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Sample records for thoracic spinal column

  1. Primary epidural malignant hemangiopericytoma of thoracic spinal column causing cord compression: case report

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    Mohammad Mohammadianpanah

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Hemangiopericytoma is an uncommon mesenchymal neoplasm that rarely affects the spinal canal. Primary malignant hemangiopericytoma of the spinal column is extremely rare. CASE REPORT: We report on a case of primary epidural malignant hemangiopericytoma of the thoracic spinal column that invaded vertebral bone and caused spinal cord compression in a 21-year-old man. The patient presented with progressive back pain over a four-month period that progressed to paraparesis, bilateral leg paresthesia and urinary incontinence. The surgical intervention involved laminectomy and subtotal resection of the tumor, with posterior vertebral fixation. Postoperative involved-field radiotherapy was administered. A marked neurological improvement was subsequently observed. We describe the clinical, radiological, and histological features of this tumor and review the literature.

  2. Primary epidural malignant hemangiopericytoma of thoracic spinal column causing cord compression: case report.

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    Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Torabinejad, Simin; Bagheri, Mohammad Hadi; Omidvari, Shapour; Mosalaei, Ahmad; Ahmadloo, Niloofar

    2004-09-02

    Hemangiopericytoma is an uncommon mesenchymal neoplasm that rarely affects the spinal canal. Primary malignant hemangiopericytoma of the spinal column is extremely rare. We report on a case of primary epidural malignant hemangiopericytoma of the thoracic spinal column that invaded vertebral bone and caused spinal cord compression in a 21-year-old man. The patient presented with progressive back pain over a four-month period that progressed to paraparesis, bilateral leg paresthesia and urinary incontinence. The surgical intervention involved laminectomy and subtotal resection of the tumor, with posterior vertebral fixation. Postoperative involved-field radiotherapy was administered. A marked neurological improvement was subsequently observed. We describe the clinical, radiological, and histological features of this tumor and review the literature.

  3. Preoperative embolization of hypervascular thoracic, lumbar, and sacral spinal column tumors: technique and outcomes from a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sreejit; Gobin, Y Pierre; Leng, Lewis Z; Marcus, Joshua D; Bilsky, Mark; Laufer, Ilya; Patsalides, Athos

    2013-09-01

    The existing literature on preoperative spine tumor embolization is limited in size of patient cohorts and diversity of tumor histologies. This report presents our experience with preoperative embolization of hypervascular thoracic, lumbar, and sacral spinal column tumors in the largest series to date. We conducted a retrospective review of 228 angiograms and 188 pre-operative embolizations for tumors involving thoracic, lumbar and sacral spinal column. Tumor vascularity was evaluated with conventional spinal angiography and was graded from 0 (same as normal adjacent vertebral body) to 3 (severe tumor blush with arteriovenous shunting). Embolic materials included poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) particles and detachable platinum coils and rarely, liquid embolics. The degree of embolization was graded as complete, near-complete, or partial. Anesthesia records were reviewed to document blood loss during surgery. Renal cell carcinoma (44.2%), thyroid carcinoma (9.2%), and leiomyosarcoma (6.6%) were the most common tumors out of a total of 40 tumor histologies. Hemangiopericytoma had the highest mean vascularity (2.6) of all tumor types with at least five representative cases followed by renal cell carcinoma (2.0) and thyroid carcinoma (2.0). PVA particles were used in 100% of cases. Detachable platinum coils were used in 51.6% of cases. Complete, near-complete, and partial embolizations were achieved in 86.1%, 12.7%, and 1.2% of all cases, respectively. There were no new post-procedure neurologic deficits or other complications with long-term morbidity. The mean intra-operative blood loss for the hypervascular tumors treated with pre-operative embolization was 1745 cc. Preoperative embolization of hypervascular thoracic, lumbar, and sacral spine tumors can be performed with high success rates and a high degree of safety at high volume centers.

  4. [Operative treatment of traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spinal column. Part I: epidemiology].

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    Reinhold, M; Knop, C; Beisse, R; Audigé, L; Kandziora, F; Pizanis, A; Pranzl, R; Gercek, E; Schultheiss, M; Weckbach, A; Bühren, V; Blauth, M

    2009-01-01

    The Spine Study Group (AG WS) of the German Trauma Association (DGU) has now been in existence for more than a decade. Its main objective is the evaluation and optimization of the operative treatment for traumatic spinal injuries. The authors present the results of the second prospective internet-based multicenter study (MCS II) of the AG WS in three consecutive parts: epidemiology, surgical treatment and radiologic findings and follow-up results. The aim of the study was to update and review the state-of-the art for treatment of spinal fractures for thoracic and lumbar spine (T1-L5) injuries in German-speaking countries: which lesions will be treated with which procedure and what differences can be found in the course of treatment and the clinical and radiological outcome? This present first part of the study outlines the new study design and concept of an internet-based data collection system. The epidemiologic findings and characteristics of the three major treatment subgroups of the study collective will be presented: operative treatment (OP), non-operative treatment (KONS), and patients receiving a kyphoplasty and/or vertebroplasty without additional instrumentation (PLASTIE). A total of 865 patients (OP n=733, KONS n=52, PLASTIE n=69, other n=7) from 8 German and Austrian trauma centers were included. The main causes of accidents in the OP subgroup were motor vehicle accidents 27.1% and trivial falls 15.8% (KONS 55.8%, PLASTIE 66.7%). The Magerl/AO classification scheme was used and 548 (63.3%) compression fractures (type A), 181 (20.9%) distraction injuries (type B), and 136 (15.7%) rotational injuries (type C) were diagnosed. Of the fractures 68.8% were located at the thoracolumbar junction (T11-L2). Type B and type C injuries carried a higher risk for concomitant injuries, neurological deficits and additional vertebral fractures. The average initial VAS spine score, representing the status before the trauma, varied between treatment subgroups (OP 80, KONS

  5. [Operative treatment of traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spinal column: Part III: Follow up data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, M; Knop, C; Beisse, R; Audigé, L; Kandziora, F; Pizanis, A; Pranzl, R; Gercek, E; Schultheiss, M; Weckbach, A; Bühren, V; Blauth, M

    2009-03-01

    ) versus combined surgery (47.8 points) were only verified at the level of injury of the thoracic spine (p=0.004). The relative frequency of patients regaining at least 80% of the initial score level was OP (posterior 60.4%, anterior 61.1%, combined 51.4%), 52.9% KONS and 67.6% PLASTIE. After surgery the mean period of incapacity from work was 4 months. Patients with a sedentary occupation before the time of injury were fully reintegrated into work in 71.1% of the cases. Patients with a physical occupation were fully reintegrated in 38.9% of the cases at follow-up. At follow-up 87 (31.2%) patients after posterior and 50 (20.1%) after combined surgery had no restrictions to their recreational activities (p=0.001). Treatment subgroups PLASTIE and KONS show a similar radiological result at follow-up with a bisegmental kyphotic deformity (GDW) of -9 degrees and -8.5 degrees, respectively. With all operative methods it was possible to correct or partly correct the posttraumatic kyphotic deformity. Until follow-up there was a loss of correction depending on the surgical approach and level of injury. Combined postero-anterior stabilization gave statistically significant better radiological results with less kyphotic deformity (-3.8 degrees) than posterior stabilization alone (-6.1 degrees) (p=0.005; ANOVA). Thus combined surgery was superior in its capability to restore spinal alignment within the observational period. At follow-up the use of titanium vertebral body replacement implants (cages) to reconstruct and support the anterior column showed significantly better radiological results with less kyphotic deformity and loss of correction (GDW 0.3 degrees) than the use of iliac bone strut grafts (-3.7 degrees ) (p<0.001). Neither additional anterior plates nor the combination of anterior plates with a cage or bone graft had a statistically significant influence on the kyphotic deformity measured at follow-up. A matched-pair analysis of anterior surgery alone versus combined

  6. Idiopathic thoracic transdural intravertebral spinal cord herniation

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    Mazda K Turel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic spinal cord herniation is a rare and often missed cause of thoracic myelopathy. The clinical presentation and radiological appearance is inconsistent and commonly confused with a dorsal arachnoid cyst and often is a misdiagnosed entity. While ventral spinal cord herniation through a dural defect has been previously described, intravertebral herniation is a distinct entity and extremely rare. We present the case of a 70-year old man with idiopathic thoracic transdural intravertebral spinal cord herniation and discuss the clinico-radiological presentation, pathophysiology and operative management along with a review the literature of this unusual entity.

  7. Spontaneous herniation of the thoracic spinal cord : a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Sung Chan; Lee, Seong Ro; Park, Dong Woo; Joo, Kyung Bin

    2001-01-01

    Spontaneous herniation of the spinal cord is a rare disease entity in which spinal cord substance is herniated through a previously uninjured and/or untouched dural. It is a cause of myelopathy that is treatable but difficult to diagnose. We report the CT and MR findings of a case of spontaneous thoracic spinal cord through a dural defect

  8. Postoperative spinal column; Postoperative Wirbelsaeule

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    Kaefer, W. [Westpfalzklinikum GmbH, Standort II, Abteilung fuer Wirbelsaeulenchirurgie, Kusel (Germany); Heumueller, I. [Westpfalzklinikum GmbH, Standort II, Institut fuer Radiologie II, Kusel (Germany); Harsch, N.; Kraus, C.; Reith, W. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    As a rule, postoperative imaging is carried out after spinal interventions to document the exact position of the implant material. Imaging is absolutely necessary when new clinical symptoms occur postoperatively. In this case a rebleeding or an incorrect implant position abutting a root or the spinal cord must be proven. In addition to these immediately occurring postoperative clinical symptoms, there are a number of complications that can occur several days, weeks or even months later. These include the failed back surgery syndrome, implant loosening or breakage of the material and relapse of a disc herniation and spondylodiscitis. In addition to knowledge of the original clinical symptoms, it is also important to know the operation details, such as the access route and the material used. In almost all postoperative cases, imaging with contrast medium administration and corresponding correction of artefacts by the implant material, such as the dual energy technique, correction algorithms and the use of special magnetic resonance (MR) sequences are necessary. In order to correctly assess the postoperative imaging, knowledge of the surgical procedure and the previous clinical symptoms are mandatory besides special computed tomography (CT) techniques and MR sequences. (orig.) [German] In der Regel erfolgt bei spinalen Eingriffen eine postoperative Bildgebung, um die exakte Lage des Implantatmaterials zu dokumentieren. Unbedingt notwendig ist die Bildgebung, wenn postoperativ neue klinische Symptome aufgetreten sind. Hier muessen eine Nachblutung bzw. inkorrekte, eine Wurzel oder das Myelon tangierende Implantatlage nachgewiesen werden. Neben diesen direkt postoperativ auftretenden klinischen Symptomen gibt es eine Reihe von Komplikationen, die erst nach mehreren Tagen, Wochen oder sogar nach Monaten auftreten koennen. Hierzu zaehlen das Failed-back-surgery-Syndrom, die Implantatlockerung oder -bruch, aber auch ein Rezidivvorfall und die Spondylodiszitis. Neben der

  9. Biomechanical Evaluation of the MACSTL Internal Fixator for Thoracic Spinal Stabilisation

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    R. Veselý

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Unstable fractures of the thoracic spine in humans represent a serious social and economic issue. They may lead to persistent consequences and chronic disease. The anatomical and biomechanical characteristics of the thoracic spine are different from all the other spinal parts due to its higher mobility. The vertebrae of the chest area are less mobile, conferring a higher degree of rigidity to the spine. To destabilize this relatively rigid system, a considerable force is necessary. The treatment of unstable spinal fractures is solely surgical. The decompression of the spinal canal with reposition and stabilisation of the fracture is indicated urgently. This intervention is performed mostly from the posterior approach in the first phase. However, the anterior spinal column is the structure responsible for the stability of the spine. Therefore, the recent advances in spine surgery focus on this area of expertise. For this reason, we carried out a bio-mechanical study aimed at assessing the effectiveness of two surgical tactics used. The study consisted of comparative experiments performed by computer-aided device on segments of pig cadavers (n = 5. The experiment involved a comparison of segments of the thoracic spine under the following conditions: an anatomically intact segment, a spine segment with an artificially created anterior instability, and a segment with an applied internal fixator. The experiment compared the mechanical characteristics of these segments. The experiment has demonstrated that after application of the internal fixator used for stabilisation of the injured anterior spinal column at defined pre-loading of 200 N, the stability of damaged spinal segment in torsion increased twofold. It was also verified that sufficient stability can be ensured using the Modular Anterior Construct System (MACSTL implant for ventral stabilisation of thoracic spine unstable injuries. Endoscopic application of this implant represents an

  10. Spinal CT scan, 1. Cervical and thoracic spines

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    Nakagawa, Hiroshi (Aichi Medical Univ. (Japan))

    1982-01-01

    Methods of CT of the cervical and thoracic spines were explained, and normal CT pictures of them were described. Spinal CT was evaluated in comparison with other methods in various spinal diseases. Plain CT revealed stenosis due to spondylosis or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament and hernia of intervertebral disc. CT took an important role in the diagnosis of spinal cord tumors with calcification and destruction of the bone. CT scan in combination with other methods was also useful for the diagnosis of spinal injuries, congenital anomalies and infections.

  11. Subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord: MRI detection of preferential involvement of the posterior columns in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolansky, L.J.; Goldstein, G.; Gozo, A.; Lee, H.J.; Sills, I.; Chatkupt, S.

    1995-01-01

    Subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord (vitamin B 12 -deficient myelopathy) is a neurologic disorder manifesting progressive symptoms of paresthesia and spastic paralysis. As shown by pathology, it initially involves the posterior columns of the thoracic cord. We present a case of vitamin B 12 deficiency with preferential posterior column involvement of the thoracic cord in a child. Theoretically, this should be the earliest, most reversible stage of the disease, making recognition of this MRI pattern of critical importance. (orig.)

  12. Spinal column damage from water ski jumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horne, J.; Cockshott, W.P.; Shannon, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    We conducted a radiographic survey of 117 competitive water ski jumpers to determine whether this sport can cause spinal column damage and, if so, whether damage is more likely to occur in those who participate during the period of spinal growth and development (age 15 years or younger). We found a high prevalence of two types of abnormality: Scheuermann (adolescent) spondylodystrophy (present in 26% of the skiers) and vertebral body wedging (present in 34%). The prevalence of adolescent spondylodystrophy increased with the number of years of participation in the sport before age 15 years or less. Of those in this age group who had skied for 5 years or more, 57 showed adolescent spondylodystrophy; of those in the same age group who had skied for 9 years or more, 100% were affected. Wedged vertebrae increased as time of participation increased, regardless of the age at which exposure began. We conclude that competitive water ski jumping may damage the spinal column and that consideration should be given to regulating this sport, particularly for children. (orig.)

  13. Spinal column damage from water ski jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, J; Cockshott, W P; Shannon, H S

    1987-01-01

    We conducted a radiographic survey of 117 competitive water ski jumpers to determine whether this sport can cause spinal column damage and, if so, whether damage is more likely to occur in those who participate during the period of spinal growth and development (age 15 years or younger). We found a high prevalence of two types of abnormality: Scheuermann (adolescent) spondylodystrophy (present in 26% of the skiers) and vertebral body wedging (present in 34%). The prevalence of adolescent spondylodystrophy increased with the number of years of participation in the sport before age 15 years or less. Of those in this age group who had skied for 5 years or more, 57 showed adolescent spondylodystrophy; of those in the same age group who had skied for 9 years or more, 100% were affected. Wedged vertebrae increased as time of participation increased, regardless of the age at which exposure began. We conclude that competitive water ski jumping may damage the spinal column and that consideration should be given to regulating this sport, particularly for children.

  14. Spinal column damage from water ski jumping

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    Horne, J.; Cockshott, W.P.; Shannon, H.S.

    1987-11-01

    We conducted a radiographic survey of 117 competitive water ski jumpers to determine whether this sport can cause spinal column damage and, if so, whether damage is more likely to occur in those who participate during the period of spinal growth and development (age 15 years or younger). We found a high prevalence of two types of abnormality: Scheuermann (adolescent) spondylodystrophy (present in 26% of the skiers) and vertebral body wedging (present in 34%). The prevalence of adolescent spondylodystrophy increased with the number of years of participation in the sport before age 15 years or less. Of those in this age group who had skied for 5 years or more, 57 showed adolescent spondylodystrophy; of those in the same age group who had skied for 9 years or more, 100% were affected. Wedged vertebrae increased as time of participation increased, regardless of the age at which exposure began. We conclude that competitive water ski jumping may damage the spinal column and that consideration should be given to regulating this sport, particularly for children. (orig.)

  15. Localized giant cell tumors in the spinal column radiologic presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Echeverria, M.A.; Parra Blanco, J.A.; Pagola Serrano, M.A.; Mellado Santos, J.M.; Bueno Lopez, J.; Gonzalez Tutor, A.

    1994-01-01

    Given the uncommonness of the location of giant cell tumors (GCT) in the spinal column and the limited number of studies published, we present a case of GCT located in the spinal column, which involved both vertebral bodies and partially destroyed the adjacent rib. (Author)

  16. Cavernous hemangioma of the thoracic spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, A.M.; Lin, J.C.T.; Morris, J.H.; Fischer, E.G.; Petersen, R.

    1988-01-01

    A 25-year-old woman presented with a four-year history of progressive right-lower-extremity weakness and atrophy and a left hemisensory deficit was found. Metrizamide-enhanced spinal CT scan showed an intramedullary lesion at the level of T1-T2; this had expanded the cord in fusiform fashion but showed no evidence of a cystic component. Surgical resection was performed and the pathological diagnosis was cavernous hemangioma. Two and one-half years later, her left hemisensory deficit was worsening and a spinal MRI showed high signal intensity mass in the region of the previous surgery consistent with chronic hematoma which was re-evacuated with some improvement in the patient's neurological condition. (orig.)

  17. Segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia in patient with Byssinosis undergoing nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kiran; Salgaonkar, Sweta

    2012-01-01

    Byssinosis is an occupational disease occurring commonly in cotton mill workers; it usually presents with features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The management of patients with COPD presents a significant challenges to the anesthetist. Regional anesthesia is preferred in most of these patients to avoid perioperative and postoperative complications related to general anesthesia. We report a known case of Byssinosis who underwent nephrectomy under segmental spinal anesthesia at the low thoracic level.

  18. Idiopathic Thoracic Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma

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    Abdurrahman Aycan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old male patient experienced temporary sensory loss and weakness in the right lower extremity one month prior to admission. The patient was admitted to a private clinic with a three-day history of acute onset of sensory loss and weakness in both lower extremities and was treated and followed up with a prediagnosis of transverse myelitis and the Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS. The patient was subsequently transferred to our clinic and the neurologic examination revealed paraplegia in both lower extremities, positive bilateral Babinski signs, and hypesthesia below the T10 dermatome with saddle anesthesia. The patient had urinary incontinence and thoracic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed an image of a mass compressing the medulla.

  19. NMR imaging of the vertebral column and the spinal canal. 2. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsting, Michael; Uhlenbrock, Detlev; Wanke, Isabel; Universitaetsklinikum Essen

    2009-01-01

    The book on the MRT (magnetic resonance tomography) of the vertebral cord and spinal canal covers the following topics: physics fundamentals and application; malformation of the spinal canal; degenerative vertebral column diseases; vertebral column and spinal canal carcinomas; inflammatory diseases of the vertebral column and the spinal canal; applicability of MRT in case of acute spinal cord traumata; vascular diseases of the spinal canal

  20. Computed tomography in the evaluation of thoracic and lumbar spinal fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Tae; Cho, Chi Ja; Lee, Jeung Sik

    1983-01-01

    The accurate diagnosis of spine trauma is essential to its proper management, since therapeutic decisions depend on radiography and clinical data. Failure to recognize significant injury to the spine can lead to severe neurological deficit in the previously neulogically intact patient. The development of CT has open a new dimension in evaluation of spinal column. In our experience CT not only offer the accurate and thorough evaluation of spinal injury, but does so in a rapid and more efficient manner when compared with conventional radiography. CT has become the diagnostic procedure of choice when screening plain film and clinical examination indicate that a comprehensive radiographic evaluation is necessary. Eighteen patients with thoracic and lumber spinal fracture were studied with CT. Four had multiple level injuries. The results are summarized as follow; 1. Among the 18 patients, 4 had multiple level injuries and other 14 patients had single spinal injury. 2. 8 patients (11 spines) had simple compression fracture and 12 patients (13 spines) had burst fracture of vertebral body. 3. 15 spines among the 24 involved spines are located at T12 and L1 level. 4. Spinal canal narrowing and bony fragment in the canal are defined only 7 of 13 spines (53.8%) of burst fracture in conventional radiography. However CT showed in all spines of burst fracture. 5. Spinal posterior element involvement is suggested only one of 12 spines of burst fracture, but correctly interpretated by CT in 7 spines (11 anatomical position)

  1. Symptomatic thoracic spinal cord herniation: case series and technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Ray, Wilson Z; Wright, Neill M

    2014-09-01

    Idiopathic spinal cord herniation (ISCH) is an uncommon condition located predominantly in the thoracic spine and often associated with a remote history of a major traumatic injury. ISCH has an incompletely described presentation and unknown etiology. There is no consensus on the treatment algorithm and surgical technique, and there are few data on clinical outcomes. In this case series and technical report, we describe the atypical myelopathy presentation, remote history of traumatic injury, radiographic progression, treatment, and outcomes of 5 patients treated at Washington University for symptomatic ISCH. A video showing surgical repair is presented. In contrast to classic compressive myelopathy symptomatology, ISCH patients presented with an atypical myelopathy, characterized by asymmetric motor and sensory deficits and early-onset urinary incontinence. Clinical deterioration correlated with progressive spinal cord displacement and herniation observed on yearly spinal imaging in a patient imaged serially because of multiple sclerosis. Finally, compared with compressive myelopathy in the thoracic spine, surgical treatment of ISCH led to rapid improvement despite a long duration of symptoms. Symptomatic ISCH presents with atypical myelopathy and slow temporal progression and can be successfully managed with surgical repair.

  2. The intelligent estimating of spinal column abnormalities by using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    saeed

    The artificial neural network was trained by using the characteristic vector extracted from ... Key words: Abnormality, spinal column, kyphosis, lordosis, neural network, classification. ..... Angle? Deep Pint or mid Point of Arch? World Appl. Sci.

  3. Subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord: MRI detection of preferential involvement of the posterior columns in a child

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    Wolansky, L.J. [Dept. of Radiology, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ (United States); Goldstein, G. [Dept. of Radiology, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ (United States); Gozo, A. [Dept. of Neurosciences, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ (United States)]|[Dept. of Pediatrics, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ (United States)]|[Children`s Hospital of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States); Lee, H.J. [Dept. of Radiology, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ (United States); Sills, I. [Dept. of Pediatrics, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ (United States)]|[Children`s Hospital of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States); Chatkupt, S. [Dept. of Neurosciences, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ (United States)]|[Dept. of Pediatrics, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ (United States)]|[Children`s Hospital of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord (vitamin B{sub 12}-deficient myelopathy) is a neurologic disorder manifesting progressive symptoms of paresthesia and spastic paralysis. As shown by pathology, it initially involves the posterior columns of the thoracic cord. We present a case of vitamin B{sub 12} deficiency with preferential posterior column involvement of the thoracic cord in a child. Theoretically, this should be the earliest, most reversible stage of the disease, making recognition of this MRI pattern of critical importance. (orig.)

  4. Imaging of thoracic and lumbar spinal extradural arachnoid cysts: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmelin, A.; Clouet, P.L.; Salatino, S.; Kehrli, P.; Maitrot, D.; Stephan, M.; Dietemann, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Extradural arachnoid cysts are uncommon expanding lesions in the spinal canal which may communicate with the subarachnoid space. Usually in the lower thoracic spine, they may cause symptoms by compressing the spinal cord or nerve roots. We report cases of thoracic and lumbar arachnoid cysts studied by cystography, myelography, CT and MRI. These techniques showed extradural cystic lesions containing cerebrospinal fluid, with variable communication with the subarachnoid space, causing anterior displacement and flattening of the spinal cord. (orig.)

  5. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy under Segmental Thoracic Spinal Anesthesia: A Feasible Economical Alternative

    OpenAIRE

    Kejriwal, Aditya Kumar; Begum, Shaheen; Krishan, Gopal; Agrawal, Richa

    2017-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is normally performed under general anesthesia, but regional techniques like thoracic epidural and lumbar spinal have been emerging and found beneficial. We performed a clinical case study of segmental thoracic spinal anaesthesia in a healthy patient. We selected an ASA grade I patient undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy and gave spinal anesthetic in T10-11 interspace using 1 ml of bupivacaine 5 mg ml?1 mixed with 0.5 ml of fentanyl 50 ?g ml?1. Other drugs we...

  6. Focal Anterior Displacement of the Thoracic Spinal Cord without Evidence of Spinal Cord Herniation or an Intradural Mass

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    Lee, Jong Yoon; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Heung Sik [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings on focal anterior displacement of the thoracic spinal cord in asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass. We identified 12 patients (male:female = 6:6; mean age, 51.7; range, 15-83 years) between 2007 and 2011, with focal anterior displacement of the spinal cord and without evidence of an intradural mass or spinal cord herniation. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings in consensus. An asymmetric spinal cord deformity with a focal dented appearance was seen on the posterior surface of the spinal cord in all patients, and it involved a length of 1 or 2 vertebral segments in the upper thoracic spine (thoracic vertebrae 1-6). Moreover, a focal widening of the posterior subarachnoid space was also observed in all cases. None of the patients had myelopathy symptoms, and they showed no focal T2-hyperintensity in the spinal cord with the exception of one patient. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow artifacts were seen in the posterior subarachnoid space of the affected spinal cord level. Computed tomography myelography revealed preserved CSF flow in the two available patients. Focal anterior spinal cord indentation can be found in the upper thoracic level of asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass.

  7. Focal Anterior Displacement of the Thoracic Spinal Cord without Evidence of Spinal Cord Herniation or an Intradural Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Yoon; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Heung Sik

    2014-01-01

    We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings on focal anterior displacement of the thoracic spinal cord in asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass. We identified 12 patients (male:female = 6:6; mean age, 51.7; range, 15-83 years) between 2007 and 2011, with focal anterior displacement of the spinal cord and without evidence of an intradural mass or spinal cord herniation. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings in consensus. An asymmetric spinal cord deformity with a focal dented appearance was seen on the posterior surface of the spinal cord in all patients, and it involved a length of 1 or 2 vertebral segments in the upper thoracic spine (thoracic vertebrae 1-6). Moreover, a focal widening of the posterior subarachnoid space was also observed in all cases. None of the patients had myelopathy symptoms, and they showed no focal T2-hyperintensity in the spinal cord with the exception of one patient. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow artifacts were seen in the posterior subarachnoid space of the affected spinal cord level. Computed tomography myelography revealed preserved CSF flow in the two available patients. Focal anterior spinal cord indentation can be found in the upper thoracic level of asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass

  8. Vertebral Column Resection for Rigid Spinal Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifi, Comron; Laratta, Joseph L; Petridis, Petros; Shillingford, Jamal N; Lehman, Ronald A; Lenke, Lawrence G

    2017-05-01

    Broad narrative review. To review the evolution, operative technique, outcomes, and complications associated with posterior vertebral column resection. A literature review of posterior vertebral column resection was performed. The authors' surgical technique is outlined in detail. The authors' experience and the literature regarding vertebral column resection are discussed at length. Treatment of severe, rigid coronal and/or sagittal malalignment with posterior vertebral column resection results in approximately 50-70% correction depending on the type of deformity. Surgical site infection rates range from 2.9% to 9.7%. Transient and permanent neurologic injury rates range from 0% to 13.8% and 0% to 6.3%, respectively. Although there are significant variations in EBL throughout the literature, it can be minimized by utilizing tranexamic acid intraoperatively. The ability to correct a rigid deformity in the spine relies on osteotomies. Each osteotomy is associated with a particular magnitude of correction at a single level. Posterior vertebral column resection is the most powerful posterior osteotomy method providing a successful correction of fixed complex deformities. Despite meticulous surgical technique and precision, this robust osteotomy technique can be associated with significant morbidity even in the most experienced hands.

  9. Correlation between spinal column length and the spread of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Correlation between spinal column length and the spread of subarachnoid hyperbaric bupivacaine in the term parturient. W.M Wan Rahiza, A.R Raha, A Muhd, M.N Nadia, M Muhammad, Z Azmil, I Azarinah, M.Z Jaafar ...

  10. Plecospondylic spinal column in the eel Anguilla anguilla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, A.

    1956-01-01

    Several cases of deformities in the spinal column were described in fishes, viz. lordosis in the bitterling Rhodeus amarus) by ROTH (1922), in the minnow (Phoxinus phoxinus) by ROTH (1922), in the pike (Esox lucius) by ROTH (1922) and PLEHN (1924); kyphosis in the toothcarps (Cyprinodontidae) by

  11. Plecospondylic spinal column in the viviparous Cyprinodont Lebistes reticulatus (Peters)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, A.

    1955-01-01

    Description of a case of plecospondylic spinal column in the viviparous Cyprinodont Lebistes reticulatus (PETERS), the so-called guppy or millionfish. In this deformity the following phenomena have been observed: displacement of vertebrae, transformation of vertebrae, increase in size of vertebrae,

  12. Accuracy of CT-guided biopsies in 158 patients with thoracic spinal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, D.J.; He, B.R.; Liu, T.J.; Zhao, Q.P.; Sun, H.H.; Jiang, Y.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Inconsistent accuracies of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsies have been reported in previous studies. Purpose. To determine the accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy, to compare the results with those previously reported, and to determine if there are any factors that influence the accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy. Material and Methods. In total, 158 consecutive CT-guided percutaneous thoracic spine procedures (performed at the Dept. of Spinal Surgery, Xian Red Cross Hospital between April 2000 and July 2010) were reviewed. The 158 lesions were categorized by location and radiographic features. Pathological and clinical follow-up were used to determine accuracy. Results. The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy was 90.5% overall. Biopsy of metastatic bone disease (98.2%) was significantly more accurate than biopsies of primary tumors (80.9%) and of hematological malignancies (47.0%) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy was significantly higher for the lower thoracic spine (97.6%) than for the middle (90.0%) or upper thoracic spine (80.4%) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.025, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy was significantly higher for lytic lesions (96.4%) than for sclerotic lesions (81.3%) (P < 0.010). The accuracy of biopsies performed using the transpedicular approach (91.0%) was not significantly different from that of biopsies performed using posterolateral approaches (91.5%) (0.25 < P < 0.5). Conclusion. Percutaneous CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy is a viable alternative to open surgical biopsy. The diagnostic accuracy was not affected by any of the variables except for lesion level, histology, and radiographic features

  13. Accuracy of CT-guided biopsies in 158 patients with thoracic spinal lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, D.J.; He, B.R.; Liu, T.J.; Zhao, Q.P. (Dept. of Spinal Surgery, Xian Red Cross Hospital, Xian Shaanxi (China)), email: zqpddn1@gmail.com; Sun, H.H. (Dept. of Orthopaedic, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical Univ., Xian Shaanxi (China)); Jiang, Y.H. (Dept. of Radiology, Xian Red Cross Hospital, Xian Shaanxi (China))

    2011-11-15

    Background. Inconsistent accuracies of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsies have been reported in previous studies. Purpose. To determine the accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy, to compare the results with those previously reported, and to determine if there are any factors that influence the accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy. Material and Methods. In total, 158 consecutive CT-guided percutaneous thoracic spine procedures (performed at the Dept. of Spinal Surgery, Xian Red Cross Hospital between April 2000 and July 2010) were reviewed. The 158 lesions were categorized by location and radiographic features. Pathological and clinical follow-up were used to determine accuracy. Results. The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy was 90.5% overall. Biopsy of metastatic bone disease (98.2%) was significantly more accurate than biopsies of primary tumors (80.9%) and of hematological malignancies (47.0%) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy was significantly higher for the lower thoracic spine (97.6%) than for the middle (90.0%) or upper thoracic spine (80.4%) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.025, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy was significantly higher for lytic lesions (96.4%) than for sclerotic lesions (81.3%) (P < 0.010). The accuracy of biopsies performed using the transpedicular approach (91.0%) was not significantly different from that of biopsies performed using posterolateral approaches (91.5%) (0.25 < P < 0.5). Conclusion. Percutaneous CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy is a viable alternative to open surgical biopsy. The diagnostic accuracy was not affected by any of the variables except for lesion level, histology, and radiographic features

  14. Thoracic spinal anesthesia is safe for patients undergoing abdominal cancer surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ellakany, Mohamed Hamdy

    2014-01-01

    Aim: A double-blinded randomized controlled study to compare discharge time and patient satisfaction between two groups of patients submitted to open surgeries for abdominal malignancies using segmental thoracic spinal or general anesthesia. Background: Open surgeries for abdominal malignancy are usually done under general anesthesia, but many patients with major medical problems sometimes can’t tolerate such anesthesia. Regional anesthesia namely segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia may be b...

  15. [Current status of thoracoscopic surgery for thoracic and lumbar spine. Part 2: treatment of the thoracic disc hernia, spinal deformities, spinal tumors, infections and miscellaneous].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdú-López, Francisco; Beisse, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery or video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) of the thoracic and lumbar spine has evolved greatly since it appeared less than 20 years ago. It is currently used in a large number of processes and injuries. The aim of this article, in its two parts, is to review the current status of VATS of the thoracic and lumbar spine in its entire spectrum. After reviewing the current literature, we developed each of the large groups of indications where VATS takes place, one by one. This second part reviews and discusses the management, treatment and specific thoracoscopic technique in thoracic disc herniation, spinal deformities, tumour pathology, infections of the spine and other possible indications for VATS. Thoracoscopic surgery is in many cases an alternative to conventional open surgery. The transdiaphragmatic approach has made endoscopic treatment of many thoracolumbar junction processes possible, thus widening the spectrum of therapeutic indications. These include the treatment of spinal deformities, spinal tumours, infections and other pathological processes, as well as the reconstruction of injured spinal segments and decompression of the spinal canal if lesion placement is favourable to antero-lateral approach. Good clinical results of thoracoscopic surgery are supported by growing experience reflected in a large number of articles. The degree of complications in thoracoscopic surgery is comparable to open surgery, with benefits in regard to morbidity of the approach and subsequent patient recovery. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparing the radiosensitivity of cervical and thoracic spinal cord using the relative seriality model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamus-Gorka, M.; Lind, B.K.; Brahme, A.

    2003-01-01

    Spinal cord is one of the most important normal tissues that are aimed to be spared during radiation therapy of cancer. This organ has been known for its strongly serial character and its high sensitivity to radiation. In order to compare the sensitivity of different parts of spinal cord, the early data (1970's) for radiation myelopathy available in the literature could be used. In the present study the relative seriality model (Kallman et al. 1992) has been fitted to two different sets of clinical data for spinal cord irradiation: radiation myelitis of cervical spinal cord after treating 248 patients for malignant disease of head and neck (Abbatucci et al. 1978) and radiation myelitis of thoracic spinal cord after radiation treating 43 patients with lung carcinoma (Reinhold et al. 1976). The maximum likelihood method was applied for the fitting and the corresponding parameters together with their 68% confidence intervals calculated for each of the datasets respectively. The alpha-beta ratio for the thoracic survival was also obtained. On the basis of the present study the following conclusions can be drawn: 1. radiation myelopathy is a strongly serial endpoint, 2. it appears to be differences in radiosensitivity between the cervical and thoracic region of spinal cord, 3. thoracic spinal cord revealed very serial characteristic of dose response, while the cervical myelopathy seems to be a bit less serial endpoint, 4. the dose-response curve is much steeper in case of myelopathy of cervical spinal cord, due to the much higher gamma value for this region. This work compares the fitting of NTCP model to the cervical and thoracic regions of the spinal cord and shows quite different responses. In the future more data should be tested for better understanding the mechanism of spinal cord sensitivity to radiation

  17. Segmental thoracic spinal has advantages over general anesthesia for breast cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elakany, Mohamed Hamdy; Abdelhamid, Sherif Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic spinal anesthesia has been used for laparoscopic cholecystectomy and abdominal surgeries, but not in breast surgery. The present study compared this technique with general anesthesia in breast cancer surgeries. Forty patients were enrolled in this comparative study with inclusion criteria of ASA physical status I-III, primary breast cancer without known extension beyond the breast and axillary nodes, scheduled for unilateral mastectomy with axillary dissection. They were randomly divided into two groups. The thoracic spinal group (S) (n = 20) underwent segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine and fentanyl at T5-T6 interspace, while the other group (n = 20) underwent general anesthesia (G). Intraoperative hemodynamic parameters, intraoperative complications, postoperative discharge time from post-anesthesia care unit (PACU), postoperative pain and analgesic consumption, postoperative adverse effects, and patient satisfaction with the anesthetic techniques were recorded. Intraoperative hypertension (20%) was more frequent in group (G), while hypotension and bradycardia (15%) were more frequent in the segmental thoracic spinal (S) group. Postoperative nausea (30%) and vomiting (40%) during PACU stay were more frequent in the (G) group. Postoperative discharge time from PACU was shorter in the (S) group (124 ± 38 min) than in the (G) group (212 ± 46 min). The quality of postoperative analgesia and analgesic consumption was better in the (S) group. Patient satisfaction was similar in both groups. Segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia has some advantages when compared with general anesthesia and can be considered as a sole anesthetic in breast cancer surgery with axillary lymph node clearance.

  18. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy under Segmental Thoracic Spinal Anesthesia: A Feasible Economical Alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kejriwal, Aditya Kumar; Begum, Shaheen; Krishan, Gopal; Agrawal, Richa

    2017-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is normally performed under general anesthesia, but regional techniques like thoracic epidural and lumbar spinal have been emerging and found beneficial. We performed a clinical case study of segmental thoracic spinal anaesthesia in a healthy patient. We selected an ASA grade I patient undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy and gave spinal anesthetic in T10-11 interspace using 1 ml of bupivacaine 5 mg ml -1 mixed with 0.5 ml of fentanyl 50 μg ml -1 . Other drugs were only given (systemically) to manage patient anxiety, pain, nausea, hypotension, or pruritus during or after surgery. The patient was reviewed 2 days postoperatively in ward. The thoracic spinal anesthetia was performed easily in the patient. Some discomfort which was readily treated with 1mg midazolam and 20 mg ketamine intravenously. There was no neurological deficit and hemodynamic parameters were in normal range intra and post-operatively and recovery was uneventful. We used a narrow gauze (26G) spinal needle which minimized the trauma to the patient and the chances of PDPH, which was more if 16 or 18G epidural needle had been used and could have increased further if there have been accidental dura puncture. Also using spinal anesthesia was economical although it should be done cautiously as we are giving spinal anesthesia above the level of termination of spinal cord.

  19. 'High resolution' computerized tomography in spinal narrow and spinal column diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koester, O.

    1985-01-01

    Bearing in mind that direct comparison is lacking, high resolution computerized tomography in spinal column diagnosis can be said to supply considerably increased information when dealing with the issues of a cervical prolapse and bony changes of any origin. Its advantages appear to be reduced when assessing lumbar prolapse, intraspinal masses and paravertebral soft-tissue processes. (orig.) [de

  20. Clinical, morphologic, and morphometric features of cranial thoracic spinal stenosis in large and giant breed dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Philippa; De Risio, Luisa; Sparkes, Andrew; McConnell, Fraser; Holloway, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The clinical, morphologic, and morphometric features of cranial thoracic spinal stenosis were investigated in large and giant breed dogs. Seventy-nine magnetic resonance imaging studies of the cranial thoracic spine were assessed. Twenty-six were retrieved retrospectively and 53 were acquired prospectively using the same inclusion criteria. Images were evaluated using a modified compression scale as: no osseous stenosis (grade 0), osseous stenosis without spinal cord compression (grade 1), and osseous stenosis with spinal cord compression (grade 2). Morphometric analysis was performed and compared to the subjective grading system. Grades 1 and 2 cranial thoracic spinal stenosis were identified on 24 imaging studies in 23 dogs. Sixteen of 23 dogs had a conformation typified by Molosser breeds and 21/23 were male. The most common sites of stenosis were T2-3 and T3-4. The articular process joints were enlarged with abnormal oblique orientation. Stenosis was dorsolateral, lateralized, or dorsoventral. Concurrent osseous cervical spondylomyelopathy was recognized in six dogs and other neurologic disease in five dogs. Cranial thoracic spinal stenosis was the only finding in 12 dogs. In 9 of these 12 dogs (all grade 2) neurolocalization was to the T3-L3 spinal segment. The median age of these dogs was 9.5 months. In the remaining three dogs neurologic signs were not present. Stenosis ratios were of limited benefit in detecting stenotic sites. Grade 2 cranial thoracic spinal stenosis causing direct spinal cord compression may lead to neurologic signs, however milder stenosis (grade 1) is likely to be subclinical or incidental. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  1. Magnetic resonance tomography of the vertebral column and spinal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlenbrock, D.; Brueckmann, H.; Bunke, J.; Giesecke, J.; Heinzerling, J.; Kunze, V.; Mirvis, S.E.; Weidner, A.; Wolf, A.L.

    1992-01-01

    In addition to all the aspects pertinent to diagnostic procedures in the vertebral column and spinal canal this pocket book provides complete coverage of congenital and acquired disorders in the fields of orthopedics, neurology and neurosurgery - including malformations of the spinal canal, degenerative vertebral diseases, tumours, inflammatory changes and vascular diseases, to mention only a few. The authors discuss the question of how image qualities can be influenced and the most information obtained from the different pulse sequences. They outline future development trends and give advice on the reduction of artefacts. The principles that must be adhered to in surgical intervention and nmr imaging for the post-operative assessment of vertebral disk syndromes and tumours are just as important an issue here as is the information the surgeon expects to obtain through diagnostic nmr imaging and the recommendations to be given by the radiologist. (orig.) With 265 figs [de

  2. Management of traumatic spinal column injury: A tertiary hospital experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Kamrul Ahsan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trauma is the leading cause of disability in the first four decades of life and third most common cause of death. Spinal trauma poses considerable threats to survival and quality of life.Objective: Aims of this study is to assess the demographics, mode of trauma, hospital stay, complications, neurological improvement and mortality.Methods: Retrospective Cross sectional analysis of the records of spinal injury patients admitted in the Spine Unit of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU Hospital from October 2003 to December 2013 was carried out. The demo­graphics, mode of trauma, involved vertebral level, co-morbid factors; neurological status and its improvement by Ameri­can Spinal Injury Association (ASIA Score, duration of hospital stay and complications during hospital stay was assessed. Results were analyzed by SPSS.Results: Out of 1288 patients admitted, 192(14.90% patients(range, 8-72 years sustained spinal injuries and most (63.02%of them were young (range, 21-40 years. Male to female ratio was 5:1. Cervical spine was most commonly ( 44.66% affected followed by lumbar (35 .41 % , thoracic (13 .54% , thoraco-lumbar (06.25% and Cervico-thoracic (03.13% region. Fracture through intervertebral disc was most common in cervical spine. Among the common causes were road traffic accidents (44.47%, fall from height (29.69%, heavy weight bearing (14.58% and assault with gunshot (07.29%. Paraparesis was most frequent (51.05% clinical presentation followed by quadriparesis (45.83%. Significant number of patients (83.33% required operative treatment (p<0.05 and 09.89% were managed conservatively. Mortality rate (03.64% was insignificant (p>0.05% and 03.12% patient refused to take treatment. Of these patients, 77.01 % had shown neurological improvement of at least one grade according to ASIA Score.Conclusion: Wide varieties of patients are encountered and managed varying from conservative to surgery. Carefully selected

  3. Isolated long thoracic nerve paralysis - a rare complication of anterior spinal surgery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameri Ebrahim

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Isolated long thoracic nerve injury causes paralysis of the serratus anterior muscle. Patients with serratus anterior palsy may present with periscapular pain, weakness, limitation of shoulder elevation and scapular winging. Case presentation We present the case of a 23-year-old woman who sustained isolated long thoracic nerve palsy during anterior spinal surgery which caused external compressive force on the nerve. Conclusion During positioning of patients into the lateral decubitus position, the course of the long thoracic nerve must be attended to carefully and the nerve should be protected from any external pressure.

  4. Primary thoracic epidural lymphoma: A rare cause of spinal cord ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spinal epidural lymphoma is a rare entity that is not often considered in the differential diagnosis of an epidural mass in a previously healthy individual. Pfatients with Primary Spinal Epidural Lymphomas (PSELs) have negative diagnostic work up for systemic lymphoma and unlike disseminated lymphoma, they achieve ...

  5. General anesthesia versus segmental thoracic or conventional lumbar spinal anesthesia for patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Yousef, Gamal T.; Lasheen, Ahmed E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy became the standard surgery for gallstone disease because of causing less postoperative pain, respiratory compromise and early ambulation. Objective: This study was designed to compare spinal anesthesia, (segmental thoracic or conventional lumbar) vs the gold standard general anesthesia as three anesthetic techniques for healthy patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy, evaluating intraoperative parameters, postoperative recovery an...

  6. Thoracic rat spinal cord contusion injury induces remote spinal gliogenesis but not neurogenesis or gliogenesis in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Franz

    Full Text Available After spinal cord injury, transected axons fail to regenerate, yet significant, spontaneous functional improvement can be observed over time. Distinct central nervous system regions retain the capacity to generate new neurons and glia from an endogenous pool of progenitor cells and to compensate neural cell loss following certain lesions. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether endogenous cell replacement (neurogenesis or gliogenesis in the brain (subventricular zone, SVZ; corpus callosum, CC; hippocampus, HC; and motor cortex, MC or cervical spinal cord might represent a structural correlate for spontaneous locomotor recovery after a thoracic spinal cord injury. Adult Fischer 344 rats received severe contusion injuries (200 kDyn of the mid-thoracic spinal cord using an Infinite Horizon Impactor. Uninjured rats served as controls. From 4 to 14 days post-injury, both groups received injections of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU to label dividing cells. Over the course of six weeks post-injury, spontaneous recovery of locomotor function occurred. Survival of newly generated cells was unaltered in the SVZ, HC, CC, and the MC. Neurogenesis, as determined by identification and quantification of doublecortin immunoreactive neuroblasts or BrdU/neuronal nuclear antigen double positive newly generated neurons, was not present in non-neurogenic regions (MC, CC, and cervical spinal cord and unaltered in neurogenic regions (dentate gyrus and SVZ of the brain. The lack of neuronal replacement in the brain and spinal cord after spinal cord injury precludes any relevance for spontaneous recovery of locomotor function. Gliogenesis was increased in the cervical spinal cord remote from the injury site, however, is unlikely to contribute to functional improvement.

  7. Approach to the irradiation of extensive cervical and upper thoracic spinal astrocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorak, E.

    1981-01-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord tumors are relatively rare, especially to the extent presented in this report. A 31-year-old woman had been diagnosed as having an inoperable astrocytoma, grade I-II, involving the entire cervical spinal cord and two upper thoracic segments. After decompressive laminectomy, she was referred for a radical course of radiation therapy. An irradiation technique was devised which allowed treatment of a single cylindrical volume of tissue encompassing the known tumor. Field fractionation with undesirable gaps and/or excessive dose to overlying normal structures was avoided. To the cervical spinal cord she received 5590 cGy in 29 fractions over 42 days. By this schedule she received at the same time 4820 cGy to the medulla oblongata and 4880 cGy to the upper thoracic cord. Partial neurological improvement occurred at the end of the treatment. The treatment approach is discussed in the background of the literature data. (orig.) [de

  8. Risk factors associated with structural postural changes in the spinal column of children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Adami Sedrez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between behavioral risk factors, specifically postural habits, with the presence of structural changes in the spinal column of children and adolescents. METHODS: 59 students were evaluated through the self-reporting Back Pain and Body Posture Evaluation Instrument and spinal panoramic radiographic examination. Spine curvatures were classified based on Cobb angles, as normal or altered in the saggital plane and as normal or scoliotic in the frontal plane. Data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0, based on descriptive statistics and chi-square association test (a=0,05. RESULTS: The prevalence of postural changes was 79.7% (n=47, of which 47.5% (n=28 showed frontal plane changes and 61% (n=36 sagital plane changes. Significant association was found between the presence of thoracic kyphosis and female gender, practice of physical exercises only once or twice a week, sleep time greater than 10 hours, inadequate postures when sitting on a seat and sitting down to write, and how school supplies are carried. Lumbar lordosis was associated with the inadequate way of carrying the school backpack (asymmetric; and scoliosis was associated wuth the practice of competitive sports and sleep time greater than 10 hours. CONCLUSIONS: Lifestyle may be associated with postural changes. It is important to develop health policies in order to reduce the prevalence of postural changes, by decreasing the associated risk factors.

  9. Temporary occipital fixation in young children with severe cervical-thoracic spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Brian J; Minkara, Anas A; Angevine, Peter D; Vitale, Michael G; Lenke, Lawrence G; Anderson, Richard C E

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE The long-term effects of instrumentation and fusion of the occipital-cervical-thoracic spine on spinal growth in young children are poorly understood. To mitigate the effects of this surgery on the growing pediatric spine, the authors report a novel technique used in 4 children with severe cervical-thoracic instability. These patients underwent instrumentation from the occiput to the upper thoracic region for stabilization, but without bone graft at the craniovertebral junction (CVJ). Subsequent surgery was then performed to remove the occipital instrumentation, thereby allowing further growth and increased motion across the CVJ. METHODS Three very young children (15, 30, and 30 months old) underwent occipital to thoracic posterior segmental instrumentation due to cervical or upper thoracic dislocation, progressive kyphosis, and myelopathy. The fourth child (10 years old) underwent similar instrumentation for progressive cervical-thoracic scoliosis. Bone graft was placed at and distal to C-2 only. After follow-up CT scans demonstrated posterior arthrodesis without unintended fusion from the occiput to C-2, 3 patients underwent removal of the occipital instrumentation. RESULTS Follow-up cervical spine flexion/extension radiographs demonstrated partial restoration of motion at the CVJ. One patient has not had the occipital instrumentation removed yet, because only 4 months have elapsed since her operation. CONCLUSIONS Temporary fixation to the occiput provides increased biomechanical stability for spinal stabilization in young children, without permanently eliminating motion and growth at the CVJ. This technique can be considered in children who require longer instrumentation constructs for temporary stabilization, but who only need fusion in more limited areas where spinal instability exists.

  10. Thoracic spinal anesthesia is safe for patients undergoing abdominal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellakany, Mohamed Hamdy

    2014-01-01

    A double-blinded randomized controlled study to compare discharge time and patient satisfaction between two groups of patients submitted to open surgeries for abdominal malignancies using segmental thoracic spinal or general anesthesia. Open surgeries for abdominal malignancy are usually done under general anesthesia, but many patients with major medical problems sometimes can't tolerate such anesthesia. Regional anesthesia namely segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia may be beneficial in such patients. A total of 60 patients classified according to American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) as class II or III undergoing surgeries for abdominal malignancy, like colonic or gastric carcinoma, divided into two groups, 30 patients each. Group G, received general anesthesia, Group S received a segmental (T9-T10 injection) thoracic spinal anesthesia with intrathecal injection of 2 ml of hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% (10 mg) and 20 ug fentanyl citrate. Intraoperative monitoring, postoperative pain, complications, recovery time, and patient satisfaction at follow-up were compared between the two groups. Spinal anesthesia was performed easily in all 30 patients, although two patients complained of paraesthesiae, which responded to slight needle withdrawal. No patient required conversion to general anesthesia, six patients required midazolam for anxiety and six patients required phenylephrine and atropine for hypotension and bradycardia, recovery was uneventful and without sequelae. The two groups were comparable with respect to gender, age, weight, height, body mass index, ASA classification, preoperative oxygen saturation and preoperative respiratory rate and operative time. This preliminary study has shown that segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia can be used successfully and effectively for open surgeries for abdominal malignancies by experienced anesthetists. It showed shorter postanesthesia care unit stay, better postoperative pain relief and patient satisfaction than

  11. Can the human lumbar posterior columns be stimulated by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation? A modeling study

    OpenAIRE

    Danner, Simon M.; Hofstoetter, Ursula S.; Ladenbauer, Josef; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Stimulation of different spinal cord segments in humans is a widely developed clinical practice for modification of pain, altered sensation and movement. The human lumbar cord has become a target for modification of motor control by epidural and more recently by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation. Posterior columns of the lumbar spinal cord represent a vertical system of axons and when activated can add other inputs to the motor control of the spinal cord than stimulated posterior roots. ...

  12. NMR imaging of the vertebral column and the spinal canal. 2. rev. and enl. ed.; MRT der Wirbelsaeule und des Spinalkanals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsting, Michael [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie; Uhlenbrock, Detlev [St.-Josefs-Hospital, Dortmund (Germany). MVZ Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Strahlentherapie; Wanke, Isabel [Privatklinikengruppe Hirslanden, Zurich (Switzerland); Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie

    2009-07-01

    The book on the MRT (magnetic resonance tomography) of the vertebral cord and spinal canal covers the following topics: physics fundamentals and application; malformation of the spinal canal; degenerative vertebral column diseases; vertebral column and spinal canal carcinomas; inflammatory diseases of the vertebral column and the spinal canal; applicability of MRT in case of acute spinal cord traumata; vascular diseases of the spinal canal.

  13. Surgical decompression of thoracic spinal stenosis in achondroplasia: indication and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen; Peul, Wilco

    2012-08-01

    The achondroplastic spinal canal is narrow due to short pedicles and a small interpedicular distance. Compression of neural structures passing through this canal is therefore regularly encountered but rarely described. Symptomatology, radiological evaluation, and treatment of 20 patients with achondroplasia who underwent decompression of the thoracic spinal cord are described and outcome is correlated with the size of the spinal canal and the thoracolumbar kyphotic angle. Scores from the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale, Nurick scale, European Myelopathy scale, Cooper myelopathy scale for lower extremities, and Odom criteria before and after surgery were compared. Magnetic resonance imaging was evaluated to determine the size of the spinal canal, spinal cord compression, and presence of myelomalacia. The thoracolumbar kyphotic angle was measured using fluoroscopy. Patient symptomatology included deterioration of walking pattern, pain, cramps, spasms, and incontinence. Magnetic resonance images of all patients demonstrated spinal cord compression due to degenerative changes. Surgery resulted in a slight improvement on all the ranking scales. Surgery at the wrong level occurred in 15% of cases, but no serious complications occurred. The mean thoracolumbar kyphotic angle was 20°, and no correlation was established between this angle and outcome after surgery. No postoperative increase in this angle was reported. There was also no correlation between size of the spinal canal and outcome. Decompressive surgery of the thoracic spinal cord in patients with achondroplasia can be performed safely if anatomical details are taken into consideration. Spondylodesis did not appear essential. Special attention should be given to the method of surgery, identification of the level of interest, and follow-up of the thoracolumbar kyphotic angle.

  14. Long descending cervical propriospinal neurons differ from thoracic propriospinal neurons in response to low thoracic spinal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelzner Dennis J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propriospinal neurons, with axonal projections intrinsic to the spinal cord, have shown a greater regenerative response than supraspinal neurons after axotomy due to spinal cord injury (SCI. Our previous work focused on the response of axotomized short thoracic propriospinal (TPS neurons following a low thoracic SCI (T9 spinal transection or moderate spinal contusion injury in the rat. The present investigation analyzes the intrinsic response of cervical propriospinal neurons having long descending axons which project into the lumbosacral enlargement, long descending propriospinal tract (LDPT axons. These neurons also were axotomized by T9 spinal injury in the same animals used in our previous study. Results Utilizing laser microdissection (LMD, qRT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry, we studied LDPT neurons (located in the C5-C6 spinal segments between 3-days, and 1-month following a low thoracic (T9 spinal cord injury. We examined the response of 89 genes related to growth factors, cell surface receptors, apoptosis, axonal regeneration, and neuroprotection/cell survival. We found a strong and significant down-regulation of ~25% of the genes analyzed early after injury (3-days post-injury with a sustained down-regulation in most instances. In the few genes that were up-regulated (Actb, Atf3, Frs2, Hspb1, Nrap, Stat1 post-axotomy, the expression for all but one was down-regulated by 2-weeks post-injury. We also compared the uninjured TPS control neurons to the uninjured LDPT neurons used in this experiment for phenotypic differences between these two subpopulations of propriospinal neurons. We found significant differences in expression in 37 of the 84 genes examined between these two subpopulations of propriospinal neurons with LDPT neurons exhibiting a significantly higher base line expression for all but 3 of these genes compared to TPS neurons. Conclusions Taken collectively these data indicate a broad overall down

  15. Segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia in patient with Byssinosis undergoing nephrectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Kiran; Salgaonkar, Sweta

    2012-01-01

    Byssinosis is an occupational disease occurring commonly in cotton mill workers; it usually presents with features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The management of patients with COPD presents a significant challenges to the anesthetist. Regional anesthesia is preferred in most of these patients to avoid perioperative and postoperative complications related to general anesthesia. We report a known case of Byssinosis who underwent nephrectomy under segmental spinal anesthesia ...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical and thoracic spine and the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MR), using a 0.3 T resistive scanner with an iron core and a vertical magnetic field, was evaluated in patients with different diseases affecting the cervical and thoracic spine and the spinal cord. The results indicate that MR is well suited as the procedure of choice for emergency examination of patients with spinal cord symptoms, for examination of patients with suspected spinal multiple sclerosis and for pre-operative evaluation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis with neurological symptoms emanating from the cranio-cervical junction. In patients with cervical radiculapathy and/or myelopathy, caused by spondylosis or disk herniation, MR was found to be equivalent with myelography and CT myelography but MR has several practical advantages. MR at 0.3 T using a vertical magnetic field provided information comparable to that reported from examinations performed with superconducting MR scanners. In order to optimize the MR examinations of the spine, the signal characteristics of different coils available when using a vertical magnetic field were determined by phantom studies. Recommendations for optimal coil selection for different levels of the cervical and thoracic spine are given. In addition, the paramagnetic contrast medium gadolinium-DTPA was administered intravenously to patients with suspected spinal multiple sclerosis. Enhancement of clinically active lesions in the cervical spinal cord was observed. Serial MR examinations with gadolinium-DTPA showed that a decrease in enhancement could be correlated with decrease in clinical symptoms and signs. (author)

  17. Trunk muscle activation in a person with clinically complete thoracic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerkefors, Anna; Carpenter, Mark G; Cresswell, Andrew G; Thorstensson, Alf

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess if, and how, upper body muscles are activated in a person with high thoracic spinal cord injury, clinically classified as complete, during maximal voluntary contractions and in response to balance perturbations. Data from one person with spinal cord injury (T3 level) and one able-bodied person were recorded with electromyography from 4 abdominal muscles using indwelling fine-wire electrodes and from erector spinae and 3 upper trunk muscles with surface electrodes. Balance perturbations were carried out as forward or backward support surface translations. The person with spinal cord injury was able to activate all trunk muscles, even those below the injury level, both in voluntary efforts and in reaction to balance perturbations. Trunk movements were qualitatively similar in both participants, but the pattern and timing of muscle responses differed: upper trunk muscle involvement and occurrence of co-activation of ventral and dorsal muscles were more frequent in the person with spinal cord injury. These findings prompt further investigation into trunk muscle function in paraplegics, and highlight the importance of including motor tests for trunk muscles in persons with thoracic spinal cord injury, in relation to injury classification, prognosis and rehabilitation.

  18. Roentgenosemiotics of GI tract functional obstruction determined by birth injuries of the spinal column and spinal cord in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akberov, R.F.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments on animals and the results of combined clinico-roentgenological investigation of 150 children with birth injuries of the spinal column and cord and 40 children with invagination and consequences of the cervical spine and cord, made it possible to study roentgenosemiotics and to establish pathogenetic interrelationship of natal injuries of the spinal column, spinal cord and GI tract functional obstruction in the form of polyspasm, spastic-hypo- and atonic intestinal dyskenesia, gastroesophageal reflux, aspiration pneumonia with the development of intestinal invagination

  19. MRI of the injured spinal cord of the thoracic and lumber spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Kenji; Satoh, Tetsurou; Hyodo, Hironori; Ohira, Nobuhiro; Moriai, Norio

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance studies using a 1.5 Tesla superconductive magnet were performed on 23 patients with spinal cord injury of the thoracic and lumbar regions in their chronic stages. Our results were as follows. The MR images were found to well represent the spinal cord lesions except several cases of complex displacement of the spinal cord. The size and the degree of penetration of the MRI abnormalities well correlated with the spinal cord injury; those cases of large and penetrating MRI abnormalities were represented by complete paraplegia and those of small and non-penetrating abnormalities were those of imcomplete paraplegia. However, the neurological levels of the spinal cord injury in cases of complete paraplegia appeared higher than the spinal segments indicated by the MRI. This discrepancy was thought to be explained by a concomitant, additional nerve roots involvement along with the spinal cord injury. Incidentally, the MRI of the cone lesions did not seem to be reproducible presumably as the result of its too small sensitive volume. We also discussed the problem of MRI artifacts and effects from gross anatomical displacement of traumatic origin. (author)

  20. Segmental thoracic spinal has advantages over general anesthesia for breast cancer surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Elakany, Mohamed Hamdy; Abdelhamid, Sherif Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Background: Thoracic spinal anesthesia has been used for laparoscopic cholecystectomy and abdominal surgeries, but not in breast surgery. The present study compared this technique with general anesthesia in breast cancer surgeries. Materials and Methods: Forty patients were enrolled in this comparative study with inclusion criteria of ASA physical status I-III, primary breast cancer without known extension beyond the breast and axillary nodes, scheduled for unilateral mastectomy with axillary...

  1. Multidimensional Analysis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Early Impairment in Thoracic and Thoracolumbar Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabray, Marc C.; Whetstone, William D.; Dhall, Sanjay S.; Phillips, David B.; Pan, Jonathan Z.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Beattie, Michael S.; Haefeli, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Literature examining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in acute spinal cord injury (SCI) has focused on cervical SCI. Reproducible systems have been developed for MRI-based grading; however, it is unclear how they apply to thoracic SCI. Our hypothesis is that MRI measures will group as coherent multivariate principal component (PC) ensembles, and that distinct PCs and individual variables will show discriminant validity for predicting early impairment in thoracic SCI. We undertook a retrospective cohort study of 25 patients with acute thoracic SCI who underwent MRI on admission and had American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) assessment at hospital discharge. Imaging variables of axial grade, sagittal grade, length of injury, thoracolumbar injury classification system (TLICS), maximum canal compromise (MCC), and maximum spinal cord compression (MSCC) were collected. We performed an analytical workflow to detect multivariate PC patterns followed by explicit hypothesis testing to predict AIS at discharge. All imaging variables loaded positively on PC1 (64.3% of variance), which was highly related to AIS at discharge. MCC, MSCC, and TLICS also loaded positively on PC2 (22.7% of variance), while variables concerning cord signal abnormality loaded negatively on PC2. PC2 was highly related to the patient undergoing surgical decompression. Variables of signal abnormality were all negatively correlated with AIS at discharge with the highest level of correlation for axial grade as assessed with the Brain and Spinal Injury Center (BASIC) score. A multiple variable model identified BASIC as the only statistically significant predictor of AIS at discharge, signifying that BASIC best captured the variance in AIS within our study population. Our study provides evidence of convergent validity, construct validity, and clinical predictive validity for the sampled MRI measures of SCI when applied in acute thoracic and thoracolumbar SCI. PMID:26414451

  2. Spinal Ischemia in Thoracic Aortic Procedures: Impact of Radiculomedullary Artery Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari, Fabian A; Wittmann, Karin; Krause, Sonja; Saravi, Babak; Puttfarcken, Luisa; Förster, Katharina; Rylski, Bartosz; Maier, Sven; Göbel, Ulrich; Siepe, Matthias; Czerny, Martin; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of thoracic anterior radiculomedullary artery (tARMA) distribution on spinal cord perfusion in a thoracic aortic surgical model. Twenty-six pigs (34 ± 3 kg; study group, n = 20; sham group, n = 6) underwent ligation of the left subclavian artery and thoracic segmental arteries. End points were spinal cord perfusion pressure (SCPP), regional spinal cord blood flow (SCBF), and neurologic outcome with an observation time of 3 hours. tARMA distribution patterns tested for an effect on end points included (1) maximum distance between any 2 tARMAs within the treated aortic segment (0 or 1 segment = small-distance group; >1 segment = large-distance group) and (2) distance between the end of the treated aortic segment and the first distal tARMA (at the level of the distal simulated stent-graft end = group 0; gap of 1 or more segments = group ≥1). The number of tARMA ranged from 3 to 13 (mean, 8). In the large-distance group, SCBF dropped from 0.48 ± 0.16 mL/g/min to 0.3 ± 0.08 mL/g/min (p distribution patterns of tARMAs correlate with the degree of SCBF drop and insufficient reactive parenchymal hyperemia in aortic procedures. Individual ARMA distribution patterns along the treated aortic segment could help us predict the individual risk of spinal ischemia. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Selective spinal angiography and embolization of tumours of the vertebral column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeter, P.; Voigt, K.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the technique, the diagnostic and therapeutic value, and the limitations of spinal angiography and embolization in tumours of the vertebral column. Three demonstrative selected cases, in which arterial embolization was performed without subsequent surgery, are discussed. (Auth.)

  4. Light and electron microscopy of contacts between primary afferent fibres and neurones with axons ascending the dorsal columns of the feline spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, D J; Koerber, H R; Bannatyne, B A

    1985-10-01

    In addition to primary afferent fibres, the dorsal columns of the cat spinal cord contain ascending second-order axons which project to the dorsal column nuclei. The aim of the present study was to obtain morphological evidence that certain primary afferent axons form monosynaptic contacts with cells of origin of this postsynaptic dorsal column pathway. In ten adult cats, neurones with axons ascending the dorsal columns were retrogradely labelled with horseradish peroxidase using a pellet implantation method in the thoracic dorsal columns. In the lumbosacral regions of the same animals, primary afferent fibres were labelled intra-axonally with ionophoretic application of horseradish peroxidase. Tissue containing labelled axons was prepared for light and combined light and electron microscopy. Ultrastructural examination demonstrated that slowly adapting (Type I), hair follicle, Pacinian corpuscle and group Ia muscle spindle afferents formed monosynaptic contacts with labelled cells and light microscopical analysis suggested that they also received monosynaptic input from rapidly adapting (Krause) afferents. This evidence suggests that sensory information from large-diameter cutaneous and muscle spindle afferent fibres is conveyed disynaptically via the postsynaptic dorsal column pathway to the dorsal column nuclei. Some of the input to this pathway is probably modified in the spinal cord as the majority of primary afferent boutons forming monosynaptic contacts were postsynaptic to other axon terminals. The postsynaptic dorsal column system appears to constitute a major somatosensory pathway in the cat.

  5. Characterization of thoracic spinal neurons with noxious convergent inputs from heart and lower airways in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chao; Foreman, Robert D; Farber, Jay P

    2007-04-13

    Respiratory symptoms experienced in some patients with cardiac diseases may be due to convergence of noxious cardiac and pulmonary inputs onto neurons of the central nervous system. For example, convergence of cardiac and respiratory inputs onto single solitary tract neurons may be in part responsible for integration of regulatory and defensive reflex control. However, it is unknown whether inputs from the lungs and heart converge onto single neurons of the spinal cord. The present aim was to characterize upper thoracic spinal neurons responding to both noxious stimuli of the heart and lungs in rats. Extracellular potentials of single thoracic (T3) spinal neurons were recorded in pentobarbital anesthetized, paralyzed, and ventilated male rats. A catheter was placed in the pericardial sac to administer bradykinin (BK, 10 microg/ml, 0.2 ml, 1 min) as a noxious cardiac stimulus. The lung irritant, ammonia, obtained as vapor over a 30% solution of NH(4)OH was injected into the inspiratory line of the ventilator (0.5-1.0 ml over 20 s). Intrapericardial bradykinin (IB) altered activity of 58/65 (89%) spinal neurons that responded to inhaled ammonia (IA). Among those cardiopulmonary convergent neurons, 81% (47/58) were excited by both IA and IB, and the remainder had complex response patterns. Bilateral cervical vagotomy revealed that vagal afferents modulated but did not eliminate responses of individual spinal neurons to IB and IA. The convergence of pulmonary and cardiac nociceptive signaling in the spinal cord may be relevant to situations where a disease process in one organ influences the behavior of the other.

  6. Neuroradiology of the spinal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, R.; Molsen, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    Radiodiagnostics of the vertebral column and of the spinal cord under normal conditions and under different pathological alterations are elaborated. Especially cervical and thoracal myelography, lumbosacral myeloradiculography, spinal arteriography and phlebography as well as spinal computerized tomography are discussed in detail

  7. DIFFERENT TYPES OF INSPIRATORY MUSCLE TRAINING PROVIDES BETTERMENT IN ALTERED PULMONARY FUNCTIONS IN UPPER THORACIC SPINAL CORD INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muruganandam Periyasamy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Respiratory problems are usual in upper thoracic spinal cord injuries when compared to Lower thoracic spinal cord injuries. Generally there are frequent respiratory complications in the individuals with spinal cord injuries. The complications of the respiratory system are severe and more prevalent source of morbidity and mortality after the spinal cord injury due to the inefficient breathing capacity including inspiratory and expiratory abilities. The present study represents the inspiratory muscle training especially in upper thoracic spinal cord injury patients to assess the improvement in the pulmonary functions. Methods: Twenty five patients with the age between 25 -40 years with the upper spinal cord injuries were selected in the present study in order to assess the efficacy of the training. Several types of exercises were practiced including diaphragmatic breathing exercises, incentive spirometry, active cycle of breathing technique and weight training. COPD Conditions, Chest wall deformities, Hypertensive patients, Cardio vascular problems were excluded in the study. Results: The results from the study showed that significant changes were found in the patients treated with all the above mentioned techniques. Axillary level, nipple level, Xiphisternum levels were analysed and the results found to be significant after the treatment. Incentive spirometry and peak flow meter observations were also found to be significant when compare to the pretreatment. Conclusion: The present study conclude that the combined effect of incentive spriometry, diaphragmatic breathing exercises, and active cycle of breathing technique is more effective in improving the pulmonary functions in upper thoracic spinal cord injuries than single method efficiency.

  8. Sudden post-traumatic sciatica caused by a thoracic spinal meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariniello, Giuseppe; Malacario, Francesca; Dones, Flavia; Severino, Rocco; Ugga, Lorenzo; Russo, Camilla; Elefante, Andrea; Maiuri, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Spinal meningiomas usually present with slowly progressive symptoms of cord and root compression, while a sudden clinical onset is very rare. A 35-year-old previously symptom-free woman presented sudden right sciatica and weakness of her right leg following a fall with impact to her left foot. A neurological examination showed paresis of the right quadriceps, tibial and sural muscles, increased bilateral knee and ankle reflexes and positive Babinski sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the presence of a spinal T11 meningioma in the left postero-lateral compartment of the spinal canal; at this level, the spinal cord was displaced to the contralateral side with the conus in the normal position. At surgery, a meningioma with dural attachment of the left postero-lateral dural surface was removed. The intervention resulted in rapid remission of both pain and neurological deficits. Spinal meningiomas may exceptionally present with sudden pain and neurological deficits as result of tumour bleeding or post-traumatic injury of the already compressed nervous structures, both in normal patients and in those with conus displacement or tethered cord. In this case, the traumatic impact of the left foot was transmitted to the spine, resulting in stretching of the already compressed cord and of the contralateral lombosacral roots. This case suggests that low thoracic cord compression should be suspected in patients with post-traumatic radicular leg pain with normal lumbar spine MRI. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Lumbar Myeloid Cell Trafficking into Locomotor Networks after Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Christopher N.; Norden, Diana M.; Faw, Timothy D.; Deibert, Rochelle; S.Wohleb, Eric; Sheridan, John F.; P.Godbout, Jonathan; Basso, D. Michele

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) promotes inflammation along the neuroaxis that jeopardizes plasticity, intrinsic repair and recovery. While inflammation at the injury site is well-established, less is known within remote spinal networks. The presence of bone marrow-derived immune (myeloid) cells in these areas may further impede functional recovery. Previously, high levels of the gelatinase, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) occurred within the lumbar enlargement after thoracic SCI and impeded activity-dependent recovery. Since SCI-induced MMP-9 potentially increases vascular permeability, myeloid cell infiltration may drive inflammatory toxicity in locomotor networks. Therefore, we examined neurovascular reactivity and myeloid cell infiltration in the lumbar cord after thoracic SCI. We show evidence of region-specific recruitment of myeloid cells into the lumbar but not cervical region. Myeloid infiltration occurred with concomitant increases in chemoattractants (CCL2) and cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1) around lumbar vasculature 24 hours and 7 days post injury. Bone marrow GFP chimeric mice established robust infiltration of bone marrow-derived myeloid cells into the lumbar gray matter 24 hours after SCI. This cell infiltration occurred when the blood-spinal cord barrier was intact, suggesting active recruitment across the endothelium. Myeloid cells persisted as ramified macrophages at 7 days post injury in parallel with increased inhibitory GAD67 labeling. Importantly, macrophage infiltration required MMP-9. PMID:27191729

  10. Continuous Thoracic Sympathetic Ganglion Block in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Patients with Spinal Cord Stimulation Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EungDon Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The sympathetic block is widely used for treating neuropathic pain such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS. However, single sympathetic block often provides only short-term effect. Moreover, frequent procedures for sympathetic block may increase the risk of complications. The use of epidural route may be limited by concern of infection in case of previous implantation of the spinal cord stimulation (SCS. In contrast, a continuous sympathetic block can be administered without such concerns. The continuous thoracic sympathetic block (TSGB has been used to treat the ischemic disease and other neuropathic conditions such as postherpetic neuralgia. We administered continuous thoracic sympathetic block using catheter in CRPS patients who underwent SCS implantations and achieved desirable outcomes. We believe a continuous sympathetic block is a considerable option before performing neurolysis or radiofrequency rhizotomy and even after SCS implantation.

  11. Neural progenitor cells but not astrocytes respond distally to thoracic spinal cord injury in rat models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI is a detrimental condition that causes loss of sensory and motor function in an individual. Many complex secondary injury cascades occur after SCI and they offer great potential for therapeutic targeting. In this study, we investigated the response of endogenous neural progenitor cells, astrocytes, and microglia to a localized thoracic SCI throughout the neuroaxis. Twenty-five adult female Sprague-Dawley rats underwent mild-contusion thoracic SCI (n = 9, sham surgery (n = 8, or no surgery (n = 8. Spinal cord and brain tissues were fixed and cut at six regions of the neuroaxis. Immunohistochemistry showed increased reactivity of neural progenitor cell marker nestin in the central canal at all levels of the spinal cord. Increased reactivity of astrocyte-specific marker glial fibrillary acidic protein was found only at the lesion epicenter. The number of activated microglia was significantly increased at the lesion site, and activated microglia extended to the lumbar enlargement. Phagocytic microglia and macrophages were significantly increased only at the lesion site. There were no changes in nestin, glial fibrillary acidic protein, microglia and macrophage response in the third ventricle of rats subjected to mild-contusion thoracic SCI compared to the sham surgery or no surgery. These findings indicate that neural progenitor cells, astrocytes and microglia respond differently to a localized SCI, presumably due to differences in inflammatory signaling. These different cellular responses may have implications in the way that neural progenitor cells can be manipulated for neuroregeneration after SCI. This needs to be further investigated.

  12. Mini-open spinal column shortening for the treatment of adult tethered cord syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaee, Michael M; Winkler, Ethan A; Chou, Dean

    2017-10-01

    Tethered cord syndrome (TCS) is a challenging entity characterized by adhesions at the caudal spinal cord that prevent upward movement during growth and result in stretching of the cord with a concomitant constellation of neurologic symptoms. Although growth in height stops in adulthood, some patients still develop progressive symptoms; many underwent detethering as a child or adolescent, resulting in significant scar tissue and re-tethering. Recent strategies have focused on spinal column shortening to reduce tension on the spinal cord without exposing the previous de-tethering site. Mini-open and minimally invasive approaches avoid the large dissection and exposure associated with traditional approaches and are associated with reduced blood loss, shorter hospital stay, and similar outcomes when compared to conventional open approaches. We describe a technique for mini-open spinal column shortening. Using intraoperative navigation pedicle screws were placed at T10, T11, L1, and L2. A mini-open 3-column "egg shell" decancellation osteotomy of T12 was performed through a transpedicular approach with preservation of the superior and inferior endplates. This procedure was performed on a 28year old male with recurrent TCS and neurogenic bladder. Postoperative imaging showed a reduction in spinal column length of 1.5cm and evidence of decreased tension on the spinal cord. At last follow-up he was recovering well with improved urinary function. Spinal column shortening for adult TCS can be safely achieved through a mini-open approach. Future studies should compare the efficacy of this technique to both traditional de-tethering and open spinal column shortening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute cervical cord injury without fracture or dislocation of the spinal column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyanagi, I; Iwasaki, Y; Hida, K; Akino, M; Imamura, H; Abe, H

    2000-07-01

    It is known that the spinal cord can sustain traumatic injury without associated injury of the spinal column in some conditions, such as a flexible spinal column or preexisting narrowed spinal canal. The purpose of this study was to characterize the clinical features and to understand the mechanisms in cases of acute cervical cord injury in which fracture or dislocation of the cervical spine has not occurred. Eighty-nine patients who sustained an acute cervical cord injury were treated in our hospitals between 1990 and 1998. In 42 patients (47%) no bone injuries of the cervical spine were demonstrated, and this group was retrospectively analyzed. There were 35 men and seven women, aged 19 to 81 years (mean 58.9 years). The initial neurological examination indicated complete injury in five patients, whereas incomplete injury was demonstrated in 37. In the majority of the patients (90%) the authors found degenerative changes of the cervical spine such as spondylosis (22 cases) or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (16 cases). The mean sagittal diameter of the cervical spinal canal, as measured on computerized tomography scans, was significantly narrower than that obtained in the control patients. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed spinal cord compression in 93% and paravertebral soft-tissue injuries in 58% of the patients. Degenerative changes of the cervical spine and developmental narrowing of the spinal canal are important preexisting factors. In the acute stage MR imaging is useful to understand the level and mechanisms of spinal cord injury. The fact that a significant number of the patients were found to have spinal cord compression despite the absence of bone injuries of the spinal column indicates that future investigations into surgical treatment of this type of injury are necessary.

  14. Conduction of impulses by axons regenerated in a Schwann cell graft in the transected adult rat thoracic spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, A; Calancie, B; Oudega, M; Noga, B R

    2001-06-01

    Central nervous system axons regenerate into a Schwann cell implant placed in the transected thoracic spinal cord of an adult rat. The present study was designed to test whether these regenerated axons are capable of conducting action potentials. Following the transection and removal of a 4- to 5-mm segment of the thoracic spinal cord (T8-T9), a polymer guidance channel filled with a mixture of adult rat Schwann cells and Matrigel was grafted into a 4- to 5-mm-long gap in the transected thoracic spinal cord. The two cut ends of the spinal cord were eased into the guidance channel openings. Transected control animals received a channel containing Matrigel only. Three months after implantation, electrophysiological studies were performed. Tungsten microelectrodes were used for monopolar stimulation of regenerated axons within the Schwann cell graft. Glass microelectrodes were used to record responses in the spinal cord rostral to the stimulation site. Evoked responses to electrical stimulation of the axon cable were found in two out of nine Schwann cell-grafted animals. These responses had approximate latencies in the range of those of myelinated axons. No responses were seen in any of the Matrigel-grafted animals. Histological analysis revealed that the two cases that showed evoked potentials had the largest number of myelinated axons present in the cable. This study demonstrates that axons regenerating through Schwann cell grafts in the complete transected spinal cord can produce measurable evoked responses following electrical stimulation. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Can the human lumbar posterior columns be stimulated by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation? A modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Simon M; Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Ladenbauer, Josef; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2011-03-01

    Stimulation of different spinal cord segments in humans is a widely developed clinical practice for modification of pain, altered sensation, and movement. The human lumbar cord has become a target for modification of motor control by epidural and, more recently, by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation. Posterior columns of the lumbar spinal cord represent a vertical system of axons and when activated can add other inputs to the motor control of the spinal cord than stimulated posterior roots. We used a detailed three-dimensional volume conductor model of the torso and the McIntyre-Richard-Grill axon model to calculate the thresholds of axons within the posterior columns in response to transcutaneous lumbar spinal cord stimulation. Superficially located large-diameter posterior column fibers with multiple collaterals have a threshold of 45.4 V, three times higher than posterior root fibers (14.1 V). With the stimulation strength needed to activate posterior column axons, posterior root fibers of large and small diameters as well as anterior root fibers are coactivated. The reported results inform on these threshold differences, when stimulation is applied to the posterior structures of the lumbar cord at intensities above the threshold of large-diameter posterior root fibers. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. General anesthesia versus segmental thoracic or conventional lumbar spinal anesthesia for patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Gamal T; Lasheen, Ahmed E

    2012-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy became the standard surgery for gallstone disease because of causing less postoperative pain, respiratory compromise and early ambulation. This study was designed to compare spinal anesthesia, (segmental thoracic or conventional lumbar) vs the gold standard general anesthesia as three anesthetic techniques for healthy patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy, evaluating intraoperative parameters, postoperative recovery and analgesia, complications as well as patient and surgeon satisfaction. A total of 90 patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy, between January 2010 and May 2011, were randomized into three equal groups to undergo laparoscopic cholecystectomy with low-pressure CO2 pneumoperitoneum under segmental thoracic (TSA group) or conventional lumbar (LSA group) spinal anesthesia or general anesthesia (GA group). To achieve a T3 sensory level we used (hyperbaric bupivacaine 15 mg, and fentanyl 25 mg at L2/L3) for LSAgroup, and (hyperbaric bupivacaine 7.5 mg, and fentanyl 25 mg at T10/T11) for TSAgroup. Propofol, fentanyl, atracurium, sevoflurane, and tracheal intubation were used for GA group. Intraoperative parameters, postoperative recovery and analgesia, complications as well as patient and surgeon satisfaction were compared between the three groups. All procedures were completed laparoscopically by the allocated method of anesthesia with no anesthetic conversions. The time for the blockade to reach T3 level, intraoperative hypotensive and bradycardic events and vasopressor use were significantly lower in (TSA group) than in (LSA group). Postoperative pain scores as assessed throughout any time, postoperative right shoulder pain and hospital stay was lower for both (TSA group) and (LSA group) compared with (GA group). The higher degree of patients satisfaction scores were recorded in patients under segmental TSA. The present study not only confirmed that both segmental TSA and conventional

  17. The intelligent estimating of spinal column abnormalities by using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results indicate that the high efficiency of this method as the CCR (train) and CCR (test) was about 96 and 93%, respectively. These results show that the neural network can be considered as a standard way to diagnose the spinal abnormalities. Moreover, the most important benefit of this method is the estimation of ...

  18. Periosteal chondroma with spinal cord compression in the thoracic spinal canal: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Dong Hyeok; Kang, Byeong Seong; Kwon, Woon Jung; Sim, Hong Bo; Kim, Misung

    2016-01-01

    Periosteal chondroma is a very unusual cartilaginous neoplasm of the spinal canal. We herein report a case of periosteal chondroma in a 41-year-old male who presented with gait disturbance and paresthesia of both lower extremities. Magnetic resonance (MR) images showed an extradural mass which caused compression of the spinal cord at the T5/6 level. The mass showed iso-signal intensity on T1-weighted images, high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and nodular and peripheral rim enhancement on post-contrast T1-weighted images. Computed tomography (CT) images showed a mass with punctate calcifications and extension into the left T5/6 neural foramen. MR and CT images showed extrinsic cortical bone erosion of the posterior inferior body of T5 and superior pedicle of T6, bone remodeling with overhanging margins, and sclerosis adjacent to the tumor. The patient underwent a complete excision of the mass by left T5/6 hemi-laminectomy and exhibited complete resolution of his symptoms. Histopathologic examination revealed periosteal chondroma. Tumor recurrence was not recorded during the 18-month follow-up period. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of lung volumes, vital capacity and respiratory muscle strength after cervical, thoracic and lumbar spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marcio Aparecido; Vidotto, Milena Carlos; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Almeida, Renato; Santoro, Ilka Lopes; Sperandio, Evandro Fornias; Jardim, José Roberto; Gazzotti, Mariana Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that physiopathological changes to the respiratory system can occur following thoracic and abdominal surgery. Laminectomy is considered to be a peripheral surgical procedure, but it is possible that thoracic spinal surgery exerts a greater influence on lung function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pulmonary volumes and maximum respiratory pressures of patients undergoing cervical, thoracic or lumbar spinal surgery. Prospective study in a tertiary-level university hospital. Sixty-three patients undergoing laminectomy due to diagnoses of tumors or herniated discs were evaluated. Vital capacity, tidal volume, minute ventilation and maximum respiratory pressures were evaluated preoperatively and on the first and second postoperative days. Possible associations between the respiratory variables and the duration of the operation, surgical diagnosis and smoking status were investigated. Vital capacity and maximum inspiratory pressure presented reductions on the first postoperative day (20.9% and 91.6%, respectively) for thoracic surgery (P = 0.01), and maximum expiratory pressure showed reductions on the first postoperative day in cervical surgery patients (15.3%; P = 0.004). The incidence of pulmonary complications was 3.6%. There were reductions in vital capacity and maximum respiratory pressures during the postoperative period in patients undergoing laminectomy. Surgery in the thoracic region was associated with greater reductions in vital capacity and maximum inspiratory pressure, compared with cervical and lumbar surgery. Thus, surgical manipulation of the thoracic region appears to have more influence on pulmonary function and respiratory muscle action.

  20. Full-thickness thoracic laminar erosion after posterior spinal fusion associated with late-presenting infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribus, Clifford B; Garvey, Kathleen E

    2003-05-15

    A case report describes unilateral complete laminar erosion of the caudal thoracic spine and late-presenting infection in a patient 10 years after anteroposterior reconstruction for scoliosis. To present an unusual but significant complication that may occur after implantation of spinal instrumentation. The reported patient presented with a deep infection and persistent back pain 10 years after successful anteroposterior reconstruction for adult idiopathic scoliosis. Delayed onset infections after implantation of spinal instrumentation are infrequent, yet when present, often require hardware removal. The case of a 51-year-old woman who underwent irrigation and debridement for a late-presenting infection and removal of posterior hardware 10 years after her index procedure is presented. Interoperatively, it was noted that full-thickness laminar erosion was present from T4 to T12. The patient was taken to the operating room for wound irrigation, debridement, and hardware removal. It was discovered that a Cotrel-Dubousset rod placed on the convexity of the curve had completely eroded through the lamina of T7-T12. Infectious material was found along the entire length of both the convex and concave Cotrel-Dubousset rods. Intraoperative cultures grew Staphylococcus epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes. Intravenous and oral antibiotics were administered, resulting in resolution of the infection and preoperative pain. The exact role of late-presenting infection with regard to the laminar erosion and rod migration seen in this case remains to be elucidated. However, the authors believe the primary cause of bony erosion was mechanical in origin. Regardless, most spine surgeons will treat many patients who have had posterior spinal implants and will perform hardware removal on a significant number of these patients during their careers. A full-thickness laminar erosion exposes the spinal cord to traumatic injury during hardware removal and debridement. This case is

  1. Comparison of histopathologic changes following X-irradiation of mid-thoracic and lumbosacral levels of neonatal rat spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heard, J.K.; Gilmore, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Light microscopic changes were studied in the dorsal funiculi of spinal cords from rats irradiated (4000 R) at 3 days of age and killed from 9-60 days postirradiation (P-I). The irradiated site was limited to a 5-mm length of mid-thoracic spinal cord (T only) in one group of rats, to a 5-mm length of lumbosacral spinal cord (L only) in a second group, and to 5-mm lengths of both mid-thoracic and lumbosacral spinal cord (T/L) in the third group. Changes in the lumbosacral regions were essentially the same in both L only and T/L irradiated groups. These changes included a decreased neuroglial population and a concurrent state of hypomyelination from 9-30 days P-I. In contrast, in the mid-thoracic regions of T only and T/L irradiated groups the decrease in the neuroglial population was obvious only through 13 days P-I, and by 30 days this population resembled that of the controls. The irradiated mid-thoracic areas were hypomyelinated, with the fasciculus gracilis showing a greater degree of hypomyelination than the fasciculus cuneatus. By 25 days P-I, myelination appeared to be normal in these areas. Scattered hemorrhages were noted in both lumbosacral and mid-thoracic regions, but necrotic areas occurred only at the lumbosacral level. In general, the mid-thoracic area appeared to be less sensitive to x-radiation at 3 days of age than the lumbosacral area. These data suggest that there may be marked differences in the developmental states of cells at these two levels at 3 days of age

  2. Computer-assisted radiographic calculation of spinal curvature in brachycephalic "screw-tailed" dog breeds with congenital thoracic vertebral malformations: reliability and clinical evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Guevar

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were: To investigate computer-assisted digital radiographic measurement of Cobb angles in dogs with congenital thoracic vertebral malformations, to determine its intra- and inter-observer reliability and its association with the presence of neurological deficits. Medical records were reviewed (2009-2013 to identify brachycephalic screw-tailed dog breeds with radiographic studies of the thoracic vertebral column and with at least one vertebral malformation present. Twenty-eight dogs were included in the study. The end vertebrae were defined as the cranial end plate of the vertebra cranial to the malformed vertebra and the caudal end plate of the vertebra caudal to the malformed vertebra. Three observers performed the measurements twice. Intraclass correlation coefficients were used to calculate the intra- and inter-observer reliabilities. The intraclass correlation coefficient was excellent for all intra- and inter-observer measurements using this method. There was a significant difference in the kyphotic Cobb angle between dogs with and without associated neurological deficits. The majority of dogs with neurological deficits had a kyphotic Cobb angle higher than 35°. No significant difference in the scoliotic Cobb angle was observed. We concluded that the computer assisted digital radiographic measurement of the Cobb angle for kyphosis and scoliosis is a valid, reproducible and reliable method to quantify the degree of spinal curvature in brachycephalic screw-tailed dog breeds with congenital thoracic vertebral malformations.

  3. Non osseous intra-spinal tumors in children and adolescents: spinal column deformity (in french)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanem, I.; Zeller, R.; Dubousset, J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose of the study. The delay in diagnosis of spinal tumors is not rare. The chief complaint may include pain, walking disability and spinal or limb deformities. The purpose of our study is to analyze the spinal deformities associated with non osseous intra-spinal tumors, to assess the complications of treatment, and to set out a preventive protocol. Methods. The incidence and pattern of spinal deformity was assessed before tumor treatment and ultimately after laminectomy or osteoplastic laminotomy (or lamino-plasty). Results. Among the 9 cases with preexisting spinal deformity, the curve magnitude increased after laminectomy in 4. A kyphotic, kyphoscoliotic or scoliotic deformity developed in 18 cases after surgery for tumor resection. Among these 18 patients, only one had bad an adequate osteoplastic laminotomy. The treatment of spinal deformities was surgical in 12 cases, and done by either posterior or anterior and posterior combined arthrodesis. Discussion. Spinal deformity may be the main complaint of a patient who has intraspinal tumor. Prevention of post-laminectomy spinal deformity is mandatory, and could be done by osteoplastic laminotomy and the use of a brace during a minimum period of 4 to 6 months after surgery. Conclusion. Diagnosis of intraspinal tumors in children and adolescents should be done early, and lamino-arthrectomy should be replaced by osteoplastic laminotomy. (authors)

  4. An unusual presentation of whiplash injury: long thoracic and spinal accessory nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, N.; Srinivasan, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    Whiplash injuries from motor vehicle accidents are very common. The usual presentation and course of this condition normally results in resolution of symptoms within a few weeks. Brachial plexus traction injuries without any bone or joint lesion of the cervical spine have been reported before. We report a case where a gentleman was involved in a rear end vehicle collision, sustained a whiplash injury and was later found to have a long thoracic nerve palsy and spinal accessory nerve palsy. Although isolated injuries of both nerves following a whiplash injury have been reported, combined injury of the two nerves following a whiplash injury is very uncommon and is being reported for the first time. PMID:17587067

  5. Flight Physical Standards of the 1980’s: Spinal Column Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    disease and spondylosis deformans. In addition, the role of vertebral body fractures oni subsequent spinal column impact is discussed. SECURITY...11 Spondylosis D eform ans ......................................... ................... 11 III...5th lumbar vertebra supports the superimposed weight of the torso upon the inclined plane of the sacrum. The necessity for bony continuity of the 5th

  6. Spinal Epidural Hematoma after Thoracolumbar Posterior Fusion Surgery without Decompression for Thoracic Vertebral Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoki Minato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare case of spinal epidural hematoma (SEH after thoracolumbar posterior fusion without decompression surgery for a thoracic vertebral fracture. A 42-year-old man was hospitalized for a thoracic vertebral fracture caused by being sandwiched against his back on broken concrete block. Computed tomography revealed a T12 dislocation fracture of AO type B2, multiple bilateral rib fractures, and a right hemopneumothorax. Four days after the injury, in order to promote early orthostasis and to improve respiratory status, we performed thoracolumbar posterior fusion surgery without decompression; the patient had back pain but no neurological deficits. Three hours after surgery, he complained of acute pain and severe weakness of his bilateral lower extremities; with allodynia below the level of his umbilicus, postoperative SEH was diagnosed. We performed immediate revision surgery. After removal of the hematoma, his symptoms improved gradually, and he was discharged ambulatory one month after revision surgery. Through experience of this case, we should strongly consider the possibility of preexisting SEH before surgery, even in patients with no neurological deficits. We should also consider perioperative coagulopathy in patients with multiple trauma, as in this case.

  7. TREATMENT OUTCOMES IN ELDERLY AND SENILE PATIENTS WITH DEGENERATIVE DEFORMATIONS AND INSTABILITY OF THE SPINAL COLUMN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Mikhaylov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Degenerative  scoliosis  is  a  prevalent  issue  among  the  aging  population.  Controversy  remains   over  the  role of surgical intervention in patients with such disease. The authors  present  the results of 14-year experience in treatment of this pathology.  Various approaches  to the surgical treatment depending  on the stage of the disease and the degree of deformation, including  decompression, instrumental posterior spinal fusion, anterior spinal fusion, and osteotomy were examined. Above treatment options are based on the analysis of clinical aspects, mechanical  stability of deformation, the degree of imbalance in the body and causes of pain or neurological  deficit.The  risk of postoperative complications is extremely  high and seems to be outweighed by the  possible successful outcomes of surgical treatment. The results presented in the treatment of degenerative scoliosis mainly provide positive outcomes and can assist in the selection of treatment for this group of patients.The purpose of the  study  is to  evaluate  the  treatment outcomes  of elderly  and  senile patients with  degenerative deformations and instability of the spinal column using various surgical techniques.Material and methods. During  the present  retrospective study the authors  analyzed 437 patients (337 (77% women and  100  (23%  men  aged  60 years  and  older  who  underwent surgical  treatment at  Russian  Research  institute of traumatology and orthopaedics named  after  R.R.Vreden between  2000 and 2016. The  study  group  included  patients with  diseases and consequences  of injuries  in the  spine, leading  to its deformation and following spinal stenosis  with development of neurological  deficit in some cases.The  patients were subdivided into  four  groups  depending  on surgical  procedure.  Patients in group  I underwent decompression  of neural  structures at affected

  8. Use of a dynamic gait trainer for a child with thoracic level spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altizer, Wendy; Noritz, Garey; Paleg, Ginny

    2017-10-10

    Paediatric spinal cord injury (SCI) can result in permanent mobility impairment with consequences for activity, participation and quality of life. This case documents the effect of an overground supported stepping intervention using a dynamic gait trainer. To our knowledge, there are no published studies on this intervention for children with SCI and similar interventions have only been reported in children at American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) levels B and C.A child with a T10 (thoracic level, vertebra 10), AIS level A injury, sustained at 2 years of age, continued to make gains in all areas including participation, activity, body structure and function over the following 4 years. Use of a dynamic gait trainer improved the participant's ability to be active and participate despite lack of further neuromuscular recovery. This novel approach with a commonly available device allowed the child to be active and participate in the absence of neural recovery. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Transient long thoracic nerve injury during posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios I Tsirikos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the transient long thoracic nerve (LTN injury during instrumented posterior spinal arthrodesis for idiopathic scoliosis. The suspected mechanism of injury, postoperative course and final outcome is discussed. The LTN is susceptible to injury due to its long and relatively superficial course across the thoracic wall through direct trauma or tension. Radical mastectomies with resection of axillary lymph nodes, first rib resection to treat thoracic outlet syndrome and cardiac surgery can be complicated with LTN injury. LTN injury producing scapular winging has not been reported in association with spinal deformity surgery. We reviewed the medical notes and spinal radiographs of two adolescent patients with idiopathic scoliosis who underwent posterior spinal arthrodesis and developed LTN neuropraxia. Scoliosis surgery was uneventful and intraoperative spinal cord monitoring was stable throughout the procedure. Postoperative neurological examination was otherwise normal, but both patients developed winging of the scapula at 4 and 6 days after spinal arthrodesis, which did not affect shoulder function. Both patients made a good recovery and the scapular winging resolved spontaneously 8 and 11 months following surgery with no residual morbidity. We believe that this LTN was due to positioning of our patients with their head flexed, tilted and rotated toward the contralateral side while the arm was abducted and extended. The use of heavy retractors may have also applied compression or tension to the nerve in one of our patients contributing to the development of neuropraxia. This is an important consideration during spinal deformity surgery to prevent potentially permanent injury to the nerve, which can produce severe shoulder dysfunction and persistent pain.

  10. REGENERATIVE GROWTH OF CORTICOSPINAL TRACT AXONS VIA THE VENTRAL COLUMN AFTER SPINAL CORD INJURY IN MICE

    OpenAIRE

    Steward, Oswald; Zheng, Binhai; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Hofstadter, Maura; Sharp, Kelli; Yee, Kelly Matsudaira

    2008-01-01

    Studies that have assessed regeneration of corticospinal tract (CST) axons in mice following genetic modifications or other treatments have tacitly assumed that there is little if any regeneration of CST axons in normal mice in the absence of some intervention. Here, we document a previously unrecognized capability for regenerative growth of CST axons in normal mice that involves growth past the lesion via the ventral column. Mice received dorsal hemisection injuries at thoracic level 6–7, wh...

  11. Treatment effect, postoperative complications, and their reasons in juvenile thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qing-Yi; Xu, Jian-Zhong; Zhou, Qiang; Luo, Fei; Hou, Tianyong; Zhang, Zehua

    2015-10-01

    Fifty-four juvenile cases under 18 years of age with thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis underwent focus debridement, deformity correction, bone graft fusion, and internal fixation. The treatment effects, complications, and reasons were analyzed retrospectively. There were 54 juvenile cases under 18 years of age with thoracolumbar spinal tuberculosis. The average age was 9.2 years old, and the sample comprised 38 males and 16 females. The disease types included 28 thoracic cases, 17 thoracolumbar cases, and 9 lumbar cases. Nerve function was evaluated with the Frankel classification. Thirty-six cases were performed with focus debridement and deformity correction and were supported with allograft or autograft in mesh and fixed with pedicle screws from a posterior approach. Eight cases underwent a combined anterior and posterior surgical approach. Nine cases underwent osteotomy and deformity correction, and one case received focus debridement. The treatment effects, complications, and bone fusions were tracked for an average of 52 months. According to the Frankel classification, paralysis was improved from 3 cases of B, 8 cases of C, 18 cases of D, and 25 cases of E preoperatively. This improvement was found in 3 cases of C, 6 cases of D, and 45 cases of E at a final follow-up postoperatively. No nerve dysfunction was aggravated. VAS was improved from 7.8 ± 1.7 preoperatively to 3.2 ± 2.1 at final follow-up postoperatively. ODI was improved from 77.5 ± 17.3 preoperatively to 28.4 ± 15.9 at final follow-up postoperatively. Kyphosis Cobb angle improved from 62.2° ± 3.7° preoperatively to 37° ± 2.4° at final follow-up postoperatively. Both of these are significant improvements, and all bone grafts were fused. Complications related to the operation occurred in 31.5% (17/54) of cases. Six cases suffered postoperative aggravated kyphosis deformity, eight cases suffered proximal kyphosis deformity, one case suffered pedicle penetration

  12. Guiding Device for Precision Grafting of Peripheral Nerves in Complete Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury: Design and Sizing for Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvid Frostell

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIn an effort to translate preclinical success in achieving spinal cord regeneration through peripheral nerve grafts, this study details the design and sizing of a guiding device for precision grafting of peripheral nerves for use in a clinical trial in complete (AIS-A thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI. The device’s design and sizing are compared to a simulation of human spinal cord sizes based on the best available data.MethodsSpinal cord segmental sizes were generated by computer simulation based on data from a meta-analysis recently published by our group. Thoracic segments T2–T12 were plotted, and seven elliptical shapes were positioned across the center of the distribution of sizes. Geometrical measures of error-of-fit were calculated. CAD modeling was used to create cranial and caudal interfaces for the human spinal cord, aiming to guide descending white matter tracts to gray matter at the caudal end of the device and ascending white matter tracts to gray matter at the cranial end of the device. The interfaces were compared qualitatively to the simulated spinal cord sizes and gray-to-white matter delineations.ResultsThe mean error-of-fit comparing simulated spinal cord segments T2–T12 to the best elliptical shape was 0.41 and 0.36 mm, and the 95th percentile was found at 1.3 and 0.98 mm for transverse and anteroposterior diameter, respectively. A guiding device design was reached for capturing the majority of corticospinal axons at the cranial end of the device and guiding them obliquely to gray matter at the caudal end of the device. Based on qualitative comparison, the vast majority of spinal cord sizes generated indicate an excellent fit to the device’s interfaces.ConclusionA set of SCI guiding devices of seven sizes can cover the variability of human thoracic spinal cord segments T2–T12 with an acceptable error-of-fit for the elliptical shape as well as guiding channels. The computational framework developed can

  13. Functional plasticity in the respiratory drive to thoracic motoneurons in the segment above a chronic lateral spinal cord lesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ford, T W; Anissimova, Natalia P; Meehan, Claire Francesca

    2016-01-01

    A previous neurophysiological investigation demonstrated an increase in functional projections of expiratory bulbospinal neurons (EBSNs) in the segment above a chronic lateral thoracic spinal cord lesion that severed their axons. We have now investigated how this plasticity might be manifested...... in thoracic motoneurons by measuring their respiratory drive and the connections to them from individual EBSNs. In anesthetized cats, simultaneous recordings were made intracellularly from motoneurons in the segment above a left-side chronic (16 wk) lesion of the spinal cord in the rostral part of T8, T9......, or T10 and extracellularly from EBSNs in the right caudal medulla, antidromically excited from just above the lesion but not from below. Spike-triggered averaging was used to measure the connections between pairs of EBSNs and motoneurons. Connections were found to have a very similar distribution...

  14. Atrophy and Primary Somatosensory Cortical Reorganization after Unilateral Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury: A Longitudinal Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Sheng Rao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI on the changes in the central nervous system (CNS over time may depend on the dynamic interaction between the structural integrity of the spinal cord and the capacity of the brain plasticity. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was used in a longitudinal study on five rhesus monkeys to observe cerebral activation during upper limb somatosensory tasks in healthy animals and after unilateral thoracic SCI. The changes in the spinal cord diameters were measured, and the correlations among time after the lesion, structural changes in the spinal cord, and primary somatosensory cortex (S1 reorganization were also determined. After SCI, activation of the upper limb in S1 shifted to the region which generally dominates the lower limb, and the rostral spinal cord transverse diameter adjacent to the lesion exhibited obvious atrophy, which reflects the SCI-induced changes in the CNS. A significant correlation was found among the time after the lesion, the spinal cord atrophy, and the degree of contralateral S1 reorganization. The results indicate the structural changes in the spinal cord and the dynamic reorganization of the cerebral activation following early SCI stage, which may help to further understand the neural plasticity in the CNS.

  15. Thoracic lateral extracavitary corpectomy for anterior column reconstruction with expandable and static titanium cages: clinical outcomes and surgical considerations in a consecutive case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Christopher M; Bass, David I; Gary, Matthew F; Howard, Brian M; Refai, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    Many surgical interventions have emerged as effective means of restoring mechanical stability of the anterior column of the spine. The lateral extracavitary approach (LECA) allows for broad visualization and circumferential reconstruction of the spinal column. However, early reports demonstrated significant complication rates, protracted operative times, and prolonged hospitalizations. More recent reports have highlighted concerns for subsidence, particularly with expandable cages. Our work seeks to describe a single-surgeon consecutive series of patients undergoing LECA for thoracic corpectomy. Specifically, the objective was to explore the surgical considerations, clinical and radiographic outcomes, and complication profile of this approach. A retrospective study examined data from 17 consecutive patients in whom single or multi-level corpectomy was performed via a LECA by a single surgeon. Vertebral body replacement was achieved with either a static or expandable titanium cage. The Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) was utilized to assess patient functional status before and after surgery. Radiographic outcomes, particularly footplate-to-body ratio and subsidence, were assessed on CT imaging at 6 weeks after surgery and at follow-up of at least 6 months. The majority of patients had post-operative KPS scores consistent with functional independence (≥70, 12/17 patients, 71%). Fourteen patients had improved or maintained function by last follow-up. In both groups, all patients had a favorable footplate-to-body ratio, and rates of subsidence were similar at both time points. Notably, the overall complication rate (24%) was significantly lower than that published in the literature, and no patient suffered a pneumothorax that required placement of a thoracostomy tube. The LECA approach for anterior column reconstruction with static or expandable cages is an important surgical consideration with favorable surgical parameters and complication rates. Further, use of

  16. Posterior instrumentation, anterior column reconstruction with single posterior approach for treatment of pyogenic osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorensek, M; Kosak, R; Travnik, L; Vengust, R

    2013-03-01

    Surgical treatment of thoracolumbar osteomyelitis consists of radical debridement, reconstruction of anterior column either with or without posterior stabilization. The objective of present study is to evaluate a case series of patients with osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine treated by single, posterior approach with posterior instrumentation and anterior column reconstruction. Seventeen patients underwent clinical and radiological evaluation pre and postoperatively with latest follow-up at 19 months (8-56 months) after surgery. Parameters assessed were site of infection, causative organism, angle of deformity, blood loss, duration of surgery, ICU stay, deformity correction, time to solid bony fusion, ambulatory status, neurologic status (ASIA impairment scale), and functional outcome (Kirkaldy-Willis criteria). Mean operating time was 207 min and average blood loss 1,150 ml. Patients spent 2 (1-4) days in ICU and were able to walk unaided 1.6 (1-2) days after surgery. Infection receded in all 17 patients postoperatively. Solid bony fusion occurred in 15 out of 17 patients (88 %) on average 6.3 months after surgery. Functional outcome was assessed as excellent or good in 82 % of cases. Average deformity correction was 8 (1-18) degrees, with loss of correction of 4 (0-19) degrees at final follow-up. Single, posterior approach addressing both columns poses safe alternative in treatment of pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine. It proved to be less invasive resulting in faster postoperative recovery.

  17. The Position and Mobility of the Shoulder, Spinal Column and Pelvis in Seated Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-01

    Considerable muscle atrophy was observed in the right shoulder. In the spinal column, tissues overlying the right sacroiliac joint felt firmer than over...subject #23 had fewer clinical findings for joint dysfunction than in the other two subjects, but the physician noted more soft tissue observations than...There was also a mild scoliotic curvature with left convexity observed at T4-6. n the pelvis, the left lumbosacral and sacroiliac joints seened to

  18. The effects of backward adjustable thoracic support in wheelchair on spinal curvature and back muscle activation for elderly people.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ting Li

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of backward adjustable thoracic support on spinal curvature and back muscle activation during wheelchair sitting.Twenty elderly people were recruited for this study. The backward adjustable thoracic support sitting posture was compared with the slumped, normal, and lumbar support sitting postures. Spinal curvatures (pelvic, lumbar, and thoracic angles and muscle activations of 4 back muscles on both sides (maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the lumbar multifidus, lumbar erector spinae, iliocostalis lumborum pars thoracis, and thoracic erector spinae at T9 were measured and compared between the different sitting postures using one-way analysis of variance with repeated measures.The backward adjustable thoracic support sitting posture showed a relatively neutral pelvic tilt (-0.32±4.80° when compared with the slumped (22.84±5.27° and lumbar support (-8.97±3.31° sitting postures (P<0.001, and showed relatively higher lumbar lordosis (-23.38±6.50° when compared with the slumped (14.77±7.83°, normal (0.44±7.47°, and lumbar support (-16.76±4.77° sitting postures (P<0.05. It also showed relatively lower back muscle activity when compared with the normal and lumbar support sitting postures (P<0.05.The backward adjustable thoracic support sitting concept was suggested because it maintains a more neutral pelvic tilt, higher lumbar lordosis, and lower back muscle activation, which may help maintain a better sitting posture and reduce the risk of back pain.

  19. Dorsal column sensory axons degenerate due to impaired microvascular perfusion after spinal cord injury in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradov, Johongir M.; Ewan, Eric E.; Hagg, Theo

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms contributing to axon loss after spinal cord injury (SCI) are largely unknown but may involve microvascular loss as we have previously suggested. Here, we used a mild contusive injury (120 kdyn IH impactor) at T9 in rats focusing on ascending primary sensory dorsal column axons, anterogradely traced from the sciatic nerves. The injury caused a rapid and progressive loss of dorsal column microvasculature and oligodendrocytes at the injury site and penumbra and a ~70% loss of the sensory axons, by 24 hours. To model the microvascular loss, focal ischemia of the T9 dorsal columns was achieved via phototoxic activation of intravenously injected rose bengal. This caused an ~53% loss of sensory axons and an ~80% loss of dorsal column oligodendrocytes by 24 hours. Axon loss correlated with the extent and axial length of microvessel and oligodendrocyte loss along the dorsal column. To determine if oligodendrocyte loss contributes to axon loss, the glial toxin ethidium bromide (EB; 0.3 µg/µl) was microinjected into the T9 dorsal columns, and resulted in an ~88% loss of dorsal column oligodendrocytes and an ~56% loss of sensory axons after 72 hours. EB also caused an ~72% loss of microvessels. Lower concentrations of EB resulted in less axon, oligodendrocyte and microvessel loss, which were highly correlated (R2 = 0.81). These data suggest that focal spinal cord ischemia causes both oligodendrocyte and axon degeneration, which are perhaps linked. Importantly, they highlight the need of limiting the penumbral spread of ischemia and oligodendrocyte loss after SCI in order to protect axons. PMID:23978615

  20. Fate of patients with spinal cord ischemia complicating thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSart, Kenneth; Scali, Salvatore T; Feezor, Robert J; Hong, Michael; Hess, Philip J; Beaver, Thomas M; Huber, Thomas S; Beck, Adam W

    2013-09-01

    Spinal cord ischemia (SCI) is a potentially devastating complication of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) that can result in varying degrees of short-term and permanent disability. This study was undertaken to describe the clinical outcomes, long-term functional impact, and influence on survival of SCI after TEVAR. A retrospective review of all TEVAR patients at the University of Florida from 2000 to 2011 was performed to identify individuals experiencing SCI, defined by any new lower extremity neurologic deficit not attributable to another cause. SCI was dichotomized into immediate or delayed onset, with immediate onset defined as SCI noted upon awakening from anesthesia, and delayed characterized as a period of normal function, followed by development of neurologic injury. Ambulatory status was determined using database query, record review, and phone interviews with patients and/or family. Mortality was estimated using life-table analysis. A total of 607 TEVARs were performed for various indications, with 57 patients (9.4%) noted to have postoperative SCI (4.3% permanent). SCI patients were more likely to be older (63.9 ± 15.6 vs 70.5 ± 11.2 years; P = .002) and have a number of comorbidities, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and cerebrovascular disease (P impact on postdischarge FI or long-term mortality. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Bone marrow stromal cells elicit tissue sparing after acute but not delayed transplantation into the contused adult rat thoracic spinal cord.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tewarie, R.D.; Hurtado, A.; Ritfeld, G.J.; Rahiem, S.T.; Wendell, D.F.; Barroso, M.M.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Oudega, M.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) transplanted into the contused spinal cord may support repair by improving tissue sparing. We injected allogeneic BMSC into the moderately contused adult rat thoracic spinal cord at 15 min (acute) and at 3, 7, and 21 days (delayed) post-injury and quantified tissue

  2. Effects of wheelchair sports on respiratory muscle strength and thoracic mobility of individuals with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Marlene Aparecida; Zamunér, Antonio Roberto; Paris, Juliana Viana; Teodori, Rosana Macher; Barros, Ricardo M L

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of wheelchair sports on respiratory muscle strength and the thoracic mobility of individuals with spinal cord injury. Thirty male subjects with chronic spinal cord injury (American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale grade A) took part in the study and were divided into four groups: sedentary subjects with quadriplegia (S-QUAD, n = 7), wheelchair rugby athletes with quadriplegia (A-QUAD, n = 8), sedentary subjects with paraplegia (S-PARA, n = 6), and wheelchair basketball athletes with paraplegia (A-PARA, n = 9). The main outcome measures were maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressure and the respiratory coefficients at the axillary and xiphoid levels. A-QUAD group presented values significantly higher for all respiratory variables studied compared with the S-QUAD group. No significant differences in any of the respiratory variables were observed between S-PARA and A-PARA groups. There was a negative correlation between spinal cord injury level and respiratory variables for the S-QUAD and S-PARA groups. There were positive correlations in the A-QUAD group between time of training and maximal inspiratory pressure (adjusted R = 0.84; P = 0.001) and respiratory coefficients at the axillary level (adjusted R = 0.80; P = 0.002). Physical training seems to have a positive influence on respiratory muscle strength and thoracic mobility, especially in subjects with quadriplegia.

  3. Spinal column shortening for tethered cord syndrome associated with myelomeningocele, lumbosacral lipoma, and lipomyelomeningocele in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldave, Guillermo; Hansen, Daniel; Hwang, Steven W; Moreno, Amee; Briceño, Valentina; Jea, Andrew

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Tethered cord syndrome is the clinical manifestation of an abnormal stretch on the spinal cord, presumably causing mechanical injury, a compromised blood supply, and altered spinal cord metabolism. Tethered cord release is the standard treatment for tethered cord syndrome. However, direct untethering of the spinal cord carries potential risks, such as new neurological deficits from spinal cord injury, a CSF leak from opening the dura, and retethering of the spinal cord from normal scar formation after surgery. To avoid these risks, the authors applied spinal column shortening to children and transitional adults with primary and secondary tethered cord syndrome and report treatment outcomes. The authors' aim with this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of spinal column shortening for tethered cord syndrome by analyzing their experience with this surgical technique. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the demographic and procedural data of children and young adults who had undergone spinal column shortening for primary or secondary tethered cord syndrome. RESULTS Seven patients with tethered cord syndrome caused by myelomeningocele, lipomyelomeningocele, and transitional spinal lipoma were treated with spinal column shortening. One patient with less than 24 months of follow-up was excluded from further analysis. There were 3 males and 4 females; the average age at the time was surgery was 16 years (range 8-30 years). Clinical presentations for our patients included pain (in 5 patients), weakness (in 4 patients), and bowel/bladder dysfunction (in 4 patients). Spinal column osteotomy was most commonly performed at the L-1 level, with fusion between T-12 and L-2 using a pedicle screw-rod construct. Pedicle subtraction osteotomy was performed in 6 patients, and vertebral column resection was performed in 1 patient. The average follow-up period was 31 months (range 26-37 months). Computed tomography-based radiographic outcomes showed solid

  4. Regeneration of descending spinal axons after transection of the thoracic spinal cord during early development in the North American opossum, Didelphis virginiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, G F; Terman, J R; Wang, X M

    2000-11-15

    Opossums are born in an immature, fetal-like state, making it possible to lesion their spinal cord early in development without intrauterine surgery. When the thoracic spinal cord of the North American opossum, Didelphis virginiana, is transected on postnatal day 5, and injections of Fast Blue (FB) are made caudal to the lesion site 30-40 days or 6 months later, neurons are labeled in all of the spinal and supraspinal areas that are labeled after comparable injections in age-matched, unlesioned controls. Double-labeling studies document that regeneration of cut axons contributes to growth of axons through the lesion site and behavioral studies show that animals lesioned on postnatal day 5 use their hindlimbs in normal appearing locomotion as adults. The critical period for developmental plasticity of descending spinal axons extends to postnatal day 26, although axons which grow through the lesion site become fewer in number and more restricted as to origin with increasing age. Animals lesioned between postnatal day 12 and 26 use the hindlimbs better than animals lesioned as adults, but hindlimb function is markedly abnormal and uncoordinated with that of the forelimbs. We conclude that restoration of anatomical continuity occurs after transection of the spinal cord in developing opossums, that descending axons grow through the lesion site, that regeneration of cut axons contributes to such growth, and that animals lesioned early enough in development have relatively normal motor function as adults.

  5. Comparative review of computed tomography of the spinal column and conventional x-ray films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, H.; Yamaura, A.; Horie, T.; Makino, H. (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-04-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) of the cervical spinal column was carried out in 39 patients using a GE.CT/T or Toshiba TCT60A scanner. There were 22 cervical disk lesions, 4 spinal neoplasms, 5 narrow spinal canals with or without ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, 2 syringomyelias, 5 traumas, and one Arnold-Chiari malformation. In all the patients, tomography was done after conventional spinal X-ray studies. The correlation between the CT findings and conventional X-ray films revealed the excellent capability of the CT. The measurement of the midline sagittal diameter of the spinal canal in the patient with the narrowest canal in this series showed 7.4 mm when done by CT and 9.6 mm when done by the conventional plain film at the C/sub 5/ level. To ascertain the precise sagittal diameter of the cord itself, CT myelography is indispensable after the intrathecal injection of metrizamide A; metrizamide CT myelogram is useful in determining the nature of the disease, the risk of and best approach to surgery, and the evaluation after a surgical procedure. Although the range of motion of cervical joints and intervertebral foramen are visible with the conventional films, the size of the spinal tumors, the degree of bony change, and the tumor extension to the paraspinal connective tissue can be precisely demonstrated only by CT. A CT study of the spine is a simple procedure and is less likely to produce complication, even with a metrizamide CT myelogram, though there are certain limitations in the examination.

  6. Regeneration of supraspinal axons after transection of the thoracic spinal cord in the developing opossum, Didelphis virginiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X M; Terman, J R; Martin, G F

    1998-08-17

    When the thoracic spinal cord of the North American opossum is transected early in development, supraspinal axons grow through the lesion. In the experiments reported here, we asked whether regeneration of cut axons contributes to such growth. Fast Blue (FB) was injected into the lumbar cord on postnatal day (PD)5, 8, 15, or 20. Five days later, FB was removed by gentle suction, and the spinal cord was transected at thoracic levels. Fourteen days later, rhodamine B dextran was injected between the site of the FB injection and the lesion. The pups were maintained for an additional 7-10 days before killing and perfusion. We assumed that supraspinal neurons that contained FB survived axotomy and those that contained both FB and rhodamine B dextran supported regenerating axons. In the PD5 group (lesioned at PD10), regenerative growth was documented for axons originating in all of the supraspinal nuclei that innervate the lumbar cord by PD10. When the injections were made at the later ages, however, neurons that supported regenerative growth were fewer in number and regionally restricted. In some cases, they were limited primarily to the red nucleus, the medullary raphe, and the adjacent reticular formation. Our results show that regeneration of cut axons contributes to growth of supraspinal axons through the lesion after transection of the thoracic cord in developing opossums and that the critical period for regenerative growth is not the same for all axons.

  7. Mid-Thoracic Spinal Injuries during Horse Racing: Report of 3 Cases and Review of Causative Factors and Prevention Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Triantafyllopoulos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report three cases of a rare pattern of mid-thoracic spine injuries after horse racing falls and discuss possible causative factors and prevention measurements to reduce injury rates in professional riding and racing. Three patients, 2 male and 1 female with a mean age of 28 years old, underwent surgical treatment for mid-thoracic fractures after professional equestrian activities. The ASIA scale was E in one patient, B in the other one and A in the third. Multilevel posterior fusion was used in two patients and somatectomy plus fusion in the other. Follow up evaluation included changing of the ASIA scale, functional outcome and participation in equestrian activities. One patient fully recovered after surgery. Two patients remained paraplegic despite early surgical treatment and prolonged rehabilitation therapy. All patients had ended their professional equestrian career. This report analyzes possible mechanisms of injury and the pattern of mid-thoracic spine fractures after professional horse riding injuries. Despite skill improvements and continued safety education for horse riding, prophylactic measures for both the head and the spine should be refined. According to our study, additional mid-thoracic spinal protection should be added.

  8. First Case of Autonomic Dysreflexia Following Elective Lower Thoracic Spinal Cord Transection in a Spina Bifida Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garces, Juanita; Mathkour, Mansour; Scullen, Tyler; Kahn, Lora; Biro, Erin; Pham, Alex; Sulaiman, Olawale A R; Smith, Roger; Bui, Cuong J

    2017-12-01

    Spinal cord transection is a radical but effective treatment for highly selective cases of symptomatic spinal retethering in paraplegic spina bifida patients. Autonomic dysreflexia (AD) is a potentially life-threatening syndrome involving a dysregulated sympathetic discharge reflex commonly seen following cervical and high thoracic spinal cord injury, leading to a disconnect between autonomic pathways above and below the lesion that can lead to severe complications including uncontrolled hypertension, bradycardia, stroke, and potentially death. Herein we present a case in which a paraplegic spina bifida patient presenting with symptomatic spinal retethering experienced autonomic dysreflexia following an elective spinal cord transection. A 51-year-old male with a history of complex spina bifida presented with an active cerebrospinal fluid leak. Physical examination revealed a thin covering of abnormal epidermis over the large placode. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large myelomeningocele defect with posterior element defects spanning from L2 to the sacrum with evidence of tethering. The patient underwent an intradural transection of the spinal cord with a "blind-pouch" closure of the dura at the level of T12/L1. Postoperatively, the patient developed intermittent episodes of hypertension, bradycardia, headaches, altered mental status, severe perspiration, and red flushing of the upper torso, face, and arms. The diagnosis of AD was made clinically and managed with a positive response to a combination of beta- and alpha-blockade along with patient education on avoidance of common AD triggers. At 5-year follow-up the patient has continued to do well on medication. This case highlights a potential major side effect from elective transection of the spinal cord. If unrecognized and untreated, AD can cause significant distress and morbidity. We hope this first case report serves to supplement existing data and aid in future surgical and medical decision

  9. Secondary Chondrosarcoma of the Upper Thoracic Costovertebral Junction with Neural Foraminal Extension and Compressing the Spinal Cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouali, Sofiene; Bouhoula, Asma; Maatar, Nidhal; Abderrahmen, Khansa; Boubaker, Adnen; Kallel, Jalel; Jemel, Hafedh

    2016-08-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a rare malignant tumor of bone. This family of tumors can be primary malignant tumors or a secondary malignant transformation of an underlying benign cartilage tumor. Secondary chondrosarcoma arising from a benign solitary costal osteochondroma is extremely rare. Data show that the reported incidence of costal osteochondroma is very low and they are usually found in the anterior region at the costochondral junction. To our knowledge, however, there have been no previous reports, in English literature, describing osteochondroma malignant transformation located in the thoracic costovertebral junction. We report the case of a man with chondrosarcoma arising from the malignant degeneration of an osteochondroma at the right first thoracic costovertebral junction with neural foraminal extension and compressing the spinal cord. Although it is rare in solitary osteochondromas of rib, malignant transformation must always be considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute electromyographic responses of deep thoracic paraspinal muscles to spinal manual therapy interventions. An experimental, randomized cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Gary; Bird, Michael; Robbins, Barry; Johnson, Jane C

    2017-07-01

    This single group, randomized, cross-over study explored whether manual therapy alters motor tone of deep thoracic back muscles by examining resting electromyographic activity (EMG) after 2 types of manual therapy and a sham control intervention. Twenty-two participants with thoracic spinal pain (15 females, 7 males, mean age 28.1 ± 6.4 years) had dual fine-wire, intramuscular electrodes inserted into deep transversospinalis muscles at a thoracic level where tissues appeared abnormal to palpation (AbP) and at 2 sites above and below normal and non-tender to palpation (NT). A surface electrode was on the contralateral paraspinal mass at the level of AbP. EMG signals were recorded for resting prone, two 3-s free neck extension efforts, two 3-s resisted maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC), and resting prone before the intervention. Randomized spinal manipulation, counterstrain, or sham manipulation was delivered and EMG re-measured. Participants returned 1 and 2 weeks later for the remaining 2 treatments. Reductions in resting EMG followed counterstrain in AbP (median decrease 3.3%, P = 0.01) and NT sites (median decrease 1.0%, P = 0.05) and for the surface electrode site (median decrease 2.0%, P = 0.009). Reduction in EMG following counterstrain during free neck extension was found for the surface electrode site (median decrease 2.7%, P < 0.01). Spinal manipulation produced no change in EMG, whereas counterstrain technique produced small significant reductions in paraspinal muscle activity during prone resting and free neck extension conditions. The clinical relevance of these changes is unclear. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Posterior-only approach for lumbar vertebral column resection and expandable cage reconstruction for spinal metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandial, Rahul; Kelly, Brandon; Chen, Mike Yue

    2013-07-01

    The increasing incidence of spinal metastasis, a result of improved systemic therapies for cancer, has spurred a search for an alternative method for the surgical treatment of lumbar metastases. The authors report a single-stage posterior-only approach for resecting any pathological lumbar vertebral segment and reconstructing with a medium to large expandable cage while preserving all neurological structures. The authors conducted a retrospective consecutive case review of 11 patients (5 women, 6 men) with spinal metastases treated at 1 institution with single-stage posterior-only vertebral column resection and reconstruction with an expandable cage and pedicle screw fixation. For all patients, the indications for operative intervention were spinal cord compression, cauda equina compression, and/or spinal instability. Neurological status was classified according to the American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale, and functional outcomes were analyzed by using a visual analog scale for pain. For all patients, a circumferential vertebral column resection was achieved, and full decompression was performed with a posterior-only approach. Each cage was augmented by posterior pedicle screw fixation extending 2 levels above and below the resected level. No patient required a separate anterior procedure. Average estimated blood loss and duration of each surgery were 1618 ml (range 900-4000 ml) and 6.6 hours (range 4.5-9 hours), respectively. The mean follow-up time was 14 months (range 10-24 months). The median survival time after surgery was 17.7 months. Delayed hardware failure occurred for 1 patient. Preoperatively, 2 patients had intractable pain with intact lower-extremity strength and 8 patients had severe intractable pain, lower-extremity paresis, and were unable to walk; 4 of whom regained the ability to walk after surgery. Two patients who were paraplegic before decompression recovered substantial function but remained wheelchair bound, and 2 patients

  12. Effects of Multilevel Facetectomy and Screw Density on Postoperative Changes in Spinal Rod Contour in Thoracic Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terufumi Kokabu

    Full Text Available Flattening of the preimplantation rod contour in the sagittal plane influences thoracic kyphosis (TK restoration in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS surgery. The effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on postoperative changes in spinal rod contour have not been documented. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on changes in spinal rod contour from before implantation to after surgical correction of thoracic curves in patients with AIS prospectively. The concave and convex rod shapes from patients with thoracic AIS (n = 49 were traced prior to insertion. Postoperative sagittal rod shape was determined by computed tomography. The angle of intersection of the tangents to the rod end points was measured. Multiple stepwise linear regression analysis was used to identify variables independently predictive of change in rod contour (Δθ. Average Δθ at the concave and convex side were 13.6° ± 7.5° and 4.3° ± 4.8°, respectively. The Δθ at the concave side was significantly greater than that of the convex side (P < 0.0001 and significantly correlated with Risser sign (P = 0.032, the preoperative main thoracic Cobb angle (P = 0.031, the preoperative TK angle (P = 0.012, and the number of facetectomy levels (P = 0.007. Furthermore, a Δθ at the concave side ≥14° significantly correlated with the postoperative TK angle (P = 0.003, the number of facetectomy levels (P = 0.021, and screw density at the concave side (P = 0.008. Rod deformation at the concave side suggests that corrective forces acting on that side are greater than on the convex side. Multilevel facetectomy and/or screw density at the concave side have positive effects on reducing the rod deformation that can lead to a loss of TK angle postoperatively.

  13. Load-bearing evaluation of spinal posterior column by measuring surface strain from lumbar pedicles. An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peidong; Zhao, Weidong; Bi, Zhenyu; Wu, Changfu; Ouyang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of the load transfer within spinal posterior column of lumbar spine is necessary to determine the influence of mechanical factors on potential mechanisms of the motion-sparing implant such as artificial intervertebral disc and the dynamic spine stabilization systems. In this study, a new method has been developed for evaluating the load bearing of spinal posterior column by the surface strain of spinal pedicle response to the loading of spinal segment. Six cadaveric lumbar spine segments were biomechanically evaluated between levels L1 and L5 in intact condition and the strain gauges were pasted to an inferior surface of L2 pedicles. Multidirectional flexibility testing used the Panjabi testing protocol; pure moments for the intact condition with overall spinal motion and unconstrained intact moments of ±8 Nm were used for flexion-extension and lateral bending testing. High correlation coefficient (0.967-0.998) indicated a good agreement between the load of spinal segment and the surface strain of pedicle in all loading directions. Principal compressive strain could be observed in flexion direction and tensile strain in extension direction, respectively. In conclusion, the new method seems to be effective for evaluating posterior spinal column loads using pedicles' surface strain data collected during biomechanical testing of spine segments.

  14. Insulin resistance in tetraplegia but not in mid-thoracic paraplegia: is the mid-thoracic spinal cord involved in glucose regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluvshtein, V; Korczyn, A D; Pinhas, I; Vered, Y; Gelernter, I; Catz, A

    2011-05-01

    Controlled experimental human study. To assess insulin resistance (IR) in tetraplegia and paraplegia, and the role of the spinal cord (SC) in glucose regulation. Laboratory of Spinal Research, Loewenstein Rehabilitation Hospital. Glucose and insulin levels and the heart rate variation spectral components LF (low frequency), HF (high frequency) and LF/HF were studied at supine rest, head-up tilt and after a standard meal in three groups: 13 healthy subjects, 7 patients with T(4)-T(6) paraplegia and 11 patients with C(4)-C(7) tetraplegia. Glucose and insulin increased significantly after the meal in all groups (Pinsulin level tended to accompany increases in LF/HF after the meal in the tetraplegia and control groups but not in the paraplegia group. Post-prandial IR appears in C(4)-C(7) but not in T(4)-T(6) SC injury. The results of the study, combined with previously published findings, are consistent with the hypotheses that IR is related to activation of the sympathetic nervous system, and that below T(4) the mid-thoracic SC is involved in the regulation of glucose and insulin levels.

  15. Cross-organ sensitization of thoracic spinal neurons receiving noxious cardiac input in rats with gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chao; Malykhina, Anna P; Thompson, Ann M; Farber, Jay P; Foreman, Robert D

    2010-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) frequently triggers or worsens cardiac pain or symptoms in patients with coronary heart disease. This study aimed to determine whether GER enhances the activity of upper thoracic spinal neurons receiving noxious cardiac input. Gastric fundus and pyloric ligations as well as a longitudinal myelotomy at the gastroesophageal junction induced acute GER in pentobarbital-anesthetized, paralyzed, and ventilated male Sprague-Dawley rats. Manual manipulations of the stomach and lower esophagus were used as surgical controls in another group. At 4-9 h after GER surgery, extracellular potentials of single neurons were recorded from the T3 spinal segment. Intrapericardial bradykinin (IB) (10 microg/ml, 0.2 ml, 1 min) injections were used to activate cardiac nociceptors, and esophageal distensions were used to activate esophageal afferent fibers. Significantly more spinal neurons in the GER group responded to IB compared with the control group (69.1 vs. 38%, P neurons in the superficial laminae of GER animals was significantly different from those in deeper layers (1/8 vs. 46/60, P 0.05). Excitatory responses of spinal neurons to IB in the GER group were greater than in the control group [32.4 +/- 3.5 impulses (imp)/s vs. 13.3 +/- 2.3 imp/s, P neurons responded to cardiac input and ED, which was higher than the control group (61.5%, P neurons in deeper laminae of the dorsal horn to noxious cardiac stimulus.

  16. Quantitative scintigraphy of the sacroiliac joints and spinal column in Bechterev's disease (spondylitis ankylopoetica)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlychkov, Kh.

    1982-01-01

    Quantitative scintigraphy of the sacroiliac joints and the spinal column was performed in 138 patients with verified Bechterev's disease and in a control group of 104 healthy subjects, who had no clinical, roentgenographic and laboratory evidence of illness of the sacroiliac joints and the spinal column. By comparing skeletal ''zones of interest'' the author studied the following quantitative parameters: sacroiliac index (separately fop the right and left sacpoiliac joint); C 7 /sacrum jndex; D 10 /sacrum and L 4 /sacrum indices. The main values of these indices in the control group were accordingly 114.5 and 113.7 (for the right and left sacroiliac joints); 59; 95; 90. In patients with Bechterev's disease these indices were raised: 154 and 149 (for right and left sacroiliac joints); 75; 123; 113. Peak diagnostic value have the sacroiliac indices and the D 10 /sacrum, index, which appeared to be elevated in more than 95 per cent of the tested patients with verified Bechterev's disease. (author)

  17. An instrumented implant for vertebral body replacement that measures loads in the anterior spinal column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlmann, Antonius; Gabel, Udo; Graichen, Friedmar; Bender, Alwina; Bergmann, Georg

    2007-06-01

    Realistic loads on a spinal implant are required among others for optimization of implant design and preclinical testing. In addition, such data may help to choose the optimal physiotherapy program for patients with such an implant and to evaluate the efficacy of aids like braces or crutches. Presently, no implant is available that can measure loads in the anterior spinal column during activities of daily life. Therefore, an implant instrumented for in vivo load measurement was developed for vertebral body replacement. The aim of this paper is to describe in detail a telemeterized implant that measures forces and moments acting on it. Six load sensors, a nine-channel telemetry unit and a coil for inductive power supply of the electronic circuits were integrated into a modified vertebral body replacement (Synex). The instrumented part of the implant is hermetically sealed. Patients are videotaped during measurements, and implant loads are displayed on and off line. The average accuracy of load measurement is better than 2% for force and 5% for moment components with reference to the maximum value of 3000 N and 20 Nm, respectively. The measuring implant described here will provide additional information on spinal loads.

  18. Radiological examination of the spinal column in farmed rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum): experiments with Flavobacterium psychrophilum and oxytetracycline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lone; Arnbjerg, J.; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2001-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum and oxytetracycline have both been associated with spinal deformities in salmonids. Experiments were carried out to investigate whether infection with F, psychrophilum or medication with oxytetracycline (OTC) at the fry stage would result in an increased occurrence...... of infected fish. OTC treatments of up to 200 mg of OTC(kgfish)(-1) day(-1) for 10 days and repeated three times did not result in increased spinal deformities relative to untreated control groups; therefore, medication of rainbow trout with oxytetracycline did not cause deformities of the spinal column under...

  19. One-stage posterior approaches for treatment of thoracic spinal infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kao, Fu-Cheng; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Niu, Chi-Chien; Lai, Po-Liang; Chen, Lih-Huei; Chen, Wen-Jer

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Treating thoracic infective spondylodiscitis with anterior surgical approaches carry a relatively high risk of perioperative and postoperative complications. Posterior approaches have been reported to result in lower complication rates than anterior procedures, but more evidence is needed to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of 1-stage posterior approaches for treating infectious thoracic spondylodiscitis. Preoperative and postoperative clinical data, of 18 patients who underwent 2...

  20. Vertebral stabilization using positively threaded profile pins and polymethylmethacrylate, with or without laminectomy, for spinal canal stenosis and vertebral instability caused by congenital thoracic vertebral anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Takeshi; Kanazono, Shinichi; Yoshigae, Yuki; Sharp, Nicholas J H; Muñana, Karen R

    2007-07-01

    To describe diagnostic findings, surgical technique, and outcome in dogs with thoracic spinal canal stenosis and vertebral instability secondary to congenital vertebral anomalies. Retrospective clinical study. Dogs (n=9) with thoracic spinal canal stenosis. Medical records (1995-1996; 2000-2006) of 9 dogs with a myelographic diagnosis of spinal canal stenosis and/or vertebral instability secondary to congenital vertebral anomaly that were surgically managed by vertebral stabilization with or without laminectomy were reviewed. Data on pre- and postoperative neurologic status, diagnostic findings, surgical techniques, and outcomes were retrieved. Follow-up evaluations were performed at 1, 2, and 6 months. Long-term outcome was assessed by means of clinical examination or owner telephone interviews. Spinal cord compression was confirmed by myelography, and in 2 dogs, dynamic compression by stress myelography. Eight dogs regained the ability to ambulate postoperatively. One dog with a partial recovery regained voluntary movement but did not become ambulatory. Spinal cord injury secondary to congenital vertebral anomaly may have a good outcome when treated by vertebral stabilization with or without laminectomy. Adequate stabilization of the vertebrae and improved neurologic outcome were achieved in most dogs. Vertebral stabilization using positively threaded profile pins and polymethylmethacrylate with or without laminectomy is an effective treatment for spinal canal stenosis and vertebral instability secondary to congenital thoracic vertebral anomalies.

  1. Analysis of cervical kyphosis and spinal balance in young idiopathic scoliosis patients classified by the apex of thoracic kyphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kenyu; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Hida, Tetsuro; Tsushima, Mikito; Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Matsumoto, Akiyuki; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Sagittal balance has recently been the focus of studies aimed at understanding the correction force required for both coronal and sagittal malalignment. However, the correlation between cervical kyphosis and sagittal balance in AIS patients has yet to be thoroughly investigated. This study aimed to clarify the correlation between cervical alignment and spinal balance in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Here, we hypothesized that cervical kyphosis patients can be classified into groups by the apex of thoracic kyphosis. This study included 92 AIS patients (84 females, 8 males; mean age, 15.1 years). Patients were divided into the cervical lordosis (CL), cervical sigmoid (CS), or cervical kyphosis (CK) groups and further classified according to the apex of thoracic kyphosis into High (above T3), Middle (T4-T9), and Low (below T10) groups. There were 17 (18.5 %), 22 (23.9 %), and 53 (57.6 %) patients with CL, CS, and CK, respectively. In the CK group, 13 had CK-High, 35 had CK-Middle, and 5 had CK-Low. The C7 sagittal vertical axis (C7SVA) measurements were most backward in CK-High and most forward in CK-Low. The T5-12 kyphosis (TK) measurement was significantly lower in CK-High. Most AIS patients had kyphotic cervical alignment. Patients with CK can be classified as having CK-High, CK-Middle, or CK-Low according to the apex of thoracic kyphosis. CK-High is due to thoracic hypokyphosis with a backward balanced C7SVA. CK-Middle is well-balanced cervical kyphosis. CK-Low has forward-bent global kyphosis of the cervicothoracic spine that positioned the C7SVA forward.

  2. EARLY AND LONG-TERM RESULTS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF THE THORACIC AND LUMBAR VERTEBRAL AND SPINAL TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Usikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article demonstrates the outcomes of operative treatment of 190 patients with spinal cord injuryof thoracic and lumbar spine for 10 years. Associated injuries were revealed in 96 patients, the mean ISS score being27.5. All patients underwent decompressive and stabilizing interventions using a transpedicular system of “Synthes” production (Saint Petersburg. Ventral interventions were performed in 27 (14.2% patients. In all cases, decompression of the spinal canalcontents at the level of damage was achieved. In those patients who were operated within two weeks after trauma, transpedicular system allowed for recovery of a form and size of the spinal canal and the damaged vertebral body. The fractures of transpedicular system were observed in patients operated both with only rear and with combined access. The errors and complications, which happened during surgery, did not influence the outcomes of treatment. The outcomes of treatment were assessed according to the neurological statusdynamics (ASIA score, recovery of support ability of the spine, the presence of pain, and patients’ recovery (Е Denis score. Favorable outcomes were achieved in 114 (61.3% patients, satisfactoryin 53 (28.5%,and poor in 19 (10.2 %.

  3. System for examining skeletal body parts of a living being, especially the spinal column of the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snijder, N.R.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to an X-ray apparatus that can image the spinal column during a longer period; e.g. for the imaging of the vertebrae during a therapeutic treatment. It is especially suitable to follow the position of the vertebrae with respect to certain referential points or lines. (G.J.P.)

  4. Prospective multicenter surveillance and risk factor analysis of deep surgical site infection after posterior thoracic and/or lumbar spinal surgery in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogihara, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Takashi; Maruyama, Toru; Oka, Hiroyuki; Miyoshi, Kota; Azuma, Seiichi; Yamada, Takashi; Murakami, Motoaki; Kawamura, Naohiro; Hara, Nobuhiro; Terayama, Sei; Morii, Jiro; Kato, So; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infection is a serious and significant complication after spinal surgery and is associated with high morbidity rates, high healthcare costs and poor patient outcomes. Accurate identification of risk factors is essential for developing strategies to prevent devastating infections. The purpose of this study was to identify independent risk factors for surgical site infection among posterior thoracic and/or lumbar spinal surgery in adult patients using a prospective multicenter surveillance research method. From July 2010 to June 2012, we performed a prospective surveillance study in adult patients who had developed surgical site infection after undergoing thoracic and/or lumbar posterior spinal surgery at 11 participating hospitals. Detailed preoperative and operative patient characteristics were prospectively recorded using a standardized data collection format. Surgical site infection was based on the definition established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A total of 2,736 consecutive adult patients were enrolled, of which 24 (0.9%) developed postoperative deep surgical site infection. Multivariate regression analysis indicated four independent risk factors. Preoperative steroid therapy (P = 0.001), spinal trauma (P = 0.048) and gender (male) (P = 0.02) were statistically significant independent patient-related risk factors, whereas an operating time ≥3 h (P operating time ≥3 h were independent risk factors for deep surgical site infection after thoracic and/or lumbar spinal surgery in adult patients. Identification of these risk factors can be used to develop protocols aimed at decreasing the risk of surgical site infection.

  5. Delayed spinal extradural hematoma following thoracic spine surgery and resulting in paraplegia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthiban Chandra JKB

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Postoperative spinal extradural hematomas are rare. Most of the cases that have been reported occured within 3 days of surgery. Their occurrence in a delayed form, that is, more than 72 hours after surgery, is very rare. This case is being reported to enhance awareness of delayed postoperative spinal extradural hematomas. Case presentation We report a case of acute onset dorsal spinal extradural hematoma from a paraspinal muscular arterial bleed, producing paraplegia 72 hours following surgery for excision of a spinal cord tumor at T8 level. The triggering mechanism was an episode of violent twisting movement by the patient. Fresh blood in the postoperative drain tube provided suspicion of this complication. Emergency evacuation of the clot helped in regaining normal motor and sensory function. The need to avoid straining of the paraspinal muscles in the postoperative period is emphasized. Conclusion Most cases of postoperative spinal extradural hematomas occur as a result of venous bleeding. However, an arterial source of bleeding from paraspinal muscular branches causing extradural hematoma and subsequent neurological deficit is underreported. Undue straining of paraspinal muscles in the postoperative period after major spinal surgery should be avoided for at least a few days.

  6. Characterization of dendritic morphology and neurotransmitter phenotype of thoracic descending propriospinal neurons after complete spinal cord transection and GDNF treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lingxiao; Ruan, Yiwen; Chen, Chen; Frye, Christian Corbin; Xiong, Wenhui; Jin, Xiaoming; Jones, Kathryn; Sengelaub, Dale; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), poor regeneration of damaged axons of the central nervous system (CNS) causes limited functional recovery. This limited spontaneous functional recovery has been attributed, to a large extent, to the plasticity of propriospinal neurons, especially the descending propriospinal neurons (dPSNs). Compared with the supraspinal counterparts, dPSNs have displayed significantly greater regenerative capacity, which can be further enhanced by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). In the present study, we applied a G-mutated rabies virus (G-Rabies) co-expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP) to reveal Golgi-like dendritic morphology of dPSNs. We also investigated the neurotransmitters expressed by dPSNs after labeling with a retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold (FG). dPSNs were examined in animals with sham injuries or complete spinal transections with or without GDNF treatment. Bilateral injections of G-Rabies and FG were made into the 2nd lumbar (L2) spinal cord at 3 days prior to a spinal cord transection performed at the 11th thoracic level (T11). The lesion gap was filled with Gelfoam containing either saline or GDNF in the injury groups. Four days post-injury, the rats were sacrificed for analysis. For those animals receiving G-rabies injection, the GFP signal in the T7–9 spinal cord was visualized via 2-photon microscopy. Dendritic morphology from stack images was traced and analyzed using a Neurolucida software. We found that dPSNs in sham injured animals had a predominantly dorsal-ventral distribution of dendrites. Transection injury resulted in alterations in the dendritic distribution with dorsal-ventral retraction and lateral-medial extension. Treatment with GDNF significantly increased the terminal dendritic length of dPSNs. The density of spine-like structures was increased after injury, and treatment with GDNF enhanced this effect. For the group receiving FG injections, immunohistochemistry for glutamate, choline

  7. Cobb Angle Changes in Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Fractures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The annual incidence of spinal column fracture is 350 per million populations. with Motor vehicular accident being the major single cause of spine injuries. The victims are predominantly young and male. The aim of this study to evaluate the clinical outcome of conservative treatment of closed thoracic and lumbar spine ...

  8. [Analysis of pain management in a pre- and post-surgical periods performed for traumatic injury of the lower-thoracic and lumbar portions of the vertebral column].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnarchuk, Iu A; Tanasiĭchuk, O F; Tolstikhin, O V; Holovan', M V

    2013-11-01

    The results of managing of 129 injured persons, treated for injuries of the lower-thoracic and lumbar portions of vertebral column, are adduced. The puncture transcutaneous vertebroplasty was done in 58 patients, stabilizing systems "Sekstant" were installed in 15, the "Mantis" systems--in 13, rigid systems by the open method--in 43. The pain syndrome dynamics was estimated in of the patients in accordance to the visual analogue scale. Positive dynamics in a frame of the pain syndrome regression was noted postoperatively. Differentiated application of various methods of treatment in the patients, suffering nonstable compressional fracture of the lower-thoracic and lumbar portions of vertebral column, permits to reduce anesthesiological risk significantly, to improve the results of treatment, to reduce the patients rehabilitation duration.

  9. Contemporary spinal cord protection during thoracic and thoracoabdominal aortic surgery and endovascular aortic repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etz, Christian D; Weigang, Ernst; Hartert, Marc

    2015-01-01

    devastating complication. The aim of this position paper is to provide physicians with broad information regarding spinal cord blood supply, to share strategies for shortening intraprocedural spinal cord ischaemia and to increase spinal cord tolerance to transitory ischaemia through detection of ischaemia...... publications available in the PubMed database, which are cohort studies, experimental research reports, case reports, reviews, short series and meta-analyses. Individual chapters of this position paper were assigned and after delivery harmonized by Christian D. Etz, Ernst Weigang and Martin Czerny....... Consequently, further writing assignments were distributed within the group and delivered in August 2014. The final version was submitted to the EJCTS for review in September 2014....

  10. Dosimetric evaluation of 4 different treatment modalities for curative-intent stereotactic body radiation therapy for isolated thoracic spinal metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing, 100853 (China); Department of Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, 88 Jiankang Road, Weihui, Henan, 453100 (China); Ma, Lin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing, 100853 (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hainan Branch of Chinese PLA General Hospital, Haitang Bay, Sanya, 572000 (China); Wang, Xiao-Shen; Xu, Wei Xu; Cong, Xiao-Hu; Xu, Shou-Ping; Ju, Zhong-Jian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing, 100853 (China); Du, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hainan Branch of Chinese PLA General Hospital, Haitang Bay, Sanya, 572000 (China); Cai, Bo-Ning [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing, 100853 (China); Yang, Jack [Department of Radiation Oncology, Monmouth Medical Center, 300 2nd Avenue, Long Branch, NJ 07740 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of 4 SBRT-capable dose delivery systems, CyberKnife (CK), Helical TomoTherapy (HT), Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) by Varian RapidArc (RA), and segmental step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) by Elekta, on isolated thoracic spinal lesions. CK, HT, RA, and IMRT planning were performed simultaneously for 10 randomly selected patients with 6 body types and 6 body + pedicle types with isolated thoracic lesions. The prescription was set with curative intent and dose of either 33 Gy in 3 fractions (3F) or 40 Gy in 5F to cover at least 90% of the planning target volume (PTV), correspondingly. Different dosimetric indices, beam-on time, and monitor units (MUs) were evaluated to compare the advantages/disadvantages of each delivery modality. In ensuring the dose-volume constraints for cord and esophagus of the premise, CK, HT, and RA all achieved a sharp conformity index (CI) and a small penumbra volume compared to IMRT. RA achieved a CI comparable to those from CK, HT, and IMRT. CK had a heterogeneous dose distribution in the target as its radiosurgical nature with less dose uniformity inside the target. CK had the longest beam-on time and the largest MUs, followed by HT and RA. IMRT presented the shortest beam-on time and the least MUs delivery. For the body-type lesions, CK, HT, and RA satisfied the target coverage criterion in 6 cases, but the criterion was satisfied in only 3 (50%) cases with the IMRT technique. For the body + pedicle-type lesions, HT satisfied the criterion of the target coverage of ≥90% in 4 of the 6 cases, and reached a target coverage of 89.0% in another case. However, the criterion of the target coverage of ≥90% was reached in 2 cases by CK and RA, and only in 1 case by IMRT. For curative-intent SBRT of isolated thoracic spinal lesions, RA is the first choice for the body-type lesions owing to its delivery efficiency (time); the second choice is CK or HT; HT is the

  11. Dosimetric evaluation of 4 different treatment modalities for curative-intent stereotactic body radiation therapy for isolated thoracic spinal metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jun; Ma, Lin; Wang, Xiao-Shen; Xu, Wei Xu; Cong, Xiao-Hu; Xu, Shou-Ping; Ju, Zhong-Jian; Du, Lei; Cai, Bo-Ning; Yang, Jack

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of 4 SBRT-capable dose delivery systems, CyberKnife (CK), Helical TomoTherapy (HT), Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) by Varian RapidArc (RA), and segmental step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) by Elekta, on isolated thoracic spinal lesions. CK, HT, RA, and IMRT planning were performed simultaneously for 10 randomly selected patients with 6 body types and 6 body + pedicle types with isolated thoracic lesions. The prescription was set with curative intent and dose of either 33 Gy in 3 fractions (3F) or 40 Gy in 5F to cover at least 90% of the planning target volume (PTV), correspondingly. Different dosimetric indices, beam-on time, and monitor units (MUs) were evaluated to compare the advantages/disadvantages of each delivery modality. In ensuring the dose-volume constraints for cord and esophagus of the premise, CK, HT, and RA all achieved a sharp conformity index (CI) and a small penumbra volume compared to IMRT. RA achieved a CI comparable to those from CK, HT, and IMRT. CK had a heterogeneous dose distribution in the target as its radiosurgical nature with less dose uniformity inside the target. CK had the longest beam-on time and the largest MUs, followed by HT and RA. IMRT presented the shortest beam-on time and the least MUs delivery. For the body-type lesions, CK, HT, and RA satisfied the target coverage criterion in 6 cases, but the criterion was satisfied in only 3 (50%) cases with the IMRT technique. For the body + pedicle-type lesions, HT satisfied the criterion of the target coverage of ≥90% in 4 of the 6 cases, and reached a target coverage of 89.0% in another case. However, the criterion of the target coverage of ≥90% was reached in 2 cases by CK and RA, and only in 1 case by IMRT. For curative-intent SBRT of isolated thoracic spinal lesions, RA is the first choice for the body-type lesions owing to its delivery efficiency (time); the second choice is CK or HT; HT is the

  12. Altered spinal kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine in people with chronic neck pain during functional task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Sharon M H; Szeto, Grace P Y; Lee, Raymond Y W

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge on the spinal kinematics and muscle activation of the cervical and thoracic spine during functional task would add to our understanding of the performance and interplay of these spinal regions during dynamic condition. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of chronic neck pain on the three-dimensional kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine during an overhead reaching task involving a light weight transfer by the upper limb. Synchronized measurements of the three-dimensional spinal kinematics and electromyographic activities of cervical and thoracic spine were acquired in thirty individuals with chronic neck pain and thirty age- and gender-matched asymptomatic controls. Neck pain group showed a significantly decreased cervical velocity and acceleration while performing the task. They also displayed with a predominantly prolonged coactivation of cervical and thoracic muscles throughout the task cycle. The current findings highlighted the importance to examine differential kinematic variables of the spine which are associated with changes in the muscle recruitment in people with chronic neck pain. The results also provide an insight to the appropriate clinical intervention to promote the recovery of the functional disability commonly reported in patients with neck pain disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sparing of descending axons rescues interneuron plasticity in the lumbar cord to allow adaptive learning after thoracic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Nelson Hansen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the role of spared axons on structural and behavioral neuroplasticity in the lumbar enlargement after a thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI. Previous work has demonstrated that recovery in the presence of spared axons after an incomplete lesion increases behavioral output after a subsequent complete spinal cord transection (TX. This suggests that spared axons direct adaptive changes in below-level neuronal networks of the lumbar cord. In response to spared fibers, we postulate that lumbar neuron networks support behavioral gains by preventing aberrant plasticity. As such, the present study measured histological and functional changes in the isolated lumbar cord after complete TX or incomplete contusion (SCI. To measure functional plasticity in the lumbar cord, we used an established instrumental learning paradigm. In this paradigm, neural circuits within isolated lumbar segments demonstrate learning by an increase in flexion duration that reduces exposure to a noxious leg shock. We employed this model using a proof-of-principle design to evaluate the role of sparing on lumbar learning and plasticity early (7 days or late (42 days after midthoracic SCI in a rodent model. Early after SCI or TX at 7d, spinal learning was unattainable regardless of whether the animal recovered with or without axonal substrate. Failed learning occurred alongside measures of cell soma atrophy and aberrant dendritic spine expression within interneuron populations responsible for sensorimotor integration and learning. Alternatively, exposure of the lumbar cord to a small amount of spared axons for 6 weeks produced near-normal learning late after SCI. This coincided with greater cell soma volume and fewer aberrant dendritic spines on interneurons. Thus, an opportunity to influence activity-based learning in locomotor networks depends on spared axons limiting maladaptive plasticity. Together, this work identifies a time dependent interaction between

  14. Characterization of upper thoracic spinal neurons responding to esophageal distension in diabetic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Chao; Ghorbani, Marie L M; Wu, Mingyuan

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine spinal neuronal processing of innocuous and noxious mechanical inputs from the esophagus in diabetic rats. Streptozotocin (50 mg/kg, ip) was used to induce diabetes in 15 male Sprague-Dawley rats, and vehicle (10 mM citrate buffer) was injected into 15 rats...

  15. Association of left subclavian artery coverage without revascularization and spinal cord ischemia in patients undergoing thoracic endovascular aortic repair: A Vascular Quality Initiative® analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Pedro Gr; Woo, Karen; Beck, Adam W; Scali, Salvatore T; Weaver, Fred A

    2017-12-01

    Objectives Investigate the impact of left subclavian artery coverage without revascularization on spinal cord ischemia development in patients undergoing thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Methods The Vascular Quality Initiative thoracic endovascular aortic repair module (April 2011-July 2014) was analyzed. Patients undergoing left subclavian artery coverage were divided into two groups according to revascularization status. The association between left subclavian artery revascularization with the primary outcome of spinal cord ischemia and the secondary outcome of stroke was assessed with multivariable analysis adjusting for between-group baseline differences. Results The left subclavian artery was covered in 508 (24.6%) of the 2063 thoracic endovascular aortic repairs performed. Among patients with left subclavian artery coverage, 58.9% underwent revascularization. Spinal cord ischemia incidence was 12.1% in the group without revascularization compared to 8.5% in the group undergoing left subclavian artery revascularization (odds ratio (95%CI): 1.48(0.82-2.68), P = 0.189). Multivariable analysis adjustment identified an independent association between left subclavian artery coverage without revascularization and the incidence of spinal cord ischemia (adjusted odds ratio (95%CI): 2.29(1.03-5.14), P = 0.043). Although the incidence of stroke was also higher for the group with a covered and nonrevascularized left subclavian artery (12.1% versus 8.5%), this difference was not statistically significant after multivariable analysis (adjusted odds ratio (95%CI): 1.55(0.74-3.26), P = 0.244). Conclusion For patients undergoing left subclavian artery coverage during thoracic endovascular aortic repair, the addition of a revascularization procedure was associated with a significantly lower incidence of spinal cord ischemia.

  16. Abnormality of the spinal column in pediatric patients with lumbosacral spinal lipoma with special reference to CT findings of the lamina defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshifuji, Kazuhisa; Ochi, Satoko; Koyanagi, Izumi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2009-01-01

    Lumbosacral spinal lipomas are usually associated with occult spinal dysraphism at the lumbosacral spine. During childfood, posterior arch defects in the lumbosacral spine are considered normal computed tomography (CT) findings because of the presence of interlaminar synchondrosis. In this study, we investigated the CT findings of the lumbosacral spine in the pediatric patients with lumbosacral spinal lipomas. We aimed to characterize the radiological features of the abnormal spinal column in case of spinal lipomas. Twenty-one patients (age, 1 month to 3 years) were enrolled in this study: 11 patients had conus lipoma; 10 patients, filum lipoma. All patients showed lamina defects of the lumbosacral spine on 3D-CT. The number of the defective laminae was significantly larger in the patients with conus lipomas than in those with filum lipomas. Although the appearance of lamina defects in the patients with filum lipoma was similar to the reported findings of defective laminae in normal children, these patients were characterized by mild scoliosis and asymmetry of the posterior arches localized in the lower sacrum and coccyx. On the other hand, the patients with conus lipoma were characterized by wider lamina defects that extended rostrally, 'open-door like' deformity of lamina, vertebral dysgenesis, thoracolumber scoliosis and heterotopic ossification. Such CT characterization of the abnormality of the lumbosacral spine in lipoma patients will be useful to differentiate the pathological spina bifida from the normal open posterior arches in childhood. (author)

  17. Peripheral nerve injury fails to induce growth of lesioned ascending dorsal column axons into spinal cord scar tissue expressing the axon repellent Semaphorin3A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; Anderson, Patrick N; Verhaagen, J

    We have investigated the hypothesis that the chemorepellent Semaphorin3A may be involved in the failure of axonal regeneration after injury to the ascending dorsal columns of adult rats. Following transection of the thoracic dorsal columns, fibroblasts in the dorsolateral parts of the lesion site

  18. Age related diffusion and tractography changes in typically developing pediatric cervical and thoracic spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Alizadeh

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and diffusion tensor tractography (DTT are two techniques that can measure white matter integrity of the spinal cord. Recently, DTI indices have been shown to change with age. The purpose of this study is (a to evaluate the maturational states of the entire pediatric spinal cord using DTI and DTT indices including fractional anisotropy (FA, mean diffusivity (MD, mean length of white matter fiber tracts and tract density and (b to analyze the DTI and DTT parameters along the entire spinal cord as a function of spinal cord levels and age. Method: A total of 23 typically developing (TD pediatric subjects ranging in age from 6 to 16 years old (11.94 ± 3.26 (mean ± standard deviation, 13 females and 10 males were recruited, and scanned using 3.0 T MR scanner. Reduced FOV diffusion tensor images were acquired axially in the same anatomical location prescribed for the T2-weighted images to cover the entire spinal cord (C1-mid L1 levels. To mitigate motion induced artifacts, diffusion directional images were aligned with the reference image (b0 using a rigid body registration algorithm performed by in-house software developed in Matlab (MathWorks, Natick, Massachusetts. Diffusion tensor maps (FA and MD and streamline deterministic tractography were then generated from the motion corrected DTI dataset. DTI and DTT parameters were calculated by using ROIs drawn to encapsulate the whole cord along the entire spinal cord by an independent board certified neuroradiologist. These indices then were compared between two age groups (age group A = 6–11 years (n = 11 and age group B = 12–16 years (n = 12 based on similar standards and age definitions used for reporting spinal cord injury in the pediatric population. Standard least squared linear regression based on a restricted maximum likelihood (REML method was used to evaluate the relationship between age and DTI and

  19. Spinal cord stimulation of dorsal columns in a rat model of neuropathic pain: evidence for a segmental spinal mechanism of pain relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, H; van Kleef, M; Joosten, E A

    2012-01-01

    Although spinal cord stimulation (SCS) of the dorsal columns is an established method for treating chronic neuropathic pain, patients still suffer from a substantial level of pain. From a clinical perspective it is known that the location of the SCS is of pivotal importance, thereby suggesting a segmental spinal mode of action. However, experimental studies suggest that SCS acts also through the modulation of supraspinal mechanisms, which might suggest that the location is unimportant. Here we investigated the effect of the rostrocaudal location of SCS stimulation and the effectiveness of pain relief in a rat model of chronic neuropathic pain. Adult male rats (n=45) were submitted to a partial ligation of the sciatic nerve. The majority of animals developed tactile hypersensitivity in the nerve lesioned paw. All allodynic rats were submitted to SCS (n=33) for 30 minutes (f=50 Hz; pulse width 0.2 ms). In one group (n=16) the electrodes were located at the level where the injured sciatic nerve afferents enter the spinal cord (T13), and in a second group (n=17) the electrodes were positioned at more rostral levels (T11) as verified by X-ray. A repositioning experiment of electrodes from T12 to T13 was performed in 2 animals. Our data demonstrate that SCS of the dorsal columns at the level where the injured fibers enter the spinal cord dorsal horn result in a much better pain-relieving effect than SCS at more rostral levels. From this we conclude that SCS in treatment of neuropathic pain acts through a segmental spinal site of action. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Three-dimensional translations following posterior three-column spinal osteotomies for the correction of severe and stiff kyphoscoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueshi; Huang, Zifang; Deng, Yaolong; Fan, Hengwei; Sui, Wenyuan; Wang, Chongwen; Yang, Junlin

    2017-12-01

    Posterior three-column spinal osteotomies were shown to be effective to treat severe and stiff kyphoscoliosis. Translations at the site of osteotomy after deformity correction were commonly seen intraoperatively, which might cause potential neurologic deficits. However, this phenomenon was not thoroughly discussed in the current literature. This study aimed to evaluate the three-dimensional (3D) translations at the three-column osteotomy site and their effects on neurologic outcome in the surgical correction of severe and stiff kyphoscoliosis. A retrospective study was carried out. Sixty-nine patients treated by posterior three-column spinal osteotomy for severe kyphoscoliosis of idiopathic, congenital, neuromuscular, neurofibromatosis, and tuberculosis origin were included. General, coronal, and sagittal translations were graded three-dimensionally according to the theory of Meyerding. The charts of 69 clinical patients with severe and stiff kyphoscoliosis treated by posterior three-column osteotomy from January 2013 to June 2015 were reviewed. There were 35 male patients with an average age of 21.5 years and 34 female patients with an average age of 22.5 years. The etiologies of these spinal deformities were idiopathic, congenital, neuromuscular, neurofibromatosis, and tuberculosis. According to our classification system of spinal cord neurologic function, there were 41 type A, 13 type B, and 15 type C cases. The 3D spine models were reconstructed from thin-sliced computed tomography (CT) scan, and the 3D translations at the three-column osteotomy site were graded and analyzed. The incidences of general translation (GT), frontal translation (FT), and sagittal translation (ST) were 62.3%, 52.2%, and 26.1%. The incidence of evoked potential (EP) change in cases with GT/FT being or more than grade II (GT, 42.9%; FT, 50.0%) was significantly higher than that with GT/FT being less than grade II (GT, 16.7%; FT, 18.2%), whereas the incidence of EP change in cases with

  1. Spinal cord blood flow and ischemic injury after experimental sacrifice of thoracic and abdominal segmental arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etz, Christian D; Homann, Tobias M; Luehr, Maximilian; Kari, Fabian A; Weisz, Donald J; Kleinman, George; Plestis, Konstadinos A; Griepp, Randall B

    2008-06-01

    Spinal cord blood flow (SCBF) after sacrifice of thoracoabdominal aortic segmental arteries (TAASA) during thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) repair remains poorly understood. This study explored SCBF for 72 h after sacrifice of all TAASA. Fourteen juvenile Yorkshire pigs underwent complete serial TAASA sacrifice (T4-L5). Six control pigs underwent anesthesia and cooling to 32 degrees C with no TAASA sacrifice. In the experimental animals, spinal cord function was continuously monitored using motor evoked potentials (MEPs) until 1h after clamping the last TAASA. Fluorescent microspheres enabled segmental measurement of SCBF along the entire spinal cord before, and 5 min, 1 h, 5 h, 24 h and 72 h after complete TAASA sacrifice. A modified Tarlov score was obtained for 3 days after surgery. All the pigs with complete TAASA sacrifice retained normal cord function (MEP) until 1h after TAASA ligation. Seven pigs (50%) with complete TAASA sacrifice recovered after 72 h; seven pigs suffered paraparesis or paraplegia. Intraoperatively, and until 1h postoperatively, SCBF was similar among the three groups along the entire cord. Postoperatively, SCBF did not decrease in any group, but significant hyperemia occurred at 5h in controls and recovery animals, but did not occur in pigs that developed paraparesis or paraplegia in the T8-L2 segments (p=0.0002) and L3-S segments (p=0.0007). At 24h, SCBF remained marginally lower from T8 caudally; at 72h, SCBF was similar among all groups along the entire cord. SCBF in the segments T8-L2 at 5h predicted functional recovery (p=0.003). This study suggests that critical spinal cord ischemia after complete TAASA sacrifice does not occur immediately (intraoperatively), but is delayed 1-5h or longer after clamping, and represents failure to mount a hyperemic response to rewarming and awakening. The short duration of low SCBF associated with spinal cord injury suggests that hemodynamic and metabolic manipulation lasting only 24-72 h may

  2. Thoracic combined spinal-epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy in an obese patient with asthma and multiple drug allergies: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Daszkiewicz Andrzej; Copik Maja; Misiolek Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Drug allergies, asthma, and obesity are more common in modern societies, and patients with these problems are often a challenge for anesthetists. Different techniques of regional anesthesia can be beneficial particularly for this group of patients. We present a patient who suffered from all of the above-mentioned conditions and successfully underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy under thoracic combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. It is still not a popular practice, and we would like to show a...

  3. Thoracic combined spinal-epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy in an obese patient with asthma and multiple drug allergies: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daszkiewicz Andrzej

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Drug allergies, asthma, and obesity are more common in modern societies, and patients with these problems are often a challenge for anesthetists. Different techniques of regional anesthesia can be beneficial particularly for this group of patients. We present a patient who suffered from all of the above-mentioned conditions and successfully underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy under thoracic combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. It is still not a popular practice, and we would like to show another indication for using it.

  4. Improvement of renal function after human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell treatment on chronic renal failure and thoracic spinal cord entrapment: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Rahyussalim, Ahmad Jabir; Saleh, Ifran; Kurniawati, Tri; Lutfi, Andi Praja Wira Yudha

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic renal failure is an important clinical problem with significant socioeconomic impact worldwide. Thoracic spinal cord entrapment induced by a metabolic yield deposit in patients with renal failure results in intrusion of nervous tissue and consequently loss of motor and sensory function. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells are immune naïve and they are able to differentiate into other phenotypes, including the neural lineage. Over the past decade, advances in the fie...

  5. Sagittal spinal balance after lumbar spinal fusion: the impact of anterior column support results from a randomized clinical trial with an eight- to thirteen-year radiographic follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videbaek, Tina S; Bünger, Cody E; Henriksen, Mads; Neils, Egund; Christensen, Finn B

    2011-02-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To analyze the long-term clinical impact of anterior column support on sagittal balance after lumbar spinal fusion. Several investigators have stressed the importance of maintaining sagittal balance in relation to spinal fusion to avoid lumbar 'flat back,' accelerated adjacent segment degeneration, pain, and inferior functional outcome. Only limited evidence exists on how sagittal alignment affects clinical outcome. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral fusion has been proved superior to posterolateral fusion alone regarding outcome and cost-effectiveness. No randomized controlled trial has been published analyzing the effect of anterior support on radiographic measurements of sagittal balance. Between 1996 and 1999, 148 patients with severe chronic low back pain were randomly selected for posterolateral lumbar fusion plus anterior support (PLF + ALIF) or posterolateral lumbar fusion. A total of 92 patients participated. Sagittal balance parameters were examined on full lateral radiographs of the spine: pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, and positioning of C7 plumb line. The type of lumbar lordosis was evaluated and outcome assessed by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Follow-up rate was 74%. Sagittal balance parameters were similar between randomization groups. None of the parameters differed significantly between patients with an ODI from 0 to 40 and patients with ODI over 40. Balanced patients had a significantly superior outcome as measured by ODI (P Lumbar lordosis and type of lordosis correlated with outcome but could not explain the superior outcome in the group with anterior support. Whether sagittal balance and anterior support during fusion provide a protective effect on adjacent motion segments remains unclear.

  6. Thoracic combined spinal epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a geriatric patient with ischemic heart disease and renal insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta N

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nandita Mehta, Sunana Gupta, Atul Sharma, Mohd Reidwan Dar Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Acharya Shri Chander College of Medical Sciences and Hospital, Jammu, Jammu and Kashmir, India Abstract: Older people undergoing any surgery have a higher incidence of morbidity and mortality, resulting from a decline in physiological reserves, associated comorbidities, polypharmacy, cognitive dysfunction, and frailty. Most of the clinical trials comparing regional versus general anesthesia in elderly have failed to establish superiority of any single technique. However, the ideal approach in elderly is to be least invasive, thus minimizing alterations in homeostasis. The goal of anesthetic management in laparoscopic procedures includes management of pneumoperitoneum, achieving an adequate level of sensory blockade without any respiratory compromise, management of shoulder tip pain, provision of adequate postoperative pain relief, and early ambulation. Regional anesthesia fulfills all the aforementioned criteria and aids in quick recovery and thus has been suggested to be a suitable alternative to general anesthesia for laparoscopic surgeries, particularly in patients who are at high risk while under general anesthesia or for patients unwilling to undergo general anesthesia. In conclusion, we report results of successful management with thoracic combined spinal epidural for laparoscopic cholecystectomy of a geriatric patient with ischemic heart disease with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and renal insufficiency. Keywords: geriatric anesthesia, bupivacaine, segmental anesthesia, laparoscopic surgery

  7. Thoracic combined spinal epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a geriatric patient with ischemic heart disease and renal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Nandita; Gupta, Sunana; Sharma, Atul; Dar, Mohd Reidwan

    2015-01-01

    Older people undergoing any surgery have a higher incidence of morbidity and mortality, resulting from a decline in physiological reserves, associated comorbidities, polypharmacy, cognitive dysfunction, and frailty. Most of the clinical trials comparing regional versus general anesthesia in elderly have failed to establish superiority of any single technique. However, the ideal approach in elderly is to be least invasive, thus minimizing alterations in homeostasis. The goal of anesthetic management in laparoscopic procedures includes management of pneumoperitoneum, achieving an adequate level of sensory blockade without any respiratory compromise, management of shoulder tip pain, provision of adequate postoperative pain relief, and early ambulation. Regional anesthesia fulfills all the aforementioned criteria and aids in quick recovery and thus has been suggested to be a suitable alternative to general anesthesia for laparoscopic surgeries, particularly in patients who are at high risk while under general anesthesia or for patients unwilling to undergo general anesthesia. In conclusion, we report results of successful management with thoracic combined spinal epidural for laparoscopic cholecystectomy of a geriatric patient with ischemic heart disease with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and renal insufficiency.

  8. Thoracic spinal cord and cervical vagosympathetic neuromodulation obtund nodose sensory transduction of myocardial ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavatian, Siamak; Beaumont, Eric; Gibbons, David; Hammer, Matthew; Hoover, Donald B; Armour, J Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L

    2017-12-01

    Autonomic regulation therapy involving either vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) or spinal cord stimulation (SCS) represents emerging bioelectronic therapies for heart disease. The objective of this study was to determine if VNS and/or SCS modulate primary cardiac afferent sensory transduction of the ischemic myocardium. Using extracellular recordings in 19 anesthetized canines, of 88 neurons evaluated, 36 ventricular-related nodose ganglia sensory neurons were identified by their functional activity responses to epicardial touch, chemical activation of their sensory neurites (epicardial veratridine) and great vessel (descending aorta or inferior vena cava) occlusion. Neural responses to 1min left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery occlusion (CAO) were then evaluated. These interventions were then studied following either: i) SCS [T1-T3 spinal level; 50Hz, 90% motor threshold] or ii) cervical VNS [15-20Hz; 1.2× threshold]. LAD occlusion activated 66% of identified nodose ventricular sensory neurons (0.33±0.08-0.79±0.20Hz; baseline to CAO; p<0.002). Basal activity of cardiac-related nodose neurons was differentially reduced by VNS (0.31±0.11 to 0.05±0.02Hz; p<0.05) as compared to SCS (0.36±0.12 to 0.28±0.14, p=0.59), with their activity response to transient LAD CAO being suppressed by either SCS (0.85±0.39-0.11±0.04Hz; p<0.03) or VNS (0.75±0.27-0.12±0.05Hz; p<0.04). VNS did not alter evoked neural responses of cardiac-related nodose neurons to great vessel occlusion. Both VNS and SCS obtund ventricular ischemia induced enhancement of nodose afferent neuronal inputs to the medulla. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of motor-evoked potential monitoring in conjunction with temporary clipping of spinal nerve roots in posterior thoracic spine tumor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleraky, Mohammed A; Setzer, Matthias; Papanastassiou, Ioannis D; Baaj, Ali A; Tran, Nam D; Katsares, Kiesha M; Vrionis, Frank D

    2010-05-01

    The vascular supply of the thoracic spinal cord depends on the thoracolumbar segmental arteries. Because of the small size and ventral course of these arteries in relation to the dorsal root ganglion and ventral root, they cannot be reliably identified during surgery by anatomic or morphologic criteria. Sacrificing them will most likely result in paraplegia. The goal of this study was to evaluate a novel method of intraoperative testing of a nerve root's contribution to the blood supply of the thoracic spinal cord. This is a clinical retrospective study of 49 patients diagnosed with thoracic spine tumors. Temporary nerve root clipping combined with motor-evoked potential (MEP) and somatosensory-evoked potential (SSEP) monitoring was performed; additionally, postoperative clinical evaluation was done and reported in all cases. All cases were monitored by SSEP and MEPs. The nerve root to be sacrificed was temporarily clipped using standard aneurysm clips, and SSEP/MEP were assessed before and after clipping. Four nerve roots were sacrificed in four cases, three nerve roots in eight cases, and two nerve roots in 22 cases. Nerve roots were sacrificed bilaterally in 12 cases. Most patients (47/49) had no changes in MEP/SSEP and had no neurological deficit postoperatively. One case of a spinal sarcoma demonstrated changes in MEP after temporary clipping of the left T11 nerve root. The nerve was not sacrificed, and the patient was neurologically intact after surgery. In another case of a sarcoma, MEPs changed in the lower limbs after ligation of left T9 nerve root. It was felt that it was a global event because of anesthesia. Postoperatively, the patient had complete paraplegia but recovered almost completely after 6 months. Temporary nerve root clipping combined with MEP and SSEP monitoring may enhance the impact of neuromonitoring in the intraoperative management of patients with thoracic spine tumors and favorably influence neurological outcome. Copyright 2010 Elsevier

  10. Effect of cervical vs. thoracic spinal manipulation on peripheral neural features and grip strength in subjects with chronic mechanical neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Aguirre, Francisco; Oliva-Pascual-Vaca, Ángel; Heredia-Rizo, Alberto M; Boscá-Gandía, Juan J; Ricard, François; Rodriguez-Blanco, Cleofás

    2017-06-01

    Cervical and thoracic spinal manipulative therapy has shown positive impact for relief of pain and improve function in non-specific mechanical neck pain. Several attempts have been made to compare their effectiveness although previous studies lacked a control group, assessed acute neck pain or combined thrust and non-thrust techniques. To compare the immediate effects of cervical and thoracic spinal thrust manipulations on mechanosensitivity of upper limb nerve trunks and grip strength in patients with chronic non-specific mechanical neck pain. Randomized, single-blinded, controlled clinical trial. Private physiotherapy clinical consultancy. Eighty-eight subjects (32.09±6.05 years; 72.7% females) suffering neck pain (grades I or II) of at least 12 weeks of duration. Participants were distributed into three groups: 1) cervical group (N.=28); 2) thoracic group (N.=30); and 3) control group (N.=30). One treatment session consisting of applying a high-velocity low-amplitude spinal thrust technique over the lower cervical spine (C7) or the upper thoracic spine (T3) was performed, while the control group received a sham-manual contact. Measurements were taken at baseline and after intervention of the pressure pain threshold over the median, ulnar and radial nerves. Secondary measures included assessing free-pain grip strength with a hydraulic dynamometer. No statistically significant differences were observed when comparing between-groups in any of the outcome measures (P>0.05). Those who received thrust techniques, regardless of the manipulated area, reported an immediate increase in mechanosensitivity over the radial (both sides) and left ulnar nerve trunks (Ppain perception over the radial nerve also improved (P≤0.025). Low-cervical and upper-thoracic thrust manipulation is no more effective than placebo to induce immediate changes on mechanosensitivity of upper limb nerve trunks and grip strength in patients with chronic non-specific mechanical neck pain. A single

  11. Morphological evaluation of the thoracic, lumbar and sacral column of the giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla Linnaeus, 1758

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    Naida C. Borges

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study aimed to describe the number of thoracic, lumbar and sacral vertebrae in tridactyla through radiographic examinations associated with gross anatomy determination. For this purpose, 12 adult specimens of M. tridactyla were analyzed, assigned to the Screening Center of Wild Animals (CETAS, IBAMA-GO, and approved by the Ethics Committee on the Use of Animals (Process CEUA-UFG nr 018/2014. In the radiographic examinations the following numbers of thoracic (T and lumbar (L vertebrae were observed: 16Tx2L (n=7, 15Tx2L (n=3, and 15Tx3L (n=2. In contrast, the numbers of vertebrae identified by anatomical dissection were as follows: 16Tx2L (n=4, 15Tx2L (n=3, and 15Tx3L (n=5. This difference occurred in cases of lumbarization of thoracic vertebrae, as seen in three specimens, and was explained by changes in regional innervations identified by anatomical dissection and the presence of floating ribs (right unilateral=1, left unilateral=1 and bilateral=1, which were not identified by radiographic exams. Regarding the sacral vertebrae there was no variation depending on the methods used, which allowed the identification of 4 (n=1 or 5 (n=11 vertebrae. Thus, we concluded that there is variation in the number of thoracic, lumbar and sacral vertebrae, in addition to lumbarization, which must be considered based on the presence of floating ribs, in this species.

  12. Case of sudden death following rupture of thoracic aortic aneurysm during “a manual therapy” procedure in the spinal area

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    Aleksandra Kaczorowska

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The reported case concerns the rupture of an aneurysm located in the descending part of the thoracic aorta during the procedure of the so-called “spinal adjustment” performed by a chiropractor. A 45-year-old patient with no significant medical history of cardiovascular diseases visited, along with his wife, one of “manual therapy” practices because of back pain. During the procedure, the patient suddenly lost consciousness. Despite cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency assistance given by an ambulance team, the patient died. An autopsy revealed that the cause of death was increasing cardiorespiratory failure secondary to bleeding into the lumen of the left pleural cavity following the rupture of pathologically altered thoracic aortic wall.

  13. Quantitative scintigraphy of the sacroiliac joints and spinal column in patients with probable form of ankylosing spondylitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlychkov, Kh.; Andreev, T.

    1983-01-01

    Quantitative scintigraphy with sup(99m)Tc-pyrophos--phate was performed in 103 patients with probable form of ankylosing spondylitis and in a control group of 104 healthy individuals. Sacroiliac and spino-sacral indexes were determined in the patients by comparing small zones of interest of the spinal column, sacroiliac joints and the sacrum. A total of 634 indexes were determined: 293 in patients with probable form of ankylosing spondylitis and 341 in the control group of normal individuals. Comparison of the sacroiliac and spino-sacral indexes in the two groups showed that these indexes were raised in patients with probable form of ankylosing spondylitis, in contrast to the control group. The difference was statistically significant with a high level of significance (p 10 /sacrum and L 4 /sacrum. The difference between the C 7 /sacrum indexes in both groups of individuals had low significance level P=0.04. Repeated check up of patients with probable form of ankylosing spondylitis over a period of 2 to 5 years revealed that in the course of time the obligatory criteria for making a reliable diagnosis had been fulfilled in 15 patients. This is a proof of the high diagnostic value of quantitative scintigraphy of the sacroiliac joints and the spinal column. (authors)

  14. MR imaging findings in subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Jun; Lee, Jae Hee; Lee, Sung Yong; Chung, Sung Woo

    2000-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can cause neurologic complications in the spinal cord, brain, and optic and peripheral nerves. Subacute combined degeneration is a rare disease of demyelinating lesions of the spinal cord, affecting mainly the posterior and lateral columns of the thoracic cord. We report the MR imaging findings of a case of subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord in a patient with vitamin B12 deficiency and mega loblastic anemia. (author)

  15. MicroRNA miR-9 modifies motor neuron columns by a tuning regulation of FoxP1 levels in developing spinal cords

    OpenAIRE

    Otaegi, Gaizka; Pollock, Andrew; Hong, Janet; Sun, Tao

    2011-01-01

    The precise organization of motor neuron subtypes in a columnar pattern in developing spinal cords is controlled by cross-interactions of multiple transcription factors and segmental expressions of Hox genes and their accessory proteins. Accurate expression levels and domains of these regulators are essential for organizing spinal motor neuron columns and axonal projections to target muscles. Here, we show that microRNA miR-9 is transiently expressed in a motor neuron subtype and displays ove...

  16. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation in surgical treatment for single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Hao; Wang, Xiyang; Zhang, Penghui; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Yupeng; Liu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility and efficacy of surgical management of single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis (TB) by using single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation.Methods: Seventeen cases of single-segment lumbar TB were treated with single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reco...

  17. Combination of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and cord blood mononuclear cells in the treatment of chronic thoracic spinal cord injury in 27 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian-zhong WANG

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate and evaluate therapeutic effects of transplantation of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in conjunction with cord blood mononuclear cells for late thoracic spinal cord injury. Methods Data from 27 patients with late thoracic spinal cord injury who received transplantation of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in conjunction with cord blood mononuclear cells in Neurosurgery Department of 463rd Hospital of PLA between July 2006 and July 2008 were collected and analyzed. The full treatment course consisted of 4 consecutive injections at one week apart. Indicators for evaluation followed that of the American Spiral Injury Association (ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS grade, ASIA motor and sensory scores, ASIA visual analog score, and the Ashworth score. The follow-up period was 6 months. Evaluations were made 6 weeks and 6 months after the treatment. Results Improvement from AIS A to AIS B was found in 4 patients. In one patient, improvement from AIS A to AIS C and in one patient from AIS B to AIS C was found 6 weeks after the treatment. The AIS improvement rate was 22.2%. In one patient improvement from AIS A to AIS B was found after 6 months. The overall AIS improvement rate was 25.9%. ASIA baseline motor scores of lower extremties were 0.5±1.5, 1.7±2.9, 3.1±3.6 before the treatment, 6 weeks and 6 months after the treatment, respectively, and showed a statistically significant improvement (P < 0.05. ASIA sensory scores including light touch and pinprick were 66.6±13.7 and 67.0±13.6 respectively before treatment, and they became 68.8±14.4, 68.4±14.7 and 70.5±14.4, 70.2±14.4 six weeks and six months after the treatment. The changes were statistically significant (P < 0.05; Modified Ashworth Scale scores were 1.8±1.5, 1.6±1.2,1.1±0.8 respectively at baseline, 6 weeks and 6months after the treatment, and showed a statistically significant descending trend (P < 0.05. Conclusion Transplantation of

  18. Employing anatomical knowledge in vertebral column labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2009-02-01

    The spinal column constitutes the central axis of human torso and is often used by radiologists to reference the location of organs in the chest and abdomen. However, visually identifying and labeling vertebrae is not trivial and can be timeconsuming. This paper presents an approach to automatically label vertebrae based on two pieces of anatomical knowledge: one vertebra has at most two attached ribs, and ribs are attached only to thoracic vertebrae. The spinal column is first extracted by a hybrid method using the watershed algorithm, directed acyclic graph search and a four-part vertebra model. Then curved reformations in sagittal and coronal directions are computed and aggregated intensity profiles along the spinal cord are analyzed to partition the spinal column into vertebrae. After that, candidates for rib bones are detected using features such as location, orientation, shape, size and density. Then a correspondence matrix is established to match ribs and vertebrae. The last vertebra (from thoracic to lumbar) with attached ribs is identified and labeled as T12. The rest of vertebrae are labeled accordingly. The method was tested on 50 CT scans and successfully labeled 48 of them. The two failed cases were mainly due to rudimentary ribs.

  19. Consideration of Dose Limits for Organs at Risk of Thoracic Radiotherapy: Atlas for Lung, Proximal Bronchial Tree, Esophagus, Spinal Cord, Ribs, and Brachial Plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Feng-Ming; Ritter, Timothy; Quint, Douglas J.; Senan, Suresh; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Hurkmans, Coen W.; Timmerman, Robert; Bezjak, Andrea; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Movsas, Benjamin; Marsh, Lon; Okunieff, Paul; Choy, Hak; Curran, Walter J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To review the dose limits and standardize the three-dimenional (3D) radiographic definition for the organs at risk (OARs) for thoracic radiotherapy (RT), including the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: The present study was performed by representatives from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, and Soutwestern Oncology Group lung cancer committees. The dosimetric constraints of major multicenter trials of 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT were reviewed and the challenges of 3D delineation of these OARs described. Using knowledge of the human anatomy and 3D radiographic correlation, draft atlases were generated by a radiation oncologist, medical physicist, dosimetrist, and radiologist from the United States and reviewed by a radiation oncologist and medical physicist from Europe. The atlases were then critically reviewed, discussed, and edited by another 10 radiation oncologists. Results: Three-dimensional descriptions of the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus are presented. Two computed tomography atlases were developed: one for the middle and lower thoracic OARs (except for the heart) and one focusing on the brachial plexus for a patient positioned supine with their arms up for thoracic RT. The dosimetric limits of the key OARs are discussed. Conclusions: We believe these atlases will allow us to define OARs with less variation and generate dosimetric data in a more consistent manner. This could help us study the effect of radiation on these OARs and guide high-quality clinical trials and individualized practice in 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT.

  20. Late effects of tumour treatment. Structural changes in the spinal column seen on X-ray

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    Gutyahr, P; Greinacher, I; Kutzner, J [Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Kinderklinik; Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Klinische Strahlenkunde)

    1976-06-01

    Cure rates are increasing in pediatric oncology; simultaneously the numbers of late effects of therapy are also increasing. 64 children with malignant neoplastic disease in whom the spine had been partially or totally exposed during X-ray treatment were re-investigated for radiographically visible irradiation effects on the vertebral column. 140 different abnormalities were found in 56 children of which scolioses were the most important. Irradiation for Wilms' tumour produced more numerous changes than direct irradiation of the vertebral column. In spite of the unexpectedly high number of growth defects rigorous X-ray treatment is indicated in certain circumstances. The growth abnormalities were of only minor clinical significance.

  1. Improvement of renal function after human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell treatment on chronic renal failure and thoracic spinal cord entrapment: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahyussalim, Ahmad Jabir; Saleh, Ifran; Kurniawati, Tri; Lutfi, Andi Praja Wira Yudha

    2017-11-30

    Chronic renal failure is an important clinical problem with significant socioeconomic impact worldwide. Thoracic spinal cord entrapment induced by a metabolic yield deposit in patients with renal failure results in intrusion of nervous tissue and consequently loss of motor and sensory function. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells are immune naïve and they are able to differentiate into other phenotypes, including the neural lineage. Over the past decade, advances in the field of regenerative medicine allowed development of cell therapies suitable for kidney repair. Mesenchymal stem cell studies in animal models of chronic renal failure have uncovered a unique potential of these cells for improving function and regenerating the damaged kidney. We report a case of a 62-year-old ethnic Indonesian woman previously diagnosed as having thoracic spinal cord entrapment with paraplegic condition and chronic renal failure on hemodialysis. She had diabetes mellitus that affected her kidneys and had chronic renal failure for 2 years, with creatinine level of 11 mg/dl, and no urinating since then. She was treated with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell implantation protocol. This protocol consists of implantation of 16 million human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells intrathecally and 16 million human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells intravenously. Three weeks after first intrathecal and intravenous implantation she could move her toes and her kidney improved. Her creatinine level decreased to 9 mg/dl. Now after 8 months she can raise her legs and her creatinine level is 2 mg/dl with normal urinating. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell implantations led to significant improvement for spinal cord entrapment and kidney failure. The major histocompatibility in allogeneic implantation is an important issue to be addressed in the future.

  2. Spinal manipulative therapy versus Graston Technique in the treatment of non-specific thoracic spine pain: Design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Bruce

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The one year prevalence of thoracic back pain has been estimated as 17% compared to 64% for neck pain and 67% for low back pain. At present only one randomised controlled trial has been performed assessing the efficacy of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT for thoracic spine pain. In addition no high quality trials have been performed to test the efficacy and effectiveness of Graston Technique® (GT, a soft tissue massage therapy using hand-held stainless steel instruments. The objective of this trial is to determine the efficacy of SMT and GT compared to a placebo for the treatment of non specific thoracic spine pain. Methods Eighty four eligible people with non specific thoracic pain mid back pain of six weeks or more will be randomised to one of three groups, either SMT, GT, or a placebo (de-tuned ultrasound. Each group will receive up to 10 supervised treatment sessions at the Murdoch University Chiropractic student clinic over a 4-week period. Treatment outcomes will be measured at baseline, one week after their first treatment, upon completion of the 4-week intervention period and at three, six and twelve months post randomisation. Outcome measures will include the Oswestry Back Pain Disability Index and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Intention to treat analysis will be utilised in the statistical analysis of any group treatment effects. Trial Registration This trial was registered with the Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry on the 7th February 2008. Trial number: ACTRN12608000070336

  3. Delayed detection of motor pathway dysfunction after selective reduction of thoracic spinal cord blood flow in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lips, Jeroen; de Haan, Peter; Bouma, Gerrit J.; Jacobs, Michael J.; Kalkman, Cor J.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Clinical monitoring of myogenic motor evoked potentials to transcranial stimulation provides rapid evaluation of motor-pathway function during surgical procedures in which spinal cord ischemia can occur. However, a severe reduction of spinal cord blood flow that remains confined to the

  4. Mid-Thoracic Spinal Injuries during Horse Racing: Report of 3 Cases and Review of Causative Factors and Prevention Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Triantafyllopoulos, Ioannis; Panagopoulos, Andreas; Sapkas, George

    2013-01-01

    We report three cases of a rare pattern of mid-thoracic spine injuries after horse racing falls and discuss possible causative factors and prevention measurements to reduce injury rates in professional riding and racing. Three patients, 2 male and 1 female with a mean age of 28 years old, underwent surgical treatment for mid-thoracic fractures after professional equestrian activities. The ASIA scale was E in one patient, B in the other one and A in the third. Multilevel posterior fusion was u...

  5. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation in surgical treatment for single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hao; Wang, Xiyang; Zhang, Penghui; Peng, Wei; Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Yupeng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility and efficacy of surgical management of single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis (TB) by using single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation. Seventeen cases of single-segment lumbar TB were treated with single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation. The mean follow-up was 36.9 months (range: 24-62 months). The kyphotic angle ranged from 15.2-35.1° preoperatively, with an average measurement of 27.8°. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) score system was used to evaluate the neurological deficits and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) used to judge the activity of TB. Spinal TB was completely cured in all 17 patients. There was no recurrent TB infection. The postoperative kyphotic angle was 6.6-10.2°, 8.1° in average, and there was no significant loss of the correction at final follow-up. Solid fusion was achieved in all cases. Neurological condition in all patients was improved after surgery. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation can be a feasible and effective method the in treatment of single-segment lumbar spinal TB.

  6. Device-Training for Individuals with Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Cord Injury Using a Powered Exoskeleton for Technically Assisted Mobility: Achievements and User Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillner, Annett; Borgwaldt, Nicole; Kroll, Sylvia; Roschka, Sybille

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Results of a device-training for nonambulatory individuals with thoracic and lumbar spinal cord injury (SCI) using a powered exoskeleton for technically assisted mobility with regard to the achieved level of control of the system after training, user satisfaction, and effects on quality of life (QoL). Methods. Observational single centre study with a 4-week to 5-week intensive inpatient device-training using a powered exoskeleton (ReWalk™). Results. All 7 individuals with SCI who commenced the device-training completed the course of training and achieved basic competences to use the system, that is, the ability to stand up, sit down, keep balance while standing, and walk indoors, at least with a close contact guard. User satisfaction with the system and device-training was documented for several aspects. The quality of life evaluation (SF-12v2™) indicated that the use of the powered exoskeleton can have positive effects on the perception of individuals with SCI regarding what they can achieve physically. Few adverse events were observed: minor skin lesions and irritations were observed; no falls occurred. Conclusions. The device-training for individuals with thoracic and lumbar SCI was effective and safe. All trained individuals achieved technically assisted mobility with the exoskeleton while still needing a close contact guard. PMID:27610382

  7. Device-Training for Individuals with Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Cord Injury Using a Powered Exoskeleton for Technically Assisted Mobility: Achievements and User Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Platz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Results of a device-training for nonambulatory individuals with thoracic and lumbar spinal cord injury (SCI using a powered exoskeleton for technically assisted mobility with regard to the achieved level of control of the system after training, user satisfaction, and effects on quality of life (QoL. Methods. Observational single centre study with a 4-week to 5-week intensive inpatient device-training using a powered exoskeleton (ReWalk™. Results. All 7 individuals with SCI who commenced the device-training completed the course of training and achieved basic competences to use the system, that is, the ability to stand up, sit down, keep balance while standing, and walk indoors, at least with a close contact guard. User satisfaction with the system and device-training was documented for several aspects. The quality of life evaluation (SF-12v2™ indicated that the use of the powered exoskeleton can have positive effects on the perception of individuals with SCI regarding what they can achieve physically. Few adverse events were observed: minor skin lesions and irritations were observed; no falls occurred. Conclusions. The device-training for individuals with thoracic and lumbar SCI was effective and safe. All trained individuals achieved technically assisted mobility with the exoskeleton while still needing a close contact guard.

  8. Comparative short-term effects of two thoracic spinal manipulation techniques in subjects with chronic mechanical neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova-Méndez, Amaloha; Oliva-Pascual-Vaca, Angel; Rodriguez-Blanco, Cleofás; Heredia-Rizo, Alberto Marcos; Gogorza-Arroitaonandia, Kristobal; Almazán-Campos, Ginés

    2014-08-01

    Spinal Manipulation (SM) has been purported to decrease pain and improve function in subjects with non-specific neck pain. Previous research has investigated which individuals with non-specific neck pain will be more likely to benefit from SM. It has not yet been proven whether or not the effectiveness of thoracic SM depends on the specific technique being used. This double-blind randomized trial has compared the short-term effects of two thoracic SM maneuvers in subjects with chronic non-specific neck pain. Sixty participants were distributed randomly into two groups. One group received the Dog technique (n = 30), with the subject in supine position, and the other group underwent the Toggle-Recoil technique (n = 30), with the participant lying prone, T4 being the targeted area in both cases. Evaluations were made of self-reported neck pain (Visual Analogue Scale); neck mobility (Cervical Range of Motion); and pressure pain threshold at the cervical and thoracic levels (C4 and T4 spinous process) and over the site described for location of tense bands of the upper trapezius muscle. Measurements were taken before intervention, immediately afterward, and 20 min later. Both maneuvers improved neck mobility and mechanosensitivity and reduced pain in the short term. No major or clinical differences were found between the groups. In the between-groups comparison slightly better results were observed in the Toggle-Recoil group only for cervical extension (p = 0.009), right lateral flexion (p = 0.004) and left rotation (p < 0.05). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Occurrence of spinal column pain and its relation to the quality of life of manicures and pedicures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrezza Pinheiro Bezerra de Menezes Kinote

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the occurrence of spine column pain in manicures/pedicures and verify its relationship with quality of life. Methods: A quantitative and descriptive crosssectional research conducted from February to June 2010 with 30 professionals aged between 18 and 45 years and with at least one year of work experience. After selection, two questionnaires were applied: the SF-36 and another developed by the researchers with questions related to occupation (working hours and length of service, occurrence of pain and its characteristics (location, type, frequency and intensity. Results: Of the 30 participants, 76.7% (n=23 reported pain, with 63.3% (n=19 occurrence in the lumbar spine and 46.7% (n=14 occurrence of chronic type (lasting more than 6 months. A total of 36.7% (n=11 of interviewees reported daily pain with an average intensity of 6.1+2.24. Age and length of service rates were higher in the group of people who felt pain (34.2+6.80 and 12.3+6.39 years respectively. Regarding the quality of life in the group of people who did not feel pain, the domains “functional capacity”, “pain” and “general health status” had higher scores when compared to the group of people who felt pain (p<0.05. Conclusion: It was detected a high occurrence of spinal column pain among manicures / pedicures, especially in the lumbar spine, leading to functional limitations, and a consequent change in quality of life. doi:10.5020/18061230.2013.p318

  10. [Diagnostic and Treatment Strategies in Morel-Lavallee Lesions in the Spinal Column and Pelvis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Christopher A; Kammerlander, Christian; Greiner, Axel; Sommer, Fabian; Linhart, Christoph; Böcker, Wolfgang; Rubenbauer, Bianka; Weidert, Simon

    2018-04-12

    The Morel-Lavallée lesion is one of the concomitant soft tissue lesions of pelvic fractures. Its role in spine fractures and its treatment in combination with osteosynthesis of pelvic or spine fractures have not yet been determined. The aim of this study was to analyse the best diagnostic and treatment options of both spine and pelvic fractures combined with Morel-Lavallée lesions (MLL). An analysis of the literature was performed via PubMed and Medline. This revealed a total of 197 studies and case reports. After analysing the literature, 19 studies/case reports met our inclusion criteria. There are several diagnostic options for MLL, including ultrasound, computed tomography or MRI. In spinal and pelvic lesions, ultrasound is capable of detecting MLL. Some authors tend to perform open debridement of the MLL, whereas others recommend percutanous treatment. Open debridement and vacuum-assisted closure are recommended in late diagnosed MLL, where primary suture of the soft tissue is impossible. Fracture fixation should be performed simultaneously to treatment of the MLL. Broad-spectrum cephalosporins combined with an aminoglycoside or piperacilline/tazobactam should be initiated. Radical debridement and drainage are recommended, especially when MLL is diagnosed late. Repeated ultrasound examinations should be performed of the surrounding soft tissue of the fracture. When MLL is diagnosed within 2 days, percutanous fracture and MLL treatment should be performed. After more than 2 days, both fracture and MLL should be treated with open debridement, open fracture fixation and primary suture if possible. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Characterization of upper thoracic spinal neurons receiving noxious cardiac and/or somatic inputs in diabetic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghorbani, Marie Louise M; Qin, Chao; Wu, Mingyuan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine spinal processing of cardiac and somatic nociceptive input in rats with STZ-induced diabetes. Type 1 diabetes was induced with streptozotocin (50mg/kg) in 14 male Sprague-Dawley rats and citrate buffer was injected in 14 control rats. After 4-11weeks...

  12. Significance and function of different spinal collateral compartments following thoracic aortic surgery: immediate versus long-term flow compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meffert, Philipp; Bischoff, Moritz S; Brenner, Robert; Siepe, Matthias; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Kari, Fabian A

    2014-05-01

    Iatrogenic paraplegia has been accompanying cardiovascular surgery since its beginning. As a result, surgeons have been developing many theories about the exact mechanisms of this devastating complication. Thus, the impact of single arteries that contribute to the spinal perfusion is one of the most discussed subjects in modern surgery. The subsequent decision of reattachment or the permanent disconnection of these intercostal arteries divides the surgical community. On the one hand, the anatomical or vascular approach pleads for the immediate reimplantation to reconstruct the anatomical situation. On the other hand, the decision of the permanent disconnection aims at avoiding stealing phenomenon away from the spinal vascular network. This spinal collateral network can be described as consisting of three components-the intraspinal and two paraspinal compartments-that feed the nutrient arteries of the spinal cord. The exact functional impact of the different compartments of the collateral network remains poorly understood. In this review, the function of the intraspinal compartment in the context of collateral network principle as an immediate emergency backup system is described. The exact structure and architectural principles of the intraspinal compartment are described. The critical parameters with regard to the risk of postoperative spinal cord ischaemia are the number of anterior radiculomedullary arteries (ARMAs) and the distance between them in relation to the longitudinal extent of aortic disease. The paraspinal network as a sleeping reserve is proposed as the long-term backup system. This sleeping reserve has to be activated by arteriogenic stimuli. These are presented briefly, and prior findings regarding arteriogenesis are discussed in the light of the collateral network concept. Finally, the role of preoperative visualization of the ARMAs in order to evaluate the risk of postoperative paraplegia is emphasized.

  13. The role of c-AMP-dependent protein kinase in spinal cord and post synaptic dorsal column neurons in a rat model of visceral pain

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jing; Su, Guangxiao; Ma, Long; Zhang, Xuan; Lei, Yongzhong; Lin, Qing; Nauta, Haring J.W.; Li, Junfa; Fang, Li

    2007-01-01

    Visceral noxious stimulation induces central neuronal plasticity changes and suggests that the c-AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) signal transduction cascade contributes to long-term changes in nociceptive processing at the spinal cord level. Our previous studies reported the clinical neurosurgical interruption of post synaptic dorsal column neuron (PSDC) pathway by performing midline myelotomy effectively alleviating the intractable visceral pain in patients with severe pain. However, the ...

  14. Paresthesia thresholds in spinal cord stimulation: a comparison of theoretical results with clinical data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijk, J.J.; Struijk, Johannes J.; Holsheimer, J.; Barolat, Giancarlo; He, Jiping; Boom, H.B.K.

    1993-01-01

    The potential distributions produced in the spinal cord and surrounding tissues by dorsal epidural stimulation at the midcervical, midthoracic, and low thoracic levels were calculated with the use of a volume conductor model. Stimulus thresholds of myelinated dorsal column fibers and dorsal root

  15. MRI Evaluation of Spinal Length and Vertebral Body Angle During Loading with a Spinal Compression Harness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James A.; Hargens, Alan R.; Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, Alan, R.; Sanchez, E.; Yang, C.; Mitsui, I.; Schwandt, D.; hide

    1998-01-01

    Weight bearing by the spinal column during upright posture often plays a role in the common problem of low back pain. Therefore, we developed a non-ferromagnetic spinal compression harness to enable MRI investigations of the spinal column during axial loading. Human subjects were fitted with a Nest and a footplate which were connected by adjustable straps to an analog load cell. MRI scans of human subjects (5 males and 1 female with age range of 27-53 yrs) during loaded and unloaded conditions were accomplished with a 1.5 Tesla GE Signa scanner. Studies of two subjects undergoing sequentially increasing spinal loads revealed significant decreases (r(sup 2) = 0.852) in spinal length between T4 and L5 culminating in a 1.5 to 2% length decrease during loading with 75% body weight. Sagittal vertebral body angles of four subjects placed under a constant 50% body weight load for one hour demonstrated increased lordotic and kyphotic curvatures. In the lumbar spine, the L2 vertebral body experienced the greatest angular change (-3 deg. to -5 deg.) in most subjects while in the thoracic spine, T4 angles increased from the unloaded state by +2 deg. to +9 deg. Overall, our studies demonstrate: 1) a progressive, although surprisingly small, decrease in spinal length with increasing load and 2) relatively large changes in spinal column angulation with 50% body weight.

  16. Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Upper Ureter Metastatic to the Thoracic Spine Presenting as a Spinal Cord Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. O. Larkin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed a left nephroureterectomy for a gentleman with transitional cell carcinoma of the upper ureter. Histological analysis revealed it to be a T1 lesion, but to be highly mitotically active. The gentleman defaulted on adjuvant therapy and defaulted on follow-up. He represented with symptoms of acute spinal cord compression and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a lesion at T6/7. Neurosurgical resection of the lesion showed it to be a metastatic deposit from the ureteric primary. Despite surgical debulking and subsequent radiotherapy to the lesion, the patient died secondary to metastatic complications. This case report is of interest to the surgeon as it demonstrates both the high metastatic potential of upper tract carcinomas and educates the surgeon on the presentation of acute spinal cord compression.

  17. Initial experience with the use of an expandable titanium cage as a vertebral body replacement in patients with tumors of the spinal column: a report of 95 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Ashwin; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad M; Doppenberg, Egon; Suki, Dima; Gokaslan, Ziya; Mendel, Ehud; Rao, Ganesh; Rhines, Laurence D

    2012-01-01

    Vertebral body resection to treat spine tumors necessitates reconstruction to maintain spinal stability. The durability of reconstruction may be a challenge in cancer patients as treatment with chemotherapy and/or radiation coupled with poor nutritional status may compromise bone quality. We present a series of patients who underwent implantation of an expandable titanium cage (ETC) for reconstruction after vertebral body resection for primary or metastatic spine tumors. We report the functional outcome, assess the durability of reconstruction, and describe complications associated with this procedure. A retrospective review of patients undergoing placement of ETC after vertebrectomy for spinal tumor at our institution was performed. From September 2001 to August 2006, 95 patients underwent implantation of an ETC for reconstruction of the anterior spinal column following vertebrectomy for tumor (75 one-level, 19 two-level, 1 three-level). All patients underwent spinal stabilization as well. The median survival after surgery was 13.7 months; 23 patients had primary spinal tumors and 72 had metastatic tumors. Numerical pain scores were significantly improved postoperatively indicating a palliative benefit. No new neurological deficits were noted postoperatively, except when intentional neurological sacrifice was performed for oncologic reasons. Median height correction of 14% (range 0-118%) and median improvement in sagittal alignment of 6° (range 0-28°) were demonstrated on immediate postoperative imaging. Three patients experienced hardware related complications, one of which had posterior migration of the ETC. On postoperative imaging, 12 patients demonstrated subsidence of greater than 1 mm, but none required operative revision. Use of an ETC for spinal reconstruction in patients with spinal tumors is safe, decreases pain associated with pathologic fracture, protects neurologic function, and is durable. We found a very low incidence of cage-related construct

  18. Remodelling of cardiac sympathetic re-innervation with thoracic spinal cord stimulation improves left ventricular function in a porcine model of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Song-Yan; Liu, Yuan; Zuo, Mingliang; Zhang, Yuelin; Yue, Wensheng; Au, Ka-Wing; Lai, Wing-Hon; Wu, Yangsong; Shuto, Chika; Chen, Peter; Siu, Chung-Wah; Schwartz, Peter J; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2015-12-01

    Thoracic spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been shown to improve left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in heart failure (HF). Nevertheless, the optimal duration (intermittent vs. continuous) of stimulation and the mechanisms of action remain unclear. We performed chronic thoracic SCS at the level of T1-T3 (50 Hz, pulse width 0.2 ms) in 30 adult pigs with HF induced by myocardial infarction and rapid ventricular pacing for 4 weeks. All the animals were treated with daily oral metoprolol succinate (25 mg) plus ramipril (2.5 mg), and randomized to a control group (n = 10), intermittent SCS (4 h ×3, n = 10) or continuous SCS (24 h, n = 10) for 10 weeks. Serial measurements of LVEF and +dP/dt and serum levels of norepinephrine and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) were measured. After sacrifice, immunohistological studies of myocardial sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve sprouting and innervation were performed. Echocardiogram revealed a significant increase in LVEF and +dP/dt at 10 weeks in both the intermittent and continuous SCS group compared with controls (P < 0.05). In both SCS groups, there was diffuse sympathetic nerve sprouting over the infarct, peri-infarct, and normal regions compared with only the peri-infarct and infarct regions in the control group. In addition, sympathetic innervation at the peri-infarct and infarct regions was increased following SCS, but decreased in the control group. Myocardium norepinephrine spillover and serum BNP at 10 weeks was significantly decreased only in the continuous SCS group (P < 0.05). In a porcine model of HF, SCS induces significant remodelling of cardiac sympathetic innervation over the peri-infarct and infarct regions and is associated with improved LV function and reduced myocardial norepinephrine spillover. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Long-term outcomes of anterior spinal fusion for treating thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis curves: average 15-year follow-up analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Hideki; Ito, Manabu; Kaneda, Kiyoshi; Shono, Yasuhiro; Takahata, Masahiko; Abumi, Kuniyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Retrospective review. To assess the long-term outcomes of anterior spinal fusion (ASF) for treating thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Although ASF is reported to provide good coronal and sagittal correction of the main thoracic (MT) AIS curves, the long-term outcomes of ASF is unknown. A consecutive series of 25 patients with Lenke 1 MT AIS were included. Outcome measures comprised radiographical measurements, pulmonary function, and Scoliosis Research Society outcome instrument (SRS-30) scores (preoperative SRS-30 scores were not documented). Postoperative surgical revisions and complications were recorded. Twenty-five patients were followed-up for 12 to 18 years (average, 15.2 yr). The average MT Cobb angle correction rate and the correction loss at the final follow-up were 56.7% and 9.2°, respectively. The average preoperative instrumented level of kyphosis was 8.3°, which significantly improved to 18.6° (P = 0.0003) at the final follow-up. The average percent-predicted forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were significantly decreased during long-term follow-up measurements (73% and 69%; P = 0.0004 and 0.0016, respectively). However, no patient had complaints related to pulmonary function. The average total SRS-30 score was 4.0. Implant breakage was not observed. All patients, except 1 who required revision surgery, demonstrated solid fusion. Late instrumentation-related bronchial problems were observed in 1 patient who required implant removal and bronchial tube repair, 13 years after the initial surgery. Overall radiographical findings and patient outcome measures of ASF for Lenke 1 MT AIS were satisfactory at an average follow-up of 15 years. ASF provides significant sagittal correction of the main thoracic curve with long-term maintenance of sagittal profiles. Percent-predicted values of forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were decreased in this cohort; however, no patient had complaints

  20. Concepts on the pathogenesis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Bone growth and mass, vertebral column, spinal cord, brain, skull, extra-spinal left-right skeletal length asymmetries, disproportions and molecular pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwell, R Geoffrey; Dangerfield, Peter H; Freeman, Brian J C

    2008-01-01

    There is no generally accepted scientific theory for the causes of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Encouraging advances thought to be related to AIS pathogenesis have recently been made in several fields including anthropometry of bone growth, bone mass, spinal growth modulation, extra-spinal left-right skeletal length asymmetries and disproportions, magnetic resonance imaging of vertebral column, spinal cord, brain, skull, and molecular pathogenesis. These advances are leading to the evaluation of new treatments including attempts at minimally invasive surgery on the spine and peri-apical ribs. Several concepts of AIS are outlined indicating their clinical applications but not their research potential. The concepts, by derivation morphological, molecular and mathematical, are addressed in 15 sections: 1) initiating and progressive factors; 2) relative anterior spinal overgrowth; 3) dorsal shear forces that create axial rotational instability; 4) rotational preconstraint; 5) uncoupled, or asynchronous, spinal neuro-osseous growth; 6) brain, nervous system and skull; 7) a novel neuro-osseous escalator concept based on a putative abnormality of two normal polarized processes namely, a) increasing skeletal dimensions, and b) the CNS body schema - both contained within a neuro-osseous timing of maturation (NOTOM) concept; 8) transverse plane pelvic rotation, skeletal asymmetries and developmental theory; 9) thoraco-spinal concept; 10) origin in contracture at the hips; 11) osteopenia; 12) melatonin deficiency; 13) systemic melatonin-signaling pathway dysfunction; 14) platelet calmodulin dysfunction; and 15) biomechanical spinal growth modulation. From these concepts, a collective model for AIS pathogenesis is formulated. The central concept of this model includes the body schema of the neural systems, widely-studied in adults, that control normal posture and coordinated movements with frames of reference in the posterior parietal cortex. The escalator concept

  1. The validity of compliance monitors to assess wearing time of thoracic-lumbar-sacral orthoses in children with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Louis N; Sison-Williamson, Mitell; Mendoza, Melissa M; McDonald, Craig M; Molitor, Fred; Mulcahey, M J; Betz, Randal R; Vogel, Lawrence C; Bagley, Anita

    2008-06-15

    Prospective multicenter observation. To determine the validity of 3 commercially available at recording thoracic-lumbar-sacral orthosis (TLSO) wearing time of children with spinal cord injury (SCI) and to assess each monitor's function during daily activities. A major limitation to studies assessing the effectiveness of spinal prophylactic bracing is the patient's compliance with the prescribed wearing time. Although some studies have begun to use objective compliance monitors, there is little documentation of the validity of the monitors during activities of daily life and no comparisons of available monitors. Fifteen children with SCI who wore a TLSO for paralytic scoliosis were observed for 4 days during their rehabilitation stay. Three compliance monitors (2 temperature and 1 pressure sensitive) were mounted onto each TLSO. Time of brace wear from the monitors was compared with the wear time per day recorded in diaries. Observed versus monitored duration of brace wear found the HOBO (temperature sensitive) to be the most valid compliance monitor. The HOBO had the lowest average of difference and variance of difference scores. The correlation between the recorded daily entries and monitored brace wear time was also highest for the HOBO in analysis of dependent and independent scores. Bland-Altman plots showed that the pressure sensitive monitor underestimated wear time whereas the temperature monitors overestimated wear time. Compliance to prescribed wearing schedule has been a barrier to studying TLSO efficacy. All 3 monitors were found to measure TLSO compliance, but the 2 temperature monitors were more in agreement with the daily diaries. Based on its functional advantages compared with the HOBO, the StowAway TidbiT will be used to further investigate the long-term compliance of TLSO bracing in children with SCI.

  2. Thoracic myelopathy with alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeda, Koji; Kasai, Yuichi; Kawakita, Eiji; Matsumura, Yoshihiro; Kono, Toshibumi; Murata, Tetsuya; Uchida, Atsumasa

    2008-01-15

    A case of thoracic myelopathy with alkaptonuria (ochronotic spondyloarthropathy) is presented. To present and review the first reported case of an alkaptonuric patient with concomitant thoracic myelopathy. Alkaptonuria, a rare hereditary metabolic disease, is characterized by accumulation of homogentistic acid, ochronosis, and destruction of connective tissue resulting in degenerative spondylosis and arthritis. Despite the high incidence of intervertebral disc diseases among patients with alkaptonuria, neurologic symptoms caused by spinal disease are rare. Thoracic myelopathy in a patient with alkaptonuria has not been previously reported. The clinical course, radiologic features, pathology, and treatment outcome of an alkaptonuria patient with thoracic myelopathy was documented. Myelopathy of the patient was caused by rupture of a thoracic intervertebral disc. The neurologic symptoms of the patient were markedly improved after surgery. We have reported for the first time, that an alkaptonuria patient showed thoracic myelopathy caused by rupture of a thoracic intervertebral disc. Decompression followed by the instrumented fusion of the thoracic spine was effective for improving the neurologic symptoms.

  3. Construction of an in vivo human spinal cord atlas based on high-resolution MR images at cervical and thoracic levels: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taso, Manuel; Le Troter, Arnaud; Sdika, Michaël; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Guye, Maxime; Bernard, Monique; Callot, Virginie

    2014-06-01

    Our goal was to build a probabilistic atlas and anatomical template of the human cervical and thoracic spinal cord (SC) that could be used for segmentation algorithm improvement, parametric group studies, and enrichment of biomechanical modelling. High-resolution axial T2*-weighted images were acquired at 3T on 15 healthy volunteers using a multi-echo-gradient-echo sequence (1 slice per vertebral level from C1 to L2). After manual segmentation, linear and affine co-registrations were performed providing either inter-individual morphometric variability maps, or substructure probabilistic maps [CSF, white and grey matter (WM/GM)] and anatomical SC template. The larger inter-individual morphometric variations were observed at the thoraco-lumbar levels and in the posterior GM. Mean SC diameters were in agreement with the literature and higher than post-mortem measurements. A representative SC MR template was generated and values up to 90 and 100% were observed on GM and WM-probability maps. This work provides a probabilistic SC atlas and a template that could offer great potentialities for parametrical MRI analysis (DTI/MTR/fMRI) and group studies, similar to what has already been performed using a brain atlas. It also offers great perspective for biomechanical models usually based on post-mortem or generic data. Further work will consider integration into an automated SC segmentation pipeline.

  4. Neural-Dural Transition at the Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Nerve Roots: A Histological Study of Human Late-Stage Fetuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Ho Cho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidural blocks have been used extensively in infants. However, little histological information is available on the immature neural-dural transition. The neural-dural transition was histologically investigated in 12 late-stage (28–30 weeks fetuses. The dural sheath of the spinal cord was observed to always continue along the nerve roots with varying thicknesses between specimens and segments, while the dorsal root ganglion sheath was usually very thin or unclear. Immature neural-dural transitions were associated with effective anesthesia. The posterior radicular artery was near the dorsal root ganglion and/or embedded in the nerve root, whereas the anterior radicular artery was separated from the nearest nerve root. The anterior radicular artery was not associated with the dural sheath but with thin mesenchymal tissue. The numbers of radicular arteries tended to become smaller in larger specimens. Likewise, larger specimens of the upper thoracic and lower lumbar segments did not show the artery. Therefore, elimination of the radicular arteries to form a single artery of Adamkiewicz was occurring in late-stage fetuses. The epidural space was filled with veins, and the loose tissue space extended ventrolaterally to the subpleural tissue between the ribs. Consequently, epidural blocks in infants require special attention although immature neural-dural transitions seemed to increase the effect.

  5. Clinical feasibility of gait training with a robotic exoskeleton (WPAL) in an individual with both incomplete cervical and complete thoracic spinal cord injury: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Shigeo; Koyama, Soichiro; Saitoh, Eiichi; Hirano, Satoshi; Yatsuya, Kanan; Tsunoda, Tetsuya; Katoh, Masaki; Gotoh, Takeshi; Furumoto, Ayako

    2017-01-01

    Patients with tetraplegia can achieve independent gait with lateral-type powered exoskeletons; it is unclear whether medial-type powered exoskeletons allow for this. To investigate gait training with a medial-type powered exoskeleton wearable power-assist locomotor (WPAL) in an individual with incomplete cervical (C5) and complete thoracic (T12) spinal cord injury (SCI). The 60-session program was investigated retrospectively using medical records. Upon completion, gait performance was examined using three-dimensional motion analyses and surface electromyography (EMG) of the upper limbs. The subject achieved independent gait with WPAL and a walker in 12 sessions. He continuously extended his right elbow; his left elbow periodically flexed/extended. His pelvic inclination was larger than the trunk inclination during single-leg stance. EMG activity was increased in the left deltoid muscles during ipsilateral foot-contact. The right anterior and medial deltoid muscle EMG activity increased just after foot-off for each leg, as did the right biceps activity. Continuous activity was observed in the left triceps throughout the gait cycle; activity was unclear in the right triceps. These results suggest the importance of upper limb residual motor function, and may be useful in extending the range of clinical applications for robotic gait rehabilitation in patients with SCI.

  6. Diagnosis of sports injuries of the spinal column. If the X-ray doesn't show enough, CT and MRI will fill the gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbsguth, A.

    1996-01-01

    Exact anamnestic exploration is a key to the successful clarification of sports lesions of the spinal column. Today, X-ray diagnostics still is of the greatest importance. Should it be impossible to diagnose the clinical situation extensively by this method recourse should be taken to computed tomography (CT) and nuclear magnetic resonance tomography (NMRT). As a rule, CT is used to clarify bone pathology and NMRT to examine soft tissue lesions. Especially complex vertebral parts - the articlular process and adjacent parts of the transverse process and lamina often are difficult to assess by a sceleton scintigraphy, thus allowing a detailed search using other methods. (orig.) [de

  7. The role of c-AMP-dependent protein kinase in spinal cord and post synaptic dorsal column neurons in a rat model of visceral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Su, Guangxiao; Ma, Long; Zhang, Xuan; Lei, Yongzhong; Lin, Qing; Nauta, Haring J W; Li, Junfa; Fang, Li

    2007-04-01

    Visceral noxious stimulation induces central neuronal plasticity changes and suggests that the c-AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) signal transduction cascade contributes to long-term changes in nociceptive processing at the spinal cord level. Our previous studies reported the clinical neurosurgical interruption of post synaptic dorsal column neuron (PSDC) pathway by performing midline myelotomy effectively alleviating the intractable visceral pain in patients with severe pain. However, the intracellular cascade in PSDC neurons mediated by PKA nociceptive neurotransmission was not known. In this study, by using multiple experimental approaches, we investigated the role of PKA in nociceptive signaling in the spinal cord and PSDC neurons in a visceral pain model in rats with the intracolonic injection of mustard oil. We found that mustard oil injection elicited visceral pain that significantly changed exploratory behavior activity in rats in terms of decreased numbers of entries, traveled distance, active and rearing time, rearing activity and increased resting time when compared to that of rats receiving mineral oil injection. However, the intrathecal infusion of PKA inhibitor, H89 partially reversed the visceral pain-induced effects. Results from Western blot studies showed that mustard oil injection significantly induced the expression of PKA protein in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Immunofluorescent staining in pre-labeled PSDC neurons showed that mustard oil injection greatly induces the neuronal profile numbers. We also found that the intrathecal infusion of a PKA inhibitor, H89 significantly blocked the visceral pain-induced phosphorylation of c-AMP-responsive element binding (CREB) protein in spinal cord in rats. The results of our study suggest that the PKA signal transduction cascade may contribute to visceral nociceptive changes in spinal PSDC pathways.

  8. The relationship of older age and perioperative outcomes following thoracolumbar three-column osteotomy for adult spinal deformity: an analysis of 300 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Darryl; Osorio, Joseph A; Deviren, Vedat; Ames, Christopher P

    2018-04-06

    OBJECTIVE Three-column osteotomies are increasingly being used in the elderly population to correct rigid spinal deformities. There is hesitation, however, in performing the technique in older patients because of the high risk for blood loss, longer operative times, and complications. This study assesses whether age alone is an independent risk factor for complications and length of stay. METHODS All patients with thoracolumbar adult spinal deformity (ASD) who underwent 3-column osteotomy (vertebral column resection or pedicle subtraction osteotomy) performed by the senior author from 2006 to 2016 were identified. Demographics, clinical baseline, and surgical details were collected. Outcomes of interest included perioperative complication, ICU stay, and hospital stay. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess the association of age with outcomes of interest. RESULTS A total of 300 patients were included, and 38.3% were male. The mean age was 63.7 years: 10.3% of patients were younger than 50 years, 36.0% were 50-64 years, 45.7% were 65-79 years, and 8.0% were 80 years or older. The overall mean EBL was 1999 ml. The overall perioperative complication rate was 24.7%: 18.0% had a medical complication and 7.0% had a surgical complication. There were no perioperative or 30-day deaths. Age was associated with overall complications (p = 0.002) and medical-specific complications (p column osteotomy for ASD. Comorbidities and other unknown variables that come with age are likely what put these patients at higher risk for complications. Older age, however, is independently associated with longer ICU and hospital stays.

  9. Management of Penetrating Spinal Cord Injuries in a Non Spinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management of Penetrating Spinal Cord Injuries in a Non Spinal Centre: Experience at Enugu, Nigeria. ... The thoracic spine{9(41%)}was most often involved. ... Five (23%) patients with injury at cervical level died from respiratory failure.

  10. Thoracic CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through a vein (IV) in your hand or forearm. It may be given through the rectum using ... CT scan Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Normal lung anatomy Thoracic organs References Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden ...

  11. [Lumbar spinal angiolipoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isla, Alberto; Ortega Martinez, Rodrigo; Pérez López, Carlos; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro; Mansilla, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are fairly infrequent benign tumours that are usually located in the epidural space of the thoracic column and represent 0.14% to 1.3% of all spinal tumours. Lumbar angiolipomas are extremely rare, representing only 9.6% of all spinal extradural angiolipomas. We report the case of a woman who complained of a lumbar pain of several months duration with no neurological focality and that had intensified in the last three days without her having had any injury or made a physical effort. The MR revealed an extradural mass L1-L2, on the posterior face of the medulla, decreasing the anteroposterior diameter of the canal. The patient symptoms improved after surgery. Total extirpation of the lesion is possible in most cases, and the prognosis is excellent even if the lesion is infiltrative. For this reason, excessively aggressive surgery is not necessary to obtain complete resection. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Blood detection in the spinal column of whole cooked chicken using an optical fibre based sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, C.; O'Farrell, M.; Lyons, W. B.; Lewis, E.; Flanagan, C.; Jackman, N.

    2005-01-01

    An optical fibre based sensor has been developed to aid the quality assurance of food cooked in industrial ovens by monitoring the product in situ as it cooks. The sensor measures the product colour as it cooks by examining the reflected visible light from the surface as well as the core of the product. This paper examines the use of the sensor for the detection of blood in the spinal area of cooked whole chickens. The results presented here show that the sensor can be successfully used for this purpose.

  13. Disorders of spinal blood circulation

    OpenAIRE

    Hevyak, O.M.; Kuzminskyy, A.P.

    2017-01-01

    Spinal strokes are rare. The most common causes of the haemorrhage are spinal cord trauma, vasculitis with signs of haemorrhagic diathesis, spinal vascular congenital anomalies (malformations) and haemangioma. By localization, haemorrhagic strokes are divided into three groups: haematomyelia, spinal subarachnoid haemorrhage, epidural hematoma. Most cavernous malformations are localized at the cervical level, fewer — at thoracic and lumbar levels of the spinal cord. The clinical case of diagno...

  14. Computed tomography in the treatment of cervical spinal cord tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hideo

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the cervical and thoracic spinal column was carried out in 12 patients of spinal cord tumor. There were 6 schwannomas, 2 metastatic tumors and other 4 cases of different tumors, which were studied by either a General Electric CT/T or a Toshiba TCT 60 Type A scanner. In all patients, CT-examination followed conventional spinal X-ray studies. The usefulness of the plain spinal CT (PCT: CT without any contrast enhancement neither intravenously nor intrathecally) was to detect subtle bony changes as well as paraspinal soft tissue abnormalities, although it was hard to distinguish the spinal cord by PCT. Metrizamide CT myelography (CTM: CT with intrathecal instillation of metrizamide) was indispensable to identify the intracanalicular architecture. It provided the clue to determine the site and the size of tumor, and it was also useful after surgical procedure. CTM with intravenous contrast enhancement (CTM-CE) together with CTM distinguished the spinal tumor from the spinal cord very well, particularly in the cases of schwannoma. The author supports significant reliability of PCT, CTM and CTM-CE in identifying the presence, the extension and the bony involvement of spinal cord tumors. (author)

  15. [Fast visualization of fat infiltration in dorsal muscles of the trunk at lumbar spinal column by magnetic resonance images (MR)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Miguelsanz, María Juliana; Herrera-Hervás, Luis; Franco-López, María de Los Ángeles

    2014-11-01

    In magnetic resonance, fat is considered an "unwanted artifact or signal" which is suppressed when performing a clinical study, unless otherwise specified. The increase in obesity and associated diseases has become necessary to study fat deposits both in adipose tissue and ectopic fat. In this paper, we analyze the information that is available from the CD which patients receive after undergoing magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen along with the medical report, using a personal computer, focusing on the fat deposits in spinal muscles of healthy adult volunteers or analyzes nonspecific low back pain. The application of colored interfaces or windows on gray resonance images is very useful to display fat deposits, especially when the observer is not familiar with these images. It is a fast, easy and intuitive method of semiquantitative muscle visualization of the ectopic fat. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. One-stage posterior approaches for treatment of thoracic spinal infection: Transforaminal and costotransversectomy, compared with anterior approach with posterior instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Fu-Cheng; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Niu, Chi-Chien; Lai, Po-Liang; Chen, Lih-Huei; Chen, Wen-Jer

    2017-10-01

    Treating thoracic infective spondylodiscitis with anterior surgical approaches carry a relatively high risk of perioperative and postoperative complications. Posterior approaches have been reported to result in lower complication rates than anterior procedures, but more evidence is needed to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of 1-stage posterior approaches for treating infectious thoracic spondylodiscitis.Preoperative and postoperative clinical data, of 18 patients who underwent 2 types of 1-stage posterior procedures, costotransversectomy and transforaminal thoracic interbody debridement and fusion and 7 patients who underwent anterior debridement and reconstruction with posterior instrumentation, were retrospectively assessed.The clinical outcomes of patients treated with 1-stage posterior approaches were generally good, with good infection control, back pain relief, kyphotic angle correction, and either partial or solid union for fusion status. Furthermore, they achieved shorter surgical time, fewer postoperative complications, and shorter hospital stay than the patients underwent anterior debridement with posterior instrumentation.The results suggested that treating thoracic spondylodiscitis with a single-stage posterior approach might prevent postoperative complications and avoid respiratory problems associated with anterior approaches. Single-stage posterior approaches would be recommended for thoracic spine infection, especially for patients with medical comorbidities.

  17. Role of disc area and trabecular bone density on lumbar spinal column fracture risk curves under vertical impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Moore, Jason; Pintar, Frank A; Banerjee, Anjishnu; DeVogel, Nicholas; Zhang, JiangYue

    2018-04-27

    While studies have been conducted using human cadaver lumbar spines to understand injury biomechanics in terms of stability/energy to fracture, and physiological responses under pure-moment/follower loads, data are sparse for inferior-to-superior impacts. Injuries occur under this mode from underbody blasts. determine role of age, disc area, and trabecular bone density on tolerances/risk curves under vertical loading from a controlled group of specimens. T12-S1 columns were obtained, pretest X-rays and CTs taken, load cells attached to both ends, impacts applied at S1-end using custom vertical accelerator device, and posttest X-ray, CT, and dissections done. BMD of L2-L4 vertebrae were obtained from QCT. Survival analysis-based Human Injury Probability Curves (HIPCs) were derived using proximal and distal forces. Age, area, and BMD were covariates. Forces were considered uncensored, representing the load carrying capacity. The Akaike Information Criterion was used to determine optimal distributions. The mean forces, ±95% confidence intervals, and Normalized Confidence Interval Size (NCIS) were computed. The Lognormal distribution was the optimal function for both forces. Age, area, and BMD were not significant (p > 0.05) covariates for distal forces, while only BMD was significant for proximal forces. The NCIS was the lowest for force-BMD covariate HIPC. The HIPCs for both genders at 35 and 45 years were based on population BMDs. These HIPCs serve as human tolerance criteria for automotive, military, and other applications. In this controlled group of samples, BMD is a better predictor-covariate that characterizes lumbar column injury under inferior-to-superior impacts. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Matrilin-1 expression is increased in the vertebral column of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) individuals displaying spinal fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mona E; Takle, Harald; Ytteborg, Elisabeth; Veiseth-Kent, Eva; Enersen, Grethe; Færgestad, Ellen; Baeverfjord, Grete; Hannesson, Kirsten O

    2011-12-01

    We have previously characterized the development of vertebral fusions induced by elevated water temperature in Atlantic salmon. Molecular markers of bone and cartilage development together with histology were used to understand the complex pathology and mechanism in the development of this spinal malformation. In this study, we wanted to use proteomics, a non-hypothetical approach to screen for possible new markers involved in the fusion process. Proteins extracted from non-deformed and fused vertebrae of Atlantic salmon were therefore compared by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) and MALDI-TOF analysis. Data analysis of protein spots in the 2DE gels demonstrated matrilin-1, also named cartilage matrix protein, to be the most highly up-regulated protein in fused compared with non-deformed vertebrae. Furthermore, real-time PCR analysis showed strong up-regulation of matrilin-1 mRNA in fused vertebrae. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated induced matrilin-1 expression in trans-differentiating cells undergoing a metaplastic shift toward chondrocytes in fusing vertebrae, whereas abundant expression was demonstrated in cartilaginous tissue and chordocytes of both non-deformed and fused vertebrae. These results identifies matrilin-1 as a new interesting candidate in the fusion process, and ratify the use of proteomic as a valuable technique to screen for markers involved in vertebral pathogenesis.

  19. 10 Levels thoracic no-intrumented laminectomy for huge spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma removal. Report of the first case and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visocchi Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: To our knowledge, the present case is the most extensive laminectomy for a SSDH removal never described before. No postoperative instability occurs in 10 levels thoracic laminectomy in case the articular processes are spared. When major neurological deficits are documented, early decompressive laminectomy with evacuation of hematoma should be considered the best treatment for SSDH.

  20. Telehealth-based model of care redesign to facilitate local fitting and management of patients with a spinal fracture requiring a thoracic lumbar sacral orthosis in rural hospitals in New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Ryan; Giles, Michelle; Morison, Jane; Henderson, Judith

    2018-03-23

    To develop and implement a telehealth-based model of care for spinal fractures requiring management with thoracic lumbar sacral orthoses that eliminates the need for transfer to a metropolitan tertiary referral hospital. Pre-post design observational study evaluating model of care implementation. Rural referral hospitals in a large NSW region covering metropolitan, rural and remote hospitals. Patients presenting with a thoracic or lumbar spine fracture requiring thoracic lumbar sacral orthoses management and rural clinicians caring for them. Number of patients managed in rural hospitals without transfer to a metropolitan tertiary referral hospital; length of stay and related cost efficiencies; clinicians' perceived skills, knowledge and confidence levels. Model of care was implemented with clinical and system governance processes; and educational workshops across eight rural hospitals. A total of 81 patients managed in rural hospitals under this model between July 2013 and June 2016 without transfer were included in this study. Mean length of stay reduced from nine to four days. Hospital transfers were eliminated from the patient journey, totalling 24 324 km. Workshops were attended by 71 clinicians from nine rural hospitals and survey findings indicated a significant increase in staff knowledge, skill and confidence post education. Cost efficiencies were gained by eliminating 162 inter-hospital transfers and 405 patient bed days. This model has streamlined patient journeys and reduced transfers and travel, enabling rural clinicians to provide specialised services in local communities and facilitating timely evidence-based care in local communities without any adverse events. © 2018 National Rural Health Alliance Ltd.

  1. MRI findings of the subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord : a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joo Chang; Cha, Sang Hoon; Lee, Sang Soo; Hun, Bae Il; Han, Gi Seok; Kim, Sung Jin; Park, Kil Sun

    2000-01-01

    Subacute combined degeneration (SCD) of the spinal cord is a neurological complication arising from vitamin B 12 deficiency. Typical findings are demyelination and axonal loss of the posterior and lateral columns of the thoracic and cervical spinal cord, leading to sensory ataxia and paresthesia. Clinical and neurological features and MRI findings all contribute to the diagnosis of this entity. In the Korean medical literature, only one case of of SCD involving pre-treatment MRI has been reported. We describe one case of SCD in a post-gastrectomy patient who initially presented with progressive sensory abnormality in both upper and lower extremities and showed T2 hyperintensity in the posterior and lateral columns of the spinal cord; this diminished, with clinical improvement, after vitamin B12 therapy. Our report includes the MR images obtained during follow up. (author)

  2. MRI findings of the subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord : a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joo Chang; Cha, Sang Hoon; Lee, Sang Soo; Hun, Bae Il; Han, Gi Seok; Kim, Sung Jin; Park, Kil Sun [College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-05-01

    Subacute combined degeneration (SCD) of the spinal cord is a neurological complication arising from vitamin B{sub 12} deficiency. Typical findings are demyelination and axonal loss of the posterior and lateral columns of the thoracic and cervical spinal cord, leading to sensory ataxia and paresthesia. Clinical and neurological features and MRI findings all contribute to the diagnosis of this entity. In the Korean medical literature, only one case of of SCD involving pre-treatment MRI has been reported. We describe one case of SCD in a post-gastrectomy patient who initially presented with progressive sensory abnormality in both upper and lower extremities and showed T2 hyperintensity in the posterior and lateral columns of the spinal cord; this diminished, with clinical improvement, after vitamin B12 therapy. Our report includes the MR images obtained during follow up. (author)

  3. Transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation of the lumbar and sacral spinal cord: a modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Sofia R.; Salvador, Ricardo; Wenger, Cornelia; de Carvalho, Mamede; Miranda, Pedro C.

    2018-06-01

    Objective. Our aim was to perform a computational study of the electric field (E-field) generated by transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) applied over the thoracic, lumbar and sacral spinal cord, in order to assess possible neuromodulatory effects on spinal cord circuitry related with lower limb functions. Approach. A realistic volume conductor model of the human body consisting of 14 tissues was obtained from available databases. Rubber pad electrodes with a metallic connector and a conductive gel layer were modelled. The finite element (FE) method was used to calculate the E-field when a current of 2.5 mA was passed between two electrodes. The main characteristics of the E-field distributions in the spinal grey matter (spinal-GM) and spinal white matter (spinal-WM) were compared for seven montages, with the anode placed either over T10, T8 or L2 spinous processes (s.p.), and the cathode placed over right deltoid (rD), umbilicus (U) and right iliac crest (rIC) areas or T8 s.p. Anisotropic conductivity of spinal-WM and of a group of dorsal muscles near the vertebral column was considered. Main results. The average E-field magnitude was predicted to be above 0.15 V m-1 in spinal cord regions located between the electrodes. L2-T8 and T8-rIC montages resulted in the highest E-field magnitudes in lumbar and sacral spinal segments (>0.30 V m-1). E-field longitudinal component is 3 to 6 times higher than the ventral-dorsal and right-left components in both the spinal-GM and WM. Anatomical features such as CSF narrowing due to vertebrae bony edges or disks intrusions in the spinal canal correlate with local maxima positions. Significance. Computational modelling studies can provide detailed information regarding the electric field in the spinal cord during tsDCS. They are important to guide the design of clinical tsDCS protocols that optimize stimulation of application-specific spinal targets.

  4. Relationship of activity in ascending paths with phase encoding in the lumbar spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Shugurov

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We studied the relationship of discharges phase characteristics in ascending column of spinal cord (SC and specificity of activation of neurones, which generate negative components of evoked potentials of SC. The discharges was recorded from SC at a level of a presence of dorsal column (DC, spinocervical and dorsal spinocerebellar tract in upper lumbar and thoracic segments at a stimulation of a nerve or DC. It is shown, that the phase of the discharges depends on the quantity of synaptic delays in generating chain of such signals. Thus, the phase of a signal can carry the additional information on specificity of activation of the sensory elements in CNS.

  5. Spontaneous regression of curve in immature idiopathic scoliosis - does spinal column play a role to balance? An observation with literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Hitesh N; Suh, Seung-Woo; Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Hong, Jae-Young; Venkatesh, Kp; Muzaffar, Nasir

    2010-11-04

    Child with mild scoliosis is always a subject of interest for most orthopaedic surgeons regarding progression. Literature described Hueter-Volkmann theory regarding disc and vertebral wedging, and muscular imbalance for the progression of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. However, many authors reported spontaneous resolution of curves also without any reason for that and the rate of resolution reported is almost 25%. Purpose of this study was to question the role of paraspinal muscle tuning/balancing mechanism, especially in patients with idiopathic scoliosis with early mild curve, for spontaneous regression or progression as well as changing pattern of curves. An observational study of serial radiograms in 169 idiopathic scoliosis children (with minimum follow-up one year) was carried. All children with Cobb angle change and progression of their curves, respectively. Additionally changes in the pattern of curve were also noted. Average age was 9.2 years at first visit and 10.11 years at final follow-up with an average follow-up of 21 months. 32.5% (55/169), 41.4% (70/169) and 26% (44/169) children exhibited regression, no change and progression in their curves, respectively. 46.1% of children (78/169) showed changing pattern of their curves during the follow-up visits before it settled down to final curve. Comparing final fate of curve with side of curve and number of curves it did not show any relationship (p > 0.05) in our study population. Possible reason for changing patterns could be better explained by the tuning/balancing mechanism of spinal column that makes an effort to balance the spine and result into spontaneous regression or prevent further progression of curve. If this which we called as "tuning/balancing mechanism" fails, curve will ultimately progress.

  6. Spontaneous regression of curve in immature idiopathic scoliosis - does spinal column play a role to balance? An observation with literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modi Hitesh N

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Child with mild scoliosis is always a subject of interest for most orthopaedic surgeons regarding progression. Literature described Hueter-Volkmann theory regarding disc and vertebral wedging, and muscular imbalance for the progression of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. However, many authors reported spontaneous resolution of curves also without any reason for that and the rate of resolution reported is almost 25%. Purpose of this study was to question the role of paraspinal muscle tuning/balancing mechanism, especially in patients with idiopathic scoliosis with early mild curve, for spontaneous regression or progression as well as changing pattern of curves. Methods An observational study of serial radiograms in 169 idiopathic scoliosis children (with minimum follow-up one year was carried. All children with Cobb angle Results Average age was 9.2 years at first visit and 10.11 years at final follow-up with an average follow-up of 21 months. 32.5% (55/169, 41.4% (70/169 and 26% (44/169 children exhibited regression, no change and progression in their curves, respectively. 46.1% of children (78/169 showed changing pattern of their curves during the follow-up visits before it settled down to final curve. Comparing final fate of curve with side of curve and number of curves it did not show any relationship (p > 0.05 in our study population. Conclusion Possible reason for changing patterns could be better explained by the tuning/balancing mechanism of spinal column that makes an effort to balance the spine and result into spontaneous regression or prevent further progression of curve. If this which we called as "tuning/balancing mechanism" fails, curve will ultimately progress.

  7. Spinal CT scan, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Methods of CT of the cervical and thoracic spines were explained, and normal CT pictures of them were described. Spinal CT was evaluated in comparison with other methods in various spinal diseases. Plain CT revealed stenosis due to spondylosis or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament and hernia of intervertebral disc. CT took an important role in the diagnosis of spinal cord tumors with calcification and destruction of the bone. CT scan in combination with other methods was also useful for the diagnosis of spinal injuries, congenital anomalies and infections. (Ueda, J.)

  8. Thoracic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Bradley M; Bellister, Seth A; Guillamondegui, Oscar D

    2017-10-01

    Management of chest trauma is integral to patient outcomes owing to the vital structures held within the thoracic cavity. Understanding traumatic chest injuries and appropriate management plays a pivotal role in the overall well-being of both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. Whether the injury includes rib fractures, associated pulmonary injuries, or tracheobronchial tree injuries, every facet of management may impact the short- and long-term outcomes, including mortality. This article elucidates the workup and management of the thoracic cage, pulmonary and tracheobronchial injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Implications of the center of rotation concept for the reconstruction of anterior column lordosis and axial preloads in spinal deformity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Heiko; Mayer, Michael; Zenner, Juliane; Resch, Herbert; Niederberger, Alfred; Fierlbeck, Johann; Hitzl, Wolfgang; Acosta, Frank L

    2012-07-01

    In thoracolumbar deformity surgery, anterior-only approaches are used for reconstruction of anterior column failures. It is generally advised that vertebral body replacements (VBRs) should be preloaded by compression. However, little is known regarding the impact of different techniques for generation of preloads and which surgical principle is best for restoration of lordosis. Therefore, the authors analyzed the effect of different surgical techniques to restore spinal alignment and lordosis as well as the ability to generate axial preloads on VBRs in anterior column reconstructions. The authors performed a laboratory study using 7 fresh-frozen specimens (from T-3 to S-1) to assess the ability for lordosis reconstruction of 5 techniques and their potential for increasing preloads on a modified distractable VBR in a 1-level thoracolumbar corpectomy. The testing protocol was as follows: 1) Radiographs of specimens were obtained. 2) A 1-level corpectomy was performed. 3) In alternating order, lordosis was applied using 1 of the 5 techniques. Then, preloads during insertion and after relaxation using the modified distractable VBR were assessed using a miniature load-cell incorporated in the modified distractable VBR. The modified distractable VBR was inserted into the corpectomy defect after lordosis was applied using 1) a lamina spreader; 2) the modified distractable VBR only; 3) the ArcoFix System (an angular stable plate system enabling in situ reduction); 4) a lordosizer (a customized instrument enabling reduction while replicating the intervertebral center of rotation [COR] according to the COR method); and 5) a lordosizer and top-loading screws ([LZ+TLS], distraction with the lordosizer applied on a 5.5-mm rod linked to 2 top-loading pedicle screws inserted laterally into the vertebra). Changes in the regional kyphosis angle were assessed radiographically using the Cobb method. The bone mineral density of specimens was 0.72 ± 22.6 g/cm(2). The maximum regional

  10. New possibilities in diagnosis of diseases of the vertebral column and reorientation of diagnostic approach via CT of spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenzl, G.; Rath, M.; Steinhoff, H.; Matzen, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    During the last three years (from May 1981 to March 1984) we performed 1368 CT examinations of the spine, 447 of the cervical, 264 of the thoracic and 657 of the lumbar vertebral column. 30% of the CT examinations of the lumbar spine revealed a prolapse of an intervertebral disk. In 38% of the cases involving the thoracic spine metastases were seen. We diagnosed fractures in 10% of the cervical spine and 11% of the thoracic spine examinations. Posttraumatic or postoperative intravertebral haemorrhage was hardly ever diagnosed in our patients (1.9% of the cases). Spinal trauma: The anterior-posterior and lateral plain films continue to be the mainstay of radiographic screening in spinal injury. Nevertheless, the degree of injury is underestimated in a significant number of patients with spinal trauma if conventional radiography is the only diagnostic approach. For further clarification CT proved to be the fastest and best method to recognise the causes and extent of compression of the vertebral canal. CT has attained a high degree of accuracy in the diagnosis of prolapse of intervertebral disks, replacing myelography if the findings are unequivocally established. CT should also be preferred to myelography in suspected recurrent prolapse. Localisation, shape and density are criteria for differentiating between scarification and prolapse via CT. The results show that CT has opened up new possibilities in the diagnosis of spinal diseases and has resulted in a reorientation of the diagnostic approach. (orig.) [de

  11. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon; Bae, Sang Jin

    2004-01-01

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance (ρ > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury

  12. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sang Jin [Sanggyepaik Hospital, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance ({rho} > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury.

  13. Isolated Juvenile Xanthogranuloma in Thoracic Spine: Intraoperative Cytological Diagnosis of a Rare Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Singhvi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile Xanthogranulomas (JXG are benign proliferative disorders of non-Langerhans histiocytes, which present in children as multiple, self-limited, cutaneous lesions. The extracutaneous manifestations of JXG are uncommon, and isolated JXG involving the spinal column is extremely rare. We report here a case of isolated juvenile xanthogranuloma in thoracic spine correctly diagnosed intraoperatively on crush smear cytology and later confirmed by histopathological and immunohistochemical studies. This case report draws attention to the fact that isolated xanthogranuloma should be considered among possible diagnoses of spinal tumor in children. Also, since the long term survival depends on complete surgical resection, a correct intraoperative diagnosis is extremely important for optimal management and prognosis of the patient. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2014; 2(3.000: 158-162

  14. Towards the causes of secondary post-traumatic deformations of thoracic and lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shulga А.Е.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to analyze and systematize main causes of secondary spine deformations forming in patients who had operations due to thoracic and lumbar spine damages. Material and Methods. The analysis of poor surgical results of 155 patients previously operated due to various thoracic and lumbar spine damages has been conducted. All patients had complications associated with secondary spinal column deformations at various time after the intervention. Standard investigation included the analysis of patients' complaints, their previous history, somatic, neurological and orthopedic status. Results. The intensity of spinal column deformation was defined due to the character and level of primary trauma structurally characterized predominantly by unstable damages. However as it has been found in this research the main cause of this complicated pathology lied in the number of tactical and technical pitfalls of primary surgical treatment. Conclusion. Surgical operations due to secondary post-traumatic deformations in most cases are laborious and are accompanied by significant surgical trauma therefore systematization and analysis of the main causes of poor results of primary spine surgery may contribute to the preventive treatment of this type of pathology.

  15. Comminuted fracture of the thoracic spine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cashman, J P

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Road deaths fell initially after the introduction of the penalty points but despite this, the rate of spinal injuries remained unchanged. AIMS: We report a patient with a dramatic spinal injury, though without neurological deficit. We discuss the classification, management and economic impact of these injuries. METHODS: We describe the management of a patient with a comminuted thoracic spinal fracture without neurological injury. We conducted a literature review with regard to the availability of literature of the management of these injuries. RESULTS: This 17-year-old female was managed surgically and had a good functional outcome. There is no clear consensus in the published literature on the management of these injuries. CONCLUSIONS: Comminuted thoracic spinal factures are potentially devastating. Such a patient presents challenges in determining the appropriate treatment.

  16. Trauma: Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Matthew J; Martin, Matthew J

    2017-10-01

    Injuries to the spinal column and spinal cord frequently occur after high-energy mechanisms of injury, or with lower-energy mechanisms, in select patient populations like the elderly. A focused yet complete neurologic examination during the initial evaluation will guide subsequent diagnostic procedures and early supportive measures to help prevent further injury. For patients with injury to bone and/or ligaments, the initial focus should be spinal immobilization and prevention of inducing injury to the spinal cord. Spinal cord injury is associated with numerous life-threatening complications during the acute and long-term phases of care that all acute care surgeons must recognize. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Lower thoracic spinal cord stimulation to restore cough in patients with spinal cord injury: results of a National Institutes of Health-Sponsored clinical trial. Part II: clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMarco, Anthony F; Kowalski, Krzysztof E; Geertman, Robert T; Hromyak, Dana R; Frost, Fredrick S; Creasey, Graham H; Nemunaitis, Gregory A

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical effects of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) to restore cough in subjects with cervical spinal cord injury. Clinical trial assessing the clinical outcomes and side effects associated with the cough system. Outpatient hospital or residence. Subjects (N=9; 8 men, 1 woman) with cervical spinal cord injury. SCS was performed at home by either the subjects themselves or caregivers on a chronic basis and as needed for secretion management. Ease in raising secretions, requirement for trained caregiver support related to secretion management, and incidence of acute respiratory tract infections. The degree of difficulty in raising secretions improved markedly, and the need for alternative methods of secretion removal was virtually eliminated. Subject life quality related to respiratory care improved, with subjects reporting greater control of breathing problems and enhanced mobility. The incidence of acute respiratory tract infections fell from 2.0+/-0.5 to 0.7+/-0.4 events/subject year (P<.01), and mean level of trained caregiver support related to secretion management measured over a 2-week period decreased from 16.9+/-7.9 to 2.1+/-1.6 and 0.4+/-0.3 times/wk (P<.01) at 28 and 40 weeks after implantation of the device, respectively. Three subjects developed mild hemodynamic effects that abated completely with continued SCS. Subjects experienced mild leg jerks during SCS, which were well tolerated. There were no instances of bowel or bladder leakage. Restoration of cough via SCS is safe and efficacious. This method improves life quality and has the potential to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with recurrent respiratory tract infections in this patient population.

  18. Spinal cord stimulation paresthesia and activity of primary afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Richard B; Streelman, Karen; Rowland, Lance; Foreman, P Jay

    2012-10-01

    A patient with failed back surgery syndrome reported paresthesia in his hands and arms during a spinal cord stimulation (SCS) screening trial with a low thoracic electrode. The patient's severe thoracic stenosis necessitated general anesthesia for simultaneous decompressive laminectomy and SCS implantation for chronic use. Use of general anesthesia gave the authors the opportunity to characterize the patient's unusual distribution of paresthesia. During SCS implantation, they recorded SCS-evoked antidromic potentials at physiologically relevant amplitudes in the legs to guide electrode placement and in the arms as controls. Stimulation of the dorsal columns at T-8 evoked potentials in the legs (common peroneal nerves) and at similar thresholds, consistent with the sensation of paresthesia in the arms, in the right ulnar nerve. The authors' electrophysiological observations support observations by neuroanatomical specialists that primary afferents can descend several (in this case, at least 8) vertebral segments in the spinal cord before synapsing or ascending. This report thus confirms a physiological basis for unusual paresthesia distribution associated with thoracic SCS.

  19. Fetal development of deep back muscles in the human thoracic region with a focus on transversospinalis muscles and the medial branch of the spinal nerve posterior ramus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuo; Koizumi, Masahiro; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Wang, Bao Jian; Murakami, Gen; Cho, Baik Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Fetal development of human deep back muscles has not yet been fully described, possibly because of the difficulty in identifying muscle bundle directions in horizontal sections. Here, we prepared near-frontal sections along the thoracic back skin (eight fetuses) as well as horizontal sections (six fetuses) from 14 mid-term fetuses at 9–15 weeks of gestation. In the deep side of the trapezius and rhomboideus muscles, the CD34-positive thoracolumbar fascia was evident even at 9 weeks. Desmin-reactivity was strong and homogeneous in the superficial muscle fibers in contrast to the spotty expression in the deep fibers. Thus, in back muscles, formation of the myotendinous junction may start from the superficial muscles and advance to the deep muscles. The fact that developing intramuscular tendons were desmin-negative suggested little possibility of a secondary change from the muscle fibers to tendons. We found no prospective spinalis muscle or its tendinous connections with other muscles. Instead, abundant CD68-positive macrophages along the spinous process at 15 weeks suggested a change in muscle attachment, an event that may result in a later formation of the spinalis muscle. S100-positive intramuscular nerves exhibited downward courses from the multifidus longus muscle in the original segment to the rotatores brevis muscles in the inferiorly adjacent level. The medial cutaneous nerve had already reached the thoracolumbar fascia at 9 weeks, but by 15 weeks the nerve could not penetrate the trapezius muscle. Finally, we propose a folded myotomal model of the primitive transversospinalis muscle that seems to explain a fact that the roofing tile-like configuration of nerve twigs in the semispinalis muscle is reversed in the multifidus and rotatores muscles. PMID:21954879

  20. Analysis of the influence of various factors on the course of neurological disorders in children with spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Алексей Георгиевич Баиндурашвили

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The study of the influence of various factors on the course of recovery of neurological disorders in children with spinal cord injuries is an important and relevant problem. The main causes of thoracic and lumbar injuries of the spine in children are road accidents and catatraumas. Anatomical and physiological features of the spine and spinal cord in children have a significant influence on the nature of spinal cord injury, clinical manifestations of the injury, and method of treatment. The degree of spinal canal deformity at the level of the damaged segment is directly proportional to the severity of the neurological disorder. The time between injury to when surgery is performed will strongly influence the nature and course of recovery of motor functions. Aim. To assess the influence of different factors in pediatric patients with complicated injuries of the spine at the thoracic and thoracolumbar levels on the recovery of neurological disorders. Materials and methods. The analysis of results of the surgical treatment of 36 children (24 boys and 12 girls aged 3-17 years with damage to the spine and spinal cord in the thoracic spine and thoracolumbar junction, accompanied with neurological deficit in the form of central or peripheral paresis and paralysis, was performed. All patients underwent surgical intervention depending on the type and extent of damage. Clinical methods (i.e., detailed neurological examination as well as X-ray, CT, and MRI were used as diagnostic methods. Results. The study revealed that the most severe damage concerning neurological disorders in children with spinal cord injury occurs in the thoracic spine. The extent of neurological changes depends not only on the level of damage to the spinal column but also on the magnitude of spinal canal stenosis. Surgery performed in the first hours of the injury leads to a more rapid and full recovery of the neurological deficit. Conclusion. Therefore, this study found

  1. Potentialities of spinal liquor scanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlakhov, N.; Vylkanov, P.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that spinal liquor scanography is a harmless and informative method for the examination of patients, permitting to detect injury foci for spinal cord tumours in 90% cases, for acute injuries of the vertebral column and spinal cord in 89.5% cases, for herniation of nucleus pulposus in 81% cases. The method of spinal liquor scanography can be used in neurology and neurosurgery to select the method of treatment and to evaluate its efficiency

  2. Treatment of Spinal Tuberculosis by Debridement, Interbody Fusion and Internal Fixation via Posterior Approach Only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming-xing; Zhang, Hong-qi; Wang, Yu-xiang; Guo, Chao-feng; Liu, Jin-yang

    2016-02-01

    Surgical treatment for spinal tuberculosis includes focal tuberculosis debridement, segmental stability reconstruction, neural decompression and kyphotic deformity correction. For the lesions mainly involved anterior and middle column of the spine, anterior operation of debridement and fusion with internal fixation has been becoming the most frequently used surgical technique for the spinal tuberculosis. However, high risk of structural damage might relate with anterior surgery, such as damage in lungs, heart, kidney, ureter and bowel, and the deformity correction is also limited. Due to the organs are in the front of spine, there are less complications in posterior approach. Spinal pedicle screw passes through the spinal three-column structure, which provides more powerful orthopedic forces compared with the vertebral body screw, and the kyphotic deformity correction effect is better in posterior approach. In this paper, we report a 68-year-old male patient with thoracic tuberculosis who underwent surgical treatment by debridement, interbody fusion and internal fixation via posterior approach only. The patient was placed in prone position under general anesthesia. Posterior midline incision was performed, and the posterior spinal construction was exposed. Then place pedicle screw, and fix one side rod temporarily. Make the side of more bone destruction and larger abscess as lesion debridement side. Resect the unilateral facet joint, and retain contralateral structure integrity. Protect the spinal cord, nerve root. Clear sequestrum, necrotic tissue, abscess of paravertebral and intervertebral space. Specially designed titanium mesh cages or bone blocks were implanted into interbody. Fix both side rods and compress both sides to make the mesh cages and bone blocks tight. Reconstruct posterior column structure with allogeneic bone and autologous bone. Using this technique, the procedures of debridement, spinal cord decompression, deformity correction, bone grafting

  3. Chronic spinal subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.; Lensch, T.

    2008-01-01

    Compared with spinal epidural hematomas, spinal subdural hematomas are rare; chronic forms are even more uncommon. These hematomas are associated not only with lumbar puncture and spinal trauma, but also with coagulopathies, vascular malformations and tumors. Compression of the spinal cord and the cauda equina means that the patients develop increasing back or radicular pain, followed by paraparesis and bladder and bowel paralysis, so that in most cases surgical decompression is carried out. On magnetic resonance imaging these hematomas present as thoracic or lumbar subdural masses, their signal intensity varying with the age of the hematoma. We report the clinical course and the findings revealed by imaging that led to the diagnosis in three cases of chronic spinal subdural hematoma. (orig.) [de

  4. Unusual causes of spinal foraminal widening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zibis, A.H.; Markonis, A.; Karantanas, A.H. [Dept. of CT and MRI, Larissa General Hospital (Greece)

    2000-01-01

    Spinal neural foraminal widening is usually caused by benign lesions, most commonly neurofibromas. Rare lesions can also cause spinal neural foraminal widening. Computed tomography and/or MRI are the modalities of choice for studying the spinal foraminal widening. The present pictorial review describes six rare lesions, namely a lateral thoracic meningocele, a malignant fibrous histiocytoma, a tuberculous abscess, an osteoblastoma, a chondrosarcoma and a malignant tumour of the lung which caused spinal neural foraminal widening. (orig.)

  5. Thoracic Pneumorrhachis in Patient with Lumbar Fractures; a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ghafarzad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Pneumorrhachis as a relatively rare condition may be an indication of substantial intra-spinal column injury. Here we report a 39-year-old man was admitted because of low back pain and dyspenea after locating between motor vehicle and wall three days before admission. On arrival, physical exams and vital signs were normal. Computed tomography (CT scan showed bilateral pleural effusion, fracture of ribs number 8, 9 and 10 in lower left side of thorax, fracture of vertebra in L2-L4, and air bubbles in upper thoracic spinal canal.  Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial;}

  6. Spinal cord compression due to epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis in thalassaemia: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydingoez, Ue.; Oto, A.; Cila, A.

    1997-01-01

    Spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis is very rare in thalassaemia. A 27-year-old man with thalassaemia intermedia presented with symptoms and signs of spinal cord compression. MRI showed a thoracic spinal epidural mass, representing extramedullary haematopoietic tissue, compressing the spinal cord. Following radiotherapy, serial MRI revealed regression of the epidural mass and gradual resolution of spinal cord oedema. (orig.)

  7. Thoracolumbar spine model with articulated ribcage for the prediction of dynamic spinal loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignasiak, Dominika; Dendorfer, Sebastian; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2016-04-11

    Musculoskeletal modeling offers an invaluable insight into the spine biomechanics. A better understanding of thoracic spine kinetics is essential for understanding disease processes and developing new prevention and treatment methods. Current models of the thoracic region are not designed for segmental load estimation, or do not include the complex construct of the ribcage, despite its potentially important role in load transmission. In this paper, we describe a numerical musculoskeletal model of the thoracolumbar spine with articulated ribcage, modeled as a system of individual vertebral segments, elastic elements and thoracic muscles, based on a previously established lumbar spine model and data from the literature. The inverse dynamics simulations of the model allow the prediction of spinal loading as well as costal joints kinetics and kinematics. The intradiscal pressure predicted by the model correlated well (R(2)=0.89) with reported intradiscal pressure measurements, providing a first validation of the model. The inclusion of the ribcage did not affect segmental force predictions when the thoracic spine did not perform motion. During thoracic motion tasks, the ribcage had an important influence on the predicted compressive forces and muscle activation patterns. The compressive forces were reduced by up to 32%, or distributed more evenly between thoracic vertebrae, when compared to the predictions of the model without ribcage, for mild thoracic flexion and hyperextension tasks, respectively. The presented musculoskeletal model provides a tool for investigating thoracic spine loading and load sharing between vertebral column and ribcage during dynamic activities. Further validation for specific applications is still necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound to increase localized blood-spinal cord barrier permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Allison H; Hawryluk, Gregory W; Anzai, Yoshimi; Odéen, Henrik; Ostlie, Megan A; Reichert, Ethan C; Stump, Amanda J; Minoshima, Satoshi; Cross, Donna J

    2017-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects thousands of people every year in the USA, and most patients are left with some permanent paralysis. Therapeutic options are limited and only modestly affect outcome. To address this issue, we used magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) as a non-invasive approach to increase permeability in the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB). We hypothesize that localized, controlled sonoporation of the BSCB by MRgFUS will aid delivery of therapeutics to the injury. Here, we report our preliminary findings for the ability of MRgFUS to increase BSCB permeability in the thoracic spinal cord of a normal rat model. First, an excised portion of normal rat spinal column was used to characterize the acoustic field and to estimate the insertion losses that could be expected in an MRgFUS blood spinal cord barrier opening. Then, in normal rats, MRgFUS was applied in combination with intravenously administered microbubbles to the spinal cord region. Permeability of the BSCB was indicated as signal enhancement by contrast administered prior to T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and verified by Evans blue dye. Neurological testing using the Basso, Beattie, and Breshnahan scale and the ladder walk was normal in 8 of 10 rats tested. Two rats showed minor impairment indicating need for further refinement of parameters. No gross tissue damage was evident by histology. In this study, we have opened successfully the blood spinal cord barrier in the thoracic region of the normal rat spine using magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles.

  9. A clinical case study of long-term injury of the thoracic and lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V Zaretskov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Overestimation of the efficacy of conservative treatment of spine injuries children often leads to unsatisfactory long-term results. The effective correction of post-traumatic spinal column deformities occurs in patients who undergo the operation in the early post-traumatic period. While choosing treatment strategies for children, higher reparative opportunities, which provide early fracture consolidation, including those in faulty positions, should be considered. This study presents a case of surgical treatment for uncomplicated injury of the thoracic and lumbar spine, with long-term compression fragmental fracture of the L1 vertebra body in a 12-year-old child. Due to the long-standing character of the injury right thoraco-frenotomy was conducted with partial L1 vertebral body and resection of the adjacent discs, deformity correction of the thoracic and lumbar spine with a transpedicular system, and ventral spondylodesis with an autograft. This extensive intervention was justified by the peculiarities in the vertebral body damage and the post-traumatic segmental kyphotic deformity that resulted from delayed medical treatment. An anterior approach was chosen to achieve immobilization at the site of the damage before correction using the transpedicular system. Surgical correction of long-term spinal injuries in children, with the use of a combined approach, is usually laborious and traumatic. The prevention of rigid post-traumatic spine deformities with the help of timely diagnostics and appropriate treatment, including surgery, should be a priority to prevent such cases.

  10. Acquired degenerative changes of the intervertebral segments at and suprajacent to the lumbosacral junction. A radioanatomic analysis of the nondiskal structures of the spinal column and perispinal soft tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinkins, J R

    2001-01-01

    In earlier evolutionary times, mammals were primarily quadrupeds. However, other bipeds have also been represented during the course of the Earth's several billion year history. In many cases, either the bipedal stance yielded a large tail and hypoplastic upper extremities (e.g., Tyrannosaurus rex and the kangaroo), or it culminated in hypoplasia of the tail and further development and specialization of the upper extremities (e.g., nonhuman primates and human beings). In the human species this relatively recently acquired posture resulted in a more or less pronounced lumbosacral kyphosis. In turn, certain compensatory anatomic features have since occurred. These include the normal characteristic posteriorly directed wedge-shape of the L5 vertebral body and the L5-S1 intervertebral disk; the L4 vertebral body and the L4-L5 disk may be similarly visibly affected. These compensatory mechanisms, however, have proved to be functionally inadequate over the long term of the human life span. Upright posture also leads to increased weight bearing in humans that progressively causes excess stresses at and suprajacent to the lumbosacral junction. These combined factors result in accelerated aging and degenerative changes and a predisposition to frank biomechanical failure of the subcomponents of the spinal column in these spinal segments. One other specific problem that occurs at the lumbosacral junction that predisposes toward premature degeneration is the singular relationship that exists between a normally mobile segment of spine (i.e., the lumbar spine) and a normally immobile one (i.e., the sacrum). It is well known that mobile spinal segments adjacent to congenitally or acquired fused segments have a predilection toward accelerated degenerative changes. The only segment of the spine in which this is invariably normally true is at the lumbosacral junction (i.e., the unfused lumbar spine adjoining the fused sacrum). Nevertheless, biomechanical failures of the human spine

  11. The impact of routine whole spine MRI screening in the evaluation of spinal degenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanna, Rishi Mugesh; Kamal, Younis; Mahesh, Anupama; Venugopal, Prakash; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad; Rajasekaran, S

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine is a sensitive investigation, which not only provides detailed images of the spinal column but also adjacent spinal regions and para-vertebral organ systems. Such incidental findings (IF) can be asymptomatic but significant. The efficacy of whole spine T2 sagittal screening in providing additional information has been demonstrated in several spinal diseases but its routine use in patients with spinal degenerative diseases has not been studied. A review of 1486 consecutive T2w whole spine screening MRI performed for cervical, thoracic or lumbar spinal imaging for degenerative diseases, was performed to document the incidence and significance of asymptomatic IF in the spinal and extra-spinal regions. 236 (15.88%) patients had IF with a M:F ratio of 102:134 and the mean age being 50.3 years. Of these, spinal IF was observed in 122 (51.7%-Group A) while extra-spinal IF was present in 114 (48.3%-Group B). In Group A, 84 patients had IF in the vertebral column and 38 patients had IF in the spinal cord. IF within the spine included vertebral haemangioma (n = 60, 4.5%), diffuse vertebral marrow changes (n = 18, 1.2%), vertebral metastasis (n = 2), incidental cord myelopathy (n = 21), intradural tumour (n = 7), and others. 33 patients required surgical intervention of the IF (2.2%). In Group B, pelvic IF were most prevalent (n = 79, 5.3%) followed by retro-peritoneal abdominal IF in 22 (1.48%) and intra-cranial IF in 9 (0.60%). 32 (2.1%) of these pathologies required further specialist medical or surgical evaluation. Routine T2 whole spine screening MRI identified 15.8% IF of the spinal and extra-spinal regions. 65 patients (4.3%) required either spine surgical intervention or other specialist care. Considering the potential advantages in identifying significant IF and the minimal extra time spent to perform whole spine screening, its application can be considered to be incorporated in routine imaging of spinal

  12. Posterior column reconstruction improves fusion rates at the level of osteotomy in three-column posterior-based osteotomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Stephen J; Mohanty, Chandan; Gazendam, Aaron M; Kato, So; Keshen, Sam G; Lewis, Noah D; Magana, Sofia P; Perlmutter, David; Cape, Jennifer

    2018-03-01

    To determine the incidence of pseudarthrosis at the osteotomy site after three-column spinal osteotomies (3-COs) with posterior column reconstruction. 82 consecutive adult 3-COs (66 patients) with a minimum of 2-year follow-up were retrospectively reviewed. All cases underwent posterior 3-COs with two-rod constructs. The inferior facets of the proximal level were reduced to the superior facets of the distal level. If that was not possible, a structural piece of bone graft either from the local resection or a local rib was slotted in the posterior column defect to re-establish continual structural posterior bone across the lateral margins of the resection. No interbody cages were used at the level of the osteotomy. There were 34 thoracic osteotomies, 47 lumbar osteotomies and one sacral osteotomy with a mean follow-up of 52 (24-126) months. All cases underwent posterior column reconstructions described above and the addition of interbody support or additional posterior rods was not performed for fusion at the osteotomy level. Among them, 29 patients underwent one or more revision surgeries. There were three definite cases of pseudarthrosis at the osteotomy site (4%). Six revisions were also performed for pseudarthrosis at other levels. Restoration of the structural integrity of the posterior column in three-column posterior-based osteotomies was associated with > 95% fusion rate at the level of the osteotomy. Pseudarthrosis at other levels was the second most common reason for revision following adjacent segment disease in the long-term follow-up.

  13. Palpation of the upper thoracic spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Vach, Werner; Vach, Kirstin

    2002-01-01

    procedure. RESULTS: Using an "expanded" definition of agreement that accepts small inaccuracies (+/-1 segment) in the numbering of spinal segments, we found--based on the pooled data from the thoracic spine--kappa values of 0.59 to 0.77 for the hour-to-hour and the day-to-day intraobserver reliability......OBJECTIVE: To assess the intraobserver reliability (in terms of hour-to-hour and day-to-day reliability) and the interobserver reliability with 3 palpation procedures for the detection of spinal biomechanic dysfunction in the upper 8 segments of the thoracic spine. DESIGN: A repeated....... INTERVENTION: Three types of palpation were performed: Sitting motion palpation and prone motion palpation for biomechanic dysfunction and paraspinal palpation for tenderness. Each dimension was rated as "absent" or "present" for each segment. All examinations were performed according to a standard written...

  14. Spine evaluation: Determination of the relationship between thoracic spinal deformity and sagittal curves by a noninvasive method DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2010v12n4p282

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalva Minonroze Albuquerque Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to compare sagittal plane alignment between subjects with spinal deformities and a group presenting no changes; to test the reliability of the tool used, and to determine the existence of correlations between spinal deformity and sagittal curvature measures. Forty young subjects were divided into two groups: a control group (n=20 presenting no changes or spinal deformity less than 0.5 cm in the dorsal curvature and 0.7 cm in the lumbar curvature, and an experimental group (n=20 with spinal deformities greater than those described for the control group. Spinal deformity and sagittal plane curvatures were measured using a water level-based tool and by the Adams test. Data were collected from the two groups on two distinct occasions. The Mann-Whitney test showed no difference between sampling times. A significant difference between the two groups was only observed in terms of cervical curvature. Spearman’s test revealed a linear correlation between dorsal curvature and dorsal spinal deformity in the control group, between dorsal and lumbar curves in the two groups, and between dorsal spinal deformity and lumbar and sacral curves and between sacral curvature and dorsal and lumbar curves in the experimental group. In conclusion, spinal deformity measurement is associated with sagittal plane curvatures. The method proposed here is reliable, simple and accessible and can be reproduced without high costs and damage to the patient’s health.

  15. Asphyxiating thoracic dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzcr, J.; Kozlowski, K.

    2008-01-01

    Asphyxiating Thoracic Dysplasia is the most frequent form of Small Thorax - Short Rib Syndromes. Asphyxiating Thoracic Dysplasia in two patients with different clinical course is reported. Radiographic examination is the only method to diagnose Asphyxiating Thoracic Dysplasia with certainty. The correct diagnosis is important for prognostication and genetic counseling. It also excludes the necessity of further, often expensive investigations. (author)

  16. Cholinergic, opioid and glycine receptor binding sites localized in human spinal cord by in vitro autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillberg, P.-G.; Aquilonius, S.-M.

    1985-01-01

    Binding sites for the receptor ligands 3 H-quinuclidinylbenzilate, 3 H-alpha-bungarotoxin ( 3 H-alpha-Btx), 3 H-etorphine and 3 H-strychnine were localized autoradiographically at cervical, thoracic and lumbar levels of spinal cords from post-mortem human control subjects and subjects with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The highest densities of muscarinic binding sites were found in the motor neuron areas and in the substantia gelatinosa, while the grey matter binding was very low within Clarke's column. Both 3 H-alpha-Btx and opioid receptor binding sites were numerous within the substantia gelatinosa, while glycine receptor binding sites were more uniformly distribute within the spinal grey matter. In ALS cases, muscarinic receptor binding sites were markedly reduced in motor neuron areas and slightly reduced in the dorsal horn, while the other binding sites studied were relatively unchanged. (author)

  17. Haemothorax and Thoracic Spine Fractures in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Masteller

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Both osteoporotic fractures and pleural effusions are frequently observed in medicine. However, rarely does one associate a hemorrhagic pleural effusion with a thoracic spinal fracture when the patient has not sustained massive trauma. In this paper, we discuss two cases where seemingly insignificant low-energy trauma precipitated massive haemothoraces in elderly patients with underlying osteoporosis, ultimately resulting in their immediate causes of death. This paper serves to remind health care professionals of the importance of using caution when moving elderly patients as well as to consider thoracic spinal fracture as a potential explanation for a hemorrhagic pleural effusion of undetermined etiology.

  18. Vertebral column decancellation in Pott's deformity: use of Surgimap Spine for preoperative surgical planning, retrospective review of 18 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenhao; Zhang, Xuesong; Yu, Jiayi; Hu, Fanqi; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Yan

    2018-01-15

    In the late stage of Spinal tuberculosis, the bony destruction and vertebral collapse often leads to significant kyphosis, presenting clinically as a painful gibbus deformity, with increased instability, vertebral body translations and increased risk of neurologic involvement. Vertebral column decancellation is thought to be suitable for most patients with severe rigid kyphosis. Surgimap Spine, could offer a pragmatic graphical method for the surgical planning of osteotomies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Vertebral column decancellation planned preoperatively with the computer software-assistance in the patients with Pott's kyphosis. Between May 2012 and May 2015, 18 patients with Pott's kyphosis underwent the Vertebral column decancellation using Surgimap Spine for preoperative surgical planning. Preoperative and postoperative Konstam's angle, sagittal vertical angle, lumbar lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, pelvic tilt and pelvic incidence were measured. Visual analog scale and American Spinal Injury Association were documented. The Konstam's angles decreased from 88.1° (range, 70-105°) preoperatively to 18.5° (range, 7-31°) (P column decancellation is an effective treatment option for severe Pott's kyphosis. The surgical planning software Surgimap Spine can be a reliable and helpful tool that provides a simplified method to evaluate and analyze the spino-pelvic parameters and simulate the osteotomy procedure. According to individual character, the appropriate surgery strategy should be selected.

  19. Local Setup Reproducibility of the Spinal Column When Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Craniospinal Irradiation With Patient in Supine Position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoiber, Eva Maria; Giske, Kristina; Schubert, Kai; Sterzing, Florian; Habl, Gregor; Uhl, Matthias; Herfarth, Klaus; Bendl, Rolf; Debus, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate local positioning errors of the lumbar spine during fractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy of patients treated with craniospinal irradiation and to assess the impact of rotational error correction on these uncertainties for one patient setup correction strategy. Methods and Materials: 8 patients (6 adults, 2 children) treated with helical tomotherapy for craniospinal irradiation were retrospectively chosen for this analysis. Patients were immobilized with a deep-drawn Aquaplast head mask. Additionally to daily megavoltage control computed tomography scans of the skull, once-a-week positioning of the lumbar spine was assessed. Therefore, patient setup was corrected by a target point correction, derived from a registration of the patient's skull. The residual positioning variations of the lumbar spine were evaluated applying a rigid-registration algorithm. The impact of different rotational error corrections was simulated. Results: After target point correction, residual local positioning errors of the lumbar spine varied considerably. Craniocaudal axis rotational error correction did not improve or deteriorate these translational errors, whereas simulation of a rotational error correction of the right–left and anterior–posterior axis increased these errors by a factor of 2 to 3. Conclusion: The patient fixation used allows for deformations between the patient's skull and spine. Therefore, for the setup correction strategy evaluated in this study, generous margins for the lumbar spinal target volume are needed to prevent a local geographic miss. With any applied correction strategy, it needs to be evaluated whether or not a rotational error correction is beneficial.

  20. Local Setup Reproducibility of the Spinal Column When Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Craniospinal Irradiation With Patient in Supine Position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoiber, Eva Maria, E-mail: eva.stoiber@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Giske, Kristina [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Schubert, Kai; Sterzing, Florian; Habl, Gregor; Uhl, Matthias; Herfarth, Klaus [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Bendl, Rolf [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Medical Informatics, Heilbronn University, Heilbronn (Germany); Debus, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate local positioning errors of the lumbar spine during fractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy of patients treated with craniospinal irradiation and to assess the impact of rotational error correction on these uncertainties for one patient setup correction strategy. Methods and Materials: 8 patients (6 adults, 2 children) treated with helical tomotherapy for craniospinal irradiation were retrospectively chosen for this analysis. Patients were immobilized with a deep-drawn Aquaplast head mask. Additionally to daily megavoltage control computed tomography scans of the skull, once-a-week positioning of the lumbar spine was assessed. Therefore, patient setup was corrected by a target point correction, derived from a registration of the patient's skull. The residual positioning variations of the lumbar spine were evaluated applying a rigid-registration algorithm. The impact of different rotational error corrections was simulated. Results: After target point correction, residual local positioning errors of the lumbar spine varied considerably. Craniocaudal axis rotational error correction did not improve or deteriorate these translational errors, whereas simulation of a rotational error correction of the right-left and anterior-posterior axis increased these errors by a factor of 2 to 3. Conclusion: The patient fixation used allows for deformations between the patient's skull and spine. Therefore, for the setup correction strategy evaluated in this study, generous margins for the lumbar spinal target volume are needed to prevent a local geographic miss. With any applied correction strategy, it needs to be evaluated whether or not a rotational error correction is beneficial.

  1. Intramedullary spinal melanocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meic H. Schmidt

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Meningeal melanocytoma is a benign lesion arising from leptomeningeal melanocytes that at times can mimic its malignant counterpart, melanoma. Lesions of the spine usually occur in extramedullary locations and present with spinal cord compression symptoms. Because most reported spinal cases occur in the thoracic region, these symptoms usually include lower extremity weakness or numbness. The authors present a case of primary intrame­dullary spinal meningeal melanocytoma presenting with bilateral lower extremity symptoms in which the patient had no known supratentorial primary lesions. Gross total surgical resection allowed for full recovery, but early recurrence of tumor was detected on close follow-up monitoring, allowing for elective local radiation without loss of neurological function. Case reports of such tumors discuss different treatment strategies, but just as important is the close follow-up monitoring in these patients even after gross total surgical resection, since these tumors can recur.

  2. Primary Spinal Chondrosarcoma: Radiologic Findings with Pathologic Correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloret, I.; Server, A. [The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Depts. of Radiology and Pathology; Bjerkehagen, B. [Ullevaal Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2006-02-15

    Purpose: To describe the radiologic appearance of the four types of primary spinal chondrosarcoma (CHS) (conventional intramedullary, juxtacortical, clear cell, and mesenchymal) and to correlate with histopathologic findings. Material and Methods: A retrospective review was carried out of 5 patients with histopathologically confirmed primary spinal CHS; 3 F and 2 M ranging in age between 27 and 66 years (mean 40.2; median 39). Charts, conventional radiographs, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance images were reviewed. All the patients underwent surgical excision, followed by postoperative chemotherapy (1 patient) and radiotherapy (3 patients). Follow-up was available for all patients but one. The mean follow-up was 42 months (14-120 months). Histopathological specimens for all patients were available for review. Results: Vertebral column distribution was 3 thoracic (60%), 1 cervical (20%), and 1 lumbar (20%). Neurological deficits were present in 3 (60%) cases. The radiological appearance of the four types of primary spinal CHS varies with specific lesion type. Imaging findings suggest diagnosis of the conventional intramedullary and juxtacortical types. While the clear cell and mesenchymal types show some distinctive features, these do not allow confident radiologic diagnosis. Conclusion: The radiologist must be aware of imaging features of these tumors in order to improve diagnostic accuracy, treatment planning, and prognosis.

  3. Primary Spinal Chondrosarcoma: Radiologic Findings with Pathologic Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloret, I.; Server, A.; Bjerkehagen, B.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the radiologic appearance of the four types of primary spinal chondrosarcoma (CHS) (conventional intramedullary, juxtacortical, clear cell, and mesenchymal) and to correlate with histopathologic findings. Material and Methods: A retrospective review was carried out of 5 patients with histopathologically confirmed primary spinal CHS; 3 F and 2 M ranging in age between 27 and 66 years (mean 40.2; median 39). Charts, conventional radiographs, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance images were reviewed. All the patients underwent surgical excision, followed by postoperative chemotherapy (1 patient) and radiotherapy (3 patients). Follow-up was available for all patients but one. The mean follow-up was 42 months (14-120 months). Histopathological specimens for all patients were available for review. Results: Vertebral column distribution was 3 thoracic (60%), 1 cervical (20%), and 1 lumbar (20%). Neurological deficits were present in 3 (60%) cases. The radiological appearance of the four types of primary spinal CHS varies with specific lesion type. Imaging findings suggest diagnosis of the conventional intramedullary and juxtacortical types. While the clear cell and mesenchymal types show some distinctive features, these do not allow confident radiologic diagnosis. Conclusion: The radiologist must be aware of imaging features of these tumors in order to improve diagnostic accuracy, treatment planning, and prognosis

  4. Recurrent Primary Spinal Hydatid Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan Turk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary hydatid disease of spine is rare and spinal hydatitosis constitute only 1% of all hydatitosis. We report a case of recurrent primary intraspinal extradural hydatid cyst of the thoracic region causing progressive paraparesis. The patient was operated 16 years ago for primary spinal hydatid disease involvement and was instrumented dorsally for stabilization. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of thoracic spine showed a cystic lesion at T11-12 level and compressed spinal cord posterolaterally. Intraspinal cyst was excised through T11-12 laminectomy which made formerly. The early postoperative period showed a progressive improvement of his neurological deficit and he was discharged with antihelmintic treatment consisting of albendazole and amoxicillin-sulbactam combination. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 84-89

  5. MR imaging and spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azar-Kia, B.; Fine, M.; Naheedy, M.; Elias, D.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging has significantly improved diagnostic capability of spinal cord injuries. Other available diagnostic modalities such as plain films, myelography, CT, and post-CT myelography have failed to consistently show the secific evidence of spinal cord injuries and their true extent. The authors are presenting our experiences with MR imaging in spinal column injury. They have found MR imaging to be the procedure of choice for prognostic evaluation of spinal cord trauma. They are showing examples of recent and old spinal cord injury such as hematomyelia, myelomalacia, transection, spinal cord edema, and cavitation

  6. Right thoracic curvature in the normal spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masuda Keigo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trunk asymmetry and vertebral rotation, at times observed in the normal spine, resemble the characteristics of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. Right thoracic curvature has also been reported in the normal spine. If it is determined that the features of right thoracic side curvature in the normal spine are the same as those observed in AIS, these findings might provide a basis for elucidating the etiology of this condition. For this reason, we investigated right thoracic curvature in the normal spine. Methods For normal spinal measurements, 1,200 patients who underwent a posteroanterior chest radiographs were evaluated. These consisted of 400 children (ages 4-9, 400 adolescents (ages 10-19 and 400 adults (ages 20-29, with each group comprised of both genders. The exclusion criteria were obvious chest and spinal diseases. As side curvature is minimal in normal spines and the range at which curvature is measured is difficult to ascertain, first the typical curvature range in scoliosis patients was determined and then the Cobb angle in normal spines was measured using the same range as the scoliosis curve, from T5 to T12. Right thoracic curvature was given a positive value. The curve pattern was organized in each collective three groups: neutral (from -1 degree to 1 degree, right (> +1 degree, and left ( Results In child group, Cobb angle in left was 120, in neutral was 125 and in right was 155. In adolescent group, Cobb angle in left was 70, in neutral was 114 and in right was 216. In adult group, Cobb angle in left was 46, in neutral was 102 and in right was 252. The curvature pattern shifts to the right side in the adolescent group (p Conclusions Based on standing chest radiographic measurements, a right thoracic curvature was observed in normal spines after adolescence.

  7. Fusionless instrumentation systems for congenital scoliosis: expandable spinal rods and vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib in the management of congenital spine deformities in the growing child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Muharrem; Emans, John

    2009-08-01

    Review of relevant literature including personal opinions. To review the current researches investigating the efficacy of growing rod and thoracic expansion techniques in the treatment of congenital spine deformity of young children, and to highlight the contrasting advantages and limitations in the fusionless treatment of progressive congenital scoliosis. Congenital scoliosis has the potential for severe spinal deformity and thoracic insufficiency syndrome (TIS). Conventional fusion treatments in children tend to shorten the spine further exacerbating trunk shortening and TIS. In the surgical treatment of congenital spinal deformities in young children, while reconstructing the spinal deformity, one should simultaneously pursue preserving the growth potential of the vertebrae, improving the volume, symmetry, and functions of the thorax, and protecting this improvement during the growth. Today, employed in the treatment of spinal deformities of young children, there are 2 deformity reconstruction methods serving these targets: Growing rod technique and vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib (VEPTR) with or without expansion thoracostomy. Peer-reviewed research articles and major international meeting presentations were reviewed. Methods were compared in terms of advantages and limitations. The growing rod technique is a safe and reliable method in the treatment of congenital spine deformity of young children who present some flexibility in the anomalous segment, or when the congenital anomaly involves a vertebral segment too long for resection, or with compensating curve with structural pattern concomitant to the congenital deformity. Expansion thoracostomy and VEPTR are the appropriate choice for severe congenital spine deformity when a large amount of growth remains. Although ventilator dependence is significantly decreasing, thoracic volume and space available for the lung are increased after expansion thoracostomy and VEPTR. Growing rod technique should be

  8. Biomechanical properties of human thoracic spine disc segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B D Stemper

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The objective was to determine the age-dependent compressive and tensile properties of female and male thoracic spine segments using postmortem human subjects (PMHS. Materials and Methods : Forty-eight thoracic disc segments at T4-5, T6-7, T8-9, and T10-11 levels from 12 PMHS T3-T11 spinal columns were divided into groups A and B based on specimen age and loaded in compression and tension. Stiffness and elastic modulus were computed. Stiffness was defined as the slope in the linear region of the force-displacement response. Elastic modulus was defined as the slope of the stress strain curve. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA was used to determine significant differences (P< 0.05 in the disc cross-sectional area, stiffness, and elastic modulus based on gender, spinal level, and group. Results : Specimen ages in group A (28 ± 8 years were significantly lower than in group B (70 ± 7 years. Male discs had significantly greater area (7.2 ± 2.0 sq cm than female discs (5.9 ± 1.8 sq cm. Tensile and compressive stiffness values were significantly different between the two age groups, but not between gender and level. Specimens in group A had greater tensile (486 ± 108 N/mm and compressive (3300 ± 642 N/mm stiffness values compared to group B specimens (tension: 397 ± 124 N/mm, compression: 2527 ± 734 N/mm. Tensile and compressive elastic modulus values depended upon age group and gender, but not on level. Group A specimens had significantly greater tensile and compressive moduli (2.9 ± 0.8 MPa, 19.5 ± 4.1 MPa than group B specimens (1.7 ± 0.6 MPa, 10.6 ± 3.4 MPa. Female specimens showed significantly greater tensile and compressive moduli (2.6 ± 1.0 MPa, 16.6 ± 6.4 MPa than male specimens (2.0 ± 0.7 MPa, 13.7 ± 5.0 MPa. Discussion: Using the two groups to represent "young" and "old" specimens, this study showed that the mechanical response decreases in older specimens, and the decrease is greater in compressive than distractive

  9. Spinal cord disease in children with malignancies: Clinical cases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mid-thoracic paravertebral mass with infiltration ... This was followed by an induction phase consisting of .... which most clinicians are familiar include back pain, localised spinal tenderness, motor.

  10. Tripolar spinal cord stimulation for the treatment of abdominal pain associated with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Maunak V; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this case report is to describe the use of transverse tripolar dorsal column stimulation in a patient with a history of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) associated with abdominal pain resistant to conservative treatments. We report a 36-year-old man who presented to the pain clinic with an eight-year history of IBS (constipation predominant with occasional diarrheal episodes), with "crampy and sharp" abdominal pain. He also had nonradicular thoracic spine pain due to thoracic scoliosis. Both pains were affecting his ability to function as an attorney. Prior conservative therapy, including psychologic treatment, antidepressants, and opioids, was without any benefits. The use of a spinal cord stimulator (SCS) was discussed with the patient. The procedure was performed after Institutional Review Board approval. A tripolar SCS was implanted at the T8 level using one-eight contact and two-four contact percutaneous leads based on paresthesia reproduction of patient's areas of discomfort. This tripolar spinal cord stimulation provided relief of abdominal and thoracic pain, and better management of gastrointestinal symptoms. The patient was followed-up for one year, and his quality of life also was improved via the IBS-Severity Scoring System quality of life tool. The use of the tripolar SCS in this patient provided relief of abdominal and thoracic spine pain, regulated bowel habits, and improved the patient's quality of life. We believe that the use of SCS should be considered as a treatment option in patients with IBS when all conservative treatments failed. © 2012 International Neuromodulation Society.

  11. Comparison of dose distribution between 3DCRT and IMRT in middle thoracic and under thoracic esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dingjie; Liu Hailong; Mao Ronghu; Liu Ru; Guo Xiaoqi; Lei Hongchang; Wang Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the dose distribution between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in treating esophageal carcinoma (middle thoracic section and under thoracic section) and to select reasonable treatment methods for esophagus cancer. Methods: Ten cases with cancer of the middle thoracic section and under thoracic section esophagus were chosen for a retrospective treatment-planning study. 3DCRT and IMRT plans were created for each patient: Some critical indicators were evolved in evaluating the treatment plans of IMRT (5B and 7B) and 3DCRT (3B), such as, PTV coverage and dose-volumes to irradiated normal structures. Evaluation indicators: prescription of 50 Gy. total lung volume (V5, V10, V20), mean lung dose (MLD), spinal cord (Dmax), heart (V40) and conformality index (CI). Each plan was evaluated with respect to dose distribution,dose-volume histograms (DVHs), and additional dosimetric endpoints described below. Results: There is no significance of CRT and IMRT technique in protection of total lung volume,mean lung dose, spinal cord (Dmax), target, CI and heart. Conclusion: As To radiotherapy of esophagus cancer of the middle thoracic section and under thoracic section, IMRT has no advantage compared with 3DCRT, the selection of plan should be adapted to the situations of every patient. (authors)

  12. Thoracic spine pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey Ivanovich Isaikin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic spine pain, or thoracalgia, is one of the common reasons for seeking for medical advice. The epidemiology and semiotics of pain in the thoracic spine unlike in those in the cervical and lumbar spine have not been inadequately studied. The causes of thoracic spine pain are varied: diseases of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and renal systems, injuries to the musculoskeletal structures of the cervical and thoracic portions, which require a thorough differential diagnosis. Facet, costotransverse, and costovertebral joint injuries and myofascial syndrome are the most common causes of musculoskeletal (nonspecific pain in the thoracic spine. True radicular pain is rarely encountered. Traditionally, treatment for thoracalgia includes a combination of non-drug and drug therapies. The cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor meloxicam (movalis may be the drug of choice in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain.

  13. Spinal cord compression due to epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis in thalassaemia: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydingoez, Ue.; Oto, A.; Cila, A. [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    1997-12-01

    Spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis is very rare in thalassaemia. A 27-year-old man with thalassaemia intermedia presented with symptoms and signs of spinal cord compression. MRI showed a thoracic spinal epidural mass, representing extramedullary haematopoietic tissue, compressing the spinal cord. Following radiotherapy, serial MRI revealed regression of the epidural mass and gradual resolution of spinal cord oedema. (orig.) With 3 figs., 6 refs.

  14. Endoscopic Transforaminal Thoracic Foraminotomy and Discectomy for the Treatment of Thoracic Disc Herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Hong-Fei; Liu, Kai-Xuan

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic disc herniation is a relatively rare yet challenging-to-diagnose condition. Currently there is no universally accepted optimal surgical treatment for symptomatic thoracic disc herniation. Previously reported surgical approaches are often associated with high complication rates. Here we describe our minimally invasive technique of removing thoracic disc herniation, and report the primary results of a series of cases. Between January 2009 and March 2012, 13 patients with symptomatic thoracic disc herniation were treated with endoscopic thoracic foraminotomy and discectomy under local anesthesia. A bone shaver was used to undercut the facet and rib head for foraminotomy. Discectomy was achieved by using grasper, radiofrequency, and the Holmium-YAG laser. We analyzed the clinical outcomes of the patients using the visual analogue scale (VAS), MacNab classification, and Oswestry disability index (ODI). At the final follow up (mean: 17 months; range: 6–41 months), patient self-reported satisfactory rate was 76.9%. The mean VAS for mid back pain was improved from 9.1 to 4.2, and the mean ODI was improved from 61.0 to 43.8. One complication of postoperative spinal headache occurred during the surgery and the patient was successfully treated with epidural blood patch. No other complications were observed or reported during and after the surgery. PMID:24455232

  15. Comparisons of MR findings of the spinal metastasis and the spinal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Myung Sun; Lee, Kil Woo; Kang, Ik Won; Yun, Ku Sub; Choi, Chul Sun; Bae, Sang Hoon

    1994-01-01

    MR findings of the spinal metastasis and the tuberculosis are well known, but sometimes it might be difficult to differentiate these lesions. Therefore we reviewed and analyzed the MR findings which would be useful for the differentiation. T1- and T2- weighted spin echo images and gadolinium-enhanced T1- weighted images were obtained with 1.5 T and 1.0 T superconductive MR imager. We reviewed MR findings in 16 cases of spinal metastases and 24 cases of spinal tuberculosis in terms of signal intensity, contrast enhancement pattern, disc space involvement, spinal canal compressing feature and paraspinal soft tissue mass. The signal intensities of both lesions were hypointense on T1WI and hyperintense on T2WI except those of the metastatic lesions from the prostatic carcinoma. Heterogeneous enhancement was noted in 63% of metastasis, whereas peripheral rim enhancement was noted 83% of spinal tuberculosis(p < .001). Spinal canal compression by collapsed vertebra was only noted in spinal metastasis, and that by paraspinal soft tissue was noted in both spinal metastasis and tuberculosis(p<.001). Disc space invasion was noted in 19% of spinal metastasis and 88% of spinal tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis was common at lower thoracic spine(T10) and typically involved two or more adjacent vertebral bodies(96%). The important differential point between spinal metastasis and tuberculosis was the enhancement pattern, involvement of two or more contiguous vertebral bodies and the feature of spinal canal compressing. The secondary importance was the disc space involvement pattern

  16. Intramedullary cavernous haemangioma of spinal cord: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thoracic myelography done showed bilateral symmetrical funnelling of the contrast at the level of T5 with widening of the spinal cord, which are typical characteristics of an intramedullary mass of spinal cord. T2-T6 Laminectomy was done. Near total excision of a 4 by 2.5 cm intradural, intramedulary bluish black, necrotic, ...

  17. Thoracic and abdominopelvic actinomycosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thoracic disease.1,2,4 The chronic progressive suppurative infection ... venous Penicillin G for 4 - 6 weeks being the treatment of ... pathology was demonstrated in the liver. (Figs 7a and b ). .... ulceration (may resemble Crohn's disease).3. 2.

  18. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Apply for Membership Membership Directory Pay Your Dues Industry Mailing List License & eBlast Communications Programs Advertise on ... Hotel Discount Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. ...

  19. PULSE COLUMN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmett, E.S.

    1964-01-01

    This patent covers a continuous countercurrent liquidsolids contactor column having a number of contactor states each comprising a perforated plate, a layer of balls, and a downcomer tube; a liquid-pulsing piston; and a solids discharger formed of a conical section at the bottom of the column, and a tubular extension on the lowest downcomer terminating in the conical section. Between the conical section and the downcomer extension is formed a small annular opening, through which solids fall coming through the perforated plate of the lowest contactor stage. This annular opening is small enough that the pressure drop thereacross is greater than the pressure drop upward through the lowest contactor stage. (AEC)

  20. CT morphometry of adult thoracic intervertebral discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Justin G R; Stringer, Mark D; Briggs, Christopher A; Davies, Tilman M; Woodley, Stephanie J

    2015-10-01

    Despite being commonly affected by degenerative disorders, there are few data on normal thoracic intervertebral disc dimensions. A morphometric analysis of adult thoracic intervertebral discs was, therefore, undertaken. Archival computed tomography scans of 128 recently deceased individuals (70 males, 58 females, 20-79 years) with no known spinal pathology were analysed to determine thoracic disc morphometry and variations with disc level, sex and age. Reliability was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Anterior and posterior intervertebral disc heights and axial dimensions were significantly greater in men (anterior disc height 4.0±1.4 vs 3.6±1.3 mm; posterior disc height 3.6±0.90 vs 3.4±0.93 mm; p<0.01). Disc heights and axial dimensions at T4-5 were similar or smaller than at T2-3, but thereafter increased caudally (mean anterior disc height T4-5 and T10-11, 2.7±0.7 and 5.4±1.2 mm, respectively, in men; 2.6±0.8 and 5.1±1.3 mm, respectively, in women; p<0.05). Except at T2-3, anterior disc height decreased with advancing age and anteroposterior and transverse disc dimensions increased; posterior and middle disc heights and indices of disc shape showed no consistent statistically significant changes. Most parameters showed substantial to almost perfect agreement for intra- and inter-rater reliability. Thoracic disc morphometry varies significantly and consistently with disc level, sex and age. This study provides unique reference data on adult thoracic intervertebral disc morphometry, which may be useful when interpreting pathological changes and for future biomechanical and functional studies.

  1. [Relationship of motor deficits and imaging features in metastatic epidural spinal cord compression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Bin; Liu, Yao-Sheng; Li, Ding-Feng; Fan, Hai-Tao; Huai, Jian-Ye; Guo, Jun; Wang, Lei; Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Ping; Cui, Qiu; Jiang, Wei-Hao; Cao, Yun-Cen; Jiang, Ning; Sui, Jia-Hong; Zhang, Bin; Zhou, Jiu

    2010-06-15

    To explore the relationship of motor deficits of the lower extremities with the imaging features of malignant spinal cord compression (MESCCs). From July 2006 through December 2008, 56 successive MESCC patients were treated at our department. All were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography and were scored according to motor deficits Frankel grading on admission. Imaging assessment factors of main involved vertebrae were level of vertebral metastatic location, epidural space involvement, vertebral body involvement, lamina involvement, posterior protrusion of posterior wall, pedicle involvement, continuity of main involved vertebrae, fracture of anterior column, fracture of posterior wall, location in upper thoracic spine and/or cervicothoracic junction. Occurrence was the same between paralytic state of MESCCs and epidural space involvement of imaging features. Multiple regression equation showed that paralytic state had a linear regression relationship with imaging factors of lamina involvement (X1), posterior protrusion of posterior wall (X2), location in upper thoracic spine and/or cervicothoracic junction (X7) of main involved vertebrae. The optimal regression equation of paralytic state (Y) and imaging feature (X) was Y = -0.009 +0.639X, + 0.149X, +0.282X. Lamina involvement of main involved vertebrae has a greatest influence upon paralytic state of MESCC patients. Imaging factors of lamina involvement, posterior protrusion of posterior wall, location in upper thoracic spine and/or cervicothoracic junction of main involved vertebrae can predict the paralytic state of MESCC patients. MESCC with lamina involvement is more easily encroached on epidural space.

  2. Early results of two methods of posterior spinal stabilization in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-17

    Apr 17, 2013 ... Discussion. PSR has become the gold standard in posterior spinal fusion techniques. Its success has revolutionized spinal surgery. The Advantages include three column fusion as against one column fusion as is seen in other posterior fusion techniques like Rogers and Bohlman's techniques.[9‑13] Other.

  3. Diagnosis of spinal cord diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Doyon, D.; David, P.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nowadays plays a predominant role in the diagnosis and evaluation of spinal canal pathologies and has reduced the other exploratory methods, including computerized tomography (CT) and myelography, to an ancillary role. These pathologies are divided into three groups: those where MRI is the only imaging method (syringomyela, tumours in the spinal canal, phakomatoses, external pachimeningitis, spinal cord injuries, myelitis); those where MRI is the initial method and is completed by other examinations (vascular malformations, dysraphism, myelopathies due to cervical osteoarthritis) and those where MRI still play a lesser role than CT (degenerative lesions of the lumbar column) [fr

  4. Relative shortening and functional tethering of spinal cord in adolescent scoliosis - Result of asynchronous neuro-osseous growth, summary of an electronic focus group debate of the IBSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Winnie Cw; Lam, Wynnie Mw; Ng, Bobby Kw; Tze-Ping, Lam; Lee, Kwong-Man; Guo, Xia; Cheng, Jack Cy; Burwell, R Geoffrey; Dangerfield, Peter H; Jaspan, Tim

    2008-06-27

    There is no generally accepted scientific theory for the causes of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). As part of its mission to widen understanding of scoliosis etiology, the International Federated Body on Scoliosis Etiology (IBSE) introduced the electronic focus group (EFG) as a means of increasing debate on knowledge of important topics. This has been designated as an on-line Delphi discussion. The Statement for this debate was written by Dr WCW Chu and colleagues who examine the spinal cord to vertebral growth interaction during adolescence in scoliosis. Using the multi-planar reconstruction technique of magnetic resonance imaging they investigated the relative length of spinal cord to vertebral column including ratios in 28 girls with AIS (mainly thoracic or double major curves) and 14 age-matched normal girls. Also evaluated were cerebellar tonsillar position, somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs), and clinical neurological examination. In severe AIS compared with normal controls, the vertebral column is significantly longer without detectable spinal cord lengthening. They speculate that anterior spinal column overgrowth relative to a normal length spinal cord exerts a stretching tethering force between the two ends, cranially and caudally leading to the initiation and progression of thoracic AIS. They support and develop the Roth-Porter concept of uncoupled neuro-osseous growth in the pathogenesis of AIS which now they prefer to term 'asynchronous neuro-osseous growth'. Morphological evidence about the curve apex suggests that the spinal cord is also affected, and a 'double pathology' is suggested. AIS is viewed as a disorder with a wide spectrum and a common neuroanatomical abnormality namely, a spinal cord of normal length but short relative to an abnormally lengthened anterior vertebral column. Neuroanatomical changes and/or abnormal neural function may be expressed only in severe cases. This asynchronous neuro-osseous growth concept is regarded as

  5. Imaging of thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uffmann, M.; Herold, C.J.; Fuchs, M.

    1998-01-01

    Blunt trauma to the chest results from transfer of kinetic energy to the human body. It may cause a wide range of mostly life-threatening injuries, including fractures of the thoracic skeleton, disintegration of the pleural space, contusion or laceration of pulmonary parenchyma and damage to the mediastinal structures. For a systematic approach it may be helpful to follow an organ-based evaluation of thoracic trauma. However, it should be borne in mind that subtle injuries may be associated with serious complications. Trauma to the chest may affect different anatomic compartments at the same time, requiring and extending diagnostic approach. Conventional radiography plays a major role in diagnosting thoracic trauma, complemented by ultrasound examination of the pleura and abdomen. It is well documented that CT scanning represents a major technological improvement for assessment of thoracic trauma. With the advent of fast helical CT scanning this method becomes more applicable for severly traumatized patients and potentially replaces other time-consuming procedures. State-of-the-art imaging of both projection and cross-sectional techniques provides useful information for immediate and appropriate treatment mandatory in patients with thoracic trauma. (orig.) [de

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  8. CT and MRI characteristics of ossification of the ligamenta flava in the thoracic spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, L. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Zeng, Q.Y. [Dept. of Radiology, General Coal Hospital, Beijing (China); Jinkins, J.R. [Dept. of Radiology, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare MRI findings with CT findings of mass-forming calcification/ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava (OTLF). Twenty-one Chinese patients presented with clinical evidence of chronic and progressive thoracic spinal cord compression which included: difficulty in walking; weakness; and/or numbness of the extremities, back pain, and lower extremity paresthesias. Axial and sagittal T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) were performed through the thoracic spine on a 1.0-T Impact unit (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). Axial CT was obtained with 5-mm contiguous sections through the thoracic region. Decompressive surgery with resection of the OTLF were carried out in all patients. Low signal intensity of the mass-forming OTLF was demonstrated at a single level (n=1) or at multiple levels (n=20) on both T1WI and T2WI. The distribution of OTLF was bilateral at all levels identified in 6 cases, unilateral at all levels in 5 patients, and both unilateral and bilateral at different levels in 10 cases. Ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava involved the upper thoracic spine (T1-4) in 3 cases, midthoracic spine (T5-8) in 3 cases, lower thoracic spine (T9-12) in 10 cases, and more than one thoracic spinal subregion in 5 cases. Computed tomography confirmed the MR findings regarding the location and distribution of OTLF in all cases, as well as the associated evidence of central spinal canal stenosis. In addition, 5 patients revealed associated ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. All patients demonstrated gradual, but incomplete, clinical improvement of the radiculomyelopathy following decompressive surgery. Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament resulting in thoracic central spinal canal stenosis and clinical radiculomyelopathy is not uncommon in the Asian people. Ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava can be accurately evaluated equally well by CT and MR with regard to level

  9. CT and MRI characteristics of ossification of the ligamenta flava in the thoracic spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, L.; Zeng, Q.Y.; Jinkins, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare MRI findings with CT findings of mass-forming calcification/ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava (OTLF). Twenty-one Chinese patients presented with clinical evidence of chronic and progressive thoracic spinal cord compression which included: difficulty in walking; weakness; and/or numbness of the extremities, back pain, and lower extremity paresthesias. Axial and sagittal T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) were performed through the thoracic spine on a 1.0-T Impact unit (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). Axial CT was obtained with 5-mm contiguous sections through the thoracic region. Decompressive surgery with resection of the OTLF were carried out in all patients. Low signal intensity of the mass-forming OTLF was demonstrated at a single level (n=1) or at multiple levels (n=20) on both T1WI and T2WI. The distribution of OTLF was bilateral at all levels identified in 6 cases, unilateral at all levels in 5 patients, and both unilateral and bilateral at different levels in 10 cases. Ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava involved the upper thoracic spine (T1-4) in 3 cases, midthoracic spine (T5-8) in 3 cases, lower thoracic spine (T9-12) in 10 cases, and more than one thoracic spinal subregion in 5 cases. Computed tomography confirmed the MR findings regarding the location and distribution of OTLF in all cases, as well as the associated evidence of central spinal canal stenosis. In addition, 5 patients revealed associated ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. All patients demonstrated gradual, but incomplete, clinical improvement of the radiculomyelopathy following decompressive surgery. Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament resulting in thoracic central spinal canal stenosis and clinical radiculomyelopathy is not uncommon in the Asian people. Ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava can be accurately evaluated equally well by CT and MR with regard to level

  10. Dose effect relationships in cervical and thoracic radiation myelopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holdorff, B.

    1980-01-01

    The course and prognosis of radiation myelopathies are determined by 3 factors: the segmental (vertical) location of the lesion, the extent of the transverse syndrome (complete or incomplete) and the radiation dose. The median spinal dose in cervical radiation myelopathies with fatal outcome was higher than in survivals with an incomplete transverse syndrome. In thoracic radiation myelopathies a dose difference between complete and incomplete transverse syndromes could be found as well. Incomplete transverse syndromes as submaximum radiation injuries are more suitable for the determination of the spinal tolerance dose than complete transverse syndromes. The lowest threshold could be stated for cases following high-volume irradiation of the lymphatic system. (Auth.)

  11. Chronic spinal subdural hematoma; Spinales chronisches subdurales Haematom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, T.; Lensch, T. [Radiologengemeinschaft, Augsburg (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Compared with spinal epidural hematomas, spinal subdural hematomas are rare; chronic forms are even more uncommon. These hematomas are associated not only with lumbar puncture and spinal trauma, but also with coagulopathies, vascular malformations and tumors. Compression of the spinal cord and the cauda equina means that the patients develop increasing back or radicular pain, followed by paraparesis and bladder and bowel paralysis, so that in most cases surgical decompression is carried out. On magnetic resonance imaging these hematomas present as thoracic or lumbar subdural masses, their signal intensity varying with the age of the hematoma. We report the clinical course and the findings revealed by imaging that led to the diagnosis in three cases of chronic spinal subdural hematoma. (orig.) [German] Spinale subdurale Haematome sind im Vergleich zu epiduralen Haematomen selten, chronische Verlaufsformen noch seltener. Ursaechlich sind neben Lumbalpunktionen und traumatischen Verletzungen auch Blutgerinnungsstoerungen, Gefaessmalformationen und Tumoren. Aufgrund der Kompression von Myelon und Cauda equina kommt es zu zunehmenden Ruecken- oder radikulaeren Schmerzen mit anschliessender Paraparese sowie einer Darm- und Blasenstoerung, weshalb in den meisten Faellen eine operative Entlastung durchgefuehrt wird. Magnetresonanztomographisch stellen sich die Haematome meist als thorakale bzw. lumbale subdurale Raumforderungen dar, die Signalintensitaet variiert mit dem Blutungsalter. Wir berichten ueber den klinischen Verlauf und die bildgebende Diagnostik von 3 Patienten mit spinalen chronischen subduralen Haematomen. (orig.)

  12. MRI findings of spinal angiomyolipoma: A case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang A; Kim, Myung Soon; Jung, Soon Hee [Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju Severance Christian Hospital, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Young Wook [Dept. of Radiology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Kangwon National University School of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Spinal angiomyolipoma (AML) is a rare disease. It is often reviewed with spinal angiolipoma. Both are composed of vascular and mature adipose elements. However, only AML contains broader array of mesenchymal component. They are accounting for 0.14% to 1.2% of spinal tumors. They appear as fat containing hypervascular tumor located at epidural space of thoracic spine. Spinal AML is more frequently infiltrative and often occurs more ventrally than angiolipoma. Previous studies have employed conventional radiograph, myelogram, and CT scan for spinal AML studies. Recently, MRI has been used for spinal AML in a few studies. Here, we describe a case of typical thoracic spinal AML with a review of its MRI findings and other differential diagnosis for epidural spinal mass with similar characteristics.

  13. Pré-condicionamento isquêmico e monitorização da função medular na abordagem da aorta torácica descendente Ischemic preconditioning and spinal cord function monitoring in the descending thoracic aorta approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Assumpção de Mônaco

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a eficácia do pré-condicionamento isquêmico (PI agudo, guiado por potenciais evocados somatossensoriais (PESS, como método de proteção medular em cães e analisar o valor dos PESS na monitorização da função medular. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados 28 cães submetidos à isquemia medular obtida pelo pinçamento da aorta torácica descendente. No grupo C45, o tempo de oclusão aórtica foi de 45 min (n = 7; no grupo PI45, os cães foram submetidos ao PI antes do pinçamento aórtico por 45 min (n = 7. No grupo C60, os cães foram submetidos a 60 min de oclusão aórtica (n = 7 e no grupo PI60, os cães foram submetidos ao PI, seguido pelo pinçamento aórtico por 60 min. Os ciclos de PI foram determinados pelas alterações dos PESS. RESULTADOS: Os índices de Tarlov dos grupos pré-condicionados foram significativamente melhores que os dos grupos de controle (p = 0,005. Observou-se paraplegia em três cães do C45 e em seis do C60, enquanto todos os cães do PI45 permaneceram neurologicamente normais, assim como quatro do grupo PI60. Houve correlação entre o tempo de recuperação dos PESS após a reperfusão aórtica e o estado neurológico pós-operatório (p = 0,011, com sensibilidade e especificidade de 0,75 e 0,83, respectivamente. CONCLUSÃO: O PI agudo repetitivo, baseado na monitorização do PESS, induziu proteção à isquemia medular causada pelo pinçamento aórtico prolongado. A monitorização do PESS parece ser um bom método de detecção precoce do comprometimento isquêmico medular.OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of acute ischemic preconditioning (IP, based on somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP monitoring, as a method of spinal cord protection and to asses SSEP importance in spinal cord neuromonitoring. METHODS: Twenty-eight dogs were submitted to spinal cord ischemic injury attained by descending thoracic aorta cross-clamping. In the C45 group, the aortic cross-clamping time was 45 min (n

  14. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi [Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  15. Surgical treatment of gross posttraumatic deformations in thoracic spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksei E. Shul’ga

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rigid severe post-traumatic thoracic spine deformities result from frequent, recent high-energy trauma in children with an increasing frequency due to a variety of reasons. These types of injuries are commonly followed by spinal cord anatomic injury; therefore, the treatment of these patients warrants special attention from the ethical viewpoint. Generally, the only indication for surgical intervention is spinal dysfunction. Considering this and the patients’ ordinary severe somatic state, surgical trauma should be minimized as much as possible. However, for adequate deformity correction, effective spine stabilization and restoration of liquorodynamics is necessary. Recent studies have reported the successful use of different methods of dorsal interventions (P/VCR in cases with unstable damages in children. Here, we present the case of a 15-year-old boy who underwent surgical treatment for coarse post-traumatic thoracic spine deformity with chronic fracture-dislocation of Th7 vertebra.

  16. Achieving a neutral cervical spine position in suspected spinal cord injury in children: analysing the use of a thoracic elevation device for imaging the cervical spine in paediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandie, Zaahid; Shepherd, Mike; Lamont, Tony; Walsh, Mark; Phillips, Mark; Page, Colin

    2010-08-01

    Paediatric patients with suspected cervical spine injury (CSI) are routinely immobilised on a firm surface using a hard collar, which results in excessive flexion of the cervical spine due to the relatively large size of the occiput. The objective of this study was to determine whether the use of a thoracic elevation device (TED) results in a more neutral cervical spine position and reduces the occurrence of cervical spine hyperflexion. A prospective cohort study was conducted at two Emergency Departments (sites A and B) from January 2006 to May 2007. Children TED and those at site B did not. x-Rays from both sites were analysed for flexion, extension or neutrality of the cervical spine as defined by the Cobb angle. A total of 76 patients were identified at site A and site B. There were four exclusions at each site for poor quality images. 51 patients in the site A group were found to be in neutral position (71%), compared to 29 patients in the site B group (43%) (p=0.001). One patient (1%) who had a TED was found to be hyperflexed (>10 degrees), whereas 12 (18%) patients at site B were hyperflexed (p=0.001). The use of a TED appears to produce a greater proportion of neutral cervical spine films in children < or =10 years of age presenting for suspected CSI.

  17. Haemothorax and Thoracic Spine Fractures in the Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Michael A. Masteller; Aakash Chauhan; Harsha Musunuru; Mark M. Walsh; Bryan Boyer; Joseph A. Prahlow

    2012-01-01

    Both osteoporotic fractures and pleural effusions are frequently observed in medicine. However, rarely does one associate a hemorrhagic pleural effusion with a thoracic spinal fracture when the patient has not sustained massive trauma. In this paper, we discuss two cases where seemingly insignificant low-energy trauma precipitated massive haemothoraces in elderly patients with underlying osteoporosis, ultimately resulting in their immediate causes of death. This paper serves to remind health ...

  18. The effect of pulse width and contact configuration on paresthesia coverage in spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsheimer, Jan; Buitenweg, Jan R; Das, John; de Sutter, Paul; Manola, Ljubomir; Nuttin, Bart

    2011-05-01

    In spinal cord stimulation for the management of chronic, intractable pain, a satisfactory analgesic effect can be obtained only when the stimulation-induced paresthesias cover all painful body areas completely or partially. To investigate the effect of stimulus pulse width (PW) and contact configuration (CC) on the area of paresthesia (PA), perception threshold (VPT), discomfort threshold (VDT), and usage range (UR) in spinal cord stimulation. Chronic pain patients were tested during a follow-up visit. They were stimulated monopolarly and with the CC giving each patient the best analgesia. VPT, VDT, and UR were determined for PWs of 90, 210, and 450 microseconds. The paresthesia contours at VDT were drawn on a body map and digitized; PA was calculated; and its anatomic composition was described. The effects of PW and CC on PA, VPT, VDT, and UR were tested statistically. Twenty-four of 31 tests with low thoracic stimulation and 8 of 9 tests with cervical stimulation gave a significant extension of PA at increasing PW. In 14 of 18 tests (low thoracic), a caudal extension was obtained (primarily in L5-S2). In cervical stimulation the extension was predominantly caudal as well. In contrast to VPT and VDT, UR is not significantly different when stimulating with any CC. PA extends caudally with increasing PW. The mechanism includes that the larger and smaller dorsal column fibers have a different mediolateral distribution and that smaller dorsal column fibers have a smaller UR and can be activated only when PW is sufficiently large. A similar effect of CC on PA is unlikely as long as electrodes with a large intercontact distance are applied.

  19. Primary multifocal gliosarcoma of the spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh M. Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gliosarcoma (GS is a rare and exceedingly malignant neoplasm of the central nervous system. It displays clinical features similar to glioblastoma, yet is histologically unique as it harbors both gliomatous and sarcomatous cellular components. Involvement of the neuroaxis is predominantly limited to the cerebral parenchyma and meninges. Primary GS of the spinal cord is rarely encountered. We report a case of a 54 year old male who presented with 2 months of progressive, bilateral lower extremity sensory deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging of the neuro-axis revealed multiple intradural lesions involving the cervical and thoracic spinal cord without evidence of intracranial involvement. Surgical resection of a dural based, extramedullary cervical lesion and two exophytic, intramedullary thoracic lesions revealed gliosarcoma, WHO grade IV. The patient died approximately 11 months after presentation. This report confirms that GS is not limited to supratentorial involvement and can primarily affect the spinal cord.

  20. Congenital abnormalities of the vertebral column in ferrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proks, Pavel; Stehlik, Ladislav; Paninarova, Michaela; Irova, Katarina; Hauptman, Karel; Jekl, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral column pathologies requiring surgical intervention have been described in pet ferrets, however little information is available on the normal vertebral formula and congenital variants in this species. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe vertebral formulas and prevalence of congenital vertebral anomalies in a sample of pet ferrets. Radiographs of 172 pet ferrets (96 males and 76 females) were included in this retrospective study. In 143 ferrets (83.14%), five different formulas of the vertebral column were recorded with normal morphology of vertebrae (rib attachment included) but with a variable number of thoracic (Th), lumbar (L), and sacral (S) vertebrae. The number of cervical (C) vertebrae was constant in all examined animals. Observed vertebral formulas were C7/Th14/L6/S3 (51.74%), C7/Th14/L6/S4 (22.10%), C7/Th14/L7/S3 (6.98%), C7/Th15/L6/S3 (1.74%), and C7/Th15/L6/S4 (0.58%). Formula C7/Th14/L6/S4 was significantly more common in males than in females (P < 0.05). Congenital spinal abnormalities were found in 29 ferrets (16.86%), mostly localized in the thoracolumbar and lumbosacral regions. The cervical region was affected in only one case. Transitional vertebrae represented the most common congenital abnormalities (26 ferrets) in the thoracolumbar (13 ferrets) and lumbosacral regions (10 ferrets) or simultaneously in both regions (three ferrets). Other vertebral anomalies included block (two ferrets) and wedge vertebra (one ferret). Spina bifida was not detected. Findings from the current study indicated that vertebral formulas may vary in ferrets and congenital abnormalities are common. This should be taken into consideration for surgical planning. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  1. Clinical Paresthesia Atlas Illustrates Likelihood of Coverage Based on Spinal Cord Stimulator Electrode Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghva, Alexander; Karst, Edward; Underwood, Paul

    2017-08-01

    Concordant paresthesia coverage is an independent predictor of pain relief following spinal cord stimulation (SCS). Using aggregate data, our objective is to produce a map of paresthesia coverage as a function of electrode location in SCS. This retrospective analysis used x-rays, SCS programming data, and paresthesia coverage maps from the EMPOWER registry of SCS implants for chronic neuropathic pain. Spinal level of dorsal column stimulation was determined by x-ray adjudication and active cathodes in patient programs. Likelihood of paresthesia coverage was determined as a function of stimulating electrode location. Segments of paresthesia coverage were grouped anatomically. Fisher's exact test was used to identify significant differences in likelihood of paresthesia coverage as a function of spinal stimulation level. In the 178 patients analyzed, the most prevalent areas of paresthesia coverage were buttocks, anterior and posterior thigh (each 98%), and low back (94%). Unwanted paresthesia at the ribs occurred in 8% of patients. There were significant differences in the likelihood of achieving paresthesia, with higher thoracic levels (T5, T6, and T7) more likely to achieve low back coverage but also more likely to introduce paresthesia felt at the ribs. Higher levels in the thoracic spine were associated with greater coverage of the buttocks, back, and thigh, and with lesser coverage of the leg and foot. This paresthesia atlas uses real-world, aggregate data to determine likelihood of paresthesia coverage as a function of stimulating electrode location. It represents an application of "big data" techniques, and a step toward achieving personalized SCS therapy tailored to the individual's chronic pain. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  2. Spinal dermoid cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Yoshihisa; Makita, Yasumasa; Nabeshima, Sachio; Tei, Taikyoku; Keyaki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Jun; Kawamura, Junichiro

    1987-01-01

    A 25-year-old male complained of intermittent, sharp pains about the left eye and in the left side of the chest. Neurological examination revealed paresthesia and impaired perception of touch and pin-pricks in the dermatomes of Th8 and Th9 on the left side. In all four extremities, the muscle stretch reflexes were equal and slightly hyperactive, without weakness or sensory deficits. Metrizamide myelography showed defective filling at the level between the upper 8th and 9th thoracic vertebrae. The lesion was also demonstrated by computed tomography (CT) scan performed 1 hour later, appearing as an oval, radiolucent mass in the left dorsal spinal canal, which compressed the spinal cord forward and toward the right. Serial sections of the spinal canal revealed the lesion to be partly filled with contrast medium. Repeat CT scan 24 hours after metrizamide myelography showed more contrast medium in the periphery of the lesion, giving it a doughnut-shaped appearance. At surgery a smooth-surfaced cyst containing sebum and white hair was totally removed from the intradural extramedullary space. The histological diagnosis was dermoid cyst. There have been a few reported cases of intracranial epidermoid cyst in which filling of the cyst was suggested on metrizamide CT myelography. These findings may complicate the differential diagnosis of arachnoid cyst and dermoid or epidermoid cyst when only CT is used. (author)

  3. Giant thoracic schwannoma presenting with abrupt onset of abdominal pain: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Giant intradural extramedullary schwannomas of the thoracic spine are not common. Schwannomas, that is, tumors derived from neoplastic Schwann cells, and neurofibromas represent the most common intradural extramedullary spinal lesions. We report the case of a patient with a giant thoracic schwannoma presenting unusually with acute abdominal pain and with delayed neurological impairment. Case presentation A 26-year-old Hispanic man with no previous medical problems presented with acute periumbilical pain. After extensive work-up including an exploratory laparotomy for appendectomy, magnetic resonance imaging scans of the lumbar and thoracic spine revealed a giant intradural extramedullary thoracic schwannoma within the spinal canal posterior to the T9, T10, and T11 vertebral bodies. Magnetic resonance imaging signal prolongation was noted in the spinal cord both rostral and caudal to the schwannoma. The patient underwent an urgent laminectomy from T8 to L1. After sacrificing the T10 root, the tumor was removed en bloc. Postoperatively, the patient improved significantly gaining antigravity strength in both lower extremities. Conclusion The T10 dermatome is represented by the umbilical region. This referred pain may represent a mechanism by which a giant thoracic schwannoma may present as acute abdominal pain. Acute, intense abdominal pain with delayed neurologic deficit is a rare presentation of a thoracic schwannoma but should be considered as a possible cause of abdominal pain presenting without clear etiology. Although these lesions may be delayed in their diagnosis, early diagnosis and treatment may lead to an improved clinical outcome. PMID:19946504

  4. Giant thoracic schwannoma presenting with abrupt onset of abdominal pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Isaac

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Giant intradural extramedullary schwannomas of the thoracic spine are not common. Schwannomas, that is, tumors derived from neoplastic Schwann cells, and neurofibromas represent the most common intradural extramedullary spinal lesions. We report the case of a patient with a giant thoracic schwannoma presenting unusually with acute abdominal pain and with delayed neurological impairment. Case presentation A 26-year-old Hispanic man with no previous medical problems presented with acute periumbilical pain. After extensive work-up including an exploratory laparotomy for appendectomy, magnetic resonance imaging scans of the lumbar and thoracic spine revealed a giant intradural extramedullary thoracic schwannoma within the spinal canal posterior to the T9, T10, and T11 vertebral bodies. Magnetic resonance imaging signal prolongation was noted in the spinal cord both rostral and caudal to the schwannoma. The patient underwent an urgent laminectomy from T8 to L1. After sacrificing the T10 root, the tumor was removed en bloc. Postoperatively, the patient improved significantly gaining antigravity strength in both lower extremities. Conclusion The T10 dermatome is represented by the umbilical region. This referred pain may represent a mechanism by which a giant thoracic schwannoma may present as acute abdominal pain. Acute, intense abdominal pain with delayed neurologic deficit is a rare presentation of a thoracic schwannoma but should be considered as a possible cause of abdominal pain presenting without clear etiology. Although these lesions may be delayed in their diagnosis, early diagnosis and treatment may lead to an improved clinical outcome.

  5. Relevance of Postoperative Magnetic Resonance Images in Evaluating Epidural Hematoma After Thoracic Fixation Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hong Kyung; Choi, Il; Roh, Sung Woo; Rhim, Seung Chul; Jeon, Sang Ryong

    2017-11-01

    It is difficult to evaluate the significant findings of epidural hematoma in magnetic resonance images (MRIs) obtained immediately after thoracic posterior screw fixation (PSF). Prospectively, immediate postoperative MRI was performed in 10 patients who underwent thoracic PSF from April to December 2013. Additionally, we retrospectively analyzed the MRIs from 3 patients before hematoma evacuation out of 260 patients who underwent thoracic PSF from January 2000 to March 2013. The MRI findings of 9 out of the 10 patients, consecutively collected after thoracic PSF, showed neurologic recovery with a well-preserved cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space and no prominent hemorrhage. Even though there were metal artifacts at the level of the pedicle screws, the preserved CSF space was observed. In contrast, the MRI of 1 patient with poor neurologic outcome demonstrated a typical hematoma and slight spinal cord compression and reduced CSF space. In the retrospective analysis of the 3 patients who showed definite motor weakness in the lower extremities after their first thoracic fusion surgery and underwent hematoma evacuation, the magnetic resonance images before hematoma evacuation also revealed hematoma compressing the spinal cord and diminished CSF space. This study shows that epidural hematomas can be detected on MRI performed immediately after thoracic fixation surgery, despite metal artifacts and findings such as hematoma causing spinal cord compression. Loss of CSF space should be considered to be associated with neurologic deficit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Relative changes in regional cerebral blood flow during spinal cord stimulation in patients with refractory angina pectoris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hautvast, RWM; TerHorst, GJ; DeJong, BM; DeJongste, MJL; Blanksma, PK; Paans, AMJ; Korf, J

    Spinal cord stimulation applied at thoracic level 1 (T1) has a neurally mediated anti-anginal effect based on antiischaemic action in the myocardium. Positron emission tomography was used to study which higher brain centres are influenced by spinal cord stimulation. Nine patients with a spinal cord

  7. Caudal articular process dysplasia of thoracic vertebrae in neurologically normal French bulldogs, English bulldogs, and Pugs: Prevalence and characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Simon; Ter Haar, Gert; De Decker, Steven

    2018-02-20

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence and anatomical characteristics of thoracic caudal articular process dysplasia in French bulldogs, English bulldogs and Pugs presenting for problems unrelated to spinal disease. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, computed tomography scans of the thoracic vertebral column of these three breeds were reviewed for the presence and location of caudal articular process hypoplasia and aplasia, and compared between breeds. A total of 271 dogs met the inclusion criteria: 108 French bulldogs, 63 English bulldogs, and 100 Pugs. A total of 70.4% of French bulldogs, 84.1% of English bulldogs, and 97.0% of Pugs showed evidence of caudal articular process dysplasia. Compared to French and English bulldogs, Pugs showed a significantly higher prevalence of caudal articular process aplasia, but also a lower prevalence of caudal articular process hypoplasia, a higher number of affected vertebrae per dog and demonstrated a generalized and bilateral spatial pattern more frequently. Furthermore, Pugs showed a significantly different anatomical distribution of caudal articular process dysplasia along the vertebral column, with a high prevalence of caudal articular process aplasia between T10 and T13. This area was almost completely spared in French and English bulldogs. As previously suggested, caudal articular process dysplasia is a common finding in neurologically normal Pugs but this also seems to apply to French and English bulldogs. The predisposition of clinically relevant caudal articular process dysplasia in Pugs is possibly not only caused by the higher prevalence of caudal articular process dysplasia, but also by breed specific anatomical characteristics. © 2018 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  8. Thoracic solitary pedunculated osteochondroma in a child: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wali Z

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Zubair Wali,1 Khalid I Khoshhal21Department of Orthopedic Surgery, King Fahd Hospital, Almadinah Almunawwarah, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, College of Medicine, Taibah University, Almadinah Almunawwarah, Saudi ArabiaObjective: This case report describes the rare presentation of a thoracic pedunculated osteochondroma in a child, arising from the lamina of the fourth thoracic vertebra.Clinical features: A 7-year-old girl was referred for the evaluation of a swelling in her back. The patient was suffering from atraumatic, progressive painless back swelling, of approximately 2 years duration. The physical examination showed a healthy child, with a well-defined mass, about 4 × 6 cm, located around the midline of the upper thoracic spine. No clinical signs of hereditary multiple exostoses were detected. Plain radiographs and computerized tomography were suggestive of a pedunculated osteochondroma arising from the lamina of the fourth thoracic vertebra.Intervention and outcome: The patient underwent surgical excision of the mass. The pathologist confirmed the diagnosis. Follow up for 2 years did not show any evidence of clinical or radiological recurrence.Conclusion: The current report describes a rare case and the management of a solitary pedunculated osteochondroma arising from the lamina of the fourth thoracic vertebra in a child below the age of 10 years.Keywords: benign tumors, hereditary multiple exostoses, spine column tumors, thoracic vertebra

  9. Reducing macrophages to improve bone marrow stromal cell survival in the contused spinal cord.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, G.J.; Nandoe Tewarie, R.D.S.; Rahiem, S.T.; Hurtado, A.; Roos, R.A.; Grotenhuis, A.; Oudega, M.

    2010-01-01

    We tested whether reducing macrophage infiltration would improve the survival of allogeneic bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) transplanted in the contused adult rat thoracic spinal cord. Treatment with cyclosporine, minocycline, or methylprednisolone all resulted in a significant decrease in

  10. Acquired degenerative changes of the intervertebral segments at and suprajacent to the lumbosacral junction A radioanatomic analysis of the nondiscal structures of the spinal column and perispinal soft tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinkins, J. Randy

    2004-01-01

    A review of the imaging features of normal and degenerative anatomy of the spine on medical imaging studies shows features that have been largely overlooked or poorly understood by the imaging community in recent years. The imaging methods reviewed included computed tomography (CT) with multiplanar reconstructions and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A routine part of the MRI examination included fat-suppressed T2 weighted fast-spin- or turbo-spin-echo acquisitions. As compared to the normal features in asymptomatic volunteers, alterations in the observed CT/MRI morphology and MR signal characteristics were sought in symptomatic individuals. Findings in symptomatic subjects which departed from the normal anatomic features of the posterior spinal elements in asymptomatic volunteers included: rupture of the interspinous ligament(s), neoarthrosis of the interspinous space with perispinous cyst formation, posterior spinal facet (zygapophyseal joint) arthrosis, related central spinal canal, lateral recess (subarticular zone) and neural foramen stenosis, posterior element alterations associated with various forms of spondylolisthesis, and perispinal muscle rupture/degeneration. These findings indicate that the posterior elements are major locations of degenerative spinal and perispinal disease that may accompany or even precede degenerative disc disease. Although not as yet proven as a reliable source of patient signs and symptoms in all individuals, because these observations may be seen in patients with radicular, referred and/or local low back pain, they should be considered in the evaluation of the symptomatic patient presenting with a clinical lumbosacral syndrome. Imaging recommendations, in addition to the usual close scrutiny of these posterior spinal elements and perispinal soft tissues on CT and MRI, include the acquisition of high-resolution multiplanar CT reconstructions, and fat-suppressed T2 weighted fast-spin- or turbo-spin-echo sequence MRI in at least

  11. Acquired degenerative changes of the intervertebral segments at and suprajacent to the lumbosacral junction A radioanatomic analysis of the nondiscal structures of the spinal column and perispinal soft tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinkins, J. Randy E-mail: jrjinkins@aol.com

    2004-05-01

    A review of the imaging features of normal and degenerative anatomy of the spine on medical imaging studies shows features that have been largely overlooked or poorly understood by the imaging community in recent years. The imaging methods reviewed included computed tomography (CT) with multiplanar reconstructions and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A routine part of the MRI examination included fat-suppressed T2 weighted fast-spin- or turbo-spin-echo acquisitions. As compared to the normal features in asymptomatic volunteers, alterations in the observed CT/MRI morphology and MR signal characteristics were sought in symptomatic individuals. Findings in symptomatic subjects which departed from the normal anatomic features of the posterior spinal elements in asymptomatic volunteers included: rupture of the interspinous ligament(s), neoarthrosis of the interspinous space with perispinous cyst formation, posterior spinal facet (zygapophyseal joint) arthrosis, related central spinal canal, lateral recess (subarticular zone) and neural foramen stenosis, posterior element alterations associated with various forms of spondylolisthesis, and perispinal muscle rupture/degeneration. These findings indicate that the posterior elements are major locations of degenerative spinal and perispinal disease that may accompany or even precede degenerative disc disease. Although not as yet proven as a reliable source of patient signs and symptoms in all individuals, because these observations may be seen in patients with radicular, referred and/or local low back pain, they should be considered in the evaluation of the symptomatic patient presenting with a clinical lumbosacral syndrome. Imaging recommendations, in addition to the usual close scrutiny of these posterior spinal elements and perispinal soft tissues on CT and MRI, include the acquisition of high-resolution multiplanar CT reconstructions, and fat-suppressed T2 weighted fast-spin- or turbo-spin-echo sequence MRI in at least

  12. Managment of thoracic empyema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, M M; Subramanian, V; Berger, R L

    1977-04-01

    Over a ten year period, 102 patients with thoracic empyemata were treated at Boston City Hospital. Only three patients died from the pleural infection while twenty-six succumbed to the associated diseases. Priniciples of management include: (1) thoracentesis; (2) antibiotics; (3) closed-tube thoracostomy; (4) sinogram; (5) open drainage; (6) empyemectomy and decortication in selected patients; and (7) bronchoscopy and barium swallow when the etiology is uncertain.

  13. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Glaucia; Araujo Neto, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza Junior, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Hospital Universitario Antonio Pedro (HUAP/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: the aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. Methods: this was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. Results: the majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). Conclusions: it is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. (author)

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available menu Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  15. Regional interdependence and manual therapy directed at the thoracic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Amy; Young, Jodi; Mintken, Paul; Cleland, Josh

    2015-07-01

    Thoracic spine manipulation is commonly used by physical therapists for the management of patients with upper quarter pain syndromes. The theoretical construct for using thoracic manipulation for upper quarter conditions is a mainstay of a regional interdependence (RI) approach. The RI concept is likely much more complex and is perhaps driven by a neurophysiological response including those related to peripheral, spinal cord and supraspinal mechanisms. Recent evidence suggests that thoracic spine manipulation results in neurophysiological changes, which may lead to improved pain and outcomes in individuals with musculoskeletal disorders. The intent of this narrative review is to describe the research supporting the RI concept and its application to the treatment of individuals with neck and/or shoulder pain. Treatment utilizing both thrust and non-thrust thoracic manipulation has been shown to result in improvements in pain, range of motion and disability in patients with upper quarter conditions. Research has yet to determine optimal dosage, techniques or patient populations to which the RI approach should be applied; however, emerging evidence supporting a neurophysiological effect for thoracic spine manipulation may negate the need to fully answer this question. Certainly, there is a need for further research examining both the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of manual therapy interventions utilized in the RI model as well as the neurophysiological effects resulting from this intervention.

  16. Thoracic posture, shoulder muscle activation patterns and isokinetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poor posture, scapular dyskinesia, altered scapular muscle recruitment patterns and ... postural deviation and incorrect shoulder kinematics.[5]. Knowledge of the .... the contra-lateral hand was placed as far down the spinal column as possible, and the ... produced by muscle contraction for rotation around a joint.[12] During.

  17. Relative shortening and functional tethering of spinal cord in adolescent scoliosis – Result of asynchronous neuro-osseous growth, summary of an electronic focus group debate of the IBSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burwell R Geoffrey

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is no generally accepted scientific theory for the causes of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. As part of its mission to widen understanding of scoliosis etiology, the International Federated Body on Scoliosis Etiology (IBSE introduced the electronic focus group (EFG as a means of increasing debate on knowledge of important topics. This has been designated as an on-line Delphi discussion. The Statement for this debate was written by Dr WCW Chu and colleagues who examine the spinal cord to vertebral growth interaction during adolescence in scoliosis. Using the multi-planar reconstruction technique of magnetic resonance imaging they investigated the relative length of spinal cord to vertebral column including ratios in 28 girls with AIS (mainly thoracic or double major curves and 14 age-matched normal girls. Also evaluated were cerebellar tonsillar position, somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs, and clinical neurological examination. In severe AIS compared with normal controls, the vertebral column is significantly longer without detectable spinal cord lengthening. They speculate that anterior spinal column overgrowth relative to a normal length spinal cord exerts a stretching tethering force between the two ends, cranially and caudally leading to the initiation and progression of thoracic AIS. They support and develop the Roth-Porter concept of uncoupled neuro-osseous growth in the pathogenesis of AIS which now they prefer to term 'asynchronous neuro-osseous growth'. Morphological evidence about the curve apex suggests that the spinal cord is also affected, and a 'double pathology' is suggested. AIS is viewed as a disorder with a wide spectrum and a common neuroanatomical abnormality namely, a spinal cord of normal length but short relative to an abnormally lengthened anterior vertebral column. Neuroanatomical changes and/or abnormal neural function may be expressed only in severe cases. This asynchronous neuro-osseous growth

  18. Spinal deformity in patients with Sotos syndrome (cerebral gigantism).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirikos, Athanasios I; Demosthenous, Nestor; McMaster, Michael J

    2009-04-01

    Retrospective review of a case series. To present the clinical characteristics and progression of spinal deformity in patients with Sotos syndrome. There is limited information on the development of spinal deformity and the need for treatment in this condition. The medical records and spinal radiographs of 5 consecutive patients were reviewed. All patients were followed to skeletal maturity (mean follow-up: 6.6 y). The mean age at diagnosis of spinal deformity was 11.9 years (range: 5.8 to 14.5) with 4 patients presenting in adolescence. The type of deformity was not uniform. Two patients presented in adolescence with relatively small and nonprogressive thoracolumbar and lumbar scoliosis, which required observation but no treatment until the end of spinal growth. Three patients underwent spinal deformity correction at a mean age of 11.7 years (range: 6 to 15.4). The first patient developed a double structural thoracic and lumbar scoliosis and underwent a posterior spinal arthrodesis extending from T3 to L4. Five years later, she developed marked degenerative changes at the L4/L5 level causing symptomatic bilateral lateral recess stenosis and affecting the L5 nerve roots. She underwent spinal decompression at L4/L5 and L5/S1 levels followed by extension of the fusion to the sacrum. The second patient developed a severe thoracic kyphosis and underwent a posterior spinal arthrodesis. The remaining patient presented at the age of 5.9 years with a severe thoracic kyphoscoliosis and underwent a 2-stage antero-posterior spinal arthrodesis. The development of spinal deformity is a common finding in children with Sotos syndrome and in our series it occurred in adolescence in 4 out of 5 patients. There is significant variability on the pattern of spine deformity, ranging from a scoliosis through kyphoscoliosis to a pure kyphosis, and also the age at presentation and need for treatment.

  19. Electrode alignment of transverse tripoles using a percutaneous triple-lead approach in spinal cord stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankarasubramanian, V.; Buitenweg, J. R.; Holsheimer, J.; Veltink, P.

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this modeling study is to determine the influence of electrode alignment of transverse tripoles on the paresthesia coverage of the pain area in spinal cord stimulation, using a percutaneous triple-lead approach. Transverse tripoles, comprising a central cathode and two lateral anodes, were modeled on the low-thoracic vertebral region (T10-T12) using percutaneous triple-lead configurations, with the center lead on the spinal cord midline. The triple leads were oriented both aligned and staggered. In the staggered configuration, the anodes were offset either caudally (caudally staggered) or rostrally (rostrally staggered) with respect to the midline cathode. The transverse tripolar field steering with the aligned and staggered configurations enabled the estimation of dorsal column fiber thresholds (IDC) and dorsal root fiber thresholds (IDR) at various anodal current ratios. IDC and IDR were considerably higher for the aligned transverse tripoles as compared to the staggered transverse tripoles. The aligned transverse tripoles facilitated deeper penetration into the medial dorsal columns (DCs). The staggered transverse tripoles always enabled broad and bilateral DC activation, at the expense of mediolateral steerability. The largest DC recruited area was obtained with the rostrally staggered transverse tripole. Transverse tripolar geometries, using percutaneous leads, allow for selective targeting of either medial or lateral DC fibers, if and only if the transverse tripole is aligned. Steering of anodal currents between the lateral leads of the staggered transverse tripoles cannot target medially confined populations of DC fibers in the spinal cord. An aligned transverse tripolar configuration is strongly recommended, because of its ability to provide more post-operative flexibility than other configurations.

  20. Relação entre a excursão do músculo diafragma e as curvaturas da coluna vertebral em crianças respiradoras bucais The relationship between excursion of the diaphragm and curvatures of the spinal column in mouth breathing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chiao Yi

    2008-04-01

    videofluoroscopic examination of the diaphragm muscle and postural assessment. Diaphragm excursion was analyzed using Adobe Photoshop® software, and postural assessment was recorded using photographs in left lateral view, which were then analyzed using SAPO postural assessment software. RESULTS: The groups studied exhibited statistically significant differences in terms of spinal curvatures (cervical lordosis: p = 0.003; lumbar lordosis: p = 0.001; thoracic kyphosis: p = 0.002; position of the pelvis: p = 0.001 and diaphragm excursion (right side diaphragm: p = 0.001; left side diaphragm: p = 0.001. The mouth breathing group exhibited reduced cervical lordosis, increased thoracic kyphosis, increased lumbar lordosis and the position of the pelvis was tilted forward. The distance traveled outwards by the diaphragm muscles of mouth breathing children was shorter than that traveled by the muscles of nose breathing children. The relationship between the behavior of spinal curvatures and diaphragm excursion had no statistical significance. CONCLUSION: There was no relationship between spinal curvatures and diaphragm excursion in the groups studied here.

  1. Spinal stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the spine that was present from birth Narrow spinal canal that the person was born with Herniated or slipped disk, which ... when you sit down or lean forward. Most people with spinal stenosis cannot walk for a long ... During a physical exam, your health care provider will try to ...

  2. Risk factors in iatrogenic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalva-Iborra, A; Alcanyis-Alberola, M; Grao-Castellote, C; Torralba-Collados, F; Giner-Pascual, M

    2017-09-01

    In the last years, there has been a change in the aetiology of spinal cord injury. There has been an increase in the number of elderly patients with spinal cord injuries caused by diseases or medical procedures. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency of the occurrence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury in our unit. The secondary aim is to study what variables can be associated with a higher risk of iatrogenesis. A retrospective, descriptive, observational study of patients with acute spinal cord injury admitted from June 2009 to May 2014 was conducted. The information collected included the patient age, aetiology, neurological level and grade of injury when admitted and when discharged, cardiovascular risk factors, a previous history of depression and any prior treatment with anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs. We applied a logistic regression. The grade of statistical significance was established as Pinjury was the thoracic level (48%). The main aetiology of spinal cord injury caused by iatrogenesis was surgery for degenerative spine disease, in patients under the age of 30 were treated with intrathecal chemotherapy. Iatrogenic spinal cord injury is a frequent complication. A statistically significant association between a patient history of depression and iatrogenic spinal cord injury was found as well as with anticoagulant and antiplatelet drug use prior to iatrogenic spinal cord injury.

  3. Central nociceptive sensitization vs. spinal cord training: Opposing forms of plasticity that dictate function after complete spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Ferguson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The spinal cord demonstrates several forms of plasticity that resemble brain-dependent learning and memory. Among the most studied form of spinal plasticity is spinal memory for noxious (nociceptive stimulation. Numerous papers have described central pain as a spinally-stored memory that enhances future responses to cutaneous stimulation. This phenomenon, known as central sensitization, has broad relevance to a range of pathological conditions. Work from the spinal cord injury (SCI field indicates that the lumbar spinal cord demonstrates several other forms of plasticity, including formal learning and memory. After complete thoracic SCI, the lumbar spinal cord can be trained by delivering stimulation to the hindleg when the leg is extended. In the presence of this response-contingent stimulation the spinal cord rapidly learns to hold the leg in a flexed position, a centrally mediated effect that meets the formal criteria for instrumental (response-outcome learning. Instrumental flexion training produces a central change in spinal plasticity that enables future spinal learning on both the ipsilateral and contralateral leg. However, if stimulation is given in a response-independent manner, the spinal cord develops central maladaptive plasticity that undermines future spinal learning on both legs. The present paper tests for interactions between spinal cord training and central nociceptive sensitization after complete spinal cord transection. We found that spinal training alters future central sensitization by intradermal formalin (24 h post-training. Conversely intradermal formalin impaired future spinal learning (24 h post-injection. Because the NMDA receptor has been implicated in formalin-induced central sensitization, we tested whether pretreatment with NMDA affects spinal learning. We found intrathecal NMDA impaired learning in a dose-dependent fashion, and that this effect endures for at least 24h. These data provide strong evidence for an

  4. Dumbbell-shaped intrathoracic-extradural haemangioma of the thoracic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, P M; Abou-Zeid, A; Du Plessis, D; Herwadkar, A; Gnanalingham, K K

    2008-04-01

    Spinal haemangiomas are benign vasoproliferative lesions that are typically intra-osseous and generally asymptomatic, although localized pain can be a symptom. Capillary and cavernous variants have been described. We describe a rare case of a dumbbell-shaped haemangioma of the thoracic spine with both an intraspinal-extradural and intrathoracic component.

  5. Diseases of the spine, spinal cord, and extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.

    1983-01-01

    This paper covers the following topics: acupuncture needle in the spinal canal of the neck; thoracic tuberculous spondylitis: cold abscess; comminuted fracture of the fifth cervical vertebra; lumbar spondylolysis; lumbar spondylosis; ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament; disk herniation of the cervical spine: narrowing of the root tunnel; ankylosing spondylitis: narrowing of the root tunnel; ossification of the ligamentum flavum; narrow spinal canal syndrome; syringomyelia; epidural neurinoma of the cervical spine; neurofibromatosis; spinal arteriovenous malformation; atrophy of the thoracic spinal cord; osteomyelitis tuberculosa of the rib; osteomyelitis tuberculosa of the left femur; chronic osteomyelitis of the left humerus; malignant giant cell tumor of the left femur; rheumatoid arthritis of the left hip joint; arthrosis deformans of the left hip joint; and enchondroma of the left index finger: Proximal Phalanx

  6. Fatal outcome after insufficient spine fixation for pyogenic thoracic spondylodiscitis: an imperative for 360° fusion of the infected spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Ernest E

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyogenic spondylodiscitis represents a potentially life-threatening condition. Due to the low incidence, evidence-based surgical recommendations in the literature are equivocal, and the treatment modalities remain controversial. Case presentation A 59 year-old patient presented with a history of thoracic spondylodiscitis resistant to antibiotic treatment for 6 weeks, progressive severe back pain, and a new onset of bilateral lower extremity weakness. Clinically, the patient showed a deteriorating spastic paraparesis of her lower extremities. An emergent MRI revealed a kyphotic wedge compression fracture at T7/T8 with significant spinal cord compression, paravertebral and epidural abscess, and signs of myelopathy. The patient underwent surgical debridement with stabilization of the anterior column from T6–T9 using an expandable titanium cage, autologous bone graft, and an anterolateral locking plate. The patient recovered well under adjunctive antibiotic treatment. She presented again to the emergency department 6 months later, secondary to a repeat fall, with acute paraplegia of the lower extremities and radiographic evidence of failure of fixation of the anterior T-spine. She underwent antero-posterior revision fixation with hardware removal, correction of kyphotic malunion, evacuation of a recurrent epidural abscess, decompression of the spinal canal, and 360° fusion from T2–T11. Despite the successful salvage procedure, the patient deteriorated in the postoperative phase, when she developed multiple complications including pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, bacterial meningitis, abdominal compartment syndrome, followed by septic shock with multiple organ failure and a lethal outcome within two weeks after revision surgery. Conclusion This catastrophic example of a lethal outcome secondary to failure of anterior column fixation for pyogenic thoracic spondylodiscitis underlines the notion that surgical

  7. Thoracic organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Richard N; Barr, Mark L; McCullough, Keith P; Egan, Thomas; Garrity, Edward; Jessup, Mariell; Murray, Susan

    2004-01-01

    This article presents an overview of factors associated with thoracic transplantation outcomes over the past decade and provides valuable information regarding the heart, lung, and heart-lung waiting lists and thoracic organ transplant recipients. Waiting list and post-transplant information is used to assess the importance of patient demographics, risk factors, and primary cardiopulmonary disease on outcomes. The time that the typical listed patient has been waiting for a heart, lung, or heart-lung transplant has markedly increased over the past decade, while the number of transplants performed has declined slightly and survival after transplant has plateaued. Waiting list mortality, however, appears to be declining for each organ and for most diseases and high-severity subgroups, perhaps in response to recent changes in organ allocation algorithms. Based on perceived inequity in organ access and in response to a mandate from Health Resources and Services Administration, the lung transplant community is developing a lung allocation system designed to minimize deaths on the waiting list while maximizing the benefit of transplant by incorporating post-transplant survival and quality of life into the algorithm. Areas where improved data collection could inform evolving organ allocation and candidate selection policies are emphasized.

  8. Thoracic damage control surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Roberto; Saad, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The damage control surgery came up with the philosophy of applying essential maneuvers to control bleeding and abdominal contamination in trauma patients who are within the limits of their physiological reserves. This concept was extended to thoracic injuries, where relatively simple maneuvers can shorten operative time of in extremis patients. This article aims to revise the various damage control techniques in thoracic organs that must be known to the surgeon engaged in emergency care. RESUMO A cirurgia de controle de danos surgiu com a filosofia de se aplicar manobras essenciais para controle de sangramento e contaminação abdominal, em doentes traumatizados, nos limites de suas reservas fisiológicas. Este conceito se estendeu para as lesões torácicas, onde manobras relativamente simples, podem abreviar o tempo operatório de doentes in extremis. Este artigo tem como objetivo, revisar as diversas técnicas de controle de dano em órgãos torácicos, que devem ser de conhecimento do cirurgião que atua na emergência.

  9. A case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia complicated with spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yukiko; Uchiyama, Noboru; Endo, Norio

    1985-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy developed spinal cord compression during remission of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Metrizamide myelography disclosed complete block at the level of the 8th thoracic vertebra. Subsequent metrizamide CT clearly showed the subarachnoid space compressed and stenosed from the 8th thoracic vertebra to the 2nd lumber verbetra, and an extradural mass compressing the spinal cord. The function in the lower extremities was almost completely recovered by radiation therapy with a total dose of 10 Gy from the 6th thoracic vertebra to the 4th lumbar vertebra. (Namekawa, K.)

  10. Dual spinal lesion paradigm in the cat: evolution of the kinematic locomotor pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrière, Grégory; Frigon, Alain; Leblond, Hugues; Provencher, Janyne; Rossignol, Serge

    2010-08-01

    The recovery of voluntary quadrupedal locomotion after an incomplete spinal cord injury can involve different levels of the CNS, including the spinal locomotor circuitry. The latter conclusion was reached using a dual spinal lesion paradigm in which a low thoracic partial spinal lesion is followed, several weeks later, by a complete spinal transection (i.e., spinalization). In this dual spinal lesion paradigm, cats can express hindlimb walking 1 day after spinalization, a process that normally takes several weeks, suggesting that the locomotor circuitry within the lumbosacral spinal cord had been modified after the partial lesion. Here we detail the evolution of the kinematic locomotor pattern throughout the dual spinal lesion paradigm in five cats to gain further insight into putative neurophysiological mechanisms involved in locomotor recovery after a partial spinal lesion. All cats recovered voluntary quadrupedal locomotion with treadmill training (3-5 days/wk) over several weeks. After the partial lesion, the locomotor pattern was characterized by several left/right asymmetries in various kinematic parameters, such as homolateral and homologous interlimb coupling, cycle duration, and swing/stance durations. When no further locomotor improvement was observed, cats were spinalized. After spinalization, the hindlimb locomotor pattern rapidly reappeared, but left/right asymmetries in swing/stance durations observed after the partial lesion could disappear or reverse. It is concluded that, after a partial spinal lesion, the hindlimb locomotor pattern was actively maintained by new dynamic interactions between spinal and supraspinal levels but also by intrinsic changes within the spinal cord.

  11. Thoracic Epidural Teratoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Quon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Spinal teratomas comprise a rare subset of spinal cord tumors, and here, we describe an even rarer childhood thoracic extradural-intracanalicular teratoma. The clinical presentation, management, and pathophysiology of these tumors are reviewed to promote recognition and guide treatment of these lesions. Methods We report the case of a 21-month-old boy who presented with marked spasticity, as well as failure to ambulate and meet motor milestones. Additionally, we provide a literature review of spinal teratomas, including their clinical presentation, work-up, pathophysiology, and underlying genetics. Results An MRI of the spine revealed a large dorsal epidural tumor extending from T3 to T10 with heterogeneous contrast enhancement and severe spinal cord compression. The tumor was resected revealing a cystic mass with tissue resembling hair, muscle, as well as cartilage; pathology confirmed the diagnosis of teratoma. Gross total resection was achieved, and the child eventually gained ambulatory function. Conclusions Given that spinal teratomas are rare entities that can present with significant neurologic compromise, they must remain on clinicians’ differentials. Unfortunately, the exact origin of these tumors remains inconclusive and requires further investigation.

  12. Thoracic spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  13. MRI diagnosis of intraspinal dermoid ruptured into central spinal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yong; Cheng Jingliang; Wang Juan; Li Huali; Ren Cuiping; Zhang Yan; Gao Xuemei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the appearances of intraspinal dermoid ruptured into the central spinal canal, as well as the MRI diagnosis and differential diagnosis. Methods: Eleven cases of intraspinal dermoid ruptured into the central spinal canal were reviewed. Six cases underwent whole spine MRI scan, 2 cases with thoracic and lumbar spine MRI, as well as 3 cases only with lumbar spine MRI. Results: Free fat droplets within spinal cord central canal demonstrated high signal intensity on T 1 WI, slight declined signal intensity on T 2 WI, and extremely low signal on fat suppression sequence. Of the 11 cases, 2 cases broke into neighboring central spinal canal of the dermoid, 3 cases scattered within thoracic spinal cord central canal, 4 cases discontinuously distributed in the whole spinal cord central canal, 2 cases showed continuous distribution. Conclusion: Intraspinal dermoid ruptured in the central spinal canal had specific appearance on MRI, when a dermoid tumor is suspected, MRI of the entire spine were recommended to detect possible leakage of' fat within central spinal canal. (authors)

  14. Spinal meningeal cyst: analysis with low-field MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Hongzhou; Chen Yejia; Chen Ronghua; Chen Yanping

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the characteristics of spinal meningeal cyst in low-field MRI and to discuss its classification, subtype, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis. Methods: Forty-two patients (20 male, 22 female) were examined with sagittal T 1 -and T 2 -, axial T 2 -weighted MR imaging. Twelve patients were also examined with contrast-enhanced MRI. Results: The cysts were classified using Nakors' classification as type Ia extradural meningeal cysts (4 patients), type Ib sacral meningeal cysts (32), type II extradural meningeal cysts with spinal nerve root fibers (4), and type III spinal intradural meningeal cysts (2). All 42 spinal meningeal cysts had well-defined boundaries with low T 1 and high T 2 signal intensities similar to cerebral spinal fluid. In type Ia, the lesions were often on the dorsum of mid-lower thoracic spinal cord compressing the spinal cord and displacing the extradural fat. In type Ib, the lesions were in the sacral canal with fat plane between the cyst and dural sac. In type II, the lesions contained nerve roots and were lateral to the dural sac. In type III, the lesions were often on the dorsum of spinal cord compressing and displacing the spinal cord anteriorly. Conclusion: Low-field MRI can clearly display the spinal meningeal cyst. Types Ia and Ib spinal meningeal cysts had typical features and can be easily diagnosed. Types II and III should be differentiated from cystic schwannomas and enterogenous cysts, respectively. (authors)

  15. Spinal injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dallas, TX: American Red Cross; 2016. Kaji AH, Newton EJ, Hockberger RS. Spinal injuries. In: Marx JA, ... member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www. ...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord injury in chronic stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobimatsu, Haruki; Nihei, Ryuichi; Kimura, Tetsuhiko; Yano, Hideo; Touyama, Tetsuo; Tobimatsu, Yoshiko; Suyama, Naoto; Yoshino, Yasumasa

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of a total of 195 patients with cervical (125) or thoracic (70) spinal cord injury were reviewed. The imaging studies of the spinal cord lesions were correlated with clinical manifestations. Sequential MR imaging revealed hypointensity on T1-weighted images (T1WI) and hyperintensity on T2-weighted images (T2WI) in all patients, except for five patients showing no signal changes and two showing isointensity, suggesting gliosis, myelomalacia, and syringomyelia. Spinal cord lesions were classified into four types: small lesions, large lesions, complete transverse, and longitudinal rupture. These lesions were well correlated with the severity of injury and paralysis. Complete paralysis was frequently associated with enlarged, complete transverse for cervical spinal cord injury, and longitudinal ruptured or thinned complete transverse for thoracic spinal cord injury. The height of paralysis was well in agreement with that of lesions. For incomplete paralysis, localized lesions were seen within the spinal cord, coinciding with the paralysis or severity. Traumatic syringomyelia was seen in 17 patients (8.7%)-- for the cervical site (10 patients, 8%) and the thoracic site (7 patients, 10%). When homogeneous and marginally clear hypointensity is shown on T1-weighted images and vacuolated hyperintensity is shown on T2-weighted images, in addition to lesions spreading two or more cords or 1.5 or more cords above the nervous root level of paralysis, traumatic syringomyelia is strongly suspected, requiring the follow up observation. (N.K.)

  17. Computed tomography of thoracic and lumbar spine fractures that have been treated with Harrington instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golimbu, C.; Firooznia, H.; Rafii, M.; Engler, G.; Delman, A.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty patients with fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine underwent computed tomography (CT) following Harrington distraction instrumentation and a spinal fusion. CT was done to search for a cause of persistent cord or nerve root compression in those patients who failed to improve and completely recover their partial neurologic deficit (14 cases). The most common abnormality was the presence of residual bone fragments originating in the burst fracture of a vertebral body displaced posteriorly, into the spinal canal. In patients with complications in the late recovery period, CT found exuberant callus indenting the canal or lack of fusion of the bone grafts placed in the anterolateral aspect of the vertebral bodies. This experience indicates that CT is the modality of choice for spinal canal evaluation in those patients who fail to have an optimal clinical course following fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine treated with Harrington rods

  18. Spinal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tali, E. Turgut; Gueltekin, Serap

    2005-01-01

    Spinal infections have an increasing prevalence among the general population. Definitive diagnosis based solely on clinical grounds is usually not possible and radiological imaging is used in almost all patients. The primary aim of the authors is to present an overview of spinal infections located in epidural, intradural and intramedullary compartments and to provide diagnostic clues regarding different imaging modalities, particularly MRI, to the practicing physicians and radiologists. (orig.)

  19. Spinal cysticercosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedert, A.V.; Silva, S.H.F.

    1990-01-01

    Spinal cysticercosis is an extremely uncommon condition. We have examined four patients with complaints that resembled nervous root compression by disk herniation. Myelography was shown to be an efficient method to evaluate spinal involvement, that was characterized by findings of multiple filling defect images (cysts) plus signs of adhesive arachnoiditis. One cyst was found to be mobile. Because of the recent development of medical treatment, a quick and precise diagnosis is of high importance to determine the prognosis of this condition. (author)

  20. Arteriovenous malformations of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, Shiro; Yoshida, Shinzo; Ishikawa, Masatsune; Yonekawa, Yasuhiro; Handa, Hajime

    1984-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the cervical spinal cord has been known to constitute 5-13% of all spinal AVMs. In contrast to the AVMs located in thoracic or thoraco-lumbar regions, cervical AVM has several characteristic features such as preponderance in younger generation, high incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage, intramedullary location of the nidus usually fed by the anterior spinal arterial system. We reported three cases of cervical AVMs, which located intramedullary at the levels of C 4 -C 6 , C 1 -C 4 and C 1 -C 2 , respectively. Although selective angiography (vertebral artery, thyrocervical artery, costocervical artery) was essential for the diagnosis of these lesions, computerized tomographic (CT) study with both intrathecal injection of metrizamide and intravenous infusion of contrast material (dynamic and static study) was found to be extremely advantageous in detecting the topography of AVMs in the concerned horizontal planes of the spinal cord. Removal of AVM was given up in one case because of its possible involvement of the anterior spinal artery and central artery shown by CT scan. Removal of AVMs were performed in other two cases. A lateral approach was tried in one case with the AVM located in C 1 -C 2 level, in which CT scan revealed not only an intramedullary but the associated extramedullary AVM in ventrolateral surface of the spinal cord. This operative approach was found to involve less bone removal and markedly reduce spinal cord manipulation necessary to deal with ventrally situated high cervical lesions, compared with a posterior approach with laminectomy. (author)

  1. Presentation and outcome of traumatic spinal fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed El-Faramawy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Motor vehicle crashes and falls account for most of the spine fractures with subsequent serious disability. Aim: To define the incidence, causes, and outcome of spinal fractures. Materials and Methods: Data were collected retrospectively from trauma registry database of all traumatic spinal injuries admitted to the section of trauma surgery in Qatar from November 2007 to December 2009. Results: Among 3712 patients who were admitted to the section of trauma surgery, 442 (12% injured patients had spinal fractures with a mean age of 33.2 ± 12 years. The male to female ratio was 11.6:1. Motor vehicle crashes (36.5% and falls from height (19.3% were the leading causes of cervical injury (P = 0.001. The injury severity score ranged between 4 and 75. Nineteen percent of cases with cervical injury had thoracic injury as well (P = 0.04. Lumber injury was associated with thoracic injury in 27% of cases (P < 0.001. Combined thoracic and lumber injuries were associated with cervical injury in 33% of cases (P < 0.001. The total percent of injuries associated with neurological deficit was 5.4%. Fifty-three cases were managed surgically for spine fractures; 14 of them had associated neurological deficits. Overall mortalityrate was 5%. Conclusions: Spine fractures are not uncommon in Qatar. Cervical and thoracic spine injuries carry the highest incidence of associated neurological deficit and injuries at other spinal levels. Young males are the most exposed population that deserves more emphasis on injury prevention programs in the working sites and in enforcement of traffic laws.

  2. Interspinous bursitis is common in polymyalgia rheumatica, but is not associated with spinal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camellino, Dario; Paparo, Francesco; Morbelli, Silvia; Cutolo, Maurizio; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Cimmino, Marco A

    2014-12-01

    Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is a common inflammatory disease in older people characterized by shoulder and/or pelvic girdle, and cervical and, occasionally, lumbar pain. Interspinous bursitis has been suggested as a potential cause of spinal symptoms. We evaluated, by 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography integrated with computed tomography (PET/CT), the vertebral structures involved in PMR in a cohort of consecutive, untreated patients. Sixty-five consecutive patients with PMR were studied. After a standardized physical examination, which included evaluation of pain and tenderness in the vertebral column, they underwent FDG-PET/CT. Sites of increased uptake and their correlation with spontaneous and provoked pain were recorded. For comparison, FDG-PET/CT was performed also in 65 age- and sex-matched controls and in 10 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. The most frequent site of spontaneous and provoked pain was the cervical portion. FDG uptake was more frequent in the lumbar portion than at any other location, and in the cervical rather than in the thoracic portion (P bursitis (r = 0.34, P = 0.007). None of the control patients and one out of ten RA patients showed interspinous bursitis. Interspinous bursitis is a frequent finding in the lumbar spine of patients with PMR. However, it is not associated with clinical symptoms and can hardly explain the spinal pain reported by the patients. Cervical pain is more frequent than lumbar pain in PMR patients and may be caused by shoulder girdle involvement.

  3. Acute presentation of solitary spinal epidural cavernous angioma in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalatbari, M.R.; Moharamzad, Y.; Hamidi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Solitary spinal epidural cavernous angiomas are rare lesions, especially in paediatric age group. They are infrequently considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural masses in children. We report a case of solitary epidural cavernous angioma of the thoracic spine in a child presenting with acute onset of back pain and myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracic spine demonstrated a posterior epidural mass at T6-T8 levels with compression of the spinal cord. Using microsurgical technique and bipolar coagulation, total excision of the lesion was achieved. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of cavernous angioma. At the five-year follow-up, there was no recurrence of the tumour. (author)

  4. Analysis of the distribution pattern of spinal meningoceles and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Spinal meningoceles and meningomyeloceles are part of a group of developmental abnormalities. They are usually midline and could be found throughout the length of the spinal column. Their preferential occurrence along the spine is not clear and their aetiological factors could be numerous. Aim: To ...

  5. Thoracic spinal cord compression secondary to metastatic synovial sarcoma: case report Compresión de la medula espinal torácica por metástasis secundaria de sarcoma sinovial: relato de caso Compressão da medula espinhal torácica por metástase secundária de sarcoma sinovial: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Arnold

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma is an uncommon malignant soft tissue neoplasm, occurring primarily in adolescents and young adults. It is prevalent in the periarticular soft tissues near large joints of the extremities and rarely involves the trunk. Metastases are not uncommon and usually involve the lungs; metastasis to the thoracic spine is rare. We report the case of a 47-year-old man with a history of synovial sarcoma of the lower back, with subsequent metastases to the lung, penis, and perineum (all previously resected, presenting with a 3-month history of low back pain and lower extremity paresthesias. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated multiple lesions involving multiple contiguous vertebral bodies, with the mass at T12 compressing the spinal cord. The patient underwent T11-T12 laminectomy, transpedicular decompression, tumor debulking, and posterior fixation and fusion. The patient died six months later due to disease progression. Although not curative, decompression and stabilization of the spine are often necessary in patients who present spinal cord compression.El sarcoma sinovial es una neoplasia rara de los tejidos blandos que afecta adolescentes y adultos jóvenes. Su mayor prevalencia es en las grandes articulaciones de las extremidades y raramente ataca el tronco. Las lesiones metastásicas son raras y generalmente atacan los pulmones, siendo que las metástasis de columna torácica son raras. Será relatado el cuadro clínico de un paciente de 47 años de edad con tres meses de historia de dolor lumbar y presentando metástasis de sarcoma sinovial en la columna lumbar. La resonancia magnética demostraba lesiones contiguas del cuerpo vertebral y compresión del canal vertebral al nivel de T12. El paciente fue sometido a la laminectomía de T11-T12, descompresión transpedicular, remoción de tejido tumoral y artrodesis con fijación posterior. El paciente fue a óbito después de seis meses debido a la progresión de la enfermedad

  6. [Surgical treatment of thoracic disc herniation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabálek, L; Kalita, O; Langová, K

    2010-08-01

    increased from 6.71 to 9.12, i.e., +2.41 points. The mean JOA Recovery Rate did not reach a plus value in group A, while in group B it improved by 55 %. JOA Recovery Rate: Of the seven patients in group A evaluated for myelopathy, a fair result was in one, unchanged in two and worse in four patients. Of the 16 patients evaluated for myelopathy in group B, the results were excellent in four, good in six, fair in four and unchanged in two patients. Frankel grade function: In group A, one patient improved by one grade, two remained unchanged, two deteriorated by one grade and two by two grades. In group B, five patients improved by one grade, two patients by two grades and two patients by three grades. Eight patients remained unchanged and no patient deteriorated. The post-operative pain intensity, as assessed by the mean VAS score, was lower at rest and after exercise in both groups; the score was better in group B, but the difference was not statistically significant. The ODI was evaluated only in group B its mean value improved from 41.4% to 26.1%, i.e., by 15.3%. Between 7 to 15 % of the patients have asymptomatic thoracic disc herniation, while symptomatic herniation is very rare and accounts for only 0.25 % to 0.57 % of herniated discs in the whole spine. Severe or progressive myelopathy is a clear indication for surgical intervention in thoracic disc herniation, but the role of surgery in pain control is controversial. There are five approaches for thoracic disc herniation. Transpleural anterolateral thoracotomy has an advantage over the other methods because it permits the treatment of all types of herniation, whether localised centrally, laterally or contralaterally, i.e., soft, calcified or sequestered intradural disc herniation. The results of treatment will depend on the outcome of surgical spinal cord decompression and the degree of spinal stabilisation achieved. The surgical procedure via thoracotomy with intersomatic fusion resulted in a statistically more

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ...

  9. Spinal penetration index assessment in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis using EOS low-dose biplanar stereoradiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilharreborde, Brice; Dubousset, Jean; Skalli, Wafa; Mazda, Keyvan

    2013-11-01

    The spinal penetration index (SPI) quantifies the portion of the rib cage occupied by vertebrae. When measured by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging, SPI can only be determined in the reclining position, which modifies spinal and thoracic morphology. CT results in high radiation exposure. The authors studied rib cage and spinal morphology using low-dose biplanar stereoradiography and their impact on respiratory function in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). In eighty thoracic AIS patients, a slot-scanning radiologic device allowing simultaneous acquisition of orthogonal images and 3D reconstructions with low exposure to radiation (EOS) was used to determine thoracic volume, mean spinal penetration index (SPIm), apical spinal penetration index (SPIa), main thoracic (MT) curve Cobb angle, T4-T12 kyphosis, and apical vertebral rotation (AVR). Thoracic volume was correlated with thoracic kyphosis (r = 0.31, p = 0.006), but not with SPI, MT Cobb angle, or AVR. SPIm and SPIa were negatively correlated with thoracic kyphosis. Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s were significantly lower in the hypokyphotic patients (p = 0.04, p = 0.03, respectively) and correlated with thoracic volume and T4-T12 kyphosis. No correlation was found between spinal penetration indices and pulmonary function tests, but SPIm was significantly greater in patients with obstructive syndrome (p = 0.01). With little radiation exposure, EOS biplanar stereoradiography permits routine imaging is a functional standing position. Hypokyphotic patients had significantly decreased FEV1 and FVC. SPIm was significantly higher in patients with obstructive syndrome.

  10. Neurological Complications Following Endoluminal Repair of Thoracic Aortic Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, J. P.; Taylor, P. R.; Bell, R. E.; Chan, Y. C.; Sabharwal, T.; Carrell, T. W. G.; Reidy, J. F.

    2007-01-01

    Open surgery for thoracic aortic disease is associated with significant morbidity and the reported rates for paraplegia and stroke are 3%-19% and 6%-11%, respectively. Spinal cord ischemia and stroke have also been reported following endoluminal repair. This study reviews the incidence of paraplegia and stroke in a series of 186 patients treated with thoracic stent grafts. From July 1997 to September 2006, 186 patients (125 men) underwent endoluminal repair of thoracic aortic pathology. Mean age was 71 years (range, 17-90 years). One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated electively and 58 patients had urgent procedures. Anesthesia was epidural in 131, general in 50, and local in 5 patients. Seven patients developed paraplegia (3.8%; two urgent and five elective). All occurred in-hospital apart from one associated with severe hypotension after a myocardial infarction at 3 weeks. Four of these recovered with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. One patient with paraplegia died and two had permanent neurological deficit. The rate of permanent paraplegia and death was 1.6%. There were seven strokes (3.8%; four urgent and three elective). Three patients made a complete recovery, one had permanent expressive dysphasia, and three died. The rate of permanent stroke and death was 2.1%. Endoluminal treatment of thoracic aortic disease is an attractive alternative to open surgery; however, there is still a risk of paraplegia and stroke. Permanent neurological deficits and death occurred in 3.7% of the patients in this series. We conclude that prompt recognition of paraplegia and immediate insertion of a CSF drain can be an effective way of recovering spinal cord function and improving the prognosis

  11. Heritability of spinal pain and consequences of spinal pain: a comprehensive genetic epidemiologic analysis using a population-based sample of 15,328 twins ages 20-71 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Jan; Nielsen, Jan; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2009-01-01

    on 15,328 twin individuals (44% monozygotic and 56% dizygotic) from complete twin pairs were included. Genetic susceptibility explained approximately 38% of lumbar pain, 32% of thoracic pain, and 39% of neck pain. For patterns of pain, estimates were 7% for lumbar/thoracic, 24% for lumbar/cervical, 0......% for thoracic/cervical, and 35% for pain in all 3 areas. Moderate to high genetic correlations indicated a common genetic basis for many spinal pain syndromes. In general, heritability was higher for women, and only a minor age effect was seen. CONCLUSION: Heritability estimates for pain in different spinal......OBJECTIVE: To assess the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors to different definitions of spinal pain and consequences of spinal pain. METHODS: The Danish Twin Registry contains detailed survey information on spinal pain and its consequences in twins ages 20-71 years...

  12. A proposed radiographic classification scheme for congenital thoracic vertebral malformations in brachycephalic "screw-tailed" dog breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Quintana, Rodrigo; Guevar, Julien; Stalin, Catherine; Faller, Kiterie; Yeamans, Carmen; Penderis, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Congenital vertebral malformations are common in brachycephalic "screw-tailed" dog breeds such as French bulldogs, English bulldogs, Boston terriers, and pugs. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether a radiographic classification scheme developed for use in humans would be feasible for use in these dog breeds. Inclusion criteria were hospital admission between September 2009 and April 2013, neurologic examination findings available, diagnostic quality lateral and ventro-dorsal digital radiographs of the thoracic vertebral column, and at least one congenital vertebral malformation. Radiographs were retrieved and interpreted by two observers who were unaware of neurologic status. Vertebral malformations were classified based on a classification scheme modified from a previous human study and a consensus of both observers. Twenty-eight dogs met inclusion criteria (12 with neurologic deficits, 16 with no neurologic deficits). Congenital vertebral malformations affected 85/362 (23.5%) of thoracic vertebrae. Vertebral body formation defects were the most common (butterfly vertebrae 6.6%, ventral wedge-shaped vertebrae 5.5%, dorsal hemivertebrae 0.8%, and dorso-lateral hemivertebrae 0.5%). No lateral hemivertebrae or lateral wedge-shaped vertebrae were identified. The T7 vertebra was the most commonly affected (11/28 dogs), followed by T8 (8/28 dogs) and T12 (8/28 dogs). The number and type of vertebral malformations differed between groups (P = 0.01). Based on MRI, dorsal, and dorso-lateral hemivertebrae were the cause of spinal cord compression in 5/12 (41.6%) of dogs with neurologic deficits. Findings indicated that a modified human radiographic classification system of vertebral malformations is feasible for use in future studies of brachycephalic "screw-tailed" dogs. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  13. Spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  14. Real-time direct measurement of spinal cord blood flow at the site of compression: relationship between blood flow recovery and motor deficiency in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Yuichiro; Ogata, Tadanori; Morino, Tadao; Hino, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Haruyasu

    2007-08-15

    An in vivo study to measure rat spinal cord blood flow in real-time at the site of compression using a newly developed device. To evaluate the change in thoracic spinal cord blood flow by compression force and to clarify the association between blood flow recovery and motor deficiency after a spinal cord compression injury. Until now, no real-time measurement of spinal cord blood flow at the site of compression has been conducted. In addition, it has not been clearly determined whether blood flow recovery is related to motor function after a spinal cord injury. Our blood flow measurement system was a combination of a noncontact type laser Doppler system and a spinal cord compression device. The rat thoracic spinal cord was exposed at the 11th vertebra and spinal cord blood flow at the site of compression was continuously measured before, during, and after the compression. The functioning of the animal's hind-limbs was evaluated by the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scoring scale and the frequency of voluntary standing. Histologic changes such as permeability of blood-spinal cord barrier, microglia proliferation, and apoptotic cell death were examined in compressed spinal cord tissue. The spinal blood flow decreased on each increase in the compression force. After applying a 5-g weight, the blood flow decreased to compression), while no significant difference was observed between the 20-minute ischemia group and the sham group. In the 20-minute ischemia group, the rats whose spinal cord blood flow recovery was incomplete showed significant motor function loss compared with rats that completely recovered blood flow. Extensive breakdown of blood-spinal cord barrier integrity and the following microglia proliferation and apoptotic cell death were detected in the 40-minute complete ischemia group. Duration of ischemia/compression and blood flow recovery of the spinal cord are important factors in the recovery of motor function after a spinal cord injury.

  15. Relationship between thoracic hypokyphosis, lumbar lordosis and sagittal pelvic parameters in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Jean-Luc; Geoffray, Anne; Yagoubi, Fatima; Chau, Edouard; Solla, Federico; Oborocianu, Ioana; Rampal, Virginie

    2013-11-01

    Sagittal spine and pelvic alignment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is poorly described in the literature. It generally reports the sagittal alignment with regard to the type of curve and never correlated to the thoracic kyphosis. The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis and sagittal pelvic parameters in thoracic AIS. Spinal and pelvic sagittal parameters were evaluated on lateral radiographs of 86 patients with thoracic AIS; patients were separated into hypokyphosis group (n = 42) and normokyphosis group (n = 44). Results were statistically analyzed. The lumbar lordosis was lower in the hypokyphosis group, due to the low proximal lordosis. The thoracic kyphosis was not correlated with any pelvic parameters but with the proximal lordosis. The pelvic incidence was correlated with sacral slope, pelvic tilt, lumbar lordosis and highly correlated with distal lumbar lordosis in the two groups. There was a significant linear regression between thoracic kyphosis and proximal lordosis and between pelvic incidence and distal lordosis. We can consider that the proximal part of the lordosis depends on the thoracic kyphosis and the distal part depends on the pelvic incidence. The hypokyphosis in AIS is independent of the pelvic parameters and could be described as a structural parameter, characteristic of the scoliotic deformity.

  16. Pleural puncture with thoracic epidural: A rare complication?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachna Wadhwa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Freedom from pain has almost developed to be a fundamental human right. Providing pain relief via epidural catheters in thoracic and upper abdominal surgeries is widely accepted. Pain relief through this technique not only provides continuous analgesia but also reduces post-operative pulmonary complications and also hastens recovery. But being a blind procedure it is accompanied by certain complications. Hypotension, dura puncture, high epidural, total spinal, epidural haematoma, spinal cord injury and infection are some of the documented side effects of epidural block. There are case reports eliciting neurological complications, catheter site infections, paresthesias, radicular symptoms and worsening of previous neurological conditions. Few technical problems related to breakage of epidural catheter are also mentioned in the literature. The patient had no sequelae on long term follow up even when a portion of catheter was retained. We present a case report where epidural catheter punctured pleura in a patient undergoing thoracotomy for carcinoma oesophagus.

  17. Spinal cord motion. Influence of respiration and cardiac cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winklhofer, S. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Schoth, F. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Stolzmann, P. [University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Krings, T. [Toronto Western Hospital, ON (Canada). Div. of Neuroradiology; Mull, M.; Wiesmann, M. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Stracke, C.P. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Alfried-Krupp-Hospital, Essen (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2014-11-15

    To assess physiological spinal cord motion during the cardiac cycle compared with the influence of respiration based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. Anterior-posterior spinal cord motion within the spinal canal was assessed in 16 healthy volunteers (median age, 25 years) by cardiac-triggered and cardiac-gated gradient echo pulse sequence MRI. Image acquisition was performed during breath-holding, normal breathing, and forced breathing. Normal spinal cord motion values were computed using descriptive statistics. Breathing-dependent differences were assessed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and compared with the cardiac-based cord motion. A normal value table was set up for the spinal cord motion of each vertebral cervico-thoracic-lumbar segment. Significant differences in cord motion were found between cardiac-based motion while breath-holding and the two breathing modalities (P < 0.01 each). Spinal cord motion was found to be highest during forced breathing, with a maximum in the lower cervical spinal segments (C5; mean, 2.1 mm ± 1.17). Image acquisition during breath-holding revealed the lowest motion. MRI permits the demonstration and evaluation of cardiac and respiration-dependent spinal cord motion within the spinal canal from the cervical to lumbar segments. Breathing conditions have a considerably greater impact than cardiac activity on spinal cord motion.

  18. Spinal cord motion. Influence of respiration and cardiac cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winklhofer, S.; University Hospital Zurich; Schoth, F.; Stolzmann, P.; Krings, T.; Mull, M.; Wiesmann, M.; Stracke, C.P.; Alfried-Krupp-Hospital, Essen

    2014-01-01

    To assess physiological spinal cord motion during the cardiac cycle compared with the influence of respiration based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. Anterior-posterior spinal cord motion within the spinal canal was assessed in 16 healthy volunteers (median age, 25 years) by cardiac-triggered and cardiac-gated gradient echo pulse sequence MRI. Image acquisition was performed during breath-holding, normal breathing, and forced breathing. Normal spinal cord motion values were computed using descriptive statistics. Breathing-dependent differences were assessed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and compared with the cardiac-based cord motion. A normal value table was set up for the spinal cord motion of each vertebral cervico-thoracic-lumbar segment. Significant differences in cord motion were found between cardiac-based motion while breath-holding and the two breathing modalities (P < 0.01 each). Spinal cord motion was found to be highest during forced breathing, with a maximum in the lower cervical spinal segments (C5; mean, 2.1 mm ± 1.17). Image acquisition during breath-holding revealed the lowest motion. MRI permits the demonstration and evaluation of cardiac and respiration-dependent spinal cord motion within the spinal canal from the cervical to lumbar segments. Breathing conditions have a considerably greater impact than cardiac activity on spinal cord motion.

  19. SPINAL CORD- A CADAVERIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayamma K. N

    2018-01-01

    developed in cervical and upper thoracic region and become thin in the lower thoracic and lumbar regions. The last tooth of the ligament elongated and tendinous. The cord was surrounded by rich vascular plexus and seen more towards the lower and posterior aspect. CONCLUSION Spinal cord is a highly vascular neuronal structure situated within the vertebral canal covered with meninges and anchored by ligamentum denticulatum on either sides. It has a unique vascular anatomy. The anterior and posterior radicular arteries provide very crucial role in the vascular supply of the cord. Arteria radicular magna was observed in 70% of specimens, of which 50% at T11 segmental level. A profuse vascular anastomosis was observed around the cord between the branches of anterior and posterior spinal arteries supplemented by radicular arteries in the lumbar and sacral segments of the cord.

  20. Transcutaneous Spinal Direct Current Stimulation (tsDCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo eCogiamanian

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the past ten years renewed interest has centered on non-invasive transcutaneous weak direct currents applied over the scalp to modulate cortical excitability (brain polarization or transcranial direct current stimulation, tDCS. Extensive literature shows that tDCS induces marked changes in cortical excitability that outlast stimulation.Aiming at developing a new, non invasive, approach to spinal cord neuromodulation we assessed the after-effects of thoracic transcutaneous spinal DC stimulation (tsDCS on somatosensory potentials (SEPs evoked in healthy subjects by posterior tibial nerve (PTN stimulation. Our findings showed that thoracic anodal tsDCS depresses the cervico-medullary PTN-SEP component (P30 without eliciting adverse effects. tsDCS also modulates post-activation H-reflex dynamics. Later works further confirmed that transcutaneous electric fields modulate spinal cord function. Subsequent studies in our laboratory showed that tsDCS modulates the flexion reflex in the human lower limb. Besides influencing the laser evoked potentials, tsDCS increases pain tolerance in healthy subjects. Hence, though the underlying mechanisms remain speculative, tsDCS modulates activity in lemniscal, spinothalamic and segmental motor systems.Here we review currently available experimental evidence that non-invasive spinal cord stimulation influences spinal function in humans and argue that, by focally modulating spinal excitability, tsDCS could provide a novel therapeutic tool complementary to drugs and invasive spinal cord stimulation in managing various pathologic conditions, including pain.

  1. Intrinsic response of thoracic propriospinal neurons to axotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelzner Dennis J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central nervous system axons lack a robust regenerative response following spinal cord injury (SCI and regeneration is usually abortive. Supraspinal pathways, which are the most commonly studied for their regenerative potential, demonstrate a limited regenerative ability. On the other hand, propriospinal (PS neurons, with axons intrinsic to the spinal cord, have shown a greater regenerative response than their supraspinal counterparts, but remain relatively understudied in regards to spinal cord injury. Results Utilizing laser microdissection, gene-microarray, qRT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry, we focused on the intrinsic post-axotomy response of specifically labelled thoracic propriospinal neurons at periods from 3-days to 1-month following T9 spinal cord injury. We found a strong and early (3-days post injury, p.i upregulation in the expression of genes involved in the immune/inflammatory response that returned towards normal by 1-week p.i. In addition, several regeneration associated and cell survival/neuroprotective genes were significantly up-regulated at the earliest p.i. period studied. Significant upregulation of several growth factor receptor genes (GFRa1, Ret, Lifr also occurred only during the initial period examined. The expression of a number of pro-apoptotic genes up-regulated at 3-days p.i. suggest that changes in gene expression after this period may have resulted from analyzing surviving TPS neurons after the cell death of the remainder of the axotomized TPS neuronal population. Conclusions Taken collectively these data demonstrate that thoracic propriospinal (TPS neurons mount a very dynamic response following low thoracic axotomy that includes a strong regenerative response, but also results in the cell death of many axotomized TPS neurons in the first week after spinal cord injury. These data also suggest that the immune/inflammatory response may have an important role in mediating the early strong

  2. Spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, R N; Ben Husien, M

    2018-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains endemic in many parts of the developing world and is increasingly seen in the developed world due to migration. A total of 1.3 million people die annually from the disease. Spinal TB is the most common musculoskeletal manifestation, affecting about 1 to 2% of all cases of TB. The coexistence of HIV, which is endemic in some regions, adds to the burden and the complexity of management. This review discusses the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, impact of HIV and both the medical and surgical options in the management of spinal TB. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:425-31.

  3. The evolution of thoracic anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Jay B

    2005-02-01

    The specialty of thoracic surgery has evolved along with the modem practice of anesthesia. This close relationship began in the 1930s and continues today. Thoracic surgery has grown from a field limited almost exclusively to simple chest wall procedures to the present situation in which complex procedures, such as lung volume reduction or lung transplantation, now can be performed on the most severely compromised patient. The great advances in thoracic surgery have followed discoveries and technical innovations in many medical fields. One of the most important reasons for the rapid escalation in the number and complexity of thoracic surgical procedures now being performed has been the evolution of anesthesia for thoracic surgery. There has been so much progress in this area that numerous books and journals are devoted entirely to this subject. The author has been privileged to work with several surgeons who specialized in noncardiac thoracic surgery. As a colleague of 25 years, the noted pulmonary surgeon James B.D. Mark wrote, "Any operation is a team effort... (but) nowhere is this team effort more important than in thoracic surgery, where near-choreography of moves by all participants is essential. Exchange of information, status and plans are mandatory". This team approach between the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesiologist reflects the history of the two specialties. With new advances in technology, such as continuous blood gas monitoring and the pharmacologic management of pulmonary circulation to maximize oxygenation during one-lung ventilation, in the future even more complex procedures may be able to be performed safely on even higher risk patients.

  4. Role of allografts in spinal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz Nather

    1999-01-01

    With development of more tissue banks in the region and internationally, allografts are increasingly being used in orthopaedic surgery including spinal surgery. Two groups of patients will particularly benefit from the use of allografts. The first group is young children in whom iliac crest is cartilaginous and cannot provide sufficient quantity of autografts. The second is the elderly where bones from iliac crest are porotic and fatty. Allografts are used to fulfill two distinct functions in Spinal Surgery. One is to act as a buttress for anterior spinal surgery using cortical allografts. The other is to enhance fusion for posterior spinal surgery. Up to December 1997, 71 transplantations have been performed using allografts from NUH Tissue Bank. Anterior Spinal Surgery has been performed in 15 cases. The indications are mainly Trauma-Burst Fractures and Spinal Secondaries to the Spine. All cases are in thoracic and thoracolumbar region. Allografts used are deep frozen and freeze-dried cortical allografts. Femur is used for thoraco-lumbar region and humerus for upper thoracic region. Instrumentation used ranged from anterior devices (Canada, DCP, Synergy etc) to posterior devices (ISOLA). Deep frozen allografts and more recently freeze-dried allografts are preferred especially for osteoporotic spines. Cortical allografts are packed with autografts from ribs in the medullary canal. Allograft-autograft composites are always used to ensure better incorporation. Postero-lateral fusion has been performed for 56 cases. The indications include congenital and idiopathic scoliosis, degenerative stenosis, degenerative spondylolisthesis, spondylolytic spondylolisthesis, fracture-dislocation, osteoporotic burst fracture, spinal secondaries with cord compression and traumatic spondylolisthesis. Deep frozen bone allografts are used in combination with patient's own autografts from spinous processes to provide a 50% mix. Instrumentation used include Hartshill, Steffee, Isola

  5. Extramedullary spinal teratoma presenting with recurrent aseptic meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpayo, Lucy L; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Xu, Man; Wang, Kai; Wang, Jiao; Yang, Li

    2014-06-01

    Spinal teratomas are extremely rare; they constitute meningitis. A 7-year-old boy presented with paroxysmal abdominal pain and a history of recurrent aseptic meningitis. Kernig and Brudzinski signs were present. Lumber puncture revealed pleocytosis with no evidence of bacteria growth. Imaging of the spine revealed a cystic lesion in spinal cord at thoracic level 9-11. Endoscopic excision of the cyst was successfully performed. Surgical and histopathological findings confirmed extramedullary matured teratoma. As the symptomatic attacks of spontaneous rupture of spinal teratoma resemble presentations of Mollaret meningitis, spinal teratoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Mollaret meningitis. We describe a rare example of spinal teratoma causing recurrent meningitis. Spine imaging should be considered in individuals with recurrent aseptic meningitis as this promotes earlier diagnosis, more appropriate treatment, and improved neurological outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Modeling Stone Columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Jorge

    2017-07-11

    This paper reviews the main modeling techniques for stone columns, both ordinary stone columns and geosynthetic-encased stone columns. The paper tries to encompass the more recent advances and recommendations in the topic. Regarding the geometrical model, the main options are the "unit cell", longitudinal gravel trenches in plane strain conditions, cylindrical rings of gravel in axial symmetry conditions, equivalent homogeneous soil with improved properties and three-dimensional models, either a full three-dimensional model or just a three-dimensional row or slice of columns. Some guidelines for obtaining these simplified geometrical models are provided and the particular case of groups of columns under footings is also analyzed. For the latter case, there is a column critical length that is around twice the footing width for non-encased columns in a homogeneous soft soil. In the literature, the column critical length is sometimes given as a function of the column length, which leads to some disparities in its value. Here it is shown that the column critical length mainly depends on the footing dimensions. Some other features related with column modeling are also briefly presented, such as the influence of column installation. Finally, some guidance and recommendations are provided on parameter selection for the study of stone columns.

  7. Irradiation of the thoracic esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, S.; Muller-Runkel, R.

    1986-01-01

    A vast majority of patients with esophageal cancer receive radiation therapy for cure or palliation. Because of the close anatomic proximity of the esophagus to the spinal cord, and unusually long fields used in the irradiation of esophageal cancer, staying within the spinal cord tolerance is crucial. The present investigation shows how this can be achieved by delivering the radiation in prone position. (orig.)

  8. IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhang; Tongxi, Liu; Jie, Luo; Yujuan, Jiao; Wei, Jiang; Xia, Liu; Yumin, Zheng; Xin, Lu

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to study the clinical, laboratory, imaging pathology, and prognosis features of IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis. We worked with a 55-year-old man suffering from IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis who had the most widespread lesion in his dura mater. We also review previous related studies and discuss the clinical characteristics of this rare disease. In total, eight IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis patients have been reported in the literature since 2009. They were mostly male patients, 51.7 ± 11.9 years old on average. Cervical and thoracic vertebrae were the most common sites for lesions. The most prominent symptom was varying numbness and weakness of the limbs and/or body associated with spinal cord compression. There was one patient (1/5) with elevated serum IgG4 levels and three patients (3/3) with increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) IgG4 index. Positive histopathologic findings are the strongest basis for a diagnosis. All the patients with IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis responded well to glucocorticoid therapy. IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis is an orphan disease that mainly occurs in cervical and thoracic vertebrae. Older males are the most susceptible group. Serum IgG4 levels were consistently normal in these cases, so analysis of CSF for IgG4 production (IgG4 index) could become a useful tool. Pathological findings remain the gold standard for diagnosis. Most patients responded favorably to glucocorticoid treatment.

  9. Pediatric thoracic SCIWORA after back bend during dance practice: a retrospective case series and analysis of trauma mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jian; Zeng, Gao; Ma, Yong-Jie; Chen, Nan; Chen, Zan; Ling, Feng; Zhang, Hong-Qi

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe a unique type of low-energy traumatic pediatric thoracic spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality (SCIWORA) after a back bend during dance practice and analyze the trauma mechanisms and treatment protocols. This was a retrospective case series from September 2007 to August 2016. The study was conducted at a tertiary medical center in Beijing, China (Xuanwu Hospital, China International Neuroscience Institute [China-INI], Capital Medical University). A total of 12 pediatric patients who had a clear traumatic history after back bend movements and had been diagnosed with thoracic SCIWORA were included. Clinical and imaging data were obtained for each patient. The follow-up data was analyzed. The traumatic mechanisms were investigated by analyzing the patients' medical history, spinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fiber tractography data. Of the 12 patients, 11 (91.7%) were younger than 8 years old. The mean age of the patients was 6.6 years. All patients had a clear traumatic history of severe thoracic spinal cord injury after performing back bend movements. The mean follow-up time was 36.5 months. During the follow-up period, 1 patient (8.3%) recovered completely, and 11 patients (91.7%) had unfavorable prognoses, including 4 (33.3%) with incomplete recovery and 7 (58.3%) with no change. Two patients underwent spinal DTI, which showed rupture of the nerve fiber bundle in the section of the injury. Back bend movements performed during dance practice may cause pediatric thoracic SCIWORA, particularly in children younger than 8 years old. We suggest that the mechanism of primary injury is the longitudinal distraction of the thoracic spine during back bend movements, which leads to violent distraction of the spinal cord and blunt injury of nerve axons, nerve cells, and small vessels. Spinal DTI may facilitate the diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of SCIWORA.

  10. The cat vertebral column: stance configuration and range of motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, J. M.; Ye, Y.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the configuration of the vertebral column of the cat during independent stance and in various flexed positions. The range of motion in the sagittal plane is similar across most thoracic and lumbar joints, with the exception of a lesser range at the transition region from thoracic-type to lumbar-type vertebrae. The upper thoracic column exhibits most of its range in dorsiflexion and the lower thoracic and lumbar in ventroflexion. Lateral flexion is limited to less than 5 degrees at all segments. The range in torsion is almost 180 degrees and occurs primarily in the midthoracic region, T4-T11. Contrary to the depiction in most atlases, the standing cat exhibits several curvatures, including a mild dorsiflexion in the lower lumbar segments, a marked ventroflexion in the lower thoracic and upper lumbar segments, and a profound dorsiflexion in the upper thoracic (above T9) and cervical segments. The curvatures are not significantly changed by altering stance distance but are affected by head posture. During stance, the top of the scapula lies well above the spines of the thoracic vertebrae, and the glenohumeral joint is just below the bodies of vertebrae T3-T5. Using a simple static model of the vertebral column in the sagittal plane, it was estimated that the bending moment due to gravity is bimodal with a dorsiflexion moment in the lower thoracic and lumbar region and a ventroflexion moment in the upper thoracic and cervical region. Given the bending moments and the position of the scapula during stance, it is proposed that two groups of scapular muscles provide the major antigravity support for the head and anterior trunk. Levator scapulae and serratus ventralis form the lateral group, inserting on the lateral processes of cervical vertebrae and on the ribs. The major and minor rhomboids form the medial group, inserting on the spinous tips of vertebrae from C4 to T4. It is also proposed that the hypaxial muscles, psoas major, minor, and quadratus

  11. A case of severe congenital kyphoscoliosis secondary to multiple bilateral thoracic pedicle aplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geoffray, Anne; Leloutre, Beatrice; Albertario, Marco; Bechard-Sevette, Nancy; Clement, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    A 9-month-old boy with congenital kyphoscoliosis secondary to multiple bilateral thoracic pedicle aplasias is presented. This anomaly has rarely been described in the literature. Plain films showed absence of thoracic pedicles bilaterally from T2 to T9, which was better demonstrated on CT multiplanar and 3-D reformatted images. There were no neurological symptoms even though the deformity progressed rapidly. Congenital kyphosis or kyphoscoliosis is often related to spinal anomalies that are located on the anterior aspect of the vertebrae. However, posterior anomalies may also be responsible and should be recognized before neurological complications occur. (orig.)

  12. SU-F-T-642: Sub Millimeter Accurate Setup of More Than Three Vertebrae in Spinal SBRT with 6D Couch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X; Zhao, Z; Yang, J; Yang, J; McAleer, M; Brown, P; Li, J; Ghia, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the initial setup accuracy in treating more than 3 vertebral body levels in spinal SBRT using a 6D couch. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed last 20 spinal SBRT patients (4 cervical, 9 thoracic, 7 lumbar/sacrum) treated in our clinic. These patients in customized immobilization device were treated in 1 or 3 fractions. Initial setup used ExacTrac and Brainlab 6D couch to align target within 1 mm and 1 degree, following by a cone beam CT (CBCT) for verification. Our current standard practice allows treating a maximum of three continuous vertebrae. Here we assess the possibility to achieve sub millimeter setup accuracy for more than three vertebrae by examining the residual error in every slice of CBCT. The CBCT had a range of 17.5 cm, which covered 5 to 9 continuous vertebrae depending on the patient and target location. In the study, CBCT from the 1st fraction treatment was rigidly registered with the planning CT in Pinnacle. The residual setup error of a vertebra was determined by expanding the vertebra contour on the planning CT to be large enough to enclose the corresponding vertebra on CBCT. The margin of the expansion was considered as setup error. Results: Out of the 20 patients analyzed, initial setup accuracy can be achieved within 1 mm for a span of 5 or more vertebrae starting from T2 vertebra to inferior vertebra levels. 2 cervical and 2 upper thoracic patients showed the cervical spine was difficult to achieve sub millimeter accuracy for multi levels without a customized immobilization headrest. Conclusion: If the curvature of spinal columns can be reproduced in customized immobilization device during treatment as simulation, multiple continuous vertebrae can be setup within 1 mm with the use of a 6D couch.

  13. SU-F-T-642: Sub Millimeter Accurate Setup of More Than Three Vertebrae in Spinal SBRT with 6D Couch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X; Zhao, Z; Yang, J; Yang, J; McAleer, M; Brown, P; Li, J; Ghia, A [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the initial setup accuracy in treating more than 3 vertebral body levels in spinal SBRT using a 6D couch. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed last 20 spinal SBRT patients (4 cervical, 9 thoracic, 7 lumbar/sacrum) treated in our clinic. These patients in customized immobilization device were treated in 1 or 3 fractions. Initial setup used ExacTrac and Brainlab 6D couch to align target within 1 mm and 1 degree, following by a cone beam CT (CBCT) for verification. Our current standard practice allows treating a maximum of three continuous vertebrae. Here we assess the possibility to achieve sub millimeter setup accuracy for more than three vertebrae by examining the residual error in every slice of CBCT. The CBCT had a range of 17.5 cm, which covered 5 to 9 continuous vertebrae depending on the patient and target location. In the study, CBCT from the 1st fraction treatment was rigidly registered with the planning CT in Pinnacle. The residual setup error of a vertebra was determined by expanding the vertebra contour on the planning CT to be large enough to enclose the corresponding vertebra on CBCT. The margin of the expansion was considered as setup error. Results: Out of the 20 patients analyzed, initial setup accuracy can be achieved within 1 mm for a span of 5 or more vertebrae starting from T2 vertebra to inferior vertebra levels. 2 cervical and 2 upper thoracic patients showed the cervical spine was difficult to achieve sub millimeter accuracy for multi levels without a customized immobilization headrest. Conclusion: If the curvature of spinal columns can be reproduced in customized immobilization device during treatment as simulation, multiple continuous vertebrae can be setup within 1 mm with the use of a 6D couch.

  14. A Brain–Spinal Interface Alleviating Gait Deficits after Spinal Cord Injury in Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capogrosso, Marco; Milekovic, Tomislav; Borton, David; Wagner, Fabien; Moraud, Eduardo Martin; Mignardot, Jean-Baptiste; Buse, Nicolas; Gandar, Jerome; Barraud, Quentin; Xing, David; Rey, Elodie; Duis, Simone; Jianzhong, Yang; Ko, Wai Kin D.; Li, Qin; Detemple, Peter; Denison, Tim; Micera, Silvestro; Bezard, Erwan; Bloch, Jocelyne; Courtine, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury disrupts the communication between the brain and the spinal circuits that orchestrate movement. To bypass the lesion, brain–computer interfaces1–3 have directly linked cortical activity to electrical stimulation of muscles, which have restored grasping abilities after hand paralysis1,4. Theoretically, this strategy could also restore control over leg muscle activity for walking5. However, replicating the complex sequence of individual muscle activation patterns underlying natural and adaptive locomotor movements poses formidable conceptual and technological challenges6,7. Recently, we showed in rats that epidural electrical stimulation of the lumbar spinal cord can reproduce the natural activation of synergistic muscle groups producing locomotion8–10. Here, we interfaced leg motor cortex activity with epidural electrical stimulation protocols to establish a brain–spinal interface that alleviated gait deficits after a spinal cord injury in nonhuman primates. Rhesus monkeys were implanted with an intracortical microelectrode array into the leg area of motor cortex; and a spinal cord stimulation system composed of a spatially selective epidural implant and a pulse generator with real-time triggering capabilities. We designed and implemented wireless control systems that linked online neural decoding of extension and flexion motor states with stimulation protocols promoting these movements. These systems allowed the monkeys to behave freely without any restrictions or constraining tethered electronics. After validation of the brain–spinal interface in intact monkeys, we performed a unilateral corticospinal tract lesion at the thoracic level. As early as six days post-injury and without prior training of the monkeys, the brain–spinal interface restored weight-bearing locomotion of the paralyzed leg on a treadmill and overground. The implantable components integrated in the brain–spinal interface have all been approved for investigational

  15. Long-term modulation of the intrinsic cardiac nervous system by spinal cord neurons in normal and ischaemic hearts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armour, JA; Linderoth, B; Arora, RC; DeJongste, MJL; Ardell, JL; Kingma, JG; Hill, M; Foreman, RD

    2002-01-01

    Electrical excitation of the dorsal aspect of the rostral thoracic spinal cord imparts long-term therapeutic benefits to patients with angina pectoris. Such spinal cord stimulation also induces short-term suppressor effects on the intrinsic cardiac nervous system. The purpose of this study was to

  16. ( Anogeissus leiocarpus ) timber columns

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A procedure for designing axially loaded Ayin (Anogeissus leiocarpus) wood column or strut has been investigated. Instead of the usual categorization of columns into short, intermediate and slender according to the value of slenderness ratio, a continuous column formula representing the three categories was derived.

  17. Column Liquid Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majors, Ronald E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature covering developments of column liquid chromatography during 1982-83. Areas considered include: books and reviews; general theory; columns; instrumentation; detectors; automation and data handling; multidimensional chromatographic and column switching techniques; liquid-solid chromatography; normal bonded-phase, reversed-phase,…

  18. MRI findings of spinal visceral larva migrans of Toxocara canis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Ho, E-mail: leeinho1974@hanmail.ne [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Chungnam National University Hospital, 33 Munhwa-ro, Jung-gu, Daejeon 301-721 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Tae, E-mail: st7.kim@hotmail.co [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Dae Kun, E-mail: odk6464@nate.co [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung-Jin, E-mail: hyungkim@skku.ed [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Keon Ha, E-mail: somatom@skku.ed [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Pyoung, E-mail: drpjeon@gmail.co [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Hong Sik, E-mail: byun5474@skku.ed [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the MRI findings of visceral larva migrans (VLS) of Toxocara canis in spinal cord. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed spinal MRI findings in eight patients with serologically proven Toxocara canis between 2005 and 2008. We evaluated the location, length, extent and migration of the lesion, MR signal intensity (SI), enhancement pattern, and swelling of the spinal cord. We evaluated clinical features including presenting symptoms and signs and treatment response. Results: Total 8 patients (M = 8; age range 36-79 years) were included. The lesions were located in the cervical or thoracic spinal cord in all patients. All lesions showed high SI and minimal or mild swelling of involved spinal cord on T2WI and focal nodular enhancement on posterior or posterolateral segment of spinal cord. The length of involved lesion was relatively short in most patients. There was a migration of lesion in one patient. In spite of albendazole or steroid treatment, neurological symptoms or signs were not significantly improved in all patients. Conclusion: Although all lesions show non-specific imaging findings like non-tumorous myelopathy mimicking transverse myelitis, single lesion, focal nodular enhancement on posterior or posterolateral segment of spinal cord, relatively short segmental involvement and migration of lesion may be characteristic findings of spinal VLM of Toxocara canis. In addition, the reluctant response to the treatment may be characteristic of spinal VLM of Toxocara canis.

  19. MRI findings of spinal visceral larva migrans of Toxocara canis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Ho; Kim, Sung Tae; Oh, Dae Kun; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Keon Ha; Jeon, Pyoung; Byun, Hong Sik

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the MRI findings of visceral larva migrans (VLS) of Toxocara canis in spinal cord. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed spinal MRI findings in eight patients with serologically proven Toxocara canis between 2005 and 2008. We evaluated the location, length, extent and migration of the lesion, MR signal intensity (SI), enhancement pattern, and swelling of the spinal cord. We evaluated clinical features including presenting symptoms and signs and treatment response. Results: Total 8 patients (M = 8; age range 36-79 years) were included. The lesions were located in the cervical or thoracic spinal cord in all patients. All lesions showed high SI and minimal or mild swelling of involved spinal cord on T2WI and focal nodular enhancement on posterior or posterolateral segment of spinal cord. The length of involved lesion was relatively short in most patients. There was a migration of lesion in one patient. In spite of albendazole or steroid treatment, neurological symptoms or signs were not significantly improved in all patients. Conclusion: Although all lesions show non-specific imaging findings like non-tumorous myelopathy mimicking transverse myelitis, single lesion, focal nodular enhancement on posterior or posterolateral segment of spinal cord, relatively short segmental involvement and migration of lesion may be characteristic findings of spinal VLM of Toxocara canis. In addition, the reluctant response to the treatment may be characteristic of spinal VLM of Toxocara canis.

  20. Epicritic Sensation in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: Diagnostic Gains Beyond Testing Light Touch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velstra, Inge-Marie; Bolliger, Marc; Baumberger, Michael; Rietman, Johan Swanik; Curt, Armin

    2013-01-01

    Applied as a bedside test of gross dorsal column function, the testing of light touch (LT) sensation is of high clinical value in the diagnosis of human spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the assessment of overall dorsal column deficit by testing only LT may be limited, because the dorsal column

  1. Symptomatic Thoracic Nerve Root Herniation into an Extradural Arachnoid Cyst : Case Report and Review of the Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shanbhag, Nagesh C.; Duyff, Ruurd F.; Groen, Rob J. M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spinal extradural arachnoid cysts (SEACs) are relatively rare and usually asymptomatic. They preferentially are situated in the thoracic extradural space and almost always dorsal. SEACs may present with back pain and/or cord compression symptoms. Needle aspiration, needle fenestration,

  2. Diffusion tensor imaging in spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Wen; Hao, Nanxin; Wang, Yibin; Zong, Genlin

    2012-01-01

    Background Although diffusion tensor imaging has been successfully applied in brain research for decades, several main difficulties have hindered its extended utilization in spinal cord imaging. Purpose To assess the feasibility and clinical value of diffusion tensor imaging and tractography for evaluating chronic spinal cord compression. Material and Methods Single-shot spin-echo echo-planar DT sequences were scanned in 42 spinal cord compression patients and 49 healthy volunteers. The mean values of the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy were measured in region of interest at the cervical and lower thoracic spinal cord. The patients were divided into two groups according to the high signal on T2WI (the SCC-HI group and the SCC-nHI group for with or without high signal). A one-way ANOVA was used. Diffusion tensor tractography was used to visualize the morphological features of normal and impaired white matter. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy values between the different spinal cord segments of the normal subjects. All of the patients in the SCC-HI group had increased apparent diffusion coefficient values and decreased fractional anisotropy values at the lesion level compared to the normal controls. However, there were no statistically significant diffusion index differences between the SCC-nHI group and the normal controls. In the diffusion tensor imaging maps, the normal spinal cord sections were depicted as fiber tracts that were color-encoded to a cephalocaudal orientation. The diffusion tensor images were compressed to different degrees in all of the patients. Conclusion Diffusion tensor imaging and tractography are promising methods for visualizing spinal cord tracts and can provide additional information in clinical studies in spinal cord compression

  3. Computed Tomography Based Three-dimensional Measurements of Spine Shortening Distance After Posterior Three-column Osteotomies for the Treatment of Severe and Stiff Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-Shi; Huang, Zi-Fang; Deng, Yao-Long; Fan, Heng-Wei; Sui, Wen-Yuan; Wang, Chong-Wen; Yang, Jun-Lin

    2017-07-15

    Retrospective study. This study is to measure and analyze the changes of three-dimensional (3D) distances of spinal column and spinal canal at the three-column osteotomy sites and address their clinical and neurologic significance. Three-column osteotomies were developed to treat severe and stiff spine deformities with insufficient understanding on the safe limit of spine shortening and the relationship between the shortening distance of the spinal column and that of the spinal canal. Records of 52 continuous patients with severe and stiff scoliosis treated with three-column spine osteotomies at our institution from July 2013 to June 2015 were reviewed. The preoperative spinal cord function classification were type A in 31 cases, type B in 10 cases, and type C in 11 cases. The types of osteotomies carried out were extended pedicle subtraction osteotomy in nine patients and posterior vertebral column resection in 43 patients. Multimodality neuromonitoring strategies were adopted intraoperatively. 3D pre- and postoperative spine models were reconstructed from the computed tomography (CT) scans. The distances of convex and concave spinal column and the spinal canal shortening were measured and analyzed. The spinal column shortening distance (SCSD) measured on the 3D models (27.8 mm) were statistically shorter than those measured intraoperatively (32.8 mm) (P column strut graft than in those with bone-on-bone fusion (P column cannot represent that of the central spinal canal in patients with severe scoliosis. The spinal column shortening procedure in appropriately selected patient groups with bone-on-bone fusion is a viable option with the CCSD being significantly shorter than the convex SCSD. 4.

  4. Automated Detection, Localization, and Classification of Traumatic Vertebral Body Fractures in the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine at CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Joseph E; Yao, Jianhua; Muñoz, Hector; Summers, Ronald M

    2016-01-01

    To design and validate a fully automated computer system for the detection and anatomic localization of traumatic thoracic and lumbar vertebral body fractures at computed tomography (CT). This retrospective study was HIPAA compliant. Institutional review board approval was obtained, and informed consent was waived. CT examinations in 104 patients (mean age, 34.4 years; range, 14-88 years; 32 women, 72 men), consisting of 94 examinations with positive findings for fractures (59 with vertebral body fractures) and 10 control examinations (without vertebral fractures), were performed. There were 141 thoracic and lumbar vertebral body fractures in the case set. The locations of fractures were marked and classified by a radiologist according to Denis column involvement. The CT data set was divided into training and testing subsets (37 and 67 subsets, respectively) for analysis by means of prototype software for fully automated spinal segmentation and fracture detection. Free-response receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed. Training set sensitivity for detection and localization of fractures within each vertebra was 0.82 (28 of 34 findings; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.68, 0.90), with a false-positive rate of 2.5 findings per patient. The sensitivity for fracture localization to the correct vertebra was 0.88 (23 of 26 findings; 95% CI: 0.72, 0.96), with a false-positive rate of 1.3. Testing set sensitivity for the detection and localization of fractures within each vertebra was 0.81 (87 of 107 findings; 95% CI: 0.75, 0.87), with a false-positive rate of 2.7. The sensitivity for fracture localization to the correct vertebra was 0.92 (55 of 60 findings; 95% CI: 0.79, 0.94), with a false-positive rate of 1.6. The most common cause of false-positive findings was nutrient foramina (106 of 272 findings [39%]). The fully automated computer system detects and anatomically localizes vertebral body fractures in the thoracic and lumbar spine on CT images with a

  5. Spine segmentation from C-arm CT data sets: application to region-of-interest volumes for spinal interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerger, C.; Lorenz, C.; Babic, D.; Hoppenbrouwers, J.; Homan, R.; Nachabe, R.; Racadio, J. M.; Grass, M.

    2017-03-01

    Spinal fusion is a common procedure to stabilize the spinal column by fixating parts of the spine. In such procedures, metal screws are inserted through the patients back into a vertebra, and the screws of adjacent vertebrae are connected by metal rods to generate a fixed bridge. In these procedures, 3D image guidance for intervention planning and outcome control is required. Here, for anatomical guidance, an automated approach for vertebra segmentation from C-arm CT images of the spine is introduced and evaluated. As a prerequisite, 3D C-arm CT images are acquired covering the vertebrae of interest. An automatic model-based segmentation approach is applied to delineate the outline of the vertebrae of interest. The segmentation approach is based on 24 partial models of the cervical, thoracic and lumbar vertebrae which aggregate information about (i) the basic shape itself, (ii) trained features for image based adaptation, and (iii) potential shape variations. Since the volume data sets generated by the C-arm system are limited to a certain region of the spine the target vertebra and hence initial model position is assigned interactively. The approach was trained and tested on 21 human cadaver scans. A 3-fold cross validation to ground truth annotations yields overall mean segmentation errors of 0.5 mm for T1 to 1.1 mm for C6. The results are promising and show potential to support the clinician in pedicle screw path and rod planning to allow accurate and reproducible insertions.

  6. Adjacent segment degeneration after lumbar spinal fusion: the impact of anterior column support: a randomized clinical trial with an eight- to thirteen-year magnetic resonance imaging follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videbaek, Tina S; Egund, Niels; Christensen, Finn B; Grethe Jurik, Anne; Bünger, Cody E

    2010-10-15

    Randomized controlled trial. To analyze long-term adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) after lumbar fusion on magnetic resonance imaging and compare randomization groups with and without anterior column support. ASD can be a long-term complication after fusion. The prevalence and the cause of ASD are not well documented, but ASD are one of the main arguments for introducing the use of motion-preserving techniques as an alternative to fusion. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral lumbar fusion (ALIF+PLF) has been proved superior to posterolateral fusion alone regarding outcome and cost-effectiveness. Between 1996 and 1999, 148 patients with severe chronic low back pain were randomly selected for ALIF+PLF or for PLF alone. Ninety-five patients participated. ASD was examined on magnetic resonance imaging with regard to disc degeneration, disc herniation, stenosis, and endplate changes. Disc heights on radiographs taken at index surgery and at long-term follow-up were compared. Outcome was assessed by validated questionnaires. The follow-up rate was 76%. ASD was similar between randomization groups. In the total cohort, endplate changes were seen in 26% of the participants and correlated significantly with the presence of disc degeneration and disc herniation. Disc degeneration and dorsal disc herniation were the parameters registered most frequently and were significantly more pronounced at the first adjacent level than at the second and the third adjacent levels. Patients without disc height reduction over time were significantly younger than patients with disc height reduction. Disc degeneration and stenosis correlated significantly with outcome at the first adjacent level. The cause of the superior outcome in the group with anterior support is still unclear. Compared with the findings reported in the literature, the prevalence of ASD is likely to be in concordance with the expected changes in a nonoperated symptomatic population and therefore

  7. Re-irradiation of the human spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sminia, P.; Oldenburger, F.; Hulshof, M.C.C.M.; Slotman, B.J.; Schneider, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Experimental animal data give evidence of long-term recovery of the spinal cord after irradiation. By extrapolation of these data, re-irradiation regimes were designed for eight patients who required palliative radiotherapy. As a consequence of reirradiation, their spinal cords were exposed to cumulative doses exceeding the tolerance dose. Radiobiological and clinical data are presented. Patients and method: Eight patients were re-irradiated on the cervical (n=1), thoracic (n=5) and lumbar (n=2) spinal cord. The time interval between the initial and re-treatment ranged from 4 months to 12.7 years (median: 2.5 years). (Re-)treatment schemes were designed and analyzed on basis of the biologically effective dose (BED) according to the linear-quadratic model. The repair capacity (α/β ratio) for the cervico-thoracic and lumbar spinal cord was assumed to be 2 Gy and 4 Gy, with a BED tolerance of 100 Gy and 84 Gy, respectively. Results: The cumulative irradiation dose applied to the spinal cord varied between 125 and 172% of the BED tolerance . During follow-up, ranging from 33 days to >4.5 years (median: 370 days) none of the patients developed neurological complications. Seven patients died from tumor progression, and one patient is still alive. Conclusion: Long-term recovery of the spinal cord from radiation injury, which has been demonstrated in rodents and primates, may also occur in humans. (orig.) [de

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injury? play_arrow What kind of surgery is common after a spinal cord injury? play_ ... How soon after a spinal cord injury should surgery be performed? play_arrow Is it common to ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury ... Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical Director, Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Program, Rehabilitation Institute ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 ...

  15. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  17. Thoracic complications of rheumatoid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massey, H.; Darby, M.; Edey, A.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a relatively common multisystem disease associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Thoracic disease, both pleural and pulmonary, is a frequent extra-articular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis and responsible for approximately 20% of rheumatoid-associated mortality. Rheumatoid disease and its associated therapies can affect all compartments of the lung inciting a range of stereotyped pathological responses and it is not infrequent for multiple disease entities to co-exist. In some instances, development of pulmonary complications may precede typical rheumatological presentation of the disease and be the first indication of an underlying connective tissue disease. The spectrum of thoracic disease related to rheumatoid arthritis is reviewed

  18. Thoracic outlet syndrome: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez, Juan Camilo; Acosta, Mauricio Fernando; Uribe Jorge Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of vascular thoracic outlet syndrome in a young man, diagnosed with upper limb arteriography, leading to repeated arterio-arterial emboli originating from a post-stenotic subclavian artery aneurysm. It is of our interest due to its low incidence and the small number of cases reported that have been diagnosed by arteriography. The thoracic outlet is the path through which vascular and neural structures goes from the neck to the axilla, and it has three anatomical strictures, that when pronounced, can compress the brachial plexus or subclavian vessels, leading to different symptoms and signs.

  19. Spinal cord contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yazhou; Zhao, Xianghui

    2014-04-15

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and limited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  20. Thoracic intradural arachnoid cyst: Possible pitfalls with myelo-CT and MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietemann, J.L.; Filippi de la Palavesa, M.M.; Kastler, B.; Warter, J.M.; Buchheit, F.

    1991-01-01

    A thoracic intradural arachnoid cyst presenting as an intradural extramedullary mass highly suggestive of psammoma on myelogram and myelo-CT is reported in a 34-year-old female. High densities of the cyst were related to collection of contrast media within the cyst. However MR examination of the thoracic spinal cord including sagittal T1 (without and with contrast) and T2 studies failed to demonstrate the mass. Lack of MR changes were related on one hand to the small size of the cyst and to the absence of mass effect on the spinal cord, and on the other hand to a CSF-like signal of the contents of the cyst. Only combination of myelography, myelo-CT and MR allows precise diagnosis of small intradual arachnoid cysts; however MR is the method of choice for evaluation of large intradural subarachnoid cysts. (orig.)

  1. Neuroradiological investigations and findings in spinal vascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogelsang, H [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    1980-02-01

    Neuroradiological examinations play a great role today in spinal blood flow disturbances due to spinal vascular disease. This goes for myelography with its new aqueous contrast medium Amipaque as well as for selective spinal arteriography, also with regard to therapeutical approaches (embolisation). Other causes of blood flow disturbances, however - with the exception of growing and displacing processes of the spinal column and spinal canal - cannot be detected by radiological methods or only indirectly; examinations with contrasting agents can only serve for diagnosis by exclusion. The article deals mainly with techniques and findings of examinations for spinal angioma which account for 7 to 11% of growing and displacing processes of the spine. Progress in diagnosis and therapeutical success has been accelerated by technical developments and new contrasting agents as well as by improved surgical techniques.

  2. An interesting case of primary spinal arachnoiditis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vaughan, Denis

    2012-02-27

    Spinal arachnoiditis describes inflammation of the meninges, subarachnoid space and, in most cases, also involve the pial layer. The vast majority of cases described are secondary and are preceded by a known event, for example,. trauma, infections or irritative substances. Here, we present the case of primary spinal arachnoiditis. A 35-year-old lady was referred to the neurosurgical services in Dublin, Ireland with a 15-month history of progressive, right lower limb weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed cystic distortion of the lumbar spinal canal extending up to the conus. Initially, an L2-L4 laminectomy was performed revealing thickened and adherent arachnoid with a large cyst in the spinal canal. Four months after initial operation, the patient represented with bilateral lower limb weakness and loss of detrusor function. Repeat magnetic resonance imaging was performed, which showed the development of a syrinx in the patient\\'s thoracic spine. We then performed a T9-T10 laminectomy, midline myelotomy and insertion of a syringe-arachnoid shunt. Post-operative imaging showed resolution of the syrinx and a vast improvement in lower limb power. The patient also regained bladder control. In conclusion, spinal arachnoiditis is a clearly defined pathological and radiological entity with a highly variable clinical presentation. It is exceedingly difficult to treat as there is no recognised treatment currently, with most interventions aimed at symptomatic relief.

  3. Radiologic analysis of the spinal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyoung Sang; Suh, Jin Suck; Park, Chang Yun

    1986-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains high incidental disease in Korea with an estimated incidence of 2.5% in general population. Among the tuberculosis of bone, spinal tuberculous is high incidence and curable disease, but early treatment demands early diagnosis. Authors reviewed clinical aspects of 376 cases, and reviewed conventional films of 74 cases and computed tomography of 8 cases, confirmed histopathologically as spinal tuberculosis from Jan. 1976 to May 1985 at Yonsei medical center, Yonsei University. The results were as follows: 1. The frequent site of involvement were lower thoracic and lumbar vertebra, 4th lumbar vertebra was the most common lesion site among them. 2. The separated lesions were 10.2% among spinal lesion. 3. The most common type and pattern of bone density was intervertebral type and mixed pattern each other. 4. Paravertebral abscess, kyphosis and narrowing of intervertebral disc space were discovered more than 80% in reviewed conventional films. 5. In children, there is no predilection site. 6. Spinal computed tomography was more accurate diagnostic method than conventional study in the evaluation of following aspects; 1) extent of lesion 2) degree of spinal canal involvement 3) change of surrounding organ

  4. Thoracic chordoma: CT and MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Yoo Mi; Hwang, Hee Young; Kim, Sang Joon; Chung, Hyo Sun; Han, Heon

    1993-01-01

    Chordoma arising from the notochordal remnants is a rare primary bone tumor in the cervicosacral region and is even more unusual in the thoracic region. The authors experienced a case of thoracic chordoma and reports its CT and MR findings

  5. False localizing sign of cervico-thoracic CSF leak in spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schievink, Wouter I; Maya, M Marcel; Chu, Ray M; Moser, Franklin G

    2015-06-16

    Spontaneous spinal CSF leaks are an important cause of new-onset headaches. Such leaks are reported to be particularly common at the cervico-thoracic junction. The authors undertook a study to determine the significance of these cervico-thoracic CSF leaks. The patient population consisted of a consecutive group of 13 patients who underwent surgery for CSF leak repair based on CT myelography showing CSF extravasation at the cervico-thoracic junction but without any evidence of an underlying structural lesion. The mean age of the 9 women and 4 men was 41.2 years. Extensive extrathecal longitudinal CSF collections were demonstrated in 11 patients. At surgery, small leaking arachnoid cysts were found in 2 patients. In the remaining 11 patients, no clear source of CSF leakage could be identified at surgery. Resolution of symptoms was achieved in both patients with leaking arachnoid cysts, but in only 3 of the 11 patients with negative intraoperative findings. Postoperative spinal imaging was performed in 9 of the 11 patients with negative intraoperative findings and showed persistence of the longitudinal intraspinal extradural CSF. Further imaging revealed the site of the CSF leak to be ventral to the thoracic spinal cord. Five of these patients underwent microsurgical repair of the ventral CSF leak with resolution of symptoms in all 5 patients. Cervico-thoracic extravasation of dye on myelography does not necessarily indicate the site of the CSF leak. Treatment directed at this site should not be expected to have a high probability of sustained improvement of symptoms. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Intramedullary capillary hemangioma of the thoracic spine: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Santiago

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Capillary hemangiomas are benign vascular neoplasms. When associated with the spine, these growths frequently involve the vertebral body, but rarely have they been reported to occur as intradural lesions, while even more rarely occurring in a true intramedullary location. We report a rare case of an intrame-dullary capillary hemangioma of the thoracic spinal cord and a review of the literature.

  7. Diffuse arachnoid ossification and multiple arachnoid cysts presenting with progressive thoracic myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Toshinori; Sairyo, Koichi; Kashima, Masahiro; Kosaka, Hirofumi; Katoh, Shinsuke; Yasui, Natsuo [The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Department of Orthopedics, Institute of Health Biosciences, Tokushima (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    An ossified arachnoid membrane combined with cystic formation is rarely reported as a cause of spinal cord compression. We report the case of a 60-year-old man who presented with diffuse ossification of the arachnoid membrane (arachnoid ossification) and multiple cystic changes (arachnoid cyst) at the thoracic and lumbar spine. The lesions were surgically removed and progressive deterioration was prevented, although no marked improvement of neurological symptoms was attained. (orig.)

  8. Chondrosarcoma of a thoracic vertebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahab, I.F.; Casden, A.M.; Klein, M.J.; Spollman, A.

    1991-01-01

    Central chondrosarcoma is an uncommon primary malignancy of the axial skeleton which usually affects the posterior elements or the posterior part of a vertebral body. The authors present an unusual case of chondrosarcoma involving the anterior part of a thoracic vertebra with massive extravertebral extension into the posterior mediastinum. The roles of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in identifying this pathology are emphasized

  9. Nanotechnology applications in thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofferberth, Sophie C; Grinstaff, Mark W; Colson, Yolonda L

    2016-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging, rapidly evolving field with the potential to significantly impact care across the full spectrum of cancer therapy. Of note, several recent nanotechnological advances show particular promise to improve outcomes for thoracic surgical patients. A variety of nanotechnologies are described that offer possible solutions to existing challenges encountered in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. Nanotechnology-based imaging platforms have the ability to improve the surgical care of patients with thoracic malignancies through technological advances in intraoperative tumour localization, lymph node mapping and accuracy of tumour resection. Moreover, nanotechnology is poised to revolutionize adjuvant lung cancer therapy. Common chemotherapeutic drugs, such as paclitaxel, docetaxel and doxorubicin, are being formulated using various nanotechnologies to improve drug delivery, whereas nanoparticle (NP)-based imaging technologies can monitor the tumour microenvironment and facilitate molecularly targeted lung cancer therapy. Although early nanotechnology-based delivery systems show promise, the next frontier in lung cancer therapy is the development of 'theranostic' multifunctional NPs capable of integrating diagnosis, drug monitoring, tumour targeting and controlled drug release into various unifying platforms. This article provides an overview of key existing and emerging nanotechnology platforms that may find clinical application in thoracic surgery in the near future. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  10. Lower thoracic degenerative spondylithesis with concomitant lumbar spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Po-Chuan; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Chen, Jyi-Feng

    2014-03-01

    Degenerative spondylolisthesis of the spine is less common in the lower thoracic region than in the lumbar and cervical regions. However, lower thoracic degenerative spondylolisthesis may develop secondary to intervertebral disc degeneration. Most of our patients are found to have concomitant lumbar spondylosis. By retrospective review of our cases, current diagnosis and treatments for this rare disease were discussed. We present a series of 5 patients who experienced low back pain, progressive numbness, weakness and even paraparesis. Initially, all of them were diagnosed with lumbar spondylosis at other clinics, and 1 patient had even received prior decompressive lumbar surgery. However, their symptoms continued to progress, even after conservative treatments or lumbar surgeries. These patients also showed wide-based gait, increased deep tendon reflex (DTR), and urinary difficulty. All these clinical presentations could not be explained solely by lumbar spondylosis. Thoracolumbar spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), neurophysiologic studies such as motor evoked potential (MEP) or somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP), and dynamic thoracolumbar lateral radiography were performed, and a final diagnosis of lower thoracic degenerative spondylolisthesis was made. Bilateral facet effusions, shown by hyperintense signals in T2 MRI sequence, were observed in all patients. Neurophysiologic studies revealed conduction defect of either MEP or SSEP. One patient refused surgical management because of personal reasons. However, with the use of thoracolumbar orthosis, his symptoms/signs stabilized, although partial lower leg myelopathy was present. The other patients received surgical decompression in association with fixation/fusion procedures performed for managing the thoracolumbar lesions. Three patients became symptom-free, whereas in 1 patient, paralysis set in before the operation; this patient was able to walk with assistance 6 months after surgical decompression

  11. Treatment of Pain and Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    currently investigating the effects of CG stimulation in subjects with debilitating pain due to cervical or thoracic SCI. This study stemmed from...had a low thoracic injury and pain in lumbar dermatomes, whereas Subject 1 had mainly mid- cervical pain that responded minimally to DBS and matched...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0559 TITLE: Treatment of Pain and Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain Stimulation PRINCIPAL

  12. Thoracic periaortal fibrosis and Ormond's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kacl, G.M.; Bino, M.; Salomon, F.; Risti, B.; Marincek, B.

    1995-01-01

    Two cases of thoracic periaortal fibrosis as a manifestation of retroperitoneal fibrosis (Ormond's disease) are shown on CT and MRI. Thoracic periaortal fibrosis can result in an inflammatory aneurysmo with chronic dissection. Manifestation of thoracic periaortal fibrosis may typically occur intermittently over decades. (orig.) [de

  13. Small Column Ion Exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huff, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) leverages a suite of technologies developed by DOE across the complex to achieve lifecycle savings. Technologies are applicable to multiple sites. Early testing supported multiple sites. Balance of SRS SCIX testing supports SRS deployment. A forma Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) was performed and selected Small Column Ion Exchange columns containing Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) in a 2-column lead/lag configuration. SEE considered use of Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF). Advantages of approach at SRS include: (1) no new buildings, (2) low volume of Cs waste in solid form compared to aqueous strip effluent; and availability of downstream processing facilities for immediate processing of spent resin.

  14. Acute Paraparesis Caused by a Giant Cell Tumor of the Thoracic Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Chun Chao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor (GCT is a benign but locally aggressive skeletal neoplasm of young adults. GCT located in the spine is relatively rare and may need a combination of surgical and adjunctive therapies. Here we present a patient who had intermittent thoracic back pain for two weeks and experienced an acute episode of decreased muscle power of both lower limbs. Magnetic resonance (MR imaging examinations of the thoracic spine revealed that the patient had severe spinal canal compression caused by pathological fracture due to a tumor within the seventh thoracic vertebra. She underwent an emergent surgical intervention for total removal of the tumor and spinal reconstruction with autologous rib grafts and instruments. Postoperatively, the patient made an uneventful recovery of muscle power of bilateral lower limbs. She subsequently received adjuvant radiotherapy. In a follow-up period of 36 months, the patient had no clinical or radiological evidence of tumor recurrence. Even though spinal location for GCT is a rare event, it should be included in the differential diagnosis in patients with osteolytic lesions or pathological fractures of the vertebra, especially in young female patients sustaining no trauma who had a clinical history of persistent low back pain.

  15. Production of lesions in rabbit spinal cord with microwave hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, C.H.; Popovic, P.

    1984-01-01

    The use of a variety of injury models in different species to produce spinal cord lesions by trauma or ischemia has often given rise to conflicting or inconclusive data. A new model has been developed in rabbits. Spinal cord lesions were produced in selected spinal cord segments of male New Zealand white rabbits by non-invasive irradiation with microwaves in the near field at 915 MHz. Graded injuries of predictable severity can be produced by the non-invasive induction of moderate hyperthermia in the thoracic spinal cord at precise dosage levels of temperature elevation and duration. Histological changes in microwave-induced hyperthermia closely parallel those seen in traumatic lesions of the human spinal cord, as well as those produced in animals with the classical weight-drop method of Allen. In addition to grading the spinal cord lesions with respect to residual neurological function, dose-response observations made with somatosensory evoked responses, blood-spinal cord barrier tracers, and neurohistological and enzyme histochemical preparations, suggest that it will be possible to use this approach to develop a standardized, calibrated model in rabbits to evaluate the efficacy of new therapeutic modalities for the treatment of spinal cord injury

  16. Thoracic trauma in newborn foals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean, D.; Laverty, S.; Halley, J.; Hannigan, D.; Leveille, R.

    1999-01-01

    In a report describing life ending fractures (255 horses) from the Livestock Disease Diagnostic Center, Kentucky (1993 and 1994), 32 foals had rib fractures. The purpose of our study was to examine the incidence of rib fractures in newborn foals on a Thoroughbred studfarm by physical and radiographic examination, to determine factors which may contribute to the problem and to document any clinical consequences. All foals (263) included were examined within 3 days of birth. The thoracic cage was palpated externally for abnormalities and all foals were placed in dorsal recumbency to evaluate thoracic cage symmetry. Radiographs were used to diagnose foals with thoraciccage asymmetry (TCA) and rib fracture (RF). A diagnosis of costochondral dislocation (CD) was made when no radiographic evidence of fracture was present but there was severe TCA, Fifty-five foals (20.1%) had TCA (9 RF), One to 5 ribs were fractured on 9 of 40 radiographic studies. No consequences of the thoracic trauma was detected clinically, radiographically or ultrasonographically in this group of foals or at a 2- and 4-week follow-up examination. The percentage of foals with a history of abnormal parturition was higher in the TCA foals (15%) compared to the normal foals (6.8%). There weremore primiparous dams in the TCA group than in the normal foal group. Fillies (56.6%) had a higher incidence of birth trauma than colts (43.4%), Thisstudy demonstrates that thoracic trauma is often present in newborn foals and may not always be of clinical significance. Dystocia foals and foals from primiparous mares should be considered high risk for thoracic trauma

  17. Variation in radiation sensitivity and repair kinetics in different parts of the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamus-Gorka, Magdalena; Brahme, Anders; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Lind, Bengt K.

    2008-01-01

    Background. The spinal cord, known for its strongly serial character and high sensitivity to radiation even when a small segment is irradiated, is one of the most critical organs at risk to be spared during radiation therapy. To compare the sensitivity of different parts of the spinal cord, data for radiation myelopathy have been used. Material and methods. In the present study, the relative seriality model was fitted to two different datasets of clinical radiation myelitis concerning cervical spinal cord after treating 248 patients for head and neck cancer and thoracic spinal cord after treating 43 patients with lung carcinoma. The maximum likelihood method was applied to fit the clinical data. The model parameters and their 68% confidence intervals were calculated for each dataset. The α/β ratio for the thoracic cord was also was also found to be 0.9 (0-3.0) Gy. Results. The dose-response curve for the more sensitive cervical myelopathy is well described by the parameters D 50 =55.9 (54.8-57.1) Gy, γ=6.9 (5.0-9.2), s=0.13 (0.07-0.24), whereas the thoracic myelopathy is described by the parameters D 50 =75.5 (70.5-80.8) Gy, γ=1.1 (0.6-1.6), s=36 (3.3-8). Discussion and conclusions. Large differences in radiation response between the cervical and thoracic region of spinal cord are thus observed: cervical myelopathy seems to be characterized by medium seriality, while thoracic spinal cord is characterized by a highly serial dose-response. The much steeper dose-response curve for cervical spinal cord myelopathy can be interpreted as a higher number of functional subunits consistent with a higher amount of white matter close to the brain

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... What is a spinal cord injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a ...

  19. Spinal computed tomography: New perspectives in the diagnostics of spine and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartor, K.

    1979-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the spine and spinal cord is gaining more and more importance as a valuable neuroradiological method of investigation. Performed as a noninvasive procedure, without any or with intravenous contrast enhancement, it may be used in diagnosing paravertebral soft tissue lesions, constrictive lesions of the bony spinal canal, structural changes of the vertebral column or of individual vertebrae, vascular intraspinal lesions, and intraspinal tumors with abnormally high or abnormally low attenuation values. Performed as an invasive procedure, after intrathecal introduction of metrizamide, spinal CT may be used in conjunction with conventional metrizamide myelography (secondary CT-myelography) or primarily (primary CT-myelography) in selected cases, taking advantage of its unique properties, namely to axially visualize the spine and related soft tissue structures and to detect even small differences in attenuation. Further improvement of spinal CT, particularly with regard to routine non-invasive demonstration of the intraspinal soft tissues, can be awaited. (orig.) [de

  20. JCE Feature Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-05-01

    The Features area of JCE Online is now readily accessible through a single click from our home page. In the Features area each column is linked to its own home page. These column home pages also have links to them from the online Journal Table of Contents pages or from any article published as part of that feature column. Using these links you can easily find abstracts of additional articles that are related by topic. Of course, JCE Online+ subscribers are then just one click away from the entire article. Finding related articles is easy because each feature column "site" contains links to the online abstracts of all the articles that have appeared in the column. In addition, you can find the mission statement for the column and the email link to the column editor that I mentioned above. At the discretion of its editor, a feature column site may contain additional resources. As an example, the Chemical Information Instructor column edited by Arleen Somerville will have a periodically updated bibliography of resources for teaching and using chemical information. Due to the increase in the number of these resources available on the WWW, it only makes sense to publish this information online so that you can get to these resources with a simple click of the mouse. We expect that there will soon be additional information and resources at several other feature column sites. Following in the footsteps of the Chemical Information Instructor, up-to-date bibliographies and links to related online resources can be made available. We hope to extend the online component of our feature columns with moderated online discussion forums. If you have a suggestion for an online resource you would like to see included, let the feature editor or JCE Online (jceonline@chem.wisc.edu) know about it. JCE Internet Features JCE Internet also has several feature columns: Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Equipment Buyers Guide, Hal's Picks, Mathcad

  1. Development of spinal deformities in Atlantic salmon and Arctic charr fed diets supplemented with oxytetracycline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toften, H.; Jobling, M.

    1996-01-01

    Some individuals within populations of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus fed diets supplemented with oxytetracycline (OTC) developed spinal deformations. Possible differences in feed intake and growth of spinally deformed fish relative to fish without any deformities were investigated. Amongst Atlantic salmon, 17% of the fish fed OTC-supplemented feed developed spinal fractures, whereas none of the fish receiving the basic feed did so. Despite deformation of the spinal column, the injured fish continued to feed and grow, but at lower rates than unaffected individuals. In contrast to Atlantic salmon, Arctic charr showed no signs of spinal fractures at any time during the 65-day experiment

  2. Development of spinal deformities in Atlantic salmon and Arctic charr fed diets supplemented with oxytetracycline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toften, H.; Jobling, M. [Norwegian Institute of Fisheries and Aquaculture, N-9005 Tromsoe (Norway)

    1996-07-01

    Some individuals within populations of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus fed diets supplemented with oxytetracycline (OTC) developed spinal deformations. Possible differences in feed intake and growth of spinally deformed fish relative to fish without any deformities were investigated. Amongst Atlantic salmon, 17% of the fish fed OTC-supplemented feed developed spinal fractures, whereas none of the fish receiving the basic feed did so. Despite deformation of the spinal column, the injured fish continued to feed and grow, but at lower rates than unaffected individuals. In contrast to Atlantic salmon, Arctic charr showed no signs of spinal fractures at any time during the 65-day experiment.

  3. Toracotomía posterior: doble abordaje vertebral torácico con incisión única Toracotomia posterior: dupla abordagem vertebral torácica com incisão única Posterior thoracotomy: a two-step spinal thoracic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Augusto Noel

    2010-09-01

    combinar cirurgias em vértebras torácicas anterior e posterior com a mesma incisão cutânea posterior. Métodos: foram avaliados, retrospectivamente, 35 pacientes operados entre 2003 e 2007. Em todos eles, realizou-se dupla abordagem combinando uma toracotomia posterior e abordagem posterior, feita só uma ferida cirúrgica, para diferentes objetivos: descompressão medular, artrodese, osteotomias, ou vertebrectomias. Foram avaliadas: as magnitudes dos ângulos, a etiologia, a idade, os níveis vertebrais, a quantidade de toracotomias e as complicações. RESULTADOS: média de idade de 14,1 anos (1-65, 10 cifoses com média de 96,8º (76-131; 24 escolioses com média de 80º (60-105. Etiologia: síndromes genéticos, 11; escolioses idiopática, 6; neurológicas, 5; congênitas, 4; tumores, 4; fraturas, 2; hérnia de disco, 1; infecção, 1; toracotomia de 1; nível 30, duplo 5; nível superior t3 e inferior t10. As complicações observadas foram um paciente com hemotórax e dois com infecções por causa da ferida. CONCLUSÃO: esta via permite o acesso a todo o nível torácico em procedimentos combinados mediante só uma ferida cirúrgica.INTRODUCTION: over the last ten years, for patients who needed a combined anterior-posterior approach, an alternative thoracotomy has been used by posterior approach using in the second step the same posterior mid-line skin incision as was used in the first step. Objective: to assess the range of possibilities and complications associated with this new approach, which allows to mix a two-step surgery through a single posterior skin incision. METHODS: thirty-five patients operated between 2003 and 2007 were evaluated. All patients underwent a two-step approach through a single posterior mid-line skin incision for spinal cord decompression, discectomy, arthrodesis, osteotomy, or vertebrectomy. The angular magnitudes, etiology, age, vertebral levels, number of thoracotomy, and complications were evaluated. RESULTS: mean age 14.1 years

  4. Clinical significance of gas myelography and CT gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinaga, Haruhiko

    1984-01-01

    Basic and clinical applications relating to air myelography of the cervical spine have already been studied and extensively been used as an adjuvant diagnostic method for diseases of the spine and the spinal cord. However, hardly any application and clinical evaluation have been made concerning gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine. The author examined X-ray findings of 183 cases with diseases of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine, including contral cases. Gas X-ray photography included simple profile, forehead tomography, sagittal plane, and CT section. Morphological characteristics of normal X-ray pictures of the throacic spine and the lumbar spine were explained from 54 control cases, and all the diameters of the subarachnoidal space from the anterior to the posterior part were measured. X-ray findings were examined on pathological cases, namely 22 cases with diseases of the throacic spine and 107 cases with diseases of the lumbar spine, and as a result these were useful for pathological elucidation of spinal cord tumors, spinal carries, yellow ligament ossification, lumbar spinal canal stenosis, hernia of intervertebral disc, etc. Also, CT gas myelography was excellent in stereoobservation of the spine and the spinal cord in spinal cord tumors, yellow ligament ossification, and spinal canal stenosis. On the other hand, it is not suitable for the diagnoses of intraspinal vascular abnormality, adhesive arachinitis, and running abnormality of the cauda equina nerve and radicle. Gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lambar spine, is very useful in clinics when experienced techniques are used in photographic conditions, and diagnoses are made, well understanding the characteristics of gas pictures. Thus, its application has been opened to selection of an operative technique, determination of operative ranges, etc. (J.P.N.)

  5. Clinical significance of gas myelography and CT gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshinaga, Haruhiko (Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1984-05-01

    Basic and clinical applications relating to air myelography of the cervical spine have already been studied and extensively been used as an adjuvant diagnostic method for diseases of the spine and the spinal cord. However, hardly any application and clinical evaluation have been made concerning gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine. The author examined X-ray findings of 183 cases with diseases of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine, including contral cases. Gas X-ray photography included simple profile, forehead tomography, sagittal plane, and CT section. Morphological characteristics of normal X-ray pictures of the throacic spine and the lumbar spine were explained from 54 control cases, and all the diameters of the subarachnoidal space from the anterior to the posterior part were measured. X-ray findings were examined on pathological cases, namely 22 cases with diseases of the throacic spine and 107 cases with diseases of the lumbar spine, and as a result these were useful for pathological elucidation of spinal cord tumors, spinal carries, yellow ligament ossification, lumbar spinal canal stenosis, hernia of intervertebral disc, etc. Also, CT gas myelography was excellent in stereo observation of the spine and the spinal cord in spinal cord tumors, yellow ligament ossification, and spinal canal stenosis. On the other hand, it is not suitable for the diagnoses of intraspinal vascular abnormality, adhesive arachinitis, and running abnormality of the cauda equina nerve and radicle. Gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lambar spine, is very useful in clinics when experienced techniques are used in photographic conditions, and diagnoses are made, well understanding the characteristics of gas pictures. Thus, its application has been opened to selection of an operative technique, determination of operative ranges, etc.

  6. Primary Ewing's sarcoma of the vertebral column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilaslan, Hakan; Sundaram, Murali [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Ch2-290 200 First Street, SW, Rochester, 55905, MN (United States); Unni, K.Krishnan [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street, SW, 55905, Rochester, MN (United States); Dekutoski, Mark B. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street, SW, 55905, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2004-09-01

    To determine the demographics, imaging findings, clinical symptoms, and prognosis of primary vertebral Ewing's sarcoma (PVES). A retrospective review of medical records and radiological studies of patients diagnosed with PVES from 1936 through 2001 in our institution and Department of Pathology consultation files was undertaken. Metastatic and soft tissue Ewing's sarcoma cases were excluded. From a total of 1,277 cases of Ewing's sarcoma, 125 (9.8%) had a primary vertebral origin. There were 48 females and 76 males. Patient ages ranged from 4 to 54 (mean 19.3, standard deviation 10.7, median 16) years. Vertebral column distribution was four cervical (3.2%), 13 thoracic (10.5%), 31 lumbar (25%), and 67 sacrum (53.2%). More than one vertebral segment was involved in ten cases (8%). Satisfactory imaging studies were available in 51 patients: 49 radiographs, 27 computerized tomography (CT), and 23 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. The majority of tumors were lytic (93%). Three cases were mixed lytic and sclerotic (6%) and one sclerotic. In the nonsacral spine, the majority of lesions (12/20) involved the posterior elements with extension into the vertebral body. Five cases were centered in the vertebral body with extension into the posterior elements. Two cases were limited to the posterior elements, and one case solely involved the vertebral body. Ala was the most frequently affected site in the sacrum (18/26). Spinal canal invasion was frequent (91%). Detailed clinical information was available in 53 patients. Duration of symptoms ranged from 1 to 30 (mean 7) months. Local pain was the first symptom and seen in all cases. Neurological deficits were present in 21 (40%) cases. All patients received radiation in various dosages; 70% additionally received chemotherapy. Twenty-five patients had surgery, and two patients received bone marrow transplantation. Forty-five patients had follow-up; the five-year disease-free survival probability is 0

  7. Spinal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izzo, R.; Popolizio, T.; D’Aprile, P.; Muto, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  8. Spinal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, R., E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Popolizio, T., E-mail: t.popolizio1@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Fg) (Italy); D’Aprile, P., E-mail: paoladaprile@yahoo.it [Neuroradiology Department, San Paolo Hospital, Bari (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  9. Concurrent spinal cord and vertebral bone marrow radionecrosis 8 years after therapeutic irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warscotte, L.; Sindic, C.J.M. [Department of Neurology, Universite Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Duprez, T.; Lecouvet, F.E. [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Lonneux, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Michaux, L. [Department of Hematology, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Renard, L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium)

    2002-03-01

    Concurrent radionecrosis within the spinal cord and the bone marrow at the same thoracic level was observed 8 years after localized therapeutic irradiation in a patient who had undergone repeated cycles of radiotherapy, glucocorticoid treatment, and chemotherapy for a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Mechanisms combining radiotoxic potentialization by glucocorticoids/alkylating agents and delayed radiation-induced vasculitis involving the common arterial pathways to the spinal cord and to the vertebrae were speculated to have acted in a synergistic way. (orig.)

  10. Spinal Cord Injury without Radiographic Abnormality (SCIWORA) – Clinical and Radiological Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Szwedowski, Dawid; Walecki, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Summary The acronym SCIWORA (Spinal Cord Injury Without Radiographic Abnormality) was first developed and introduced by Pang and Wilberger who used it to define “clinical symptoms of traumatic myelopathy with no radiographic or computed tomographic features of spinal fracture or instability”. SCIWORA is a clinical-radiological condition that mostly affects children. SCIWORA lesions are found mainly in the cervical spine but can also be seen, although much less frequently, in the thoracic or l...

  11. Spinal Trauma is Never without Sin: A Tetraplegia Patient Presented Without any Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    EFEOGLU, Melis; AKOGLU, Haldun; AKOGLU, Tayfun; EROGLU, Serkan Emre; ONUR, Ozge Ecmel; DENIZBASI, Arzu

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY: Spinal cord injuries are amongst the most dangerous injuries, leading to high mortality and morbidity. Injured patients are occasionally faced with life-threatening complications and quality-of-life changing neurological deficits. Thoracic and cervical spinal segments are the most effected sites of injury and a wide range of complications including paraplegia, respiratory and cardiovascular compromise secondary to autonomic dysfunction or tetraplegia may ensue. We aim to draw attenti...

  12. Acute intraparenchymal spinal cord injury in a cat due to high-rise syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Arámbulo, Robert; Nykamp, Stephanie

    2012-03-01

    A 9-year-old spayed female Bengal Red cat was evaluated for high-rise syndrome. The cat had paraplegia of the hind limbs, intact reflexes and pain perception, and hyperesthesia in the caudal thoracic area. Mentation, cranial nerve function, forelimb proprioceptive responses, and spinal reflexes were normal. There were no abnormalities on radiographs or computed tomography scan, but magnetic resonance imaging revealed a hyperintense intraparenchymal spinal cord lesion on T2-weighted and T2 fat saturation images.

  13. Acute intraparenchymal spinal cord injury in a cat due to high-rise syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz–Arámbulo, Robert; Nykamp, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    A 9-year-old spayed female Bengal Red cat was evaluated for high-rise syndrome. The cat had paraplegia of the hind limbs, intact reflexes and pain perception, and hyperesthesia in the caudal thoracic area. Mentation, cranial nerve function, forelimb proprioceptive responses, and spinal reflexes were normal. There were no abnormalities on radiographs or computed tomography scan, but magnetic resonance imaging revealed a hyperintense intraparenchymal spinal cord lesion on T2-weighted and T2 fat...

  14. Concurrent spinal cord and vertebral bone marrow radionecrosis 8 years after therapeutic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warscotte, L.; Sindic, C.J.M.; Duprez, T.; Lecouvet, F.E.; Lonneux, M.; Michaux, L.; Renard, L.

    2002-01-01

    Concurrent radionecrosis within the spinal cord and the bone marrow at the same thoracic level was observed 8 years after localized therapeutic irradiation in a patient who had undergone repeated cycles of radiotherapy, glucocorticoid treatment, and chemotherapy for a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Mechanisms combining radiotoxic potentialization by glucocorticoids/alkylating agents and delayed radiation-induced vasculitis involving the common arterial pathways to the spinal cord and to the vertebrae were speculated to have acted in a synergistic way. (orig.)

  15. MRI findings in thoracic outlet syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aralasmak, Ayse; Sharifov, Rasul; Kilicarslan, Rukiye; Alkan, Alpay [Bezmialem Vakif University, Department of Radiology, Fatih/Istanbul (Turkey); Cevikol, Can; Karaali, Kamil; Senol, Utku [Akdeniz University, Department of Radiology, Antalya (Turkey)

    2012-11-15

    We discuss MRI findings in patients with thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). A total of 100 neurovascular bundles were evaluated in the interscalene triangle (IS), costoclavicular (CC), and retropectoralis minor (RPM) spaces. To exclude neurogenic abnormality, MRIs of the cervical spine and brachial plexus (BPL) were obtained in neutral. To exclude compression on neurovascular bundles, sagittal T1W images were obtained vertical to the longitudinal axis of BPL from spinal cord to the medial part of the humerus, in abduction and neutral. To exclude vascular TOS, MR angiography (MRA) and venography (MRV) of the subclavian artery (SA) and vein (SV) in abduction were obtained. If there is compression on the vessels, MRA and MRV of the subclavian vessels were repeated in neutral. Seventy-one neurovascular bundles were found to be abnormal: 16 arterial-venous-neurogenic, 20 neurogenic, 1 arterial, 15 venous, 8 arterial-venous, 3 arterial-neurogenic, and 8 venous-neurogenic TOS. Overall, neurogenic TOS was noted in 69%, venous TOS in 66%, and arterial TOS in 39%. The neurovascular bundle was most commonly compressed in the CC, mostly secondary to position, and very rarely compressed in the RPM. The cause of TOS was congenital bone variations in 36%, congenital fibromuscular anomalies in 11%, and position in 53%. In 5%, there was unilateral brachial plexitis in addition to compression of the neurovascular bundle. Severe cervical spondylosis was noted in 14%, contributing to TOS symptoms. For evaluation of patients with TOS, visualization of the brachial plexus and cervical spine and dynamic evaluation of neurovascular bundles in the cervicothoracobrachial region are mandatory. (orig.)

  16. Ultrasonographyin diagnosis of thoracic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Stević Ruža; Jaković Radoslav; Mašulović Dragan; Nagorni-Obradović Ljudmila; Mujović Nataša; Jovanović Dragana

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Chest sonography was used until recently mainly for diagnosis of pleural diseases. High resolution ultrasound machines enable ultrasound application not only in pleural diseases detection, but in diagnosing peripheral lung and mediastinal lesions. Ultrasonography can define the origin and structure of the lesion of thoracic wall, pleural and peripheral lung lesions and mediastinal lesions. Pleural lesions. Ultrasonography is very useful in diagnosing pleural effusion and disting...

  17. Ancient schwannoma of thoracic spine in a schizophrenic patient with somatic delusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ting Wen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ancient schwannoma is a rare variant of schwannoma characterized by histopathologic degenerative changes, which are thought to be the result of long-term tumor growth and aging. However, ancient schwannoma in the spinal canal is particularly rare. We report a case of thoracic spine intradural extramedullary ancient schwannoma in a schizophrenic patient, who kept saying that “something in his back was giving him electric shock” for a long time. Unfortunately, this complaint was misinterpreted as somatic delusion symptoms. A spinal cord tumor was taken into consideration only after paraparesis developed. We have highlighted this case to remind every clinician to remain alert about the possibility of organic disease while treating patients with psychotic disorder history. Thorough neurological examination is required to avoid misdiagnosis. Spinal canal schwannoma can be totally removed successfully with good functional outcome and prognosis.

  18. Prevention of paraplegia after endovascular exclusion for stanford B thoracic aortic dissection aneurism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Rui; Jing Zaiping; Bao Junmin; Zhao Zhiqing; Zhao Jun; Feng Xiang; Lu Qingsheng; Huang Cheng

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prophylactic measures of paraplegia and paralysis after endovascular graft exclusion (EVE) for Stanford B thoracic aortic dissections (TAD). Methods: The records of 116 consecutive patients undergoing endovascular TAD repair from 1998 to 2001 were retrospectively reviewed. Steroids were administrated postoperatively in high risk patients likely to be candidates for paraplegia or paralysis. Results: No paraplegia or paralysis occurred postoperatively in all cases, including the patient undergone selective spinal artery angiography (SSAA). Conclusions: Transluminal repair can avoid spinal cord ischemia due to aortic cross-clamping, there is still a risk of spinal cord injury caused by occlusion of intercostal arteries under the cover of endograft. A combination of the prophylactic measures, including SSAA and steroids, have been able to reduce the risk of paraplegia and paralysis. A graft-stent of appropriate length is the key point of this procedure

  19. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George E. Dzyacky

    2010-11-23

    The Flooding Predictor™ is a patented advanced control technology proven in research at the Separations Research Program, University of Texas at Austin, to increase distillation column throughput by over 6%, while also increasing energy efficiency by 10%. The research was conducted under a U. S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement awarded to George Dzyacky of 2ndpoint, LLC. The Flooding Predictor™ works by detecting the incipient flood point and controlling the column closer to its actual hydraulic limit than historical practices have allowed. Further, the technology uses existing column instrumentation, meaning no additional refining infrastructure is required. Refiners often push distillation columns to maximize throughput, improve separation, or simply to achieve day-to-day optimization. Attempting to achieve such operating objectives is a tricky undertaking that can result in flooding. Operators and advanced control strategies alike rely on the conventional use of delta-pressure instrumentation to approximate the column’s approach to flood. But column delta-pressure is more an inference of the column’s approach to flood than it is an actual measurement of it. As a consequence, delta pressure limits are established conservatively in order to operate in a regime where the column is never expected to flood. As a result, there is much “left on the table” when operating in such a regime, i.e. the capacity difference between controlling the column to an upper delta-pressure limit and controlling it to the actual hydraulic limit. The Flooding Predictor™, an innovative pattern recognition technology, controls columns at their actual hydraulic limit, which research shows leads to a throughput increase of over 6%. Controlling closer to the hydraulic limit also permits operation in a sweet spot of increased energy-efficiency. In this region of increased column loading, the Flooding Predictor is able to exploit the benefits of higher liquid

  20. Thoracic neuroblastoma: what is the best imaging modality for evaluating extent of disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovis, T.L.; Meza, M.P.; Cushing, B.; Elkowitz, S.S.; Leonidas, J.C.; Festa, R.; Kogutt, M.S.; Fletcher, B.D.

    1997-01-01

    Thoracic neuroblastoma accounts for 15% of all cases of neuroblastoma. A minority of children with thoracic neuroblastoma will have dumbbell tumors, i.e., intraspinal extension, but only half these patients will have neurologic signs or symptoms. Hypothesis. MR imaging is the single best test to evaluate the extent of thoracic and spinal disease in thoracid neuroblastoma after the diagnosis of a mass is estbalished on plain film. A retrospective multi-institutional investigation over 7 years of all cases of thoracic neuroblastoma (n=26) imaged with CT and/or MR were reviewed for detection of the extent of disease. The chest film, nuclear bone scan, and other imaging modalities were also reviewed. The surgical and histologic correlation in each case, as well as the patients' staging and outcome, were tabulated. The chest radiography was 100% sensitive in suggesting the diagnosis. MR imaging was 100% sensitive in predicting enlarged lymph nodes, intraspinal extension, and chest wall involvement. CT was 88% sensitive for intraspinal extension but only 20% sensitive for lymph node enlargement. CT was 100% sensitive in detecting chest wall involvement. Direct comparison of CT and MR imaging in six cases revealed no difference in detection of enlarged lymph nodes or chest wall involvement. Neither test was able to detect remote disease, as noted by bone scan. The chest film is 100% sensitive in suggesting the diagnosis of thoracic neuroblastoma; MR imaging appears to be the single best test for detecting nodal involvement, intraspinal extension, and chest wall involvement. (orig.)

  1. Nuclear reactor control column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachovchin, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest crosssectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor

  2. Spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beale, S.; Pathria, M.N.; Ross, J.S.; Masaryk, T.J.; Modic, M.T.

    1988-01-01

    The authors studied 50 patients who had spinal stenosis by means of MR imaging. All patients had undergone myelography and CT. Thirty patients underwent surgery. MR imaging included T1-weighted spin echo sequences with repetition time = 600 msec, echo time = 20 (600/20) sagittal and axial sections 4 mm thick with 2 mm gap. T2-weighted 2,000/60 axial images were obtained on 14 patients. Examinations were retrospectively evaluated for central stenosis, lateral recess narrowing, and foraminal encroachment. Measurements of sagittal, interpedicular, interfacet, and recess dimensions were made at L3-5. On MR images, 20 patients had single-level and 30 had multiple-level stenosis. There was excellent agreement between modalities with central canal stenosis, but a discrepancy in six patients with bony foraminal stenosis. MR imaging was an accurate method for assessment of lumbar stenosis, but CT appears marginally better for detection of bony foraminal stenosis in certain cases

  3. A study on the hollow-out radiation technique applied to the protection of the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Tadayoshi

    1975-01-01

    The hollow-out radiation technique to protect the spinal cord in linear accelerator X-ray treatment of malignant diseases has been established in this study. Several kinds of diseases were selected as the subjects of the hollow-out technique to protect the cervical spinal cord, thoracic spinal cord, and dorsolumbar spinal cord from radiation, plus fundamental data, such as the materials, shapes and sizes of absorber, which are most appropriate for each of the diseases, were established. In all the cases receiving this technique, the necessary areas of therapy are covered by 80-90% dose distribution and the radiation dose of the spinal cord is kept below 40%. The fundamental data and irradiation conditions for the hollow-out technique of every part of the spinal cord were arranged from the results of phantom examinations on every part of the human body and from 42 cases actually treated. In the present study, the hollow-out technique for the cervical spinal cord, thoracic spinal cord, and dorsolumbar spinal cord is divided into 5 categories, and a method for the planning of radiation therapy and the actual treatment are described. The hollow-out radiation technique on the spinal cord is useful radiation therapy which can give better results by preventing radiation myelopathy. (auth.)

  4. Improvements in solvent extraction columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aughwane, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    Solvent extraction columns are used in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel. For an effective reprocessing operation a solvent extraction column is required which is capable of distributing the feed over most of the column. The patent describes improvements in solvent extractions columns which allows the feed to be distributed over an increased length of column than was previously possible. (U.K.)

  5. Radiogenic cancer induction associated with spinal radiography: a quantitative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fickel, T.E.

    1988-01-01

    Computations of organ-specific radiation absorption by lung, breast, thyroid, active bone marrow and uterine tissues are used to rank sectional and full spine radiographic procedures according to their potentials for cancer induction. Assuming that the dose-effect relationship of radiation damage is linear and lacks a threshold effect, the prospective and retrospective carcinogenicities of commonly ordered spinal series are estimated. Cervical radiography is demonstrated to pose the least hazard to the patient, while full spine and lumbar (five views) procedures have the greatest. Organs most at risk as a result of spinal radiography are lung (thoracic and full spine), colon (lumbar and full spine), breast (thoracic and full spine), and prostate (full spine and lumbar)

  6. Directly measuring spinal cord blood flow and spinal cord perfusion pressure via the collateral network: correlations with changes in systemic blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kise, Yuya; Kuniyoshi, Yukio; Inafuku, Hitoshi; Nagano, Takaaki; Hirayasu, Tsuneo; Yamashiro, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    During thoracoabdominal surgery in which segmental arteries are sacrificed over a large area, blood supply routes from collateral networks have received attention as a means of avoiding spinal cord injury. The aim of this study was to investigate spinal cord blood supply through a collateral network by directly measuring spinal cord blood flow and spinal cord perfusion pressure experimentally. In beagle dogs (n = 8), the thoracoabdominal aorta and segmental arteries L1-L7 were exposed, and a temporary bypass was created for distal perfusion. Next, a laser blood flow meter was placed on the spinal dura mater in the L5 region to measure the spinal cord blood flow. The following were measured simultaneously when the direct blood supply from segmental arteries L2-L7 to the spinal cord was stopped: mean systemic blood pressure, spinal cord perfusion pressure (blood pressure within the aortic clamp site), and spinal cord blood flow supplied via the collateral network. These variables were then investigated for evidence of correlations. Positive correlations were observed between mean systemic blood pressure and spinal cord blood flow during interruption of segmental artery flow both with (r = 0.844, P flow with and without distal perfusion (r = 0.803, P network from outside the interrupted segmental arteries, and high systemic blood pressure (∼1.33-fold higher) was needed to obtain the preclamping spinal cord blood flow, whereas 1.68-fold higher systemic blood pressure was needed when distal perfusion was halted. Spinal cord blood flow is positively correlated with mean systemic blood pressure and spinal cord perfusion pressure under spinal cord ischemia caused by clamping a wide range of segmental arteries. In open and endovascular thoracic and thoracoabdominal surgery, elevating mean systemic blood pressure is a simple and effective means of increasing spinal cord blood flow, and measuring spinal cord perfusion pressure seems to be useful for monitoring

  7. Pulmonary function tests correlated with thoracic volumes in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledonio, Charles Gerald T; Rosenstein, Benjamin E; Johnston, Charles E; Regelmann, Warren E; Nuckley, David J; Polly, David W

    2017-01-01

    Scoliosis deformity has been linked with deleterious changes in the thoracic cavity that affect pulmonary function. The causal relationship between spinal deformity and pulmonary function has yet to be fully defined. It has been hypothesized that deformity correction improves pulmonary function by restoring both respiratory muscle efficiency and increasing the space available to the lungs. This research aims to correlate pulmonary function and thoracic volume before and after scoliosis correction. Retrospective correlational analysis between thoracic volume modeling from plain x-rays and pulmonary function tests was conducted. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients enrolled in a multicenter database were sorted by pre-operative Total Lung Capacities (TLC) % predicted values from their Pulmonary Function Tests (PFT). Ten patients with the best and ten patients with the worst TLC values were included. Modeled thoracic volume and TLC values were compared before and 2 years after surgery. Scoliosis correction resulted in an increase in the thoracic volume for patients with the worst initial TLCs (11.7%) and those with the best initial TLCs (12.5%). The adolescents with the most severe pulmonary restriction prior to surgery strongly correlated with post-operative change in total lung capacity and thoracic volume (r 2  = 0.839; p volume in this group was 373.1 cm 3 (11.7%) which correlated with a 21.2% improvement in TLC. Scoliosis correction in adolescents was found to increase thoracic volume and is strongly correlated with improved TLC in cases with severe restrictive pulmonary function, but no correlation was found in cases with normal pulmonary function. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:175-182, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections: endovascular treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Donald T; Cho, Jae S; Chaer, Rabih A; Makaroun, Michel S

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of thoracic aortic disease has changed radically with the advances made in endovascular therapy since the concept of thoracic endovascular aortic repair was first described 15 years ago. Currently, there is a diverse array of endografts that are commercially available to treat the thoracic aorta. Multiple studies, including industry-sponsored and single-institution reports, have demonstrated excellent outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair for the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms, with less reported perioperative morbidity and mortality in comparison with conventional open repair. Additionally, similar outcomes have been demonstrated for the treatment of type B dissections. However, the technology remains relatively novel, and larger studies with longer term outcomes are necessary to more fully evaluate the role of endovascular therapy for the treatment of thoracic aortic disease. This review examines the currently available thoracic endografts, preoperative planning for thoracic endovascular aortic repair, and outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair for the treatment of both thoracic aortic aneurysms and type B aortic dissections. Mt Sinai J Med 77:256-269, 2010. (c) 2010 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  9. In Vivo Spinal Posture during Upright and Reclined Sitting in an Office Chair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Zemp

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of people spend the majority of their working lives seated in an office chair. Musculoskeletal disorders, in particular low back pain, resulting from prolonged static sitting are ubiquitous, but regularly changing sitting position throughout the day is thought to reduce back problems. Nearly all currently available office chairs offer the possibility to alter the backrest reclination angles, but the influence of changing seating positions on the spinal column remains unknown. In an attempt to better understand the potential to adjust or correct spine posture using adjustable seating, five healthy subjects were analysed in an upright and reclined sitting position conducted in an open, upright MRI scanner. The shape of the spine, as described using the vertebral bodies’ coordinates, wedge angles, and curvature angles, showed high inter-subject variability between the two seating positions. The mean lumbar, thoracic, and cervical curvature angles were 29±15°, -29±4°, and 13±8° for the upright and 33±12°, -31±7°, and 7±7° for the reclined sitting positions. Thus, a wide range of seating adaptation is possible through modification of chair posture, and dynamic seating options may therefore provide a key feature in reducing or even preventing back pain caused by prolonged static sitting.

  10. UPPER THORACIC SPINE FRACTURE ASSOCIATED WITH FRACTURE OF THE STERNUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOAQUÍN VALERO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: The objectives of this presentation are to analyze the kinematics that causes this association, describe the impact of the injury, and evaluate the treatment performed Methods: Three cases are analyzed by quantifying the displacement and angulation of the sternum, the characteristics of the spinal injury and deformity, treatment, and complications Results: The mechanism that causes the injury is flexion-distraction, the component of the vertebral body presented is type A, and the most affected region was T5. Two patients had neurological picture E. Sternum injury was caused by direct trauma Conclusion: The association of these was observed in patients who have suffered from high-energy trauma in a car accident. There was no relationship between the angulation of the sternum and its displacement to the degree of kyphosis and displacement of the thoracic spine. It is important to carry out good radiographic studies that include the sternum when there is suspicion of this relationship.

  11. Multifocal Spinal Cord Nephroblastoma in a Dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henker, L C; Bianchi, R M; Vargas, T P; de Oliveira, E C; Driemeier, D; Pavarini, S P

    2018-01-01

    A 1-year-old male American pit bull terrier was presented with a history of proprioceptive deficits and mild lameness of the right hindlimb, which progressed after 5 months to paraparesis, culminating in tetraparesis after 2 weeks. Necropsy findings were limited to the spinal cord and consisted of multiple, intradural, extramedullary, slightly red masses which produced segmental areas of medullary swelling located in the cervical intumescence, thoracolumbar column, sacral segment and cauda equina. Histological evaluation revealed a tumour, composed of epithelial, stromal and blastemal cells, with structures resembling tubules, acini and embryonic glomeruli. Immunohistochemical labelling for vimentin, cytokeratin and S100 was positive for the stromal, epithelial and blastemal cells, respectively. A final diagnosis of multifocal spinal cord nephroblastoma was established. This is the first report of such a tumour showing concomitant involvement of the cervicothoracic, thoracolumbar, sacral and cauda equina areas of the spinal cord. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. SPINAL DEFORMITIES AFTER SELECTIVE DORSAL RHIZOTOMY

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    PATRICIO PABLO MANZONE

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR used for spasticity treatment could worsen or develop spinal deformities. Our goal is to describe spinal deformities seen in patients with cerebral palsy (CP after being treated by SDR. Methods: Retrospective study of patients operated on (SDR between January/1999 and June/2012. Inclusion criteria: spinal Rx before SDR surgery, spinography, and assessment at follow-up. We evaluated several factors emphasizing level and type of SDR approach, spinal deformity and its treatment, final Risser, and follow-up duration. Results: We found 7 patients (6 males: mean age at SDR 7.56 years (4.08-11.16. Mean follow-up: 6.64 years (2.16-13, final age: 14.32 years (7.5-19. No patient had previous deformity. GMFCS: 2 patients level IV, 2 level III, 3 level II. Initial walking status: 2 community walkers, 2 household walkers, 2 functional walkers, 1 not ambulant, at the follow-up, 3 patients improved, and 4 kept their status. We found 4 TL/L laminotomies, 2 L/LS laminectomies, and 1 thoracic laminectomy. Six spinal deformities were observed: 2 sagittal, 3 mixed, and 1 scoliosis. There was no association among the type of deformity, final gait status, topographic type, GMFCS, age, or SDR approach. Three patients had surgery indication for spinal deformity at skeletal maturity, while those patients with smaller deformities were still immature (Risser 0 to 2/3 although with progressive curves. Conclusions: After SDR, patients should be periodically evaluated until they reach Risser 5. The development of a deformity does not compromise functional results but adds morbidity because it may require surgical treatment.

  13. A rare case of spinal dural arteriovenous fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya Apostolova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF is a rare vascular malformation of the spine. Only a limited number of cases of SDAVF have been reported in the current literature. We describe the case of a 74 year old male who presented with gradually progressive bilateral lower extremity weakness and bladder dysfunction and was subsequently diagnosed with SDAVF affecting both the thoracic and lumbar spine. The patient later underwent embolization with some improvement in his neurologic symptoms.

  14. Buckling of liquid columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habibi, M.; Rahmani, Y.; Bonn, D.; Ribe, N.M.

    2010-01-01

    Under appropriate conditions, a column of viscous liquid falling onto a rigid surface undergoes a buckling instability. Here we show experimentally and theoretically that liquid buckling exhibits a hitherto unsuspected complexity involving three different modes—viscous, gravitational, and

  15. A systematic procedure to optimise dose and image quality for the measurement of inter-vertebral angles from lateral spinal projections using Cobb and superimposition methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Qaroot, Bashar; Hogg, Peter; Twiste, Martin; Howard, David

    2014-01-01

    Patients with vertebral column deformations are exposed to high risks associated with ionising radiation exposure. Risks are further increased due to the serial X-ray images that are needed to measure and asses their spinal deformation using Cobb or superimposition methods. Therefore, optimising such X-ray practice, via reducing dose whilst maintaining image quality, is a necessity. With a specific focus on lateral thoraco-lumbar images for Cobb and superimposition measurements, this paper outlines a systematic procedure to the optimisation of X-ray practice. Optimisation was conducted based on suitable image quality from minimal dose. Image quality was appraised using a visual-analogue-rating-scale, and Monte-Carlo modelling was used for dose estimation. The optimised X-ray practice was identified by imaging healthy normal-weight male adult living human volunteers. The optimised practice consisted of: anode towards the head, broad focus, no OID or grid, 80 kVp, 32 mAs and 130 cm SID. Images of suitable quality for laterally assessing spinal conditions using Cobb or superimposition measurements were produced from an effective dose of 0.05 mSv, which is 83% less than the average effective dose used in the UK for lateral thoracic/lumbar exposures. This optimisation procedure can be adopted and use for optimisation of other radiographic techniques.

  16. Spinal cord transection before scoliosis correction in myelomeningocele may improve bladder function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linthorst, Josephine I.; Veenboer, Paul W.; Dik, Pieter; Pruijs, Hans E. H.; Han, Sen K. S.; de Kort, Laetitia M. O.; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.

    2014-01-01

    In patients with myelomeningocele (MMC) and coexistent scoliosis, a spinal cord transection (SC-transection) is sometimes performed before scoliosis correction to prevent traction on the myelum after stretching the spinal column. Performing a SC-transection may have positive effects on bladder

  17. Twofold trauma of vertebral column in a calf (case report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzner, M.; Weiler, H.

    1991-01-01

    A double spinal cord trauma of an eight weeks old calf is reported, born on pasture from a heifer as a premature birth at the beginning of month 9. Observations made were rupture of intervertebral disk at the crossing of cervical to thoracic vertebrae followed by syndesmosis or synchondrosis resp., as well as a comminutet fracture of the 1st lumbar vertebra including both the adjoining vertebrae, with succeeding reactive callus formation. It is concluded that this traumatization has occurred during parturition. Motoric or sensoric disturbances were observed neither

  18. Solvent extraction columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, P.; Smith, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    In pulsed columns for use in solvent extraction processes, e.g. the reprocessing of nuclear fuel, the horizontal perforated plates inside the column are separated by interplate spacers manufactured from metallic neutron absorbing material. The spacer may be in the form of a spiral or concentric circles separated by radial limbs, or may be of egg-box construction. Suitable neutron absorbing materials include stainless steel containing boron or gadolinium, hafnium metal or alloys of hafnium. (UK)

  19. Alterations in cardiac autonomic control in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Liu, Nan; Malmqvist, Lasse; Wecht, Jill Maria; Krassioukov, Andrei

    2018-01-01

    A spinal cord injury (SCI) interferes with the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The effect on the cardiovascular system will depend on the extent of damage to the spinal/central component of ANS. The cardiac changes are caused by loss of supraspinal sympathetic control and relatively increased parasympathetic cardiac control. Decreases in sympathetic activity result in heart rate and the arterial blood pressure changes, and may cause arrhythmias, in particular bradycardia, with the risk of cardiac arrest in those with cervical or high thoracic injuries. The objective of this review is to give an update of the current knowledge related to the alterations in cardiac autonomic control following SCI. With this purpose the review includes the following subheadings: 2. Neuro-anatomical plasticity and cardiac control 2.1 Autonomic nervous system and the heart 2.2 Alteration in autonomic control of the heart following spinal cord injury 3. Spinal shock and neurogenic shock 3.1 Pathophysiology of spinal shock 3.2 Pathophysiology of neurogenic shock 4. Autonomic dysreflexia 4.1 Pathophysiology of autonomic dysreflexia 4.2 Diagnosis of autonomic dysreflexia 5. Heart rate/electrocardiography following spinal cord injury 5.1 Acute phase 5.2 Chronic phase 6. Heart rate variability 6.1 Time domain analysis 6.2 Frequency domain analysis 6.3 QT-variability index 6.4 Nonlinear (fractal) indexes 7. Echocardiography 7.1 Changes in cardiac structure following spinal cord injury 7.2 Changes in cardiac function following spinal cord injury 8. International spinal cord injury cardiovascular basic data set and international standards to document the remaining autonomic function in spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Treatment of traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidović Lazar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Interest for traumatic thoracic aorta rupture stems from the fact that its number continually increases, and it can be rapidly lethal. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study is to present early and long term results as well as experiences of our team in surgical treatment of traumatic thoracic aorta rupture. METHOD Our retrospective study includes 12 patients with traumatic thoracic aorta rupture treated between 1985 and 2007. There were 10 male and two female patients of average age 30.75 years (18-74. RESULTS In six cases, primary diagnosis was established during the first seven days days after trauma, while in 6 more than one month later. In 11 cases, classical open surgical procedure was performed, while endovascular treatment was used in one patient. Three (25% patients died, while two (16.6% had paraplegia. Nine patients (75% were treated without complications, and are in good condition after a mean follow-up period of 9.7 years (from one month to 22 years. CONCLUSION Surgical treatment requires spinal cord protection to prevent paraplegia, using cardiopulmonary by-pass (three of our cases or external heparin-bonded shunts (five of our cases. Cardiopulmonary by-pass is followed with lower incidence of paraplegia, however it is not such a good solution for patients with polytrauma because of hemorrhage. The endovascular repair is a safe and feasible procedure in the acute phase, especially because of traumatic shock and polytrauma which contributes to higher mortality rate after open surgery. On the other hand, in chronic postrauamatic aortic rupture, open surgical treatment is connected with a lower mortality rate and good long-term results. There have been no published data about long-term results of endovascular treatment in the chronic phase.

  1. Pneumothorax in severe thoracic traumas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camassa, N.W.; Boccuzzi, F.; Diettorre, E.; Troilo, A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors reviewed CT scans and supine chest X-ray of 47 patients affected by severe thoracic trauma, examined in 1985-86. The sensibility of the two methodologies in the assessment of pneumothorax was compared. CT detected 25 pneumothorax, whereas supine chest X-ray allowed a diagnosis in 18 cases only. In 8 of the latter (44.4%) the diagnosis was made possible by the presence of indirect signs of pneumothorax only - the most frequent being the deep sulcus sign. The characterization of pneumothorax is important especially in the patients who need to be treated with mechanical ventilation therapy, or who are to undergo surgery in total anaesthesia

  2. Effects of dorsal versus ventral shear loads on the rotational stability of the thoracic spine: a biomechanical porcine and human cadaveric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouwenhoven, J.W.M.; Smit, T.H.; van der Veen, A.J.; Kingma, I.; van Dieen, J.H.; Castelein, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. A biomechanical in vitro study on porcine and human spinal segments. OBJECTIVE. To investigate axial rotational stability of the thoracic spine under dorsal and ventral shear loads. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Idiopathic scoliosis is a condition restricted exclusively to humans. An

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos ... Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with a New Injury Robin Dorman, PsyD Sex and Fertility After Spinal Cord Injury Diane M. ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, MS Occupational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Katie Powell, OT ... does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

  5. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite ... play_arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect stem-cell treatments to become available for spinal cord injuries? ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect stem-cell treatments to become available for spinal cord injuries? ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal ... health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources ... Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... play_arrow What are the chances of regaining feeling and mobility after a spinal cord injury? play_arrow How long does it usually take for feeling and movement to return after a spinal cord ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation ... Rogers, PT Recreational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By Topic Media Resources Donate to support families facing spinal cord ...

  17. Spinal cord stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007560.htm Spinal cord stimulation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ... a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? ...

  19. Spinal stenosis with paraparesis in albright hereditary osteodystrophy. Case report and review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindert, E.J. van; Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Noordam, C.

    2008-01-01

    We describe thoracic spinal stenosis with progressive myelopathy in association with Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) in a 12-year-old child with delayed diagnosis and review the relevant literature in order to identify the pathophysiological mechanism. The child was successfully treated by

  20. Rapid recovery and altered neurochemical dependence of locomotor central pattern generation following lumbar neonatal spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züchner, Mark; Kondratskaya, Elena; Sylte, Camilla B; Glover, Joel C; Boulland, Jean-Luc

    2018-01-15

    Spinal compression injury targeted to the neonatal upper lumbar spinal cord, the region of highest hindlimb locomotor rhythmogenicity, leads to an initial paralysis of the hindlimbs. Behavioural recovery is evident within a few days and approaches normal function within about 3 weeks. Fictive locomotion in the isolated injured spinal cord cannot be elicited by a neurochemical cocktail containing NMDA, dopamine and serotonin 1 day post-injury, but can 3 days post-injury as readily as in the uninjured spinal cord. Low frequency coordinated rhythmic activity can be elicited in the isolated uninjured spinal cord by NMDA + dopamine (without serotonin), but not in the isolated injured spinal cord. In both the injured and uninjured spinal cord, eliciting bona fide fictive locomotion requires the additional presence of serotonin. Following incomplete compression injury in the thoracic spinal cord of neonatal mice 1 day after birth (P1), we previously reported that virtually normal hindlimb locomotor function is recovered within about 3 weeks despite substantial permanent thoracic tissue loss. Here, we asked whether similar recovery occurs following lumbar injury that impacts more directly on the locomotor central pattern generator (CPG). As in thoracic injuries, lumbar injuries caused about 90% neuronal loss at the injury site and increased serotonergic innervation below the injury. Motor recovery was slower after lumbar than thoracic injury, but virtually normal function was attained by P25 in both cases. Locomotor CPG status was tested by eliciting fictive locomotion in isolated spinal cords using a widely used neurochemical cocktail (NMDA, dopamine, serotonin). No fictive locomotion could be elicited 1 day post-injury, but could within 3 days post-injury as readily as in age-matched uninjured control spinal cords. Burst patterning and coordination were largely similar in injured and control spinal cords but there were differences. Notably, in both groups there

  1. Anatomical contouring variability in thoracic organs at risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCall, Ross, E-mail: rmccall86@gmail.com [Medical Dosimetry Program, University of Wisconsin, La Crosse, WI (United States); MacLennan, Grayden; Taylor, Matthew; Lenards, Nishele [Medical Dosimetry Program, University of Wisconsin, La Crosse, WI (United States); Nelms, Benjamin E. [Canis Lupus LLC, Madison, WI (United States); Koshy, Matthew; Lemons, Jeffrey [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Hunzeker, Ashley [Medical Dosimetry Program, University of Wisconsin, La Crosse, WI (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether contouring thoracic organs at risk was consistent among medical dosimetrists and to identify how trends in dosimetrist's education and experience affected contouring accuracy. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used to contextualize the raw data that were obtained. A total of 3 different computed tomography (CT) data sets were provided to medical dosimetrists (N = 13) across 5 different institutions. The medical dosimetrists were directed to contour the lungs, heart, spinal cord, and esophagus. The medical dosimetrists were instructed to contour in line with their institutional standards and were allowed to use any contouring tool or technique that they would traditionally use. The contours from each medical dosimetrist were evaluated against “gold standard” contours drawn and validated by 2 radiation oncology physicians. The dosimetrist-derived contours were evaluated against the gold standard using both a Dice coefficient method and a penalty-based metric scoring system. A short survey was also completed by each medical dosimetrist to evaluate their individual contouring experience. There was no significant variation in the contouring consistency of the lungs and spinal cord. Intradosimetrist contouring was consistent for those who contoured the esophagus and heart correctly; however, medical dosimetrists with a poor metric score showed erratic and inconsistent methods of contouring.

  2. Spinal segmental dysgenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Mahomed

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal segmental dysgenesis is a rare congenital spinal abnormality , seen in neonates and infants in which a segment of the spine and spinal cord fails to develop normally . The condition is segmental with normal vertebrae above and below the malformation. This condition is commonly associated with various abnormalities that affect the heart, genitourinary, gastrointestinal tract and skeletal system. We report two cases of spinal segmental dysgenesis and the associated abnormalities.

  3. Identifying the Long-Term Role of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury Using a Transgenic Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic M. Maggio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS is a potent mediator of oxidative stress during neuroinflammation triggered by neurotrauma or neurodegeneration. We previously demonstrated that acute iNOS inhibition attenuated iNOS levels and promoted neuroprotection and functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI. The present study investigated the effects of chronic iNOS ablation after SCI using inos-null mice. iNOS−/− knockout and wild-type (WT control mice underwent a moderate thoracic (T8 contusive SCI. Locomotor function was assessed weekly, using the Basso Mouse Scale (BMS, and at the endpoint (six weeks, by footprint analysis. At the endpoint, the volume of preserved white and gray matter, as well as the number of dorsal column axons and perilesional blood vessels rostral to the injury, were quantified. At weeks two and three after SCI, iNOS−/− mice exhibited a significant locomotor improvement compared to WT controls, although a sustained improvement was not observed during later weeks. At the endpoint, iNOS−/− mice showed significantly less preserved white and gray matter, as well as fewer dorsal column axons and perilesional blood vessels, compared to WT controls. While short-term antagonism of iNOS provides histological and functional benefits, its long-term ablation after SCI may be deleterious, blocking protective or reparative processes important for angiogenesis and tissue preservation.

  4. Synaptic defects in the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen K Y Ling

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a major genetic cause of death in childhood characterized by marked muscle weakness. To investigate mechanisms underlying motor impairment in SMA, we examined the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry governing hindlimb ambulatory behavior in SMA model mice (SMNΔ7. In the neuromuscular circuitry, we found that nearly all neuromuscular junctions (NMJs in hindlimb muscles of SMNΔ7 mice remained fully innervated at the disease end stage and were capable of eliciting muscle contraction, despite a modest reduction in quantal content. In the spinal circuitry, we observed a ∼28% loss of synapses onto spinal motoneurons in the lateral column of lumbar segments 3-5, and a significant reduction in proprioceptive sensory neurons, which may contribute to the 50% reduction in vesicular glutamate transporter 1(VGLUT1-positive synapses onto SMNΔ7 motoneurons. In addition, there was an increase in the association of activated microglia with SMNΔ7 motoneurons. Together, our results present a novel concept that synaptic defects occur at multiple levels of the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry in SMNΔ7 mice, and that proprioceptive spinal synapses could be a potential target for SMA therapy.

  5. Assembly for connecting the column ends of two capillary columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, B.; Auer, M.; Pospisil, P.

    1984-01-01

    In gas chromatography, the column ends of two capillary columns are inserted into a straight capillary from both sides forming annular gaps. The capillary is located in a tee out of which the capillary columns are sealingly guided, and to which carrier gas is supplied by means of a flushing flow conduit. A ''straight-forward operation'' having capillary columns connected in series and a ''flush-back operation'' are possible. The dead volume between the capillary columns can be kept small

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  10. Thoracic organ transplantation: laboratory methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jignesh K; Kobashigawa, Jon A

    2013-01-01

    Although great progress has been achieved in thoracic organ transplantation through the development of effective immunosuppression, there is still significant risk of rejection during the early post-transplant period, creating a need for routine monitoring for both acute antibody and cellular mediated rejection. The currently available multiplexed, microbead assays utilizing solubilized HLA antigens afford the capability of sensitive detection and identification of HLA and non-HLA specific antibodies. These assays are being used to assess the relative strength of donor specific antibodies; to permit performance of virtual crossmatches which can reduce the waiting time to transplantation; to monitor antibody levels during desensitization; and for heart transplants to monitor antibodies post-transplant. For cell mediated immune responses, the recent development of gene expression profiling has allowed noninvasive monitoring of heart transplant recipients yielding predictive values for acute cellular rejection. T cell immune monitoring in heart and lung transplant recipients has allowed individual tailoring of immunosuppression, particularly to minimize risk of infection. While the current antibody and cellular laboratory techniques have enhanced the ability to manage thoracic organ transplant recipients, future developments from improved understanding of microchimerism and graft tolerance may allow more refined allograft monitoring techniques.

  11. Imaging of thoracic aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, F.H.; Young, N.; Soo, Y.S.

    1994-01-01

    Acute thoracic aortic dissection has a high mortality rate if untreated, so the diagnosis must be rapidly made. Multiple imaging techniques are often used. This retrospective study from 1988 to 1993 assesses the usefulness in diagnosis of chest X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scanning, aortography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), trans-thoracic (TTE) and trans-oesophageal (TOE) echocardiography. Forty-two patients with a final clinical diagnosis of dissection were studied. The diagnosis was confirmed in 16 (13 at surgery and three at autopsy). Three died with dissection given as the only cause of death. Chest X-ray abnormalities were seen in all 19 patients with surgery or death from dissection, with a widened mediastinum and/or dilated aorta being present in 17. In the group of 16 patients with surgery or autopsy proof, CT scans found dissections in 9 out of 12 patients studied and correctly classified the type in only five. Aortography was preformed in five, with accurate depiction of dissection and type in all. TTE found dissections in three of eight patients imaged by this method. MRI and TOE were preformed each on two patients, with accurate depiction of dissection and type in each. Because of the relatively low sensitivity of CT scanning in defining aortic dissections Westmead Hospital is currently assessing the use of TOE as the prime imaging modality prior to surgical intervention. 17 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs

  12. Acute Reciprocal Changes Distant from the Site of Spinal Osteotomies Affect Global Postoperative Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Klineberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Three-column vertebral resections are frequently applied to correct sagittal malalignment; their effects on distant unfused levels need to be understood. Methods. 134 consecutive adult PSO patients were included (29 thoracic, 105 lumbar. Radiographic analysis included pre- and postoperative regional curvatures and pelvic parameters, with paired independent t-tests to evaluate changes. Results. A thoracic osteotomy with limited fusion leads to a correction of the kyphosis and to a spontaneous decrease of the unfused lumbar lordosis (−8°. When the fusion was extended, the lumbar lordosis increased (+8°. A lumbar osteotomy with limited fusion leads to a correction of the lumbar lordosis and to a spontaneous increase of the unfused thoracic kyphosis (+13°. When the fusion was extended, the thoracic kyphosis increased by 6°. Conclusion. Data from this study suggest that lumbar and thoracic resection leads to reciprocal changes in unfused segments and requires consideration beyond focal corrections.

  13. Metastatic tumor of thoracic and lumbar spine: prospective study comparing the surgery and radiotherapy vs external immobilization with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Ioppi, Ana Elisa Empinotti; Grasselli, Juliana

    2007-01-01

    Bone metastases at the thoracic and lumbar segment of the spine are usually presented with painful sensation and medullar compression. The treatment is based on the clinical and neurological conditions of the patient and the degree of tumor invasion. In the present study, 32 patients with spinal metastasis of thoracic and lumbar segment were prospectively analyzed. These patients were treated by decompression and internal stabilization followed by radiotherapy or irradiation with external immobilization. The election of the groups was in accordance with the tumor radiotherapy sensitivity, clinical conditions, spinal stability, medullar or nerve compression and patient's decision. The Frankel scale and pain visual test were applied at the moment of diagnosis and after 1 and 6 months. The surgical group had better results with preserving the ambulation longer and significant reduction of pain.(author)

  14. Evolution of thoracic surgery in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslauriers, Jean; Pearson, F Griffith; Nelems, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Canada's contributions toward the 21st century's practice of thoracic surgery have been both unique and multilayered. Scattered throughout are tales of pioneers where none had gone before, where opportunities were greeted by creativity and where iconic figures followed one another. To describe the numerous and important achievements of Canadian thoracic surgeons in the areas of surgery for pulmonary tuberculosis, thoracic oncology, airway surgery and lung transplantation. Information was collected through reading of the numerous publications written by Canadian thoracic surgeons over the past 100 years, interviews with interested people from all thoracic surgery divisions across Canada and review of pertinent material form the archives of several Canadian hospitals and universities. Many of the developments occurred by chance. It was the early and specific focus on thoracic surgery, to the exclusion of cardiac and general surgery, that distinguishes the Canadian experience, a model that is now emerging everywhere. From lung transplantation in chimera twin calves to ex vivo organ preservation, from the removal of airways to tissue regeneration, and from intensive care research to complex science, Canadians have excelled in their commitment to research. Over the years, the influence of Canadian thoracic surgery on international practice has been significant. Canada spearheaded the development of thoracic surgery over the past 100 years to a greater degree than any other country. From research to education, from national infrastructures to the regionalization of local practices, it happened in Canada.

  15. Advancements in robotic-assisted thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenwyk, Brad; Lyerly, Ralph

    2012-12-01

    Advancements in robotic-assisted thoracic surgery present potential advantages for patients as well as new challenges for the anesthesia and surgery teams. This article describes the major aspects of the surgical approach for the most commonly performed robotic-assisted thoracic surgical procedures as well as the pertinent preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative anesthetic concerns. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Thoracic duct lymphography by subcutaneous contrast agent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A second lymphography revealed a collateral thoracic duct that was not detected during the first lymphography. The collateral duct was ligated and chylothorax was resolved after the second surgery. The lymphography applied in this study was minimally-invasive and easily provided images of the thoracic duct in a dog with ...

  17. Visualization of the thoracic duct by lymphoscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baulieu, F.; Baulieu, J.L.; Itti, R.; Tours Univ., 37

    1987-01-01

    Imaging of the thoracic duct is usually performed by radiological lymphography. However, this procedure, which uses an oil based dye injected directly into the lymph channels, has some adverse effects. In this paper we note that lymphoscintigraphy, a physiological and non invasive method, may visualize thoracic duct abnormalities, and might be particularly usefull when radiological lymphography is contraindicated. (orig.)

  18. Bilateral locked facets in the thoracic spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.A. Willems; Braakman, R. (Reinder); B. van Linge (Bert)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractTwo cases of traumatic bilateral locked facets in the thoracic spine are reported. Both patients had only minor neurological signs. They both made a full neurological recovery after surgical reduction of the locked facets. Bilateral locked facets are very uncommon in the thoracic spine.

  19. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Izarzugaza, Isabel; Jaal, Jana; Treasure, Tom; Foschi, Roberto; Ricardi, Umberto; Groen, Harry; Tavilla, Andrea; Ardanaz, Eva

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  20. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Zwan, J.M.V.D.; Izarzugaza, I.; Jaal, J.; Treasure, T.; Foschi, R.; Ricardi, U.; Groen, H.; Tavilla, A.; Ardanaz, E.

    2012-01-01

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  1. Spinal Exostosis in a Boy with Multiple Hereditary Exostoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Al Kaissi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a 13-year-old boy who presented with multiple hereditary exostosis and had development of back pain, associated with neurological deficits, and was found to have exostoses in the spinal canal. Spine radiograph showed a cauliflower-like abnormality of multiple exostoses of the posterior arch (pedicle of the thoracic vertebrae (T3–5. Reformatted CT scanning revealed the simultaneous development of intra- and extraspinal osteochondromatosis of T3–5. The spinal cord was compressed by the intraspinal exostosis. Our patient was surgically treated for intraspinal exostoses and showed cessation of neurological deficits. We report what might be a rare association of spinal cord compression in a patient with multiple hereditary exostoses.

  2. A very rare spinal cord tumor primary spinal oligodendroglioma: A review of sixty cases in the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askin Esen Hasturk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Literature review. In this study, we evaluated a case of primary spinal oligodendroglioma (PSO with a rare localization between L3 and S2, and also examined sixty cases in the literature in terms of demographic characteristics, clinical, radiological, and histopathological characteristics, and treatment planning. A case of PSO has been presented, and the relevant literature between 1931 and 2016 was reviewed. A total of 57 papers regarding PSO were found and utilized in this review. The main treatment options include radical surgical excision with neuromonitoring, followed by radiotherapy. Despite these treatment protocols, the relapse rate is high, and treatment does not significantly prolong survival. Oligodendrogliomas are rare among the primary spinal cord tumors. Oligodendrogliomas are predominantly found in the cervical spinal cord, thoracic spinal cord, or junctions during childhood and adulthood. Extension to the sacral region, inferior to the Conus, is very rare. Furthermore, of the sixty cases in the literature, the case we present here is the first to be reported in this particular age group. These localizations usually occur in the pediatric age group and after relapses. While for a limited number of cases the oligodendroglioma initiates in the thoracic region and reaches as far as L2, we encountered a case of an oligodendroglioma within the range of L3 to S2. Clinical findings are observed in accordance with location, and magnetic resonance imaging is the gold standard for diagnosis.

  3. Aortic rupture complicating a fracture of an ankylosed thoracic spine. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savolaine, E R; Ebraheim, N A; Stitgen, S; Jackson, W T

    1991-11-01

    A 34-year-old man was injured in a motorcycle accident and suffered both aortic rupture and thoracic spinal fracture, complicated by an underlying undetected ankylosing spondylitis. The latter disease can affect the integrity of vascular and spinal structure. Aortography is recommended as a high priority for the patient in an unstable cardiovascular condition requiring a definitive diagnosis. Aortic rupture and thoracic spine fracture may occur from high energy deceleration trauma. Motor vehicle passenger and pedestrian injuries are most commonly involved, although airline accidents and high falls also generate some cases. Mediastinal widening, displacement of esophagus and trachea, apical dissection of blood, and, especially, paravertebral pleural space widening are common to both injuries. Whereas most mediastinal hematomas are nonaortic in origin, a combined injury must be considered because clinical features may also overlap. These include hypotension (hypovolemic or spinal shock), paraplegia, and severe back pain. In light of the high mortality and time constraints associated with aortic rupture, immediate diagnostic resolution is necessary for appropriate management and priority of investigation.

  4. High-field MR imaging of spinal cord multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De La Paz, R.L.; Floris, R.; Norman, D.; Enzmann, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Fifty-one high-field MR imaging studies (1.5 T, General Electric Signa) of the spinal cord were performed in 42 patients (27 female, 15 male; mean age, 40 years) with clinically definitive (n = 34) or probable (n = 8) multiple sclerosis and suspected spinal cord lesions. MR imaging showed focal spinal cord abnormalities in 38 (75%) of 51 studies. T2-weighted images were abnormal (showing foci of high signal intensity) in 38 studies, T1-weighted images were abnormal (showing areas of low signal intensity or mass effect) in 16 (42%) of 38, and GRASS images were abnormal (showing foci of high signal intensity) in 9 (82%) of 11 cases. Brain MR imaging showed periventricular lesions typical of multiple sclerosis in 34 (81%) of 42 studies. Spinal cord studies were positive in eight cases with normal brain MR images, and brain studies were positive in 13 instances of normal spinal cord MR images. Four lesions were at the cervicomedullary junction, 44 in the cervical spinal cord, and three in the thoracic cord. Mass effect in cord lesions, simulating neoplasm, was seen in seven patients during the acute symptomatic phase. Serial studies in three patients with decreasing symptoms showed a reduction after 3-4 weeks and resolution of the mass effect after 2-6 months

  5. Human spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    Human studies in the past three decades have provided us with an emerging understanding of how cortical and spinal networks collaborate to ensure the vast repertoire of human behaviors. We differ from other animals in having direct cortical connections to spinal motoneurons, which bypass spinal...... the central motor command by opening or closing sensory feedback pathways. In the future, human studies of spinal motor control, in close collaboration with animal studies on the molecular biology of the spinal cord, will continue to document the neural basis for human behavior. Expected final online...

  6. Movement coordination and differential kinematics of the cervical and thoracic spines in people with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Sharon M H; Szeto, Grace P Y; Lee, Raymond Y W

    2013-07-01

    Research on the kinematics and inter-regional coordination of movements between the cervical and thoracic spines in motion adds to our understanding of the performance and interplay of these spinal regions. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of chronic neck pain on the three-dimensional kinematics and coordination of the cervical and thoracic spines during active movements of the neck. Three-dimensional spinal kinematics and movement coordination between the cervical, upper thoracic, and lower thoracic spines were examined by electromagnetic motion sensors in thirty-four individuals with chronic neck pain and thirty-four age- and gender-matched asymptomatic subjects. All subjects performed a set of free active neck movements in three anatomical planes in sitting position and at their own pace. Spinal kinematic variables (angular displacement, velocity, and acceleration) of the three defined regions, and movement coordination between regions were determined and compared between the two groups. Subjects with chronic neck pain exhibited significantly decreased cervical angular velocity and acceleration of neck movement. Cross-correlation analysis revealed consistently lower degrees of coordination between the cervical and upper thoracic spines in the neck pain group. The loss of coordination was most apparent in angular velocity and acceleration of the spine. Assessment of the range of motion of the neck is not sufficient to reveal movement dysfunctions in chronic neck pain subjects. Evaluation of angular velocity and acceleration and movement coordination should be included to help develop clinical intervention strategies to promote restoration of differential kinematics and movement coordination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Spinal cord stimulation: modeling results and clinical data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijk, Johannes J.; Struijk, J.J.; Holsheimer, J.; Barolat, Giancarlo; He, Jiping

    1992-01-01

    The potential distribution in volume couductor models of the spinal cord at cervical, midthoracic and lowthoracic levels, due to epidural stimulation, was calculated. Treshold stimuli of modeled myelhated dorsal column and dorsal root fibers were calculated and were compared with perception

  8. Spinal Cord Injury without Radiographic Abnormality (SCIWORA) – Clinical and Radiological Aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szwedowski, Dawid; Walecki, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    The acronym SCIWORA (Spinal Cord Injury Without Radiographic Abnormality) was first developed and introduced by Pang and Wilberger who used it to define “clinical symptoms of traumatic myelopathy with no radiographic or computed tomographic features of spinal fracture or instability”. SCIWORA is a clinical-radiological condition that mostly affects children. SCIWORA lesions are found mainly in the cervical spine but can also be seen, although much less frequently, in the thoracic or lumbar spine. Based on reports from different authors, SCIWORA is responsible for 6 to 19% and 9% to 14% of spinal injuries in children and adults, respectively. Underlying degenerative changes, including spondylosis or spinal canal stenosis, are typically present in adult patients. The level of spinal cord injury corresponds to the location of these changes. With recent advances in neuroimaging techniques, especially in magnetic resonance imaging, and with increasing availability of MRI as a diagnostic tool, the overall detection rate of SCIWORA has significantly improved

  9. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Finkenstaedt, Felix W; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient's environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P spinal cord injury directly causes increased risk for bacterial infection in mice as well as in patients. Besides obvious motor and sensory paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS ('immune paralysis'), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Secondary damage in the spinal cord after motor cortex injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weishaupt, Nina; Silasi, Gergely; Colbourne, Frederick; Fouad, Karim

    2010-08-01

    When neurons within the motor cortex are fatally injured, their axons, many of which project into the spinal cord, undergo wallerian degeneration. Pathological processes occurring downstream of the cortical damage have not been extensively studied. We created a focal forelimb motor cortex injury in rats and found that axons from cell bodies located in the hindlimb motor cortex (spared by the cortical injury) become secondarily damaged in the spinal cord. To assess axonal degeneration in the spinal cord, we quantified silver staining in the corticospinal tract (CST) at 1 week and 4 weeks after the injury. We found a significant increase in silver deposition at the thoracic spinal cord level at 4 weeks compared to 1 week post-injury. At both time points, no degenerating neurons could be found in the hindlimb motor cortex. In a separate experiment, we showed that direct injury of neurons within the hindlimb motor cortex caused marked silver deposition in the thoracic CST at 1 week post-injury, and declined thereafter. Therefore, delayed axonal degeneration in the thoracic spinal cord after a focal forelimb motor cortex injury is indicative of secondary damage at the spinal cord level. Furthermore, immunolabeling of spinal cord sections showed that a local inflammatory response dominated by partially activated Iba-1-positive microglia is mounted in the CST, a viable mechanism to cause the observed secondary degeneration of fibers. In conclusion, we demonstrate that following motor cortex injury, wallerian degeneration of axons in the spinal cord leads to secondary damage, which is likely mediated by inflammatory processes.

  11. Two-Stage Surgical Management of Multilevel Symptomatic Thoracic Haemangioma Using Ethanol and Iliac Crest Bone Graft

    OpenAIRE

    Degulmadi, Devanand; Brahmajoshyula, Venkatramana; Mayi, Shivanand; Teegala, Suman

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a 56-year-old obese female who presented with back pain and progressive weakness in her lower limbs for three months. She was bed-ridden for one week before reporting to our hospital. Plain radiographs showed vertical striations in multiple vertebrae classical of haemangioma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spine revealed multiple thoracic and lumbar vertebral haemangiomas. Extra osseous extension of haemangioma at T12 was causing spinal cord compression. Two-stage surg...

  12. Fast and accurate semi-automated segmentation method of spinal cord MR images at 3T applied to the construction of a cervical spinal co