WorldWideScience

Sample records for thoracic opll patient

  1. Analysis of progression of cervical OPLL using computerized tomography: typical sign of maturation of OPLL mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Byung-Wan; Baek, Dong-Hoon; Sheffler, Lindsey C; Chang, Han

    2015-07-17

    OBJECT The progression of cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) can lead to increase in the size of the OPLL mass and aggravation of neurological symptoms. In the present study, the authors aimed to analyze the progression of cervical OPLL by using CT imaging, elucidate the morphology of OPLL masses, and evaluate the factors associated with the progression of cervical OPLL. METHODS Sixty patients with cervical OPLL were included. All underwent an initial CT examination and had at least 24 months' follow-up with CT. The mean duration of follow-up was 29.6 months. Fourteen patients (Group A) had CT evidence of OPLL progression, and 46 (Group B) did not show evidence of progression on CT. The 2 groups were compared with respect to the following variables: sex, age, number of involved segments, type of OPLL, and treatment methods. The CT findings, such as the connection of an OPLL mass with the vertebral body and formation of trabeculation in the mass, were evaluated. RESULTS Sex and treatment modality were not associated with OPLL progression. The mean age of the patients in Group A was significantly lower than that in Group B (p = 0.03). The mean number of involved segments was 5.3 in Group A and 3.6 in Group B (p = 0.002). Group A had a higher proportion of cases with the mixed type of OPLL, whereas Group B had a higher proportion of cases with the segmental type (p = 0.02). A connection between the vertebral body and OPLL mass and trabeculation formation were more common in Group B (p cervical OPLL is associated with younger age, involvement of multiple levels, and mixed-type morphology. OPLL masses that are contiguous with the vertebral body and have trabecular formation are useful findings for identifying masses that are less likely to progress.

  2. Postoperative Paralysis From Thoracic Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament Surgery Risk Factor of Neurologic Injury: Nationwide Multiinstitution Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Zenya; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Ando, Muneharu; Kawabata, Shigenori; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Kida, Kazunobu; Fujiwara, Yasushi; Yamada, Kei; Yamamoto, Naoya; Kobayashi, Sho; Saito, Takanori; Wada, Kanichiro; Tadokoro, Nobuaki; Takahashi, Masato; Satomi, Kazuhiko; Shinomiya, Kenichi; Tani, Toshikazu

    2016-10-01

    Retrospective case-control study. The purpose of this study was to examine the factors of postoperative paralysis in patients who have undergone thoracic ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) surgery. A higher percentage of thoracic OPLL patients experience postoperative aggravation of paralysis than cervical OPLL patients, including patients that presented great difficulties in treatment. However, there were a few reports to prevent paralysis thoracic OPLL. The 156 patients who had received thoracic OPLL surgery were selected as the subjects of this study. The items for review were the duration of disease; the preoperative muscle strength (Muscle Manual Testing); OPLL levels (T1/2-4/5: high, T5/6-8/9: middle, and T9/10-11/12: low); the spinal canal occupancy ratio; the ratio of yellow ligament ossification as a complication; the ratio of transcranial-motor evoked potential (Tc-MEP) derivation; the preoperative/postoperative kyphotic angles in the thoracic vertebrae; the correction angle of kyphosis; the duration of surgery; and the amount of bleeding. The subjects were divided into two groups based on the absence or presence of postoperative paralysis to determine the factors of postoperative paralysis. Twenty-three patients (14.7%) exhibited postoperative paralysis. Multivariate analysis identified factors associated with postoperative paralysis: the duration of disease (odds ratio, OR = 3.3); the correction angle of kyphosis (OR = 2.4); and the ratio of Tc-MEP derivation (OR = 2.2). The risk factors of postoperative paralysis are a short duration of disease and a small correction angle of kyphosis. In addition, ratios of Tc-MEP derivation below 50% may anticipate paralysis. 4.

  3. Radiologic evaluation after posterior instrumented surgery for thoracic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament: union between rostral and caudal ossifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Kei; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Ukai, Junichi; Muramoto, Akio; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2014-05-01

    Retrospective clinical study. To investigate, using multislice CT images, how thoracic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) changes with time after thoracic posterior fusion surgery. Few studies have evaluated thoracic OPLL preoperatively and post using computed tomography (CT). The subjects included 19 patients (7 men and 12 women) with an average age at surgery of 52 years (38-66 y) who underwent indirect posterior decompression with corrective fusion and instrumentation at our institute. Minimum follow-up period was 1 year, and averaged 3 years 10 months (12-120 mo). Using CT images, we investigated fusion range, preoperative and postoperative Cobb angles of thoracic fusion levels, intraoperative and postoperative blood loss, operative time, hyperintense areas on preoperative MRI of thoracic spine and thickness of the OPLL on the reconstructed sagittal, multislice CT images taken before the operation and at 3 months, 6 months and 1 year after surgery. The basic fusion area was 3 vertebrae above and below the OPLL lesion. The mean operative time was 7 hours and 48 min (4 h 39 min-10 h 28 min), and blood loss was 1631 mL (160-11,731 mL). Intramedullary signal intensity change on magnetic resonance images was observed at the most severe ossification area in 18 patients. Interestingly, the rostral and caudal ossification regions of the OPLLs, as seen on sagittal CT images, were discontinuous across the disk space in all patients. Postoperatively, the discontinuous segments connected in all patients without progression of OPLL thickness by 5.1 months on average. All patients needing surgery had discontinuity across the disk space between the rostral and caudal ossified lesions as seen on CT. This discontinuity was considered to be the main reason for the myelopathy because a high-intensity area on magnetic resonance imaging was seen in 18 of 19 patients at the same level. Rigid fixation with instrumentation may allow the discontinuous segments

  4. Intraoperative 3-dimensional navigation and ultrasonography during posterior decompression with instrumented fusion for ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament in the thoracic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wei; Weng, Chong; Liu, Bo; Li, Qin; Sun, Yu-Qing; Yuan, Qiang; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yong-Qing; He, Da

    2013-08-01

    A retrospective clinical study was conducted. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical outcomes of intraoperative 3D navigation (ITN) and ultrasonography during posterior decompression and instrumented fusion for thoracic myelopathy due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). The symptoms caused by thoracic-ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (T-OPLL) are usually progressive and do not respond to conservative treatment-surgical intervention is the only effective treatment option. Various methods have been described for the treatment of symptomatic T-OPLL, all of which have limitations. The study included 18 patients with T-OPLL who underwent posterior decompression with instrumented fusion from 2006 to 2011. A staged operative procedure was used. First, pedicle screws were placed with ITN and a wide laminectomy was performed with resection of ossification of the ligamentum flavum (if present). With insufficient decompression on intraoperative ultrasonography, additional circumferential decompression was performed through a transpedicular approach. ITN-guided OPLL resection was performed using a burr attached to a navigational tracker. In all cases, posterior instrumented fusion was performed in situ. The outcomes were evaluated with the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores and recovery rates. Intraoperative ultrasonography showed that posterior laminectomy was sufficient in 6 patients; the remaining 12 were treated with additional circumferential decompression. The follow-up period ranged from 1 to 6 years (mean period, 2.8 y). Postoperative transient neurological deterioration occurred in 1 patient, and cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred in 4 patients. All patients showed neurological recovery with a mean Japanese Orthopaedic Association score that improved from 5.5 points preoperatively to 8.5 points at the final follow-up and a mean recovery rate of 54.5%. Intraoperative ultrasonography and ITN

  5. The voluntary driven exoskeleton Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL) for postoperative training of thoracic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Kengo; Abe, Tetsuya; Kubota, Shigeki; Marushima, Aiki; Kawamoto, Hiroaki; Ueno, Tomoyuki; Matsushita, Akira; Nakai, Kei; Saotome, Kosaku; Kadone, Hideki; Endo, Ayumu; Haginoya, Ayumu; Hada, Yasushi; Matsumura, Akira; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2017-05-01

    The hybrid assistive limb (HAL) is a wearable robot suit that assists in voluntary control of knee and hip joint motion by detecting bioelectric signals on the surface of the skin with high sensitivity. HAL has been reported to be effective for functional recovery in motor impairments. However, few reports have revealed the utility of HAL for patients who have undergone surgery for thoracic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (thoracic OPLL). Herein, we present a postoperative thoracic OPLL patient who showed remarkable functional recovery after training with HAL. A 63-year-old woman, who could not walk due to muscle weakness before surgery, underwent posterior decompression and fusion. Paralysis was re-aggravated after the initial postoperative rising. We diagnosed that paralysis was due to residual compression from the anterior lesion and microinstability after posterior fixation, and prescribed bed rest for a further 3 weeks. The incomplete paralysis gradually recovered, and walking training with HAL was started on postoperative day 44 in addition to standard physical therapy. The patient underwent 10 sessions of HAL training until discharge on postoperative day 73. Results of a 10-m walk test were assessed after every session, and the patient's speed and cadence markedly improved. At discharge, the patient could walk with 2 crutches and no assistance. Furthermore, no adverse events associated with HAL training occurred. HAL training for postoperative thoracic OPLL patients may enhance improvement in walking ability, even if severe impairment of ambulation and muscle weakness exist preoperatively.

  6. Management of cerebrospinal fluid leakage after anterior decompression for ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament in the thoracic spine: the utilization of a volume-controlled pseudomeningocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ji Young; Chan, Chee Keong; Lee, Sang-Ho; Choi, Won-Chul; Maeng, Dae Hyeon; Lee, Ho-Yeon

    2012-06-01

    Retrospective review To determine the efficacy of management of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage after the anterior thoracic approach. CSF leakage after incidental durotomy commonly occurs after anterior thoracic ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) surgery. Pseudomeningocele will invariably form under such circumstances. Among them, uncontrolled CSF leakage with a fistulous condition is problematic. As a solution, we have managed these durotomies with chest drains alone without any CSF drainage by the concept of a "volume-controlled pseudomeningocele." Between 2001 and 2009, CSF leakage occurred in 26 patients (37.7%) of the total 69 patients who underwent anterior decompression for thoracic OPLL. In the initial 11 cases, subarachnoid drainage was utilized as an augmentive measure in combination with chest tube drainage in the postoperative period (group A). In the subsequent 15 cases, the durotomy was managed in a similar manner but in the absence of any subarachnoid drainage (group B). Various parameters such as the duration of postoperative hospital stay, clinical outcome score, drainage output, resolution of CSF leakage, complications, and additional surgery performed were analyzed and compared between the 2 groups. A resolution of the CSF leakage grading system was also proposed for the residual pseudomeningocele that formed in each group. There were statistically no significant differences in the outcome parameters between the 2 groups and also in patients with grade I or grade II residual pseudomeningocele of the new grading system. Two complications occurred in group A. No reexploration for persistent CSF leakage was required in both groups. CSF leakage managed with controlled chest tube drainage can produce a comparable result with those with additional subarachnoid drainage when watertight dural repair is impossible. The concept of controlled pseudomeningocele may be a useful and practical technique for the treatment of CSF leakage

  7. Additive-manufactured patient-specific titanium templates for thoracic pedicle screw placement: novel design with reduced contact area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Mitsuru; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Ota, Eigo; Otsuki, Bungo; Kimura, Hiroaki; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Kawai, Toshiyuki; Futami, Tohru; Sasaki, Kiyoyuki; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Nakamura, Takashi; Neo, Masashi; Matsuda, Shuich

    2016-06-01

    Image-based navigational patient-specific templates (PSTs) for pedicle screw (PS) placement have been described. With recent advances in three-dimensional computer-aided designs and additive manufacturing technology, various PST designs have been reported, although the template designs were not optimized. We have developed a novel PST design that reduces the contact area without sacrificing stability. It avoids susceptibility to intervening soft tissue, template geometric inaccuracy, and difficulty during template fitting. Fourteen candidate locations on the posterior aspect of the vertebra were evaluated. Among them, locations that had high reproducibility on computed tomography (CT) images and facilitated accurate PS placement were selected for the final PST design. An additive manufacturing machine (EOSINT M270) fabricated the PSTs using commercially pure titanium powder. For the clinical study, 36 scoliosis patients and 4 patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) were treated with thoracic PSs using our newly developed PSTs. We intraoperatively and postoperatively evaluated the accuracy of the PS hole created by the PST. Based on the segmentation reproducibility and stability analyses, we selected seven small, round contact points for our PST: bilateral superior and inferior points on the transverse process base, bilateral inferior points on the laminar, and a superior point on the spinous process. Clinically, the success rates of PS placement using this PST design were 98.6 % (414/420) for scoliosis patients and 100 % (46/46) for OPLL patients. This study provides a useful design concept for the development and introduction of patient-specific navigational templates for placing PSs.

  8. Timing Jitter Analysis for Clock recovery Circuits Based on an Optoelectronic Phase-Locked Loop (OPLL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibar, Darko; Mørk, Jesper; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo

    2005-01-01

    Timing jitter of an OPLL based clock recovery is investigated. We demonstrate how loop gain, input and VCO signal jitter, loop filter bandwidth and a loop time delay influence jitter of the extracted clock signal......Timing jitter of an OPLL based clock recovery is investigated. We demonstrate how loop gain, input and VCO signal jitter, loop filter bandwidth and a loop time delay influence jitter of the extracted clock signal...

  9. Prevalence and distribution of ossification of the supra/interspinous ligaments in symptomatic patients with cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine: a CT-based multicenter cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kanji; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Hirai, Takashi; Iwanami, Akio; Takeuchi, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Seki, Shoji; Tsuji, Takashi; Fujiyoshi, Kanehiro; Furukawa, Mitsuru; Nishimura, Soraya; Wada, Kanichiro; Koda, Masao; Furuya, Takeo; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Hasegawa, Tomohiko; Takeshita, Katsushi; Kimura, Atsushi; Abematsu, Masahiko; Haro, Hirotaka; Ohba, Tetsuro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Kei; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Kanno, Haruo; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Yamazaki, Masashi; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Okawa, Atsushi; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu

    2016-12-01

    Supra/interspinous ligaments connect adjacent spinous processes and act as a stabilizer of the spine. As with other spinal ligaments, it can become ossified. However, few report have discussed ossification supra/interspinous ligaments (OSIL), so its epidemiology remains unknown. We therefore aimed to investigate the prevalence and distribution of OSIL in symptomatic patients with cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). The participants of our study were symptomatic patients with cervical OPLL who were diagnosed by standard radiographs of the cervical spine. The whole spine CT data as well as clinical parameters such as age and sex were obtained from 20 institutions belong to the Japanese Multicenter Research Organization for Ossification of the Spinal Ligament (JOSL). The prevalence and distribution of OSIL and the association between OSIL and clinical parameters were reviewed. The sum of the levels involved by OPLL (OP-index) and OSIL (OSI-index) as well as the prevalence of ossification of the nuchal ligament (ONL) were also investigated. A total of 234 patients with a mean age of 65 years was recruited. The CT-based evidence of OSIL was noted in 68 (54 males and 14 females) patients (29%). The distribution of OSIL showed a significant thoracic preponderance. In OSIL-positive patients, single-level involvement was noted in 19 cases (28%), whereas 49 cases (72%) presented multi-level involvement. We found a significant positive correlation between the OP-index grade and OSI-index. ONL was noted at a significantly higher rate in OSIL-positive patients compared to negative patients. The prevalence of OSIL in symptomatic patients with cervical OPLL was 29%. The distribution of OSIL showed a significant thoracic preponderance.

  10. Emergency thoracic surgery in elderly patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Stefan; Unger, Lena; Czymek, Ralf; Kujath, Peter; Hoffmann, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Emergency thoracic surgery in the elderly represents an extreme situation for both the surgeon and patient. The lack of an adequate patient history as well as the inability to optimize any co-morbidities, which are the result of the emergent situation, are the cause of increased morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the outcome and prognostic factors for this selected group of patients. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Academic tertiary care referral center. Participants Emergency patients treated at the Department of Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital of Luebeck, Germany. Main outcome measures Co-morbidities, mortality, risk factors and hospital length of stay. Results A total of 124 thoracic procedures were performed on 114 patients. There were 79 men and 36 women (average age 72.5 ±6.4 years, range 65–94). The overall operative mortality was 25.4%. The most frequent indication was thoracic/mediastinal infection, followed by peri- or postoperative thoracic complications. Risk factors for hospital mortality were a high ASA score, pre-existing diabetes mellitus and renal insufficiency. Conclusions Our study documents a perioperative mortality rate of 25% in patients over 65 who required emergency thoracic surgery. The main indication for a surgical intervention was sepsis with a thoracic/mediastinal focus. Co-morbidities and the resulting perioperative complications were found to have a significant effect on both inpatient length of stay and outcome. Long-term systemic co-morbidities such as diabetes mellitus are difficult to equalize with respect to certain organ dysfunctions and significantly increase mortality. PMID:21369531

  11. Upper thoracic-spine disc degeneration in patients with cervical pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Estanislao; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Mollá, Enrique; Costa, Salvador

    2004-01-01

    To study the relationship of upper thoracic spine degenerative disc contour changes on MR imaging in patients with neck pain. The relation between upper thoracic and cervical spine degenerative disc disease is not well established. One hundred and fifty-six patients referred with cervical pain were studied. There were 73 women and 77 men with a mean age of 48.6 +/- 14.6 years (range, 19 to 83 years). All MR studies were performed with a large 23-cm FOV covering at least from the body of T4 to the clivus. Discs were coded as normal, protrusion/bulge or extrusion. Degenerative thoracic disc contour changes were observed in 13.4% of patients with cervical pain. T2-3 was the most commonly affected level of the upper thoracic spine, with 15 bulge/protrusions and one extrusion. Upper degenerative thoracic disc contour changes presented in older patients than the cervical levels (Student-Newman-Keuls test, P < 0.001). Degenerative disc contour changes at the C7-T1, T1-2, T2-3 and T3-4 levels were significantly correlated ( P = 0.001), but unrelated to any other disc disease, patient's gender or age. Degenerative cervical disc disease was closely related together ( P < 0.001), but not with any thoracic disc. A statistically significant relation was found within the upper thoracic discs, reflecting common pathoanatomical changes. The absence of relation to cervical segments is probably due to differences in their pathomechanisms.

  12. Upper thoracic-spine disc degeneration in patients with cervical pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arana, Estanislao; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Costa, Salvador [Department of Radiology, Clinica Quiron, Avda Blasco Ibanez 14, 46010, Valencia (Spain); Molla, Enrique [Department of Radiology, Clinica Quiron, Avda Blasco Ibanez 14, 46010, Valencia (Spain); Department of Morphological Sciences, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain)

    2004-01-01

    To study the relationship of upper thoracic spine degenerative disc contour changes on MR imaging in patients with neck pain. The relation between upper thoracic and cervical spine degenerative disc disease is not well established. One hundred and fifty-six patients referred with cervical pain were studied. There were 73 women and 77 men with a mean age of 48.6{+-}14.6 years (range, 19 to 83 years). All MR studies were performed with a large 23-cm FOV covering at least from the body of T4 to the clivus. Discs were coded as normal, protrusion/bulge or extrusion. Degenerative thoracic disc contour changes were observed in 13.4% of patients with cervical pain. T2-3 was the most commonly affected level of the upper thoracic spine, with 15 bulge/protrusions and one extrusion. Upper degenerative thoracic disc contour changes presented in older patients than the cervical levels (Student-Newman-Keuls test, P<0.001). Degenerative disc contour changes at the C7-T1, T1-2, T2-3 and T3-4 levels were significantly correlated (P=0.001), but unrelated to any other disc disease, patient's gender or age. Degenerative cervical disc disease was closely related together (P<0.001), but not with any thoracic disc. A statistically significant relation was found within the upper thoracic discs, reflecting common pathoanatomical changes. The absence of relation to cervical segments is probably due to differences in their pathomechanisms. (orig.)

  13. Upper thoracic-spine disc degeneration in patients with cervical pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arana, Estanislao; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Costa, Salvador; Molla, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    To study the relationship of upper thoracic spine degenerative disc contour changes on MR imaging in patients with neck pain. The relation between upper thoracic and cervical spine degenerative disc disease is not well established. One hundred and fifty-six patients referred with cervical pain were studied. There were 73 women and 77 men with a mean age of 48.6±14.6 years (range, 19 to 83 years). All MR studies were performed with a large 23-cm FOV covering at least from the body of T4 to the clivus. Discs were coded as normal, protrusion/bulge or extrusion. Degenerative thoracic disc contour changes were observed in 13.4% of patients with cervical pain. T2-3 was the most commonly affected level of the upper thoracic spine, with 15 bulge/protrusions and one extrusion. Upper degenerative thoracic disc contour changes presented in older patients than the cervical levels (Student-Newman-Keuls test, P<0.001). Degenerative disc contour changes at the C7-T1, T1-2, T2-3 and T3-4 levels were significantly correlated (P=0.001), but unrelated to any other disc disease, patient's gender or age. Degenerative cervical disc disease was closely related together (P<0.001), but not with any thoracic disc. A statistically significant relation was found within the upper thoracic discs, reflecting common pathoanatomical changes. The absence of relation to cervical segments is probably due to differences in their pathomechanisms. (orig.)

  14. [Thoracic surgery for patients with bronchial asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyoda, A; Satoh, Y

    2012-07-01

    Thoracic surgery poses a risk for complications in the respiratory system. In particular, for patients with bronchial asthma, we need to care for perioperative complications because it is well known that these patients frequently have respiratory complications after surgery, and they may have bronchial spasms during surgery. If we can get good control of their bronchial asthma, we can usually perform surgery for these patients without limitations. For safe postoperative care, it is desirable that these patients have stable asthma conditions that are well-controlled before surgery, as thoracic surgery requires intrabronchial intubation for anesthesia and sometimes bronchial resection. These stimulations to the bronchus do not provide for good conditions because of the risk of bronchial spasm. Therefore, we should use the same agents that are used to control bronchial asthma if it is already well controlled. If it is not, we have to administer a β₂ stimulator, aminophylline, or steroidal agents for good control. Isoflurane or sevoflurane are effective for the safe control of anesthesia during surgery, and we should use a β₂ stimulator, with or without inhalation, or steroidal agents after surgery. It is important to understand that we can perform thoracic surgery for asthma patients if we can provide perioperative control of bronchial asthma, although these patients still have severe risks.

  15. Cardiovascular complications following thoracic radiotherapy in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Borchsenius, Julie I Helene; Offersen, Birgitte Vrou

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications following thoracic radiotherapy in patients with cancer are well described. Advancements in surgery, radiotherapy and systemic treatments have led to an increasing number of cancer survivors and thus an increasing number of patients with long-term side effects...... of their cancer treatments. This article describes the short- and long-term cardiovascular morbidity and mortality following thoracic radiotherapy and further, optimal cardiovascular assessments and diagnostic tools in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients....

  16. Intensive Care Management of Thoracic Aortic Surgical Patients, Including Thoracic and Infradiaphragmatic Endovascular Repair (EVAR/TEVAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Sheela Pai

    2015-12-01

    The patient with thoracic aortic disease can present for open or endovascular repair. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has emerged as a minimally invasive option for a multitude of aortic pathology, including dissections, aneurysms, traumatic injuries, and ulcers. Postoperative management of these patients depends on the extent of procedure, whether it was open or endovascular, and, finally, on the preoperative comorbidities present. While procedural success has catapulted TEVAR to popularity, midterm results have been mixed. Additionally, periprocedural complications such as paraplegia and renal failure remain a significant morbidity in these patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Adverse Effect of Trauma on Neurologic Recovery for Patients with Cervical Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Soo Eon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2015-01-01

    Study Design?Retrospective study. Objective?Minor trauma, even from a simple fall, can often cause cervical myelopathy, necessitating surgery in elderly patients who may be unaware of their posterior longitudinal ligament ossification (OPLL). The aim of this study is to determine the influence of trauma on the neurologic course in patients who have undergone surgery for cervical OPLL. Methods?Patients who underwent surgery due to OPLL were divided by trauma history and compared (34 in the tra...

  18. Thoracic myelopathy with alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeda, Koji; Kasai, Yuichi; Kawakita, Eiji; Matsumura, Yoshihiro; Kono, Toshibumi; Murata, Tetsuya; Uchida, Atsumasa

    2008-01-15

    A case of thoracic myelopathy with alkaptonuria (ochronotic spondyloarthropathy) is presented. To present and review the first reported case of an alkaptonuric patient with concomitant thoracic myelopathy. Alkaptonuria, a rare hereditary metabolic disease, is characterized by accumulation of homogentistic acid, ochronosis, and destruction of connective tissue resulting in degenerative spondylosis and arthritis. Despite the high incidence of intervertebral disc diseases among patients with alkaptonuria, neurologic symptoms caused by spinal disease are rare. Thoracic myelopathy in a patient with alkaptonuria has not been previously reported. The clinical course, radiologic features, pathology, and treatment outcome of an alkaptonuria patient with thoracic myelopathy was documented. Myelopathy of the patient was caused by rupture of a thoracic intervertebral disc. The neurologic symptoms of the patient were markedly improved after surgery. We have reported for the first time, that an alkaptonuria patient showed thoracic myelopathy caused by rupture of a thoracic intervertebral disc. Decompression followed by the instrumented fusion of the thoracic spine was effective for improving the neurologic symptoms.

  19. Emergency thoracic surgery in elderly patients

    OpenAIRE

    Limmer, Stefan; Unger, Lena; Czymek, Ralf; Kujath, Peter; Hoffmann, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Emergency thoracic surgery in the elderly represents an extreme situation for both the surgeon and patient. The lack of an adequate patient history as well as the inability to optimize any co-morbidities, which are the result of the emergent situation, are the cause of increased morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the outcome and prognostic factors for this selected group of patients. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Academic tertiary care referral center. Participants ...

  20. Thoracic manual therapy is not more effective than placebo thoracic manual therapy in patients with shoulder dysfunctions: A systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzarri, Paolo; Buzzatti, Luca; Cattrysse, Erik; Scafoglieri, Aldo

    2018-02-01

    Manual treatments targeting different regions (shoulder, cervical spine, thoracic spine, ribs) have been studied to deal with patients complaining of shoulder pain. Thoracic manual treatments seem able to produce beneficial effects on this group of patients. However, it is not clear whether the patient improvement is a consequence of thoracic manual therapy or a placebo effect. To compare the efficacy of thoracic manual therapy and placebo thoracic manual treatment for patients with shoulder dysfunction. Electronic databases (MEDLINE, CENTRAL, PEDro, CINAHL, WoS, EMBASE, ERIC) were searched through November 2016. Randomized Controlled Trials assessing pain, mobility and function were selected. The Cochrane bias estimation tool was applied. Outcome results were either extracted or computed from raw data. Meta-analysis was performed for outcomes with low heterogeneity. Four studies were included in the review. The methodology of the included studies was generally good except for one study that was rated as high risk of bias. Meta-analysis showed no significant effect for "pain at present" (SMD -0.02; 95% CI: -0.35, 0.32) and "pain during movement" (SMD -0.12; 95% CI: -0.45, 0.21). There is very low to low quality of evidence that a single session of thoracic manual therapy is not more effective than a single session of placebo thoracic manual therapy in patients with shoulder dysfunction at immediate post-treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Thoracic spinal anesthesia is safe for patients undergoing abdominal cancer surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ellakany, Mohamed Hamdy

    2014-01-01

    Aim: A double-blinded randomized controlled study to compare discharge time and patient satisfaction between two groups of patients submitted to open surgeries for abdominal malignancies using segmental thoracic spinal or general anesthesia. Background: Open surgeries for abdominal malignancy are usually done under general anesthesia, but many patients with major medical problems sometimes can’t tolerate such anesthesia. Regional anesthesia namely segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia may be b...

  2. The significance of routine thoracic computed tomography in patients with blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çorbacıoğlu, Seref Kerem; Er, Erhan; Aslan, Sahin; Seviner, Meltem; Aksel, Gökhan; Doğan, Nurettin Özgür; Güler, Sertaç; Bitir, Aysen

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the use of thoracic computed tomography (TCT) as part of nonselective computed tomography (CT) guidelines is superior to selective CT during the diagnosis of blunt chest trauma. This study was planned as a prospective cohort study, and it was conducted at the emergency department between 2013 and 2014. A total of 260 adult patients who did not meet the exclusion criteria were enrolled in the study. All patients were evaluated by an emergency physician, and their primary surveys were completed based on the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) principles. Based on the initial findings and ATLS recommendations, patients in whom thoracic CT was indicated were determined (selective CT group). Routine CTs were then performed on all patients. Thoracic injuries were found in 97 (37.3%) patients following routine TCT. In 53 (20%) patients, thoracic injuries were found by selective CT. Routine TCT was able to detect chest injury in 44 (16%) patients for whom selective TCT would not otherwise be ordered based on the EP evaluation (nonselective TCT group). Five (2%) patients in this nonselective TCT group required tube thoracostomy, while there was no additional treatment provided for thoracic injuries in the remaining 39 (15%). In conclusion, we found that the nonselective TCT method was superior to the selective TCT method in detecting thoracic injuries in patients with blunt trauma. Furthermore, we were able to demonstrate that the nonselective TCT method can change the course of patient management albeit at low rates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The evaluation of preoperative nutritional status in patients undergoing thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trufă, D I; Arhire, Lidia Iuliana; Niţă, Otilia; Gherasim, Andreea; Niţă, G; Graur, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the preoperative nutritional status of patients undergoing thoracic surgery using different nutritional tools. . We conducted a prospective study on a sample of 43 thoracic patients, including 23 with neoplasms and 20 with non-neoplastic pathology who underwent thoracic surgery procedures between July-September 2011, in the Thoracic Surgery Clinic in Iaşi. Weight and height were measured and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. WHO classification for BMI categories was used. Preoperative serum level of transthyretin (TTR) and demographic data (gender, age) were also assessed. All patients were examined by the Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) and the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS 2002). After performing SGA, 67.9% of the patients were well-nourished, 21.4% were moderately or suspected of being malnourished and 10.7% were severely malnourished. The level of TTR was significantly lower in the moderately or severely malnourished group, compared to those considered well-nourished. According to NRS-2002, 42.9% of the patients were considered at nutritional risk. The level of TTR of these patients was lower than the level of TTR of the patients without nutritional risk, but without statistical significance. Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) and the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS 2002) are useful in identifying patients with nutritional risk, so that appropriate nutritional management could be initialised even before surgery.

  4. The thoracic aortography by Gd-DTPA enhanced ultrafast cine MR imaging. Assessment of thoracic aortic dilatation in aging and in patients with hypertension and aortic valve disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Kentaro; Nakase, Emiko; Kawai, Ichiyoshi; Saito, Takayuki; Kikkawa, Nobutada; Haiyama, Toru

    1995-01-01

    To assess the morphology of thoracic aorta, we had a trial of Gd-DTPA enhanced ultrafast cine MR imaging on the thoracic aorta. This method was provided with high quality thoracic aortogram during 15-20 seconds. In patients without hypertension and aortic valve disease, dimensions of ascending aorta and aortic arch were significantly correlated with aging. In patients with hypertension, dimensions of ascending aorta and aortic arch were significantly dilated. In patients with aortic valve disease, thoracic aorta was diffusely enlarged, especially in ascending aorta. Gd-DTPA enhanced ultrafact cine MR imaging was useful to assess the thoracic aortic anatomy and diseases. (author)

  5. Embolization for Thoracic Duct Collateral Leakage in High-Output Chylothorax After Thoracic Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kariya, Shuji; Nakatani, Miyuki; Yoshida, Rie; Ueno, Yutaka; Komemushi, Atsushi; Tanigawa, Noboru

    2017-01-01

    PurposeThis study was designed to investigate thoracic duct collateral leakage and the supply route of lymphatic fluid by lymphangiography and transcatheter thoracic ductography and to evaluate the results of embolization for thoracic duct collateral leakage performed to cut off this supply route.MethodsData were retrospectively collected from five patients who underwent embolization for thoracic duct collateral leakage in persistent high-output chylothorax after thoracic surgery. Extravasation of lipiodol at the ruptured thoracic duct collaterals was confirmed in all patients on lymphangiography. Transcatheter thoracic ductography was used to identify extravasation of iodinated contrast agent and to identify communication between the thoracic duct and leakage site. Thoracic duct embolization (TDE) was performed using the percutaneous transabdominal approach to cut off the supply route using N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) mixed with lipiodol (1:5–1:20).ResultsClinical success (drainage volume ≤10 mL/kg/day within 7 days after TDE) was achieved in all patients. The collateral routes developed as consequence of surgical thoracic duct ligation. In three patients, NBCA-Lipiodol reached the leakage site through direct communication between the thoracic duct and the ruptured lymphatic duct. In the other two patients, direct communication and extravasation was not detected on thoracic ductography, and NBCA-Lipiodol did not reach the leakage site. However, NBCA-Lipiodol did reach the cisterna chyli, lumbar trunks, and some collateral routes via the cisterna chyli or lumbar lymphatics. As a result, leakage was stopped.ConclusionsTDE was effective for the management of leakage of the collaterals in high-output chylothorax after thoracic surgery.

  6. Embolization for Thoracic Duct Collateral Leakage in High-Output Chylothorax After Thoracic Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kariya, Shuji, E-mail: kariyas@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Nakatani, Miyuki, E-mail: nakatanm@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Yoshida, Rie, E-mail: yagir@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Ueno, Yutaka, E-mail: uenoyut@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Komemushi, Atsushi, E-mail: komemush@takii.kmu.ac.jp; Tanigawa, Noboru, E-mail: tanigano@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp [Kansai Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2017-01-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to investigate thoracic duct collateral leakage and the supply route of lymphatic fluid by lymphangiography and transcatheter thoracic ductography and to evaluate the results of embolization for thoracic duct collateral leakage performed to cut off this supply route.MethodsData were retrospectively collected from five patients who underwent embolization for thoracic duct collateral leakage in persistent high-output chylothorax after thoracic surgery. Extravasation of lipiodol at the ruptured thoracic duct collaterals was confirmed in all patients on lymphangiography. Transcatheter thoracic ductography was used to identify extravasation of iodinated contrast agent and to identify communication between the thoracic duct and leakage site. Thoracic duct embolization (TDE) was performed using the percutaneous transabdominal approach to cut off the supply route using N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) mixed with lipiodol (1:5–1:20).ResultsClinical success (drainage volume ≤10 mL/kg/day within 7 days after TDE) was achieved in all patients. The collateral routes developed as consequence of surgical thoracic duct ligation. In three patients, NBCA-Lipiodol reached the leakage site through direct communication between the thoracic duct and the ruptured lymphatic duct. In the other two patients, direct communication and extravasation was not detected on thoracic ductography, and NBCA-Lipiodol did not reach the leakage site. However, NBCA-Lipiodol did reach the cisterna chyli, lumbar trunks, and some collateral routes via the cisterna chyli or lumbar lymphatics. As a result, leakage was stopped.ConclusionsTDE was effective for the management of leakage of the collaterals in high-output chylothorax after thoracic surgery.

  7. Evaluation of rotational set-up errors in patients with thoracic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yanyang; Fu Xiaolong; Xia Bing; Fan Min; Yang Huanjun; Ren Jun; Xu Zhiyong; Jiang Guoliang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the rotational set-up errors in patients with thoracic neoplasms. Methods: 224 kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (KVCBCT) scans from 20 thoracic tumor patients were evaluated retrospectively. All these patients were involved in the research of 'Evaluation of the residual set-up error for online kilovoltage cone-beam CT guided thoracic tumor radiation'. Rotational set-up errors, including pitch, roll and yaw, were calculated by 'aligning the KVCBCT with the planning CT, using the semi-automatic alignment method. Results: The average rotational set-up errors were -0.28 degree ±1.52 degree, 0.21 degree ± 0.91 degree and 0.27 degree ± 0.78 degree in the left-fight, superior-inferior and anterior-posterior axis, respectively. The maximal rotational errors of pitch, roll and yaw were 3.5 degree, 2.7 degree and 2.2 degree, respectively. After correction for translational set-up errors, no statistically significant changes in rotational error were observed. Conclusions: The rotational set-up errors in patients with thoracic neoplasms were all small in magnitude. Rotational errors may not change after the correction for translational set-up errors alone, which should be evaluated in a larger sample future. (authors)

  8. Radiofrequency Denervation Improves Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Thoracic Zygapophyseal Joint Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambraeus, Johan; Hambraeus, Kjerstin S; Persson, Jan

    2018-05-01

    To describe a practical approach for the diagnosis and treatment of thoracic zygapophyseal joint pain and to present preliminary clinical data on the effects of this treatment approach on health-related quality of life. An observational study. Specialist outpatient pain clinic in northern Sweden. Patients with long-term thoracic pain. We describe a method of radiofrequency denervation of thoracic zygapophyseal joints. We compared health-related quality of life between patients who underwent radiofrequency denervation of thoracic zygapophyseal joints and patients who underwent radiofrequency denervation for lumbar and cervical zygapophyseal joint pain. Treatment according to the Spine Intervention Society Guidelines was performed on the lumbar region in 178 patients and in the cervical region in 55 patients. Another 82 patients were treated in the thoracic region with our proposed technique. A survival plot of improvements in health-related quality of life revealed that all three treatments were effective in 65% or more of patients. The improvement in health-related quality of life was maintained for 12 or more months after treatment in 47% to 51% of patients. Our results suggest that radiofrequency denervation of thoracic zygapophyseal joint pain is as effective as radiofrequency denervation, the standard treatment, for lumbar and cervical zygapophyseal joint pain. If these results can be confirmed by other centers, radiofrequency denervation is likely to become more widely available for the treatment of thoracic zygapophyseal joint pain.

  9. Increased interleukin-11 levels in thoracic aorta and plasma from patients with acute thoracic aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yao; Ye, Jing; Wang, Menglong; Wang, Yuan; Ji, Qingwei; Huang, Ying; Zeng, Tao; Wang, Zhen; Ye, Di; Jiang, Huimin; Liu, Jianfang; Lin, Yingzhong; Wan, Jun

    2018-06-01

    Interleukin (IL) 11 is closely related to tumor and hematological system diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated that IL-11 also participates in cardiovascular diseases, including ischemia-reperfusion mediated heart injury and acute myocardial infarction. This study aimed to investigate whether IL-11 is involved in acute thoracic aortic dissection (TAD). Aortic tissue samples from normal donors and acute TAD patients were collected, and the expression of IL-11 in all aortic tissue was analyzed. In addition, blood samples from patients with chest pain were collected and divided into a non-AD (NAD) group and a TAD group according to the results of computed tomography angiography of the thoracic aorta. The plasma IL-11, IL-17 and interferon (IFN) γ in all blood samples were measured. Compared with aortic tissue of normal controls, IL-11 was significantly increased in aortic tissue of acute TAD patients, especially in the torn section. The IL-11 was derived from aorta macrophages in TAD. In addition, the plasma IL-11, IL-17 and IFN-γ were significantly higher in acute TAD patients than in NAD patients, and the correlation analysis showed that IL-11 levels were positively correlated with levels of IFN-γ, IL-17, glucose, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, white blood cells, C-reactive proteins and D-dimers. Binary logistic regression analyses showed that elevated IL11 in patients who may have diagnostic value of TAD, but less that D-dimer. IL-11 was increased in thoracic aorta and plasma of TAD patients and may be a promising biomarker for diagnosis in patients with TAD. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Involvement of the thoracic duct in liver cirrhosis patients with ascites. Using MR lymphography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuboyama, Shin-ichi; Ishii, Kunihide; Koga, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    To elucidate whether the morphological changes of the thoracic duct are observed in patients with liver cirrhosis and ascites, the thoracic duct was examined at magnetic resonance (MR) lymphography without contrast agent. In 7 healthy volunteers, the thoracic duct was clearly visualized as an intermittent or continuous straight line along the thoracic aorta (its mean diameter was 3.9 mm). In 20 liver cirrhosis without ascites, its mean diameter was 3.6 mm. In 6 liver cirrhosis with refractory ascites, the thoracic duct was visualized as straight or slightly tortuous and slender line (its mean diameter was 2.5 mm). On the other hand, 7 cases with ascites which respond well to the administration of diuretics showed tortuous and dilated thoracic duct (its mean diameter was 4.3 mm). In cases with refractory ascites, mean diameter of the thoracic duct was significantly reduced, compared with the cases without ascites and with ascites that respond well to the administration of diuretics. Thus, it was found that the morphological differences of the thoracic duct depend on the response to the diuretics in liver cirrhosis patients with ascites. To elucidate whether the morphological changes of the thoracic duct are observed in patients with liver cirrhosis and ascites, the thoracic duct was examined at magnetic resonance lymphography without contrast agent. In cases with refractory ascites, mean diameter of the thoracic duct was significantly reduced, compared with the cases without ascites and with ascites that respond well to the administration of diuretics. (author)

  11. Thoracic spinal anesthesia is safe for patients undergoing abdominal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellakany, Mohamed Hamdy

    2014-01-01

    A double-blinded randomized controlled study to compare discharge time and patient satisfaction between two groups of patients submitted to open surgeries for abdominal malignancies using segmental thoracic spinal or general anesthesia. Open surgeries for abdominal malignancy are usually done under general anesthesia, but many patients with major medical problems sometimes can't tolerate such anesthesia. Regional anesthesia namely segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia may be beneficial in such patients. A total of 60 patients classified according to American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) as class II or III undergoing surgeries for abdominal malignancy, like colonic or gastric carcinoma, divided into two groups, 30 patients each. Group G, received general anesthesia, Group S received a segmental (T9-T10 injection) thoracic spinal anesthesia with intrathecal injection of 2 ml of hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% (10 mg) and 20 ug fentanyl citrate. Intraoperative monitoring, postoperative pain, complications, recovery time, and patient satisfaction at follow-up were compared between the two groups. Spinal anesthesia was performed easily in all 30 patients, although two patients complained of paraesthesiae, which responded to slight needle withdrawal. No patient required conversion to general anesthesia, six patients required midazolam for anxiety and six patients required phenylephrine and atropine for hypotension and bradycardia, recovery was uneventful and without sequelae. The two groups were comparable with respect to gender, age, weight, height, body mass index, ASA classification, preoperative oxygen saturation and preoperative respiratory rate and operative time. This preliminary study has shown that segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia can be used successfully and effectively for open surgeries for abdominal malignancies by experienced anesthetists. It showed shorter postanesthesia care unit stay, better postoperative pain relief and patient satisfaction than

  12. Risk factors for reinsertion of urinary catheter after early removal in thoracic surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, John; Geraci, Travis; Milman, Steven; Maslow, Andrew; Jones, Richard N; Ng, Thomas

    2018-03-08

    To reduce the incidence of urinary tract infection, Surgical Care Improvement Project 9 mandates the removal of urinary catheters within 48 hours postoperatively. In patients with thoracic epidural anesthesia, we sought to determine the rate of catheter reinsertion, the complications of reinsertion, and the factors associated with reinsertion. We conducted a prospective observational study of consecutive patients undergoing major pulmonary or esophageal resection with thoracic epidural analgesia over a 2-year period. As per Surgical Care Improvement Project 9, all urinary catheters were removed within 48 hours postoperatively. Excluded were patients with chronic indwelling catheter, patients with urostomy, and patients requiring continued strict urine output monitoring. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent risk factors for urinary catheter reinsertion. Thirteen patients met exclusion criteria. Of the 275 patients evaluated, 60 (21.8%) required reinsertion of urinary catheter. There was no difference in the urinary tract infection rate between patients requiring reinsertion (1/60 [1.7%]) versus patients not requiring reinsertion (1/215 [0.5%], P = .389). Urethral trauma during reinsertion was seen in 1 of 60 patients (1.7%). After reinsertion, discharge with urinary catheter was required in 4 of 60 patients (6.7%). Multivariable logistic regression analysis found esophagectomy, lower body mass index, and benign prostatic hypertrophy to be independent risk factors associated with catheter reinsertion after early removal in the presence of thoracic epidural analgesia. When applying Surgical Care Improvement Project 9 to patients undergoing thoracic procedures with thoracic epidural analgesia, consideration to delayed removal of urinary catheter may be warranted in patients with multiple risk factors for reinsertion. Copyright © 2018 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical course and management of patients undergoing open window thoracostomy for thoracic empyema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, R; Ondo, K; Mikami, K; Ueda, H; Motohiro, A

    2001-01-01

    While open window thoracostomy (OWT) is a safe procedure and is indicated in patients who have thoracic empyema either with or without a bronchopleural fistula, it may prolong the hospital stay. We retrospectively analyzed the relationship between the etiology of thoracic empyema and the open window interval (OWI). Between January 1986 and May 1997, 53 patients resistant to conventional therapy underwent OWT for thoracic empyema at the Department of Surgery of the National Minami-Fukuoka Chest Hospital. The patients were classified into five groups based on the etiological findings of thoracic empyema. 44 patients also underwent closure of the window until June 1999. The average OWI was 180.4 +/- 51.9 (mean +/- SE) days for postoperative empyemas in lung cancer, 128.0 +/- 32.1 days for bacterial nontuberculous empyemas, 189.6 +/- 24.1 days for fungal empyemas, 365.8 +/- 201 days for empyemas caused by atypical mycobacteria and 322.0 +/- 58.7 days for tuberculous empyemas. There was no evidence that the OWI was related to either sex, age, etiology of thoracic empyemas, performance status, the existence of bronchopleural fistulae, complications of diabetes mellitus or preoperative malnutrition status in multivariable models. 5 patients underwent a second OWT because of recurrence of empyema. Mortality rate was 7.5%. There was no relationship between clinical factors including nutritional assessment and OWI. OWT generally is a safe and effective procedure for thoracic empyema resisting to conventional therapy except that it can make an extended hospital stay necessary. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. The Benefits of Internal Thoracic Artery Catheterization in Patients With Chronic Abdominal Aortic Occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilic, Nikola; Davidovic, Lazar; Koncar, Igor; Dragas, Marko; Markovic, Miroslav; Colic, Momcilo; Cinara, Ilijas

    2011-01-01

    Occlusion of the abdominal aorta may be caused by an embolic lesion, but more commonly by thrombotic disease at the aortoiliac area, progressing retrograde. However, the visualization of the distal run-off via internal thoracic-epigastric inferior artery collateral channel may be a very important diagnostic tool, especially in countries with poor technical equipment. This study was designed to show the benefit of the selective internal thoracic angiography in cases with complete aortic occlusion. We present 30 patients with chronic aortic abdominal occlusion who were submitted to the transaxillary aortography and selective ITA angiography with purpose of distal run off evaluation. Angiographic evaluation was performed by two independent radiologists according to previously defined classification. Good angiographic score via internal thoracic angiography by first observer was achieved in 19 (63.3%) patients and in 18 (60%) by a second observer. Transaxillary aortography showed inferior results: good angiographic score by the first observer in six (20%) patients and by the second observer in three (3%) patients. Low extremity run-off is better visualized during internal thoracic angiography than during transaxillary aortography.

  15. Impact of Cervical Sagittal Alignment on Axial Neck Pain and Health-related Quality of Life After Cervical Laminoplasty in Patients With Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy or Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament: A Prospective Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Oda, Takenori; Makino, Takahiro; Moriguchi, Yu; Yonenobu, Kazuo; Kaito, Takashi

    2018-05-01

    This is prospective observational study. To prospectively investigate the correlation among axial neck pain; a newly developed patient-based quality of life outcome measure, the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire (JOACMEQ); and cervical sagittal alignment after open-door laminoplasty for cervical myelopathy. Many studies have focused on postoperative axial neck pain after laminoplasty. However, the correlation among cervical sagittal alignment, neck pain, and JOACMEQ has not been investigated. In total, 57 consecutive patients treated by open-door laminoplasty for cervical myelopathy were included (mean age, 63.7 y; 15 women and 42 men) and divided into 2 groups according to diagnosis [cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) group: 35 patients, and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) group: 22 patients]. JOA score, a subdomain of cervical spine function (CSF) in the JOACMEQ, and the visual analog scale for axial neck pain were assessed preoperatively and 12 months postoperatively. Radiographic cervical sagittal parameters were measured by C2 sagittal vertical axis (C2 SVA), C2-C7 lordosis, C7 sagittal slope (C7 slope), and range of motion. C2 SVA values in both groups shifted slightly anteriorly between preoperative and 12-month postoperative measurements (CSM: +19.7±10.9 mm; OPLL: +22.1±13.4 mm vs. CSM: +23.2±16.1 mm; OPLL: +28.7±15.4 mm, respectively). Postoperative axial neck pain in the OPLL group showed strong negative correlations with C2 SVA and C7 slope. Strong negative correlations were found between axial neck pain and CSF in both the preoperative CSM and OPLL groups (CSM: r=-0.45, P=0.01; OPLL: r=-0.61, Ppain and CSF in the postoperative OPLL group (r=-0.51, P=0.05). This study demonstrated a significant negative correlation between neck pain and CSF in both the CSM and OPLL groups preoperatively and in the OPLL group postoperatively. Radiographic cervical sagittal alignment

  16. Asphyxiating thoracic dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzcr, J.; Kozlowski, K.

    2008-01-01

    Asphyxiating Thoracic Dysplasia is the most frequent form of Small Thorax - Short Rib Syndromes. Asphyxiating Thoracic Dysplasia in two patients with different clinical course is reported. Radiographic examination is the only method to diagnose Asphyxiating Thoracic Dysplasia with certainty. The correct diagnosis is important for prognostication and genetic counseling. It also excludes the necessity of further, often expensive investigations. (author)

  17. Clinical significance of conventional rib series in patients with minor thoracic trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffstetter, P.; Dornia, C. [Asklepios Medical Center, Bad Abbach (Germany). Radiology; University Medical Center Regensburg (Germany). Radiology; Wagner, M.; Niessen, C.; Dendl, L.M.; Stroszczynski, C.; Schreyer, A.G. [University Medical Center Regensburg (Germany). Radiology; Al Suwaidi, M.H. [Asklepios Medical Center, Bad Abbach (Germany). Rheumatology/Clinical Immmunology

    2014-09-15

    Background: Conventional rib series (RS) represent a dedicated radiographic technique to visualize the bony parts of the chest wall. The method is commonly used to evaluate minor thoracic trauma, frequently in combination with chest radiographs (CRs). The aim of this study is to asses the clinical relevance of rib fractures diagnosed by RS in minor thoracic trauma. Methods: Retrospective study of 669 patients who received RS for the evaluation of minor thoracic trauma. 405 of the 669 patients received an additional CR. Radiological reports were classified into fracture versus no fracture. Patients were divided into four groups depending on the clinical follow-up. The findings of RS and CR were analyzed using the McNemar test. The statistical significance between the results of the radiographic examinations and the clinical follow-up was analyzed by the Chi-Square test and the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: We included 669 patients (61.4% men, 38.6% women, median age: 51 years, range: 13-92 years). Analyzing the reports of 669 patients who received RS, 157 (23.5%) patients were diagnosed with at least one fractured rib while no fracture was found in 512 (76.5%) patients. Considering the 157 patients with fractured ribs, 73 (46.8%) had a single fracture, 38 (24.4%) and two fractures and 45 (28.8%) had more than two fractures. When assessing the 405 CRs, we detected 69 (17%) fractures while the corresponding RS of the same patients revealed 87 (21.5%) fractures (p < 0.05). Concerning all patients with rib fractures, 63.1% received medical therapy, while 64.5% of those patients without a radiologically documented fracture also received therapy (p = 0.25). Conclusion: Our results suggest a limited clinical value of detected rib fractures based on RS. Despite being superior compared to CR in diagnosing rib fractures, the results from RS seem to have no significant influence on further clinical management and therapeutic measures. Minor thoracic trauma should be evaluated

  18. Clinical significance of conventional rib series in patients with minor thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffstetter, P.; Dornia, C.; University Medical Center Regensburg; Wagner, M.; Niessen, C.; Dendl, L.M.; Stroszczynski, C.; Schreyer, A.G.; Al Suwaidi, M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Conventional rib series (RS) represent a dedicated radiographic technique to visualize the bony parts of the chest wall. The method is commonly used to evaluate minor thoracic trauma, frequently in combination with chest radiographs (CRs). The aim of this study is to asses the clinical relevance of rib fractures diagnosed by RS in minor thoracic trauma. Methods: Retrospective study of 669 patients who received RS for the evaluation of minor thoracic trauma. 405 of the 669 patients received an additional CR. Radiological reports were classified into fracture versus no fracture. Patients were divided into four groups depending on the clinical follow-up. The findings of RS and CR were analyzed using the McNemar test. The statistical significance between the results of the radiographic examinations and the clinical follow-up was analyzed by the Chi-Square test and the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: We included 669 patients (61.4% men, 38.6% women, median age: 51 years, range: 13-92 years). Analyzing the reports of 669 patients who received RS, 157 (23.5%) patients were diagnosed with at least one fractured rib while no fracture was found in 512 (76.5%) patients. Considering the 157 patients with fractured ribs, 73 (46.8%) had a single fracture, 38 (24.4%) and two fractures and 45 (28.8%) had more than two fractures. When assessing the 405 CRs, we detected 69 (17%) fractures while the corresponding RS of the same patients revealed 87 (21.5%) fractures (p < 0.05). Concerning all patients with rib fractures, 63.1% received medical therapy, while 64.5% of those patients without a radiologically documented fracture also received therapy (p = 0.25). Conclusion: Our results suggest a limited clinical value of detected rib fractures based on RS. Despite being superior compared to CR in diagnosing rib fractures, the results from RS seem to have no significant influence on further clinical management and therapeutic measures. Minor thoracic trauma should be evaluated

  19. Thoracic Injuries in earthquake-related versus non-earthquake-related trauma patients: differentiation via Multi-detector Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhi-hui; Yang, Zhi-gang; Chen, Tian-wu; Chu, Zhi-gang; Deng, Wen; Shao, Heng

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Massive earthquakes are harmful to humankind. This study of a historical cohort aimed to investigate the difference between earthquake-related crush thoracic traumas and thoracic traumas unrelated to earthquakes using a multi-detector Computed Tomography (CT). METHODS: We retrospectively compared an earthquake-exposed cohort of 215 thoracic trauma crush victims of the Sichuan earthquake to a cohort of 215 non-earthquake-related thoracic trauma patients, focusing on the lesions and coexisting injuries to the thoracic cage and the pulmonary parenchyma and pleura using a multi-detector CT. RESULTS: The incidence of rib fracture was elevated in the earthquake-exposed cohort (143 vs. 66 patients in the non-earthquake-exposed cohort, Risk Ratio (RR) = 2.2; pchest (45/143 vs. 11/66 patients, RR = 1.9; ptraumas resulting from the earthquake were life threatening with a high incidence of bony thoracic fractures. The ribs were frequently involved in bilateral and severe types of fractures, which were accompanied by non-rib fractures, pulmonary parenchymal and pleural injuries. PMID:21789386

  20. Initial thoracic involvement in lymphoma. CT assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustos, A.; Corredoira, J.; Ferreiros, J.; Cabeza, B.; Jorquera, M.; Pedrosa, I.; Martinez, R.; Fernandez, C.

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the initial thoracic involvement by CT in a consecutive series of patients with lymphoma. A retrospective analysis was made of thoracic CT studies made at the time of diagnosis of 259 patients with lymphoma. Mediastinal pulmonary, pleural, pericardial and chest wall involvement was assessed by CT. Of 259 patients (129 men y 130 women), 56 had Hodgkin's disease (HD) and 203 had non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Forty-two percent (42.5%, 110/259) of the patients had chest involvement on CT: 33 of 56 patients with HD (58.9%) and 77 of 203 patients with NHL (37.9%). All the patients with thoracic HD) and 71.4% of patients with thoracic NHL, had mediastinal lymph node involvement. of the patients with thoracic involvement 12.1% (4/33) of the patient with HD and 23.3% (18/77) of the patients with NHL had pulmonary involvement. Thoracic involvement on CT was more frequent in HD. Mediastinal lymph node involvement was the most common finding fundamentally in HD. Pulmonary disease always occurred in the presence of mediastinal lymph node involvement in HD but could occur as an isolated finding in NHL. (Author) 24 refs

  1. A Rare Entity: Traumatic Thoracic Aortic Injury in a Patient with Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hiten Mohanbhai; Banerjee, Shubhabrata; Bulsara, Shahzad; Sahu, Tapish; Sheorain, Virender K; Grover, Tarun; Parakh, Rajiv

    2017-05-01

    Aberrant right subclavian artery is an uncommon entity incidence ranging from 0.5 to 2.5%. Management of thoracic aortic injury in the presence of such anomalies can be a challenge. We present here a case of traumatic aortic injury, which was incidentally found to have an asymptomatic aberrant right subclavian artery. The patient was managed by an endovascular repair of thoracic aortic injury with an endograft and a right carotid to subclavian artery bypass as a hybrid procedure. A 40-year male patient was brought to the emergency in shock with an alleged history of road traffic accident an hour back. After initial resuscitation as per advance trauma life support protocol, imaging revealed thoracic aortic injury with aberrant right subclavian artery with multiple rib and bilateral humerus fracture. After primary stabilization of arm fractures, the patient was shifted to a hybrid operation room. As the aortic injury was within 10 mm of the origin of both subclavian arteries, it was decided to cover the origin of both subclavian arteries and land the endograft distal to the left carotid artery origin. Since there was a right dominant vertebral artery on imaging, right carotid to right subclavian artery bypass was done with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft to prevent posterior circulatory stroke along with thoracic endovascular aortic repair to seal the thoracic aortic injury. After endovascular repair of thoracic aortic injury, left subclavian artery perfusion was maintained through left vertebral artery; and hence, revascularization of left subclavian artery was deferred. After management of all fractures, the patient was discharged 3 weeks after the date of admission without any complications. At 6 months follow-up, patient was stable and images showed patent bypass graft and sealed aortic injury. In a trauma setting with multiple injuries, hybrid procedure with a thoracic endograft is associated with low mortality and morbidity; hence, it is the treatment

  2. Thoracic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Bradley M; Bellister, Seth A; Guillamondegui, Oscar D

    2017-10-01

    Management of chest trauma is integral to patient outcomes owing to the vital structures held within the thoracic cavity. Understanding traumatic chest injuries and appropriate management plays a pivotal role in the overall well-being of both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. Whether the injury includes rib fractures, associated pulmonary injuries, or tracheobronchial tree injuries, every facet of management may impact the short- and long-term outcomes, including mortality. This article elucidates the workup and management of the thoracic cage, pulmonary and tracheobronchial injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Endoscopic Transforaminal Thoracic Foraminotomy and Discectomy for the Treatment of Thoracic Disc Herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Hong-Fei; Liu, Kai-Xuan

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic disc herniation is a relatively rare yet challenging-to-diagnose condition. Currently there is no universally accepted optimal surgical treatment for symptomatic thoracic disc herniation. Previously reported surgical approaches are often associated with high complication rates. Here we describe our minimally invasive technique of removing thoracic disc herniation, and report the primary results of a series of cases. Between January 2009 and March 2012, 13 patients with symptomatic thoracic disc herniation were treated with endoscopic thoracic foraminotomy and discectomy under local anesthesia. A bone shaver was used to undercut the facet and rib head for foraminotomy. Discectomy was achieved by using grasper, radiofrequency, and the Holmium-YAG laser. We analyzed the clinical outcomes of the patients using the visual analogue scale (VAS), MacNab classification, and Oswestry disability index (ODI). At the final follow up (mean: 17 months; range: 6–41 months), patient self-reported satisfactory rate was 76.9%. The mean VAS for mid back pain was improved from 9.1 to 4.2, and the mean ODI was improved from 61.0 to 43.8. One complication of postoperative spinal headache occurred during the surgery and the patient was successfully treated with epidural blood patch. No other complications were observed or reported during and after the surgery. PMID:24455232

  4. Pre-hospital transport times and survival for Hypotensive patients with penetrating thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamta Swaroop

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Achieving definitive care within the "Golden Hour" by minimizing response times is a consistent goal of regional trauma systems . This study hypothesizes that in urban Level I Trauma Centers, shorter pre-hospital times would predict outcomes in penetrating thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed using a statewide trauma registry for the years 1999-2003 . Total pre-hospital times were measured for urban victims of penetrating thoracic trauma. Crude and adjusted mortality rates were compared by pre-hospital time using STATA statistical software. Results: During the study period, 908 patients presented to the hospital after penetrating thoracic trauma, with 79% surviving . Patients with higher injury severity scores (ISS were transported more quickly. Injury severity scores (ISS ≥16 and emergency department (ED hypotension (systolic blood pressure, SBP <90 strongly predicted mortality (P < 0.05 for each . In a logistic regression model including age, race, and ISS, longer transport times for hypotensive patients were associated with higher mortality rates (all P values <0.05. This was seen most significantly when comparing patient transport times 0-15 min and 46-60 min (P < 0.001. Conclusion: In victims of penetrating thoracic trauma, more severely injured patients arrive at urban trauma centers sooner . Mortality is strongly predicted by injury severity, although shorter pre-hospital times are associated with improved survival . These results suggest that careful planning to optimize transport time-encompassing hospital capacity and existing resources, traffic patterns, and trauma incident densities may be beneficial in areas with a high burden of penetrating trauma.

  5. Thoracic Injuries in earthquake-related versus non-earthquake-related trauma patients: differentiation via Multi-detector Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-hui Dong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Massive earthquakes are harmful to humankind. This study of a historical cohort aimed to investigate the difference between earthquake-related crush thoracic traumas and thoracic traumas unrelated to earthquakes using a multi-detector Computed Tomography (CT. METHODS: We retrospectively compared an earthquake-exposed cohort of 215 thoracic trauma crush victims of the Sichuan earthquake to a cohort of 215 non-earthquake-related thoracic trauma patients, focusing on the lesions and coexisting injuries to the thoracic cage and the pulmonary parenchyma and pleura using a multi-detector CT. RESULTS: The incidence of rib fracture was elevated in the earthquake-exposed cohort (143 vs. 66 patients in the non-earthquake-exposed cohort, Risk Ratio (RR = 2.2; p<0.001. Among these patients, those with more than 3 fractured ribs (106/143 vs. 41/66 patients, RR=1.2; p<0.05 or flail chest (45/143 vs. 11/66 patients, RR=1.9; p<0.05 were more frequently seen in the earthquake cohort. Earthquake-related crush injuries more frequently resulted in bilateral rib fractures (66/143 vs. 18/66 patients, RR= 1.7; p<0.01. Additionally, the incidence of non-rib fracture was higher in the earthquake cohort (85 vs. 60 patients, RR= 1.4; p<0.01. Pulmonary parenchymal and pleural injuries were more frequently seen in earthquake-related crush injuries (117 vs. 80 patients, RR=1.5 for parenchymal and 146 vs. 74 patients, RR = 2.0 for pleural injuries; p<0.001. Non-rib fractures, pulmonary parenchymal and pleural injuries had significant positive correlation with rib fractures in these two cohorts. CONCLUSIONS: Thoracic crush traumas resulting from the earthquake were life threatening with a high incidence of bony thoracic fractures. The ribs were frequently involved in bilateral and severe types of fractures, which were accompanied by non-rib fractures, pulmonary parenchymal and pleural injuries.

  6. Measurement and analysis of the thoracic patient setup deviations in routine radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Mingxuan; Zou Huawei; Wu Rong; Sun Jian; Dong Xiaoqi

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine the magnitude of the setup deviations of the thoracic patients in routine radiotherapy. Methods: Altogether 408 films for 21 thoracic patients were recorded using the electronic portal imaging device (EPID), and comparison with reference CT simulator digitally-reconstructed radiograph (DRR) for anterior-posterior fields was performed. The deviation of setup for 21 patients in the left-right (RL), superior-inferior (SI) directions and rotation about the anterior-posterior (AP) axis were measured and analyzed. Results: Without immobilization device, the mean translational and rotational setup deviations were (0.7±3.1) mm and (1.5±4.1) mm in the RL and SI directions, respectively, and (0.3±2.4) degree about AP axis. With immobilization device, the mean translational and rotational setup deviations were (0.5±2.4) mm and (0.8±2.7) mm in the RL and SI directions respectively, and (0.2±1.6) degree about AP axis. Conclusion: The setup deviations in thoracic patients irradiation may be reduced with the use of the immobilization device. The setup deviation in the SI direction is greater than that in the RL direction. The setup deviations are mainly random errors

  7. Orthostatic hypotension during postoperative continuous thoracic epidural bupivacaine-morphine in patients undergoing abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crawford, M E; Møiniche, S; Orbæk, Janne

    1996-01-01

    Fifty patients undergoing colonic surgery received combined thoracic epidural and general anesthesia followed by continuous epidural bupivacaine 0.25% and morphine 0.05 mg/mL, 4 mL/h, for 96 h postoperatively plus oral tenoxicam 20 mg daily. Heart rate (HR) and arterial blood pressure (BP) were...... hypotension. The results suggest that patients undergoing abdominal surgery and treated with continuous small-dose thoracic epidural bupivacaine-morphine are subjected to a decrease of BP at rest and during mobilization, but not to an extent that seriously impairs ambulation in most patients....

  8. Varied effects of thoracic irradiation on peripheral lymphocyte subsets in lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Yasuhiro; Makino, Shigeki; Fukuda, Yasuki; Min, Kyong-Yob; Ikemoto, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Akira; Ohsawa, Nakaaki

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the influence of thoracic irradiation on immunological competence in patients with lung cancer, we examined the changes in peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in 15 patients before and after radiation therapy by two-color flow cytometry techniques. After radiation therapy, the percentage and the absolute number of CD4+CD45RA+ cells (naive T cells) and CD56+and/orCD16+ cells (NK cells) decreased. The percentage of CD4+ human leukocyte antigen-DR(HLA-DR)+ cells (activated CD4T cells) and CD8+HLA-DR+ cells (activated CD8T cells) increased, although the absolute number did not change significantly. Naive T cells may be more selectively damaged than memory T cells by thoracic irradiation, through their recirculation behavior. The reduction of natural killer (NK) cells is disadvantageous for anti-tumor immunity. The percentage of HLA-DR positive T lymphocytes was significantly increased, and thus the possibility of HLA-DR enhancement by irradiation cannot be excluded. Therefore, thoracic irradiation has numerous varied effects on the immunological system of lung cancer patients. (author)

  9. Surgical treatment of double thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis with a rigid proximal thoracic curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Hideki; Abe, Yuichiro; Abumi, Kuniyoshi; Iwasaki, Norimasa; Ito, Manabu

    2016-02-01

    There is limited consensus on the optimal surgical strategy for double thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Recent studies have reported that pedicle screw constructs to maximize scoliosis correction cause further thoracic spine lordosis. The objective of this study was to apply a new surgical technique for double thoracic AIS with rigid proximal thoracic (PT) curves and assess its clinical outcomes. Twenty one consecutive patients with Lenke 2 AIS and a rigid PT curve (Cobb angle ≥30º on side-bending radiographs, flexibility ≤30 %) treated with the simultaneous double-rod rotation technique (SDRRT) were included. In this technique, a temporary rod is placed at the concave side of the PT curve. Then, distraction force is applied to correct the PT curve, which reforms a sigmoid double thoracic curve into an approximate single thoracic curve. As a result, the PT curve is typically converted from an apex left to an apex right curve before applying the correction rod for PT and main thoracic curve. All patients were followed for at least 2 years (average 2.7 years). The average main thoracic and PT Cobb angle correction rate at the final follow-up was 74.7 and 58.0 %, respectively. The average preoperative T5-T12 thoracic kyphosis was 9.3°, which improved significantly to 19.0° (p corrected using SDRRT for Lenke 2 AIS with a rigid PT curve.

  10. MRI assessment of thoracic stent grafts after emergency implantation in multi trauma patients: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasche, Volker [University Hospital Ulm, Department of Internal Medicine II, Ulm (Germany); University Hospital Ulm, University of Ulm, Department of Internal Medicine II, Ulm (Germany); Oberhuber, Alexander; Orend, Karl-Heinz [University Hospital Ulm, Department of Vascular and Thoracic Surgery, Ulm (Germany); Trumpp, Stephan [University Hospital Ulm, Department of Internal Medicine II, Ulm (Germany); University Hospital Ulm, Department of Vascular and Thoracic Surgery, Ulm (Germany); Bornstedt, Axel; Merkle, Nico; Rottbauer, Wolfgang [University Hospital Ulm, Department of Internal Medicine II, Ulm (Germany); Hoffmann, Martin [University Hospital Ulm, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Ulm (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of MRI for static and dynamic assessment of the deployment of thoracic aortic stent grafts after emergency implantation in trauma patients. Twenty patients initially presenting with a rupture of the thoracic aorta were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). The deployment of the implanted stent graft was assessed by CTA and MRI, comprising the assessment of the aortic arch with and without contrast agent, and the assessment of the motion of the stent graft over the cardiac cycle. The stent graft geometry and motion over the cardiac cycle were assessable by MRI in all patients. Flow-mediated signal variations in areas of flow acceleration could be well visualised. No statistically significant differences in stent-graft diameters were observed between CT and MRI measurements. MRI appears to be a valuable tool for the assessment of thoracic stent grafts. It shows similar performance in the accurate assessment of stent-graft dimensions to the current gold standard CTA. Its capability of providing additional functional information and the lack of ionising radiation and nephrotoxic contrast agents may make MRI a valuable tool for monitoring patients after TEVAR. (orig.)

  11. Effective dose to patients from thoracic spine examinations with tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Baath, Magnus; Soederman, Christina

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of the present work were to calculate the average effective dose to patients from lateral tomosynthesis examinations of the thoracic spine, compare the results with the corresponding conventional examination and to determine a conversion factor between dose-area product (DAP) and effective dose for the tomosynthesis examination. Thoracic spine examinations from 17 patients were included in the study. The registered DAP and information about the field size for each projection radiograph were, together with patient height and mass, used to calculate the effective dose for each projection radiograph. The total effective doses for the tomosynthesis examinations were obtained by adding the effective doses from the 60 projection radiographs included in the examination. The mean effective dose was 0.47 mSv (range 0.24-0.81 mSv) for the tomosynthesis examinations and 0.20 mSv (range 0.07-0.29 mSv) for the corresponding conventional examinations (anteroposterior + left lateral projection). For the tomosynthesis examinations, a conversion factor between total DAP and effective dose of 0.092 mSv Gycm -2 was obtained. (authors)

  12. Failures and complications of thoracic drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Ivana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Thoracic drainage is a surgical procedure for introducing a drain into the pleural space to drain its contents. Using this method, the pleura is discharged and set to the physiological state which enables the reexpansion of the lungs. The aim of the study was to prove that the use of modern principles and protocols of thoracic drainage significantly reduces the occurrence of failures and complications, rendering the treatment more efficient. Methods. The study included 967 patients treated by thoracic drainage within the period from January 1, 1989 to June 1, 2000. The studied patients were divided into 2 groups: group A of 463 patients treated in the period from January 1, 1989 to December 31, 1994 in whom 386 pleural drainage (83.36% were performed, and group B of 602 patients treated form January 1, 1995 to June 1, 2000 in whom 581 pleural drainage (96.51% were performed. The patients of the group A were drained using the classical standards of thoracic drainage by the general surgeons. The patients of the group B, however, were drained using the modern standards of thoracic drainage by the thoracic surgeons, and the general surgeons trained for this kind of the surgery. Results. The study showed that better results were achieved in the treatment of the patients from the group B. The total incidence of the failures and complications of thoracic drainage decreased from 36.52% (group A to 12.73% (group B. The mean length of hospitalization of the patients without complications in the group A was 19.5 days versus 10 days in the group B. The mean length of the treatment of the patients with failures and complications of the drainage in the group A was 33.5 days versus 17.5 days in the group B. Conclusion. The shorter length of hospitalization and the lower morbidity of the studied patients were considered to be the result of the correct treatment using modern principles of thoracic drainage, a suitable surgical technique, and a

  13. Increased levels of interleukin-22 in thoracic aorta and plasma from patients with acute thoracic aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jing; Wang, Menglong; Jiang, Huimin; Ji, Qingwei; Huang, Ying; Liu, Jianfang; Zeng, Tao; Xu, Yao; Wang, Zhen; Lin, Yingzhong; Wan, Jun

    2017-11-03

    Interleukin (IL)-22 plays important roles in the development of arterial disease, including atherosclerosis and hypertension. However, the relationship between IL-22 and acute thoracic aortic dissection (TAD) remains unknown. Blood samples were collected from patients with chest pain who underwent computed tomography angiography of the thoracic aorta but had no known preoperative diagnosis of coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, arthritis, and/or membranous nephropathy. Patients were divided into non-AD (NAD) and TAD groups, and the plasma concentrations of IL-22, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured. In addition, aortic tissue samples from acute TAD patients and normal donors were collected, and the expression levels of IL-22 and IL-22 receptor 1 (IL-22R1) were measured. IL-22, IL-6 and TNF-α levels were significantly higher in acute TAD patients than in NAD patients (IL-22, NAD group: 27.0 (19.1, 38.6) pg/ml vs. TAD group: 32.9 (20.6, 58.3) pg/ml, pTAD (OR 1.169, 95% CI 1.069 to 1.277; p=0.001). In addition, compared with aortic tissue of normal controls, TAD aortas showed increased expression of IL-22 and IL-22R1, especially in the torn section (IL-22, non-torn section: 2.8±0.5/HPF vs. torn section 2.8±0.5/HPF, pTAD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Risk factors in surgical management of thoracic empyema in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Liu, Yun-Hen; Chao, Yin-Kai; Lu, Ming-Shian; Liu, Hui-Ping; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Lu, Hung-I; Chu, Yen

    2008-06-01

    Although elderly patients with thoracic disease were considered to be poor candidates for thoracotomy before, recent advances in preoperative and postoperative care as well as surgical techniques have improved outcomes of thoracotomies in this patient group. The aim of this study was to investigate surgical risk factors and results in elderly patients (aged > or =70 years) with thoracic empyema. Seventy-one elderly patients with empyema thoracis were enrolled and evaluated from July 2000 to April 2003. The following characteristics and clinical data were analysed: age, sex, aetiology of empyema, comorbid diseases, preoperative conditions, postoperative days of intubation, length of hospital stay after surgery, complications and mortality. Surgical intervention, including total pneumonolysis and evacuation of the pleura empyema cavity, was carried out in all patients. Possible influent risk factors on the outcome were analysed. The sample group included 54 men and 17 women with an average age of 76.8 years. The causes of empyema included parapneumonic effusion (n = 43), lung abscess (n = 8), necrotizing pneumonitis (n = 8), malignancy (n = 5), cirrhosis (n = 2), oesophageal perforation (n = 2), post-traumatic empyema (n = 2) and post-thoracotomy complication (n = 1). The 30-day mortality rate was 11.3% and the in-hospital mortality rate was 18.3% (13 of 71). Mean follow up was 9.4 months and mean duration of postoperative hospitalization was 35.8 days. Analysis of risk factors showed that patients with necrotizing pneumonitis or abscess had the highest mortality rate (10 of 18, 62.6%). The second highest risk factor was preoperative intubation or ventilator-dependency (8 of 18, 44.4%). This study presents the clinical features and outcomes of 71 elderly patients with empyema thoracis who underwent surgical treatment. The 30-day surgical mortality rate was 11.3%. Significant risk factors in elderly patients with empyema thoracis were necrotizing pneumonitis, abscess

  15. Imaging of thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uffmann, M.; Herold, C.J.; Fuchs, M.

    1998-01-01

    Blunt trauma to the chest results from transfer of kinetic energy to the human body. It may cause a wide range of mostly life-threatening injuries, including fractures of the thoracic skeleton, disintegration of the pleural space, contusion or laceration of pulmonary parenchyma and damage to the mediastinal structures. For a systematic approach it may be helpful to follow an organ-based evaluation of thoracic trauma. However, it should be borne in mind that subtle injuries may be associated with serious complications. Trauma to the chest may affect different anatomic compartments at the same time, requiring and extending diagnostic approach. Conventional radiography plays a major role in diagnosting thoracic trauma, complemented by ultrasound examination of the pleura and abdomen. It is well documented that CT scanning represents a major technological improvement for assessment of thoracic trauma. With the advent of fast helical CT scanning this method becomes more applicable for severly traumatized patients and potentially replaces other time-consuming procedures. State-of-the-art imaging of both projection and cross-sectional techniques provides useful information for immediate and appropriate treatment mandatory in patients with thoracic trauma. (orig.) [de

  16. Age-associated impact on presentation and outcome for penetrating thoracic trauma in the adult and pediatric patient populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollberg, Nathan M; Tabachnick, Deborah; Lin, Fang-Ju; Merlotti, Gary J; Varghese, Thomas K; Arensman, Robert M; Massad, Malek G

    2014-02-01

    Studies reporting on penetrating thoracic trauma in the pediatric population have been limited by small numbers and implied differences with the adult population. Our objectives were to report on a large cohort of pediatric patients presenting with penetrating thoracic trauma and to determine age-related impacts on management and outcome through comparison with an adult cohort. A Level I trauma center registry was queried between 2006 and 2012. All patients presenting with penetrating thoracic trauma were identified. Patient demographics, injury mechanism, injury severity, admission physiology, and outcome were recorded. Patients were compared, and outcomes were analyzed based on age at presentation, with patients 17 years or younger defining our pediatric cohort. A total of 1,423 patients with penetrating thoracic trauma were admitted during the study period. Two hundred twenty patients (15.5%) were pediatric, with 205 being adolescents (13-17 years) and 15 being children (≤ 12 years). In terms of management for the pediatric population, tube thoracostomy alone was needed in 32.7% (72 of 220), whereas operative thoracic exploration was performed in 20.0% (44 of 220). Overall mortality was 13.6% (30 of 220). There was no significant difference between the pediatric and adult population with regard to injury mechanism or severity, need for therapeutic intervention, operative approach, use of emergency department thoracotomy, or outcome. Stepwise logistic regression failed to identify age as a predictor for the need for either therapeutic intervention or mortality between the two age groups as a whole. However, subgroup analysis revealed that being 12 years or younger (odds ratio, 3.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-11.4) was an independent predictor of mortality. Management of traumatic penetrating thoracic injuries in terms of the need for therapeutic intervention and operative approach was similar between the adult and pediatric populations. Mortality from

  17. EFFECTIVE DOSE TO PATIENTS FROM THORACIC SPINE EXAMINATIONS WITH TOMOSYNTHESIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Söderman, Christina; Båth, Magnus

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of the present work were to calculate the average effective dose to patients from lateral tomosynthesis examinations of the thoracic spine, compare the results with the corresponding conventional examination and to determine a conversion factor between dose-area product (DAP) and effective dose for the tomosynthesis examination. Thoracic spine examinations from 17 patients were included in the study. The registered DAP and information about the field size for each projection radiograph were, together with patient height and mass, used to calculate the effective dose for each projection radiograph. The total effective doses for the tomosynthesis examinations were obtained by adding the effective doses from the 60 projection radiographs included in the examination. The mean effective dose was 0.47 mSv (range 0.24-0.81 mSv) for the tomosynthesis examinations and 0.20 mSv (range 0.07-0.29 mSv) for the corresponding conventional examinations (anteroposterior + left lateral projection). For the tomosynthesis examinations, a conversion factor between total DAP and effective dose of 0.092 mSv Gycm(-2) was obtained. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia in patient with Byssinosis undergoing nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kiran; Salgaonkar, Sweta

    2012-01-01

    Byssinosis is an occupational disease occurring commonly in cotton mill workers; it usually presents with features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The management of patients with COPD presents a significant challenges to the anesthetist. Regional anesthesia is preferred in most of these patients to avoid perioperative and postoperative complications related to general anesthesia. We report a known case of Byssinosis who underwent nephrectomy under segmental spinal anesthesia at the low thoracic level.

  19. Retrospective estimation of patient dose-area product in thoracic spine tomosynthesis performed using VolumeRAD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baath, Magnus; Svalkvist, Angelica; Soederman, Christina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a recently developed method of retrospectively estimating the patient dose-area product (DAP) of a chest tomosynthesis examination, performed using VolumeRAD, in thoracic spine tomosynthesis and to determine the necessary field-size correction factor. Digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data for the projection radiographs acquired during a thoracic spine tomosynthesis examination were retrieved directly from the modality for 17 patients. Using the previously developed method, an estimated DAP for the tomosynthesis examination was determined from DICOM data in the scout image. By comparing the estimated DAP with the actual DAP registered for the projection radiographs, a field-size correction factor was determined. The field-size correction factor for thoracic spine tomosynthesis was determined to 0.92. Applying this factor to the DAP estimated retrospectively, the maximum difference between the estimated DAP and the actual DAP was <3 %. In conclusion, the previously developed method of retrospectively estimating the DAP in chest tomosynthesis can be applied to thoracic spine tomosynthesis. (authors)

  20. [Comparison of clinical effectiveness of thoracic epidural and intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for the treatment of rib fractures pain in intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topçu, Ismet; Ekici, Zeynep; Sakarya, Melek

    2007-07-01

    The results of thoracic epidural and systemic patient controlled analgesia practice were evaluated retrospectively in patients with thoracic trauma. Patients who were admitted to the intensive care unit between 1997 and 2003, with a diagnosis of multiple rib fractures related to thoracic trauma were evaluated retrospectively. Data were recorded from 49 patients who met the following criteria; three or more rib fractures, initiation of PCA with I.V. phentanyl or thoracic epidural analgesia with phentanyl and bupivacaine. There were no significant differences between the groups concerning injury severity score. APACHE II score (8.1+/-1.6 and 9.2+/-1.7) and the number of rib fractures (4+/-1.1 and 6.8+/-2.7) were higher in thoracic epidural analgesia group (pPain scores of patients who received thoracic epidural analgesia were significantly lower as from 6th hour during whole therapy (prib fractures who require intensive care.

  1. Effects of thoracic squeezing on airway secretion removal in mechanically ventilated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkhondeh Yousefnia-Darzi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: According to the study findings, endotracheal suction with thoracic squeezing on expiration helps airway secretion discharge more than suction alone in patients on mechanical ventilators and can be used as an effective method.

  2. Association between two polymorphisms of the bone morpho-genetic protein-2 gene with genetic susceptibility to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the cervical spine and its severity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hao; YANG Zhao-hui; LIU Dong-mei; WANG Ling; MENG Xiang-long; TIAN Bao-peng

    2008-01-01

    Background Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) has a strong genetic background. Previous studies have shown that bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) and BMP2 mRNA are expressed in ossifying matrix and chondrocytes adjacent to cartilaginous areas of OPLL tissues and mesenchymal cells with fibroblastic features in the immediate vicinity of the cartilaginous areas. It is suggested that BMP2 plays different roles in the different stages of development of OPLL. However, it remains unknown which factors induce ligament cells to produce BMP2.Methods OPLL patients (n=192) and non-OPLL controls (n=304) were studied. Radiographs of the cervical spine were analyzed for extent of OPLL. We investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms of exons 3(-726) TIC and 3(-583) A/G in the BMP2 gene are statistically associated with genetic susceptibility to OPLL in Chinese Han subjects.Results There was no statistical difference between the occurrence of exons 3(-726) TIC and 3(-583) A/G and the occurrence of OPLL in the cervical spine. However, there was a significant association between occurrence of exon 3(-726) TIC polymorphism and occurrence of OPLL in males of cases and controls in the cervical spine. In addition, no significant association was found between the exons 3(-726) TIC and 3(-583) A/G with number of ossified cervical vertebrae in OPLL patients.Conclusions Exon 3(-583) A/G polymorphism in BMP2 gene is not associated with the occurrence and the extent of OPLL in the cervical spine. Chinese Han male patients with TC and CC genotypes in exon 3(-726) T/C have genetic susceptibility to OPLL but not to more extensive OPLL in the cervical spine.

  3. The evolution of thoracic anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Jay B

    2005-02-01

    The specialty of thoracic surgery has evolved along with the modem practice of anesthesia. This close relationship began in the 1930s and continues today. Thoracic surgery has grown from a field limited almost exclusively to simple chest wall procedures to the present situation in which complex procedures, such as lung volume reduction or lung transplantation, now can be performed on the most severely compromised patient. The great advances in thoracic surgery have followed discoveries and technical innovations in many medical fields. One of the most important reasons for the rapid escalation in the number and complexity of thoracic surgical procedures now being performed has been the evolution of anesthesia for thoracic surgery. There has been so much progress in this area that numerous books and journals are devoted entirely to this subject. The author has been privileged to work with several surgeons who specialized in noncardiac thoracic surgery. As a colleague of 25 years, the noted pulmonary surgeon James B.D. Mark wrote, "Any operation is a team effort... (but) nowhere is this team effort more important than in thoracic surgery, where near-choreography of moves by all participants is essential. Exchange of information, status and plans are mandatory". This team approach between the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesiologist reflects the history of the two specialties. With new advances in technology, such as continuous blood gas monitoring and the pharmacologic management of pulmonary circulation to maximize oxygenation during one-lung ventilation, in the future even more complex procedures may be able to be performed safely on even higher risk patients.

  4. Thoracic CT findings at hypovolemic shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotondo, A.; Angelelli, G.; Catalano, O.; Grassi, R.; Scialpi, M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To describe and discuss the thoracic CT features of hypovolemic shock. Material and Methods: From a group of 18 patients with signs of hypovolemia on contrast-enhanced abdominal CT, 11 were selected for our study as having also undergone a complete chest examination. Pulse rate, blood pressure, trauma score value, Glasgow coma scale value, surgical result, and final outcome were retrospectively evaluated. The CT features analyzed were: decreased cardiac volume, reduced caliber of the thoracic aorta, aortic branches and caval venous system, increased enhancement of the aorta, and increased enhancement of the pulmonary collapses/contusions. Results: All 11 subjects presented severe injuries and hemodynamic instability; 7 were stable enough to undergo surgery; only 1 of the 11 survived. Two patients showed none of the features of thoracic hypovolemia. All the other patients presented at least two signs: reduced caliber of the thoracic aorta in 7 cases; decreased volume of the cardiac chambers and increased aortic enhancement in 6; decreased caliber of the aortic vessels in 4; decreased caliber of the caval veins in 3; and increased enhancement of the pulmonary collapses/contusions in 3. Conclusions: In patients with hypovolemia, CT may show several thoracic findings in addition to abdominal ones. Knowledge of these features is important for distinguishing them from traumatic injuries. (orig.)

  5. Magnetic resonance-thoracic ductography. Imaging aid for thoracic surgery and thoracic duct depiction based on embryological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Itsuko; Udagawa, Harushi; Takahashi, Junji; Yamase, Hiromi; Kohno, Tadasu; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    We describe the optimal protocol of magnetic resonance-thoracic ductography (MRTD) and provide examples of thoracic ducts (TD) and various anomalies. The anatomical pathway of the TD was analyzed based on embryological considerations. A total of 78 subjects, consisting of noncancer adults and patients with esophageal cancer and lung cancer, were enrolled. The MRTD protocol included a long echo time and was based on emphasizing signals from the liquid fraction and suppressing other signals, based on the principle that lymph flow through the TD appears hyperintense on T2-weighted images. The TD configuration was classified into nine types based on location [right and/or left side(s) of the descending aorta] and outflow [right and/or left venous angle(s)]. MRTD was conducted in 78 patients, and the three-dimensional reconstruction was considered to provide excellent view of the TD in 69 patients, segmentalization of TD in 4, and a poor view of the TD in 5. MRTD achieved a visualization rate of 94%. Most of the patients had a right-side TD that flowed into the left venous angle. Major configuration variations were noted in 14% of cases. Minor anomalies, such as divergence and meandering, were frequently seen. MRTD allows noninvasive evaluation of TD and can be used to identify TD configuration. Thus, this technique is considered to contribute positively to safer performance of thoracic surgery. (author)

  6. Clinical observation on thoracic paravertebral nerve block with ozone treatment in patients with postherpetic neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUO Xiang-fei

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the clinical efficacy of thoracic paravertebral nerve block with ozone in the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia. Methods Eighty-five patients suffered postherpetic neuralgia were divided into 4 groups: Group A (oral drugs + intramuscular injection of vitamin B12 + local nerve block of lesion area, Group B (oral drugs + intramuscular injection of compound trivitamin B + local nerve block of lesion area, Group C (oral drugs + intramuscular injection of compound trivitamin B + thoracic paravertebral nerve block + local nerve block of lesion area, Group D (oral drugs + intramuscular injection of compound trivitamin B + thoracic paravertebral nerve block with ozone + local nerve block of lesion area. Treatment outcomes were evaluated by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, Quality of Sleep (QS, Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS and C-reactive protein (CRP before treatment and 4 weeks after treatment. Results After treatment, VAS, QS and SDS scores of 4 groups were lower than that before treatment, and the differences were statistically significant (P 0.05, for all, while a significant change in CRP was observed in patients of group D between before and after treatment (P < 0.05. The improvement of VAS, QS and SDS scores of group D was significantly better than other 3 groups (P < 0.05, for all. Conclusion Thoracic paravertebral nerve block combined with ozone is a quick and effective method for postherpetic neuralgia patients.

  7. Correlation between trans and intra-thoracic impedance and conductance in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfatto, Gabriella; Villani, Alessandra; Rosa, Francesco Della; Rella, Valeria; Oldani, Matteo; Giglio, Alessia; Facchini, Mario; Parati, Gianfranco

    2016-04-01

    In chronic heart failure, changes of intra-thoracic impedance (Z0IT) may suggest impending pulmonary congestion; a similar result has been found by measuring trans-thoracic conductance (TFCTT = 1/Z0 = 1/kΩ). We assumed that a relationship could exist between Z0IT and TFCTT. We collected 140 measurements from 70 patients carrying an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator/cardiac resynchronization device with the CareLink function (71 ± 9 years, New York Heart Association (NYHA) 2.4 ± 0.9, ejection fraction 31 ± 8%, optimal treatment); they were studied during system alarms and after appropriate treatment (diuretics and/or vasodilators, n = 42) or during clinical stability and at the time of a system alarm (n = 28); correspondent BNP values were obtained. We related Z0IT obtained by the device, with TFCTT obtained with a commercial system. A strong relationship was found between Z0IT and TFCTT. Changes in the variables after treatment or during worsening conditions were of the same direction and order of magnitude, and were related to BNP levels obtained simultaneously. Trans-thoracic conductance, similarly to intra-thoracic impedance, may noninvasively point to pulmonary congestion and be useful in patients not carrying an implanted device. The possibility of remotely obtaining this variable should be evaluated for the telemonitoring of heart failure patients.

  8. Early detection of thoracic spine fracture in the multiple-trauma patient: Findings on the initial anteroposterior chest radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrason, J.N.; Novelline, R.A.; Rhea, J.T.; DeLuca, S.A.; Sacknoff, R.

    1987-01-01

    In the unconscious, multiple-trauma patient, thoracic spine fractures may be initially overlooked due to a combination of immediate concern given to more obvious injuries and a failure to carefully scrutinize the initial, often anteroposterior (AP) and portable chest radiograph. In a recent review of their cases the authors retrospectively identified primary or secondary signs of thoracic spine fracture in 80% of the initial chest radiographs of multiple-trauma patients with this injury. This paper reviews these obvious and subtle, bony and soft-tissue AP chest radiograph signs of thoracic spine fracture and compare them with matching spine radiographs, tomography, and CT

  9. Complications related to osteopenia in the thoracic spine on admission chest radiographs of substance abuse detoxification patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haramati, L.B.; Alterman, D.D.; Israel, G.M.; Haramati, N.; Mallavurapu, R.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. To assess the prevalence of complications related to osteopenia in the thoracic spine (anterior wedging and fish vertebrae) of patients admitted for substance abuse detoxification. Design and patients. We retrospectively identified 150 sequential patients admitted to our drug and alcohol detoxification ward in whom posteroanterior and lateral admission chest radiographs and clinical charts were available for review. There were 116 men and 34 women with a mean age of 37 years (range 19-67 years). Thirty-eight patients were admitted for drug detoxification, 37 for alcohol detoxification, and 75 for drug and alcohol detoxification. These patients were compared with 66 age- and sex-matched controls from our hospital's employee health service. Two radiologists reviewed all chest radiographs for the presence of anterior wedging and fish vertebrae in the thoracic spine and other nonspinal fractures. Serum calcium and inorganic phosphorus levels were recorded for the substance abuse detoxification patients. Results. Forty-nine percent (n=73) of detoxification patients had complications of osteopenia in the thoracic spine including: anterior wedging (n=47), fish vertebrae (n=21), or both (n=5). Twenty-four percent (n=36) of patients had an elevated serum inorganic phosphorus level and one patient had an elevated serum calcium level. Patients with anterior wedging or fish vertebrae included: 45% (n=45) of patients below age 40 years, 35% (n=12) of women, 41% (n=15) of drug detoxification patients, 58% (n=22) of alcohol detoxification patients, 48% (n=36) of drug and alcohol detoxification patients, and 47% (n=17) of patients with elevated serum inorganic phosphorus (P=NS). Six percent (n=9) of our study population had nonspinal fractures on their chest radiographs. Twenty-one percent (n=14) of controls had complications of osteopenia in the thoracic spine (all anterior wedging). This prevalence differed significantly (P<0.05, chi-squared) from the study population

  10. Is there a difference in range of motion, neck pain, and outcomes in patients with ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament versus those with cervical spondylosis, treated with plated laminoplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Takahito; Le, Hai; Ziewacz, John E; Chou, Dean; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2013-07-01

    There are little data on the effects of plated, or plate-only, open-door laminoplasty on cervical range of motion (ROM), neck pain, and clinical outcomes. The purpose of this study was to compare ROM after a plated laminoplasty in patients with ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) versus those with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) and to correlate ROM with postoperative neck pain and neurological outcomes. The authors retrospectively compared patients with a diagnosis of cervical stenosis due to either OPLL or CSM who had been treated with plated laminoplasty in the period from 2007 to 2012 at the University of California, San Francisco. Clinical outcomes were measured using the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scale and neck visual analog scale (VAS). Radiographic outcomes included assessment of changes in the C2-7 Cobb angle at flexion and extension, ROM at C2-7, and ROM of proximal and distal segments adjacent to the plated lamina. Sixty patients (40 men and 20 women) with an average age of 63.1 ± 10.9 years were included in the study. Forty-one patients had degenerative CSM and 19 patients had OPLL. The mean follow-up period was 20.9 ± 13.1 months. The mean mJOA score significantly improved in both the CSM and the OPLL groups (12.8 to 14.5, p cervical ROM, especially in the extension angle. Among patients who have undergone laminoplasty, those with OPLL lose more ROM than do those with CSM. No correlation was observed between neck pain and ROM in either group. Neither group had a change in neck pain that reached the MCID following laminoplasty. Both groups improved in neurological function and outcomes.

  11. Blunt thoracic trauma - an analysis of 264 patients in Rawalpindi, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subhani, S.S.; Muzaffar, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the outcome in terms of morbidity and mortality in blunt thoracic trauma patients in tertiary care hospitals, Rawalpindi. Methods: The prospective study was conducted from March 2008 to February 2012 in surgical wards of public and private sector hospitals in Rawalpindi. A total of 221 patients were included from the Combined Military Hospital during 2008-10, and 43 patients from the Heart's International during 2011-12. The patients reported to emergency department within 48 hours of trauma. All patients were subjected to detailed history and respiratory system examination to ascertain fracture of ribs, flail segment and haemopneumothorax. The diagnosis of chest wall injuries, parenchymal pulmonary injuries and pleural involvement were made on the basis of chest radiographs and computed tomography scan of the chest. The lung contusion was assessed by the number of lobes involved. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 264 patients in the study, 211 (80%) were males and 54 (20%) females. The overall mean age was 44.8+-17.1 years. Over all morbidity was 222 (84.2%); morbidity (minor) was 128 (48.5%), and morbidity (major) was 94 (35.7%). Mortality was 26 (9.8%) and 16 (6%) cases had normal outcome. Conclusion: Early identification and aggressive management of blunt thoracic trauma is essential to reducing significant rates of morbidity and mortality. (author)

  12. A randomized clinical trial to compare the immediate effects of seated thoracic manipulation and targeted supine thoracic manipulation on cervical spine flexion range of motion and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karas, Steve; Olson Hunt, Megan J

    2014-05-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To determine the effectiveness of seated thoracic manipulation versus targeted supine thoracic manipulation on cervical spine pain and flexion range of motion (ROM). There is evidence that thoracic spine manipulation is an effective treatment for patients with cervical spine pain. This evidence includes a variety of techniques to manipulate the thoracic spine. Although each of them is effective, no research has compared techniques to determine which produces the best outcomes. A total of 39 patients with cervical spine pain were randomly assigned to either a seated thoracic manipulation or targeted supine thoracic manipulation group. Pain and flexion ROM measures were taken before and after the intervention. Pain reduction (post-treatment-pre-treatment) was significantly greater in those patients receiving the targeted supine thoracic manipulation compared to the seated thoracic manipulation (Pmanipulation group. The results of this study indicate that a targeted supine thoracic manipulation may be more effective in reducing cervical spine pain and improving cervical flexion ROM than a seated thoracic manipulation. Future studies should include a variety of patients and physical therapists (PTs) to validate our findings.

  13. Usefulness of Reformatted CT Rib Series in Patients with Thoracic Trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Nam; Park, Seong Hoon; Kim, Na Hyung; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Yoon, Kwon Ha [Dept. of Radiology and Institute for Radiological Imaging Science, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Bang, Dong Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Aerospace Medical Center, Cheongwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    To assess the value of adding a reformatted computed tomography (CT) rib series to transversely reconstructed CT imaging in the evaluation of rib fractures in patients with suspected traumatic thoracic injuries. One hundred consecutive patients with suspected traumatic thoracic injuries underwent 128-section multi-detector row CT. Transverse CT images with 5-mm-thick sections were reconstructed and rib series were reformatted using isotropic vogel data. Three independent radiologists, who were blinded to the data, interpreted the CT scans at 2 sessions with a 4-week interval between the sessions. Only transverse CT images were reviewed at the first session. At the second session, the CT images were reviewed along with the reformatted CT rib series. The following parameters were analyzed: receiver operating characteristic (Roc) curve, pairwise comparisons of Roc curves, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. There were 153 rib fractures in 29 patients. The level of the area under the Roc curve, Az improved for all observers. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of each observer tended to improve in the second session. The mean confidence scores for all observers of patients with rib fractures improved significantly in the second session. A reformatted CT rib series together with transverse CT scan is useful for the evaluation of rib fracture.

  14. Thoracic trauma: presentation and management outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saaiq, M.; Shah, S. A.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the presentation and management outcome of thoracic trauma in a tertiary care setting. A total of 143 patients, who presented with chest trauma, were included in the study. All the patients were assessed by the history, physical examination and ancillary investigations. Appropriate managements were instituted as required. Data was described in percentages. out of 143 patients, 119 (83)% were males and 24 (17)% were females. Most of the patients belonged to the age group of 21-50 years. Ninety seven (66)% patients were admitted for indoor management. Blunt injury was found in 125 (87.4%) patients, while penetrating injuries in only 18 (12.6%) patients. Road Traffic Accidents (RTAs) were the commonest cause of trauma (n=103, 72%). Rib fracture was the commonest chest injury (74% patients). Head injury was the most frequently associated injury (18% of the patients). Tube thoracostomy was the commonest intervention undertaken in 65 (45%) patients. Seventeen (11.88%) patients were managed with mechanical ventilation. there were 17 deaths with a mortality rate of 11.88%. Thoracic trauma is an important cause of hospitalization, morbidity and mortality in the younger population. RTAs constitute the leading cause of thoracic trauma in our setup. Tube thoracostomy is the most frequent and at times the only invasive procedure required as a definitive measure in thoracic trauma patients. A policy of selective hospitalization helps to avoid unnecessary hospital admissions. (author)

  15. Thoracic trauma: analysis of 100 consecutive cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Benito Scapolan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze thoracic trauma assisted by the EmergencyService of Hospital da Irmandade da Santa Casa de Misericórdia deSão Paulo. Methods: One hundred patients with thoracic trauma wereassisted throughout six months in 2006. Data from their records werecollected and a protocol of thoracic trauma was fulfilled. The RevisedTrauma Score was used to evaluate gravity of injury and to calculatethe survival index. Results: Prevalence of trauma injury in male from20 to 29 years old was observed. Out of all patients, 44 had blunttrauma and 56 penetrating trauma (78.6% presented stab woundsand 21.4% gun shots. Up to the settings of injuries, 23% were in thethoracoabdominal transition, 7% in the precordium and 70% in theremainder thoracic area. In those with the thoracoabdominal transitioninjury, 22.7% were hemodynamically unstable and 77.3% stable.Thoracoabdominal injury patients presented 40.9% of diaphragmwound and all were stable. Of those with precordium wound, 37.5%presented cardiac injury. In cardiac onset, 66.7% presented stableand 33.3% unstable. Thoracic drainage was the most accomplishedsurgical procedure (71%. Conclusions: The thoracic trauma patientis most prevalently young male with stab wound penetrating injury,without associated injuries, hemodynamically stable, presentinghemothorax, with high probability of survival.

  16. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Glaucia; Araujo Neto, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza Junior, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Hospital Universitario Antonio Pedro (HUAP/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: the aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. Methods: this was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. Results: the majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). Conclusions: it is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. (author)

  17. Surgical and Clinical Decision Making in Isolated Long Thoracic Nerve Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Shelley S; Krauss, Emily M; Felder, John M; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2017-10-01

    Isolated long thoracic nerve palsy results in scapular winging and destabilization. In this study, we review the surgical management of isolated long thoracic nerve palsy and suggest a surgical technique and treatment algorithm to simplify management. In total, 19 patients who required surgery for an isolated long thoracic nerve palsy were reviewed retrospectively. Preoperative demographics, electromyography (EMG), and physical examinations were reviewed. Intraoperative nerve stimulation, surgical decision making, and postoperative outcomes were reviewed. In total, 19 patients with an average age of 32 were included in the study. All patients had an isolated long thoracic nerve palsy caused by either an injury (58%), Parsonage-Turner syndrome (32%), or shoulder surgery (10%); 18 patients (95%) underwent preoperative EMG; 10 with evidence of denervation (56%); and 13 patients had motor unit potentials in the serratus anterior (72%). The preoperative EMG did not correlate with intraoperative nerve stimulation in 13 patients (72%) and did correlate in 5 patients (28%); 3 patients had a nerve transfer (3 thoracodorsal to long thoracic at lateral chest, 1 pec to long thoracic at supraclavicular incision). In the 3 patients who had a nerve transfer, there was return of full forward flexion of the shoulder at an average of 2.5 months. A treatment algorithm based on intraoperative nerve stimulation will help guide surgeons in their clinical decision making in patients with isolated long thoracic nerve palsy. Intraoperative nerve stimulation is the gold standard in the management of isolated long thoracic nerve palsy.

  18. Graft-Sparing Strategy for Thoracic Prosthetic Graft Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Gaku; Yoshida, Takeshi; Kakii, Bunpachi; Furui, Masato

    2018-04-01

    Thoracic prosthetic graft infection is a rare but serious complication with no standard management. We reported our surgical experience on graft-sparing strategy for thoracic prosthetic graft infection.  This study included patients who underwent graft-sparing surgery for thoracic prosthetic graft infection at Matsubara Tokushukai Hospital in Japan from January 2000 to October 2017.  There were 17 patients included in the analyses, with a mean age at surgery of 71.0 ± 10.5 years; 11 were men. In-hospital mortality was observed in five patients (29.4%).  Graft-sparing surgery for thoracic prosthetic graft infection is an alternative option particularly for early graft infection after hemiarch replacement. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. A Case of Fatal Pulmonary Hypoplasia with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia, Thoracic Myelomeningocele, and Thoracic Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Ai; Fujinaga, Hideshi; Matsui, Sachiko; Tago, Kumiko; Iwasaki, Yuka; Fujino, Shuhei; Nagasawa, Junko; Amari, Shoichiro; Kaneshige, Masao; Wada, Yuka; Takahashi, Shigehiro; Tsukamoto, Keiko; Miyazaki, Osamu; Yoshioka, Takako; Ishiguro, Akira; Ito, Yushi

    2017-10-01

    Background  Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is fatal in severe cases of pulmonary hypoplasia. We experienced a fatal case of pulmonary hypoplasia due to CDH, thoracic myelomeningocele (MMC), and thoracic dysplasia. This constellation of anomalies has not been previously reported. Case Report  A male infant with a prenatal diagnosis of thoracic MMC with severe hydrocephalus and scoliosis was born at 36 weeks of gestation. CDH was found after birth and the patient died of respiratory failure due to pulmonary hypoplasia and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn at 30 hours of age despite neonatal intensive care. An autopsy revealed a left CDH without herniation of the liver or stomach into the thoracic cavity, severe hydrocephalus, Chiari malformation type II, MMC with spina bifida from Th4 to Th12, hemivertebrae, fused ribs, deformities of the thoracic cage and legs, short trunk, and agenesis of the left kidney. Conclusion  We speculate that two factors may be associated with the severe pulmonary hypoplasia: decreased thoracic space due to the herniation of visceral organs caused by CDH and thoracic dysplasia due to skeletal deformity and severe scoliosis.

  20. Re-interventions on the thoracic and thoracoabdominal aorta in patients with Marfan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenhoff, Florian S.; Carrel, Thierry P.

    2017-01-01

    The advent of multi-gene panel genetic testing and the discovery of new syndromic and non-syndromic forms of connective tissue disorders have established thoracic aortic aneurysms as a genetically mediated disease. Surgical results in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) provide an important benchmark for this patient population. Prophylactic aortic root surgery prevents acute dissection and has contributed to the improved survival of MFS patients. In the majority of patients, re-interventions...

  1. The hemiclamshell approach in thoracic surgery: indications and associated morbidity in 50 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, Guillaume; Baste, Jean-Marc; Thumerel, Matthieu; Delcambre, Frédéric; Velly, Jean-Françis; Jougon, Jacques

    2009-12-01

    This retrospective study was carried out to evaluate the indications for and outcomes of the hemiclamshell (HCS) approach (longitudinal partial sternotomy with antero-lateral thoracotomy) in patients undergoing mass resection in thoracic surgery. All patients (50) who underwent a HCS procedure in our department, between July 1996 and July 2005, were studied retrospectively, analyzing the indications, morbidity and outcome (pain, neurological or shoulder defects, mortality) at one month and one year. The main indications were apical tumours (38%), tumours of the cervicothoracic junction (46%) and chest wall (10%), and 'bulky' tumours (6%). One-month mortality was 6%. Two patients suffered from a chylothorax and one from phrenic paralysis. The postoperative analgesic requirements were similar to those after other thoracic surgery approaches. Twelve percent of patients suffered pain at one month and 6% at one year. Shoulder dysfunction was observed in 10% of patients at one month and 6% at one year. In conclusion, the HCS surgical approach was associated with an uncomplicated postoperative course. This anterior approach is suitable for apical tumours, tumours of the cervicothoracic junction and 'bulky' lung tumours, providing good access for control of the large vessels and radical mediastinal clearance.

  2. Initial assessment of chest X-ray in thoracic trauma patients: Awareness of specific injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aukema, Tjeerd S.; Beenen, Ludo F. M.; Hietbrink, Falco; Leenen, Luke Ph

    2012-01-01

    To compare the reported injuries on initial assessment of the chest X-ray (CXR) in thoracic trauma patients to a second read performed by a dedicated trauma radiologist. By retrospective analysis of a prospective database, 712 patients with an injury to the chest admitted to the University Medical

  3. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Izarzugaza, Isabel; Jaal, Jana; Treasure, Tom; Foschi, Roberto; Ricardi, Umberto; Groen, Harry; Tavilla, Andrea; Ardanaz, Eva

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  4. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Zwan, J.M.V.D.; Izarzugaza, I.; Jaal, J.; Treasure, T.; Foschi, R.; Ricardi, U.; Groen, H.; Tavilla, A.; Ardanaz, E.

    2012-01-01

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  5. Correlation analysis between change in thoracic kyphosis and multilevel facetectomy and screw density in main thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Hideki; Abe, Yuichiro; Kokabu, Terufumi; Ito, Manabu; Abumi, Kuniyoshi; Ito, Yoichi M; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2016-09-01

    Controversy exists regarding the effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on deformity correction, especially thoracic kyphosis (TK) restoration in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on sagittal plane correction in patients with main thoracic (MT) AIS curve. A retrospective correlation and comparative analysis of prospectively collected, consecutive, non-randomized series of patients at a single institution was undertaken. Sixty-four consecutive patients with Lenke type 1 AIS treated with posterior correction and fusion surgery using simultaneous double-rod rotation technique were included. Patient demographics and preoperative and 2-year postoperative radiographic measurements were the outcome measures for this study. Multiple stepwise linear regression analysis was conducted between change in TK (T5-T12) and the following factors: age at surgery, Risser sign, number of facetectomy level, screw density, preoperative main thoracic curve, flexibility in main thoracic curve, coronal correction rate, preoperative TK, and preoperative lumbar lordosis. Patients were classified into two groups: TKcorrect hypokyphosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Thoracic epidural anesthesia and interscalene block for a pneumonectomized patient posted for modified radical mastectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mridul Dua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic epidural anesthesia with ipsilateral brachial plexus block is emerging as an alternative to general anesthesia for oncologic breast surgery.1. A 31 year old, pneumonectomised female with a past history of MDR TB was diagnosed with infiltrating ductal carcinoma in left breast 2 months ago and was posted for MRM. She also had moderate Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension. Thoracic epidural anesthesia was induced with 12 ml of 0.5% Ropivacaine at T6-T7 level. Interscalene block was given with 10 ml 0.5% Ropivacaine using peripheral nerve locator. Patient was comfortable throughout the procedure and remained vitally stable. Post-operative analgesia was given with 10 ml of 0.2% ropivacaine and patient was discharged the following week. Thoracic epidural anesthesia provides the advantage of superior intra and post-operative analgesia without the adverse effects of general anesthesia like postoperative nausea, vomiting, respiratory depression and sedation.2 Coupled with interscalene block for axillary lymph node dissection, it can be successfully used as an alternative to GA for MRM.

  7. Endovascular repair of traumatic thoracic aortic tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, M Ashraf; Kirk, Jeffrey S; Cuff, Robert F; Banegas, Shonda L; Ambrosi, Gavin M; Liao, Timothy H; Chambers, Christopher M; Wong, Peter Y; Heiser, John C

    2012-03-01

    Patients with thoracic aorta injuries (TAI) present a unique challenge. The purpose of this study was to review the outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with TAI. A retrospective chart review of all patients admitted for TEVAR for trauma was performed. In a 5-year period, 19 patients (6 women and 13 men; average age, 42 y) were admitted to our trauma center with TAI. Mechanism of injury was a motor vehicle crash in 12 patients, motorcycle crash in 2 patients, automobile-pedestrian accident in 2 patients, 1 fall, 1 crush injury, and 1 stab wound to the back. A thoracic endograft was used in 6 patients and proximal aortic cuffs were used in 13 patients (68%). One patient (5%) died. There were no strokes, myocardial infarctions, paraplegia, or renal failure. TEVAR for TAI appears to be a safe option for patients with multiple injuries. TEVAR in young patients is still controversial because long-term endograft behavior is unknown. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of dose distribution between 3DCRT and IMRT in middle thoracic and under thoracic esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dingjie; Liu Hailong; Mao Ronghu; Liu Ru; Guo Xiaoqi; Lei Hongchang; Wang Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the dose distribution between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in treating esophageal carcinoma (middle thoracic section and under thoracic section) and to select reasonable treatment methods for esophagus cancer. Methods: Ten cases with cancer of the middle thoracic section and under thoracic section esophagus were chosen for a retrospective treatment-planning study. 3DCRT and IMRT plans were created for each patient: Some critical indicators were evolved in evaluating the treatment plans of IMRT (5B and 7B) and 3DCRT (3B), such as, PTV coverage and dose-volumes to irradiated normal structures. Evaluation indicators: prescription of 50 Gy. total lung volume (V5, V10, V20), mean lung dose (MLD), spinal cord (Dmax), heart (V40) and conformality index (CI). Each plan was evaluated with respect to dose distribution,dose-volume histograms (DVHs), and additional dosimetric endpoints described below. Results: There is no significance of CRT and IMRT technique in protection of total lung volume,mean lung dose, spinal cord (Dmax), target, CI and heart. Conclusion: As To radiotherapy of esophagus cancer of the middle thoracic section and under thoracic section, IMRT has no advantage compared with 3DCRT, the selection of plan should be adapted to the situations of every patient. (authors)

  9. Similar Outcomes in Diabetes Patients After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting With Single Internal Thoracic Artery Plus Radial Artery Grafting and Bilateral Internal Thoracic Artery Grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Sajjad; Blackstone, Eugene H; Houghtaling, Penny L; Koprivanac, Marijan; Ravichandren, Kirthi; Javadikasgari, Hoda; Bakaeen, Faisal G; Svensson, Lars G; Sabik, Joseph F

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine in patients with diabetes mellitus whether single internal thoracic artery (SITA) plus radial artery (RA) grafting yields outcomes similar to those of bilateral internal thoracic artery (BITA) grafting. From January 1994 to January 2011, 1,325 diabetic patients underwent primary isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery with either (1) SITA plus RA with or without saphenous vein (SV) grafts (n = 965) or (2) BITA with or without SV grafts (n = 360); an internal thoracic artery was used in all patients to graft the left anterior descending coronary artery. Endpoints were in-hospital outcomes and time-related mortality. Median follow-up was 7.4 years, with a total follow-up of 9,162 patient-years. Propensity score matching was performed to identify 282 well-matched pairs for adjusted comparisons. Unadjusted in-hospital mortality was 0.52% for SITA plus RA with or without SV grafts and 0.28% for BITA with or without SV grafts, and prevalence of deep sternal wound infection was 3.2% and 1.7%, respectively. Unadjusted survival at 1, 5, 10, and 14 years was 97%, 88%, 68%, and 51% for SITA plus RA with or without SV grafts, and 97%, 95%, 80%, and 66% for BITA with or without SV grafts, respectively. Among propensity-matched patients, in-hospital mortality (0.35% versus 0.35%) and prevalence of deep sternal wound infection (1.4% versus 1.4%) were similar (p > 0.9) in the two groups, as was 1-, 5-, 10-, and 14-year survival: 97%, 90%, 70%, and 58% for SITA plus RA with or without SV grafting versus 97%, 93%, 79%, and 64% for BITA with or without SV grafting, respectively (early p = 0.8, late p = 0.2). For diabetic patients, SITA plus RA with or without SV grafting and BITA with or without SV grafting yield similar in-hospital outcomes and long-term survival after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Therefore, both SITA plus RA and BITA plus SV grafting should be considered for these patients. Copyright © 2017 The Society

  10. Treatment Results of Injuries of Thoracic and Lumbar Backbone Departments at Osteoporosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.Y. Sumin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Information relates to radiologic (computer tomography manifestations providing the visualization of thoracic and lumbar backbone department injuries at osteoporotic patients. Contemporary methods of transcutaneous and trans-pedicle vertebroplasty with bone cement allows to obtain a stable positive healing effect against such pathologies.

  11. Thoracic splenosis as a differential diagnosis of juxtapleural nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic splenosis is rare and consists of ectopic implantation of splenic tissue into the chest after concomitant thoracic and abdominal trauma with diaphragm injury. It occurs in about 18% of cases of splenic ruptures. In almost all cases, diagnosis is given incidentally once patients are usually asymptomatic. Thoracic splenosis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in all patients with history of trauma presenting with juxtapleural nodules in chest computed tomography. However, malignant conditions should be ruled out firstly. Biopsy is not essential for the diagnosis once nuclear medicine can confirm splenosis in patients with pertinent history of trauma and suggestive tomographic image. We present a typical case of thoracic splenosis whose diagnosis was made by nuclear medicine and no invasive procedures were required.

  12. Digital radiography of crush thoracic trauma in the Sichuan earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhi-Hui; Shao, Heng; Chen, Tian-Wu; Chu, Zhi-Gang; Deng, Wen; Tang, Si-Shi; Chen, Jing; Yang, Zhi-Gang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the features of crush thoracic trauma in Sichuan earthquake victims using chest digital radiography (CDR). METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 772 CDR of 417 females and 355 males who had suffered crush thoracic trauma in the Sichuan earthquake. Patient age ranged from 0.5 to 103 years. CDR was performed between May 12, 2008 and June 7, 2008. We looked for injury to the thoracic cage, pulmonary parenchyma and the pleura. RESULTS: Antero-posterior (AP) and lateral CDR were obtained in 349 patients, the remaining 423 patients underwent only AP CDR. Thoracic cage fractures, pulmonary contusion and pleural injuries were noted in 331 (42.9%; 95% CI: 39.4%-46.4%), 67 and 135 patients, respectively. Of the 256 patients with rib fractures, the mean number of fractured ribs per patient was 3. Rib fractures were mostly distributed from the 3rd through to the 8th ribs and the vast majority involved posterior and lateral locations along the rib. Rib fractures had a significant positive association with non-rib thoracic fractures, pulmonary contusion and pleural injuries (P < 0.001). The number of rib fractures and pulmonary contusions were significant factors associated with patient death. CONCLUSION: Earthquake-related crush thoracic trauma has the potential for multiple fractures. The high number of fractured ribs and pulmonary contusions were significant factors which needed appropriate medical treatment. PMID:22132298

  13. The contribution of thoracic vertebral deformity and arthropathy to trunk pain in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Coxson, Harvey O; Coupal, Tyler M; Lam, Stephen; Munk, Peter L; Leipsic, Jonathon; Reid, W Darlene

    2018-04-01

    Pain, commonly localized to the trunk in individuals with COPD, may be due to osteoporosis-related vertebral deformity and chest wall hyper-expansion causing misalignment of joints between the ribs and vertebrae. The purpose of this study was to determine if thoracic vertebral deformity and arthropathy were independent contributors to trunk pain in COPD patients compared to people with a significant smoking history. Participants completed the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) on the same day as chest CT scans and spirometry. Current and ex-smokers were separated into COPD (n = 91) or non-COPD (n = 80) groups based on spirometry. Subsequently, CT images were assessed for thoracic vertebral deformity, bone attenuation values, and arthropathy of thoracic vertebral joints. The trunk area was the most common pain location in both COPD and non-COPD groups. Thoracic vertebral deformity and costotransverse joint arthropathy were independent contributors to trunk pain in COPD patients (adjusted OR = 3.55 and 1.30, respectively) whereas alcohol consumption contributed to trunk pain in the non-COPD group (adjusted OR = 0.35 in occasional alcohol drinkers; 0.08 in non-alcohol drinkers). The spinal deformity index and the number of narrowed disc spaces were significantly positively related to the BPI intensity, interference, and total scores significantly in COPD patients. Trunk pain, at least in part, is caused by thoracic vertebral deformity, and costotransverse and intervertebral arthropathy in patients living with COPD. The results of this study provided the foundation for the management of pain, which requires further exploration. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Responsiveness of internal thoracic arteries to nitroglycerin in patients with renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawa, Masashi; Kinoshita, Takeshi; Asai, Tohru; Suzuki, Tomoaki; Ishibashi, Takaharu; Okamura, Tomio

    2017-12-11

    Nitroglycerin is commonly used as an antispasmodic for treating spasm of coronary artery bypass grafts. This study investigated whether the presence of renal failure affects reactivity to nitroglycerin in internal thoracic arteries obtained from patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery. The patients were divided into three groups according to estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, mL/min/1.73 m 2 ): without renal failure (60 ≤ eGFR, n = 13), with moderate renal failure (30 ≤ eGFR renal failure (eGFR renal failure than in those without renal failure. In addition, there was a negative correlation between eGFR and the relaxant efficacy of nitroglycerin (P = 0.016). On the other hand, relaxant responses to BAY 60-2770 (which enhances cGMP generation as with nitroglycerin) were similar among three grades of renal function. An inverse relationship of eGFR to the relaxant efficacy of BAY 60-2770 was not observed, either (P = 0.314). These findings suggest that severe renal failure specifically potentiates nitroglycerin-induced relaxation in internal thoracic artery grafts.

  15. Is there a benefit in receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy for elderly patients with inoperable thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The benefit of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT in elderly patients with inoperable esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is controversial. This study aimed to assess the efficiency and safety of CCRT in elderly thoracic esophageal cancer patients. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between January 2002 and December 2011, 128 patients aged 65 years or older treated with CCRT or radiotherapy (RT alone for inoperable thoracic esophageal SCC were analyzed retrospectively (RT alone, n = 55; CCRT, n = 73. RESULTS: No treatment-related deaths occurred and no patients experienced any acute grade 4 non-hematologic toxicities. Patients treated with CCRT developed more severe acute toxicities than patients who received RT alone. The 3-year overall survival (OS rate was 36.1% for CCRT compared with 28.5% following RT alone (p = 0.008. Multivariate analysis identified T stage and treatment modality as independent prognostic factors for survival. Further analysis revealed that survival was significantly better in the CCRT group than in the RT alone group for patients ≤ 72 years. Nevertheless, the CCRT group had a similar OS to the RT group for patients > 72 years. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that elderly patients with inoperable thoracic esophageal SCC could benefit from CCRT, without major toxicities. However, for patients older than 72 years, CCRT is not superior to RT alone in terms of survival benefit.

  16. Adjacent-segment disease after thoracic pedicle screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nitin; Heary, Robert F; Agarwal, Prateek

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Pedicle screw fixation is a technique widely used to treat conditions ranging from spine deformity to fracture stabilization. Pedicle screws have been used traditionally in the lumbar spine; however, they are now being used with increasing frequency in the thoracic spine as a more favorable alternative to hooks, wires, or cables. Although safety concerns, such as the incidence of adjacent-segment disease (ASD) after cervical and lumbar fusions, have been reported, such issues in the thoracic spine have yet to be addressed thoroughly. Here, the authors review the literature on ASD after thoracic pedicle screw fixation and report their own experience specifically involving the use of pedicle screws in the thoracic spine. METHODS Select references from online databases, such as PubMed (provided by the US National Library of Medicine at the National Institutes of Health), were used to survey the literature concerning ASD after thoracic pedicle screw fixation. To include the authors' experience at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database was performed to determine the incidence of complications over a 13-year period in 123 consecutive adult patients who underwent thoracic pedicle screw fixation. Children, pregnant or lactating women, and prisoners were excluded from the review. By comparing preoperative and postoperative radiographic images, the occurrence of thoracic ASD and disease within the surgical construct was determined. RESULTS Definitive radiographic fusion was detected in 115 (93.5%) patients. Seven incidences of instrumentation failure and 8 lucencies surrounding the screws were observed. One patient was observed to have ASD of the thoracic spine. The mean follow-up duration was 50 months. CONCLUSIONS This long-term radiographic evaluation revealed the use of pedicle screws for thoracic fixation to be an effective stabilization modality. In particular, ASD seems to be less of a problem in the

  17. [Surgical treatment of thoracic disc herniation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabálek, L; Kalita, O; Langová, K

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of different surgical approaches to thoracic disc herniation, and to show the role of segmental fusion and selection of an appropriate microsurgical decompression technique for the successful outcome of surgery. A group of 27 patients, 10 men and 17 women, between 31 and 70 years (average age, 49.33 years) were included in this prospective study. They underwent surgery for thoracic degeneration disc disease in the period from June 1994 to August 2008. In all patients, the severity of myelopathy was assessed using the grading Frankel system and JOA score, axial and radicular pain intensity was evaluated with VAS and ODI rating systems. The diagnosis was established on the basis of thoracic spine radiography, thoracic spine MRI and a CT scan of the segment. A total of 30 thoracic segments, in the range of Th4/Th5 to Th12/L1, were indicated for surgery. Localisation of the hernia was medial at 19 segments, mediolateral at three and lateral at eight segments. Soft disc herniation was found in 17 cases and hard disc protrusion at the remaining 13 segments. Surgery for significant myelopathy was carried out in 23 patients and for pain in four patients. According to the surgical procedure used, the patients were allocated to two groups: group A comprised 10 patients treated without disc replacement through a laminectomy or a costotransversectomy exposure, and group B consisted of 17 patients undergo- ing intersomatic fusion via a thoracotomy. Clinical and radiographic examinations were made at regular intervals for at least 1 year of follow-up. The results of clinical assessment, including JOA scores, JOA Recovery Rate, VAS scores at rest and after exercise and ODI, were statistically analysed for each group and compared. There was a statistically significant difference in JOA evaluation of myelopathy between the groups in group A, the mean JOA score declined from 7.9 to 7.0, i.e., -0.9 point, while in group B it

  18. Epidural Hematoma and Abscess Related to Thoracic Epidural Analgesia: A Single-Center Study of 2,907 Patients Who Underwent Lung Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupersztych-Hagege, Elisa; Dubuisson, Etienne; Szekely, Barbara; Michel-Cherqui, Mireille; François Dreyfus, Jean; Fischler, Marc; Le Guen, Morgan

    2017-04-01

    To report the major complications (epidural hematoma and abscess) of postoperative thoracic epidural analgesia in patients who underwent lung surgery. Prospective, monocentric study. A university hospital. All lung surgical patients who received postoperative thoracic epidural analgesia between November 2007 and November 2015. Thoracic epidural analgesia for patients who underwent lung surgery. During the study period, data for 2,907 patients were recorded. The following 3 major complications were encountered: 1 case of epidural hematoma (0.34 case/1,000; 95% confidence interval 0.061-1.946), for which surgery was performed, and 2 cases of epidural abscesses (0.68 case/1,000; 95% confidence interval 0.189-2.505), which were treated medically. The risk range of serious complications was moderate; only the patient who experienced an epidural hematoma also experienced permanent sequelae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. One-stage sequential bilateral thoracic expansion for asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (Jeune syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthialu, Nagarajan; Mussa, Shafi; Owens, Catherine M; Bulstrode, Neil; Elliott, Martin J

    2014-10-01

    Jeune syndrome (asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy) is a rare disorder characterized by skeletal dysplasia, reduced diameter of the thoracic cage and extrathoracic organ involvement. Fatal, early respiratory insufficiency may occur. Two-stage lateral thoracic expansion has been reported, addressing each side sequentially over 3-12 months. While staged repair theoretically provides less invasive surgery in a small child with respiratory distress, we utilized a single stage, bilateral procedure aiming to rapidly maximize lung development. Combined bilateral surgery also offered the chance of rapid recovery, and reduced hospital stay. We present our early experience of this modification of existing surgical treatment for an extremely rare condition, thought to be generally fatal in early childhood. Nine children (6 males, 3 females; median age 30 months [3.5-75]) underwent thoracic expansion for Jeune syndrome in our centre. All patients required preoperative respiratory support (5 with tracheostomy, 8 requiring positive pressure ventilation regularly within each day/night cycle). Two children underwent sequential unilateral (2-month interval between stages) and 7 children bilateral thoracic expansion by means of staggered osteotomies of third to eighth ribs and plate fixation of fourth to fifth rib and sixth to seventh rib, leaving the remaining ribs floating. There was no operative mortality. There were 2 deaths within 3 months of surgery, due to pulmonary hypertension (1 following two-stage and 1 following single-stage thoracic expansion). At the median follow-up of 11 months (1-15), 3 children have been discharged home from their referring unit and 2 have significantly reduced respiratory support. One child remains on non-invasive ventilation and another is still ventilated with a high oxygen requirement. Jeune syndrome is a difficult condition to manage, but bilateral thoracic expansion offers an effective reduction in ventilator requirements in these children

  20. Long Term Follow-up of Ventilated Patients with Thoracic Restriction and Neuromuscular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Brooks

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the long term effects of home mechanical ventilation (HMV on pulmonary function, nighttime gas exchange, daytime arterial blood gases, sleep architecture and functional exercise capacity (6 min walk. Patients with respiratory failure attributable to thoracic restrictive disease (TRD (kyphoscoliosis or neuromuscular disease (NMD were assessed, ventilated, trained and followed in a dedicated unit for the care of patients requiring long term ventilation.

  1. Single injection thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB for breast surgery in morbidly obese patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Kulkarni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Morbidly obese (MO patients with associated restrictive airway disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and coronary artery disease pose challenge to an anesthesiologist. Regional block combined with general anesthesia (GA is the anesthetic technique of choice as it will decrease the requirement of opioids, anesthetics, and postoperative respiratory depression. A MO patient for modified radical mastectomy was successfully managed with single-injection thoracic paravertebral block and conventional GA.

  2. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for acute thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Goodman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Operative intervention for thoracic trauma typically requires thoracotomy. We hypothesized that thoracoscopy may be safely and effectively utilized for the acute management of thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: The Trauma Registry of a Level I trauma center was queried from 1999 through 2010 for all video-assisted thoracic procedures within 24 h of admission. Data collected included initial vital signs, operative indication, intraoperative course, and postoperative outcome. Results: Twenty-three patients met inclusion criteria: 3 (13% following blunt injury and 20 (87% after penetrating trauma. Indications for urgent thoracoscopy included diaphragmatic/esophageal injury, retained hemothorax, ongoing hemorrhage, and open/persistent pneumothorax. No conversions to thoracotomy were required and no patient required re-operation. Mean postoperative chest tube duration was 2.9 days and mean length of stay was 5.6 days. Conclusion: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is safe and effective for managing thoracic trauma in hemodynamically stable patients within the first 24 h post-injury.

  3. Bilateral locked facets in the thoracic spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.A. Willems; Braakman, R. (Reinder); B. van Linge (Bert)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractTwo cases of traumatic bilateral locked facets in the thoracic spine are reported. Both patients had only minor neurological signs. They both made a full neurological recovery after surgical reduction of the locked facets. Bilateral locked facets are very uncommon in the thoracic spine.

  4. Analysis of cervical kyphosis and spinal balance in young idiopathic scoliosis patients classified by the apex of thoracic kyphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kenyu; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Hida, Tetsuro; Tsushima, Mikito; Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Matsumoto, Akiyuki; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Sagittal balance has recently been the focus of studies aimed at understanding the correction force required for both coronal and sagittal malalignment. However, the correlation between cervical kyphosis and sagittal balance in AIS patients has yet to be thoroughly investigated. This study aimed to clarify the correlation between cervical alignment and spinal balance in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Here, we hypothesized that cervical kyphosis patients can be classified into groups by the apex of thoracic kyphosis. This study included 92 AIS patients (84 females, 8 males; mean age, 15.1 years). Patients were divided into the cervical lordosis (CL), cervical sigmoid (CS), or cervical kyphosis (CK) groups and further classified according to the apex of thoracic kyphosis into High (above T3), Middle (T4-T9), and Low (below T10) groups. There were 17 (18.5 %), 22 (23.9 %), and 53 (57.6 %) patients with CL, CS, and CK, respectively. In the CK group, 13 had CK-High, 35 had CK-Middle, and 5 had CK-Low. The C7 sagittal vertical axis (C7SVA) measurements were most backward in CK-High and most forward in CK-Low. The T5-12 kyphosis (TK) measurement was significantly lower in CK-High. Most AIS patients had kyphotic cervical alignment. Patients with CK can be classified as having CK-High, CK-Middle, or CK-Low according to the apex of thoracic kyphosis. CK-High is due to thoracic hypokyphosis with a backward balanced C7SVA. CK-Middle is well-balanced cervical kyphosis. CK-Low has forward-bent global kyphosis of the cervicothoracic spine that positioned the C7SVA forward.

  5. Blunt Cardiac Injury in Trauma Patients with Thoracic Aortic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathachai Kaewlai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma patients with thoracic aortic injury (TAI suffer blunt cardiac injury (BCI at variable frequencies. This investigation aimed to determine the frequency of BCI in trauma patients with TAI and compare with those without TAI. All trauma patients with TAI who had admission electrocardiography (ECG and serum creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB from January 1999 to May 2009 were included as a study group at a level I trauma center. BCI was diagnosed if there was a positive ECG with either an elevated CK-MB or abnormal echocardiography. There were 26 patients (19 men, mean age 45.1 years, mean ISS 34.4 in the study group; 20 had evidence of BCI. Of 52 patients in the control group (38 men, mean age 46.9 years, mean ISS 38.7, eighteen had evidence of BCI. There was a significantly higher rate of BCI in trauma patients with TAI versus those without TAI (77% versus 35%, P<0.001.

  6. Idiopathic chylopericardium treated by percutaneous thoracic duct embolization after failed surgical thoracic duct ligation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, Malachi; Ayyagari, Raj R. [Yale School of Medicine, Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (United States); Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, 789 Howard Avenue, P.O. Box 208042, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Chylopericardium rarely occurs in pediatric patients, but when it does it is most often a result of lymphatic injury during cardiothoracic surgery. Primary idiopathic chylopericardium is especially rare, with few cases in the pediatric literature. We report a 10-year-old boy who presented with primary idiopathic chylopericardium after unsuccessful initial treatment with surgical lymphatic ligation and creation of a pericardial window. Following readmission to the hospital for a right-side chylothorax resulting from the effluent from the pericardial window, he had successful treatment by interventional radiology with percutaneous thoracic duct embolization. This case illustrates the utility of thoracic duct embolization as a less-invasive alternative to surgical thoracic duct ligation, or as a salvage procedure when surgical ligation fails. (orig.)

  7. Idiopathic chylopericardium treated by percutaneous thoracic duct embolization after failed surgical thoracic duct ligation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtney, Malachi; Ayyagari, Raj R.

    2015-01-01

    Chylopericardium rarely occurs in pediatric patients, but when it does it is most often a result of lymphatic injury during cardiothoracic surgery. Primary idiopathic chylopericardium is especially rare, with few cases in the pediatric literature. We report a 10-year-old boy who presented with primary idiopathic chylopericardium after unsuccessful initial treatment with surgical lymphatic ligation and creation of a pericardial window. Following readmission to the hospital for a right-side chylothorax resulting from the effluent from the pericardial window, he had successful treatment by interventional radiology with percutaneous thoracic duct embolization. This case illustrates the utility of thoracic duct embolization as a less-invasive alternative to surgical thoracic duct ligation, or as a salvage procedure when surgical ligation fails. (orig.)

  8. A Knowledge Translation Programme to Increase the Utilization of Thoracic Spine Mobilization and Manipulation for Patients with Neck Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karas, Steve; Westerheide, Angela; Daniel, Laura

    2016-06-01

    There is extensive evidence that mobilization and manipulation of the thoracic spine is associated with improved outcomes in patients with neck pain. However, these evidence-based techniques are not always utilized. Successful knowledge translation programmes are needed to move the best available evidence to clinical practice. The purpose of the present research was to evaluate the effects of a structured knowledge translation programme on the frequency of manual therapy techniques performed by physical therapists on patients with neck pain. Prior to our intervention, we assessed physical therapists' use of thoracic spine intervention for the treatment of neck pain and their knowledge of the evidence. We delivered a multimodal knowledge translation programme and then reassessed their use and knowledge of the interventions. The majority of our physical therapists increased the use of thoracic spine techniques for their patients with neck pain. The increase was greater in those who used the techniques infrequently. Overall knowledge of the evidence appeared unchanged. Knowledge translation programmes are essential in ensuring clinical use of evidence-based practice. Our programme results, although on a small scale and not statistically significant, showed a positive trend toward increased thoracic spine manual therapy use for neck pain. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. A rare case of traumatic chylothorax after blunt thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasić Marko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chylothorax is an accumulation of chyle in the pleural cavity due to a disruption of the thoracic duct. Traumatic chylothoraces are usually a result of a penetrating trauma and disruption of the thoracic duct, but blunt traumatic chylothorax is a rare condition. The aim of this paper is to present a rare case of traumatic chylothorax after blunt thoracic trauma. Case Outline. We present a case of traumatic chylothorax after blunt thoracic trauma in a patient injured in a motor vehicle accident. The patient had a right-sided fracture of rib XI, hydropneumothorax, lung contusion, and signs of pneumomediastinum. We performed thoracic drainage, but a few days later, according to the increase of amount of the fluid daily drained, and the confirmation of laboratory findings of the analyzed fluid, we made a diagnosis of chylothorax and the patient underwent a thoracotomy, where we sutured the thoracic duct. Conclusion. Chylothorax should be considered in patients after chest trauma if they develop a milky pleural effusion. Analysis of pleural fluid and level of triglycerides is important for the diagnosis and treatment of chylothorax. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. III41007

  10. Accuracy of CT-guided biopsies in 158 patients with thoracic spinal lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, D.J.; He, B.R.; Liu, T.J.; Zhao, Q.P. (Dept. of Spinal Surgery, Xian Red Cross Hospital, Xian Shaanxi (China)), email: zqpddn1@gmail.com; Sun, H.H. (Dept. of Orthopaedic, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical Univ., Xian Shaanxi (China)); Jiang, Y.H. (Dept. of Radiology, Xian Red Cross Hospital, Xian Shaanxi (China))

    2011-11-15

    Background. Inconsistent accuracies of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsies have been reported in previous studies. Purpose. To determine the accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy, to compare the results with those previously reported, and to determine if there are any factors that influence the accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy. Material and Methods. In total, 158 consecutive CT-guided percutaneous thoracic spine procedures (performed at the Dept. of Spinal Surgery, Xian Red Cross Hospital between April 2000 and July 2010) were reviewed. The 158 lesions were categorized by location and radiographic features. Pathological and clinical follow-up were used to determine accuracy. Results. The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy was 90.5% overall. Biopsy of metastatic bone disease (98.2%) was significantly more accurate than biopsies of primary tumors (80.9%) and of hematological malignancies (47.0%) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy was significantly higher for the lower thoracic spine (97.6%) than for the middle (90.0%) or upper thoracic spine (80.4%) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.025, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy was significantly higher for lytic lesions (96.4%) than for sclerotic lesions (81.3%) (P < 0.010). The accuracy of biopsies performed using the transpedicular approach (91.0%) was not significantly different from that of biopsies performed using posterolateral approaches (91.5%) (0.25 < P < 0.5). Conclusion. Percutaneous CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy is a viable alternative to open surgical biopsy. The diagnostic accuracy was not affected by any of the variables except for lesion level, histology, and radiographic features

  11. Accuracy of CT-guided biopsies in 158 patients with thoracic spinal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, D.J.; He, B.R.; Liu, T.J.; Zhao, Q.P.; Sun, H.H.; Jiang, Y.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Inconsistent accuracies of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsies have been reported in previous studies. Purpose. To determine the accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy, to compare the results with those previously reported, and to determine if there are any factors that influence the accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy. Material and Methods. In total, 158 consecutive CT-guided percutaneous thoracic spine procedures (performed at the Dept. of Spinal Surgery, Xian Red Cross Hospital between April 2000 and July 2010) were reviewed. The 158 lesions were categorized by location and radiographic features. Pathological and clinical follow-up were used to determine accuracy. Results. The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy was 90.5% overall. Biopsy of metastatic bone disease (98.2%) was significantly more accurate than biopsies of primary tumors (80.9%) and of hematological malignancies (47.0%) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy was significantly higher for the lower thoracic spine (97.6%) than for the middle (90.0%) or upper thoracic spine (80.4%) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.025, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy was significantly higher for lytic lesions (96.4%) than for sclerotic lesions (81.3%) (P < 0.010). The accuracy of biopsies performed using the transpedicular approach (91.0%) was not significantly different from that of biopsies performed using posterolateral approaches (91.5%) (0.25 < P < 0.5). Conclusion. Percutaneous CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy is a viable alternative to open surgical biopsy. The diagnostic accuracy was not affected by any of the variables except for lesion level, histology, and radiographic features

  12. Advancements in robotic-assisted thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenwyk, Brad; Lyerly, Ralph

    2012-12-01

    Advancements in robotic-assisted thoracic surgery present potential advantages for patients as well as new challenges for the anesthesia and surgery teams. This article describes the major aspects of the surgical approach for the most commonly performed robotic-assisted thoracic surgical procedures as well as the pertinent preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative anesthetic concerns. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Upper cervical and upper thoracic thrust manipulation versus nonthrust mobilization in patients with mechanical neck pain: a multicenter randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, James R; Cleland, Joshua A; Waldrop, Mark A; Arnot, Cathy F; Young, Ian A; Turner, Michael; Sigurdsson, Gisli

    2012-01-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To compare the short-term effects of upper cervical and upper thoracic high-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA) thrust manipulation to nonthrust mobilization in patients with neck pain. Although upper cervical and upper thoracic HVLA thrust manipulation and nonthrust mobilization are common interventions for the management of neck pain, no studies have directly compared the effects of both upper cervical and upper thoracic HVLA thrust manipulation to nonthrust mobilization in patients with neck pain. Patients completed the Neck Disability Index, the numeric pain rating scale, the flexion-rotation test for measurement of C1-2 passive rotation range of motion, and the craniocervical flexion test for measurement of deep cervical flexor motor performance. Following the baseline evaluation, patients were randomized to receive either HVLA thrust manipulation or nonthrust mobilization to the upper cervical (C1-2) and upper thoracic (T1-2) spines. Patients were reexamined 48-hours after the initial examination and again completed the outcome measures. The effects of treatment on disability, pain, C1-2 passive rotation range of motion, and motor performance of the deep cervical flexors were examined with a 2-by-2 mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA). One hundred seven patients satisfied the eligibility criteria, agreed to participate, and were randomized into the HVLA thrust manipulation (n = 56) and nonthrust mobilization (n = 51) groups. The 2-by-2 ANOVA demonstrated that patients with mechanical neck pain who received the combination of upper cervical and upper thoracic HVLA thrust manipulation experienced significantly (Ppain (58.5%) than those of the nonthrust mobilization group (12.8% and 12.6%, respectively) following treatment. In addition, the HVLA thrust manipulation group had significantly (Pcervical flexor muscles as compared to the group that received nonthrust mobilization. The number needed to treat to avoid an unsuccessful outcome

  14. Geometric Deformations of the Thoracic Aorta and Supra-Aortic Arch Branch Vessels Following Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullery, Brant W; Suh, Ga-Young; Hirotsu, Kelsey; Zhu, David; Lee, Jason T; Dake, Michael D; Fleischmann, Dominik; Cheng, Christopher P

    2018-04-01

    To utilize 3-D modeling techniques to better characterize geometric deformations of the supra-aortic arch branch vessels and descending thoracic aorta after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Eighteen patients underwent endovascular repair of either type B aortic dissection (n = 10) or thoracic aortic aneurysm (n = 8). Computed tomography angiography was obtained pre- and postprocedure, and 3-D geometric models of the aorta and supra-aortic branch vessels were constructed. Branch angle of the supra-aortic branch vessels and curvature metrics of the ascending aorta, aortic arch, and stented thoracic aortic lumen were calculated both at pre- and postintervention. The left common carotid artery branch angle was lower than the left subclavian artery angles preintervention ( P Supra-aortic branch vessel angulation remains relatively static when proximal landing zones are distal to the left common carotid artery.

  15. Catheter-directed thrombolytic therapy for thoracic deep vein thrombosis is safe and effective in selected patients with and without cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleux, Geert; Marchal, Pieter; Heye, Sam; Vaninbroukx, Johan; Palmers, Marleen; Verhamme, Peter; Verhaeghe, Raymond

    2010-01-01

    To assess the safety, feasibility and efficacy of catheter-directed thrombolysis for thoracic central venous thrombosis in both cancer and non-cancer patients. A retrospective case series of 68 patients, including 35 with active cancer and 33 without cancer, was analysed. They all received catheter-directed thrombolysis with alteplase or urokinase for symptomatic acute major thoracic vein thrombosis. Substantial clot lysis was obtained in 62 out of 68 patients (91%), the results being 88.6 and 93.8% for cancer and non-cancer patients respectively (P = 0.68). The mean infusion time in patients with and without cancer was 2.11 and 1.84 days respectively (P = 0.3259). Procedure-related complications occurred in two cancer patients (8.6%) and in seven non-cancer patients (21%) (P = 0.18). One cancer patient developed a fatal intracranial bleeding. Additional intervention after successful lysis was performed in cancer (n = 18; 51%) as well as in non-cancer patients (n = 29; 88%). Catheter-directed thrombolysis is a feasible and highly effective interventional procedure with an acceptable safety profile in selected patients with and without cancer for the treatment of symptomatic thoracic central venous thrombosis. In most cases, additional endovascular or surgical procedures are required to restore and maintain vessel patency after successful thrombolysis. (orig.)

  16. Transection of the inferior vena cava from blunt thoracic trauma: case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitzman, A B; Udekwu, A O; Pevec, W; Albrink, M

    1989-04-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma is a frequent cause of death in multiple trauma victims. Myocardial rupture may occur in up to 65% of patients who die with thoracic injuries. Two cases are presented with intrapericardial transection of the inferior vena cava, pericardial rupture, and myocardial rupture from blunt thoracic trauma. Both patients died.

  17. Thoracic Aorta 3D Hemodynamics in Pediatric and Young Adult Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, Bradley D.; van Ooij, Pim; Barker, Alex J.; Carr, Maria; Gabbour, Maya; Schnell, Susanne; Jarvis, Kelly B.; Carr, James C.; Markl, Michael; Rigsby, Cynthia; Robinson, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the 3D hemodynamics in the thoracic aorta of pediatric and young adult bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) patients. Methods: 4D flow MRI was performed in 30 pediatric and young adult BAV patients (age: 13.9 +/- 4.4 (range: [3.4, 20.7]) years old, M:F = 17:13) as part of this

  18. Effect of Thoracic Surgeons on Lung Cancer Patients’ Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning LI

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Surgeons are the direct decision-makers and performers in the surgical treatment of patients with lung cancer. Whether the differences among doctors affect the survival of patients is unclear. This study analyzed the five-year survival rates of different thoracic surgeries in patients undergoing surgery to assess the physician's impact and impact. Methods A retrospective analysis of five years between 2002-2007 in the Department of Thoracic Surgery, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, for surgical treatment of lung cancer patients. According to different surgeons grouping doctors to compare the basic information of patients, surgical methods, short-term results and long-term survival differences. Results A total of 712 patients treated by 11 experienced thoracic surgeons were included in this study. The patients have nosignificant difference with gender, age, smoking, pathological type between groups. There were significant differences in clinical staging, surgery type, operation time, blood transfusion rate, number of lymph node dissection, palliative resection rate, postoperative complications and perioperative mortality. There was a significant difference in five-year survival rates among patients treated by different doctors. This difference can be seen in all clinical stage analyzes with consistency. In the multivariate analysis, it was suggested that surgeon was an independent factor influencing the prognosis of patients. Conclusion Thoracic surgeon has a significant effect on the therapeutic effect of lung cancer patients.

  19. Nanotechnology applications in thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofferberth, Sophie C; Grinstaff, Mark W; Colson, Yolonda L

    2016-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging, rapidly evolving field with the potential to significantly impact care across the full spectrum of cancer therapy. Of note, several recent nanotechnological advances show particular promise to improve outcomes for thoracic surgical patients. A variety of nanotechnologies are described that offer possible solutions to existing challenges encountered in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. Nanotechnology-based imaging platforms have the ability to improve the surgical care of patients with thoracic malignancies through technological advances in intraoperative tumour localization, lymph node mapping and accuracy of tumour resection. Moreover, nanotechnology is poised to revolutionize adjuvant lung cancer therapy. Common chemotherapeutic drugs, such as paclitaxel, docetaxel and doxorubicin, are being formulated using various nanotechnologies to improve drug delivery, whereas nanoparticle (NP)-based imaging technologies can monitor the tumour microenvironment and facilitate molecularly targeted lung cancer therapy. Although early nanotechnology-based delivery systems show promise, the next frontier in lung cancer therapy is the development of 'theranostic' multifunctional NPs capable of integrating diagnosis, drug monitoring, tumour targeting and controlled drug release into various unifying platforms. This article provides an overview of key existing and emerging nanotechnology platforms that may find clinical application in thoracic surgery in the near future. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  20. Utility of Chest Computed Tomography after a "Normal" Chest Radiograph in Patients with Thoracic Stab Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Brian M; Plurad, David; Abrishami, Sadaf; Neville, Angela; Putnam, Brant; Kim, Dennis Y

    2015-10-01

    Chest computed tomography (CCT) is used to screen for injuries in hemodynamically stable patients with penetrating injury. We aim to determine the incidence of missed injuries detected on CCT after a negative chest radiograph (CXR) in patients with thoracic stab wounds. A 10-year retrospective review of a Level I trauma center registry was performed on patients with thoracic stab wounds. Patients who were hemodynamically unstable or did not undergo both CXR and CCT were excluded. Patients with a negative CXR were evaluated to determine if additional findings were diagnosed on CCT. Of 386 patients with stab wounds to the chest, 154 (40%) underwent both CXR and CCT. One hundred and fifteen (75%) had a negative screening CXR. CCT identified injuries in 42 patients (37%) that were not seen on CXR. Pneumothorax and/or hemothorax occurred in 40 patients (35%), of which 14 patients underwent tube thoracostomy. Two patients had hemopericardium on CCT and both required operative intervention. Greater than one-third of patients with a normal screening CXR were found to have abnormalities on CCT. Future studies comparing repeat CXR to CCT are required to further define the optimal diagnostic strategy in patients with stab wounds to chest after normal screening CXR.

  1. Effect of different ways of intraoperative lymph node dissection on prognosis of patients with thoracic mid-upper esophageal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Huang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effect of different ways of intraoperative lymph node dissection on prognosis of patients with thoracic mid-upper esophageal carcinoma. Methods: 106 cases of patients with thoracic mid-upper esophageal carcinoma were selected and according to different ways of lymph node dissection, divided into three-field group who received three-field lymph node dissection and two-field group who received two-field lymph node dissection, then serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, nitric oxide (NO, nitric oxide synthase (NOS and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA as well as soluble interleukin-2 receptor (SIL- 2R, keratinized protein fragment 19 (Cyfra21-1 and squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC levels of two groups were compared, and postoperative follow-up was carried out to record disease-free survival rate and overall survival rate. Results: In three-field group, postoperative average serum LDH levels of patients with thoracic upper esophageal carcinoma and thoracic mid esophageal carcinoma were lower than LDH values of corresponding patients in two-field group (P<0.05; postoperative serum NO value of three-field group was higher than that of two-field group, and NOS, CEA and SIL-2R values were lower than those of two-field group (P<0.05; postoperative serum Cyfra21-1 and SCC values of three-field group were lower than those of two-field group (P<0.05; postoperative disease-free survival rate during the followup period of three-field group was higher than that of two-field group, and overall survival rate at corresponding points in time was also higher than that of two-field group (P<0.05. Conclusion: After patients with thoracic mid-upper esophageal carcinoma receive three-field lymph node dissection, levels of serum indexes with poor prognosis and tumor markers were optimized, long-term disease-free survival rate and overall survival rate are improved. It has positive clinical significance.

  2. Emergency Anaesthetic Management of Extensive Thoracic Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H C Chandola

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available High speed vehicles, drug abuse, alcohol and easy availability of handguns are the main reasons of increasing number of trauma especially thoracic trauma. Anaesthesiologist plays an important role in the management of extensive thoracic trauma. Thoracic trauma, penetrating or blunt, may cause damage to organs suspended in thorax viz. pleura, lungs, heart, great vessels, trachea and oesophagus. It may lead to pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade or life threatening haemorrhage. With aggressive care and management of these factors, majority of patients can survive and return to normal life.

  3. Pattern of relapse in surgical treated patients with thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and its possible impact on target delineation for postoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Wenjie; Xin Peiling

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide a reference for determination of the postoperative radiotherapy target volume for thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Background data: The irradiation target volume is important for effective postoperative treatment of thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: One hundred forty patients with recurrent or metastatic thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma who had been treated with radical surgery but not with postoperative radiotherapy were enrolled in this study. The information of locoregional recurrence and distant metastasis for these patients was analyzed. Results: The median time to progression in the 140 patients with recurrence or metastasis was 18.3 months (range 15.4-21.1 months). Anastomotic recurrence accounted for 13.6% of treatment failures. The supraclavicular and station 1-5 and 7 lymph nodes had high metastasis rates for esophageal squamous cell carcinomas in all locations. The order from highest to lowest metastasis rate for the station 3 and 4 lymph nodes was middle, upper and lower thoracic esophageal regions and the order for upper abdominal lymph nodes was lower, middle, and upper thoracic esophageal regions. Locoregional recurrence was the most common type of recurrence. Conclusions: For upper and middle thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, the anastomosis, supraclavicular, and station 1-5 and 7 lymph nodes should be delineated as the postoperative prophylactic irradiation target volume with upper abdominal lymph nodes excluded; for lower thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, anastomosis, supraclavicular, station 1-5 and 7 lymph nodes and upper abdominal lymph nodes should be delineated as the postoperative prophylactic irradiation target volume.

  4. Comparison of British Thoracic Society and American Thoracic Society reintroduction guidelines for anti-tuberculous therapy induced liver injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuberi, B. F.; Alvi, H.; Zuberi, F. F.; Salahuddin, J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of British Thoracic Society and American Thoracic Society guidelines for re-introduction of anti-tuberculous therapy after drug-induced liver injury, and to assess the ease of administration of each guideline on a scale of 1-10. Methods: The randomised prospective interventional study was conducted at the Department of Medicine and Pulmonology, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, from December 2011 to November 2013. Patients with anti-tuberculous therapy drug-induced liver injury were selected. Hepatotoxic anti-tuberculous therapy was stopped and modified anti-tuberculous therapy was started. Patients were followed weekly till clinical and biochemical parameters got stabilised. After stabilisation, the patients were randomised to one of the two groups to receive re-introduction of anti-tuberculous therapy under the guidelines of British Thoracic Society (Group I) or those of American Thoracic Society (Group II). Means of the groups were analysed by Student's t test and proportions were compared by chi-square test. Multivariate analysis was done for age, body mass index and serum albumin for recurrence of drug-induced liver injury after the re-introduction. P value <0.05 was taken as significant. Results: Of the total 325 patients, 163(50.15%) were in Group I, while 162(49.84%) were in Group II. The frequency of recurrence of drug-induced liver injury in Group I was 16 (9.8%) and in Group II it was 18 (11.1%). There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (p<0.7). Age was positively related with drug-induced liver injury, while body mass index and serum albumin were negatively associated. Conclusion: There was no significant difference between the two major guidelines though the American Thoracic Society guideline was easier to follow. (author)

  5. Posterior paramedian subrhomboidal analgesia versus thoracic epidural analgesia for pain control in patients with multiple rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Casey L; Berry, Stepheny; Howard, James; De Ruyter, Martin; Thepthepha, Melissa; Nazir, Niaman; McDonald, Tracy; Dalton, Annemarie; Moncure, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Rib fractures are common in trauma admissions and are associated with an increased risk of pulmonary complications, intensive care unit admissions, and mortality. Providing adequate pain control in patients with multiple rib fractures decreases the risk of adverse events. Thoracic epidural analgesia is currently the preferred method for pain control. This study compared outcomes in patients with multiple acute rib fractures treated with posterior paramedian subrhomboidal (PoPS) analgesia versus thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA). This prospective study included 30 patients with three or more acute rib fractures admitted to a Level I trauma center. Thoracic epidural analgesia or PoPS catheters were placed, and local anesthesia was infused. Data were collected including patients' pain level, adjunct morphine equivalent use, adverse events, length of stay, lung volumes, and discharge disposition. Nonparametric tests were used and two-sided p Pain rating was lower in the PoPS group (2.5 vs. 5; p = 0.03) after initial placement. Overall, there was no other statistically significant difference in pain control or use of oral morphine adjuncts between the groups. Hypotension occurred in eight patients, 75% with TEA and only 25% with PoPS. No difference was found in adverse events, length of stay, lung volumes, or discharge disposition. In patients with rib fractures, PoPS analgesia may provide pain control equivalent to TEA while being less invasive and more readily placed by a variety of hospital staff. This pilot study is limited by its small sample size, and therefore additional studies are needed to prove equivalence of PoPS compared to TEA. Therapeutic study, level IV.

  6. The History of the Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery at Rush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, L Penfield; Liptay, Michael J; Seder, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    The Rush Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery received certification by the American Board of Thoracic Surgery (ABTS) to train thoracic surgical residents in 1962. The outstanding clinical faculty, with nationally recognized technical expertise, was eager to provide resident education. The hallmark of the program has been clinical excellence, dedication to patient care, and outstanding results in complex cardiac, vascular, and general thoracic surgical procedures. A strong commitment to resident education has been carried to the present time. Development of the sternotomy incision, thoracic and abdominal aneurysm repair, carotid endarterectomy, along with valve replacement, have been the hallmark of the section of cardiovascular surgery. Innovation in bronchoplastic lung resection, aggressive approach to thoracic malignancy, and segmental resection for lung cancer identify the section of general thoracic surgery. A total of 131 thoracic residents have been trained by the Rush Thoracic Surgery program, and many achieved their vascular certificate, as well. Their training has been vigorous and, at times, difficult. They carry the Rush thoracic surgical commitment of excellence in clinical surgery and patient care throughout the country, both in practice groups and academic centers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Thoracic Lordosis Correction Improves Sacral Slope and Walking Ability in Neuromuscular Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Yeon; Moon, Eun Su; Park, Jin Oh; Chong, Hyon Su; Lee, Hwan Mo; Moon, Seong Hwan; Kim, Sung Hoon; Kim, Hak Sun

    2016-10-01

    Retrospective study. To report on neuromuscular patients with preserved walking ability, but forward bending of the body due to thoracic lordosis, and to suggest thoracic lordosis correction as the surgical treatment. It is an established fact that lumbar lordosis or pelvic parameter is directly related to thoracic sagittal balance. However, the reverse relationship has not been fully defined yet. Loss of thoracic kyphosis results in positive sagittal balance, which causes walking difficulty. Neuromuscular patients with thoracic lordosis have not been reported yet, and there have been no reports on their surgical treatments. This study analyzed 8 patients treated with thoracic lordosis correction surgery. Every patient was diagnosed with muscular dystrophy. In thoracic lordosis correction surgery, anterior release was performed in the first stage and posterior segmental instrumentation was performed in the second stage. Radiographic parameters were compared and walking ability was evaluated with gait analysis. All patients were classified according to the modified Rancho Los Amigos Hospital system preoperatively and 2 years postoperatively to evaluate functional ability. The average follow-up period was 2.9 years. Before surgery, the mean thoracic sagittal alignment was -2.1-degree lordosis, the mean Cobb angle and sacral slope increased to 36.3 and 56.6 degrees, respectively. The anterior pelvic tilt in gait analysis was 29.3 degrees. At last follow-up after surgery, the mean thoracic sagittal alignment changed to 12.6-degree kyphosis, and the Cobb angle and sacral slope decreased to 18.9 and 39.5 degrees, respectively. Lumbar lordosis and the sacral slope showed significant positive correlation (Plordosis showed a significant correlation to the preoperative flexibility of the major curve (P=0.028). The anterior pelvic tilt in gait analysis improved to 15.4 degrees. The functional ability improved in 2 (50%) of 4 patients in class 2 and maintained in remaining 6

  8. Managment of thoracic empyema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, M M; Subramanian, V; Berger, R L

    1977-04-01

    Over a ten year period, 102 patients with thoracic empyemata were treated at Boston City Hospital. Only three patients died from the pleural infection while twenty-six succumbed to the associated diseases. Priniciples of management include: (1) thoracentesis; (2) antibiotics; (3) closed-tube thoracostomy; (4) sinogram; (5) open drainage; (6) empyemectomy and decortication in selected patients; and (7) bronchoscopy and barium swallow when the etiology is uncertain.

  9. Lower thoracic degenerative spondylithesis with concomitant lumbar spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Po-Chuan; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Chen, Jyi-Feng

    2014-03-01

    Degenerative spondylolisthesis of the spine is less common in the lower thoracic region than in the lumbar and cervical regions. However, lower thoracic degenerative spondylolisthesis may develop secondary to intervertebral disc degeneration. Most of our patients are found to have concomitant lumbar spondylosis. By retrospective review of our cases, current diagnosis and treatments for this rare disease were discussed. We present a series of 5 patients who experienced low back pain, progressive numbness, weakness and even paraparesis. Initially, all of them were diagnosed with lumbar spondylosis at other clinics, and 1 patient had even received prior decompressive lumbar surgery. However, their symptoms continued to progress, even after conservative treatments or lumbar surgeries. These patients also showed wide-based gait, increased deep tendon reflex (DTR), and urinary difficulty. All these clinical presentations could not be explained solely by lumbar spondylosis. Thoracolumbar spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), neurophysiologic studies such as motor evoked potential (MEP) or somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP), and dynamic thoracolumbar lateral radiography were performed, and a final diagnosis of lower thoracic degenerative spondylolisthesis was made. Bilateral facet effusions, shown by hyperintense signals in T2 MRI sequence, were observed in all patients. Neurophysiologic studies revealed conduction defect of either MEP or SSEP. One patient refused surgical management because of personal reasons. However, with the use of thoracolumbar orthosis, his symptoms/signs stabilized, although partial lower leg myelopathy was present. The other patients received surgical decompression in association with fixation/fusion procedures performed for managing the thoracolumbar lesions. Three patients became symptom-free, whereas in 1 patient, paralysis set in before the operation; this patient was able to walk with assistance 6 months after surgical decompression

  10. Permanent interstitial implantation of 125Iodine seed for thoracic malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zhongheng; Qian Yongyue; Wu Jinchang; Liu Zengli

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To observe effect of 125 Iodine sed on interstitial brachytherapy of patient with thoracic malignant tumor. Methods: 125 Iodine seed were inserted into the target tissue and permanent left there for brachytherapy in 6 cases of thoracic malignant tumors, which including lung cancer, Pancoast's tumour, mediastinal malignant schwannoma. Results: All cases were rehabilitated shortly after operation. The implanted lesions remained controlled now and in dead patients. No radiation-related and 125 Iodine seed-related complications occurred. Conclusion: Brachytherapy by implantation of 125 Iodine seeds of remained tumor tissue in patients with thoracic malignant tumor after operation has a satisfactory outcome. This therapy can control local recurrent of thoracic malignant tumor. But the results in long term should be studied further

  11. Patient safety in thoracic surgery and European Society of Thoracic Surgeons checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Nuria M

    2015-04-01

    Improving patient safety seems to be a new interesting clinical subject but, in fact, it is no new. It has to do with one of the oldest ethical principles of our profession: curing and not harming. The important research that has been done in a short period of time has brought in new insight to this complex area that is fast developing. The creation of safety managing systems will allow coordinating efforts from very different, although complementary, areas to create real safety culture and safety climate in every organization. In the surgical settings, teamwork is basic to provide good quality of care. Safety leaders in every team have an important role in establishing priorities, summarizing proposals, coordinating efforts, launching new initiatives and transmitting that safety efforts are worth taken. Preparedness and anticipation are key points for avoiding most of the diverse types of patient harm that can occur. As has been published, a great number of errors can be avoided simply using crosscheck based on specialized checklist that reviews every important detail of the procedure. This strategy has been demonstrated very useful at other high risk industries such as aviation, nuclear or food management. The Safe Surgery Saves Lives program launched in 2002 by the WHO has taught us that improvement is possible using a simple checklist. More complex and detail checklist can be more adequate for more complex procedures and settings. The proposed ESTS checklist reviews different areas of possible error in deeper detail allowing the finest adjustment of the patient before the skin incision. It has been recently released to the general thoracic community and monitors its use and usefulness has to be warrantied.

  12. MR imaging of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanase, Mitsuhiro; Yone, Kazunori; Taketomi, Eiji; Kawaida, Hidefumi; Sakou, Takashi (Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1992-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images from consecutive 100 patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) were retrospectively reviewed to determine MR manifestations of OPLL foci (ossificated foci) and the surrounding tissue. MR images from 50 patients with cervical spondylosis served as controls for comparison. Inside ossificated foci were isointense or hyperintense on T1-weighted images in 43% of the OPLL cases and on T2-weighted images in 38%. According to X-ray proven ossification form, both T1- and T2-weighted images showed isointensity or hyperintensity in approximately half of the cases of continuous and mixed types of ossificated foci. Two characteristic morphologies of cervical disc were seen more frequently in OPLL than cervical spondylosis, which has clinical implication for continuously proliferated fibrocartilage in the cervical disc. Hypertrophy of the posterior longitudinal ligament was seen in 7% of OPLL cases on MR images, reflecting the likelihood of precursor condition of ossification. (N.K.).

  13. Comparison of contrast and noncontrast magnetic resonance angiography for quantitative analysis of thoracic arteries in young patients with congenital heart defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqua Alessia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Contrast MRA (C-MRA is the standard for quantitative analysis of thoracic vessels. We evaluated a noncontrast MRA (NC-MRA sequence (3-D EKG and navigator-gated SSFP for quantitative evaluation of the thoracic aorta and branch pulmonary arteries in young patients with congenital heart disease. Objective : To compare contrast and noncontrast magnetic resonance angiography for quantitative analysis of thoracic arteries in young patients with congenital heart defects. Methods : Measurements of thoracic aorta and branch pulmonary arteries were obtained from C-MRA and NC-MRA images in 51 patients, ages 2-35 years. Vessel diameters were compared using correlation and Bland-Altman analysis. Interobserver variability was assessed using percent variation. Results : C-MRA and NC-MRA measurements were highly correlated (r = 0.91-0.98 except for the right pulmonary artery (r = 0.74, 0.78. Agreement of measurements was excellent (mean difference -0.07 to -0.53 mm; mean % difference -1.8 to -4.9% except for the right pulmonary artery which was less good (mean difference 0.73, -1.38 mm; -3, -10%. Interobserver variability ranged from 5% to 8% for aortic and from 10% to 16% for pulmonary artery measures. The worse agreement and greater variability of the pulmonary artery measures appears due to difficulty standardizing the measurements in patients with abnormal and irregular vessels. Conclusion : These data indicate that C-MRA and NC-MRA measures are comparable and could be used interchangeably, avoiding administration of contrast in selected patients.

  14. MR imaging of the thoracic aorta in patients with Marfan syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommerhoff, B.A.; Sechtem, U.P.; Schiller, N.B.; Higgins, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    Gated MR imaging was used to evaluate the thoracic aorta in 11 with Marfan syndrome, eight patients with aneurysm of the ascending aorta, and 20 healthy subjects. The aortic diameter was measured on transverse and sagittal images at the levels of the sinuses of Valsalva, the caudal portion of the ascending aorta, the prearch region, the middle arch, and the descending aorta. The sinus of Valsalva-prearch region aortic diameter ratio in patients with Marfan syndrome was significantly greater than in the two other groups, indicating the characteristic shape of the Maranoid aorta. MR imaging allows definitive measurements' of aortic dimensions and is a valuable noninvasive method for monitoring the course of aortic enlargement

  15. Thoracic paravertebral block versus intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for pain treatment in patients with multiple rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeying, Ge; Liyong, Yuan; Yuebo, Chen; Yu, Zhang; Guangao, Ye; Weihu, Ma; Liujun, Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Objectives To assess the effect of thoracic paravertebral block (PVB) on pain management and preservation of pulmonary function compared with intravenous, patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA) in patients with multiple rib fractures (MRFs). Methods Ninety patients with unilateral MRFs were included in this prospective study and randomly assigned to the TPVB or IVPCA group. The visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score, blood gas analysis, and bedside spirometry were measured and recorded at different time points after analgesia. Results TPVB and IVPCA provided good pain relief. VAS scores were significantly lower in the TPVB group than in the IVPCA group at rest and during coughing ( P pain relief and preservation of pulmonary function in patients with MRFs.

  16. Mead acid (20:3n-9) and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are not associated with risk of posterior longitudinal ligament ossification: results of a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamazaki, Kei; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu; Nakano, Masato; Yasuda, Taketoshi; Seki, Shoji; Hori, Takeshi; Hamazaki, Tomohito; Kimura, Tomoatsu

    2015-05-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) involves the replacement of ligamentous tissue with ectopic bone. Although genetics and heritability appear to be involved in the development of OPLL, its pathogenesis remains to be elucidated. Given previous findings that 5,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid [20:3n-9, Mead acid (MA)] has depressive effects on osteoblastic activity and anti-angiogenic effects, and that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have a preventive effect on heterotopic ossification, we hypothesized that both fatty acids would be involved in OPLL development. To examine the biological significance of these and other fatty acids in OPLL, we conducted this case-control study involving 106 patients with cervical OPLL and 109 age matched controls. Fatty acid composition was determined from plasma samples by gas chromatography. Associations between fatty acid levels and incident OPLL were evaluated by logistic regression. Contrary to our expectations, we found no significant differences between patients and controls in the levels of MA or n-3 PUFAs (e.g., eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid). Logistic regression analysis did not reveal any associations with OPLL risk for MA or n-3 PUFAs. In conclusion, no potential role was found for MA or n-3 PUFAs in ectopic bone formation in the spinal canal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ball tip method for thoracic pedicle screw placement in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kota; Matsumoto, Morio; Iizuka, Shingo

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of ball tip method for thoracic pedicle screw placements in idiopathic scoliosis patients. 24 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were included in this study. Conventional method was performed in 12 patients. Ball tip method was performed in 12 patients. Accuracy of the pedicle screw placement was evaluated based on the postoperative CT. In the ball tip method, a probe which was consisted of ball tip with flexible shaft was used. After removing of cortical bone at a starting point, the probe was inserted manually or sometimes with gently tapping by hammer. During the maneuver, the probe will gradually progress into cancellous bone in the pedicle, without perforating cortical bone in the pedicle. Following expansion of the hole by a rigid gear shift probe, screw was placed in the pedicle. 65.1% of screws were located within pedicle in the conventional group and 86.5% in the ball tip group. 5.3% of screws were located out of pedicle within 2 mm in the conventional group and 8.2% in the ball tip group. 15.8% of screws were located out of pedicle beyond 2 mm and 1.8% in the ball tip group. The ball tip method enhanced the accuracy of thoracic pedicle screw placements in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients. The ball tip method may be effective for accurate pedicle screw placement in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. (author)

  18. Rib fractures in blunt chest trauma - associated thoracic injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iv. Dimitrov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE. The aim of our retrospective study was to analyze the patterns of associated thoracic injuries in patients underwent blunt chest trauma and rib fractures. METHODS. The study included 212 patients with rib fractures due to blunt thoracic trauma. The mechanism of trauma, the type of rib fracture and the type of associated injuries were analyzed. RESULTS. The patients were divided in two groups according to the number of fractured ribs-group I included the patients with up to two fractured ribs (72 patients-33,9%, and group II – with ≥3 fractured ribs (140 patients-66,1%. Associated chest injuries were present in 36 of the patients from group I (50%, and in 133 patients from group II (95%. Pulmonary contusion was the most common intrathoracicinjurie-65,6% of the cases. The mean hospital stay was 8, 7 days. The lethality rate was 16,9% -all of them due to the associated chest injuries. CONCLUSIONS. The mortality related to rib fractures is affected by the associated thoracic injuries, the advanced age, and the number of fractured ribs.

  19. [Contribution of Perioperative Oral Health Care and Management for Patients who Underwent General Thoracic Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hajime; Minamiya, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Due to the recent advances in radiological diagnostic technology, the role of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in thoracic disease has expanded, surgical indication extended to the elderly patients. Cancer patients receiving surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy may encounter complications in conjunction with the oral cavity such as aspiration pneumonia, surgical site infection and various type of infection. Recently, it is recognized that oral health care management is effective to prevent the postoperative infectious complications, especially pneumonia. Therefore, oral management should be scheduled before start of therapy to prevent these complications as supportive therapy of the cancer treatment. In this background, perioperative oral function management is highlighted in the remuneration for dental treatment revision of 2012,and the importance of oral care has been recognized in generally. In this manuscript, we introduce the several opinions and evidence based on the recent previous reports about the perioperative oral health care and management on thoracic surgery.

  20. The association between incentive spirometry performance and pain in postoperative thoracic epidural analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David J; Hilliard, Paul E; Jewell, Elizabeth S; Brummett, Chad M

    2015-01-01

    Effective use of postoperative incentive spirometry improves patient outcomes but is limited by pain after thoracic and upper abdominal surgery. Thoracic epidurals are frequently used to provide analgesia and attenuate postoperative pulmonary dysfunction. We hypothesized that, in patients with thoracic epidurals for thoracic and abdominal surgery, high pain scores would be associated with poorer incentive spirometry performance, even when accounting for other variables. Retrospective study of 468 patients who underwent upper abdominal or thoracic surgery using postoperative thoracic epidural analgesia between June 1, 2009, and August 31, 2013, at a single tertiary academic center. The association between incentive spirometry performance and pain was assessed as the primary outcome. Other independent predictors of incentive spirometry performance were also identified. Postoperative incentive spirometry performance was found to be inversely proportional to pain score, which correlated significantly stronger with deep breathing pain compared with pain at rest (-0.33 vs -0.14 on postoperative day 1; -0.23 vs -0.12 on postoperative day 2). Pain with deep breathing was independently associated with poorer incentive spirometry performance in the multivariable linear regression model (P spirometry performance could be used as another indicator of thoracic epidural efficacy. This may be particularly useful in patients reporting high pain scores postoperatively.

  1. Prospective Evaluation of Thoracic Ultrasound in the Detection of Pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, K. W.; Hamilton, D. R.; Kirkpatrick, A. W.; Billica, R. D.; Williams, D. R.; Diebel, L. N.; Sargysan, A. E.; Dulchavsky, S. A.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: Pneumothorax (PTX) occurs commonly in trauma patients and is confirmed by examination and radiography. Thoracic ultrasound (VIS) has been suggested as an alternative method for rapidly diagnosing PTX when X-ray is unavailable as in rural, military, or space flight settings; however, its accuracy and specificity are not known. Methods: We evaluated the accuracy of thoracic U/S detection of PTX compared to radiography in stable, emergency patients with a high suspicion of PTX at a Level-l trauma center over a 6-month period. Following University and NASA Institutional Review Board approval, informed consent was obtained from patients with penetrating or blunt chest trauma, or with a history consistent with PTX. Whenever possible, the presence or absence of the " lung sliding" sign or the "comet tail" artifact were determined by U/S in both hemithoraces by residents instructed in thoracic U/S before standard radiologic verification of PTX. Results were recorded on data sheets for comparison to standard radiography. Results: Thoracic VIS had a 94% sensitivity; two PTX could not be reliably diagnosed due to subcutaneous air; the true negative rate was 100%. In one patient, the VIS exam was positive while X ray did not confirm PTX; a follow-up film 1 hour later demonstrated a small PTX. The average time for bilateral thoracic VIS examination was 2 to 3 minutes. Conclusions: Thoracic ultrasound reliably diagnoses pneumothorax. Presence of the "lung sliding" sign conclusively excludes pneumothorax. Expansion of the FAST examination to include the thorax should be investigated.

  2. Indian hedgehog signaling promotes chondrocyte differentiation in enchondral ossification in human cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Daisuke; Yayama, Takafumi; Uchida, Kenzo; Kokubo, Yasuo; Nakajima, Hideaki; Yamagishi, Atsushi; Takeura, Naoto; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2013-10-15

    Histological, immunohistochemical, and immunoblot analyses of the expression of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling in human cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). To examine the hypothesis that Ihh signaling in correlation with Sox9 and parathyroid-related peptide hormone (PTHrP) facilitates chondrocyte differentiation in enchondral ossification process in human cervical OPLL. In enchondral ossification, certain transcriptional factors regulate cell differentiation. OPLL is characterized by overexpression of these factors and disturbance of the normal cell differentiation process. Ihh signaling is essential for enchondral ossification, especially in chondrocyte hypertrophy. Samples of ossified ligaments were harvested from 45 patients who underwent anterior cervical decompressive surgery for symptomatic OPLL, and 6 control samples from patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy/radiculopathy without OPLL. The harvested sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and toluidine blue, examined by transmission electron microscopy, and immunohistochemically stained for Ihh, PTHrP, Sox9, type X, XI collagen, and alkaline phosphatase. Immunoblot analysis was performed in cultured cells derived from the posterior longitudinal ligaments in the vicinity of the ossified plaque and examined for the expression of these factors. The ossification front in OPLL contained chondrocytes at various differentiation stages, including proliferating chondrocytes in fibrocartilaginous area, hypertrophic chondrocytes around the calcification front, and apoptotic chondrocytes near the ossified area. Immunoreactivity for Ihh and Sox9 was evident in proliferating chondrocytes and was strongly positive for PTHrP in hypertrophic chondrocytes. Mesenchymal cells with blood vessel formation were positive for Ihh, PTHrP, and Sox9. Cultured cells from OPLL tissues expressed significantly higher levels of Ihh, PTHrP, and Sox9 than those in non-OPLL cells. Our results

  3. Thoracic Duct Injury Following Cervical Spine Surgery: A Multicenter Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshan, Adeeb; Lubelski, Daniel; Steinmetz, Michael P; Corriveau, Mark; Lee, Sungho; Pace, Jonathan R; Smith, Gabriel A; Gokaslan, Ziya; Bydon, Mohamad; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Riew, K Daniel; Mroz, Thomas E

    2017-04-01

    Multicenter retrospective case series. To determine the rate of thoracic duct injury during cervical spine operations. A retrospective case series study was conducted among 21 high-volume surgical centers to identify instances of thoracic duct injury during anterior cervical spine surgery. Staff at each center abstracted data for each identified case into case report forms. All case report forms were collected by the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network Methodological Core for data processing, cleaning, and analysis. Of a total of 9591 patients reviewed that underwent cervical spine surgery, 2 (0.02%) incurred iatrogenic injury to the thoracic duct. Both patients underwent a left-sided anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. The interruption of the thoracic duct was addressed intraoperatively in one patient with no residual postoperative effects. The second individual developed a chylous fluid collection approximately 2 months after the operation that required drainage via needle aspiration. Damage to the thoracic duct during cervical spine surgery is a relatively rare occurrence. Rapid identification of the disruption of this lymphatic vessel is critical to minimize deleterious effects of this complication.

  4. Predictive factors for cerebrovascular accidents after thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscalco, Giovanni; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Tozzi, Matteo; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Carrafiello, Giampaolo; Sala, Andrea; Castelli, Patrizio

    2009-12-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents are devastating and worrisome complications after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. The aim of this study was to determine cerebrovascular accident predictors after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Between January 2001 and June 2008, 76 patients treated with thoracic endovascular aortic repair were prospectively enrolled. The study cohort included 61 men; mean age was 65.4 +/- 16.8 years. All patients underwent a specific neurologic assessment on an hourly basis postoperatively to detect neurologic deficits. Cerebrovascular accidents were diagnosed on the basis of physical examination, tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging, or autopsy. Cerebrovascular accidents occurred in 8 (10.5%) patients, including 4 transient ischemic attack and 4 major strokes. Four cases were observed within the first 24-hours. Multivariable analysis revealed that anatomic incompleteness of the Willis circle (odds ratio [OR] 17.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.10 to 140.66), as well as the presence of coronary artery disease (OR 6.86, 95 CI% 1.18 to 40.05), were independently associated with postoperative cerebrovascular accident development. Overall hospital mortality was 9.2%, with no significant difference for patients hit by cerebrovascular accidents (25.0% vs 7.3%, p = 0.102). Preexisting coronary artery disease, reflecting a severe diseased aorta and anomalies of Willis circle are independent cerebrovascular accident predictors after thoracic endovascular aortic repair procedures. A careful evaluation of the arch vessels and cerebral vascularization should be mandatory for patients suitable for thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

  5. Use of thoracic spine thrust manipulation for neck pain and headache in a patient following multiple-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatori, Renata; Rowe, Robert H; Osborne, Raine; Beneciuk, Jason M

    2014-06-01

    Case report. Thoracic spine thrust manipulation has been shown to be an effective intervention for individuals experiencing mechanical neck pain. The patient was a 46-year-old woman referred to outpatient physical therapy 2 months following multiple-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. At initial evaluation, primary symptoms consisted of frequent headaches, neck pain, intermittent referred right elbow pain, and muscle fatigue localized to the right cervical and upper thoracic spine regions. Initial examination findings included decreased passive joint mobility of the thoracic spine, limited cervical range of motion, and limited right shoulder strength. Outcome measures consisted of the numeric pain rating scale, the Neck Disability Index, and the global rating of change scale. Treatment consisted of a combination of manual therapy techniques aimed at the thoracic spine, therapeutic exercises for the upper quarter, and patient education, including a home exercise program, over a 6-week episode of care. Immediate reductions in cervical-region pain (mean ± SD, 2.0 ± 1.1) and headache (2.0 ± 1.3) intensity were reported every treatment session immediately following thoracic spine thrust manipulation. At discharge, the patient reported 0/10 cervical pain and headache symptoms during all work-related activities. From initial assessment to discharge, Neck Disability Index scores improved from 46% to 16%, with an associated global rating of change scale score of +7 ("a very great deal better"). This case report describes the immediate and short-term clinical outcomes for a patient presenting with symptoms of neck pain and headache following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion surgical intervention. Clinical rationale and patient preference aided the decision to incorporate thoracic spine thrust manipulation as a treatment for this patient. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 4.

  6. Teaching practices of thoracic epidural catheterizations in different grade of anesthesia residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Alagoz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In this study, we aimed to clarify the importance of residency grade and other factors which influence the success of thoracic epidural catheterization in thoracotomy patients. METHODS: After the ethical committee approval, data were recorded retrospectively from the charts of 415 patients. All patients had given written informed consent. The thoracic epidural catheterization attempts were divided into two groups as second-third year (Group I and fourth year (Group II according to residency grade. We retrospectively collected demographic data, characteristics of thoracic epidural catheterization attempts, and all difficulties and complications during thoracic epidural catheterization. RESULTS: Overall success rate of thoracic epidural catheterization was similar between the groups. Levels of catheter placement, number and duration of thoracic epidural catheterization attempts were not different between the groups (p > 0.05. Change of needle insertion level was statistically higher in Group II (p = 0.008, whereas paresthesia was significantly higher in Group I (p = 0.007. Dural puncture and postdural puncture headache rates were higher in Group I. Higher body mass index and level of the insertion site were significant factors for thoracic epidural catheterization failure and postoperative complication rate and those were independence from residents' experience (p < 0.001, 0.005. CONCLUSION: Body mass index and level of insertion site were significant on thoracic epidural catheterization failure and postoperative complication rate. We think that residents' grade is not a significant factor in terms overall success rate of thoracic epidural catheterization, but it is important for outcome of these procedures.

  7. Comminuted fracture of the thoracic spine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cashman, J P

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Road deaths fell initially after the introduction of the penalty points but despite this, the rate of spinal injuries remained unchanged. AIMS: We report a patient with a dramatic spinal injury, though without neurological deficit. We discuss the classification, management and economic impact of these injuries. METHODS: We describe the management of a patient with a comminuted thoracic spinal fracture without neurological injury. We conducted a literature review with regard to the availability of literature of the management of these injuries. RESULTS: This 17-year-old female was managed surgically and had a good functional outcome. There is no clear consensus in the published literature on the management of these injuries. CONCLUSIONS: Comminuted thoracic spinal factures are potentially devastating. Such a patient presents challenges in determining the appropriate treatment.

  8. Choice of surgical approach for ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament in combination with cervical disc hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hai-song; Chen, De-yu; Lu, Xu-hua; Yang, Li-li; Yan, Wang-jun; Yuan, Wen; Chen, Yu

    2010-03-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is a common spinal disorder that presents with or without cervical myelopathy. Furthermore, there is evidence suggesting that OPLL often coexists with cervical disc hernia (CDH), and that the latter is the more important compression factor. To raise the awareness of CDH in OPLL for spinal surgeons, we performed a retrospective study on 142 patients with radiologically proven OPLL who had received surgery between January 2004 and January 2008 in our hospital. Plain radiograph, three-dimensional computed tomography construction (3D CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine were all performed. Twenty-six patients with obvious CDH (15 of segmental-type, nine of mixed-type, two of continuous-type) were selected via clinical and radiographic features, and intraoperative findings. By MRI, the most commonly involved level was C5/6, followed by C3/4, C4/5, and C6/7. The areas of greatest spinal cord compression were at the disc levels because of herniated cervical discs. Eight patients were decompressed via anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), 13 patients via anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF), and five patients via ACDF combined with posterior laminectomy and fusion. The outcomes were all favorable. In conclusion, surgeons should consider the potential for CDH when performing spinal cord decompression and deciding the surgical approach in patients presenting with OPLL.

  9. Initial thoracic involvement in lymphoma. CT assessment; Afectacion toracica inicial en el linfom. Valoracion con TC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustos, A.; Corredoira, J.; Ferreiros, J.; Cabeza, B.; Jorquera, M.; Pedrosa, I.; Martinez, R.; Fernandez, C. [Hospital Clinico San Carlos. Madrid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    To analyze the initial thoracic involvement by CT in a consecutive series of patients with lymphoma. A retrospective analysis was made of thoracic CT studies made at the time of diagnosis of 259 patients with lymphoma. Mediastinal pulmonary, pleural, pericardial and chest wall involvement was assessed by CT. Of 259 patients (129 men y 130 women), 56 had Hodgkin's disease (HD) and 203 had non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Forty-two percent (42.5%, 110/259) of the patients had chest involvement on CT: 33 of 56 patients with HD (58.9%) and 77 of 203 patients with NHL (37.9%). All the patients with thoracic HD and 71.4% of patients with thoracic NHL, had mediastinal lymph node involvement. of the patients with thoracic involvement 12.1% (4/33) of the patient with HD and 23.3% (18/77) of the patients with NHL had pulmonary involvement. Thoracic involvement on CT was more frequent in HD. Mediastinal lymph node involvement was the most common finding fundamentally in HD. Pulmonary disease always occurred in the presence of mediastinal lymph node involvement in HD but could occur as an isolated finding in NHL. (Author) 24 refs.

  10. Profile of thoracic injury at College of Medical Sciences Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Chapagain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Thoracic injury is a challenge to the thoracic surgeon practicing in developing countries. This prospective study was conducted to see the mode of injury, injury types and overall outcome of thoracic injury in our settings. Materials and methods: This prospective study was conducted in 100 thoracic injury patients between December 2011 to June 2012. The demographic features, type of the trauma, radiological assessment, associated organ injuries, management of the injury, surgical interventions, morbidity, mortality, length of hospital stay were analysed. Results: In this study the ages ranged from 7 to 84 years. There were 73 (73% males and 27 (27% females. The majority of patients (83% were injured during the evening and night time. The majority of patients 92(92% sustained blunt chest injuries. The mechanism of injury was not significantly associated with length of hospital stay (P > 0.05 and mortality (P > 0.05.Road traffic accident was the most common cause of injuries affecting 68(68% of patients followed by fall injury of 19(19%. Rib fractures, haemothorax, pneumothorax and lung contusion were the most common type of injuries accounting for 83.0%, 57%,34% and 33% respectively. Associated extra-thoracic injuries were noted in 64.0% of patients. 45(45% of the cases of haemothorax, pneumotharax and haemopneumothorax were treated by tube thoracotomy. Four patients (04% had undergone thoracotomy. There were 09(09% patients of flail chest and treated conservatively. Fourty six patients (46% were admitted in the ICU. Eleven (11% patients were treated with ventilator support. Seventeen (17% patients had complication. The overall length of hospital stay ranged from 0 to 25 days. Conclusion: Road traffic accidents and fall from height are the major public health problems. Preventive measures at reducing road traffic accidents and timely management with closed tube thoracotomy are the main factors to be considered in the thoracic

  11. Impact of thoracic radiotherapy timing in limited-stage small-cell lung cancer: usefulness of the individual patient data meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ruysscher, D; Lueza, B; Le Péchoux, C; Johnson, D H; O'Brien, M; Murray, N; Spiro, S; Wang, X; Takada, M; Lebeau, B; Blackstock, W; Skarlos, D; Baas, P; Choy, H; Price, A; Seymour, L; Arriagada, R; Pignon, J-P

    2016-10-01

    Chemotherapy (CT) combined with radiotherapy is the standard treatment of 'limited-stage' small-cell lung cancer. However, controversy persists over the optimal timing of thoracic radiotherapy and CT. We carried out a meta-analysis of individual patient data in randomized trials comparing earlier versus later radiotherapy, or shorter versus longer radiotherapy duration, as defined in each trial. We combined the results from trials using the stratified log-rank test to calculate pooled hazard ratios (HRs). The primary outcome was overall survival. Twelve trials with 2668 patients were eligible. Data from nine trials comprising 2305 patients were available for analysis. The median follow-up was 10 years. When all trials were analysed together, 'earlier or shorter' versus 'later or longer' thoracic radiotherapy did not affect overall survival. However, the HR for overall survival was significantly in favour of 'earlier or shorter' radiotherapy among trials with a similar proportion of patients who were compliant with CT (defined as having received 100% or more of the planned CT cycles) in both arms (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.69-0.91), and in favour of 'later or longer' radiotherapy among trials with different rates of CT compliance (HR 1.19, 1.05-1.34, interaction test, P < 0.0001). The absolute gain between 'earlier or shorter' versus 'later or longer' thoracic radiotherapy in 5-year overall survival for similar and for different CT compliance trials was 7.7% (95% CI 2.6-12.8%) and -2.2% (-5.8% to 1.4%), respectively. However, 'earlier or shorter' thoracic radiotherapy was associated with a higher incidence of severe acute oesophagitis than 'later or longer' radiotherapy. 'Earlier or shorter' delivery of thoracic radiotherapy with planned CT significantly improves 5-year overall survival at the expense of more acute toxicity, especially oesophagitis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights

  12. Thoracic manifestation of Wegener's granulomatosis: CT findings in 30 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Eun A.; Fujimoto, Kiminori; Moriya, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Tateishi, Ukihide; Ashizawa, Kazuoto; Johkoh, Takeshi; Kwon, O. Jung

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to describe the CT findings of thoracic Wegener's granulomatosis. At presentation, both conventional and thin-section CT scans were available in 30 patients with Wegener's granulomatosis. Serial CT scans (range of intervals: 1-25 months, mean 4.5 months) were available in 20 patients. The initial and follow-up CT scans were analyzed retrospectively by two observers in terms of pattern and extent of parenchymal and airway lesions. Positive CT findings were seen in 29 of 30 (97%) patients at initial presentation. The most common pattern was nodules or masses seen in 27 of 30 (90%) patients. They were multiple in 23 of 27 (85%) patients, bilateral in 18 (67%), subpleural in 24 (89%), and peribronchovascular in 11 (41%) in distribution. Bronchial wall thickening in the segmental or subsegmental bronchi was seen in 22 (73%) patients. Large airways were also abnormal in 9 (30%) patients. Patchy areas of consolidation and ground-glass opacity were seen in 7 (23%) patients, respectively. In 17 of 20 (85%) patients in whom follow-up CT scans were available, the parenchymal or airway lesion showed complete or partial improvement with treatment. The CT findings of Wegener's granulomatosis, although multiple and variable, consist mainly of bilateral subpleural or peribronchovascular nodules or masses and bronchial wall thickening in the segmental or subsegmental bronchi. Parenchymal and airway lesions improve with treatment in most patients. (orig.)

  13. Enhanced Recovery in Thoracic Surgery: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna D. Dinic

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of enhanced recovery program after thoracic surgery is to minimize stress response, reduce postoperative pulmonary complications, and improve patient outcome, which will in addition decrease hospital stay and reduce hospital costs. As minimally invasive technique, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery represents an important element of enhanced recovery program in thoracic surgery. Anesthetic management during preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative period is essential for the enhanced recovery. In the era of enhanced recovery protocols, non-intubated thoracoscopic procedures present a step forward. This article focuses on the key elements of the enhanced recovery program in thoracic surgery. Having reviewed recent literature, the authors highlight potential procedures and techniques that might be incorporated into the program.

  14. Neurological Complications Following Endoluminal Repair of Thoracic Aortic Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, J. P.; Taylor, P. R.; Bell, R. E.; Chan, Y. C.; Sabharwal, T.; Carrell, T. W. G.; Reidy, J. F.

    2007-01-01

    Open surgery for thoracic aortic disease is associated with significant morbidity and the reported rates for paraplegia and stroke are 3%-19% and 6%-11%, respectively. Spinal cord ischemia and stroke have also been reported following endoluminal repair. This study reviews the incidence of paraplegia and stroke in a series of 186 patients treated with thoracic stent grafts. From July 1997 to September 2006, 186 patients (125 men) underwent endoluminal repair of thoracic aortic pathology. Mean age was 71 years (range, 17-90 years). One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated electively and 58 patients had urgent procedures. Anesthesia was epidural in 131, general in 50, and local in 5 patients. Seven patients developed paraplegia (3.8%; two urgent and five elective). All occurred in-hospital apart from one associated with severe hypotension after a myocardial infarction at 3 weeks. Four of these recovered with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. One patient with paraplegia died and two had permanent neurological deficit. The rate of permanent paraplegia and death was 1.6%. There were seven strokes (3.8%; four urgent and three elective). Three patients made a complete recovery, one had permanent expressive dysphasia, and three died. The rate of permanent stroke and death was 2.1%. Endoluminal treatment of thoracic aortic disease is an attractive alternative to open surgery; however, there is still a risk of paraplegia and stroke. Permanent neurological deficits and death occurred in 3.7% of the patients in this series. We conclude that prompt recognition of paraplegia and immediate insertion of a CSF drain can be an effective way of recovering spinal cord function and improving the prognosis

  15. Haemothorax and Thoracic Spine Fractures in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Masteller

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Both osteoporotic fractures and pleural effusions are frequently observed in medicine. However, rarely does one associate a hemorrhagic pleural effusion with a thoracic spinal fracture when the patient has not sustained massive trauma. In this paper, we discuss two cases where seemingly insignificant low-energy trauma precipitated massive haemothoraces in elderly patients with underlying osteoporosis, ultimately resulting in their immediate causes of death. This paper serves to remind health care professionals of the importance of using caution when moving elderly patients as well as to consider thoracic spinal fracture as a potential explanation for a hemorrhagic pleural effusion of undetermined etiology.

  16. False localizing sign of cervico-thoracic CSF leak in spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schievink, Wouter I; Maya, M Marcel; Chu, Ray M; Moser, Franklin G

    2015-06-16

    Spontaneous spinal CSF leaks are an important cause of new-onset headaches. Such leaks are reported to be particularly common at the cervico-thoracic junction. The authors undertook a study to determine the significance of these cervico-thoracic CSF leaks. The patient population consisted of a consecutive group of 13 patients who underwent surgery for CSF leak repair based on CT myelography showing CSF extravasation at the cervico-thoracic junction but without any evidence of an underlying structural lesion. The mean age of the 9 women and 4 men was 41.2 years. Extensive extrathecal longitudinal CSF collections were demonstrated in 11 patients. At surgery, small leaking arachnoid cysts were found in 2 patients. In the remaining 11 patients, no clear source of CSF leakage could be identified at surgery. Resolution of symptoms was achieved in both patients with leaking arachnoid cysts, but in only 3 of the 11 patients with negative intraoperative findings. Postoperative spinal imaging was performed in 9 of the 11 patients with negative intraoperative findings and showed persistence of the longitudinal intraspinal extradural CSF. Further imaging revealed the site of the CSF leak to be ventral to the thoracic spinal cord. Five of these patients underwent microsurgical repair of the ventral CSF leak with resolution of symptoms in all 5 patients. Cervico-thoracic extravasation of dye on myelography does not necessarily indicate the site of the CSF leak. Treatment directed at this site should not be expected to have a high probability of sustained improvement of symptoms. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. EFFECT OF UPPER-LIMB AND THORACIC MUSCLE STRENGTH ON 6-MIN WALK DISTANCE IN COPD PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Varalakshmi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is the only cause of death from chronic disease that will increase worldwide until 2020 and it represents a big burden for patients and society. Patients with COPD characteristically show poor exercise performance indicated by a marked reduction in both peak pulmonary 02 uptake and work rate at peak exercise. The sequelae of exercise intolerance include increased difficulty in performing daily tasks, etc. The objective of the study is to investigate the influence of thoracic and upper limb muscle function on 6-min walk distance (6MWD in patients with COPD. Method: Thirty eight COPD patients were included if they fulfilled the criteria for COPD according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines. Prospective, cross-sectional design with sample size of 38 patients. All patients performed 6MWD and 1RM exercises. Results: To study the correlation between variables, Pearson or Spearman coefficients of correlation were used with the level of statistical significance set at 5%.Results of this study suggested for the first time that thoracic muscle strength is a predictor of 6MWD in COPD patients. It also confirms the influence of respiratory muscle strength (Pimax, dyspnea, on the 6MWD of these patients. Conclusion: It is concluded that peripheral muscle strength, respiratory muscle strength, and the sensation of dyspnea all have an influence on the capacity of COPD patients to perform exercises.

  18. Thoracic CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through a vein (IV) in your hand or forearm. It may be given through the rectum using ... CT scan Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Normal lung anatomy Thoracic organs References Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden ...

  19. Pulmonary function tests correlated with thoracic volumes in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledonio, Charles Gerald T; Rosenstein, Benjamin E; Johnston, Charles E; Regelmann, Warren E; Nuckley, David J; Polly, David W

    2017-01-01

    Scoliosis deformity has been linked with deleterious changes in the thoracic cavity that affect pulmonary function. The causal relationship between spinal deformity and pulmonary function has yet to be fully defined. It has been hypothesized that deformity correction improves pulmonary function by restoring both respiratory muscle efficiency and increasing the space available to the lungs. This research aims to correlate pulmonary function and thoracic volume before and after scoliosis correction. Retrospective correlational analysis between thoracic volume modeling from plain x-rays and pulmonary function tests was conducted. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients enrolled in a multicenter database were sorted by pre-operative Total Lung Capacities (TLC) % predicted values from their Pulmonary Function Tests (PFT). Ten patients with the best and ten patients with the worst TLC values were included. Modeled thoracic volume and TLC values were compared before and 2 years after surgery. Scoliosis correction resulted in an increase in the thoracic volume for patients with the worst initial TLCs (11.7%) and those with the best initial TLCs (12.5%). The adolescents with the most severe pulmonary restriction prior to surgery strongly correlated with post-operative change in total lung capacity and thoracic volume (r 2  = 0.839; p volume in this group was 373.1 cm 3 (11.7%) which correlated with a 21.2% improvement in TLC. Scoliosis correction in adolescents was found to increase thoracic volume and is strongly correlated with improved TLC in cases with severe restrictive pulmonary function, but no correlation was found in cases with normal pulmonary function. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:175-182, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Thoracic organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Richard N; Barr, Mark L; McCullough, Keith P; Egan, Thomas; Garrity, Edward; Jessup, Mariell; Murray, Susan

    2004-01-01

    This article presents an overview of factors associated with thoracic transplantation outcomes over the past decade and provides valuable information regarding the heart, lung, and heart-lung waiting lists and thoracic organ transplant recipients. Waiting list and post-transplant information is used to assess the importance of patient demographics, risk factors, and primary cardiopulmonary disease on outcomes. The time that the typical listed patient has been waiting for a heart, lung, or heart-lung transplant has markedly increased over the past decade, while the number of transplants performed has declined slightly and survival after transplant has plateaued. Waiting list mortality, however, appears to be declining for each organ and for most diseases and high-severity subgroups, perhaps in response to recent changes in organ allocation algorithms. Based on perceived inequity in organ access and in response to a mandate from Health Resources and Services Administration, the lung transplant community is developing a lung allocation system designed to minimize deaths on the waiting list while maximizing the benefit of transplant by incorporating post-transplant survival and quality of life into the algorithm. Areas where improved data collection could inform evolving organ allocation and candidate selection policies are emphasized.

  1. COMPLEX TREATMENT OF PATIENT WITH MULTIPLE FRACTURES OF THE VERTEBRAE IN THE THORACIC SPINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Vissarionov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors presented an example of a complex treatment of pediatric patient with multiple fractures of the vertebrae in the thoracic spine. The child was operated on the burst fracture of a Th5 vertebra. Due to the presence of vertebral compression fractures Th8 a course of conservative treatment by the orthosis in hyperextension brace. Follow-up was 15 months.

  2. Thoracic computed tomography in patients with suspected malignant pleural effusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traill, Zoee C.; Davies, Robert J.O.; Gleeson, Fergus V.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To assess the role of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) prospectively in patients with suspected malignant pleural effusions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty consecutive patients referred for the investigation of a suspected malignant pleural effusion had contrast-enhanced thoracic CT, thoracoscopy, thoraco-centesis and pleural biopsy, either percutaneously or at thoracoscopy. Final diagnoses were based on histopathological or cytological analysis (n = 30), autopsy findings (n = 3) or clinical follow-up (n = 7). The pleural surfaces were classified at contrast-enhanced CT as normal or abnormal and, if abnormal, as benign or malignant in appearance using previously established CT criteria for malignant pleural thickening by two observers unaware of the pathological diagnosis. RESULTS: Pleural effusions were malignant in 32 patients and benign in eight patients. Pleural surfaces assessed at CT showed features of malignancy in 27 out of 32 patients with a malignant effusion (sensitivity 84%, specificity 100%). Overall, CT appearances indicated the presence of malignancy in 28 of 32 (87%) patients. All eight patients with benign pleural disease were correctly diagnosed by CT. CONCLUSION: Contrast-enhanced CT is of value in patients with suspected malignant pleural effusions. The previously established criteria for malignant pleural thickening of nodularity, irregularity and pleural thickness >1 cm are reliable in the presence of a pleural effusion. Traill, Z.C. et al. (2001)

  3. General anesthesia versus segmental thoracic or conventional lumbar spinal anesthesia for patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Yousef, Gamal T.; Lasheen, Ahmed E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy became the standard surgery for gallstone disease because of causing less postoperative pain, respiratory compromise and early ambulation. Objective: This study was designed to compare spinal anesthesia, (segmental thoracic or conventional lumbar) vs the gold standard general anesthesia as three anesthetic techniques for healthy patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy, evaluating intraoperative parameters, postoperative recovery an...

  4. Ligamentum flavum hematomas of the cervical and thoracic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Florian; Tuettenberg, Jochen; Grau, Armin; Weis, Joachim; Krauss, Joachim K

    2014-01-01

    To report extremely rare cases of ligamentum flavum hematomas in the cervical and thoracic spine. Only six cases of thoracic ligamentum flavum hematomas and three cases of cervical ligamentum flavum hematomas have been reported so far. Two patients presented with tetraparesis and one patient presented with radicular pain and paresthesias in the T3 dermatome. MRI was performed in two patients, which showed a posterior intraspinal mass, continuous with the ligamentum flavum. The mass was moderately hypointense on T2-weighted images and hyperintense on T1-weighted images with no contrast enhancement. The third patient underwent cervical myelography because of a cardiac pacemaker. The myelography showed an intraspinal posterior mass with compression of the dural sac at C3/C4. All patients underwent a hemilaminectomy to resect the ligamentum flavum hematoma and recovered completely afterwords, and did not experience a recurrence during follow-up of at least 2 years. This case series shows rare cases of ligamentum flavum hematomas in the cervical and thoracic spine. Surgery achieved complete recovery of the preoperative symptoms in all patients within days. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Thoracic injury rule out criteria and NEXUS chest in predicting the risk of traumatic intra-thoracic injuries: A diagnostic accuracy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Saeed; Radfar, Fatemeh; Baratloo, Alireza

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of NEXUS chest and Thoracic Injury Rule out criteria (TIRC) models in predicting the risk of intra-thoracic injuries following blunt multiple trauma. In this diagnostic accuracy study, using the 2 mentioned models, blunt multiple trauma patients over the age of 15 years presenting to emergency department were screened regarding the presence of intra-thoracic injuries that are detectable via chest x-ray and screening performance characteristics of the models were compared. In this study, 3118 patients with the mean (SD) age of 37.4 (16.9) years were studied (57.4% male). Based on TIRC and NEXUS chest, respectively, 1340 (43%) and 1417 (45.4%) patients were deemed in need of radiography performance. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of TIRC were 98.95%, 62.70%, 21.19% and 99.83%. These values were 98.61%, 59.94%, 19.97% and 99.76%, for NEXUS chest, respectively. Accuracy of TIRC and NEXUS chest models were 66.04 (95% CI: 64.34-67.70) and 63.50 (95% CI: 61.78-65.19), respectively. TIRC and NEXUS chest models have proper and similar sensitivity in prediction of blunt traumatic intra-thoracic injuries that are detectable via chest x-ray. However, TIRC had a significantly higher specificity in this regard. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Haemodynamic imaging of thoracic stent-grafts by computational fluid dynamics (CFD): presentation of a patient-specific method combining magnetic resonance imaging and numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midulla, Marco; Moreno, Ramiro; Baali, Adil; Chau, Ming; Negre-Salvayre, Anne; Nicoud, Franck; Pruvo, Jean-Pierre; Haulon, Stephan; Rousseau, Hervé

    2012-10-01

    In the last decade, there was been increasing interest in finding imaging techniques able to provide a functional vascular imaging of the thoracic aorta. The purpose of this paper is to present an imaging method combining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to obtain a patient-specific haemodynamic analysis of patients treated by thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). MRI was used to obtain boundary conditions. MR angiography (MRA) was followed by cardiac-gated cine sequences which covered the whole thoracic aorta. Phase contrast imaging provided the inlet and outlet profiles. A CFD mesh generator was used to model the arterial morphology, and wall movements were imposed according to the cine imaging. CFD runs were processed using the finite volume (FV) method assuming blood as a homogeneous Newtonian fluid. Twenty patients (14 men; mean age 62.2 years) with different aortic lesions were evaluated. Four-dimensional mapping of velocity and wall shear stress were obtained, depicting different patterns of flow (laminar, turbulent, stenosis-like) and local alterations of parietal stress in-stent and along the native aorta. A computational method using a combined approach with MRI appears feasible and seems promising to provide detailed functional analysis of thoracic aorta after stent-graft implantation. • Functional vascular imaging of the thoracic aorta offers new diagnostic opportunities • CFD can model vascular haemodynamics for clinical aortic problems • Combining CFD with MRI offers patient specific method of aortic analysis • Haemodynamic analysis of stent-grafts could improve clinical management and follow-up.

  7. Reconstruction of cervical scar contracture using axial thoracic flap based on the thoracic branch of the supraclavicular artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xianjie; Li, Yang; Wang, Lu; Li, Weiyang; Dong, Liwei; Xia, Wei; Su, Yingjun

    2014-09-01

    Cervical scar contracture causes both physical and psychological distress for burn patients. Many pedicle flaps or skin grafting have been suggested for reconstruction of cervical scar contracture with variable results in the literature. The authors present the axial thoracic flap based on the thoracic branch of the supraclavicular artery (TBSA) for reconstruction of cervical scar contracture. Postburn scar contractures in anterior neck region of 66 patients had been reconstructed with the axial pattern thoracic flaps based on the TBSA, including 1 expanded and 10 nonexpanded pedicle flaps, and 9 expanded and 46 nonexpanded island pedicle flaps, during 1988 through 2012. After removing and releasing the cervical scar contracture, the flap was designed in the thoracic region. The axial artery of the flap is the TBSA bifurcating from the intersection point of sternocleidomastoid muscle and omohyoid muscle with several concomitant veins as the axial veins. The flap can be designed in a large area within the borders of the anterior border of the trapezius muscle superiorly, the middle part of the deltoid muscle laterally, the midsternal line medially, and the level 3 to 4 cm below nipples inferiorly. After incisions were made along the medial, inferior, and lateral border, dissection was performed toward the pedicle. Donor site was closed directly in expanded cases and with skin grafting in nonexpanded cases. Cervical scar contractures were repaired with good functional and cosmetic results in 64 cases among this cohort. Flap tip necrosis in other 2 cases, caused by postoperative hematoma, was repaired by skin grafting. The color and texture of all flaps were fitted with those of the surrounding skin. The donor sites all healed primarily. The flap sensation in the thoracic region regained in the early stage postoperatively and that in cervical area recovered completely after 6 months according to the report of the patients. With reliable blood supply based on the

  8. Regional interdependence and manual therapy directed at the thoracic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Amy; Young, Jodi; Mintken, Paul; Cleland, Josh

    2015-07-01

    Thoracic spine manipulation is commonly used by physical therapists for the management of patients with upper quarter pain syndromes. The theoretical construct for using thoracic manipulation for upper quarter conditions is a mainstay of a regional interdependence (RI) approach. The RI concept is likely much more complex and is perhaps driven by a neurophysiological response including those related to peripheral, spinal cord and supraspinal mechanisms. Recent evidence suggests that thoracic spine manipulation results in neurophysiological changes, which may lead to improved pain and outcomes in individuals with musculoskeletal disorders. The intent of this narrative review is to describe the research supporting the RI concept and its application to the treatment of individuals with neck and/or shoulder pain. Treatment utilizing both thrust and non-thrust thoracic manipulation has been shown to result in improvements in pain, range of motion and disability in patients with upper quarter conditions. Research has yet to determine optimal dosage, techniques or patient populations to which the RI approach should be applied; however, emerging evidence supporting a neurophysiological effect for thoracic spine manipulation may negate the need to fully answer this question. Certainly, there is a need for further research examining both the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of manual therapy interventions utilized in the RI model as well as the neurophysiological effects resulting from this intervention.

  9. Internal thoracic artery collateral to the external iliac artery in chronic aortoiliac occlusive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jinna; Won, Jong Yun; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Do Yun

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence and angiographic findings of the collateral pathway involving the internal thoracic artery in patients with chronic aortoiliac occlusive disease. Between March 2000 and Februrary 2001, 124 patients at our hospital underwent angiographic evaluation of chronic aortoiliac occlusive disease, and in 15 of these complete obstruction or severe stenosis of the aortoiliac artery was identified. The aortograms and collateral arteriograms obtained, including internal thoracic arteriograms, as well as the medical records of the patients involved, were evaluated. In nine patients there was complete occlusion of the infrarenal aorta, or diffuse stenosis of 75% or more in the descending thoracic aorta, and in the other six, a patent aorta but complete occlusion or stenosis of 75% or more of the common iliac artery was demonstrated. Collateral perfusion via hypertrophied internal thoracic arteries and rich anastomoses between the superior and inferior epigastric arteries, reconstituting the external iliac artery, were noted in all fifteen patients, regardless of symptom duration, which ranged from six months to twelve years. In patients with chronic aortoiliac occlusive disease, the internal thoracic artery, along with visceral collaterals and those from the contralateral side, is one of the major parietal collateral pathways

  10. A dual centre study of setup accuracy for thoracic patients based on Cone-Beam CT data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tine B; Hansen, Vibeke N; Westberg, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To compare setup uncertainties at two different institutions by using identical imaging and analysis techniques for thoracic patients with different fixation equipments. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Patient registration results from Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) scans of 174 patients were...... increase of the systematic setup uncertainties in between imaging fractions. A margin reduction of ⩾0.2cm can be achieved for patients with peak-to-peak respiration amplitudes of ⩾1.2cm when changing from 4D-CT to Active Breathing Coordinator™ (ABC). CONCLUSIONS: The setup uncertainties at the two...

  11. Financial validation of the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk score predicting prolonged air leak after video-assisted thoracic surgery lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Alessandro; Pompili, Cecilia; Dinesh, Padma; Bassi, Vinod; Imperatori, Andrea

    2018-04-27

    The objective of this study was to verify whether the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons prolonged air leak risk score for video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy was associated with incremental postoperative costs. We retrospectively analyzed 353 patients subjected to video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy or segmentectomy (April 2014 to March 2016). Postoperative costs were obtained from the hospital Finance Department. Patients were grouped in different classes of risk according to their prolonged air leak risk score. To verify the independent association of the prolonged air leak risk score with postoperative costs, we performed a stepwise multivariable regression analysis in which the dependent variable was postoperative cost. Prolonged air leak developed in 56 patients (15.9%). Their length of stay was 3 days longer compared with those without prolonged air leak (8.3 vs 5.4, P validated the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons prolonged air leak risk score for video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomies, which appears useful in selecting those patients in whom the application of additional intraoperative interventions to avoid prolonged air leak may be more cost-effective. Copyright © 2018 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Robert R. Shaw, MD: thoracic surgical hero, Afghanistan medical pioneer, champion for the patient, never a surgical society president.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urschel, Harold C; Urschel, Betsey Bradley

    2012-06-01

    Dr Robert R. Shaw arrived in Dallas to practice Thoracic Surgery in 1937, as John Alexander's 7th Thoracic Surgical Resident from Michigan University Medical Center. Dr Shaw's modus operandi was, "You can accomplish almost anything, if you don't care who gets the credit." He was a remarkable individual who cared the most about the patient and very little about getting credit for himself. From 1937 to 1970, Dr Shaw established one of the largest lung cancer surgical centers in the world in Dallas, Texas. It was larger than M.D. Anderson and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Hospitals put together regarding the surgical treatment of lung cancer patients. To accomplish this, he had the help of Dr Donald L. Paulson, who trained at the Mayo Clinic and served as Chief of Thoracic Surgery at Brook Army Hospital during the Second World War. Following the War, because of his love for Texas, he ended up as a partner of Dr Shaw in Dallas. Together, they pursued the development of this very large surgical lung cancer center. Dr Shaw and his wife Ruth went to Afghanistan with Medico multiple times to teach men modern cardiac and thoracic surgery. They also served as consultants on Medico's Ship of Hope in Africa. Dr Shaw initiated multiple new operations including: 1) resection of Pancoast's cancer of the lung after preoperative irradiation; 2) upper lobe of the lung bronchoplasty, reattaching (and saving) the lower lobe to prevent the "disabling" pneumonectomy; and 3) resections of pulmonary mucoid impaction of the lung in asthmatics. Because of his humility and giving "the credit to others," Dr Shaw was never President of a major medical or surgical association. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Thoracic dysfunction in whiplash associated disorders: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard; Tyros, Isaak; Falla, Deborah; Rushton, Alison

    2018-01-01

    Background Research investigating Whiplash Associated Disorder (WAD) has largely focused on the cervical spine yet symptoms can be widespread. Thoracic spine pain prevalence is reported ~66%; perhaps unsurprising given the forceful stretch/eccentric loading of posterior structures of the spine, and the thoracic spine’s contribution to neck mobility/function. Approximately 50% WAD patients develop chronic pain and disability resulting in high levels of societal and healthcare costs. It is time to look beyond the cervical spine to fully understand anatomical dysfunction in WAD and provide new directions for clinical practice and research. Purpose To evaluate the scope and nature of dysfunction in the thoracic region in patients with WAD. Methods A systematic review and data synthesis was conducted according to a pre-defined, registered (PROSPERO, CRD42015026983) and published protocol. All forms of observational study were included. A sensitive topic-based search strategy was designed from inception to 1/06/16. Databases, grey literature and registers were searched using a study population terms and key words derived from scoping search. Two reviewers independently searched information sources, assessed studies for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. A third reviewer checked for consistency and clarity. Extracted data included summary data: sample size and characteristics, outcomes, and timescales to reflect disorder state. Risk of bias was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Data were tabulated to allow enabling a semi-qualitative comparison and grouped by outcome across studies. Strength of the overall body of evidence was assessed using a modified GRADE. Results Thirty eight studies (n>50,000) which were conducted across a range of countries were included. Few authors responded to requests for further data (5 of 9 contacted). Results were reported in the context of overall quality and were presented for measures of pain or dysfunction and

  14. Clinical and electrocardiographic characteristics of patients admitted to a thoracic pain unit in the context of a new definition of acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, Guillermo; Franco, Roberto; Fajardo, Hugo; Serrano, Daniel; Suarez, Martin

    2005-01-01

    In our environment we do ignore the clinical and para clinical characteristics from patients who come to a thoracic pain unit and more so with the new definition of acute myocardial infarction (Amid). 398 patients admitted to a thoracic pain unit were prospectively evaluated as to the pain characteristics, its risk factors, clinical examination findings, electrocardiographic findings and the troponin a T behaviour. 29.4% of the patients had a diagnosis of Amid, 29.9% of unstable angina and 40.7% of non-ischemic thoracic pain. retrosternal pain, irradiation to the neck, presence of diaphoresis, nausea or vomit are related with a higher probability to the diagnosis of Amid. Male sex and the presence of risk factors such as diabetes or dislipidemia increase the probability of the diagnosis. In the electrocardiogram, only the presence of a lesion, especially subepicardical favors the diagnosis. Unstable angina and in general acute coronary syndrome have a similar although not equal clinical behavior

  15. CT and MRI characteristics of ossification of the ligamenta flava in the thoracic spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, L. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Zeng, Q.Y. [Dept. of Radiology, General Coal Hospital, Beijing (China); Jinkins, J.R. [Dept. of Radiology, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare MRI findings with CT findings of mass-forming calcification/ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava (OTLF). Twenty-one Chinese patients presented with clinical evidence of chronic and progressive thoracic spinal cord compression which included: difficulty in walking; weakness; and/or numbness of the extremities, back pain, and lower extremity paresthesias. Axial and sagittal T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) were performed through the thoracic spine on a 1.0-T Impact unit (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). Axial CT was obtained with 5-mm contiguous sections through the thoracic region. Decompressive surgery with resection of the OTLF were carried out in all patients. Low signal intensity of the mass-forming OTLF was demonstrated at a single level (n=1) or at multiple levels (n=20) on both T1WI and T2WI. The distribution of OTLF was bilateral at all levels identified in 6 cases, unilateral at all levels in 5 patients, and both unilateral and bilateral at different levels in 10 cases. Ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava involved the upper thoracic spine (T1-4) in 3 cases, midthoracic spine (T5-8) in 3 cases, lower thoracic spine (T9-12) in 10 cases, and more than one thoracic spinal subregion in 5 cases. Computed tomography confirmed the MR findings regarding the location and distribution of OTLF in all cases, as well as the associated evidence of central spinal canal stenosis. In addition, 5 patients revealed associated ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. All patients demonstrated gradual, but incomplete, clinical improvement of the radiculomyelopathy following decompressive surgery. Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament resulting in thoracic central spinal canal stenosis and clinical radiculomyelopathy is not uncommon in the Asian people. Ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava can be accurately evaluated equally well by CT and MR with regard to level

  16. CT and MRI characteristics of ossification of the ligamenta flava in the thoracic spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, L.; Zeng, Q.Y.; Jinkins, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare MRI findings with CT findings of mass-forming calcification/ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava (OTLF). Twenty-one Chinese patients presented with clinical evidence of chronic and progressive thoracic spinal cord compression which included: difficulty in walking; weakness; and/or numbness of the extremities, back pain, and lower extremity paresthesias. Axial and sagittal T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) were performed through the thoracic spine on a 1.0-T Impact unit (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). Axial CT was obtained with 5-mm contiguous sections through the thoracic region. Decompressive surgery with resection of the OTLF were carried out in all patients. Low signal intensity of the mass-forming OTLF was demonstrated at a single level (n=1) or at multiple levels (n=20) on both T1WI and T2WI. The distribution of OTLF was bilateral at all levels identified in 6 cases, unilateral at all levels in 5 patients, and both unilateral and bilateral at different levels in 10 cases. Ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava involved the upper thoracic spine (T1-4) in 3 cases, midthoracic spine (T5-8) in 3 cases, lower thoracic spine (T9-12) in 10 cases, and more than one thoracic spinal subregion in 5 cases. Computed tomography confirmed the MR findings regarding the location and distribution of OTLF in all cases, as well as the associated evidence of central spinal canal stenosis. In addition, 5 patients revealed associated ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. All patients demonstrated gradual, but incomplete, clinical improvement of the radiculomyelopathy following decompressive surgery. Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament resulting in thoracic central spinal canal stenosis and clinical radiculomyelopathy is not uncommon in the Asian people. Ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava can be accurately evaluated equally well by CT and MR with regard to level

  17. Thoracic spine pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey Ivanovich Isaikin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic spine pain, or thoracalgia, is one of the common reasons for seeking for medical advice. The epidemiology and semiotics of pain in the thoracic spine unlike in those in the cervical and lumbar spine have not been inadequately studied. The causes of thoracic spine pain are varied: diseases of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and renal systems, injuries to the musculoskeletal structures of the cervical and thoracic portions, which require a thorough differential diagnosis. Facet, costotransverse, and costovertebral joint injuries and myofascial syndrome are the most common causes of musculoskeletal (nonspecific pain in the thoracic spine. True radicular pain is rarely encountered. Traditionally, treatment for thoracalgia includes a combination of non-drug and drug therapies. The cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor meloxicam (movalis may be the drug of choice in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain.

  18. Thoracic solitary pedunculated osteochondroma in a child: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wali Z

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Zubair Wali,1 Khalid I Khoshhal21Department of Orthopedic Surgery, King Fahd Hospital, Almadinah Almunawwarah, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, College of Medicine, Taibah University, Almadinah Almunawwarah, Saudi ArabiaObjective: This case report describes the rare presentation of a thoracic pedunculated osteochondroma in a child, arising from the lamina of the fourth thoracic vertebra.Clinical features: A 7-year-old girl was referred for the evaluation of a swelling in her back. The patient was suffering from atraumatic, progressive painless back swelling, of approximately 2 years duration. The physical examination showed a healthy child, with a well-defined mass, about 4 × 6 cm, located around the midline of the upper thoracic spine. No clinical signs of hereditary multiple exostoses were detected. Plain radiographs and computerized tomography were suggestive of a pedunculated osteochondroma arising from the lamina of the fourth thoracic vertebra.Intervention and outcome: The patient underwent surgical excision of the mass. The pathologist confirmed the diagnosis. Follow up for 2 years did not show any evidence of clinical or radiological recurrence.Conclusion: The current report describes a rare case and the management of a solitary pedunculated osteochondroma arising from the lamina of the fourth thoracic vertebra in a child below the age of 10 years.Keywords: benign tumors, hereditary multiple exostoses, spine column tumors, thoracic vertebra

  19. A rare malformation of urinary system: Right ectopic thoracic kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musab Ilgi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An ectopic kidney is a common developmental anomaly of the urinary system. However, the thoracic kidney (TK is the rarest state form of an aberrant kidney. The aim of this case report is defining the symptoms in TK diagnosis and constructing a treatment model will promote the best outcomes. These patients come to the physician with the various symptoms, and they could be diagnosed incidentally. In our case, we describe 40 years female patient with severe respiratory problems and upper back pain. In the pulmonary clinic, suspected mass was diagnosed with chest X-ray, and computerized tomography detected nontraumatic nonhernia associated, a truly ectopic TK. Moreover, the thoracic surgeon and urologist team decided to exploration and reconstructed the right ectopic kidney. The 1st month of the control of patient symptoms was disappeared. Overall, TK should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of thoracic tumors. Surgical exploration and reconstruction should be thought in patients who have severe respiratory symptoms.

  20. Thoracic damage control surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Roberto; Saad, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The damage control surgery came up with the philosophy of applying essential maneuvers to control bleeding and abdominal contamination in trauma patients who are within the limits of their physiological reserves. This concept was extended to thoracic injuries, where relatively simple maneuvers can shorten operative time of in extremis patients. This article aims to revise the various damage control techniques in thoracic organs that must be known to the surgeon engaged in emergency care. RESUMO A cirurgia de controle de danos surgiu com a filosofia de se aplicar manobras essenciais para controle de sangramento e contaminação abdominal, em doentes traumatizados, nos limites de suas reservas fisiológicas. Este conceito se estendeu para as lesões torácicas, onde manobras relativamente simples, podem abreviar o tempo operatório de doentes in extremis. Este artigo tem como objetivo, revisar as diversas técnicas de controle de dano em órgãos torácicos, que devem ser de conhecimento do cirurgião que atua na emergência.

  1. Indication for resuscitative thoracotomy in thoracic injuries-Adherence to the ATLS guidelines. A forensic autopsy based evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohrt-Nissen, S; Colville-Ebeling, B; Kandler, K

    2016-01-01

    of deceased patients with potentially reversible thoracic lesions (PRTL). METHODS: The database at the Department of Forensic Medicine at Copenhagen University was queried for autopsy cases with thoracic lesions indicated by the SNOMED autopsy coding system. Patients were included if thoracic lesions were...

  2. Efficacy and prognostic analysis of chemoradiotherapy in patients with thoracic esophageal squamous carcinoma with cervical lymph nodal metastasis alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Peng; Xi, Mian; Zhao, Lei; Li, Qiao-Qiao; He, Li-Ru; Liu, Shi-Liang; Shen, Jing-Xian; Liu, Meng-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic factors of thoracic esophageal squamous carcinoma with cervical lymph nodal metastasis (CLNM) have not been specifically investigated. This study was performed to analyze the efficacy and prognostic factors of chemoradiotherapy for thoracic esophageal carcinoma with CLNM alone. From 2002 to 2011, 139 patients with inoperable esophageal cancer who underwent chemoradiotherapy at the Sun Yat-Sen University were retrospectively analyzed. Median radiation doses were 60 Gy (range: 50–68 Gy). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to compare overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). The 1- and 3-year OS rates were 68.2% and 27.9%, respectively. The 1- and 3-year PFS rates were 51.9% and 20.1%, respectively. The multivariate analysis demonstrated that response to treatment, T stage, pathological grade, and laterality of cervical lymph nodal metastases were independent prognostic factors for thoracic esophageal carcinoma with CLNM. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is an important and hopeful treatment option for patients with esophageal cancer with CLNM alone. Our study has revealed that response to treatment, T stage, pathological grade and laterality of cervical lymph nodal metastases are significant prognostic factors for long-term survival

  3. Endolymphatic Thoracic Duct Stent-Graft Reconstruction for Chylothorax: Approach, Technical Success, Safety, and Short-term Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa, Rajiv N; Chick, Jeffrey Forris Beecham; Hage, Anthony N; Gemmete, Joseph J; Murrey, Douglas C; Srinivasa, Ravi N

    2018-04-01

    To report approach, technical success, safety, and short-term outcomes of thoracic duct stent-graft reconstruction for the treatment of chylothorax. Two patients, 1 (50%) male and 1 (50%) female, with mean age of 38 years (range: 16-59 years) underwent endolymphatic thoracic duct stent-graft reconstruction between September 2016 and July 2017. Patients had radiographic left-sided chylothoraces (n = 2) from idiopathic causes (n = 1) and heart transplantation (n = 1). In both (100%) patients, antegrade lymphatic access was used to opacify the thoracic duct after which retrograde access was used for thoracic duct stent-graft placement. Pelvic lymphangiography technical success, antegrade cisterna chyli cannulation technical success, thoracic duct opacification technical success, retrograde thoracic duct access technical success, thoracic duct stent-graft reconstruction technical success, ethiodized oil volume, contrast volume, estimated blood loss, procedure time, fluoroscopy time, radiation dose, clinical success, complications, deaths, and follow-up were recorded. Pelvic lymphangiography, antegrade cisterna chyli cannulation, thoracic duct opacification, retrograde thoracic duct access, and thoracic duct stent-graft reconstruction were technically successful in both (100%) patients. Mean ethiodized oil volume was 8 mL (range: 5-10 mL). Mean contrast volume was 13 mL (range: 5-20 mL). Mean estimated blood loss was 13 mL (range: 10-15 mL). Mean fluoroscopy time was 50.4 min (range: 31.2-69.7 min). Mean dose area product and reference air kerma were 954.4 μGmy 2 (range: 701-1,208 μGmy 2 ) and 83.5 mGy (range: 59-108 mGy), respectively. Chylothorax resolved in both (100%) patients. There were no minor or major complications directly related to the procedure. Thoracic duct stent-graft reconstruction may be a technically successful and safe alternative to thoracic duct embolization, disruption, and surgical ligation for the treatment of chylothorax

  4. The clinical significance of adjacent rib involvement on MRI in patients with acute osteoporotic compression fractures of the thoracic spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kwon, Kui Hyang; Choi, Deuk Lin; Goo, Dong Erk; Suh, You Sung; Bae, Won Kyung

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of the presence of adjacent rib involvement in osteoporotic compression fractures. All the patients with acute osteoporotic compression fractures of the thoracic spine on thoracic spine MRI that presented to our clinic between September 2003 and January 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. All the vertebrae were divided into two groups: those that showed signal intensity change in the rib adjacent to the compression fracture and those that did not. We compared the results between the two groups to determine if there were differences in the degree of osteoporosis, the compression fracture level and the age of patients between the two groups. We calculated the degree of correlation between the MRI and the bone scan images of these patients. We also reviewed whether percutaneous vertebroplasty relieved symptoms or not. Signal intensity changes were found in the adjacent rib(s) in 12 of the 60 patients and in 14 of the 94 levels (the total number of levels). The MRI and bone scan showed significant correlation (p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant difference in the incidence of pain at the one month outpatient follow up between the two groups (p = 0.0215). The radiologist should comment on the presence or absence of adjacent rib involvement when reporting on the thoracic spine MRI of patients suffering from osteoporotic compression fractures in order to more accurately determine prognosis

  5. The clinical significance of adjacent rib involvement on MRI in patients with acute osteoporotic compression fractures of the thoracic spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kwon, Kui Hyang; Choi, Deuk Lin; Goo, Dong Erk; Suh, You Sung [Soonchunhyang Univ. Seoul Hospital/Soonchunhyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Won Kyung [Soonchunhyang Univ. Cheonan Hospital/Soonchunhyang Univ. College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of the presence of adjacent rib involvement in osteoporotic compression fractures. All the patients with acute osteoporotic compression fractures of the thoracic spine on thoracic spine MRI that presented to our clinic between September 2003 and January 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. All the vertebrae were divided into two groups: those that showed signal intensity change in the rib adjacent to the compression fracture and those that did not. We compared the results between the two groups to determine if there were differences in the degree of osteoporosis, the compression fracture level and the age of patients between the two groups. We calculated the degree of correlation between the MRI and the bone scan images of these patients. We also reviewed whether percutaneous vertebroplasty relieved symptoms or not. Signal intensity changes were found in the adjacent rib(s) in 12 of the 60 patients and in 14 of the 94 levels (the total number of levels). The MRI and bone scan showed significant correlation (p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant difference in the incidence of pain at the one month outpatient follow up between the two groups (p = 0.0215). The radiologist should comment on the presence or absence of adjacent rib involvement when reporting on the thoracic spine MRI of patients suffering from osteoporotic compression fractures in order to more accurately determine prognosis.

  6. Diagnostic imaging costs before and after digital tomosynthesis implementation in patient management after detection of suspected thoracic lesions on chest radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaia, Emilio; Grisi, Guido; Baratella, Elisa; Cuttin, Roberto; Poillucci, Gabriele; Kus, Sara; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate diagnostic imaging costs before and after DTS implementation in patients with suspected thoracic lesions on CXR. Four hundred sixty-five patients (263 male, 202 female; age, 72.47 ± 11.33 years) with suspected thoracic lesion(s) after CXR underwent DTS. Each patient underwent CT when a pulmonary non-calcified lesion was identified by DTS while CT was not performed when a benign pulmonary or extrapulmonary lesion or pseudolesion was identified. The average per-patient imaging cost was calculated by normalising the costs before and after DTS implementation. In 229/465 patients who underwent DTS after suspicious CXR, DTS showed 193 pulmonary lesions and 36 pleural lesions, while in the remaining 236/465 patients, lesions were ruled out as pseudolesions of CXR. Chest CT examination was performed in 127/465 (27 %) patients while in the remaining 338/465 patients (73 %) CXR doubtful findings were resolved by DTS. The average per-patient costs of CXR, DTS and CT were 15.15, 41.55 and 113.66. DTS allowed an annual cost saving of 8,090.2 considering unenhanced CT and 19,298.12 considering contrast-enhanced CT. Considering a DTS reimbursement rate of 62.7 the break even point corresponds to 479 DTS examinations. Per-patient diagnostic imaging costs decreased after DTS implementation in patients with suspected thoracic lesions. • Digital tomosynthesis improves the diagnostic accuracy and confidence in chest radiography • Digital tomosynthesis reduces the need for CT for a suspected pulmonary lesion • Digital tomosynthesis requires a dose level equivalent to that of around two chest radiographies • Digital tomosynthesis produces a significant per-patient saving in diagnostic imaging costs.

  7. Emergency operation for penetrating thoracic trauma in a metropolitan surgical service in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Damian Luiz; Quazi, Muhammed A; Reddy, Kriban; Thomson, Sandie Rutherford

    2011-09-01

    This audit examines our total experience with penetrating thoracic trauma. It reviews all the patients who were brought alive to our surgical service and all who were taken directly to the mortuary. The group of patients who underwent emergency operation for penetrating thoracic trauma is examined in detail. A prospective trauma registry is maintained by the Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Complex. This database was retrospectively interrogated for all patients requiring an emergency thoracic operation for penetrating injury from July 2006 till July 2009. A retrospective review of mortuary data for the same period was undertaken to identify patients with penetrating thoracic trauma who had been taken to the forensic mortuary. Over the 3-year period July 2006 to July 2009, a total of 1186 patients, 77 of whom were female, were admitted to the surgical services in Pietermaritzburg with penetrating thoracic trauma. There were 124 gunshot wounds and 1062 stab wounds. A total of 108 (9%) patients required emergency operation during the period under review. The mechanism of trauma in the operative group was stab wounds (n = 102), gunshot wound (n = 4), stab with compass (n = 1), and impalement by falling on an arrow (n = 1). Over the same period 676 persons with penetrating thoracic trauma were taken to the mortuary. There were 135 (20%) gunshot wounds of the chest in the mortuary cohort. The overall mortality for penetrating thoracic trauma was 541 (33%) of 1603 for stab wounds and 135 (52%) of 259 for gunshot wounds of the chest. Among the 541 subjects with stab wounds from the mortuary cohort, there were 206 (38%) with cardiac injuries. In the emergency operation group there were 11 (10%) deaths. In 76 patients a cardiac injury was identified. The other injuries identified were lung parenchyma bleeding (n = 12) intercostal vessels (n = 10), great vessels of the chest (n = 6), internal thoracic vessel (n = 2), and pericardial injury with no myocardial injury (n = 2

  8. Surgical outcome analysis of paediatric thoracic and cervical neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Dakshesh; Short, Melissa; Eshmawy, Mohamed; Brown, Rachel

    2012-03-01

    To identify factors determining the surgical outcome of primary cervical and thoracic neuroblastoma. Twenty-six children with primary thoracic neuroblastoma presented over the last 14 years were analysed for age, mode of presentation, tumour histopathology, biology and outcome. Primary thoracic neuroblastoma was presented in 16 boys and 10 girls at a median age of 2 years (range 6 weeks-15 years). The International Neuroblastoma Staging System (INSS) classified these as Stage 1 (8), Stage 2 (5), Stage 3 (6) and Stage 4 (7). Computed tomography defined the tumour location at the thoracic inlet (11), cervical (2), cervico-thoracic (3), mid-thorax (9) and thoraco-abdominal (1). Twenty-two children underwent surgery that allowed an adequate exposure and resection. Surgical resection was achieved after initial biopsy and preoperative chemotherapy in 15 children, whereas primary resection was performed in 7 children. Four patients with Stage 4 disease underwent chemotherapy alone after initial biopsy; of which, two died despite chemotherapy. Favourable outcome after surgical resection and long-term survival was seen in 19 (86.4%) of the 22 children. Three had local recurrence (14 to 21 months postoperatively), all with unfavourable histology on initial biopsy. The prognostic factors that determined the outcome were age and INSS stage at presentation. In this series, all patients under 2 years of age are still alive, while mortality was seen in five older children. Thoracic neuroblastoma in children under 2 years of age irrespective of stage and histology of the tumour results in long-term survival.

  9. Patients' satisfaction: customer relationship management as a new opportunity for quality improvement in thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Gaetano; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2012-11-01

    Clinical and nonclinical indicators of performance are meant to provide the surgeon with tools to identify weaknesses to be improved. The World Health Organization's Performance Evaluation Systems represent a multidimensional approach to quality measurement based on several categories made of different indicators. Indicators for patient satisfaction may include overall perceived quality, accessibility, humanization and patient involvement, communication, and trust in health care providers. Patient satisfaction is included among nonclinical indicators of performance in thoracic surgery and is increasingly recognized as one of the outcome measures for delivered quality of care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Relevance of Postoperative Magnetic Resonance Images in Evaluating Epidural Hematoma After Thoracic Fixation Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hong Kyung; Choi, Il; Roh, Sung Woo; Rhim, Seung Chul; Jeon, Sang Ryong

    2017-11-01

    It is difficult to evaluate the significant findings of epidural hematoma in magnetic resonance images (MRIs) obtained immediately after thoracic posterior screw fixation (PSF). Prospectively, immediate postoperative MRI was performed in 10 patients who underwent thoracic PSF from April to December 2013. Additionally, we retrospectively analyzed the MRIs from 3 patients before hematoma evacuation out of 260 patients who underwent thoracic PSF from January 2000 to March 2013. The MRI findings of 9 out of the 10 patients, consecutively collected after thoracic PSF, showed neurologic recovery with a well-preserved cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space and no prominent hemorrhage. Even though there were metal artifacts at the level of the pedicle screws, the preserved CSF space was observed. In contrast, the MRI of 1 patient with poor neurologic outcome demonstrated a typical hematoma and slight spinal cord compression and reduced CSF space. In the retrospective analysis of the 3 patients who showed definite motor weakness in the lower extremities after their first thoracic fusion surgery and underwent hematoma evacuation, the magnetic resonance images before hematoma evacuation also revealed hematoma compressing the spinal cord and diminished CSF space. This study shows that epidural hematomas can be detected on MRI performed immediately after thoracic fixation surgery, despite metal artifacts and findings such as hematoma causing spinal cord compression. Loss of CSF space should be considered to be associated with neurologic deficit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Echocardiographic evaluation of global left ventricular function during high thoracic epidural anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Y; Ichinose, F; Saegusa, H; Nakata, Y; Morita, S

    1997-03-01

    To assess the effects of high thoracic epidural anesthesia on left ventricular (LV) diastolic filling and systolic function in patients without heart disease. Prospective study. University hospital. 24 ASA physical status I and II patients scheduled for elective noncardiac surgery. Patients received high thoracic (HTE; n = 12) or low thoracic (LTE; n = 12) epidural anesthesia. Left ventricular diastolic filling was noninvasively determined by precordial echocardiography using a pulsed Doppler technique and with a newly developed acoustic quantification (AQ) method that automatically detects endocardial borders and measures cavity area. All measurements were performed in awake premedicated patients. In the HTE group, the extent of sensory blockade of T1-T5, at the least, was induced with 2% lidocaine 5 ml. During HTE, systolic blood pressure (119 +/- 16 vs. 108 +/- 14 mmHg, p LTE group, no significant differences were noted in all systolic and diastolic indices obtained by pulsed Doppler and AQ method. High thoracic epidural anesthesia causes a decrease in CO without changing LV ejection and diastolic filling performance in healthy subjects.

  12. Bovine aortic arch: A novel association with thoracic aortic dilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, C.D.; Urbania, T.H.; Crook, S.E.S.; Hope, M.D.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether there is a link between bovine arch and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Materials and methods: Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images of the thorax of 191 patients with dilated thoracic aortas and 391 consecutive, unselected patients as controls were retrospectively reviewed. Bovine arch was considered present if either a shared origin of the left common carotid and innominate arteries or an origin of the left common carotid from the innominate artery was identified. A chi-square test was used to evaluate the significance of differences between subgroups. Results: A trend towards increased prevalence of bovine arch was seen in patients with dilated aortas (26.2%) compared to controls (20.5%, p = 0.12). The association was statistically significant in patients over 70 years old (31.9%, p = 0.019) and when dilation involved the aortic arch (47.6%, p = 0.003). Conclusions: An association between bovine arch and aortic dilation is seen in older patients, and when dilation involves the aortic arch. Bovine arch should be considered a potential risk factor for thoracic aortic aneurysm.

  13. An analysis of cervical myelopathy due to cervical spondylosis or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament by CT myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Keiju; Yonenobe, Sakuo; Ebara, Sohei; Yamashita, Kazuo; Ono, Keiro

    1988-01-01

    CT-myelographic (CTM) findings of 20 patients with ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) and 24 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) were reviewed for the evaluation of (1) contributing factors to preoperative neurologic symptoms and therapeutic prognosis in OPLL, and (2) differences in pathology between OPLL and CSM. In OPLL, the severity of preoperative neurologic symptoms was not related to the degree of deformed spinal cord - as expressed by the transverse area of the spinal cord and the rate of flatness - nor the degree of ossification - as expressed by the rate of stricture, and the transverse areas of the effective spinal canal and ossification. The transverse areas of the spinal cord and effective spinal canal were correlated with both postoperative scores for neurologic symptoms and the recovery rate. Osseous compression to the spinal cord was severer in OPLL than OSM. Regarding other factors, such as size and shape of the spinal cord and therapeutic prognosis, there was no difference between the two diseases. This implied the association of dynamic compression to the spinal cord that resulted from the unstable cervical spine in the case of CSM. (Namekawa, K.)

  14. Chest x-ray as a screening tool for blunt thoracic trauma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanchar, Natalie L; Woo, Kenneth; Brennan, Maureen; Palmer, Cameron S; Zs Ee, Michael; Sweeney, Brian; Crameri, Joe

    2013-10-01

    With the increasing use of thoracic computed tomography (CT) to screen for injuries in pediatric blunt thoracic trauma (BTT), we determined whether chest x-ray (CXR) and other clinical and epidemiologic variables could be used to predict significant thoracic injuries, to inform the selective use of CT in pediatric BTT. We further queried if these were discrepant from factors associated with the decision to obtain a thoracic CT. This retrospective cohort study included cases of BTT from three Level I pediatric trauma centers between April 1999 and March 2008. Pre-CT epidemiologic, clinical, and radiologic variables associated with CT findings of any thoracic injury or a significant thoracic injury as well as the decision to obtain a thoracic CT were determined using logistic regression. Of 425 patients, 40% patients had a significant thoracic injury, 49% had nonsignificant thoracic injury, and 11% had no thoracic injury at all. Presence of hydrothorax and/or pneumothorax on CXR significantly increased the likelihood of significant chest injury visualized by CT (adjusted odds ratio 10.8; 95% confidence interval, 6.5-18), as did the presence of isolated subcutaneous emphysema (adjusted odds ratio, 19.8; 95% confidence interval, 2.3-168). Although a normal CXR finding was not statistically associated with a reduced risk of significant thoracic injury, 8 of the 9 cases with normal CXR findings and significant injuries involved occult pneumothoraces or hemothoraces not requiring intervention. Converse to features suggesting increased risk of significant injury, the decision to obtain a thoracic CT was only associated with later period in the study and obtaining a CT scan of another body region. CXR can be used to screen for significant thoracic injuries and direct the selective use of thoracic CT in pediatric BTT. Prospective studies are needed to validate these findings and develop guidelines that include CXR to define indications for thoracic CT in pediatric BTT

  15. Wall stress on ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms with bicuspid compared with tricuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yue; Wang, Zhongjie; Liu, Raymond; Haraldsson, Henrik; Hope, Michael D; Saloner, David A; Guccione, Julius M; Ge, Liang; Tseng, Elaine

    2018-03-08

    Guidelines for repair of bicuspid aortic valve-associated ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms have been changing, most recently to the same criteria as tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms. Rupture/dissection occurs when wall stress exceeds wall strength. Recent studies suggest similar strength of bicuspid aortic valve versus tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms; thus, comparative wall stress may better predict dissection in bicuspid aortic valve versus tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms. Our aim was to determine whether bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms had higher wall stresses than their tricuspid aortic valve counterparts. Patients with bicuspid aortic valve- and tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (bicuspid aortic valve = 17, tricuspid aortic valve = 19) greater than 4.5 cm underwent electrocardiogram-gated computed tomography angiography. Patient-specific 3-dimensional geometry was reconstructed and loaded to systemic pressure after accounting for prestress geometry. Finite element analyses were performed using the LS-DYNA solver (LSTC Inc, Livermore, Calif) with user-defined fiber-embedded material model to determine ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm wall stress. Bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms 99th-percentile longitudinal stresses were 280 kPa versus 242 kPa (P = .028) for tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms in systole. These stresses did not correlate to diameter for bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (r = -0.004) but had better correlation to tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms diameter (r = 0.677). Longitudinal stresses on sinotubular junction were significantly higher in bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms than in tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (405 vs 329 kPa, P = .023). Bicuspid

  16. The reduction of image noise and streak artifact in the thoracic inlet during low dose and ultra-low dose thoracic CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, N S; Prezelj, E; Burey, P; Menezes, R J; Blobel, J; Ursani, A; Kashani, H; Siewerdsen, J H

    2010-01-01

    Increased pixel noise and streak artifact reduce CT image quality and limit the potential for radiation dose reduction during CT of the thoracic inlet. We propose to quantify the pixel noise of mediastinal structures in the thoracic inlet, during low-dose (LDCT) and ultralow-dose (uLDCT) thoracic CT, and assess the utility of new software (quantum denoising system and BOOST3D) in addressing these limitations. Twelve patients had LDCT (120 kV, 25 mAs) and uLDCT (120 kV, 10 mAs) images reconstructed initially using standard mediastinal and lung filters followed by the quantum denoising system (QDS) to reduce pixel noise and BOOST3D (B3D) software to correct photon starvation noise as follows: group 1 no QDS, no B3D; group 2 B3D alone; group 3 QDS alone and group 4 both QDS and B3D. Nine regions of interest (ROIs) were replicated on mediastinal anatomy in the thoracic inlet, for each patient resulting in 3456 data points to calculate pixel noise and attenuation. QDS reduced pixel noise by 18.4% (lung images) and 15.8% (mediastinal images) at 25 mAs. B3D reduced pixel noise by ∼8% in the posterior thorax and in combination there was a 35.5% reduction in effective radiation dose (E) for LDCT (1.63-1.05 mSv) in lung images and 32.2% (1.55-1.05 mSv) in mediastinal images. The same combination produced 20.7% reduction (0.53-0.42 mSv) in E for uLDCT, for lung images and 17.3% (0.51-0.42) for mediastinal images. This quantitative analysis of image quality confirms the utility of dedicated processing software in targeting image noise and streak artifact in thoracic LDCT and uLDCT images taken in the thoracic inlet. This processing software potentiates substantial reductions in radiation dose during thoracic LDCT and uLDCT.

  17. Symptom recovery after thoracic surgery: Measuring patient-reported outcomes with the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundes, Christopher P; Shi, Qiuling; Vaporciyan, Ara A; Rice, David C; Popat, Keyuri U; Cleeland, Charles S; Wang, Xin Shelley

    2015-09-01

    Measuring patient-reported outcomes (PROs) has become increasingly important for assessing quality of care and guiding patient management. However, PROs have yet to be integrated with traditional clinical outcomes (such as length of hospital stay), to evaluate perioperative care. This study aimed to use longitudinal PRO assessments to define the postoperative symptom recovery trajectory in patients undergoing thoracic surgery for lung cancer. Newly diagnosed patients (N = 60) with stage I or II non-small cell lung cancer who underwent either standard open thoracotomy or video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery lobectomy reported multiple symptoms from before surgery to 3 months after surgery, using the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory. We conducted Kaplan-Meier analyses to determine when symptoms returned to presurgical levels and to mild-severity levels during recovery. The most-severe postoperative symptoms were fatigue, pain, shortness of breath, disturbed sleep, and drowsiness. The median time to return to mild symptom severity for these 5 symptoms was shorter than the time to return to baseline severity, with fatigue taking longer. Recovery from pain occurred more quickly for patients who underwent lobectomy versus thoracotomy (8 vs 18 days, respectively; P = .022). Patients who had poor preoperative performance status or comorbidities reported higher postoperative pain (all P < .05). Assessing symptoms from the patient's perspective throughout the postoperative recovery period is an effective strategy for evaluating perioperative care. This study demonstrates that the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory is a sensitive tool for detecting symptomatic recovery, with an expected relationship among surgery type, preoperative performance status, and comorbid conditions. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Thoracic manifestations of Kaposi's sarcoma in AIDS: radiological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchiori, Edson; Baptista, Maria Ines Garcia; Cardenas, Gloria Pamela; Costa Praxedes, Marcia da; Boechat, Lucia de Fatima; Quaresma, Patricia Souto Maior

    1995-01-01

    The radiological findings of 189 cases of Kaposi's sarcoma occurring in patients with AIDS were studied. There was also made pathological correlations in these patients. Interstitial reticular infiltrations were frequently detected on thoracic examination showing paracardiac confluent areas. There was also lymphadenopathy, gross nodules and pleural fluid accumulation. Although there was no detection of any pathognomonic aspect, the interstitial reticular infiltration finding together with the paracardiac confluent areas and associated with gross nodules, is highly indicative to thoracic involvement by the disease. (author). 32 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Warm fresh whole blood and thoracic traumain iraq and afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keneally, Ryan J; Parsons, Andrew M; Willett, Peter B

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic trauma occurred in 10% of the patients seen at US military treatment facilities in Iraq and Afghanistan and 52% of those patients were transfused. Among those transfused, 281 patients received warm fresh whole blood. A previous report documented improved survival with warm fresh whole blood in patients injured in combat without stratification by injury pattern. A later report described an increase in acute lung injuries after its administration. Survivorship and warm fresh whole blood have never been analyzed in a subpopulation at highest risk for lung injuries, such as patients with thoracic trauma. There may be a heterogeneous relationship between whole blood and survival based on likelihood of a concomitant pulmonary injury. In this report, the relationship between warm fresh whole blood and survivorship was analyzed among patients at highest risk for concomitant pulmonary injuries. Patients with thoracic trauma who received a transfusion were identified in the Joint Theater Trauma Registry. Gross mortality rates were compared between whole blood recipients and patients transfused with component therapy only. The association between each blood component and mortality was determined in a regression model. The overall mortality risk was compared between warm fresh whole blood recipients and non-recipients. Patients transfused with warm fresh whole blood in addition to component therapy had a higher mortality rate than patients transfused only separated blood components (21.3% vs. 12.8%, P warm fresh whole blood in addition to component therapy was not associated with increased mortality risk compared with the transfusion of component therapy only (OR 1.247 [95% CI 0.760-2.048], P = 0.382). Patients with combat related thoracic trauma transfused with warm fresh whole blood were not at increased risk for mortality compared to those who received component therapy alone when controlling for covariates.

  20. Use of Chest Computed Tomography in Stable Patients with Blunt Thoracic Trauma: Clinical and Forensic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makbule Ergin

    2011-01-01

    fractures were the most common injury. Thorax computed tomography was significantly superior to chest radiography in detecting pneumothorax , hemothorax and lung contusion. Eightyone life threatening lesions were detected and 50 (61%; pneumothorax 13, hemothorax 24, lung contusion 9,and pneumomediastinum 4 of these lesions could not be detected with plain chest radiography. The clinical management [in 15 patients (30%], and the forensic assesment was changed [in 14 (28%] patients were changed.  Conclusion:We concluded that using Computed Tomography of the thorax in thoracic travmas prive meticulous assesment in management of patients and forens icissues.

  1. Experience of thoracic surgery performed under difficult conditions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We did not use post-operative suction drainage but simple "under water seal" bottle drainage. Results: Thoracic surgery was performed in 32 patients in Medina Hospital. Most of these cases underwent pleural decortications for chronic empyema (18 patients), 7 patients had removal of bronchial foreign bodies, 4 patients ...

  2. Treatment outcomes of extended-field radiation therapy for thoracic superficial esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Doo Yeul; Moon, Sung Ho; Cho, Kwan Ho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Moon Soo; Lee, Jong Yeul; Suh, Yang Gun

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of extended-field radiation therapy for patients with thoracic superficial esophageal cancer (SEC). From May 2007 to October 2016, a total of 24 patients with thoracic SEC (T1a and T1b) who underwent definitive radiotherapy and were analyzed retrospectively. The median total radiotherapy dose was 64 Gy (range, 54 to 66 Gy) in conventional fractionation. All 24 patients received radiotherapy to whole thoracic esophagus and 23 patients received elective nodal irradiation. The supraclavicular lymph nodes, the celiac lymph nodes, and both of those nodal areas were included in 11, 3, and 9 patients, respectively. The median follow-up duration was 28.7 months (range 7.9 to 108.0 months). The 3-year overall survival, local control, and progression-free survival rates were 95.2%, 89.7%, and 78.7%, respectively. There were 5 patients (20.8%) with progression of disease, 2 local failures (8.3%) and 3 (12.5%) regional failures. Three patients also experienced distant metastasis and had died of disease progression. There were no treatment-related toxicities of grade 3 or higher. Definitive extended-field radiotherapy for thoracic SEC showed durable disease control rates in medically inoperable and endoscopically unfit patients. Even extended-field radiotherapy with elective nodal irradiation was safe without grade 3 or 4 toxicities

  3. Treatment outcomes of extended-field radiation therapy for thoracic superficial esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Doo Yeul; Moon, Sung Ho; Cho, Kwan Ho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Moon Soo; Lee, Jong Yeul; Suh, Yang Gun [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of extended-field radiation therapy for patients with thoracic superficial esophageal cancer (SEC). From May 2007 to October 2016, a total of 24 patients with thoracic SEC (T1a and T1b) who underwent definitive radiotherapy and were analyzed retrospectively. The median total radiotherapy dose was 64 Gy (range, 54 to 66 Gy) in conventional fractionation. All 24 patients received radiotherapy to whole thoracic esophagus and 23 patients received elective nodal irradiation. The supraclavicular lymph nodes, the celiac lymph nodes, and both of those nodal areas were included in 11, 3, and 9 patients, respectively. The median follow-up duration was 28.7 months (range 7.9 to 108.0 months). The 3-year overall survival, local control, and progression-free survival rates were 95.2%, 89.7%, and 78.7%, respectively. There were 5 patients (20.8%) with progression of disease, 2 local failures (8.3%) and 3 (12.5%) regional failures. Three patients also experienced distant metastasis and had died of disease progression. There were no treatment-related toxicities of grade 3 or higher. Definitive extended-field radiotherapy for thoracic SEC showed durable disease control rates in medically inoperable and endoscopically unfit patients. Even extended-field radiotherapy with elective nodal irradiation was safe without grade 3 or 4 toxicities.

  4. Thoracic CT in the ED: a study of thoracic computed tomography utilisation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Williams, E

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the use of thoracic Computed Tomography (CT) in the Emergency Department of a Dublin Academic Teaching Hospital over a six month period. Data was retrieved using the hospital\\'s computerised information system. There were 202 referrals in total for thoracic CT from the Emergency Department during this time period. The most common indication for thoracic CT referral was for the investigation of pulmonary embolism with 127 (63%) referrals. There were 40 (25%) referrals for suspected malignancy and lung disease, whilst 8 (4%) of the referrals were for investigation of thoracic aortic dissection, 8 (4%) for infection, and 6 (3%) were for investigation of thoracic injury. Only 8 (4%) of all referrals were for investigation of injury as a result of chest trauma.

  5. Right thoracic curvature in the normal spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masuda Keigo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trunk asymmetry and vertebral rotation, at times observed in the normal spine, resemble the characteristics of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. Right thoracic curvature has also been reported in the normal spine. If it is determined that the features of right thoracic side curvature in the normal spine are the same as those observed in AIS, these findings might provide a basis for elucidating the etiology of this condition. For this reason, we investigated right thoracic curvature in the normal spine. Methods For normal spinal measurements, 1,200 patients who underwent a posteroanterior chest radiographs were evaluated. These consisted of 400 children (ages 4-9, 400 adolescents (ages 10-19 and 400 adults (ages 20-29, with each group comprised of both genders. The exclusion criteria were obvious chest and spinal diseases. As side curvature is minimal in normal spines and the range at which curvature is measured is difficult to ascertain, first the typical curvature range in scoliosis patients was determined and then the Cobb angle in normal spines was measured using the same range as the scoliosis curve, from T5 to T12. Right thoracic curvature was given a positive value. The curve pattern was organized in each collective three groups: neutral (from -1 degree to 1 degree, right (> +1 degree, and left ( Results In child group, Cobb angle in left was 120, in neutral was 125 and in right was 155. In adolescent group, Cobb angle in left was 70, in neutral was 114 and in right was 216. In adult group, Cobb angle in left was 46, in neutral was 102 and in right was 252. The curvature pattern shifts to the right side in the adolescent group (p Conclusions Based on standing chest radiographic measurements, a right thoracic curvature was observed in normal spines after adolescence.

  6. Mural Thrombus in the Normal-Appearing Descending Thoracic Aorta of a Chronic Smoker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Habib; Hsu, Judy; Winchell, Patricia Jo; Daoko, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Thrombus formation in an atherosclerotic or aneurysmal descending thoracic aorta is a well-described, frequently encountered vascular condition. In comparison, thrombus formation in a normal-appearing descending thoracic aorta is reported far less often. We describe the case of a 46-year-old woman who had splenic and renal infarctions secondary to embolic showers from a large, mobile thrombus in a morphologically normal proximal descending thoracic aorta. After the patient underwent anticoagulation, stent-grafting, and surgical bypass to correct an arterial blockage caused by the stent-graft, she resumed a relatively normal life. In contrast with other cases of a thrombotic but normal-appearing descending thoracic aorta, this patient had no known malignancy or systemic coagulative disorders; her sole risk factor was chronic smoking. We discuss our patient's case and review the relevant medical literature, focusing on the effect of smoking on coagulation physiology. PMID:24391341

  7. The role of diagnostic VATS in penetrating thoracic injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guasti Guido

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Penetrating chest injuries account for 1–13% of thoracic trauma hospital admissions and most of these are managed with a conservative approach. Nevertheless, 18–30% of cases managed only with tube thoracostomy have residual clotted blood, considered the major risk factor for the development of fibrothorax and empyema. In addition, 4–23% of chest injury patients present persistent pneumothorax and 15–59% present an injury to the diaphragm, which is missed in 30% of cases. In order to make a correct diagnosis, reduce the number of missed injuries, chronic sequelae and late mortality we propose performing surgical exploration of all patients with a penetrating injury of the pleural cavity. Methods 1270 patients who sustained thoracic trauma were admitted to our hospital between 1994 and 2004. Of these, 16 patients had penetrating injuries: thirteen were surgically explored by means of Video Assisted Thoracic Surgery (VATS, and 3 with thoracotomy due to hemodynamic instability or suspected lesion of the heart or great vessels. Results In the 13 patients who underwent VATS, 5 injuries to the diaphragm, 3 lesions to an intercostal artery, and 1 lesion to the diaphragmatic artery were detected. In 12 of these patients a laceration of the pulmonary parenchyma was also present. A conversion to thoracotomy was necessary due to a broad laceration of the diaphragm and due to hemostasis of an intercostal artery. In all but one case, which was later converted, diagnostic imaging missed the diagnosis of laceration of the diaphragm. There was no intra- or postoperative mortality, and average hospital stay was five days. Conclusion VATS is a safe and effective way to diagnose and manage penetrating thoracic injuries, and its extensive use leads to a reduction in the number of missed, potentially fatal lesions as well as in chronic sequelae.

  8. Continuous Thoracic Sympathetic Ganglion Block in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Patients with Spinal Cord Stimulation Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EungDon Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The sympathetic block is widely used for treating neuropathic pain such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS. However, single sympathetic block often provides only short-term effect. Moreover, frequent procedures for sympathetic block may increase the risk of complications. The use of epidural route may be limited by concern of infection in case of previous implantation of the spinal cord stimulation (SCS. In contrast, a continuous sympathetic block can be administered without such concerns. The continuous thoracic sympathetic block (TSGB has been used to treat the ischemic disease and other neuropathic conditions such as postherpetic neuralgia. We administered continuous thoracic sympathetic block using catheter in CRPS patients who underwent SCS implantations and achieved desirable outcomes. We believe a continuous sympathetic block is a considerable option before performing neurolysis or radiofrequency rhizotomy and even after SCS implantation.

  9. The definition of chronic lung disease in patients undergoing cardiac surgery: a comparison between the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Classifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, L; Holmes, S D; Lamberti, J; Halpin, L; Hunt, S; Ad, N

    2012-12-01

    Early and late outcomes following cardiac surgery may be adversely affected in patients with chronic lung disease (CLD) and the presence of CLD is definition dependent. The purpose of this study was to compare the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) definitions for CLD to the modified American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) definitions in diagnosing and classifying CLD among a cohort of cardiac surgery patients. A prospectively-designed study whereby high risk patients for CLD presenting for non-emergent cardiac surgery and had a history of asthma, a 10 or more pack year history of smoking or a persistent cough were included. All patients underwent spirometry testing within two weeks of surgery. The presence and severity of CLD was coded two times: 1) STS definitions with spirometry; 2) ATS/ERS guidelines. The rate of misclassification was determined using concordance and discordance rates. Sensitivity analysis of the STS spirometry definitions was calculated against the ATS/ERS definitions and respective classifications. The discordant rate for the STS spirometry driven definitions versus the ATS/ERS definitions was 21%. Forty patients (21%) classified as no CLD by the STS spirometry definition were found to have CLD by the ATS/ERS definition. The STS classification had 68% sensitivity (84/124) when identifying any CLD and only 26% sensitivity (14/54) when identifying moderate CLD. The current STS spirometry driven definitions for CLD did not perform as well as the ATS/ERS definitions in diagnosing and classifying the degree of CLD. Consideration should be given to using the ATS/ERS definitions.

  10. Improved Outcomes Associated with the Liberal Use of Thoracic Epidural Analgesia in Patients with Rib Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Courtney D; Stark, Jamie T; Jacobson, Lewis L; Powers, Jan M; Joseph, Michael F; Kinsella-Shaw, Jeffrey M; Denegar, Craig R

    2017-09-01

    Each year, more than 150,000 patients with rib fractures are admitted to US trauma centers; as many as 10% die. Effective pain control is critical to survival. One way to manage pain is thoracic epidural analgesia. If this treatment reduces mortality, more frequent use may be indicated. We analyzed the patient registry of a level II trauma center. All patients admitted with one or more rib fractures (N = 1,347) were considered. Patients who were not candidates for epidural analgesia (N = 382) were eliminated. Mortality was assessed with binary logistic regressions. Across the total population, mortality was 6.7%; incidence of pneumonia was 11.1%; mechanical ventilation was required in 23.8% of patients, for an average duration of 10.0 days; average stay in the hospital was 7.7 nights; and 49.7% of patients were admitted to the ICU for an average of 7.2 nights. Epidural analgesia was administered to 18.4% of patients. After matching samples for candidacy, patients who received epidurals were 3.7 years older, fractured 2.6 more ribs, had higher injury severity scores, and were more likely to present with bilateral fractures, flail segments, pulmonary contusions, hemothoraces, and pneumothoraces. Despite greater injury severity, mortality among these patients was lower (0.5%) than those who received alternative care (1.9%). Controlling for age, injury severity, and use of mechanical ventilation, epidural analgesia predicted a 97% reduction in mortality. Thoracic epidural analgesia associates with reduced mortality in rib fracture patients. Better care of this population is likely to be facilitated by more frequent reliance on this treatment. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  11. Value of postmortem thoracic CT over radiography in imaging of pediatric rib fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Terence S.; Babyn, Paul S. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Reyes, Jeanette A.; Chiasson, David A. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Paediatric Laboratory Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [University of Toronto, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Berdon, Walter E. [Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies Hospital, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Studies have reported that thoracic CT may provide greater sensitivity compared with radiography in detection of pediatric rib fractures and fracture healing. The additional sensitivity afforded by thoracic CT may have medicolegal implications where abuse is suspected. To determine the additional value of postmortem thoracic CT compared with radiography in detecting pediatric rib fractures, and fracture healing, using autopsy findings as a gold standard. We retrospectively reviewed 56 coroner's cases with postmortem radiography and CT thoracic survey. All studies underwent primary interpretation by one or two radiologists. The study radiologist independently reviewed all images from 13 patients with positive findings on radiography, CT or autopsy. Sensitivity and specificity between observers and imaging modalities were compared. Primary interpretation: Fractures were recognized on radiography in 5/12 patients who had fractures found at autopsy, and on CT in 8/12 patients. In total, 29% (24/83) of fractures were reported on radiography, and 51% (52/101) of fractures were reported on CT. Study radiologist: Fractures were recognized on radiography in 7/12 patients who had fractures found at autopsy, and on CT in 11/12 patients. In total, 46% (38/83) of fractures were reported on radiography, and 85% (86/101) of fractures were reported on CT. Postmortem thoracic CT provides greater sensitivity than radiography in detecting pediatric rib fractures, most notably in anterior and posterior fractures. However, the degree of improvement in sensitivity provided by CT might depend on observer experience. (orig.)

  12. Imaging of thoracic aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, F.H.; Young, N.; Soo, Y.S.

    1994-01-01

    Acute thoracic aortic dissection has a high mortality rate if untreated, so the diagnosis must be rapidly made. Multiple imaging techniques are often used. This retrospective study from 1988 to 1993 assesses the usefulness in diagnosis of chest X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scanning, aortography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), trans-thoracic (TTE) and trans-oesophageal (TOE) echocardiography. Forty-two patients with a final clinical diagnosis of dissection were studied. The diagnosis was confirmed in 16 (13 at surgery and three at autopsy). Three died with dissection given as the only cause of death. Chest X-ray abnormalities were seen in all 19 patients with surgery or death from dissection, with a widened mediastinum and/or dilated aorta being present in 17. In the group of 16 patients with surgery or autopsy proof, CT scans found dissections in 9 out of 12 patients studied and correctly classified the type in only five. Aortography was preformed in five, with accurate depiction of dissection and type in all. TTE found dissections in three of eight patients imaged by this method. MRI and TOE were preformed each on two patients, with accurate depiction of dissection and type in each. Because of the relatively low sensitivity of CT scanning in defining aortic dissections Westmead Hospital is currently assessing the use of TOE as the prime imaging modality prior to surgical intervention. 17 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs

  13. Temporary occipital fixation in young children with severe cervical-thoracic spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Brian J; Minkara, Anas A; Angevine, Peter D; Vitale, Michael G; Lenke, Lawrence G; Anderson, Richard C E

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE The long-term effects of instrumentation and fusion of the occipital-cervical-thoracic spine on spinal growth in young children are poorly understood. To mitigate the effects of this surgery on the growing pediatric spine, the authors report a novel technique used in 4 children with severe cervical-thoracic instability. These patients underwent instrumentation from the occiput to the upper thoracic region for stabilization, but without bone graft at the craniovertebral junction (CVJ). Subsequent surgery was then performed to remove the occipital instrumentation, thereby allowing further growth and increased motion across the CVJ. METHODS Three very young children (15, 30, and 30 months old) underwent occipital to thoracic posterior segmental instrumentation due to cervical or upper thoracic dislocation, progressive kyphosis, and myelopathy. The fourth child (10 years old) underwent similar instrumentation for progressive cervical-thoracic scoliosis. Bone graft was placed at and distal to C-2 only. After follow-up CT scans demonstrated posterior arthrodesis without unintended fusion from the occiput to C-2, 3 patients underwent removal of the occipital instrumentation. RESULTS Follow-up cervical spine flexion/extension radiographs demonstrated partial restoration of motion at the CVJ. One patient has not had the occipital instrumentation removed yet, because only 4 months have elapsed since her operation. CONCLUSIONS Temporary fixation to the occiput provides increased biomechanical stability for spinal stabilization in young children, without permanently eliminating motion and growth at the CVJ. This technique can be considered in children who require longer instrumentation constructs for temporary stabilization, but who only need fusion in more limited areas where spinal instability exists.

  14. Ancient schwannoma of thoracic spine in a schizophrenic patient with somatic delusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ting Wen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ancient schwannoma is a rare variant of schwannoma characterized by histopathologic degenerative changes, which are thought to be the result of long-term tumor growth and aging. However, ancient schwannoma in the spinal canal is particularly rare. We report a case of thoracic spine intradural extramedullary ancient schwannoma in a schizophrenic patient, who kept saying that “something in his back was giving him electric shock” for a long time. Unfortunately, this complaint was misinterpreted as somatic delusion symptoms. A spinal cord tumor was taken into consideration only after paraparesis developed. We have highlighted this case to remind every clinician to remain alert about the possibility of organic disease while treating patients with psychotic disorder history. Thorough neurological examination is required to avoid misdiagnosis. Spinal canal schwannoma can be totally removed successfully with good functional outcome and prognosis.

  15. Reshaping of Gait Coordination by Robotic Intervention in Myelopathy Patients After Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, Sandra; Kadone, Hideki; Kubota, Shigeki; Abe, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Yukiyo; Marushima, Aiki; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Masashi; Suzuki, Kenji

    2018-01-01

    The Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament (OPLL) is an idiopathic degenerative spinal disease which may cause motor deficit. For patients presenting myelopathy or severe stenosis, surgical decompression is the treatment of choice; however, despite adequate decompression residual motor impairment is found in some cases. After surgery, there is no therapeutic approach available for this population. The Hybrid Assistive Limb® (HAL) robot suit is a unique powered exoskeleton designed to predict, support, and enhance the lower extremities performance of patients using their own bioelectric signals. This approach has been used for spinal cord injury and stroke patients where the walking performance improved. However, there is no available data about gait kinematics evaluation after HAL therapy. Here we analyze the effect of HAL therapy in OPLL patients in acute and chronic stages after decompression surgery. We found that HAL therapy improved the walking performance for both groups. Interestingly, kinematics evaluation by the analysis of the elevation angles of the thigh, shank, and foot by using a principal component analysis showed that planar covariation, plane orientation, and movement range evaluation improved for acute patients suggesting an improvement in gait coordination. Being the first study performing kinematics analysis after HAL therapy, our results suggest that HAL improved the gait coordination of acute patients by supporting the relearning process and therefore reshaping their gait pattern. PMID:29551960

  16. Phrenic nerve reconstruction in complete video-assisted thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Shun; Kohno, Tadasu; Fujimori, Sakashi; Yokomakura, Naoya; Ikeda, Takeshi; Harano, Takashi; Suzuki, Souichiro; Iida, Takahiro; Sakai, Emi

    2015-01-01

    Primary or metastatic lung cancer or mediastinal tumours may at times involve the phrenic nerve and pericardium. To remove the pathology en bloc, the phrenic nerve must be resected. This results in phrenic nerve paralysis, which in turn reduces pulmonary function and quality of life. As a curative measure of this paralysis and thus a preventive measure against decreased pulmonary function and quality of life, we have performed immediate phrenic nerve reconstruction under complete video-assisted thoracic surgery, and with minimal additional stress to the patient. This study sought to ascertain the utility of this procedure from an evaluation of the cases experienced to date. We performed 6 cases of complete video-assisted thoracic surgery phrenic nerve reconstruction from October 2009 to December 2013 in patients who had undergone phrenic nerve resection or separation to remove tumours en bloc. In all cases, it was difficult to separate the phrenic nerve from the tumour. Reconstruction involved direct anastomosis in 3 cases and intercostal nerve interposition anastomosis in the remaining 3 cases. In the 6 patients (3 men, 3 women; mean age 50.8 years), we performed two right-sided and four left-sided procedures. The mean anastomosis time was 5.3 min for direct anastomosis and 35.3 min for intercostal nerve interposition anastomosis. Postoperative phrenic nerve function was measured on chest X-ray during inspiration and expiration. Direct anastomosis was effective in 2 of the 3 patients, and intercostal nerve interposition anastomosis was effective in all 3 patients. Diaphragm function was confirmed on X-ray to be improved in these 5 patients. Complete video-assisted thoracic surgery phrenic nerve reconstruction was effective for direct anastomosis as well as for intercostal nerve interposition anastomosis in a small sample of selected patients. The procedure shows promise for phrenic nerve reconstruction and further data should be accumulated over time. © The

  17. Possible radiation induced cancer of the thoracic esophagus after postoperative irradiation for the breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Mamoru; Matsubara, Toshiki; Kasumi, Fujio; Nishi, Mitsumasa; Kajitani, Tamaki

    1991-01-01

    We report 11 patients with cancer of the thoracic esophagus developing after postoperative irradiation therapy for breast cancer. Irradiation was done immediately after mastectomy in these patients and the irradiation field included the unilateral or bilateral parasternal region. They received a total dose ranging from 35 Gy to 60 Gy and the dose received to the thoracic esophagus was estimated from 10 Gy to 48 Gy. All cancer sites were involved in the irradiation field. The latent intervals of 10 patients from radiation to the manifest of cancer ranged from 10 to 19 years. Among 4777 women undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer between 1946 and 1980 in our hospital, 8 women (0.17%) developed cancer of the thoracic esophagus, whereas 5 (0.335%) out of 1534 women treated with mastectomy and radiotherapy with Linac between 1964 and 1980 developed cancer of the thoracic esophagus. Higher incidence of esophageal cancer in patients treated with surgery and radiation suggests that these cancers might be induced by radiation. Eight patients had esophagectomy and 4 patients of them received postoperative irradiation. They have survived from 9 months to 13 years. Two patients were controlled well by the irradiation alone. It is interesting that radiation therapy is sensitive to the possible radiation induced cancer of the thoracic esophagus. Follow up study should be directed to the possible development of second malignancy in patients who survive for a long time after radiation therapy. (author)

  18. Radiologic findings of thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akgul Ozmen C

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cihan Akgul Ozmen,1 Serdar Onat,2 Delal Aycicek3 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Chest Surgery, Dicle University School of Medicine, Diyarbakir, 3Radiology Unit, Siirt State Hospital, Siirt, Turkey Introduction: Chest trauma may be blunt or penetrating and the chest is the third most common trauma region. It is a significant cause of mortality. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT has been an increasingly used method to evaluate chest trauma because of its high success in detecting tissue and organ injuries. Herein, we aimed to present MDCT findings in patients with blunt and penetrating chest trauma admitted to our department. Methods: A total of 240 patients admitted to the emergency department of our hospital between April 2012 and July 2013 with a diagnosis of chest trauma who underwent MDCT evaluations were included. Most of the patients were male (83.3% and victims of a blunt chest trauma. The images were analyzed with respect to the presence of fractures of bony structures, hemothorax, pneumothorax, mediastinal organ injury, and pulmonary and vascular injuries. Results: MDCT images of the 240 patients yielded a prevalence of 41.7% rib fractures, 11.2% scapular fractures, and 7.5% clavicle fractures. The prevalence of thoracic vertebral fracture was 13.8% and that of sternal fracture was 3.8%. The prevalence of hemothorax, pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, and subcutaneous emphysema was 34.6%, 62.1%, 9.6%, and 35.4%, respectively. The prevalence of rib, clavicle, and thoracic vertebral fractures and pulmonary contusion was higher in the blunt trauma group, whereas the prevalence of hemothorax, subcutaneous emphysema, diaphragmatic injury, and other vascular lacerations was significantly higher in the penetrating trauma group than in the blunt trauma group (p<0.05. Conclusion: MDCT images may yield a high prevalence of fracture of bony structures, soft tissue lacerations, and vascular lesions, which should be well understood by

  19. Prognostic value of trans-thoracic echocardiography in patients with acute stroke and atrial fibrillation: findings from the RAF study

    OpenAIRE

    Paciaroni, Maurizio; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Falocci, Nicola; Caso, Valeria; Becattini, Cecilia; Marcheselli, Simona; Rueckert, Christina; Pezzini, Alessandro; Poli, Loris; Padovani, Alessandro; Csiba, Laszló; Szabó, Lilla; Sohn, Sung-Il; Tassinari, Tiziana; Abdul-Rahim, Azmil H.

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy is recommended for the secondary prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). T he identification of patients at high risk for early recurrence, which are potential candidates to prompt anticoagulation, is crucial to justify the risk of bleeding associated with early anticoagulant treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate in patients with acute ischemic stroke and AF the association between findings at trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE) and 9...

  20. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy under Segmental Thoracic Spinal Anesthesia: A Feasible Economical Alternative

    OpenAIRE

    Kejriwal, Aditya Kumar; Begum, Shaheen; Krishan, Gopal; Agrawal, Richa

    2017-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is normally performed under general anesthesia, but regional techniques like thoracic epidural and lumbar spinal have been emerging and found beneficial. We performed a clinical case study of segmental thoracic spinal anaesthesia in a healthy patient. We selected an ASA grade I patient undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy and gave spinal anesthetic in T10-11 interspace using 1 ml of bupivacaine 5 mg ml?1 mixed with 0.5 ml of fentanyl 50 ?g ml?1. Other drugs we...

  1. Relationship between thoracic hypokyphosis, lumbar lordosis and sagittal pelvic parameters in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Jean-Luc; Geoffray, Anne; Yagoubi, Fatima; Chau, Edouard; Solla, Federico; Oborocianu, Ioana; Rampal, Virginie

    2013-11-01

    Sagittal spine and pelvic alignment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is poorly described in the literature. It generally reports the sagittal alignment with regard to the type of curve and never correlated to the thoracic kyphosis. The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis and sagittal pelvic parameters in thoracic AIS. Spinal and pelvic sagittal parameters were evaluated on lateral radiographs of 86 patients with thoracic AIS; patients were separated into hypokyphosis group (n = 42) and normokyphosis group (n = 44). Results were statistically analyzed. The lumbar lordosis was lower in the hypokyphosis group, due to the low proximal lordosis. The thoracic kyphosis was not correlated with any pelvic parameters but with the proximal lordosis. The pelvic incidence was correlated with sacral slope, pelvic tilt, lumbar lordosis and highly correlated with distal lumbar lordosis in the two groups. There was a significant linear regression between thoracic kyphosis and proximal lordosis and between pelvic incidence and distal lordosis. We can consider that the proximal part of the lordosis depends on the thoracic kyphosis and the distal part depends on the pelvic incidence. The hypokyphosis in AIS is independent of the pelvic parameters and could be described as a structural parameter, characteristic of the scoliotic deformity.

  2. Regional distribution of ventilation in patients with obstructive sleep apnea: the role of thoracic electrical impedance tomography (EIT) monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiovanni, Filippo; Mura, Benedetta; Tagliaferri, Chiara; Bisanti, Alessandra; Testani, Elisa; Maviglia, Riccardo; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2016-12-01

    The aim of our study was to apply the electrical impedance tomography (EIT) technique to the study of ventilation during wake and NREM and REM sleep in patients with obstructive sleep apneas (OSA). This is a prospective, observational, monocentric, pilot study in a neurology department with a sleep disorder center. Inclusion criteria were age ≥18 years, both gender, and diagnosis of OSA. Exclusion criteria were the contraindications to the thoracic EIT. All patients underwent laboratory-based polysomnography (PSG) alongside thoracic EIT. Primary endpoint was to compare the global impedance (GI) among the conditions: "Wake" vs "Sleep," "NREM" vs "REM," and "OSA" vs "Non-OSA." Secondary endpoint was to measure the regional distribution of impedance in the four regions of interest (ROIs), in each condition. Of the 17 consecutive patients enrolled, two were excluded because of poor-quality EIT tracings. Fifteen were analyzed, 10 men and 5 women, mean age 51.6 ± 14.4 years. GI was higher in Wake vs Sleep (Wake 13.24 ± 11.23; Sleep 12.56 ± 13.36; p EIT can prove a valuable additional strategy for the evaluation of OSA patients.

  3. Heartbeat-related displacement of the thoracic aorta in patients with chronic aortic dissection type B: Quantification by dynamic CTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Tim F. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: tim.weber@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Ganten, Maria-Katharina [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: m.ganten@dkfz.de; Boeckler, Dittmar [University of Heidelberg, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: dittmar.boeckler@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Geisbuesch, Philipp [University of Heidelberg, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: philipp.geisbuesch@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [University of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: hu.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik von [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: h.vontengg@dkfz.de

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to characterize the heartbeat-related displacement of the thoracic aorta in patients with chronic aortic dissection type B (CADB). Materials and methods: Electrocardiogram-gated computed tomography angiography was performed during inspiratory breath-hold in 11 patients with CADB: Collimation 16 mm x 1 mm, pitch 0.2, slice thickness 1 mm, reconstruction increment 0.8 mm. Multiplanar reformations were taken for 20 equidistant time instances through both ascending (AAo) and descending aorta (true lumen, DAoT; false lumen, DAoF) and the vertex of the aortic arch (VA). In-plane vessel displacement was determined by region of interest analysis. Results: Mean displacement was 5.2 {+-} 1.7 mm (AAo), 1.6 {+-} 1.0 mm (VA), 0.9 {+-} 0.4 mm (DAoT), and 1.1 {+-} 0.4 mm (DAoF). This indicated a significant reduction of displacement from AAo to VA and DAoT (p < 0.05). The direction of displacement was anterior for AAo and cranial for VA. Conclusion: In CADB, the thoracic aorta undergoes a heartbeat-related displacement that exhibits an unbalanced distribution of magnitude and direction along the thoracic vessel course. Since consecutive traction forces on the aortic wall have to be assumed, these observations may have implications on pathogenesis of and treatment strategies for CADB.

  4. One-stage posterior approaches for treatment of thoracic spinal infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kao, Fu-Cheng; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Niu, Chi-Chien; Lai, Po-Liang; Chen, Lih-Huei; Chen, Wen-Jer

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Treating thoracic infective spondylodiscitis with anterior surgical approaches carry a relatively high risk of perioperative and postoperative complications. Posterior approaches have been reported to result in lower complication rates than anterior procedures, but more evidence is needed to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of 1-stage posterior approaches for treating infectious thoracic spondylodiscitis. Preoperative and postoperative clinical data, of 18 patients who underwent 2...

  5. Thoracic radiation therapy before autologous bone marrow transplantation in relapsed or refractory Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, R.W.; Gospodarowicz, M.K.; Sutcliffe, S.B.; Crump, M.; Keating, A.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between radiation therapy (RT) and treatment-related mortality in patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) for recurrent/refractory Hodgkin's disease (HD). Between December 1986 and December 1992, 59 patients previously treated at the Princess Margaret Hospital underwent HDCT (etoposide 60 mg/kg, melphalan 160 mg/m 2 ) and ABMT, performed for refractory (13 patients) or relapsed (46 patients) HD. RT was incorporated in the salvage treatment with the intent to achieve complete control of disease prior to ABMT. RT was given before ABMT in 33 patients, and after ABMT in 4 patients. Treatment-related (TR) mortality was defined as any death occurring within 100 days of ABMT. Autopsies were performed for all patients with TR deaths. With a median follow-up of 4.6 years (range 1.2-7.4 years), the actuarial overall survival was 41%±14% at 5 years. We observed 37 deaths, and 10 of these were TR deaths. Among the 24 patients who received thoracic RT before ABMT, there were 8 TR deaths, 3 of these solely attributable to radiation pneumonitis. The remaining 5 TR deaths all had respiratory failure with complicating sepsis as a major medical problem. The interval from RT to ABMT was shorter for 8 patients dying of TR death (mean 37 days; range 0-103 days), than for the 16 survivors (mean 105 days; range 0-263 days) (P=0.026). Among 9 patients with ABMT within 50 days of thoracic RT, 6 had TR death. In contrast, among the 35 patients without thoracic RT (26 no RT, 9 non-thoracic RT), there were only 2 TR deaths. The 4 patients treated with mantle RT post-ABMT had no serious pulmonary complications. The use of thoracic RT before HDCT and ABMT was associated with a high post-transplant mortality rate. It was most evident in patients who received thoracic RT within 50 days prior to ABMT, or when the target volume included large volume of lung. We recommend that the use of

  6. Retrosternal goiter: The need for thoracic approach based on CT findings: Surgeon’s view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakkary, M.A.; Abdelrahman, A.M.; Mostafa, A.M.; Abbas, A.A.; Zedan, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: The incidence of retrosternal goiter (Rg) varies from 2% to 26% of all thyroidectomies, depending on the defining criteria . There are no clear guidelines to identify patients that require an intrathoracic approach. So, we tried to correlate, between the size and/ or anatomical site of the RSG based on preoperative CT findings and the surgical approaches used, aiming at defining those patients with RSG who are in need for thoracic approach. Patients and methods: Out of 1481 patients underwent thyroidectomy at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Cairo University, between January 2000 and December 2009, only 73 (4.93%) of them had retrosternal extension. Demographic, clinical, operative, anatomical, and pathological data of patients with RSG were recorded and analyzed. Results: The intraoperative extension of the goiter correlated with the extension seen in the CT in all except two patients. Laterality and longitudinal extension found in preoperative CT, correlated well with the surgical findings. The approach used was cervical in 66 cases (90.4%); combined approach in six patients (8.2%). Pure thoracic (full sternotomy) was used alone in one case (1.4%). Extension of the RSG down to or below the arch was associated with an increased risk of using a thoracic approach p< 0.0001. Conclusion: Preoperative CT, can be used effectively to guide the indications for using a thoracic approach. Reaching the aortic arch or beyond and loss of fat planes in CT, recurrent and malignant disease, are significant risk factors for using a thoracic approach.

  7. Atraumatic Occult Odontoid Fracture in Patients with Osteoporosis-Associated Thoracic Kyphotic Deformity: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanji Mori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anderson type II odontoid fractures are reported to be the most common injury of the odontoid process in patients over the age of 65. However, atraumatic occult Anderson type III odontoid fractures have been rarely described and remain a diagnostic challenge. In the present report, we illustrate a 78-year-old female with osteoporosis-associated marked thoracic kyphotic deformity who developed atraumatic Anderson type III occult odontoid fracture and raise awareness of this condition. Anteroposterior and lateral standard radiographs of cervical spine failed to disclose odontoid fracture. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated intensity changes of the axis. Subsequent computed tomography clearly demonstrated Anderson type III odontoid fracture. Conservative treatment achieved complete bone union without neurological deteriorations. At 3-year follow-up, the patient was doing well without neurological and radiological deteriorations. Even if the patients have no traumatic event, we have to keep odontoid fractures in our mind as one of the differential diagnoses when we encounter elderly patients with neck pain, especially in patients with osteoporosis-associated marked thoracic kyphotic deformity.

  8. Effects of thoracic paravertebral block with bupivacaine versus combined thoracic epidural block with bupivacaine and morphine on pain and pulmonary function after cholecystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigler, D; Dirkes, W; Hansen, R

    1989-01-01

    Twenty patients undergoing elective cholecystectomy via a subcostal incision were randomized in a double-blind study to either thoracic paravertebral blockade with bupivacaine 0.5% (15 ml followed by 5 ml/h) or thoracic epidural blockade with bupivacaine 7 ml 0.5% + morphine 2 mg followed by 5 ml...... by forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume and peak expiratory flow rate decreased about 50% postoperatively in both groups. In conclusion, the continuous paravertebral bupivacaine infusion used here was insufficient as the only analgesic after cholecystectomy. In contrast, epidural blockade...... with combined bupivacaine and low dose morphine produced total pain relief in six of ten patients....

  9. Pulmonary actinomycosis with thoracic soft tissue mass: a rare onset form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarca-diaz de la Espina, Miguel A.; Lopez-Menendez, Carlos; Ruiz-Martinez, Rafael; Molino-Trinidad, Ceferino

    2001-03-01

    Actinomycosis is unusual, and rare especially when the lung and the thoracic wall are involved. It is more frequent in immunocompromised patient. US, CT, or MRI are imaging methods of diagnosis with high sensibility to recognise the disease and are able to the management. We point out a rare case in a normal teenager with thoracic abscess.

  10. Pulmonary actinomycosis with thoracic soft tissue mass: a rare onset form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarca-diaz de la Espina, Miguel A.; Lopez-Menendez, Carlos; Ruiz-Martinez, Rafael; Molino-Trinidad, Ceferino

    2001-01-01

    Actinomycosis is unusual, and rare especially when the lung and the thoracic wall are involved. It is more frequent in immunocompromised patient. US, CT, or MRI are imaging methods of diagnosis with high sensibility to recognise the disease and are able to the management. We point out a rare case in a normal teenager with thoracic abscess

  11. Glutathione system participation in thoracic aneurysms from patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga-Muñoz, Alejandra María; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Guarner-Lans, Verónica; Núñez-Garrido, Elías; Velázquez Espejel, Rodrigo; Huesca-Gómez, Claudia; Gamboa-Ávila, Ricardo; Soto, María Elena

    2017-05-01

    Aortic dilatation in Marfan syndrome (MFS) is progressive. It is associated with oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction that contribute to the early acute dissection of the vessel and can result in rupture of the aorta and sudden death. We evaluated the participation of the glutathione (GSH) system, which could be involved in the mechanisms that promote the formation and progression of the aortic aneurysms in MFS patients. Aortic aneurysm tissue was obtained during chest surgery from eight control subjects and 14 MFS patients. Spectrophotometrical determination of activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), lipid peroxidation (LPO) index, carbonylation, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and concentration of reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH and GSSG respectively), was performed in the homogenate from aortic aneurysm tissue. LPO index, carbonylation, TGF-β1, and GR activity were increased in MFS patients (p < 0.04), while TAC, GSH/GSSG ratio, GPx, and GST activity were significantly decreased (p < 0.04). The depletion of GSH, in spite of the elevated activity of GR, not only diminished the activity of GSH-depend GST and GPx, but increased LPO, carbonylation and decreased TAC. These changes could promote the structural and functional alterations in the thoracic aorta of MFS patients.

  12. Fractures of the thoracic spine in patients with minor trauma: Comparison of diagnostic accuracy and dose of biplane radiography and MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karul, M., E-mail: m.karul@uke.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Bannas, P.; Schoennagel, B.P.; Hoffmann, A.; Wedegaertner, U.; Adam, G.; Yamamura, J. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    Objectives: To investigate the accuracy of biplane radiography in the detection of fractures of the thoracic spine in patients with minor trauma using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as the reference and to compare the dose of both techniques. Methods: 107 consecutive trauma patients with suspected fractures of the thoracic spine on physical examination were included. All had undergone biplane radiography first, followed by a MDCT scan between October 2008 and October 2012. A fourfold table was used for the classification of the screening test results. Both the Chi-square test (χ{sup 2}) and the mean dose-length product (DLP) were used to compare the diagnostic methods. Results: MDCT revealed 77 fractures in 65/107 patients (60.7%). Biplane radiography was true positive in 32/107 patients (29.9%), false positive in 19/107 patients (17.8%), true negative in 23/107 (21.5%) and false negative in 33/107 patients (30.8%), showing a sensitivity of 49.2%, a specificity of 54.7%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 62.7%, a negative predictive value (NPV) of 41.1%, and an accuracy of 51.4%. The presence of a fracture on biplane radiography was highly statistical significant, if this was simultaneously proven by MDCT (χ{sup 2} = 7.6; p = 0.01). None of the fractures missed on biplane radiography was unstable. The mean DLP on biplane radiography was 14.5 mGy cm (range 1.9–97.8) and on MDCT 374.6 mGy cm (range 80.2–871). Conclusions: The sensitivity and the specificity of biplane radiography in the diagnosis of fractures of the thoracic spine in patients with minor trauma are low. Considering the wide availability of MDCT that is usually necessary for taking significant therapeutic steps, the indication for biplane radiography should be very restrictive.

  13. Left Sided Trans-thoracic Esophagectomy for Resectable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    Background: Surgery is the main stay of treatment for Esophageal Cancer but there is no .... patients and a nasogastric tube positioned in the gastric tube in all. .... infection, thorough drainage of the thoracic cavity, maintenance of nutrition and ...

  14. Double vs single internal thoracic artery harvesting in diabetic patients: role in perioperative infection rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parolari Alessandro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this prospective study is to evaluate the role in the onset of surgical site infections of bilateral internal thoracic arteries harvesting in patients with decompensated preoperative glycemia. Methods 81 consecutive patients with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus underwent elective CABG harvesting single or double internal thoracic arteries. Single left ITA was harvested in 41 patients (Group 1, 50.6%, BITAs were harvested in 40 (Group 2, 49.4%. The major clinical end points analyzed in this study were infection rate, type of infection, duration of infection, infection relapse rate and total hospital length of stay. Results Five patients developed sternal SSI in the perioperative period, 2 in group 1 and 3 in group 2 without significant difference. All sternal SSIs were superficial with no sternal dehiscence. The development of infection from the time of surgery took 18.5 ± 2.1 and 7.3 ± 3.0 days for Groups 1 and 2 respectively. The infections were treated with wound irrigation and debridement, and with VAC therapy as well as with antibiotics. The VAC system was removed after a mean of 12.8 ± 5.1 days, when sterilization was achieved. The overall survival estimate at 1 year was 98.7%. Only BMI was a significant predictor of SSI using multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis (Odds Ratio: 1.34; 95%Conficdence Interval: 1.02–1.83; p value: 0.04. In the model, the use of BITA was not an independent predictor of SSI. Conclusion CABG with bilateral pedicled ITAs grafting could be performed safely even in diabetics with poor preoperative glycaemic control.

  15. Giant thoracic schwannoma presenting with abrupt onset of abdominal pain: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Giant intradural extramedullary schwannomas of the thoracic spine are not common. Schwannomas, that is, tumors derived from neoplastic Schwann cells, and neurofibromas represent the most common intradural extramedullary spinal lesions. We report the case of a patient with a giant thoracic schwannoma presenting unusually with acute abdominal pain and with delayed neurological impairment. Case presentation A 26-year-old Hispanic man with no previous medical problems presented with acute periumbilical pain. After extensive work-up including an exploratory laparotomy for appendectomy, magnetic resonance imaging scans of the lumbar and thoracic spine revealed a giant intradural extramedullary thoracic schwannoma within the spinal canal posterior to the T9, T10, and T11 vertebral bodies. Magnetic resonance imaging signal prolongation was noted in the spinal cord both rostral and caudal to the schwannoma. The patient underwent an urgent laminectomy from T8 to L1. After sacrificing the T10 root, the tumor was removed en bloc. Postoperatively, the patient improved significantly gaining antigravity strength in both lower extremities. Conclusion The T10 dermatome is represented by the umbilical region. This referred pain may represent a mechanism by which a giant thoracic schwannoma may present as acute abdominal pain. Acute, intense abdominal pain with delayed neurologic deficit is a rare presentation of a thoracic schwannoma but should be considered as a possible cause of abdominal pain presenting without clear etiology. Although these lesions may be delayed in their diagnosis, early diagnosis and treatment may lead to an improved clinical outcome. PMID:19946504

  16. Giant thoracic schwannoma presenting with abrupt onset of abdominal pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Isaac

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Giant intradural extramedullary schwannomas of the thoracic spine are not common. Schwannomas, that is, tumors derived from neoplastic Schwann cells, and neurofibromas represent the most common intradural extramedullary spinal lesions. We report the case of a patient with a giant thoracic schwannoma presenting unusually with acute abdominal pain and with delayed neurological impairment. Case presentation A 26-year-old Hispanic man with no previous medical problems presented with acute periumbilical pain. After extensive work-up including an exploratory laparotomy for appendectomy, magnetic resonance imaging scans of the lumbar and thoracic spine revealed a giant intradural extramedullary thoracic schwannoma within the spinal canal posterior to the T9, T10, and T11 vertebral bodies. Magnetic resonance imaging signal prolongation was noted in the spinal cord both rostral and caudal to the schwannoma. The patient underwent an urgent laminectomy from T8 to L1. After sacrificing the T10 root, the tumor was removed en bloc. Postoperatively, the patient improved significantly gaining antigravity strength in both lower extremities. Conclusion The T10 dermatome is represented by the umbilical region. This referred pain may represent a mechanism by which a giant thoracic schwannoma may present as acute abdominal pain. Acute, intense abdominal pain with delayed neurologic deficit is a rare presentation of a thoracic schwannoma but should be considered as a possible cause of abdominal pain presenting without clear etiology. Although these lesions may be delayed in their diagnosis, early diagnosis and treatment may lead to an improved clinical outcome.

  17. Thoracic ROM measurement system with visual bio-feedback: system design and biofeedback evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Takeshi; Kawamura, Kazuya; Fujitani, Junko; Koike, Tomokazu; Fujimoto, Masashi; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2011-01-01

    Patients with diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) need to improve their thorax mobility. Thoracic ROM is one of the simplest and most useful indexes to evaluate the respiratory function. In this paper, we have proposed the prototype of a simple thoracic ROM measurement system with real-time visual bio-feedback in the chest expansion test. In this system, the thoracic ROM is measured using a wire-type linear encoder whose wire is wrapped around the thorax. In this paper, firstly, the repeatability and reliability of measured thoracic ROM was confirmed as a first report of the developed prototype. Secondly, we analyzed the effect of the bio-feedback system on the respiratory function. The result of the experiment showed that it was easier to maintain a large and stable thoracic ROM during deep breathing by using the real-time visual biofeedback system of the thoracic ROM.

  18. Clinical application of thoracic paravertebral anesthetic block in breast surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Socorro Faria

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Optimum treatment for postoperative pain has been of fundamental importance in surgical patient care. Among the analgesic techniques aimed at this group of patients, thoracic paravertebral block combined with general anesthesia stands out for the good results and favorable risk-benefit ratio. Many local anesthetics and other adjuvant drugs are being investigated for use in this technique, in order to improve the quality of analgesia and reduce adverse effects. OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the effectiveness and safety of paravertebral block compared to other analgesic and anesthetic regimens in women undergoing breast cancer surgeries. METHODS: Integrative literature review from 1966 to 2012, using specific terms in computerized databases of articles investigating the clinical characteristics, adverse effects, and beneficial effects of thoracic paravertebral block. RESULTS: On the selected date, 16 randomized studies that met the selection criteria established for this literature review were identified. Thoracic paravertebral block showed a significant reduction of postoperative pain, as well as decreased pain during arm movement after surgery. CONCLUSION: Thoracic paravertebral block reduced postoperative analgesic requirement compared to placebo group, markedly within the first 24 h. The use of this technique could ensure postoperative analgesia of clinical relevance. Further studies with larger populations are necessary, as paravertebral block seems to be promising for preemptive analgesia in breast cancer surgery.

  19. Occupational therapy needs of patients with thoracic cancer at the time of diagnosis: findings of a dedicated rehabilitation service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Rachel; Hussain, Asmah; Maddocks, Matthew; Wilcock, Andrew

    2013-06-01

    Guidelines recommend screening patients with cancer to identify their rehabilitation needs. To help quantify this area of need and associated workload from an occupational therapy perspective in patients with thoracic cancer, we report the experiences of a dedicated rehabilitation service. Consecutive patients were screened soon after diagnosis using items associated with occupational performance in the Sheffield Profile for Assessment and Referral for Care questionnaire. Those reporting predetermined levels of distress underwent a full occupational therapy evaluation; this generated a problem list from which individualised goals and interventions were instigated. Of 540 patients screened, 273 (51 %) reported levels of distress which warranted a full occupational therapy assessment. Of these, 260 (95%) reported a total of 681 problems (median of 4 [2-5] per patient). Mostly these lay within the domain of self care (553, 78%) in the categories of transfers, functional mobility and bathing/showering. A total of 646 goals (median of 2 [1-3] per patient) were formulated, resulting in 652 individual interventions, most frequently the provision of equipment (79%) or advice (32%) and referral to another professional/agency (23%). Patients considered that most goals were achieved (98%) and that the provision of equipment was useful (97%). About half of patients with thoracic cancer screened have occupational therapy needs around the time of diagnosis. Problems are mostly in the area of self-care, with equipment provision the most frequent intervention provided. Future work should examine the efficacy of occupational therapy interventions further.

  20. Thoracic and abdominopelvic actinomycosis | Spiegel | SA Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    intervention it is worthwhile including actinomycosis infection in the differential diagnosis. We present radiological findings for 4 patients presenting with different forms of thoracic and abdominopelvic actinomycosis infection, and a short review of the documented literature findings. South African Journal of Radiology Vol.

  1. The Askin tumour. Neuroactodermic tumour of the thoracic wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velazquez, P.; Nicolas, A. I.; Vivas, I.; Damaso Aquerreta, J.; Martinez-Cuesta, A.

    1999-01-01

    The Askin tumours is an extremely rare and malignant process in the thoracic pulmonary region during infancy and youth. The differential diagnosis has to be considered with other thoracic wall tumours that are more common in pediatrics like the undifferentiated neuroblastoma, the embionic rabdomiosarcoma, the Ewing sarcoma and the linfoma. A retrospective examination was carried out on 473 thoracic wall tumours from 1994 to 1997 at our centre, resulting in 4 patients with an anatomopathologically tested Askin tumour (ages from 13-21). All the cases were studied using simple radiography and CT. In two cases MRI was also used. The most common clinical manifestation was a palpable painful mass in the thoracic wall. In the simple radiograph the main finding was a large mass of extrapleural soft material, with costal destruction ( n=3) and a pleural effusion (n=2). In the CT study the mass was heterogeneous, with internal calcifications in one case. CT and MRI showed invasion in the mediastinum (n=1), medular channel (n=1) and phrenic and sulphrenic extension (n=1). The Askin tumour should be included in the differential diagnosis of thoracic wall masses in infant-youth ages. There are no specific morphological characteristics. Both CT and MRI are useful for the diagnosis, staging and follow up. (Author) 11 refs

  2. Disruptive technology in the treatment of thoracic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R Stephen

    2013-12-01

    The care of patients with thoracic injuries has undergone monumental change over the past 25 years. Advances in technology have driven improvements in care, with obvious benefits to patients. In many instances, new or "disruptive" technologies have unexpectedly displaced previously established standards for the diagnosis and treatment of these potentially devastating injuries. Examples of disruptive technology include the use of ultrasound technology for the diagnosis of cardiac tamponade and pneumothorax; thoracoscopic techniques instead of thoracotomy, pulmonary tractotomy, and stapled lung resection; endovascular repair of thoracic aortic injury; operative fixation of flail chest; and the enhanced availability of extracorporeal lung support for severe respiratory failure. Surgeons must be prepared to recognize the benefits, and limits, of novel technologies and incorporate these methods into day-to-day treatment protocols. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Profile of thoracic trauma victims submitted to chest drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CESAR AUGUSTO BROSKA JÚNIOR

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to describe and compare the variables involved in trauma victims undergoing thoracic drainage. Methods: we conducted a retrospective, analytical, descriptive, cross-sectional study, with medical records of patients attended at the Trauma Service of the Curitiba Evangelical University Hospital between February 2011 and January 2014. Results: there were 488 patients undergoing chest drainage, 84.7% men and 15.3% women, with an average age of 38.2 years. Attendances usually occurred at night, without predominance between open or closed mechanism, gender or age group. The majority of patients with thoracic trauma requiring drainage were diagnosed by anamnesis and physical examination (41.1% and drained in the emergency room (80.8%. Most of the patients (66.2% had another associated lesion, mostly some abdominal viscera. Complications were present in 16.6% (81 patients, most of them due to drainage positioning error (9.2%. The mean hospital stay was 15 days and drainage lasted for an average of 8.1 days, with no statistical difference between open and closed trauma. The clinical outcome was discharge in most cases. Conclusion: the profile of patients with thoracic trauma is that of young men, attended at night, with some other associated lesion. Although diagnosis and treatment were rapid and most often without the need for complex examinations, the time of drainage, hospitalization and complications were higher than in the literature, which can be explained by the drainage being made at the Emergency Room and the presence of associated injuries.

  4. Radiographic analysis of the correlation between ossification of the nuchal ligament and sagittal alignment and segmental stability of the cervical spine in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Jinwei; Teng, Honglin; Qian, Yunfan; Hu, Yingying; Wen, Tianyong; Ruan, Dike; Zhu, Minyu

    2018-01-01

    Background Ossification of the nuchal ligament (ONL) caused by chronic injury to the nuchal ligament (NL) is very common in instability-related cervical disorders. Purpose To determine possible correlations between ONL, sagittal alignment, and segmental stability of the cervical spine. Material and Methods Seventy-three patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) and ONL (ONL group) and 118 patients with CSM only (control group) were recruited. Radiographic data included the characteristics of ONL, sagittal alignment and segmental stability, and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). We performed comparisons in terms of radiographic parameters between the ONL and control groups. The correlations between ONL size, cervical sagittal alignment, and segmental stability were analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the independent risk factors of the development of ONL. Results C2-C7 sagittal vertical axis (SVA), T1 slope (T1S), T1S minus cervical lordosis (T1S-CL) on the lateral plain, angular displacement (AD), and horizontal displacement (HD) on the dynamic radiograph increased significantly in the ONL group compared with the control group. The size of ONL significantly correlated with C2-C7 SVA, T1S, AD, and HD. The incidence of ONL was higher in patients with OPLL and segmental instability. Cervical instability, sagittal malalignment, and OPLL were independent predictors of the development of ONL through multivariate analysis. Conclusion Patients with ONL are more likely to have abnormal sagittal alignment and instability of the cervical spine. Thus, increased awareness and appreciation of this often-overlooked radiographic finding is warranted during diagnosis and treatment of instability-related cervical pathologies and injuries.

  5. The relationship of the emotional climate of work and threat to patient outcome in a high-volume thoracic surgery operating room team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurok, Michael; Evans, Linda A; Lipsitz, Stuart; Satwicz, Paul; Kelly, Andrea; Frankel, Allan

    2011-03-01

    It is widely believed that the emotional climate of surgical team's work may affect patient outcome. To analyse the relationship between the emotional climate of work and indices of threat to patient outcome. Interventional study. Operating rooms in a high-volume thoracic surgery centre from September 2007 to June 2008. Thoracic surgery operating room teams. Two 90 min team-skills training sessions focused on findings from a standardised safety-culture survey administered to all participants and highlighting positive and problematic aspects of team skills, communication and leadership. Relationship of functional or less functional emotional climates of work to indices of threat to patient outcome. A less functional emotional climate corresponded to more threat to outcome in the sterile surgical environment in the pre-intervention period (pwork in the sterile surgical environment appeared to be related to threat to patient outcome prior to, but not after, a team-training intervention. Further study of the relationship between the emotional climate of work and threat to patient outcome using reproducible methods is required.

  6. Thoracic and diaphragmatic endometriosis: Single-institution experience using a novel broadened diagnostic criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larraín, Demetrio; Suárez, Francisco; Braun, Hernán; Chapochnick, Javier; Diaz, Lidia; Rojas, Iván

    2018-06-05

    To describe our experience with the multidisciplinary management of both thoracic/diaphragmatic endometriosis (TED), applying a broadened definition of the “thoracic endometriosis syndrome (TES)” to define cases. We present a retrospective series of consecutive patients affected by pathology-proven TED, treated at our institution, during a period of 7 years. Five women were included. Two cases were referred due to catamenial chest/shoulder pain, one due to recurrent catamenial pneumothorax, one due to new-onset diaphragmatic hernia. One patient had not thoracic symptoms, and diaphragmatic endometriosis was found during gynecologic laparoscopy for pelvic endometriosis. Endometriosis was histologically confirmed in all cases. After follow-up all patients remain asymptomatic. Broadened TES criteria could increase the incidence of TED and determine better knowledge of this condition. Multidisciplinary, minimally invasive surgery is effective and safe, but should be reserved to tertiary referral centers.

  7. Exposure to 100% Oxygen Abolishes the Impairment of Fracture Healing after Thoracic Trauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Kemmler

    Full Text Available In polytrauma patients a thoracic trauma is one of the most critical injuries and an important trigger of post-traumatic inflammation. About 50% of patients with thoracic trauma are additionally affected by bone fractures. The risk for fracture malunion is considerably increased in such patients, the pathomechanisms being poorly understood. Thoracic trauma causes regional alveolar hypoxia and, subsequently, hypoxemia, which in turn triggers local and systemic inflammation. Therefore, we aimed to unravel the role of oxygen in impaired bone regeneration after thoracic trauma. We hypothesized that short-term breathing of 100% oxygen in the early post-traumatic phase ameliorates inflammation and improves bone regeneration. Mice underwent a femur osteotomy alone or combined with blunt chest trauma 100% oxygen was administered immediately after trauma for two separate 3 hour intervals. Arterial blood gas tensions, microcirculatory perfusion and oxygenation were assessed at 3, 9 and 24 hours after injury. Inflammatory cytokines and markers of oxidative/nitrosative stress were measured in plasma, lung and fracture hematoma. Bone healing was assessed on day 7, 14 and 21. Thoracic trauma induced pulmonary and systemic inflammation and impaired bone healing. Short-term exposure to 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase significantly attenuated systemic and local inflammatory responses and improved fracture healing without provoking toxic side effects, suggesting that hyperoxia could induce anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative effects after severe injury. These results suggest that breathing of 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase might reduce the risk of poorly healing fractures in severely injured patients.

  8. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections: endovascular treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Donald T; Cho, Jae S; Chaer, Rabih A; Makaroun, Michel S

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of thoracic aortic disease has changed radically with the advances made in endovascular therapy since the concept of thoracic endovascular aortic repair was first described 15 years ago. Currently, there is a diverse array of endografts that are commercially available to treat the thoracic aorta. Multiple studies, including industry-sponsored and single-institution reports, have demonstrated excellent outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair for the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms, with less reported perioperative morbidity and mortality in comparison with conventional open repair. Additionally, similar outcomes have been demonstrated for the treatment of type B dissections. However, the technology remains relatively novel, and larger studies with longer term outcomes are necessary to more fully evaluate the role of endovascular therapy for the treatment of thoracic aortic disease. This review examines the currently available thoracic endografts, preoperative planning for thoracic endovascular aortic repair, and outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair for the treatment of both thoracic aortic aneurysms and type B aortic dissections. Mt Sinai J Med 77:256-269, 2010. (c) 2010 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  9. X-ray examination of the thoracic organs in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fil'shtinskij, A.Ya.; Efimenko, S.I.

    1987-01-01

    The authors presented a combined clinicoroentgenological study of the thoracic organs in 12 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It revealed specific involvement of the thoracic organs supported by clinicomorphological findings and assessment of therapeutic results in 66 patients (55.0 ± 3.2 %). It also played an important role in the recognition of disease starting with changes in the bone marrow, in the differential diagnosis of specific and nonspecific changes in the thoracic organs, and in the assessment of a degree of remission

  10. Noninvasive radiodiagnosis of aneurysms of the thoracic aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todua, F.I.; Petsko, A.P.; Arablinskij, A.V.; Kazanchyan, P.O.; Nikitaev, N.S.; Sultanaliev, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    The paper is concerned with analysis of the results of X-ray investigation of 45 patients with aneurysms of the distal part of the arch and descending part of the thoracic aorta. X-ray investigation helped to establish correct diagnosis of aneurysm of the aorta in 42 of 45 patients (93.3 %) on the basis of the detection of intense additional shadow formation in left pulmonary field, unseparable from the aortic shadow. The use of a new method of ultrasound diagnosis-duplex scanning-made it possible to establish the presence of aneurysm and to determine its sizes as well as to visualize the relation of the left subclavicular artery to aneurysm in 17 of 21 patients. CT-semiotics of aneurysms of the descending part of the thoracic aorta consisted in its dilatation over 3.5 cm, wall calcification, thrombosis of the cavity and change of the adjacent structures. Basing on the analysis of these signs correct diagnosis was established in 34 of 35 examinees (97.1 %)

  11. Treatment of traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidović Lazar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Interest for traumatic thoracic aorta rupture stems from the fact that its number continually increases, and it can be rapidly lethal. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study is to present early and long term results as well as experiences of our team in surgical treatment of traumatic thoracic aorta rupture. METHOD Our retrospective study includes 12 patients with traumatic thoracic aorta rupture treated between 1985 and 2007. There were 10 male and two female patients of average age 30.75 years (18-74. RESULTS In six cases, primary diagnosis was established during the first seven days days after trauma, while in 6 more than one month later. In 11 cases, classical open surgical procedure was performed, while endovascular treatment was used in one patient. Three (25% patients died, while two (16.6% had paraplegia. Nine patients (75% were treated without complications, and are in good condition after a mean follow-up period of 9.7 years (from one month to 22 years. CONCLUSION Surgical treatment requires spinal cord protection to prevent paraplegia, using cardiopulmonary by-pass (three of our cases or external heparin-bonded shunts (five of our cases. Cardiopulmonary by-pass is followed with lower incidence of paraplegia, however it is not such a good solution for patients with polytrauma because of hemorrhage. The endovascular repair is a safe and feasible procedure in the acute phase, especially because of traumatic shock and polytrauma which contributes to higher mortality rate after open surgery. On the other hand, in chronic postrauamatic aortic rupture, open surgical treatment is connected with a lower mortality rate and good long-term results. There have been no published data about long-term results of endovascular treatment in the chronic phase.

  12. Thoracic epidural analgesia reduces myocardial injury in ischemic patients undergoing major abdominal cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad MF

    2017-04-01

    to PCIA at all measured time points. Regarding perioperative hemodynamics, there was a significant reduction in intra-operative mean arterial pressure (MAP; and heart rate in PCEA group in comparison to PCIA group at most of measured time points while there was not a significant reduction in postoperative MAP and heart rate in the second and third post-operative days. The incidence of other postoperative complications such as DVT, pneumonia and in hospital mortality were decreased in PCEA group.Conclusion: Perioperative thoracic epidural analgesia in patients suffering from coronary artery disease subjected to major abdominal cancer surgery reduced significantly postoperative major adverse cardiac events with better pain control in comparison with perioperative IV analgesia. Keywords: postoperative myocardial infarction, thoracic epidural analgesia, PCA

  13. Isolated long thoracic nerve paralysis - a rare complication of anterior spinal surgery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameri Ebrahim

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Isolated long thoracic nerve injury causes paralysis of the serratus anterior muscle. Patients with serratus anterior palsy may present with periscapular pain, weakness, limitation of shoulder elevation and scapular winging. Case presentation We present the case of a 23-year-old woman who sustained isolated long thoracic nerve palsy during anterior spinal surgery which caused external compressive force on the nerve. Conclusion During positioning of patients into the lateral decubitus position, the course of the long thoracic nerve must be attended to carefully and the nerve should be protected from any external pressure.

  14. Segmental thoracic spinal has advantages over general anesthesia for breast cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elakany, Mohamed Hamdy; Abdelhamid, Sherif Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic spinal anesthesia has been used for laparoscopic cholecystectomy and abdominal surgeries, but not in breast surgery. The present study compared this technique with general anesthesia in breast cancer surgeries. Forty patients were enrolled in this comparative study with inclusion criteria of ASA physical status I-III, primary breast cancer without known extension beyond the breast and axillary nodes, scheduled for unilateral mastectomy with axillary dissection. They were randomly divided into two groups. The thoracic spinal group (S) (n = 20) underwent segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine and fentanyl at T5-T6 interspace, while the other group (n = 20) underwent general anesthesia (G). Intraoperative hemodynamic parameters, intraoperative complications, postoperative discharge time from post-anesthesia care unit (PACU), postoperative pain and analgesic consumption, postoperative adverse effects, and patient satisfaction with the anesthetic techniques were recorded. Intraoperative hypertension (20%) was more frequent in group (G), while hypotension and bradycardia (15%) were more frequent in the segmental thoracic spinal (S) group. Postoperative nausea (30%) and vomiting (40%) during PACU stay were more frequent in the (G) group. Postoperative discharge time from PACU was shorter in the (S) group (124 ± 38 min) than in the (G) group (212 ± 46 min). The quality of postoperative analgesia and analgesic consumption was better in the (S) group. Patient satisfaction was similar in both groups. Segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia has some advantages when compared with general anesthesia and can be considered as a sole anesthetic in breast cancer surgery with axillary lymph node clearance.

  15. Usefulness of three dimensional reconstructive images for thoracic trauma induced fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Kyung Hun; Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Young Sook; Byun, Joo Nam [Chosun University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of three-dimensional reconstructive images using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for thoracic traumatic patients visiting emergency room. 76 patients with fractures of the 105 patients who visited our emergency room with complaints of thoracic trauma were analyzed retrospectively. All the patients had thoracic MDCT performed and the three-dimensional reconstructive images were taken. The fractures were confirmed by axial CT, the clinical information, whole body bone scanning and the multiplanar reformation images. Plain x-ray images were analyzed by the fractured sites in a blind comparison of two radiologists' readings, and then that finding was compared with the axial CT scans and the three-dimensional reconstructive images. The fracture sites were rib (n 68), sternum (n = 14), clavicle (n = 6), scapula (n = 3), spine (n = 5) and combined fractures (n = 14). Plain x-ray and axial CT scans had a correspondency of 0.555 for the rib fractures. Axial CT scans and the three-dimensional reconstructive images had a correspondency of .952. For sternal fractures, those values were 0.692 and 0.928, respectively. The axial CT scans and three-dimensional reconstructive images showed sensitivities of 94% and 91% for rib and other fractures, respectively, and 93% and 100% for sternal fracture, respectively. Three-dimensional reconstructive image had an especially high sensitivity for the diagnosis of sternal fracture. While evaluating thoracic trauma at the emergency room, the three-dimensional reconstructive image was useful to easily diagnose the extent of fracture and it was very sensitive for detecting sternal fracture.

  16. Usefulness of three dimensional reconstructive images for thoracic trauma induced fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Kyung Hun; Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Young Sook; Byun, Joo Nam

    2006-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of three-dimensional reconstructive images using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for thoracic traumatic patients visiting emergency room. 76 patients with fractures of the 105 patients who visited our emergency room with complaints of thoracic trauma were analyzed retrospectively. All the patients had thoracic MDCT performed and the three-dimensional reconstructive images were taken. The fractures were confirmed by axial CT, the clinical information, whole body bone scanning and the multiplanar reformation images. Plain x-ray images were analyzed by the fractured sites in a blind comparison of two radiologists' readings, and then that finding was compared with the axial CT scans and the three-dimensional reconstructive images. The fracture sites were rib (n 68), sternum (n = 14), clavicle (n = 6), scapula (n = 3), spine (n = 5) and combined fractures (n = 14). Plain x-ray and axial CT scans had a correspondency of 0.555 for the rib fractures. Axial CT scans and the three-dimensional reconstructive images had a correspondency of .952. For sternal fractures, those values were 0.692 and 0.928, respectively. The axial CT scans and three-dimensional reconstructive images showed sensitivities of 94% and 91% for rib and other fractures, respectively, and 93% and 100% for sternal fracture, respectively. Three-dimensional reconstructive image had an especially high sensitivity for the diagnosis of sternal fracture. While evaluating thoracic trauma at the emergency room, the three-dimensional reconstructive image was useful to easily diagnose the extent of fracture and it was very sensitive for detecting sternal fracture

  17. JAG Tearing Technique with Radiofrequency Guide Wire for Aortic Fenestration in Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricci, Carmelo; Ceccherini, Claudio; Leonini, Sara; Cini, Marco; Vigni, Francesco; Neri, Eugenio; Tucci, Enrico; Benvenuti, Antonio; Tommasino, Giulio; Sassi, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    An innovative approach, the JAG tearing technique, was performed during thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair in a patient with previous surgical replacement of the ascending aorta with a residual uncomplicated type B aortic dissection who developed an aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta with its lumen divided in two parts by an intimal flap. The proximal landing zone was suitable to place a thoracic stent graft. The distal landing zone was created by cutting the intimal flap in the distal third of the descending thoracic aorta with a radiofrequency guide wire and intravascular ultrasound catheter.

  18. Association of left subclavian artery coverage without revascularization and spinal cord ischemia in patients undergoing thoracic endovascular aortic repair: A Vascular Quality Initiative® analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Pedro Gr; Woo, Karen; Beck, Adam W; Scali, Salvatore T; Weaver, Fred A

    2017-12-01

    Objectives Investigate the impact of left subclavian artery coverage without revascularization on spinal cord ischemia development in patients undergoing thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Methods The Vascular Quality Initiative thoracic endovascular aortic repair module (April 2011-July 2014) was analyzed. Patients undergoing left subclavian artery coverage were divided into two groups according to revascularization status. The association between left subclavian artery revascularization with the primary outcome of spinal cord ischemia and the secondary outcome of stroke was assessed with multivariable analysis adjusting for between-group baseline differences. Results The left subclavian artery was covered in 508 (24.6%) of the 2063 thoracic endovascular aortic repairs performed. Among patients with left subclavian artery coverage, 58.9% underwent revascularization. Spinal cord ischemia incidence was 12.1% in the group without revascularization compared to 8.5% in the group undergoing left subclavian artery revascularization (odds ratio (95%CI): 1.48(0.82-2.68), P = 0.189). Multivariable analysis adjustment identified an independent association between left subclavian artery coverage without revascularization and the incidence of spinal cord ischemia (adjusted odds ratio (95%CI): 2.29(1.03-5.14), P = 0.043). Although the incidence of stroke was also higher for the group with a covered and nonrevascularized left subclavian artery (12.1% versus 8.5%), this difference was not statistically significant after multivariable analysis (adjusted odds ratio (95%CI): 1.55(0.74-3.26), P = 0.244). Conclusion For patients undergoing left subclavian artery coverage during thoracic endovascular aortic repair, the addition of a revascularization procedure was associated with a significantly lower incidence of spinal cord ischemia.

  19. Society of Thoracic Surgeons Risk Score predicts hospital charges and resource use after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaoutakis, George J; George, Timothy J; Alejo, Diane E; Merlo, Christian A; Baumgartner, William A; Cameron, Duke E; Shah, Ashish S

    2011-09-01

    The impact of Society of Thoracic Surgeons predicted mortality risk score on resource use has not been previously studied. We hypothesize that increasing Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk scores in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement are associated with greater hospital charges. Clinical and financial data for patients undergoing aortic valve replacement at The Johns Hopkins Hospital over a 10-year period (January 2000 to December 2009) were reviewed. The current Society of Thoracic Surgeons formula (v2.61) for in-hospital mortality was used for all patients. After stratification into risk quartiles, index admission hospital charges were compared across risk strata with rank-sum and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Linear regression and Spearman's coefficient assessed correlation and goodness of fit. Multivariable analysis assessed relative contributions of individual variables on overall charges. A total of 553 patients underwent aortic valve replacement during the study period. Average predicted mortality was 2.9% (±3.4) and actual mortality was 3.4% for aortic valve replacement. Median charges were greater in the upper quartile of patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (quartiles 1-3, $39,949 [interquartile range, 32,708-51,323] vs quartile 4, $62,301 [interquartile range, 45,952-97,103], P < .01]. On univariate linear regression, there was a positive correlation between Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk score and log-transformed charges (coefficient, 0.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.05-0.07; P < .01). Spearman's correlation R-value was 0.51. This positive correlation persisted in risk-adjusted multivariable linear regression. Each 1% increase in Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk score was associated with an added $3000 in hospital charges. This is the first study to show that increasing Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk score predicts greater charges after aortic valve replacement. As competing therapies, such as percutaneous valve replacement, emerge to

  20. Surgical Thoracic Transplant Training: Super Fellowship-Is It Super?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdisi, George; Makdisi, Tony; Caldeira, Christiano C; Wang, I-Wen

    2017-10-11

    The quality of training provided to thoracic transplant fellows is a critical step in the care of complex patients undergoing transplant. The training varies since it is not an accreditation council for graduate medical education accredited fellowship. A total of 104 heart or lung transplant program directors throughout the United States were sent a survey of 24 questions focusing on key aspects of training, fellowship training content and thoracic transplant job satisfaction. Out of the 104 programs surveyed 45 surveys (43%) were returned. In total, 26 programs offering a transplant fellowship were included in the survey. Among these programs 69% currently have fellows of which 56% are American Board of Thoracic Surgery board eligible. According to the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) requirements, 46% of the programs do not meet the requirements to be qualified as a primary heart transplant surgeon. A total of 23% of lung transplant programs also perform less than the UNOS minimum requirements. Only 24% have extra-surgical curriculum. Out of the participating programs, only 38% of fellows secured a job in a hospital setting for performing transplants. An astounding 77% of replies site an unpredictable work schedule as the main reason that makes thoracic transplant a less than favorable profession among new graduates. Long hours were also a complaint of 69% of graduates who agreed that their personal life is affected by excessive work hours. Annually, almost half of all thoracic transplant programs perform fewer than the UNOS requirements to be a primary thoracic surgeon. This results in a majority of transplant fellows not finding a suitable transplant career. The current and future needs for highly qualified thoracic transplant surgeons will not be met through our existing training mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy under Segmental Thoracic Spinal Anesthesia: A Feasible Economical Alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kejriwal, Aditya Kumar; Begum, Shaheen; Krishan, Gopal; Agrawal, Richa

    2017-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is normally performed under general anesthesia, but regional techniques like thoracic epidural and lumbar spinal have been emerging and found beneficial. We performed a clinical case study of segmental thoracic spinal anaesthesia in a healthy patient. We selected an ASA grade I patient undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy and gave spinal anesthetic in T10-11 interspace using 1 ml of bupivacaine 5 mg ml -1 mixed with 0.5 ml of fentanyl 50 μg ml -1 . Other drugs were only given (systemically) to manage patient anxiety, pain, nausea, hypotension, or pruritus during or after surgery. The patient was reviewed 2 days postoperatively in ward. The thoracic spinal anesthetia was performed easily in the patient. Some discomfort which was readily treated with 1mg midazolam and 20 mg ketamine intravenously. There was no neurological deficit and hemodynamic parameters were in normal range intra and post-operatively and recovery was uneventful. We used a narrow gauze (26G) spinal needle which minimized the trauma to the patient and the chances of PDPH, which was more if 16 or 18G epidural needle had been used and could have increased further if there have been accidental dura puncture. Also using spinal anesthesia was economical although it should be done cautiously as we are giving spinal anesthesia above the level of termination of spinal cord.

  2. General anesthesia versus segmental thoracic or conventional lumbar spinal anesthesia for patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Gamal T; Lasheen, Ahmed E

    2012-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy became the standard surgery for gallstone disease because of causing less postoperative pain, respiratory compromise and early ambulation. This study was designed to compare spinal anesthesia, (segmental thoracic or conventional lumbar) vs the gold standard general anesthesia as three anesthetic techniques for healthy patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy, evaluating intraoperative parameters, postoperative recovery and analgesia, complications as well as patient and surgeon satisfaction. A total of 90 patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy, between January 2010 and May 2011, were randomized into three equal groups to undergo laparoscopic cholecystectomy with low-pressure CO2 pneumoperitoneum under segmental thoracic (TSA group) or conventional lumbar (LSA group) spinal anesthesia or general anesthesia (GA group). To achieve a T3 sensory level we used (hyperbaric bupivacaine 15 mg, and fentanyl 25 mg at L2/L3) for LSAgroup, and (hyperbaric bupivacaine 7.5 mg, and fentanyl 25 mg at T10/T11) for TSAgroup. Propofol, fentanyl, atracurium, sevoflurane, and tracheal intubation were used for GA group. Intraoperative parameters, postoperative recovery and analgesia, complications as well as patient and surgeon satisfaction were compared between the three groups. All procedures were completed laparoscopically by the allocated method of anesthesia with no anesthetic conversions. The time for the blockade to reach T3 level, intraoperative hypotensive and bradycardic events and vasopressor use were significantly lower in (TSA group) than in (LSA group). Postoperative pain scores as assessed throughout any time, postoperative right shoulder pain and hospital stay was lower for both (TSA group) and (LSA group) compared with (GA group). The higher degree of patients satisfaction scores were recorded in patients under segmental TSA. The present study not only confirmed that both segmental TSA and conventional

  3. Thoracic spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  4. Acute Paraparesis Caused by a Giant Cell Tumor of the Thoracic Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Chun Chao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor (GCT is a benign but locally aggressive skeletal neoplasm of young adults. GCT located in the spine is relatively rare and may need a combination of surgical and adjunctive therapies. Here we present a patient who had intermittent thoracic back pain for two weeks and experienced an acute episode of decreased muscle power of both lower limbs. Magnetic resonance (MR imaging examinations of the thoracic spine revealed that the patient had severe spinal canal compression caused by pathological fracture due to a tumor within the seventh thoracic vertebra. She underwent an emergent surgical intervention for total removal of the tumor and spinal reconstruction with autologous rib grafts and instruments. Postoperatively, the patient made an uneventful recovery of muscle power of bilateral lower limbs. She subsequently received adjuvant radiotherapy. In a follow-up period of 36 months, the patient had no clinical or radiological evidence of tumor recurrence. Even though spinal location for GCT is a rare event, it should be included in the differential diagnosis in patients with osteolytic lesions or pathological fractures of the vertebra, especially in young female patients sustaining no trauma who had a clinical history of persistent low back pain.

  5. Radionuclide gastric emptying time study for patients with cervical and thoracic esophageal cancer after resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lin; Tang Jin; Wang Yonggang; Li Jiaxiu

    1994-01-01

    Semi-solid meal was mixed with 99m Tc-DTPA and used as test meal given to patients orally. Gastric emptying time was measured in 70 patients after resection of esophageal cancer and 24 normal subjects. 70 patients were divided into 3 groups: (1) 14 cases with cervical esophageal cancer operated by using colon to replace the esophagus (CRE group). (2) 28 cases with cervical esophageal cancer operated by using stomach to replace the esophagus (SRE group). (3) 28 patients with thoracic esophageal cancer after resection only (TE group). The range of gastric emptying time of normal subjects was 53.9 +- 10.5%/60 minutes. The results showed that SRE group (28 pts) had a more rapid gastric emptying time than that of normal subjects. CRE group (14 pts) and TE group (28 pts) had slower gastric emptying time than that of normal subjects

  6. Shoulder Pain After Thoracic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blichfeldt-Eckhardt, Morten R; Andersen, Claus; Ørding, Helle

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the time course of ipsilateral shoulder pain after thoracic surgery with respect to incidence, pain intensity, type of pain (referred versus musculoskeletal), and surgical approach. DESIGN: Prospective, observational cohort study. SETTING: Odense University Hospital, Denmark...... for musculoskeletal involvement (muscle tenderness on palpation and movement) with follow-up 12 months after surgery. Clinically relevant pain was defined as a numeric rating scale score>3. Of the 60 patients included, 47 (78%) experienced ipsilateral shoulder pain, but only 25 (42%) reported clinically relevant...... shoulder pain. On postoperative day 4, 19 patients (32%) still suffered shoulder pain, but only 4 patients (7%) had clinically relevant pain. Four patients (8%) still suffered shoulder pain 12 months after surgery. In 26 patients (55%), the shoulder pain was classified as referred versus 21 patients (45...

  7. Thoracic combined spinal-epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy in an obese patient with asthma and multiple drug allergies: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Daszkiewicz Andrzej; Copik Maja; Misiolek Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Drug allergies, asthma, and obesity are more common in modern societies, and patients with these problems are often a challenge for anesthetists. Different techniques of regional anesthesia can be beneficial particularly for this group of patients. We present a patient who suffered from all of the above-mentioned conditions and successfully underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy under thoracic combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. It is still not a popular practice, and we would like to show a...

  8. The Efficacy of Thoracic Ultrasonography in Postoperative Newborn Patients after Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkut Ozturk

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: In this study, the efficacy of thoracic ultrasonography during echocardiography was evaluated in newborns. Methods: Sixty newborns who had undergone pediatric cardiac surgery were successively evaluated between March 1, 2015, and September 1, 2015. Patients were evaluated for effusion, pulmonary atelectasis, and pneumothorax by ultrasonography, and results were compared with X-ray findings. Results: Sixty percent (n=42 of the cases were male, the median age was 14 days (2-30 days, and the median body weight was 3.3 kg (2.8-4.5 kg. The median RACHS-1 score was 4 (2-6. Atelectasis was demonstrated in 66% (n=40 of the cases. Five of them were determined solely by X-ray, 10 of them only by ultrasonography, and 25 of them by both ultrasonography and X-ray. Pneumothorax was determined in 20% (n=12 of the cases. Excluding one case determined by both methods, all of the 11 cases were diagnosed by X-ray. Pleural effusion was diagnosed in 26% (n=16 of the cases. Four of the cases were demonstrated solely by ultrasonography, three of them solely by X-ray, and nine of the cases by both methods. Pericardial effusion was demonstrated in 10% (n=6 of the cases. Except for one of the cases determined by both methods, five of the cases were diagnosed by ultrasonography. There was a moderate correlation when all pathologies evaluated together (k=0.51. Conclusion: Thoracic ultrasonography might be a beneficial non-invasive method to evaluate postoperative respiratory problems in newborns who had congenital cardiac surgery.

  9. Starting a robotic program in general thoracic surgery: why, how, and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerfolio, Robert J; Bryant, Ayesha S; Minnich, Douglas J

    2011-06-01

    We report our experience in starting a robotic program in thoracic surgery. We retrospectively reviewed our experience in starting a robotic program in general thoracic surgery on a consecutive series of patients. Between February 2009 and September 2010, 150 patients underwent robotic operations. Types of procedures were lobectomy in 62, thymectomy in 30, and benign esophageal procedures in 6. No thymectomy or esophageal procedures required conversion. One conversion was needed for suspected bleeding for a mediastinal mass. Twelve patients were converted for lobectomy (none for bleeding, 1 in the last 24). Median operative time for robotic thymectomy was 119 minutes, and median length of stay was 1 day. The median time for robotic lobectomy was 185 minutes, and median length of stay was 2 days. There were no operative deaths. Morbidity occurred in 23 patients (15%). All patients with cancer had R0 resections and resection of all visible mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. Robotic surgery is safe and oncologically sound. It requires training of the entire operating room team. The learning curve is steep, involving port placement, availability of the proper instrumentation, use of the correct robotic arms, and proper patient positioning. The robot provides an ideal surgical approach for thymectomy and other mediastinal tumors. Its advantage over thoracoscopy for pulmonary resection is unproven; however, we believe complete thoracic lymph node dissection and teaching is easier. Importantly, defined credentialing for surgeons and cost analysis studies are needed. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Adherence to the recommendations in respiratory rehabilitation of the British Thoracic Society in patients with cystic fibrosis: a study of Colombian physiotherapists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran-Palomino, Diana; Chapetón, Olga; Martínez-Santa, Jaime; Campos-Rodríguez, Adriana; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson

    2013-04-01

    The aim was to evaluate compliance with the recommendations in respiratory rehabilitation (ReR), raised by the British Thoracic Society (BTS) in patients with cystic fibrosis. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 224 Colombian physiotherapists to identify interventions and components of ReR programs as recommended by the BTS. Interventions with high level of evidence (Grade A) such as: Bronchial Hygiene Therapy (54.0%), and Active Cycle of Breathing Techniques (35.3%) were identified. However, high percentage of physiotherapists practiced interventions with lower grade of recommendation (Grade D) such as: hypertonic saline and bronchodilator to prevent bronchospasm (33.9%), and using manual therapy techniques and thoracic mobility exercises (38.4%) to correct postural and breathing problems. In conclusions we confirm important differences in therapeutic assistant components of the ReR raised by the BTS for patients with cystic fibrosis.

  11. Digital subtraction angiography of the thoracic aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, L.B.; Buonocore, E.; Modic, M.T.; Meaney, T.F.

    1984-01-01

    Forty-three patients with acquired and congenital abnormalities of the thoracic aorta were studied using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) after an intravenous bolus injection of 40 ml of contrast material. Abnormalities studied included coarctation, pseudocoarctation, Marfan syndrome, cervical aorta, double aortic arch, aneurysm, dissection, and tumor. Twenty-four patients also had conventional angiography. DSA was accurate in 95% of cases; in the other 5%, involving patients with acute type I dissection, the coronary arteries could not be seen. The authors concluded that in 92% of their patients, DSA could have replaced the standard aortogram

  12. Digital subtraction angiography of the thoracic aorta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, L.B.; Buonocore, E.; Modic, M.T.; Meaney, T.F.

    1984-02-01

    Forty-three patients with acquired and congenital abnormalities of the thoracic aorta were studied using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) after an intravenous bolus injection of 40 ml of contrast material. Abnormalities studied included coarctation, pseudocoarctation, Marfan syndrome, cervical aorta, double aortic arch, aneurysm, dissection, and tumor. Twenty-four patients also had conventional angiography. DSA was accurate in 95% of cases; in the other 5%, involving patients with acute type I dissection, the coronary arteries could not be seen. The authors concluded that in 92% of their patients, DSA could have replaced the standard aortogram.

  13. Everolimus with reduced calcineurin inhibitor in thoracic transplant recipients with renal dysfunction: a multicenter, randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullestad, Lars; Iversen, Martin; Mortensen, Svend-Aage

    2010-01-01

    The proliferation signal inhibitor everolimus offers the potential to reduce calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) exposure and alleviate CNI-related nephrotoxicity. Randomized trials in maintenance thoracic transplant patients are lacking.......The proliferation signal inhibitor everolimus offers the potential to reduce calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) exposure and alleviate CNI-related nephrotoxicity. Randomized trials in maintenance thoracic transplant patients are lacking....

  14. A comparison of oblique subcostal transversus abdominis plane block versus thoracic paravertebral block for postoperative analgesia after open cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Kamhawy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: A major challenge in the postoperative period is pain management which, if not adequately controlled, may contribute to patient discomfort and decreased patient satisfaction, and possibly increased morbidity and mortality. Both Thoracic paravertebral block and oblique subcostal transversus abdominis plane block can be used as analgesic techniques for abdominal surgeries. Our aim in this research was comparison of cumulative 24-h post-operative morphine consumption between ultrasound-guided oblique subcostal transversus abdominis plane block and ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral block in patients who underwent an open cholecystectomy under general anesthesia. Patients and methods: This study was performed on 46 patients who underwent open cholecystectomy under general anesthesia. All patients were randomly allocated alternatively to one of two equal groups to either undergo ultrasound-guided unilateral oblique subcostal transversus abdominis plane block Group (I or to undergo ultrasound-guided unilateral thoracic paravertebral block Group (II. Both groups were subjected to a similar analgesic regimen in the immediate post-operative period that involved intravenous patient-controlled morphine analgesia which was used in both groups. Results: The total morphine consumption in the first postoperative 24 h was lower in thoracic paravertebral block Group (II (9.9 mg in thoracic paravertebral block group vs. 15.4 mg in oblique subcostal transversus abdominis plane block Group (I with p < 0.001. The mean time of first request of analgesia in Group (I was 248.7 min compared to 432.1 for Group (II with p < 0.001. Conclusions: Both ultrasound-guided oblique subcostal transversus abdominis plain block and single injection ultrasound guided thoracic paravertebral block are effective analgesic techniques for upper abdominal surgeries and reduces postoperative opioid requirements. However, thoracic paravertebral block is more

  15. Overexpression of interleukin-1β and interferon-γ in type I thoracic aortic dissections and ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms: possible correlation with matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression and apoptosis of aortic media cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Liao, Ming-fang; Tian, Lei; Zou, Si-li; Lu, Qing-sheng; Bao, Jun-min; Pei, Yi-fei; Jing, Zai-ping

    2011-07-01

    To examine the expression of interleukin-1β and interferon-γ and their possible roles in aortic dissections and aneurysms. Aortic specimens were obtained from patients with type I thoracic aortic dissection, ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms, and control organ donors. The expression of interleukin-1β, interferon-γ, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and signal transduction factors phospho-p38 and phosphorylated c-jun N-terminal kinase (phospho-JNK) were detected by real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real time RT-PCR), Western blot, and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining was performed to detect apoptosis of media cells. The correlation of these factors and apoptosis was also studied. Apoptosis in the media of thoracic aortic dissection and in ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms was dramatically higher than in the control group. The expression of interleukin-1β gradually increased from the control group, thoracic aortic dissection to ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (p matrix metalloproteinase-9 was significantly increased in the media of thoracic aortic dissection and ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms compared with the control group (p correlations between interleukin-1β versus matrix metalloproteinase-9, interleukin-1β versus phospho-p38 in thoracic aortic dissection (p matrix metalloproteinase-9, interferon-γ versus phospho-JNK, interferon-γ versus apoptosis, and interleukin-1β versus apoptosis in ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (p = 0.02, 0.02, p matrix metalloproteinase-9 and the apoptosis of media cells in humans. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Lumbar Lordosis Minus Thoracic Kyphosis: Remain Constant in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Patients Before and After Correction Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingyuan; Yang, Changwei; Chen, Ziqiang; Wei, Xianzhao; Chen, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Jian; Shao, Jie; Zhu, Xiaodong; Li, Ming

    2016-03-01

    A retrospective study. To explore the relationship between the change of lumbar lordosis (LL) and thoracic kyphosis (TK) in AIS patients after correction surgery. TK tends to decrease in Lenke 1 and Lenke 2 AIS patients after correction surgery using pedicle screws, with the compensation of LL decrease. We hypothesize that lumbar lordosis minus thoracic kyphosis (LL-TK) remains constant after correction surgery to achieve the sagittal balance in AIS patients. Medical records of Lenke 1 or Lenke 2 AIS patients who received posterior correction surgery using pedicle screws in our hospital from January 2010 to January 2013 were reviewed. General characters of patients and radiological parameters were evaluated before the surgery and at two years' follow-up. Correlation analysis between TK and LL was conducted. LL-TK and the change of LL and TK were analyzed at preoperation and final follow-up. A total of 76 Lenke 1 and Lenke 2 AIS patients were included. Both TK and LL decreased significantly after correction surgery (P = 0.019 and P = 0.040, respectively). There were significant correlations between TK and LL before and after surgery, respectively (preoperative: r = 0.234, P = 0.042; postoperative: r = 0.310, P = 0.006). Preoperative and postoperative LL-TK was 23.80° and 25.09°, respectively, and no significant difference of LL-TK was observed (P = 0.372). The same tendency was observed in the change of LL and TK, and significant correlation was also found between the change of TK and LL (r = 0.626, P = 0.002). The same change of LL and TK and no significant difference in LL-TK indicated that LL-TK might be an important compensatory mechanism in keeping sagittal balance.

  17. Thoracic epidural anaesthesia for major abdominal surgeries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pulse rate, blood pressure and oxygen saturation were monitored throughout the procedure and recorded. Data were obtained from the ... In a previous study, Consani et al.3 documented the feasibility of thoracic epidural ... thoracostomy and mastectomy in high-risk patients.2,6 Since TEA places less demand on drugs, ...

  18. Thoracic periaortal fibrosis and Ormond's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kacl, G.M.; Bino, M.; Salomon, F.; Risti, B.; Marincek, B.

    1995-01-01

    Two cases of thoracic periaortal fibrosis as a manifestation of retroperitoneal fibrosis (Ormond's disease) are shown on CT and MRI. Thoracic periaortal fibrosis can result in an inflammatory aneurysmo with chronic dissection. Manifestation of thoracic periaortal fibrosis may typically occur intermittently over decades. (orig.) [de

  19. Evaluation of lung volumes, vital capacity and respiratory muscle strength after cervical, thoracic and lumbar spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marcio Aparecido; Vidotto, Milena Carlos; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Almeida, Renato; Santoro, Ilka Lopes; Sperandio, Evandro Fornias; Jardim, José Roberto; Gazzotti, Mariana Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that physiopathological changes to the respiratory system can occur following thoracic and abdominal surgery. Laminectomy is considered to be a peripheral surgical procedure, but it is possible that thoracic spinal surgery exerts a greater influence on lung function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pulmonary volumes and maximum respiratory pressures of patients undergoing cervical, thoracic or lumbar spinal surgery. Prospective study in a tertiary-level university hospital. Sixty-three patients undergoing laminectomy due to diagnoses of tumors or herniated discs were evaluated. Vital capacity, tidal volume, minute ventilation and maximum respiratory pressures were evaluated preoperatively and on the first and second postoperative days. Possible associations between the respiratory variables and the duration of the operation, surgical diagnosis and smoking status were investigated. Vital capacity and maximum inspiratory pressure presented reductions on the first postoperative day (20.9% and 91.6%, respectively) for thoracic surgery (P = 0.01), and maximum expiratory pressure showed reductions on the first postoperative day in cervical surgery patients (15.3%; P = 0.004). The incidence of pulmonary complications was 3.6%. There were reductions in vital capacity and maximum respiratory pressures during the postoperative period in patients undergoing laminectomy. Surgery in the thoracic region was associated with greater reductions in vital capacity and maximum inspiratory pressure, compared with cervical and lumbar surgery. Thus, surgical manipulation of the thoracic region appears to have more influence on pulmonary function and respiratory muscle action.

  20. Comparison between conventional and protective one-lung ventilation for ventilator-assisted thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, H J; Kim, J A; Yang, M; Shim, W S; Park, K J; Lee, J J

    2012-09-01

    Recent papers suggest protective ventilation (PV) as a primary ventilation strategy during one-lung ventilation (OLV) to reduce postoperative pulmonary morbidity. However, data regarding the advantage of the PV strategy in patients with normal preoperative pulmonary function are inconsistent, especially in the case of minimally invasive thoracic surgery. Therefore we compared conventional OLV (VT 10 ml/kg, FiO2 1.0, zero PEEP) to protective OLV (VT 6 ml/kg, FiO2 0.5, PEEP 5 cmH2O) in patients with normal preoperative pulmonary function tests undergoing video-assisted thoracic surgery. Oxygenation, respiratory mechanics, plasma interleukin-6 and malondialdehyde levels were measured at baseline, 15 and 60 minutes after OLV and 15 minutes after restoration of two-lung ventilation. PaO2 and PaO2/FiO2 were higher in conventional OLV than in protective OLV (PProtective ventilation did not provide advantages over conventional ventilation for video-assisted thoracic surgery in this group of patients with normal lung function.

  1. Computed tomography (CT) findings in 88 neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) patients: Prevalence rates and correlations of thoracic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Ken; Honda, Osamu; Satoh, Yukihisa; Kawai, Misa; Gyobu, Tomoko; Kanazawa, Toru; Hidaka, Shojiro; Yanagawa, Masahiro; Sumikawa, Hiromitsu; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Various thoracic CT findings, including cysts, mediastinal masses, etc. were found. • Cysts show upper and peripheral dominant distribution. • The number, size, and distribution of the pulmonary cysts in NF-1 revealed significant correlation. • It is suspected that thoracic CT findings in NF-1 occur independently. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence rates and the correlations of thoracic computed tomography (CT) findings of neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) in 88 patients. Materials and methods: Chest CT images of 88 NF1 patients were independently reviewed by three observers, and the CT findings were evaluated. If abnormal findings were present, their number, size, and distribution were recorded. The prevalence rate of each CT finding was calculated, and the correlations between CT findings were analyzed. Results: Of the 88 cases, 13 were positive for cysts, 16 for emphysema, 8 for nodules, 8 for GGNs (ground glass nodules), 13 for mediastinal masses, 20 for scoliosis, 44 for subcutaneous nodules, and 34 for skin nodules. Cysts showed upper and peripheral dominant distributions. Regarding 13 mediastinal masses, 2 were diagnosed as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), 1 was diagnosed as primary lung cancer, 2 were diagnosed as lateral meningocele, 3 were diagnosed as neurofibromas, and the remaining 7 were considered neurofibromas. There was a significant correlation between the prevalence of subcutaneous nodules and that of skin nodules. Significant positive correlations were also seen between size and number, size and rate of central distribution, and number and rate of central distribution of cysts. Conclusion: Various CT findings were found in NF-1 patients, and the prevalence rates of subcutaneous and skin nodules were higher than other findings. Though the prevalence rates of subcutaneous nodules and skin nodules were significantly correlated, the other CT findings in NF-1 occurred independently. The number, size, and

  2. Computed tomography (CT) findings in 88 neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) patients: Prevalence rates and correlations of thoracic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Ken, E-mail: k-ueda@radiol.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Honda, Osamu [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Satoh, Yukihisa [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases (Japan); Kawai, Misa; Gyobu, Tomoko; Kanazawa, Toru; Hidaka, Shojiro; Yanagawa, Masahiro [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Sumikawa, Hiromitsu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Osaka Rosai Hospital (Japan); Tomiyama, Noriyuki [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Various thoracic CT findings, including cysts, mediastinal masses, etc. were found. • Cysts show upper and peripheral dominant distribution. • The number, size, and distribution of the pulmonary cysts in NF-1 revealed significant correlation. • It is suspected that thoracic CT findings in NF-1 occur independently. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence rates and the correlations of thoracic computed tomography (CT) findings of neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) in 88 patients. Materials and methods: Chest CT images of 88 NF1 patients were independently reviewed by three observers, and the CT findings were evaluated. If abnormal findings were present, their number, size, and distribution were recorded. The prevalence rate of each CT finding was calculated, and the correlations between CT findings were analyzed. Results: Of the 88 cases, 13 were positive for cysts, 16 for emphysema, 8 for nodules, 8 for GGNs (ground glass nodules), 13 for mediastinal masses, 20 for scoliosis, 44 for subcutaneous nodules, and 34 for skin nodules. Cysts showed upper and peripheral dominant distributions. Regarding 13 mediastinal masses, 2 were diagnosed as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), 1 was diagnosed as primary lung cancer, 2 were diagnosed as lateral meningocele, 3 were diagnosed as neurofibromas, and the remaining 7 were considered neurofibromas. There was a significant correlation between the prevalence of subcutaneous nodules and that of skin nodules. Significant positive correlations were also seen between size and number, size and rate of central distribution, and number and rate of central distribution of cysts. Conclusion: Various CT findings were found in NF-1 patients, and the prevalence rates of subcutaneous and skin nodules were higher than other findings. Though the prevalence rates of subcutaneous nodules and skin nodules were significantly correlated, the other CT findings in NF-1 occurred independently. The number, size, and

  3. Multidisciplinary team management in thoracic oncology: more than just a concept?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Helen A; Baldwin, David R

    2014-06-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) management in thoracic oncology has been introduced over the past two decades with the aim of improving outcomes for patients. While MDT management has become the standard of care in some countries, not all healthcare systems have adopted this practice. In this article we review the history and implementation of MDT care in thoracic oncology and explore the evidence for, and challenges associated with, this system of working. There are many advantages of an MDT both to the patient, the clinicians and the wider population, but it is difficult to demonstrate a beneficial effect on outcomes such as treatment rates or survival given the substantial number of coexistent changes in the management of thoracic malignancies over the same time period. There are also some disadvantages associated with MDT working, particularly the costs of setting up the service and the time commitment from each of the healthcare professionals involved. Barriers to effective MDT working include poor attendance by some specialists, inadequate preparation and poor quality information about the patient. Variation in quality of MDTs has been reported so it is important that practice is monitored and areas for improvement identified. ©ERS 2014.

  4. Energy metabolism of thoracic surgical patients in the early postoperative period. Effect of posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandi, L S; Bertolini, R; Janni, A; Gioia, A; Angeletti, C A

    1996-03-01

    To determine the effect of elective thoracic surgery on energy metabolism and gas exchange and to evaluate whether the 30-degree sitting position would affect these variables. Prospective, unblinded, controlled study. Surgical ICU in a university hospital. Twenty-two adult patients undergoing elective pulmonary resection. Posture change from supine to 30-degree sitting position. Oxygen consumption (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2), respiratory quotient (RQ), and energy expenditure (EE) were measured by means of computerized indirect calorimetry before and after surgery. Heart rate and respiratory frequency were measured continuously during gas exchange measurement. Blood gases were analyzed with an automated blood gas analyzer. Preoperatively, altering position did not affect energy metabolism, gas exchange, and cardiopulmonary variables. Postoperatively, the measured EE was 116% of the expected value. Mean EE and VO2 values for each position were higher than the preoperative values for the corresponding postures (pMean percent increases in EE, VO2, and VCO2 were significantly lower in the 30-degree sitting position than in the supine position (EE: 7.9+/-2.7% vs 14.4+/-2.3%; pexchange for each position were worse than the preoperative values for the corresponding postures (pMean arterial pressure, heart rate, and respiratory frequency for each position were higher than the preoperative values for the corresponding postures (pmean values of these variables occurred between the two positions postoperatively. The early postoperative period of patients undergoing elective thoracic surgery is characterized by a condition of impaired gas exchange and by a hypermetabolic state. Hypermetabolism can be partly mitigated by assuming the 30-degree sitting position.

  5. Microneurolysis and decompression of long thoracic nerve injury are effective in reversing scapular winging: Long-term results in 50 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyons Andrew B

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long thoracic nerve injury leading to scapular winging is common, often caused by closed trauma through compression, stretching, traction, direct extrinsic force, penetrating injury, or neuritides such as Parsonage-Turner syndrome. We undertook the largest series of long thoracic nerve decompression and neurolysis yet reported to demonstrate the usefulness of long thoracic nerve decompression. Methods Winging was bilateral in 3 of the 47 patients (26 male, 21 female, yielding a total of 50 procedures. The mean age of the patients was 33.4 years, ranging from 24–57. Causation included heavy weight-lifting (31 patients, repetitive throwing (5 patients, deep massage (2 patients, repetitive overhead movement (1 patient, direct trauma (1 patient, motor bike accident (1 patient, and idiopathic causes (9 patients. Decompression and microneurolysis of the long thoracic nerve were performed in the supraclavicular space. Follow-up (average of 25.7 months consisted of physical examination and phone conversations. The degree of winging was measured by the operating surgeon (RKN. Patients also answered questions covering 11 quality-of-life facets spanning four domains of the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire. Results Thoracic nerve decompression and neurolysis improved scapular winging in 49 (98% of the 50 cases, producing "good" or "excellent" results in 46 cases (92%. At least some improvement occurred in 98% of cases that were less than 10 years old. Pain reduction through surgery was good or excellent in 43 (86% cases. Shoulder instability affected 21 patients preoperatively and persisted in 5 of these patients after surgery, even in the 5 patients with persistent instability who experienced some relief from the winging itself. Conclusion Surgical decompression and neurolysis of the long thoracic nerve significantly improve scapular winging in appropriate patients, for whom these techniques should be considered

  6. Evolution of thoracic surgery in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslauriers, Jean; Pearson, F Griffith; Nelems, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Canada's contributions toward the 21st century's practice of thoracic surgery have been both unique and multilayered. Scattered throughout are tales of pioneers where none had gone before, where opportunities were greeted by creativity and where iconic figures followed one another. To describe the numerous and important achievements of Canadian thoracic surgeons in the areas of surgery for pulmonary tuberculosis, thoracic oncology, airway surgery and lung transplantation. Information was collected through reading of the numerous publications written by Canadian thoracic surgeons over the past 100 years, interviews with interested people from all thoracic surgery divisions across Canada and review of pertinent material form the archives of several Canadian hospitals and universities. Many of the developments occurred by chance. It was the early and specific focus on thoracic surgery, to the exclusion of cardiac and general surgery, that distinguishes the Canadian experience, a model that is now emerging everywhere. From lung transplantation in chimera twin calves to ex vivo organ preservation, from the removal of airways to tissue regeneration, and from intensive care research to complex science, Canadians have excelled in their commitment to research. Over the years, the influence of Canadian thoracic surgery on international practice has been significant. Canada spearheaded the development of thoracic surgery over the past 100 years to a greater degree than any other country. From research to education, from national infrastructures to the regionalization of local practices, it happened in Canada.

  7. Utilization of Cupping Therapy in the Treatment of Vascular Thoracic Outlet Syndrome in a Collegiate Pitcher: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Cage

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Present a clinical case detailing the effectiveness of dry cupping therapy in treating thoracic outlet syndrome. The utilization of dry cupping therapy on a 20-year-old collegiate baseball pitcher with diagnosed thoracic outlet syndrome is presented. Background: Thoracic outlet syndrome is a relatively rare musculoskeletal condition affecting 1/100,000 patients annually. Dry cupping therapy is an ancient therapeutic modality that utilizes various means of suction with the goal of decompressing myofascial layers. Treatment: Following diagnosis, patient was successfully treated in two weeks using dry cupping therapy. The patient experienced no further incidence of thoracic outlet syndrome symptoms and was able to complete the remainder of his competitive season. Uniqueness: The patient’s thoracic outlet syndrome was diagnosed at an early stage, leading to the need of clearance from a vascular specialist before returning to competition. To the author’s knowledge, there are currently no published case reports detailing the use of cupping therapy to treat thoracic outlet syndrome. Conclusion: Cupping therapy may be a viable treatment option when seeking to address tight musculature. Further research needs to be conducted to determine optimal parameters for cupping therapy as a therapeutic modality.

  8. Preoperative planning of thoracic surgery with use of three-dimensional reconstruction, rapid prototyping, simulation and virtual navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuts, Samuel; Maessen, Jos G.

    2016-01-01

    For the past decades, surgeries have become more complex, due to the increasing age of the patient population referred for thoracic surgery, more complex pathology and the emergence of minimally invasive thoracic surgery. Together with the early detection of thoracic disease as a result of innovations in diagnostic possibilities and the paradigm shift to personalized medicine, preoperative planning is becoming an indispensable and crucial aspect of surgery. Several new techniques facilitating this paradigm shift have emerged. Pre-operative marking and staining of lesions are already a widely accepted method of preoperative planning in thoracic surgery. However, three-dimensional (3D) image reconstructions, virtual simulation and rapid prototyping (RP) are still in development phase. These new techniques are expected to become an important part of the standard work-up of patients undergoing thoracic surgery in the future. This review aims at graphically presenting and summarizing these new diagnostic and therapeutic tools PMID:29078505

  9. Role of clamping tube thoracostomy prior to removal in non-cardiac thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasheed, M.A.; Majeed, F.A.; Naz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The frequently encountered thoracic trauma in surgical emergencies is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Eighty percent of thoracic trauma can be managed by simple insertion of tube thoracostomy. Though guidelines for insertion are comprehensively explained in literature, an ideal algorithm for discontinuation is not available. A standard and safe defined protocol would eliminate hesitancy in confident removal among general surgeons. The objective of this study was to determine role of clamping trial prior to removal in terms of frequency of recurrent pneumothorax. Methods: This study was conducted in department of Surgery Combined military hospital/Military Hospital Rawalpindi from April 2013 to March 2014. Total 180 patients with blunt or penetrating thoracic trauma were included in the study. Chest tube (28-36 Fr) was inserted in Trauma centre under strict asepsis. Tubes were then connected to under water seal for minimum six hours. Patients were randomly divided in two equal groups (90 in each). In Group A, Clamping trial was given before attempting removal while in Group B, tube was removed immediately without clamping trial. Patients of both groups were observed two hourly for development of recurrent pneumothorax. Data was analysed using SPSS-18. Results: The comparison of frequency of recurrent pneumothorax in Group A (9 patients, 10%) and in Group B (4 patients, 4.5%) was not found to be statistically significant. (p-value 2.073). Conclusion: Clamping trial is unnecessary prior to removal of tube thoracostomy in blunt and penetrating non-cardiac thoracic trauma in terms of recurrent pneumothorax. (author)

  10. Thoracic cavity segmentation algorithm using multiorgan extraction and surface fitting in volumetric CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, JangPyo [Interdisciplinary Program, Bioengineering Major, Graduate School, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-744, South Korea and Department of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Namkug, E-mail: namkugkim@gmail.com; Lee, Sang Min; Seo, Joon Beom [Department of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Chan [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine and Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate a semiautomatic segmentation method for thoracic cavity volumetry and mediastinum fat quantification of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Methods: The thoracic cavity region was separated by segmenting multiorgans, namely, the rib, lung, heart, and diaphragm. To encompass various lung disease-induced variations, the inner thoracic wall and diaphragm were modeled by using a three-dimensional surface-fitting method. To improve the accuracy of the diaphragm surface model, the heart and its surrounding tissue were segmented by a two-stage level set method using a shape prior. To assess the accuracy of the proposed algorithm, the algorithm results of 50 patients were compared to the manual segmentation results of two experts with more than 5 years of experience (these manual results were confirmed by an expert thoracic radiologist). The proposed method was also compared to three state-of-the-art segmentation methods. The metrics used to evaluate segmentation accuracy were volumetric overlap ratio (VOR), false positive ratio on VOR (FPRV), false negative ratio on VOR (FNRV), average symmetric absolute surface distance (ASASD), average symmetric squared surface distance (ASSSD), and maximum symmetric surface distance (MSSD). Results: In terms of thoracic cavity volumetry, the mean ± SD VOR, FPRV, and FNRV of the proposed method were (98.17 ± 0.84)%, (0.49 ± 0.23)%, and (1.34 ± 0.83)%, respectively. The ASASD, ASSSD, and MSSD for the thoracic wall were 0.28 ± 0.12, 1.28 ± 0.53, and 23.91 ± 7.64 mm, respectively. The ASASD, ASSSD, and MSSD for the diaphragm surface were 1.73 ± 0.91, 3.92 ± 1.68, and 27.80 ± 10.63 mm, respectively. The proposed method performed significantly better than the other three methods in terms of VOR, ASASD, and ASSSD. Conclusions: The proposed semiautomatic thoracic cavity segmentation method, which extracts multiple organs (namely, the rib, thoracic wall, diaphragm, and heart

  11. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding, aneurismatic dilatation of the thoracic aorta and filling defect on the esophagogram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naschitz, J.E.; Bassan, H.; Lazarov, N.; Grishkan, A.

    1982-06-01

    A patient is described with an aneurysm of the thoracic aorta, which has ruptured into the esophagus. An esophageal X-ray contrast study has revealed a filling defect at the contact site of the esophagus and the aortic aneurysm. The filling defect was due to a clot protruding from the aorta into the esophagus. This unique case calls attention to a diagnostic triad: upper gastrointestinal bleeding, aneurysm of the thoracic aorta, and filling defect in the esophagus at its site of contact with the enlarged aorta. This triad suggested aortoesophageal fistula (AEF) in the patient and could help in the diagnosis of atypical cases of AEF, where thoracic aortography has not been performed initially.

  12. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding, aneurismatic dilatation of the thoracic aorta and filling defect on the esophagogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naschitz, J.E.; Bassan, H.; Lazarov, N.; Grishkan, A.; Haifa Univ.; Haifa Univ.

    1982-01-01

    A patient is described with an aneurysm of the thoracic aorta, which has ruptured into the esophagus. An esophageal X-ray contrast study has revealed a filling defect at the contact site of the esophagus and the aortic aneurysm. The filling defect was due to a clot protruding from the aorta into the esophagus. This unique case calls attention to a diagnostic triad: upper gastrointestinal bleeding, aneurysm of the thoracic aorta, and filling defect in the esophagus at its site of contact with the enlarged aorta. This triad suggested aortoesophageal fistula (AEF) in the patient and could help in the diagnosis of atypical cases of AEF, where thoracic aortography has not been performed initially. (orig.) [de

  13. Role of contrast-enhanced helical CT in the evaluation of acute thoracic aortic injuries after blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaglione, M.; Pinto, A.; Pinto, F.; Romano, L.; Ragozzino, A.; Grassi, R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the value of contrast-enhanced helical CT for detecting and managing acute thoracic aortic injury (ATAI). Between June 1995 and February 2000, 1419 consecutive chest CT examinations were performed in the setting of major blunt trauma. The following CT findings were considered indicative of ATAI: intimal flap; pseudoaneurysm; contour irregularity; lumen abnormality; and extravasation of contrast material. On the basis of these direct findings no further diagnostic investigations were performed. Isolated mediastinal hematoma on CT scans was considered an indirect sign of ATAI: In these cases, thoracic aortography was performed even if CT indicated normal aorta. Seventy-seven patients had abnormal CT scans: Among the 23 patients with direct CT signs, acute thoracic aortic injuries was confirmed at thoracotomy in 21. Two false-positive cases were observed. The 54 remaining patients had isolated mediastinal hematoma without aortic injuries at CT and corresponding negative angiograms. The 1342 patients with negative CT scans were included in the 8-month follow-up program and did not show any adverse sequela based on clinical and radiographic criteria. Contrast-enhanced helical CT has a critical role in the exclusion of thoracic aortic injuries in patient with major blunt chest trauma and prevents unnecessary thoracic aortography. Direct CT signs of ATAI do not require further diagnostic investigations to confirm the diagnosis: Isolated aortic bands or contour vessel abnormalities should be first considered as possible artifacts or related to non-traumatic etiologies especially when mediastinal hematoma is absent. In cases of isolated mediastinal hematoma other possible sources of bleeding should be considered before directing patients to thoracic aortography. (orig.)

  14. Carcinoma of the thoracic esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herskovic, A.M.; Leichman, L.; Lattin, P.B.

    1987-01-01

    The authors analyzed all cases of thoracic esophagel carcinoma seen from 1980 to 1984 inclusive, plus an additional 22 cases from a pilot study at Wayne State University. Most patients received preoperative combination radiation and chemotherapy. Eighty-nine patients completed treatment (5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, and radiation therapy) as in both the RTOG and SWOG national studies. Of these 89, 39 refused or were not offered planned surgery. Four patients are still alive and well. Fifty patients underwent esophagectomy; 12 patients were free of tumor at esophagectomy, and four of these are alive and well. One patient with a tumor in the resected esophagus alone is still alive. Twenty-two patients were enrolled in the pilot study in which surgery was reserved for salvage, the initial radiation volume was increased, the tumor dose was increased to 5,000 rad give continuously, and chemotherapy was increased to four courses

  15. The Role at Rehabilitation in Treatment of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Hosseinian

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Thoracic outlet syndrome is a complex disorder caused by neurovascular irritation in the region of the thoracic outlet. The syndrome have been said to be mainly due to anomalous structures in the thoracic outlet, treatment for thoracic outlet syndrome varies among different institutions, and there has not been any standard program. In general conservative and surgical treatment can be do if necessary. Materials & Methods: The rehabilitation program consists of exercise and physiotherapy and brace designed to hold the posture in which thoracic outlet is enlarged. Exercise program was designed simple enough to be performed in the daily living or during work after minimal training and isometric exercises of Serratus anterior, Levator Scapulae and Erector Spinae muscles to be performed in one posture: flexion and elevation of scapular girdle and correction position of upper-thoracic spine. During 7 years, 131 cases of (T.O.S. were evaluated that 26 cases (20% have operated and 84 cases (64% have treated with conservative treatment and 21 cases (16% have been candidate for surgery but they didn't accepted. Results: All of the cases have treated with conservative treatment for four months. 84 cases responded well and no further treatment was needed. 47 cases were not satisfied with. The outcome of their treatment, that 26 cases have operated and 21 cases have not accepted the operation and continued the conservative treatment, they have had pain and slightly disability. 23 cases of operated group responded well and they have resumed to work, one case has had neuropraxia for about one year. Conclusion: Most cases of thoracic outlet syndrome (T.O.S. can be treated conservatively. Surgically treatment is indicated only in cases severe enough to make them disable to work. It is better all the patients undergo conservative treatment for at least four months then will decided for surgical treatment.

  16. Surgical treatment of Lenke 1 thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis with maintenance of kyphosis using the simultaneous double-rod rotation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Hideki; Ito, Manabu; Abe, Yuichiro; Abumi, Kuniyoshi; Takahata, Masahiko; Nagahama, Ken; Hiratsuka, Shigeto; Kuroki, Kei; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2014-06-15

    Retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected, consecutive, nonrandomized series of patients. To assess the surgical outcomes of the simultaneous double-rod rotation technique for treating Lenke 1 thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). With the increasing popularity of segmental pedicle screw spinal reconstruction for treating AIS, concerns regarding the limited ability to correct hypokyphosis have also increased. A consecutive series of 32 patients with Lenke 1 main thoracic AIS treated with the simultaneous double-rod rotation technique at our institution was included. Outcome measures included patient demographics, radiographical measurements, and Scoliosis Research Society questionnaire scores. All 32 patients were followed up for a minimum of 2 years (average, 3.6 yr). The average main thoracic Cobb angle correction rate and the correction loss at the final follow-up were 67.8% and 3.3°, respectively. The average preoperative thoracic kyphosis (T5-T12) was 11.9°, which improved significantly to 20.5° (P correction of the main thoracic curve while maintaining sagittal profiles and correcting coronal and axial deformities. 4.

  17. Endovascular Repair of Traumatic Rupture of the Thoracic Aorta: Single-Center Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saratzis, Nikolaos A.; Saratzis, Athanasios N.; Melas, Nikolaos; Ginis, Georgios; Lioupis, Athanasios; Lykopoulos, Dimitrios; Lazaridis, John; Dimitrios, Kiskinis

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. Traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta secondary to blunt chest trauma is a life-threatening emergency and a common cause of death, usually following violent collisions. The objective of this retrospective report was to evaluate the efficacy of endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic disruptions with a single commercially available stent-graft. Methods. Nine men (mean age 29.5 years) were admitted to our institution between January 2003 and January 2006 due to blunt aortic trauma following violent motor vehicle collisions. Plain chest radiography, spiral computed tomography, aortography, and transesophageal echocardiography were used for diagnostic purposes in all cases. All patients were diagnosed with contained extramural thoracic aortic hematomas, secondary to aortic disruption. One patient was also diagnosed with a traumatic thoracic aortic dissection, secondary to blunt trauma. All subjects were poor surgical candidates, due to major injuries such as multiple bone fractures, abdominal hematomas, and pulmonary contusions. All repairs were performed using the EndoFit (LeMaitre Vascular) stent-graft. Results. Complete exclusion of the traumatic aortic disruption and pseudoaneurysm was achieved and verified at intraoperative arteriography and on CT scans, within 10 days of the repair in all patients. In 1 case the deployment of a second cuff was necessary due to a secondary endoleak. In 2 cases the left subclavian artery was occluded to achieve adequate graft fixation. No procedure-related deaths have occurred and no cardiac or peripheral vascular complications were observed within the 12 months (range 8-16 months) follow-up. Conclusions. This is the first time the EndoFit graft has been utilized in the treatment of thoracic aortic disruptions secondary to chest trauma. The repair of such pathologies is technically feasible and early follow-up results are promising

  18. Teaching practices of thoracic epidural catheterizations in different grade of anesthesia residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Alagoz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: In this study, we aimed to clarify the importance of residency grade and other factors which influence the success of thoracic epidural catheterization in thoracotomy patients. Methods: After the ethical committee approval, data were recorded retrospectively from the charts of 415 patients. All patients had given written informed consent. The thoracic epidural catheterization attempts were divided into two groups as second–third year (Group I and fourth year (Group II according to residency grade. We retrospectively collected demographic data, characteristics of thoracic epidural catheterization attempts, and all difficulties and complications during thoracic epidural catheterization. Results: Overall success rate of thoracic epidural catheterization was similar between the groups. Levels of catheter placement, number and duration of thoracic epidural catheterization attempts were not different between the groups (p > 0.05. Change of needle insertion level was statistically higher in Group II (p = 0.008, whereas paresthesia was significantly higher in Group I (p = 0.007. Dural puncture and postdural puncture headache rates were higher in Group I. Higher body mass index and level of the insertion site were significant factors for thoracic epidural catheterization failure and postoperative complication rate and those were independence from residents’ experience (p  0,05. A alteração do nível de inserção da agulha foi estatisticamente maior no Grupo II (p = 0,008, enquanto que a parestesia foi significativamente maior no Grupo I (p = 0,007. As taxas de cefaléia durante e após punção dural foram maiores no Grupo I. Um índice de massa corporal (IMC maior e o nível do local de inserção foram fatores significativos para o fracasso do CET e para as taxas de complicações no pós-operatório, mas independentes da experiência dos residentes (p < 0,001, 0,005. Conclusão: O IMC e o nível do local

  19. Operativ behandling af thoracic outlet syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, Peter; Stiasny, Jerzy

    2012-01-01

    of the brachial plexus. At surgery, we found and severed a fibrous band that compressed the inferior trunk. Postoperatively, the pain subsided and fine hand movements improved. One patient had no cervical rib, however, in the two other cases we found rudimentary cervical ribs. Magnetic resonance imaging......We present three cases with longstanding true neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome. All patients had aching pain in the shoulder, arm and ulnar border of the hand. On examination, we found atrophy of the hand muscles. Electromyography revealed signs of compromised function of the inferior trunk...

  20. Thoracic combined spinal-epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy in an obese patient with asthma and multiple drug allergies: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daszkiewicz Andrzej

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Drug allergies, asthma, and obesity are more common in modern societies, and patients with these problems are often a challenge for anesthetists. Different techniques of regional anesthesia can be beneficial particularly for this group of patients. We present a patient who suffered from all of the above-mentioned conditions and successfully underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy under thoracic combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. It is still not a popular practice, and we would like to show another indication for using it.

  1. One-stage posterior approaches for treatment of thoracic spinal infection: Transforaminal and costotransversectomy, compared with anterior approach with posterior instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Fu-Cheng; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Niu, Chi-Chien; Lai, Po-Liang; Chen, Lih-Huei; Chen, Wen-Jer

    2017-10-01

    Treating thoracic infective spondylodiscitis with anterior surgical approaches carry a relatively high risk of perioperative and postoperative complications. Posterior approaches have been reported to result in lower complication rates than anterior procedures, but more evidence is needed to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of 1-stage posterior approaches for treating infectious thoracic spondylodiscitis.Preoperative and postoperative clinical data, of 18 patients who underwent 2 types of 1-stage posterior procedures, costotransversectomy and transforaminal thoracic interbody debridement and fusion and 7 patients who underwent anterior debridement and reconstruction with posterior instrumentation, were retrospectively assessed.The clinical outcomes of patients treated with 1-stage posterior approaches were generally good, with good infection control, back pain relief, kyphotic angle correction, and either partial or solid union for fusion status. Furthermore, they achieved shorter surgical time, fewer postoperative complications, and shorter hospital stay than the patients underwent anterior debridement with posterior instrumentation.The results suggested that treating thoracic spondylodiscitis with a single-stage posterior approach might prevent postoperative complications and avoid respiratory problems associated with anterior approaches. Single-stage posterior approaches would be recommended for thoracic spine infection, especially for patients with medical comorbidities.

  2. Fate of patients with spinal cord ischemia complicating thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSart, Kenneth; Scali, Salvatore T; Feezor, Robert J; Hong, Michael; Hess, Philip J; Beaver, Thomas M; Huber, Thomas S; Beck, Adam W

    2013-09-01

    Spinal cord ischemia (SCI) is a potentially devastating complication of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) that can result in varying degrees of short-term and permanent disability. This study was undertaken to describe the clinical outcomes, long-term functional impact, and influence on survival of SCI after TEVAR. A retrospective review of all TEVAR patients at the University of Florida from 2000 to 2011 was performed to identify individuals experiencing SCI, defined by any new lower extremity neurologic deficit not attributable to another cause. SCI was dichotomized into immediate or delayed onset, with immediate onset defined as SCI noted upon awakening from anesthesia, and delayed characterized as a period of normal function, followed by development of neurologic injury. Ambulatory status was determined using database query, record review, and phone interviews with patients and/or family. Mortality was estimated using life-table analysis. A total of 607 TEVARs were performed for various indications, with 57 patients (9.4%) noted to have postoperative SCI (4.3% permanent). SCI patients were more likely to be older (63.9 ± 15.6 vs 70.5 ± 11.2 years; P = .002) and have a number of comorbidities, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and cerebrovascular disease (P impact on postdischarge FI or long-term mortality. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Preliminary analysis of the risk factors for radiation pneumonitis in patients with non- small-cell lung cancer treated with concurrent erlotinib and thoracic radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang H

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hongqing Zhuang,* Hailing Hou,* Zhiyong Yuan, Jun Wang, Qingsong Pang, Lujun Zhao, Ping WangDepartment of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, and Tianjin Lung Cancer Center, Tianjin, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: The aim of this study was to investigate radiation pneumonitis and its associated risk factors in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with concurrent erlotinib and thoracic radiotherapy.Materials and methods: We conducted an analysis of patients with nonoperable stage IIIA–IV non-small-cell lung cancer who were treated with concurrent thoracic radiotherapy and erlotinib (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00973310. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 grading system was applied to evaluate the incidence of radiation pneumonitis. The lung dosimetric parameters were recorded in accordance with the treatment plan, and the study endpoint was radiation pneumonitis at grade 2 or more.Results: Among the 24 selected clinical cases, nine were identified with radiation pneumonitis of grade 2 or above (37.5%. This included four cases with grade 2 (16.7%, two cases with grade 3 (8.3%, and three cases with grade 5 (12.5%. The results showed that the planning target volume was a significant factor affecting the incidence of radiation pneumonitis. All lung dosimetric parameters exhibited statistically significant differences between patients with pneumonitis and patients without pneumonitis. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis showed that all lung dosimetric parameters were useful in predicting the incidence of radiation pneumonitis. In addition, the threshold values of V5, V10, V15, V20, V30, and mean lung dose were >4%, >29%, >27%, >22%, >17% and >1,027 cGy, respectively.Conclusion: Special attention

  4. Limiting chest computed tomography in the evaluation of pediatric thoracic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Jamie; Isani, Mubina; Bowling, Jordan; Zagory, Jessica; Goodhue, Catherine J; Burke, Rita V; Upperman, Jeffrey S; Gayer, Christopher P

    2016-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the chest (chest CT) is overused in blunt pediatric thoracic trauma. Chest CT adds to the diagnosis of thoracic injury but rarely changes patient management. We sought to identify a subset of blunt pediatric trauma patients who would benefit from a screening chest CT based on their admission chest x-ray (CXR) findings. We hypothesize that limiting chest CT to patients with an abnormal mediastinal silhouette identifies intrathoracic vascular injuries not otherwise seen on CXR. All blunt trauma activations that underwent an admission CXR at our Level 1 pediatric trauma center from 2005 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients who had a chest CT were evaluated for added diagnoses and change in management after CT. An admission CXR was performed in 1,035 patients. One hundred thirty-nine patients had a CT, and the diagnosis of intra-thoracic injury was added in 42% of patients. Chest CT significantly increased the diagnosis of contusion or atelectasis (30.3% vs 60.4%; p pneumothorax (7.2% vs 18.7%; p chest CT. Chest CT changed the management of only 4 patients (2.9%). Two patients underwent further radiologic evaluation that was negative for injury, one had a chest tube placed for an occult pneumothorax before exploratory laparotomy, and one patient had a thoracotomy for repair of aortic injury. Chest CT for select patients with an abnormal mediastinal silhouette on CXR would have decreased CT scans by 80% yet still identified patients with an intrathoracic vascular injury. The use of chest CT should be limited to the identification of intrathoracic vascular injuries in the setting of an abnormal mediastinal silhouette on CXR. Therapeutic study, level IV; diagnostic study, level III.

  5. Platinum-based chemotherapy with or without thoracic radiation therapy in patients with unresectable thymic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yoichi; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kubota, Kaoru

    2000-01-01

    Thymic carcinoma is a rare mediastinal neoplasm with poor prognosis. Although the clinical benefit of chemotherapy for thymic carcinoma is controversial, cisplatin-based chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy is ordinarily adopted in advanced cases. We evaluated the clinical outcome of platinum-based chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy in unresectable thymic carcinoma patients. Ten patients with unresectable thymic carcinoma were treated with platinum-based chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy in the National Cancer Center Hospital between 1989 and 1998. We reviewed the histological type, treatment, response and survival of these patients. Four of the 10 patients responded to chemotherapy and both the median progression-free survival period and the median response duration were 6.0 months. The median survival time was 11.0 months. There was no relationship between histological classification and prognosis. Platinum-based chemotherapy with or without thoracic radiation is, regardless of tumor histology, marginally effective in advanced thymic carcinoma patients, giving only a modest tumor response rate and short response duration and survival. (author)

  6. Evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging in thoracic inlet tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Eiro (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-06-01

    To evaluate the detectability of tumor invasion to the thoracic inlet, MRI was performed in 57 patients with thoracic inlet tumor, and the diagnostic accuracy of MRI was compared with that of CT concerning the utility for thoracic inlet lesions. And we assessed abnormal findings in comparison with surgical or autopsy findings. In the local extent of the tumor, the accuracy for tumor invasion to the vessels such as subclavian artery and vein was 94.9% for MRI, and 83.5% for CT, and to the brachial plexus was 95.0% for MRI, and 60.0% for CT. MRI was superior to CT, but MRI was equivalent to CT with regard to invasion to the base of the neck, lateral chest wall, ribs, and vertebral bodies. However on MRI, it is easier to understand the longitudinal tumor extent than on CT. CT has superior spatial resolusion but CT has also disadvantages, such as streak artifact caused by shoulder joints, resulting in image degradation. In contrast, MRI has inherent advantages, and multiple images which facilitate the relationship between tumor and normal structures. Coronal and sagittal MR images facilitated three-dimensional observation of tumor of invasion in the thoracic inlet. Furthermore to improve image quality of MRI for the thoracic inlet, we newly devised a high molecular polyester shell for fixing a surface coil. On the high resolution MR (HR-MR) imaging using our shell, normal lymph nodes, muscles, blood vessels and the branches of the branchial plexus were clearly visualized in detail. Our shell was simple to process and facilitated immobilization of a surface coil. HR-MR technique produces images of high resolution after simple preparation. In conclusion, MRI was very useful for detecting lesions of the thoracic inlet and in deciding surgical indication and the planning for radiotherapy. (author).

  7. Patterns of failure after complete resection of thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: implications for postoperative radiation therapy volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wencheng; Wang Qifeng; Xiao Zefen; Yang Longhai; Liu Xiangyang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyze intrathoracic or extrathoracic recurrence pattern after surgical resection of thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (TESCC) and its help for further modify and improvement on the target of postoperative radiation therapy. Methods: One hundred and ninety-five patients who had undergone resection of TESCC at the Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences enrolled from April 1999 to July 2007. Sites of failure on different primary location of esophageal cancer were documented. Results: Patients with upper or middle thoracic esophageal cancer had higher proportion of intrathoracic recurrence. Patients with lower thoracic esophageal cancer had more intrathoracic recurrence and abdominal lymph node metastatic recurrence. Histological lymph node status has nothing to do with intrathoracic recurrence, supraclavicular lymph node (SLN) metastasis or distant metastasis (χ 2 =1.58, 0.06, 0.04, P =0.134, 0.467, 0.489, respectively), whereas the chance of abdominal lymph node metastases in N positive patients was significantly higher than that in N 0 patients (28.7%: 10.6%, χ 2 =9.94, P =0.001), and so did in middle thoracic esophageal cancer (20.0%: 5.6%, χ 2 =5.67, P =0.015). Anatomic recurrence rate of patients with proximal resection margin no more than 3 cm was significantly higher compared to those more than 3 cm (25.0%: 11.3%, χ 2 =5.65, P=0.019). Conclusions: Mediastinum is the most common recurrence site.According to recurrence site, the following radiation targets are recommended: when tumor was located at the upper or middle thoracic esophagus with negative N status, the mediastinum, the tumor bed and the supraclavicular region should be included as postoperative RT target; when tumor was located at the middle thoracic esophagus with positive N or located at the lower thoracic esophagus, the abdominal lymph node should be added.If the proximal resection margin was no more than 3 cm, the anastomotic-stoma should be included

  8. Pneumothorax in severe thoracic traumas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camassa, N.W.; Boccuzzi, F.; Diettorre, E.; Troilo, A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors reviewed CT scans and supine chest X-ray of 47 patients affected by severe thoracic trauma, examined in 1985-86. The sensibility of the two methodologies in the assessment of pneumothorax was compared. CT detected 25 pneumothorax, whereas supine chest X-ray allowed a diagnosis in 18 cases only. In 8 of the latter (44.4%) the diagnosis was made possible by the presence of indirect signs of pneumothorax only - the most frequent being the deep sulcus sign. The characterization of pneumothorax is important especially in the patients who need to be treated with mechanical ventilation therapy, or who are to undergo surgery in total anaesthesia

  9. Comparison thoracic epidural and intercostal block to improve ventilation parameters and reduce pain in patients with multiple rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemzadeh, Shahryar; Hashemzadeh, Khosrov; Hosseinzadeh, Hamzeh; Aligholipour Maleki, Raheleh; Golzari, Samad E J; Golzari, Samad

    2011-01-01

    Chest wall blunt trauma causes multiple rib fractures and will often be associated with significant pain and may compromise ventilator mechanics. Analgesia has great roll in rib fracture therapies, opioid are useful, but when used as sole agent may require such high dose that they produce respiratory depression, especially in elderly .the best analgesia for a severe chest wall injury is a continuous epidural infusion of local anesthetic. This provides complete analgesia allowing inspiration and coughing without of the risk of respiratory depression. sixty adult patients who with multiple rib fractures were enrolled in this study. They were divided into Group A or thoracic epidural with bupivacaine 0.125 % +1mg/5ml morphine and group B or intercostal block with 0.25% bupivacaine. The patients were assessed through ICU and hospital stay length, ventilation function tests. Pain score among the patients was measured with verbal rating scale, before and after administration of the analgesia. We found a significant improvement in ventilatory function tests during the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd days after epidural analgesia compared with the intercostal block (P pain at rest and pain caused by coughing and deep breathing in group A compared group B... ICU and hospital stay markedly reduced in Group A. thoracic epidural analgesia is superior to intercostals block regarding pain relief of rib fractures. Patients who received epidural analgesia had significantly lower pain scores at all studied times.

  10. Ipsilateral Brachial Plexus Block and Hemidiaphragmatic Paresis as Adverse Effect of a High Thoracic Paravertebral Block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renes, Steven H.; van Geffen, Geert J.; Snoeren, Miranda M.; Gielen, Matthieu J.; Groen, Gerbrand J.

    Background: Thoracic paravertebral block is regularly used for unilateral chest and abdominal surgery and is associated with a low complication rate. Case Reports: We describe 2 patients with an ipsilateral brachial plexus block with Horner syndrome after a high continuous thoracic paravertebral

  11. The role of whole-body computed tomography in the diagnosis of thoracic injuries in severely injured patients - a retrospective multi-centre study based on the trauma registry of the German trauma society (TraumaRegister DGU®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Patricia; Kulla, Martin; Kerwagen, Fabian; Lefering, Rolf; Friemert, Benedikt; Palm, Hans-Georg

    2017-08-15

    Thoracic injuries are a leading cause of death in polytrauma patients. Early diagnosis and treatment are of paramount importance. Whole-body computed tomography (WBCT) has largely replaced traditional imaging techniques such as conventional radiographs and focused computed tomography (CT) as diagnostic tools in severely injured patients. It is still unclear whether WBCT has led to higher rates of diagnosis of thoracic injuries and thus to a change in outcomes. In a retrospective study based on the trauma registry of the German Trauma Society (TraumaRegister DGU ® ), we analysed data from 16,545 patients who underwent treatment in 59 hospitals between 2002 and 2012 (ISS ≥ 9). The 3 years preceding and the 3 years following the introduction of WBCT as a standard imaging modality for the investigation of severely injured patients were assessed for every hospital. Accordingly, patients were assigned to either the pre-WBCT or the WBCT group. We compared the numbers of thoracic injuries and the outcomes of patients before and after the routine use of WBCT. A total of 13,564 patients (pre-WBCT: n = 5005, WBCT: n = 8559) were included. Relevant thoracic injuries were detected in 47.8%. There were no major differences between the patient groups in injury severity (pre-WBCT: median ISS 21; WBCT: median ISS 22), injury patterns and demographics. After the introduction of WBCT, only minor changes were observed regarding the rates of most thoracic injuries. Clinically relevant injuries were pulmonary contusions (pre-WBCT: 18.5%; WBCT: 28.7%), injuries to the lung parenchyma (pre-WBCT: 12.6%; WBCT: 5.9%), multiple rib fractures (pre-WBCT: 10.6%; WBCT: 21.6%), and pneumothoraces (pre-WBCT: 17.3%; WBCT: 21.6%). The length of stay in the intensive care unit (pre-WBCT: 10.8 days; WBCT: 9.7 days) and in hospital (pre-WBCT: 26.2 days; WBCT: 23.3 days) decreased. There was no difference in overall mortality (pre-WBCT: 15.5%; WBCT: 15.6%). The routine use of WBCT in the

  12. Postpartum Osteoporosis and Thoracic Vertebral Fracture in a Patient Treated with Heparin During Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Aydemir Ekim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Postpartum osteoporosis (PPO is a rare form of osteoporosis related to pregnancy. We report the case of a 35-year-old woman who consulted for severe low-back pain one week after her delivery. This woman had a personal history of protein C deficiency and was treated with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH 40 mg/day during her pregnancy. Her body mass index was 19.8 and she had only gained 8 kg during pregnancy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed a fracture of thoracic 11. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA measured T score = - 4,9 and Z score = -4,8 in Lumbar 1-4 vertebrae. These findings suggest that PPO may be one of the causes of severe back pain in postpartum patients. We think that PPO risk is higher in those patients with low BMI who were treated with LMWH during pregnancy.

  13. Haemothorax and Thoracic Spine Fractures in the Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Michael A. Masteller; Aakash Chauhan; Harsha Musunuru; Mark M. Walsh; Bryan Boyer; Joseph A. Prahlow

    2012-01-01

    Both osteoporotic fractures and pleural effusions are frequently observed in medicine. However, rarely does one associate a hemorrhagic pleural effusion with a thoracic spinal fracture when the patient has not sustained massive trauma. In this paper, we discuss two cases where seemingly insignificant low-energy trauma precipitated massive haemothoraces in elderly patients with underlying osteoporosis, ultimately resulting in their immediate causes of death. This paper serves to remind health ...

  14. Myocardial ischemia due to compression of an unruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm in a patient with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hiroya; Asada, Tatsuro; Gan, Kunio; Abe, Koichiro; Izumi, Satoshi

    2007-06-01

    We report a 33-year-old woman who had a 60-mm thoracic aneurysm of the ascending aorta with Marfan syndrome and effort angina due to compression of the right coronary artery (RCA) by the aneurysm. Surgery was performed using the Bentall procedure and a coronary artery bypass graft to the RCA. Postoperatively, coronary angiography showed that the coronary flow of the RCA was restored by removing the aneurysmal compression. The patient was discharged without angina on postoperative day 21.

  15. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in the management of penetrating and blunt thoracic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanchi, S; Makey, I; McKenna, R; Margulies, D R

    2009-01-01

    The role of video-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS) is still being defined in the management of thoracic trauma. We report our trauma cases managed by VATS and review the role of VATS in the management of thoracic trauma. All the trauma patients who underwent VATS from 2000 to 2007 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center were retrospectively studied. Twenty-three trauma patients underwent 25 cases of VATS. The most common indication for VATS was retained haemothorax. Thoracotomy was avoided in 21 patients. VATS failed in two cases. On an average VATS was performed on trauma day seven (range 1-26) and the length of hospital stay was 20 days (range 3-58). There was no mortality. VATS was performed in an emergency (day 1-2), or in the early (day 2-7) or late (after day 7) phases of trauma. VATS can be performed safely for the management of thoracic traumas. VATS can be performed before or after thoracotomy and at any stage of trauma. The use of VATS in trauma has a trimodal distribution (emergent, early, late), each with different indications.

  16. Anatomical landmarks and skin markers are not reliable for accurate labeling of thoracic vertebrae on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabshin, Nogah; Schweitzer, Mark E.; Carrino, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Numbering of the thoracic spine on MRI can be tedious if C2 and L5-S1 are not included and may lead to errors in lesion level. Purpose: To determine whether anatomic landmarks or external markers are reliable as an aid for accurate numbering of thoracic vertebrae on MRI. Material and Methods: Sixty-seven thoracic spine MR studies of 67 patients (30 males, 37 females, age range 18-83 years) were studied, composed of 52 consecutive MR studies and an additional 15 MRI in which vitamin E markers were placed over the skin. In the 52 thoracic MR examinations potential numbering aids such as the level of the sternal apex, pulmonary artery, aortic arch, and osseous or disc abnormalities were numbered on both cervical localizer (standard of reference) and thoracic sagittal images. The additional 15 examinations in which vitamin E markers were placed over the skin were evaluated for consistency in the level of the markers on different sequences in the same exam. Results: The sternal apex level ranged from T2 to T5 [T3 in 28/51 patients (55%), T2 in 10/51 (20%)]. The aortic arch level ranged from T2 to T4 [T4 in 18/48 (38%) and T3 in 17 (35%)]. Pulmonary artery level ranged from T4 to T6-7 disc [T5 in 20/52 patients (38%) and T6 in 14/52 (27%)]. In 3 of 12 patients who had abnormalities in a vertebral body or disc as definite point reference, the non-localizer image mislabelled the level. In 11/15 (73%) patients with vitamin E markers that were placed over the upper thoracic spine, the results showed consistency in the level of the markers in relation to the reference points or consistent inter-marker gap between the sequences. Conclusion: There are only two reliable ways to accurately define the levels if no landmarking feature is available on the magnet. The first is by including C2 in the thoracic sequence of a diagnostic quality, and the second is by using an abnormality in the discs or vertebral bodies as a point of reference

  17. Anatomical landmarks and skin markers are not reliable for accurate labeling of thoracic vertebrae on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabshin, Nogah (Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-HaShomer (Israel)), e-mail: shabshin@gmail.com; Schweitzer, Mark E. (Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa Hospital and Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa (Canada)); Carrino, John A. (Dept. of Radiology, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    2010-11-15

    Background: Numbering of the thoracic spine on MRI can be tedious if C2 and L5-S1 are not included and may lead to errors in lesion level. Purpose: To determine whether anatomic landmarks or external markers are reliable as an aid for accurate numbering of thoracic vertebrae on MRI. Material and Methods: Sixty-seven thoracic spine MR studies of 67 patients (30 males, 37 females, age range 18-83 years) were studied, composed of 52 consecutive MR studies and an additional 15 MRI in which vitamin E markers were placed over the skin. In the 52 thoracic MR examinations potential numbering aids such as the level of the sternal apex, pulmonary artery, aortic arch, and osseous or disc abnormalities were numbered on both cervical localizer (standard of reference) and thoracic sagittal images. The additional 15 examinations in which vitamin E markers were placed over the skin were evaluated for consistency in the level of the markers on different sequences in the same exam. Results: The sternal apex level ranged from T2 to T5 [T3 in 28/51 patients (55%), T2 in 10/51 (20%)]. The aortic arch level ranged from T2 to T4 [T4 in 18/48 (38%) and T3 in 17 (35%)]. Pulmonary artery level ranged from T4 to T6-7 disc [T5 in 20/52 patients (38%) and T6 in 14/52 (27%)]. In 3 of 12 patients who had abnormalities in a vertebral body or disc as definite point reference, the non-localizer image mislabelled the level. In 11/15 (73%) patients with vitamin E markers that were placed over the upper thoracic spine, the results showed consistency in the level of the markers in relation to the reference points or consistent inter-marker gap between the sequences. Conclusion: There are only two reliable ways to accurately define the levels if no landmarking feature is available on the magnet. The first is by including C2 in the thoracic sequence of a diagnostic quality, and the second is by using an abnormality in the discs or vertebral bodies as a point of reference

  18. Temporary quadriplegia following continuous thoracic paravertebral block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calenda, Emile; Baste, Jean Marc; Danielou, Eric; Michelin, Paul

    2012-05-01

    A case of temporary quadriplegia following a continuous thoracic paravertebral block in an adult patient scheduled for video-assisted thoracoscopy is presented. An 18-gauge Tuohy needle was inserted under direct vision by the surgeon but the tip of the catheter was not localized. Postoperatively, the patient developed temporary quadriplegia 90 minutes after the start of a continuous infusion of ropivacaine 0.2%. Imaging studies showed that the catheter was localized in the intrathecal space. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Focal Anterior Displacement of the Thoracic Spinal Cord without Evidence of Spinal Cord Herniation or an Intradural Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Yoon; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Heung Sik [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings on focal anterior displacement of the thoracic spinal cord in asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass. We identified 12 patients (male:female = 6:6; mean age, 51.7; range, 15-83 years) between 2007 and 2011, with focal anterior displacement of the spinal cord and without evidence of an intradural mass or spinal cord herniation. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings in consensus. An asymmetric spinal cord deformity with a focal dented appearance was seen on the posterior surface of the spinal cord in all patients, and it involved a length of 1 or 2 vertebral segments in the upper thoracic spine (thoracic vertebrae 1-6). Moreover, a focal widening of the posterior subarachnoid space was also observed in all cases. None of the patients had myelopathy symptoms, and they showed no focal T2-hyperintensity in the spinal cord with the exception of one patient. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow artifacts were seen in the posterior subarachnoid space of the affected spinal cord level. Computed tomography myelography revealed preserved CSF flow in the two available patients. Focal anterior spinal cord indentation can be found in the upper thoracic level of asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass.

  20. Focal Anterior Displacement of the Thoracic Spinal Cord without Evidence of Spinal Cord Herniation or an Intradural Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Yoon; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Heung Sik

    2014-01-01

    We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings on focal anterior displacement of the thoracic spinal cord in asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass. We identified 12 patients (male:female = 6:6; mean age, 51.7; range, 15-83 years) between 2007 and 2011, with focal anterior displacement of the spinal cord and without evidence of an intradural mass or spinal cord herniation. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings in consensus. An asymmetric spinal cord deformity with a focal dented appearance was seen on the posterior surface of the spinal cord in all patients, and it involved a length of 1 or 2 vertebral segments in the upper thoracic spine (thoracic vertebrae 1-6). Moreover, a focal widening of the posterior subarachnoid space was also observed in all cases. None of the patients had myelopathy symptoms, and they showed no focal T2-hyperintensity in the spinal cord with the exception of one patient. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow artifacts were seen in the posterior subarachnoid space of the affected spinal cord level. Computed tomography myelography revealed preserved CSF flow in the two available patients. Focal anterior spinal cord indentation can be found in the upper thoracic level of asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass

  1. Radiation dose-reduction strategies in thoracic CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, J B; Sheard, S L; Edyvean, S; Vlahos, I

    2017-05-01

    Modern computed tomography (CT) machines have the capability to perform thoracic CT for a range of clinical indications at increasingly low radiation doses. This article reviews several factors, both technical and patient-related, that can affect radiation dose and discusses current dose-reduction methods relevant to thoracic imaging through a review of current techniques in CT acquisition and image reconstruction. The fine balance between low radiation dose and high image quality is considered throughout, with an emphasis on obtaining diagnostic quality imaging at the lowest achievable radiation dose. The risks of excessive radiation dose reduction are also considered. Inappropriately low dose may result in suboptimal or non-diagnostic imaging that may reduce diagnostic confidence, impair diagnosis, or result in repeat examinations incurring incremental ionising radiation exposure. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI study of primary primitive neuroectodermal tumor in the thoracic spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yu; Xu Jianmin; Li Ying; Zhang Jingzhong; Zhu Jing

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging in the diagnosis and differentiation of primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) in the thoracic spine. Methods: The dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging of 2 patients (3 times) with PNET in the thoracic spine proved by surgery and pathology were prospectively studied. Results: In the curves of SI-time and CER-time, PNET in the thoracic spine showed a rapid rise to the peak between 60 s and 120 s, then the flat level was kept and no obvious decline was detected after about 3.5 minute. Conclusion: Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI can help to make the diagnosis and differential diagnosis for PNET in the thoracic spine, offer reliable information for the choice of clinical management, and predict the prognosis

  3. Mid-Thoracic Spinal Injuries during Horse Racing: Report of 3 Cases and Review of Causative Factors and Prevention Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Triantafyllopoulos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report three cases of a rare pattern of mid-thoracic spine injuries after horse racing falls and discuss possible causative factors and prevention measurements to reduce injury rates in professional riding and racing. Three patients, 2 male and 1 female with a mean age of 28 years old, underwent surgical treatment for mid-thoracic fractures after professional equestrian activities. The ASIA scale was E in one patient, B in the other one and A in the third. Multilevel posterior fusion was used in two patients and somatectomy plus fusion in the other. Follow up evaluation included changing of the ASIA scale, functional outcome and participation in equestrian activities. One patient fully recovered after surgery. Two patients remained paraplegic despite early surgical treatment and prolonged rehabilitation therapy. All patients had ended their professional equestrian career. This report analyzes possible mechanisms of injury and the pattern of mid-thoracic spine fractures after professional horse riding injuries. Despite skill improvements and continued safety education for horse riding, prophylactic measures for both the head and the spine should be refined. According to our study, additional mid-thoracic spinal protection should be added.

  4. Idiopathic Thoracic Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahman Aycan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old male patient experienced temporary sensory loss and weakness in the right lower extremity one month prior to admission. The patient was admitted to a private clinic with a three-day history of acute onset of sensory loss and weakness in both lower extremities and was treated and followed up with a prediagnosis of transverse myelitis and the Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS. The patient was subsequently transferred to our clinic and the neurologic examination revealed paraplegia in both lower extremities, positive bilateral Babinski signs, and hypesthesia below the T10 dermatome with saddle anesthesia. The patient had urinary incontinence and thoracic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed an image of a mass compressing the medulla.

  5. Thoracic manifestations of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, M.F.; Hutton, L.C.; Kaplan, B.R. [University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)

    1995-02-01

    In order to determine the thoracic manifestations of severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, the medical records and available images of 771 patients who had received gonadotropins to induce superovulation, were reviewed. In 22 patients (3%) severe hyperstimulation syndrome was diagnosed clinically and confirmed with ultrasonography (US). Pleural effusion occurred in five of these (23%), one of whom required thoracentesis. Atelectasis and internal jugular vein thrombosis developed in one patient, and ventilation-perfusion mismatch occurred in another. The study concluded that respiratory distress in patients with ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome was most likely due to lung restriction. Pulmonary manifestations formed an important part of this syndrome, and radiologic input were considered necessary for assessment, monitoring and management. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Providing nutritional support to patients with thoracic cancer: findings of a dedicated rehabilitation service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Cheryl; Hussain, Asmah; Zadora-Chrzastowska, Sonja; White, Gillian; Maddocks, Matthew; Wilcock, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    National guidelines recommend screening patients with thoracic cancer to identify those requiring nutritional support. To help quantify this area of need, the associated workload and explore its impact, we report findings from a dedicated rehabilitation service. Patients were screened soon after diagnosis to determine the prevalence of malnutrition, and various aspects compared between malnourished and not malnourished groups. A nutritional care plan was instigated and all contacts recorded, together with follow-up body weight. Of 243 patients seen, 35% were malnourished which was associated with a palliative treatment intent (P group received oral nutritional supplements, but also experienced problems tolerating them. Over one month, neither the pattern nor magnitude of the change in weight differed between malnourished and not malnourished groups. Overall, weight was stable, increased or decreased in 52 (27%), 80 (42%) and 59 (31%) respectively, with no difference in overall survival (P = 0.16). Our data provides a pragmatic insight into the implications of following national guidance on nutritional screening and support in this patient group. Nutritional support failed to prevent weight loss in some patients, and did not appear to impact on survival; new assessments and treatments for cachexia are required. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pediatric thoracic SCIWORA after back bend during dance practice: a retrospective case series and analysis of trauma mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jian; Zeng, Gao; Ma, Yong-Jie; Chen, Nan; Chen, Zan; Ling, Feng; Zhang, Hong-Qi

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe a unique type of low-energy traumatic pediatric thoracic spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality (SCIWORA) after a back bend during dance practice and analyze the trauma mechanisms and treatment protocols. This was a retrospective case series from September 2007 to August 2016. The study was conducted at a tertiary medical center in Beijing, China (Xuanwu Hospital, China International Neuroscience Institute [China-INI], Capital Medical University). A total of 12 pediatric patients who had a clear traumatic history after back bend movements and had been diagnosed with thoracic SCIWORA were included. Clinical and imaging data were obtained for each patient. The follow-up data was analyzed. The traumatic mechanisms were investigated by analyzing the patients' medical history, spinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fiber tractography data. Of the 12 patients, 11 (91.7%) were younger than 8 years old. The mean age of the patients was 6.6 years. All patients had a clear traumatic history of severe thoracic spinal cord injury after performing back bend movements. The mean follow-up time was 36.5 months. During the follow-up period, 1 patient (8.3%) recovered completely, and 11 patients (91.7%) had unfavorable prognoses, including 4 (33.3%) with incomplete recovery and 7 (58.3%) with no change. Two patients underwent spinal DTI, which showed rupture of the nerve fiber bundle in the section of the injury. Back bend movements performed during dance practice may cause pediatric thoracic SCIWORA, particularly in children younger than 8 years old. We suggest that the mechanism of primary injury is the longitudinal distraction of the thoracic spine during back bend movements, which leads to violent distraction of the spinal cord and blunt injury of nerve axons, nerve cells, and small vessels. Spinal DTI may facilitate the diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of SCIWORA.

  8. Health-related quality-of-life outcomes after thoracic (T1-T10) fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Rowan; Keynan, Ory; Lee, Robert S; Street, John T; Boyd, Michael C; Paquette, Scott J; Kwon, Brian K; Dvorak, Marcel F; Fisher, Charles G

    2014-08-01

    The thoracic spine exhibits a unique response to trauma as the result of recognized anatomical and biomechanical differences. Despite this response, clinical studies often group thoracic fractures (T1-T10) with more caudal thoracolumbar injuries. Subsequently, there is a paucity of literature on the functional outcomes of this distinct group of injuries. To describe and identify predictors of health-related quality-of-life outcomes and re-employment status in patients with thoracic fractures who present to a spine injury tertiary referral center. An ambispective cohort study with cross-sectional outcome assessment. A prospectively collected fully relational spine database was searched to identify all adult (>16 years) patients treated with traumatic thoracic (T1-T10) fractures with and without neurologic deficits, treated between 1995 and 2008. The Short-Form-36, Oswestry Disability Index, and Prolo Economic Scale outcome instruments were completed at a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Preoperative and minimum 1-year postinjury X-rays were evaluated. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis was used to identify predictors of outcomes from a range of demographic, injury, treatment, and radiographic variables. One hundred twenty-six patients, age 36±15 years (mean±SD), with 135 fractures were assessed at a mean follow-up of 6 years (range 1-15.5 years). Traffic accidents (45%) and translational injuries (54%) were the most common mechanism and dominant fracture pattern, respectively. Neurologic deficits were frequent-53% had complete (American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale [AIS] A) spinal cord deficits on admission. Operative management was performed in 78%. Patients who sustain thoracic fractures, but escaped significant neurologic injury (AIS D or E on admission) had SF-36 scores that did not differ significantly from population norms at a mean follow-up of 6 years. Eighty-eight percent of this cohort was re-employed. Interestingly, Oswestry

  9. Assessing Readmission After General, Vascular, and Thoracic Surgery Using ACS-NSQIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Donald J.; Haider, Adil; Haut, Elliot; Dodson, Rebecca; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Ahuja, Nita; Sweeney, John; Pawlik, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In 2012, Medicare began cutting reimbursement for hospitals with high readmission rates. We sought to define the incidence and risk factors associated with readmission after surgery. Methods A total of 230,864 patients discharged after general, upper gastrointestinal (GI), small and large intestine, hepatopancreatobiliary (HPB), vascular, and thoracic surgery were identified using the 2011 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Readmission rates and patient characteristics were analyzed. A predictive model for readmission was developed among patients with length of stay (LOS) 10 days or fewer and then validated using separate samples. Results Median patient age was 56 years; 43% were male, and median American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class was 2 (general surgery: 2; upper GI: 3; small and large intestine: 2; HPB: 3; vascular: 3; thoracic: 3; P readmission was 7.8% (general surgery: 5.0%; upper GI: 6.9%; small and large intestine: 12.6%; HPB: 15.8%; vascular: 11.9%; thoracic: 11.1%; P readmission included ASA class, albumin less than 3.5, diabetes, inpatient complications, nonelective surgery, discharge to a facility, and the LOS (all P readmission. A simple integer-based score using ASA class and the LOS predicted risk of readmission (area under the receiver operator curve 0.702). Conclusions Readmission among patients with the LOS 10 days or fewer occurs at an incidence of at least 5% to 16% across surgical subspecialties. A scoring system on the basis of ASA class and the LOS may help stratify readmission risk to target interventions. PMID:24022435

  10. Chest physiotherapy with positive expiratory pressure breathing after abdominal and thoracic surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orman, J; Westerdahl, E

    2010-03-01

    A variety of chest physiotherapy techniques are used following abdominal and thoracic surgery to prevent or reduce post-operative complications. Breathing techniques with a positive expiratory pressure (PEP) are used to increase airway pressure and improve pulmonary function. No systematic review of the effects of PEP in surgery patients has been performed previously. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the effect of PEP breathing after an open upper abdominal or thoracic surgery. A literature search of randomised-controlled trials (RCT) was performed in five databases. The trials included were systematically reviewed by two independent observers and critically assessed for methodological quality. We selected six RCT evaluating the PEP technique performed with a mechanical device in spontaneously breathing adult patients after abdominal or thoracic surgery via thoracotomy. The methodological quality score varied between 4 and 6 on the Physiotherapy Evidence Database score. The studies were published between 1979 and 1993. Only one of the included trials showed any positive effects of PEP compared to other breathing techniques. Today, there is scarce scientific evidence that PEP treatment is better than other physiotherapy breathing techniques in patients undergoing abdominal or thoracic surgery. There is a lack of studies investigating the effect of PEP over placebo or no physiotherapy treatment.

  11. Thoracic Ganglioneuromas Resulting in Nonimmune Hydrops Fetalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Singh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction - Most often, ganglioneuromas affect older pediatric and adult patients. They are typically slow growing tumors that remain clinically silent until they become large enough to cause symptoms by compression of adjacent structures. Case - We report a case of a 22-year-old Hispanic gravida 2 para 1 female patient who was found to have massive hydrops fetalis at 20 completed gestational weeks. Fetal echocardiography revealed a narrowed distal ductal arch and proximal descending aorta. Cesarean delivery was undertaken at 29 completed gestational weeks for refractory labor and nonreassuring fetal status. The neonate expired at 47 minutes of life despite aggressive resuscitation. At autopsy, multiple thoracic masses were found adjacent to a compressed proximal descending aorta. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the diagnosis of a ganglioneuroma, a rare type of neural crest tumor. Discussion - A variety of intrathoracic masses have previously been reported to cause hydrops fetalis including teratomas, fibrosarcomas, and lymphangiomas. To our knowledge, this case is the first description of hydrops fetalis caused by ganglioneuromas. We propose that multiple thoracic ganglioneuromas led to biventricular distal outflow tract obstruction and hydrops fetalis.

  12. [Plastic surgery of the thoracic wall as a method of thoracic wall reconstruction after complete surgical wound disintegration after sternotomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hájek, T; Jirásek, K; Urban, M; Straka, Z

    1998-12-01

    During the period between January 1996 and July 1998 in our department 1920 patients were operated on account of heart disease from median sternotomy. In 17 patients, i.e. in 0.9% during the early postoperative period the surgical wound disintegrated incl. dehiscence of the sternum and the development of postoperative mediastinitis. In 14 of these patients the authors reconstructed the defect of the thoracic wall by their own modification of Jurkiewicz plastic operation using the pectoral muscles. One patient from this group died, in the remaining 13 patients the wound healed without deformity of the chest and without signs of instability, without restriction of movement and function.

  13. Phase I Results of Vinorelbine With Concurrent Radiotherapy in Elderly Patients With Unresectable, Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: West Japan Thoracic Oncology Group (WJTOG3005-DI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Hideyuki, E-mail: h.harada@scchr.jp [Division of Radiation Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka (Japan); Seto, Takashi [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Kyushu Cancer Center, Fukuoka (Japan); Igawa, Satoshi [Division of Thoracic Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka (Japan); Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Tsuya, Asuka [Division of Thoracic Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka (Japan); Wada, Mayuko [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Kaira, Kyoichi; Naito, Tateaki [Division of Thoracic Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Nishimura, Tetsuo [Division of Radiation Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka (Japan); Masuda, Noriyuki [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Yamamoto, Nobuyuki [Division of Thoracic Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and efficacy of concurrent vinorelbine and thoracic radiotherapy in elderly patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients were 71 years of age or older with unresectable Stage III NSCLC. Patients were treated with thoracic radiotherapy (60 Gy) and concurrent vinorelbine (20 mg/m{sup 2} in Level 1 and 25 mg/m{sup 2} in Level 2) on Days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks for two cycles, followed by adjuvant vinorelbine (25 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks for two cycles. Results: Four patients were enrolled at Level 1. One patient experienced Grade 3 febrile neutropenia at Level 1 and the dose was escalated to Level 2. At Level 2, 2 of 6 patients experienced dose-limiting toxicities (Grade 4 neutropenia in 1 patient and Grade 3 infection in another). Three of 6 patients developed late Grade 2 or 3 pneumonitis. Therefore, the dose was de-escalated to Level 1. An additional 6 patients were enrolled at Level 1, 4 of whom experienced dose-limiting toxicities (incomplete radiotherapy because of Grade 2 pneumonitis in 1 patient and Grade 3 infection in 1, Grade 3 febrile neutropenia in 1, and Grade 3 esophagitis in 1). Moreover, late Grade 3 pneumothorax and Grade 5 pneumonitis occurred in 1 and 1 patient, respectively. Overall, Grade 2, 3 and 5 pneumonitis occurred in 3, 3, and 1 among 16 patients, respectively. Conclusions: Concurrent vinorelbine and thoracic radiotherapy resulted in a high incidence of severe pneumonitis when the standard dose of this agent was used for elderly patients. We therefore recommend caution in the use of this regimen and schedule for elderly patients.

  14. Concomitant lower thoracic spine disc disease in lumbar spine MR imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Estanislao; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Dosdá, Rosa; Mollá, Enrique

    2002-11-01

    Our objective was to study the coexistence of lower thoracic-spine disc changes in patients with low back pain using a large field of view (FOV) in lumbar spine MR imaging. One hundred fifty patients with low back pain were referred to an MR examination. All patients were studied with a large FOV (27 cm), covering from the coccyx to at least the body of T11. Discs were coded as normal, protrusion, and extrusion (either epiphyseal or intervertebral). The relationship between disc disease and level was established with the Pearson chi(2) test. The T11-12 was the most commonly affected level of the lower thoracic spine with 58 disc cases rated as abnormal. Abnormalities of T11-12 and T12-L1 discs were significantly related only to L1-L2 disease ( p=0.001 and p=0.004, respectively) but unrelated to other disc disease, patient's gender, and age. No correlation was found between other discs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine can detect a great amount of lower thoracic disease, although its clinical significance remains unknown. A statistically significant relation was found within the thoracolumbar junctional region (T11-L2), reflecting common pathoanatomical changes. The absence of relation with lower lumbar spine discs is probably due to differences in their pathomechanisms.

  15. Concomitant lower thoracic spine disc disease in lumbar spine MR imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arana, Estanislao; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Dosda, Rosa; Molla, Enrique

    2002-01-01

    Our objective was to study the coexistence of lower thoracic-spine disc changes in patients with low back pain using a large field of view (FOV) in lumbar spine MR imaging. One hundred fifty patients with low back pain were referred to an MR examination. All patients were studied with a large FOV (27 cm), covering from the coccyx to at least the body of T11. Discs were coded as normal, protrusion, and extrusion (either epiphyseal or intervertebral). The relationship between disc disease and level was established with the Pearson χ 2 test. The T11-12 was the most commonly affected level of the lower thoracic spine with 58 disc cases rated as abnormal. Abnormalities of T11-12 and T12-L1 discs were significantly related only to L1-L2 disease (p=0.001 and p=0.004, respectively) but unrelated to other disc disease, patient's gender, and age. No correlation was found between other discs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine can detect a great amount of lower thoracic disease, although its clinical significance remains unknown. A statistically significant relation was found within the thoracolumbar junctional region (T11-L2), reflecting common pathoanatomical changes. The absence of relation with lower lumbar spine discs is probably due to differences in their pathomechanisms. (orig.)

  16. External validation of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons General Thoracic Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Mitchell J; Wright, Cameron D; McDonald, Donna; Fernandez, Felix G; Kozower, Benjamin D

    2013-11-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) General Thoracic Surgery Database (GTSD) reports outstanding results for lung and esophageal cancer resection. However, a major weakness of the GTSD has been the lack of validation of this voluntary registry. The purpose of this study was to perform an external, independent audit to assess the accuracy of the data collection process and the quality of the database. An independent firm was contracted to audit 5% of sites randomly selected from the GTDB in 2011. Audits were performed remotely to maximize the number of audits performed and reduce cost. Auditors compared lobectomy cases submitted to the GTSD with the hospital operative logs to evaluate completeness of the data. In addition, 20 lobectomy records from each site were audited in detail. Agreement rates were calculated for 32 individual data elements, 7 data categories pertaining to patient status or care delivery, and an overall agreement rate for each site. Six process variables were also evaluated to assess best practice for data collection and submission. Ten sites were audited from the 222 participants. Comparison of the 559 submitted lobectomy cases with operative logs from each site identified 28 omissions, a 94.6% agreement rate (discrepancies/site range, 2 to 27). Importantly, cases not submitted had no mortality or major morbidity, indicating a lack of purposeful omission. The aggregate agreement rates for all categories were greater than 90%. The overall data accuracy was 94.9%. External audits of the GTSD validate the accuracy and completeness of the data. Careful examination of unreported cases demonstrated no purposeful omission or gaming. Although these preliminary results are quite good, it is imperative that the audit process is refined and continues to expand along with the GTSD to insure reliability of the database. The audit results are currently being incorporated into educational and quality improvement processes to add further value. Copyright

  17. Hybrid constructs for tridimensional correction of the thoracic spine in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a comparative analysis of universal clamps versus hooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilharreborde, Brice; Even, Julien; Lefevre, Yan; Fitoussi, Franck; Presedo, Ana; Penneçot, Georges-François; Mazda, Keyvan

    2010-02-01

    Retrospective study of prospectively collected data. Compare Universal Clamps (UCs) and hooks for the thoracic correction of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). In scoliosis surgery, sagittal correction is as important as frontal correction due to the risk of junctional kyphosis. Compared to all-screw constructs, hybrid constructs with lumbar pedicle screws and thoracic hooks or sublaminar wires have been shown to achieve similar coronal correction while providing superior postoperative thoracic kyphosis. The authors used a novel sublaminar thoracic implant, the UC with improvements over sublaminar wires. Hybrid constructs using thoracic UCs were compared to those with thoracic hooks. This series involved 150 patients treated for AIS with hybrid constructs. A total of 75 consecutive patients operated from 2001 to 2003, who had thoracic hooks with in situ contouring, distraction, and compression (Group 1), were compared to 75 consecutive patients operated from 2004 to 2006, who had thoracic UCs with posteromedial translation (Group 2). All had intraoperative somatosensory/motor-evoked potential monitoring and at least 2-years follow-up. Except for follow-up (longer in Group 1), the 2 groups were similar before surgery. The UCs achieved better thoracic coronal correction (P motor-evoked potentials. UC reduced operative time by 20% (60 minutes; P < 0.001) and blood loss by 23% (250 mL; P < 0.001). Although both of these hybrid constructs efficaciously corrected the coronal and axial deformities in AIS, the results of the UC technique were superior to those achieved with hooks in all 3 planes, especially the sagittal plane. Moreover, the UC technique is straightforward and safe, reducing both operative duration and blood loss.

  18. Thoracic neuroblastoma: what is the best imaging modality for evaluating extent of disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovis, T.L.; Meza, M.P.; Cushing, B.; Elkowitz, S.S.; Leonidas, J.C.; Festa, R.; Kogutt, M.S.; Fletcher, B.D.

    1997-01-01

    Thoracic neuroblastoma accounts for 15% of all cases of neuroblastoma. A minority of children with thoracic neuroblastoma will have dumbbell tumors, i.e., intraspinal extension, but only half these patients will have neurologic signs or symptoms. Hypothesis. MR imaging is the single best test to evaluate the extent of thoracic and spinal disease in thoracid neuroblastoma after the diagnosis of a mass is estbalished on plain film. A retrospective multi-institutional investigation over 7 years of all cases of thoracic neuroblastoma (n=26) imaged with CT and/or MR were reviewed for detection of the extent of disease. The chest film, nuclear bone scan, and other imaging modalities were also reviewed. The surgical and histologic correlation in each case, as well as the patients' staging and outcome, were tabulated. The chest radiography was 100% sensitive in suggesting the diagnosis. MR imaging was 100% sensitive in predicting enlarged lymph nodes, intraspinal extension, and chest wall involvement. CT was 88% sensitive for intraspinal extension but only 20% sensitive for lymph node enlargement. CT was 100% sensitive in detecting chest wall involvement. Direct comparison of CT and MR imaging in six cases revealed no difference in detection of enlarged lymph nodes or chest wall involvement. Neither test was able to detect remote disease, as noted by bone scan. The chest film is 100% sensitive in suggesting the diagnosis of thoracic neuroblastoma; MR imaging appears to be the single best test for detecting nodal involvement, intraspinal extension, and chest wall involvement. (orig.)

  19. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in the management of penetrating and blunt thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanchi S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The role of video-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS is still being defined in the management of thoracic trauma. We report our trauma cases managed by VATS and review the role of VATS in the management of thoracic trauma. Materials and Methods: All the trauma patients who underwent VATS from 2000 to 2007 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center were retrospectively studied. Results: Twenty-three trauma patients underwent 25 cases of VATS. The most common indication for VATS was retained haemothorax. Thoracotomy was avoided in 21 patients. VATS failed in two cases. On an average VATS was performed on trauma day seven (range 1-26 and the length of hospital stay was 20 days (range 3-58. There was no mortality. VATS was performed in an emergency (day 1-2, or in the early (day 2-7 or late (after day 7 phases of trauma. Conclusion: VATS can be performed safely for the management of thoracic traumas. VATS can be performed before or after thoracotomy and at any stage of trauma. The use of VATS in trauma has a trimodal distribution (emergent, early, late, each with different indications.

  20. Are computer numerical control (CNC)-manufactured patient-specific metal templates available for posterior thoracic pedicle screw insertion? Feasibility and accuracy evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangxue; Tang, Lei; Ye, Qiang; Huang, Wenhua; Li, Jianyi

    2017-11-01

    Accurate and safe posterior thoracic pedicle insertion (PTPI) remains a challenge. Patient-specific drill templates (PDTs) created by rapid prototyping (RP) can assist in posterior thoracic pedicle insertion, but pose biocompatibility risks. The aims of this study were to develop alternative PDTs with computer numerical control (CNC) and assess their feasibility and accuracy in assisting PTPI. Preoperative CT images of 31 cadaveric thoracic vertebras were obtained and then the optimal pedicle screw trajectories were planned. The PDTs with optimal screw trajectories were randomly assigned to be designed and manufactured by CNC or RP in each vertebra. With the guide of the CNC- or RP-manufactured PDTs, the appropriate screws were inserted into the pedicles. Postoperative CT scans were performed to analyze any deviations at entry point and midpoint of the pedicles. The CNC group was found to be significant manufacture-time-shortening, and cost-decreasing, when compared with the RP group (P  0.05). The screw positions were grade 0 in 90.3% and grade 1 in 9.7% of the cases in the CNC group and grade 0 in 93.5% and grade 1 in 6.5% of the cases in the RP group (P = 0.641). CNC-manufactured PDTs are viable for assisting in PTPI with good feasibility and accuracy.

  1. Diagnosing thoracic venous aneurysm: A contemporary imaging perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Aggarwal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic venous aneurysms are a rare clinical entity and contrast-enhanced computed tomography has been the cornerstone of their diagnosis. We are reporting a rare case of isolated left brachiocephalic vein aneurysm, which was surgically managed, highlighting the role of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging as a definitive diagnostic modality in this patient.

  2. [Incidence of postoperative venous thromboembolism after thoracic surgery and its characteristic: a single center, prospective cohort study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, C F; Li, H; Tian, B; Chen, S; Miao, J B; Fu, Y L; You, B; Chen, Q R; Li, T; Hu, X X; Zhang, W Q; Hu, B

    2018-04-01

    Objective: To evaluate the incidence of postoperative venous thromboembolism (VTE) after thoracic surgery and its characteristic. Methods: This was a single-center, prospective cohort study. Patients undergoing major thoracic surgeries between July 2016 and March 2017 at Department of Thoracic Surgery, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University were enrolled in this study. Besides the routine examination, all patients were screened for deep venous thrombosis (DVT) by using noninvasive duplex lower-extremity ultrasonography after surgery. CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) was carried out if patients had one of the following conditions including typical symptoms of PE, high Caprini score (>9 points) or new diagnosed postoperative DVT. Caprini risk assessment model was used to detect high risk patients. No patients received any prophylaxis of VTE before surgery. Further data was analyzed for identifying the incidence of postoperative VTE. The t -test, χ 2 test or Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to analyze the quantitative data and classification data, respectively. Results: Totally 345 patients who undergoing major thoracic surgery were enrolled in this study including 145 benign diseases and 200 malignant diseases.There were 207 male and 138 female, aging from 15 to 85 years. Surgery procedures included 285 lung surgeries, 27 esophagectomies, 22 mediastinal surgeries and 11 other procedures. The overall incidence of VTE was 13.9% (48 of 345) after major thoracic surgery including 39 patients with newly diagnosed DVT (81.2%), 1 patient with PE (2.1%) and 8 patients with DVT+ PE (16.7%). The median time of VTE detected was 4.5 days postoperative. There were 89.6% (43/48) VTE cases diagnosed in 1 week. The incidence of VTE was 9.0% in patients with benign diseases, while 17.5% in malignant diseases (χ 2 =5.112, P patients with pulmonary diseases was 12.6%, among that, in patients with lung cancer and benign lung diseases was 16.4% and 7.5 % (χ 2

  3. Mid-term results of zone 0 thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair after ascending aorta wrapping and supra-aortic debranching in high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecoraro, Felice; Lachat, Mario; Hofmann, Michael; Cayne, Neal S; Chaykovska, Lyubov; Rancic, Zoran; Puippe, Gilbert; Pfammatter, Thomas; Mangialardi, Nicola; Veith, Frank J; Bettex, Dominique; Maisano, Francesco; Neff, Thomas A

    2017-06-01

    Surgical repair of aneurysmal disease involving the ascending aorta, aortic arch and eventually the descending aorta is generally associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A less invasive approach with the ascending wrapping technique (WT), supra-aortic vessel debranching (SADB) and thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) in zone 0 was developed to reduce the associated risk in these patients. During a 10-year period, consecutive patients treated by the ascending WT, SADB and TEVAR in zone 0 were included. All patients were considered at high risk for conventional surgery. Measured outcomes included perioperative deaths and morbidity, maximal aortic transverse diameter (TD) and its postoperative evolution, endoleak, survival, freedom from cardiovascular reinterventions, SADB freedom from occlusion and aortic valve function during follow-up. Median follow-up was 37.4 [mean = 34; range, 0-65; standard deviation (SD) = 20] months. Twenty-six cases were included with a mean age of 71.88 ( r  = 56-87; SD = 8) years. A mean of 2.9 supra-aortic vessels (75) per patient was debranched from the ascending aorta. The mean time interval from WT/SADB and TEVAR was 29 ( r  = 0-204; SD = 48) days. TEVAR was associated with chimney and/or periscope grafts in 6 (23%) patients, and extra-anatomical supra-aortic bypasses were performed in 6 (23%) patients. Perioperative mortality was 7.7% (2/26). Neurological events were registered in 3 (11.5%) cases, and a reintervention was required in 3 (11.5%) cases. After the WT, the ascending diameter remained stable during the follow-up period in all cases. At mean follow-up, significant shrinkage of the arch/descending aorta diameter was observed. A type I/III endoleak occurred in 3 cases. At 5 years, the rates of survival, freedom from cardiovascular reinterventions and SADB freedom from occlusion were 71.7, 82.3 and 96%, respectively. The use of the ascending WT, SADB and TEVAR in selected patients

  4. Factors on prognosis in patients of stage pT3N0M0 thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma after two-field esophagectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxiang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: For patients of pT3N0M0 thoracic ESCC, the independent factors were the site of a lesion for OS and PFS, Hb levels, small LN in CT, and number of removed LN for OS. The value of postoperative adjuvant therapy need be further proved.

  5. Thoracic epidural analgesia for breast oncological procedures: A better alternative to general anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parli Raghavan Ravi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the outcomes of the incidence of nausea/vomiting and other complications along with the time taken for discharged in patients undergoing Thoracic Epidural Analgesia (TEA and General Anaesthesia (GA for breast oncological surgeries. Background: GA with or without TEA or other postoperative pain-relieving strategies remains the traditional anesthetic technique used for breast oncological procedures. We initiated the use of high segmental TEA for patients undergoing these procedures in our hospital. Methods: Eighty patients undergoing breast oncological procedures performed by one surgical team were randomly allocated into two groups receiving TEA and GA. The Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test were used for categorical parameters, paired t-test and Student's t-test was used for continuous measurements. Results: In comparison with GA, TEA was associated with lesser incidence of complications of nausea/vomiting. In lumpectomy with axillary node dissection, 1 out of 18 patients (5.55% in the TEA group had nausea/vomiting, while 11 out of 19 (57.8% of the GA group had similar symptoms (P < 0.001. The discharge rate for the thoracic epidural group was 12 out of 18 by day 3 (66.6% while all patients in the GA group required more than 3 days of hospitalization (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Thoracic epidural anesthesia is a safe technique and its use in breast oncological procedures could improve patients' recovery and facilitate their early discharge to home.

  6. Endovascular stent-graft management of thoracic aortic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dake, Michael D.

    2001-01-01

    The traditional standard therapy for descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is open operative repair with graft replacement of the diseased aortic segment. Despite important advances in surgical techniques, anesthetic management, and post-operative care over the last 30 years, the mortality and morbidity of surgery remains considerable, especially in patients at high risk for thoracotomy because of coexisting severe cardiopulmonary abnormalities or other medical diseases. The advent of endovascular stent-graft technology provides an alternative to open surgery for selected patients with TAA. The initial experience suggests that stent-graft therapy potentially may reduce the operative risk, hospital stay and procedural expenses of TAA repair. These potential benefits are especially attractive for patients at high risk for open TAA repair. Current results of endovascular TAA therapy document operative mortalities of between 0 and 4%, aneurysm thrombosis in 90 and 100% of cases, and paraplegia as a complication in 0 and 1.6% of patients. The early success of stent-graft repair of TAA has fostered the application of these devices for the management of a wide variety of thoracic aortic pathologies, including acute and chronic dissection, intramural hematoma, penetrating ulcer, traumatic injuries, and other diseases. The results of prospective controlled trials that compare the outcomes of stent-graft therapy with those of surgical treatment in patients with specific types of aortic disease are anxiously awaited before recommendations regarding the general use of these new devices can be made with confidence

  7. Long-term results after proximal thoracic aortic redo surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Czerny

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate early and mid-term results in patients undergoing proximal thoracic aortic redo surgery. METHODS: We analyzed 60 patients (median age 60 years, median logistic EuroSCORE 40 who underwent proximal thoracic aortic redo surgery between January 2005 and April 2012. Outcome and risk factors were analyzed. RESULTS: In hospital mortality was 13%, perioperative neurologic injury was 7%. Fifty percent of patients underwent redo surgery in an urgent or emergency setting. In 65%, partial or total arch replacement with or without conventional or frozen elephant trunk extension was performed. The preoperative logistic EuroSCORE I confirmed to be a reliable predictor of adverse outcome- (ROC 0.786, 95%CI 0.64-0.93 as did the new EuroSCORE II model: ROC 0.882 95%CI 0.78-0.98. Extensive individual logistic EuroSCORE I levels more than 67 showed an OR of 7.01, 95%CI 1.43-34.27. A EuroSCORE II larger than 28 showed an OR of 4.44 (95%CI 1.4-14.06. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified a critical preoperative state (OR 7.96, 95%CI 1.51-38.79 but not advanced age (OR 2.46, 95%CI 0.48-12.66 as the strongest independent predictor of in-hospital mortality. Median follow-up was 23 months (1-52 months. One year and five year actuarial survival rates were 83% and 69% respectively. Freedom from reoperation during follow-up was 100%. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a substantial early attrition rate in patients presenting with a critical preoperative state, proximal thoracic aortic redo surgery provides excellent early and mid-term results. Higher EuroSCORE I and II levels and a critical preoperative state but not advanced age are independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. As a consequence, age alone should no longer be regarded as a contraindication for surgical treatment in this particular group of patients.

  8. Thoracic Synovial Cyst at the Th2-3 Level Causing Myelopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundskarð, Martin M; Gaini, Shahin

    2017-01-01

    Intraspinal synovial cyst is a rare cause of myelopathy. These cysts present most often in the lumbar and cervical parts of the spine but are more infrequent in the thoracic spine. We present a case of a 73-year-old man with an intraspinal, extradural synovial cyst at the Th2-3 level causing...... paraesthesia and weakness in the legs. A laminectomy and excision of the cyst were performed and the patient recovered fully. In the thoracic spine, synovial cysts are almost exclusively found in the lower part. Laminectomy, with excision, is the treatment of choice, although steroid injections have been...

  9. Electrical impedance measured changes in thoracic fluid content during thoracentesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, J R; Jensen, B V; Drabaek, H

    1994-01-01

    In patients (seven females and 11 males) with pleural effusion due to pulmonary (n = 13) or cardiac disease (n = 5) the change in baseline transthoracic impedance (Z0) was measured by electrical impedance (BoMed's NCCOM-3, 70 kHz) during thoracentesis. Data were obtained before and after withdrawal...... of each 500 ml, and at the end of the thoracentesis. We found a close linear correlation (r = 0.97) between changes in Z0 and the volume of aspirated pleural effusion (y = 0.415.x+0.093). The variability of the estimated thoracic fluid volumes was analysed with a plot of the residuals from the regression...... line, and we found that changes in thoracic fluid volume estimated by impedance technique would be within +/- 302 ml (= 2 SD). However, the absolute value of Z0 before thoracentesis could not differentiate the group of patients with pleural effusion from normal subjects (n = 28)....

  10. Clinical characteristics of catamenial and non-catamenial thoracic endometriosis-related pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Mizuki; Kurihara, Masatoshi; Haga, Takahiro; Ebana, Hiroki; Kataoka, Hideyuki; Mizobuchi, Teruaki; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2015-11-01

    A major pathogenic factor for catamenial pneumothorax is thoracic endometriosis. However, thoracic endometriosis-related pneumothorax (TERP) can develop as either catamenial or non-catamenial pneumothorax (CP). Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate the clinical differences between catamenial and non-catamenial TERP. The clinical and pathological data in female patients who underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery at the Pneumothorax Research Center during an 8-year period were retrospectively reviewed. This study included 150 female patients with surgico-pathologically confirmed TERP. The subjects were divided into two groups, those having all of the pneumothorax episodes in the catamenial period (CP group) and those who did not (non-CP group). We compared the clinical characteristics and surgico-pathological findings between these two groups. Of the 150 TERP patients, 55 (36.7%) were classified in the CP group, and 95 (63.3%) in the non-CP group. In regard to the locations of endometriosis, all TERP patients had diaphragmatic endometriosis, while pleural implantation was recognized in 34 of the 55 (61.8%) patients in the CP group and 42 of the 95 (44.2%) patients in the non-CP group (P pneumothorax episodes. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  11. Exclusive use of arterial grafts in coronary artery bypass operations for three-vessel disease : Use of both thoracic arteries and the gastroepiploic artery in 256 consecutive patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grandjean, JG; Voors, AA; Boonstra, PW; denHeyer, P; Ebels, T

    1996-01-01

    Methods: From September 1989 to September 1994 we operated on a consecutive group of 256 patients with three-vessel disease in whom we used the right gastroepiploic artery together with both internal thoracic arteries, Vein grafts were not used in these patients, This population consisted of 233 men

  12. Role of Ultrasound Guided Biopsy of Thoracic Lesions | Elameen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This prospective study is to evaluate and enhance the role of ultrasound in biopsy guidance of thoracic lesions. Methods: 55 patients were subjected for fine needle aspiration (FNA) and/or core needle biopsy (CNB) from peripheral chest lesions in Ribat University Hospital during the period from April 2011 and ...

  13. Endovascular stent graft treatment of acute thoracic aortic transections due to blunt force trauma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bjurlin, Marc A

    2012-02-01

    Endovascular stent graft treatment of acute thoracic aortic transections is an encouraging minimally invasive alternative to open surgical repair. Between 2006 and 2008, 16 patients with acute thoracic aortic transections underwent evaluation at our institution. Seven patients who were treated with an endovascular stent graft were reviewed. The mean Glasgow Coma Score was 13.0, probability of survival was .89, and median injury severity score was 32. The mean number of intensive care unit days was 7.7, mean number of ventilator support days was 5.4, and hospital length of stay was 10 days. Mean blood loss was 285 mL, and operative time was 143 minutes. Overall mortality was 14%. Procedure complications were a bleeding arteriotomy site and an endoleak. Endovascular treatment of traumatic thoracic aortic transections appears to demonstrate superior results with respect to mortality, blood loss, operative time, paraplegia, and procedure-related complications when compared with open surgical repair literature.

  14. Re-interventions on the thoracic and thoracoabdominal aorta in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenhoff, Florian S; Carrel, Thierry P

    2017-11-01

    The advent of multi-gene panel genetic testing and the discovery of new syndromic and non-syndromic forms of connective tissue disorders have established thoracic aortic aneurysms as a genetically mediated disease. Surgical results in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) provide an important benchmark for this patient population. Prophylactic aortic root surgery prevents acute dissection and has contributed to the improved survival of MFS patients. In the majority of patients, re-interventions are driven by a history of dissection. Patients undergoing elective root repair have a low risk for re-interventions on the root itself. Experienced centers have results after valve-sparing procedures at 10 years comparable with those seen after a modified Bentall procedure. In patients where only the ascending aorta was replaced during the initial surgery, re-intervention rates are high as the root continues to dilate. The fate of the aortic arch in MFS patients presenting with dissection is strongly correlated with the extent of the initial surgery. Not replacing the entire ascending aorta and proximal aortic arch results in a high rate of re-interventions. Nevertheless, the additional burden of replacing the entire aortic arch during emergent proximal repair is not very well defined and makes comparisons with patients undergoing elective arch replacement difficult. Interestingly, replacing the entire aortic arch during initial surgery for acute dissection does not protect from re-interventions on downstream aortic segments. MFS patients suffering from type B dissection have a high risk for re-interventions ultimately leading up to replacement of the entire thoracoabdominal aorta even if the dissection was deemed uncomplicated by conventional criteria. While current guidelines do not recommend the implantation of stent grafts in MFS patients, implantation of a frozen-elephant-trunk to create a stable proximal landing zone for future endovascular or open procedures has

  15. Extended replacement of the thoracic aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Yutaka; Okada, Kenji; Oka, Takanori; Inoue, Takeshi; Tanaka, Akiko; Omura, Atsushi; Kano, Hiroya; Okita, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    We present our experience of total aortic arch replacement. Twenty-nine patients (21 males and 8 females; mean age 63.3 ± 13.3 years) with extended thoracic aortic aneurysms underwent graft replacement. The pathology of the diseased aorta was non-dissecting aneurysm in 11 patients, including one aortitis and aortic dissection in 18 patients (acute type A: one, chronic type A: 11, chronic type B: six). Five patients had Marfan syndrome. In their previous operation, two patients had undergone the Bentall procedure, three had endovascular stenting, one had aortic root replacement with valve sparing and 12 had hemi-arch replacement for acute type A dissection. Approaches to the aneurysm were as follows: posterolateral thoracotomy with rib-cross incision in 16, posterolateral thoracotomy extended to the retroperitoneal abdominal aorta in seven, mid-sternotomy and left pleurotomy in three, anterolateral thoracotomy with partial lower sternotomy in two and clam-shell incision in one patient. Extension of aortic replacement was performed from the aortic root to the descending aorta in 4, from the ascending aorta to the descending aorta in 17 and from the ascending to the abdominal aorta in eight patients. Arterial inflow for cardiopulmonary bypass consisted of the femoral artery in 15 patients, ascending aorta and femoral artery in seven, descending or abdominal aorta in five and ascending aorta in two. Venous drainage site was the femoral vein in 10, pulmonary artery in eight, right atrium in five, femoral artery with right atrium/pulmonary artery in four and pulmonary artery with right atrium in two patients. The operative mortality, 30-day mortality and hospital mortality was one (cardiac arrest due to aneurysm rupture), one (rupture of infected aneurysm) and one (brain contusion), respectively. Late mortality occurred in three patients due to pneumonia, ruptured residual aneurysm and intracranial bleeding. Actuarial survival at 5 years after the operations was 80.6

  16. Effect of thoracic epidural anesthesia on oxygen delivery and utilization in cardiac surgical patients scheduled to undergo off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryaprakash, Sharadaprasad; Chakravarthy, Murali; Gautam, Mamatha; Gandhi, Anurag; Jawali, Vivek; Patil, Thimmannagowda; Jayaprakash, Krishnamoorthy; Pandey, Saurabh; Muniraju, Geetha

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) on tissue oxygen delivery and utilization in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. This prospective observational study was conducted in a tertiary referral heart hospital. A total of 25 patients undergoing elective off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery were enrolled in this study. All patients received thoracic epidural catheter in the most prominent inter-vertebral space between C7 and T3 on the day before operation. On the day of surgery, an arterial catheter and Swan Ganz catheter (capable of measuring cardiac index) was inserted. After administering full dose of local anesthetic in the epidural space, serial hemodynamic and oxygen transport parameters were measured for 30 minute prior to administration of general anesthesia, with which the study was culminated. A significant decrease in oxygen delivery index with insignificant changes in oxygen extraction and consumption indices was observed. We conclude that TEA does not affect tissue oxygenation despite a decrease in arterial pressures and cardiac output.

  17. Effect of thoracic epidural anesthesia on oxygen delivery and utilization in cardiac surgical patients scheduled to undergo off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryaprakash Sharadaprasad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA on tissue oxygen delivery and utilization in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. This prospective observational study was conducted in a tertiary referral heart hospital. A total of 25 patients undergoing elective off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery were enrolled in this study. All patients received thoracic epidural catheter in the most prominent inter-vertebral space between C7 and T3 on the day before operation. On the day of surgery, an arterial catheter and Swan Ganz catheter (capable of measuring cardiac index was inserted. After administering full dose of local anesthetic in the epidural space, serial hemodynamic and oxygen transport parameters were measured for 30 minute prior to administration of general anesthesia, with which the study was culminated. A significant decrease in oxygen delivery index with insignificant changes in oxygen extraction and consumption indices was observed. We conclude that TEA does not affect tissue oxygenation despite a decrease in arterial pressures and cardiac output.

  18. A randomized comparison of the Saphenous Vein Versus Right Internal Thoracic Artery as a Y-Composite Graft (SAVE RITA) trial: early results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ho Young; Kim, Jun Sung; Oh, Se Jin; Kim, Ki-Bong

    2012-11-01

    The Saphenous Vein Versus Right Internal Thoracic Artery as a Y-Composite Graft trial was designed to evaluate the saphenous vein compared with the right internal thoracic artery as a Y-composite graft anastomosed to the side of the left internal thoracic artery. In this early analysis, we compared early angiographic patency rates and clinical outcomes. From September 2008 to October 2011, 224 patients with multivessel coronary artery disease were randomized prospectively to undergo off-pump revascularization using the saphenous vein group (n = 112) or the right internal thoracic artery group (n = 112) as Y-composite grafts. Early postoperative (1.4 ± 1.1 days) angiographic patency and clinical outcomes were compared. There was 1 operative death in the right internal thoracic artery group. No statistically significant differences in postoperative morbidities, including atrial fibrillation and acute renal failure, were observed between the groups. The number of distal anastomoses using the side-arm Y-composite graft (saphenous vein vs right internal thoracic artery) were 2.3 ± 0.8 and 1.9 ± 0.7 in the saphenous vein and right internal thoracic artery groups, respectively (P < .001). A third conduit was used in 44 patients (saphenous vein group vs right internal thoracic artery group, 4/109 vs 40/110; P < .001) to extend the side-arm Y-composite graft for complete revascularization. Early angiography demonstrated an overall patency rate of 99.4% (771 of 776 distal anastomoses). Patency rates of the side-arm Y-composite graft (saphenous vein vs right internal thoracic artery) were 98.8% (245 of 248) and 99.5% (207 of 208) in the saphenous vein and right internal thoracic artery groups, respectively (P = .629). A third conduit was needed to extend the right internal thoracic artery composite graft and reach the target vessels in 36.4% (40/110) of the patients. The saphenous vein composite graft was comparable with the right internal thoracic artery composite graft

  19. Outcomes of endovascular management of acute thoracic aortic emergencies in an academic level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, Angela B; Branco, Bernardino C; Goshima, Kay R; Hughes, John D; Mills, Joseph L

    2014-12-01

    Thoracic aortic emergencies account for 10% of thoracic-related admissions in the United States and remain associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Open repair has declined owing to the emergence of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR), but data on emergency TEVAR use for acute aortic pathology remain limited. We therefore reviewed our experience. We retrospectively evaluated emergency descending thoracic aortic endovascular interventions performed at a single academic level 1 trauma center between January 2005 and August 2013 including all cases of traumatic aortic injury, ruptured descending thoracic aneurysm, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer, aortoenteric fistula, and acute complicated type B dissection. Demographics, clinical data, and outcomes were extracted. Stepwise logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors for death. During the study period, 51 patients underwent TEVAR; 22 cases (43.1%) were performed emergently (11 patients [50.0%] traumatic aortic injury; 4 [18.2%] ruptured descending thoracic aneurysm; 4 [18.2%] complicated type B dissection; 2 [9.1%] penetrating aortic ulcer; and 1 [4.5%] aortoenteric fistula). Overall, 72.7% (n = 16) were male with a mean age of 54.8 ± 15.9 years. Nineteen patients (86.4%) required only a single TEVAR procedure, whereas 2 (9.1%) required additional endovascular therapy, and 1 (4.5%) open thoracotomy. Four traumatic aortic injury patients required exploratory laparotomy for concomitant intra-abdominal injuries. During a mean hospital length of stay of 18.9 days (range, 1 to 76 days), 3 patients (13.6%) developed major complications. In-hospital mortality was 27.2%, consisting of 6 deaths from traumatic brain injury (1); exsanguination in the operating room before repair could be achieved (2); bowel ischemia (1) and multisystem organ failure (1); and family withdrawal of care (1). A stepwise logistic regression model identified 24-hour packed red blood cell requirements ≥4

  20. CT findings in severe thoracic sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennebicque, Anne-Sophie; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Moulahi, Hassen; Brauner, Michel W.; Nunes, Hilario; Valeyre, Dominique

    2005-01-01

    Severe thoracic sarcoidosis includes manifestations with significant clinical and functional impairment and a risk of mortality. Severe thoracic sarcoidosis can take on various clinical presentations and is associated with increased morbidity. The purpose of this article was to describe the CT findings in severe thoracic sarcoidosis and to explain some of their mechanisms. Subacute respiratory insufficiency is a rare and early complication due to a high profusion of pulmonary lesions. Chronic respiratory insufficiency due to pulmonary fibrosis is a frequent and late complication. Three main CT patterns are identified: bronchial distortion, honeycombing and linear opacities. CT can be helpful in diagnosing some mechanisms of central airway obstruction such as bronchial distortion due to pulmonary fibrosis or an extrinsic bronchial compression by enlarged lymph nodes. An intrinsic narrowing of the bronchial wall by endobronchial granulomatous lesions may be suggested by CT when it shows evidence of bronchial mural thickening. Pulmonary hypertension usually occurs in patients with end-stage pulmonary disease and is related to fibrotic destruction of the distal capillary bed and to the resultant chronic hypoxemia. Several other mechanisms may contribute to the development of pulmonary hypertension including extrinsic compression of major pulmonary arteries by enlarged lymph nodes and secondary pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Aspergilloma colonization of a cavity is the main cause of hemoptysis in sarcoidosis. Other rare causes are bronchiesctasis, necrotizing bronchial aspergillosis, semi-invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, erosion of a pulmonary artery due to a necrotic sarcoidosis lesion, necrosis of parenchymal sarcoidosis lesions and specific endobronchial macroscopic lesions. (orig.)

  1. Comparison Thoracic Epidural and Intercostal Block to Improve Ventilation Parameters and Reduce Pain in Patients with Multiple Rib Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheleh Aligholipour Maleki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chest wall blunt trauma causes multiple rib fractures and will often be associated with significant pain and may compromise ventilator mechanics. Analgesia has great roll in rib fracture therapies, opioid are useful, but when used as sole agent may re-quire such high dose that they produce respiratory depression, especially in el-derly .the best analgesia for a severe chest wall injury is a continuous epidural infusion of local anesthetic. This provides complete analgesia allowing inspiration and coughing without of the risk of respiratory depression. Methods: sixty adult patients who with multiple rib fractures were enrolled in this study. They were divided into Group A or thoracic epidural with bupivacaine 0.125 % +1mg/5ml morphine and group B or inter-costal block with %0.25 bupivacaine. The patients were assessed through ICU and hos-pital stay length, ventilation function tests. Pain score among the patients was meas-ured with verbal rating scale, before and after administration of the analgesia. Results: We found a significant improvement in ventilatory function tests during the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd days after epidural analgesia compared with the intercostal block (P < 0.004. Changes in the visual Analogue Scale were associated with marked improvement re-garding pain at rest and pain caused by coughing and deep breathing in group A com-pared group B... ICU and hospital stay markedly reduced in Group A. Conclusion: tho-racic epidural analgesia is superior to intercostals block regarding pain relief of rib frac-tures. Patients who received epidural analgesia had significantly lower pain scores at all studied times.

  2. Thoracic empyema caused by Campylobacter rectus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Tomoyuki; Urata, Teruo; Nemoto, Daisuke; Hitomi, Shigemi

    2017-03-01

    We report a case of thoracic empyema caused by Campylobacter rectus, an organism considered as a periodontal pathogen but rarely recovered from extraoral specimens. The patient fully recovered through drainage of purulent pleural fluid and administration of antibiotics. The present case illustrates that C. rectus can be a cause of not only periodontal disease but also pulmonary infection. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Endovascular stenting of a chronic ruptured type B thoracic aortic dissection, a second chance: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Ali; Khan, Sumaira L; Whitaker, Simon C; Macsweeney, Shane T

    2008-02-07

    We aim to highlight the need for awareness of late complications of endovascular thoracic aortic stenting and the need for close follow-up of patients treated by this method. We report the first case in the English literature of an endovascular repair of a previously stented, ruptured chronic Stanford type B thoracic aortic dissection re-presenting with a type III endoleak of the original repair. Endovascular thoracic stenting is now a widely accepted technique for the treatment of thoracic aortic dissection and its complications. Long term follow up is necessary to ensure that late complications are identified and treated appropriately. In this case of type III endoleak, although technically challenging, endovascular repair was feasible and effective.

  4. Thoracic chordoma: CT and MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Yoo Mi; Hwang, Hee Young; Kim, Sang Joon; Chung, Hyo Sun; Han, Heon

    1993-01-01

    Chordoma arising from the notochordal remnants is a rare primary bone tumor in the cervicosacral region and is even more unusual in the thoracic region. The authors experienced a case of thoracic chordoma and reports its CT and MR findings

  5. Patient Health Engagement (PHE) model in enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS): monitoring patients' engagement and psychological resilience in minimally invasive thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffigna, Guendalina; Barello, Serena

    2018-03-01

    In the last decade, the humanization of medicine has contributed to an important shift in medical paradigms (from a doctor-centered to a patient-centered approach to care). This paradigm shift promoted a greater acknowledgement of patient engagement as a crucial asset for healthcare due to its benefits on both clinical outcomes and healthcare sustainability. Particularly, patient engagement should be considered a vital parameter for the healthcare system as well as it is a marker of the patients' ability to be resilient to the illness experience and thus to be an effective manager of his/her own health after the diagnosis. For this reason, measuring and promoting patient engagement both in chronic and acute care is today a priority for healthcare systems all over the world. In this contribution, the authors propose the Patient Health Engagement (PHE) model and the PHE scale as scientific and reliable tools to orient clinical actions and organizational strategies based on the patient engagement score. Particularly, this work discusses the implication of the adoption of these scientific tools in the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) experience and their potentialities for healthcare professionals working in thoracic surgery settings.

  6. Conventional versus frozen elephant trunk surgery for extensive disease of the thoracic aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Eusanio, Marco; Borger, Michael; Petridis, Francesco D; Leontyev, Sergey; Pantaleo, Antonio; Moz, Monica; Mohr, Friedrich; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto

    2014-11-01

    To compare early and mid-term outcomes after repair of extensive aneurysm of the thoracic aorta using the conventional elephant trunk or frozen elephant trunk (FET) procedures. Fifty-seven patients with extensive thoracic aneurysmal disease were treated using elephant trunk (n = 36) or FET (n = 21) procedures. Patients with aortic dissection, descending thoracic aorta (DTA) diameter less than 40 mm, and thoracoabdominal aneurysms were excluded from the analysis, as were those who did not undergo antegrade selective cerebral perfusion during circulatory arrest. Short-term and mid-term outcomes were compared according to elephant trunk/FET surgical management. Preoperative and intraoperative variables were similar in the two groups, except for a higher incidence of female sex, coronary artery disease and associated procedures in elephant trunk patients. Hospital mortality (elephant trunk: 13.9% versus FET: 4.8%; P = 0.2), permanent neurologic dysfunction (elephant trunk: 5.7% versus FET: 9.5%; P = 0.4) and paraplegia (elephant trunk: 2.9% versus FET: 4.8%; P = 0.6) rates were similar in the two groups. Follow-up was 100% complete. In the elephant trunk group, 68.4% of patients did not undergo a second-stage procedure during follow-up for a variety of reasons. Of these patients, the DTA diameter was greater than 51 mm in 72.2% and two (6.7%) died due to aortic rupture while awaiting stage-two intervention. Endovascular second-stage procedures were successfully performed in all FET patients with residual DTA aneurysmal disease (n = 3), whereas nine of 11 elephant trunk patients who returned for second-stage procedures required conventional surgical replacement through a lateral thoracotomy. Kaplan-Meier estimate of 4-year survival was 75.8 ± 7.6 and 72.8 ± 10.6 in elephant trunk and FET patients, respectively (log-rank P = 0.8). In patients with extensive aneurysmal disease of thoracic aorta, elephant trunk and FET procedures

  7. Home Mechanical Ventilation: A Canadian Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    OpenAIRE

    McKim, Douglas A; Road, Jeremy; Avendano, Monica; Abdool, Steve; Côté, Fabien; Duguid, Nigel; Fraser, Janet; Maltais, François; Morrison, Debra L; O’Connell, Colleen; Petrof, Basil J; Rimmer, Karen; Skomro, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are surviving episodes of prolonged mechanical ventilation or benefitting from the recent availability of user-friendly noninvasive ventilators. Although many publications pertaining to specific aspects of home mechanical ventilation (HMV) exist, very few comprehensive guidelines that bring together all of the current literature on patients at risk for or using mechanical ventilatory support are available. The Canadian Thoracic Society HMV Guideline Committee ha...

  8. The role of wet lab in thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedetti, Benedetta; Schnorr, Philipp; Schmidt, Joachim; Scarci, Marco

    2017-01-01

    During the last three decades, minimally invasive surgery has become common practice in all kinds of surgical disciplines and, in Thoracic Surgery, the minimally invasive approach is recommended as the treatment of choice for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Nevertheless, all over the world a large number of lobectomies is still performed by conventional open thoracotomy and not as video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), which shows the need of a proper training for this technique. Development and improvement of surgical skills are not only challenging and time-consuming components of the training curriculum for resident or fellow surgeons, but also for more experienced consultants learning new techniques. The rapid evolution of medical technologies like VATS or robotic surgery requires an evolution of the existing educational models to improve cognitive and procedural skills before reaching the operating room in order to increase patient safety. Nowadays, in the Thoracic Surgery field, there is a wide range of simulation-based training methods for surgeons starting or wanting to improve their learning curve in VATS. Aim is to overcome the learning curve required to successfully master this new technique in a brief time. In general, the basic difference between the various learning techniques is the distinction between "dry" and "wet" lab modules, which mainly reflects the use of synthetic or animal-model-based materials. Wet lab trainings can be further sub-divided into in vivo modules, where living anaesthetized animals are used, and ex vivo modules, where only animal tissues serve as basis of the simulation-based training method. In the literature, the role of wet lab in Thoracic Surgery is still debated.

  9. The management of thoracic inlet syndrome associated with Hurler's syndrome: a novel surgical technique.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ahsan, Rauf M

    2012-02-01

    A 21-year-old male developed significant swelling of his tongue after a respiratory arrest. The patient had a history of Hurler\\'s syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) angiogram delineated that the swelling was due to compression of his internal jugular veins at the level of the first rib, resulting in thoracic inlet obstruction. The standard surgical treatment of thoracic inlet obstruction was not suitable in this patient\\'s case due to his short thick neck and his characteristic Hurler\\'s syndrome body habitus. Therefore, a novel surgical strategy was used to decompress his head and neck vessels. The manubrium was widened using an iliac crest bone graft, stabilised using internal fixation plates and reconstructed with a pectoral muscle flap.

  10. A new instrument to assess physician skill at thoracic ultrasound, including pleural effusion markup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamonsen, Matthew; McGrath, David; Steiler, Geoff; Ware, Robert; Colt, Henri; Fielding, David

    2013-09-01

    To reduce complications and increase success, thoracic ultrasound is recommended to guide all chest drainage procedures. Despite this, no tools currently exist to assess proceduralist training or competence. This study aims to validate an instrument to assess physician skill at performing thoracic ultrasound, including effusion markup, and examine its validity. We developed an 11-domain, 100-point assessment sheet in line with British Thoracic Society guidelines: the Ultrasound-Guided Thoracentesis Skills and Tasks Assessment Test (UGSTAT). The test was used to assess 22 participants (eight novices, seven intermediates, seven advanced) on two occasions while performing thoracic ultrasound on a pleural effusion phantom. Each test was scored by two blinded expert examiners. Validity was examined by assessing the ability of the test to stratify participants according to expected skill level (analysis of variance) and demonstrating test-retest and intertester reproducibility by comparison of repeated scores (mean difference [95% CI] and paired t test) and the intraclass correlation coefficient. Mean scores for the novice, intermediate, and advanced groups were 49.3, 73.0, and 91.5 respectively, which were all significantly different (P < .0001). There were no significant differences between repeated scores. Procedural training on mannequins prior to unsupervised performance on patients is rapidly becoming the standard in medical education. This study has validated the UGSTAT, which can now be used to determine the adequacy of thoracic ultrasound training prior to clinical practice. It is likely that its role could be extended to live patients, providing a way to document ongoing procedural competence.

  11. Robotic thoracic surgery: The state of the art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arvind; Asaf, Belal Bin

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive thoracic surgery has come a long way. It has rapidly progressed to complex procedures such as lobectomy, pneumonectomy, esophagectomy, and resection of mediastinal tumors. Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) offered perceptible benefits over thoracotomy in terms of less postoperative pain and narcotic utilization, shorter ICU and hospital stay, decreased incidence of postoperative complications combined with quicker return to work, and better cosmesis. However, despite its obvious advantages, the General Thoracic Surgical Community has been relatively slow in adapting VATS more widely. The introduction of da Vinci surgical system has helped overcome certain inherent limitations of VATS such as two-dimensional (2D) vision and counter intuitive movement using long rigid instruments allowing thoracic surgeons to perform a plethora of minimally invasive thoracic procedures more efficiently. Although the cumulative experience worldwide is still limited and evolving, Robotic Thoracic Surgery is an evolution over VATS. There is however a lot of concern among established high-volume VATS centers regarding the superiority of the robotic technique. We have over 7 years experience and believe that any new technology designed to make minimal invasive surgery easier and more comfortable for the surgeon is most likely to have better and safer outcomes in the long run. Our only concern is its cost effectiveness and we believe that if the cost factor is removed more and more surgeons will use the technology and it will increase the spectrum and the reach of minimally invasive thoracic surgery. This article reviews worldwide experience with robotic thoracic surgery and addresses the potential benefits and limitations of using the robotic platform for the performance of thoracic surgical procedures. PMID:25598601

  12. THORACIC COMPLICATIONS OF OESOPHAGEAL CARCINOMA- A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF CT APPEARANCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Joshi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Oesophageal cancer is a common gastrointestinal tract malignancy and Computed Tomography (CT is generally used for its initial evaluation and staging. Due to the anatomical relationships of the oesophagus, malignancies afflicting it can also give rise to various pulmonary and thoracic complications. The staging CT can also be used to detect and evaluate these complications. Detection of concurrent thoracic complications in addition to the primary malignancy is imperative to institute appropriate management. The aim of the study is to analyse and discuss the various thoracic complications in cases of oesophageal carcinoma detected on Multidetector Computed Tomography (MDCT. MATERIALS AND METHODS MDCT images of 27 cases of histopathologically-proven carcinoma oesophagus who had thoracic complications in addition to features of malignancy and metastases were retrospectively analysed. The various pulmonary and thoracic complications in addition to the primary lesions were assessed and evaluated. RESULTS There were 27 cases of oesophageal carcinoma with complications, of which there were 20 patients who had pulmonary consolidation/pneumonitis, 5 had oesophago-respiratory fistulae, 1 had a lung abscess, 2 had pericardial effusions, 3 had pleural effusions, 2 cases of airway compromise with atelectasis and 2 cases with Pulmonary Thromboembolism (PTE. CONCLUSION The routine chest CT for evaluation and staging of the primary tumour in cases of oesophageal carcinoma can also reveal thoracic complications directly or indirectly related the cancer some of which may alter management. The most common of these are pneumonia and oesophago-respiratory fistulas. Others like pulmonary thromboembolism may require immediate intervention. An awareness of the spectrum of imaging appearances of these complications and due vigilance while interpreting chest CT studies will aid decision making and institution of appropriate management.

  13. MRI of thoracic outlet syndrome in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavhan, Govind B.; Batmanabane, Vaishnavi; Muthusami, Prakash; Towbin, Alexander J.; Borschel, Gregory H.

    2017-01-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is caused by compression of the neurovascular bundle as it passes from the upper thorax to the axilla. The neurovascular bundle can be compressed by bony structures such as the first rib, cervical ribs or bone tubercles, or from soft-tissue abnormalities like a fibrous band, muscle hypertrophy or space-occupying lesion. Thoracic outlet syndrome commonly affects young adults but can be seen in the pediatric age group, especially in older children. Diagnosis is based on a holistic approach encompassing clinical features, physical examination findings including those triggered by various maneuvers, electromyography, nerve conduction studies and imaging. Imaging is performed to confirm the diagnosis, exclude mimics and classify thoracic outlet syndrome into neurogenic, arterial, venous or mixed causes. MRI and MR angiography are useful in this process. A complete MRI examination for suspected thoracic outlet syndrome should include the assessment of anatomy and any abnormalities using routine sequences, vessel assessment with the arms in adduction by MR angiography and assessment of dynamic compression of vessels with abduction of the arms. The purpose of this paper is to describe the anatomy of the thoracic outlet, causes of thoracic outlet syndrome, the MR imaging techniques used in its diagnosis and the principles of image interpretation. (orig.)

  14. MRI of thoracic outlet syndrome in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavhan, Govind B.; Batmanabane, Vaishnavi [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Muthusami, Prakash [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); The Hospital for Sick Children, Division of Image Guided Therapy, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Towbin, Alexander J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Borschel, Gregory H. [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2017-09-15

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is caused by compression of the neurovascular bundle as it passes from the upper thorax to the axilla. The neurovascular bundle can be compressed by bony structures such as the first rib, cervical ribs or bone tubercles, or from soft-tissue abnormalities like a fibrous band, muscle hypertrophy or space-occupying lesion. Thoracic outlet syndrome commonly affects young adults but can be seen in the pediatric age group, especially in older children. Diagnosis is based on a holistic approach encompassing clinical features, physical examination findings including those triggered by various maneuvers, electromyography, nerve conduction studies and imaging. Imaging is performed to confirm the diagnosis, exclude mimics and classify thoracic outlet syndrome into neurogenic, arterial, venous or mixed causes. MRI and MR angiography are useful in this process. A complete MRI examination for suspected thoracic outlet syndrome should include the assessment of anatomy and any abnormalities using routine sequences, vessel assessment with the arms in adduction by MR angiography and assessment of dynamic compression of vessels with abduction of the arms. The purpose of this paper is to describe the anatomy of the thoracic outlet, causes of thoracic outlet syndrome, the MR imaging techniques used in its diagnosis and the principles of image interpretation. (orig.)

  15. The European Respiratory Society and European Society of Thoracic Surgeons clinical guidelines for evaluating fitness for radical treatment (surgery and chemoradiotherapy) in patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Alessandro; Charloux, Anne; Bolliger, Chris T; Rocco, Gaetano; Sculier, Jean-Paul; Varela, Gonzalo; Licker, Marc; Ferguson, Mark K; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Clini, Enrico M; Win, Thida; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Goldman, Lee

    2009-07-01

    The European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) established a joint task force with the purpose to develop clinical evidence-based guidelines on evaluation of fitness for radical therapy in patients with lung cancer. The following topics were discussed, and are summarized in the final report along with graded recommendations: Cardiologic evaluation before lung resection; lung function tests and exercise tests (limitations of ppoFEV1; DLCO: systematic or selective?; split function studies; exercise tests: systematic; low-tech exercise tests; cardiopulmonary (high tech) exercise tests); future trends in preoperative work-up; physiotherapy/rehabilitation and smoking cessation; scoring systems; advanced care management (ICU/HDU); quality of life in patients submitted to radical treatment; combined cancer surgery and lung volume reduction surgery; compromised parenchymal sparing resections and minimally invasive techniques: the balance between oncological radicality and functional reserve; neoadjuvant chemotherapy and complications; definitive chemo and radiotherapy: functional selection criteria and definition of risk; should surgical criteria be re-calibrated for radiotherapy?; the patient at prohibitive surgical risk: alternatives to surgery; who should treat thoracic patients and where these patients should be treated?

  16. Genetic polymorphisms in bone morphogenetic protein receptor type IA gene predisposes individuals to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the cervical spine via the smad signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Jin, Weitao; Li, Haibin

    2018-02-20

    The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the 4A > C and -349C > T single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in bone morphogenetic protein receptor type IA (BMPR-IA) gene, which significantly associated with the occurrence and the extent of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) in the cervical spine. The SNPs in BMPR-IA gene were genotyped, and the association with the occurrence and severity of OPLL were evaluated in 356 OPLL patients and 617 non-OPLL controls. In stably transfected mouse embryonic mesenchymal stem cells (C3H10T1/2), the expression levels of the BMPR-IA gene and Smad4 protein as well as phosphorylated Smad1/5/8 were detected by Western blotting. In addition, the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin (OC) activity of osteogenesis specificity protein was assessed using the ALP quantitation and osteocalcin radioimmunoassay kit, respectively. The 4A > C and the -349C > T polymorphisms of BMPR-IA gene were significantly associated with the development of OPLL in the cervical spine. The C allele type in 4A > C polymorphism significantly increases the occurrence and the extent of OPLL. The T allele type in -349C > T polymorphism significantly increases the susceptibility to OPLL, but not the extent of OPLL. The current results further validate our previous observations. The expression levels of BMPR-IA gene were significantly increased in pcDNA3.1/BMPR-IA (mutation type, MT -349C > T; MT 4A > C; MT -349C > T and 4A > C) vector-transfected C3H10T1/2 cells compared to the wild type (WT) vector-transfected cells. The levels of phosphorylated Smad1/5/8 and ALP activity were significantly increased in pcDNA3.1/BMPR-IA (MT -349C > T) vector-transfected C3H10T1/2 cells compared to the WT vector-transfected cells. However, no significant differences were observed in the protein levels of phosphorylated Smad1/5/8 and the ALP activity between MT A/C and WT vector

  17. Problems and prospects of managing thoracic aortic aneurysm at the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chianakwana, Gabriel U; Odike, Maxy A C; Nwofor, Alexander M E

    2004-03-01

    The objective of this report is to highlight the problems encountered in managing thoracic aortic aneurysm in a third-generation teaching hospital serving a purely rural community in the heartland of Anambra State, in the southeastern part of Nigeria. This report also proffers solutions aimed at assisting in providing better care for patients afflicted with this condition. From time to time, patients present with vascular diseases, including aneurysm, but the condition is only occasionally suspected and sparingly investigated. This is a report of two cases within the setting of the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH), Nnewi Nigeria. After the death of these two patients, one of whom was a member of the staff of the hospital, post mortem examinations revealed that they had died of ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm. Their medical records were retrieved from the Medical Records Department and reviewed with the aim of analyzing their clinical features and management in the light of the unexpected post-mortem examination results. The survey of the patient records revealed that the diagnosis of thoracic aortic aneurysm was not suspected in either patient even though both had symptoms pointing to this condition. The staff member was a 55-year old man and the other patient was a 31-year old woman in her 30th week of pregnancy. We conclude by drawing the attention of medical practitioners in our community to the fact that thoracic aortic aneurysms are probably more common than we thought. Only a high index of suspicion will lead to clinical diagnosis and treatment.

  18. Evaluations of Factors Predicting the Need for an Extra-Cervical Approach for Intra-Thoracic Goiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sadrizadeh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intra-thoracic goiter refers to the extension of enlarged thyroid tissue into the thoracic inlet. This condition can produce symptoms of compression on adjacent organs and can sometimes be accompanied by malignant transformation. Therefore surgical treatment is almost always necessary. In order to remove the pathology with the fewest post-operative complications, selection of the appropriate surgical approach is essential. In this study we aimed to detect the criteria which help us select the best therapeutic approach.   Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, 82 patients with intra-thoracic goiter were investigated. Their data were extracted from medical records and analyzed using SPSS software.   Results: Overall 82 patients, 18 (21% males and 64 (78% females with mean age of 56.38 years were studied. The most common clinical symptoms were mass (95% and dyspnea (73%. In most patients, the surgical approach was cervical (90.2%, while 9.8% of patients required an extra-cervical approach. Post-operation complications were observed in 17.1% of patients; the most common being transient recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis (4.9%. Malignancy was reported in the histopathology of seven patients (8.5%. The most common malignant histopathology was papillary thyroid carcinoma (7.3%. Extension of the thyroid tissue below the uppermost level of the aortic arch was significantly correlated with the need for an extra-cervical approach to surgery (P

  19. Percutaneous implantation of thoracic and abdominal aortic prostheses in patients at high surgical risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C Ortiz

    2013-02-01

    intraluminal stent implantation is an alternative. Objective: to analyze the impact of percutaneous implantation of aortic stents in high-risk surgical patients with a minimum of one y ear follow-up. Method: Descriptive study conducted from December 2005 to March 2010 which included 125 patients with thoracic or abdominal aortic aneurysm, meeting surgical criteria by its diameter and that were rejected from surgery due to their high risk. The outcomes were intraoperative death from any cause and aneurysm-related at one, six and twelve months. Complications were defined as vascular occurred during the first thirty days. Results: Abdominal aneurysm was more frequent (70.4%. The overall mortality at 25.7 months follow-up was 14.8%. Of this percentage, 5.2% died from causes related to the aneurysm. One patient died during surgery. 4.3% were reoperated for leaks. There was higher aneurysm-related mortality in the thoracic (14.7 vs. 1.2% p = 0.003 and a trend in those of larger diameter (6.9 vs. 5.7 cm p = 0.210. There was no association between mortality and diabetes mellitus, smoking, heart disease, hypertension or dyslipidemia. Conclusions: aneurysm-related mortality in patients undergoing aortic stent graft is low. Mortality was associated with thoracic aneurysm and to its greater diameter. Complications did not imply an increase in mortality. In conclusion, in patients with aortic aneurysm and high surgical risk rejected for open surgery, percutaneous approach is a safe and effective treatment in a medium-term follow-up.

  20. Thoraco-laparoscopic esophagectomy: thoracic stage in prone position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Bernardo Cola

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze the National Cancer Institute Abdominopelvic Division (INCA / MS/HC I initial experience with thoraco-laparoscopic esophagectomy with thoracic stage in prone position. Methods: we studied 19 consecutive thoraco-laparoscopic esophagectomies from may 2012 to august 2014, including ten patients with squamous cells carcinoma (five of the middle third and five of the lower third and nine cases of gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma (six Siewert I and three Siewert II. All procedures were initiated by the prone thoracic stage. Results: There were minimal blood loss, optimal mediastinal visualization, oncological radicality and no conversions. Surgical morbidity was 42 %, most being minor complications (58% Clavien I or II, with few related to the technique. The most common complication was cervical anastomotic leak (37%, with a low anastomotic stricture rate (two stenosis: 10.53%. We had one (5.3% surgical related death, due to a gastric tube`s mediastinal leak, treated by open reoperation and neck diversion. The median Intensive Care Unit stay and hospital stay were two and 12 days, respectively. The mean thoracoscopic stage duration was 77 min. Thirteen patients received neoadjuvant treatment (five squamous cells carcinoma and eight gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas. The average lymph node sample had 16.4 lymph nodes per patient and 22.67 when separately analyzing patients without neoadjuvant treatment. Conclusion: the thoraco-laparoscopic approach was a safe technique in the surgical treatment of esophageal cancer, with a good lymph node sampling.

  1. Algorithm of pulmonary emphysema extraction using thoracic 3D CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saita, Shinsuke; Kubo, Mitsuru; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Nakano, Yasutaka; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Tominaga, Keigo; Eguchi, Kenji; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2007-03-01

    Recently, due to aging and smoking, emphysema patients are increasing. The restoration of alveolus which was destroyed by emphysema is not possible, thus early detection of emphysema is desired. We describe a quantitative algorithm for extracting emphysematous lesions and quantitatively evaluate their distribution patterns using low dose thoracic 3-D CT images. The algorithm identified lung anatomies, and extracted low attenuation area (LAA) as emphysematous lesion candidates. Applying the algorithm to thoracic 3-D CT images and then by follow-up 3-D CT images, we demonstrate its potential effectiveness to assist radiologists and physicians to quantitatively evaluate the emphysematous lesions distribution and their evolution in time interval changes.

  2. Malignant granular cell tumour on the thoracic wall: a case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, E.; Esteban, R.; Alcalaya, R.; Albors, L.; Jimenez, C.; Ovelar, Y.; Cantera, M.G.

    1993-01-01

    A case is presented of a malignant granular cell tumour in a 52-year-old patient the initial location of which was the thoracic wall. After the tumour's removal there was recurrence in the lymph nodes, retroperitoneum, bone, lung and orbits. The important features of this case are its extraordinary rarity, the unusual location in the thoracic wall, and the tumour's infrequent malignancy. The radiological and histological findings are discussed, and the literature on the subject is reviewed. (orig.)

  3. Acute quadriplegia following closed traction reduction of a cervical facet dislocation in the setting of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimberley, David W; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Goyal, Nitin; Harrop, James S; Anderson, D Greg; Albert, Todd J; Hilibrand, Alan S

    2005-08-01

    A case report of acute quadriplegia resulting from closed traction reduction of traumatic bilateral cervical facet dislocation in a 54-year-old male with concomitant ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). To report an unusual presentation of a spinal cord injury, examine the approach to reversal of the injury, and review the treatment and management controversies of acute cervical facet dislocations in specific patient subgroups. The treatment of acute cervical facet dislocations is an area of ongoing controversy, especially regarding the question of the necessity of advanced imaging studies before closed traction reduction of the dislocated cervical spine. The safety of an immediate closed, traction reduction of the cervical spine in awake, alert, cooperative, and appropriately select patients has been reported in several studies. To date, there have been no permanent neurologic deficits resulting from awake, closed reduction reported in the literature. A case of temporary, acute quadriplegia with complete neurologic recovery following successful closed traction reduction of a bilateral cervical facet dislocation in the setting of OPLL is presented. The clinical neurologic examination, radiographic, and advanced imaging studies before and after closed, traction reduction of a cervical facet dislocation are evaluated and discussed. A review of the literature regarding the treatment of acute cervical facet dislocations is presented. Radiographs showed approximately 50% subluxation of the fifth on the sixth cervical vertebrae, along with computerized tomography revealing extensive discontinuous OPLL. The cervical facet dislocation was successfully reduced with an awake, closed traction reduction, before magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation. The patient subsequently had acute quadriplegia develop, with the ensuing MRI study illustrating severe spinal stenosis at the C5, C6 level as a result of OPLL or a large extruded disc herniation

  4. November 2017 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The November 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 15, 2017 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with a lecture followed by case presentations. There were 15 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, allergy, infectious disease and radiology communities. At the beginning of the meeting several issues were discussed: 1. CME offered by the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (SWJPCC is currently offered to only the Southwest state thoracic societies and the Mayo Clinic. After discussion it was felt that this restriction of access was no longer appropriate and CME credits should be available to all. 2. Efforts continue to obtain CME for the Arizona Thoracic Society meetings. Our Chapter Representative, Dr. Gerry Schwartzberg, is approaching this with the American Thoracic Society. Locally, HonorHealth sent out a survey on CME needs. Members were encouraged …

  5. April 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The April 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 4/23/2014 at Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 15 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. It was announced that there will be a wine tasting with the California, New Mexico and Colorado Thoracic Societies at the American Thoracic Society International Meeting. The tasting will be led by Peter Wagner and is scheduled for the Cobalt Room in the Hilton San Diego Bayfront on Tuesday, May 20, from 4-8 PM. Guideline development was again discussed. The consensus was to await publication of the IDSA Cocci Guidelines and respond appropriately. George Parides, Arizona Chapter Representative, gave a presentation on Hill Day. Representatives of the Arizona, New Mexico and Washington Thoracic Societies met with their Congressional delegations, including Rep. David Schweikert, to discuss the Cigar Bill, NIH funding, and the Medicare Sustainable Growth ...

  6. Comparison of fractional flow reserve of composite Y-grafts with saphenous vein or right internal thoracic arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glineur, David; Boodhwani, Munir; Poncelet, Alain; De Kerchove, Laurent; Etienne, Pierre Yves; Noirhomme, Philippe; Deceuninck, Paul; Michel, Xavier; El Khoury, Gebrine; Hanet, Claude

    2010-09-01

    Composite Y-grafts, using the left internal thoracic artery as the inflow, allow a more efficient use of conduits without the need to touch a diseased ascending aorta. Among other conduits, the saphenous vein graft may be an alternative to the radial artery in elderly patients. We evaluated the hemodynamic characteristics of 17 composite Y-grafts made with the left internal thoracic artery anastomosed to the left anterior descending coronary artery in all cases and with either the free right internal thoracic artery (RITA group, n = 10) or a saphenous vein graft (SVG group, n = 7) implanted proximally to the left internal thoracic artery and distally to the circumflex territory 6 months after the operation. At baseline, the pressure gradient measured with a 0.014-inch pressure wire was minimal between the aorta and the internal thoracic artery stem (2 +/- 1 mm Hg), the internal thoracic artery and left anterior descending (4 +/- 2 mm Hg), the internal thoracic artery and left circumflex (3 +/- 1 mm Hg), and the saphenous vein graft and left circumflex (2 +/- 2 mm Hg). During hyperemia induced by adenosine, the pressure gradient increased significantly to 6 +/- 2 mm Hg in the internal thoracic artery stem, 9 +/- 4 mm Hg in the internal thoracic artery and left anterior descending artery, 9 +/- 3 mm Hg in the internal thoracic artery and left circumflex, and 7 +/- 4 mm Hg in the saphenous vein graft and left circumflex. Fractional flow reserve was 0.94 +/- 0.02 in internal thoracic artery stem, 0.90 +/- 0.04 mm Hg in the internal thoracic artery and left anterior descending, 0.91 +/- 0.03 mm Hg in the internal thoracic artery and left circumflex, and 0.92 +/- 0.06 mm Hg in the saphenous vein graft and left circumflex. No difference between the two types of composite Y-grafts was observed for pressure gradients or fractional flow reserve measured in internal thoracic artery stem or in distal branches. Composite Y-grafts with saphenous vein or right internal thoracic

  7. Management of an ingested fish bone in the lung using video-assist thoracic surgery: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sichuang; Tan, Sipin; Peng, Muyun; Yu, Fenglei

    2015-06-01

    We report a case of lung abscess caused by an ingested fish bone that was successfully treated by minimally invasive surgery. Although cases of ingested foreign body abscess are well reported, lung abscess caused by ingested fish bone is extremely rare. To date, less than 10 similar cases have been reported in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, the case presented in this case report is the first report of this kind that was successfully treated by video-assist thoracic surgery (VATS). A 47-year-old man was admitted to department of thoracic surgery with the complaint of continues dry cough and fever. The patient accidentally swallowed a long sharp-blade-shaped fish bone 20 days before, which perforated the upper thoracic esophagus on the right and embedded in the right upper lobe.The diagnosis was verified by computed tomography scan and a video-assist thoracic surgery procedure was successfully performed to treat the patient. The patient survived the esophageal perforation fortunately without involvement of great vessel injury and probable mediastinitis. This report may provide additional experience on lung abscess caused by ingested fish bones. However, it is also important to educate the public of the risks of trying to force an ingested object down into the stomach.

  8. [Thoracic aortic dissection revealed by systemic cholesterol embolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braem, L; Paule, P; Héno, P; Morand, J J; Mafart, B; La Folie, T; Varlet, P; Mioulet, D; Fourcade, L

    2006-10-01

    Systemic cholesterol embolism is a rare complication of atherosclerosis, and has various presentations. Arterial catheterisms are a common cause. However, the association with an aortic dissection has been exceptionally reported. We report the observation of a 70 year-old man, with coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia. Six months before hospitalization, a coronary angioplasty was performed due to recurrent angina. The association of purpuric lesions on the feet, with acute renal failure confirmed cholesterol embolism syndrome. Transoesophageal echocardiography showed a dissection of the descending thoracic aorta associated with complex atheroma. The evolution was marked by the pulpar necrosis of a toe and by a worsening of the renal failure, requiring definitive hemodialysis. Further echographic control highlighted the rupture of the intimal veil of the dissection. Cholesterol embolism syndrome may reveal an aortic dissection in patients without thoracic symptoms. In such cases, transoesophageal echocardiography is a useful and non-invasive examination.

  9. Evaluation of the value of ENI in radiotherapy for cervical and upper thoracic esophageal cancer: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mina; Zhao, Kuaile; Chen, Yun; Jiang, Guo-Liang

    2014-10-25

    A retrospective study to compare the failure patterns and effects of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) or involved field irradiation (IFI) for cervical and upper thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) patients. One hundred and sixty nine patients with the cervical and upper thoracic esophageal SCC were analyzed retrospectively; 99 patients (59%) underwent IFI and 70 patients (41%) received ENI. We defined "Out-PTVifi in-PTVeni metastasis" as lymph node metastasis occurring in the cervical prophylactic field of PTVeni thus out of PTVifi. Out-PTVifi in-PTVeni cervical node metastasis occurred in 8% of patients in the IFI group, all within 2 years after treatment. However, it occurred in 10% of patients in the ENI group, and these failures happened gradually since one year after treatments. No difference was found in OS and the incidences of Grade ≥ 3 treatment-related esophageal and lung toxicities between the two groups. ENI for cervical and upper thoracic esophageal SCC patients did not bring longer OS and better long-term control of cervical lymph nodes. Although ENI might delay cervical nodes progression in elective field; it could not decrease the incidence of these failures.

  10. Thoracic spine disc-related abnormalities: longitudinal MR imaging assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, Charles J.; Schweitzer, Mark E.; Morrison, William B.; Parellada, Joan A. [TJUH Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Carrino, J.A. [Department of Radiology ASB-1, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, L1, Room 002B, 75 Francis Street, MA 02115, Boston (United States)

    2004-04-01

    To describe and characterize the temporal changes in disc-related disorders of the thoracic spine using MR imaging. A retrospective longitudinal cohort study was carried out of 40 patients with two sequential thoracic spine MR images at variable intervals. The images were assessed for baseline presence of, new incidence of and changes in disc herniation, degenerative disc disease, endplate marrow signal alteration and Schmorl nodes. The range of follow-up was 4-149 weeks. Baseline presence was: disc herniation, 10% (49/480); degenerative disc disease, 14% (66/480); endplate marrow signal alteration, 2.3% (11/480); Schmorl nodes 9.6% (46/480). Most pre-existing lesions tended to remain unchanged. Herniations showed the most change, tending to improve in 27%. New incidence was: disc herniation, 1.5% (7/480), degenerative disc disease, 2% (10/480); endplate marrow signal alteration, 1.6% (8/480); Schmorl nodes, 2.1% (10/480). Disc degeneration was first visible at an 11-week interval and once established almost never changed over many weeks to months. Endplate signal alterations (Modic changes) were uncommon. Schmorl nodes show no change from baseline for up to 2 1/2 years. All findings predominated in the lower intervertebral levels from T6 to T10. The most prevalent thoracic spine disc-related findings are degeneration and herniation. Disc herniations predominate in the lower segments and are a dynamic phenomenon. Disc degeneration can be rapidly evolving but tends to remain unchanged after occurrence. Endplate marrow signal changes were an uncommon manifestation of thoracic disc disease. Schmorl nodes showed the least change over time. (orig.)

  11. One-stage surgery in combination with thoracic endovascular grafting and resection of T4 lung cancer invading the thoracic aorta and spine

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Seijiro; Goto, Tatsuya; Koike, Terumoto; Okamoto, Takeshi; Shoji, Hirokazu; Ohashi, Masayuki; Watanabe, Kei; Tsuchida, Masanori

    2017-01-01

    A novel strategy of one-stage surgery in combination with thoracic endovascular grafting and resection for T4 lung cancer invading the thoracic aorta and spine is described. A 56-year-old man with locally advanced lung cancer infiltrating the aortic wall and spine underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and thoracic irradiation, followed by en bloc resection of the aortic wall and spine with thoracic endovascular grafting. He developed postoperative chylothorax, but there were no stent graft-relat...

  12. Thoracic computer tomography for the evaluation of the thymus gland in cases of myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druschky, K.F.; Stadler, H.W.; Daun, H.; Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen

    1981-01-01

    Hyperplasia of the thymus gland is observed in 65% of all patients with myasthenia gravis, while the incidence of thymus tumor is reported to be 8.5-28%. Conventional radiological techniques provide little information in the diagnosis of mediastinal lesions. Even a clearly developed thymus tumor can escape clinical detection. Since March 1978 thoracic computer tomography has been performed in addition to X-rays of the chest in a series of 19 patients with myasthenia ravis, 10 women and 9 men ranging in age from 15-71 years and in 3 patients with suspected thymomas but without myasthenia gravis. These examinations were carried out with a Somatom II (Siemens) since September 1979. On the average 15-20 scans were made at the level of the upper two-third of the sternum. The chest X-rays in 2 planes revealed signs of a thymus tumor in 3 female patients. Thoracic computer tomography showed definite signs of a space-occupying lesion in the anterior mediastinum in 11 cases. At thymectomy 6 patients were found to have hyperplasia of the thymus, 2 patients had a benign thymoma and 3 patients a malignant thymoma. In 6 cases computer tomography showed only slight changes and in 5 patients no pathological findings could be demonstrated in the thymus gland. Thoracic computer tomography is a relatively harmless diagnostic measure without any risk for the patient. It has a high resolution and great accuracy in the evaluation of the thymus gland and is therefore the method of choice for the diagnosis of patients with myasthenia gravis. (orig.) [de

  13. Thoracic computer tomography for the evaluation of the thymus gland in cases of myasthenia gravis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druschky, K.F.; Stadler, H.W.; Daun, H.

    1981-01-01

    Hyperplasia of the thymus gland is observed in 65% of all patients with myasthenia gravis, while the incidence of thymus tumor is reported to be 8.5-28%. Conventional radiological techniques provide little information in the diagnosis of mediastinal lesions. Even a clearly developed thymus tumor can escape clinical detection. Since March 1978 thoracic computer tomography has been performed in addition to X-rays of the chest in a series of 19 patients with myasthenia ravis, 10 women and 9 men ranging in age from 15-71 years and in 3 patients with suspected thymomas but without myasthenia gravis. These examinations were carried out with a Somatom II (Siemens) since September 1979. On the average 15-20 scans were made at the level of the upper two-third of the sternum. The chest X-rays in 2 planes revealed signs of a thymus tumor in 3 female patients. Thoracic computer tomography showed definite signs of a space-occupying lesion in the anterior mediastinum in 11 cases. At thymectomy 6 patients were found to have hyperplasia of the thymus, 2 patients had a benign thymoma and 3 patients a malignant thymoma. In 6 cases computer tomography showed only slight changes and in 5 patients no pathological findings could be demonstrated in the thymus gland. Thoracic computer tomography is a relatively harmless diagnostic measure without any risk for the patient. It has a high resolution and great accuracy in the evaluation of the thymus gland and is therefore the method of choice for the diagnosis of patients with myasthenia gravis.

  14. Objected constrained registration and manifold learning: A new patient setup approach in image guided radiation therapy of thoracic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Ting; Jabbour, Salma K.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Yue, Ning [Radiation Oncology Department, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany Street, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901 (United States); Qin Songbing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The management of thoracic malignancies with radiation therapy is complicated by continuous target motion. In this study, a real time motion analysis approach is proposed to improve the accuracy of patient setup. Methods: For 11 lung cancer patients a long training fluoroscopy was acquired before the first treatment, and multiple short testing fluoroscopies were acquired weekly at the pretreatment patient setup of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The data analysis consisted of three steps: first a 4D target motion model was constructed from 4DCT and projected to the training fluoroscopy through deformable registration. Then the manifold learning method was used to construct a 2D subspace based on the target motion (kinetic) and location (static) information in the training fluoroscopy. Thereafter the respiratory phase in the testing fluoroscopy was determined by finding its location in the subspace. Finally, the phase determined testing fluoroscopy was registered to the corresponding 4DCT to derive the pretreatment patient position adjustment for the IGRT. The method was tested on clinical image sets and numerical phantoms. Results: The registration successfully reconstructed the 4D motion model with over 98% volume similarity in 4DCT, and over 95% area similarity in the training fluoroscopy. The machine learning method derived the phase values in over 98% and 93% test images of the phantom and patient images, respectively, with less than 3% phase error. The setup approach achieved an average accumulated setup error less than 1.7 mm in the cranial-caudal direction and less than 1 mm in the transverse plane. All results were validated against the ground truth of manual delineations by an experienced radiation oncologist. The expected total time for the pretreatment setup analysis was less than 10 s. Conclusions: By combining the registration and machine learning, the proposed approach has the potential to improve the accuracy of pretreatment setup for

  15. Objected constrained registration and manifold learning: A new patient setup approach in image guided radiation therapy of thoracic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ting; Jabbour, Salma K.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Yue, Ning; Qin Songbing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The management of thoracic malignancies with radiation therapy is complicated by continuous target motion. In this study, a real time motion analysis approach is proposed to improve the accuracy of patient setup. Methods: For 11 lung cancer patients a long training fluoroscopy was acquired before the first treatment, and multiple short testing fluoroscopies were acquired weekly at the pretreatment patient setup of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The data analysis consisted of three steps: first a 4D target motion model was constructed from 4DCT and projected to the training fluoroscopy through deformable registration. Then the manifold learning method was used to construct a 2D subspace based on the target motion (kinetic) and location (static) information in the training fluoroscopy. Thereafter the respiratory phase in the testing fluoroscopy was determined by finding its location in the subspace. Finally, the phase determined testing fluoroscopy was registered to the corresponding 4DCT to derive the pretreatment patient position adjustment for the IGRT. The method was tested on clinical image sets and numerical phantoms. Results: The registration successfully reconstructed the 4D motion model with over 98% volume similarity in 4DCT, and over 95% area similarity in the training fluoroscopy. The machine learning method derived the phase values in over 98% and 93% test images of the phantom and patient images, respectively, with less than 3% phase error. The setup approach achieved an average accumulated setup error less than 1.7 mm in the cranial-caudal direction and less than 1 mm in the transverse plane. All results were validated against the ground truth of manual delineations by an experienced radiation oncologist. The expected total time for the pretreatment setup analysis was less than 10 s. Conclusions: By combining the registration and machine learning, the proposed approach has the potential to improve the accuracy of pretreatment setup for

  16. Complications corner: Anterior thoracic disc surgery with dural tear/CSF fistula and low-pressure pleural drain led to severe intracranial hypotension

    OpenAIRE

    Oudeman, Eline A.; Tewarie, Rishi D. S. Nandoe; J?bsis, G. Joost; Arts, Mark P.; Kruyt, Nyika D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thoracic disc surgery can lead to a life-threatening complication: intracranial hypotension due to a subarachnoid-pleural fistula. Case Description: We report a 63-year-old male with paraparesis due to multiple herniated thoracic discs, with compressive myelopathy. The patient required a circumferential procedure including a laminectomy/fusion followed by an anterior thoracic decompression to address both diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) anteriorly and posterior...

  17. [Flexible endoscope in thoracic surgery: CITES or cVATS?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouad, J; Fénane, H; Masmoudi, H; Giol, M; Karsenti, A; Gounant, V; Grunenwald, D

    2013-10-01

    Early pain and persistent parietal disorders remains a major unresolved problem in thoracic surgery. Thoracotomy and the use of multiple ports in most Video Assisted Thoracic Surgery (VATS) procedures are the major cause of this persistent pain. For the last decade, a few publications describing the use of either single incision VATS and cervical thoracic approaches have been reported without significant results in comparison with current used techniques. Intercostals compression during surgery and early after by intercostals chest tube placement, are probably the major cause of postoperative pain. Flexible endoscope is currently used in several surgeries and will take more and more importance in our daily use in thoracic surgery. Instrument flexibility allows its use through minimally invasive approaches and offers a very interesting intra-thoracic navigation. We describe here the first use in France of a flexible endoscope in thoracic surgery through a single cervical incision to perform simultaneous exploration and biopsies of the mediastinum and right pleura using the original approach of Cervical Incision Thoracic Endoscopic Surgery (CITES). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. [Post-operative analgesia in thoracic surgery: physiopathological features, therapeutic framework and methodologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavia, R; Barresi, P; Puliafito, M; Canciglia, A; Mondello, B

    2006-01-01

    Pain after surgery is a major handicap for patients as it bounds and decreases ability for spontaneous movement, cough and deep breathing, aiding the onset of complications and invalidating the recovery capabilities of operated patients. In thoracic surgery, the need to compile and employ guidelines for post-surgical pain management has become a pressing requirement in recent years. Currently available protocols include several options of treatment that are frequently a subject in the most recent scientific papers and play a key role, as they constitute the framework upon which building with changes and fixes that take account of incidental circumstances, in relation to both patients and surgery, again for both the organizational and structural features of the surgical environment. Purpose of this job is a thorough analysis of post-operating analgesic treatments for thoracic surgery, introducing the most effective ones currently available as for channels and procedures of administration, as well as possible side effects or complications.

  19. AIDS related thoracic lymphoma: evaluation by computed tomography; Linfoma toracico na sindrome da imunodeficiencia adquirida: avaliacao por tomografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siciliano, Antonio Alexandre de Oliveira [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Radiodiagnostico; Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Curso de Pos-graduacao em Radiologia

    2000-02-01

    The authors reviewed five cases of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) related lymphoma to describe the thoracic findings on computed tomography. The patients were followed at Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Hospital Universitario Antonio Pedro and Hospital da Lagoa, from November, 1989 to March 1998. Epidemiological, clinical and pathological data from these patients were quiet variable and pulmonary nodules and masses, hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and thoracic wall masses were observed. AIDS related lymphomas involving the chest are pleomorphic and most commonly extranodal. (author)

  20. Differential wedging of vertebral body and intervertebral disc in thoracic and lumbar spine in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis – A cross sectional study in 150 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Hak-Jun

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hueter-Volkmann's law regarding growth modulation suggests that increased pressure on the end plate of bone retards the growth (Hueter and conversely, reduced pressure accelerates the growth (Volkmann. Literature described the same principle in Rat-tail model. Human spine and its deformity i.e. scoliosis has also same kind of pattern during the growth period which causes wedging in disc or vertebral body. Methods This cross sectional study in 150 patients of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis was done to evaluate vertebral body and disc wedging in scoliosis and to compare the extent of differential wedging of body and disc, in thoracic and lumbar area. We measured wedging of vertebral bodies and discs, along with two adjacent vertebrae and disc, above and below the apex and evaluated them according to severity of curve (curve 30° to find the relationship of vertebral body or disc wedging with scoliosis in thoracic and lumbar spine. We also compared the wedging and rotations of vertebrae. Results In both thoracic and lumbar curves, we found that greater the degree of scoliosis, greater the wedging in both disc and body and the degree of wedging was more at apex supporting the theory of growth retardation in stress concentration area. However, the degree of wedging in vertebral body is more than the disc in thoracic spine while the wedging was more in disc than body in lumbar spine. On comparing the wedging with the rotation, we did not find any significant relationship suggesting that it has no relation with rotation. Conclusion From our study, we can conclude that wedging in disc and body are increasing with progression on scoliosis and maximum at apex; however there is differential wedging of body and disc, in thoracic and lumbar area, that is vertebral body wedging is more profound in thoracic area while disc wedging is more profound in lumbar area which possibly form 'vicious cycle' by asymmetric loading to spine for the

  1. Endograft Collapse After Endovascular Treatment for Thoracic Aortic Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandorski, Dirk; Brueck, Martin; Guenther, Hans-Ulrich; Manke, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Endovascular treatment is an established therapy for thoracic aortic disease. Collapse of the endograft is a potentially fatal complication. We reviewed 16 patients with a thoracic endograft between 2001 and 2006. Medical records of the treated patients were studied. Data collected include age, gender, diagnosis, indication for endoluminal treatment, type of endograft, and time of follow up. All patients (n = 16; mean age, 61 years; range, 21-82 years) underwent computed tomography (CT) for location of the lesion and planning of the intervention. Time of follow-up with CT scan ranged from 1 to 61 months. Indications for endovascular treatment were degenerative aneurysm (n = 7; 44%), aortic dissection (n = 2; 12%), perforated aortic ulcer (n = 4; 25%), and traumatic aortic injury (n = 3; 19%). Three patients suffered from a collapse of the endograft (one patient distal, two patients proximal) between 3 and 8 days after endovascular treatment. These patients were younger (mean age, 37 ± 25 years vs. 67 ± 16 years; P 0.05]; distal, 45 ± 23.5% vs. 38 ± 21.7% [P > 0.05]). Proximal collapse was corrected by placing a bare stent. In conclusion, risk factors for stent-graft collapse are a small lumen of the aorta and a small radius of the aortic arch curvature (young patients), as well as oversizing, which is an important risk factor and is described for different types of endografts and protheses (Gore TAG and Cook Zenith). Dilatation of the collapsed stent-graft is not sufficient. Following therapy implantation of a second stent or surgery is necessary in patients with a proximal endograft collapse. Distal endograft collapse can possibly be treated conservatively under close follow-up.

  2. Thoracic trauma in newborn foals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean, D.; Laverty, S.; Halley, J.; Hannigan, D.; Leveille, R.

    1999-01-01

    In a report describing life ending fractures (255 horses) from the Livestock Disease Diagnostic Center, Kentucky (1993 and 1994), 32 foals had rib fractures. The purpose of our study was to examine the incidence of rib fractures in newborn foals on a Thoroughbred studfarm by physical and radiographic examination, to determine factors which may contribute to the problem and to document any clinical consequences. All foals (263) included were examined within 3 days of birth. The thoracic cage was palpated externally for abnormalities and all foals were placed in dorsal recumbency to evaluate thoracic cage symmetry. Radiographs were used to diagnose foals with thoraciccage asymmetry (TCA) and rib fracture (RF). A diagnosis of costochondral dislocation (CD) was made when no radiographic evidence of fracture was present but there was severe TCA, Fifty-five foals (20.1%) had TCA (9 RF), One to 5 ribs were fractured on 9 of 40 radiographic studies. No consequences of the thoracic trauma was detected clinically, radiographically or ultrasonographically in this group of foals or at a 2- and 4-week follow-up examination. The percentage of foals with a history of abnormal parturition was higher in the TCA foals (15%) compared to the normal foals (6.8%). There weremore primiparous dams in the TCA group than in the normal foal group. Fillies (56.6%) had a higher incidence of birth trauma than colts (43.4%), Thisstudy demonstrates that thoracic trauma is often present in newborn foals and may not always be of clinical significance. Dystocia foals and foals from primiparous mares should be considered high risk for thoracic trauma

  3. Associations between vertebral fractures, increased thoracic kyphosis, a flexed posture and falls in older adults: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Jagt-Willems, Hanna C; de Groot, Maartje H; van Campen, Jos P C M; Lamoth, Claudine J C; Lems, Willem F

    2015-03-28

    Vertebral fractures, an increased thoracic kyphosis and a flexed posture are associated with falls. However, this was not confirmed in prospective studies. We performed a prospective cohort study to investigate the association between vertebral fractures, increased thoracic kyphosis and/or flexed posture with future fall incidents in older adults within the next year. Patients were recruited at a geriatric outpatient clinic. Vertebral fractures were evaluated on lateral radiographs of the spine with the semi-quantitative method of Genant; the degree of thoracic kyphosis was assessed with the Cobb angle. The occiput-to-wall distance was used to determine a flexed posture. Self-reported falls were prospectively registered by monthly phone contact for the duration of 12 months. Fifty-one older adults were included; mean age was 79 years (SD = 4.8). An increased thoracic kyphosis was independently associated with future falls (OR 2.13; 95% CI 1.10-4.51). Prevalent vertebral fractures had a trend towards significancy (OR 3.67; 95% CI 0.85-15.9). A flexed posture was not significantly associated with future falls. Older adults with an increased thoracic kyphosis are more likely to fall within the next year. We suggest clinical attention for underlying causes. Because patients with increased thoracic curvature of the spine might have underlying osteoporotic vertebral fractures, clinicians should be aware of the risk of a new fracture.

  4. Intraoperative use of low-dose recombinant activated factor VII during thoracic aortic operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Nicholas D; Bhattacharya, Syamal D; Williams, Judson B; Fosbol, Emil L; Lockhart, Evelyn L; Patel, Mayur B; Gaca, Jeffrey G; Welsby, Ian J; Hughes, G Chad

    2012-06-01

    Numerous studies have supported the effectiveness of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) for the control of bleeding after cardiac procedures; however safety concerns persist. Here we report the novel use of intraoperative low-dose rFVIIa in thoracic aortic operations, a strategy intended to improve safety by minimizing rFVIIa exposure. Between July 2005 and December 2010, 425 consecutive patients at a single referral center underwent thoracic aortic operations with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB); 77 of these patients received intraoperative low-dose rFVIIa (≤60 μg/kg) for severe coagulopathy after CPB. Propensity matching produced a cohort of 88 patients (44 received intraoperative low-dose rFVIIa and 44 controls) for comparison. Matched patients receiving intraoperative low-dose rFVIIa got an initial median dose of 32 μg/kg (interquartile range [IQR], 16-43 μg/kg) rFVIIa given 51 minutes (42-67 minutes) after separation from CPB. Patients receiving intraoperative low-dose rFVIIa demonstrated improved postoperative coagulation measurements (partial thromboplastin time 28.6 versus 31.5 seconds; p=0.05; international normalized ratio, 0.8 versus 1.2; pproduct transfusions (2.5 versus 5.0 units; p=0.05) compared with control patients. No patient receiving intraoperative low-dose rFVIIa required postoperative rFVIIa administration or reexploration for bleeding. Rates of stroke, thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, and other adverse events were equivalent between groups. Intraoperative low-dose rFVIIa led to improved postoperative hemostasis with no apparent increase in adverse events. Intraoperative rFVIIa administration in appropriately selected patients may correct coagulopathy early in the course of refractory blood loss and lead to improved safety through the use of smaller rFVIIa doses. Appropriately powered randomized studies are necessary to confirm the safety and efficacy of this approach. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons

  5. Reduction of thoracic aorta motion artifact with high-pitch 128-slice dual-source computed tomographic angiography: a historical control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Junichiro; Tasaki, Osamu; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Azuma, Takeo; Ohnishi, Mitsuo; Ukai, Isao; Tahara, Kenichi; Ogura, Hiroshi; Kuwagata, Yasuyuki; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Electrocardiogram-gated imaging combined with multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) has reduced cardiac motion artifacts, but it was not practical in the emergency setting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of a high-pitch, 128-slice dual-source CT (DSCT) scanner to reduce motion artifacts in patients admitted to the emergency room. This study comprised 100 patients suspected of having thoracic aorta lesions. We examined 47 patients with the 128-slice DSCT scanner (DSCT group), and 53 patients were examined with a 64-slice MDCT scanner (MDCT group). Six anatomic areas in the thoracic aorta were evaluated. Computed tomography images in the DSCT group were distinct, and significant differences were observed in images of all areas between the 2 groups except for the descending aorta. The high-pitch DSCT scanner can reduce motion artifacts of the thoracic aorta and enable radiological diagnosis even in patients with tachycardia and without breath hold.

  6. Anterior or posterior surgery for right thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS)? A prospective cohorts' comparison using radiologic and functional outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Paul R P; Grevitt, Michael P; Sell, Philip J

    2015-04-01

    Prospective cohort study. Prospectively compare patient-reported as well as clinical and radiologic outcomes after anterior or posterior surgery for right thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) in a single center by the same surgeons. Anterior and posterior spinal instrumentation and arthrodesis are both well-established treatments of thoracic AIS. The majority of studies comparing the 2 approaches have focused on radiographic outcomes. There remains a paucity of prospectively gathered patient-reported outcomes comparing surgical approaches. Forty-two consecutive patients with right thoracic AIS were treated in a single center by one of 2 surgeons with either anterior (n=18) or posterior (n=24) approaches and followed up for over 2 years. Radiographic, clinical, and patient-reported outcomes of the Modified Scoliosis Research Society Outcome Instrument were gathered and analyzed by an independent surgeon. Patients reported significant improvements in all areas of the Modified Scoliosis Research Society Outcome Instrument, especially pain and self-image domains. There were no significant differences in the degree of improvement in any domains between the groups. Posterior and anterior surgery corrected rib hump by 53% and 61%, respectively (P=0.4). The Main thoracic curve Cobb angle was corrected from 69 to 26 degrees (62%) by posterior surgery and 61 to 23 degrees (64%) by anterior surgery (P=0.6). Posterior surgery significantly reduced kyphosis and lumbosacral lordosis. Anterior surgery had no overall affect of sagittal alignment but seemed able to correct those hypokyphotic preoperatively. Complications differed and were largely approach-related--intrathoracic in anterior and wound-related in posterior surgery. Patients with right thoracic AIS of differing curve types but otherwise similar preoperatively demonstrated that anterior and posterior surgery are largely equivalent. Patient-reported outcomes are improved similarly by either approach. Both offer

  7. Symptomatic thoracic spinal cord herniation: case series and technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Ray, Wilson Z; Wright, Neill M

    2014-09-01

    Idiopathic spinal cord herniation (ISCH) is an uncommon condition located predominantly in the thoracic spine and often associated with a remote history of a major traumatic injury. ISCH has an incompletely described presentation and unknown etiology. There is no consensus on the treatment algorithm and surgical technique, and there are few data on clinical outcomes. In this case series and technical report, we describe the atypical myelopathy presentation, remote history of traumatic injury, radiographic progression, treatment, and outcomes of 5 patients treated at Washington University for symptomatic ISCH. A video showing surgical repair is presented. In contrast to classic compressive myelopathy symptomatology, ISCH patients presented with an atypical myelopathy, characterized by asymmetric motor and sensory deficits and early-onset urinary incontinence. Clinical deterioration correlated with progressive spinal cord displacement and herniation observed on yearly spinal imaging in a patient imaged serially because of multiple sclerosis. Finally, compared with compressive myelopathy in the thoracic spine, surgical treatment of ISCH led to rapid improvement despite a long duration of symptoms. Symptomatic ISCH presents with atypical myelopathy and slow temporal progression and can be successfully managed with surgical repair.

  8. Lower thoracic rib stress fractures in baseball pitchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrie, Brayden J; Harris, Joshua D; Lintner, David M; McCulloch, Patrick C

    2016-01-01

    Stress fractures of the first rib on the dominant throwing side are well-described in baseball pitchers; however, lower thoracic rib fractures are not commonly recognized. While common in other sports such as rowing, there is scant literature on these injuries in baseball. Intercostal muscle strains are commonly diagnosed in baseball pitchers and have a nearly identical presentation but also a highly variable healing time. The diagnosis of a rib stress fracture can predict a more protracted recovery. This case series presents two collegiate baseball pitchers on one team during the same season who were originally diagnosed with intercostal muscle strains, which following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were found to have actually sustained lower thoracic rib stress fractures. The first sustained a stress fracture of the posterior aspect of the right 8th rib on the dominant arm side, while the second presented with a left-sided 10th rib stress fracture on the nondominant arm side. In both cases, MRI was used to visualize the fractures as plain radiographs are insensitive and commonly negative early in patient presentation. Patients were treated with activity modification, and symptomatic management for 4-6 weeks with a graduated return to throwing and competition by 8-10 weeks. The repetitive high stresses incurred by pitching may cause either dominant or nondominant rib stress fractures and this should be included in the differential diagnosis of thoracic injuries in throwers. It is especially important that athletic trainers and team physicians consider this diagnosis, as rib fractures may have a protracted course and delayed return to play. Additionally, using the appropriate imaging techniques to establish an accurate diagnosis can help inform return-to-play decisions, which have important practical applications in baseball, such as roster management and eligibility.

  9. Thoracic pathologies on scout views and bolus tracking slices for computed tomographic cerebral angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groth, M.; Fiehler, J.; Buhk, J.H. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology; Henes, F.O. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2015-08-15

    To evaluate the incidence of additional thoracic pathologic findings (TPF) detected on scout views and corresponding bolus tracking slices (SVBT) for computed tomographic cerebral angiography (CTCA) and to test the reliability and accuracy of these findings. The study collective included 505 consecutive patients who underwent multidetector CTCA. Appendant SVBT of all patients were reviewed for any pathologic findings and patient medical reports were analyzed, if any medical treatment was initiated for the detected pathologic findings. In 18 patients thoracic CT scans were performed in the same session. These were additionally reviewed by two blinded observers to test for intra- and interobserver reliability as well as for accuracy of detecting thoracic pathologies on SVBT. TPF were detected in 165 (33 %) SVBT. The five most common pathologic findings were: pleural effusion, 12 %; pneumonia, 8 %; atelectasis/dystelecatsis, 6 %; pericardial effusion, 2 % and elevated diaphragm, 1 %. For 48 % of these findings medical treatment was initiated. SVBT showed a sensitivity of 53 %, a specificity of 99 %, a positive predictive value of 89 %, a negative predictive value of 94 % and accuracy of 94 % for the detection of TPF. The intraobserver reliability was very good and the interobserver reliability showed moderate agreement. SVBT for CTCA should be reviewed with care by radiologists, since additional TPF can affect patient management. Nevertheless, despite a high specificity of SVBT for detecting TPF, an only moderate sensitivity has to be taken into account.

  10. Enhanced recovery pathways in thoracic surgery from Italian VATS Group: perioperative analgesia protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccioni, Federico; Segat, Matteo; Falini, Stefano; Umari, Marzia; Putina, Olga; Cavaliere, Lucio; Ragazzi, Riccardo; Massullo, Domenico; Taurchini, Marco; Del Naja, Carlo; Droghetti, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is a minimally invasive technique that allows a faster recovery after thoracic surgery. Although enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) principles seem reasonably applicable to thoracic surgery, there is little literature on the application of such a strategy in this context. In regard to pain management, ERAS pathways promote the adoption of a multimodal strategy, tailored to the patients. This approach is based on combining systemic and loco-regional analgesia to favour opioid-sparing strategies. Thoracic paravertebral block is considered the first-line loco-regional technique for VATS. Other techniques include intercostal nerve block and serratus anterior plane block. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and paracetamol are essential part of the multimodal treatment of pain. Also, adjuvant drugs can be useful as opioid-sparing agents. Nevertheless, the treatment of postoperative pain must take into account opioid agents too, if necessary. All above is useful for careful planning and execution of a multimodal analgesic treatment to enhance the recovery of patients. This article summarizes the most recent evidences from literature and authors' experiences on perioperative multimodal analgesia principles for implementing an ERAS program after VATS lobectomy.

  11. Pragmatically Applied Cervical and Thoracic Nonthrust Manipulation Versus Thrust Manipulation for Patients With Mechanical Neck Pain: A Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, David; Learman, Ken; Kolber, Morey J; O'Halloran, Bryan; Cleland, Joshua A

    2018-03-01

    Study Design Randomized clinical trial. Background The comparative effectiveness between nonthrust manipulation (NTM) and thrust manipulation (TM) for mechanical neck pain has been investigated, with inconsistent results. Objective To compare the clinical effectiveness of concordant cervical and thoracic NTM and TM for patients with mechanical neck pain. Methods The Neck Disability Index (NDI) was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), numeric pain-rating scale (NPRS), deep cervical flexion endurance (DCF), global rating of change (GROC), number of visits, and duration of care. The covariate was clinical equipoise for intervention. Outcomes were collected at baseline, visit 2, and discharge. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either NTM or TM directed at the cervical and thoracic spines. Techniques and dosages were selected pragmatically and applied to the most symptomatic level. Two-way mixed-model analyses of covariance were used to assess clinical outcomes at 3 time points. Analyses of covariance were used to assess between-group differences for the GROC, number of visits, and duration of care at discharge. Results One hundred three patients were included in the analyses (NTM, n = 55 and TM, n = 48). The between-group analyses revealed no differences in outcomes on the NDI (P = .67), PSFS (P = .26), NPRS (P = .25), DCF (P = .98), GROC (P = .77), number of visits (P = .21), and duration of care (P = .61) for patients with mechanical neck pain who received either NTM or TM. Conclusion NTM and TM produce equivalent outcomes for patients with mechanical neck pain. The trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02619500). Level of Evidence Therapy, level 1b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2018;48(3):137-145. Epub 6 Feb 2018. doi:10.2519/jospt.2018.7738.

  12. An Official American Thoracic Society Research Statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slatore, Christopher G; Horeweg, Nanda; Jett, James R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary nodules are frequently detected during diagnostic chest imaging and as a result of lung cancer screening. Current guidelines for their evaluation are largely based on low-quality evidence, and patients and clinicians could benefit from more research in this area. METHODS......: In this research statement from the American Thoracic Society, a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates reviewed available evidence for pulmonary nodule evaluation, characterized six focus areas to direct future research efforts, and identified fundamental gaps in knowledge...... demographic and nodule characteristics with patient-level outcomes. Methods to share data from registries are also necessary. CONCLUSIONS: This statement may help researchers to develop impactful and innovative research projects and enable funders to better judge research proposals. We hope...

  13. Tomosynthesis of the thoracic spine: added value in diagnosing vertebral fractures in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijer, Mats; Gunnlaugsson, Eirikur; Götestrand, Simon; Weber, Lars; Geijer, Håkan

    2017-02-01

    Thoracic spine radiography becomes more difficult with age. Tomosynthesis is a low-dose tomographic extension of radiography which may facilitate thoracic spine evaluation. This study assessed the added value of tomosynthesis in imaging of the thoracic spine in the elderly. Four observers compared the image quality of 50 consecutive thoracic spine radiography and tomosynthesis data sets from 48 patients (median age 67 years, range 55-92 years) on a number of image quality criteria. Observer variation was determined by free-marginal multirater kappa. The conversion factor and effective dose were determined from the dose-area product values. For all observers significantly more vertebrae were seen with tomosynthesis than with radiography (mean 12.4/9.3, P tomosynthesis was significantly higher than for radiography, for all evaluated structures. Tomosynthesis took longer to evaluate than radiography. Despite this, all observers scored a clear preference for tomosynthesis. Observer agreement was substantial (mean κ = 0.73, range 0.51-0.94). The calibration or conversion factor was 0.11 mSv/(Gy cm 2 ) for the combined examination. The resulting effective dose was 0.87 mSv. Tomosynthesis can increase the detection rate of thoracic vertebral fractures in the elderly, at low added radiation dose. • Tomosynthesis helps evaluate the thoracic spine in the elderly. • Observer agreement for thoracic spine tomosynthesis was substantial (mean κ = 0.73). • Significantly more vertebrae and significantly more fractures were seen with tomosynthesis. • Tomosynthesis took longer to evaluate than radiography. • There was a clear preference among all observers for tomosynthesis over radiography.

  14. Thoracic radiation therapy (RT) before autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) in relapsed or refractory Hodgkin's disease (HD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, Richard W.; Gospodarowicz, Mary K.; Sutcliffe, Simon B.; Crump, Michael; Keating, Armand

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between peri-ABMT RT and treatment-related mortality in patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and ABMT for recurrent/refractory HD. Materials and Methods: Between 12/1986 and 12/1992, 90 patients (pts) with HD were treated with HDCT (etoposide 60 mg/kg, melphalan 160 mg/m 2 ) +ABMT in Toronto. Fifty-nine of these had all or part of their treatment (RT and/or CT) at the PMH, and they form the basis of this report. HDCT + ABMT was performed for refractory (11 pts) or relapsed (48 pts) HD. The median age at ABMT was 29 (range 16-47), F:M ratio was 1:1.2. Salvage chemotherapy consisted of DHAP (36), mini-BEAM (7), both (8), other chemotherapy (5), and no chemotherapy (3). RT have been incorporated in the salvage treatment with the intent to achieve complete disease control of active disease at relapse or disease progression. RT was given pre-ABMT in 33 pts (3 mantle, 8 mantle with lung, 7 modified mantle excluding axillae, 4 involved field, 1 mantle with TBI, 1 TBI, and 9 non-thoracic), and post-ABMT in 4 pts (2 mantle, 2 modified mantle). Planned RT tumor dose was 35 Gy over 4 weeks (median 35 Gy, range 25-40 Gy), lower doses were used for lung RT (15-17.5 Gy). Treatment-related (TR) mortality was defined as any death occurring within 100 days of ABMT. Autopsies were performed for all patients with TR deaths. Results: We observed 36 deaths, and 10 of these were treatment-related (TR) deaths. With an average follow-up of 4.9 years (range 1.2-7.4 years), the actuarial overall survival was 52% ± 13% at 3 years, and 41% ± 14% at 5 years. Among the 24 patients who received thoracic RT before ABMT, there were 8 TR deaths, with 3 solely attributable to radiation pneumonitis. The remaining 5 TR deaths all had respiratory failure as a major medical problem with complicating sepsis and pancytopenia. The interval from RT to ABMT was shorter for 8 patients dying of TR death (mean 37 days; range 0-103 days), than for the 16 pts with

  15. Vertebral scale system to measure heart size in thoracic radiographs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In veterinary diagnostic radiology, determination of heart size is necessary in the assessment of patients with clinical signs of cardiac anomaly. In this study, heart sizes were compared with lengths of mid-thoracic vertebrae in 12 clinically normal West African Dwarf Goats (WADGs) (8 females, 4 males). The aim of the ...

  16. Thoracic Cavernoma with Intraosseous and Extradural Component Mimicking Metastasis: Case Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocaman Umit

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Spinal epidural cavernomas are quite rare lesions and only 5% of all cavernomas are located in the spine. The lesions are most commonly localized in the thoracic region. The differential diagnosis includes neurogenic tumors, lymphoma, schwannoma, meningioma, multiple myeloma, Ewing's sarcoma and metastasis. A 40- year-old male patient presented with paraplegia and MR images revealed an epidural soft tissue constricting the right posterolateral of the cord at the T6 level. Pathology showed cavernous hemangioma. A literature search revealed no other case that so closely mimicked metastasis by invading all components of the thoracic vertebra and also expanding to the epidural distance. We therefore present the case emphasizing these features.

  17. Latissimus-sparing thoracotomy in the pediatric patient: a valuable asset for thoracic reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malczewski, M C; Colony, L; Cobb, L M

    1994-03-01

    The traditional posterolateral thoracotomy involves division of the latissimus dorsi muscle (LD). While the division results in no functional disability, it does negate the potential for possible future thoracic reconstruction if required in individual cases (eg, bronchopleural fistula, empyema, etc). A latissimus-sparing thoracotomy (LST) mobilizes the muscle dorsad and does not compromise the operation. Thus, the ipsilateral LD can be used when chest wall reconstruction is required. This option has been used frequently for adults; however, its use in children has not been extensively documented. Microvascular anastomoses for a contralateral LD free-flap may be tenuous in the small vessels of the child; thus, reconstruction using the ipsilateral LD could be beneficial and safer. The feasibility of LST has not been established with regard to the chest of the child. The authors present three pediatric thoracic cases that illustrate the value of this procedure, and discuss different situations in which latissimus-sparing thoracotomy is advantageous.

  18. Evaluation of chemokine receptors (CCRs expression on peripheral blood T-lymphocyte subsets in patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal Kishore Tiwari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Mortality and morbidity from the complication of aortic aneurysm remain very high. Aortic size index, which classify thoracic aortic aneurysm patients in three risk groups for aortic rupture prediction. Recent data support that aortic wall remodeling is a dynamic process with active involvement of the chronic inflammation and immunological system. Aim of our study is to evaluate expression level of chemokine receptors known to be involved in the T-cells migration and to correlate them with aortic size index. Materials & Methods: Total 20 patients undergoing surgery for ascending aortic aneurysm and/or aortic valve surgery were enrolled. Aortic size index was calculated. Preoperatively blood samples collected. By flowcytometry and dual parameter dot plot technology percentage of positivity of CCR5 on these T-cell subsets were quantified. Results: Mean age of the patients was 67±5.93 years. Majority of patients had hypertension. Mean ascending aortic diameter was 42.1±8.14 mm. Mean Aortic size Index was 22.21±3.38 mm/m2. A statistical significance has observed between aortic size index and the expression of CCR5 on total CD4 positive T-cells (p-0.0949, and between aortic size index and CCR5 expression on the total CD3 positive T-cells (p-0.0293. Significant correlation observed between ASI and CCR5 expression on the CD8+/CD3+ T-cell subset (p-0.0183. Similarly, strong positive relationship between ASI and the expression of CCR5 on the cytotoxic CD28-/CD4+ T-cell subset (p-0.0055. Activated state of cytotoxic CD28-/CD4+ cell also correlated with aortic size index (p-0.0668.Conclusion: We conclude that T-cell mediated cytotoxic mechanism driven by CCR5 play an important role in the pathophysiology of the thoracic aortic aneurysm.JCMS Nepal. 2016;12(1:23-27.

  19. The Role of Telemedicine in Providing Thoracic Oncology Care to Remote Areas of British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humer, Michael F; Campling, Barbara G

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the role of telemedicine in providing oncology care; we describe our long-standing, high-volume telemedicine experience. The Interior Health Thoracic Surgical Group (IHTSG) uses telemedicine, through Virtual Thoracic Surgical Clinics (VTSC), to provide service to remote patients. The IHTSG serves a population of 1.01 million people over an area of 807,538 km 2 (1.3 persons/km 2 ) in the Interior and North of British Columbia, Canada. Between 2003 and 2015, the IHTSG conducted 15,073 telemedicine patient encounters at 63 geographic sites. Telemedicine saved these patients a total travel distance of 11.5 million km-an average of 766 km per patient. VTSC supports and strengthens the Hub and Spoke model of healthcare delivery-patients residing remotely can easily access centrally delivered service. Telemedicine makes specialized care available to all patients by overcoming a major impediment to access, namely distance.

  20. Incremental value of thoracic ultrasound in intensive care units: Indications, uses, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liccardo, Biagio; Martone, Francesca; Trambaiolo, Paolo; Severino, Sergio; Cibinel, Gian Alfonso; D'Andrea, Antonello

    2016-05-28

    Emergency physicians are required to care for unstable patients with life-threatening conditions, and thus must make decisions that are both quick and precise about unclear clinical situations. There is increasing consensus in favor of using ultrasound as a real-time bedside clinical tool for clinicians in emergency settings alongside the irreplaceable use of historical and physical examinations. B-mode sonography is an old technology that was first proposed for medical applications more than 50 years ago. Its application in the diagnosis of thoracic diseases has always been considered limited, due to the presence of air in the lung and the presence of the bones of the thoracic cage, which prevent the progression of the ultrasound beam. However, the close relationship between air and water in the lungs causes a variety of artifacts on ultrasounds. At the bedside, thoracic ultrasound is based primarily on the analysis of these artifacts, with the aim of improving accuracy and safety in the diagnosis and therapy of the various varieties of pulmonary pathologic diseases which are predominantly "water-rich" or "air-rich". The indications, contraindications, advantages, disadvantages, and techniques of thoracic ultrasound and its related procedures are analyzed in the present review.

  1. Case study thoracic radiotherapy in an elderly patient with pacemaker: The issue of pacing leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, Youlia M.; Menard, Jean; Chargari, Cyrus; Mazal, Alejandro; Kirov, Krassen

    2012-01-01

    To assess clinical outcome of patients with pacemaker treated with thoracic radiation therapy for T8-T9 paravertebral chloroma. A 92-year-old male patient with chloroma presenting as paravertebral painful and compressive (T8-T9) mass was referred for radiotherapy in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie. The patient presented with cardiac dysfunction and a permanent pacemaker that had been implanted prior. The decision of Multidisciplinary Meeting was to deliver 30 Gy in 10 fractions for reducing the symptoms and controlling the tumor growth. The patient received a total dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions using 4-field conformal radiotherapy with 20-MV photons. The dose to pacemaker was 0.1 Gy but a part of the pacing leads was in the irradiation fields. The patient was treated the first time in the presence of his radiation oncologist and an intensive care unit doctor. Moreover, the function of his pacemaker was monitored during the entire radiotherapy course. No change in pacemaker function was observed during any of the radiotherapy fractions. The radiotherapy was very well tolerated without any side effects. The function of the pacemaker was checked before and after the radiotherapy treatment by the cardiologist and no pacemaker dysfunction was observed. Although updated guidelines are needed with acceptable dose criteria for implantable cardiac devices, it is possible to treat patients with these devices and parts encroaching on the radiation field. This case report shows we were able to safely treat our patient through a multidisciplinary approach, monitoring the patient during each step of the treatment.

  2. Case study thoracic radiotherapy in an elderly patient with pacemaker: The issue of pacing leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirova, Youlia M., E-mail: youlia.kirova@curie.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Menard, Jean; Chargari, Cyrus; Mazal, Alejandro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Kirov, Krassen [Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Institut Curie, Paris (France)

    2012-07-01

    To assess clinical outcome of patients with pacemaker treated with thoracic radiation therapy for T8-T9 paravertebral chloroma. A 92-year-old male patient with chloroma presenting as paravertebral painful and compressive (T8-T9) mass was referred for radiotherapy in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie. The patient presented with cardiac dysfunction and a permanent pacemaker that had been implanted prior. The decision of Multidisciplinary Meeting was to deliver 30 Gy in 10 fractions for reducing the symptoms and controlling the tumor growth. The patient received a total dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions using 4-field conformal radiotherapy with 20-MV photons. The dose to pacemaker was 0.1 Gy but a part of the pacing leads was in the irradiation fields. The patient was treated the first time in the presence of his radiation oncologist and an intensive care unit doctor. Moreover, the function of his pacemaker was monitored during the entire radiotherapy course. No change in pacemaker function was observed during any of the radiotherapy fractions. The radiotherapy was very well tolerated without any side effects. The function of the pacemaker was checked before and after the radiotherapy treatment by the cardiologist and no pacemaker dysfunction was observed. Although updated guidelines are needed with acceptable dose criteria for implantable cardiac devices, it is possible to treat patients with these devices and parts encroaching on the radiation field. This case report shows we were able to safely treat our patient through a multidisciplinary approach, monitoring the patient during each step of the treatment.

  3. Radiofrequency thermocoagulation of the thoracic splanchnic nerve in functional abdominal pain syndrome -A case report-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji-Won; Joo, Eun-Young; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Chul-Joong; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Sim, Woo-Seok

    2011-07-01

    The thoracic splanchnic nerve block has been used in managing abdominal pain, especially for pains arising from abdominal cancers. A 27-year-old male patient who had a constant abdominal pain was referred to our clinic for pain management but had no organic disease. The numeric rating scale (NRS) for pain scored 7/10. We applied a diagnostic thoracic splanchnic nerve block under the diagnosis of functional abdominal pain syndrome. Since the block reduced the pain, we applied a radiofrequency thermocoagulation at the T11 and T12 vertebral level. Thereafter, his symptoms improved markedly with pain decreasing to an NRS score of 2-3/10. Hereby, we report a successful management of functional abdominal pain via radiofrequency thermocoagulation of the thoracic splanchnic nerves.

  4. The effects of aprotinin on blood product transfusion associated with thoracic aortic surgery requiring deep hypothermic circulatory arrest.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Seigne, P W

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of aprotinin on blood product use and postoperative complications in patients undergoing thoracic aortic surgery requiring deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. DESIGN: A retrospective study. SETTING: A university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Nineteen patients who underwent elective or urgent thoracic aortic surgery. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The total number of units of packed red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, and platelets was significantly less in the group that received aprotinin (p = 0.01, 0.04, and 0.01). The intraoperative transfusion of packed red blood cells and platelets, collection and retransfusion of cell saver, and postoperative transfusion of fresh frozen plasma were also significantly less in the aprotinin group (p = 0.01, 0.02, 0.01, and 0.05). No patient in either group sustained renal dysfunction or a myocardial infarction. Two patients who had not received aprotinin suffered from chronic postoperative seizures, and one patient who had received aprotinin sustained a perioperative stroke. CONCLUSIONS: Low-dose aprotinin administration significantly decreases blood product transfusion requirements in the setting of thoracic aortic surgery requiring deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, and it does not appear to be associated with renal or myocardial dysfunction.

  5. Telehealth-based model of care redesign to facilitate local fitting and management of patients with a spinal fracture requiring a thoracic lumbar sacral orthosis in rural hospitals in New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Ryan; Giles, Michelle; Morison, Jane; Henderson, Judith

    2018-03-23

    To develop and implement a telehealth-based model of care for spinal fractures requiring management with thoracic lumbar sacral orthoses that eliminates the need for transfer to a metropolitan tertiary referral hospital. Pre-post design observational study evaluating model of care implementation. Rural referral hospitals in a large NSW region covering metropolitan, rural and remote hospitals. Patients presenting with a thoracic or lumbar spine fracture requiring thoracic lumbar sacral orthoses management and rural clinicians caring for them. Number of patients managed in rural hospitals without transfer to a metropolitan tertiary referral hospital; length of stay and related cost efficiencies; clinicians' perceived skills, knowledge and confidence levels. Model of care was implemented with clinical and system governance processes; and educational workshops across eight rural hospitals. A total of 81 patients managed in rural hospitals under this model between July 2013 and June 2016 without transfer were included in this study. Mean length of stay reduced from nine to four days. Hospital transfers were eliminated from the patient journey, totalling 24 324 km. Workshops were attended by 71 clinicians from nine rural hospitals and survey findings indicated a significant increase in staff knowledge, skill and confidence post education. Cost efficiencies were gained by eliminating 162 inter-hospital transfers and 405 patient bed days. This model has streamlined patient journeys and reduced transfers and travel, enabling rural clinicians to provide specialised services in local communities and facilitating timely evidence-based care in local communities without any adverse events. © 2018 National Rural Health Alliance Ltd.

  6. Radiographic evaluation of obesity-caused oppression of the thoracic cavity in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morooka, T.; Niiyama, M.; Kougo, A.; Soya, M.; Nunome, K.

    2004-01-01

    Thoracic radiographs of fifteen beagles with mild-to-moderate obesity revealed that oppression of the thoracic cavity increased with increasing degree of obesity. Oppression of the thoracic cavity was evaluated based on the length, depth, width and area of the thoracic cavity. To obtain thoracic radiographs at the terminal inspiration and expiration phases, thoracic fluororadiographs were recorded with a digital video camera. Bodyweight and the depth of the back fat layer at the seventh lumbar vertebra (DB, measured by ultrasonography) were used as indicators of the degree of obesity. The length of the thoracic cavity tended to become shorter and the depth and width of the thoracic cavity tended to increase as bodyweight increased and as DB increased. On the other hand, the area of the thoracic cavity was not clearly related to bodyweight or DB. These results suggest that oppression of the thoracic cavity due to the cranial shift of the diaphragm is compensated for by increases in the depth and width of the thoracic cavity in beagles with mild-to-moderate obesity

  7. Comparing the radiosensitivity of cervical and thoracic spinal cord using the relative seriality model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamus-Gorka, M.; Lind, B.K.; Brahme, A.

    2003-01-01

    Spinal cord is one of the most important normal tissues that are aimed to be spared during radiation therapy of cancer. This organ has been known for its strongly serial character and its high sensitivity to radiation. In order to compare the sensitivity of different parts of spinal cord, the early data (1970's) for radiation myelopathy available in the literature could be used. In the present study the relative seriality model (Kallman et al. 1992) has been fitted to two different sets of clinical data for spinal cord irradiation: radiation myelitis of cervical spinal cord after treating 248 patients for malignant disease of head and neck (Abbatucci et al. 1978) and radiation myelitis of thoracic spinal cord after radiation treating 43 patients with lung carcinoma (Reinhold et al. 1976). The maximum likelihood method was applied for the fitting and the corresponding parameters together with their 68% confidence intervals calculated for each of the datasets respectively. The alpha-beta ratio for the thoracic survival was also obtained. On the basis of the present study the following conclusions can be drawn: 1. radiation myelopathy is a strongly serial endpoint, 2. it appears to be differences in radiosensitivity between the cervical and thoracic region of spinal cord, 3. thoracic spinal cord revealed very serial characteristic of dose response, while the cervical myelopathy seems to be a bit less serial endpoint, 4. the dose-response curve is much steeper in case of myelopathy of cervical spinal cord, due to the much higher gamma value for this region. This work compares the fitting of NTCP model to the cervical and thoracic regions of the spinal cord and shows quite different responses. In the future more data should be tested for better understanding the mechanism of spinal cord sensitivity to radiation

  8. The effect of pre-emptive intravenous Dexketoprofen + thoracal epidural analgesia on the chronic post-thoracotomy pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comez, Mehmet; Celik, Mine; Dostbil, Aysenur; Aksoy, Mehmet; Ahiskalioglu, Ali; Erdem, Ali Fuat; Aydin, Yener; İnce, İlker

    2015-01-01

    Post thoracotomy chronic pain is a severe problem that affects the majority of patients and decreases the quality of life. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the long-term effects of thoracal epidural levobupivacaine and intravenous dexketoprofen analgesia formed pre-emptively on the wound site pain after major thoracotomy operations. This randomised, prospective and double-blind study was performed with 60 patients undergoing thoracic surgery. Patients were divided into three groups; Control Group (Group C), Pre-emptive Epidural Group (Group PE) and Pre-emptive Dexketoprofen + Epidural Group (Group PED). Patients in the Group C did not receive epidural analgesics and i.v. dexketoprofen before and during the operation. 10-15 ml 0.125% levobupivacaine was given to cases in Group PE pre-emptively through epidural catheter before the anesthesia induction. The cases in Group PED were given 10-15 ml 0.125% epidural levobupivacaine and 50 mg dexketoprofen with i.v. infusion pre-emptively. The VAS score was found to be lower in Group PED during postoperative 24 and 48 hours and before the discharge (P0.05). A statistically significant decrease was determined in the VAS score in Group PED during the sixth month, compared to the other groups (Pdexketoprofen and thoracal epidural analgesia reduce the chronic post-thoracotomy pain.

  9. CT appearance of complications related to thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR): a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pua, U.; Tay, K.H.; Tan, B.S.; Htoo, M.M.; Sebastian, M.; Sin, K.; Chua, Y.L.

    2009-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is a recognized treatment for various diseases involving the thoracic aorta. Patients treated with TEVAR require lifelong surveillance for potential complications, with CT being highly utilized in most centres. Endoleak is the most common complication and can be detected using CT. However, other complications such as stent strut perforations and end organ ischemia can also be detected on CT. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to illustrate the CT appearance of post-TEVAR complications encountered in our institution and to highlight their significance. (orig.)

  10. CT appearance of complications related to thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR): a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pua, U. [Singapore General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore (Singapore); Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore (Singapore); Tay, K.H.; Tan, B.S.; Htoo, M.M. [Singapore General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore (Singapore); Sebastian, M. [Singapore General Hospital, Department of General Surgery, Singapore (Singapore); Sin, K.; Chua, Y.L. [National Heart Centre, Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Singapore (Singapore)

    2009-05-15

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is a recognized treatment for various diseases involving the thoracic aorta. Patients treated with TEVAR require lifelong surveillance for potential complications, with CT being highly utilized in most centres. Endoleak is the most common complication and can be detected using CT. However, other complications such as stent strut perforations and end organ ischemia can also be detected on CT. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to illustrate the CT appearance of post-TEVAR complications encountered in our institution and to highlight their significance. (orig.)

  11. “ELEPHANT TRUNK” AND ENDOVASCULAR STENTGRAFTING – A HYBRID APPROACH TO THE TREATMENT OF EXTENSIVE THORACIC AORTIC ANEURYSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Holubec

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid approach to elephant trunk technique for treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms combines a conventional surgical and endovascular therapy. Compared to surgery alone, there is a presumption that mortality and morbidity is reduced. We present a case report of a 42-year-old man with a giant aneurysm of the entire thoracic aorta, significant aortic and tricuspid regurgitation and ventricular septum defect. The patient underwent multiple consecutive operations and interventions having, among others, finally replaced the entire thoracic aorta with the use of the hybrid elephant trunk technique.

  12. Radiofrequency thermocoagulation of the thoracic splanchnic nerve in functional abdominal pain syndrome -A case report-

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Ji-Won; Joo, Eun-Young; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Chul-Joong; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Sim, Woo-Seok

    2011-01-01

    The thoracic splanchnic nerve block has been used in managing abdominal pain, especially for pains arising from abdominal cancers. A 27-year-old male patient who had a constant abdominal pain was referred to our clinic for pain management but had no organic disease. The numeric rating scale (NRS) for pain scored 7/10. We applied a diagnostic thoracic splanchnic nerve block under the diagnosis of functional abdominal pain syndrome. Since the block reduced the pain, we applied a radiofrequency ...

  13. [Safety and efficacy of percutaneous patent ductus arteriosus closure solely under thoracic echocardiography guidance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiangbin; Ouyang, Wenbin; Li, Shoujun; Guo, Gaili; Liu, Yao; Zhang, Dawei; Zhang, Fengwen; Pang, Kunjing; Fang, Nengxin; Hu, Shengshou

    2015-01-01

    To avoid the radiation injuries and use of contrast agent, we assessed the safety and efficacy of percutaneous patent ductus arteriosus closure solely under thoracic echocardiography guidance. From June 2013 to June 2014, thirty patients (mean age: (6.3 ± 2.5) years, mean body weight:(22.5 ± 7.3) kg) with pure patent ductus arteriosus were continuously included in this study. The mean diameter of patent ductus arteriosus was (3.8 ± 0.9) mm. Patients were all treated by percutaneous patent ductus arteriosus closure via right femoral artery solely under thoracic echocardiography guidance. The efficacy of the procedure was evaluated by thoracic echocardiography. Follow-up was performed at one month after procedure. All 30 cases were successfully treated with percutaneous patent ductus arteriosus closure solely under thracic echocardiography guidance. The procedural time was (32.8 ± 5.7) minutes. The mean diameter of Amplatzer ADO II was (4.9 ± 1.0) mm. Postoperative trivial residual shunt occurred in six patients immediately after the procedure. All patients survived without peripheral vascular injury or complications such as cardiac perforation. Hospitalization time was (3.4 ± 0.7) days. At one-month follow-up, no complications such as residual shunt or pericardial effusion were observed. Echocardiography guided percutaneous patent ductus arteriosus closure by femoral artery approach is safe and effective, and can avoid X-ray and the use of contrast agents.

  14. Mid-Thoracic Spinal Injuries during Horse Racing: Report of 3 Cases and Review of Causative Factors and Prevention Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Triantafyllopoulos, Ioannis; Panagopoulos, Andreas; Sapkas, George

    2013-01-01

    We report three cases of a rare pattern of mid-thoracic spine injuries after horse racing falls and discuss possible causative factors and prevention measurements to reduce injury rates in professional riding and racing. Three patients, 2 male and 1 female with a mean age of 28 years old, underwent surgical treatment for mid-thoracic fractures after professional equestrian activities. The ASIA scale was E in one patient, B in the other one and A in the third. Multilevel posterior fusion was u...

  15. Surgical treatment of gross posttraumatic deformations in thoracic spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksei E. Shul’ga

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rigid severe post-traumatic thoracic spine deformities result from frequent, recent high-energy trauma in children with an increasing frequency due to a variety of reasons. These types of injuries are commonly followed by spinal cord anatomic injury; therefore, the treatment of these patients warrants special attention from the ethical viewpoint. Generally, the only indication for surgical intervention is spinal dysfunction. Considering this and the patients’ ordinary severe somatic state, surgical trauma should be minimized as much as possible. However, for adequate deformity correction, effective spine stabilization and restoration of liquorodynamics is necessary. Recent studies have reported the successful use of different methods of dorsal interventions (P/VCR in cases with unstable damages in children. Here, we present the case of a 15-year-old boy who underwent surgical treatment for coarse post-traumatic thoracic spine deformity with chronic fracture-dislocation of Th7 vertebra.

  16. Expression of platelet-derived growth factor B is upregulated in patients with thoracic aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Weixin; Liu, Shangdian; Li, Dandan; Liu, Zonghong; Yang, Hui; Sun, Bo; Liu, Hongyu

    2018-04-20

    Thoracic aortic dissection (TAD) is a serious condition requiring urgent treatment to avoid catastrophic consequences. The inflammatory response is involved in the occurrence and development of TAD, possibly potentiated by platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs). This study aimed to determine whether expression of PDGF-B (a subunit of PDGF-BB) was increased in TAD patients and to explore the factors responsible for its upregulation and subsequent effects on TAD. Full-thickness ascending aorta wall specimens from TAD patients (n = 15) and control patients (n = 10) were examined for expression of PDGF-B and its receptor (PDGFRB) and in terms of morphology, inflammation, and fibrosis. Blood samples from TAD and control patients were collected to detect plasma levels of PDGF-BB and soluble elastins. Expression levels of PDGF-B, PDGFRB, and collagen I were significantly enhanced in ascending aorta wall specimens from TAD patients compared with controls. Furthermore, soluble elastic fragments and PDGF-BB were significantly increased in plasma from TAD patients compared with controls, and numerous irregular elastic fibers and macrophages were seen in the ascending aorta wall in TAD patients. An increase in elastic fragments in the aorta wall might be responsible for inducing the activation and migration of macrophages to injured sites, leading to elevated expression of PDGF-B, which in turn induces deposition of collagen, disrupts extracellular matrix homeostasis, and increases the stiffness of the aorta wall, resulting in compromised aorta compliance. Copyright © 2018 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Video-assisted thoracic surgery lobectomy cost variability: implications for a bundled payment era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medbery, Rachel L; Perez, Sebastian D; Force, Seth D; Gillespie, Theresa W; Pickens, Allan; Miller, Daniel L; Fernandez, Felix G

    2014-05-01

    In 2013, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services began its Bundled Payments for Care Improvement Initiative. If payments are to be bundled, surgeons must be able to predict which patients are at risk for more costly care. We aim to identify factors driving variability in hospital costs after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy for lung cancer. Our institutional Society of Thoracic Surgeons data were queried for patients undergoing VATS lobectomy for lung cancer during fiscal years 2010 to 2011. Clinical outcomes data were linked with hospital financial data to determine operative and postoperative costs. Linear regression models were created to identify the impact of preoperative risk factors and perioperative outcomes on cost. One hundred forty-nine VATS lobectomies for lung cancer were reviewed. The majority of patients had clinical stage IA lung cancer (67.8%). Median length of stay was 4 days, with 30-day mortality and morbidity rates of 0.7% and 37.6%, respectively. Mean operative and postoperative costs per case were $8,492.31 (±$2,238.76) and $10,145.50 (±$7,004.71), respectively, resulting in an average overall hospital cost of $18,637.81 (±$8,244.12) per patient. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and coronary artery disease, as well as postoperative urinary tract infections and blood transfusions, were associated with statistically significant variability in cost. Variability in cost associated with VATS lobectomy is driven by assorted patient and clinical variables. Awareness of such factors can help surgeons implement quality improvement initiatives and focus resource utilization. Understanding risk-adjusted clinical-financial data is critical to designing payment arrangements that include financial and performance accountability, and thus ultimately increasing the value of health care. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Computer aided detection system for Osteoporosis using low dose thoracic 3D CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Daisuke; Matsuhiro, Mikio; Suzuki, Hidenobu; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Nakano, Yasutaka; Harada, Masafumi; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Tsuchida, Takaaki; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro

    2018-02-01

    The patient of osteoporosis is about 13 million people in Japan and it is one of healthy life problems in the aging society. It is necessary to do early stage detection and treatment in order to prevent the osteoporosis. Multi-slice CT technology has been improving the three dimensional (3D) image analysis with higher resolution and shorter scan time. The 3D image analysis of thoracic vertebra can be used for supporting to diagnosis of osteoporosis. This analysis can be used for lung cancer detection at the same time. We develop method of shape analysis and CT values of spongy bone for the detection osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and lung cancer screening show high extraction rate by the thoracic vertebral evaluation CT images. In addition, we created standard pattern of CT value per thoracic vertebra for male age group using 298 low dose data.

  19. [Current status of thoracoscopic surgery for thoracic and lumbar spine. Part 2: treatment of the thoracic disc hernia, spinal deformities, spinal tumors, infections and miscellaneous].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdú-López, Francisco; Beisse, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery or video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) of the thoracic and lumbar spine has evolved greatly since it appeared less than 20 years ago. It is currently used in a large number of processes and injuries. The aim of this article, in its two parts, is to review the current status of VATS of the thoracic and lumbar spine in its entire spectrum. After reviewing the current literature, we developed each of the large groups of indications where VATS takes place, one by one. This second part reviews and discusses the management, treatment and specific thoracoscopic technique in thoracic disc herniation, spinal deformities, tumour pathology, infections of the spine and other possible indications for VATS. Thoracoscopic surgery is in many cases an alternative to conventional open surgery. The transdiaphragmatic approach has made endoscopic treatment of many thoracolumbar junction processes possible, thus widening the spectrum of therapeutic indications. These include the treatment of spinal deformities, spinal tumours, infections and other pathological processes, as well as the reconstruction of injured spinal segments and decompression of the spinal canal if lesion placement is favourable to antero-lateral approach. Good clinical results of thoracoscopic surgery are supported by growing experience reflected in a large number of articles. The degree of complications in thoracoscopic surgery is comparable to open surgery, with benefits in regard to morbidity of the approach and subsequent patient recovery. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of Surgical Stroke on the Early and Late Outcomes After Thoracic Aortic Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Noritaka; Oshima, Hideki; Narita, Yuji; Abe, Tomonobu; Araki, Yoshimori; Mutsuga, Masato; Fujimoto, Kazuro L; Tokuda, Yoshiyuki; Usui, Akihiko

    2015-06-01

    Thoracic aortic operations still remain associated with substantial risks of death and neurologic injury. This study investigated the impact of surgical stroke on the early and late outcomes, focusing on the physical status and quality of life (QOL). From 1986 to 2008, 500 patients (aged 63 ± 13 years) underwent open thoracic aortic repair for root and ascending (31%), arch (39%), extended arch (10%), and descending and thoracoabdominal (19%) aneurysms. Brain protection consisted of retrograde cerebral perfusion (52%), antegrade cerebral perfusion (29%), and simple deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (19%). Surgical stroke was defined as a neurologic deficit persisting more than 72 hours after the operation. QOL was assessed with the Short-Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire 5.9 ± 4.2 years after the operation. Stroke occurred in 10.3% of patients.