplastic lesion and thoracolumbar stabilization, an incisional biopsy was performed. There was no postoperative medullary functional improvement. Morphological findings corresponded to an aneurysmal bone cyst at T8. This lesion is mainly located in the long bones and less frequently of the spine, where instability and medullary compression may occur. It is possible to confuse this neoplasia with other lesions. Hence, definite diagnosis with biopsy is necessary for determining an adequate therapeutic plan to eradicate recurrence risk or associated neurologic sequelae, as well as to gain proper stability at the involved vertebral segments.

  1. Incidence and functional evolution of traumatic injuries of the spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Alberto Trinidad Ovalle

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence and functional outcome of traumatic injuries of the spine in the period from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013, at the General Hospital "Dr. Rafael Pascacio Gamboa", state of Chiapas, México. METHODS: A retrospective, cross-sectional, descriptive, observational study, where all patients seeking medical and surgical care in the emergency department and inpatient unit for a traumatic spinal injury were included, regardless of age or sex. RESULTS: A sample of 60 patients, of whom 43 were male (71.7% and 17 females (28.3%, with an average age of 35 was obtained. As for the cause of the injury, falls were the leading cause (61.7% followed by motor vehicle accidents (35% and finally, assaults (3.3%. In this sample, 21% had associated injuries being the most common (7.3% the thoracic trauma. The most common site of injury was the thoracic spine, followed by the lower cervical and finally the thoracolumbar ones. We found that 70% of patients had partial or complete neurological injury, with complete spinal cord transection (Frankel A being the most frequent lesion in 53%. CONCLUSION: The incidence in our series is similar that the reported in developing countries which have sociocultural problems similar to ours. The same applies to the etiology of these lesions, which is closely linked to social and economic activity in each country or region.

  2. Hippocampal Dendritic Spines Are Segregated Depending on Their Actin Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Iturza, Nuria; Calvo, María; Benoist, Marion; Esteban, José Antonio; Morales, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are mushroom-shaped protrusions of the postsynaptic membrane. Spines receive the majority of glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Their morphology, dynamics, and density have been related to synaptic plasticity and learning. The main determinant of spine shape is filamentous actin. Using FRAP, we have reexamined the actin dynamics of individual spines from pyramidal hippocampal neurons, both in cultures and in hippocampal organotypic slices. Our results indicate that, in cultures, the actin mobile fraction is independently regulated at the individual spine level, and mobile fraction values do not correlate with either age or distance from the soma. The most significant factor regulating actin mobile fraction was the presence of astrocytes in the culture substrate. Spines from neurons growing in the virtual absence of astrocytes have a more stable actin cytoskeleton, while spines from neurons growing in close contact with astrocytes show a more dynamic cytoskeleton. According to their recovery time, spines were distributed into two populations with slower and faster recovery times, while spines from slice cultures were grouped into one population. Finally, employing fast lineal acquisition protocols, we confirmed the existence of loci with high polymerization rates within the spine.

  3. Consequences of intraoperative spinal cord manipulation in dogs with thoracolumbar intervertebral disc extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C. Diogo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of the present study was to evaluate if extradural contact during hemilaminectomy would cause neurological deterioration in the early and/or late postoperative period in dogs with intervertebral disc extrusion. Nineteen dogs with thoracolumbar intervertebral disc extrusion underwent hemilaminectomy for spinal cord decompression and removal of extruded disc material. Meningeal contacts during surgery were quantified. Paraplegia (with nociception and paraparesis were observed in 11/19 and 8/19 of dogs, respectively, before surgery. At the end of our study, only two (2/19 had paraplegia and one (1/19, paraparesis. There were more extradural contacts when extruded intervertebral disc material was at a ventrolateral position. Extradural contacts during surgery had no influence on neurological progression nor on time to recovery of motor function. Immediately (24 and 48 hours after surgery, 13/19 dogs had the same neurological stage before surgery. At 7 and 90 days, 13/19 and 17/19 dogs, respectively, showed neurological improvement, compared with their preoperative stage. There was no influence of the number of extradural contacts on neurological recovery. These findings indicate that a careful inspection of the vertebral canal for removal of as much extruded disc material as possible does not cause neurologic deterioration.

  4. Walking Out of the Curve: Thoracolumbar Kyphosis in Achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalit, Adam; McKean, Greg; Lawing, Cheryl; Galey, Scott; Ain, Michael C

    2016-09-15

    Thoracolumbar kyphosis (TLK) is common in infants with achondroplasia. Our goals were to examine the natural history of TLK and identify factors associated with persistent TLK. We reviewed records of patients with achondroplasia seen by a board-certified orthopaedic surgeon at a tertiary care medical center between 1997 and 2013. Inclusion criteria were minimum 2-year follow-up and radiographs taken at time of presentation, within 6 months of walking age, and within 6 months of the first anniversary of walking age. We defined TLK as kyphosis of ≥20 degrees centered at T12 and L1. We assessed patient demographic characteristics, radiographic parameters (Cobb angle, apical vertebral translation, and apical vertebral wedging for vertebral height and width), and clinical parameters (developmental motor delay, hydrocephalus, presence of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt, and foramen magnum decompression). Developmental motor delay was defined as the inability to sit or ambulate independently by age 14 or 30 months, respectively. Associations between these factors and persistent TLK (ie, unresolved at final follow-up) were evaluated using logistic regression and χ, Fisher exact, and independent t tests. Significance was set at Pachondroplasia, TLK resolved at walking age in 15% of patients and after a year of walking in 58% of patients. Earlier bracing may slow TLK progression in patients with achondroplasia and developmental motor delay. Patients with kyphotic curves between 20 and 40 degrees should be examined intermittently for progressive deformity or worsening symptoms of spinal cord compression. Level II.

  5. Mechanisms, Predisposing Factors, and Prognosis of Intraoperative Vertebral Subluxation During Pedicle Subtraction Osteotomy in Surgical Correction of Thoracolumbar Kyphosis Secondary to Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Bang-Ping; Mao, Sai-Hu; Jiang, Jun; Wang, Bin; Qiu, Yong

    2017-08-15

    A retrospective study. To analyze the mechanisms, predisposing factors, and prognosis of the intraoperative vertebral subluxation (VS) during pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) for thoracolumbar kyphosis secondary to ankylosing spondylitis (AS). VS is one of the most daunting challenges that surgeons encounter during PSO closure, especially in patients with AS with ankylosed and mostly osteoporotic spine. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of research designed to conceptualize the mechanisms, predisposing factors, and discuss the complication-avoidance strategies and prognosis. A retrospective single-center review was performed for a consecutive series of 153 patients with AS with rigid thoracolumbar kyphosis who underwent one-level PSO from April 2000 to December 2013. The incidence of the VS at the level of PSO during correction was analyzed and the potential causative factors were investigated. VS occurred in six patients with the incidence being 3.9% in this patient cohort. The predisposing factors were (1) early fracture of the anterior cortex of the osteotomized vertebra (OV); (2) excessive decancellation from vertebral body causing parallel collapse of the vertebral column with significant loss of the ability to create local lordosis; (3) improper manual osteoclasis due to insufficient decancellation of the OV; and (4) inappropriate application of cantilever technique and concomitant long instrumentation. The early surgical complication involved one patient with cerebrospinal fluid leakage at the osteotomized site, but no devastating neurological deficits. During follow-up, bone healing and adaptive vertebral remodeling with no rod breakage were observed for all these six patients. Intraoperative VS was a rare occurrence associated with inappropriate manual manipulation of osteotomy, gap closure, and rod insertion. Neurological complication was a potential risk, but could be well prevented with extensive laminectomy and emergency actions favoring partial

  6. Reduced thoracolumbar fascia shear strain in human chronic low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The role played by the thoracolumbar fascia in chronic low back pain (LBP) is poorly understood. The thoracolumbar fascia is composed of dense connective tissue layers separated by layers of loose connective tissue that normally allow the dense layers to glide past one another during trunk motion. The goal of this study was to quantify shear plane motion within the thoracolumbar fascia using ultrasound elasticity imaging in human subjects with and without chronic low back pain (LBP). Methods We tested 121 human subjects, 50 without LBP and 71 with LBP of greater than 12 months duration. In each subject, an ultrasound cine-recording was acquired on the right and left sides of the back during passive trunk flexion using a motorized articulated table with the hinge point of the table at L4-5 and the ultrasound probe located longitudinally 2 cm lateral to the midline at the level of the L2-3 interspace. Tissue displacement within the thoracolumbar fascia was calculated using cross correlation techniques and shear strain was derived from this displacement data. Additional measures included standard range of motion and physical performance evaluations as well as ultrasound measurement of perimuscular connective tissue thickness and echogenicity. Results Thoracolumbar fascia shear strain was reduced in the LBP group compared with the No-LBP group (56.4% ± 3.1% vs. 70.2% ± 3.6% respectively, p fascia shear strain and the following variables: perimuscular connective tissue thickness (r = -0.45, p fascia shear strain was ~20% lower in human subjects with chronic low back pain. This reduction of shear plane motion may be due to abnormal trunk movement patterns and/or intrinsic connective tissue pathology. There appears to be some sex-related differences in thoracolumbar fascia shear strain that may also play a role in altered connective tissue function. PMID:21929806

  7. Reduced thoracolumbar fascia shear strain in human chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Helene M; Fox, James R; Koptiuch, Cathryn; Badger, Gary J; Greenan-Naumann, Ann C; Bouffard, Nicole A; Konofagou, Elisa E; Lee, Wei-Ning; Triano, John J; Henry, Sharon M

    2011-09-19

    The role played by the thoracolumbar fascia in chronic low back pain (LBP) is poorly understood. The thoracolumbar fascia is composed of dense connective tissue layers separated by layers of loose connective tissue that normally allow the dense layers to glide past one another during trunk motion. The goal of this study was to quantify shear plane motion within the thoracolumbar fascia using ultrasound elasticity imaging in human subjects with and without chronic low back pain (LBP). We tested 121 human subjects, 50 without LBP and 71 with LBP of greater than 12 months duration. In each subject, an ultrasound cine-recording was acquired on the right and left sides of the back during passive trunk flexion using a motorized articulated table with the hinge point of the table at L4-5 and the ultrasound probe located longitudinally 2 cm lateral to the midline at the level of the L2-3 interspace. Tissue displacement within the thoracolumbar fascia was calculated using cross correlation techniques and shear strain was derived from this displacement data. Additional measures included standard range of motion and physical performance evaluations as well as ultrasound measurement of perimuscular connective tissue thickness and echogenicity. Thoracolumbar fascia shear strain was reduced in the LBP group compared with the No-LBP group (56.4% ± 3.1% vs. 70.2% ± 3.6% respectively, p low back pain. This reduction of shear plane motion may be due to abnormal trunk movement patterns and/or intrinsic connective tissue pathology. There appears to be some sex-related differences in thoracolumbar fascia shear strain that may also play a role in altered connective tissue function.

  8. Increased pedicle screw pullout strength with vertebroplasty augmentation in osteoporotic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarzier, John S; Evans, Avery J; Cahill, David W

    2002-04-01

    The authors conducted a biomechanical study to evaluate pedicle screw pullout strength in osteoporotic cadaveric spines. Nonaugmented hemivertebrae were compared with pressurized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-augmented hemivertebrae. Six formalin-fixed cadaveric thoracolumbar spines at least two standard deviations below the mean bone mineral density (BMD) for age were obtained. Radiographic and BMD studies were correlated to grades I, II, and III osteoporosis according to the Jekei scale. Each of the 21 vertebrae underwent fluoroscopic placement of 6-mm transpedicular screws with each hemivertebra serving as the control for the contralateral PMMA-augmented hemivertebra. Pedicle screws were then evaluated for biomechanical axial pullout resistance. Augmented hemivertebrae axial pullout forces were increased (p = 0.0005). The mean increase in pullout force was 181% for Grade I, 206% for Grade II, and 213% for Grade III osteoporotic spines. Augmented Grade I osteoporotic spines demonstrated axial pullout forces near those levels reported in the literature for nonosteoporotic specimens. Augmented Grade II osteoporotic specimens demonstrated increases to levels found in nonaugmented vertebrae with low-normal BMD. Augmented Grade III osteoporotic specimens had increases to levels equal to those found in nonaugmented Grade I vertebrae. Augmentation of osteoporotic vertebrae in PMMA-assisted vertebroplasty can significantly increase pedicle screw pullout forces to levels exceeding the strength of cortical bone. The maximum attainable force appears to be twice the pullout force of the nonaugmented pedicle screw for each osteoporotic grade.

  9. Innervation changes induced by inflammation of the rat thoracolumbar fascia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoheisel, U; Rosner, J; Mense, S

    2015-08-06

    Recently, the fascia innervation has become an important issue, particularly the existence of nociceptive fibers. Fascia can be a source of pain in several disorders such as fasciitis and non-specific low back pain. However, nothing is known about possible changes of the fascia innervation under pathological circumstances. This question is important, because theoretically pain from the fascia cannot only be due to increased nociceptor discharges, but also to a denser innervation of the fascia by nociceptive endings. In this histological study, an inflammation was induced in the thoracolumbar fascia (TLF) of rats and the innervation by various fiber types compared between the inflamed and intact TLF. Although the TLF is generally considered to have proprioceptive functions, no corpuscular proprioceptors (Pacini and Ruffini corpuscles) were found. To obtain quantitative data, the length of fibers and free nerve endings were determined in the three layers of the rat TLF: inner layer (IL, adjacent to the multifidus muscle), middle layer (ML) and outer layer (OL). The main results were that the overall innervation density showed little change; however, there were significant changes in some of the layers. The innervation density was significantly decreased in the OL, but this change was partly compensated for by an increase in the IL. The density of substance P (SP)-positive - presumably nociceptive - fibers was significantly increased. In contrast, the postganglionic sympathetic fibers were significantly decreased. In conclusion, the inflamed TLF showed an increase of presumably nociceptive fibers, which may explain the pain from a pathologically altered fascia. The meaning of the decreased innervation by sympathetic fibers is obscure at present. The lack of proprioceptive corpuscular receptors within the TLF does not preclude its role as a proprioceptive structure, because some of the free nerve endings may function as proprioceptors. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published

  10. THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE: STRUCTURAL CHANGES AND CLINICAL OUTCOME OF TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Arnold Tisot

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the correlation between structural changes in burst fractures of thoracic and lumbar spine with clinical outcome of the treatment. Methods: A retrospective study in 25 patients with fractures of thoracic and lumbar spine burst fractures without neurological deficit. Eleven patients underwent conservative treatment and for the remaining the treatment was surgical. All patients were followed up for at least 24 months. The cases were evaluated by a protocol that included: posttraumatic measurement of kyphosis, vertebral body collapse and narrowing of the spinal canal, the visual analog scale of pain, and the quality of life questionnaire SF-36 at the follow-up. For statistical analysis, the significance level was 5% and the software SPSS 18.0 was used. Results: No statistically significant difference was observed when comparing the clinical outcomes of one treatment over another. Similarly, there was no statistically significant correlation between kyphosis and post-traumatic narrowing of the spinal canal with clinical worsening in the follow-up, regardless of the treatment used. We found a positive correlation (p<0.05 between initial collapse and SF-36 domains in both groups (operated and non-operated. Conclusion: There was no significant superiority of one treatment over the other, and no correlation was found between kyphosis and spinal canal narrowing in burst fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine without neurological deficit. However, there was correlation between initial collapse and clinical outcome in some domains of the SF-36 questionnaire.

  11. Lumbar spine degenerative disease : effect on bone mineral density measurements in the lumbar spine and femoral neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhng, Seon Kwan; Koplyay, Peter; Jeffrey Carr, J.; Lenchik, Leon

    2001-01-01

    To determine the effect of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine on bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and femoral neck. We reviewed radiographs and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry scans of the lumbar spine and hip in 305 Caucasian women with suspected osteoporosis. One hundred and eight-six patient remained after excluding women less than 40 years of age (n=18) and those with hip osteoarthritis, scoliosis, lumbar spine fractures, lumbar spinal instrumentation, hip arthroplasty, metabolic bone disease other than osteoporosis, or medications known to influence bone metabolism (n=101). On the basis of lumbar spine radiographs, those with absent/mild degenerative disease were assigned to the control group and those with moderate/severe degenerative disease to the degenerative group. Spine radiographs were evaluated for degenerative disease by two radiologists working independently; discrepant evaluations were resolved by consensus. Lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral density was compared between the two groups. Forty-five (24%) of 186 women were assigned to the degenerative group and 141 (76%) to the control group. IN the degenerative group, mean bone mineral density measured 1.075g/cm? in the spine and 0.788g/cm 2 in the femoral neck, while for controls the corresponding figures were 0.989g/cm 2 and 0.765g/cm 2 . Adjusted for age, weight and height by means of analysis of variance, degenerative disease of the lumbar spine was a significant predictor of increased bone mineral density in the spine (p=0.0001) and femoral neck (p=0.0287). Our results indicate a positive relationship between degenerative disease of the lumbar spine and bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and femoral neck, and suggest that degenerative disease in that region, which leads to an intrinsic increase in bone mineral density in the femoral neck, may be a good negative predictor of osteoporotic hip fractures

  12. Tuberculosis of the cervical spine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis of the cervical spine is rare, comprising 3 -. 5% of cases of tuberculosis of the spine. Eight patients with tuberculosis of the cervicaJ spine seen during 1989 -. 1992 were reviewed. They all presented with neck pain. The 4 children presented with a kyphotic deformity. In all the children the disease was extensive, ...

  13. Thoracic spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  14. Accuracy of ultrasound-guided injections of thoracolumbar articular process joints in horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglbjerg, Vibeke; Nielsen, J.V.; Thomsen, Preben Dybdahl

    2010-01-01

    in the literature. Objectives: To evaluate factors of affecting the accuracy of intra-articular injections of the APJs in the caudal thoracolumbar region. Method: One-hundred-and-fifty-four injections with blue dye were performed on APJs including the T14-L6 region in 12 horses subjected to euthanasia for reasons...

  15. The effect of induced hindlimb lameness on thoracolumbar kinematics during treadmill locomotion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez Alvarez, C.B.; Bobbert, M.F.; Lamers, L.; Johnston, C.; Back, W.; van Weeren, P.R.

    2008-01-01

    Reasons for performing study: There are no detailed studies describing a relationship between hindlimb lameness and altered motion of the back. Objectives: To quantify the effect of induced subtle hindlimb lameness on thoracolumbar kinematics in the horse. Methods: Kinematics of 6 riding horses were

  16. The effect of induced forelimb lameness on thoracolumbar kinematics during treadmill locomotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez, C.B.; Wennerstrand, J.; Bobbert, M.F.; Lamers, L.; Johnston, C.; Back, W.; van Weeren, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    Reasons for performing study: Lameness has often been suggested to result in altered movement of the back, but there are no detailed studies describing such a relationship in quantitative terms. Objectives: To quantify the effect of induced subtle forelimb lameness on thoracolumbar kinematics in the

  17. [Cervical spine trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, U; Hellen, P

    2016-08-01

    In the emergency department 65 % of spinal injuries and 2-5 % of blunt force injuries involve the cervical spine. Of these injuries approximately 50 % involve C5 and/or C6 and 30 % involve C2. Older patients tend to have higher spinal injuries and younger patients tend to have lower injuries. The anatomical and development-related characteristics of the pediatric spine as well as degenerative and comorbid pathological changes of the spine in the elderly can make the radiological evaluation of spinal injuries difficult with respect to possible trauma sequelae in young and old patients. Two different North American studies have investigated clinical criteria to rule out cervical spine injuries with sufficient certainty and without using imaging. Imaging of cervical trauma should be performed when injuries cannot be clinically excluded according to evidence-based criteria. Degenerative changes and anatomical differences have to be taken into account in the evaluation of imaging of elderly and pediatric patients.

  18. Thoracic spine CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. CT Scans Read more Spinal Cord Injuries Read more Spine ...

  19. Open versus percutaneous instrumentation in thoracolumbar fractures: magnetic resonance imaging comparison of paravertebral muscles after implant removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntilikina, Yves; Bahlau, David; Garnon, Julien; Schuller, Sébastien; Walter, Axel; Schaeffer, Mickaël; Steib, Jean-Paul; Charles, Yann Philippe

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Percutaneous instrumentation in thoracolumbar fractures is intended to decrease paravertebral muscle damage by avoiding dissection. The aim of this study was to compare muscles at instrumented levels in patients who were treated by open or percutaneous surgery. METHODS Twenty-seven patients underwent open instrumentation, and 65 were treated percutaneously. A standardized MRI protocol using axial T1-weighted sequences was performed at a minimum 1-year follow-up after implant removal. Two independent observers measured cross-sectional areas (CSAs, in cm 2 ) and region of interest (ROI) signal intensity (in pixels) of paravertebral muscles by using OsiriX at the fracture level, and at cranial and caudal instrumented pedicle levels. An interobserver comparison was made using the Bland-Altman method. Reference ROI muscle was assessed in the psoas and ROI fat subcutaneously. The ratio ROI-CSA/ROI-fat was compared for patients treated with open versus percutaneous procedures by using a linear mixed model. A linear regression analyzed additional factors: age, sex, body mass index (BMI), Pfirrmann grade of adjacent discs, and duration of instrumentation in situ. RESULTS The interobserver agreement was good for all CSAs. The average CSA for the entire spine was 15.7 cm 2 in the open surgery group and 18.5 cm 2 in the percutaneous group (p = 0.0234). The average ROI-fat and ROI-muscle signal intensities were comparable: 497.1 versus 483.9 pixels for ROI-fat and 120.4 versus 111.7 pixels for ROI-muscle in open versus percutaneous groups. The ROI-CSA varied between 154 and 226 for open, and between 154 and 195 for percutaneous procedures, depending on instrumented levels. A significant difference of the ROI-CSA/ROI-fat ratio (0.4 vs 0.3) was present at fracture levels T12-L1 (p = 0.0329) and at adjacent cranial (p = 0.0139) and caudal (p = 0.0100) instrumented levels. Differences were not significant at thoracic levels. When adjusting based on age, BMI, and Pfirrmann

  20. Spread of dye after single thoracolumbar paravertebral injection in infants. A cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albokrinov, Andrew A; Fesenko, Ulbolgan A

    2014-06-01

    Thoracolumbar paravertebral block (PVB) is one method of providing regional anaesthesia for abdominal wall surgery in children. It is common practice when performing a PVB for abdominal wall anaesthesia to inject a certain volume of local anaesthetic solution in the paravertebral space at several levels. This increases the duration of the procedure and makes it more invasive. To determine the character of dye spread in infants' paravertebral space, to check the feasibility of single injection PVB and to determine the optimal volume of injectate necessary to cover the paravertebral segments responsible for sensation of the lower abdomen. Experimental study. Single centre, University Hospital, April 2013 to August 2013. Twenty infant cadavers. Ultrasound-guided, single thoracolumbar paravertebral injections were performed on infant cadavers. The total number of paravertebral segments stained after dye injection and specific vertebral levels of cephalad and caudad spread of dye in the paravertebral space. Dye was present in the paravertebral spaces of all cadavers. Spread of dye within the paravertebral space was different depending on dye volume. Strong correlation was found between the volume of injectate and the number of paravertebral segments involved. The number of spinal nerve roots surrounded with dye corresponded with the number of paravertebral segments involved. T11, T12 and L1 nerve roots were stained in all cadavers. The optimal injectate volume to involve T10-L1 segments was defined as 0.2 to 0.3  ml  kg(-1). Single thoracolumbar paravertebral injection at T12-L1 level leads to caudad and cephalad spread of injectate in a dose-dependent manner. Single injection thoracolumbar paravertebral injections could be performed for lower abdomen anaesthesia in infants. We suggest that a single injection of 0.2 to 0.3  ml  kg(-1) of local anaesthetic in the thoracolumbar paravertebral space could provide adequate coverage of the dermatomes of the lower

  1. Adjuvant analgesics for spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Rikke Vibeke

    2018-03-01

    Increasing evidence indicate that pain is insufficiently treated following surgical procedures. It is essential that pain treatment is effective with a minimum of side effects in order to promote postoperative rehabilitation. Multimodal analgesia is most likely an important strategy in reducing postoperative pain. Combinations of different analgesics with different mechanisms of action may have an additive analgesic effect with fewer side effects compared to using a single drug. However, there is still a pronounced lack of documentation for the effect and side effects of these multimodal analgesic regimes. More than 6,000 spine surgeries are performed annually in Denmark and spine surgery has been associated with high levels of pain compared to other surgical procedures. Therefore, we considered spine surgery to pose a group of well-defined surgical procedures and we used this model to investigate the efficacy of 3 adjuvant analgesics aiming to improve the multimodal approach in pain management.
 
In study I and II we hypothesized that preoperative IV dexamethasone 16 mg would reduce acute postoperative pain, opioid consumption and persistent pain after lumbar disk surgery. We found that dexamethasone significantly reduced acute pain during mobilization. The clinical relevance is however debatable and we could not demonstrate an opioid sparing effect. Further, we discovered significantly higher pain levels in the dexamethasone group compared to placebo 1 year postoperatively.
 
In study III we explored the effect of 500 mg of oral chlorzoxazone on acute postoperative pain and opioid consumption in patients with moderate to severe pain after spine surgery and found no effect of chlorzoxazone compared to placebo.
 
In study IV we hypothesized that intraoperative ketamine would reduce postoperative opioid consumption and persistent pain after spinal fusion surgery in chronic pain patients with opioid dependency. We found a significantly reduced opioid

  2. Sensitivity of lumbar spine loading to anatomical parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putzer, Michael; Ehrlich, Ingo; Rasmussen, John

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal simulations of lumbar spine loading rely on a geometrical representation of the anatomy. However, this data has an inherent inaccuracy. This study evaluates the in uence of dened geometrical parameters on lumbar spine loading utilizing ve parametrized musculoskeletal lumbar spine...... models for four different postures. The in uence of the dimensions of vertebral body, disc, posterior parts of the vertebrae as well as the curvature of the lumbar spine were studied. Additionally, simulations with combinations of selected parameters were conducted. Changes in L4/L5 resultant joint force...... were used as outcome variable. Variations of the vertebral body height, disc height, transverse process width and the curvature of the lumbar spine were the most in uential. The results indicated that measuring these parameters from X-rays would be most important to morph an existing musculoskeletal...

  3. The effects of abdominal muscle coactivation on lumbar spine stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner-Morse, M G; Stokes, I A

    1998-01-01

    A biomechanical model of the lumbar spine was used to calculate the effects of abdominal muscle coactivation on spinal stability. To estimate the effects of abdominal muscle coactivation on lumbar spine stability, muscle fatigue rate, and lumbar spine compression forces. The activation of human trunk muscles has been found to involve coactivation of antagonistic muscles, which has not been adequately predicted by biomechanical models. Antagonistic activation of abdominal muscles might produce flexion moments resulting from abdominal pressurization. Qualitatively, antagonistic activity also has been attributed to the need to stabilize the spine. Spinal loads and spinal stability were calculated for maximum and submaximum (40%, 60% and 80%) efforts in extension and lateral bending using a previously published, anatomically realistic biomechanical model of the lumbar spine and its musculature. Three different antagonistic abdominal muscle coactivation patterns were imposed, and results were compared with those found in a model with no imposed coactivation. Results were quantified in terms of the sum of cubed muscle stresses (sigma sigma m3, which is related to the muscle fatigue rate), the maximum compressive loading on the lumbar spine, and the critical value of the muscle stiffness parameter (q) required for the spine to be stable. Forcing antagonistic coactivation increased stability, but at the cost of an increase in sigma sigma m3 and a small increase in maximum spinal compression. These analyses provide estimates of the effects of antagonistic abdominal muscle coactivation, indicating that its probable role is to stabilize the spine.

  4. Role of early minimal-invasive spine fixation in acute thoracic and lumbar spine trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Polytraumatized patients following a severe trauma suffer from substantial disturbances of the immune system. Secondary organ dysfunction syndromes due to early hyperinflammation and late immunparalysis contribute to adverse outcome. Consequently the principle of damage control surgery / orthopedics developed in the last two decades to limit secondary iatrogenic insult in these patients. New percutaneous internal fixators provide implants for a damage control approach of spinal trauma in polytraumatized patients. The goal of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of minimal-invasive instrumentation in the setting of minor and major trauma and to discuss the potential benefits and drawbacks of this procedure. Materials and Methods: The present study is a prospective analysis of 76 consecutive patients (mean age 53.3 years with thoracolumbar spine fractures following major or minor trauma from August 2003 to January 2007 who were subjected to minimal-invasive dorsal instrumentation using CD Horizon ® Sextant TM Rod Insertion System and Longitude TM Rod Insertion System (Medtronic ® Sofamor Danek. Perioperative and postoperative outcome measures including e.g. local and systemic complications were assessed and discussed. Results: Forty-nine patients (64.5% suffered from minor trauma (Injury Severity Score < 16. Polytraumatized patients (n=27; 35.5% had associated chest (n=20 and traumatic brain injuries (n=22. For mono- and bisegmental dorsal instrumentation the Sextant TM was used in 60 patients, whereas in 16 longer ranging instrumentations the (prototype Longitude TM system was implanted. Operation time was substantially lower than in conventional approach at minimum 22.5 min for Sextant and 36.2 min for Longitude TM , respectively. Geriatric patients with high perioperative risk according to ASA classification benefited from the less invasive approach and lack of approach-related complications including no substantial blood loss

  5. Beyond the spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donovan, James; Cassidy, J David; Cancelliere, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, clinical research within the chiropractic profession has focused on the spine and spinal conditions, specifically neck and low back pain. However, there is now a small group of chiropractors with clinical research training that are shifting their focus away from traditi...... highlight recent research in these new areas and discuss how clinical research efforts in musculoskeletal areas beyond the spine can benefit patient care and the future of the chiropractic profession.......Over the past two decades, clinical research within the chiropractic profession has focused on the spine and spinal conditions, specifically neck and low back pain. However, there is now a small group of chiropractors with clinical research training that are shifting their focus away from...... traditional research pursuits towards new and innovative areas. Specifically, these researchers are now delving into areas such as brain injury, work disability prevention, undifferentiated chest pain, hip osteoarthritis, and prevention of pain in children and adolescents to name a few. In this paper, we...

  6. Rendering the Topological Spines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieves-Rivera, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-05

    Many tools to analyze and represent high dimensional data already exits yet most of them are not flexible, informative and intuitive enough to help the scientists make the corresponding analysis and predictions, understand the structure and complexity of scientific data, get a complete picture of it and explore a greater number of hypotheses. With this in mind, N-Dimensional Data Analysis and Visualization (ND²AV) is being developed to serve as an interactive visual analysis platform with the purpose of coupling together a number of these existing tools that range from statistics, machine learning, and data mining, with new techniques, in particular with new visualization approaches. My task is to create the rendering and implementation of a new concept called topological spines in order to extend ND²AV's scope. Other existing visualization tools create a representation preserving either the topological properties or the structural (geometric) ones because it is challenging to preserve them both simultaneously. Overcoming such challenge by creating a balance in between them, the topological spines are introduced as a new approach that aims to preserve them both. Its render using OpenGL and C++ and is currently being tested to further on be implemented on ND²AV. In this paper I will present what are the Topological Spines and how they are rendered.

  7. Operative strategy for different types of thoracolumbar stress fractures in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, WenSheng; Zheng, MinQian

    2014-12-01

    There are no accurate guidelines on the operative treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS)-related thoracolumbar stress fractures. For this reason, we categorized such bone fractures into 2 types: vertebral body type and intervertebral space type, according to the damage mechanism, cross-section spot, and iconography, and devised a targeted surgical plan based on the characteristics of each fracture type. To investigate the types and surgical treatment of thoracolumbar stress fractures in AS. Thoracolumbar stress fractures are complications of AS. The patients with AS have a higher fracture risk that is approximately 3.5 times than the healthy. As the mechanism of injury, clinical manifestations, imaging characteristics, and principles of treatment of these fractures differ from those of general spinal fractures, the surgical approach is different from that of AS kyphosis orthopedic surgery. In this study, we summarize the clinical data of 11 AS patients with thoracolumbar fractures and discuss the clinical efficacy of the surgical approach based on the mechanism of injury and radiographic features. We reviewed the data of 11 patients who underwent surgery for AS-related thoracolumbar stress fractures. Five patients with vertebral body-type fractures underwent vertebral wedge osteotomy through the pedicle and posterior internal fixation, whereas 6 patients with intervertebral space-type fractures underwent anterior spinal decompression with strut grafting and posterior internal fixation. The follow-up period was 2-4 years. After surgery, all kyphosis deformities were corrected, low back pain was relieved immediately, and scores on the visual analog scale improved by >70%. At the final follow-up, kyphosis correction had no significant loss. In the radiographic images, neither nonunion signs of pseudarthrosis plane nor neurologic or infectious complications were observed. Choosing an anterior or posterior surgical approach based on the type of AS

  8. Postoperative stabilization of the posttraumatic thoracic and lumbar spine: a review of concepts and orthotic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzel, E C; Larson, S J

    1989-03-01

    A review of 109 case histories of patients who had undergone a spine fusion and/or posterior instrumentation procedure for thoracic and/or lumbar spine trauma was performed with respect to efficacy of several postoperative external splinting techniques. These data formed the basis for a review of external spinal splinting techniques. The type of orthosis that appears to offer the most efficacious immobilization and maximum patient comfort for fractures in the upper thoracic region in a body shell jacket extending from the submental and suboccipital regions to the lumbar region (modified Minerva jacket). To gain a lower point of fixation in patients with mid-to-low lumbar fractures, it was found that an extended body shell or an extension of a body jacket to one leg (hip spica) was necessary. Thoracic and thoracolumbar injuries may be stabilized with either a Jewett brace or a body jacket. The lack of maintenance of the cylindrical body shell, as well as excessive discomfort, make the Jewett brace and similar orthotic devices a second choice to body shell jackets for fractures in this region. The application of plastic polymer (Thermoplast) to spine splinting techniques offers the patient increased comfort and stability, as well as facilitating easy application and a more snug fit.

  9. Introduction of a new standardized assessment score of spine morphology in osteogenesis imperfecta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerber, F.; Schulze Uphoff, U.; Koerber, S.; Maintz, D. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Schoenau, E.; Semler, O. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Children' s Hospital

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare hereditary disease leading to multiple bone deformities and fractures. In the absence of causal therapy, a symptomatic approach is based on treatment with bisphosphonates and physiotherapy. The clinical and radiological manifestations vary. Therefore, standardization and quantification for an objective comparison, especially during therapy, are required. In this paper, radiological changes of the spine are quantified according to their clinical relevance to define a scoring system that transfers the morphological changes into a single value representing the severity of the disease. Materials and Methods: 268 lateral spine X-rays of 95 patients with OI (median age 5.6 years) were assessed. The findings were classified based on their clinical relevance. Results: The three criteria, vertebral compression, thoracolumbar kyphosis and deformity type, were quantified in a new grading system. Based on this, a 'severity classification' (1 to 5) was defined with implications for diagnostics and treatment. A mathematical formula that takes into account the three criteria and their correlations to clinical relevance, resulting in a 'severity score', was developed. Conclusion: 'Severity classification' and 'severity score' introduce a new concept for a standardized evaluation of spine X-rays in patients with OI. For both scientific and routine purposes, it provides the user with a simple and easy-to-handle tool for assessing and comparing different stages of severity prior to and during therapy with detailed accuracy. (orig.)

  10. Introduction of a new standardized assessment score of spine morphology in osteogenesis imperfecta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerber, F.; Schulze Uphoff, U.; Koerber, S.; Maintz, D.; Schoenau, E.; Semler, O.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare hereditary disease leading to multiple bone deformities and fractures. In the absence of causal therapy, a symptomatic approach is based on treatment with bisphosphonates and physiotherapy. The clinical and radiological manifestations vary. Therefore, standardization and quantification for an objective comparison, especially during therapy, are required. In this paper, radiological changes of the spine are quantified according to their clinical relevance to define a scoring system that transfers the morphological changes into a single value representing the severity of the disease. Materials and Methods: 268 lateral spine X-rays of 95 patients with OI (median age 5.6 years) were assessed. The findings were classified based on their clinical relevance. Results: The three criteria, vertebral compression, thoracolumbar kyphosis and deformity type, were quantified in a new grading system. Based on this, a 'severity classification' (1 to 5) was defined with implications for diagnostics and treatment. A mathematical formula that takes into account the three criteria and their correlations to clinical relevance, resulting in a 'severity score', was developed. Conclusion: 'Severity classification' and 'severity score' introduce a new concept for a standardized evaluation of spine X-rays in patients with OI. For both scientific and routine purposes, it provides the user with a simple and easy-to-handle tool for assessing and comparing different stages of severity prior to and during therapy with detailed accuracy. (orig.)

  11. Effects of vertebroplasty on endplate subsidence in elderly female spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraja, Srinidhi; Awada, Hassan K; Dreher, Maureen L; Bouck, John T; Gupta, Shikha

    2015-03-01

    The aim in this study was to quantify the effects of vertebroplasty on endplate subsidence in treated and adjacent vertebrae and their relationship to endplate thickness and underlying trabecular bone in elderly female spines. Vertebral compression fractures were created in female cadaveric (age range 51-88 years) thoracolumbar spine segments. Specimens were placed into either the control or vertebroplasty group (n = 9/group) such that bone mineral density, trabecular microarchitecture, and age were statistically similar between groups. For the vertebroplasty group, polymethylmethacrylate bone cement was injected into the fractured vertebral body under fluoroscopy. Cyclic compression (685-1370 N sinusoid) was performed on all spine segments for 115,000 cycles. Micro-CT scans were obtained before and after cyclic loading to quantify endplate subsidence. Maximum subsidence was compared between groups in the caudal endplate of the superior adjacent vertebra (SVcau); cranial (TVcra) and caudal (TVcau) endplates of the treated vertebra; and the cranial endplate of the inferior adjacent vertebra (IVcra). In addition, micro-CT images were used to quantify average endplate thickness and trabecular bone volume fraction. These parameters were then correlated with maximum endplate subsidence for each endplate. The maximum subsidence in SVcau endplate for the vertebroplasty group (0.34 ± 0.58 mm) was significantly (p subsidence in the TVcra, TVcau, and IVcra endplates were greater in the vertebroplasty group, but these differences were not significant (p > 0.16). Increased subsidence in the vertebroplasty group manifested locally in the anterior region of the SVcau endplate and in the posterior region of the TVcra and TVcau endplates (p subsidence was observed in thinner endplates with lower trabecular bone volume fraction for both vertebroplasty and control groups (R(2) correlation up to 62%). In the SVcau endplate specifically, these 2 covariates aided in understanding

  12. Preoperative narcotic use and its relation to depression and anxiety in patients undergoing spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaghani, Sheyan J; Lee, Dennis S; Bible, Jesse E; Archer, Kristin R; Shau, David N; Kay, Harrison; Zhang, Chi; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2013-12-01

    Prospective review of registry data at a single institution from October 2010 to June 2012. To assess whether the amount of preoperative narcotic use is associated with preoperative depression and anxiety in patients undergoing spine surgery for a structural lesion. Previous work suggests that narcotic use and psychiatric comorbidities are significantly related. Among other psychological considerations, depression and anxiety may be associated with the amount of preoperative narcotic use in patients undergoing spine surgery. Five hundred eighty-three patients undergoing lumbar (60%), thoracolumbar (11%), or cervical spine (29%) were included. Self-reported preoperative narcotic consumption was obtained at the initial preoperative visit and converted to daily morphine equivalent amounts. Preoperative Zung Depression Scale (ZDS) and Modified Somatic Perception Questionnaire (MSPQ) scores were also obtained at the initial preoperative visit and recorded as measures of depression and anxiety, respectively. Resistant and robust bootstrapped multivariable linear regression analysis was performed to determine the association between ZDS and MSPQ scores and preoperative narcotics, controlling for clinically important covariates. Mann-Whitney U tests examined preoperative narcotic use in patients who were categorized as depressed (ZDS ≥ 33) or anxious (MSPQ ≥ 12). Multivariable analysis controlling for age, sex, smoking status, preoperative employment status, and prior spinal surgery demonstrated that preoperative ZDS (P = 0.006), prior spine surgery (P = 0.007), and preoperative pain (0.014) were independent risk factors for preoperative narcotic use. Preoperative MSPQ (P = 0.083) was nearly a statistically significant risk factor. Patients who were categorized as depressed or anxious on the basis of ZDS and MSPQ scores also showed higher preoperative narcotic use than those who were not (P spine surgery.

  13. Gunshot injuries in the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros Filho, T E P; Cristante, A F; Marcon, R M; Ono, A; Bilhar, R

    2014-07-01

    Review article. To review the literature regarding treatment approaches in cases of gunshot wounds (GSWs) affecting the spine. Brazil. Narrative review of medical literature. GSWs are an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality. Most patients with spinal GSW have complete neurological deficit. The injury is more common in young men and is frequently immobilizing. The initial approach should follow advanced trauma life support, and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy should be initiated immediately, especially in patients with perforation of the gastrointestinal tract. The indications for surgery in spinal GSW are deterioration of the neurologic condition in a patient with incomplete neurological deficit, the presence of liquor fistula, spinal instability, intoxication by the metal from the bullet or risk of bullet migration. Surgical treatment is associated with a higher complication rate than conservative treatment. Therefore, the surgeon must know the treatment limitations and recognize patients who would truly benefit from surgery.

  14. Surgical Site Infection Following Posterior Instrumented Surgery for Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zulkefli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To study the prevalence and the risk factors for surgical site infection in patients who underwent posterior instrumented surgery for thoracolumbar burst fractures. METHODOLOGY: Retrospective review of cases operated between year 2006 and 2007. The final end point is the detection of surgical site infection within one year. RESULTS: A total of 38 cases were reviewed. Surgical site infection occurred in 5 cases. Only one had deep infection. The onset of infection occurred within one month in all cases. The risk factors studied were smoking, timing of surgery, duration of surgery, neurological deficit, associated injuries and high dose methylprednisolone administration. None of them were statistically significant as risk factors for surgical site infection. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of surgical site infection in patients who underwent posterior instrumented surgery for thoracolumbar burst fractures was 13%.

  15. Acquired pathology of the pediatric spine and spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palasis, Susan; Hayes, Laura L. [Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology at Scottish Rite, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Pediatric spine pathology poses a diagnostic challenge for radiologists. Acquired spine pathology often yields nonspecific signs and symptoms in children, especially in the younger age groups, and diagnostic delay can carry significant morbidity. This review is focused on some of the more common diagnostic dilemmas we face when attempting to evaluate and diagnose acquired pediatric spine anomalies in daily practice. An understanding of some of the key differentiating features of these disease processes in conjunction with pertinent history, physical exam, and advanced imaging techniques can indicate the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  16. Acquired pathology of the pediatric spine and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palasis, Susan; Hayes, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric spine pathology poses a diagnostic challenge for radiologists. Acquired spine pathology often yields nonspecific signs and symptoms in children, especially in the younger age groups, and diagnostic delay can carry significant morbidity. This review is focused on some of the more common diagnostic dilemmas we face when attempting to evaluate and diagnose acquired pediatric spine anomalies in daily practice. An understanding of some of the key differentiating features of these disease processes in conjunction with pertinent history, physical exam, and advanced imaging techniques can indicate the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  17. [Sacral block: indications and effectiveness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, D; Dvorak, J

    1998-02-25

    It has been shown that during injection of 17 to 20 ml local anesthetics combined with a corticosteroid via the hiatus canalis sacralis that the solution is distributed up to the level of the thoraco-lumbar junction. The indication for therapeutical peridural injection are radicular symptoms as a result of disc herniation, foraminal stenosis as well as neurogenic claudicatio. Contraindications are anticoagulation, local infection as well as suspicion of systemic inflammatory disease of the peripheral nervous system. With proper technique and adequate desinfection, complications and side effects are very rare.

  18. A Levering Technique Using Small Parallel Rods for Open Reduction of High-Grade Thoracolumbar Dislocation

    OpenAIRE

    Hadgaonkar, Shailesh; Shah, Kunal; Khurjekar, Ketan; Krishnan, Vibhu; Shyam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: Technical report. Objective: Dorsolumbar vertebral dislocations, with or without associated fractures, occur secondary to very high velocity trauma. The reduction procedures and techniques, which may be adopted in these situations, have been multifariously discussed in the literature. Our objective was to assess the outcome of a novel reduction maneuver, using parallel rods which we have employed in reduction of high-grade thoracolumbar fractures to achieve precise sagittal bala...

  19. CT-findings in pain syndromes originated from thoraco-lumbar junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, I.; Karadjova, M.; Malchanova, V.

    2007-01-01

    The thoraco-lumbar junction syndrome imitates, as far as clinical symptoms are concerned, low back pain, caused by disc protrusion in the lower lumbar vertebral segments. It is manifested by referred pain in the area, innervated by posterior and anterior primary rami (dorsal and ventral rami), belonging to thoraco-lumbar junction vertebral segments (Th11-L2). Eighty one patients with clinically diagnosed thoraco-lumbar junction syndrome underwent CT-investigations, that aimed establishing pathological processes, leading to this clinical symptomatology. 148 vertebral levels were examined. In 67 patients we scanned two consecutive levels to find the type of change of the zygapophyseal joints. We found facet tropism (asymmetry) in 72 patients (88.8%) or in 117 levels (79.6%), degenerated faced joints in 63 patients (77.8%), pathology of the intervertebral disc - in 33 patients (43.1%) including 5 patients (6.2%) with disc prolapse. When investigating on two subsequent segments (Th11-Th12 and Th12-L1) sudden anatomical change in orientation of facets occurred in 55 patients (82%). Our findings support the hypothesis of the facet-joint origin of this ailment. (authors)

  20. Radiographic evaluation of posterior selective thoracolumbar or lumbar fusion for moderate Lenke 5C curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanbin; Lin, Guanfeng; Zhang, Jianguo; Guo, Jianwei; Wang, Shengru; Yang, Yang; Shen, Jianxiong; Wang, Yipeng

    2017-01-01

    Posterior selective thoracolumbar or lumbar (TL/L) fusion with pedicle screw constructs for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) has been studied in a few researches. However, few studies have discussed the indication for selective TL/L fusion and the behaviors of its adjacent disc angle. The present study aims to discuss the indication for posterior selective TL/L fusion and the behavior of the adjacent disc angle. 45 consecutive cases of AIS undergoing posterior selective TL/L fusion were retrospectively evaluated, with an average follow-up of 36 months. Radiographs were reviewed to determine the coronal curve magnitude and the sagittal alignment preoperatively, postoperatively and at final follow-up. Thoracic curves in groups A had a correction loss of more than 5°, while thoracic curves in group B had a correction loss of not more than 5°. The coronal curve magnitude of the TL/L curve averaged 44° preoperatively and it was corrected to 6° immediately with a correction rate of 84.8 %. At final follow-up it was 9° with a correction loss of 3°. The minor thoracic curve was 26° preoperatively, and the convex side bending curve magnitude averaged 8° with a flexibility of 72.7 %. It was corrected to 13° immediately with a spontaneous correction of 48.5 %. At final follow-up it was 14° with a correction loss of 1°. UIVA decreased from 4° to 2° after surgery, and it was 2° at final follow-up. LIVA decreased from 7° to 4° after surgery, and it was 5° at final follow-up. Maximal correction of TL/L curves in group A is significantly less than that in group B. 1 patient received revision surgery to fuse the progressive thoracic curve. Posterior selective TL/L fusion with pedicle screw constructs allows for spontaneous thoracic correction and maintains coronal and sagittal balance during the follow-up. Maximal correction instead of undercorrection was recommended for moderate Lenke 5C curves. Disc wedging could be improved after surgery and well

  1. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  2. Static and fatigue biomechanical properties of anterior thoracolumbar instrumentation systems. A synthetic testing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Y; Cunningham, B W; Parker, L M; Kanayama, M; McAfee, P C

    1999-07-15

    A mechanical testing standard for anterior thoracolumbar instrumentation systems was introduced, using a synthetic model. Twelve recent instrumentation systems were tested in static and fatigue modes. To establish the testing standard for anterior thoracolumbar instrumentation systems using a synthetic model and to evaluate the static and fatigue biomechanical properties of 12 anterior thoracolumbar instrumentation systems. Although numerous studies have been performed to evaluate the biomechanics of anterior spinal instrumentation using a cadaveric or animal tissue, problems of specimen variation, lack of reproducibility, and inability to perform fatigue testing have been pointed out. In no studies has a precise synthetic testing standard for anterior thoracolumbar instrumentation systems been described. An ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene cylinder was designed according to the anatomic dimensions of the vertebral body. Two cylinders spanned by spinal instrumentation simulated a total corpectomy defect, and a compressive lateral bending load was applied. The instrumentation assembly was precisely standardized. The static destructive and fatigue tests up to 2 million cycles at three load levels were conducted, followed by the failure mode analysis. Twelve anterior instrumentation systems, consisting of five plate and seven rod systems were compared in stiffness, bending strength, and cycles to failure. Static and fatigue test parameters both demonstrated highly significant differences between devices. The stiffness ranged from 280.5 kN/m in the Synthes plate (Synthes, Paoli, PA) to 67.9 kN/m in the Z-plate ATL (SofamorDanek, Memphis, TN). The Synthes plate and Kaneda SR titanium (AcroMed, Cleveland, OH) formed the highest subset in bending strength of 1516.1 N and 1209.9 N, respectively, whereas the Z-plate showed the lowest value of 407.3 N. There were no substantial differences between plate and rod devices. In fatigue, only three systems: Synthes plate

  3. Micromechanics of Sea Urchin spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Tsafnat

    Full Text Available The endoskeletal structure of the Sea Urchin, Centrostephanus rodgersii, has numerous long spines whose known functions include locomotion, sensing, and protection against predators. These spines have a remarkable internal microstructure and are made of single-crystal calcite. A finite-element model of the spine's unique porous structure, based on micro-computed tomography (microCT and incorporating anisotropic material properties, was developed to study its response to mechanical loading. Simulations show that high stress concentrations occur at certain points in the spine's architecture; brittle cracking would likely initiate in these regions. These analyses demonstrate that the organization of single-crystal calcite in the unique, intricate morphology of the sea urchin spine results in a strong, stiff and lightweight structure that enhances its strength despite the brittleness of its constituent material.

  4. Micromechanics of Sea Urchin spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsafnat, Naomi; Fitz Gerald, John D; Le, Hai N; Stachurski, Zbigniew H

    2012-01-01

    The endoskeletal structure of the Sea Urchin, Centrostephanus rodgersii, has numerous long spines whose known functions include locomotion, sensing, and protection against predators. These spines have a remarkable internal microstructure and are made of single-crystal calcite. A finite-element model of the spine's unique porous structure, based on micro-computed tomography (microCT) and incorporating anisotropic material properties, was developed to study its response to mechanical loading. Simulations show that high stress concentrations occur at certain points in the spine's architecture; brittle cracking would likely initiate in these regions. These analyses demonstrate that the organization of single-crystal calcite in the unique, intricate morphology of the sea urchin spine results in a strong, stiff and lightweight structure that enhances its strength despite the brittleness of its constituent material.

  5. Surgical management of coronal and sagittal imbalance of the spine without PSO: a multicentric cohort study on compensated adult degenerative deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramieri, Alessandro; Miscusi, Massimo; Domenicucci, Maurizio; Raco, Antonino; Costanzo, Giuseppe

    2017-10-01

    Sagittal imbalance of severe adult degenerative deformities requires surgical correction to improve pain, mobility and quality of life. Our aim was a harmonic and balanced spine, treating a series of adult degenerative thoracolumbar and lumbar kyphoscoliosis by a non posterior subtraction osteotomy technique. We operated 22 painful thoracolumbar and lumbar compensated degenerative deformities by anterior (ALIF), extreme lateral (XLIF) and transforaminal (TLIF) interbody fusion and grade 2 osteotomy (SPO) to restore lumbar lordosis and mobilize the coronal curve. Two-stage surgery, first anterior and after 2 or 3 weeks posterior, was proposed when the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was equal to or greater than 50% and VAS more than 5. All patients were submitted to X-ray and clinical screening during pre, post-operative and follow-up periods. We performed 5 ALIFs, 39 XLIFs, 8 TLIFs, 32 SPOs. No major complications were recorded and complication rate was 18% after lateral fusion and 22.7% after posterior approach. Pelvic tilt, lumbar lordosis, sagittal vertical axis and thoracic kyphosis improved (p < 0.05). Clinical follow-up (mean 20.5; range 18-24) was satisfactory in all cases, except for two due to sacroiliac pain. Mean preoperative VAS was 7.7 (range 6-10), while ODI was 67% on average (range 50-78). After two-stage surgery, VAS and ODI decreased, respectively, to 2.4 (range 2-4) and 31% (range 25-45), while their values were 4 (range 2-6) and 35% (range 20-55) at the final follow-up. Current follow-up does not allow definitive conclusions. However, the surgical approach adopted in this study seems promising, improving balance and clinical condition of adult patients with a compensated sagittal degenerative imbalance of the thoracolumbar spine.

  6. Prevalence of thoracolumbar vertebral fractures on multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartalena, Tommaso [Department of Radiology, S. Orsola University Hospital, Via Massarenti 9 - 40138 Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: t.bartalena@email.it; Giannelli, Giovanni; Rinaldi, Maria Francesca [Department of Radiology, S. Orsola University Hospital, Via Massarenti 9 - 40138 Bologna (Italy); Rimondi, Eugenio [Department of Radiology, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via G.C. Pupilli 1 - 40136 Bologna (Italy); Rinaldi, Giovanni [Department of Radiology, S. Orsola University Hospital, Via Massarenti 9 - 40138 Bologna (Italy); Sverzellati, Nicola [Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiology, University of Parma, Via Gramsci, 14 - 43100 Parma (Italy); Gavelli, Giampaolo [Department of Radiology, S. Orsola University Hospital, Via Massarenti 9 - 40138 Bologna (Italy)

    2009-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of osteoporotic vertebral fractures in patients undergoing multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) of the chest and/or abdomen. Materials and methods: 323 consecutive patients (196 males, 127 females) with a mean age of 62.6 years (range 20-88) who had undergone chest and/or abdominal MDCT were evaluated. Sagittal reformats of the spine obtained from thin section datasets were reviewed by two radiologists and assessed for vertebral fractures. Morphometric analysis using electronic calipers was performed on vertebral bodies which appeared abnormal upon visual inspection. A vertebral body height loss of 15% or more was considered a fracture and graded as mild (15-24%), moderate (25-49%) or severe (more than 50%). Official radiology reports were reviewed and whether the vertebral fractures had been reported or not was noted. Results: 31 out of 323 patients (9.5%) had at least 1 vertebral fracture and 7 of those patients had multiple fractures for a total of 41 fractures. Morphometric grading revealed 10 mild, 16 moderate and 15 severe fractures. Prevalence was higher in women (14.1%) than men (6.6%) and increased with patients age with a 17.1% prevalence in post-menopausal women. Only 6 out 41 vertebral fractures (14.6%) had been noted in the radiology final report while the remaining 35 (85.45) had not. Conclusion: although vertebral fractures represent frequent incidental findings on multidetector CT studies and may be easily identified on sagittal reformats, they are often underreported by radiologists, most likely because of unawareness of their clinical importance.

  7. Survey of French spine surgeons reveals significant variability in spine trauma practices in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonjon, G; Grelat, M; Dhenin, A; Dauzac, C; Lonjon, N; Kepler, C K; Vaccaro, A R

    2015-02-01

    In France, attempts to define common ground during spine surgery meetings have revealed significant variability in clinical practices across different schools of surgery and the two specialities involved in spine surgery, namely, neurosurgery and orthopaedic surgery. To objectively characterise this variability by performing a survey based on a fictitious spine trauma case. Our working hypothesis was that significant variability existed in trauma practices and that this variability was related to a lack of strong scientific evidence in spine trauma care. We performed a cross-sectional survey based on a clinical vignette describing a 31-year-old male with an L1 burst fracture and neurologic symptoms (numbness). Surgeons received the vignette and a 14-item questionnaire on the management of this patient. For each question, surgeons had to choose among five possible answers. Differences in answers across surgeons were assessed using the Index of Qualitative Variability (IQV), in which 0 indicates no variability and 1 maximal variability. Surgeons also received a questionnaire about their demographics and surgical experience. Of 405 invited spine surgeons, 200 responded to the survey. Five questions had an IQV greater than 0.9, seven an IQV between 0.5 and 0.9, and two an IQV lower than 0.5. Variability was greatest about the need for MRI (IQV=0.93), degree of urgency (IQV=0.93), need for fusion (IQV=0.92), need for post-operative bracing (IQV=0.91), and routine removal of instrumentation (IQV=0.94). Variability was lowest for questions about the need for surgery (IQV=0.42) and use of the posterior approach (IQV=0.36). Answers were influenced by surgeon specialty, age, experience level, and type of centre. Clinical practice regarding spine trauma varies widely in France. Little published evidence is available on which to base recommendations that would diminish this variability. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. Do exercises with the Foam Roller have a short-term impact on the thoracolumbar fascia? - A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griefahn, Annika; Oehlmann, Jan; Zalpour, Christoff; von Piekartz, Harry

    2017-01-01

    Due to new research results in the past few years, interest in the fascia of the human body has increased. Dysfunctions of the fascia are indicated by various symptoms, amongst others, musculoskeletal pain. As a result stronger focus has been put on researching therapeutic approaches in this area. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Foam Roll exercises on the mobility of the thoracolumbar fascia (TLF). Study has been conducted in a randomized and controlled trial which sampled 38 healthy athletic active men and women. The subjects were randomly assigned to a Foam Roll Group (FMG), a Placebo Group (PG) and a Control Group (CG). Depending on the assigned group the volunteers were either instructed to do exercises with the Foam Roll, received a pseudo treatment with the Foam Roll or received no treatment. A total of three measurements were carried out. The most important field of research was the mobility of the TLF, which was determined using a sonographic assessment. In addition the lumbar flexion and the mechanosensivity of relevant muscles were determined. After the intervention, the FMG showed an average increase of 1.7915 mm for the mobility of the TLF (p fascia in a healthy young population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Intraoperative computed tomography navigation for transpedicular screw fixation to treat unstable thoracic and lumbar spine fractures: clinical analysis of a case series (CARE-compliant).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Yu; Wu, Meng-Huang; Li, Yen-Yao; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Hsu, Chu-Hsiang; Huang, Tsung-Jen; Hsu, Robert Wen-Wei

    2015-05-01

    Transpedicular screw (TPS) fixation in unstable thoracic and lumbar (TL) spine fractures remains technically difficult because of destroyed anatomical landmarks, unstable gross segments, and discrepancies in anatomic orientation using conventional anatomic landmarks, fluoroscopic guidance, or computed tomography (CT)-based navigation. In this study, we evaluated the safety and accuracy of TPS placement under intraoperative computed tomography (iCT) navigation in managing unstable TL spine fractures.From 2010 to 2013, we retrospectively reviewed the Spine Operation Registry records of patients who underwent posterior instrumented fusion to treat unstable TL spine fractures via the iCT navigation system. An unstable spine fracture was identified as AO/Magerl classification type B or type C.In all, 316 screws in 37 patients with unstable TL spine fractures were evaluated and involved 7 thoracic, 23 thoracolumbar junctional, and 7 lumbar fractures. The accuracy of TPS positioning in the pedicle without breach was 98% (310/316). The average number of iCT scans per patient was 2.1 (range 2-3). The average total radiation dose to patients was 15.8 mSv; the dose per single level exposure was 2.7 mSv. The TPS intraoperative revision rate was 0.6% (2/316) and no neurovascular sequela was observed. TPS fixation using the iCT navigation system obtained a 98% accuracy in stabilizing unstable TL spine fractures. A malplaced TPS could be revised during real-time confirmation of the TPS position, and no secondary operation was required to revise malplaced screws.The iCT navigation system provides accurate and safe management of unstable TL spine fractures. In addition, operating room personnel, including surgeons and nurses, did not need to wear heavy lead aprons as they were not exposed to radiation.

  10. Trauma of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wimmer, B.; Hofmann, E.; Jacob, A.L.H.

    1990-01-01

    Primary reconstructive surgery is assuming increasing importance in the management of fractures of the spine. Analysis of the injury and thus surgical decision-making are greatly facilitated by the diagnostic power of CT and MRI. This volume provides a systemic introduction to the interpretation of CT and MRI images of injuries to the spinal column and the spinal cord, with special emphasis on the assessment or residual stability. Since survey X-rays remain the indispensable first step in radiodiagnosis, the typical appearances of spinal injuries on conventional films are also shown. This will help the reader interpret the CT and MRI images and also reflects the procedure in radiologic practice. The book's classification of spinal fractures, together with the attempt to conclude how the injury happened by analyzing the damage caused, paves the way for individually oriented therapy. (orig.) With 72 figs. in 132 separate illustrations

  11. Spine Care as a Framework for the Chiropractic Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Michael; Murphy, Donald; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this commentary is to provide an argument for the role and identity of chiropractors as spine care providers within the context of the greater health care system. DISCUSSION: Surveys of the general public and chiropractors indicate that the majority of patients seek...... chiropractic services for back and neck pain. Insurance company utilization data confirm these findings. Regulatory and legal language found in chiropractic practice acts reveals that most jurisdictions define the chiropractic scope of practice as based on a foundation of spine care. Educational accrediting...... and testing organizations have been shaped around a chiropractic education that produces graduates who focus on the diagnosis and treatment of spine and musculoskeletal disorders. Spine care is thus the common denominator and theme throughout all aspects of chiropractic practice, legislation, and education...

  12. Clinical detectable tension in the growing body: new and revisited signs in clinical examination in children with postural problems and spinal deformities. Restoration of lordosis on the thoracolumbar junction can correct sagittal and coronal plane deformity; a new (revisited) linked approach on the treatment and etiology of adolescent spinal deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, P J M

    2008-01-01

    Unclear etiology in scoliotic and kyphotic deformities of the spine is responsible for uncertainty in treatment options. Normal all-day factors can be of importance. Newly developed or revisited clinical examination of sitting and supine children and consequent testing of neuro-muscular tightness shows to be useful in understanding the different spinal deformations and postural problems during growth and point to neuromuscular tension in growth. The goal is: -Better understanding of the role and individual characteristics of the central nervous system, especially the cord and roots in proper and improper growth of the human spine. -Clarifying that preservation of lordosis and good function at the thoracolumbar junction at the end of growth can be of value for normal configuration and function of the spine in adult life. -Present obvious important and consistent clinical observations in children in sitting and supine position with early and advanced adolescent deformities, by photographic studies and video fragments. Use of work on growth and deformation of the spine by Milan Roth on uncoupled neuro-osseous growth and other historical literature. -Relate these clinical findings and background literature with common knowledge about adolescent spinal deformities and mechanical laws on tensile and compressive forces in structures. Overview of relevant clinical tests in the growing child presented with deformities show possible correlation with the proposed internal balancing problem (uncoupled neuro-osseous growth) researched by Roth. Concomitant radiological and MRI signs are shown. Around 1900 most orthopaedic surgeons and anatomists saw relationship between the new habitude of children to sit for prolonged periods in schools and spinal deformities. A physiological explanation as adaptations needed by the total neuromuscular system ("the growing system") was widely postulated (Hueter-Volkmann principle) and subject in research but a concise theory was not achieved

  13. Percutaneous Cement-Augmented Screws Fixation in the Fractures of the Aging Spine: Is It the Solution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Pesenti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Management of elderly patients with thoracolumbar fractures is still challenging due to frequent osteoporosis and risk of screws pull-out. The aim of this study was to evaluate results of a percutaneous-only procedure to treat these fragile patients using cement-augmented screws. Methods. 12 patients diagnosed with a thoracolumbar fracture associated with an important loss of bone stock were included in this prospective study. Surgical procedure included systematically a percutaneous osteosynthesis using cemented fenestrated screws. When necessary, additional anterior support was performed using a kyphoplasty procedure. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed using CT scan. Results. On the whole series, 15 fractures were diagnosed and 96 cemented screws were inserted. The difference between the pre- and postoperative vertebral kyphosis was statistically significant (12.9° versus 4.4°, P=0.0006. No extrapedicular screw was reported and one patient was diagnosed with a cement-related pulmonary embolism. During follow-up period, no infectious complications, implant failures, or pull-out screws were noticed. Discussion. Aging spine is becoming an increasing public health issue. Management of these patients requires specific attention due to the augmented risk of complications. Using percutaneous-only screws fixation with cemented screw provides satisfactory results. A rigorous technique is mandatory in order to achieve best outcomes.

  14. Pain and functional improvement effects of methylene blue injection on the soft tissue around fusion site after traumatic thoracolumbar fixation: A double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Majid Reza; Yazdanpanah, Hamed; Gholami, Mehrnaz; Farrokhi, Farnaz; Mesbahi, Amir Reza

    2016-11-01

    Fractures of the thoracolumbar spine can cause pain, long-term reductions in quality of life (QOL), and neural deficits. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of methylene blue (MB) on preventing postoperative pain and improving QOL in patients with throracolumbar fractures undergoing posterior pedicle screw fixation. Fifty patients underwent standard posterior pedicular screw fixation for stabilization of the thoracolumbar fractures: 25 received 1ml of MB solution at a concentration of 0.5% and 25 received normal saline on the soft tissue around fusion site. Primary outcomes were the control of pain, evaluated at 48h, 2 and 6 months after surgery with the use of a visual analog scale (VAS), and the improvement of QOL, assessed 2 and 6 months postoperatively by means of Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) questionnaire. The mean VAS scores for pain were significantly lower in the MB group compared with the control group at 2 months (1.30±0.45 vs. 2.60±1.19, P<0.001) and 6 months (1.17±0.37 vs. 1.60±0.87; P=0.028) after treatment. At 2 months after the surgery, the mean ODI score was significantly lower in the MB-treated patients than the control group (20.4±10.92 vs. 34.8±15.11; P=0.001). The ODI score in the MB-treated patients was better than the control group at 6 months after the surgery (12.2±11.66 vs. 20.8±11.14; P=0.016). A single dose of MB on the soft tissue around fusion site shows promising results in terms of safety, reduction of postoperative pain, and functional results when compared with placebo 6 months after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Fratura toracolombar explosão: confiabilidade do método de guerra na análise tomográfica Thoracolumbar burst fracture: reliability of the guerra's method on tomographic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmar Avanzi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar as características do fragmento retropulsado nas fraturas explosão da coluna toracolombar, de acordo com dois examinadores independentes no plano sagital da TAC e correlacionar estes achados com a presença de déficit neurológico. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Coleta retrospectiva de dados de prontuário e TC em 138 pacientes com fratura toracolombar do tipo explosão internados no nosso serviço entre 1983 e 2004. RESULTADOS: Observamos correlação significante entre dois examinadores independentes (pOBJECTIVES: The objective of the current study was to evaluate the correlation between neurological deficits and the characteristics of retropulsed fragment into the spinal canal in patients with thoracolumbar burst fractures. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From 1983 to 2004, 135 patients with thoracolumbar burst fractures according to Denis' criteria were evaluated at a tertiary teaching institution by two different observers. CT-Scans of the fractured spine were analyzed in order to assess the narrowing of the spinal canal. Neurological deficit was evaluated by using the Franke's classification. RESULTS: A significant correlation was found between two independent observers (P<0.05. The observed characteristics of the retropulsed fragment into the spinal canal were: triangular form, rotation dislocation with average of 20 degrees and cranial dislocation with average of eight millimeters. There was no statistical correlation between neurological deficits and the characteristics of retropulsed fragment of the spinal canal. CONCLUSION: There was no statistical correlation between neurological deficits and the characteristics of retropulsed fragment of the spinal canal.

  16. Automatic Localization of Target Vertebrae in Spine Surgery: Clinical Evaluation of the LevelCheck Registration Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Sheng-fu L.; Otake, Yoshito; Puvanesarajah, Varun; Wang, Adam S.; Uneri, Ali; De Silva, Tharindu; Vogt, Sebastian; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Elder, Benjamin D; Goodwin, C. Rory; Kosztowski, Thomas A.; Liauw, Jason A.; Groves, Mari; Bydon, Ali; Sciubba, Daniel M.; Witham, Timothy F.; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Aygun, Nafi; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A 3D-2D image registration algorithm, “LevelCheck,” was used to automatically label vertebrae in intraoperative mobile radiographs obtained during spine surgery. Accuracy, computation time, and potential failure modes were evaluated in a retrospective study of 20 patients. Objective To measurethe performance of the LevelCheck algorithm using clinical images acquired during spine surgery. Summary of Background Data In spine surgery, the potential for wrong level surgery is significant due to the difficulty of localizing target vertebrae based solely on visual impression, palpation, and fluoroscopy. To remedy this difficulty and reduce the risk of wrong-level surgery, our team introduced a program (dubbed LevelCheck) to automatically localize target vertebrae in mobile radiographs using robust 3D-2D image registration to preoperative CT. Methods Twenty consecutive patients undergoing thoracolumbar spine surgery, for whom both a preoperative CT scan and an intraoperative mobile radiograph were available, were retrospectively analyzed. A board-certified neuroradiologist determined the “true” vertebra levels in each radiograph. Registration of the preoperative CT to the intraoperative radiographwere calculated via LevelCheck, and projection distance errors were analyzed. Five hundred random initializations were performed for eachpatient, andalgorithm settings (viz., the number of robust multi-starts, ranging 50 to 200) were varied to evaluate the tradeoff between registration error and computation time. Failure mode analysis was performed by individually analyzing unsuccessful registrations (>5 mm distance error) observed with 50 multi-starts. Results At 200 robust multi-starts (computation time of ∼26 seconds), the registration accuracy was 100% across all 10,000 trials. As the number of multi-starts (and computation time) decreased, the registration remained fairly robust, down to 99.3% registration accuracy at 50 multi-starts (computation time

  17. Patterns of spine surgeries at Mulago Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diagnoses were categorised to aid analysis. The level of the lesion was determined and categorised. Injuries spanning the cervical and thoracic regions were labeled cervico-thoracic while those spanning the thoracic and lumbar regions and the lumbar and sacral regions thoraco-lumbar and lumbo-sacral respectively.

  18. Does 'Kinesio tape' alter thoracolumbar fascia movement during lumbar flexion? An observational laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shihfan Jack; Woledge, Roger C; Morrissey, Dylan

    2016-10-01

    Changes in thoracolumbar fascial thickness, structure and shear strain are associated with lower back pain (LBP). Therapeutic taping techniques such as Kinesio-Taping (KT) are increasingly used to treat LBP, albeit with variable effects and unclear mechanisms. However, evidence for quantifying how treatment effects in vivo fascia properties is inadequate. We therefore aimed to explore taping mechanisms using an in vivo ultrasound measurement. Thoracolumbar ultrasound videos of known orientations and positions were taken from 12 asymptomatic participants (8 males and 4 females, aged 22.9 ± 3.59) while performing velocity-guided lumbar flexion with and without KT applied. An automated algorithm using cross-correlation to track contiguous tissue layers across sequential frames in the sagittal plane, was developed and applied to two movements of each subject in each taping condition. Differences of inter-tissue movements and paracutaneous translation at tissue boundaries were compared. Significant reduction in the mean movement of subcutaneous tissue during lumbar flexion before and after taping was found. There was no difference in other observed tissue layers. Tissue paracutaneous translations at three boundaries were significantly reduced during lumbar flexion when KT was applied (skin-subcutaneous: 0.25 mm, p < 0.01; subcutaneous-perimuscular tissue: 0.5 mm, p = 0.02; and perimuscular-muscle: 0.46, p = 0.05). No overall reduction in lumbar flexion was found (p = 0.10). KT reduced subcutaneous inter-tissue movement and paracutaneous translation in the superficial thoracolumbar fascia during lumbar flexion, and the relationship of such difference to symptomatic change merits exploration. Combining ultrasound data with muscle activation information may be useful to reveal potential mechanisms of therapeutic taping in patients with LBP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Unilateral Wiltse intermuscular approach and contralateral decompression for the treatment of thoracolumbar burst fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chi; Wang, Jing; Teng, Hong-Lin; Zhu, Ming-Yu; Zhou, Yang

    2017-05-25

    To compare the clinical effects and multifidus muscle injury of different approaches, including unilateral Wiltse intermuscular approach and intramuscular approach combined with contralateral decompression, in treating thoracolumbar burst fracture. Forty-three patients with thoracolumbar burst fracture were enrolled in the study from January 2010 to December 2014, including 29 males and 14 females with an average age of 42.3 years old(ranged from 21 to 64 years old). The patients were treated with posterior pedicle screw fixation and unilateral decompression and were divided into Wiltse intermuscular approach group (group A) and intramuscular approach group (group B) according to surgical approach. Operation time and intraoperative bleeding were recorded for all patients; visual analogue scale(VAS) was compared 1 d preoperatively, 1 week, 12 months postoperatively between two groups; preoperation and 12 months postoperatively, the fractured vertebral canal and two-sides multifidus muscle of the same section were observed and compared by CT measure between two groups. All the patients were follow-up for 14 to 21 months with an average of 16.3 months. Partial wound non-healing occurred in 3 patients and the wound ultimately healing after debridgement suture and change dressings. No screw breakage was found. There was significant difference in operation and intraoperative bleeding operation between two groups ( P groups( P >0.05). As for CT measurement results, postoperative vertebral canal narrow ratio was significant decreased in all patients( P group A ( P group B ( P >0.05). Neurologic status of all patients got recovery at final follow-up. The method of unilateral Wiltse intermuscular approach combined with contralateral decompression for the treatment of thoracolumbar burst fracture has good clinical effects, also it is less invasive and less damage to multifidus muscle compared with intramuscular approach.

  20. Does the correlation between Schmorl's nodes and vertebral morphology extend into the lumbar spine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomp, Kimberly; Roberts, Charlotte; Strand Vidarsdottir, Una

    2015-07-01

    Schmorl's nodes are depressions on vertebrae due to herniation of the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc into the vertebral body. This study provides an extension of our previous study which analyzed the shape of the lower thoracic spine and found that vertebral morphology was associated with the presence of Schmorl's nodes. Ninety adult individuals from the late Medieval site of Fishergate House, York, and the Post-Medieval site of Coach Lane, North Shields, Tyne and Wear, England, were analysed using 2D geometric morphometrics to identify possible relationships between vertebral morphology and Schmorl's nodes at the thoraco-lumbar junction and in the lumbar spine. A significant correlation was found between vertebral shape and the presence of Schmorl's nodes in the twelfth thoracic vertebrae and the first to third lumbar vertebrae. The findings corroborate previous studies and suggest that vertebral shape may be an important factor in spinal health. It is hypothesized that the pedicle shape of affected vertebrae may not provide adequate structural support for the vertebral bodies, resulting in vertical disc herniation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Early recurrence of thoracolumbar intervertebral disc extrusion after surgical decompression: a report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jäderlund Karin H

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thoracolumbar disc extrusions were diagnosed in three chondrodystrophic dogs with paraparesis of up to three days duration. All cases were managed by hemilaminectomy and removal of extruded disc material. In one dog, fenestration of the herniated disc space was also performed. Initially neurological function improved or was unchanged, but from two to ten days postoperatively clinical signs of deterioration became apparent. In all the dogs, recurrence of disc extrusion at the same location as the initial extrusion was diagnosed by computer tomography and at a second surgery abundant disc material was found at the hemilaminectomy site between the dura and an implanted graft of autogenous fat.

  2. COMPARISON BETWEEN SHORT AND LONG SEGMENT TRANSPEDICULAR FIXATION OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makkena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Transpedicular instrumentation systems have distinct advantages such as rigid segmental fixation, stabilization of the three columns, least failure at bone metal interface, early post-operative mobilization with efficient nursing care and least complications in the management of thoracolumbar burst fractures. The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the clinical and radiological outcome of thoracolumbar burst fractures treated by short segment and long segment transpedicular instrumentation. METHODS 34 patients who underwent posterior spinal stabilization with transpedicular instrumentation and posterolateral fusion for unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures with or without neurological deficit were included in the study. Load sharing classification (Gaines scoring was used retrospectively to correlate fracture comminution and displacement with progression of the deformity and implant failure. Neurological evaluation was done and patients were graded according to ASIA (American Spinal Cord Injury Association impairment scale as a part of physical examination. RESULTS The mean intra-operative correction in the short segment group was 14.4° and the loss of correction observed at the last follow-up evaluation was 7.48° with a final gain of 6.92°. The mean intra-operative correction in the long segment group was 19.77° and the loss of correction observed at the last follow-up evaluation was 6.61°. Final gain was 13.16°. On radiological evaluation, mean correction loss of 7.48 degrees and 3.4% implant failure was noted in the short segment group while the long segment group had 6.61 degrees of mean correction loss and no implant failure. There was no positive correlation found between Gaines score with progression of deformity. CONCLUSION Transpedicular fixation is a stable, reliable and less surgically extensive construct for addressing thoracolumbar burst fractures. About 6-8° loss of correction was observed with both

  3. Fluoroscopic-guided intradiscal oxygen-ozone injection therapy for thoracolumbar intervertebral disc herniations in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Joon-Young; Jang, Ha-Young; Lee, Bora; Yoon, Jung-Hee; Jang, Sang-Keun; Choi, Seok Hwa; Jeong, Soon-Wuk

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the effect of oxygen-ozone (O2-O3) injection on thoracolumbar intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH) in dogs. Ten herniated discs of five dogs were treated with percutaneous injection of an O2-O3 gas mixture with O3 concentration of 32 microg/microl intradiscally (1.5-2 microl) under fluoroscopy guidance. Five weeks after treatment, the mean size of herniated discs was measured by computed tomography and showed significant reduction of disc volumes in all animals (8.8%+/-3.82%). The degree of shrinkage was negatively linearly correlated with disc mineralization (correlation coefficient=-0.636) and statistically significant at pdiscs by disc shrinkage.

  4. Radiology illustrated. Spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Joon Woo [Seoul National Univ. Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Kyonggi-do (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology; Kwon, Jong Won [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Offers a practical approach to image interpretation for spinal disorders. Includes numerous high-quality radiographic images and schematic illustrations. Will serve as a self-learning book covering daily routine cases from the basic to the advanced. Radiology Illustrated: Spine is an up-to-date, superbly illustrated reference in the style of a teaching file that has been designed specifically to be of value in clinical practice. Common, critical, and rare but distinctive spinal disorders are described succinctly with the aid of images highlighting important features and informative schematic illustrations. The first part of the book, on common spinal disorders, is for radiology residents and other clinicians who are embarking on the interpretation of spinal images. A range of key disorders are then presented, including infectious spondylitis, cervical trauma, spinal cord disorders, spinal tumors, congenital disorders, uncommon degenerative disorders, inflammatory arthritides, and vascular malformations. The third part is devoted to rare but clinically significant spinal disorders with characteristic imaging features, and the book closes by presenting practical tips that will assist in the interpretation of confusing cases.

  5. Postoperative spine infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Domenico Parchi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative spinal wound infection is a potentially devastating complication after operative spinal procedures. Despite the utilization of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in recent years and improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patients’ outcome after spinal surgery. In the modern era of pending health care reform with increasing financial constraints, the financial burden of post-operative spinal infections also deserves consideration. The aim of our work is to give to the reader an updated review of the latest achievements in prevention, risk factors, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment of post-operative spinal wound infections. A review of the scientific literature was carried out using electronic medical databases Pubmed, Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus for the years 1973-2012 to obtain access to all publications involving the incidence, risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. We initially identified 119 studies; of these 60 were selected. Despite all the measures intended to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in spine surgery, these remain a common and potentially dangerous complication.

  6. Postoperative spine; Postoperative Wirbelsaeule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaeger, R. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Neurologische Klinik und Poliklinik, Basel (Switzerland); Lieb, J.M. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland); Shariat, K. [Neurochirurgie Koeln-Merheim, Koeln (Germany); Ahlhelm, F.J. [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Abteilung Neuroradiologie, Institut fuer Radiologie, Baden (Switzerland)

    2014-11-15

    Approximately 15-30 % of surgical procedures involving the lumbar spine are associated with complications that require further diagnostic work-up. The choice of imaging modality for postoperative complications depends on the extent, pattern and temporal evolution of the postoperative neurological signs and symptoms as well as on the preoperative clinical status, the surgical procedure itself and the underlying pathology. The interpretation of imaging findings, in particular the distinction between postoperative complications and normally expected nonspecific postoperative imaging alterations can be challenging and requires the integration of clinical neurological information and the results of laboratory tests. The combination of different imaging techniques might help in cases of equivocal imaging results. (orig.) [German] Etwa 15-30 % der operativen Eingriffe im Bereich der lumbalen Wirbelsaeule verlaufen nicht komplikationsfrei und erfordern weiterfuehrende Abklaerungen. Die Auswahl des bildgebenden Verfahrens im Rahmen postoperativer Komplikationen haengt dabei wesentlich von der zeitlichen Entwicklung, dem Ausmass und Verteilungsmuster der neuaufgetretenen klinisch-neurologischen bzw. orthopaedischen Symptome sowie von den Ausfaellen vor dem Eingriff, der zugrundeliegenden Pathologie und der Lokalisation und Art des Eingriffs ab. Die Interpretation der bildgebenden Befunde, insbesondere die Abgrenzung postoperativer Komplikationen von natuerlicherweise zu erwartenden postoperativen Veraenderungen kann dabei eine Herausforderung darstellen. Bei unklaren Befunden kann ergaenzend zur eingehend klinisch-neurologischen und laborchemischen Bestandsaufnahme auch der kombinierte Einsatz mehrerer bildgebender Modalitaeten diagnostisch weiterhelfen. (orig.)

  7. The postoperative spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is one of the most perplexing medical and medicoeconomic problems facing our health system today. In many studies reoperation rates tend to be between 10 and 20%, but as many as 20-45% 3 of patients may have persistent back or radicular pain following what was to have been definitive therapy. The causes for the FBSS are very complex. The Workmen's Compensation system and medicolegal trends toward very high settlements of litigation for injury have provided serious incentive for patients to remain symptomatic. It is difficult to analyze any statistical survey of symptomatic back patients without serious bias from this group of patients. Others suggest that patients with severe psychological problems, drug abuse, and alcoholism are inappropriately selected as surgical candidates. They believe that careful psychological evaluation of patients minimizes FBSS. Even if all extrinsic factors could be eliminated, the problem of failed back surgery would still be a major one. This chapter is based on a review of 300 postoperative lumbar spine multiplanar CT scans performed over a 15-month period. All patients had a complete set of axial images, with sagittal and coronal reformations photographed twice: optimized once for bone definition and once for soft-tissue contrast resolution

  8. Preoperative Opioid Use as a Predictor of Adverse Postoperative Self-Reported Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dennis; Armaghani, Sheyan; Archer, Kristin R; Bible, Jesse; Shau, David; Kay, Harrison; Zhang, Chi; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton

    2014-06-04

    Opioids are commonly used for preoperative pain management in patients undergoing spine surgery. The objective of this investigation was to assess whether preoperative opioid use predicts worse self-reported outcomes in patients undergoing spine surgery. Five hundred and eighty-three patients undergoing lumbar, thoracolumbar, or cervical spine surgery to treat a structural lesion were included in this prospective cohort study. Self-reported preoperative opioid consumption data were obtained at the preoperative visit and were converted to the corresponding daily morphine equivalent amount. Patient-reported outcome measures were assessed at three and twelve months postoperatively via the 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey and the EuroQol-5D questionnaire, as well as, when appropriate, the Oswestry Disability Index and the Neck Disability Index. Separate multivariable linear regression analyses were then performed. At the preoperative evaluation, of the 583 patients, 56% (326 patients) reported some degree of opioid use. Multivariable analyses controlling for age, sex, diabetes, smoking, surgery invasiveness, revision surgery, preoperative Modified Somatic Perception Questionnaire score, preoperative Zung Depression Scale score, and baseline outcome score found that increased preoperative opioid use was a significant predictor (p complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2014 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  9. A pilot study to record visual evoked potentials during prone spine surgery using the SightSaver™ photic visual stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffin, E M; Emerson, R G; Cheng, J; Mercado, K; Smith, K; Beckman, J D

    2017-12-20

    This is a pilot study to assess the clinical safety and efficacy of recording real-time flash visual evoked potentials (VEPs) using the SightSaver TM Visual Stimulator mask during prone spine surgery. A prospective, observational pilot study. Twenty patients presenting for spine surgery (microdiscectomy, 1-2 level lumbar fusion, or > 2 levels thoraco-lumbar fusion) were enrolled. The SightSaver™ Visual Stimulator™ was used to elicit VEPs throughout surgery. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) were simultaneously recorded. All patients underwent general anesthesia with a combination of intravenous and inhaled agents. The presence, absence, and changes in VEP were qualitatively analyzed. Reproducible VEPs were elicited in 18/20 patients (36/40 eyes). VEPs were exquisitely sensitive to changes in anesthesia and decayed with rising MAC of isoflurane and/or N 2 O. Decrements in VEPs were observed without concomitant changes in SSEPs. The mask was simple to apply and use and was not associated with adverse effects. The SightSaver™ mask represents an emerging technology for monitoring developing visual insults during surgery. The definitive applications remain to be determined, but likely include use in select patients and/or surgeries. Here, we have validated the device as safe and effective, and show that VEPs can be recorded in real time under general anesthesia in the prone position. Future studies should be directed towards understanding the ideal anesthetic regimen to facilitate stable VEP recording during prone spine surgery.

  10. Progression of trunk imbalance in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis with a thoracolumbar/lumbar curve: is it predictable at the initial visit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Chang Ju; Lee, Choon Sung; Lee, Dong-Ho; Cho, Jae Hwan

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Progression of trunk imbalance is an important finding during follow-up of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Nevertheless, no factors that predict progression of trunk imbalance have been identified. The purpose of this study was to identify parameters that predict progression of trunk imbalance in cases of AIS with a structural thoracolumbar/lumbar (TL/L) curve. METHODS This study included 105 patients with AIS and a structural TL/L curve who were followed up at an outpatient clinic. Patients with trunk imbalance (trunk shift ≥ 20 mm) at the initial visit were excluded. All patients were followed up for more than 2 years. Patients were divided into the following groups according to progression of trunk imbalance: 1) Group P, trunk shift ≥ 20 mm at the final visit and degree of progression ≥ 10 mm; and 2) Group NP, trunk shift < 20 mm at the final visit or degree of progression < 10 mm. Radiological parameters included Cobb angle, upper end vertebrae and lower end vertebrae (LEV), LEV tilt, disc wedge angle between LEV and LEV+1, trunk shift, apical vertebral translation, and apical vertebral rotation (AVR). Each parameter was compared between groups. Radiological parameters were assessed at every visit using whole-spine standing anteroposterior radiographs. RESULTS Among the 105 patients examined, 13 showed trunk imbalance with progression ≥ 10 mm at the final visit (Group P). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified a lower Risser grade (p = 0.002) and a greater initial AVR (p = 0.020) as predictors of progressive trunk imbalance. A change in LEV tilt during follow-up was associated with trunk imbalance (p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Risser grade and AVR measured at the initial visit may predict progression of trunk imbalance. Surgeons should consider the risk of progressive trunk imbalance if patients show skeletal immaturity and a greater AVR at the initial visit.

  11. Depression of the Thoracolumbar Posterior Vertebral Body on the Estimation of Cement Leakage in Vertebroplasty and Kyphoplasty Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Chen

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Depression of the thoracolumbar posterior vertebral body may be informative for the estimation of cement location on C-arm images. To reduce type-B leakage, DCPW should be made longer than DBCV on C-arm images for safety during PVP or PKP.

  12. Combined Anterior-Posterior Surgery Versus Posterior Surgery for Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P. Oprel (Pim); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); P. Patka (Peter); D. den Hartog (Dennis)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: Study Design: A systematic quantitative review of the literature. Objective: To compare combined anterior-posterior surgery versus posterior surgery for thoracolumbar fractures in order to identify better treatments. Summary of Background Data: Axial load of the anterior and

  13. Robotic systems in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onen, Mehmet Resid; Naderi, Sait

    2014-01-01

    Surgical robotic systems have been available for almost twenty years. The first surgical robotic systems were designed as supportive systems for laparoscopic approaches in general surgery (the first procedure was a cholecystectomy in 1987). The da Vinci Robotic System is the most common system used for robotic surgery today. This system is widely used in urology, gynecology and other surgical disciplines, and recently there have been initial reports of its use in spine surgery, for transoral access and anterior approaches for lumbar inter-body fusion interventions. SpineAssist, which is widely used in spine surgery, and Renaissance Robotic Systems, which are considered the next generation of robotic systems, are now FDA approved. These robotic systems are designed for use as guidance systems in spine instrumentation, cement augmentations and biopsies. The aim is to increase surgical accuracy while reducing the intra-operative exposure to harmful radiation to the patient and operating team personnel during the intervention. We offer a review of the published literature related to the use of robotic systems in spine surgery and provide information on using robotic systems.

  14. Evaluation of twelve vibration regimes applied to improve spine properties in ovariectomized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Komrakova

    2017-12-01

    The findings of the present study indicate that application frequency rate and direction of vibration might influence spine response differently. However, we were unable to find any clearly beneficial or harmful effect of vibration regimes on the osteopenic lumbar spine in rats.

  15. A description of the lumbar interfascial triangle and its relation with the lateral raphe: anatomical constituents of load transfer through the lateral margin of the thoracolumbar fascia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuenke, M D; Vleeming, A; Van Hoof, T; Willard, F H

    2012-01-01

    Movement and stability of the lumbosacral region is contingent on the balance of forces distributed through the myofascial planes associated with the thoracolumbar fascia (TLF). This structure is located at the common intersection of several extremity muscles (e.g. latissimus dorsi and gluteus maximus), as well as hypaxial (e.g. ventral trunk muscles) and epaxial (paraspinal) muscles. The mechanical properties of the fascial constituents establish the parameters guiding the dynamic interaction of muscle groups that stabilize the lumbosacral spine. Understanding the construction of this complex myofascial junction is fundamental to biomechanical analysis and implementation of effective rehabilitation in individuals with low back and pelvic girdle pain. Therefore, the main objectives of this study were to describe the anatomy of the lateral margin of the TLF, and specifically the interface between the fascial sheath surrounding the paraspinal muscles and the aponeurosis of the transversus abdominis (TA) and internal oblique (IO) muscles. The lateral margin of the TLF was exposed via serial reduction dissections from anterior and posterior approaches. Axial sections (cadaveric and magnetic resonance imaging) were examined to characterize the region between the TA and IO aponeurosis and the paraspinal muscles. It is confirmed that the paraspinal muscles are enveloped by a continuous paraspinal retinacular sheath (PRS), formed by the deep lamina of the posterior layer of the TLF. The PRS extends from the spinous process to transverse process, and is distinct from both the superficial lamina of the posterior layer and middle layer of the TLF. As the aponeurosis approaches the lateral border of the PRS, it appears to separate into two distinct laminae, which join the anterior and posterior walls of the PRS. This configuration creates a previously undescribed fat-filled lumbar interfascial triangle situated along the lateral border of the paraspinal muscles from the 12th

  16. Parametric modelling and segmentation of vertebral bodies in 3D CT and MR spine images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Darko; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2011-12-07

    Accurate and objective evaluation of vertebral deformations is of significant importance in clinical diagnostics and therapy of pathological conditions affecting the spine. Although modern clinical practice is focused on three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques, the established methods for evaluation of vertebral deformations are limited to measuring deformations in two-dimensional (2D) x-ray images. In this paper, we propose a method for quantitative description of vertebral body deformations by efficient modelling and segmentation of vertebral bodies in 3D. The deformations are evaluated from the parameters of a 3D superquadric model, which is initialized as an elliptical cylinder and then gradually deformed by introducing transformations that yield a more detailed representation of the vertebral body shape. After modelling the vertebral body shape with 25 clinically meaningful parameters and the vertebral body pose with six rigid body parameters, the 3D model is aligned to the observed vertebral body in the 3D image. The performance of the method was evaluated on 75 vertebrae from CT and 75 vertebrae from T(2)-weighted MR spine images, extracted from the thoracolumbar part of normal and pathological spines. The results show that the proposed method can be used for 3D segmentation of vertebral bodies in CT and MR images, as the proposed 3D model is able to describe both normal and pathological vertebral body deformations. The method may therefore be used for initialization of whole vertebra segmentation or for quantitative measurement of vertebral body deformations.

  17. Aβ-mediated spine changes in the hippocampus are microtubule-dependent and can be reversed by a subnanomolar concentration of the microtubule-stabilizing agent epothilone D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penazzi, Lorène; Tackenberg, Christian; Ghori, Adnan; Golovyashkina, Nataliya; Niewidok, Benedikt; Selle, Karolin; Ballatore, Carlo; Smith, Amos B.; Bakota, Lidia; Brandt, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines represent the major postsynaptic input of excitatory synapses. Loss of spines and changes in their morphology correlate with cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and are thought to occur early during pathology. Therapeutic intervention at a preclinical stage of AD to modify spine changes might thus be warranted. To follow the development and to potentially interfere with spine changes over time, we established a long term ex vivo model from organotypic cultures of the hippocampus from APP transgenic and control mice. The cultures exhibit spine loss in principal hippocampal neurons, which closely resembles the changes occurring in vivo, and spine morphology progressively changes from mushroom-shaped to stubby. We demonstrate that spine changes are completely reversed within few days after blocking amyloid-β (Aβ) production with the gamma-secretase inhibitor DAPT. We show that the microtubule disrupting drug nocodazole leads to spine loss similar to Aβ expressing cultures and suppresses DAPT-mediated spine recovery in slices from APP transgenic mice. Finally, we report that epothilone D (EpoD) at a subnanomolar concentration, which slightly stabilizes microtubules in model neurons, completely reverses Aβ-induced spine loss and increases thin spine density. Taken together the data indicate that Aβ causes spine changes by microtubule destabilization and that spine recovery requires microtubule polymerization. Moreover, our results suggest that a low, subtoxic concentration of EpoD is sufficient to reduce spine loss during the preclinical stage of AD. PMID:26772969

  18. Diversity of Spine Synapses in Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Xian; Mattson, Mark P.; Yao, Pamela J.

    2016-01-01

    Here we examine the structure of the various types of spine synapses throughout the animal kingdom. Based on available evidence, we suggest that there are two major categories of spine synapses: invaginating and non-invaginating, with distributions that vary among different groups of animals. In the simplest living animals with definitive nerve cells and synapses, the cnidarians and ctenophores, most chemical synapses do not form spine synapses. But some cnidarians have invaginating spine synapses, especially in photoreceptor terminals of motile cnidarians with highly complex visual organs, and also in some mainly sessile cnidarians with rapid prey capture reflexes. This association of invaginating spine synapses with complex sensory inputs is retained in the evolution of higher animals in photoreceptor terminals and some mechanoreceptor synapses. In contrast to invaginating spine synapse, non-invaginating spine synapses have been described only in animals with bilateral symmetry, heads and brains, associated with greater complexity in neural connections. This is apparent already in the simplest bilaterians, the flatworms, which can have well-developed non-invaginating spine synapses in some cases. Non-invaginating spine synapses diversify in higher animal groups. We also discuss the functional advantages of having synapses on spines and more specifically, on invaginating spines. And finally we discuss pathologies associated with spine synapses, concentrating on those systems and diseases where invaginating spine synapses are involved. PMID:27230661

  19. Degenerative disease of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czervionke, L.F.; Daniels, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    With few exceptions, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming the modality of choice for the evaluation of degenerative disorders of the entire spine. With the implementation of surface coils and continued refinement and development of new pulse sequences, osseous and soft tissue structures of the spine can now be studied in great detail. The introduction of paramagnetic contrast agents has made it possible to differentiate epidural scar from recurrent disc herniation in the postoperative setting and to discern previously undetected degenerative changes within the intervertebral disc itself. This paper discusses the spectrum of degenerative diseases of the spine, including disc degeneration (intervertebral osteochondrosis), disc herniation, spinal stenosis, spondylosis deformans, and osteoarthritis. A brief description of the MR techniques and strategies used to evaluate these disorders is also

  20. Multiplanar CT of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, S.L.G.; Glenn, W.V. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This is an illustrated text on computed tomography (CT) of the lumbar spine with an emphasis on the role and value of multiplanar imaging for helping determine diagnoses. The book has adequate discussion of scanning techniques for the different regions, interpretations of various abnormalities, degenerative disk disease, and different diagnoses. There is a 50-page chapter on detailed sectional anatomy of the spine and useful chapters on the postoperative spine and the planning and performing of spinal surgery with CT multiplanar reconstruction. There are comprehensive chapters on spinal tumors and trauma. The final two chapters of the book are devoted to CT image processing using digital networks and CT applications of medical computer graphics

  1. Three-dimensional lumbar spine vertebral motion during running using indwelling bone pins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacWilliams, Bruce A; Rozumalski, Adam; Swanson, Andrew N; Wervey, Roy; Dykes, Daryll C; Novacheck, Tom F; Schwartz, Michael H

    2014-12-15

    Eight healthy volunteers participated in this observational study. Quantify 3-dimensional motions of the lumbar vertebrae during running via direct in vivo measurement and compare these motions to walking data from the same technique and running data from a skin-mounted technique. Lumbar spine motions in running are only reported in 1 series of articles using a skin-mounted technique subject to overestimation and only instrumented a single vertebra. Reflective marker triads were attached to Kirschner wires inserted into the spinous processes of L1-S1. Anatomic registration between each vertebra and attached triad was achieved using spinal computed tomographic scans. Skin-mounted trunk markers were used to assess thoracic motions. Subjects ran several times in a calibrated volume at self-selected speed while 3-dimensional motion data were collected. Lumbar spine flexion and pelvic rotation patterns in running were reversed compared with walking. Increased lumbar spine motions during running occurred at the most inferior segments. Thoracic spine, lumbar spine and pelvis exhibited significantly greater range of sagittal plane motion with running. The pelvis had significantly greater range of frontal plane motion, and the thoracic spine had significantly greater range of transverse plane motion with running. Skin-mounted studies reported as much as 4 times the motion range determined by the indwelling bone pin techniques, indicating that the skin motion relative to the underlying bone during running was greater than the motion of the underlying vertebrae. The lumbar spine acts as a distinct functional segment in the spine during running, chiefly contributing lateral flexion to balance the relative motions between the trunk and pelvis. The lumbar spine is also shown to oppose thoracic spine sagittal flexion. While the lumbar spine chiefly contributes to frontal plane motion, the thoracic spine contributes the majority of the transverse plane motion. N/A.

  2. Vascularization and odontode structure of a dorsal ridge spine of Romundina stellina Ørvig 1975.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Jerve

    Full Text Available There are two types of dermal skeletons in jawed vertebrates: placoderms and osteichthyans carry large bony plates (macromery, whereas chondrichthyans and acanthodians are covered by small scales (micromery. Fin spines are one of the last large dermal structures found on micromeric taxa and offer a potential source of histology and morphology that can be compared to those found on macromeric groups. Dermal fin spines offer a variety of morphology but aspects of their growth modes and homology are unclear. Here, we provide detailed descriptions of the microstructure and growth of a dorsal ridge spine from the acanthothoracid placoderm, Romundina stellina, using virtual three-dimensional paleohistological datasets. From these data we identify several layers of dentine ornamentation covering the lateral surfaces of the spine and reconstructed their growth pattern. We show that this spine likely grew posteriorly and proximally from a narrow portion of bone located along the leading edge of the spine. The spine is similarly constructed to the scales with a few exceptions, including the absence of polarized fibers distributed throughout the bone and the presence of a thin layer of perichondral bone. The composition of the spine (semidentine odontodes, dermal bone, perichondral bone is identical to that of the Romundina dermal plates. These results illustrate the similarities and differences between the dermal tissues in Romundina and indicate that the spine grew differently from the dentinous fin spines from extant and fossil chondrichthyans. The morphology and histology of Romundina is most similar to the fin spine of the probable stem osteichthyan Lophosteus, with a well-developed inner cellular bony base and star-shaped odontodes on the surface. Results from these studies will undoubtedly have impact on our understanding of fossil fin spine histology and evolution, contributing to the on-going revision of early gnathostome phylogeny.

  3. A simulation study of spine biofidelity in the hybrid-III 6-year-old ATD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Cao, Libo; Reed, Matthew P; Hu, Jingwen

    2013-01-01

    Because of the lack of pediatric biomechanical data, Hybrid-III (HIII) child anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) are essentially scaled from the mid-size male ATD based on the geometric considerations. These ATDs inherit a rigid thoracic spine from the adult HIII ATDs, which has been criticized as unrealistic. Therefore, the objective of this study was to explore possible design modifications for improving the spine biofidelity of the HIII 6-year-old ATD. A previously developed and validated HIII 6-year-old MADYMO ATD model was used as the baseline model to investigate the effects of design modifications on the spine biofidelity of the current ATD. Several sets of child volunteer and cadaver test data were considered as the design targets, including child volunteer low-speed crash test data, pediatric cadaver cervical spine tensile test data, and child cadaver crash test data. ATD design modifications include adding an additional joint to the thoracic spine region and changing the joint characteristics at the cervical and lumbar spine regions. Optimization techniques were used to match simulation results to each set of test results. The results indicate that the translational characteristics of the cervical and lumbar spine in the current child ATD need to be reduced to achieve realistic spine flexibility. Adding an additional joint at the thoracic spine region with degree of freedom in both flexion/extension and tension would significantly improve the ATD biofidelity in terms of predicting the overall spine curvature and head excursion in frontal crashes. Future ATD spine modification should focus on reducing the neck and lumbar tension stiffness and adding additional flexibility both in flexion/extension and tension at the thoracic spine region. The child ATD model developed in this study can be used as an important tool to improve child ATD biofidelity and child restraint system design in motor vehicle crashes.

  4. Fifty top-cited spine articles from mainland China: A citation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yaohong; Zhao, Yachao; Lin, Linghan; Lu, Zhijun; Guo, Zhaoyang; Li, Xiaoming; Chen, Rongchun; Ma, Huasong

    2018-02-01

    Objective To identify the 50 top-cited spine articles from mainland China and to analyze their main characteristics. Methods Web of Science was used to identify the 50 top-cited spine articles from mainland China in 27 spine-related journals. The title, year of publication, number of citations, journal, anatomic focus, subspecialty, evidence level, city, institution and author were recorded. Results The top 50 articles had 29-122 citations and were published in 11 English-language journals; most (32) were published in the 2000s. The journal Spine had the largest number of articles and The Lancet had the highest impact factor. The lumber spine was the most discussed anatomic area (18). Degenerative spine disease was the most common subspecialty topic (22). Most articles were clinical studies (29); the others were basic research (21). Level IV was the most common evidence level (17). Conclusions This list indicates the most influential articles from mainland China in the global spine research community. Identification of these articles provides insights into the trends in spine care in mainland China and the historical contributions of researchers from mainland China to the international spine research field.

  5. Degenerative disorders of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallucci, Massimo; Puglielli, Edoardo; Splendiani, Alessandra; Pistoia, Francesca; Spacca, Giorgio

    2005-01-01

    Patients with back pain and degenerative disorders of the spine have a significant impact on health care costs. Some authors estimate that up to 80% of all adults experience back pain at some point in their lives. Disk herniation represents one of the most frequent causes. Nevertheless, other degenerative diseases have to be considered. In this paper, pathology and imaging of degenerative spine diseases will be discussed, starting from pathophysiology of normal age-related changes of the intervertebral disk and vertebral body. (orig.)

  6. Benign osteoblastoma mimicking malignancy of the spine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheshwari V

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available A case of osteoblastoma of the spine in a sixty year old female is presented. These lesions usually get misdiagnosed as tuberculosis or malignancy of the spine. Salient diagnostic features have been discussed.

  7. Adherence to Canadian C-Spine Rule in a regional hospital: a retrospective study of 406 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Mark; Heal, Clare F; Drobetz, Herwig

    2012-10-01

    Cervical spine radiography may be over-utilised in an emergency department setting. The Canadian C-Spine Rule has been developed to reduce unnecessary radiography. Our aim was to retrospectively determine the proportion of cervical spine radiographs requested through the emergency department for trauma patients that were clinically indicated, according to the Canadian C-Spine Rule. This was a cross-sectional survey conducted at a regional centre in Northern Queensland, Australia. All cervical spine radiographs for trauma, performed at the Mackay Base Hospital from 1 January 2009 to the 31 December 2009, were reviewed. The relevant patient charts were audited for evidence of indications for radiography. Of 406 patients in the study, 155 patients (38%) (95% confidence interval 33.3%, 42.7%) had cervical spine imaging performed that was not indicated according to the Canadian C-Spine Rule. None of these patients had a significant cervical spine injury on radiography. Applying the Canadian C-Spine Rule would have safely reduced the incidence of cervical spine radiography by 38%. This would also reduce costs, patient morbidity and radiation exposure. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  8. Automated three-dimensional reconstruction and morphological analysis of dendritic spines based on semi-supervised learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Peng; Huang, Yue; Hong, Jinsheng

    2014-05-01

    A dendritic spine is a small membranous protrusion from a neuron's dendrite that typically receives input from a single synapse of an axon. Recent research shows that the morphological changes of dendritic spines have a close relationship with some specific diseases. The distribution of different dendritic spine phenotypes is a key indicator of such changes. Therefore, it is necessary to classify detected spines with different phenotypes online. Since the dendritic spines have complex three dimensional (3D) structures, current neuron morphological analysis approaches cannot classify the dendritic spines accurately with limited features. In this paper, we propose a novel semi-supervised learning approach in order to perform the online morphological classification of dendritic spines. Spines are detected by a new approach based on wavelet transform in the 3D space. A small training data set is chosen from the detected spines, which has the spines labeled by the neurobiologists. The remaining spines are then classified online by the semi-supervised learning (SSL) approach. Experimental results show that our method can quickly and accurately analyze neuron images with modest human intervention.

  9. Thoracic spine type C injuries: injury profile, management and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Checiu Gheorghe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last years we observed an increased number of patients with multiple lesions after high energy accidents. Type C injuries of the thoracic spine are the most severe lesions, with the worse prognosis. The study analyzes the injury profile, management and outcome of all patients with thoracic spine, from T1- to T10, type C injuries treated in the Spinal Surgery Department of “Bagdsar- Arseni” Emergency Hospital, in the last 5 years. There were 26 patients admitted in the study, mostly male, 77%, with a mean age of 33.8 years. All of them were victims of high energy accidents, and all had spine injury associated with multiple lesions (head, thoracic, abdominal and limbs. We have chosen a posterior approach in all cases, with laminectomy or hemilaminectomy, permitting us to achieve all the major objectives of surgery, with the advantage of lower blood loss and a reduced operating time. The purpose of surgery was to achieve decompression of the spinal cord and stability of the thoracic spine. We treated 19 patient surgically and 4 patient conservative. Thoracic spine type C fractures remain a challenge for the spinal surgeon. These lesions require a multidisciplinary team approach for the treatment of associated lesions. The main goal of surgery is to achieve stability of the fractured segments. The timing for surgery is indicated mainly by associated respiratory problems.

  10. Imaging the spine in arthritis-a pictorial review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurik, Anne Grethe

    2011-01-01

    radiographic features of spinal changes in RA and SpA in addition to the advantages of MRI and CT, respectively. RA changes are usually located in the cervical spine and can result in serious joint instability. Subluxation is diagnosed by radiography, but supplementary MRI and/or CT is always indicated...... to visualise the spinal cord and canal in patients with vertical subluxation, neck pain and/or neurological symptoms. SpA may involve all parts of the spine. Ankylosing spondylitis is the most frequent form of SpA and has rather characteristic radiographic features. In early stages it is characterised...

  11. Radiology of the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wackenheim, A.

    1989-01-01

    The author describes some particularities seen in the abnormal or pathological image of the cervical spine: The osteolysis of the cortical bone in the spinous processes, the 'Y' shaped course of the corporeal veins, the notch in interspinous bursitis, and the main forms of constitutional stenosis of the cervical canal. (orig.) [de

  12. spine injury in mulago hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Muiruri

    from arrival in hospital to review by a clinician. Figure i of adequate cervical spine X-rays(22, 25). High pick-up summarizes our findings. rates are only attained with adequate X-rays. Studies done elsewhere have shown that up to 45% of initial. Clinical evaluation: Not all patients were assessed for. X-rays are inadequate.

  13. SPINE INJURY IN MULAGO HOSPITAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    flt the remaining E? uncleared patients, iii'. Siiei had severe cervical spine injuries which had been missed. Conciu.-riorr.'This study concluded that the initial clinical and radiological evaluation of patients with suspected CSI in iiilulago Hospital ...

  14. Effects of Spine Motion on Foot Slip in Quadruped Bounding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongliang Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Translation and bend of the spine in the sagittal plane during high-speed quadruped running were investigated. The effect of the two spine motions on slip between the foot and the ground was also explored. First, three simplified sagittal plane models of quadruped mammals were studied in symmetric bounding. The first model’s trunk allowed no relative motion, the second model allowed only trunk bend, and the third model allowed both bend and translation. Next, torque was introduced to equivalently replace spine motion and the possibility of foot slip of the three models was analyzed theoretically. The results indicate that the third model has the least possibility of slip. This conclusion was further confirmed by simulation experiments. Finally, the conclusion was verified by the reductive model crawling robot.

  15. Spinal CT scan, 2. Lumbar and sacral spines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi (Aichi Medical Univ., Aichi (Japan))

    1982-08-01

    Plain CT described fairly accurately the anatomy and lesions of the lumbar and sacral spines on their transverse sections. Since hernia of the intervertebral disc could be directly diagnosed by CT, indications of myelography could be restricted. Spinal-canal stenosis of the lumbar spine occurs because of various factors, and CT not only demonstrated the accurate size and morphology of bony canals, but also elucidated thickening of the joints and yellow ligament. CT was also useful for the diagnosis of tumors in the lumbar and sacral spines, visualizing the images of bone changes and soft tissues on the trasverse sections. But the diagnosis of intradural tumors required myelography and metrizamide CT. CT has become important for the diagnosis of spinal and spinal-cord diseases and for selection of the route of surgical arrival.

  16. Surgical site infection in posterior spine surgery | Ojo | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Surgical site infections (SSIs) in spine surgery remain a significant cause of morbidity and prolonged hospitalization. Factors affecting SSI includes patient's comorbidities, duration of surgery, type and indication for surgery among others. We intend to document our experience in our center and highlight ...

  17. Rare Complications of Cervical Spine Surgery: Pseudomeningocoele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailon, Tamir; Smith, Justin S; Nassr, Ahmad; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Fehlings, Michael G; Fish, David E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Hilibrand, Alan S; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Chou, Dean; Sasso, Rick C; Traynelis, Vincent C; Arnold, Paul M; Mroz, Thomas E; Buser, Zorica; Lord, Elizabeth L; Massicotte, Eric M; Sebastian, Arjun S; Than, Khoi D; Steinmetz, Michael P; Smith, Gabriel A; Pace, Jonathan; Corriveau, Mark; Lee, Sungho; Riew, K Daniel; Shaffrey, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    This study was a retrospective, multicenter cohort study. Rare complications of cervical spine surgery are inherently difficult to investigate. Pseudomeningocoele (PMC), an abnormal collection of cerebrospinal fluid that communicates with the subarachnoid space, is one such complication. In order to evaluate and better understand the incidence, presentation, treatment, and outcome of PMC following cervical spine surgery, we conducted a multicenter study to pool our collective experience. This study was a retrospective, multicenter cohort study of patients who underwent cervical spine surgery at any level(s) from C2 to C7, inclusive; were over 18 years of age; and experienced a postoperative PMC. Thirteen patients (0.08%) developed a postoperative PMC, 6 (46.2%) of whom were female. They had an average age of 48.2 years and stayed in hospital a mean of 11.2 days. Three patients were current smokers, 3 previous smokers, 5 had never smoked, and 2 had unknown smoking status. The majority, 10 (76.9%), were associated with posterior surgery, whereas 3 (23.1%) occurred after an anterior procedure. Myelopathy was the most common indication for operations that were complicated by PMC (46%). Seven patients (53%) required a surgical procedure to address the PMC, whereas the remaining 6 were treated conservatively. All PMCs ultimately resolved or were successfully treated with no residual effects. PMC is a rare complication of cervical surgery with an incidence of less than 0.1%. They prolong hospital stay. PMCs occurred more frequently in association with posterior approaches. Approximately half of PMCs required surgery and all ultimately resolved without residual neurologic or other long-term effects.

  18. Correlation of plain radiographic and lumbar myelographic findings with surgical findings in thoracolumbar disc disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldby, N.J.; Dyce, J.; Houlton, J.E.F.

    1994-01-01

    The results of a prospective study to compare the plain radiographic and lumbar myelographic findings with the surgical findings in 70 cases of suspected thoracolumbar disc protrusion in the dog are reported. The aim was to assess the relative accuracy of disc lesion localisation using plain and contrast radiography. From the plain radiographs, the affected disc space was correctly identified in 40 cases (57.1 per cent), and incorrectly identified in seven. More than one site was identified in 11; in eight of these dogs, the affected disc space was strongly suspected. It was not possible to identify an affected disc in 12 cases. The site of disc protrusion was accurately identified by myelography in 60 dogs (85.7 per cent). In four dogs, myelography was helpful in identifying an adjacent disc and, in a further two, cord swelling was found at surgery. In one dog, neither disc material nor cord swelling was identified. Three myelograms were non-diagnostic

  19. Prediction of Deformity Correction by Pedicle Screw Instrumentation in Thoracolumbar Scoliosis Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriyama, Yoshimori; Yamazaki, Nobutoshi; Nagura, Takeo; Matsumoto, Morio; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    In segmental pedicle screw instrumentation, the relationship between the combinations of pedicle screw placements and the degree of deformity correction was investigated with a three-dimensional rigid body and spring model. The virtual thoracolumbar scoliosis (Cobb’s angle of 47 deg.) was corrected using six different combinations of pedicle-screw placements. As a result, better correction in the axial rotation was obtained with the pedicle screws placed at or close to the apical vertebra than with the screws placed close to the end vertebrae, while the correction in the frontal plane was better with the screws close to the end vertebrae than with those close to the apical vertebra. Additionally, two screws placed in the convex side above and below the apical vertebra provided better correction than two screws placed in the concave side. Effective deformity corrections of scoliosis were obtained with the proper combinations of pedicle screw placements.

  20. Bilateral transtibial amputation with concomitant thoracolumbar vertebral collapse in a Sichuan earthquake survivor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Herman

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The devastating earthquake in Sichuan, China on 12 May 2008 left thousands of survivors requiring medical care and intensive rehabilitation. In view of this great demand, the Chinese Speaking Orthopaedic Society established the "Stand Tall" project to provide voluntary services to aid amputee victims in achieving total rehabilitation and social integration. This case report highlights the multidisciplinary rehabilitation of a girl who suffered thoracolumbar vertebral collapse and underwent bilateral transtibial amputation. The rehabilitation team was involved in all stages of the care process from the pre-operative phase, through amputation, into prosthetic training, and during her life thereafter. Despite this catastrophic event, early rehabilitation and specially designed bilateral prostheses allowed her a high level of functional ability. The joint efforts of the multidisciplinary team and the advancement of new technology have revolutionized the care process for amputees.

  1. Clinical practice of image-guided spine radiosurgery - results from an international research consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guckenberger Matthias

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal radiosurgery is a quickly evolving technique in the radiotherapy and neurosurgical communities. However, the methods of spine radiosurgery have not been standardized. This article describes the results of a survey about the methods of spine radiosurgery at five international institutions. Methods All institutions are members of the Elekta Spine Radiosurgery Research Consortium and have a dedicated research and clinical focus on image-guided radiosurgery. The questionnaire consisted of 75 items covering all major steps of spine radiosurgery. Results Strong agreement in the methods of spine radiosurgery was observed. In particular, similarities were observed with safety and quality assurance playing an important role in the methods of all institutions, cooperation between neurosurgeons and radiation oncologists in case selection, dedicated imaging for target- and organ-at-risk delineation, application of proper safety margins for the target volume and organs-at-risk, conformal planning and precise image-guided treatment delivery, and close clinical and radiological follow-up. In contrast, three major areas of uncertainty and disagreement were identified: 1 Indications and contra-indications for spine radiosurgery; 2 treatment dose and fractionation and 3 tolerance dose of the spinal cord. Conclusions Results of this study reflect the current practice of spine radiosurgery in large academic centers. Despite close agreement was observed in many steps of spine radiosurgery, further research in form of retrospective and especially prospective studies is required to refine the details of spinal radiosurgery in terms of safety and efficacy.

  2. Male Spine Motion During Coitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorkewicz, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. Repeated measures design. Objective. To describe male spine movement and posture characteristics during coitus and compare these characteristics across 5 common coital positions. Summary of Background Data. Exacerbation of pain during coitus due to coital movements and positions is a prevalent issue reported by low back pain patients. A biomechanical analysis of spine movements and postures during coitus has never been conducted. Methods. Ten healthy males and females engaged in coitus in the following preselected positions and variations: QUADRUPED, MISSIONARY, and SIDELYING. An optoelectronic motion capture system was used to measure 3-dimensional lumbar spine angles that were normalized to upright standing. To determine whether each coital position had distinct spine kinematic profiles, separate univariate general linear models, followed by Tukey's honestly significant difference post hoc analysis were used. The presentation of coital positions was randomized. Results. Both variations of QUADRUPED, mQUAD1 and mQUAD2, were found to have a significantly higher cycle speed than mSIDE (P = 0.043 and P = 0.034, respectively), mMISS1 (P = 0.003 and P = 0.002, respectively), and mMISS2 (P = 0.001 and P spine movement varied depending on the coital position; however, across all positions, the majority of the range of motion used was in flexion. Based on range of motion, the least-to-most recommended positions for a male flexion-intolerant patient are mSIDE, mMISS2, mQUAD2, mMISS1, and mQUAD1. Conclusion. Initial recommendations—which include specific coital positions to avoid, movement strategies, and role of the partner—were developed for male patients whose low back pain is exacerbated by specific motions and postures. Level of Evidence: N/A PMID:25208042

  3. Spine Metastases in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Yu. Stolyarova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose and the objectives of the study were to determine the incidence of metastatic lesions to various parts of the spine, the assessment of the association with other clinical signs of lung cancer (localization, form, histology, degree of differentiation, staging, nature of extraosseous metastasis, to investigate the effect of these parameters on the survi­val of the patients. Material and methods. The study included 1071 patients with lung cancer aged 24 to 86 years. None of the examined patients has been operated previously for lung cancer, and after arriving at a diagnosis, all patients received radiation therapy, 73 % of them — combined radiochemothe­rapy. Results. Metastasis in the vertebral bodies and vertebral joints occurs in 13 % of patients with lung cancer and in 61 % of patients with bone form of the disease, the ratio of the defeat of thoracic, sacral, lumbar and cervical spine was 6 : 4 : 2 : 1. The development of metastases in the spine is mostly associa­ted with the localization of the tumor in the upper lobe of the lung, the peripheral form of the disease, with non-small cell histologic variants (adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. The number of metastases in the spinal column directly correlates with the degree of metastatic involvement of the inguinal lymph nodes, abdominal wall and the liver, has an impact on the invasion of lung tumor into the esophagus and the trachea. The life expectancy of the deceased persons with spine metastases is less than that of other patients with the lung cancer, but the overall survival rate in these groups of patients is not very different. Conclusions. Clinical features of lung cancer with metastases in the spine necessitate the development of medical technology of rational radiochemotherapy in such patients.

  4. Evaluation of the cervical spine in the polytrauma patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M B; Kronlage, S C; Carboni, P A; Robert, K Q; Menmuir, B; Ricciardi, J E; Chutkan, N B

    2000-11-15

    Two-part study. Part One: the analysis of surveys distributed to members of the Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA) and 1000 surgeon members of NASS. Part Two: a prospective clinical study evaluating a new algorithm to evaluate the cervical spine in polytrauma patients. To determine if there is a consensus of the optimal method for "clearing the cervical spine"; to assess the safety and efficacy of a newly proposed algorithm. There is no uniformly accepted algorithm for "clearing the cervical spine" in the polytrauma patient or those patients with altered mental status secondary to the influence of alcohol, drugs or a closed head injury. All members of the OTA and 1000 surgeon members of NASS were sent questionnaires to assess their methods of "clearing the cervical spine" in the polytrauma patient. Their answers were collated, analyzed and compared to standard ATLS protocol guidelines. A new protocol, which includes a surgeon, controlled stretch test and flouroscopically visualized flexion-extension views, was initiated and evaluated for safety and efficacy. Fifty-five percent of the members of the OTA and 31% of the NASS surgeons responded to the questionnaire. Among the responses from the NASS members, the ratio of orthopaedic spine surgeons to neurosurgeons accurately parallels the society's membership (77% ortho, 23% neuro). Sixty-nine of the OTA and 54% of the NASS responders replied that they followed ATLS guidelines. Analysis of their responses showed only 40% compliance. Eighty-one percent of the OTA respondents utilize the standard three view cervical spine trauma series, only 31% of the NASS members adhere to this guideline. Nearly 90% of all respondents identified the presence of neck pain or retropharygeal soft tissue swelling as an indicator to expand their initial radiographic evaluation. There was no consensus as to management of the polytrauma patient with a closed head injury. Eighty-two percent of all respondents has seen or treated a purely

  5. Multidimensional Analysis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Early Impairment in Thoracic and Thoracolumbar Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabray, Marc C.; Whetstone, William D.; Dhall, Sanjay S.; Phillips, David B.; Pan, Jonathan Z.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Beattie, Michael S.; Haefeli, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Literature examining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in acute spinal cord injury (SCI) has focused on cervical SCI. Reproducible systems have been developed for MRI-based grading; however, it is unclear how they apply to thoracic SCI. Our hypothesis is that MRI measures will group as coherent multivariate principal component (PC) ensembles, and that distinct PCs and individual variables will show discriminant validity for predicting early impairment in thoracic SCI. We undertook a retrospective cohort study of 25 patients with acute thoracic SCI who underwent MRI on admission and had American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) assessment at hospital discharge. Imaging variables of axial grade, sagittal grade, length of injury, thoracolumbar injury classification system (TLICS), maximum canal compromise (MCC), and maximum spinal cord compression (MSCC) were collected. We performed an analytical workflow to detect multivariate PC patterns followed by explicit hypothesis testing to predict AIS at discharge. All imaging variables loaded positively on PC1 (64.3% of variance), which was highly related to AIS at discharge. MCC, MSCC, and TLICS also loaded positively on PC2 (22.7% of variance), while variables concerning cord signal abnormality loaded negatively on PC2. PC2 was highly related to the patient undergoing surgical decompression. Variables of signal abnormality were all negatively correlated with AIS at discharge with the highest level of correlation for axial grade as assessed with the Brain and Spinal Injury Center (BASIC) score. A multiple variable model identified BASIC as the only statistically significant predictor of AIS at discharge, signifying that BASIC best captured the variance in AIS within our study population. Our study provides evidence of convergent validity, construct validity, and clinical predictive validity for the sampled MRI measures of SCI when applied in acute thoracic and thoracolumbar SCI. PMID:26414451

  6. [The un-healing cause of its management after operation of thoracolumbar tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Jun; Lai, Zhen; Bi, Dawei; Shen, Jian; Wei, Wei

    2013-06-01

    To analyze the un-healing cause and management after operation of thoracolumbar tuberculosis. From January 2008 to December 2011, the data of 12 patients with postoperative un-healing thoracolumbar tuberculosis were retrospectively analyzed. There were 5 males and 7 females, with an average age of 51.3 years old (ranged, 42 to 65). All the patients occurred different degree of vertebral destruction, abscess-formation, kyphosis and nerve functional injury at the first operation. Among them, 11 patients underwent debridement and fusion with autogenous iliac bone grafting and internal fixation, 1 patient underwent debridement and fusion with autogenous iliac bone grafting. At 2-6 months after operation, internal fixation loosening, fusion failure, abscess-ormation, or erythrocyte sedimentation rate increasing occurred in the patients. For the patients to adjust anti-tuberculosis scheme, 2 patients were treated with puncture to multiple abscess combining with rifampicin local injection; 10 patients were reoperated with debridement and internal fixation adjusting. At 1-2.5 years (mean 1.8 years) after follow-up, 9 cases were cured finally. Re-admission had 3 cases because of re-occurred erythrocyte sedimentation rate increasing and abscess-formation at the 2-4 months after operation, whose bacterial culture showed more than 2 kinds of drug fast, and the treatment effect was still not ideal after adjusting anti-tuberculosis scheme. Insufficient anti-tuberculosis and bad nutritional status before operation,incomplete debridement and unreasonable fixation style during operation, inadequate drainage, irregular anti-tuberculosis and drug fast of Bacillus tuberculosis after operation are main reasons leading to un-healing of tuberculosis. Therefore, actively improving malnutrition, making individual operation plan before operation, ensuring complete debridement, rebuilding spinal stability, removing the compression of spinal cord, combining with postoperative effective

  7. Correlation of outcome measures with epidemiological factors in thoracolumbar spinal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upendra Bidre

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The epidemiological data of a given population on spinal trauma in India is lacking. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the profile of patients with thoracolumbar fractures in a tertiary care hospital in an urban setup. Materials and Methods : Four hundred forty patients with thoracolumbar spinal injuries admitted from January 1990 to May 2000 to the All India Institute of Medical Sciences were included in the analysis. Both retrospective data retrieval and prospective data evaluation of patients were done from January 1998 to May 2000. Epidemiological factors like age, sex and type of injury, mode of transport, time of reporting and number of transfers before admission were recorded. Frankel′s grading was used to assess neurological status. Functional assessment of all patients was done using the FIM™ instrument (Functional Independence Measure. Average follow-up was 33 months (24-41 months. Results : Of the 440 patients, females comprised 17.95% (n=79, while 82.04% (n=361 were males. As many as 40.9% (n=180 of them were in the third decade. Fall from height remained the most common cause 52.3% (n=230. Two hundred sixty (59.1% patients reported within 48 hours. Thirty-two (7.27% patients had single transfer, and all 32 showed complete independence for mobility at final follow-up. 100 of 260 (38.5% patients reporting within 48 hours developed pressure sores, while 114 of 142 (80.28% patients reporting after 5 days developed pressure sores. Conclusion : The present study highlights the magnitude of the problems of our trauma-care and transport system and the difference an effective system can make in the care of spinal injury patients. There is an urgent need for epidemiological data on a larger scale to emphasize the need for a better trauma-care system and pave way for adaptation of well-established trauma-care systems from developed countries.

  8. Classification-related approach in the surgical treatment of thoracolumbar fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas R

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Advanced diagnostic tools, classification systems and accordingly selected surgical approaches are essential requirements for the prevention of failure of surgical treatment of thoracolumbar fractures. The present study is designed to evaluate the contribution of classification to the choice of a surgical approach using the current fracture classification systems. Materials and Methods: We studied prospectively a group of 64 patients (22 females, 42 males of an average age of 43 years, all operated on for thoracolumbar fractures during the year 2001. The AO-ASIF classification was used preoperatively with all imaging studies (X-ray, computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. When the damage was detected only in the anterior column (A type, an isolated anterior stabilization (n=22 was preferred. If the MRI study disclosed an injury in the posterior column, a posterior approach (n=20 using the internal fixator was chosen. Injuries involving the posterior column (B or C type were classified additionally according to the load-sharing classification (LSC. If LSC gave six or more points, treatment was completed with an anterior fusion.. The combined postero-anterior procedure was carried out 22 times.. The minimum follow-up period was 22 months. Results: Neither implant failure and nor significant loss of correction were observed in patients treated with anterior or combined procedures. The average loss of correction (increase of kyphosis in simple posterior stabilization was 3.1 degree. Conclusion: Complex fracture classification helps in the selection of the surgical approach and helps to decrease the chances of treatment failure.

  9. Imaging of cervical spine injuries of childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanna, Geetika; El-Khoury, Georges Y. [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, 3951 JPP, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Cervical spine injuries of children, though rare, have a high morbidity and mortality. The pediatric cervical spine is anatomically and biomechanically different from that of adults. Hence, the type, level and outcome of cervical spine injuries in children are different from those seen in adults. Normal developmental variants seen in children can make evaluation of the pediatric cervical spine challenging. This article reviews the epidemiology of pediatric cervical spine trauma, normal variants seen in children and specific injuries that are more common in the pediatric population. We also propose an evidence-based imaging protocol to avoid unnecessary imaging studies and minimize radiation exposure in children. (orig.)

  10. Physical rehabilitation of patients with lumbar spine dorsopathy at the hospital stage of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Максим Валериевич Манин

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work is an ascertainment of efficiency of the use of an offered way of the complex treatment of the lumbar spine dorsopathies at the hospital stage of treatment as the more effective one comparing to the standard method of the therapeutic physical training for patients with the lumbar spine dorsopathies. The object of research is the lumbar spine dorsopathies. The subject of research is the dynamics of the painful and musculo-tonic syndromes, mobility, degrees of the functional blocking of spine.Methods of research: questioning and interrogation, functional assays of the spine mobility, manual examination. 30 persons with lumbar spine dorsopathies with neurological manifestations took part in the research. 15 patients who underwent extended method of therapeutic physical training (TPT including the way of the complex treatment of the lumbar spine dopsopathies formed the main group. 15 persons who underwent the TPT by the standard method formed the control group. Results, received in testing the dynamics of indicators of the spine mobility blocking, painful, musculo-tonic syndrome at the end of physical rehabilitation reliably demonstrate the more significant increase of results in the main group comparing to the control one. It happened first of all due to the use of traction exercises, positions and traction massage that form the complex treatment of the lumbar spine dorsopathies.An offered way of the complex treatment of the lumbar spine dorsopathies had the more effective impact on an increase of the spine mobility, decrease of the painful syndrome comparing to the standard complex of physical rehabilitation. It gives the reasons to recommend this way for introduction into practice as the mean of special TPT at the hospital stage of treatment. 

  11. Aquatic antagonists: cutaneous sea urchin spine injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Clifford; Aronson, Erica R; Ruiz de Luzuriaga, Arlene M

    2016-11-01

    Injuries from sea urchin spines are commonly seen in coastal regions with high levels of participation in water activities. Although these injuries may seem minor, the consequences vary based on the location of the injury. Sea urchin spine injuries may cause arthritis and synovitis from spines in the joints. Nonjoint injuries have been reported, and dermatologic aspects of sea urchin spine injuries rarely have been discussed. We present a case of a patient with sea urchin spines embedded in the thigh who subsequently developed painful skin nodules. Tissue from the site of the injury demonstrated foreign-body type granulomas. Following the removal of the spines and granulomatous tissue, the patient experienced resolution of the nodules and associated pain. Extraction of sea urchin spines can attenuate the pain and decrease the likelihood of granuloma formation, infection, and long-term sequelae.

  12. Contemporary treatment with radiosurgery for spine metastasis and spinal cord compression in 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Sam Uel; Yoon, Han Hah; Stessin, Alexander; Gutman, Fred; Rosiello, Arthur; Davis, Raphael [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook (United States)

    2015-03-15

    With the progress of image-guided localization, body immobilization system, and computerized delivery of intensity-modulated radiation delivery, it became possible to perform spine radiosurgery. The next question is how to translate the high technology treatment to the clinical application. Clinical trials have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of spine radiosurgery and efficacy of the treatment in the setting of spine metastasis, leading to the randomized trials by a cooperative group. Radiosurgery has also demonstrated its efficacy to decompress the spinal cord compression in selected group of patients. The experience indicates that spine radiosurgery has a potential to change the clinical practice in the management of spine metastasis and spinal cord compression.

  13. Authorship Trends in Spine Publications from 2000 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haws, Brittany E; Khechen, Benjamin; Movassaghi, Kamran; Yom, Kelly H; Guntin, Jordan A; Cardinal, Kaitlyn L; Shoshana, Noah B; Singh, Kern

    2018-02-06

    Literature review. To examine changes in authorship characteristics for Spine publications from the year 2000-2015. Scientific publications are considered an indication of academic achievement for physicians. Recently, authorship trends have been investigated, however, limited information is available on this topic within spine-specific literature. Original research articles published in Spine in the years 2000, 2005, 2010, and 2015 were evaluated. Authorship characteristics were collected for each article, including the number of authors and institutions per publication, first and last author gender, publication origin, and highest degree held by the first and last author. Trends over time were analyzed using numeric and visual descriptive analyses including percentages, means, standard deviations, and graphs. An average of 506 articles per year were published in Spine during the years 2000, 2005, 2010, and 2015. The number of articles written by ≥ 10 authors increased during this time (0.9% to 14.4%). There was a substantial increase in the number of multiple institutional affiliations (33.6% to 68.7%) and articles originating from outside North America (47.6% to 55.7%) from 2000 to 2015. The percentage of first authors with bachelor's degrees was higher in 2015 (6.6%) as compared to 2000 (1.4%), and more last authors were identified as MD/PhDs in 2015 (19.2%) than in 2000 (10.0%). Similar female representation was noted for first and last authorship for all years evaluated. The results of this study demonstrate increases in authors per article published in Spine from 2000 to 2015. Additionally, first authors were more likely to hold bachelor's degrees over time. This may be attributed to increasing competition in spine-related fields, necessitating earlier research exposure to aid in academic achievement. Interestingly, the percentage of female authorship has not changed significantly over time, in contrast with much of the previous literature. 2.

  14. Passively morphing ornithopter wings constructed using a novel compliant spine: design and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wissa, A A; Hubbard Jr, J E; Tummala, Y; Frecker, M I

    2012-01-01

    Ornithopters or flapping wing uncrewed aerial vehicles (UAVs) have potential applications in civil and military sectors. Amongst the UAVs, ornithopters have a unique ability to fly in low Reynolds number flight regimes and also have the agility and maneuverability of rotary wing aircraft. In nature, birds achieve such performance by exploiting various wing kinematics known as gaits. The objective of this work is to improve the steady level flight performance of an ornithopter by implementing a continuous vortex gait using a novel passive compliant spine inserted in the ornithopter’s wings. This paper presents an optimal compliant spine concept for ornithopter applications. A quasi-static design optimization procedure was formulated to design the compliant spine. Finite element analysis was performed on a first generation spine and the spine was fabricated. This prototype was then tested by inserting it into an ornithopter’s wing leading edge spar. The effect of inserting the compliant spine into the wings on the electric power required, the aerodynamic loads and the wing kinematics was studied. The ornithopter with the compliant spines inserted in its wings consumed 45% less power and produced an additional 16% of its weight in mean lift compared to the same ornithopter without the compliant spine. The results indicate that this passive morphing approach is promising for improved steady level flight performance. (paper)

  15. Age-Based Comparison of Human Dendritic Spine Structure Using Complete Three-Dimensional Reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; Robles, Victor; Yuste, Rafael; DeFelipe, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons are targets of most excitatory synapses in the cerebral cortex. Recent evidence suggests that the morphology of the dendritic spine could determine its synaptic strength and learning rules. However, unfortunately, there are scant data available regarding the detailed morphology of these structures for the human cerebral cortex. In the present study, we analyzed over 8900 individual dendritic spines that were completely 3D reconstructed along the length of apical and basal dendrites of layer III pyramidal neurons in the cingulate cortex of 2 male humans (aged 40 and 85 years old), using intracellular injections of Lucifer Yellow in fixed tissue. We assembled a large, quantitative database, which revealed a major reduction in spine densities in the aged case. Specifically, small and short spines of basal dendrites and long spines of apical dendrites were lost, regardless of the distance from the soma. Given the age difference between the cases, our results suggest selective alterations in spines with aging in humans and indicate that the spine volume and length are regulated by different biological mechanisms. PMID:22710613

  16. The anatomy of the bifurcated neural spine and its occurrence within Tetrapoda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, D Cary

    2014-09-01

    Vertebral neural spine bifurcation has been historically treated as largely restrictive to sauropodomorph dinosaurs; wherein it is inferred to be an adaptation in response to the increasing weight from the horizontally extended cervical column. Because no extant terrestrial vertebrates have massive, horizontally extended necks, extant forms with large cranial masses were examined for the presence of neural spine bifurcation. Here, I report for the first time on the soft tissue surrounding neural spine bifurcation in a terrestrial quadruped through the dissection of three Ankole-Watusi cattle. With horns weighing up to a combined 90 kg, the Ankole-Watusi is unlike any other breed of cattle in terms of cranial weight and presence of neural spine bifurcation. Using the Ankole-Watusi as a model, it appears that neural spine bifurcation plays a critical role in supporting a large mobile weight adjacent to the girdles. In addition to neural spine bifurcation being recognized within nonavian dinosaurs, this vertebral feature is also documented within many members of temnospondyls, captorhinids, seymouriamorphs, diadectomorphs, Aves, marsupials, artiodactyls, perissodactyls, and Primates, amongst others. This phylogenetic distribution indicates that spine bifurcation is more common than previously thought, and that this vertebral adaptation has contributed throughout the evolutionary history of tetrapods. Neural spine bifurcation should now be recognized as an anatomical component adapted by some vertebrates to deal with massive, horizontal, mobile weights adjacent the girdles. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Structural Plasticity of Dendritic Spines Requires GSK3α and GSK3β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cymerman, Iwona A; Gozdz, Agata; Urbanska, Malgorzata; Milek, Jacek; Dziembowska, Magdalena; Jaworski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Although memories appear to be elusive phenomena, they are stored in the network of physical connections between neurons. Dendritic spines, which are actin-rich dendritic protrusions, serve as the contact points between networked neurons. The spines' shape contributes to the strength of signal transmission. To acquire and store information, dendritic spines must remain plastic, i.e., able to respond to signals, by changing their shape. We asked whether glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) 3α and GSK3β, which are implicated in diseases with neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as Alzheimer's disease, bipolar disease and schizophrenia, play a role in a spine structural plasticity. We used Latrunculin B, an actin polymerization inhibitor, and chemically induced Long-Term Depression to trigger fast spine shape remodeling in cultured hippocampal neurons. Spine shrinkage induced by either stimulus required GSK3α activity. GSK3β activity was only important for spine structural changes after treatment with Latrunculin B. Our results indicate that GSK3α is an essential component for short-term spine structural plasticity. This specific function should be considered in future studies of neurodegenerative diseases and neuropsychiatric conditions that originate from suboptimal levels of GSK3α/β activity.

  18. Structural Plasticity of Dendritic Spines Requires GSK3α and GSK3β.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona A Cymerman

    Full Text Available Although memories appear to be elusive phenomena, they are stored in the network of physical connections between neurons. Dendritic spines, which are actin-rich dendritic protrusions, serve as the contact points between networked neurons. The spines' shape contributes to the strength of signal transmission. To acquire and store information, dendritic spines must remain plastic, i.e., able to respond to signals, by changing their shape. We asked whether glycogen synthase kinase (GSK 3α and GSK3β, which are implicated in diseases with neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as Alzheimer's disease, bipolar disease and schizophrenia, play a role in a spine structural plasticity. We used Latrunculin B, an actin polymerization inhibitor, and chemically induced Long-Term Depression to trigger fast spine shape remodeling in cultured hippocampal neurons. Spine shrinkage induced by either stimulus required GSK3α activity. GSK3β activity was only important for spine structural changes after treatment with Latrunculin B. Our results indicate that GSK3α is an essential component for short-term spine structural plasticity. This specific function should be considered in future studies of neurodegenerative diseases and neuropsychiatric conditions that originate from suboptimal levels of GSK3α/β activity.

  19. Posterior instrumentation, anterior column reconstruction with single posterior approach for treatment of pyogenic osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorensek, M; Kosak, R; Travnik, L; Vengust, R

    2013-03-01

    Surgical treatment of thoracolumbar osteomyelitis consists of radical debridement, reconstruction of anterior column either with or without posterior stabilization. The objective of present study is to evaluate a case series of patients with osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine treated by single, posterior approach with posterior instrumentation and anterior column reconstruction. Seventeen patients underwent clinical and radiological evaluation pre and postoperatively with latest follow-up at 19 months (8-56 months) after surgery. Parameters assessed were site of infection, causative organism, angle of deformity, blood loss, duration of surgery, ICU stay, deformity correction, time to solid bony fusion, ambulatory status, neurologic status (ASIA impairment scale), and functional outcome (Kirkaldy-Willis criteria). Mean operating time was 207 min and average blood loss 1,150 ml. Patients spent 2 (1-4) days in ICU and were able to walk unaided 1.6 (1-2) days after surgery. Infection receded in all 17 patients postoperatively. Solid bony fusion occurred in 15 out of 17 patients (88 %) on average 6.3 months after surgery. Functional outcome was assessed as excellent or good in 82 % of cases. Average deformity correction was 8 (1-18) degrees, with loss of correction of 4 (0-19) degrees at final follow-up. Single, posterior approach addressing both columns poses safe alternative in treatment of pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine. It proved to be less invasive resulting in faster postoperative recovery.

  20. Characteristic MRI and MR Myelography Findings for the Facet Cyst Hematoma at T12-L1 Spine: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Seung Eun; Lee, Sang Ho; Kim, Tae Hong; Choi, Gun; Paeng, Sung Suk

    2011-01-01

    A facet cyst is a very rare condition in the thoracolumbar spine and more so, hemorrhage into a cyst is extremely rare. We present a case of a facet cyst hematoma in the T12-L1 spine. A 69-year-old woman complained of chronic back pain with right lower extremity pain, and weakness for 3 years. MRI and MR myelography showed an extradural mass at the T12-L1 level with heterogeneous signal intensity on both T1-and T2-weighted images, which was continuous to the right T12-L1 facet joint. The neighboring facet joint showed severe degeneration on the CT scan. The mass a was simple hematoma covered with a thin fibrous membrane and connected with facet joint macroscopically and microscopically. The pathogenesis of the facet cyst hematoma is not clear but it can compress nerve roots or dura mater and cause radiculopathy or cauda equina syndrome. Surgical removal should be recommended for symptomatic relief.

  1. Characteristic MRI and MR Myelography Findings for the Facet Cyst Hematoma at T12-L1 Spine: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Seung Eun [Dept of Diagnostic Radiology, Wooridul Spine Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Ho [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Wooridul Spine Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hong [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Gun [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Seoul Wooridul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paeng, Sung Suk [Dept of Radiology, Wooridul Spine Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    A facet cyst is a very rare condition in the thoracolumbar spine and more so, hemorrhage into a cyst is extremely rare. We present a case of a facet cyst hematoma in the T12-L1 spine. A 69-year-old woman complained of chronic back pain with right lower extremity pain, and weakness for 3 years. MRI and MR myelography showed an extradural mass at the T12-L1 level with heterogeneous signal intensity on both T1-and T2-weighted images, which was continuous to the right T12-L1 facet joint. The neighboring facet joint showed severe degeneration on the CT scan. The mass a was simple hematoma covered with a thin fibrous membrane and connected with facet joint macroscopically and microscopically. The pathogenesis of the facet cyst hematoma is not clear but it can compress nerve roots or dura mater and cause radiculopathy or cauda equina syndrome. Surgical removal should be recommended for symptomatic relief.

  2. Fetal evaluation of spine dysraphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulas, Dorothy [George Washington University Medical Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Spinal dysraphism or neural tube defects (NTD) encompass a heterogeneous group of congenital spinal anomalies that result from the defective closure of the neural tube early in gestation with anomalous development of the caudal cell mass. Advances in ultrasound and MRI have dramatically improved the diagnosis and therapy of spinal dysraphism and caudal spinal anomalies both prenatally and postnatally. Advances in prenatal US including high frequency linear transducers and three dimensional imaging can provide detailed information concerning spinal anomalies. MR imaging is a complementary tool that can further elucidate spine abnormalities as well as associated central nervous system and non-CNS anomalies. Recent studies have suggested that 3-D CT can help further assess fetal spine anomalies in the third trimester. With the advent of fetal therapy including surgery, accurate prenatal diagnosis of open and closed spinal dysraphism becomes critical in appropriate counselling and perinatal management. (orig.)

  3. Multilevel noncontiguous cervical spine injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adetunji Mapaderun Toluse

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report highlights the successful combination of operative and nonoperative management of a patient with noncontiguous cervical spine fractures and incomplete spinal cord injury. A case report of a 40-year-old male victim of a motor vehicular accident who presented with noncontiguous cervical spine fractures (Anderson and D'Alonzo Type III odontoid fracture and traumatic spondylolisthesis of C4/C5 and incomplete spinal cord injury. The odontoid fracture was managed nonoperatively, whereas anterior cervical discectomy and fusion were done at the C4/C5 vertebral level. The patient made full neurologic recovery with radiologic evidence of successful fusion and fracture healing at 12 weeks postoperation in both levels of injuries. Operative and nonoperative modalities can be utilized to manage selected patients.

  4. NMR imaging of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, J.S. (Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH); Kaufman, B.; El Yousef, S.J.; Benson, J.E.; Bonstelle, C.T.; Alfidi, R.J.; Haaga, J.R.; Yeung, H.; Huss, R.G.

    1983-12-01

    The usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images in the evaluation of spinal disorders below the craniocervical junction was studied. Six normal subjects and 41 patients with various spinal abnormalities were examined. NMR proved capable of demonstrating important normal and pathologic anatomic structures; it was useful in the evaluation of syringohydromyelia and cystic spinal cord tumors, and the bright signal intensity of lipoma was quite impressive. In the evaluation of herniated disk, NMR images offered a new perspective by visualizing abnormal degradation of the signal intensity of the nucleus pulposus itself. NMR images were least valuable in the evaluation of spondylosis and spinal stenosis. Although NMR imaging of the spine is still in a very early developmental stage, the absence of both ionizing radiation and risks associated with contrast material makes it especially attractive as a new diagnostic method. This limited experience with currently available equipment suggests that, with technical refinement, the efficacy of NMR of the spine will increase.

  5. MRI of the fetal spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, Erin M.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal spine is a vital complement to fetal sonographic examination. Assessing the wide spectrum of spinal dysraphism, as well as spinal neoplasia, allows for more correct prenatal diagnoses, patient care planning, and patient counselling. Proper appraisal of the value of experimental procedures, such as fetal myelomeningocoele repair, requires a high level of diagnostic accuracy for the selection and follow-up of appropriate candidates. (orig.)

  6. Heterogeneity of spine bone density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskey, M.A.; Crisp, A.J.; Compston, J.E.; Khaw, K.-T. (Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom))

    1993-05-01

    This short communication investigates how accurate bone density measured in the lumbar spine (L1-L4 or L2-L4) reflects the bone density of vertebrae where many compression fractures occur (T12 and L1). The ability of two dual-energy X-ray absorptiometers (Lunar DPX and Hologic QDR-1000) to determine the bone density of T12 was also investigated. (Author).

  7. MRI of the fetal spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Erin M. [Departement of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal spine is a vital complement to fetal sonographic examination. Assessing the wide spectrum of spinal dysraphism, as well as spinal neoplasia, allows for more correct prenatal diagnoses, patient care planning, and patient counselling. Proper appraisal of the value of experimental procedures, such as fetal myelomeningocoele repair, requires a high level of diagnostic accuracy for the selection and follow-up of appropriate candidates. (orig.)

  8. Sensory findings after stimulation of the thoracolumbar fascia with hypertonic saline suggest its contribution to low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilder, Andreas; Hoheisel, Ulrich; Magerl, Walter; Benrath, Justus; Klein, Thomas; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2014-02-01

    Injection of hypertonic saline into deep tissues of the back (subcutis, muscle, or the surrounding fascia) can induce acute low back pain (LBP). So far, no study has analyzed differences in temporal, qualitative, and spatial pain characteristics originating from these tissues. The current study aimed to investigate the role of the thoracolumbar fascia as a potential source of LBP. In separate sessions, 12 healthy subjects received ultrasound-guided bolus injections of isotonic saline (0.9%) or hypertonic saline (5.8%) into the erector spinae muscle, the thoracolumbar fascia (posterior layer), and the overlying subcutis. Subjects were asked to rate pain intensity, duration, quality, and spatial extent. Pressure pain thresholds were determined pre and post injection. Injections of hypertonic saline into the fascia resulted in significantly larger area under the curve of pain intensity over time than injections into subcutis (Pfascia or subcutis. Pain radiation and pain affect evoked by fascia injection exceeded those of the muscle (Pfascia injection (burning, throbbing, and stinging) suggested innervation by both A- and C-fiber nociceptors. These findings show that the thoracolumbar fascia is the deep tissue of the back that is most sensitive to chemical stimulation, making it a prime candidate to contribute to nonspecific LBP but not to localized pressure hyperalgesia. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Transforaminal decompression and interbody fusion in the treatment of thoracolumbar fracture and dislocation with spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Min Wu

    Full Text Available A retrospective clinical study.To evaluate the efficacy and safety of transforaminal decompression and interbody fusion in the treatment of thoracolumbar fracture and dislocation with spinal cord injury.Twenty-six spinal cord injured patients with thoracolumbar fracture and dislocation were treated by transforaminal decompression and interbody fusion. The operation time, intraoperative blood loss, and complications were recorded; the Cobb angle and compressive rate (CR of the anterior height of two adjacent vertebrae were measured; and the nerve injury was assessed according to sensory scores and motor scores of the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA standards for neurological classification of spinal cord injury.The operative time was 250±57 min, and intraoperative blood loss was 440±168 ml. Cerebrospinal leakage was detected and repaired during the operation in two patients. A total of 24 of 26 patients were followed up for more than 2 years. ASIA sensory scores and motor scores were improved significantly at 3 months and 6 months after operation; the Cobb angle and CR of the anterior height of two adjacent vertebrae were corrected and showed a significant difference at post-operation; and the values were maintained at 3 months after operation and the last follow-up.We showed that transforaminal decompression together with interbody fusion is an alternative method to treat thoracolumbar fracture and dislocation.

  10. Maxillofacial trauma - Underestimation of cervical spine injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Waldemar; Surov, Alexey; Eckert, Alexander Walter

    2016-09-01

    Undiagnosed cervical spine injury can have devastating results. The aim of this study was to analyse patients with primary maxillofacial trauma and a concomitant cervical spine injury. It is hypothetised that cervical spine injury is predictable in maxillofacial surgery. A monocentric clinical study was conducted over a 10-year period to analyse patients with primary maxillofacial and associated cervical spine injuries. Demographic data, mechanism of injury, specific trauma and treatments provided were reviewed. Additionally a search of relevant international literature was conducted in PubMed by terms "maxillofacial" AND "cervical spine" AND "injury". Of 3956 patients, n = 3732 (94.3%) suffered from craniomaxillofacial injuries only, n = 174 (4.4%) from cervical spine injuries only, and n = 50 (1.3%) from both craniomaxillofacial and cervical spine injuries. In this study cohort the most prevalent craniofacial injuries were: n = 41 (44%) midfacial and n = 21 (22.6%) skull base fractures. Cervical spine injuries primarily affected the upper cervical spine column: n = 39 (58.2%) vs. n = 28 (41.8%). Only in 3 of 50 cases (6%), the cervical spine injury was diagnosed coincidentally, and the cervical spine column was under immobilised. The operative treatment rate for maxillofacial injuries was 36% (n = 18), and for cervical spine injuries 20% (n = 10). The overall mortality rate was 8% (n = 4). The literature search yielded only 12 papers (11 retrospective and monocentric cohort studies) and is discussed before our own results. In cases of apparently isolated maxillofacial trauma, maxillofacial surgeons should be aware of a low but serious risk of underestimating an unstable cervical spine injury. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Risk Factors and Compression and Kyphosis Rates after 1 Year in Patients with AO type A Thoracic, Thoracolumbar, and Lumbar Fractures Treated Conservatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzey, Feyza Karagoz; Eren, Burak; Tufan, Azmi; Aktas, Ozgur; Isler, Cihan; Vatansever, Mustafa; Tas, Abdurrahim; Cetin, Eyup; Yucel, Murat; Ornek, Mustafa

    2018-01-01

    Conservative treatment is a frequently used treatment modality for traumatic thoracolumbar fractures. However, not many studies evaluating radiological and clinical results of conservative treatment are found. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors, and compression and kyphosis rates after 1 year in patients with AO type A thoracic, thoracolumbar, and lumbar fractures treated conservatively. Radiological and clinical results of 79 thoracolumbar fractures in 57 patients, who were treated conservatively, were evaluated one year after trauma. Fractures were classified according to thoracolumbar injury classification and severity (TLICS) score and AO spinal trauma classification system. Compression rate, wedge and kyphosis angles, and sagittal index were calculated in early and late periods after trauma. Female/male ratio was 25/32, and mean age was 41.7±16.7 years. They were followed for 15.2±4.9 months. Mean compression rates were 19.6% and 25.2%; wedge angles were 10.1 and 12.7 degrees; kyphosis angles were 5.82 and 8.9 degrees; and sagittal indexes were 8.01 and 10.13 in all patients just after trauma and after one year, respectively. Fractures in older patients ( > 60 years of age) and in patients with osteopenia or osteoporosis, located in the thoracolumbar junction, AO type A2 and A3 fractures, and solitary fractures had higher compression and kyphosis rates at last follow-up. Early mobilization without bed rest for stable thoracolumbar fractures according to the TLICS system is a good treatment option, and radiological and clinical results are usually acceptable. However, fractures in patients older than 60 years, those with osteoporosis or osteopenia, fractures located in the thoracolumbar junction, solitary fractures, and fractures in AO type A2 or A3, are more inclined to increase in compression and kyphosis and may require a closer follow-up.

  12. Multilevel brown tumors of the spine in a patient with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Daniela; Muresan, Simona; Muresan, Mircea; Neagoe, Radu

    2016-03-31

    The brown tumour is an extreme form of osteitis fibrosa cystica, representing a serious complication of the advanced primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism. It occurs in settings of high levels parathyroid hormone, like in primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism, with a frequency of 3-4% and 1.5-13% respectively, usually affecting young people. The authors report a case of a 45 years old woman on long-term hemodialysis, with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism. The main clinical complaints were neck pain, lower thoraco-lumbar back pain, persistent left groin pain, and bilateral lower extremities weakness. The computed tomography scan revealed multiple spine brown tumors affecting the cervical, thoracic and lumbar level. After an initial partial response to the treatment of two years with Cinacalcet, a deterioration of the secondary hyperparathyroidism occurred (hypercalcemia, hyperphosphatemia) and the patient was referred for parathyroidectomy. The patient underwent total parathyroidectomy with auto-transplantation, with a positive postoperative result. Secondary hyperparathyroidism can lead, during its course, to osteolytic bone lesions called brown tumors. If the medical treatment fails, the surgical removal of the parathyroid glands with autotransplant remains the only treatment of the bone lesions progression. Reviewing the relevant literature in English (until March 2015), we found 24 cases of symptomatic vertebral brown tumors. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case which describes a multilevel spine involvement (more than two), and the fifth describing a cervical localization. Hypocalcaemia, Secondary hyperparathyroidism, Spine brown tumors.

  13. Microscope sterility during spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jesse E; O'Neill, Kevin R; Crosby, Colin G; Schoenecker, Jonathan G; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2012-04-01

    Prospective study. Assess the contamination rates of sterile microscope drapes after spine surgery. The use of the operating microscope has become more prevalent in certain spine procedures, providing superior magnification, visualization, and illumination of the operative field. However, it may represent an additional source of bacterial contamination and increase the risk of developing a postoperative infection. This study included 25 surgical spine cases performed by a single spine surgeon that required the use of the operative microscope. Sterile culture swabs were used to obtain samples from 7 defined locations on the microscope drape after its use during the operation. The undraped technician's console was sampled in each case as a positive control, and an additional 25 microscope drapes were swabbed immediately after they were applied to the microscope to obtain negative controls. Swab samples were assessed for bacterial growth on 5% sheep blood Columbia agar plates using a semiquantitative technique. No growth was observed on any of the 25 negative control drapes. In contrast, 100% of preoperative and 96% of postoperative positive controls demonstrated obvious contamination. In the postoperative group, all 7 sites of evaluation were found to be contaminated with rates of 12% to 44%. Four of the 7 evaluated locations were found to have significant contamination rates compared with negative controls, including the shafts of the optic eyepieces on the main surgeon side (24%, P = 0.022), "forehead" portion on both the main surgeon (24%, P = 0.022) and assistant sides (28%, P = 0.010), and "overhead" portion of the drape (44%, P = 0.0002). Bacterial contamination of the operative microscope was found to be significant after spine surgery. Contamination was more common around the optic eyepieces, likely due to inadvertent touching of unsterile portions. Similarly, all regions above the eyepieces also have a propensity for contamination because of unknown contact

  14. Ocean acidification impacts spine integrity but not regenerative capacity of spines and tube feet in adult sea urchins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Chloe E; Reinardy, Helena C; Bates, Nicholas R; Bodnar, Andrea G

    2017-05-01

    Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) has resulted in a change in seawater chemistry and lowering of pH, referred to as ocean acidification. Understanding how different organisms and processes respond to ocean acidification is vital to predict how marine ecosystems will be altered under future scenarios of continued environmental change. Regenerative processes involving biomineralization in marine calcifiers such as sea urchins are predicted to be especially vulnerable. In this study, the effect of ocean acidification on regeneration of external appendages (spines and tube feet) was investigated in the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus exposed to ambient (546 µatm), intermediate (1027 µatm) and high (1841 µatm) partial pressure of CO 2 ( p CO 2 ) for eight weeks. The rate of regeneration was maintained in spines and tube feet throughout two periods of amputation and regrowth under conditions of elevated p CO 2 . Increased expression of several biomineralization-related genes indicated molecular compensatory mechanisms; however, the structural integrity of both regenerating and homeostatic spines was compromised in high p CO 2 conditions. Indicators of physiological fitness (righting response, growth rate, coelomocyte concentration and composition) were not affected by increasing p CO 2 , but compromised spine integrity is likely to have negative consequences for defence capabilities and therefore survival of these ecologically and economically important organisms.

  15. Ocean acidification impacts spine integrity but not regenerative capacity of spines and tube feet in adult sea urchins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Chloe E.; Reinardy, Helena C.; Bates, Nicholas R.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) has resulted in a change in seawater chemistry and lowering of pH, referred to as ocean acidification. Understanding how different organisms and processes respond to ocean acidification is vital to predict how marine ecosystems will be altered under future scenarios of continued environmental change. Regenerative processes involving biomineralization in marine calcifiers such as sea urchins are predicted to be especially vulnerable. In this study, the effect of ocean acidification on regeneration of external appendages (spines and tube feet) was investigated in the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus exposed to ambient (546 µatm), intermediate (1027 µatm) and high (1841 µatm) partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) for eight weeks. The rate of regeneration was maintained in spines and tube feet throughout two periods of amputation and regrowth under conditions of elevated pCO2. Increased expression of several biomineralization-related genes indicated molecular compensatory mechanisms; however, the structural integrity of both regenerating and homeostatic spines was compromised in high pCO2 conditions. Indicators of physiological fitness (righting response, growth rate, coelomocyte concentration and composition) were not affected by increasing pCO2, but compromised spine integrity is likely to have negative consequences for defence capabilities and therefore survival of these ecologically and economically important organisms. PMID:28573022

  16. May "Dubel" be a solution for pullout problem of the pedicle screws at osteoporotic spine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Ertugrul; Eyuboglu, Eylem Eren; Yazar, Ugur; Gazioglu, Gurkan; Guvercin, Ali Riza; Baykal, Suleyman

    2014-01-01

    To improve the strength of stabilization systems currently used in osteoporotic spinal fractures, essentially by increasing the fixation force of pedicle screws. Six human cadaveric vertebrae were used. Bone mineral densities of the specimens were measured with Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry in order to assess the osteoporosis. All vertebrae were found to be severely osteoporotic. Standard pedicle screws were applied to left pedicles of vertebrae. Pedicle screws reinforced by fixing plugs "Dubel" were applied to right pedicles of vertebrae. Afterwards the vertebrae were embedded in acrylic casts to prevent possible fracture of the osteoporotic vertebrae and to obtain a correct vertical pull-out vector. The biomechanical pullout tests were performed with biomechanical testing machine. Pullout forces in each group were recorded and compared with Mann-Whitney U test. The pedicle screws strengthened by "Dubel" were found to be four times stronger than the standard pedicle screws, in the osteoporotic human cadaveric vertebrae. "Dubel"-augmented pedicle screws may contribute to developing better stabilization systems for osteoporotic thoracolumbar fractures needing surgery and in the revision of the previous fusion surgeries of the spine.

  17. Evaluation of the safety and reliability of the newly-proposed AO spine injury classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoub, Alexandre Rd; Joaquim, Andrei F; Ghizoni, Enrico; Tedeschi, Helder; Patel, Alpesh A

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and reliability of the new AO Classification, a recent classification system for Thoraco-Lumbar Spine Trauma (TLST). Retrospective study. We applied the new AO system in patients with TLST treated according to the TLICS. Two researchers classified injuries independently. Eight weeks later, the classification was repeated for intra and inter-observer agreement evaluation. To evaluate safety, we correlated the treatment performed based on the TLICS with the newer AO classification obtained. Fifty-four patients were included in this study, with a mean follow-up of 363.8 days. Twenty-three neurologically intact patients were initially treated conservatively. Their mean TLICS was 1.78 (1-4 points). Four patients underwent late surgery. Thirty-one patients were treated surgically. Their average TLICS was 7.22 points (4-10 points). Agreements in the four independent evaluations according to AO groups and subgroups were of 64.8% (35/54) and 55.5% (30/54) respectively. Kappa index for groups A, B and C was 0.75, 0.7 and 0.85 respectively. Kappa index for subgroups ranged from 0.16 to 0.85. Regarding safety, thirty (57.6%) patients with total subgroups agreement were analyzed. All patients with fracture in groups B and C underwent surgical treatment and patients in group A received surgery according to neurological status or failure of conservative treatment. The newer AO spine classification demonstrated good reliability at the level of groups. Subgroups demonstrated worse and varying reliability. Although the safety analysis was limited due to the low level of total concordance among all evaluations, patients from group A can be treated conservatively or surgically, whereas those from groups B and C are treated surgically.

  18. Operative compared with nonoperative treatment of a thoracolumbar burst fracture without neurological deficit: a prospective randomized study with follow-up at sixteen to twenty-two years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kirkham B; Buttermann, Glenn R; Phukan, Rishabh; Harrod, Christopher C; Mehbod, Amir; Shannon, Brian; Bono, Christopher M; Harris, Mitchel B

    2015-01-07

    Studies comparing operative with nonoperative treatment of a stable burst fracture of the thoracolumbar junction in neurologically intact patients have not shown a meaningful difference at early follow-up. To our knowledge, longer-term outcome data have not before been presented. From 1992 to 1998, forty-seven consecutive patients with a stable thoracolumbar burst fracture and no neurological deficit were evaluated and randomized to one of two treatment groups: operative treatment (posterior or anterior arthrodesis) or nonoperative treatment (a body cast or orthosis). We previously reported the results of follow-up at an average of forty-four months. The current study presents the results of long-term follow-up, at an average of eighteen years (range, sixteen to twenty-two years). As in the earlier study, patients at long-term follow-up indicated the degree of pain on a visual analog scale and completed the Roland and Morris disability questionnaire, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) questionnaire, and the Short Form-36 (SF-36) health survey. Work and health status were obtained, and patients were evaluated radiographically. Of the original operatively treated group of twenty-four patients, follow-up data were obtained for nineteen; one patient had died, and four could not be located. Of the original nonoperatively treated group of twenty-three patients, data were obtained for eighteen; two patients had died, and three could not be located. The average kyphosis was not significantly different between the two groups (13° for those who received operative treatment compared with 19° for those treated nonoperatively). Median scores for pain (4 cm for the operative group and 1.5 cm for the nonoperative group; p = 0.003), ODI scores (20 for the operative group and 2 for the nonoperative group; p years) revealed few significant differences between the two groups, at long-term follow-up (sixteen to twenty-two years), those with a stable burst fracture who were treated

  19. Do thoraco-lumbar spinal injuries classification systems exhibit lower inter- and intra-observer agreement than other fractures classifications?: A comparison using fractures of the trochanteric area of the proximal femur as contrast model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, Julio; Zamora, Tomas; Klaber, Ianiv; Carmona, Maximiliano; Palma, Joaquin; Campos, Mauricio; Yurac, Ratko

    2016-04-01

    It has been postulated that the complex patterns of spinal injuries have prevented adequate agreement using thoraco-lumbar spinal injuries (TLSI) classifications; however, limb fracture classifications have also shown variable agreements. This study compared agreement using two TLSI classifications with agreement using two classifications of fractures of the trochanteric area of the proximal femur (FTAPF). Six evaluators classified the radiographs and computed tomography scans of 70 patients with acute TLSI using the Denis and the new AO Spine thoraco-lumbar injury classifications. Additionally, six evaluators classified the radiographs of 70 patients with FTAPF using the Tronzo and the AO schemes. Six weeks later, all cases were presented in a random sequence for repeat assessment. The Kappa coefficient (κ) was used to determine agreement. Inter-observer agreement: For TLSI, using the AOSpine classification, the mean κ was 0.62 (0.57-0.66) considering fracture types, and 0.55 (0.52-0.57) considering sub-types; using the Denis classification, κ was 0.62 (0.59-0.65). For FTAPF, with the AO scheme, the mean κ was 0.58 (0.54-0.63) considering fracture types and 0.31 (0.28-0.33) considering sub-types; for the Tronzo classification, κ was 0.54 (0.50-0.57). Intra-observer agreement: For TLSI, using the AOSpine scheme, the mean κ was 0.77 (0.72-0.83) considering fracture types, and 0.71 (0.67-0.76) considering sub-types; for the Denis classification, κ was 0.76 (0.71-0.81). For FTAPF, with the AO scheme, the mean κ was 0.75 (0.69-0.81) considering fracture types and 0.45 (0.39-0.51) considering sub-types; for the Tronzo classification, κ was 0.64 (0.58-0.70). Using the main types of AO classifications, inter- and intra-observer agreement of TLSI were comparable to agreement evaluating FTAPF; including sub-types, inter- and intra-observer agreement evaluating TLSI were significantly better than assessing FTAPF. Inter- and intra-observer agreements using the Denis

  20. Thyroid storm following anterior cervical spine surgery for tuberculosis of cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjiv Huzurbazar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The primary objective was to report this rare case and discuss the probable mechanism of thyroid storm following anterior cervical spine surgery for Kochs cervical spine.

  1. Selective Loss of Smaller Spines in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Matthew L; Alhassan, Jamil; Newman, Jason T; Richard, Michelle; Gu, Hong; Kelly, Ryan M; Sampson, Alan R; Fish, Kenneth N; Penzes, Peter; Wills, Zachary P; Lewis, David A; Sweet, Robert A

    2017-06-01

    Decreased density of dendritic spines in adult schizophrenia subjects has been hypothesized to result from increased pruning of excess synapses in adolescence. In vivo imaging studies have confirmed that synaptic pruning is largely driven by the loss of large or mature synapses. Thus, increased pruning throughout adolescence would likely result in a deficit of large spines in adulthood. Here, the authors examined the density and volume of dendritic spines in deep layer 3 of the auditory cortex of 20 schizophrenia and 20 matched comparison subjects as well as aberrant voltage-gated calcium channel subunit protein expression linked to spine loss. Primary auditory cortex deep layer 3 spine density and volume was assessed in 20 pairs of schizophrenia and matched comparison subjects in an initial and replication cohort (12 and eight pairs) by immunohistochemistry-confocal microscopy. Targeted mass spectrometry was used to quantify postsynaptic density and voltage-gated calcium channel protein expression. The effect of increased voltage-gated calcium channel subunit protein expression on spine density and volume was assessed in primary rat neuronal culture. Only the smallest spines are lost in deep layer 3 of the primary auditory cortex in subjects with schizophrenia, while larger spines are retained. Levels of the tryptic peptide ALFDFLK, found in the schizophrenia risk gene CACNB4, are inversely correlated with the density of smaller, but not larger, spines in schizophrenia subjects. Consistent with this observation, CACNB4 overexpression resulted in a lower density of smaller spines in primary neuronal cultures. These findings require a rethinking of the overpruning hypothesis, demonstrate a link between small spine loss and a schizophrenia risk gene, and should spur more in-depth investigations of the mechanisms that govern new or small spine generation and stabilization under normal conditions as well as how this process is impaired in schizophrenia.

  2. TU-A-BRB-00: PANEL DISCUSSION: SBRT/SRS Case Studies - Brain and Spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Brain stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are commonly treated by a multidisciplinary team of neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, and medical physicists. However the treatment objectives, constraints, and technical considerations involved can be quite different between the two techniques. In this interactive session an expert panel of speakers will present clinical brain SRS and spine SBRT cases in order to demonstrate real-world considerations for ensuring safe and accurate treatment delivery and to highlight the significant differences in approach for each treatment site. The session will include discussion of topic such as clinical indications, immobilization, target definition, normal tissue tolerance limits, and beam arrangements. Learning Objectives: Understand the differences in indications and dose/fractionation strategies for intracranial SRS and spine SBRT. Describe the different treatment modalities which can be used to deliver intracranial SRS and spine SBRT. Cite the major differences in treatment setup and delivery principles between intracranial and spine treatments. Identify key critical structures and clinical dosimetric tolerance levels for spine SBRT and intracranial SRS. Understand areas of ongoing work to standardize intracranial SRS and spine SBRT procedures. Schlesinger: Research support: Elekta Instruments, AB; D. Schlesinger, Elekta Instruments, AB - research support; B. Winey, No relevant external funding for this subject.

  3. Diffusion-Weighted MRI Assessment of Adjacent Disc Degeneration After Thoracolumbar Vertebral Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noriega, David C., E-mail: dcnoriega1970@gmail.com [Valladolid University Hospital, Spine Department (Spain); Marcia, Stefano, E-mail: stemarcia@gmail.com [SS. Trinità Hospital ASL 8 Cagliari, Department of Radiology (Italy); Ardura, Francisco, E-mail: fardura@ono.com [Valladolid University Hospital, Spine Department (Spain); Lite, Israel Sanchez, E-mail: israelslite@hotmail.com [Valladolid University Hospital, Radiology Department (Spain); Marras, Mariangela, E-mail: mariangela.marrasmd@gmail.com [Azienda Ospedaliero Brotzu (A.O.B.), Department of Radiology (Italy); Saba, Luca, E-mail: lucasaba@tiscali.it [Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), Department of Radiology (Italy)

    2016-09-15

    ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to assess, by the mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), if a relationship exists between disc ADC and MR findings of adjacent disc degeneration after thoracolumbar fractures treated by anatomic reduction using vertebral augmentation (VAP).Materials and MethodsTwenty non-consecutive patients (mean age 50.7 years; range 45–56) treated because of vertebral fractures, were included in this study. There were 10 A3.1 and 10 A1.2 fractures (AO classification). Surgical treatment using VAP was applied in 14 cases, and conservative in 6 patients. MRI T2-weighted images and mapping of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the intervertebral disc adjacent to the fractured segment were performed after a mean follow-up of 32 months. A total of 60 discs, 3 per patient, were analysed: infra-adjacent, supra-adjacent and a control disc one level above the supra-adjacent.ResultsNo differences between patients surgically treated and those following a conservative protocol regarding the average ADC values obtained in the 20 control discs analysed were found. Considering all discs, average ADC in the supra-adjacent level was lower than in the infra-adjacent (1.35 ± 0.12 vs. 1.53 ± 0.06; p < 0.001). Average ADC values of the discs used as a control were similar to those of the infra-adjacent level (1.54 ± 0.06). Compared to surgically treated patients, discs at the supra-adjacent fracture level showed statistically significant lower values in cases treated conservatively (p < 0.001). The variation in the delay of surgery had no influence on the average values of ADC at any of the measured levels.ConclusionsADC measurements of the supra-adjacent discs after a mean follow-up of 32 months following thoracolumbar fractures, showed that restoration of the vertebral collapse by minimally invasive VAP prevents posttraumatic disc degeneration.

  4. Ergotropic effect of bone cement on pedicle screw fixation in treatment of osteoporotic thoracolumbar fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da LIU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the ergotropic effect of bone cement on pedicle screw fixation in treatment of osteopo¬rotic thoracolumbar fracture. Methods Fifty-three patients with osteoporotic thoracolumbar fracture, admitted from Jun. 2013 to Dec. 2014, were included for treatment by augmentation of pedicle screw fixation with bone cement. All patients underwent pre-operative examination of bone mineral density with T-score ≤-2.5 and augmentation of pedicle screw fixation with injection of 1.5 ml bone cement in adjacent to fractured vertebra. All patients were treated with anti-osteoporosis therapy pre- and post-operation, ob¬served and recorded with basic conditions and complications. At pre-operation, one-week post-operation and last follow-up, pain vi¬sual analogue scale (VAS and neurological function score (ASIA of all patients were recorded, and the compression rats of anterior and posterior edge of fractured vertebra, and compression rats of spinal canal and Cobb angel of all patients were measured. Results All the 53 patients were successfully undergone operation in about 90-140 min with blood loss of about 150-350 ml. No spinal cord or nerve injury, dural tear and obvious leakage of bone cement and screw loosening occurred during operation. All patients were followed up for 12 to 36 months and the neurological function obviously recovered contrasted with pre-operation. X-ray and CT examination at last follow-up showed good fractures healing, good position and non-loosening of internal fixation device and non-leakage of bone cement. At one week post-operation and last follow-up, VAS, compression rats of anterior edge and posterior edge of fractured vertebra, compression rats of spinal canal and Cobb angel were significantly lower than those at pre-operation (P0.05. Conclusions Augmentation of pedicle screw fixation with bone cement can effectively strengthen the initial stability of pedicle screw in osteo¬porosis, restore the

  5. Comparison of lidocaine, levobupivacaine or ropivacaine for distal paravertebral thoracolumbar anesthesia in ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alice R; Araújo, Marcelo A; Jardim, Paulo Ha; Lima, Stephanie C; Leal, Paula V; Frazílio, Fabrício O

    2016-11-01

    To compare the effects of lidocaine, levobupivacaine, or ropivacaine on the onset time and duration of anesthesia of the flank of ewes, using the distal paravertebral thoracolumbar approach. Randomized experimental study. Twenty-six healthy mixed-breed ewes (46 ± 3.1 kg). Thoracolumbar paravertebral nerve blocks were performed using the distal approach in sheep for ruminal fistulation. The 13th thoracic (T13), first lumbar (L1) and second lumbar (L2) nerves were infiltrated with 2% lidocaine (group GLI, n = 9), 0.5% levobupivacaine (group GLE, n = 8) or 0.5% ropivacaine (group GRO, n = 9); 1.5 mL on the dorsal branch and 2.5 mL on the ventral branch, total volume of 12 mL per ewe. Anesthesia onset time and duration were assessed by application of superficial and deep pin pricks, and skin clamping with a hemostat. Heart rate, respiratory rate, rectal temperature and systemic arterial pressures were recorded prior to nerve block (T0), after the anesthetic agent injection and onset time (T1) and predetermined time points during the surgical procedure (T2-T6). Incomplete nerve blocks were present in five of the 26 ewes enrolled in the study and they were not included in the statistical analyzes. Onset times in GLI, GLE and GRO were 1.5 ± 0.5, 3.1 ± 1.5 and 2.1 ± 0.8 minutes, respectively, with GLE significantly longer than GLI. The durations of anesthesia for GLI, GLE and GRO were 80 ± 27, 649 ± 68 and 590 ± 40 minutes, respectively, with the duration of GLI significantly shorter than GLE and GRO. There were no clinically important changes in cardiopulmonary variables. Administration of levobupivacaine and ropivacaine at the distal paravertebral site to block nerves T13, L1 and L2 produced a longer duration of anesthesia of the ewe's flanks compared with lidocaine. © 2016 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  6. Surgical treatment of anterior iliac spines fractures: our experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogliacomi, F; Calderazzi, F; Paterlini, M; Ceccarelli, F

    2014-09-24

    Iliac spines fractures represent 4% of all pelvic ring fractures and affect more frequently young people with open growth physis. These lesions are usually the consequence of an indirect avulsion trauma due to a sudden and forceful contraction of the muscles that take their origin on these structures. The treatment can be conservative or surgical according to the size and the amount of the dislocation of the fragment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of surgical approach of these fractures. Between 2002 and 2010, 9 patients with fractures of anterior iliac spines were surgically treated. All patients, after an average follow up of 48 months, were evaluated clinically with the Non-arthritic Hip Score (NAHS) and radiographically in order to detect their consolidation. Complications related to the fracture and its treatment were analyzed. Time between trauma and return to sport performance (RSP) was recorded. Mean NAHS was 98 points and RSP averaged 82 days. In 2 cases a transient meralgia paresthetica was observed. In 2 other cases follow-up radiographs showed asymptomatic hyperostosis around the iliac spines. The treatment of iliac spines fractures is mainly conservative. When fragment size is bigger than 2 cm and is dislocated of more than 2 cm surgical treatment is indicated. We recommend a fixation with metallic screws in order to obtain a more stable fixation and an earlier recovery especially in high demanding patients.

  7. Corpectomia da coluna toracolombar com colocação de cage por acesso único via posterior: técnica cirúrgica e resultados de seis pacientes Corpectomía de la columna toracolumbar con la colocación de cage por abordaje único vía posterior: técnica quirúrgica y los resultados de seis pacientes Thoracolumbar spine corpectomy with placement of a cage by single posterior approach: surgical technique and results of six patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Morais Nogueira

    2011-01-01

    segmentaria y describir la técnica quirúrgica. Métodos: Estudio retrospectivo evaluó seis pacientes con colapso vertebral, inestabilidad biomecánica y daños neurológicos causados por diferentes etiologías. Estos pacientes son candidatos para la descompresión neural y recibieron la indicación para la corpectomía y reconstrucción circunferencial con cage por una vía exclusivamente posterior. Resultados: Cuatro pacientes fueron hombres y dos mujeres. La edad promedio fue 58 años (22-82 y el seguimiento medio fue de 10,5 meses (2-24. En tres casos la resección fue un cuerpo vertebral y en tres casos dos vértebras fueron sometidas a resección. Todos los pacientes mejoraron en el estado neurológico, el dolor lumbar o el dolor radicular. Las indicaciones de cirugía fueron tres casos de espondilodiscitis, uno de fractura osteoporótica, un caso de tumor metastásico y un caso de tumor primario. Tres pacientes tuvieron complicaciones que requieren una revisión quirúrgica desarrollada con una mejoría de los síntomas. Las complicaciones fueron pérdida de líquido cefalorraquídeo, la radiculopatía lumbar, infección de la herida, la meningitis y el fracaso de la instrumentación. Conclusión: Los pacientes que se sometieron a corpectomía por una vía exclusivamente posterior mostraron resultados favorables con mejoría del déficit neurológico o dolor en todos los casos. Esta técnica fue eficiente en la reconstrucción de la columna y evitar las complicaciones del doble abordaje.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate retrospectively the results of a series of patients undergone thoracic or lumbar corpectomy via single posterior approach with placement of cage and segmental instrumented arthrodesis. The surgical technique performed was described. METHODS: The retrospective study evaluated six patients with vertebral collapse, biomechanical instability or neurological damage caused by different etiologies. These patients showed neural decompression and received indication to

  8. Prehospital Cervical Spine Motion: Immobilization Versus Spine Motion Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Erik E; Tucker, W Steven; Nowak, Matthew; Roberto, Jason; Hollingworth, Amy; Decoster, Laura C; Trimarco, Thomas W; Mihalik, Jason P

    2018-02-16

    This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of two different spinal immobilization techniques on cervical spine movement in a simulated prehospital ground transport setting. A counterbalanced crossover design was used to evaluate two different spinal immobilization techniques in a standardized environment. Twenty healthy male volunteers (age = 20.9 ± 2.2 yr) underwent ambulance transport from a simulated scene to a simulated emergency department setting in two separate conditions: utilizing traditional spinal immobilization (TSI) and spinal motion restriction (SMR). During both transport scenarios, participants underwent the same simulated scenario. The main outcome measures were cervical spine motion (cumulative integrated motion and peak range of motion), vital signs (heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation), and self-reported pain. Vital signs and pain were collected at six consistent points throughout each scenario. Participants experienced greater transverse plane cumulative integrated motion during TSI compared to SMR (F 1,57 = 4.05; P = 0.049), and greater transverse peak range of motion during participant loading/unloading in TSI condition compared to SMR (F 1,57 = 17.32; P TSI compared to 25% of participants during SMR (χ 2 = 1.29; P = 0.453). Spinal motion restriction controlled cervical motion at least as well as traditional spinal immobilization in a simulated prehospital ground transport setting. Given these results, along with well-documented potential complications of TSI in the literature, SMR is supported as an alternative to TSI. Future research should involve a true patient population.

  9. Single-surgeon Extensile Approach and Fixation of Thoraco-lumbar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Extensile approaches to the thoracic and lumbar spine are required for tumours, fractures, malignancies, deformity corrections and degenerative diseases. The body cavities (thorax and abdomen) require different approaches depending on the primary pathology and the desired exposure plus fixation method.

  10. Dose-volume effects in rat thoracolumbar spinal cord: an evaluation of NTCP models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippens, Marielle E P; Pop, Lucas A M; Visser, Andries G; Schellekens, Suzanne A M W; van der Kogel, Albert J

    2004-10-01

    To evaluate models for normal-tissue-complication probability (NTCP) on describing the dose-volume effect in rat thoracolumbar spinal cord. Single-dose irradiation of four field lengths (4, 1.5, 1.0, and 0.5 cm) was evaluated by the endpoints paresis and white-matter necrosis. The resulting dose-response data were used to rank phenomenological and tissue architecture NTCP models. The 0.5-cm field length showed a steep increase in radiation tolerance. Statistical analysis of the model fits, which included evaluation of goodness of fit (GOF) and confidence intervals, resulted in the rejection of all the models considered. Excluding the smallest field length, the Schultheiss (D(50) = 21.5 Gy, k = 26.5), the relative seriality (D(50) = 21.4 Gy, s = 1.6, gamma(50) = 6.3), and the critical element (D(50,FSU) = 26.6 Gy, gamma(50,FSU) = 2.3, n = 1.3) model gave the best fit. A thorough statistical analysis resulted in a serial or critical-element behavior for the field lengths of 1.0 cm and greater. Including the 0.5-cm field length, the radiation response markedly diverged from serial properties, but none of the models applied acceptably described this dose-response relationship. This study suggests that the commonly assumed serial behavior of the spinal cord might be valid for daily use in external- beam irradiation.

  11. Residual herniated disc material following hemilaminectomy in chondrodystrophic dogs with thoracolumbar intervertebral disc disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, W J; Thomas, M; Weh, J M; Bleedorn, J; Wells, K

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the presence of residual disc material within the vertebral canal following hemilaminectomy in chondrodystrophic dogs with thoracolumbar intervertebral disc disease. Forty dogs were treated by hemilaminectomy. Computed tomography was performed preoperatively and immediately postoperatively. The vertebral canal height, width, area, and herniated disc material area were measured. Maximum filling percentage (MFP), residual disc percentage (RDP), maximum residual filling percentage (MRFP), and residual filling percentage (RFP) were calculated. Clinical outcome was determined by telephone interviews. Residual disc material was present in 100% of the dogs. Mean MFP = 55.4% (range 25.9-82.3%; median 56.9%). Mean RDP = 50.3% (range 2.6-155.8%; median 47.9%). Mean MRFP = 30.8% (range 4.9-60%; median 30.1%). Mean RFP = 19.8% (range 4.8-45%; median 19.0%). All dogs were ambulatory with voluntary urination at the long-term follow-up (range: 88-735 days). Residual disc was present in all dogs following hemilaminectomy for intervertebral disc disease. Residual disc was not associated with failure to achieve functional recovery in these cases.

  12. Postoperative quality-of-life assessment in patients with spine metastases treated with long-segment pedicle-screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Florian; Lemée, Jean-Michel; Lucas, Olivier; Menei, Philippe

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE In recent decades, progress in the medical management of cancer has been significant, resulting in considerable extension of survival for patients with metastatic disease. This has, in turn, led to increased attention to the optimal surgical management of bone lesions, including metastases to the spine. In addition, there has been a shift in focus toward improving quality of life and reducing hospital stay for these patients, and many minimally invasive techniques have been introduced with the aim of reducing the morbidity associated with more traditional open approaches. The goal of this study was to assess the efficacy of long-segment percutaneous pedicle screw stabilization for the treatment of instability associated with thoracolumbar spine metastases in neurologically intact patients. METHODS This study was a retrospective review of data from a prospective database. The authors analyzed cases in which long-segment percutaneous pedicle screw fixation was performed for the palliative treatment of thoracolumbar spinal instability due to spinal metastases in neurologically intact patients. All of the patients included in the study underwent surgery between January 2014 and May 2015 at the authors' institution. Postoperative radiation therapy was planned within 10 days following the stabilization in all cases. Clinical and radiological follow-up assessments were planned for 3 days, 3 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after surgery. Outcome was assessed by means of standard postoperative evaluation and oncological and spinal quality of life measures (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Version 3.0 [EORTC QLQ-C30] and Oswestry Disability Index [ODI], respectively). Moreover, 5 patients were given an activity monitoring device for recording the distance walked daily; preoperative and postoperative daily distances were compared. RESULTS Data from 17 cases were analyzed. There were no

  13. Irradiation spine deformity in children treated for neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayfield, J.K.; Riseborough, E.J.; Nehme, M.

    1978-01-01

    A retrospective long-term follow-up review of 56 children with neuroblastoma surviving five years and longer following treatment since 1946 revealed that 57% had developed spine deformity (S.D.) following treatment with 250 kilovolt irradiation at the time of review. The average age at diagnosis was 17 months. Irradiation therapy was delivered to most children before 24 months of age. Follow-up averaged 12.9 years with a range of 5-31 years. Eighty-five per cent of the children had developed structural spine deformity at skeletal maturity and 54% of these children had scoliosis greater than 20 degrees. Sixteen per cent of irradiated children developed structural kyphosis. Non-midline opposing anterior and posterior ports were used most frequently. Mean dosage in patients who developed scoliosis of 20 degrees or more was 3588 rads (spine dosage) and 3746 rads in patients who developed kyphosis. Irradiation through opposing anterior and posterior ports was more commonly associated with the development of S.D. Sixty-six per cent of children who had more than 2000 rads developed S.D. The adolescent growth spurt was associated with an increase in the frequency and severity of spine deformity. This study indicated that moderate to severe S.D. was produced by irradiation in excess of 2000 rads administered with a 250-kilovoltage machine. This study would also suggest that children with neuroblastoma treated with orthovoltage irradiation should be followed closely by the orthopaedic surgeon, the oncologist, the radiotherapist and the paediatrician until the completion of skeletal growth for the development of unsightly structural spine deformity. Early bracing and surgery may be helpful in controlling these deformities in the pre-adolescent to early adolescent years. Continued observation is necessary to determine if current irradiation techniques will minimize or eradicate the incidence and severity of these complications. (author)

  14. Dendrite and spine modifications in autism and related neurodevelopmental disorders in patients and animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica

    2017-04-01

    Dendrites and spines are the main neuronal structures receiving input from other neurons and glial cells. Dendritic and spine number, size, and morphology are some of the crucial factors determining how signals coming from individual synapses are integrated. Much remains to be understood about the characteristics of neuronal dendrites and dendritic spines in autism and related disorders. Although there have been many studies conducted using autism mouse models, few have been carried out using postmortem human tissue from patients. Available animal models of autism include those generated through genetic modifications and those non-genetic models of the disease. Here, we review how dendrite and spine morphology and number is affected in autism and related neurodevelopmental diseases, both in human, and genetic and non-genetic animal models of autism. Overall, data obtained from human and animal models point to a generalized reduction in the size and number, as well as an alteration of the morphology of dendrites; and an increase in spine densities with immature morphology, indicating a general spine immaturity state in autism. Additional human studies on dendrite and spine number and morphology in postmortem tissue are needed to understand the properties of these structures in the cerebral cortex of patients with autism. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 419-437, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray ... MRI): Lumbar Spine Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  16. Bilateral locked facets in the thoracic spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.A. Willems; Braakman, R. (Reinder); B. van Linge (Bert)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractTwo cases of traumatic bilateral locked facets in the thoracic spine are reported. Both patients had only minor neurological signs. They both made a full neurological recovery after surgical reduction of the locked facets. Bilateral locked facets are very uncommon in the thoracic spine.

  17. Retropharyngeal cold abscess without Pott's spine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tube≠rculosisof the spine, or external injuries caused by endoscopes or foreignbodies (e.g. fish bones). Tuberculosis of the retropharyngeal ... of the disease. We present a case of tuberculous retropharyngeal abscess in an adult woman without tuberculosis of the cervical spine who was managed surgically by aspirating ...

  18. Primary multiple osseous leiomyosarcomas of the spine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary osseous leiomyosarcoma of the spine is a very unusual condition, with only few cases being reported in the literature.In fact, this type of tumors arises from the smooth muscle cells and occurs usually in the uterus and the gastrointestinal tracts. If the spine should be involved, it occurs generally as a metastatic ...

  19. Morbidity and mortality of complex spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstensen, Sven; Bari, Tanvir; Gehrchen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Most literature on complications in spine surgery has been retrospective or based on national databases with few variables. The Spine AdVerse Events Severity (SAVES) system has been found reliable and valid in two Canadian centers, providing precise information regarding all...

  20. The Spine of the Cosmic Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; Platen, Erwin; van de Weijgaert, Rien; Szalay, Alexander S.

    2010-01-01

    We present the SpineWeb framework for the topological analysis of the Cosmic Web and the identification of its walls, filaments, and cluster nodes. Based on the watershed segmentation of the cosmic density field, the SpineWeb method invokes the local adjacency properties of the boundaries between

  1. Computed tomography as the primary radiological examination of lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilkko, E.; Laehde, S.

    1988-10-01

    A series of 235 patients examined by lumbar CT because of sciatica or other low back disorder was studied. The need of additional examinations and correlations to surgical findings were evaluated. Inadequate information was the cause of additional examination, mostly myelography in 20 patients (8,5%). It was concluded that lumbar CT is a suitable first examination of the lumbar spine in sciatica and low back pain. The indications to complementary myelography and its benefit are discussed.

  2. Precision and accuracy of age estimates obtained from anal fin spines, dorsal fin spines, and sagittal otoliths for known-age largemouth bass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Zachary B.; Bonvechio, Timothy F.; Bowen, Bryant R.; Quist, Michael C.

    2017-01-01

    Sagittal otoliths are the preferred aging structure for Micropterus spp. (black basses) in North America because of the accurate and precise results produced. Typically, fisheries managers are hesitant to use lethal aging techniques (e.g., otoliths) to age rare species, trophy-size fish, or when sampling in small impoundments where populations are small. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the precision and accuracy of 2 non-lethal aging structures (i.e., anal fin spines, dorsal fin spines) in comparison to that of sagittal otoliths from known-age Micropterus salmoides (Largemouth Bass; n = 87) collected from the Ocmulgee Public Fishing Area, GA. Sagittal otoliths exhibited the highest concordance with true ages of all structures evaluated (coefficient of variation = 1.2; percent agreement = 91.9). Similarly, the low coefficient of variation (0.0) and high between-reader agreement (100%) indicate that age estimates obtained from sagittal otoliths were the most precise. Relatively high agreement between readers for anal fin spines (84%) and dorsal fin spines (81%) suggested the structures were relatively precise. However, age estimates from anal fin spines and dorsal fin spines exhibited low concordance with true ages. Although use of sagittal otoliths is a lethal technique, this method will likely remain the standard for aging Largemouth Bass and other similar black bass species.

  3. Sport injuries of the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargon, G.

    1981-01-01

    The article reports on injuries of the cervical spine occurring during sports activities. An attempt is made to reconstruct the movements which led to the cervical spine injuries in question. In two cases of accidents occuring during bathing, one football accident and a toboggan accident, the injuries concerned point to hyperextension of the cervical spine as cause of the injury. In another football accident and a riding accident, the changes observed allow us to conclude that the movement leading to the injury must have been a hyperflexion. One accident occurring while jumping on the trampolin resulted in an injury of the upper cervical spine pointing to the action of a compressive force on the cervical spine in addition to the force resulting in hyperflexion. (orig.) [de

  4. Positioning patients for spine surgery: Avoiding uncommon position-related complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Ihab; Barnette, Rodger

    2014-01-01

    Positioning patients for spine surgery is pivotal for optimal operating conditions and operative-site exposure. During spine surgery, patients are placed in positions that are not physiologic and may lead to complications. Perioperative peripheral nerve injury (PPNI) and postoperative visual loss (POVL) are rare complications related to patient positioning during spine surgery that result in significant patient disability and functional loss. PPNI is usually due to stretch or compression of the peripheral nerve. PPNI may present as a brachial plexus injury or as an isolated injury of single nerve, most commonly the ulnar nerve. Understanding the etiology, mechanism and pattern of injury with each type of nerve injury is important for the prevention of PPNI. Intraoperative neuromonitoring has been used to detect peripheral nerve conduction abnormalities indicating peripheral nerve stress under general anesthesia and to guide modification of the upper extremity position to prevent PPNI. POVL usually results in permanent visual loss. Most cases are associated with prolonged spine procedures in the prone position under general anesthesia. The most common causes of POVL after spine surgery are ischemic optic neuropathy and central retinal artery occlusion. Posterior ischemic optic neuropathy is the most common cause of POVL after spine surgery. It is important for spine surgeons to be aware of POVL and to participate in safe, collaborative perioperative care of spine patients. Proper education of perioperative staff, combined with clear communication and collaboration while positioning patients in the operating room is the best and safest approach. The prevention of uncommon complications of spine surgery depends primarily on identifying high-risk patients, proper positioning and optimal intraoperative management of physiological parameters. Modification of risk factors extrinsic to the patient may help reduce the incidence of PPNI and POVL. PMID:25232519

  5. Reduction of progressive thoracolumbar adolescent idiopathic scoliosis by chiropractic biophysics® (CBP®) mirror image® methods following failed traditional chiropractic treatment: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Haggard, Joshua S.; Haggard, Jennifer B.; Oakley, Paul A.; Harrison, Deed E.

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To present a case demonstrating the reduction of progressive thoracolumbar scoliosis by incorporating Chiropractic BioPhysics® (CBP®) technique’s mirror image® exercises, traction and blocking procedures based on the ‘non-commutative properties of finite rotation angles under addition’ engineering law. [Subject and Methods] A 15-year-old female presented with a right thoracolumbar scoliosis having a Cobb angle from T5–L3 of 27° and suffering from headaches and lower back pains. Her ...

  6. Evaluation of the Results of Posterior Decompression, Corpectomy and Instrumentation in Traumatic Unstable Thoraco-Lumbar Burst Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Anowarul Islam

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thoraco-lumbar burst fractures occur as a result of axial load which often causes displacement of the middle column into the vertebral canal. Posterior surgery reduces the morbid outcomes of different other approaches. Objective: To evaluate the clinical and radiological success of posterior corpectomy and instrumentation in the management of traumatic unstable thoraco-lumbar burst fractures. Methods: It is a prospective interventional study carried out in Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University and different private hospitals in Dhaka from July 2008 to December 2011. Total 18 patients; 13 male and 05 female within an age range of 21-40 years were selected. Total 09 cases involved L1, 05 cases at D12, 02 cases at D11 and at L2 each. Neurological status was assessed by Frankel‘s grading and pain status by Visual Analogue Score (VAS. Paired t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results: All the patients were followed up for minimum 1 year. Eleven out of 12 patients with Frankel grade-B and 04 patients out of 06 with Frankel grade-C recovered fully and could walk without support (p<0.05. Overall 03 patients ended with some degrees of persistant neurological deficit. The mean postoperative pain improvement and kyphotic angle correction was significant  (p<0.05. Conclusion: Decompression through posterior approach by laminectomy, corpectomy and fusion by cage with bone graft and stabilization by pedicle screw and rod significantly improves the clinical and radiological outcome in management of traumatic unstable thoraco-lumbar burst fractures.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3329/bsmmuj.v5i1.10998 BSMMU J 2012; 5(1:35-41 

  7. Osteoporotic thoracolumbar junctional fracture accompanied by spinous process fracture without posterior ligament injury: its clinical and radiologic significances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seonjong; Park, Moon Soo; Kim, Yong-Chan; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2016-11-01

    To assess the clinical and radiologic outcome of osteoporotic thoracolumbar junctional fracture accompanied by spinous process fracture (SPF) without posterior ligament injury. A total of 391 patients with single-level osteoporotic thoracolumbar junctional (T10-L2) fracture were selectively enrolled. The patients were divided into two groups by absence (group I) or presence (group II) of SPF. Clinical and radiologic parameters were compared between the two groups. Group I comprised of 332 patients with only vertebral body fracture, and group II comprised of 59 patients with both vertebral body and SPFs. In all cases of group II, SPFs were located just one level above the fractured vertebral body, and the injury of the posterior ligament was not found. At the time of injury, group II patients showed worse outcomes in anterior vertebral body compression percentage, kyphotic Cobb angle, cranial disk status, and the rate of the initial neurologic injury. Kyphotic alignment changes during 1-year follow-up were compared between the conservative subgroups of groups I and II. At the time of injury, there were no statistical differences in anterior vertebral body compression percentage and Cobb angle between the two conservative subgroups. However, the difference was significant after 1-year follow-up. Comparison of kyphotic alignment change at 12 months after diagnosis within group II was done according to the treatment method. Vertebroplasty subgroup in group II did not show benefit even in preventing such kyphotic alignment change, whereas instrumentation subgroup in group II showed lordotic alignment restoration despite more severe kyphotic alignment at the time of injury. Osteoporotic thoracolumbar junctional fracture accompanied by spinous process fracture without posterior ligament injury represented more severe injury with flexion forces on the anterior column and tensile forces on the posterior column, and was related with more severe posttraumatic kyphotic

  8. Spreading epidural hematoma and deep subcutaneous edema: indirect MRI signs of posterior ligamentous complex injury in thoracolumbar burst fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Na Ra; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja-Young; Myung, Jae Sung; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Joon Woo; Kang, Heung Sik; Moon, Sung Gyu

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of a spreading epidural hematoma (SEH) and deep subcutaneous edema (DSE) as indirect signs of posterior ligamentous complex (PLC) injuries on MR imaging of thoracolumbar burst fractures. We retrospectively reviewed spinal MR images of 43 patients with thoracolumbar burst fractures: 17 patients with PLC injuries (study group) and 26 without PLC injuries (control group). An SEH was defined as a hemorrhagic infiltration into the anterior or posterior epidural space that spread along more than three vertebrae including the level of the fracture. A DSE was regarded as a fluid-like signal lesion in the deep subcutaneous layer of the back, and its epicenter was at the burst fracture level. The frequency of the SEH/DSE in the two groups was analyzed. In addition, the association between each sign and the degree of vertebral collapse, the severity of central canal compromise, and surgical decisions were analyzed. Magnetic resonance images showed an SEH in 20 out of 43 patients (46%) and a DSE in 17 (40%). The SEH and DSE were more commonly seen in the study group with PLC injuries (SEH, 15 out of 17 patients, 80%; DSE, 16 out of 17 patients, 94%) than in the control group without PLC injuries (SEH, 5 out of 26, 19%; DSE, 1 out of 26, 4%) (P <0.0001). The SEH and DSE were significantly associated with surgical management decisions (17 out of 20 patients with SEH, 85%, vs 8 out of the 23 without SEH, 35%, P =0.002; 15 out of 17 with DSE, 88%, vs 10 out of 26 without DSE, 38%, P =0.002). The SEH and DSE did not correlate with the degree of vertebral collapse or the severity of central canal compromise. The SEH and DSE may be useful secondary MR signs of posterior ligamentous complex injury in thoracolumbar burst fractures. (orig.)

  9. A Prospective Outcomes Study of Proton Therapy for Chordomas and Chondrosarcomas of the Spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indelicato, Daniel J., E-mail: dindelicato@floridaproton.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Rotondo, Ronny L.; Begosh-Mayne, Dustin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Scarborough, Mark T.; Gibbs, C. Parker [Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, William M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of definitive or adjuvant external beam proton therapy on survival in patients with chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the spine. Methods and Materials: Between March 2007 and May 2013, 51 patients with a median age of 58 years (range, 22-83 years) with chordoma (n=34) or chondrosarcomas (n=17) of the sacrum (n=21), the cervical spine (n=20), and the thoracolumbar spine (n=10) were treated with external beam proton therapy to a median dose of 70.2 Gy(RBE) [range, 64.2-75.6 Gy(RBE)] at our institution. Distant metastases, overall survival, cause-specific survival, local control, and disease-free survival were calculated. Results: The mean follow-up time was 3.7 years (range, 0.3-7.7 years). Across all time points, 25 patients experienced disease recurrence: 18 local recurrences, 6 local and distant recurrences, and 1 distant metastasis. The 4-year rates of overall survival and cause-specific survival were 72%; disease-free survival was 57%, local control was 58%, and freedom from distant metastases was 86%. The median time to local progression was 1.7 years (range, 0.2-6.0 years), and the median time to distant progression was 1.6 years (range, 0.2-6.0 years). The risk factors for local recurrence were age ≤58 years (62% vs 26%; P=.04) and recurrence after prior surgery (29% vs 81%; P=.01). Secondary cancers developed in 2 patients: B-cell lymphoma 5.5 years after treatment and bladder cancer 2 years after treatment. We observed the following toxicities: sacral soft tissue necrosis requiring surgery (n=2), T1 vertebral fracture requiring fusion surgery (n=1), chronic urinary tract infections (n=1), surgery for necrotic bone cyst (n=1), and grade 2 bilateral radiation nephritis (n=1). Conclusion: High-dose proton therapy controls more than half of spinal chordomas and chondrosarcomas and compares favorably with historic photon data. Local progression is the dominant mode of treatment failure and may be reduced by

  10. Loading effects of anterior cervical spine fusion on adjacent segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Shiung Wang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Adjacent segment degeneration typically follows anterior cervical spine fusion. However, the primary cause of adjacent segment degeneration remains unknown. Therefore, in order to identify the loading effects that cause adjacent segment degeneration, this study examined the loading effects to superior segments adjacent to fused bone following anterior cervical spine fusion. The C3–C6 cervical spine segments of 12 sheep were examined. Specimens were divided into the following groups: intact spine (group 1; and C5–C6 segments that were fused via cage-instrumented plate fixation (group 2. Specimens were cycled between 20° flexion and 15° extension with a displacement control of 1°/second. The tested parameters included the range of motion (ROM of each segment, torque and strain on both the body and inferior articular process at the superior segments (C3–C4 adjacent to the fused bone, and the position of the neutral axis of stress at under 20° flexion and 15° extension. Under flexion and Group 2, torque, ROM, and strain on both the bodies and facets of superior segments adjacent to the fused bone were higher than those of Group 1. Under extension and Group 2, ROM for the fused segment was less than that of Group 1; torque, ROM, and stress on both the bodies and facets of superior segments adjacent to the fused bone were higher than those of Group 1. These analytical results indicate that the muscles and ligaments require greater force to achieve cervical motion than the intact spine following anterior cervical spine fusion. In addition, ROM and stress on the bodies and facets of the joint segments adjacent to the fused bone were significantly increased. Under flexion, the neutral axis of the stress on the adjacent segment moved backward, and the stress on the bodies of the segments adjacent to the fused bone increased. These comparative results indicate that increased stress on the adjacent segments is caused by stress-shielding effects

  11. Hemangiopericytoma of the cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghvendra V Ramdasi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 28-year-old male presented with neck pain and dysesthesias in the right upper limb. On examination, he had a firm, well-defined midline posterior cervical mass discernible on palpation at the mid-cervical level. He had no neurological deficit. Neuroradiology revealed a variegated enhancing cervical mass is arising from C3 lamina. The mass extended into the right extradural space eroding the C3 lamina and posteriorly into the intermuscular plane. The tumor was excised totally. Histopathology of the tumor showed features of hemangiopericytoma (HPC. The patient underwent postoperative radiotherapy. Primary osseous spinal HPC are rare malignant extra-axial tumors that tend to recur and metastasize. Only two cases of primary osseous HPC have been reported earlier to involve the cervical spine. The clinical presentation and management of the present case with a review of the literature is presented.

  12. Hemangiopericytoma of the cervical spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdasi, Raghvendra V.; Nadkarni, Trimurti D.; Goel, Naina A.

    2014-01-01

    A 28-year-old male presented with neck pain and dysesthesias in the right upper limb. On examination, he had a firm, well-defined midline posterior cervical mass discernible on palpation at the mid-cervical level. He had no neurological deficit. Neuroradiology revealed a variegated enhancing cervical mass is arising from C3 lamina. The mass extended into the right extradural space eroding the C3 lamina and posteriorly into the intermuscular plane. The tumor was excised totally. Histopathology of the tumor showed features of hemangiopericytoma (HPC). The patient underwent postoperative radiotherapy. Primary osseous spinal HPC are rare malignant extra-axial tumors that tend to recur and metastasize. Only two cases of primary osseous HPC have been reported earlier to involve the cervical spine. The clinical presentation and management of the present case with a review of the literature is presented. PMID:25210342

  13. The Global Spine Care Initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurwitz, Eric L; Randhawa, Kristi; Torres, Paola

    2018-01-01

    spinal disorders and their burden on individuals and communities in most rural places of the developing world. These findings should be a call to action to devote resources for high-quality research to fill these knowledge gaps in medically underserved areas and low and middle-income countries......PURPOSE: The purpose of this review was to synthesize literature on the burden of spinal disorders in rural communities to inform the Global Spine Care Initiative care pathway and model of care for their application in medically underserved areas and low- and middle-income countries. METHODS...... and in those with less education, psychological factors (stress, anxiety, depression), and alcohol consumers. The literature is inconsistent as to whether back pain is more common in rural or urban areas. High risk of bias in many studies, lack of data on disability and other burden measures and few studies...

  14. Malpractice litigation following spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Alan H; Ruttiman, Roy; Eltorai, Adam E M; DePasse, J Mason; Brea, Bielinsky A; Palumbo, Mark A

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Adverse events related to spine surgery sometimes lead to litigation. Few studies have evaluated the association between spine surgical complications and medical malpractice proceedings, outcomes, and awards. The aim of this study was to identify the most frequent causes of alleged malpractice in spine surgery and to gain insight into patient demographic and clinical characteristics associated with medical negligence litigation. METHODS A search for "spine surgery" spanning February 1988 to May 2015 was conducted utilizing the medicolegal research service VerdictSearch (ALM Media Properties, LLC). Demographic data for the plaintiff and defendant in addition to clinical data for the procedure and legal outcomes were examined. Spinal cord injury, anoxic/hypoxic brain injury, and death were classified as catastrophic complications; all other complications were classified as noncatastrophic. Both chi-square and t-tests were used to evaluate the effect of these variables on case outcomes and awards granted. RESULTS A total of 569 legal cases were examined; 335 cases were excluded due to irrelevance or insufficient information. Of the 234 cases included in this investigation, 54.2% (127 cases) resulted in a defendant ruling, 26.1% (61) in a plaintiff ruling, and 19.6% (46) in a settlement. The awards granted for plaintiff rulings ranged from $134,000 to $38,323,196 (mean $4,045,205 ± $6,804,647). Awards for settlements ranged from $125,000 to $9,000,000 (mean $1,930,278 ± $2,113,593), which was significantly less than plaintiff rulings (p = 0.022). Compared with cases without a delay in diagnosis of the complication, the cases with a diagnostic delay were more likely to result in a plaintiff verdict or settlement (42.9% vs 72.7%, p = 0.007) than a defense verdict, and were more likely to settle out of court (17.5% vs 40.9%, p = 0.008). Similarly, compared with cases without a delay in treatment of the complication, those with a therapeutic delay were more

  15. Unusual cervical spine epidural abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Jr-Han; Su, Yu-Jang

    2015-10-01

    A 48-year-old man presented to the emergency department with complain of severe neck pain and anterior chest pain. Intermittent fever in the recent 2 days was also noted. There is a track maker over his left side of neck. The laboratory examination showed leukocytosis and high C-reactive protein level. Urine drug screen was positive for opiate. Empirical antibiotic administration was given. Blood culture grew gram-positive cocci in chain, and there was no vegetation found by heart echocardiogram. However, progressive weakness of four limbs was noted, and patient even cannot stand up and walk. The patient also complained of numbness sensation over bilateral hands and legs, and lower abdomen. Acute urine retention occurred. We arranged magnetic resonance imaging survey, which showed evidence of inflammatory process involving the retropharyngeal spaces and epidural spaces from the skull base to the bony level of T5. Epidural inflammatory process resulted in compression of the spinal cord and bilateral neural foramen narrowing. Neurosurgeon was consulted. Operation with laminectomy and posterior fusion with bone graft and internal fixation was done. Culture of epidural abscess and 2 sets of blood culture all yielded methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. For epidural abscess, the most common involved spine is lumbar followed by thoracic and cervical spine. Diagnosis and treatment in the drug abusers are still challenging because they lack typical presentation, drug compliance, and adequate follow-up and because it is hard to stop drug abuser habit. Significant improvement of neurological deficit can be expected in most spinal abscess in drug abusers after treatment.

  16. Anterior superior iliac spine avulsion fracture presenting as meralgia paraesthetica in an adolescent sprinter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chia-Yu; Wu, Chu-Ming; Lin, Shih-Wei; Cheng, Kui-Lin

    2014-02-01

    We report here a rare case of anterior superior iliac spine avulsion fracture that presented initially as meralgia paraesthetica. A 14-year-old male sprinter presented with anterior superior iliac spine avulsion fracture, which was not observed on initial plain radiograph of the hip, but was diagnosed by ultrasound. Both clinical presentations and electrophysiological studies indicated meralgia paraesthetica. The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve of the thigh was probably compressed by an inguinal haematoma resulting from sartorius muscle strain, which was detected on musculoskeletal ultrasound. Computed tomography of the pelvis confirmed anterior superior iliac spine avulsion fracture. Meralgia paraesthetica in adolescents can be due to anterior superior iliac spine avulsion fracture. Sonography is a valuable tool for screening for muscular haematoma and occult fractures, which may allow clinicians to diagnose the nature of the muscle injury, and thus guide the most appropriate therapeutic strategy.

  17. Dose-volume effects in rat thoracolumbar spinal cord: the effects of nonuniform dose distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippens, Mariëlle E P; Pop, Lucas A M; Visser, Andries G; van der Kogel, Albert J

    2007-09-01

    To investigate dose-volume effects in rat spinal cord irradiated with nonuniform dose distributions and to assess regional differences in radiosensitivity. A total of 106 rats divided into three groups were irradiated with (192)Ir gamma-rays at a high dose rate. The groups were irradiated with one, two, or six catheters distributed around the thoracolumbar spinal cord to create different dose distributions. After irradiation, the animals were tested for motor function for 9 months. The response was defined as motor dysfunction and WM or nerve root necrosis. Dose-response data were analyzed with a probit analysis as function of the dose level at a percentage of the volume (D(%)) and with different normal tissue complication probability models. Additionally, the histologic responses of the individual dose voxels were analyzed after registration with the histologic sections. The probit analysis at D(24) (24% of the volume) gave the best fit results. In addition, the Lyman Kutcher Burman model and the relative seriality model showed acceptable fits, with volume parameters of 0.17 and 0.53, respectively. The histology-based analysis revealed a lower radiosensitivity for the dorsal (50% isoeffective dose [ED(50)] = 32.3) and lateral WM (ED(50) = 33.7 Gy) compared with the dorsal (ED(50) = 25.9 Gy) and ventral nerve roots (ED(50) = 24.1 Gy). For this nonuniform irradiation, the spinal cord did not show typical serial behavior. No migration terms were needed for an acceptable fit of the dose-response curves. A higher radiosensitivity for the lumbar nerve roots than for the thoracic WM was found.

  18. Operative Techniques and Preliminary Outcomes Following Percutaneous Endoscopic Thoracolumbar Pediculectomy in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yong-Hyun; Lee, Hee-Chun; Lee, Jae-Hoon

    2016-11-01

    To examine the technical feasibility of percutaneous endoscopic pediculectomy using a lateral approach and to evaluate its use for decompression and examination of the thoracic and lumbar spinal canals in small dogs. Experimental study. Clinically normal adult dogs (n=10). After optimizing the technique in cadavers, percutaneous endoscopic pediculectomy was performed using a lateral approach to the thoracic (T12) or lumbar (L2) vertebrae in 5 dogs each. Using fluoroscopic guidance, a K-wire, dilator, and (cannula) working sleeve were placed. A window for visualizing the spinal cord and floor of the spinal canal was created using a specialized drill, rongeurs, trephine, and elevator. Gait and neurologic status were monitored postoperatively, and computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed. All procedures were completed successfully (T12, 45 ± 13 minutes; L2, 59 ± 14 minutes) with clear observation of the spinal cord and floor of the spinal canal. Normal ambulation was maintained in 9 dogs. One dog in the L2 group had ipsilateral hind limb weakness that resolved within 4 days. One dog in the L2 group suffered a fracture of the accessory process. One dog each in the T12 and L2 groups had hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted MRI images, suspicious of focal edema, which reduced at 4 weeks after initial examination, possibly reflecting gliosis. Pediculectomy using a percutaneous endoscopic thoracolumbar lateral approach is feasible, provides a good view of the spinal canal, and may be an alternative for treatment of disk disease in dogs. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  19. Degenerative spine disorders in the context of clinical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, Michael; Sartor, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Hardly any other structure in the human body is held responsible for so many complaints, pain, and costs as the spine and its degenerative disorders. In the following article, the role of imaging procedures in diagnosing disorders of the spine is presented. Due to the fact that disk herniation represents the most frequent cause for degenerative disorders the anatomy of the intervertebral disk and the pathology of the entities that can cause diseases of the disks are described. In particular, the authors focus on the significance of radiological findings with respect to patient history, subjective symptoms, and objective clinical findings. In addition to presenting the technical procedures and their indications and contraindications also practical tips and tricks in conducting these examinations are presented in this paper

  20. Magnetic resonance tomography for trauma of the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meydam, K.; Sehlen, S.; Schlenkhoff, D.; Kiricuta, J.C.; Beyer, H.K.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty patients who had suffered spinal trauma were examined by magnetic resonance tomography. Fifteen patients with first degree trauma in Erdmann's classification showed no abnormality. Magnetic resonance tomography of the cervical spine appears to be a suitable method for investigating patients with whiplash injuries. It is indicated following severe flexion injuries with subluxations and neurological symptoms, since it is the only method that can demonstrate the spinal cord directly and completely and show the extent of cord compression. For patients with thoracic trauma and rapidly developing neurological symptoms, magnetic resonance tomography is ideal for showing post-traumatic syringomyelia. Magnetic resonance tomography following whiplash injuries is recommended if plain films of the cervical spine show any abnormalities, as well as for the investigation of acute or sub-acute neurological abnormalities. The various findings are discussed. (orig.) [de

  1. General practitioners' willingness to request plain lumbar spine radiographic examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryynaenen, Olli-Pekka; Lehtovirta, Jukka; Soimakallio, Seppo; Takala, Jorma

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: To examine general practitioners' attitudes to plain lumbar spine radiographic examinations. Design: A postal questionnaire consisting of questions on background data and doctors' opinions about plain lumbar spine radiographic examinations, as well as eight vignettes (imaginary patient cases) presenting indications for lumbar radiography, and five vignettes focusing on the doctors' willingness to request lumbar radiography on the basis of patients' age and duration of symptoms. The data were analysed according to the doctor's age, sex, workplace and the medical school of graduation. Setting: Finland. Subjects: Six hundred and fifteen randomly selected physicians working in primary health care (64% of original target group). Results: The vignettes revealed that the use of plain lumbar radiographic examination varied between 26 and 88%. Patient's age and radiation protection were the most prominent factors influencing doctors' decisions to request lumbar radiographies. Only slight differences were observed between the attitudes of male and female doctors, as well as between young and older doctors. Doctors' willingness to request lumbar radiographies increased with the patient's age in most vignettes. The duration of patients' symptoms had a dramatic effect on the doctor's decision: in all vignettes, doctors were more likely to request lumbar radiography when patient's symptoms had exceeded 4 weeks. Conclusions: General practitioners commonly use plain lumbar spine radiographic examinations, despite its limited value in the diagnosis of low back pain. Further consensus and medical education is needed to clarify the indications for plain lumbar radiographic examination

  2. Trauma: Conventional radiologic study in spine injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosch, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book includes a discussion of the anatomy of the spinal cord and descriptions of methods for tailored radiologic investigation of spine trauma. Most of the text is devoted to the analysis and classification of spinal injury by radiologic signs and mode of injury. The author addresses injury to the entire spine but emphasizes the cervical spine. Plain radiography and conventional tomography are the only imaging methods discussed. The author stresses the active role of the attending radiologist in directing every phase of the x-ray study. Many subtle variations in patient positioning plus beam direction and angulation are described

  3. 49 CFR 572.85 - Lumbar spine flexure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine flexure. 572.85 Section 572.85... Lumbar spine flexure. (a) When subjected to continuously applied force in accordance with paragraph (b) of this section, the lumbar spine assembly shall flex by an amount that permits the thoracic spine to...

  4. Surgical site infections following instrumented stabilization of the spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dapunt U

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ulrike Dapunt,1 Caroline Bürkle,1 Frank Günther,2 Wojciech Pepke,1 Stefan Hemmer,1 Michael Akbar1 1Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Center for Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, 2Department for Infectious Diseases, Medical Microbiology and Hygiene, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany Background: Implant-associated infections are still a feared complication in the field of orthopedics. Bacteria attach to the implant surface and form so-called biofilm colonies that are often difficult to diagnose and treat. Since the majority of studies focus on prosthetic joint infections (PJIs of the hip and knee, current treatment options (eg, antibiotic prophylaxis of implant-associated infections have mostly been adapted according to these results. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate patients with surgical site infections following instrumented stabilization of the spine with regard to detected bacteria species and the course of the disease. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective single-center analysis of implant-associated infections of the spine from 2010 to 2014. A total of 138 patients were included in the study. The following parameters were evaluated: C-reactive protein serum concentration, microbiological evaluation of tissue samples, the time course of the disease, indication for instrumented stabilization of the spine, localization of the infection, and the number of revision surgeries required until cessation of symptoms. Results: Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. were most commonly detected (n=69, 50%, followed by fecal bacteria (n=46, 33.3%. In 23.2% of cases, no bacteria were detected despite clinical suspicion of an infection. Most patients suffered from degenerative spine disorders (44.9%, followed by spinal fractures (23.9%, non-degenerative scoliosis (20.3%, and spinal tumors (10.1%. Surgical site infections occurred predominantly within 3

  5. Disparities in Rates of Spine Surgery for Degenerative Spine Disease Between HIV Infected and Uninfected Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Joseph T.; Gordon, Adam J.; Perkal, Melissa F.; Crystal, Stephen; Rosenthal, Ronnie A.; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Butt, Adeel A.; Gibert, Cynthia L.; Rimland, David; Simberkoff, Michael S.; Justice, Amy C.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of nationwide Veterans Health Administration (VA) clinical and administrative data. Objective Examine the association between HIV infection and the rate of spine surgery for degenerative spine disease. Summary of Background Data Combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) has prolonged survival in patients with HIV/AIDS, increasing the prevalence of chronic conditions such as degenerative spine disease that may require spine surgery. Methods We studied all HIV infected patients under care in the VA from 1996–2008 (n=40,038) and uninfected comparator patients (n=79,039) matched on age, gender, race, year, and geographic region. The primary outcome was spine surgery for degenerative spine disease defined by ICD-9 procedure and diagnosis codes. We used a multivariate Poisson regression to model spine surgery rates by HIV infection status, adjusting for factors that might affect suitability for surgery (demographics, year, comorbidities, body mass index, cART, and laboratory values). Results Two-hundred twenty eight HIV infected and 784 uninfected patients underwent spine surgery for degenerative spine disease during 700,731 patient-years of follow-up (1.44 surgeries per 1,000 patient-years). The most common procedures were spinal decompression (50%), and decompression and fusion (33%); the most common surgical sites were the lumbosacral (50%), and cervical (40%) spine. Adjusted rates of surgery were lower for HIV infected patients (0.86 per 1,000 patient-years of follow-up) than for uninfected patients (1.41 per 1,000 patient-years; IRR 0.61, 95% CI: 0.51, 0.74, Pdegenerative spine disease. Possible explanations include disease prevalence, emphasis on treatment of non-spine HIV-related symptoms, surgical referral patterns, impact of HIV on surgery risk-benefit ratio, patient preferences, and surgeon bias. PMID:21697770

  6. Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma and multiple thoraco-lumbar lateral meningoceles: two rare pathological entities in a patient with NF-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, C.; Carneiro, E.; Fonseca, J.; Salgado, A.; Pereira, P.; Vaz, R.; Pinto, R.; Capelinha, A.F.; Lopes, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EHE) is a rare vascular soft-tissue tumour of intermediate malignancy. Neurofibromatosis type I (NF-1) is a genetic syndrome associated with soft tissue sarcoma and higher risk of developing neoplasia. Lateral meningoceles are uncommon entities, being mostly associated with NF-1. We report a case of a 31-year-old woman, with NF-1 and past history of right thalamic/peduncular astrocytoma WHO grade II, admitted to the Neurosurgery Department in December 2003 due to severe low back pain, irradiating to the left leg without a radicular pattern. Thoraco-lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large left posterior paravertebral expansive lesion, bilateral and multiple thoraco-lumbar lateral meningoceles and dural ectasias with scalloping of the vertebral bodies. Biopsy of the paravertebral mass lesion disclosed EHE. We present this case because of the novel association between NF-1 and EHE, and the unusual aggressiveness of the neoplasia. Additionally, we highlight the co-existence of bilateral and multiple lateral meningoceles. (orig.)

  7. Ultrasound Evaluation of the Combined Effects of Thoracolumbar Fascia Injury and Movement Restriction in a Porcine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, James H; Fox, James R; Maple, Rhonda; Loretan, Caitlin; Badger, Gary J; Henry, Sharon M; Vizzard, Margaret A; Langevin, Helene M

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of back pain following acute back "sprains" is a serious public health problem with poorly understood pathophysiology. The recent finding that human subjects with chronic low back pain (LBP) have increased thickness and decreased mobility of the thoracolumbar fascia measured with ultrasound suggest that the fasciae of the back may be involved in LBP pathophysiology. This study used a porcine model to test the hypothesis that similar ultrasound findings can be produced experimentally in a porcine model by combining a local injury of fascia with movement restriction using a "hobble" device linking one foot to a chest harness for 8 weeks. Ultrasound measurements of thoracolumbar fascia thickness and shear plane mobility (shear strain) during passive hip flexion were made at the 8 week time point on the non-intervention side (injury and/or hobble). Injury alone caused both an increase in fascia thickness (p = .007) and a decrease in fascia shear strain on the non-injured side (p = .027). Movement restriction alone did not change fascia thickness but did decrease shear strain on the non-hobble side (p = .024). The combination of injury plus movement restriction had additive effects on reducing fascia mobility with a 52% reduction in shear strain compared with controls and a 28% reduction compared to movement restriction alone. These results suggest that a back injury involving fascia, even when healed, can affect the relative mobility of fascia layers away from the injured area, especially when movement is also restricted.

  8. Ultrasound Evaluation of the Combined Effects of Thoracolumbar Fascia Injury and Movement Restriction in a Porcine Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H Bishop

    Full Text Available The persistence of back pain following acute back "sprains" is a serious public health problem with poorly understood pathophysiology. The recent finding that human subjects with chronic low back pain (LBP have increased thickness and decreased mobility of the thoracolumbar fascia measured with ultrasound suggest that the fasciae of the back may be involved in LBP pathophysiology. This study used a porcine model to test the hypothesis that similar ultrasound findings can be produced experimentally in a porcine model by combining a local injury of fascia with movement restriction using a "hobble" device linking one foot to a chest harness for 8 weeks. Ultrasound measurements of thoracolumbar fascia thickness and shear plane mobility (shear strain during passive hip flexion were made at the 8 week time point on the non-intervention side (injury and/or hobble. Injury alone caused both an increase in fascia thickness (p = .007 and a decrease in fascia shear strain on the non-injured side (p = .027. Movement restriction alone did not change fascia thickness but did decrease shear strain on the non-hobble side (p = .024. The combination of injury plus movement restriction had additive effects on reducing fascia mobility with a 52% reduction in shear strain compared with controls and a 28% reduction compared to movement restriction alone. These results suggest that a back injury involving fascia, even when healed, can affect the relative mobility of fascia layers away from the injured area, especially when movement is also restricted.

  9. Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma and multiple thoraco-lumbar lateral meningoceles: two rare pathological entities in a patient with NF-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, C.; Carneiro, E.; Fonseca, J.; Salgado, A. [Hospital S. Joao, Departments of Neuroradiology, Porto (Portugal); Pereira, P.; Vaz, R. [Hospital S. Joao, Department of Neurosurgery, Porto (Portugal); Pinto, R. [Hospital S. Joao, Department of Orthopaedics, Porto (Portugal); Capelinha, A.F.; Lopes, J.M. [Hospital S. Joao, Department of Pathology, Porto (Portugal)

    2005-02-01

    Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EHE) is a rare vascular soft-tissue tumour of intermediate malignancy. Neurofibromatosis type I (NF-1) is a genetic syndrome associated with soft tissue sarcoma and higher risk of developing neoplasia. Lateral meningoceles are uncommon entities, being mostly associated with NF-1. We report a case of a 31-year-old woman, with NF-1 and past history of right thalamic/peduncular astrocytoma WHO grade II, admitted to the Neurosurgery Department in December 2003 due to severe low back pain, irradiating to the left leg without a radicular pattern. Thoraco-lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large left posterior paravertebral expansive lesion, bilateral and multiple thoraco-lumbar lateral meningoceles and dural ectasias with scalloping of the vertebral bodies. Biopsy of the paravertebral mass lesion disclosed EHE. We present this case because of the novel association between NF-1 and EHE, and the unusual aggressiveness of the neoplasia. Additionally, we highlight the co-existence of bilateral and multiple lateral meningoceles. (orig.)

  10. EFFECTS OF X-RAY BEAM ANGLE AND GEOMETRIC DISTORTION ON WIDTH OF EQUINE THORACOLUMBAR INTERSPINOUS SPACES USING RADIOGRAPHY AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djernaes, Julie D.; Nielsen, Jon V.; Berg, Lise C.

    2017-01-01

    The widths of spaces between the thoracolumbar processi spinosi (interspinous spaces) are frequently assessed using radiography in sports horses; however effects of varying X-ray beam angles and geometric distortion have not been previously described. The aim of this prospective, observational st...

  11. Phosphorylation of CRMP2 by Cdk5 Regulates Dendritic Spine Development of Cortical Neuron in the Mouse Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Jin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper density and morphology of dendritic spines are important for higher brain functions such as learning and memory. However, our knowledge about molecular mechanisms that regulate the development and maintenance of dendritic spines is limited. We recently reported that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 is required for the development and maintenance of dendritic spines of cortical neurons in the mouse brain. Previous in vitro studies have suggested the involvement of Cdk5 substrates in the formation of dendritic spines; however, their role in spine development has not been tested in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that Cdk5 phosphorylates collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2 in the dendritic spines of cultured hippocampal neurons and in vivo in the mouse brain. When we eliminated CRMP2 phosphorylation in CRMP2KI/KI mice, the densities of dendritic spines significantly decreased in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in the mouse brain. These results indicate that phosphorylation of CRMP2 by Cdk5 is important for dendritic spine development in cortical neurons in the mouse hippocampus.

  12. Lesion of the Spine in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Syniachenko

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions. Spondylopathy is a frequent manifestation of RA, it is correlated with many clinical and laboratory signs of the disease. In the future, early detection of the spine pathology will be useful in these patients for proper rehabilitation measures.

  13. San Pablo Avenue Green Stormwater Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the SFBWQP San Pablo Avenue Green Stormwater Spine Project project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  14. The FAt Spondyloarthritis Spine Score (FASSS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Zhao, Zheng; Lambert, Robert Gw

    2013-01-01

    an important measure of treatment efficacy as well as a surrogate marker for new bone formation. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a new scoring method for fat lesions in the spine, the Fat SpA Spine Score (FASSS), which in contrast to the existing scoring method addresses the localization......Studies have shown that fat lesions follow resolution of inflammation in the spine of patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA). Fat lesions at vertebral corners have also been shown to predict development of new syndesmophytes. Therefore, scoring of fat lesions in the spine may constitute both...... and phenotypic diversity of fat lesions in patients with axial SpA....

  15. Biostratigraphy of Echinoid spines, Cretaceous of Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkland, P.L.

    1984-04-01

    Echinoid (sea urchin) spines from Cretaceous strata have widely varying morphology. They are common, and most are small enough to be recovered from well cuttings. Many forms have restricted ranges; consequently, echinoid spine have substantial biostratigraphic utility. There have been established 115 form taxa of echinoid spines and 14 form taxa of ophiuroid-asteroid spines for the Cretaceous of Texas. The specimens used for establishing the form taxa were processed from 533 outcrop samples (78 localities) from 30 Cretaceous formations, each with a well-defined age based on faunal zones of ammonites and Foraminifera. A dichotomous key in 9 parts and a catalog of scanning electron micrographs (87 plates) have been set up to assist identification of the form taxa. Range charts for the echinoid and ophiuroid-asteroid form taxa have utility through the Cretaceous of much of the Gulf Coastal area. The most precise zonation has been possible for the Albian.

  16. A Rare Nasal Bone Fracture: Anterior Nasal Spine Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egemen Kucuk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anterior nasal spine fractures are a quite rare type of nasal bone fractures. Associated cervical spine injuries are more dangerous than the nasal bone fracture. A case of the anterior nasal spine fracture, in a 18-year-old male was presented. Fracture of the anterior nasal spine, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the midface injuries and also accompanying cervical spine injury should not be ignored.

  17. A method for articulating and displaying the human spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Robert W

    2009-11-01

    An inexpensive and effective method for articulating a dry human spine is described. By constructing a Styrofoam spine tray, analysts can now accurately position and align each vertebra in correct anatomical order, allow for gaps because of missing vertebrae, and lay out the spine for documentation and photography. The spine tray provides analysts with a quick, easy, and professional quality method for aligning and orienting the human spine in the field and laboratory.

  18. How the neck affects the back: changes in regional cervical sagittal alignment correlate to HRQOL improvement in adult thoracolumbar deformity patients at 2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Scheer, Justin K; Terran, Jamie S; Smith, Justin S; Hamilton, D Kojo; Kim, Han Jo; Mundis, Greg M; Hart, Robert A; McCarthy, Ian M; Klineberg, Eric; Lafage, Virginie; Bess, Shay; Schwab, Frank; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Ames, Christopher P

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT Regional cervical sagittal alignment (C2-7 sagittal vertical axis [SVA]) has been shown to correlate with health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The study objective was to examine the relationship between cervical and thoracolumbar alignment parameters with HRQOL among patients with operative and nonoperative adult thoracolumbar deformity. METHODS This is a multicenter prospective data collection of consecutive patients with adult thoracolumbar spinal deformity. Clinical measures of disability included the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Scoliosis Research Society-22 Patient Questionnaire (SRS-22), and 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Cervical radiographic parameters were correlated with global sagittal parameters within the nonoperative and operative cohorts. A partial correlation analysis was performed controlling for C-7 SVA. The operative group was subanalyzed by the magnitude of global deformity (C-7 SVA ≥ 5 cm vs Physical Component Summary (PCS), SRS Activity domain, and SRS Appearance domain. Baseline C2-7 SVA also correlated with SRS Pain and SRS Total. For the operative patients with baseline C-7 SVA ≥ 5 cm, the 2-year C2-7 SVA significantly correlated with 2-year Mental Component Summary, SRS Mental, SRS Satisfaction, and decreases in ODI. Decreases in C2-7 SVA at 2 years significantly correlated with lower ODI at 2 years. Using partial correlations while controlling for C-7 SVA, the C2-7 SVA correlated significantly with baseline ODI (r = 0.211, p = 0.002), PCS (r = -0.178, p = 0.009), and SRS Activity (r = -0.145, p = 0.034) for the entire cohort. In the subset of operative patients with larger thoracolumbar deformities, the change in C2-7 SVA correlated with change in ODI (r = -0.311, p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS Changes in cervical lordosis correlate to HRQOL improvements in thoracolumbar deformity patients at 2-year follow-up. Regional cervical sagittal parameters such as CL and C2-7 SVA are correlated with clinical measures of

  19. Cervical Spine Axial Rotation Goniometer Design

    OpenAIRE

    Emin Ulaş Erdem; Filiz Can

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the cervical spine rotation movement is quiet harder than other joints. Configuration and arrangement of current goniometers and devices is not always practic in clinics and some methods are quiet expensive. The cervical axial rotation goniometer designed by the authors is consists of five pieces (head apparatus, chair, goniometric platform, eye pads and camera). With this goniometer design a detailed evaluation of cervical spine range of motion can be obtained. Besides, measureme...

  20. [New progress on three-dimensional movement measurement analysis of human spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiao-wen; He, Xi-jing; Huang, Si-hua; Liang, Bao-bao; Yu, Zi-rui

    2015-05-01

    Spinal biomechanics, especially the range of spine motion,has close connection with spinal surgery. The change of the range of motion (ROM) is an important indicator of diseases and injuries of spine, and the essential evaluating standards of effect of surgeries and therapies to spine. The analysis of ROM can be dated to the time of the invention of X-ray and even that before it. With the development of science and technology as well as the optimization of various types of calculation methods, diverse measuring methods have emerged, from imaging methods to non-imaging methods, from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, from measuring directly on the X-ray films to calculating automatically by computer. Analysis of ROM has made great progress, but there are some older methods cannot meet the needs of the times and disappear, some classical methods such as X-ray still have vitality. Combining different methods, three dimensions and more vivo spine research are the trend of analysis of ROM. And more and more researchers began to focus on vivo spine research. In this paper, the advantages and disadvantages of the methods utilized recently are presented through viewing recent literatures, providing reference and help for the movement analysis of spine.

  1. [Biomechanical study on the posterior screw fixation in the lower cervical spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hua-jie; Xu, Rong-min; Liu, Guan-yi

    2011-06-01

    So far, the fixation in the lower cervical spine through posterior approach technology has commonly been used, besides the lateral screw and pedicle screw techniques, transarticular screw and laminar screw techniques have being paid more attention recently. This article introduced four screw fixation ways in the lower cervical spine through posterior approach and reviewed the recent biomechanics studies of four screw fixation techniques. The biomechanics study includes stabilization, pollout strength, insertion technique, and screw characteristic and so on. Lateral screw and pedicle screw techniques have become an effective internal fixation way for the lower cervical spine instability because of their superior stabilization and higher pollout strength. Transarticular screw fixation has become a new way to fix the lower cervical spine through posterior approach, which has widely surgical indications. Besides, this technique is relatively safe, simple and has achieved favorable curative effect in clinic. Laminar screw fixation technique is rarely used in clinic, but the study of anatomy and biomechanics confirmed that this technique can be applied as a salvage technique in clinic. Above four techniques of the screw fixation in the lower cervical spine through posterior approach have advantages and disadvantages, respectively, and the application in clinic is different. Through the biomechanics study of these techniques will contribute to the development of the techniques of the screw fixation in the lower cervical spine through posterior approach and guide the clinical work effectively.

  2. Spine Shape Predicts Vertebral Fractures in Postmenopausal Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bruijne, Marleen; Pettersen, P.C.; A. Ghosh

    2008-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of patients at high risk of developing fragility fractures is crucial in the management of osteoporosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the shape of the spine as can be observed from lateral X-rays is indicative for the risk of future development...... of fragility fractures in the spine. The study included 568 elderly women of whom 455 maintained skeletal integrity during the mean observation period of 4.8 years and 113 sustained at least one vertebral fracture in the same period. At baseline, none of the women had experienced a previous osteoporotic...... fracture, and the two groups were not significantly different in terms of age (66.2 ± 0.2 vs. 66.1 ± 0.4), spine BMD (0.77 ± 0.004 vs. 0.76 ± 0.008), body weight (64.7 ± 0.4 vs. 64.6 ± 0.8), height (160.6 ± 0.3 vs. 161 ± 0.5), and number of years since menopause. A radiologist annotated the corner points...

  3. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi [Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  4. Repair of the spondylolysis in lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matta Ibarra, Javier; Arrieta Maria, Victor; Torres Romero Fernando; Ramirez Cabrales, Vladimir

    2005-01-01

    The objective is to present the surgical experience in the repair of the spondylolysis in lumbar spine. Background: Spodylolysis is an important cause of low back pain in young adults and is responsible for high grade of incapacity. Classically, patients with surgical indications with Spondylolysis have been treated with vertebral arthrodesis arthrodesis, with the following functional lost of the intervened segment and biomechanical overload of the upper contiguous segment. There are not previous reports about repairing of lysis in national literature and international references in this technique are scarce. Materials and methods: Eight patients within 2002-2004 were operated, a direct repairing of the lyses by in situ, fusion and interfragmental osteosynthesis with AO 3.5 mm titanium cortical screws with autogenous bone grafts was achieved. The casuistic was analyzed depending on clinical presentation, consolidation, mobility and vitality of the disc in imaginology studies. Results: During the follow-up a firm fusion in all cases, mobility and vitality preservation of the L5-S1 intervertebral disc was detected. There was neither infection nor neurological deficit. Recommendations: Repairing of spondylolysis in lumbar column, in young symptomatic patients without or with mild lystesis (grade I) and without associated disc damage, is a safe surgical technique

  5. Rheumatic diseases of the spine: imaging diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narváez, J A; Hernández-Gañán, J; Isern, J; Sánchez-Fernández, J J

    2016-04-01

    Spinal involvement is common both in the spondyloarthritides and in rheumatoid arthritis, in which the cervical segment is selectively affected. Rheumatoid involvement of the cervical spine has characteristic radiologic manifestations, fundamentally different patterns of atlantoaxial instability. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for evaluating the possible repercussions of atlantoaxial instability on the spinal cord and/or nerve roots in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as for evaluating parameters indicative of active inflammation, such as bone edema and synovitis. Axial involvement is characteristic in the spondyloarthritides and has distinctive manifestations on plain-film X-rays, which reflect destructive and reparative phenomena. The use of MRI has changed the conception of spondyloarthritis because it is able to directly detect the inflammatory changes that form part of the disease, making it possible to establish the diagnosis early in the disease process, when plain-film X-ray findings are normal (non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis), to assess the prognosis of the disease, and to contribute to treatment planning. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Subcutaneous fluid collection: An imaging marker for treatment response of infectious thoracolumbar spondylodiscitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakigi, Takahide; Okada, Tomohisa; Sakai, Osamu; Iwamoto, Yoshitaka; Kubo, Soichi; Yamamoto, Akira; Togashi, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • No imaging marker for treatment response of spondylodiscitis (SD) has been proposed. • Volume changes of subcutaneous fluid collection (SFC) had significant correlation with changes of C-reactive protein (CRP). • SFC can be used as an imaging marker for treatment response of SD on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate prevalence of subcutaneous fluid collection (SFC) in infectious thoracolumbar spondylodiscitis (SD) compared with control patients and to investigate correlation between volume changes of SFC and treatment response of SD. Materials and methods: This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board. From April 2011 to March 2012, 49 patients (24 SD and 25 non-SD patients) were enrolled. Prevalence of SFC was evaluated respectively for SD and non-SD patients using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the sagittal short tau inversion recovery (STIR) imaging or fat-saturated T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), and compared. In SD patients with SFC, correlation was investigated between SFC volume on the 1st MRI and initial clinical status. The same analysis was conducted also for SFC volume changes from the 1st to 2nd or last MRI. Results: SFC was found in 20 patients with SD (83.3%) and 3 non-SD patients (12%) with significant difference (p < .001). In 20 SD patients with SFC, 17 patients had follow-up MRI. For the 1st MRI, no significant correlation was found between volume of SFC and initial status of patients, including body weight, body mass index (BMI), white blood cell (WBC), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). However, significant positive correlations were found between changes of C-reactive protein (CRP) and SFC volume from the 1st to 2nd as well as from the 1st to the last MRI (each p < .05). Conclusion: SD patients had significantly higher prevalence of SFC than non-SD patients. Volume changes of SFC had significant correlation with changes of CRP, which can be used as an imaging

  7. Subcutaneous fluid collection: An imaging marker for treatment response of infectious thoracolumbar spondylodiscitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakigi, Takahide, E-mail: tkakigi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Okada, Tomohisa, E-mail: tomokada@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Sakai, Osamu, E-mail: osamu.sakai@bmc.org [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, 820 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Iwamoto, Yoshitaka, E-mail: iwacame@hotmail.co.jp [Department of General Internal Medicine, Rakuwakai Otowa Hospital, 2 Otowachoinji-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8062 (Japan); Kubo, Soichi, E-mail: kubo-s@mbox.kyoto-inet.or.jp [Department of Radiology, Rakuwakai Otowa Hospital, 2 Otowachoinji-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8062 (Japan); Yamamoto, Akira, E-mail: yakira@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Togashi, Kaori, E-mail: nmdioffice@kuhp.kyoto-ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • No imaging marker for treatment response of spondylodiscitis (SD) has been proposed. • Volume changes of subcutaneous fluid collection (SFC) had significant correlation with changes of C-reactive protein (CRP). • SFC can be used as an imaging marker for treatment response of SD on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate prevalence of subcutaneous fluid collection (SFC) in infectious thoracolumbar spondylodiscitis (SD) compared with control patients and to investigate correlation between volume changes of SFC and treatment response of SD. Materials and methods: This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board. From April 2011 to March 2012, 49 patients (24 SD and 25 non-SD patients) were enrolled. Prevalence of SFC was evaluated respectively for SD and non-SD patients using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the sagittal short tau inversion recovery (STIR) imaging or fat-saturated T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), and compared. In SD patients with SFC, correlation was investigated between SFC volume on the 1st MRI and initial clinical status. The same analysis was conducted also for SFC volume changes from the 1st to 2nd or last MRI. Results: SFC was found in 20 patients with SD (83.3%) and 3 non-SD patients (12%) with significant difference (p < .001). In 20 SD patients with SFC, 17 patients had follow-up MRI. For the 1st MRI, no significant correlation was found between volume of SFC and initial status of patients, including body weight, body mass index (BMI), white blood cell (WBC), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). However, significant positive correlations were found between changes of C-reactive protein (CRP) and SFC volume from the 1st to 2nd as well as from the 1st to the last MRI (each p < .05). Conclusion: SD patients had significantly higher prevalence of SFC than non-SD patients. Volume changes of SFC had significant correlation with changes of CRP, which can be used as an imaging

  8. Reoperation Rates Following Instrumented Lumbar Spine Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmola, Tero Matti; Häkkinen, Arja; Järvenpää, Salme; Marttinen, Ilkka; Vihtonen, Kimmo; Neva, Marko

    2018-02-15

    A prospective cohort study. This study evaluated the cumulative reoperation rate and indications for reoperation following instrumented lumbar spine fusion (LSF). LSF reduces disability and improves health-related quality of life for patients with several spinal disorders. The rate of instrumented LSF has drastically increased over the last few decades. The increased incidence of LSF, however, has led to increased reoperation rates. The data are based on the prospective LSF database of Tampere University Hospital that includes all elective indications for LSF surgery. A total of 433 consecutive patients (64% women, mean age 62 years) who underwent LSF in Tampere University Hospital between 2008 and 2011 were evaluated and indications for reoperations were rechecked from patient records and radiographs. The most common diagnosis for the primary surgery was degenerative spondylolisthesis and the mean follow-up time was 3.9 years. The cumulative incidence of reoperations and the "time to event" survival rate was calculated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. By the end of 2013, 81 patients had undergone at least one reoperation. The cumulative reoperation rate at 2 years was 12.5% (95% confidence interval: 95% CI: 9.7-16.0) and at 4 years was 19.3% (95% CI: 15.6-23.8). The most common pathology leading to reoperation was adjacent segment pathology with a cumulative reoperation rate of 8.7% (95% CI: 6.1-12.5) at 4 years. The corresponding rates for early and late instrumentation failure were 4.4% (95% CI: 2.7-7.0) and 2.9% (95% CI: 1.9-7.1), respectively, and for acute complications, 2.5% (95% CI: 1.4-4.5). Although previous studies reported that early results of spinal fusion are promising, one in five patients required reoperation within 4 years after surgery. Patients and surgeons should be aware of the reoperation rates when planning fusion surgery. 4.

  9. Digital tomosynthesis as a new diagnostic tool for evaluation of spine damage in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Young Bin; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Park, Jina; Joo, Kyung Bin; Song, Yoonah; Lee, Seunghun

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to compare digital tomosynthesis (DTS) with radiographs for the assessment of spinal bone damage in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The study comprised 68 patients with AS who underwent both DTS and radiographs of the cervical and lumbar spine on the same day. Spinal bone damage was assessed using the modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spinal Score (mSASSS) and the presence of facet joint damage. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test and McNemar's test were used to compare spinal bone damage between the two modalities. In 68 AS patients with mean 4.5 years of disease duration, the mean mSASSS was 11.7 ± 11.3 with radiographs and 13.1 ± 11.5 with DTS (p = 0.001). A grade 1 (erosion, sclerosis, or squaring) score in the mSASSS system was higher with DTS than with radiographs (p = 0.001), but grade 2 (syndesmophyte) and grade 3 (bridge) scores (p > 0.005 each) were not. In particular, the grade 1 score was higher with DTS than with radiographs at the cervicothoracic (p < 0.001) and thoracolumbar (p = 0.003) junctions. With regard to facet joint damage, erosion/sclerosis of facet joints was better depicted by DTS than by radiographs in the cervical (54.4 vs. 22.1%, p < 0.001) and lumbar spine (72.1 vs. 11.8%, p < 0.001). DTS depicted more subtle damage of spinal vertebrae in patients with AS than radiographs did. Moreover, erosion/sclerosis of facet joints was better detected with DTS than with radiographs.

  10. Complete debridement for treatment of thoracolumbar spinal tuberculosis: a clinical curative effect observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Weidong; Wang, Qian; Wang, Zili; Geng, Guangqi

    2014-06-01

    Traditional focal debridement involves clearing of cold abscesses, caseous necrosis, residual intervertebral disc tissue, sinus tracts, bony sequestration, and inflammatory granulation. Reports have demonstrated that approximately 13% to 26% of patients were not better or relapsed after traditional focal debridement; these patients required a second surgery or prolonged antituberculous therapy. The presence of retained and diseased focal tissues requiring removal remains poorly understood. The contents of these retained tuberculous foci, improvement of surgical strategies, and improvement in spinal tuberculosis success rate are key subjects for discussion. To explain the contents of foci and explore the surgical methods and curative effect of complete debridement. Retrospective study of the curative effect of treatment of thoracolumbar spinal tuberculosis by using complete debridement. A total of 289 patients were included. The outcomes were evaluated clinically by Frankel grading. The status of the anterior fusion was assessed according to the Moon standard. Eradication of infection was determined by the level of C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. X-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging were used to evaluate disease localization and morphology. A total of 289 patients with spinal tuberculosis (150 male and 139 female patients, aged 18-82; average age, 41.0±1.4 years) were included in this study. Damage to the vertebrae was as follows: 86 patients had thoracic damage, 49 had thoracolumbar damage, 125 had lumbar damage, and 47 had lumbosacral segment damage. After 2 to 4 weeks of antituberculous therapy, all patients underwent anterior debridement, deformity correction, graft fusion, and internal fixation. In this study, complete debridement was defined as the clearing of any damage or disease, including psoas abscesses, granulomas, residual intervertebral disc tissue, sinus tracts, bony sequestration, and inflammatory

  11. Imaging the Traumatized Spine'Clearing The Cervical Spine'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monu, U.V.J.

    2015-01-01

    Failure to recognize and diagnose injury to the cervical spine on plain radiographs can lead to severe and devastating consequences to the patient in particular and to the radiologist financially and otherwise. CT examination of the cervical spine aids and significantly improves diagnoses in many instances. it is neither economically feasible nor desirable to obtain CT on all patients. Meticulous attention to detail and zero tolerance for deviations from the usual radiographic landmarks will help select cases that should obtain additional imaging in form of CT or MRI scans. Faced with a task of clearing a cervical spine, a number of options are available. The first discriminator is whether or not the patient can be cleared clinically. If that is not possible, radiographic evaluation is needed. Strict adherence to a minimum three view plain radiograph for C-spine series must be maintained. Deviation from established norms for cervical spine radiographs should trigger a CT for additional evaluation

  12. Andersson lesions of whole spine magnetic resonance imaging compared with plain radiography in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Kyu; Shin, Kichul; Song, Yoonah; Lee, Seunghun; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the characteristics of Andersson lesions using whole spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with plain radiography in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A total of 62 patients with AS who had undergone whole spine MRI and plain radiography were retrospectively enrolled in this study. We compared the number of discovertebral units (DVUs) with Andersson lesions with clinical and radiographic indices such as erythrocyte sediment rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spine Score (mSASSS). Fifty-three patients (85.5 %) by whole spine MRI and 23 patients (37.1 %) by plain radiography had at least one Andersson lesion. We found 129 DVUs with Andersson lesions (11.1 %) by MRI and 35 DVUs by plain radiography over all the spine levels. Andersson lesions by MRI were most commonly detected at the lower thoracic spine (from T7-8 to T12-L1). Among the 151 total Andersson lesions by whole spine MRI, 41 were identified as central disc type, 26 as anterior peripheral disc type, 44 as posterior peripheral disc type, and 40 as diffuse disc type. However, the number of Andersson lesions did not correlate with ESR, CRP, BASDAI, BASFI, or mSASSS (p > 0.05 for all). Our study indicates that the presence of Andersson lesions in patients with AS is clearly underestimated. MRI is a superior technique for detecting early Andersson lesions compared with plain radiography.

  13. National representation in the spine literature: a bibliometric analysis of highly cited spine journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Fan; Jia, Zhiwei; Liu, Ming

    2016-03-01

    Significant progress has been seen in the field of spine in recent years as a consequence of worldwide contributions. However, the national productivity to the field of spine is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the national contributions in the field of spine. Web of Science was searched for articles published in the five highly cited spine journals from 2009 to 2013, including The Spine Journal, European Spine Journal, Spine, Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, and Journal of Spinal Disorders and Techniques. The number of total articles, the per capita numbers, impact factors, citations and funding source were recorded and analyzed. A total number of 6920 articles were published in the five journals from 2009 to 2013 worldwide. North America, East Asia, and West Europe were the most productive world areas. High-income countries published 83.97% of articles, middle-income 16.01%, and lower-income just 0.01%. The United States published the most number of articles (35.79%), followed by China, Japan, South Korea, and Canada, and had the highest total impact factors and the highest total citations. However, when normalized to population size, Switzerland had the highest number of articles per million populations, followed by The Netherlands and Sweden. The majority of the spine articles are published by authors from high-income countries while few publications from low-income countries. The United States is the most productive country in the field of spine. However, some European countries may be more productive when normalized to population size.

  14. Initial Experience With Real-Time Continuous Physical Activity Monitoring in Patients Undergoing Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Justin K; Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Keefe, Malla K; Lafage, Virginie; Bess, Shay; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Burton, Douglas C; Hart, Robert A; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Schwab, Frank; Smith, Justin S; Smith, Zachary A; Koski, Tyler R; Ames, Christopher P

    2017-12-01

    Multicenter prospective pilot study. To evaluate if continuous physical activity monitoring by a personal electronic 3-dimensional accelerometer device is feasible and can provide objective data that correlates with patient-reported outcomes following spine surgery. Self-reported health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) metrics are inherently limited by being very subjective, having a low frequency of data collection, and inconsistent follow-up. Inclusion criteria: adults (18+), thoracolumbar deformity or degenerative disease, and regular access to a computer with internet connection. Physical activity parameters included: number of daily steps, maximum hourly steps, and activity intensity. Patients completed the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), the Short-Form Health Survey 36 (SF-36), and the Scoliosis Research Society-22r (SRS22) preoperatively and postoperatively at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. Thirty-two patients were enrolled, 8 (25%) withdrew, 1 (3.1%) died, and 1 (3.1%) did not end up undergoing surgery resulting in 22 (68.8%) available patients. Mean preoperative and postoperative step ranges were 1278±767 to 17,800±6464 and 891±587 to 12,655±7038, respectively. Eleven patients improved in mean total daily steps at the final postoperative month with 2 having significant improvements (P0.05) and 6 patients had significantly lower mean total daily steps at 6 months (PPhysical Component Summary, SRS Activity, SRS Appearance, SRS Mental, SRS Satisfaction, and SRS Total score at 6 months postoperative (PPhysical Component Summary were significantly correlated with preoperative average total daily steps (r=-0.61, P=0.0058 and r=0.60, P=0.0114, respectively). No other HRQOL metrics were significantly correlated at baseline or at 6 months postoperative (P>0.05). A prospective pilot study for continuous real-time physical activity monitoring was successfully completed. This is the first study of its kind and demonstrates a foundation to continuous physical

  15. MRI in degenerative diseases of the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubeus, P.; Sander, B.; Hosten, N.; Mayer, H.M.; Weber, U.; Felix, R.

    1994-01-01

    MRI has grown increasingly important in recent years in diagnosis of degenerative diseases of the cervical spine, due to improvements of method that have made it a valuable diagnostic tool. The following contribution gives a brief introduction to the pathophysiology of degenerative changes in the cervical vertebral column and to the indications for MRI, describing within the framework of imaging the present state of MR examination technique. The ranking of the various gradient echo sequences, of the 3D methods and of the administration of contrast media in cervical myelopathy and radiaculopathy is discussed. (orig.) [de

  16. Percutaneous versus traditional and paraspinal posterior open approaches for treatment of thoracolumbar fractures without neurologic deficit: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiang-Yao; Zhang, Xi-Nuo; Hai, Yong

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluated differences in outcome variables between percutaneous, traditional, and paraspinal posterior open approaches for traumatic thoracolumbar fractures without neurologic deficit. A systematic review of PubMed, Cochrane, and Embase was performed. In this meta-analysis, we conducted online searches of PubMed, Cochrane, Embase using the search terms "thoracolumbar fractures", "lumbar fractures", ''percutaneous'', "minimally invasive", ''open", "traditional", "posterior", "conventional", "pedicle screw", "sextant", and "clinical trial". The analysis was performed on individual patient data from all the studies that met the selection criteria. Clinical outcomes were expressed as risk difference for dichotomous outcomes and mean difference for continuous outcomes with 95 % confidence interval. Heterogeneity was assessed using the χ 2 test and I 2 statistics. There were 4 randomized controlled trials and 14 observational articles included in this analysis. Percutaneous approach was associated with better ODI score, less Cobb angle correction, less Cobb angle correction loss, less postoperative VBA correction, and lower infection rate compared with open approach. Percutaneous approach was also associated with shorter operative duration, longer intraoperative fluoroscopy, less postoperative VAS, and postoperative VBH% in comparison with traditional open approach. No significant difference was found in Cobb angle correction, postoperative VBA, VBA correction loss, Postoperative VBH%, VBH correction loss, and pedicle screw misplacement between percutaneous approach and open approach. There was no significant difference in operative duration, intraoperative fluoroscopy, postoperative VAS, and postoperative VBH% between percutaneous approach and paraspianl approach. The functional and the radiological outcome of percutaneous approach would be better than open approach in the long term. Although trans-muscular spatium approach belonged to open fixation methods

  17. Growth modulation and remodeling by means of posterior tethering technique for correction of early-onset scoliosis with thoracolumbar kyphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Alaaeldin A; Aker, Loai; Hanbali, Yahia; Sbaih, Aesha; Nazzal, Zaher

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of the non-fusion instrumented procedure with compression adjunct to lengthening by distraction in facilitating spinal modulation of the wedged peak vertebra, in patients with congenital thoracolumbar kyphosis/kyphoscoliosis according to the Hueter-Volkmann law. The authors seek to address the progressive modulation of the most wedged vertebra by analyzing the subjects' pre-operative and latest follow-up sagittal radiograph. Ongoing data collection of 14 peak wedged vertebra modulation during surgical management of 13 patients with Type I congenital thoracolumbar kyphosis (5 patients) or kyphoscoliosis (8 patients). Age at initial surgery averaged 58.6 months, with mean follow-up of 55.6 months (24-78). All were done with hybrid rib construct with clawing fashion through a single posterior approach with at least 4 lengthenings. Two vertebral bodies were selected, the peaked deformed vertebrae within the instrumentation compression level (WICL) and the vertebrae nearest but outside the instrumentation compression process (OICL). Anterior vertebral body height (AVBH) and posterior vertebral body height (PVBH) were measured in both vertebral bodies. Regarding measured vertebrae (WICL), average preoperative AVBH/PVBH ratio significantly increased from 0.54 to 0.77 in the final follow-up. Regarding measured vertebrae (OICL), the average preoperative AVBH/PVBH ratio increased from 0.76 to 0.79 in the final follow-up. Modulation can be confirmed in the most deformed vertebrae (WICL) as the difference between the change in AVBH/PVBH ratio between vertebrae (OICL) and (WICL) was statistically significant (P modulation (WICL) in comparison with the (OICL). This calls for further studies on the impact of surgical correction of EOS on modulation of the vertebrae.

  18. Posterior Fixation with Unilateral Same Segment Pedicle Fixation and Contralateral Hook in Surgical Treatment of Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Omidi-Kashani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background In surgical treatment of thoracolumbar burst fractures, most authors try to lower the number of vertebrae involved during the surgery. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of a medium-segment posterior spinal fixation in these patients. Patients and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 27 patients (18 male, 9 female with mean age of 39.4 ± 15.0 years old in a before-and-after study. The mean follow-up period was 38.4 ± 15.6 months. We involved 2 intact above vertebrae and one intact below vertebra, inserting a pedicular screw at the fractured level and supplemented the construct with contralateral infralaminar hook. Clinical and radiologic characteristics were assessed with American spinal injury association (ASIA scale, oswestry disability index (ODI, visual analogue scale (VAS, and plain radiography. Data analysis was carried out by SPSS version 11.5 software. Results Mean post traumatic kyphosis was + 15.7° ± 3.3° that was changed to - 8.5° ± 4.3° and +1° ± 4.4° at immediate and last visit after surgery, respectively. Mean loss of correction (LOC was 9.5° ± 1.9° (P < 0.001. At the most recent follow-up visit, mean ODI and VAS were 15.0 ± 14.4 and 2.4 ± 2.5, respectively and 24 cases (88.9% declared excellent or good clinical results. At the last follow-up visit, LOC had no significant correlation neither with VAS nor ODI. Conclusions In surgical treatment of thoracolumbar burst fractures, a medium-segment posterior spinal fixation, although cannot maintain the radiologic reduction of the fractured vertebrae efficiently, is not only associated with acceptable clinical outcome but also spare one lower intact lumbar segment and therefore recommended.

  19. 3D visualization of Thoraco-Lumbar Spinal Lesions in German Shepherd Dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azpiroz, J.; Krafft, J.; Cadena, M.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2006-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been found to be an excellent imaging modality due to its sensitivity to characterize the morphology of the spine in dogs. This technique is considered to be particularly helpful for diagnosing spinal cord atrophy and spinal stenosis. The three-dimensional visualization of organs and bones can significantly improve the diagnosis of certain diseases in dogs. CT images were acquired of a German shepherd's dog spinal cord to generate stacks and digitally process them to arrange them in a volume image. All imaging experiments were acquired using standard clinical protocols on a clinical CT scanner. The three-dimensional visualization allowed us to observe anatomical structures that otherwise are not possible to observe with two-dimensional images. The combination of an imaging modality like CT together with imaging processing techniques can be a powerful tool for the diagnosis of a number of animal diseases

  20. The Management of Unstable Cervical Spine Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venu M. Nemani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Injuries to the cervical spine can cause potentially devastating morbidity and even mortality. In this review we discuss the anatomy and biomechanics of the cervical spine. The evaluation and treatment of cervical spine injuries begins with the prompt immobilization of suspected injuries in the field. Once an assessment of the patient's neurological status is made, imaging studies are obtained, which can include X-rays, CT, and MRI. Careful scrutiny of the imaging studies for bony and/or ligamentous injury allows the physician to determine the mechanism of injury, which guides treatment. The ultimate treatment plan can consist of non-operative or operative management, and depends on patient specific factors (medical condition and neurological status, the mechanism of injury, and the resultant degree of instability. With prompt diagnosis and appropriate management, the morbidity of these injuries can be minimized.

  1. Palpation of the upper thoracic spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Vach, Werner; Vach, Kirstin

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the intraobserver reliability (in terms of hour-to-hour and day-to-day reliability) and the interobserver reliability with 3 palpation procedures for the detection of spinal biomechanic dysfunction in the upper 8 segments of the thoracic spine. DESIGN: A repeated-measures des......OBJECTIVE: To assess the intraobserver reliability (in terms of hour-to-hour and day-to-day reliability) and the interobserver reliability with 3 palpation procedures for the detection of spinal biomechanic dysfunction in the upper 8 segments of the thoracic spine. DESIGN: A repeated...... procedure. RESULTS: Using an "expanded" definition of agreement that accepts small inaccuracies (+/-1 segment) in the numbering of spinal segments, we found--based on the pooled data from the thoracic spine--kappa values of 0.59 to 0.77 for the hour-to-hour and the day-to-day intraobserver reliability...

  2. Survey of Hatching Spines of Bee Larvae Including Those of Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozen, Jerome G; Shepard Smith, Corey; Cane, James H

    2017-07-01

    This article explores the occurrence of hatching spines among bee taxa and how these structures enable a larva on hatching to extricate itself from the egg chorion. These spines, arranged in a linear sequence along the sides of the first instar just dorsal to the spiracles, have been observed and recorded in certain groups of solitary and cleptoparasitic bee taxa. After eclosion, the first instar remains loosely covered by the egg chorion. The fact that this form of eclosion has been detected in five families (Table 1 identifies four of the families. The fifth family is the Andrenidae for which the presence of hatching spines in the Oxaeinae will soon be announced.) of bees invites speculation as to whether it is a fundamental characteristic of bees, or at least of solitary and some cleptoparasitic bees. The wide occurrence of these spines has prompted the authors to explore and discover their presence in the highly eusocial Apis mellifera L. Hatching spines were indeed discovered on first instar A. mellifera. The honey bee hatching process appears to differ in that the spines are displayed somewhat differently though still along the sides of the body, and the chorion, instead of splitting along the sides of the elongate egg, seems to quickly disintegrate from the emerging first instar in association with the nearly simultaneous removal of the serosa that covers and separates the first instar from the chorion. Unexpected observations of spherical bodies of various sizes perhaps containing dissolving enzymes being discharged from spiracular openings during hatching may shed future light on the process of how A. mellifera effects chorion removal during eclosion. Whereas hatching spines occur among many groups of bees, they appear to be entirely absent in the Nomadinae and parasitic Apinae, an indication of a different eclosion process. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  3. The surgical management of the rheumatoid spine: Has the evolution of surgical intervention changed outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Bhatia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Surgery for the rheumatoid cervical spine has been shown to stabilize the unstable spine; arrest/improve the progression of neurological deficit, help neck pain, and possibly decelerate the degenerative disease process. Operative intervention for the rheumatoid spine has significantly changed over the last 30 years. Aims: The purpose of this study was to review all cases of cervical rheumatoid spine requiring surgical intervention in a single unit over the last 30 years. Materials and Methods: A prospectively-maintained spine database was retrospectively searched for all cases of rheumatoid spine, leading to a review of indications, imaging, Ranawat and Myelopathy Disability Index measures, surgical morbidity, and survival curve analysis. Results: A total of 224 cases were identified between 1981 and 2011. Dividing the data into three time-epochs, there has been a significant increase in the ratio of segment-saving Goel-Harms C1-C2: Occipitocervical fixation (OCF surgery and survival has increased between 1981 and 2011 from 30% to 51%. Patients undergoing C1-C2 fixation were comparatively less myelopathic and in a better Ranawat class preoperatively, but postoperative outcome measures were well-preserved with favorable mortality rates over mean 39.6 months of follow-up. However, 11% of cases required OCF at mean 28 months post-C1-C2 fixation, largely due to instrumentation failure (80%. Conclusion: We present the largest series of surgically managed rheumatoid spines, revealing comparative data on OCF and C1-C2 fixation. Although survival has improved over the last 30 years, there have been changes in medical, surgical and perioperative management over that period of time too confounding the interpretation; however, the analysis presented suggests that rheumatoid patients presenting early in the disease process may benefit from C1 to C2 fixation, albeit with a proportion requiring OCF at a later time.

  4. The effect of elbow flexor fatigue on spine kinematics and muscle activation in response to sudden loading at the hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwambag, Derek P; Freeman, Nikole E; Brown, Stephen H M

    2015-04-01

    Sudden loads, originating at either the hands or the feet, can cause injury to spine structures. As muscles are primarily responsible for stabilization following a perturbation, the effect of spine muscle fatigue in this context has been well investigated. However, the effect of fatigue of arm muscles, which can help control perturbations originating at the hands, on the spine is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if the magnitude of spine flexion or the pre-activation, reflex amplitude, and reflex latency of spine muscles were altered by elbow flexor fatigue during a sudden loading (6.8 kg) perturbation at the hands. Elbow flexor fatigue was induced by an isometric 30% maximal elbow flexion moment until failure. Results demonstrate that spine kinematics were not altered in the presence of elbow flexor fatigue. Small magnitude differences in trunk muscle pre- and peak activation indicate that the presence of elbow flexor fatigue does not necessitate substantially greater spine muscle action under the tested conditions. Despite fatigued elbow flexors, the arm muscles were sufficiently able to control the perturbation. Interestingly, 5/14 participants demonstrated altered reflex latencies in all observed muscles that lasted up to 10 min after the fatiguing task. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dendritic spine remodeling following early and late Rac1 inhibition after spinal cord injury: evidence for a pain biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng; Hill, Myriam; Liu, Shujun; Chen, Lubin; Bangalore, Lakshmi; Waxman, Stephen G.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a significant complication following spinal cord injury (SCI) with few effective treatments. Drug development for neuropathic pain often fails because preclinical studies do not always translate well to clinical conditions. Identification of biological characteristics predictive of disease state or drug responsiveness could facilitate more effective clinical translation. Emerging evidence indicates a strong correlation between dendritic spine dysgenesis and neuropathic pain. Because dendritic spines are located on dorsal horn neurons within the spinal cord nociceptive system, dendritic spine remodeling provides a unique opportunity to understand sensory dysfunction after SCI. In this study, we provide support for the postulate that dendritic spine profiles can serve as biomarkers for neuropathic pain. We show that dendritic spine profiles after SCI change to a dysgenic state that is characteristic of neuropathic pain in a Rac1-dependent manner. Suppression of the dysgenic state through inhibition of Rac1 activity is accompanied by attenuation of neuropathic pain. Both dendritic spine dysgenesis and neuropathic pain return when inhibition of Rac1 activity is lifted. These findings suggest the utility of dendritic spines as structural biomarkers for neuropathic pain. PMID:26936986

  6. Cervical spine fractures and dislocations in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apple, J.S.; Kirks, D.R.; Merten, D.F.; Martinez, S.

    1987-01-01

    A retrospectivce analysis of pediatric admissions over 10 years revealed 29 patients with cervical spine injuries. Eleven patients were below 12 years of age, and 10 of these had injuries involving C1, C2 or the occipitoatlantal articulation. Eighteen patients were between 12 and 16 years of age with injuries distributed throughout the cervical spine similar to injuries in the adult population. Our results suggest that teenagers with suspected cervical injuries are best evaluated by an adult radiographic series including trauma oblique views. In younger patients, careful evaluation of occipitoatlantoaxial alignment and the prevertebral soft tissues is required for diagnosis and selection of additional imaging evaluation. (orig.)

  7. Cervical Spine Axial Rotation Goniometer Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin Ulaş Erdem

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the cervical spine rotation movement is quiet harder than other joints. Configuration and arrangement of current goniometers and devices is not always practic in clinics and some methods are quiet expensive. The cervical axial rotation goniometer designed by the authors is consists of five pieces (head apparatus, chair, goniometric platform, eye pads and camera. With this goniometer design a detailed evaluation of cervical spine range of motion can be obtained. Besides, measurement of "joint position sense" which is recently has rising interest in researches can be made practically with this goniometer.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine What's in this article? ...

  9. Dendritic spines form 'collars' in hippocampal granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusakov, D A; Stewart, M G; Sojka, M; Richter-Levin, G; Bliss, T V

    1995-07-31

    A quantitative study of the distribution of dendritic spines was carried out in three orders of dendritic branches of granule cells from the dentate gyrus of the rat hippocampus. Golgi-stained preparations (7-19 neurones in each of seven rats) were analysed using computerized microscopy. Identification of spines and quantification of stem-spine geometry was performed using a segmentation algorithm and a line skeleton transformation of dendritic images. Analysis of data using the statistics of point processes revealed that, in all three branch orders, the distribution of visible spines along dendrites was not evenly random, but included dense clusters of spines surrounding the dendritic stem (spine 'collars'). Three-dimensional reconstructions from serial ultrathin sections have confirmed the presence of such spine groups. We speculate the spine collars represent a functional element in which associative synaptic plasticity is fostered by the proximity of individual synapses.

  10. Degenerative Changes in the Spine: Is This Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in my spine. Does this mean I have arthritis? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Yes. ... spine. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. Doctors may also refer to it as degenerative ...

  11. Association between preoperative cervical sagittal deformity and inferior outcomes at 2-year follow-up in patients with adult thoracolumbar deformity: analysis of 182 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Justin K; Passias, Peter G; Sorocean, Alexandra M; Boniello, Anthony J; Mundis, Gregory M; Klineberg, Eric; Kim, Han Jo; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Gupta, Munish; Bess, Shay; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Schwab, Frank; Lafage, Virginie; Smith, Justin S; Ames, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    A high prevalence of cervical deformity (CD) has been identified among adult patients with thoracolumbar spinal deformity undergoing surgical treatment. The clinical impact of this is uncertain. This study aimed to quantify the differences in patient-reported outcomes among patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD) based on presence of CD prior to treatment. A retrospective review was conducted of a multicenter prospective database of patients with ASD who underwent surgical treatment with 2-year follow-up. Patients were grouped by the presence of preoperative CD: 1) cervical positive sagittal malalignment (CPSM) C2-7 sagittal vertical axis ≥ 4 cm; 2) cervical kyphosis (CK) C2-7 angle > 0; 3) CPSM and CK (BOTH); and 4) no baseline CD (NONE). Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) scores included the Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary (PCS and MCS) scores of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Scoliosis Research Society-22 questionnaire (SRS-22), and minimum clinically important difference (MCID) of these scores at 2 years. Standard radiographic measurements were conducted for cervical, thoracic, and thoracolumbar parameters. One hundred eighty-two patients were included in this study: CPSM, 45; CK, 37; BOTH, 16; and NONE, 84. Patients with preoperative CD and those without had similar baseline thoracolumbar radiographic measurements and similar correction rates at 2 years. Patients with and without preoperative CD had similar baseline HRQOL and on average both groups experienced some HRQOL improvement. However, those with preoperative CPSM had significantly worse postoperative ODI, PCS, SRS-22 Activity, SRS-22 Appearance, SRS-22 Pain, SRS-22 Satisfaction, and SRS-22 Total score, and were less likely to meet MCID for ODI, PCS, SRS-22 Activity, and SRS-22 Pain scores with the following ORs and 95% CIs: ODI 0.19 (0.07-0.58), PCS 0.17 (0.06-0.47), SRS-22 Activity 0.23 (0.09-0.62), SRS-22 Pain 0.20 (0

  12. Analogue pattern matching in a dendritic spine model based on phosphorylation of potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, K H; Blackwell, K T

    2000-11-01

    Modification of potassium channels by protein phosphorylation has been shown to play a role in learning and memory. If such memory storage machinery were part of dendritic spines, then a set of spines could act as an 'analogue pattern matching' device by learning a repeatedly presented pattern of synaptic activation. In this study, the plausibility of such analogue pattern matching is investigated in a detailed circuit model of a set of spines attached to a dendritic branch. Each spine head contains an AMPA synaptic channel in parallel with a calcium-dependent potassium channel whose sensitivity depends on its phosphorylation state. Repeated presentation of synaptic activity results in calcium activation of protein kinases and subsequent channel phosphorylation. Simulations demonstrate that signal strength is greatest when the synaptic input pattern is equal to the previously learned pattern, and smaller when components of the synaptic input pattern are either smaller or larger than corresponding components of the previously learned pattern. Therefore, our results indicate that dendritic spines may act as an analogue pattern matching device, and suggest that modulation of potassium channels by protein kinases may mediate neuronal pattern recognition.

  13. Long lasting protein synthesis- and activity-dependent spine shrinkage and elimination after synaptic depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazmín Ramiro-Cortés

    Full Text Available Neuronal circuits modify their response to synaptic inputs in an experience-dependent fashion. Increases in synaptic weights are accompanied by structural modifications, and activity dependent, long lasting growth of dendritic spines requires new protein synthesis. When multiple spines are potentiated within a dendritic domain, they show dynamic structural plasticity changes, indicating that spines can undergo bidirectional physical modifications. However, it is unclear whether protein synthesis dependent synaptic depression leads to long lasting structural changes. Here, we investigate the structural correlates of protein synthesis dependent long-term depression (LTD mediated by metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs through two-photon imaging of dendritic spines on hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We find that induction of mGluR-LTD leads to robust and long lasting spine shrinkage and elimination that lasts for up to 24 hours. These effects depend on signaling through group I mGluRs, require protein synthesis, and activity. These data reveal a mechanism for long lasting remodeling of synaptic inputs, and offer potential insights into mental retardation.

  14. LTP promotes a selective long-term stabilization and clustering of dendritic spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias De Roo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines are the main postsynaptic site of excitatory contacts between neurons in the central nervous system. On cortical neurons, spines undergo a continuous turnover regulated by development and sensory activity. However, the functional implications of this synaptic remodeling for network properties remain currently unknown. Using repetitive confocal imaging on hippocampal organotypic cultures, we find that learning-related patterns of activity that induce long-term potentiation act as a selection mechanism for the stabilization and localization of spines. Through a lasting N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and protein synthesis-dependent increase in protrusion growth and turnover, induction of plasticity promotes a pruning and replacement of nonactivated spines by new ones together with a selective stabilization of activated synapses. Furthermore, most newly formed spines preferentially grow in close proximity to activated synapses and become functional within 24 h, leading to a clustering of functional synapses. Our results indicate that synaptic remodeling associated with induction of long-term potentiation favors the selection of inputs showing spatiotemporal interactions on a given neuron.

  15. Biomechanical evaluation of pedicle screws versus pedicle and laminar hooks in the thoracic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordista, Andrew; Conrad, Bryan; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Walters, Sheri; Rechtine, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    Pedicle screws have been shown to be superior to hooks in the lumbar spine, but few studies have addressed their use in the thoracic spine. The objective of this study was to biomechanically evaluate the pullout strength of pedicle screws in the thoracic spine and compare them to laminar hooks. STUDY DESING/SETTING: Twelve vertebrae (T1-T12) were harvested from each of five embalmed human cadavers (n=60). The age of the donors averaged 83+8.5 years. After bone mineral density had been measured in the vertebrae (mean=0.47 g/cm(3)), spines were disarticulated. Some pedicles were damaged during disarticulation or preparation for testing, so that 100 out of a possible 120 pullout tests were performed. Each vertebra was secured using a custom-made jig, and a posteriorly directed force was applied to either the screw or the claw. Constructs were ramped to failure at 3 mm/min using a Mini Bionix II materials testing machine (MTS, Eden Prairie, MN). Pedicle claws had an average pullout strength of 577 N, whereas the pullout strength of pedicle screws averaged 309 N. Hooks installed using the claw method in the thoracic spine had an overwhelming advantage in pullout strength versus pedicle screws. Even in extremely osteoporotic bone, the claw withstood 88% greater pullout load. The results of this study indicate that hooks should be considered when supplemental instrumentation is required in thoracic vertebrae, especially in osteoporotic bone.

  16. Barriers in the brain : resolving dendritic spine morphology and compartmentalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian, Max; Kusters, Remy; Wierenga, Corette J; Storm, Cornelis; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Kapitein, Lukas C

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines are micron-sized protrusions that harbor the majority of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system. The head of the spine is connected to the dendritic shaft by a 50-400 nm thin membrane tube, called the spine neck, which has been hypothesized to confine biochemical and

  17. Surgical Disorders of the Spine in Adults: Aetiology and Outcome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There has been steady and progressive advancement in spine surgery in Nigeria with the increase in spine surgeons, availability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), intraoperative fluoroscopy and some spinal titanium implants. We decided to study the frequency of various spine pathologies requiring ...

  18. Patterns of spine surgeries at Mulago Hospital | Kigera | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Spine surgery is a specialised area of orthopaedics that is still in its formative stages in Africa. It may be done to relieve symptoms, or stabilise the spine to allow rehabilitation of patients. This review analyses spine surgeries done in the period 2005-2009 in a National Referral Hospital. Objectives: Patterns of ...

  19. Spine surgery practice in Nigeria: present perceptions and future ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Spine surgery is an emerging orthopaedic surgery subspecialty in Nigeria. There are about 2 designated spine surgeons and about 10 other orthopaedic surgeons and neurosurgeons that operate on the spine for 140 million Nigerians. This study is an evaluation of the perception of the health workers in the ...

  20. Early MRI findings in stab wound of the cervical spine: two case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkan, A.; Baysal, T.; Sarac, K.; Sigirci, A.; Kutlu, R. [Inonu Universitesi Turgut Ozal Tip Merkezi, Radyoloji Anabilim Dali, Malatya (Turkey)

    2002-01-01

    MR imaging was found to be the most sensitive modality for the detection of spinal cord abnormalities in the acutely injured spine. Although it is reported that traumatic pneumomyelogram indicates a base-of-skull or middle cranial fossa fracture and is almost certainly associated with intracranial subarachnoid air, early MR imaging may demonstrate subarachnoid air in penetrating trauma of the spinal cord without head injury. We report two cervical-spine stab-wound cases, one of which had subarachnoid air on early MR findings. (orig.)

  1. Spine surgery cost reduction at a specialized treatment center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Dan Carai Maia; Lenza, Mario; de Almeida, Suze Luize Ferraz; dos Santos, Oscar Fernando Pavão; Cendoroglo, Miguel; Lottenberg, Claudio Luiz; Ferretti, Mario

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To compare the estimated cost of treatment of spinal disorders to those of this treatment in a specialized center. Methods An evaluation of average treatment costs of 399 patients referred by a Health Insurance Company for evaluation and treatment at the Spine Treatment Reference Center of Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein. All patients presented with an indication for surgical treatment before being referred for assessment. Of the total number of patients referred, only 54 underwent surgical treatment and 112 received a conservative treatment with motor physical therapy and acupuncture. The costs of both treatments were calculated based on a previously agreed table of values for reimbursement for each phase of treatment. Results Patients treated non-surgically had an average treatment cost of US$ 1,650.00, while patients treated surgically had an average cost of US$ 18,520.00. The total estimated cost of the cohort of patients treated was US$ 1,184,810.00, which represents a 158.5% decrease relative to the total cost projected for these same patients if the initial type of treatment indicated were performed. Conclusion Treatment carried out within a center specialized in treating spine pathologies has global costs lower than those regularly observed. PMID:23579752

  2. Degenerative intraspinal cyst of the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojiri, Hidetoshi; Sakuma, Yoshio; Uta, Soichi

    2009-10-10

    We describe two cases of degenerative intraspinal cyst of the cervical spine that caused a gradually progressive myelopathy. One case had a cyst that arose from the facet joint and the other case had a cyst that formed in the ligamentum flavum. The symptoms improved immediately after posterior decompression by cystectomy with laminoplasty.

  3. Degenerative intraspinal cyst of the cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Nojiri

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe two cases of degenerative intraspinal cyst of the cervical spine that caused a gradually progressive myelopathy. One case had a cyst that arose from the facet joint and the other case had a cyst that formed in the ligamentum flavum. The symptoms improved immediately after posterior decompression by cystectomy with laminoplasty.

  4. Histopathology of Synovial Cysts of the Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebib, Ivan; Chang, Connie Y; Schwab, Joseph H; Kerr, Darcy A; Deshpande, Vikram; Nielsen, G Petur

    2018-01-04

    Cystic lesions derived from the synovial and ligamentous structures of the spine have varied histologic appearances. Not uncommonly, there is discrepancy between the clinico-radiologic diagnosis and histology. Therefore, we sought to characterize the histologic features of tissue submitted as "synovial cysts" of the spine. Resected specimens of the spine labeled "synovial cysts" and "lumbar cysts" were histologically evaluated and classified based on histopathologic features. 75 histologic samples of spinal cysts were identified. 31 were classified as synovial cysts (definite synovial lining), 28 showed pseudocystic degeneration of the ligamentum flavum, 7 showed pseudocyst formation without evidence of synovial lining or degeneration of the ligamentum flavum, 8 showed cyst contents only or no histologic evidence of cyst wall for evaluation. Twenty-five cases (33%), especially those showing pseudocystic degeneration of the ligamentum flavum were associated with very characteristic tumor calcinosis-like calcium deposition with surrounding foreign-body giant cell reaction. Histology of "synovial cysts" of the spine shows varied types of cysts; a large proportion are not synovial lined cysts but rather show pseudocystic degenerative changes of the ligamentum flavum often associated with very characteristic finely granular calcifications and foreign body giant cell reaction. This may have implications, not only in understanding the pathogenesis of these lesions, but also in their varied response to non-surgical interventions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Retropharyngeal cold abscess without Pott's spine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    space is one of the rareforms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Early diagnosis and treatment ... of the disease. We present a case of tuberculous retropharyngeal abscess in an adult woman without tuberculosis of the cervical spine who was managed .... de la face: anatomie et applications a la pathologie. J Neuroradiol 1997 ...

  6. Cervical human spine loads during traumatomechanical investigations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallieris, D.; Rizzetti, A.; Mattern. R.; Thunnissen, J.G.M.; Philippens, M.M.G.M.

    1996-01-01

    The last decade's improvements in automotive safety resulted into a significant decrease of fatal injuries. However, due to the use of belts and airbags it can be observed that cervical spine injuries, non-severe and severe, have become more important. It seems that inertial loading of the neck by

  7. Cervical spine instability in rheumatoid arthritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-01-22

    Jan 22, 1983 ... (ORTH.) Date received: 2 February I 2. Fig. 1. Flexion view of the cervical spine. Pathological anatomy. The rheumatoid process attacks the atlanta-aXial joint in the same way as it does other joints in the body. A synovitis is produced with pannus formation, and the ligaments and capsu- lar structures of the ...

  8. Congenital spine anomalies: the closed spinal dysraphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Erin Simon [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rossi, Andrea [G. Gaslini Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    The term congenital spinal anomalies encompasses a wide variety of dysmorphology that occurs during early development. Familiarity with current terminology and a practical, clinico-radiologic classification system allows the radiologist to have a more complete understanding of malformations of the spine and improves accuracy of diagnosis when these entities are encountered in practice. (orig.)

  9. On the controversies of spine surgery research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, W.C.H.

    1974-01-01

    This thesis is about effectiveness of surgical interventions in the spine and the value of different methodologies for providing a valid answer. In the first part five systematic reviews were performed. One reviewed cervical degenerative disc disease comparing the different anterior fusion

  10. The Spine of the Cosmic Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; Platen, Erwin; Weygaert, Rien van de; Szalay, Alexander S.

    2008-01-01

    We present a new concept, the Spine of the Cosmic Web, for the topological analysis of the Cosmic Web and the identification of its filaments and walls. Based on the watershed segmentation of the cosmic density field, the method invokes the local properties of the regions adjacent to the critical

  11. Cervical Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... see your physician before starting any exercises. The Importance of Exercise for the Neck Spine experts agree that physical ... valuable things you can do for your overall health and is especially important if you have neck pain. Con- tinue exercises as long as your symptoms do not return, ...

  12. Brachial Plexopathy After Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, Khoi D; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective, multicenter case-series study and literature review. To determine the prevalence of brachial plexopathy after cervical spine surgery and to review the literature to better understand the etiology and risk factors of brachial plexopathy after cervical spine surgery. A retrospective case-series study of 12 903 patients at 21 different sites was performed to analyze the prevalence of several different complications, including brachial plexopathy. A literature review of the US National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health (PubMed) database was conducted to identify articles pertaining to brachial plexopathy following cervical spine surgery. In our total population of 12 903 patients, only 1 suffered from postoperative brachial plexopathy. The overall prevalence rate was thus 0.01%, but the prevalence rate at the site where this complication occurred was 0.07%. Previously reported risk factors for postoperative brachial plexopathy include age, anterior surgical procedures, and a diagnosis of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. The condition can also be due to patient positioning during surgery, which can generally be detected via the use of intraoperative neuromonitoring. Brachial plexopathy following cervical spine surgery is rare and merits further study.

  13. Posterior arch defects of the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, A.M.; Wechsler, R.J.; Landy, M.D.; Wetzner, S.M.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1982-05-01

    Spondylolysis and absence of the pedicle are congenital anomalies of the posterior cervical spine. Their roentgenographic changes may be confused with other more serious entities which may necessitate either emergent therapy or require extensive diagnostic testing and treatment. Four cases are present and the literature is reviewed. A hypothesis for the embryologic etiology of these entities is proposed.

  14. Posterior arch defects of the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, A.M.; Wechsler, R.J.; Landy, M.D.; Wetzner, S.M.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    Spondylolysis and absence of the pedicle are congenital anomalies of the posterior cervical spine. Their roentgenographic changes may be confused with other more serious entities which may necessitate either emergent therapy or require extensive diagnostic testing and treatment. Four cases are present and the literature is reviewed. A hypothesis for the embryologic etiology of these entities is proposed. (orig.)

  15. The value of retropharyngeal soft tissue measurements in trauma of the adult cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Templeton, P.A.; Young, J.W.R.; Mirvis, S.E.; Buddemeyer, E.U.

    1987-01-01

    Widening of the retropharyngeal soft tissue space (RSTS) has been interpreted as a sign of cervical spine trauma. Widely differing measurements are reported in the literature. However it is clear that, using the currently acceptable limits of normal, a large number of patients without spinal injury are subjected to further tests. The RSTS on lateral cervical spine radiographs of 318 patients with a history of cervical spine trauma were measured at the C2-C4 level. The values for patients found to be normal or with fractures/dislocations were evaluated. Statistical analysis of the results demonstrates a considerable overlap in the RSTS of normal and abnormal patients. Therefore we suggest that RSTS measurements are of limited diagnostic value. Using the statistical probability of abnormality, guidelines that indicate which patients may require additional study are suggested. (orig.)

  16. Sleep promotes branch-specific formation of dendritic spines after learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Lai, Cora Sau Wan; Cichon, Joseph; Ma, Lei; Li, Wei; Gan, Wen-Biao

    2014-06-06

    How sleep helps learning and memory remains unknown. We report in mouse motor cortex that sleep after motor learning promotes the formation of postsynaptic dendritic spines on a subset of branches of individual layer V pyramidal neurons. New spines are formed on different sets of dendritic branches in response to different learning tasks and are protected from being eliminated when multiple tasks are learned. Neurons activated during learning of a motor task are reactivated during subsequent non-rapid eye movement sleep, and disrupting this neuronal reactivation prevents branch-specific spine formation. These findings indicate that sleep has a key role in promoting learning-dependent synapse formation and maintenance on selected dendritic branches, which contribute to memory storage. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Oxygen-ozone therapy for degenerative spine disease in the elderly: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Matteo; Fontana, Alessandro; Martinelli, Francesco; Andreula, Cosma

    2011-01-01

    We describe our experience of oxygen-ozone therapy to treat degenerative spine disease in the elderly. From April 2004 to March 2008 we selected 129 patients with CT and/or MR evidence of spondyloarthrosis and disc degeneration of the lumbar spine. All patients enrolled in the study had contraindications to the administration of commonly used analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs.Oxygen-ozone therapy was given by CT-guided intraforaminal injection as the first treatment followed by 4 weekly paralumbar infiltrations on an outpatient basis. The full treatment lasted a month. Clinical outcome was assessed 3 months and 1 year after treatment. The good results obtained indicate that oxygen-ozone therapy is an ideal treatment with no side-effects in elderly patients with degenerative spine disease.

  18. INFORMATIVE VALUE OF FRACTAL PORTRAIT OF PATIENTS WITH NEUROLOGICAL SYNDROMES OF OSTEOCHONDROSIS OF THE CERVICAL SPINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Vakulenko

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients with neurological syndromes of degenerative disc disease of the cervical spine are characterized by decrease of the fractal dimension of electrocardiosignals compared to healthy. This indicates about a low level of energy, immune status, biorhythms harmonization of different organs and systems, psycho-emotional and physiological activity of the body of patients

  19. Intraoperative evaluation of device placement in spine surgery using known-component 3D-2D image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uneri, A.; De Silva, T.; Goerres, J.; Jacobson, M. W.; Ketcha, M. D.; Reaungamornrat, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Khanna, A. J.; Osgood, G. M.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-04-01

    Intraoperative x-ray radiography/fluoroscopy is commonly used to assess the placement of surgical devices in the operating room (e.g. spine pedicle screws), but qualitative interpretation can fail to reliably detect suboptimal delivery and/or breach of adjacent critical structures. We present a 3D-2D image registration method wherein intraoperative radiographs are leveraged in combination with prior knowledge of the patient and surgical components for quantitative assessment of device placement and more rigorous quality assurance (QA) of the surgical product. The algorithm is based on known-component registration (KC-Reg) in which patient-specific preoperative CT and parametric component models are used. The registration performs optimization of gradient similarity, removes the need for offline geometric calibration of the C-arm, and simultaneously solves for multiple component bodies, thereby allowing QA in a single step (e.g. spinal construct with 4-20 screws). Performance was tested in a spine phantom, and first clinical results are reported for QA of transpedicle screws delivered in a patient undergoing thoracolumbar spine surgery. Simultaneous registration of ten pedicle screws (five contralateral pairs) demonstrated mean target registration error (TRE) of 1.1  ±  0.1 mm at the screw tip and 0.7  ±  0.4° in angulation when a prior geometric calibration was used. The calibration-free formulation, with the aid of component collision constraints, achieved TRE of 1.4  ±  0.6 mm. In all cases, a statistically significant improvement (p  surgery demonstrated TRE of 2.7  ±  2.6 mm and 1.5  ±  0.8°. The KC-Reg algorithm offers an independent check and quantitative QA of the surgical product using radiographic/fluoroscopic views acquired within standard OR workflow. Such intraoperative assessment could improve quality and safety, provide the opportunity to revise suboptimal constructs in the OR, and reduce the

  20. Vertebral artery injuries in cervical spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunardini, David J; Eskander, Mark S; Even, Jesse L; Dunlap, James T; Chen, Antonia F; Lee, Joon Y; Ward, Timothy W; Kang, James D; Donaldson, William F

    2014-08-01

    Vertebral artery injuries (VAIs) are rare but serious complications of cervical spine surgery, with the potential to cause catastrophic bleeding, permanent neurologic impairment, and even death. The present literature regarding incidence of this complication largely comprises a single surgeon or small multicenter case series. We sought to gather a large sample of high-volume surgeons to adequately characterize the incidence and risk factors for VAI, management strategies used, and patient outcomes after VAI. The study was constructed as a cross-sectional study comprising all cervical spine patients operated on by the members of the international Cervical Spine Research Society (CSRS). All patients who have undergone cervical spine surgery by a current member of CSRS as of the spring of 2012. For each surgeon surveyed, we collected self-reported measures to include the number of cervical cases performed in the surgeon's career, the number of VAIs encountered, the stage of the case during which the injury occurred, the management strategies used, and the overall patient outcome after injury. An anonymous 10-question web-based survey was distributed to the members of the CSRS. Statistical analysis was performed using Student t tests for numerical outcomes and chi-squared analysis for categorical variables. One hundred forty-one CSRS members (of 195 total, 72%) responded to the survey, accounting for a total of 163,324 cervical spine surgeries performed. The overall incidence of VAI was 0.07% (111/163,324). Posterior instrumentation of the upper cervical spine (32.4%), anterior corpectomy (23.4%), and posterior exposure of the cervical spine (11.7%) were the most common stages of the case to result in an injury to the vertebral artery. Discectomy (9%) and anterior exposure of the spine (7.2%) were also common time points for an arterial injury. One-fifth (22/111) of all VAI involved an anomalous course of the vertebral artery. The most common management of VAI was by

  1. Preliminary Report of Instrumentation in Tuberculous Lumbosacral Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Zin-Naing

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aims of spinal tuberculosis treatment are to eradicate the disease, to prevent the development of paraplegia and kyphotic deformity, to manage the existing deformity and neurological deficit, to allow early ambulation and to return the patient back to daily life. Methods for the treatment of tuberculosis of vertebra are still controversial. Conservative treatment includes medical therapy as well as external supports and surgery is indicated for deformity of spine, severe pain, or neurological compromise conditions. Most cases in our country were late presentations with disc space already infected, and after débridement there was a large gap needing bone graft to enhance bony fusion and anterior column support. Although the spine was infected, instrumentation posed no additional hazard in terms of tuberculous discitis. Oga et al. reported that M. tuberculosis has low adhesion capability and forms only a few microcolonies surrounded by a biofilm. Moon et al. stated that interbody fusion performed with classical anterior radical surgery per se was ineffective in the correction of kyphosis and did not prevent the increase in kyphosis angle. The present study focuses on collected clinical and radiographic outcomes in ten patients who underwent Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF for tuberculous lumbosacral spine. All the cases had instability with kyphotic deformity or loss of lordosis. Clinical outcomes were measured by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, modified MacNab Criteria, and radiographic outcomes (segmental kyphotic angle and total lumbar lordotic, TLL, angle on follow-up to six months. The mean VAS back scores showed decrease, and kyphotic angles and lordotic angles improved. Three cases had excellent results, six good and one fair using the modified MacNab criteria.

  2. Epidural Hematoma Following Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Hilibrand, Alan S; Arnold, Paul M; Fish, David E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Gum, Jeffrey L; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Isaacs, Robert E; Kanter, Adam S; Mroz, Thomas E; Nassr, Ahmad; Sasso, Rick C; Fehlings, Michael G; Buser, Zorica; Bydon, Mohamad; Cha, Peter I; Chatterjee, Dhananjay; Gee, Erica L; Lord, Elizabeth L; Mayer, Erik N; McBride, Owen J; Nguyen, Emily C; Roe, Allison K; Tortolani, P Justin; Stroh, D Alex; Yanez, Marisa Y; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A multicentered retrospective case series. To determine the incidence and circumstances surrounding the development of a symptomatic postoperative epidural hematoma in the cervical spine. Patients who underwent cervical spine surgery between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, at 23 institutions were reviewed, and all patients who developed an epidural hematoma were identified. A total of 16 582 cervical spine surgeries were identified, and 15 patients developed a postoperative epidural hematoma, for a total incidence of 0.090%. Substantial variation between institutions was noted, with 11 sites reporting no epidural hematomas, and 1 site reporting an incidence of 0.76%. All patients initially presented with a neurologic deficit. Nine patients had complete resolution of the neurologic deficit after hematoma evacuation; however 2 of the 3 patients (66%) who had a delay in the diagnosis of the epidural hematoma had residual neurologic deficits compared to only 4 of the 12 patients (33%) who had no delay in the diagnosis or treatment ( P = .53). Additionally, the patients who experienced a postoperative epidural hematoma did not experience any significant improvement in health-related quality-of-life metrics as a result of the index procedure at final follow-up evaluation. This is the largest series to date to analyze the incidence of an epidural hematoma following cervical spine surgery, and this study suggest that an epidural hematoma occurs in approximately 1 out of 1000 cervical spine surgeries. Prompt diagnosis and treatment may improve the chance of making a complete neurologic recovery, but patients who develop this complication do not show improvements in the health-related quality-of-life measurements.

  3. Observational evaluation of outcomes and resource utilization from hemostatic matrices in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J Scott; Tackett, Scott; Patel, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Studies have indicated that outcomes may differ by choice of flowable hemostat, but there is limited evidence in spine surgery. The objective of this study was to conduct a comparison of outcomes following use of advanced flowable hemostatic matrices in a large spine surgery population. This is an observational retrospective cohort analysis using Premier's US Perspective Hospital Database. Two commonly-used hemostatic matrices (Floseal and Surgiflo kitted with thrombin) were compared in cases categorized as either major or severe spine surgery. Outcomes included complications, blood product administration, hospital length of stay (LOS), surgery time, and amount of matrix used in surgery. Major spine surgery patients treated with Surgiflo were associated with increased risk of blood product transfusion (OR = 2.56, 95% CI = 1.79-3.65, p group. Severe spine surgery patients treated with Surgiflo were associated with longer surgical time (+26.9 min, p transfusion and LOS did not differ by choice of matrix in this patient group. Inherent to limitations associated with database analysis, this study did not evaluate potential physician differences such as skill and experience, assess long-term outcomes, nor include cases with missing data. The results from this analysis indicated that surgery time, risk of blood transfusion, and amount of matrix used are greater with Surgiflo patients, compared to Floseal patients. Choice of matrix did not appear to impact hospital LOS or risk of surgical complications. Future research should evaluate the cost consequences of increased clinical and resource utilization by choice of hemostatic matrix in spine surgery.

  4. Multilevel Thoracolumbar Spondylolysis with Spondylolisthesis at L4 on L5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Whoan Jeang; Song, Young Dong; Choy, Won Sik

    2015-09-01

    A 24-year-old male patient was initially evaluated for persistent back pain. The visual analogue scale (VAS) score was 7 points. Physical examination revealed a decreased range of lumbar spinal motion, which caused pain. Simple X-ray revealed Meyerding grade 1 spondylolisthesis at L4 on L5, with mild dome-shaped superior endplate and consecutive multilevel spondylolysis at T12-L5. Standing anteroposterior and lateral views of the entire spine revealed normal balance of sagittal and coronal alignment. A computed tomography scan revealed bilateral spondylolysis at T12-L4, left unilateral spondylolysis at L5, and spina bifida at L5 to sacral region. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed mild dural ectasia at the lumbar region. Due to the absence of any neurological symptoms, the patient was managed conservatively. He was rested a few weeks with corset brace and physiotherapy. After treatment, his back pain improved, VAS score changed from 7 to 2, and he was able to return to normal activity.

  5. Cervical spine injury in child abuse: report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rooks, V.J.; Sisler, C.; Burton, B. [Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1998-03-01

    Pediatric cervical spine injuries have rarely been reported in the setting of child abuse. We report two cases of unsuspected lower cervical spine fracture-dislocation in twin infant girls who had no physical examination findings to suggest cervical spine injury. Classic radio-graphic findings of child abuse were noted at multiple other sites in the axial and appendicular skeleton. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging proved to be valuable in both the initial evaluation of the extent of cervical spine injury and in following postoperative changes. The unexpected yet devastating findings in these two cases further substantiate the importance of routine evaluation of the cervical spine in cases of suspected child abuse. (orig.)

  6. Cervical spine injury in child abuse: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooks, V.J.; Sisler, C.; Burton, B.

    1998-01-01

    Pediatric cervical spine injuries have rarely been reported in the setting of child abuse. We report two cases of unsuspected lower cervical spine fracture-dislocation in twin infant girls who had no physical examination findings to suggest cervical spine injury. Classic radio-graphic findings of child abuse were noted at multiple other sites in the axial and appendicular skeleton. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging proved to be valuable in both the initial evaluation of the extent of cervical spine injury and in following postoperative changes. The unexpected yet devastating findings in these two cases further substantiate the importance of routine evaluation of the cervical spine in cases of suspected child abuse. (orig.)

  7. Does applying the Canadian Cervical Spine rule reduce cervical spine radiography rates in alert patients with blunt trauma to the neck? A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesupalan Rajam

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A cautious outlook towards neck injuries has been the norm to avoid missing cervical spine injuries. Consequently there has been an increased use of cervical spine radiography. The Canadian Cervical Spine rule was proposed to reduce unnecessary use of cervical spine radiography in alert and stable patients. Our aim was to see whether applying the Canadian Cervical Spine rule reduced the need for cervical spine radiography without missing significant cervical spine injuries. Methods This was a retrospective study conducted in 2 hospitals. 114 alert and stable patients who had cervical spine radiographs for suspected neck injuries were included in the study. Data on patient demographics, high risk & low risk factors as per the Canadian Cervical Spine rule and cervical spine radiography results were collected and analysed. Results 28 patients were included in the high risk category according to the Canadian Cervical Spine rule. 86 patients fell into the low risk category. If the Canadian Cervical Spine rule was applied, there would have been a significant reduction in cervical spine radiographs as 86/114 patients (75.4% would not have needed cervical spine radiograph. 2/114 patients who had significant cervical spine injuries would have been identified when the Canadian Cervical Spine rule was applied. Conclusion Applying the Canadian Cervical Spine rule for neck injuries in alert and stable patients would have reduced the use of cervical spine radiographs without missing out significant cervical spine injuries. This relates to reduction in radiation exposure to patients and health care costs.

  8. The functional coupling of the deep abdominal and paraspinal muscles: the effects of simulated paraspinal muscle contraction on force transfer to the middle and posterior layer of the thoracolumbar fascia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vleeming, A; Schuenke, M D; Danneels, L; Willard, F H

    2014-01-01

    The thoracolumbar fascia (TLF) consists of aponeurotic and fascial layers that interweave the paraspinal and abdominal muscles into a complex matrix stabilizing the lumbosacral spine. To better understand low back pain, it is essential to appreciate how these muscles cooperate to influence lumbopelvic stability. This study tested the following hypotheses: (i) pressure within the TLF's paraspinal muscular compartment (PMC) alters load transfer between the TLF's posterior and middle layers (PLF and MLF); and (ii) with increased tension of the common tendon of the transversus abdominis (CTrA) and internal oblique muscles and incremental PMC pressure, fascial tension is primarily transferred to the PLF. In cadaveric axial sections, paraspinal muscles were replaced with inflatable tubes to simulate paraspinal muscle contraction. At each inflation increment, tension was created in the CTrA to simulate contraction of the deep abdominal muscles. Fluoroscopic images and load cells captured changes in the size, shape and tension of the PMC due to inflation, with and without tension to the CTrA. In the absence of PMC pressure, increasing tension on the CTrA resulted in anterior and lateral movement of the PMC. PMC inflation in the absence of tension to the CTrA resulted in a small increase in the PMC perimeter and a larger posterior displacement. Combining PMC inflation and tension to the CTrA resulted in an incremental increase in PLF tension without significantly altering tension in the MLF. Paraspinal muscle contraction leads to posterior displacement of the PLF. When expansion is combined with abdominal muscle contraction, the CTrA and internal oblique transfers tension almost exclusively to the PLF, thereby girdling the paraspinal muscles. The lateral border of the PMC is restrained from displacement to maintain integrity. Posterior movement of the PMC represents an increase of the PLF extension moment arm. Dysfunctional paraspinal muscles would reduce the posterior

  9. Siamese convolutional networks for tracking the spine motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Sui, Xiubao; Sun, Yicheng; Liu, Chengwei; Hu, Yong

    2017-09-01

    Deep learning models have demonstrated great success in various computer vision tasks such as image classification and object tracking. However, tracking the lumbar spine by digitalized video fluoroscopic imaging (DVFI), which can quantitatively analyze the motion mode of spine to diagnose lumbar instability, has not yet been well developed due to the lack of steady and robust tracking method. In this paper, we propose a novel visual tracking algorithm of the lumbar vertebra motion based on a Siamese convolutional neural network (CNN) model. We train a full-convolutional neural network offline to learn generic image features. The network is trained to learn a similarity function that compares the labeled target in the first frame with the candidate patches in the current frame. The similarity function returns a high score if the two images depict the same object. Once learned, the similarity function is used to track a previously unseen object without any adapting online. In the current frame, our tracker is performed by evaluating the candidate rotated patches sampled around the previous frame target position and presents a rotated bounding box to locate the predicted target precisely. Results indicate that the proposed tracking method can detect the lumbar vertebra steadily and robustly. Especially for images with low contrast and cluttered background, the presented tracker can still achieve good tracking performance. Further, the proposed algorithm operates at high speed for real time tracking.

  10. Surgical Management of Subaxial Cervical Spine Trauma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Emre Aydın

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available These days, as a consequence of the improvement in technology and increase in the use of motor vehicles, spine injuries have become common. Spine traumas, which often occur after motor vehicle accidents, are observed mostly in cervical regions, particularly in the subaxial cervical region, which is also known as the subcervical region, and neurological damage occurs in 70% of the patients. Despite still being controversial, the common ranging for neurological evaluation is the American Spinal Injury Association ranging, which includes the motor and sensory loss and accordingly, the impairment rate. In subaxial cervical traumas, acute neurological deterioration is an indication and therefore requires urgent surgical treatment. The choice of anterior or posterior approach substantially depends on the traumatization mechanism, affected tissues, and neurological deterioration occurring after. The state of patient and instability are the most two important factors affecting the treatment decision. Although the anterior approach is accepted as a routinely available and easily applicable surgical technique, it lacks in the burst fractures involving the three colons, which shows a stabilization disorder. The anterior plate screw technique and posterior lateral mass screw application applied in our clinic are reviewed in literature and are discussed in two cases. Although the best clinical results are achieved in cases where only anterior surgery is performed and in cases where instability is excessive, in unstable compression and blow-out fractures, even if neurological deficit and three colon involvement are not observed in the patient, the requirement of posterior fusion is observed.

  11. People With Chronic Neck Pain Walk With a Stiffer Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falla, Deborah; Gizzi, Leonardo; Parsa, Hesam; Dieterich, Angela; Petzke, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study, case-control design. Objective To evaluate spine kinematics and gait characteristics in people with nonspecific chronic neck pain. Background People with chronic neck pain present with a number of sensorimotor and biomechanical alterations, yet little is known about the influence of neck pain on gait and motions of the spine during gait. Methods People with chronic nonspecific neck pain and age- and sex-matched asymptomatic controls walked on a treadmill at 3 different speeds (self-selected, 3 km/h, and 5 km/h), either with their head in a neutral position or rotated 30°. Tridimensional motion capture was employed to quantify body kinematics. Neck and trunk rotations were derived from the difference between the transverse plane component of the head and thorax and thorax and pelvis angles to provide an indication of neck and trunk rotation during gait. Results Overall, the patient group showed shorter stride length compared to the control group (Pneck pain showed smaller trunk rotations (Pneck pain walk with reduced trunk rotation, especially when challenged by walking with their head positioned in rotation. Reduced rotation of the trunk during gait may have long-term consequences on spinal health. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(4):268-277. Epub 3 Feb 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.6768.

  12. Reirradiation spine stereotactic body radiation therapy for spinal metastases: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrehaug, Sten; Sahgal, Arjun; Hayashi, Motohiro; Levivier, Marc; Ma, Lijun; Martinez, Roberto; Paddick, Ian; Régis, Jean; Ryu, Samuel; Slotman, Ben; De Salles, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Spinal metastases that recur after conventional palliative radiotherapy have historically been difficult to manage due to concerns of spinal cord toxicity in the retreatment setting. Spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), also known as stereotactic radiosurgery, is emerging as an effective and safe means of delivering ablative doses to these recurrent tumors. The authors performed a systematic review of the literature to determine the clinical efficacy and safety of spine SBRT specific to previously irradiated spinal metastases. METHODS A systematic literature review was conducted, which was specific to SBRT to the spine, using MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Evidence-Based Medicine Database, National Guideline Clearinghouse, and CMA Infobase, with further bibliographic review of appropriate articles. Research questions included: 1) Is retreatment spine SBRT efficacious with respect to local control and symptom control? 2) Is retreatment spine SBRT safe? RESULTS The initial literature search retrieved 2263 articles. Of these articles, 160 were potentially relevant, 105 were selected for in-depth review, and 9 studies met all inclusion criteria for analysis. All studies were single-institution series, including 4 retrospective, 3 retrospective series of prospective databases, 1 prospective, and 1 Phase I/II prospective study (low- or very low-quality data). The results indicated that spine SBRT is effective, with a median 1-year local control rate of 76% (range 66%-90%). Improvement in patients' pain scores post-SBRT ranged from 65% to 81%. Treatment delivery was safe, with crude rates of vertebral body fracture of 12% (range 0%-22%) and radiation-induced myelopathy of 1.2%. CONCLUSIONS This systematic literature review suggests that SBRT to previously irradiated spinal metastases is safe and effective with respect to both local control and pain relief. Although the evidence is limited to low-quality data, SBRT can be a recommended treatment option

  13. Sexual experience enhances cognitive flexibility and dendritic spine density in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasper, Erica R; LaMarca, Elizabeth A; Bocarsly, Miriam E; Fasolino, Maria; Opendak, Maya; Gould, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex is important for cognitive flexibility, a capability that is affected by environmental conditions and specific experiences. Aversive experience, such as chronic restraint stress, is known to impair performance on a task of cognitive flexibility, specifically attentional set-shifting, in rats. Concomitant with this performance decrement, chronic stress reduces the number of dendritic spines on pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex. No previous studies have examined whether a rewarding experience, namely mating, affects cognitive flexibility and dendritic spines in the medial prefrontal cortex of male rats. To test this possibility, we exposed adult male rats to sexual receptive females once daily for one week, assessed attentional set-shifting performance, and then analyzed their brains for changes in dendritic spines. We found that sexual experience improved performance on extradimensional set-shifting, which is known to require the medial prefrontal cortex. Additionally, we observed increased dendritic spine density on apical and basal dendrites of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex, but not the orbitofrontal cortex, after sexual experience. We also found that sexual experience enhanced dendritic spine density on granule neurons of the dentate gyrus. The ventral hippocampus sends a direct projection to the medial prefrontal cortex, raising the possibility that experience-dependent changes in the hippocampus are necessary for alterations in medial prefrontal cortex structure and function. As a first attempt at investigating this, we inactivated the ventral hippocampus with the GABA agonist muscimol, after each daily bout of sexual experience to observe whether the beneficial effects on cognitive flexibility were abolished. Contrary to our hypothesis, blocking hippocampal activity after sexual experience had no impact on enhanced cognitive flexibility. Taken together, these findings indicate that sexual

  14. Adolescent bisphenol-A exposure decreases dendritic spine density: role of sex and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Rachel E; Luine, Victoria; Khandaker, Hameda; Villafane, Joseph J; Frankfurt, Maya

    2014-11-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA), a common environmental endocrine disruptor, modulates estrogenic, androgenic, and antiandrogenic effects throughout the lifespan. We recently showed that low dose BPA exposure during adolescence increases anxiety and impairs spatial memory independent of sex. In this study, six week old Sprague Dawley rats (n=24 males, n=24 females) received daily subcutaneous injections (40 µg/kg bodyweight) of BPA or vehicle for one week. Serum corticosterone levels in response to a 1 h restraint stress and spine density were examined at age 7 (cohort 1) and 11 (cohort 2) weeks. Adolescent BPA exposure did not alter stress dependent corticosterone responses but decreased spine density on apical and basal dendrites of pyramidal cells in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampal CA1 region (CA1). Sex differences in spine density were observed on basal dendrites of the mPFC and CA1 with females having greater spine density than males. This sex difference was further augmented by both age and treatment, with results indicating that BPA-dependent decreases in spine density were more pronounced in males than females on mPFC basal dendrites. Importantly, the robust neuronal alterations were observed in animals exposed to BPA levels below the current U.S.E.P.A. recommended safe daily limit. These results are the first demonstrating that BPA given during adolescence leads to enduring effects on neural morphology at adulthood. Given that humans are routinely exposed to low levels of BPA through a variety of sources, the decreased spine density reported in both male and female rats after BPA exposure warrants further investigation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Active hip and spine ROM differs when comparing unconstrained motion with voluntary segmental constraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreside, Janice M; Barbado, David; Juan-Recio, Casto; Vera-Garcia, Francisco J

    2013-12-01

    Active range of motion trials are frequently used as a baseline for normalizing other data. However, previous research has not focused on methods utilized to achieve maximum active range of motion. Twenty-seven males (age 20-38 years) participated in this study. Active hip extension in upright standing was compared to active lumbar extension with regards to degrees of total hip and spine extension obtained. Similarly, active spine rotation whereby participants attempted to constrain associated pelvis and hip rotation was compared to rotation trials in which the pelvis and hips were free to rotate concurrently. An infra-red motion capture system and associated software were used to capture movement and determine joint angles. Results indicate that average degrees of hip extension did not differ between the two methods (p = 0.138), nor did either method result more frequently in the highest measurement. Spine extension values were significantly greater in the active spine extension manoeuvre compared to the associated back extension that occurred when participants were asked to actively extend their hip (p < 0.001). Average degrees of spine rotation were greater in the unconstrained trials: when concurrent hip and pelvis rotation were allowed to take place (p < 0.001). Of the 27 participants, 23 obtained maximum rotation during the unconstrained trials. To obtain maximum active hip joint extension, both hip and back extension trials should be collected. Maximum spine rotation is more likely to occur when the pelvis and hips are unconstrained. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of the Young Spine Questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Hestbæk, Lise

    Title Development of the Young Spine Questionnaire Authors & Affiliations Henrik Hein Lauridsen1, Lise Hestbæk1,2 1. Research Unit for Clinical Biomechanics, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Clinical Locomotion Network, Campusvej 55, DK-5230...... and adolescents are absent. The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument for children aged 9-12 years which could fill this gap in the literature. Methods The Young Spine Questionnaire (YSQ) was developed in three phases – the conceptualisation, development and testing phase. We used the conceptual...... model of Wilson and Cleary (1995) and divided the YSQ into two parts: part one included spinal prevalence estimates (including pictures of spinal area) and part two questions regarding pain, activity restrictions, care seeking behaviour and influence of parental back trouble. During the developing phase...

  17. Branched standard spines of 3-manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetti, Riccardo

    1997-01-01

    This book provides a unified combinatorial realization of the categroies of (closed, oriented) 3-manifolds, combed 3-manifolds, framed 3-manifolds and spin 3-manifolds. In all four cases the objects of the realization are finite enhanced graphs, and only finitely many local moves have to be taken into account. These realizations are based on the notion of branched standard spine, introduced in the book as a combination of the notion of branched surface with that of standard spine. The book is intended for readers interested in low-dimensional topology, and some familiarity with the basics is assumed. A list of questions, some of which concerning relations with the theory of quantum invariants, is enclosed.

  18. Influence of dolphin style on the spine

    OpenAIRE

    Šenková, Martina

    2009-01-01

    Severe idiopathic scoliosis often represents a therapeutic problem of how to influence a patient with these substantial spinal deformities for a long period of time. There are many possibilities to therapeutically affect the patient at the start of the therapy; but in order to prevent the defect's progression it is necessary to employ a long-term and even permanent care. The aim of this thesis is to demonstrate the possibility of influencing the position of the spine through dolphin style in ...

  19. Spine fractures caused by horse riding

    OpenAIRE

    Siebenga, Jan; Segers, Michiel J. M.; Elzinga, Matthijs J.; Bakker, Fred C.; Haarman, Henk J. T. M.; Patka, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Study Design: Retrospective study and review of literature. Objectives: Study of demographic data concerning spinal fractures caused by horse riding, classification of fractures according to the AO and Load Sharing classifications, evaluation of mid-term radiological results and long-term functional results. Methods: A review of medical reports and radiological examinations of patients presented to our hospital with horse riding-related spine fractures over a 13-year period; long-term functio...

  20. Pedicular stress fracture in the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, V.F.H.; Htoo, M.M.

    1997-01-01

    Spondylolisthesis with or without spondylolysis is common in the lumbar spine. Associated fracture in the pedicle ('pediculolysis') is unusual. The margins of pedicular stress fractures, like spondylolysis, usually appear sclerotic. A patient with a pedicular stress fracture with minimal marginal sclerosis suggesting an injury of recent onset is presented here. There was associated bilateral spondylolysis. The findings in this patient suggest that established pediculolysis probably represents a stress fracture that has failed to heal. (authors)

  1. Pedicular stress fracture in the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, V.F.H.; Htoo, M.M. [Singapore General Hospital, Singapore, (Singapore). Department of Diagnostic Radiology

    1997-08-01

    Spondylolisthesis with or without spondylolysis is common in the lumbar spine. Associated fracture in the pedicle (`pediculolysis`) is unusual. The margins of pedicular stress fractures, like spondylolysis, usually appear sclerotic. A patient with a pedicular stress fracture with minimal marginal sclerosis suggesting an injury of recent onset is presented here. There was associated bilateral spondylolysis. The findings in this patient suggest that established pediculolysis probably represents a stress fracture that has failed to heal. (authors). 10 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Zinc and Copper Effects on Stability of Tubulin and Actin Networks in Dendrites and Spines of Hippocampal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Laura; Roudeau, Stéphane; Carmona, Asuncion; Domart, Florelle; Petersen, Jennifer D; Bohic, Sylvain; Yang, Yang; Cloetens, Peter; Ortega, Richard

    2017-07-19

    Zinc and copper ions can modulate the activity of glutamate receptors. However, labile zinc and copper ions likely represent only the tip of the iceberg and other neuronal functions are suspected for these metals in their bound state. We performed synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging with 30 nm resolution to image total biometals in dendrites and spines from hippocampal neurons. We found that zinc is distributed all along the dendrites while copper is mainly pinpointed within the spines. In spines, zinc content is higher within the spine head while copper is higher within the spine neck. Such specific distributions suggested metal interactions with cytoskeleton proteins. Zinc supplementation induced the increase of β-tubulin content in dendrites. Copper supplementation impaired the β-tubulin and F-actin networks. Copper chelation resulted in the decrease of F-actin content in dendrites, drastically reducing the number of F-actin protrusions. These results indicate that zinc is involved in microtubule stability whereas copper is essential for actin-dependent stability of dendritic spines, although copper excess can impair the dendritic cytoskeleton.

  3. Cessation of reproduction-related spine elongation after multiple breeding cycles in female naked mole-rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengler-Crish, Christine M; Catania, Kenneth C

    2009-01-01

    The breeding female or "queen" naked mole-rat has a uniquely elongated body morphology attributed to the lengthening of the lumbar vertebral column that occurs during pregnancy. It is unknown whether this vertebral growth is a continuous process, or associated only with early reproductive experience. We compared pregnancy-related bone elongation in nascent primiparous queens and established queens to determine if this vertebral expansion was a lifelong process in these females. We also investigated the impact of lactation on vertebral elongation in these mole-rats because it is known to be a time of significant bone loss in other mammals. Our data show that after eight or more pregnancies, established queens no longer experienced a net gain in lumbar spine length over the reproductive cycle, whereas the nascent breeders demonstrated significant spine lengthening over this time. Despite the lack of net spine lengthening in established breeders, our results indicated that these queens still experienced some pregnancy-specific vertebral elongation. In naked mole-rats, pregnancy-induced bone elongation may serve the dual purposes of first lengthening the spine, and then once optimal spine size is achieved, serving as a homeostatic mechanism that prepares the spine for the mineral demands of lactation. Anat Rec, 2009. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Normal CT anatomy of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiroga, O.; Matozzi, F.; Beranger, M.; Nazarian, S.; Salamon, G.; Gambarelli, J.

    1982-01-01

    To analyse the anatomo-radiological correlation of the spine and spinal cord, 22 formalized, frozen anatomical specimens corresponding to different regions of the spinal column (8 cervical, 5 dorsal, and 9 lumbar) were studied by CT scans on axial, sagittal and coronal planes and by contact radiography after they were cut into anatomical slices in order to clarify the normal CT anatomy of the spinal column. The results obtained from CT patient scans, performed exclusively on the axial plane, were compared with those obtained from the anatomical specimens (both CT and contrast radiography). High resolution CT programs were used, enabling us to obtain better individualization of the normal structures contained in the spinal column. Direct sagittal and coronal sections were performed on the specimens in order to get further anatomo-radiological information. Enhanced CT studies of the specimens were also available because of the air already present in the subarachnoid spaces. Excellent visualization was obtained of bone structures, soft tissue and the spinal cord. High CT resolution of the spine appeares to be an excellent neuroradiological procedure to study the spine and spinal cord. A metrizamide CT scan is, however, necessary when a normal unenhanced CT scan is insufficient for diagnosis and when the spinal cord is not clearly visible, as often happens at the cervical level. Clinical findings are certainly very useful to ascertain the exact CT level and to limit the radiation exposure. (orig.)

  5. Sports-related injuries of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochmuth, K.; Mack, M.G.; Vogl, T.J.; Kurth, A.A.; Zichner, L.

    2002-01-01

    Different sports show different patterns and frequencies of injuries, which are discussed in this paper. About 3% of all sports accidents relate to the spine. These injuries often have far-reaching consequences for the patients. A very early and extensive diagnosis of all changes is decisive for the start of an adequate therapy and thus for the prognosis of the injury. Radiological diagnosis is also of decisive importance for the documentation of late injuries and in the question of rehabilitation. Here special focus is put on MRT and CT diagnostics.A healthy spine of humans is normally able to resist all static and dynamic strains of the usual sports. However, anomalies and dysfunctions of the spine can reduce its capacity to resist strain. The recommendations of sporting activities are given according to the extent of deflection and the expected growth. The importance of radiology in primary diagnosis and in the follow-up due to typical changes like scoliosis, Morbus Scheuerman, spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis is discussed here as well. (orig.) [de

  6. Findings in osteosarcoma of the dorsal spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Dayem, H.

    1998-01-01

    A 60-year-old male had a left pneumonectomy four-and-a-half-years ago to remove a carcinoma of the lung; the surgery was followed by radiation therapy. In September 1997, he complained of back pain. When the back pain was investigated, a malignant tumor was found in the upper dorsal spine. Tumor decompression was performed in November 1997. Pathologic examination confirmed the presence of radiation bone sarcoma and he was treated with postoperative chemotherapy. In April 1998, the patient had another surgery in which three ribs were removed from the upper left chest wall posteriorly and most of the tumor was removed from the left side of the spine. A second surgery was planned to remove tumor from the right side of the spine. An 18 FDG study was requested to determine the extent of the tumor prior to the second operation. It is concluded that adding attenuation correction to the ADAC Solus Molecular Co-incidence Detection (MCD) gamma-camera, markedly improved the quality of the 18 FDG images and the accuracy of the anatomical distribution of uptake

  7. Findings in osteosarcoma of the dorsal spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Dayem, H. [Saint Vincents Hospital and Medical Centre, New York (United States)

    1998-09-01

    A 60-year-old male had a left pneumonectomy four-and-a-half-years ago to remove a carcinoma of the lung; the surgery was followed by radiation therapy. In September 1997, he complained of back pain. When the back pain was investigated, a malignant tumor was found in the upper dorsal spine. Tumor decompression was performed in November 1997. Pathologic examination confirmed the presence of radiation bone sarcoma and he was treated with postoperative chemotherapy. In April 1998, the patient had another surgery in which three ribs were removed from the upper left chest wall posteriorly and most of the tumor was removed from the left side of the spine. A second surgery was planned to remove tumor from the right side of the spine. An {sup 18}FDG study was requested to determine the extent of the tumor prior to the second operation. It is concluded that adding attenuation correction to the ADAC Solus Molecular Co-incidence Detection (MCD) gamma-camera, markedly improved the quality of the {sup 18}FDG images and the accuracy of the anatomical distribution of uptake

  8. Subsequent, unplanned spine surgery and life survival of patients operated for neuropathic spine deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Marc A; Lai, Sue-Min; Burton, Douglas C

    2012-01-01

    Retrospective study of a prospectively assembled cohort. To characterize the survival from subsequent spine surgery and the life survival of patients treated surgically for severe spinal deformity due to neuropathic diseases. Survivorship analysis is widely used to study the natural history of disease processes and of treatments provided, but has very seldom been used to study patients' course after surgery for spinal deformity associated with neuropathic diseases. Patients with neuropathic spinal deformity treated with primary posterior instrumentation and arthrodesis from 1989 through 2002 were identified and studied by review of charts and radiographs, and by mail survey. Subsequent spine surgery and death events, and the time interval from surgery were identified. Fifteen variables possibly influencing survivorship were studied. There were no perioperative deaths, spinal cord injuries, or acute wound infections in the 117 eligible patients. Reoperation and life survival statuses were available for 110 patients (94%) at an average follow-up of 11.89 years (±5.3; range: 2-20.9 yr). Twelve patients (11%) had subsequent spine surgery. Survival from subsequent spine surgery was 91% at 5 years, 90% at 10 and 15 years, and 72% at 20 years. Proximal fixation problems occurred in 4 patients. Twenty-two patients (20%) had died from 4 to 20 years postoperative. Life survival was 98% at 5 years, 89% at 10 years, 81% at 15 years, and 56% at 20 years. The only variable associated with life survival was the occurrence of one or more perioperative complications, P = 0.0032. The younger half of the series at operation (spine operation was similar to adolescent idiopathic scoliosis series studied in the same manner. Life survival decline began at 4 years postoperative and was significantly associated with the occurrence of one or more perioperative complications. Even after successful spine deformity surgery, this population's health status is often precarious.

  9. AO spine injury classification system: a revision proposal for the thoracic and lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, Maximilian; Audigé, Laurent; Schnake, Klaus John; Bellabarba, Carlo; Dai, Li-Yang; Oner, F Cumhur

    2013-10-01

    The AO Spine Classification Group was established to propose a revised AO spine injury classification system. This paper provides details on the rationale, methodology, and results of the initial stage of the revision process for injuries of the thoracic and lumbar (TL) spine. In a structured, iterative process involving five experienced spine trauma surgeons from various parts of the world, consecutive cases with TL injuries were classified independently by members of the classification group, and analyzed for classification reliability using the Kappa coefficient (κ) and for accuracy using latent class analysis. The reasons for disagreements were examined systematically during review meetings. In four successive sessions, the system was revised until consensus and sufficient reproducibility were achieved. The TL spine injury system is based on three main injury categories adapted from the original Magerl AO concept: A (compression), B (tension band), and C (displacement) type injuries. Type-A injuries include four subtypes (wedge-impaction/split-pincer/incomplete burst/complete burst); B-type injuries are divided between purely osseous and osseo-ligamentous disruptions; and C-type injuries are further categorized into three subtypes (hyperextension/translation/separation). There is no subgroup division. The reliability of injury types (A, B, C) was good (κ = 0.77). The surgeons' pairwise Kappa ranged from 0.69 to 0.90. Kappa coefficients κ for reliability of injury subtypes ranged from 0.26 to 0.78. The proposed TL spine injury system is based on clinically relevant parameters. Final evaluation data showed reasonable reliability and accuracy. Further validation of the proposed revised AO Classification requires follow-up evaluation sessions and documentation by more surgeons from different countries and backgrounds and is subject to modification based on clinical parameters during subsequent phases.

  10. Clinical significance of gas myelography and CT gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine<