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Sample records for thoracic aortic injury

  1. Blunt thoracic aortic injuries: an autopsy study.

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    Teixeira, Pedro G R; Inaba, Kenji; Barmparas, Galinos; Georgiou, Chrysanthos; Toms, Carla; Noguchi, Thomas T; Rogers, Christopher; Sathyavagiswaran, Lakshmanan; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the incidence and patterns of thoracic aortic injuries in a series of blunt traumatic deaths and describe their associated injuries. All autopsies performed by the Los Angeles County Department of Coroner for blunt traumatic deaths in 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients who had a traumatic thoracic aortic (TTA) injury were compared with the victims who did not have this injury for differences in baseline characteristics and patterns of associated injuries. During the study period, 304 (35%) of 881 fatal victims of blunt trauma received by the Los Angeles County Department of Coroner underwent a full autopsy and were included in the analysis. The patients were on average aged 43 years±21 years, 71% were men, and 39% had a positive blood alcohol screen. Motor vehicle collision was the most common mechanism of injury (50%), followed by pedestrian struck by auto (37%). A TTA injury was identified in 102 (34%) of the victims. The most common site of TTA injury was the isthmus and descending thoracic aorta, occurring in 67 fatalities (66% of the patients with TTA injuries). Patients with TTA injuries were significantly more likely to have other associated injuries: cardiac injury (44% vs. 25%, p=0.001), hemothorax (86% vs. 56%, pinjury (74% vs. 49%, pinjury. Patients with a TTA injury were significantly more likely to die at the scene (80% vs. 63%, p=0.002). Thoracic aortic injuries occurred in fully one third of blunt traumatic fatalities, with the majority of deaths occurring at the scene. The risk for associated thoracic and intra-abdominal injuries is significantly increased in patients with thoracic aortic injuries.

  2. Blunt Cardiac Injury in Trauma Patients with Thoracic Aortic Injury

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    Kaewlai, Rathachai; de Moya, Marc A.; Santos, Antonio; Asrani, Ashwin V.; Avery, Laura L.; Novelline, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Trauma patients with thoracic aortic injury (TAI) suffer blunt cardiac injury (BCI) at variable frequencies. This investigation aimed to determine the frequency of BCI in trauma patients with TAI and compare with those without TAI. All trauma patients with TAI who had admission electrocardiography (ECG) and serum creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) from January 1999 to May 2009 were included as a study group at a level I trauma center. BCI was diagnosed if there was a positive ECG with either an eleva...

  3. Results of a multicenter, prospective trial of thoracic endovascular aortic repair for blunt thoracic aortic injury (RESCUE trial).

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    Khoynezhad, Ali; Azizzadeh, Ali; Donayre, Carlos E; Matsumoto, Alan; Velazquez, Omaida; White, Rodney

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the early outcomes of patients undergoing thoracic endovascular aortic repair for blunt thoracic aortic injuries. A prospective, nonrandomized, multicenter trial using the Medtronic Valiant Captivia stent graft was conducted at 20 sites in North America. Fifty patients with blunt thoracic aortic injuries were enrolled between April 2010 and January 2012 and will be followed for 5 years. The injuries were classified into categories (grades I-IV) based on severity: intimal tear, intramural hematoma, pseudoaneurysm, or rupture. The primary end point was 30-day all-cause mortality. Secondary end points were adverse events occurring within 30 days that were related to the procedure, device or aorta, and aortic-related mortality. Technical success was measured as successful device delivery and deployment. Seventy-six percent (38/50) of patients were male with mean age of 41 ± 17 years. Fifty-one Medtronic Valiant Captivia thoracic stent grafts and a single Talent thoracic stent graft were implanted within a median of 1.0 days following injury (mean, 1.8 ± 4.0 days). Seventy percent (35/50) of aortic injuries were grade III or higher, including one patient with free rupture. Mean injury severity score was 38 ± 14. Fifty-four percent of stent grafts were ≤26 mm (28/52). The left subclavian artery was completely covered in 40% of patients (20/50) and partially covered in 18% of patients (9/50). Four patients underwent subclavian artery revascularization: one at the time of the endograft procedure and three others after developing arm ischemia after the initial endograft procedure. Cerebral spinal fluid was drained in two patients. The median procedure time was 91 minutes, and median hospital stay was 12 days. There was 100% successful device delivery and deployment. Four (8%) patients died within 30 days. Nonfatal adverse events within 30 days that were related to the procedure, device, or aorta were experienced by 12% (6/50) of patients. No nonfatal

  4. Blunt Cardiac Injury in Trauma Patients with Thoracic Aortic Injury

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    Rathachai Kaewlai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma patients with thoracic aortic injury (TAI suffer blunt cardiac injury (BCI at variable frequencies. This investigation aimed to determine the frequency of BCI in trauma patients with TAI and compare with those without TAI. All trauma patients with TAI who had admission electrocardiography (ECG and serum creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB from January 1999 to May 2009 were included as a study group at a level I trauma center. BCI was diagnosed if there was a positive ECG with either an elevated CK-MB or abnormal echocardiography. There were 26 patients (19 men, mean age 45.1 years, mean ISS 34.4 in the study group; 20 had evidence of BCI. Of 52 patients in the control group (38 men, mean age 46.9 years, mean ISS 38.7, eighteen had evidence of BCI. There was a significantly higher rate of BCI in trauma patients with TAI versus those without TAI (77% versus 35%, P<0.001.

  5. A Rare Entity: Traumatic Thoracic Aortic Injury in a Patient with Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery.

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    Patel, Hiten Mohanbhai; Banerjee, Shubhabrata; Bulsara, Shahzad; Sahu, Tapish; Sheorain, Virender K; Grover, Tarun; Parakh, Rajiv

    2017-05-01

    Aberrant right subclavian artery is an uncommon entity incidence ranging from 0.5 to 2.5%. Management of thoracic aortic injury in the presence of such anomalies can be a challenge. We present here a case of traumatic aortic injury, which was incidentally found to have an asymptomatic aberrant right subclavian artery. The patient was managed by an endovascular repair of thoracic aortic injury with an endograft and a right carotid to subclavian artery bypass as a hybrid procedure. A 40-year male patient was brought to the emergency in shock with an alleged history of road traffic accident an hour back. After initial resuscitation as per advance trauma life support protocol, imaging revealed thoracic aortic injury with aberrant right subclavian artery with multiple rib and bilateral humerus fracture. After primary stabilization of arm fractures, the patient was shifted to a hybrid operation room. As the aortic injury was within 10 mm of the origin of both subclavian arteries, it was decided to cover the origin of both subclavian arteries and land the endograft distal to the left carotid artery origin. Since there was a right dominant vertebral artery on imaging, right carotid to right subclavian artery bypass was done with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft to prevent posterior circulatory stroke along with thoracic endovascular aortic repair to seal the thoracic aortic injury. After endovascular repair of thoracic aortic injury, left subclavian artery perfusion was maintained through left vertebral artery; and hence, revascularization of left subclavian artery was deferred. After management of all fractures, the patient was discharged 3 weeks after the date of admission without any complications. At 6 months follow-up, patient was stable and images showed patent bypass graft and sealed aortic injury. In a trauma setting with multiple injuries, hybrid procedure with a thoracic endograft is associated with low mortality and morbidity; hence, it is the treatment

  6. Injury grade is a predictor of aortic-related death among patients with blunt thoracic aortic injury.

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    Fortuna, Gerald R; Perlick, Alexa; DuBose, Joseph J; Leake, Samuel S; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Miller, Charles C; Estrera, Anthony L; Azizzadeh, Ali

    2016-05-01

    The current Society for Vascular Surgery Clinical Practice Guidelines suggest urgent (grade (G) II to G IV blunt thoracic aortic injuries (BTAIs). The purpose of this study was to determine whether some patients may require more emergency treatment. We reviewed imaging variables of prospectively collected BTAI patients between 1999 and 2014. We used computed tomographic angiography to classify BTAIs into four categories: G I, intimal tear; G II, intramural hematoma; G III, aortic pseudoaneurysm; and G IV, free rupture. Specific examination of G III injuries was undertaken in an effort to predict aortic-related mortality (ARM) before repair. For this subset, we examined pseudoaneurysm size, lesion/normal aortic diameter ratio, and mediastinal hematoma location and size. Among 331 patients with BTAIs, 86 died before imaging. Admission computed tomographic angiography was available for 205 patients (71.2% male; mean age, 39.3 years) with BTAIs (24 G I, 49 G II, 124 G III, 8 G IV). The mean Injury Severity Score was 35.6, and 22.4% had hypotension (grade is a predictor of ARM among patients with BTAIs. Aggressive use of the current Society for Vascular Surgery Clinical Practice Guidelines at a busy level I trauma center resulted in low rates of ARM. In this setting, identification of additional physiologic and radiographic criteria indicating the need for emergency (vs urgent) repair of aortic pseudoaneurysms remains elusive. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Endovascular versus open repair for blunt thoracic aortic injury: short-term results.

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    Kokotsakis, John; Kaskarelis, Ioannis; Misthos, Panagiotis; Athanasiou, Thanos; Kanakakis, Konstantinos; Athanasiou, Chariklia; Romana, Constantina; Skouteli, Elian; Lioulias, Achilles

    2007-12-01

    Endovascular stent grafting has been increasingly used as an alternative treatment modality. The aim of this study is to evaluate the immediate and short-term results of endovascular stent grafting repair after blunt thoracic aortic injury due to trauma. A review of a tertiary trauma center registry identified all patients who suffered blunt thoracic aortic injury from 2002 to 2006. All patients underwent either open repair with synthetic graft interposition or endovascular stent grafting (EVS) of the descending thoracic aorta. Type and severity of injury, concomitant injuries, clinical factors, and outcome were compared between groups. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed. Endovascular stent grafting was performed in 22 patients, and 10 patients underwent open surgical repair. In the open group, the 30-day mortality rate was 10%, the paraplegia rate was 10%, and incidence of major complications was 30%, which were comparable with the incidences observed in the EVS group of 4.5%, 4.5%, and 13.6%, respectively. No statistically significant differences were demonstrated. Multivariate regression analysis identified associated thoracic injury as the main independent predictor of hospital length of stay (p = 0.03, 95% confidence interval: 0.53 to 18.85). In the EVS group, 1 patient died in the short-term follow-up period and 2 cases of endovascular leak required additional treatment. Although postoperative mortality and morbidity between open and endovascular repair were comparable, EVS can be considered a safe alternative treatment modality in the therapeutic algorithm of blunt thoracic aortic injury particularly for the higher risk multitrauma patients.

  8. Blunt thoracic aortic injury with small pseudoaneurysm may be managed by nonoperative treatment.

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    Tanizaki, Shinsuke; Maeda, Shigenobu; Matano, Hideyuki; Sera, Makoto; Nagai, Hideya; Nakanishi, Taizo; Ishida, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The efficacy of nonoperative management of blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI) was evaluated in patients with pseudoaneurysm. A retrospective review was done for patients with BTAI at Fukui Prefectural Hospital during a 9-year period. Charts were reviewed for age, gender, Injury Severity Score, Abbreviated Injury Scale for each body area, initial type of aortic injury, site of aortic injury, type of definitive management, complications, and outcomes. Eighteen patients with BTAI were treated at Fukui Prefectural Hospital. Of 18 patients with pseudoaneurysm, seven patients were hemodynamically unstable and four patients died because of associated injuries; there were no aortic-related deaths. All 14 surviving patients were followed up for an average of 40.9 months. Only two patients with pseudoaneurysm required operative management because of the progression of the pseudoaneurysm. The pseudoaneurysm/normal aortic diameter ratio of those with any intervention was higher than that of those with nonoperative management. BTAI with pseudoaneurysm can be managed nonoperatively, with about 10% risk of progression to require surgical repair. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Lung injury following thoracic aortic occlusion: comparison of sevoflurane and propofol anaesthesia.

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    Annecke, T; Kubitz, J C; Langer, K; Hilberath, J M; Kahr, S; Krombach, F; Bittmann, I; Rehm, M; Kemming, G I; Conzen, P F

    2008-08-01

    Halogenated anaesthetics have been shown to reduce ischaemia-reperfusion injuries in various organs due to pre- and post-conditioning mechanisms. We compared volatile and total intravenous anaesthesia with regard to their effect on remote pulmonary injury after thoracic aortic occlusion and reperfusion. Eighteen pigs were randomized after sternotomy and laparotomy (fentanyl-midazolam anaesthesia) to receive either sevoflurane or propofol in an investigator-blinded fashion. Ninety minutes of thoracic aortic occlusion was induced by a balloon catheter. During reperfusion, a goal-directed resuscitation protocol was performed. After 120 min of reperfusion, the anaesthetic regimen was changed to fentanyl-midazolam again for another 180 min. The oxygenation index and intra-pulmonary shunt fractions were calculated. After 5 h of reperfusion, a bronchoalveolar lavage was performed. The total protein content and lactate dehydrogenase activity were measured in epithelial lining fluid (ELF). Alveolar macrophage oxidative burst was analysed. The wet to dry ratio was calculated and tissue injury was graded using a semi-quantitative score. Ten animals (n=5 for each anaesthetic) without aortic occlusion served as time controls. The oxygenation index decreased and the intra-pulmonary shunt fraction increased significantly in both occlusion groups. There were no significant differences between sevoflurane and propofol with respect to the oxygenation index, ELF composition, morphologic lung damage, wet to dry ratio and alveolar macrophage burst activity. Differences were, however, seen in terms of systemic haemodynamic stability, where catecholamine requirements were less pronounced with sevoflurane. We conclude that the severity of remote lung injury was not different between sevoflurane and propofol anaesthesia in this porcine model of severe lower-body ischaemia and reperfusion injury.

  10. Treatment of blunt thoracic aortic injury in Germany-Assessment of the TraumaRegister DGU®.

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    Gombert, Alexander; Barbati, Mohammad E; Storck, Martin; Kotelis, Drosos; Keschenau, Paula; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Andruszkow, Hagen; Lefering, Rolf; Hildebrand, Frank; Greiner, Andreas; Jacobs, Michael J; Grommes, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    Using the data delivered by the German Trauma Register DGU® from 2002 till 2013, the value of different therapies of blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI) in Germany was analyzed. Prospectively collected data of patients suffering from BTAI were retrospectively analyzed with focus on the different treatment modalities for grade I-IV injuries. 821 patients suffering from BTAI were identified: 51.6% (424) grade I injury, 35.4% (291) grade II or III injury and 12.9% (106) grade IV injury (77.5% men [44.94 ± 20.6 years]). The main patterns of injury were high- speed accidents and falls (78.0% [n = 640], 21.8% [n = 171] respectively). Significant differences between grade I and grade II/III as well as IV injuries could be assessed for the incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, a Glasgow Coma Scale score below 8 and a systolic blood pressure below 90 mmHg (p-value: injuries and cardiac arrest. Endovascular therapy became the treatment of choice for BTAI in Germany. Patients who have been treated by surgical means showed the highest survival rate, especially endovascular therapy showed a favorable low mortality rate.

  11. Endovascular repair for blunt thoracic aortic injury: 11-year outcomes and postoperative surveillance experience.

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    Spiliotopoulos, Konstantinos; Kokotsakis, John; Argiriou, Michalis; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Farsaris, Dimosthenis; Diamantis, Theodore; Charitos, Christos

    2014-12-01

    Surveillance for patients undergoing thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) for blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI) varies. Annual chest computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is often recommended but concerns about the risks and costs have emerged. The aim of this study was to examine the optimal follow-up frequency based on 11-year outcomes and surveillance experience. Seventy-six patients with BTAI received TEVAR from May 2002 to July 2013. Demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, Injury Severity Score (ISS), types, sizes, timing, and outcomes of stent grafts were collected retrospectively. Mean age was 39.7 years (range, 17-85 years); 8 (11%) were women. Mean ISS was 46.2 ± 18.5 (deceased, 61.0 ± 19.2; surviving, 44.2 ± 17.6; P = .023). Technical success was achieved in 71 patients (93.4%). All-cause mortality was 7 (9.2%), 1 (1.3%) of which was related to the procedure. Six were lost to follow-up (8%). To examine the effect of surveillance frequency on outcomes, after excluding the 2 most recent (6 months after scheduled annual visit). No significant differences were found for survival, graft-related complications, need for reintervention, except for postoperative hypertension, which was higher in the first group. All surviving patients had excellent outcomes, with no cerebrovascular accidents, paraplegia, or paraparesis; the median follow-up for both groups was 3 years (interquartile range 2.0-3.5, 1.5-5.4 years). Midterm outcomes of TEVAR for patients with stable repair after BTAI are excellent, both with timely (1.0-1.5 years) and delayed (>1.5 years) follow-up intervals after a median surveillance period of 3 years. A larger prospective randomized study could lead to a more relaxed, but equally safe surveillance schedule for these patients, lowering risks and costs. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Risk factors and early outcomes of acute renal injury after thoracic aortic endograft repair for type B aortic dissection

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    Luo S

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Songyuan Luo,* Huanyu Ding,* Jianfang Luo, Wei Li, Bing Ning, Yuan Liu, Wenhui Huang, Ling Xue, Ruixin Fan, Jiyan Chen Cardiology Department, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Coronary Heart Disease Prevention, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR has become an emerging treatment modality for acute type B aortic dissection (TBAD patients in recent years. The risk factors and impacts of acute kidney injury (AKI after percutaneous TEVAR, however, have not been widely established.Methods: We retrospectively studied the clinical records of 305 consecutive patients who admitted to our institution and had TEVAR for TBAD between December 2009 and June 2013. The patients were routinely monitored for their renal functions preoperatively until 7 days after TEVAR. The Kidney Disease Improving Global Guidelines (KDIGO criteria were used for AKI.Results: Of the total 305 consecutive patients, 84 (27.5% developed AKI after TEVAR, comprising 66 (21.6% patients in KDIGO stage 1, 6 (2.0% patients in stage 2 and 12 (3.9% patients in stage 3. From the logistic regression analysis, systolic blood pressure (SBP on admission >140 mmHg (odds ratio [OR], 2.288; 95% CI, 1.319–3.969 and supra-aortic branches graft bypass hybrid surgery (OR, 3.228; 95% CI, 1.526–6.831 were independent risk factors for AKI after TEVAR. Local anesthesia tended to be a protective factor (OR, 0.563; 95% CI, 0.316–1.001. The preoperative renal function, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker or statin administration, volume of contrast agent, range of TBAD and false lumen involving renal artery were not associated with post-operation AKI. The in-hospital mortality and major adverse events were markedly increased with the occurrence of AKI (7.1% vs 0.9%, P=0

  13. Chylothorax complicating thoracic aortic surgery.

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    Kanakis, Meletios A; Misthos, Panagiotis; Kokotsakis, John N; Lioulias, Achilleas G

    2011-07-01

    Chylothorax is a very rare complication of patients undergoing thoracic aortic aneurysm repair. Possible mechanisms of this condition during thoracic aorta operations and current therapeutic strategies are analyzed according to our experience and thorough search of the English literature. Current experience with chylothorax occurring during thoracic aortic surgery is analyzed in this review by collecting data retrieved from English literature research. Significant risk factors for postoperative chylothorax development after thoracic aorta surgical procedures are thoracic aortic reoperations and descending thoracic repairs. Various treatment modalities from conservative to operative intervention have been proposed. Currently, the morbidity and mortality have improved due to prompt management. Surgical intervention is needed when response to conservative treatment has failed.  © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Traumatic Aortic Injury

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    Brianna Miner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 48-year-old male with unknown past medical history presents as a trauma after being hit by a car traveling approximately 25 miles per hour. On initial presentation, the patient is confused, combative, and not answering questions appropriately. The patient is hypotensive with a blood pressure of 68/40 and a heart rate of 50 beats per minute, with oxygen saturation at 96% on room air. FAST scan is positive for fluid in Morrison’s pouch, splenorenal space, and pericardial space. Significant findings: The initial chest x-ray showed an abnormal superior mediastinal contour (blue line, suggestive of a possible aortic injury. The CT angiogram showed extensive circumferential irregularity and outpouching of the distal aortic arch (red arrows compatible with aortic transection. In addition, there was a circumferential intramural hematoma, which extended through the descending aorta to the proximal infrarenal abdominal aorta (green arrow. There was also an extensive surrounding mediastinal hematoma extending around the descending aorta and supraaortic branches (purple arrows. Discussion: Traumatic aortic injury is a life-threatening event. The incidence of blunt thoracic aortic injury is low, between 1 to 2 percent of those patients with blunt thoracic trauma.1 However, approximately 80% of patients with traumatic aortic injury die at the scene.2 Therefore it is imperative to diagnose traumatic aortic injury in a timely fashion. The diagnosis can be difficult due to the non-specific signs and symptoms and other distracting injuries. Clinical suspicion should be based on the mechanism of the injury and the hemodynamic status of the patient. In any patient with blunt or penetrating trauma to the chest that is hemodynamically unstable, traumatic aortic injury should be on the differential. Chest x-ray can be used as a screening tool. A normal chest x-ray has a negative predictive value of approximately 97%. CTA chest is the

  15. Thoracic aortic catastrophes : towards the endovascular solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, F.H.W.

    2010-01-01

    Descending thoracic aortic catastrophes include a variety of acute pathologies of the descending thoracic aorta, which are all associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, requiring immediate intervention. For this thesis, we explored the management and outcomes of several thoracic aortic

  16. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

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    ... of the aorta Injury from falls or motor vehicle accidents Syphilis Symptoms Aneurysms develop slowly over many ... rupture) if you do not have surgery to repair it. The treatment depends on the location of ...

  17. A History of Thoracic Aortic Surgery.

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    McFadden, Paul Michael; Wiggins, Luke M; Boys, Joshua A

    2017-08-01

    Ancient historical texts describe the presence of aortic pathology conditions, although the surgical treatment of thoracic aortic disease remained insurmountable until the 19th century. Surgical treatment of thoracic aortic disease then progressed along with advances in surgical technique, conduit production, cardiopulmonary bypass, and endovascular technology. Despite radical advances in aortic surgery, principles established by surgical pioneers of the 19th century hold firm to this day. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Adult thoracic and abdominal aortic

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    Randa O. Kaddah

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Aortic COA could be found in any segment of the aorta. Proper identification of the anatomical details and pressure gradient studies are important factors affecting the plan of management.

  19. Telomere Biology and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

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    Thomas Aschacher

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ascending aortic aneurysms are mostly asymptomatic and present a great risk of aortic dissection or perforation. Consequently, ascending aortic aneurysms are a source of lethality with increased age. Biological aging results in progressive attrition of telomeres, which are the repetitive DNA sequences at the end of chromosomes. These telomeres play an important role in protection of genomic DNA from end-to-end fusions. Telomere maintenance and telomere attrition-associated senescence of endothelial and smooth muscle cells have been indicated to be part of the pathogenesis of degenerative vascular diseases. This systematic review provides an overview of telomeres, telomere-associated proteins and telomerase to the formation and progression of aneurysms of the thoracic ascending aorta. A better understanding of telomere regulation in the vascular pathology might provide new therapeutic approaches. Measurements of telomere length and telomerase activity could be potential prognostic biomarkers for increased risk of death in elderly patients suffering from an aortic aneurysm.

  20. Geometric Deformations of the Thoracic Aorta and Supra-Aortic Arch Branch Vessels Following Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair.

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    Ullery, Brant W; Suh, Ga-Young; Hirotsu, Kelsey; Zhu, David; Lee, Jason T; Dake, Michael D; Fleischmann, Dominik; Cheng, Christopher P

    2018-04-01

    To utilize 3-D modeling techniques to better characterize geometric deformations of the supra-aortic arch branch vessels and descending thoracic aorta after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Eighteen patients underwent endovascular repair of either type B aortic dissection (n = 10) or thoracic aortic aneurysm (n = 8). Computed tomography angiography was obtained pre- and postprocedure, and 3-D geometric models of the aorta and supra-aortic branch vessels were constructed. Branch angle of the supra-aortic branch vessels and curvature metrics of the ascending aorta, aortic arch, and stented thoracic aortic lumen were calculated both at pre- and postintervention. The left common carotid artery branch angle was lower than the left subclavian artery angles preintervention ( P Supra-aortic branch vessel angulation remains relatively static when proximal landing zones are distal to the left common carotid artery.

  1. Ascending aortic injuries following blunt trauma.

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    Sun, Xiumei; Hong, Jenny; Lowery, Robert; Goldstein, Steven; Wang, Zuyue; Lindsay, Joseph; Hill, Peter C; Corso, Paul J

    2013-11-01

    The diagnosis and the management of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries have undergone significant changes due to new technology and improved prehospital care. Most of the discussions have focused on descending aortic injuries. In this review, we discuss the recent management of ascending aortic injuries. We found 5 cohort studies on traumatic aortic injuries and 11 case reports describing ascending aortic injuries between 1998 to the present through Medline research. Among case reports, 78.9% of cases were caused by motor vehicle accidents (MVA). 42.1% of patients underwent emergent open repair and the operative mortality was 12.5%. 36.8% underwent delayed repair. Associated injuries occurred in 84.2% of patients. Aortic valve injury was concurrent in 26.3% of patients. The incidence of ascending aortic injury ranged 1.9-20% in cohort studies. Traumatic injuries to the ascending aorta are relatively uncommon among survivors following blunt trauma. Aortography has been replaced by computed tomography and echocardiography as a diagnostic tool. Open repair, either emergent or delayed, remains the treatment of choice. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. 14-3-3 in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

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    Chakravarti, Ritu; Gupta, Karishma; Swain, Mamuni; Willard, Belinda; Scholtz, Jaclyn; Svensson, Lars G.; Roselli, Eric E.; Pettersson, Gosta; Johnston, Douglas R.; Soltesz, Edward G.; Yamashita, Michifumi; Stuehr, Dennis; Daly, Thomas M.; Hoffman, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Large vessel vasculitides (LVV) are a group of autoimmune diseases characterized by injury to and anatomic modifications of large vessels, including the aorta and its branch vessels. Disease etiology is unknown. This study was undertaken to identify antigen targets within affected vessel walls in aortic root, ascending aorta, and aortic arch surgical specimens from patients with LVV, including giant cell arteritis, Takayasu arteritis, and isolated focal aortitis. Methods Thoracic aortic aneurysm specimens and autologous blood were acquired from consenting patients who underwent aorta reconstruction procedures. Aorta proteins were extracted from both patients with LVV and age-, race-, and sex-matched disease controls with noninflammatory aneurysms. A total of 108 serum samples from patients with LVV, matched controls, and controls with antinuclear antibodies, different forms of vasculitis, or sepsis were tested. Results Evaluation of 108 serum samples and 22 aortic tissue specimens showed that 78% of patients with LVV produced antibodies to 14-3-3 proteins in the aortic wall (93.7% specificity), whereas controls were less likely to do so (6.7% produced antibodies). LVV patient sera contained autoantibody sufficient to immunoprecipitate 14-3-3 protein(s) from aortic lysates. Three of 7 isoforms of 14-3-3 were found to be up-regulated in aorta specimens from patients with LVV, and 2 isoforms (ε and ζ) were found to be antigenic in LVV. Conclusion This is the first study to use sterile, snap-frozen thoracic aorta biopsy specimens to identify autoantigens in LVV. Our findings indicate that 78% of patients with LVV have antibody reactivity to 14-3-3 protein(s). The precise role of these antibodies and 14-3-3 proteins in LVV pathogenesis deserves further study. PMID:25917817

  3. MDCT angiography after open thoracic aortic surgery: pearls and pitfalls.

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    Hoang, Jenny K; Martinez, Santiago; Hurwitz, Lynne M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review open thoracic aortic surgical techniques and to describe the range of postoperative findings on CT angiography (CTA). An understanding of surgical thoracic aortic procedures will allow appropriate differentiation of normal from abnormal CTA findings on postoperative imaging.

  4. CT of suspected thoracic acute aortic injury in the emergency department: is routine abdominopelvic imaging worth the additional collective radiation dose?

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    Haji-Momenian, Shawn; Rischall, Jonathan; Okey, Neil; Taffel, Myles; Khati, Nadia; Zeman, Robert

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the incidence of non-traumatic acute aortic injury (AAI) extending from the chest into the abdomen or pelvis in emergency department (ED) patients with acute aortic syndrome (AAS), to estimate the effective dose of the abdominopelvic portion of these CT exams, and to compare the number needed to screen (NNS) with the collective population radiation dose of imaging those stations. All patients (n = 238) presenting to the ED with AAS between March 2014 and June 2015 who were imaged per CT AAI protocol (noncontrast and contrast-enhanced CT angiography of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis) were retrospectively identified in this IRB-approved HIPAA-compliant study. The Stanford classification for positive cases of AAI was further subclassified based on chest, abdominal, or pelvic involvement. The dose length product (DLP) of each exam was used to estimate the dose of the abdominal and pelvic stations and the collective effective dose for the population. There were five cases of aortic dissection (AD) and two of intramural hematoma (IMH), with an AAI incidence of 2.9/100. Three cases of AAI were confined to the chest. Two cases of AAI were confined to the chest and abdomen, and two cases involved the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. There was only one case of AAI involving the ascending aorta that extended into the abdomen or pelvis. The number needed to screen to identify (a) AAI extending from the chest into the abdomen or pelvis was 59.5 and (b) Stanford A AAI extending into the abdomen or pelvis was 238. The estimated mean effective dose for the abdominopelvic stations were unenhanced abdomen 2.3 mSv, unenhanced pelvis 3.3 mSv, abdominal CTA 2.5 mSv, and pelvic CTA 3.6 mSv. The collective effective doses to the abdomen and pelvis with unenhanced CT and CTA in 59.5 patients and 238 patients were 761.6 and 3046.4 mSv, respectively. While the estimated mean effective dose for imaging of the abdominopelvic stations are low, the collective

  5. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair migration and aortic elongation differentiated using dual reference point analysis.

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    Alberta, Hillary B; Takayama, Toshio; Panthofer, Annalise; Cambria, Richard P; Farber, Mark A; Jordan, William D; Matsumura, Jon S

    2018-02-01

    We evaluated images of patients undergoing a thoracic endovascular aortic repair procedure using two reference points as a means for differentiating stent graft migration from aortic elongation. Conventional standards define migration of a stent graft as an absolute change in the distance from the distal graft ring to a distal landmark ≥10 mm compared with a baseline measurement. Aortic elongation occurs over time in both healthy individuals and patients with aortic disease. Aortic elongation in patients with stent grafts may result in increased distal thoracic aortic lengths over time. False-positive stent graft migration would be defined when these patients meet the standard definition for migration, even if the stent has not moved in relation to the elongating aorta. This retrospective study evaluated the aortic length of 23 patients treated with the conformable GORE TAG thoracic endoprosthesis (W. L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, Ariz) in three clinical trials (dissection, traumatic injury, and aneurysm). Patients who met the standard definition for migration were selected. A standardized protocol was used to measure aortic centerline lengths, including the innominate artery (IA) to the most distal device ring, the IA to the celiac artery (CA), and the distal ring to the CA. Baseline lengths obtained from the first postoperative image were compared with length measurements obtained from the first interval at which they met the standard definition for migration. The conventional standards for migration using a single reference point were compared with the use of dual reference points. Of the 23 patients with endograft changes, 20 were deemed to have aortic elongation rather than true migration. The remaining three patients were deemed to have migration on the basis of the IA to distal ring position compared with the IA to CA length change. The IA to CA interval length change was markedly greater in those with elongation compared with migration (23.8 ± 8.4

  6. Emergency endovascular stent grafting for thoracic aortic pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Wendy T. G. J.; Verhoeven, Eric L. G.; Zeebregts, Clark J. A. M.; Tielliu, Ignace F. J.; Prins, Ted R.; Oranen, Bjorn L.; van den Dungen, Jan J. A. M.

    2007-01-01

    Our aim was to report single-center results of emergency endovascular treatment for thoracic aortic disease. From March 1998 to January 2006, 30 acute thoracic EVAR procedures were carried out in 29 patients. One patient received two procedures in different settings. Four patients died before

  7. FOXE3 mutations predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shao-Qing; Medina-Martinez, Olga; Guo, Dong-chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S.; Reynolds, Corey L.; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Kwartler, Callie S.; Zhu, Lawrence Yang; Peters, Andrew M.; Duan, Xue-Yan; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Debbie A.; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Dong, Xiurong; Leal, Suzanne M.; Majesky, Mark W.; Swindell, Eric C.; Jamrich, Milan; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2016-01-01

    The ascending thoracic aorta is designed to withstand biomechanical forces from pulsatile blood. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections (TAADs) occur as a result of genetically triggered defects in aortic structure and a dysfunctional response to these forces. Here, we describe mutations in the forkhead transcription factor FOXE3 that predispose mutation-bearing individuals to TAAD. We performed exome sequencing of a large family with multiple members with TAADs and identified a rare variant in FOXE3 with an altered amino acid in the DNA-binding domain (p.Asp153His) that segregated with disease in this family. Additional pathogenic FOXE3 variants were identified in unrelated TAAD families. In mice, Foxe3 deficiency reduced smooth muscle cell (SMC) density and impaired SMC differentiation in the ascending aorta. Foxe3 expression was induced in aortic SMCs after transverse aortic constriction, and Foxe3 deficiency increased SMC apoptosis and ascending aortic rupture with increased aortic pressure. These phenotypes were rescued by inhibiting p53 activity, either by administration of a p53 inhibitor (pifithrin-α), or by crossing Foxe3–/– mice with p53–/– mice. Our data demonstrate that FOXE3 mutations lead to a reduced number of aortic SMCs during development and increased SMC apoptosis in the ascending aorta in response to increased biomechanical forces, thus defining an additional molecular pathway that leads to familial thoracic aortic disease. PMID:26854927

  8. Endovascular stent graft treatment of acute thoracic aortic transections due to blunt force trauma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bjurlin, Marc A

    2012-02-01

    Endovascular stent graft treatment of acute thoracic aortic transections is an encouraging minimally invasive alternative to open surgical repair. Between 2006 and 2008, 16 patients with acute thoracic aortic transections underwent evaluation at our institution. Seven patients who were treated with an endovascular stent graft were reviewed. The mean Glasgow Coma Score was 13.0, probability of survival was .89, and median injury severity score was 32. The mean number of intensive care unit days was 7.7, mean number of ventilator support days was 5.4, and hospital length of stay was 10 days. Mean blood loss was 285 mL, and operative time was 143 minutes. Overall mortality was 14%. Procedure complications were a bleeding arteriotomy site and an endoleak. Endovascular treatment of traumatic thoracic aortic transections appears to demonstrate superior results with respect to mortality, blood loss, operative time, paraplegia, and procedure-related complications when compared with open surgical repair literature.

  9. The thoracic aortography by Gd-DTPA enhanced ultrafast cine MR imaging. Assessment of thoracic aortic dilatation in aging and in patients with hypertension and aortic valve disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Kentaro; Nakase, Emiko; Kawai, Ichiyoshi; Saito, Takayuki; Kikkawa, Nobutada; Haiyama, Toru

    1995-01-01

    To assess the morphology of thoracic aorta, we had a trial of Gd-DTPA enhanced ultrafast cine MR imaging on the thoracic aorta. This method was provided with high quality thoracic aortogram during 15-20 seconds. In patients without hypertension and aortic valve disease, dimensions of ascending aorta and aortic arch were significantly correlated with aging. In patients with hypertension, dimensions of ascending aorta and aortic arch were significantly dilated. In patients with aortic valve disease, thoracic aorta was diffusely enlarged, especially in ascending aorta. Gd-DTPA enhanced ultrafact cine MR imaging was useful to assess the thoracic aortic anatomy and diseases. (author)

  10. Long-term results after proximal thoracic aortic redo surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Czerny

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate early and mid-term results in patients undergoing proximal thoracic aortic redo surgery. METHODS: We analyzed 60 patients (median age 60 years, median logistic EuroSCORE 40 who underwent proximal thoracic aortic redo surgery between January 2005 and April 2012. Outcome and risk factors were analyzed. RESULTS: In hospital mortality was 13%, perioperative neurologic injury was 7%. Fifty percent of patients underwent redo surgery in an urgent or emergency setting. In 65%, partial or total arch replacement with or without conventional or frozen elephant trunk extension was performed. The preoperative logistic EuroSCORE I confirmed to be a reliable predictor of adverse outcome- (ROC 0.786, 95%CI 0.64-0.93 as did the new EuroSCORE II model: ROC 0.882 95%CI 0.78-0.98. Extensive individual logistic EuroSCORE I levels more than 67 showed an OR of 7.01, 95%CI 1.43-34.27. A EuroSCORE II larger than 28 showed an OR of 4.44 (95%CI 1.4-14.06. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified a critical preoperative state (OR 7.96, 95%CI 1.51-38.79 but not advanced age (OR 2.46, 95%CI 0.48-12.66 as the strongest independent predictor of in-hospital mortality. Median follow-up was 23 months (1-52 months. One year and five year actuarial survival rates were 83% and 69% respectively. Freedom from reoperation during follow-up was 100%. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a substantial early attrition rate in patients presenting with a critical preoperative state, proximal thoracic aortic redo surgery provides excellent early and mid-term results. Higher EuroSCORE I and II levels and a critical preoperative state but not advanced age are independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. As a consequence, age alone should no longer be regarded as a contraindication for surgical treatment in this particular group of patients.

  11. Atypical Presentation of Traumatic Aortic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Fu Wah Ho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Blunt thoracic aorta injury (BAI is second only to head injury as cause of mortality in blunt trauma. While most patients do not survive till arrival at the hospital, for the remainder, prompt diagnosis and treatment greatly improve outcomes. We report an atypical presentation of BAI, highlighting the diagnostic challenges of this condition in the emergency department. Case Presentation. A previously well 25-year-old male presented 15 hours after injury hemodynamically stable with delirium. There were no signs or symptoms suggestive of BAI. Sonography showed small bilateral pleural effusions. Chest radiograph showed a normal mediastinum. Eventually, CT demonstrated a contained distal aortic arch disruption. The patient underwent percutaneous endovascular thoracic aortic repair and recovered well. Conclusion. This catastrophic lesion may present with few reliable signs and symptoms; hence, a high index of suspicion is crucial for early diagnosis and definitive surgical management. This paper discusses the diagnostic utility of clinical features, injury mechanism, and radiographic modalities. Consideration of mechanism of injury, clinical features, and chest radiograph findings should prompt advanced chest imaging.

  12. Total arch and descending thoracic aortic replacement by left thoracotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvera, Joel S; Fehrenbacher, John W

    2012-05-01

    The hybrid treatment of transverse aortic arch pathologies with supraaortic debranching and endovascular repair is associated with significant morbidity and death and lacks long-term follow-up. The traditional two-stage open surgical approach to extensive arch and descending thoracic aneurysms carries a significant interval mortality rate. We report the results of a single-stage technique of total arch and descending thoracic aortic replacement by a left thoracotomy. From January 1995 to February 2011, 426 patients underwent thoracic or thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair, of which a highly selected group of 27 patients underwent total arch replacement with descending thoracic or thoracoabdominal aortic replacement. All procedures were performed with hypothermic circulatory arrest and selective antegrade cerebral perfusion. Two patients required transverse division of the sternum. Two patients had emergency or urgent operations. Five patients had concomitant coronary artery bypass, and 1 had concomitant mitral valve replacement. There were no hospital deaths, no cerebrovascular accidents, and one instance of transient spinal cord ischemia. Three patients had acute renal failure not requiring hemodialysis. Intubation in 5 patients exceeded 48 hours, and 1 patient needed tracheostomy. Two patients required reexploration for postoperative bleeding. Survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 95%, 78%, and 73%, respectively. Replacement of the total arch and descending thoracic aorta by a left thoracotomy provides excellent short-term and long-term results for the treatment of extensive arch and thoracic aortic pathology, without the need for a second-stage operation. Other cardiac pathologies, such as left-sided coronary disease and mitral valve disease, can be addressed concurrently. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Spiral CT aortography: an efficient technique for the diagnosis of traumatic aortic injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicky, S.; Capasso, P.; Meuli, R.; Schnyder, P.; Fischer, A.; Segesser, L. von

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficiency of spiral CT (SCT) aortography for diagnosing acute aortic lesions in blunt thoracic trauma patients. Between October 1992 and June 1997, 487 SCT scans of the chest were performed on blunt thoracic trauma patients. To assess aortic injury, the following SCT criteria were considered: hemomediastinum, peri-aortic hematoma, irregular aspect of the aortic wall, aortic pseudodiverticulum, intimal flap and traumatic dissection. Aortic injury was diagnosed on 14 SCT examinations (2.9 %), five of the patients having had an additional digital aortography that confirmed the aortic trauma. Twelve subjects underwent surgical repair of the thoracic aorta, which in all but one case confirmed the aortic injury. Two patients died before surgery from severe brain lesions. The aortic blunt lesions were confirmed at autopsy. According to the follow-up of the other 473 patients, we are aware of no false-negative SCT examination. Our limited series shows a sensitivity of 100 % and specificity of 99.8 % of SCT aortography in the diagnosis of aortic injury. It is concluded that SCT aortagraphy is an accurate diagnostic method for the assessment of aortic injury in blunt thoracic trauma patients. (orig.)

  14. Blunt traumatic aortic injuries of the ascending aorta and aortic arch: a clinical multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, Victor X; Marini, Milagros; Muñiz, Javier; Gulias, Daniel; Asorey-Veiga, Vanesa; Adrio-Nazar, Belen; Herrera, José M; Pradas-Montilla, Gonzalo; Cuenca, José J

    2013-09-01

    To report the clinical and radiological characteristics, management and outcomes of traumatic ascending aorta and aortic arch injuries. Historic cohort multicentre study including 17 major trauma patients with traumatic aortic injury from January 2000 to January 2011. The most common mechanism of blunt trauma was motor-vehicle crash (47%) followed by motorcycle crash (41%). Patients sustaining traumatic ascending aorta or aortic arch injuries presented a high proportion of myocardial contusion (41%); moderate or greater aortic valve regurgitation (12%); haemopericardium (35%); severe head injuries (65%) and spinal cord injury (23%). The 58.8% of the patients presented a high degree aortic injury (types III and IV). Expected in-hospital mortality was over 50% as defined by mean TRISS 59.7 (SD 38.6) and mean ISS 48.2 (SD 21.6) on admission. Observed in-hospital mortality was 53%. The cause of death was directly related to the ATAI in 45% of cases, head and abdominal injuries being the cause of death in the remaining 55% cases. Long-term survival was 46% at 1 year, 39% at 5 years, and 19% at 10 years. Traumatic aortic injuries of the ascending aorta/arch should be considered in any major thoracic trauma patient presenting cardiac tamponade, aortic valve regurgitation and/or myocardial contusion. These aortic injuries are also associated with a high incidence of neurological injuries, which can be just as lethal as the aortic injury, so treatment priorities should be modulated on an individual basis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Characteristics and Outcomes of Ascending Versus Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vapnik, Joshua S; Kim, Joon Bum; Isselbacher, Eric M; Ghoshhajra, Brian B; Cheng, Yisha; Sundt, Thoralf M; MacGillivray, Thomas E; Cambria, Richard P; Lindsay, Mark E

    2016-05-15

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAs) occur in reproducible patterns, but etiologic factors determining the anatomic distribution of these aneurysms are not well understood. This study sought to gain insight into etiologic differences and clinical outcomes associated with repetitive anatomic distributions of TAs. From 3,247 patients registered in an institutional Thoracic Aortic Center database from July 1992 to August 2013, we identified 844 patients with full aortic dimensional imaging by computerized axial tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scan (mean age 62.8 ± 14 years, 37% women, median follow-up 40 months) with TA diameter >4.0 cm and without evidence of previous aortic dissection. Patient demographic and imaging data were analyzed in 3 groups: isolated ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (AAs; n = 628), isolated descending TAs (DTAs; n = 130), and combined AA and DTA (mixed thoracic aortic aneurysm, MTA; n = 86). Patients with DTA had more hypertension (82% vs 59%, p <0.001) and a higher burden of atherosclerosis (88% vs 9%, p <0.001) than AA. Conversely, patients with isolated AA were younger (59.5 ± 13.5 vs 71.0 ± 11.8 years, p <0.001) and contained almost every case of overt, genetically triggered TA. Patients with isolated DTA were demographically indistinguishable from patients with MTA. In follow-up, patients with DTA/MTA experienced more aortic events (aortic dissection/rupture) and had higher mortality than patients with isolated AA. In multivariate analysis, aneurysm size (odds ratio 1.1, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.16, p <0.001) and the presence of atherosclerosis (odds ratio 5.7, 95% CI 2.02 to 16.15, p <0.001) independently predicted adverse aortic events. We find that DTA with or without associated AA appears to be a disease more highly associated with atherosclerosis, hypertension, and advanced age. In contrast, isolated AA appears to be a clinically distinct entity with a greater burden of genetically triggered disease. Copyright © 2016

  16. Debranching Solutions in Endografting for Complex Thoracic Aortic Dissections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goksel, Onur Selcuk, E-mail: onurgokseljet@gmail.com [Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul (Turkey); Guven, Koray [Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Karatepe, Celalettin [Mustafa Kemal Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul (Turkey); Gok, Emre [Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul (Turkey); Acunas, Bulent [Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Cinar, Bayer [Medical Park Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Alpagut, Ufuk [Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2014-08-15

    Conventional surgical repair of thoracic aortic dissections is a challenge due to mortality and morbidity risks. We analyzed our experience in hybrid aortic arch repair for complex dissections of the aortic arch. Between 2009 and 2013, 18 patients (the mean age of 67 ± 8 years-old) underwent hybrid aortic arch repair. The procedural strategy was determined on the individual patient. Thirteen patients had type I repair using trifurcation and another patient with bifurcation graft. Two patients had type II repair with replacement of the ascending aorta. Two patients received extra-anatomic bypass grafting to left carotid artery allowing covering of zone 1. Stent graft deployment rate was 100%. No patients experienced stroke. One patient with total debranching of the aortic arch following an acute dissection of the proximal arch expired 3 months after TEVAR due to heart failure. There were no early to midterm endoleaks. The median follow-up was 20 ± 8 months with patency rate of 100%. Various debranching solutions for different complex scenarios of the aortic arch serve as less invasive procedures than conventional open surgery enabling safe and effective treatment of this highly selected subgroup of patients with complex aortic pathologies.

  17. Aneurysm growth after late conversion of thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Kasahara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 69-year-old man underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair of a descending aortic aneurysm. Three years later, he developed impending rupture due to aneurysmal expansion that included the proximal landing zone. Urgent open surgery was performed via lateral thoracotomy, and a Dacron graft was sewn to the previous stent graft distally with Teflon felt reinforcement. Postoperatively, four sequential computed tomography scans demonstrated that the aneurysm was additionally increasing in size probably due to continuous hematoma production, suggesting a possibility of endoleaks. This case demonstrates the importance of careful radiologic surveillance after endovascular repair, and also after partial open conversion.

  18. [Thoracic aortic dissection revealed by systemic cholesterol embolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braem, L; Paule, P; Héno, P; Morand, J J; Mafart, B; La Folie, T; Varlet, P; Mioulet, D; Fourcade, L

    2006-10-01

    Systemic cholesterol embolism is a rare complication of atherosclerosis, and has various presentations. Arterial catheterisms are a common cause. However, the association with an aortic dissection has been exceptionally reported. We report the observation of a 70 year-old man, with coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia. Six months before hospitalization, a coronary angioplasty was performed due to recurrent angina. The association of purpuric lesions on the feet, with acute renal failure confirmed cholesterol embolism syndrome. Transoesophageal echocardiography showed a dissection of the descending thoracic aorta associated with complex atheroma. The evolution was marked by the pulpar necrosis of a toe and by a worsening of the renal failure, requiring definitive hemodialysis. Further echographic control highlighted the rupture of the intimal veil of the dissection. Cholesterol embolism syndrome may reveal an aortic dissection in patients without thoracic symptoms. In such cases, transoesophageal echocardiography is a useful and non-invasive examination.

  19. Core curriculum case illustration: blunt traumatic thoracic aortic pseudo aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzan, Muhammad Mubashir; Fadl, Shaimaa Abdelhassib; Robinson, Jeffrey D

    2017-06-19

    Core Curriculum Illustration: [blunt thoracic aortic pseudo aneurysm]. This is the [40th] installment of a series that will highlight one case per publication issue from the bank of cases available online as part of the American Society of Emergency Radiology (ASER) educational resources. Our goal is to generate more interest in and use of our online materials. To view more cases online, please visit the ASER Core Curriculum and Recommendations for Study online at: http://www.aseronline.org/curriculum/toc.html.

  20. Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair in a Patient with Mobile Aortic Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham M. Lohrmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 58-year-old female presented with acute arterial insufficiency to her left leg. Following cardiovascular evaluation using multimodality imaging, it was discovered that she had mobile thoracic thrombi overlying a normal descending thoracic aorta which had also caused a splenic infarction. This patient was treated with unfractionated heparin for three days and underwent subsequent thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR uneventfully with no subsequent complications at one-year followup. This case highlights the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in treating patients with this uncommon challenging clinical scenario.

  1. [Endovascular stent-grafting for mycotic thoracic aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, S; Kaneko, T; Ezure, M; Satoh, Y; Hasegawa, Y; Koike, N; Okonogi, S; Takihara, H

    2009-02-01

    We report 3 cases of endovascular stent-grafting (ESG) for mycotic thoracic aortic aneurysm. The case 1 was a rupture of pseudoaneurysm of the descending aorta caused by mediastinitis due to perforation of esophageal ulcer. The patient underwent emergent ESG for temporary control of the rupture. He underwent esophagus reconstruction 5 month after ESG. The case 2 was admitted due to inflammatory reaction. She was diagnosed with mycotic descending aortic aneurysm and underwent elective ESG because of her old age. Her postoperative course was uneventful and no infection recurred. The case 3 underwent ESG for a ruptured mycotic descending aortic aneurysm. But 113 days after ESG, he underwent ESG again for a ruptured endoleak of the stentgraft. His blood culture demonstrated methillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). He died of rupture to bronchus and esophagus at 18th day after ESG. We believe that ESG is useful in high risk patients for temporary management of the rupture.

  2. Factors Affecting Optimal Aortic Remodeling After Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair of Type B (IIIb) Aortic Dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, I-Ming [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine (China); Chen, Po-Lin; Huang, Chun-Yang [National Yang Ming University, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine (China); Weng, Shih-Hsien; Chen, Wei-Yuan; Shih, Chun-Che, E-mail: ccshih@vghtpe.gov.tw [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine (China)

    2017-05-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with entire aortic remodeling after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with type B dissection.Materials and MethodsThe patients with type B (IIIb) dissections who underwent TEVAR from 2006 to 2013 with minimum of 2 years of follow-up computed tomography data were retrospectively reviewed. Based on the status of false lumen remodeling of entire aorta, patients were divided into three groups: complete regression, total thrombosis, and inadequate regression with patent abdominal false lumen.ResultsA total of 90 patients (72 males, 18 females; mean age 56.6 ± 16.4 years) were included and divided into the complete regression (n = 22), total thrombosis (n = 18), and inadequate regression (n = 50) groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that dissection extension to iliac arteries, increased preoperative number of dissection tear over abdominal aorta, and decreased preoperative abdominal aorta bifurcation true lumen ratio, as compared between the inadequate and complete regression groups, were associated with a persistent false lumen (odds ratio = 33.33, 2.304, and 0.021; all, p ≤ 0.012). Comparison of 6, 12, and 24 months postoperative data revealed no significant differences at any level, suggesting that the true lumen area ratio might not change after 6 months postoperatively.ConclusionsIncreased preoperative numbers of dissection tear around the abdominal visceral branches, dissection extension to the iliac arteries, and decreased preoperative true lumen area ratio of abdominal aorta are predictive of entire aortic remodeling after TEVAR in patients with type B dissection.Level of EvidenceIII.

  3. Extra-Thoracic Supra-aortic Bypass Surgery Is Safe in Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair and Arterial Occlusive Disease Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombert, Alexander; van Issum, Lea; Barbati, Mohammad E; Grommes, Jochen; Keszei, Andras; Kotelis, Drosos; Jalaie, Houman; Greiner, Andreas; Jacobs, Michael J; Kalder, Johannes

    2018-04-20

    The safety and feasibility of supra-aortic debranching as part of endovascular aortic surgery or as a treatment option for arterial occlusive disease (AOD) remains controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical outcome of this surgery. This single centre, retrospective study included 107 patients (mean age 69.2 years, 38.4% women) who underwent supra-aortic bypass surgery (carotid-subclavian bypass, carotid-carotid bypass, and carotid-carotid-subclavian bypass) because of thoracic or thoraco-abdominal endovascular aortic repair (57%; 61/107) or as AOD treatment (42.9%; 46/107) between January 2006 and January 2015. Mortality, morbidity with a focus on neurological complications, and patency rate were assessed. Twenty-six of 107 (14.2%) of the debranching patients were treated under emergency conditions because of acute type B dissection or symptomatic aneurysm. Follow up, conducted by imaging interpretation and telephone interviews, continued till March 2017 (mean 42.1, 0-125, months). The in hospital mortality rate was 10.2% (11/107), all of these cases from the debranching group and related to emergency procedures (p supra-aortic bypass surgery involves low complication rates and high mid-term bypass patency rates. It is a safe and feasible treatment option in the form of debranching in combination with endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and in AOD. Copyright © 2018 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Neurological Complications Following Endoluminal Repair of Thoracic Aortic Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, J. P.; Taylor, P. R.; Bell, R. E.; Chan, Y. C.; Sabharwal, T.; Carrell, T. W. G.; Reidy, J. F.

    2007-01-01

    Open surgery for thoracic aortic disease is associated with significant morbidity and the reported rates for paraplegia and stroke are 3%-19% and 6%-11%, respectively. Spinal cord ischemia and stroke have also been reported following endoluminal repair. This study reviews the incidence of paraplegia and stroke in a series of 186 patients treated with thoracic stent grafts. From July 1997 to September 2006, 186 patients (125 men) underwent endoluminal repair of thoracic aortic pathology. Mean age was 71 years (range, 17-90 years). One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated electively and 58 patients had urgent procedures. Anesthesia was epidural in 131, general in 50, and local in 5 patients. Seven patients developed paraplegia (3.8%; two urgent and five elective). All occurred in-hospital apart from one associated with severe hypotension after a myocardial infarction at 3 weeks. Four of these recovered with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. One patient with paraplegia died and two had permanent neurological deficit. The rate of permanent paraplegia and death was 1.6%. There were seven strokes (3.8%; four urgent and three elective). Three patients made a complete recovery, one had permanent expressive dysphasia, and three died. The rate of permanent stroke and death was 2.1%. Endoluminal treatment of thoracic aortic disease is an attractive alternative to open surgery; however, there is still a risk of paraplegia and stroke. Permanent neurological deficits and death occurred in 3.7% of the patients in this series. We conclude that prompt recognition of paraplegia and immediate insertion of a CSF drain can be an effective way of recovering spinal cord function and improving the prognosis

  5. Emergency endovascular management of acute thoracic aortic pathology A safe and feasible option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Z; McHugh, S M; Elmallah, A; Colgan, M P; O'Callaghan, A; O'Neill, S M; Madhavan, P; Martin, Z

    2017-12-01

    Endovascular repair has revolutionised the emergency treatment of thoracic aortic disease. We report our 10 year experience using this treatment in emergency cases. A prospectively maintained vascular database was analysed. Patients' medical records and CT images stored on the hospital PACS system were also reviewed. Statistical analysis was done using IBM SPSS V21. There were a total of 59 thoracic aortic stenting procedures of which 33 (60% males with a mean age of 58 yrs) were performed for emergency thoracic pathologies: traumatic transection (n = 10), ruptured aneurysm (n = 6), non-traumatic dissection (n = 8) and penetrating aortic ulcer (n = 9). All patients had self-expanding endografts implanted. Two patients required debranching procedures before the endovascular treatment. Thirty-day mortality was 12.1% (4/33). 70% of patients received a single device. There were 7 procedure related complications, 6 requiring re-intervention: thoracotomy and drainage in 2 patients, proximal graft extension in 2, open drainage of groin haematoma in 1 and open repair of a common femoral artery pseudo-aneurysm in one patient. In total 23 patients were transferred from 11 centres nationwide. There were no mortalities or other complications related to patient transfer from peripheral centres. Although acute thoracic aortic pathology is life threatening, appropriate blood pressure management and treatment of associated injuries can result in favourable outcomes. Endovascular repair is a safe and effective treatment option which enables patients to be treated with reduced morbidity and mortality. Transfer of patients with acute pathology to a tertiary centre can safely be performed. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Aortic Thrombus Formation Following Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauta, Foeke J H; Lau, Kevin D; Arthurs, Christopher J; Eagle, Kim A; Williams, David M; Trimarchi, Santi; Patel, Himanshu J; Figueroa, Carlos A

    2017-06-01

    We present the possible utility of computational fluid dynamics in the assessment of thrombus formation and virtual surgical planning illustrated in a patient with aortic thrombus in a kinked ascending aortic graft following thoracic endovascular aortic repair. A patient-specific three-dimensional model was built from computed tomography. Additionally, we modeled 3 virtual aortic interventions to assess their effect on thrombosis potential: (1) open surgical repair, (2) conformable endografting, and (3) single-branched endografting. Flow waveforms were extracted from echocardiography and used for the simulations. We used the computational index termed platelet activation potential (PLAP) representing accumulated shear rates of fluid particles within a fluid domain to assess thrombosis potential. The baseline model revealed high PLAP in the entire arch (119.8 ± 42.5), with significantly larger PLAP at the thrombus location (125.4 ± 41.2, p fluid dynamics may assist in the prediction of aortic thrombus formation in hemodynamically complex cases and help guide repair strategies. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Overexpression of interleukin-1β and interferon-γ in type I thoracic aortic dissections and ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms: possible correlation with matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression and apoptosis of aortic media cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Liao, Ming-fang; Tian, Lei; Zou, Si-li; Lu, Qing-sheng; Bao, Jun-min; Pei, Yi-fei; Jing, Zai-ping

    2011-07-01

    To examine the expression of interleukin-1β and interferon-γ and their possible roles in aortic dissections and aneurysms. Aortic specimens were obtained from patients with type I thoracic aortic dissection, ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms, and control organ donors. The expression of interleukin-1β, interferon-γ, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and signal transduction factors phospho-p38 and phosphorylated c-jun N-terminal kinase (phospho-JNK) were detected by real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real time RT-PCR), Western blot, and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining was performed to detect apoptosis of media cells. The correlation of these factors and apoptosis was also studied. Apoptosis in the media of thoracic aortic dissection and in ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms was dramatically higher than in the control group. The expression of interleukin-1β gradually increased from the control group, thoracic aortic dissection to ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (p matrix metalloproteinase-9 was significantly increased in the media of thoracic aortic dissection and ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms compared with the control group (p correlations between interleukin-1β versus matrix metalloproteinase-9, interleukin-1β versus phospho-p38 in thoracic aortic dissection (p matrix metalloproteinase-9, interferon-γ versus phospho-JNK, interferon-γ versus apoptosis, and interleukin-1β versus apoptosis in ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (p = 0.02, 0.02, p matrix metalloproteinase-9 and the apoptosis of media cells in humans. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Thoracic aortic aneurysm in a child due to cystic medial necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuribayashi, Sachio; Watabe, Tsuneya; Ohtaki, Makoto; Matsuyama, Shoya; Ogawa, Junichi

    1983-01-01

    The valuable role of computed tomography (CT) was stressed in the diagnosis of thoracic aortic aneurysm in an asymptomatic 12-year-old child. She initially presented mediastinal mass on plain chest film. A saccular thoracic aortic aneurysm was highly suspected from the CT findings, and it was confirmed on angiography. Pathological examination of the aneurysmal wall revealed cystic medial necrosis. (author)

  9. Influence of distal entry tears in acute type B aortic dissection after thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenmou; Huang, Bin; Zhao, Jichun; Ma, Yukui; Yuan, Ding; Yang, Yi; Xiong, Fei; Wang, Tiehao

    2017-08-01

    This study evaluated the clinical influence of distal entry tears in acute type B aortic dissection (ATBAD) after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). From August 2009 to December 2014, the clinical outcomes of 130 patients who underwent TEVAR for ATBAD were retrospectively analyzed. According to whether distal entry tears existed after TEVAR, patients were divided into group A (n = 25, absence of distal entry tears) and group B (n = 105, presence of distal entry tears). We evaluated clinical outcomes, including mortality and morbidity in early and late follow-up, as well as aortic remolding. Late aortic events were defined as aortic dissection-related events occurring >30 days from the initial TEVAR procedures, which consisted of endoleak, retrograde type A aortic dissection, aortic enlargement, late rupture, repeat dissection, and stent-induced new entry tear. The study comprised 130 patients (114 men [87.7%] and 16 women [12.3%)] with a mean age of 53.71 years. The 30-day mortality was 3.1%, and early morbidity included type I endoleak, 3.1%, organ failure, 3.8%; stroke, 3.1%; spinal cord ischemia, 0%; and early rupture 1.5%. The overall survival rate by Kaplan-Meier analysis at 1, 3, and 5 years was 93.8%, 89.5%, and 79.2%, respectively. There were no significant differences in early morbidity and 30-day mortality and late survival between group A and group B. However, group A had a significantly lower rate of late aortic events than group B (P = .028 by log-rank test). Meanwhile, group A had better aortic remolding than group B in complete thrombosis of the thoracic aorta at 12 months postoperatively (100% vs 83.5%; P = .029). This study demonstrated that TEVAR for ATBAD had low perioperative morbidity and mortality and satisfactory midterm outcome. Distal entry tears increase the occurrence of late aortic events and inhibit aortic remolding but do not have a significantly negative effect on late survival. Repairing all entry tears to restore

  10. Hybrid thoracic endovascular aortic repair: pushing the envelope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Houssam K; Davies, Mark G; Bismuth, Jean; Naoum, Joseph J; Peden, Eric K; Reardon, Michael J; Lumsden, Alan B

    2010-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) can be limited by inadequate proximal and distal landing zones. Debranching or hybrid TEVAR has emerged as an important modality to expand landing zones and facilitate TEVAR. We report a single-center experience with hybrid TEVAR. We retrospectively reviewed all patients with thoracic aortic disease who received a TEVAR between February 2005 and October 2008. Forty-two patients underwent a hybrid procedure (mean age 68 +/- 13 years; 55% men). All patients were denied open surgery due to preoperative comorbidities or low physiologic reserve; 62% had a history of coronary artery disease, 67% had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 61% had undergone prior aortic surgery, and 90% had an American Society of Anesthesiology score of 4 and above. The average Society for Vascular Surgery comorbidity score was 12 +/- 2 with a range of 9 to 14. Fifty-five percent of cases were symptomatic on presentation and 83% were done emergently. Seventy-six percent underwent debranching of the aortic arch, 17% of the visceral vessels, and 7% required both. Primary technical success was achieved in all cases and of these, 43% were staged. The 30-day mortality was 5%. Myocardial infarction developed in 5%, respiratory failure in 31%, cerebrovascular accident (stroke or transient ischemic attack) in 19%, and spinal cord ischemia with ensuant paraplegia occurred in 5% of patients. Fifty-eight percent of patients were discharged home, 11% required rehabilitation, and 29% were transferred to a skilled nursing facility. There was a significant association between visceral vessel debranching and both spinal cord ischemia (P = .004) and gastrointestinal complications (P = .005). On the other hand, there was no difference between staged and non-staged hybrid procedures. Hybrid procedures can successfully extend the range of patients suitable for a subsequent TEVAR. These procedures are associated with higher complication rates than isolated infrarenal

  11. Retrograde ascending aortic dissection during or after thoracic aortic stent graft placement: insight from the European registry on endovascular aortic repair complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggebrecht, Holger; Thompson, Matt; Rousseau, Hervé

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Single-center reports have identified retrograde ascending aortic dissection (rAAD) as a potentially lethal complication of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). METHODS AND RESULTS: Between 1995 and 2008, 28 centers participating in the European Registry on Endovascular Aortic...

  12. Thoracic aortic aneurysm in a buck associated with caseous lymphadenitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Pinheiro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the clinical, bacteriological and pathological findings of a thoracic aortic aneurysm in a four-year-old Anglo-Nubian goat buck, related to a framework of visceral caseous lymphadenitis. General clinical examination showed heart rate of 75 beats per minute, respiratory rate of 20 movements per minute and ruminal movements of four movements per minute. Superficial lymph nodes were normal upon palpation. Rectal temperature was slightly high (40.5°C. Blood test showed an intense leukocytosis (54,000/µL, characterized by strong neutrophil shift to the left. At necropsy, a large blood clot was detected in the thoracic cavity. The thickening of the myocardium and dilatation of the aorta in the thoracic portion, presenting a saculiform format was also observed. A large number of abscesses were disseminated in the media and intima layers of aorta. The aorta lumen obstruction by arterial plaques consisting of inflammatory infiltrate, predominantly neutrophilic was also detected. Abscesses were found spread in turbinate, rumen, reticulum, kidneys, liver, spleen, testicles and aorta wall. The microbiological exam of exudate confirmed Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis as the causal agent.

  13. Morphological risk factors of stroke during thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelis, Drosos; Bischoff, Moritz S; Jobst, Bertram; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Hinz, Ulf; Geisbüsch, Philipp; Böckler, Dittmar

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to identify independent factors correlating to an increased risk of perioperative stroke during thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). A prospective maintained TEVAR database, medical records, and imaging studies of 300 patients (205 men; median age of all, 66 years, range 21-89), who underwent TEVAR between March 1997 and February 2011, were reviewed. Preoperative CT data sets were reviewed by two experienced radiologists with focus on the atheroma burden in the aortic arch (grade I, normal, to grade V, ulcerated or pedunculated atheroma). Aortic arch geometry (arch types I-III) was documented. Further parameters included in the univariate analysis were age, gender, urgency of repair, duration of procedure, adenosine-induced cardiac arrest or rapid pacing, proximal landing zone, left subclavian artery (LSA) coverage, and number of stent grafts. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the independent correlations of potential risk factors. Atherosclerotic aneurysm was the most common pathology (44%). One hundred and fifty-four of our patients (51%) were treated under urgent or emergent conditions. Seventeen percent of all patients had significant arch atheroma (grade IV or V), and 43% had a steep type III aortic arch. The perioperative stroke was 4% (12 patients; median age, 73 years, range 31-78). Two strokes were lethal (0.7%). All strokes were classified as embolic based on imaging characteristics. In eight patients, strokes were located in the left cerebral hemisphere (seven of them in the anterior and one in the posterior circulation). Four stroke patients (one in the left posterior circulation) underwent LSA coverage without revascularization. Three stroke patients had severe arch atheroma grade V. Five patients suffering stroke were recognized to have a type III aortic arch. Strokes were equally distributed between zones 0-2 vs. 3-4 (n = 6 each, 5 vs. 3.3%). The highest incidence was found in zone 1 (11

  14. [Non-penetrating thoracic injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manák, P; Drác, P; Blahut, L

    2001-05-01

    The authors compare the causes and severity of non-penetrating chest injuries during two three-year periods: 1986-1989 and 1996-1999. Within the 10-year interval the incidence of blunt chest injuries increased by almost 124%, the mean age of the casualties reduce by five years and the most frequent cause were road accidents. Chest injuries are in more than half the casualties part of multiple injuries or polytraumatism. During the period 1996-1999 the authors recorded more serious intrathoracic injuries, incl. severing of the v. azygos in three patients. With regard to the danger associated with delay it is essential that these casualties should be taken from the site of the accident directly to a specialized department.

  15. Endovascular Treatment of Late Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms after Surgical Repair of Congenital Aortic Coarctation in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszkat, Robert; Perek, Bartlomiej; Zabicki, Bartosz; Trojnarska, Olga; Jemielity, Marek; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Smoczyk, Wiesław; Pukacki, Fryderyk

    2013-01-01

    Background In some patients, local surgery-related complications are diagnosed many years after surgery for aortic coarctation. The purposes of this study were: (1) to systematically evaluate asymptomatic adults after Dacron patch repair in childhood, (2) to estimate the formation rate of secondary thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) and (3) to assess outcomes after intravascular treatment for TAAs. Methods This study involved 37 asymptomatic patients (26 female and 11 male) who underwent surgical repair of aortic coarctation in the childhood. After they had reached adolescence, patients with secondary TAAs were referred to endovascular repair. Results Follow-up studies revealed TAA in seven cases (19%) (including six with the gothic type of the aortic arch) and mild recoarctation in other six (16%). Six of the TAA patients were treated with stentgrafts, but one refused to undergo an endovascular procedure. In three cases, stengrafts covered the left subclavian artery (LSA), in another the graft was implanted distally to the LSA. In two individuals, elective hybrid procedures were performed with surgical bypass to the supraaortic arteries followed by stengraft implantation. All subjects survived the secondary procedures. One patient developed type Ia endoleak after stentgraft implantation that was eventually treated with a debranching procedure. Conclusions The long-term course of clinically asymptomatic patients after coarctation patch repair is not uncommonly complicated by formation of TAAs (particularly in individuals with the gothic pattern of the aortic arch) that can be treated effectively with stentgrafts. However, in some patients hybrid procedures may be necessary. PMID:24386233

  16. Endovascular treatment of late thoracic aortic aneurysms after surgical repair of congenital aortic coarctation in childhood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Juszkat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In some patients, local surgery-related complications are diagnosed many years after surgery for aortic coarctation. The purposes of this study were: (1 to systematically evaluate asymptomatic adults after Dacron patch repair in childhood, (2 to estimate the formation rate of secondary thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs and (3 to assess outcomes after intravascular treatment for TAAs. METHODS: This study involved 37 asymptomatic patients (26 female and 11 male who underwent surgical repair of aortic coarctation in the childhood. After they had reached adolescence, patients with secondary TAAs were referred to endovascular repair. RESULTS: Follow-up studies revealed TAA in seven cases (19% (including six with the gothic type of the aortic arch and mild recoarctation in other six (16%. Six of the TAA patients were treated with stentgrafts, but one refused to undergo an endovascular procedure. In three cases, stengrafts covered the left subclavian artery (LSA, in another the graft was implanted distally to the LSA. In two individuals, elective hybrid procedures were performed with surgical bypass to the supraaortic arteries followed by stengraft implantation. All subjects survived the secondary procedures. One patient developed type Ia endoleak after stentgraft implantation that was eventually treated with a debranching procedure. CONCLUSIONS: The long-term course of clinically asymptomatic patients after coarctation patch repair is not uncommonly complicated by formation of TAAs (particularly in individuals with the gothic pattern of the aortic arch that can be treated effectively with stentgrafts. However, in some patients hybrid procedures may be necessary.

  17. The reported thoracic injuries in Homer's Iliad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolakis, Efstratios; Apostolaki, Georgia; Apostolaki, Mary; Chorti, Maria

    2010-11-19

    Homer's Iliad is considered to be a prominent and representative work of the tradition of the ancient Greek epic poetry. In this poem Homer presents the battles which took place during the last year of the 10-year lasting Trojan War between Achaeans and Trojans. We wanted to examine the chest wounds, especially those which are described in detail, according to their localization, severity and mortality. Finally, there are reported 54 consecutive thoracic injuries in the Iliad. The mostly used weapons were the spear (63%), the stones (7.4%), the arrow (5.5%) and the sword (5.5%). We divided the injuries according to their severity in mild (those which did not cause serious injury to the victim), medium (those which cause the victim to abandon the battlefield), and severe (those which cause death of the victim). According to this classification, the reported injuries were mild in 11.11%, medium in 18.52%, and severe in the last 70.37% of the reported cases. In other words, 89% of the injuries belong to the medium or severe category of thoracic injury. As far as the mortality of the injuries is concerned, 38 out of 54 thoracic injuries include death, which makes the mortality percentage reach 70.37%. Concerning the "allocation of the roles", the Achaean were in 68% perpetrators and the Trojans in only 32%. In terms of gravity, out of 38 mortal injuries 30 involve a Trojan (78.95%) and the remaining 8 an Achaean (21.05%). The excellent and detailed description of the injuries by Homer, as well as of the symptoms, may reveal a man with knowledge of anatomy and medicine who cared for the injured warriors in the battlefield.

  18. The current status of endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TEVAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Hosam; Ramlawi, Basel

    2011-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has been one of the most important advances in the management of thoracic aortic disease in the past two decades. The procedure was originally developed by Dake and colleagues in 1994 for the treatment of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (DTAA), using the same principles as EVAR for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The first device approved for this indication was the TAG device (W.L. Gore & Associated, Inc., Flagstaff, AZ) in 2005. Since then there has been a plethora of changes and new developments related to thoracic endovascular aortic repair. This article will summarize the major updates related to TEVAR, focusing on three main aspects: what is new in device technology and future prospects; the expanding indications of TEVAR for the treatment of other pathologies and the newly developed techniques involved; and a glimpse at the expected future direction in the field.

  19. Thoracic aortic aneurysm: A rare cause of elevated hemidiaphragm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Arshad Ejazi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve palsy causing hemidiaphragm paralysis is a very uncommon feature of thoracic aortic aneurysm. In one case, a 30 year male complained of chronic dull aching chest pain, and hoarseness of voice; posteroanterior view chest radiograph revealed large spherical radiopacity on the left upper lung zone with smooth lobulated margin with elevated left hemidiaphragm. On Colour Doppler sonography, lesion was anechoic on gray scale sonography but on Doppler analysis revealed intense internal vascularity within it with characteristic "Ying Yang" sign. The finding favor the vascular origin of the lesion and a diagnosis of an arterial aneurysm was made Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT of the thorax revealed a large well defined spherical lesion of 8 × 10 cm size with smooth well defined margin arising from the aortic arch and attenuation of impending rupture or dissection were lesion on immediate post contrast and delayed scan was similar to that of aorta. Left hemidiaphragm elevation was explained by the gross mass effect of the aneurysm causing right phrenic nerve palsy.

  20. Clinical and genetic aspects of Marfan syndrome and familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    This thesis concerns the clinical and genetic aspects of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections, in particular in Marfan syndrome. It includes the Dutch multidisciplinary guidelines for diagnosis and management of Marfan syndrome. These guidelines contain practical directions for

  1. Helical CT of traumatic injuries of the thoracic aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengozzi, E.; Burzi, M.; Miceli, M.; Lipparini, M.; Sartoni Galloni, S.

    2000-01-01

    Acute thoracic aortic injuries account for up to 10-20% of fatalities in high-speed deceleration road accidents and have an estimated immediate fatality rate of 80-90%. Untreated survivors to acute trauma (10-20%) have a dismal prognosis: 30% of them die within 6 hours, 40-50% die within 24 hours, and 90% within 4 months. It was investigated the diagnostic accuracy of Helical Computed Tomography (Helical CT) in acute traumatic injuries of the thoracic aorta, and the role of this technique in the diagnostic management of trauma patients with a strong suspicion of aortic rupture. It was compared retrospectively the chest Helical CT findings of 256 trauma patients examined June 1995 through August 1999. Chest Helical CT examinations were performed according to trauma score, to associated traumatic lesions and to plain chest radiographic findings. All the examinations were performed with no intravenous contrast agent administration and the pitch 2 technique. After a previous baseline study, contrast-enhanced scans were acquired with pitch 1 in 87 patients. Helical CT showed aortic lesions in 9 of 256 patients examined. In all the 9 cases it was found a mediastinal hematoma and all of them had positive plain chest radiographic findings of mediastinal enlargement. Moreover, in 6 cases aortic knob blurring was also evident on plain chest film and in 5 cases depressed left mainstem bronchus and trachea deviation rightwards were observed. All aortic lesions were identified on axial scans and located at the isthmus of level. Aortic rupture was always depicted as pseudo diverticulum of the proximal descending tract and intimal flap. It was also found that periaortic hematoma in 6 cases and intramural hematoma in 1 case. There were non false positive results in the series: 7 patients with Helical CT diagnosis of aortic rupture were submitted to conventional aortography that confirmed both type and extension of the lesions as detected by Helical CT, and all findings were

  2. Thoracic spine type C injuries: injury profile, management and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Checiu Gheorghe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last years we observed an increased number of patients with multiple lesions after high energy accidents. Type C injuries of the thoracic spine are the most severe lesions, with the worse prognosis. The study analyzes the injury profile, management and outcome of all patients with thoracic spine, from T1- to T10, type C injuries treated in the Spinal Surgery Department of “Bagdsar- Arseni” Emergency Hospital, in the last 5 years. There were 26 patients admitted in the study, mostly male, 77%, with a mean age of 33.8 years. All of them were victims of high energy accidents, and all had spine injury associated with multiple lesions (head, thoracic, abdominal and limbs. We have chosen a posterior approach in all cases, with laminectomy or hemilaminectomy, permitting us to achieve all the major objectives of surgery, with the advantage of lower blood loss and a reduced operating time. The purpose of surgery was to achieve decompression of the spinal cord and stability of the thoracic spine. We treated 19 patient surgically and 4 patient conservative. Thoracic spine type C fractures remain a challenge for the spinal surgeon. These lesions require a multidisciplinary team approach for the treatment of associated lesions. The main goal of surgery is to achieve stability of the fractured segments. The timing for surgery is indicated mainly by associated respiratory problems.

  3. Wall Stress and Geometry of the Thoracic Aorta in Patients With Aortic Valve Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Barry J; Norman, Paul E; Hoskins, Peter R; Newby, David E; Dweck, Marc R

    2018-04-01

    Aortic valve disease increases velocity and changes the way blood enters the aorta. Over time, the biomechanical environment can cause aortic remodelling. We hypothesized that aortic geometry and wall stress would be different in patients with aortic valve disease compared with controls. We examined 40 patients with aortic sclerosis (n = 10) or mild (n = 10), moderate (n = 10), and severe (n = 10) aortic stenosis, and also 10 control individuals. The thoracic aorta of each individual was reconstructed into a three-dimensional model from computed tomography. We measured geometric variables and used finite element analysis to compute aortic wall stress. Statistical analyses were performed to test our hypothesis. Aortic wall stress was significantly associated with tortuosity of the descending aorta (r = 0.35, p = 0.01), arch radius (r = 0.49, p < 0.01), ascending aortic diameter (r = 0.59, p < 0.01), and aortic centerline length (r = 0.39, p < 0.01). Wall stress was highest in patients with severe stenosis (p = 0.02), although elevations in wall stress were also noted in those with mild stenosis (p = 0.02), and aortic sclerosis (p = 0.02) compared with controls. Similar trends were observed when we corrected for difference in blood pressure. Total centerline tortuosity was higher in patients with severe aortic stenosis than in controls (p = 0.04), as was descending aorta tortuosity (p = 0.04). Aortic geometry is associated with aortic wall stress. Patients with aortic valve disease have higher aortic wall stress than controls, and those with severe aortic stenosis have more tortuous aortas. However, increases in geometric measures and wall stress are not stepwise with increasing disease severity. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Anatomic severity grading score for primary descending thoracic aneurysms predicts procedural difficulty and aortic-related reinterventions after thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Chad P; Larion, Sebastian; Ahanchi, Sadaf S; Lavingia, Kedar S; Dexter, David J; Panneton, Jean M

    2016-10-01

    An anatomic severity grading (ASG) score for primary descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAs) was developed. The objective of this study was to determine if an ASG score cutoff value for DTAs is predictive of procedural complexity, aortic-related reinterventions, and mortality in patients who undergo thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). A retrospective review from 2008 to 2013 of patient records was conducted of all consecutive patients who underwent TEVAR for a primary DTA. A comprehensive scoring system of preoperative DTA morphology on the basis of computed tomography angiography images was established to identify and classify anatomic features that might influence outcome after TEVAR. ASG score calculations were achieved using preoperative computed tomography angiography images. Primary outcomes included primary technical success, aortic-related reinterventions, aneurysm-related mortality, and all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included procedural complexity (unplanned adjunctive procedures, number of endografts implanted, contrast volume, and procedure time), endoleak formation, endoleak requiring reintervention, stroke and paraplegia, and conversion to open repair. Of 469 patients with a diagnosis of a thoracic aortic aneurysm, 62 patients (13%) underwent TEVAR and had adequate preoperative imaging (mean age, 71 years). Applying the ASG score, we identified 39 patients (63%) with a score ≥24 (high-score group) and 23 patients (37%) with a score DTAs predicted procedure complexity and aortic-related reinterventions after TEVAR. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Associated injuries, management, and outcomes of blunt abdominal aortic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mestral, Charles; Dueck, Andrew D; Gomez, David; Haas, Barbara; Nathens, Avery B

    2012-09-01

    Blunt abdominal aortic injury (BAAI) is very rare, and current literature is limited to case series of single-center experience. Through an analysis of the National Trauma Data Bank, the largest aggregation of United States trauma registry data, our aim was to characterize the associated injury pattern, contemporary management, and in-hospital outcomes of patients with BAAI. We used a nested case-control design. The overall cohort consisted of adult patients (age ≥ 16 years) severely injured (Injury Severity Score ≥ 16) after blunt trauma who were treated at a level 1 or 2 trauma center in years 2007 to 2009. Cases were patients with BAAI and were frequency-matched by age group and mechanism to randomly selected controls at a one-to-five ratio. Multivariable matched analysis (conditional logistic regression) was used to derive adjusted measures of association between BAAI and adjacent arterial, intra-abdominal, and bony injuries. We identified 436 patients with BAAI from 180 centers. The mean Injury Severity Score was 35 ± 14, and most patients were injured in motor vehicle crashes (84%). Multivariable analysis showed injury to the thoracic aorta, renal and iliac artery, small bowel, colon, liver, pancreas, and kidney, as well as lumbar spine fractures were independently associated with BAAI. A total of 394 patients (90%) were managed nonoperatively, and 42 (10%) underwent repair. Of these 42 patients, 29 (69%) underwent endovascular repair, with 11 patients undergoing open aortic repair and two extra-anatomic bypasses. Median time from admission to repair was 1 day (interquartile range, 1-2 days). Overall mortality was 29%. A total of 271 (69%) patients managed nonoperatively survived to hospital discharge. The index of suspicion for BAAI should be raised in severely injured patients by the presence of injuries to the lumbar spine, bowel, retroperitoneal organs, and adjacent major arteries. Although endovascular repair is the most common intervention, most

  6. Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair into the False Lumen in Chronic Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamman, Arnoud V; Williams, David M; Patel, Himanshu J

    2017-07-01

    Deployment of a stent graft for the treatment of aortic dissections is normally performed in the true lumen. However, in some rare occasions landing in the false lumen may be appropriate. We present 2 different cases of chronic aortic dissection, where we opted to land the stent graft into the false lumen to treat the associated aneurysm. For the first case, the goal of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) was to exclude the aneurysm from within the false lumen because of a slit-like true lumen. In the second case, the visceral arteries came off the false lumen, with the renal vessels from the true lumen. False lumen TEVAR was performed, and the infrarenal aorta fenestrated, as to ensure adequate perfusion. These different clinical scenarios show how false lumen TEVAR for chronic dissections with associated aneurysms can be an alternative treatment approach and highlight the importance of assessing the origin of branch vessels and the possible necessity of reperfusion of these, before TEVAR is performed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm due to brucellosis: a rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Qi; Liu, Han; Sun, Siqiao; Sun, Xiwei; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Zhongying; Cheng, Zhihua

    2017-06-02

    Arterial damage is a known complication of brucellosis, but the occurrence of a thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm secondary to brucellosis has not been previously reported. A 65-year-old Chinese man presented with a pseudoaneurysm in the descending segment of the thoracic aorta that caused symptoms of chest pain and intermittent fever. He was diagnosed with a thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm secondary to brucellosis based on a positive brucella serology test (standard-tube agglutination test) and imaging examination (computed tomography angiography). Anti-brucellosis treatment and covered stent graft implantation were attempted to eliminate the brucellosis and pseudoaneurysm, respectively, and were ultimately successful, with no symptoms after 6 months of follow-up. Endovascular repair may be effective and safe for treating a thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm resulting from brucellosis.

  8. Dynamic aortic changes in patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms evaluated with electrocardiography-triggered computed tomographic angiography before and after thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair: preliminary results.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prehn, J. van; Bartels, L.W.; Mestres, G.; Vincken, K.L.; Prokop, M.; Verhagen, H.J.; Moll, F.L.; Herwaarden, J.A. van

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize dynamic computed tomographic angiography (CTA) on pre- and postoperative thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) patients to characterize cardiac pulsatility-induced aortic motion on essential TEVAR proximal sealing zones and to study the influence of

  9. Selective nonoperative management of penetrating thoracic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Waes, Oscar J F; Halm, Jens A; Van Imhoff, Diederik I; Navsaria, Pradeep H; Nicol, Andrew J; Verhofstad, Michael H J; Vermeulen, Jefrey

    2018-02-01

    Thoracic penetrating injury is a cause for up to one-fifth of all non-natural deaths. The aim of this study was to determine the success of selective nonoperative management (SNOM) of patients presenting with a penetrating thoracic injury (PTI). This was a prospective study of patients with PTI who presented to a level 1 Trauma Center between April 2012 and August 2012. A total of 248 patients were included in the study, with 5.7% (n=14) requiring immediate emergency surgery. Overall, five of these 248 patients died, resulting in a mortality rate of 2.0%. Primarily 221 patients (89.1%) were managed with SNOM, of whom 15 (6.8%) failed conservative management. Failure of SNOM was primarily caused by complications of chest tube drainage (n=12) (e.g. retained clot, empyema) and delayed development of cardiac tamponade (n=3). The survival rate in the SNOM group was 100%. PTI has a low in-hospital mortality rate. Only 16.5% (41/248) of the patients presenting with PTI will need surgical treatment. The other patients are safe to be treated conservatively according to a protocolized SNOM approach for PTI without any additional mortality. Conservative treatment of patients who were selected for this nonoperative treatment strategy with repeated clinical reassessment was successful in 93.2%.

  10. JAG Tearing Technique with Radiofrequency Guide Wire for Aortic Fenestration in Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricci, Carmelo; Ceccherini, Claudio; Leonini, Sara; Cini, Marco; Vigni, Francesco; Neri, Eugenio; Tucci, Enrico; Benvenuti, Antonio; Tommasino, Giulio; Sassi, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    An innovative approach, the JAG tearing technique, was performed during thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair in a patient with previous surgical replacement of the ascending aorta with a residual uncomplicated type B aortic dissection who developed an aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta with its lumen divided in two parts by an intimal flap. The proximal landing zone was suitable to place a thoracic stent graft. The distal landing zone was created by cutting the intimal flap in the distal third of the descending thoracic aorta with a radiofrequency guide wire and intravascular ultrasound catheter.

  11. Local repair of distal thoracal aortic dissections (Locus minoris resistencia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Iu V; Komarov, R N; Stepanenko, A B; Gens, A P; Charchian, E R

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents the method of local repair of distal aortic dissections. Local aortic grafting for surgical correction of type B dissecting aortic aneurysms helped to decrease hospital mortality up to 15.4%, the rate of paraparesis and multiorgan failure - up to 11.5%.

  12. Thoracic cage injury imaging in rugby players | de Villiers | SA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rugby players often sustain high-impact collisions and are therefore at risk of significant traumatic thoracic injuries. Injury to the thoracic cage may be associated with potentially life-threatening sequelae. Player management is often based on the accuracy of the imaging report. The author suggests a combination of ...

  13. Aortic Wall Injury Related to Endovascular Therapy for Aortic Coarctation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretter, Justin T; Jones, Thomas K; McElhinney, Doff B

    2015-09-01

    Aortic wall complications can occur in unrepaired aortic coarctation (CoA) and after surgical repair or endovascular treatment. This review summarizes the available literature and current understanding of aortic wall injury (AWI) surrounding the management of CoA, focusing specifically on acute and follow-up AWI after endovascular treatment. There have been 23 reported cases of aortic rupture after endovascular treatment for CoA, including angioplasty alone, bare metal stenting, and primary covered stent therapy. Even if these published cases represent only a minority of ruptures that have actually occurred, the incidence is substantially treatment of CoA seems to be declining in frequency with increasing experience and improving technology, it remains one of the most important potential adverse outcomes. Long-term surveillance for new AWI and monitoring of existing AWI is mandatory, with institution of appropriate treatment when necessary. A central research focus in this population should be determination of the appropriate treatment for both native and recurrent CoA across various ages with regard to limiting recurrent CoA and preventing associated aortic wall complications, in addition to determining the appropriate treatment of various AWI. Consistent definitions and reporting are necessary to truly understand the incidence of, risk factors for, and measures protective against AWI after angioplasty or stent implantation for CoA. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Reconstruction of a Rollover Crash for Thoracic Injury Etiology Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tana Tan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The cause of serious and fatal thoracic injuries in passenger vehicle rollover crashes is currently not well understood. Previous research on thoracic injuries resulting from rollover crashes have focused primarily on statistical analysis of crash data. This study seeks to develop a better understanding of where in the rollover sequence thoracic injuries may occur. To do this, a real-world passenger vehicle rollover crash where the driver sustained serious bilateral thoracic injuries was reconstructed. Multi-body analysis was used to determine the vehicle’s pre-trip trajectory and to obtain the vehicle’s position and kinematics at the point of trip. This information was then used to prescribe the motion of the vehicle in a finite element analysis. A finite element model of the EuroSID-2re anthropomorphic test device was placed in the driver’s seat. Four simulations, each with the anthropomorphic test device positioned in different postures, were performed. Rib deflection, spinal acceleration, and thoracic impact velocity were obtained from the anthropomorphic test device and compared to existing thoracic injury assessment reference values. From the analysis, lateral thoracic impact velocity indicates that a serious thoracic injury is likely to have occurred when the driver impacted the centre console during the vehicle’s fourth quarter-turn.

  15. Bicuspid Aortic Valve and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm: Three Patient Populations, Two Disease Phenotypes, and One Shared Genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Hinton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV and thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA are two discrete cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by latent progressive disease states. There is a clear association between BAV and TAA; however the nature and extent of this relationship is unclear. There are both distinct and overlapping developmental pathways that have been established to contribute to the formation of the aortic valve and the aortic root, and the mature anatomy of these different tissue types is intimately intertwined. Likewise, human genetics studies have established apparently separate and common contributions to these clinical phenotypes, suggesting complex inheritance and a shared genetic basis and translating 3 patient populations, namely, BAV, TAA, or both, into a common but diverse etiology. A better understanding of the BAV-TAA association will provide an opportunity to leverage molecular information to modify clinical care through more sophisticated diagnostic testing, improved counseling, and ultimately new pharmacologic therapies.

  16. Performant Mutation Identification Using Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing of 14 Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Proost, D.; Vandeweyer, G.; Meester, J.A.; Salemink, S.; Kempers, M.; Ingram, C.; Peeters, N.; Saenen, J.; Vrints, C.; Lacro, R.V.; Roden, D.; Wuyts, W.; Dietz, H.C.; Mortier, G.; Loeys, B.L.; Laer, L. Van

    2015-01-01

    At least 14 causative genes have been identified for both syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of thoracic aortic aneurysm/dissection (TAA), an important cause of death in the industrialized world. Molecular confirmation of the diagnosis is increasingly important for gene-tailored patient management but

  17. Polyamine concentration is increased in thoracic ascending aorta of patients with bicuspid aortic valve

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Forte, A.; Grossi, Mario; Bancone, C.; Cipollaro, M.; De Feo, M.; Hellstrand, P.; Persson, L.; Nilsson, B.O.; Della Corte, A.

    Roč. 33, č. 3 ( 2017 ), s. 327-339 ISSN 0910-8327 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Aneurysm * Aortopathy * Bicuspid aortic valve * Ornithine decarboxylase * Polyamines * Thoracic ascending aorta Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.434, year: 2016

  18. Moderately Elevated Homocysteine Does Not Contribute to Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohi, Jasmin; Kang, Benjamin; Bernard, David; Bedja, Djahida; Dietz, Harry C; Brody, Lawrence C

    2017-07-01

    Background: Moderate hyperhomocysteinemia is an attractive target for intervention because it is present in 5-7% of the population and can be reversed by diet. This approach presupposes that hyperhomocysteinemia is directly involved in the disease process. Epidemiologic studies have indicated that moderately elevated homocysteine may contribute to thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) dilatation and dissection in humans. In vitro, elevated homocysteine disrupts the structure and function of extracellular matrix components, suggesting that moderate hyperhomocysteinemia may contribute to the development and/or progression of TAA. Objective: We investigated moderately elevated homocysteine in the development and progression of TAA in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome (MFS) and in isogenic wild-type mice. The MFS mouse is a well-described model of a systemic connective tissue disorder characterized by thoracic aortic dilatation, dissection, and rupture. We used this model as a sensitized indicator system to examine the impact of homocysteine on the progression of TAA. Methods: Murine fibrillin 1 gene ( Fbn1 ) C1039G/+ MFS and C57BL/6J wild-type mice were fed a cobalamin-restricted diet to induce moderate hyperhomocysteinemia from weaning until the age of 32 wk. Homocysteine and methylmalonic acid were measured and aortic root diameter assessed with the use of echocardiography in mice aged 3, 7, 15, and 32 wk. Results: Cobalamin-restricted mice exhibited significantly higher homocysteine ( P < 0.0001) and methylmalonic acid ( P < 0.0001) in the blood. For both strains, no significant difference in thoracic aortic diameter was observed in mice on the cobalamin-restricted diet compared with those on the control diet. Conclusions: Fbn1 C1039G/+ mice are a well-characterized model of progressive aortic root dilation. Hyperhomocysteinemia in the physiologic range did not induce abnormal aortic growth in wild-type mice and did not accelerate or otherwise influence aortic root growth

  19. Blunt traumatic aortic injury: initial experience with endovascular repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizzadeh, Ali; Keyhani, Kourosh; Miller, Charles C; Coogan, Sheila M; Safi, Hazim J; Estrera, Anthony L

    2009-06-01

    Endovascular treatment of traumatic aortic injury (TAI) is an alternative to open repair (OR) in patients with blunt trauma. We report our initial experience after integration of endovascular repair using thoracic devices. A retrospective review of a prospectively collected institutional trauma registry was performed. Between September 2005 and November 2008, 71 patients with TAI presented to our institution. Based on imaging, TAIs were classified into grade 1-4 in severity. These included: grade 1, intimal tear; grade 2, intramural hematoma; grade 3, aortic pseudoaneurysm; and grade 4, free rupture. Initial management included resuscitation, blood pressure control, and treatment of associated injuries. After stabilization, all patients were considered for thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) using a thoracic device. If contraindicated, candidates underwent OR. Outcome measures were mortality, stroke, paraplegia, intensive care unit (ICU), and hospital stay. The mean age was 39.8 years, with 50 males. The mean injury severity score (ISS) was 42.6. Nineteen (27%) patients with a mean ISS of 60 died shortly after arrival prior to any vascular intervention. Ten (14%) patients with grade 1 injuries were managed medically. The remaining 42 (59%) patients with grade 2 and 3 injuries underwent repair. Median interval between admission and repair was 4.3 days (range, 0-109 days). Fifteen (21%) patients with a mean ISS of 34.4 underwent OR with no mortality, stroke, or paraplegia. Twenty-seven (38%) patients with a mean ISS of 36.7 underwent TEVAR with no mortality or paraplegia. One TEVAR patient suffered a perioperative stroke. Twenty-two patients had a TAG (W.L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, Ariz) device. Four patients had a Talent Thoracic (Medtronic Vascular, Santa Rosa, Calif), and 1 patient had an Excluder (W.L. Gore) device. The left subclavian artery was covered in 13 (48%) patients. Patients who underwent TEVAR were older than those who had OR (47.8 vs 31

  20. Cardiovascular Disease in Ageing: An Overview on Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm as an Emerging Inflammatory Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calogera Pisano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Medial degeneration associated with thoracic aortic aneurysm and acute aortic dissection was originally described by Erdheim as a noninflammatory lesion related to the loss of smooth muscle cells and elastic fibre fragmentation in the media. Recent evidences propose the strong role of a chronic immune/inflammatory process in aneurysm evocation and progression. The coexistence of inflammatory cells with markers of apoptotic vascular cell death in the media of ascending aorta with aneurysms and type A dissections raises the possibility that activated T cells and macrophages may contribute to the elimination of smooth muscle cells and degradation of the matrix. On the other hand, several inflammatory pathways (including TGF-β, TLR-4 interferon-γ, chemokines, and interferon-γ seem to be involved in the medial degeneration related to aged and dilated aorta. This is an overview on thoracic aortic aneurysm as an emerging inflammatory disease.

  1. Preoperative Evaluation and Endovascular Procedure of Intraoperative Aneurysm Rupture During Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zha, Bin-Shan, E-mail: binszha2013@163.com; Zhu, Hua-Gang, E-mail: huagzhu@yeah.net; Ye, Yu-Sheng, E-mail: yeyusheng@aliyun.com; Li, Yong-Sheng, E-mail: 872868848@qq.com; Zhang, Zhi-Gong, E-mail: zzgedward@sina.com; Xie, Wen-Tao, E-mail: 345344347@qq.com [The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Department of Vascular Surgery (China)

    2017-03-15

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms are now routinely repaired with endovascular repair if anatomically feasible because of advantages in safety and recovery. However, intraoperative aneurysm rupture is a severe complication which may have an adverse effect on the outcome of treatment. Comprehensive preoperative assessment and considerate treatment are keys to success of endovascular aneurysm repair, especially during unexpected circumstances. Few cases have reported on intraoperative aortic rupture, which were successfully managed by endovascular treatment. Here, we present a rare case of an intraoperative aneurysm rupture during endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm with narrow neck and angulated aorta arch (coarctation-associated aneurysm), which was successfully treated using double access route approach and iliac limbs of infrarenal devices.Level of EvidenceLevel 5.

  2. Are frailty markers associated with serious thoracic and spinal injuries among motor vehicle crash occupants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskutis, Morgan Q; Lauerman, Margaret H; Kufera, Joseph A; Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanathan; Burch, Cynthia; Kerns, Timothy; Ho, Shiu; Scalea, Thomas M; Stein, Deborah M

    2016-07-01

    While age is a known risk factor in trauma, markers of frailty are growing in their use in the critically ill. Frailty markers may reflect underlying strength and function more than chronologic age, as many modern elderly patients are quite active. However, the optimal markers of frailty are unknown. A retrospective review of The Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) database was performed over an 11-year period. Computed tomographic images were analyzed for multiple frailty markers, including sarcopenia determined by psoas muscle area, osteopenia determined by Hounsfield units (HU) of lumbar vertebrae, and vascular disease determined by aortic calcification. Overall, 202 patients were included in the review, with a mean age of 58.5 years. Median Injury Severity Score was 17. Sarcopenia was associated with severe thoracic injury (62.9% vs. 42.5%; p = 0.03). In multivariable analysis controlling for crash severity, sarcopenia remained associated with severe thoracic injury (p = 0.007) and osteopenia was associated with severe spine injury (p = 0.05). While age was not significant in either multivariable analysis, the association of sarcopenia and osteopenia with development of serious injury was more common with older age. Multiple markers of frailty were associated with severe injury. Frailty may more reflect underlying physiology and injury severity than age, although age is associated with frailty. Prognostic and epidemiologic study, level IV.

  3. Endovascular stent grafting of thoracic aortic aneurysms: technological advancements provide an alternative to traditional surgical repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lauren E Beste

    2005-01-01

    The use of endovascular stent grafts is a leading technological advancement in the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms, and is being trialed in the United States as an alternative to medical management and traditional surgical repair. Aortic stent grafts, initially used only for abdominal aortic aneurysms, have been used for over 10 years in Europe and are currently under United States Food and Drug Administration investigation for the treatment of chronic and acute aortic aneurysms. Diseases of the thoracic aorta are often present in high-risk individuals, and, as a result, there is a high morbidity and mortality rate associated with both medical and surgical management of these patients. The development and refinement of endovascular approaches have the potential to decrease the need for traditional surgical repair, especially in high-risk populations such as the elderly and those with multiple comorbidities. Endovascular technology for thoracic repair has only been used in Europe for the last 10 years, with no long-term outcomes available; however, preliminary research demonstrates favorable early and midterm outcomes showing that endovascular stent graft placement to exclude the dilated, dissected, or ruptured aorta is both technically feasible and safe for patients. The article highlights the historical perspective of endovascular stent grafting as well as a description of patient selection, the operative procedure, benefits, risks, and unresolved issues pertaining to the procedure. A brief review of aneurysm and dissection pathophysiology and management is provided, as well as postoperative management for acute care nurses and recommendations for clinical practice.

  4. Biomechanical and biochemical properties of the thoracic aorta in warmblood horses, Friesian horses, and Friesians with aortic rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saey, Veronique; Famaey, Nele; Smoljkic, Marija; Claeys, Erik; van Loon, Gunther; Ducatelle, Richard; Ploeg, Margreet; Delesalle, Catherine; Gröne, Andrea; Duchateau, Luc; Chiers, Koen

    2015-11-18

    Thoracic aortic rupture and aortopulmonary fistulation are rare conditions in horses. It mainly affects Friesian horses. Intrinsic differences in biomechanical properties of the aortic wall might predispose this breed. The biomechanical and biochemical properties of the thoracic aorta were characterized in warmblood horses, unaffected Friesian horses and Friesians with aortic rupture in an attempt to unravel the underlying pathogenesis of aortic rupture in Friesian horses. Samples of the thoracic aorta at the ligamentum arteriosum (LA), mid thoracic aorta (T1) and distal thoracic aorta (T2) were obtained from Friesian horses with aortic rupture (A), nonaffected Friesian (NA) and warmblood horses (WB). The biomechanical properties of these samples were determined using uniaxial tensile and rupture assays. The percentages of collagen and elastin (mg/mg dry weight) were quantified. Data revealed no significant biomechanical nor biochemical differences among the different groups of horses. The distal thoracic aorta displayed an increased stiffness associated with a higher collagen percentage in this area and a higher load-bearing capacity compared to the more proximal segments. Our findings match reported findings in other animal species. Study results did not provide evidence that the predisposition of the Friesian horse breed for aortic rupture can be attributed to altered biomechanical properties of the aortic wall.

  5. Endovascular treatment of type II endoleak following thoracic endovascular aortic repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm: Case report of squeeze technique to reach the aneurysmal sac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Jung; Kim, Chang Won; Lee, Tae Hong; Song, Seung Hwan; Lee, Chung Won; Chung, Sung Woon [Pusan National University Hospital, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Type II endoleaks are common after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Various strategies are introduced to manage type II endoleaks, such as the use of coils, plugs, or liquid embolic agents (histoacryl, thrombin, onyx, etc.) through a transarterial approach or a direct puncture of the aneurysmal sac. We herein report a case of a type II endoleak caused by reverse blood flow through intercostal artery after TEVAR which was successfully treated with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (histoacryl)-lipiodol mixture by a squeeze technique to reach the aneurismal sac using a microcatheter.

  6. Quantification of progression and regression of descending thoracic aortic wall thickness by enhanced computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Kenichi; Takasu, Junichiro; Yamamoto, Rie; Taguchi, Rie; Itani, Yasutaka; Ito, Yuichi; Watanabe, Shigeru; Masuda, Yoshiaki

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to verify the usefulness of the quantification of aortic wall involvement by enhanced computed tomography (CT). One-hundred thirteen Japanese patients underwent two enhanced CT of the descending thoracic aorta at intervals. We sliced the descending thoracic aorta continuously from the level of the tracheal bifurcation with 1 cm intervals, and we defined aortic wall volume (AWV) (cm 3 ) as the sum of a 7-slice area of aortic wall involving calcification. The average of AWV increased from 7.95±2.92 cm 3 to 8.70±2.98 cm 3 . The developmental rate of AWV (ΔAWV) was 0.270±0.281 cm 3 /year. ΔAWV did not have a significant correlation with any risk factor at the baseline. ΔAWV had significant correlation with total cholesterol, (LDL-C) low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and LDL-C/(HDL-C) high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio at the follow-up, and by multivariate analysis with only the LDL-C/HDL-C ratio. ΔAWV was not correlated with the intake status of hypoglycemic, antihypertensive or lipid-lowering drugs. The cut-off level of total cholesterol with the most significant odds ratio for progression of aortic wall was 190 mg/dl, and that of LDL-C was 130 mg/dl. This method proved to be useful for the non-invasive assessment of aortic wall thickness. (author)

  7. An unique case of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) graft infection with Streptococcus viridans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubaidah, N H; Azim, M I M; Osama, M H; Harunarashid, H; Das, S

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of infection following TEVAR is low. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of post thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) with Streptococcus viridans graft infection. A 54-year-old male underwent TEVAR for dissecting thoracic aneurysm with spinal ischaemia. He had an eventful recovery with prolonged period of stay in intensive care unit. Three months later, he presented with persistent chest discomfort and fever. Computed tomography (CT) of the thorax revealed evidence of graft infection and the blood culture grew Streptococcus viridans. The rarity of TEVAR graft infection due to Streptococcus viridans and its management are being discussed.

  8. Evolution in management of adolescent blunt aortic injuries--a single institution 22-y experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Adam S; Rogers, Andrew P; Acher, Charles W; Wynn, Martha M; Nichol, Peter F; Ostlie, Daniel J; Gosain, Ankush

    2015-02-01

    In children, severe, life-threatening traumatic injuries of the thoracic aorta can be seen after motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) resulting in a sudden deceleration. Concurrent injuries in the thorax and abdomen can make treatment prioritization difficult and require early recognition and prompt intervention. With the increased utilization of minimally invasive endovascular approaches to traumatic aortic (TA) injuries, patients are often spared the increased surgical morbidity (spinal cord ischemia and renal insults) that can be seen with an open technique. The aim of this study was to evaluate a single American College of Surgeons level 1 pediatric trauma center's 22-y experience with TA injuries in children. After the Institutional Review Board approval, a 22-y (January 1990-April 2013) retrospective review of all pediatric trauma patients admitted with TA injuries was performed. Patient demographics including age, injury detail, treatment, and outcomes were recorded for analysis. 17 children (mild mental deficits as a result of head trauma. TA injuries are an uncommon injury in children and can result from MVCs or other sudden deceleration mechanisms. Surgical intervention is required in most of the cases and can be performed safely and effectively with low morbidity using an endovascular approach, which is the evolving approach of choice for thoracic aortic injuries. Lengthy follow-up care is recommended in children treated with an endovascular device to monitor for endoleaks and device complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Successful Endobronchial stenting for bronchial compression from a massive thoracic aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Comer

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A case of bronchial occlusion caused by a thoracic aortic aneurysm and the relief of this obstruction by the implantation of expandable metallic stents is described. Stent deployment provided an immediate improvement in lung ventilation and chest radiograph appearances. Stent insertion was uncomplicated, but weaning from mechanical ventilation was unsuccessful and the patient died from a ventilator-associated pneumonia, unrelated to the procedure. Endobronchial stenting should be considered as a non-invasive therapy for the treatment of bronchial obstruction, with respiratory compromise, caused by a thoracic aortic aneurysm when vascular surgery is not an option. The medium to long term survival of this patient group is poor. This can be attributed to complications related to the stent and also to the poor performance status of these patients.

  10. Multiple subfailures characterize blunt aortic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemper, Brian D; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Brasel, Karen J

    2007-05-01

    Blunt aortic injuries result from rapid deceleration of the thorax as may occur during automotive impacts and falls from extreme heights. Pathological findings can range from failure of specific vessel layers to immediate vessel wall rupture. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the sequence of local structural events that may lead to aortic wall disruption. Fourteen porcine aorta specimens were opened to expose the intima and longitudinally distracted until rupture. Longitudinal mechanics were quantified and subfailures were identified. Histology was used to examine internal layer subfailure. Videography demonstrated that subfailures propagated into complete vessel wall rupture. Subfailures occurred before complete vessel rupture in 93% of specimens. Intimal and medial subfailures were present at 74% of the stress and 82% of the strain to rupture. Multiple subfailures were evident in 79% of specimens. Present results supported the clinical theory that nonimmediate death as a result of blunt aortic injury is commonly caused by propagation of lesser lesions, initiating on the intimal layer, into complete vessel rupture including the adventitial layer. This finding, along with histologic evidence of subfailure pathological findings, confirms the presence of an acute window during which recognition and initiation of permissive hypotension may be lifesaving.

  11. Delayed management of Grade III blunt aortic injury: Series from a Level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeds, Matthew R; Wright, Mark P; Eidt, John F; Moursi, Mohammed M; Escobar, Guillermo A; Spencer, Horace J; Ali, Ahsan T

    2016-06-01

    Blunt aortic injuries (BAIs) are traditionally treated as surgical emergencies, with the majority of repairs performed in an urgent fashion within 24 hours, irrespective of the grade of aortic injury. These patients are often underresuscitated and often have multiple other trauma issues that need to be addressed. This study reviews a single center's experience comparing urgent (24 hours) TEVAR for Grade III BAI. All patients undergoing TEVAR for BAI at a single institution between March 2004 and March 2014 were reviewed (n = 43). Patients with Grade I, II, or IV aortic injuries as well as those who were repaired with an open procedure or who lacked preoperative imaging were excluded from the analysis. Demographics, intraoperative data, postoperative survival, and complications were compared. During this period, there were 43 patients with blunt thoracic aortic injury. There were 29 patients with Grade III or higher aortic injuries. Of these 29 patients, 1 declined surgery, 2 were repaired with an open procedure, 10 underwent urgent TEVAR, and 16 had initial observation. Of these 16, 13 underwent TEVAR in a delayed fashion (median, 9 days; range, 2-91 days), and 3 died of non-aortic-related pathology. Comparing the immediate repair group versus the delayed repair group, there were no significant demographic differences. Trauma classification scores were similar, although patients in the delayed group had a higher number of nonaortic injuries. The 30-day survival was similar between the two groups (9 of 10 vs. 12 of 16), with no mortalities caused by aortic pathology in either group. Watchful waiting may be permissible in patients with Grade III BAI with other associated multisystem trauma. This allows for a repair in a more controlled environment. Therapeutic study, level V.

  12. Recurrent Rare Genomic Copy Number Variants and Bicuspid Aortic Valve Are Enriched in Early Onset Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Prakash

    Full Text Available Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections (TAAD are a major cause of death in the United States. The spectrum of TAAD ranges from genetic disorders, such as Marfan syndrome, to sporadic isolated disease of unknown cause. We hypothesized that genomic copy number variants (CNVs contribute causally to early onset TAAD (ETAAD. We conducted a genome-wide SNP array analysis of ETAAD patients of European descent who were enrolled in the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC. Genotyping was performed on the Illumina Omni-Express platform, using PennCNV, Nexus and CNVPartition for CNV detection. ETAAD patients (n = 108, 100% European American, 28% female, average age 20 years, 55% with bicuspid aortic valves were compared to 7013 dbGAP controls without a history of vascular disease using downsampled Omni 2.5 data. For comparison, 805 sporadic TAAD patients with late onset aortic disease (STAAD cohort and 192 affected probands from families with at least two affected relatives (FTAAD cohort from our institution were screened for additional CNVs at these loci with SNP arrays. We identified 47 recurrent CNV regions in the ETAAD, FTAAD and STAAD groups that were absent or extremely rare in controls. Nine rare CNVs that were either very large (>1 Mb or shared by ETAAD and STAAD or FTAAD patients were also identified. Four rare CNVs involved genes that cause arterial aneurysms when mutated. The largest and most prevalent of the recurrent CNVs were at Xq28 (two duplications and two deletions and 17q25.1 (three duplications. The percentage of individuals harboring rare CNVs was significantly greater in the ETAAD cohort (32% than in the FTAAD (23% or STAAD (17% cohorts. We identified multiple loci affected by rare CNVs in one-third of ETAAD patients, confirming the genetic heterogeneity of TAAD. Alterations of candidate genes at these loci may contribute to the pathogenesis of TAAD.

  13. [Severe hemodynamic deterioration during epidural anesthesia for endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsma, M; Herrera, P; Moreno, I; Matoses, S; Ortí, I; López, A; Alepuz, R

    2005-10-01

    A 72-year-old woman diagnosed with critical descending aortic stenosis was scheduled for endovascular treatment by angioplasty and implantation of an aortic stent. Her medical history included arterial hypertension, lipid metabolic disorder, obesity, Takayasu disease, dermatopolymyositis, and alleged allergy to iodine contrast and local anesthetics. After the allergies were ruled out, it was decided to use a regional anesthetic technique to avoid the postoperative complications of general anesthesia and achieve better hemodynamic control during surgery. Surgery was carried out under epidural anesthesia and intravenous sedation. After angioplasty and during self-expansion of the stent, the patient's hemodynamics deteriorated rapidly; she lost consciousness and required orotracheal intubation and immediate resuscitation measures. The literature describes in detail the management of patients with thoracic aortic lesions, including the most appropriate way to provide anesthesia. General anesthesia seems to be preferred, although care is taken to individualize the decision. We analyze this case of a patient with severe thoracic aortic stenosis undergoing endovascular treatment under epidural anesthesia.

  14. Metabolomic profiling of ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections - Implications for pathophysiology and biomarker discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Doppler

    Full Text Available Our basic understanding of ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm (ATAA pathogenesis is still very limited, hampering early diagnosis, risk prediction, and development of treatment options. "Omics"-technologies, ideal to reveal tissue alterations from the normal physiological state due to disease have hardly been applied in the field. Using a metabolomic approach, with this study the authors seek to define tissue differences between controls and various forms of ATAAs.Using a targeted FIA-MS/MS metabolomics approach, we analysed and compared the metabolic profiles of ascending thoracic aortic wall tissue of age-matched controls (n = 8, bicuspid aortic valve-associated aneurysms (BAV-A; n = 9, tricuspid aortic valve-associated aneurysms (TAV-A; n = 14, and tricuspid aortic valve-associated aortic dissections (TAV-Diss; n = 6.With sphingomyelin (SM (OH C22:2, SM C18:1, SM C22:1, and SM C24:1 only 4 out of 92 detectable metabolites differed significantly between controls and BAV-A samples. Between controls and TAV-Diss samples only phosphatidylcholine (PC ae C32:1 differed. Importantly, our analyses revealed a general increase in the amount of total sphingomyelin levels in BAV-A and TAV-Diss samples compared to controls.Significantly increased levels of sphingomyelins in BAV-A and TAV-Diss samples compared to controls may argue for a repression of sphingomyelinase activity and the sphingomyelinase-ceramide pathway, which may result in an inhibition of tissue regeneration; a potential basis for disease initiation and progression.

  15. [Diagnosis and treatment of thoracic injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guguli, M; Gasi, M

    1979-01-01

    Injuries of the chest isolated or joined with injuries of other organs are distinctly increasing. There are almost no polytraumatic people without thorax injuries. Traffic traumas have a dominant role in causing these injuries. We had most injuries in sammer months. The isolated chest injurie we had 60% and the accompanying injurie 40%. Of the accompanying injuries, the head injurie have the most autstanding place, which especially make difficult the diagnostics, and curing. In heavy injuries of the thorax with paradoxical breathing and on both sides of the leasions, establishing the internal pneumatic stabilisation at the beginning by pulmomatic and then ostheosyntesis of ribs are the most effective therapy. In order to prevent the infections, atracheobronchial dressing with antibiotics is performed as well as the regular X-ray check. As a general rule than 200 ml. per 3 hour requires operative control of the hemorrhage. We had 5,6% thoracothomy after continuous drainage by persstend hemorrhage. The obstructive pneumonia, particularly the eldery are to avoid obstructis, aspiration by catheter with bronchoscopy.

  16. Blunt abdominal aortic injury: a Western Trauma Association multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalhub, Sherene; Starnes, Benjamin W; Brenner, Megan L; Biffl, Walter L; Azizzadeh, Ali; Inaba, Kenji; Skiada, Dimitra; Zarzaur, Ben; Nawaf, Cayce; Eriksson, Evert A; Fakhry, Samir M; Paul, Jasmeet S; Kaups, Krista L; Ciesla, David J; Todd, S Rob; Seamon, Mark J; Capano-Wehrle, Lisa M; Jurkovich, Gregory J; Kozar, Rosemary A

    2014-12-01

    Blunt abdominal aortic injury (BAAI) is a rare injury. The objective of the current study was to examine the presentation and management of BAAI at a multi-institutional level. The Western Trauma Association Multi-Center Trials conducted a study of BAAI from 1996 to 2011. Data collected included demographics, injury mechanism, associated injuries, interventions, and complications. Of 392,315 blunt trauma patients, 113 (0.03%) presented with BAAI at 12 major trauma centers (67% male; median age, 38 years; range, 6-88; median Injury Severity Score [ISS], 34; range, 16-75). The leading cause of injury was motor vehicle collisions (60%). Hypotension was documented in 47% of the cases. The most commonly associated injuries were spine fractures (44%) and pneumothorax/hemothorax (42%). Solid organ, small bowel, and large bowel injuries occurred in 38%, 35%, and 28% respectively. BAAI presented as free aortic rupture (32%), pseudoaneurysm (16%), and injuries without aortic external contour abnormality on computed tomography such as large intimal flaps (34%) or intimal tears (18%). Open and endovascular repairs were undertaken as first-choice therapy in 43% and 15% of cases, respectively. Choice of management varied by type of BAAI: 89% of intimal tears were managed nonoperatively, and 96% of aortic ruptures were treated with open repair. Overall mortality was 39%, the majority (68%) occurring in the first 24 hours because of hemorrhage or cardiac arrest. The highest mortality was associated with Zone II aortic ruptures (92%). Follow-up was documented in 38% of live discharges. This is the largest BAAI series reported to date. BAAI presents as a spectrum of injury ranging from minimal aortic injury to aortic rupture. Nonoperative management is successful in uncomplicated cases without external aortic contour abnormality on computed tomography. Highest mortality occurred in free aortic ruptures, suggesting that alternative measures of early noncompressible torso hemorrhage

  17. [Change of paradigms in the surgical treatment of complex thoracic aortic disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Ulf; Tsagakis, Konstantinos; Kamler, Markus; Massoudy, Parwis; Assenmacher, Eva; Eggebrecht, Holger; Buck, Thomas; Jakob, Heinz

    2006-08-01

    One of the main issues in complex thoracic aortic disease, requiring the replacement of the ascending aorta, the entire aortic arch and the descending aorta, is the vast amount of surgery necessary to cure the patient. Though one-stage repair is feasible by a clamshell thoracotomy, the associated surgical trauma and perioperative morbidity limit this approach to younger patients only. Classic surgical repair consist of a two-stage strategy, whereby, in the first step, the ascending aorta and the aortic arch are replaced via a midline sternotomy. In the second step, via a lateral thoracotomy, the descending aorta is replaced. The two stages may sum up to a mortality of 20%; furthermore, the waiting period between the stages is associated with a mortality rate of 10% of its own. Additionally, the two-stage strategy has an inherent limitation, due to the comorbidity and advanced age of the majority of patients. Therefore, the second stage cannot be offered to up to 30% of patients. New developments and improvements in aortic surgery were introduced to overcome these shortcomings and to simplify the surgical repair. The "elephant trunk" principle, introduced by Borst et al. in 1983, was an important step to facilitate surgical repair, but still required the second step. With the introduction of endovascular repair of thoracic aortic disease with stent grafts implanted retrograde via the femoral artery, new therapeutic concepts emerged. In the late 1990s, two Japanese groups reported first trials to stabilize the free-floating "elephant trunk" prosthesis by implantation of nitinol stent grafts into the vascular graft. The applied devices were purely custom-made and nonstandardized. The availability of industrially made and CE-marked stent-graft devices raised the possibility to apply them in open aortic arch surgery. The experience with stent-graft devices implanted antegrade into the descending aorta (Medtronic Talent) was reported first by the Essen and the Vienna

  18. Medical image of the week: atherosclerotic aneurysm of aortic arch and descecnding thoracic aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parasram M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 94-year-old Spanish-speaking woman presented to the hospital with intermittent episodes of dyspnea and abdominal pain for one week. Her past medical history was notable for 30 pack-year smoking history and hypertension, which was reportedly controlled with medical therapy. Physical exam showed trace peripheral edema bilaterally, intact peripheral pulses, and a mild abdominal bruit. Work up at the emergency department revealed a non-ST elevation myocardial infarction with troponin T of 0.34 ng/mL but no ST-wave abnormality on electrocardiography. Chest x-ray displayed an incidental thoracic aneurysm (Figure 1. Chest computed tomography with contrast demonstrated a continuous aneurysm of the aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta with diameters measuring 6.8 cm and 6 cm, respectively (Figure 2A and 2B. Eccentric thrombi are noted in the aortic arch and the descending aorta. Interestingly, the distal descending thoracic aorta curves as it transitions to the abdominal aorta, which is evidence of a tortuous descending ...

  19. Combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Lönn, Lars; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    valve stenosis (AS) who are considered at high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement. In this report, we describe the combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of an extensive TAA and AS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of hybrid TAA repair combined with TAVR....

  20. Endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms: results of the phase II multicenter trial of the GORE TAG thoracic endoprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makaroun, Michel S; Dillavou, Ellen D; Kee, Stephen T; Sicard, Gregorio; Chaikof, Elliot; Bavaria, Joseph; Williams, David; Cambria, Richard P; Mitchell, R Scott

    2005-01-01

    A decade after the first report of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (DTA) repair with endografts, a commercial device is yet to be approved in the United States. The GORE TAG endoprosthesis, an investigational nitinol-supported expanded polytetrafluoroethylene tube graft with diameters of 26 to 40 mm, is the first DTA device to enter phase II trials in the United States and has been used worldwide for a host of thoracic pathologies. A multicenter prospective nonrandomized phase II study of the GORE TAG endoprosthesis was conducted at 17 sites. Enrollment was from September 1999 to May 2001. Preoperative workup included arteriography and spiral computed tomography scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. Follow-up radiographs and computed tomography scans were obtained at 1, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. A total of 139 (98%) of 142 patients had a successful implantation of the device. Inadequate arterial access was responsible for the 3 failures. The mean DTA size was 64.1 +/- 15.4 mm. Men slightly outnumbered women (57.7%), with an average age of 71 years, and 88% of the patients were white. Ninety percent were American Society of Anesthesiologists category III or IV. One device was used in 44% of patients, and 56% required two or more devices to bridge the thoracic aorta. The left subclavian artery was covered in 28 patients, with planned carotid-subclavian transposition. The procedure time averaged 150 minutes, estimated blood loss averaged 506 mL, intensive care unit stay averaged 2.6 days, and hospital stay averaged 7.6 days. Within 30 days, 45 (32%) patients had at least 1 major adverse event: 5 (4%) experienced a stroke, 4 (3%) demonstrated temporary or permanent paraplegia, 20 (14%) experienced vascular trauma or thrombosis, and 2 (1.5%) died. Mean follow-up was 24.0 months. Four patients had aneurysm-related deaths. Three patients underwent endovascular revisions for endoleak. No ruptures have been reported. Twenty wire fractures have been

  1. Influence of virtual intervention and blood rheology on mass transfer through thoracic aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yu; Chen, Ming; Xiong, Guanglei; Chen, Jie

    2015-09-18

    Computational fluid dynamics tools have been used to investigate blood flow through the human thoracic aortic models with aneurysm before and after virtual stent graft operation. The impact of blood rheology and aortic geometry on the wall shear stress (WSS), luminal surface low-density lipoproteins (LDL) concentration, and oxygen flux along the arterial wall is investigated. The stent graft at the aneurysm has significant effects on WSS and mass transport in blood flow. Due to the low flow rate, Newtonian blood assumption generally under-estimates the WSS. The non-Newtonian blood rheology play an important role in the LDL transport as well as oxygen transport. It is found that WSS alone is insufficient to correctly predict the location with high risk of atherogenesis. The results suggest that WSS, luminal surface LDL concentration, and the oxygen flux on the wall have to be considered together to evaluate the performance of virtual operation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnostic and therapy of acute thoracic aortic diseases; Diagnostik und Therapie akuter Erkrankungen der thorakalen Aorta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schotten, Sebastian; Pitton, Michael B. [Universitaetsmedizin Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2017-09-15

    Acute diseases of the thoracic aorta represent a relatively rare but life threatening spectrum of pathologies. The non-traumatic diseases are usually summarized by the term ''acute aortic syndrome''. A timely diagnosis and initiation of therapy are cornerstones for the patient outcome. CT has become the standard imaging procedure due do its widespread availability and excellent sensitivity. Furthermore, CT is able to discriminate the variants of acute aortic diseases and to detect the wide spectrum of complications. The volumetric CT dataset is also the basis for planning of interventional procedures. Open surgical repair still represents the standard of care for acute pathologies of the ascending aorta while endovascular therapy, due to minimally invasive character and good outcome, has replaced open surgery in most cases of complicated lesions of the descending aorta.

  3. Relation of murine thoracic aortic structural and cellular changes with aging to passive and active mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Jason B; Mukherjee, Rupak; Stroud, Robert E; Jones, Jeffrey A; Ikonomidis, John S

    2015-02-25

    Maintenance of the structure and mechanical properties of the thoracic aorta contributes to aortic function and is dependent on the composition of the extracellular matrix and the cellular content within the aortic wall. Age-related alterations in the aorta include changes in cellular content and composition of the extracellular matrix; however, the precise roles of these age-related changes in altering aortic mechanical function are not well understood. Thoracic aortic rings from the descending segment were harvested from C57BL/6 mice aged 6 and 21 months. Thoracic aortic diameter and wall thickness were higher in the old mice. Cellular density was reduced in the medial layer of aortas from the old mice; concomitantly, collagen content was higher in old mice, but elastin content was similar between young and old mice. Stress relaxation, an index of compliance, was reduced in aortas from old mice and correlated with collagen fraction. Contractility of the aortic rings following potassium stimulation was reduced in old versus young mice. Furthermore, collagen gel contraction by aortic smooth muscle cells was reduced with age. These results demonstrate that numerous age-related structural changes occurred in the thoracic aorta and were related to alterations in mechanical properties. Aortic contractility decreased with age, likely because of a reduction in medial cell number in addition to a smooth muscle contractile deficit. Together, these unique findings provide evidence that the age-related changes in structure and mechanical function coalesce to provide an aortic substrate that may be predisposed to aortopathies. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  4. Endovascular stent graft repair for thoracic aortic aneurysms: the history and the present in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Shimizu, Hideyuki; Yoshitake, Akihiro; Shimazaki, Taro; Iwahashi, Toru; Ogino, Hitoshi; Ishimaru, Shin; Shigematsu, Hiroshi; Yozu, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    Stent-grafts for endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms have been commercially available for more than ten years in the West, whereas, in Japan, a manufactured stent-graft was not approved for the use until March 2008. Nevertheless, endovascular thoracic intervention began to be performed in Japan in the early 1990s, with homemade devices used in most cases. Many researchers have continued to develop their homemade devices. We have participated in joint design and assessment efforts with a stent-graft manufacturer, focusing primarily on fenestrated stent-grafts used in repairs at the distal arch, a site especially prone to aneurysm. In March 2008, TAG (W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Flagstaff, Arizona, USA) was approved as a stent graft for the thoracic area first in Japan, which was major turning point in treatment for thoracic aortic aneurysms. Subsequently, TALENT (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA) was approved in May 2009, and TX2 (COOK MEDICAL Inc., Bloomington, Indiana, USA) in March 2011. Valiant as an improved version of TALENT was approved in November 2011, and TX2 Proform as an improved version of TX2 began to be supplied in October 2012. These stent grafts are excellent devices that showed good results in Western countries, and marked effectiveness can be expected by making the most of the characteristics of each device. A clinical trial in Japan on Najuta (tentative name) (Kawasumi Labo., Inc., Tokyo, Japan) as a line-up of fenestrated stent grafts that can be applied to distal arch aneurysms showing a high incidence, and allow maintenance of blood flow to the arch vessel was initiated. This trial was completed, and Najuta has just been approved in January of 2013 in Japan, and further development is expected. In the U.S., great efforts have recently been made to develop and manufacture excellent stent grafts for thoracic aneurysms, and rapid progress has been achieved. In particular, in the area of the aortic arch, in which we

  5. Procyanidin C1 Causes Vasorelaxation Through Activation of the Endothelial NO/cGMP Pathway in Thoracic Aortic Rings

    OpenAIRE

    Byun, Eui-Baek; Sung, Nak-Yun; Yang, Mi-So; Song, Du-Sup; Byun, Eui-Hong; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Sang-Hyun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Kim, Jae-Hun

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the efficacy of procyanidin C1 (Pro C1) for modulating vascular tone. Pro C1 induced a potent vasorelaxant effect on phenylephrine-constricted endothelium-intact thoracic aortic rings, but had no effect on denuded thoracic aortic rings. Moreover, Pro C1 caused a significant increase in nitric oxide (NO) production in endothelial cells. Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation and Pro C1-induced NO production were significantly decreased in the presence of a nonspecif...

  6. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting after renal transplantation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanase, Yohsuke; Muraki, Satoshi; Koyanagi, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Noriyasu; Kurimoto, Yoshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Twelve years after receiving a renal transplant, a 50-year-old woman developed asthmatic symptoms. Chest CT revealed a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. She had undergone percutaneous coronary intervention to treat the left anterior descending artery 10 years earlier. Coronary artery angiography revealed restenosis of the left anterior descending artery (99%, #6 in-stent). Because cardiopulmonary bypass may cause problems for transplanted kidney, we performed off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (left internal thoracic artery to left anterior descending artery) and thoracic endovascular graft placement to treat the aortic aneurysm. Considering that the artery of the transplanted kidney was attached to the right iliac artery, and then the left common femoral artery was selected as the access root for GORE TAG(®) endografts (34 × 200 and 34 × 150 mm) (stentgrafts were deployed for the descending aortic artery). Postoperative angiography showed a patent bypass graft. Postoperative CT confirmed the absence of endoleaks. The postoperative course was uneventful, and she was discharged without complications. Ischemic heart disease and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm in recipients of kidney transplants can be treated using off-pump coronary bypass grafting and thoracic endovascular graft placement. The transplanted kidney was protected without using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB).

  7. Morphometric Properties of the Thoracic Aorta of Warmblood and Friesian Horses with and without Aortic Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saey, V; Ploeg, M; Delesalle, C; van Loon, G; Gröne, A; Ducatelle, R; Duchateau, L; Chiers, K

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of the aorta is much more common in Friesians compared with other breeds of horse. Rupture always occurs adjacent to the scar of the ligamentum arteriosum. Previous histological examination of ruptured aortic walls suggested the presence of an underlying connective tissue disorder. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare the structural characteristics of the tunica media of the mid-thoracic aorta, distant to the lesion, in warmblood and Friesian horses with and without thoracic aortic rupture. In unaffected Friesian horses, the thickness of the tunica media, as well as the percentage area comprised of collagen type I, were significantly higher compared with the warmblood horses, supporting the hypothesis of a primary collagen disorder in the Friesian horse breed. However, in the tunica media of the affected Friesian horses there was no significant wall thickening. Moreover, the percentage area comprised of elastin was significantly lower, while the percentage area comprised of smooth muscle was higher, compared with unaffected Friesian and warmblood horses. These lesions are suggestive of an additional mild elastin deficiency with compensatory smooth muscle cell hypertrophy in affected Friesians. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase in Smooth Muscle Cells Maintains Genome Integrity, Resists Aortic Medial Degeneration, and Is Suppressed in Human Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Alanna; Nong, Zengxuan; Yin, Hao; O'Neil, Caroline; Fox, Stephanie; Balint, Brittany; Guo, Linrui; Leo, Oberdan; Chu, Michael W A; Gros, Robert; Pickering, J Geoffrey

    2017-06-09

    The thoracic aortic wall can degenerate over time with catastrophic consequences. Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) can resist and repair artery damage, but their capacities decline with age and stress. Recently, cellular production of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ) via nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) has emerged as a mediator of cell vitality. However, a role for Nampt in aortic SMCs in vivo is unknown. To determine whether a Nampt-NAD + control system exists within the aortic media and is required for aortic health. Ascending aortas from patients with dilated aortopathy were immunostained for NAMPT, revealing an inverse relationship between SMC NAMPT content and aortic diameter. To determine whether a Nampt-NAD + control system in SMCs impacts aortic integrity, mice with Nampt -deficient SMCs were generated. SMC- Nampt knockout mice were viable but with mildly dilated aortas that had a 43% reduction in NAD + in the media. Infusion of angiotensin II led to aortic medial hemorrhage and dissection. SMCs were not apoptotic but displayed senescence associated-ß-galactosidase activity and upregulated p16, indicating premature senescence. Furthermore, there was evidence for oxidized DNA lesions, double-strand DNA strand breaks, and pronounced susceptibility to single-strand breakage. This was linked to suppressed poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 activity and was reversible on resupplying NAD + with nicotinamide riboside. Remarkably, we discovered unrepaired DNA strand breaks in SMCs within the human ascending aorta, which were specifically enriched in SMCs with low NAMPT. NAMPT promoter analysis revealed CpG hypermethylation within the dilated human thoracic aorta and in SMCs cultured from these tissues, which inversely correlated with NAMPT expression. The aortic media depends on an intrinsic NAD + fueling system to protect against DNA damage and premature SMC senescence, with relevance to human thoracic aortopathy. © 2017 American Heart

  9. Improvement of thoracic aortic vasoreactivity by continuous and intermittent exercise in high-fat diet-induced obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongpeng; Yang, Zhen; Hu, Jian; Luo, Yan; Zhu, Lingqin; Yang, Huifang; Li, Guanghua

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of continuous and intermittent exercise on the thoracic aortic vasoreactivity and free radical metabolism in rats fed with a high-fat diet (HD). Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=8, each group): Conventional diet (CD), HD, HD with continuous exercise (HCE) and HD with intermittent exercise (HIE). HCE rats swam once/day for 90 min; HIE rats performed swimming exercises 3 times/day, 30 min each time with an interval of 4 h. In these two groups, the exercise was conducted 5 days a week for 8 weeks. Rats in the CD and HD groups were fed without swimming training. At the end of the exercise, all the rats were sacrificed and the blood, thoracic aorta and myocardium were collected immediately. The thoracic aortic vasoreactivity, the plasma total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA) and vascular endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene expression were measured. Compared to the control group, in the HD group the enhanced contractile response of the thoracic aortic rings to noradrenaline (NA) was observed (Pimprove the activity of the thoracic aorta in obese rats, which may be associated with enhanced antioxidant enzyme activity and reduced free radical generating. Additionally, intermittent exercise is better than the continuous exercise in improving the thoracic aorta vasoreactivity.

  10. Electromagnetic Navigation for Thoracic Aortic Stent Graft Deployment: A Pilot Study in Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Glossop, Neil; Dake, Michael; Pritchard, William F.; Chiesa, Alberto; Dreher, Matthew R.; Tang, Thomas; Karanian, John W.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to determine the feasibility of electromagnetic tracking as a method to augment conventional imaging guidance for the safe delivery, precise positioning, and accurate deployment of thoracic aortic endografts. Materials & Methods Custom guidewires were fabricated and the delivery catheters for thoracic aortic endoprostheses (Gore TAG endoprostheses, W.L. Gore & Assoc. Inc., Flagstaff AZ) were retrofitted with integrated electromagnetic coil sensors enabling realtime endovascular tracking. Pre-procedure thoracic CTA were obtained after placement of fiducial skin patches on the chest wall of three anesthetized swine, enabling automatic registration. The stent graft deployment location target near the subclavian artery was selected on the pre-procedure CTA. Two steps were analyzed: advancing a tracked glidewire to the aortic arch, and positioning the tracked stent graft assembly using electromagnetic guidance alone. Multiple CT scans were performed to evaluate the accuracy of the electromagnetic tracking system by measuring the target registration error which compared the actual position of the tracked devices to the displayed “virtual” electromagnetic-tracked position. Post-deployment CTA and necropsy confirmed stent graft position and subclavian artery patency. Results A stent graft was successfully delivered and deployed in each of the three animals using real-time electromagnetic tracking alone. The mean of the fiducial registration error of the auto-registration was 1.5 mm. Sixteen comparative scans were obtained to determine the target registration error, which was 4.3mm ± 0.97 mm (Range: 3.0 to 6.0mm) for the glidewire sensor coil. The target registration error for the stent graft delivery catheter sensor coil was 2.6 mm ± 0.7 mm (Range: 1.9 to 3.8 mm). The deployment error for the stent graft defined as deployment deviation from target was 2.6mm ± 3.0 mm. Conclusion Delivery and deployment of customized thoracic stent

  11. Hybrid repair of a very late, post-aortic coarctation surgery thoracic aneurysm: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilea Ioan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Local aneurysms after surgical repair of coarctation of the aorta occur mainly in patients surgically treated by Dacron patch plasty during adulthood. The management of these patients is always problematic, with frequent complications and increased mortality rates. Percutaneous stent-graft implantation avoids the need for surgical reintervention. Case presentation We report a case involving the hybrid treatment by stent-graft implantation and transposition of the left subclavian artery to the left common carotid artery of an aneurysmal dilatation of the thoracic aorta that occurred in a 64-year-old Caucasian man, operated on almost 40 years earlier with a Dacron patch plasty for aortic coarctation. Our patient presented to our facility for evaluation with back pain and shortness of breath after minimal physical effort. A physical examination revealed stony dullness to percussion of the left posterior thorax, with no other abnormalities. The results of chest radiography, followed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography and aortography, led to a diagnosis of giant aortic thoracic aneurysm. Successful treatment of the aneurysm was achieved by percutaneous stent-graft implantation combined with transposition of the left subclavian artery to the left common carotid artery. His post-procedural recovery was uneventful. Three months after the procedure, computed tomography showed complete thrombosis of the excluded aneurysm, without any clinical signs of left lower limb ischemia or new onset neurological abnormalities. Conclusions Our patient’s case illustrates the clinical outcomes of surgical interventions for aortic coarctation. However, the very late appearance of a local aneurysm is rather unusual. Management of such cases is always difficult. The decision-making should be multidisciplinary. A hybrid approach was considered the best solution for our patient.

  12. Thoracic Endovascular Repair of Complicated Penetrating Aortic Ulcer: An 11-Year Single-Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jánosi, Rolf Alexander; Gorla, Riccardo; Tsagakis, Konstantinos; Kahlert, Philipp; Horacek, Michael; Bruckschen, Florian; Dohle, Daniel-Sebastian; Jakob, Heinz; Schlosser, Thomas; Eggebrecht, Holger; Bossone, Eduardo; Erbel, Raimund

    2016-02-01

    To analyze an 11-year single-center experience of treating complicated penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU) using thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). This study included 63 consecutive patients (mean age 69.1±11.5 years; 40 men) with complicated PAU (42 symptomatic, 22 with rupture) who underwent TEVAR between 2002 and 2013. The PAUs were located in the aortic arch (n=11), the descending thoracic aorta (n=43), and the thoracoabdominal aorta (n=9). TEVAR was performed within 14 days of diagnosis in 33 (52.3%) cases (19 ruptures treated immediately); the other 30 (47.6%) patients had an average interval between diagnosis and intervention of 40±39 days. Technical success was 98.4% (62/63). One patient had a type I endoleak after stent-graft repair of a PAU in the aortic arch without great vessel transposition; another procedure was required for carotid-subclavian bypass and proximal stent-graft extension. No patient experienced spinal cord ischemia after TEVAR. Five (7.9%) patients died in-hospital; 3 had severe cardiac complications, 1 died from complications of aortic rupture, and the other succumbed to septic shock. Mean follow-up was 45.6±47.2 months, during which 12 (19.0%) patients needed a secondary intervention because of late endoleaks (n=4, 6.3%) or new complications due to disease progression. Multivariate analysis indicated that a PAU depth >15 mm was an independent predictor of mortality (hazard ratio 6.92, p=0.03). In the biomarker analysis, symptomatic patients had significantly higher D-dimer and troponin levels compared to asymptomatic patients [559.5±460.7 vs 283.2±85.2 µg/L (p=0.016) and 0.22±0.61 vs 0.02±0.03 ng/mL (p=0.04), respectively]. Patients with PAU suffer from underlying severe atherosclerotic disease and have a significant number of cardiovascular comorbidities that lead to relevant mortality and morbidity after TEVAR. As a PAU diameter >15 mm represented high risk for disease progression, these patients may be candidates for

  13. Assessment of thoracic aortic elasticity: a preliminary study using electrocardiographically gated dual-source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ning; Guo, Lijun; Sun, Haitao; Gao, Fei; Liu, Cheng; Beck, Thomas; Chen, Jiuhong; Biermann, Christina

    2011-01-01

    To gain a new insight into the elastic properties of the thoracic aorta in patients without aortic diseases using electrocardiographically (ECG)-gated dual-source (DS) CT. 56 subjects with no cardiovascular disease, selected from 2,700 people undergoing ECG-gated DSCT examination, were divided into three groups according to their age. CT data were reconstructed in 5% step throughout the RR interval. Diameter and area were measured at the curve of the ascending aorta (AA) and at the same level of the descending aorta (DA). The pulsation and elasticity of the aorta were evaluated. Aortic diameter changes were noted throughout the cardiac cycle. The maximum average diameter was seen at an RR interval of 24.02 ± 4.99% for the AA and 25.63 ± 4.77% for the DA. The minimum was at 93.5 ± 4.04% for the AA and 96.6 ± 4.58% for the DA. There was an age-dependent decrease in elasticity, while different correlation coefficients were found between various age groups and different elastic parameters. The properties of aortic pulsation and wall elasticity could be well shown by ECG-gated DSCT. The new findings regarding segment difference and age relevance were significant and should be taken into account in clinical trials and treatments for the elasticity related cardiovascular diseases. (orig.)

  14. Stent-graft repair for blunt traumatic aortic injury: functional and survival outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Sánchez, S; Martín Conejero, A; Moñux Ducajú, G; Martínez López, I; Hernando Rydings, M; Serrano Hernando, F J

    2013-02-01

    Traumatic aortic injury is usually lethal, most often because of serious associated wounds. The short- and midterm outcome of endovascular exclusion was assessed as the current treatment of choice due to a lower mortality and morbidity than open surgical treatment. We reviewed the cases of 8 patients (5 male, mean age 33 years) undergoing endovascular repair of a traumatic thoracic aortic lesion, confirmed by computed tomographic angiography, at our centre. Most patients showed a contained lesion limited to the aortic isthmus and severe associated injuries. Intrahospital mortality was 37.5% (N.=3) and mostly due to posttraumatic brain injury (N.=2). Most patients were hemodynamically stable at the time of endovascular repair (N.=6). The median time to surgery was 12 hours (3-48 hours). The endografts used were TAG® (W.L. Gore and Associates, Flagstaff) in three patients, and Valiant® (Medtronic, Santa Rosa, CA) in four. The technical success rate was 100%. In one case, the left subclavian artery was occluded without signs of arm ischemia. There were no cases of paraplegia or stroke related to treatment. No revision procedures were needed during follow-up. Endovascular repair shortly after injury seems to be effective and safe with a low associated morbidity and mortality.

  15. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement in patients with Marfan syndrome enrolled in the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Howard K; Preiss, Liliana R; Maslen, Cheryl L; Kroner, Barbara; Devereux, Richard B; Roman, Mary J; Holmes, Kathryn W; Tolunay, H Eser; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Asch, Federico M; Milewski, Rita K; Bavaria, Joseph; LeMaire, Scott A

    2014-05-01

    The long-term outcomes of aortic valve-sparing (AVS) root replacement in Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients remain uncertain. The study aim was to determine the utilization and outcomes of AVS root replacement in MFS patients enrolled in the Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC). At the time of this analysis, 788 patients with MFS were enrolled in the GenTAC Registry, of whom 288 had undergone aortic root replacement. Patients who had undergone AVS procedures were compared to those who had undergone aortic valve replacement (AVR). AVS root replacement was performed in 43.5% of MFS patients, and the frequency of AVS was increased over the past five years. AVS patients were younger at the time of surgery (31.0 versus 36.3 years, p = 0.006) and more likely to have had elective rather than emergency surgery compared to AVR patients, in whom aortic valve dysfunction and aortic dissection was the more likely primary indication for surgery. After a mean follow up of 6.2 +/- 3.6 years, none of the 87 AVS patients had required reoperation; in contrast, after a mean follow up of 10.5 +/- 7.6 years, 11.5% of AVR patients required aortic root reoperation. Aortic valve function has been durable, with 95.8% of AVS patients having aortic insufficiency that was graded as mild or less. AVS root replacement is performed commonly among the MFS population, and the durability of the aortic repair and aortic valve function have been excellent to date. These results justify a continued use of the procedure in an elective setting. The GenTAC Registry will be a useful resource to assess the long-term durability of AVS root replacement in the future.

  16. Valve Sparing Aortic Root Replacement in Patients with Marfan Syndrome Enrolled in the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Howard K.; Preiss, Liliana R.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Kroner, Barbara; Devereux, Richard B.; Roman, Mary J.; Holmes, Kathryn W.; Tolunay, H. Eser; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Asch, Federico M.; Milewski, Rita K.; Bavaria, Joseph; LeMaire, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The long-term outcomes of aortic valve sparing (AVS) root replacement in Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients remain uncertain. We sought to determine the utilization and outcomes of AVS root replacement in MFS patients enrolled in the Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC). Methods At the time of this analysis, 788 patients with MFS were enrolled in the GenTAC Registry, of whom 288 have undergone aortic root replacement. Patients who have undergone AVS procedures were compared to those who have undergone aortic valve replacing (AVR) procedures. Results AVS root replacement was performed in 43.5% of MFS patients and the frequency of AVS increased over the past 5 years. AVS patients were younger at the time of surgery (31.0 vs. 36.3 years, p=0.006) and more likely to have had elective rather than emergency surgery compared to AVR patients. AVR patients were more likely to have had aortic valve dysfunction and aortic dissection as a primary indication for surgery. After mean follow-up of 6.2 (SD=3.6) years, none of the 87 AVS patients have required reoperation; in contrast, after mean follow up of 10.5 (SD=7.6) years, 11.5% of AVR patients have required aortic root reoperation. Aortic valve function has been durable with 95.8% of AVS patients with aortic insufficiency graded as mild or less. Conclusions AVS root replacement is performed commonly in the MFS population. The durability of the aortic repair and aortic valve function have been excellent to date. These results justify the continued use of the procedure in the elective setting. The GenTAC Registry will be a useful resource to assess the long-term durability of AVS root replacement in the future. PMID:25296451

  17. [Hybrid treatment of patients with aneurysms and dissections of the aortic arch and descending portion of the thoracic aorta].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlomin, V V; Gordeev, M L; Zverev, D A; Shloĭdo, E A; Uspenskiĭ, V E; Zvereva, E D; Bondarenko, P B; Puzdriak, P D

    The authors share herein their experience with hybrid surgical treatment of 21 patients presenting with lesions of the aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta. Aortic pathology included dissection of the thoracoabdominal aorta (n=15), a sacciform aneurysm of the aortic arch (n=5), and a spindle-shaped aneurysm of the distal portions of the aortic arch (n=1). The first stage consisted of the following operations: transposition of the left subclavian artery into the left common carotid artery (n=9; 42.8%), partial debranching (n=11; 52.5%), and total debranching (n=1; 4.7%). The second stage consisted in implantation of a stent graft: to the thoracic aorta in 18 (85.8%) cases, and to the thoracic and abdominal portions of the aorta in 3 (14.2%) cases. The most significant complications of the immediate postoperative period included acute cerebral circulation impairment (n=1) and local dissection of the ascending aorta (n=1). Type I endoleaks were observed in 4 (19%) patients, type II endoleaks in 1 (4.7%), and type III endoleaks in 1 (4.7%). The mean duration of the follow up after discharge from hospital amounted to 11.6±7.9 months. In 4 patients after 6 months the findings of the control MSCT angiography showed no significant changes of the endoleaks. 1-year patency of the shunted branches of the aortic arch amounted to 95.2%. The cumulative survival rate amounted to 95.2%.

  18. Innovative postmarket device evaluation using a quality registry to monitor thoracic endovascular aortic repair in the treatment of aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Adam W; Lombardi, Joseph V; Abel, Dorothy B; Morales, J Pablo; Marinac-Dabic, Danica; Wang, Grace; Azizzadeh, Ali; Kern, John; Fillinger, Mark; White, Rodney; Cronenwett, Jack L; Cambria, Richard P

    2017-05-01

    United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-mandated postapproval studies have long been a mainstay of the continued evaluation of high-risk medical devices after initial marketing approval; however, these studies often present challenges related to patient/physician recruitment and retention. Retrospective single-center studies also do not fully represent the spectrum of real-world performance nor are they likely to have a sufficiently large enough sample size to detect important signals. In recent years, The FDA Center for Devices and Radiological Health has been promoting the development and use of patient registries to advance infrastructure and methodologies for medical device investigation. The FDA 2012 document, "Strengthening the National System for Medical Device Post-market Surveillance," highlighted registries as a core foundational infrastructure when linked to other complementary data sources, including embedded unique device identification. The Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) thoracic endovascular aortic repair for type B aortic dissection project is an innovative method of using quality improvement registries to meet the needs of device evaluation after market approval. Here we report the organization and background of this project and highlight the innovation facilitated by collaboration of physicians, the FDA, and device manufacturers. This effort used an existing national network of VQI participants to capture patients undergoing thoracic endovascular aortic repair for acute type B aortic dissection within a registry that aligns with standard practice and existing quality efforts. The VQI captures detailed patient, device, and procedural data for consecutive eligible cases under the auspices of a Patient Safety Organization (PSO). Patients were divided into a 5-year follow-up group (200 acute; 200 chronic dissections) and a 1-year follow-up group (100 acute; 100 chronic). The 5-year cohort required additional imaging details, and the 1-year

  19. Use of Suture-Mediated Closure Device in Percutaneous Direct Carotid Puncture During Chimney-Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Gabriel, E-mail: dr.changabriel@gmail.com; Quek, Lawrence Hwee Han, E-mail: lawrence-quek@ttsh.com.sg [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore); Tan, Glenn Leong Wei, E-mail: glenn-tan@ttsh.com.sg [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of General Surgery (Singapore); Pua, Uei, E-mail: druei@yahoo.com [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore)

    2016-07-15

    BackgroundInsertion of a carotid chimney graft during thoracic endovascular aortic repair (Ch-TEVAR) is a recognized technique to extend the proximal landing zone into the aortic arch in the treatment of thoracic aortic disease. Conventional technique requires surgical exposure of the carotid artery for insertion of the carotid chimney graft.MethodologyWe describe our experience in the use of a suture-mediated closure device in percutaneous Ch-TEVAR in four patients.ResultsSuccessful hemostasis was achieved in all four patients. No complications related to the carotid puncture were recorded.ConclusionWe conclude that using suture-mediated closure device for carotid closure appears feasible and deserves further studies as a potential alternative to conventional surgical approach.

  20. Frozen elephant trunk repair for descending thoracic aortic dissection in a man with a hostile left pleural cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, William D T; Manjunath, Adarsh; Malaisrie, S Chris

    2014-06-01

    The frozen elephant trunk procedure is a hybrid, single-staged alternative to conventional surgery for repairing diffuse pathologic conditions of the thoracic aorta. This approach is particularly advantageous in patients who have pathologic conditions of the left side of the chest, because the descending thoracic aorta can be repaired without entering a hostile pleural cavity. We present the case of a 67-year-old man who had undergone repair of acute type A aortic dissection. He presented with aneurysmal dilation of the descending thoracic aorta secondary to chronic dissection, a large acute dissection of the proximal ascending aorta, and a large paraesophageal hernia that made him a poor candidate for conventional, 2-staged open aortic repair. We describe the hybrid frozen elephant trunk technique that we used to repair the aorta, and its broader advantages.

  1. Outcome of endovascular repair for intact and ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellgren, Tina; Wanhainen, Anders; Steuer, Johnny; Mani, Kevin

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess long-term outcome after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) for thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA). All patients who underwent TEVAR for TAA at Uppsala University Hospital from December 1999 to December 2014 were included. Characteristics of the patients and outcome data were collected from medical records, national population registry, and cause of death registry. Perioperative survival was analyzed with the χ 2 test, and 5-year survival was estimated with Kaplan-Meier analysis. Predictors of long-term survival were assessed with Cox regression. There were 77 patients included in the study, 49 with intact TAAs (iTAAs) and 28 with ruptured TAAs (rTAAs). Mean follow-up was 83.7 months for iTAA patients and 82.0 months for rTAA patients (P = .853). Mean age was 71.5 years for iTAA patients and 74.8 years for rTAA patients (P = .04). Survival after iTAA repair was 95.9% at 30 days, 91.8% at 90 days, and 62.5% at 5 years. After rTAA repair, survival was 71.4% at 30 days and decreased to 57.1% at 90 days (P < .01), with most deaths after 30 days being related to the aortic event. The 3-year survival rate after rTAA repair was 27.8%, and only one rTAA patient with 5 years of follow-up remained alive. Six aorta-related deaths occurred after 90 days (three iTAA patients, three rTAA patients); five were due to rupture of nontreated aortic segments. The 5-year reintervention rate was 13.2% for iTAA patients and 17.9% for rTAA patients (P = .682). All reinterventions occurred within 14 months of TEVAR. The age-adjusted hazard ratio for long-term mortality was 4.4 after rTAA repair compared with iTAA repair. TEVAR for iTAA was associated with low perioperative mortality and acceptable 5-year survival at 62.5%. Results were more pessimistic after rTAA repair, however, for which two-thirds of the patients were deceased at 3-year follow-up. Improved selection of patients is necessary to identify patients who are

  2. Management of aorto-esophageal fistula secondary after thoracic endovascular aortic repair: a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kaname; Koike, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Seiichi; Komazawa, Daisuke; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2017-10-01

    Aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF) is a rare and lethal entity, and the difficulty of making diagnosis of AEF is well-known. As promising results in the short-term effectiveness of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) promote its usage, the occurrence of AEF after TEVAR (post-TEVAR AEF) increases as one of the major complications. Therefore, we provide a review concerning the management strategy of post-TEVAR AEF. Although its representative symptom was reported as the triad of mid-thoracic pain and sentinel hematemesis followed by massive hematemesis, the symptom-free interval between sentinel hemorrhage and massive exsanguination is unpredictable. However, the physiological condition represents a surgical contraindication. Accordingly, early diagnosis is important, but either CT or esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy rarely depicts a typical image. The formation of post-TEVAR AEF might be associated with the infection of micro-organisms, which is uncontrollable with anti-biotic administration. The current first-line strategy is combination therapy as follows, (1) to control bleeding by TEVAR in the urgent phase, and (2) radical debridement and aortic/esophageal re-construction in the semi-urgent phase. In view of the high mortality and morbidity rate, it is proposed that the choice in treatment strategies might be affected by patient`s condition, size of the wall defects and the etiology of AEF. Practically, we should keep in mind the importance of making an early diagnosis and, once a suspicious symptom has occurred in a patient with a history of TEVAR, the existence of post-TEVAR AEF should be suspected. A prospective registry together with more developed technologies will be needed to establish a future strategy.

  3. Celiac Trunk Embolization, as a Means of Elongating Short Distal Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Necks, Prior to Endovascular Aortic Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belenky, Alexander; Haddad, Menashe; Idov, Igor; Knizhnik, Michael; Litvin, Sergey; Bachar, Gil N.; Atar, Eli

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience in elongating short distal necks of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAAs) by coil embolization of the celiac trunk prior to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). During 6 years seven patients (five men and two women; mean age, 74) who had DTAAs with short distal necks unsuitable for conventional EVAR, and well patent superior and inferior mesenteric arteries based on CT, were treated in one session with EVAR after the celiac trunk was coil embolized to elongate the neck. All patients were followed by CT every 3 months in the first year and every 6 months thereafter. Technical success was achieved in all patients, and no early or late ischemic complications were noted. No procedural complications occurred and good aneurysm sealing was obtained in all patients. Three endoleaks were identified after 3 months (one patient) and 6 months (two patients); all were treated successfully with insertion of an additional stent-graft. In patients with DTAAs who are candidates for EVAR but have short aneurysm distal necks, celiac trunk embolization-only if the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries are patent-is a good and safe way to elongate the neck and enable EVAR.

  4. Endovascular Treatment of Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms with the EndoFit Stent-Graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saratzis, N.; Saratzis, Athanasios; Melas, N.; Ginis, G.; Lioupis, A.; Lykopoulos, D.; Lazaridis, J.; Kiskinis, Dimitrios

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the mid-term feasibility, efficacy, and durability of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (DTAA) exclusion using the EndoFit device (LeMaitre Vascular). Methods. Twenty-three (23) men (mean age 66 years) with a DTAA were admitted to our department for endovascular repair (21 were ASA III+ and 2 refused open repair) from January 2003 to July 2005. Results. Complete aneurysm exclusion was feasible in all subjects (100% technical success). The median follow-up was 18 months (range 8-40 months). A single stent-graft was used in 6 cases. The deployment of a second stent-graft was required in the remaining 17 patients. All endografts were attached proximally, beyond the left subclavian artery, leaving the aortic arch branches intact. No procedure-related deaths have occurred. A distal type I endoleak was detected in 2 cases on the 1 month follow-up CT scan, and was repaired with reintervention and deployment of an extension graft. A nonfatal acute myocardial infarction occurred in 1 patient in the sixth postoperative month. Graft migration, graft infection, paraplegia, cerebral or distal embolization, renal impairment or any other major complications were not observed. Conclusion. The treatment of DTAAs using the EndoFit stent-graft is technically feasible. Mid-term results in this series are promising

  5. Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm with Dissection Presenting as Flash Pulmonary Edema in a 26-Year-Old Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabry Omar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting a case of familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection in a 26-year-old man with no significant past medical history and a family history of dissecting aortic aneurysm in his mother at the age of 40. The patient presented with cough, shortness of breath, and chest pain. Chest X-ray showed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. CT scan of the chest showed a dissection of the ascending aorta. The patient underwent aortic dissection repair and three months later he returned to our hospital with new complaints of back pain. CT angiography showed a new aortic dissection extending from the left carotid artery through the bifurcation and into the iliac arteries. The patient underwent replacement of the aortic root, ascending aorta, total aortic arch, and aortic valve. The patient recovered well postoperatively. Genetic studies of the patient and his children revealed no mutations in ACTA2, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, TGFB2, MYH11, MYLK, SMAD3, or FBN1. This case report focuses on a patient with familial TAAD and discusses the associated genetic loci and available screening methods. It is important to recognize potential cases of familial TAAD and understand the available screening methods since early diagnosis allows appropriate management of risk factors and treatment when necessary.

  6. Advances in Imaging and Management Trends of Traumatic Aortic Injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagpal, Prashant, E-mail: drprashantnagpal@gmail.com, E-mail: Prashant-nagpal@uiowa.edu; Mullan, Brian F. [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology (United States); Sen, Indrani [Mayo Clinic, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery (United States); Saboo, Sachin S. [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Khandelwal, Ashish [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Acute traumatic aortic injury (ATAI) is a life-threatening injury. CT is the imaging tool of choice, and the knowledge of direct and indirect signs of injury, grading system, and current management protocol helps the emergency radiologist to better identify and classify the injury and provide additional details that can impact management options. Newer dual-source CT technology with ultrafast acquisition speed has also influenced the appropriate protocol for imaging in patients with suspected ATAI. This review highlights the imaging protocol in patients with blunt trauma, CT appearance and grading systems of ATAI, management options, and the role of the multidisciplinary team in the management of these patients. We also briefly review the current literature on the definition, treatment, and follow-up protocol in patients with minimal aortic injury.

  7. Advances in Imaging and Management Trends of Traumatic Aortic Injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagpal, Prashant; Mullan, Brian F.; Sen, Indrani; Saboo, Sachin S.; Khandelwal, Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Acute traumatic aortic injury (ATAI) is a life-threatening injury. CT is the imaging tool of choice, and the knowledge of direct and indirect signs of injury, grading system, and current management protocol helps the emergency radiologist to better identify and classify the injury and provide additional details that can impact management options. Newer dual-source CT technology with ultrafast acquisition speed has also influenced the appropriate protocol for imaging in patients with suspected ATAI. This review highlights the imaging protocol in patients with blunt trauma, CT appearance and grading systems of ATAI, management options, and the role of the multidisciplinary team in the management of these patients. We also briefly review the current literature on the definition, treatment, and follow-up protocol in patients with minimal aortic injury.

  8. Outcomes of thoracic endovascular repair for type B aortic dissection with multichanneled morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Baolei; Hou, Kai; Guo, Daqiao; Xu, Xin; Shi, Zhenyu; Shan, Yan; Lv, Peng; Fu, Weiguo

    2017-10-01

    Clinical outcomes after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) for patients with multichanneled aortic dissection (MCAD) are poorly understood but seem substantially different from those for patients with double-channeled aortic dissection (AD). This study compared the anatomic and clinical factors for patients with MCAD who underwent TEVAR with or without full true lumen (TL) collapse. From January 2012 to March 2016, 54 of 644 consecutive type B AD patients (8.4%) who presented with MCAD were reviewed. Patients were classified as MCAD with full TL collapse and without full TL collapse according to computed tomography angiography findings. We analyzed potential variables including clinical characteristics, anatomic morphologic features, and procedural details. Multivariable analysis was performed to determine independent predictors of AD-related deaths. A total of four patients (7.4%) died preoperatively of aortic rupture, all of whom experienced full TL collapse. MCAD patients with full TL collapse showed significantly higher 30-day major adverse events than those without full TL collapse (36.8% vs 9.7%; P = .030). The mean follow-up duration was 25.6 ± 13.2 months (range, 3-53 months). The overall mortality for all MCAD patients was 16.7%, whereas the follow-up major adverse events rate was 40.0% after TEVAR. Significant differences were present between patients with full TL collapse and patients without full TL collapse in survival at 3 years (55.4% vs 94.7%; P = .002). Maximum diameter of affected aorta (hazard ratio, 1.176; 95% confidence interval, 1.015-1.362; P = .031) was identified as the only predictor of AD-related deaths. MCAD was identified in a small but not insignificant number of our patients presenting with type B AD. Urgent or elective TEVAR was indicated in all our patients with MCAD. In patients with MCAD, full TL collapse was associated with worse outcomes, and this finding may indicate the need for more urgent or emergent repair

  9. Serum beta-2 microglobulin levels for predicting acute kidney injury complicating aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleska-Kociecka, Marta; Skrobisz, Anna; Wojtkowska, Izabela; Grabowski, Maciej; Dabrowski, Maciej; Kusmierski, Krzysztof; Piotrowska, Katarzyna; Imiela, Jacek; Stepinska, Janina

    2017-10-01

    Acute kidney injury complicating both transcatheter and surgical aortic valve replacement is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of serum beta 2 (β2) microglobulin, cystatin C and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin levels in detecting periprocedural acute kidney injury. Eighty consecutive patients who were 70 years of age or older and who were having surgical (n = 40) or transcatheter (n = 40) aortic valve replacement were recruited in a prospective study. The biomarkers were tested before the procedure, 6 times afterwards, at discharge and at a 6-month follow-up visit. The baseline β2-microglobulin level was the strongest predictor of acute kidney injury as a complication of transcatheter aortic valve replacement [odds ratio (OR) 5.277, P = 0.009]. Its level 24 h after the procedure reached the largest area under the curve (AUC) of 0.880 (P regression analysis, the levels of β2-microglobulin and cystatin C 24 h after the procedure were significantly associated with acute kidney injury after transcatheter valve replacement (OR 38.15, P = 0.044; OR 1782, P = 0.019, respectively). In the surgical aortic valve replacement group, the highest AUCs belonged to β2-microglobulin and cystatin C at 24 h (AUC = 0.808, P = 0.003 and AUC = 0.854, P = 0.001, respectively). Their higher values were also associated with acute kidney injury (OR 17.2, P = 0.018; OR 965.6, P = 0.02, respectively). A persistent increase in the postoperative levels of β2-microglobulin following acute kidney injury was associated with the progression of chronic kidney disease for 6 months after both transcatheter (OR 6.56, P = 0.030) and surgical (OR 7.67, P = 0.03) aortic valve replacements. Serum β2-microglobulin had the potential to predict acute kidney injury complicating transcatheter valve replacement and to diagnose it as early as 24 h after both the

  10. Pathogenetic Basis of Aortopathy and Aortic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-19

    Aortopathies; Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm; Aortic Valve Disease; Thoracic Aortic Disease; Thoracic Aortic Dissection; Thoracic Aortic Rupture; Ascending Aortic Disease; Descending Aortic Disease; Ascending Aortic Aneurysm; Descending Aortic Aneurysm; Marfan Syndrome; Loeys-Dietz Syndrome; Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; Shprintzen-Goldberg Syndrome; Turner Syndrome; PHACE Syndrome; Autosomal Recessive Cutis Laxa; Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly; Arterial Tortuosity Syndrome

  11. Aortic dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... made in the chest or abdomen. Endovascular aortic repair. This surgery is done without any major surgical ... needed. If the heart arteries are involved, a coronary bypass is also performed. Outlook ... aneurysm - dissecting; Chest pain - aortic dissection; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - ...

  12. Problems and prospects of managing thoracic aortic aneurysm at the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chianakwana, Gabriel U; Odike, Maxy A C; Nwofor, Alexander M E

    2004-03-01

    The objective of this report is to highlight the problems encountered in managing thoracic aortic aneurysm in a third-generation teaching hospital serving a purely rural community in the heartland of Anambra State, in the southeastern part of Nigeria. This report also proffers solutions aimed at assisting in providing better care for patients afflicted with this condition. From time to time, patients present with vascular diseases, including aneurysm, but the condition is only occasionally suspected and sparingly investigated. This is a report of two cases within the setting of the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH), Nnewi Nigeria. After the death of these two patients, one of whom was a member of the staff of the hospital, post mortem examinations revealed that they had died of ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm. Their medical records were retrieved from the Medical Records Department and reviewed with the aim of analyzing their clinical features and management in the light of the unexpected post-mortem examination results. The survey of the patient records revealed that the diagnosis of thoracic aortic aneurysm was not suspected in either patient even though both had symptoms pointing to this condition. The staff member was a 55-year old man and the other patient was a 31-year old woman in her 30th week of pregnancy. We conclude by drawing the attention of medical practitioners in our community to the fact that thoracic aortic aneurysms are probably more common than we thought. Only a high index of suspicion will lead to clinical diagnosis and treatment.

  13. The selective poly(ADP)ribose-polymerase 1 inhibitor INO1001 reduces spinal cord injury during porcine aortic cross-clamping-induced ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Christian; Scheuerle, Angelika; Hauser, Balázs; Schelzig, Hubert; Szabó, Csaba; Radermacher, Peter; Kick, Jochen

    2007-05-01

    It is well-established that poly(ADP)ribose-polymerase (PARP) assumes major importance during ischemic brain damage, and the selective PARP-1 inhibitor PJ34 reduced spinal cord damage in murine aortic occlusion-induced ischemia/reperfusion injury. We investigated the effect of the PARP-1 inhibitor INO1001 on aortic-occlusion-related porcine spinal cord injury. Prospective, randomized, controlled experimental study in an animal laboratory. Ten anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, and instrumented pigs. Animals underwent 45 min of thoracic aortic cross-clamping after receiving vehicle (n=5) or intravenous INO1001 (n=5, total dose 4 mg/kg administered both before clamping and during reperfusion). During reperfusion continuous intravenous norepinephrine was incrementally adjusted to maintain blood pressure at or above 80% of the preclamping level. Plasma INO1001 levels were analyzed by HPLC. After 4[Symbol: see text]h of reperfusion spinal cord biopsy samples were analyzed for neuronal damage (hematoxyline-eosine and Nissl staining), expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes p21 and p27 (immunohistochemistry), and apoptosis (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated nick end labeling assay). Plasma INO1001 levels were 0.8-2.3 and 0.30-0.76 mM before and after clamping, respectively. While 3-5% of the spinal cord neurons were irreversibly damaged in the INO1001 animals, the neuronal cell injury was three times higher in the control group. Neither p21 and p27 expression nor apoptosis showed any intergroup difference. The selective PARP-1 inhibitor INO1001 markedly reduced aortic occlusion-induced spinal cord injury. Given the close correlation reported in the literature between morphological damage and impaired spinal cord function, INO1001 may improve spinal cord recovery after thoracic aortic cross-clamping.

  14. Computational predictions of damage propagation preceding dissection of ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, S Jamaleddin; Farzaneh, Solmaz; Avril, Stéphane

    2018-04-01

    Dissections of ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (ATAAs) cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. They occur when a tear in the intima-media of the aorta permits the penetration of the blood and the subsequent delamination and separation of the wall in 2 layers, forming a false channel. To predict computationally the risk of tear formation, stress analyses should be performed layer-specifically and they should consider internal or residual stresses that exist in the tissue. In the present paper, we propose a novel layer-specific damage model based on the constrained mixture theory, which intrinsically takes into account these internal stresses and can predict appropriately the tear formation. The model is implemented in finite-element commercial software Abaqus coupled with user material subroutine. Its capability is tested by applying it to the simulation of different exemplary situations, going from in vitro bulge inflation experiments on aortic samples to in vivo overpressurizing of patient-specific ATAAs. The simulations reveal that damage correctly starts from the intimal layer (luminal side) and propagates across the media as a tear but never hits the adventitia. This scenario is typically the first stage of development of an acute dissection, which is predicted for pressures of about 2.5 times the diastolic pressure by the model after calibrating the parameters against experimental data performed on collected ATAA samples. Further validations on a larger cohort of patients should hopefully confirm the potential of the model in predicting patient-specific damage evolution and possible risk of dissection during aneurysm growth for clinical applications. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Heartbeat-related displacement of the thoracic aorta in patients with chronic aortic dissection type B: Quantification by dynamic CTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Tim F. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: tim.weber@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Ganten, Maria-Katharina [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: m.ganten@dkfz.de; Boeckler, Dittmar [University of Heidelberg, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: dittmar.boeckler@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Geisbuesch, Philipp [University of Heidelberg, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: philipp.geisbuesch@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [University of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: hu.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik von [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: h.vontengg@dkfz.de

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to characterize the heartbeat-related displacement of the thoracic aorta in patients with chronic aortic dissection type B (CADB). Materials and methods: Electrocardiogram-gated computed tomography angiography was performed during inspiratory breath-hold in 11 patients with CADB: Collimation 16 mm x 1 mm, pitch 0.2, slice thickness 1 mm, reconstruction increment 0.8 mm. Multiplanar reformations were taken for 20 equidistant time instances through both ascending (AAo) and descending aorta (true lumen, DAoT; false lumen, DAoF) and the vertex of the aortic arch (VA). In-plane vessel displacement was determined by region of interest analysis. Results: Mean displacement was 5.2 {+-} 1.7 mm (AAo), 1.6 {+-} 1.0 mm (VA), 0.9 {+-} 0.4 mm (DAoT), and 1.1 {+-} 0.4 mm (DAoF). This indicated a significant reduction of displacement from AAo to VA and DAoT (p < 0.05). The direction of displacement was anterior for AAo and cranial for VA. Conclusion: In CADB, the thoracic aorta undergoes a heartbeat-related displacement that exhibits an unbalanced distribution of magnitude and direction along the thoracic vessel course. Since consecutive traction forces on the aortic wall have to be assumed, these observations may have implications on pathogenesis of and treatment strategies for CADB.

  16. The effects of aprotinin on blood product transfusion associated with thoracic aortic surgery requiring deep hypothermic circulatory arrest.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Seigne, P W

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of aprotinin on blood product use and postoperative complications in patients undergoing thoracic aortic surgery requiring deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. DESIGN: A retrospective study. SETTING: A university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Nineteen patients who underwent elective or urgent thoracic aortic surgery. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The total number of units of packed red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, and platelets was significantly less in the group that received aprotinin (p = 0.01, 0.04, and 0.01). The intraoperative transfusion of packed red blood cells and platelets, collection and retransfusion of cell saver, and postoperative transfusion of fresh frozen plasma were also significantly less in the aprotinin group (p = 0.01, 0.02, 0.01, and 0.05). No patient in either group sustained renal dysfunction or a myocardial infarction. Two patients who had not received aprotinin suffered from chronic postoperative seizures, and one patient who had received aprotinin sustained a perioperative stroke. CONCLUSIONS: Low-dose aprotinin administration significantly decreases blood product transfusion requirements in the setting of thoracic aortic surgery requiring deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, and it does not appear to be associated with renal or myocardial dysfunction.

  17. Time-resolved three-dimensional magnetic resonance velocity mapping of chronic thoracic aortic dissection. A preliminary investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yasuo; Sekine, Tetsuro; Tanaka, Keiji; Takagi, Ryo; Kumita, Shinichiro; Suzuki, Yuriko

    2011-01-01

    The blood flow patterns of chronic thoracic aortic dissection are complicated, and their clinical significance remains unknown. We evaluated the technical and clinical potentials of time-resolved 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) velocity mapping for assessing these patterns. We used data collected from time-resolved 3D phase-contrast MR imaging of 16 patients with chronic thoracic aortic dissection to generate time-resolved 3D MR velocity mapping that included 3D streamline and path line. We investigated blood flow patterns of this disease in the mapping and compared them with the morphological changes of the patent false lumen. Time-resolved 3D MR velocity mapping visualized rapid flow at the entry and in the true lumen immediately distal to the entry. We observed slower helical or laminar flow in the patent false lumen. In patients with disease progression, slower helical flow following rapid entry jet collided with the outer wall of the false lumen and was also observed in a growing ulcer-like projection. We showed the potential of time-resolved 3D MR velocity mapping for visualizing pathologic flow patterns related to chronic thoracic aortic dissection. (author)

  18. Volumetric analysis demonstrates that true and false lumen remodeling persists for 12 months after thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ga-Young Suh, PhD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A 62-year-old man underwent an elephant trunk procedure followed by thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR. Computed tomography angiography-based models were built to quantify volume of the whole aorta and true and false lumens preoperatively, before TEVAR, after TEVAR, and at follow-up at 3, 6, and 12 months. With TEVAR, descending aortic true lumen volume increased by 54%, then increased additionally by 60% during 12 months. The descending aortic false lumen volume regressed continuously for 12 months following TEVAR, with the most rapid rate from 6 to 12 months at 16 cm3/month. TEVAR immediately increased true lumen volume and continued to remodel the true and false lumens throughout the following 12 months.

  19. Thoracic endograft positioning and carotid-subclavian bypass grafting in a patient with a saccular aneurysm at the aortic arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, Nicolas; Bucci, Federico; Redler, Adriano; Salvati, Bruno; Ferdani, Michel

    2007-01-01

    A 75-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of sudden thoracic pain. A saccular aneurysm of the aortic arch extending on the anterior surface of the aortic arch was found on computed tomographic arteriography. The patient was hemodynamically stable and he was programmed for a staged surgical and endovascular approach (hybrid approach). As a first stage and in order to prevent major cardiac complications due to the overstenting of the left subclavian artery (LSA) with the occlusion of the aortocoronary bypass, the patient underwent a polytetrafluoroethylene bypass graft (GORE-TEX, W.L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ) between the LSA and the left carotid artery. Intraoperative arteriography revealed a good patency of the left carotid-subclavian bypass and of the left internal mammary bypass on the left anterior descending artery. As a second stage the endovascular procedure was accomplished 5 days later in the operating room. A Gore TAG stent graft (W.L. Gore & Associates) was deployed in the aortic arch 20 mm proximally to the aneurysmatic segment covering the ostium of the LSA. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on the fifth postoperative day in good general conditions. Hybrid procedures for treatment of aneurysms of the aortic arch or of the descending thoracic aorta are a promising alternative to open surgery especially in high-risk patients, with lower early morbidity and mortality rates. Long-term effectiveness remains to be fully elucidated.

  20. Thoracic Stent Graft Implantation for Aortic Coarctation with Patent Ductus Arteriosus via Retroperitoneal Iliac Approach in the Presence of Small Sized Femoral Artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Ozge; Beton, Osman; Goksel, Sabahattin; Kaya, Hakkı; Berkan, Ocal

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular stent graft implantation is a favorable method for complex aortic coarctation accompanied by patent ductus arteriosus. Herein, an 18-year-old woman with complex aortic coarctation and patent ductus arteriosus was successfully treated by endovascular thoracic stent graft via retroperitoneal approach. The reason for retroperitoneal iliac approach was small sized common femoral arteries which were not suitable for stent graft passage. This case is the first aortic coarctation plus patent ductus arteriosus case described in the literature which is treated by endovascular thoracic stent graft via retroperitoneal approach. PMID:27242935

  1. Spinal ischaemia after thoracic endovascular aortic repair with left subclavian artery sacrifice: is there a critical stent graft length?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari, Fabian A; Saravi, Babak; Krause, Sonja; Puttfarcken, Luisa; Wittmann, Karin; Förster, Katharina; Rylski, Bartosz; Maier, Sven; Göbel, Ulrich; Siepe, Matthias; Czerny, Martin; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2017-08-24

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is used for treatment of thoracic aortic pathologies, but the covered stent graft can induce spinal ischaemia depending on the length used. The left subclavian artery contributes to spinal cord collateralization and is frequently occluded by the stent graft. Our objective was to investigate the impact of covered stent graft length on the risk of spinal ischaemia in the setting of left subclavian artery sacrifice. Twenty-six pigs (German country race, mean body weight 36 ± 4 kg) underwent simulated descending aortic TEVAR via left lateral thoracotomy, with left subclavian artery and thoracic segmental artery occlusion in normothermia. Animals were assigned to treatment groups according to simulated stent graft length: TEVAR to T8 ( n  = 4), TEVAR to T9 ( n  = 4), TEVAR to T10 ( n  = 4), TEVAR to T11 ( n  = 7) and TEVAR to T12 ( n  = 1) and a sham group ( n  = 6). End points included spinal cord perfusion pressure, cerebrospinal fluid pressure and spinal cord blood flow using fluorescent microspheres. There were no group differences in spinal cord perfusion pressure drop or in spinal cord perfusion pressure regeneration potential at 3 h after the procedure: from a baseline average of 75 mmHg (95% confidence interval 71-83 mmHg) to 73 mmHg (67-75 mmHg) at 3 h in Group T10 versus from a baseline average of 67 mmHg (95% CI 50-81 mmHg) to 65 mmHg (95% confidence interval 48-81 mmHg) in Group T8. There were no differences in the spinal cord blood flow courses over time in the different groups nor was there any difference in cerebrospinal fluid pressure levels and cerebrospinal fluid pressure dynamics between groups. However, we did observe local blood flow distribution to the spinal cord that was inhomogeneous depending on the distance between the simulated stent graft end and the first thoracic anterior radiculomedullary artery. The risk of spinal ischaemia after serial

  2. Percutaneous implantation of thoracic and abdominal aortic prostheses in patients at high surgical risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C Ortiz

    2013-02-01

    intraluminal stent implantation is an alternative. Objective: to analyze the impact of percutaneous implantation of aortic stents in high-risk surgical patients with a minimum of one y ear follow-up. Method: Descriptive study conducted from December 2005 to March 2010 which included 125 patients with thoracic or abdominal aortic aneurysm, meeting surgical criteria by its diameter and that were rejected from surgery due to their high risk. The outcomes were intraoperative death from any cause and aneurysm-related at one, six and twelve months. Complications were defined as vascular occurred during the first thirty days. Results: Abdominal aneurysm was more frequent (70.4%. The overall mortality at 25.7 months follow-up was 14.8%. Of this percentage, 5.2% died from causes related to the aneurysm. One patient died during surgery. 4.3% were reoperated for leaks. There was higher aneurysm-related mortality in the thoracic (14.7 vs. 1.2% p = 0.003 and a trend in those of larger diameter (6.9 vs. 5.7 cm p = 0.210. There was no association between mortality and diabetes mellitus, smoking, heart disease, hypertension or dyslipidemia. Conclusions: aneurysm-related mortality in patients undergoing aortic stent graft is low. Mortality was associated with thoracic aneurysm and to its greater diameter. Complications did not imply an increase in mortality. In conclusion, in patients with aortic aneurysm and high surgical risk rejected for open surgery, percutaneous approach is a safe and effective treatment in a medium-term follow-up.

  3. Pituitary insufficiency following traumatic thoracic injury in an adolescent male patient

    OpenAIRE

    Gilis-Januszewska, Aleksandra; Kluczyński, Łukasz; Wilusz, Małgorzata; Pantofliński, Jacek; Turek-Jabrocka, Renata; Pach, Dorota; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Traumatic thoracic injuries in adolescents are rare but could be connected with traumatic brain injuries (TBI) and development of chronic hypopituitarism. Early recognition of these endocrine problems is a significant challenge to clinicians. We present difficulties in diagnosis of hypothalamic-pituitary insufficiency following traumatic thoracic injury in adolescence. We also review the literature of similar cases. Patient concerns: We present a case of a 24-years-old mal...

  4. Comparison of British Thoracic Society and American Thoracic Society reintroduction guidelines for anti-tuberculous therapy induced liver injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuberi, B. F.; Alvi, H.; Zuberi, F. F.; Salahuddin, J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of British Thoracic Society and American Thoracic Society guidelines for re-introduction of anti-tuberculous therapy after drug-induced liver injury, and to assess the ease of administration of each guideline on a scale of 1-10. Methods: The randomised prospective interventional study was conducted at the Department of Medicine and Pulmonology, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, from December 2011 to November 2013. Patients with anti-tuberculous therapy drug-induced liver injury were selected. Hepatotoxic anti-tuberculous therapy was stopped and modified anti-tuberculous therapy was started. Patients were followed weekly till clinical and biochemical parameters got stabilised. After stabilisation, the patients were randomised to one of the two groups to receive re-introduction of anti-tuberculous therapy under the guidelines of British Thoracic Society (Group I) or those of American Thoracic Society (Group II). Means of the groups were analysed by Student's t test and proportions were compared by chi-square test. Multivariate analysis was done for age, body mass index and serum albumin for recurrence of drug-induced liver injury after the re-introduction. P value <0.05 was taken as significant. Results: Of the total 325 patients, 163(50.15%) were in Group I, while 162(49.84%) were in Group II. The frequency of recurrence of drug-induced liver injury in Group I was 16 (9.8%) and in Group II it was 18 (11.1%). There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (p<0.7). Age was positively related with drug-induced liver injury, while body mass index and serum albumin were negatively associated. Conclusion: There was no significant difference between the two major guidelines though the American Thoracic Society guideline was easier to follow. (author)

  5. Multidetector-row computed tomography of thoracic aortic anomalies in dogs and cats: patent ductus arteriosus and vascular rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henjes, Christiane R; Nolte, Ingo; Wefstaedt, Patrick

    2011-09-23

    Diagnosis of extracardiac intrathoracic vascular anomalies is of clinical importance, but remains challenging. Traditional imaging modalities, such as radiography, echocardiography, and angiography, are inherently limited by the difficulties of a 2-dimensional approach to a 3-dimensional object. We postulated that accurate characterization of malformations of the aorta would benefit from 3-dimensional assessment. Therefore, multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) was chosen as a 3-dimensional, new, and noninvasive imaging technique. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patients with 2 common diseases of the intrathoracic aorta, either patent ductus arteriosus or vascular ring anomaly, by contrast-enhanced 64-row computed tomography. Electrocardiography (ECG)-gated and thoracic nongated MDCT images were reviewed in identified cases of either a patent ductus arteriosus or vascular ring anomaly. Ductal size and morphology were determined in 6 dogs that underwent ECG-gated MDCT. Vascular ring anomalies were characterized in 7 dogs and 3 cats by ECG-gated MDCT or by a nongated thoracic standard protocol. Cardiac ECG-gated MDCT clearly displayed the morphology, length, and caliber of the patent ductus arteriosus in 6 affected dogs. Persistent right aortic arch was identified in 10 animals, 8 of which showed a coexisting aberrant left subclavian artery. A mild dilation of the proximal portion of the aberrant subclavian artery near its origin of the aorta was present in 4 dogs, and a diverticulum analogous to the human Kommerell's diverticulum was present in 2 cats. Contrast-enhanced MDCT imaging of thoracic anomalies gives valuable information about the exact aortic arch configuration. Furthermore, MDCT was able to characterize the vascular branching patterns in dogs and cats with a persistent right aortic arch and the morphology and size of the patent ductus arteriosus in affected dogs. This additional information can be of help with regard to improved

  6. Multidetector-row computed tomography of thoracic aortic anomalies in dogs and cats: Patent ductus arteriosus and vascular rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolte Ingo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis of extracardiac intrathoracic vascular anomalies is of clinical importance, but remains challenging. Traditional imaging modalities, such as radiography, echocardiography, and angiography, are inherently limited by the difficulties of a 2-dimensional approach to a 3-dimensional object. We postulated that accurate characterization of malformations of the aorta would benefit from 3-dimensional assessment. Therefore, multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT was chosen as a 3-dimensional, new, and noninvasive imaging technique. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patients with 2 common diseases of the intrathoracic aorta, either patent ductus arteriosus or vascular ring anomaly, by contrast-enhanced 64-row computed tomography. Results Electrocardiography (ECG-gated and thoracic nongated MDCT images were reviewed in identified cases of either a patent ductus arteriosus or vascular ring anomaly. Ductal size and morphology were determined in 6 dogs that underwent ECG-gated MDCT. Vascular ring anomalies were characterized in 7 dogs and 3 cats by ECG-gated MDCT or by a nongated thoracic standard protocol. Cardiac ECG-gated MDCT clearly displayed the morphology, length, and caliber of the patent ductus arteriosus in 6 affected dogs. Persistent right aortic arch was identified in 10 animals, 8 of which showed a coexisting aberrant left subclavian artery. A mild dilation of the proximal portion of the aberrant subclavian artery near its origin of the aorta was present in 4 dogs, and a diverticulum analogous to the human Kommerell's diverticulum was present in 2 cats. Conclusions Contrast-enhanced MDCT imaging of thoracic anomalies gives valuable information about the exact aortic arch configuration. Furthermore, MDCT was able to characterize the vascular branching patterns in dogs and cats with a persistent right aortic arch and the morphology and size of the patent ductus arteriosus in affected dogs. This additional

  7. Diagnosing Sarcopenia on Thoracic Computed Tomography: Quantitative Assessment of Skeletal Muscle Mass in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Ursula; Heidinger, Benedikt; Sokas, Claire; Chu, Louis; Eisenberg, Ronald L

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to assess the use of skeletal muscle mass measurements at two thoracic levels to diagnose sarcopenia on computed tomography (CT) chest examinations and to analyze the impact of these measurements on clinical outcome parameters following transcatheter aortic valve replacement. This study retrospectively included 157 patients who underwent preoperative CT examinations. The total muscle area was measured on transverse CT images at the 3rd lumbar and 7th and 12th thoracic levels with skeletal muscle indices (SMIs) calculated at each level. SMIs were then compared to clinical outcome parameters, and thoracic cutoff values for sarcopenia at the 7th and 12th thoracic levels were calculated. Correlation between SMIs at the third lumbar vertebra (L3) and the 12th thoracic vertebra (T12) was stronger (r = 0.724, P sarcopenia and could be used to correlate sarcopenia with outcome parameters in patients undergoing CT limited to the chest. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A correlative study of aortic valve rotation angle and thoracic aortic sizes using ECG gated CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saremi, Farhood, E-mail: fsaremi@usc.edu; Cen, Steven; Tayari, Nazila; Alizadeh, Houman; Emami, Amir; Lin, Leah; Fleischman, Fernando

    2017-04-15

    Objective: Various degrees of aortic valve rotation may be seen in individuals with no history of congenital cardiovascular malformations, but its association with aortic sizes has not been studied. Methods: Gated computed tomographic (CT angiograms in 217 patients were studied (66.7 ± 15; 22–97 years old)). Aortic diameters were determined at 5 anatomic locations. The length of the aorta from sinus to left subclavian artery was measured. The angle of valve rotation was recorded by measuring the angle between a line connecting the midpoint of the non-coronary sinus to the anterior commissure and another line along the interatrial septum. Rotation angles were correlated with aortic measurements. Patients were separated into two groups based on aortic sizes and into three groups based on age. The threshold for aortic dilatation was set at maximum ascending aorta diameter ≥40 mm (≥21 mm body surface area [BSA] indexed). Results: No significant difference in rotation angles was seen between the three age groups or between genders. Rotation angles were significantly correlated with maximal, average, and BSA adjustment of the aortic root and ascending aortic measurements. The aortic root angles were significantly different between the dilated versus nondilated aortas. There was no significant association between the rotation angles and age, length of ascending aorta, or diameters of descending aorta. Multivariate adaptive regression splines showed 25° of aortic root rotation as the diagnostic cut off for ascending aorta dilation. Above the 25° rotation, every 10° of increasing rotation was associated with a 3.78 ± 0.87 mm increase in aortic diameter (p < 0.01) and a 1.73 ± 0.25 times increased risk for having a dilated aorta (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Rotation angles of the aortic valve may be an independent non-invasive imaging marker for dilatation of the ascending aorta. Patients with increased rotation angle of the aortic valve may have higher risk for

  9. The repair of a type Ia endoleak following thoracic endovascular aortic repair using a stented elephant trunk procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Rui-Dong; Zhu, Jun-Ming; Liu, Yong-Min; Chen, Lei; Li, Cheng-Nan; Xing, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Li-Zhong

    2018-04-01

    Type Ia endoleaks are not uncommon complications that occur after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Because aortic arch vessels prevent extension of the landing zone, it is very difficult to manipulate a type Ia endoleak using an extension cuff or stent-graft, especially when the aortic arch is involved. Here, we retrospectively review our experience of surgical treatment of type Ia endoleak after TEVAR using a stented elephant trunk procedure. From July 2010 to August 2016, we treated 17 patients diagnosed with a type Ia endoleak following TEVAR using stented elephant trunk procedure. The mean age of our patients was 52 ± 8 years. The mean interval between TEVAR and the open surgical repair was 38 ± 43 months. All cases of type Ia endoleak (100%) were repaired successfully. There were no in-hospital deaths. One case required reintubation and continuous renal replacement therapy due to renal failure; this patient recovered smoothly before discharge. One other patient suffered a stroke and renal failure and did not fully recover following discharge, or follow-up. During follow-up, there were 3 deaths. Acceptable results were obtained using a stented elephant trunk procedure in patients with a type Ia endoleak after TEVAR. This technique allowed us to repair the proximal aortic arch lesions, surgically correct the type Ia endoleak, and promote false lumen thrombosis in the distal aorta. Implantation of a stented elephant trunk, with or without a concomitant aortic arch procedure, is an alternative approach for this type of lesion. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Contemporary economic and clinical evaluations of endovascular repair for intact descending thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silingardi, Roberto; Gennai, Stefano; Coppi, Giovanni; Chester, Johanna; Marcheselli, Luigi; Brunetti, Massimo

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess clinical and contemporary costs associated with elective endovascular repair of intact descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAA) into the mid-term follow-up. A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained clinical database including 29 consecutive patients from July 2005 to December 2009 treated with elective endovascular repair (TEVAR) or TEVAR and surgical infrarenal repair (hybrid) of intact DTAA was performed. Mean age was 74.5 years old (±7.1). Primary clinical endpoints include mortality and major morbidity. Additionally a comprehensive economic appraisal of individual in-hospital and follow-up costs was executed. Economic endpoints include in-hospital and follow-up costs and patient discharge status. Elective endovascular and open repairs' clinical and economical outcomes in contemporary literature were assessed for comparison according to PRISMA standards. Immediate mortality was 6.9% (1/24 TEVAR and 1/5 hybrid). Three respiratory complications were recorded (11%; 2 TEVAR, 1 hybrid). Renal and cardiac complication rates were 7.4% (1 TEVAR, 1 hybrid) and 3.7% (1 TEVAR) respectively. Routine discharge home was achieved for 85% of patients (95.7% TEVAR, 25% hybrid). Three endoleaks were treated throughout the follow-up (2 TEVAR, 1 hybrid; mean 30.4 mo, ±19.9) rendering an 11% (3/27) reintervention rate. Average immediate cost was €21,976.87 for elective endovascular repair and €33,783.21 for elective endovascular hybrid repair. Additional reintervention and routine follow-up costs augmented immediate costs by 12.4%. This study supports satisfying immediate clinical outcomes for TEVAR and TEVAR+surgical infrarenal procedures. Although limited by a small population size and difficulties in economic comparisons, this study presents the real world social and economic cost scenario for both elective TEVAR and TEVAR hybrid treatment of DTAA of both the in-hospital and at mid term follow-up periods.

  11. Thoracic Aortic Rupture and Aortopulmonary Fistulation in the Friesian Horse : Histomorphologic Characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, M; Saey, V; Delesalle, C; Gröne, A; Ducatelle, R; de Bruijn, M; Back, W; van Weeren, P R; van Loon, G; Chiers, K

    Aortic rupture in horses is a rare condition. Although it is relatively common in the Friesian breed, only limited histopathologic information is available. Twenty Friesian horses (1-10 years old) were diagnosed with aortic rupture by postmortem examination. Ruptured aortic walls were analyzed with

  12. What is the optimal myocardial preservation strategy at re-operation for aortic valve replacement in the presence of a patent internal thoracic artery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan B; Suri, Rakesh M; Burkhart, Harold M; Greason, Kevin L; Dearani, Joseph A; Schaff, Hartzell V; Sundt, Thoralf M

    2011-06-01

    The optimal myocardial preservation strategy at re-operation for aortic valve replacement (AVR) after prior coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in the presence of a patent internal thoracic artery (ITA) remains undefined. Patients undergoing AVR after prior CABG at our institution between 1 January 1996 and 31 December 2007 were identified; operative notes and outcomes were reviewed. Of 628 patients with prior CABG undergoing AVR with or without concomitant procedures, 427 patients had a patent ITA. In 390, management of the ITA was detailed in the operative note, including 251 in whom it was clamped and 139 in whom it was left uncontrolled. Groups were demographically similar, although re-operative CABG was more frequent in the clamped group (42% vs 23%, poptimal perfusion temperature when the ITA was left uncontrolled. Efforts to control the patent ITA at re-operation for AVR after prior CABG increase risk of injury and may actually increase operative mortality rate compared with leaving this critical graft open and perfusing the heart. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  13. The non-syndromic familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections maps to 15q21 locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandok Gurangad

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD is a critical condition that often goes undiagnosed with fatal consequences. While majority of the cases are sporadic, more than 20% are inherited as a single gene disorder. The most common familial TAA is Marfan syndrome (MFS, which is primarily caused by mutations in fibrillin-1 (FBN1 gene. Patients with FBN1 mutations are at higher risk for dissection compared to other patients with similar size aneurysms. Methods Fifteen family members were genotyped using Affymetrix-10K genechips. A genome-wide association study was carried out using an autosomal dominant model of inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Mutation screening of all exons and exon-intron boundaries of FBN1 gene which reside near the peak Lod score was carried out by direct sequencing. Results The index case presented with agonizing substernal pain and was found to have TAAD by transthoracic echocardiogram. The family history was significant for 3 first degree relatives with TAA. Nine additional family members were diagnosed with TAA by echocardiography examinations. The affected individuals had no syndromic features. A genome-wide analysis of linkage mapped the disease gene to a single locus on chromosome 15q21 with a peak Lod score of 3.6 at fibrillin-1 (FBN1 gene locus (odds ratio > 4000:1 in favour of linkage, strongly suggesting that FBN1 is the causative gene. No mutation was identified within the exons and exon-intron boundaries of FBN1 gene that segregated with the disease. Haplotype analysis identified additional mutation carriers who had previously unknown status due to borderline dilation of the ascending aorta. Conclusions A familial non-syndromic TAAD is strongly associated with the FBN1 gene locus and has a malignant disease course often seen in MFS patients. This finding indicates the importance of obtaining detailed family history and echocardiographic screening of extended relatives of patients

  14. True four-dimensional analysis of thoracic aortic displacement and distension using model-based segmentation of computed tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tim F; Müller, Tobias; Biesdorf, Andreas; Wörz, Stefan; Rengier, Fabian; Heye, Tobias; Holland-Letz, Tim; Rohr, Karl; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Previous analyses of aortic displacement and distension using computed tomography angiography (CTA) were performed on double-oblique multi-planar reformations and did not consider through-plane motion. The aim of this study was to overcome this limitation by using a novel computational approach for the assessment of thoracic aortic displacement and distension in their true four-dimensional extent. Vessel segmentation with landmark tracking was executed on CTA of 24 patients without evidence of aortic disease. Distension magnitudes and maximum displacement vectors (MDV) including their direction were analyzed at 5 aortic locations: left coronary artery (COR), mid-ascending aorta (ASC), brachiocephalic trunk (BCT), left subclavian artery (LSA), descending aorta (DES). Distension was highest for COR (2.3 ± 1.2 mm) and BCT (1.7 ± 1.1 mm) compared with ASC, LSA, and DES (p < 0.005). MDV decreased from COR to LSA (p < 0.005) and was highest for COR (6.2 ± 2.0 mm) and ASC (3.8 ± 1.9 mm). Displacement was directed towards left and anterior at COR and ASC. Craniocaudal displacement at COR and ASC was 1.3 ± 0.8 and 0.3 ± 0.3 mm. At BCT, LSA, and DES no predominant displacement direction was observable. Vessel displacement and wall distension are highest in the ascending aorta, and ascending aortic displacement is primarily directed towards left and anterior. Craniocaudal displacement remains low even close to the left cardiac ventricle.

  15. Commentary on “Inhibition of interleukin-1beta decreases aneurysm formation and progression in a novel model of thoracic aortic aneurysms”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua Bi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aortic aneurysm is a silent but life-threatening disease, whose pathogenesis remains poorly understood. Aneurysm models have been induced in small animals to study its pathogenesis, Johnston WF et al. successfully induced a novel model of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA by periadventitial application of elastase in mice. We comment on this model according to our experiment. We hypothesize that endogenous MMPs, especially MMP2, play a vital role in complex repair process of aneurysmal wall, which should be a key target in the investigation and treatment of aortic aneurysms.

  16. Esophageal Foreign Body Causing Direct Aortic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ECS Lam

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Foreign bodies in the esophagus are uncommon causes of esophageal perforation. Many nonperforating cases are successfully managed by flexible gastroscopy. However, complicated foreign bodies such as those that result in esophageal perforation and vascular injury are best managed surgically. Gastroscopy remains the primary method of diagnosis. A case of a 59-year-old woman who developed retrosternal and intrascapular pain, odynophagia and hematemesis after eating fish is reported. Flexible gastroscopy showed arterial bleeding from the midthoracic esophagus. Computed tomography scan localized a 3 cm fish bone perforating the esophagus with surrounding hematoma. An aortogram did not reveal an actively bleeding aortoesophageal fistula. The fish bone was surgically removed and the patient recovered with no postoperative complications. This case illustrates the importance of early consideration for surgical intervention when confronted with a brisk arterial bleed from the esophagus with suggestive history of foreign body ingestion.

  17. Surgical treatment and thoracic endovascular aortic repair in type A aortic dissection in a pregnant patient with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterner, Doerthe; Probst, Chris; Mellert, Friedrich; Schiller, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    We report an acute aortic dissection type Stanford A extending down to both iliac arteries affecting a 32-year-old woman suspected to have Marfan syndrome during week 37 of pregnancy. In a multidisciplinary approach, and emergency Cesarean section was performed followed by an abdominal hysterectomy and a valve-sparing aortic root replacement using a reimplantation technique. The aorta was replaced up to the hemi arch. Because of the high suspicion of visceral ischemia as confirmed ex juvantibus, an endovascular stent graft was implanted. Molecular testing revealed a frameshift mutation and confirmed the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome. Both the patient and her healthy child underwent an uneventful recovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Thoracic and abdominal aortic diameters in a general population: MRI-based reference values and association with age and cardiovascular risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensel, Birger; Hesselbarth, Lydia; Wenzel, Michael; Kuehn, Jens-Peter; Hegenscheid, Katrin [University Medicine Greifswald, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald (Germany); Doerr, Marcus [University Medicine Greifswald, Department of Internal Medicine, Greifswald (Germany); DZHK (German Center for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Greifswald, Greifswald (Germany); Voelzke, Henry [University Medicine Greifswald, Institute for Community Medicine, Greifswald (Germany); DZHK (German Center for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Greifswald, Greifswald (Germany); Lieb, Wolfgang [Christian Albrechts University, Institute of Epidemiology, Kiel (Germany); Lorbeer, Roberto [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    To generate reference values for thoracic and abdominal aortic diameters determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyse their association with cardiovascular risk factors in the general population. Data from participants (n = 1759) of the Study of Health in Pomerania were used for analysis in this study. MRI measurement of thoracic and abdominal aortic diameters was performed. Parameters for calculation of reference values according to age and sex analysis were provided. Multivariable linear regression models were used for determination of aortic diameter-related risk factors, including smoking, blood pressure (BP), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). For the ascending aorta (β = -0.049, p < 0.001), the aortic arch (β = -0.061, p < 0.001) and the subphrenic aorta (β = -0.018, p = 0.004), the body surface area (BSA)-adjusted diameters were lower in men. Multivariable-adjusted models revealed significant increases in BSA-adjusted diameters with age for all six aortic segments (p < 0.001). Consistent results for all segments were observed for the positive associations of diastolic BP (β = 0.001; 0.004) and HDL (β = 0.035; 0.087) with BSA-adjusted aortic diameters and for an inverse association of systolic BP (β = -0.001). Some BSA-adjusted median aortic diameters are smaller in men than in women. All diameters increase with age, diastolic blood pressure and HDL-C and decrease as systolic BP increases. (orig.)

  19. Thoracic aortic rupture and aortopulmonary fistulation in the Friesian horse: histomorphologic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploeg, M; Saey, V; Delesalle, C; Gröne, A; Ducatelle, R; de Bruijn, M; Back, W; van Weeren, P R; van Loon, G; Chiers, K

    2015-01-01

    Aortic rupture in horses is a rare condition. Although it is relatively common in the Friesian breed, only limited histopathologic information is available. Twenty Friesian horses (1-10 years old) were diagnosed with aortic rupture by postmortem examination. Ruptured aortic walls were analyzed with histology and immunohistochemistry. Based on the histologic and immunohistochemical findings, these cases were divided into 3 groups: acute (n = 4, 20%), subacute (n = 8, 40%), and chronic (n = 8, 40%). Features common to samples from horses in all groups included accumulation of mucoid material; disorganization and fragmentation of the elastic laminae; aortic medial smooth muscle hypertrophy; and medial necrosis of varying degrees, ranging from mild and patchy in the acute cases to severe midzonal necrosis in the chronic cases. Inflammation, most likely secondary to medial necrosis, varied from predominantly neutrophilic infiltrates in the media and periadventitial tissue in the acute group to the presence of mainly hemosiderophages in the periadventitial tissue in the chronic group. Medial fibrosis with aberrant collagen morphology was seen in the subacute group and, more commonly, in the chronic group. Only minimal changes were seen in the aortic vasa vasorum. Smooth muscle hypertrophy and accumulation of mucoid material were not related to the age of the lesions. The findings of this study suggest that a connective tissue disorder affecting elastin or collagen in the aortic media is potentially the underlying cause of aortic rupture in Friesian horses. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Candidate Gene Resequencing in a Large Bicuspid Aortic Valve-Associated Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Cohort: SMAD6 as an Important Contributor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Elisabeth; Kumar, Ajay A; Luyckx, Ilse; Preuss, Christoph; Cannaerts, Elyssa; van de Beek, Gerarda; Wieschendorf, Björn; Alaerts, Maaike; Bolar, Nikhita; Vandeweyer, Geert; Meester, Josephina; Wünnemann, Florian; Gould, Russell A; Zhurayev, Rustam; Zerbino, Dmytro; Mohamed, Salah A; Mital, Seema; Mertens, Luc; Björck, Hanna M; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; McCallion, Andrew S; Van Laer, Lut; Verhagen, Judith M A; van de Laar, Ingrid M B H; Wessels, Marja W; Messas, Emmanuel; Goudot, Guillaume; Nemcikova, Michaela; Krebsova, Alice; Kempers, Marlies; Salemink, Simone; Duijnhouwer, Toon; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Albuisson, Juliette; Eriksson, Per; Andelfinger, Gregor; Dietz, Harry C; Verstraeten, Aline; Loeys, Bart L

    2017-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common congenital heart defect. Although many BAV patients remain asymptomatic, at least 20% develop thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA). Historically, BAV-related TAA was considered as a hemodynamic consequence of the valve defect. Multiple lines of evidence currently suggest that genetic determinants contribute to the pathogenesis of both BAV and TAA in affected individuals. Despite high heritability, only very few genes have been linked to BAV or BAV/TAA, such as NOTCH1, SMAD6 , and MAT2A . Moreover, they only explain a minority of patients. Other candidate genes have been suggested based on the presence of BAV in knockout mouse models (e.g., GATA5, NOS3 ) or in syndromic (e.g., TGFBR1/2, TGFB2/3 ) or non-syndromic (e.g., ACTA2 ) TAA forms. We hypothesized that rare genetic variants in these genes may be enriched in patients presenting with both BAV and TAA. We performed targeted resequencing of 22 candidate genes using Haloplex target enrichment in a strictly defined BAV/TAA cohort ( n = 441; BAV in addition to an aortic root or ascendens diameter ≥ 4.0 cm in adults, or a Z-score ≥ 3 in children) and in a collection of healthy controls with normal echocardiographic evaluation ( n = 183). After additional burden analysis against the Exome Aggregation Consortium database, the strongest candidate susceptibility gene was SMAD6 ( p = 0.002), with 2.5% ( n = 11) of BAV/TAA patients harboring causal variants, including two nonsense, one in-frame deletion and two frameshift mutations. All six missense mutations were located in the functionally important MH1 and MH2 domains. In conclusion, we report a significant contribution of SMAD6 mutations to the etiology of the BAV/TAA phenotype.

  1. Pituitary insufficiency following traumatic thoracic injury in an adolescent male patient: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilis-Januszewska, Aleksandra; Kluczyński, Łukasz; Wilusz, Małgorzata; Pantofliński, Jacek; Turek-Jabrocka, Renata; Pach, Dorota; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja

    2017-11-01

    Traumatic thoracic injuries in adolescents are rare but could be connected with traumatic brain injuries (TBI) and development of chronic hypopituitarism. Early recognition of these endocrine problems is a significant challenge to clinicians. We present difficulties in diagnosis of hypothalamic-pituitary insufficiency following traumatic thoracic injury in adolescence. We also review the literature of similar cases. We present a case of a 24-years-old male. In 2007, at the age of 15 he underwent a severe traffic accident followed by thoracic injury with concussion, hemothorax and dissection of the aorta requiring aortic stent-graft implantation. During the post-traumatic period, transient polydipsia and polyuria symptoms were observed. The patient had no medical history of any serious disease before the accident, his growth and pubertal development was normal. After the accident the patient did not undergo any routine medical check-ups. In 2013 gonadal axis deficiency was diagnosed during investigation of libido problems. Following the diagnosis testosterone replacement therapy was initiated. Further endocrinological investigation was carried out in 2016. The patient's main complaints were decreased mood and poor physical fitness. BMI was 27.34 kg/m, with a tendency to abdominal fat distribution. The patient's height is 160 cm, while Mid Parental Height (MPH) is 173.5 cm. Decreased bone density was found in DEXA examination. Serum growth hormone level (GH) was normal while insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) level was below normal. Insulin tolerance test (ITT) and low levels of IGF-1 confirmed somatotropic axis deficiency. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of the hypothalamo-pituitary region showed no abnormalities. PROP 1 and other common genetic mutations associated with GH deficits were excluded. Testosterone treatment was continued. The patient increased physical activity and implemented diet. The patient has lost weight, improved physical activity

  2. The Value and Limitations of Guidelines, Expert Consensus, and Registries on the Management of Patients with Thoracic Aortic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Pacini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Doctors are often faced with difficult decisions and uncertainty when patients need a certain treatment. They routinely rely on the scientific literature, in addition to their knowledge, experience, and patient preferences. Clinical practice guidelines are created with the intention of facilitating decision-making. They may offer concise instructions for the diagnosis, management (medical or surgical treatments, and prevention of specific diseases o r conditions. All information included in t he f inal v ersion a re the r esult of a s ystematic rev iew of scientific articles and an assessment of the benefits and costs of alternative care options. The final document attempts to meet the needs of most patients in most circumstances and clinicians, aware of these recommendations, should always make individualized treatment decisions. In this review, we attempted to define the intent and applicability of clinical practice guidelines, expert consensus documents, and registry studies, focusing on the management of patients with thoracic aortic disease.

  3. Retracted: Reversal of Spinal Cord Ischemia Following Endovascular Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Repair with Hyperbaric Oxygen and Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquieta, Emmanuel; Jye Poi, Mun; Varon, Joseph; Lin, Peter H

    2015-12-14

    This article has been officially retracted. The senior author, Emmanuel Urquieta, of the article entitled, "Reversal of Spinal Cord Ischemia Following Endovascular Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Repair with Hyperbaric Oxygen and Therapeutic Hypothermia," has requesed that the article, published online ahead of print (DOI: 10.1089/ther.2015.0025), be retracted because he discovered one of his coauthors mistakenly submitted the same article to the Journal of Vascular Surgery due to a miscommunication between them. The editorial leadership of Therapeutic Hypothermia and Temperature Management agree that the article must be retracted as a matter of proper scientific publishing protocol whereby an article may not be simultaneously submitted to two journals. The Editors commend Dr. Urquieta for willingly bringing this situation to their attention. Dr. Urquieta and his coauthors sincerely apologize to the Editors and the readership of Therapeutic Hypothermia and Temperature Management.

  4. Mean blood velocities and flow impedance in the fetal descending thoracic aortic and common carotid artery in normal pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilardo, C M; Campbell, S; Nicolaides, K H

    1988-12-01

    A linear array pulsed Doppler duplex scanner was used to establish reference ranges for mean blood velocities and flow impedance (Pulsatility Index = PI) in the descending thoracic aorta and in the common carotid artery from 70 fetuses in normal pregnancies at 17-42 weeks' gestation. The aortic velocity increased with gestation up to 32 weeks, then remained constant until term, when it decreased. In contrast, the velocity in the common carotid artery increased throughout pregnancy. The PI in the aorta remained constant throughout pregnancy, while in the common carotid artery it fell steeply after 32 weeks. These results suggest that with advancing gestation there is a redistribution of the fetal circulation with decreased impedance to flow to the fetal brain, presumably to compensate for the progressive decrease in fetal blood PO2.

  5. Characterization of neurological recovery following traumatic sensorimotor complete thoracic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zariffa, J; Kramer, J L K; Fawcett, J W; Lammertse, D P; Blight, A R; Guest, J; Jones, L; Burns, S; Schubert, M; Bolliger, M; Curt, A; Steeves, J D

    2011-03-01

    Retrospective, longitudinal analysis of sensory, motor and functional outcomes from individuals with thoracic (T2-T12) sensorimotor complete spinal cord injury (SCI). To characterize neurological changes over the first year after traumatic thoracic sensorimotor complete SCI. A dataset of 399 thoracic complete SCI subjects from the European Multi-center study about SCI (EMSCI) was examined for neurological level, sensory levels and sensory scores (pin-prick and light touch), lower extremity motor score (LEMS), ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS) grade, and Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) over the first year after SCI. AIS grade conversions were limited. Sensory scores exhibited minimal mean change, but high variability in both rostral and caudal directions. Pin-prick and light touch sensory levels, as well as neurological level, exhibited minor changes (improvement or deterioration), but most subjects remained within one segment of their initial injury level after 1 year. Recovery of LEMS occurred predominantly in subjects with low thoracic SCI. The sensory zone of partial preservation (ZPP) had no prognostic value for subsequent recovery of sensory levels or LEMS. However, after mid or low thoracic SCI, ≥3 segments of sensory ZPP correlated with an increased likelihood for AIS grade conversion. The data suggest that a sustained deterioration of three or more thoracic sensory levels or loss of upper extremity motor function are rare events and may be useful for tracking the safety of a therapeutic intervention in early phase acute SCI clinical trials, if a significant proportion of study subjects exhibit such an ascent.

  6. Preoperative evaluation of the artery of adamkiewicz by MR angiography and CT angiography in patients with a thoracic aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Ohira, Atsushi; Makita, Shinji; Moriai, Yoshiteru; Hiramori, Katsuhiko; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Nakajima, Takayuki; Kawazoe, Kohei

    2002-01-01

    Paraplegia is known as an extremely serious and important complication of surgical repair in patients with a thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm. It is important to evaluate the artery of Adamkiewicz (AdA) before surgical repair to prevent paraplegia. But the AdA is difficult to visualize by the invasive and hazardous, conventional selective angiography. The aim of this study was to visualize AdA by MR angiography (MRA) and CT angiography (CTA). Twenty-one consecutive patients with a thoracic aortic aneurysm underwent both gadolinium-enhanced, three-dimensional MRA and CTA using multislice helical CT. The AdA was successfully visualized in 15 of the 21 patients (71.4%) by MRA, and in 17 of those 21 patients (80.9%) by CTA. Its continuity was depicted in 12 of 15 patients (80%) by MRA, and in 9 of 17 patients (47%) by CTA. AdA was visualized at 85.7% by MRA or CTA, respectively. This study shows that CTA is a much more sensitive method to detect AdA than MRA. On the other hand, MRA is better to evaluate the continuity of AdA from the descending aorta to the anterior spinal artery, than CTA. Therefore, MRA and CTA are both useful for a preoperative evaluation of AdA and its detailed vascular anatomy from the aorta to the anterior spinal artery. (author)

  7. Thoracic aortic stent-graft placement combined with left subclavian artery 'chimney operation': therapeutic analysis of 15 cases with insufficient proximal anchor area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiayi; Huang Lianjun; Fan Zhanming; Zhang Zhaoqi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the strategies for the management of insufficient proximal anchoring area during the performance of transluminal stent-graft placement (TSGP), and to evaluate the feasibility of intentional coverage of the left subclavian artery (LSA) together with left subclavian artery stent-graft placement by using 'chimney operation' technique. Methods: A total of 15 patients with thoracic aortic diseases complicated by insufficient proximal anchoring area, who were encountered in authors' hospital during the period from Dec. 2009 to April 2011, were enrolled in this study. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. The thoracic aortic diseases included aortic dissection (n=6), aortic pseudoaneurysm (n=1), aortic aneurysm (n=4) and penetrating ulcer (n=4). Of the 15 patients, the distance between the lesion and LSA anchoring site 15 mm in 2. TSGP was carried out. The ostium of LSA was intentionally and completely covered by thoracic aortic stent-graft and left subclavian artery stent-graft placement was subsequently performed. The patients were kept under observation for symptoms of cerebral and upper limb ischemia. The postoperative complications such as endoleak and the patency of LSA were assessed with angiography. Results: Thoracic aortic stent-graft placement was successfully carried out in all 15 patients. In addition, one 'chimney' stent was properly implanted in LSA in each patient. After the procedure, no complications of nervous system or severe ischemia of upper extremity occurred. Follow-up examinations performed between 5 days to 3 months after the treatment revealed that the aortic stent-graft remained in stable condition and no type Ⅰ endoleak occurred, meanwhile the blood flow in 'chimney' stent was unobstructed. Conclusion: Intentional LSA coverage with 'chimney operation' can expand the applicability of TSGP with high tolerability. It is especially useful for patients with left vertebral artery blood supply dominance or with

  8. Aortic root repair for thoracic aorta false aneurysm following Bentall procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Jones, Steve; Sivananthan, U M; McGoldrick, J P

    2008-08-01

    The Bentall procedure for aortic root replacement in Marfan's syndrome is safe and durable. We describe successful repair of periprosthetic valvular leak, 12 years following Bentall repair with composite graft. The aim of this report is to analyse and evaluate technical factors leading to this unusual occurrence.

  9. Morphometric Properties of the Thoracic Aorta of Warmblood and Friesian Horses with and without Aortic Rupture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saey, V; Ploeg, M; Delesalle, C; van Loon, G; Gröne, A; Ducatelle, R; Duchateau, L; Chiers, K

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of the aorta is much more common in Friesians compared with other breeds of horse. Rupture always occurs adjacent to the scar of the ligamentum arteriosum. Previous histological examination of ruptured aortic walls suggested the presence of an underlying connective tissue disorder.

  10. Type 1a endoleak following Zone 1 and Zone 2 thoracic endovascular aortic repair: effect of bird-beak configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Tomoaki; Kuratani, Toru; Shimamura, Kazuo; Sakamoto, Tomohiko; Kin, Keiwa; Masada, Kenta; Shijo, Takayuki; Torikai, Kei; Maeda, Koichi; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2017-10-01

    Type 1a endoleak is one of the most severe complications after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR), because it carries the risk of aortic rupture. The association between bird-beak configuration and Type 1a endoleak remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to analyse the predictors of Type 1a endoleak following Zone 1 and Zone 2 TEVAR, with a particular focus on the effect of bird-beak configuration. From April 2008 to July 2015, 105 patients (mean age 68.6 years) who underwent Zone 1 and 2 landing TEVAR were enrolled, with a mean follow-up period of 4.3 years. The patients were categorized into 2 groups, according to the presence (Group B, n = 32) or the absence (Group N, n = 73) of bird-beak configuration on the first postoperative multidetector computed tomography. The Kaplan-Meier event-free rate curve showed that Type 1a endoleak and bird-beak progression occurred less frequently in Group N than in Group B. Five-year freedom from Type 1a endoleak rates were 79.7% and 100% for Groups B and N, respectively (P = 0.007). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that dissecting aortic aneurysm (odds ratio 3.72, 95% confidence interval 1.30-11.0; P = 0.014) and shorter radius of inner curvature (odds ratio 1.09, 95% confidence interval 0.85-0.99; P = 0.025) were significant risk factors for bird-beak configuration. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression showed that Z-type stent graft (hazard ratio 2.69, 95% confidence interval 1.11-6.51; P = 0.030) was a significant risk factor for bird-beak progression. Appropriate stent grafts need to be chosen carefully to prevent Type 1a endoleak and bird-beak configuration after landing Zone 1 and 2 TEVAR. Patients with bird-beak configuration on early postoperative multidetector computed tomography require closer follow-up to screen for Type 1a endoleak. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic

  11. Long thoracic nerve injury in breast cancer patients treated with axillary lymph node dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, Roser; Monleon, Sandra; Bofill, Neus; Alvarado, Martha Ligia; Espadaler, Josep; Royo, Inmaculada

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to electromyographically (EMG) describe and analyze factors associated with long thoracic nerve injuries in breast cancer patients after axillary lymph node dissection. This was a prospective longitudinal observational study. Two hundred sixty-four women with primary invasive breast cancer were included between 2008 and 2011. All of them were treated by axillary lymph node dissection. Patients were evaluated at 1, 6, and 12 months following surgery. The presence of winged scapula was systematically tested at each follow-up and an EMG performed whenever it was observed. Affected and unaffected groups were compared for demographic, tumour, and treatment variables. Student t test, Mann-Whitney U test, chi-squared or Fisher test were computed as appropriate. Among the 36 (13.6%) winged scapula observed, the EMG confirmed long thoracic nerve injury in 30 (11.3%) of them, 27 were partial axonotmesis and three were severe axonotmesis. At 12 months, the EMG showed that injury persisted in six (2.27%) patients. Patients with long thoracic nerve injury had a lower body mass index than unaffected patients (26.2 vs. 28.2, p = 0.045). Age, tumour stage, type of breast surgery, nodes excised, surgical complications, previous chemotherapy and previous hormonotherapy were not factors associated with winged scapula. A lower body mass index was the only factor associated to long thoracic nerve injury. In most of the patients, the EMG showed partial axonotmesis. At 12 months, 2.27% of studied patients remained with an unsolved long thoracic nerve injury.

  12. Endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic pathology: Feasibility and mid-term results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamme, B.; de Jonge, I. C. D. Y. M.; Reekers, J. A.; de Mol, B. A. J. M.; Balm, R.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: to report our experience with 21 consecutive patients treated with a thoracic stent-graft. Design: retrospective analysis. Materials and Methods: Between October 1998 and February 2002, 21 patients (12 male), mean age 55.6 years (range 19-86 years), were treated for aorticortic pathology

  13. Lower thoracic spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality in an amateur rugby player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Hannah K; Durnford, Andrew J; Sherlala, Khaled; Merriam, William F

    2012-10-26

    A 37-year-old man, amateur rugby player sustained a hyperextension injury to his lower thoracic spine during a scrum collapse. The patient developed extreme hyperpathia in the T10-12 dermatome, and parasthesia from T12 to S1 in the left lower limb. Medical Research Council grade 5 power was regained rapidly within minutes of the accident, and the hyperpathia resolved within a week. MRI showed contusion of the spinal cord at T10 level but no associated osseoligamentous injury. Six months later, parasthesia and subjective weakness remained in the left lower limb. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a lower thoracic spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality following an isolated low-energy injury in a skeletally mature patient.

  14. A Retrospective Observational Study Examining the Effect of Thoracic Epidural and Patient Controlled Analgesia on Short-term Outcomes in Blunt Thoracic Trauma Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Edward James; Lee, Geraldine Ann

    2016-01-01

    Effective analgesia in the early stages after any major traumatic event remains pivotal to optimal trauma management. For patients with significant thoracic injuries, this is paramount to ensure ongoing efficient respiratory function. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of analgesic modes in the management of patients with a primary thoracic injury and blunt mechanism of injury. By understanding variables that influence the use of varying analgesic modes and influence the development of pulmonary complications, there should be more uniform evidence-based prescription in the future.This retrospective study considered analgesic use in patients admitted after blunt thoracic injuries at one major trauma center over a 2-year period. Pulmonary complications measured included both infective and ventilator-associated failure. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify patient and injury severity characteristics and their association with respiratory complications.A total of 401 cases were reviewed and analyzed: 159 received Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA), 32 received PCA and epidural analgesia (EA), 6 received EA alone, and 204 received interval-administered analgesia. There were no significant differences in the rates of complication when compared between analgesic modes. Patients who developed pneumonia had significantly increased number of thoracic fractures and underlying organ injury (P cardiac disease (OR 2.624, P = 0.042) and ICU length of stay (OR: 1.146, P blunt thoracic injuries. However, variables that may influence usage of different analgesic modes and high-risk groups for the development of pneumonia were identified. Further work is warranted to consider the long-term benefits of analgesia in patients post-blunt thoracic injuries.

  15. Treatment Results of Injuries of Thoracic and Lumbar Backbone Departments at Osteoporosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.Y. Sumin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Information relates to radiologic (computer tomography manifestations providing the visualization of thoracic and lumbar backbone department injuries at osteoporotic patients. Contemporary methods of transcutaneous and trans-pedicle vertebroplasty with bone cement allows to obtain a stable positive healing effect against such pathologies.

  16. Long descending cervical propriospinal neurons differ from thoracic propriospinal neurons in response to low thoracic spinal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelzner Dennis J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propriospinal neurons, with axonal projections intrinsic to the spinal cord, have shown a greater regenerative response than supraspinal neurons after axotomy due to spinal cord injury (SCI. Our previous work focused on the response of axotomized short thoracic propriospinal (TPS neurons following a low thoracic SCI (T9 spinal transection or moderate spinal contusion injury in the rat. The present investigation analyzes the intrinsic response of cervical propriospinal neurons having long descending axons which project into the lumbosacral enlargement, long descending propriospinal tract (LDPT axons. These neurons also were axotomized by T9 spinal injury in the same animals used in our previous study. Results Utilizing laser microdissection (LMD, qRT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry, we studied LDPT neurons (located in the C5-C6 spinal segments between 3-days, and 1-month following a low thoracic (T9 spinal cord injury. We examined the response of 89 genes related to growth factors, cell surface receptors, apoptosis, axonal regeneration, and neuroprotection/cell survival. We found a strong and significant down-regulation of ~25% of the genes analyzed early after injury (3-days post-injury with a sustained down-regulation in most instances. In the few genes that were up-regulated (Actb, Atf3, Frs2, Hspb1, Nrap, Stat1 post-axotomy, the expression for all but one was down-regulated by 2-weeks post-injury. We also compared the uninjured TPS control neurons to the uninjured LDPT neurons used in this experiment for phenotypic differences between these two subpopulations of propriospinal neurons. We found significant differences in expression in 37 of the 84 genes examined between these two subpopulations of propriospinal neurons with LDPT neurons exhibiting a significantly higher base line expression for all but 3 of these genes compared to TPS neurons. Conclusions Taken collectively these data indicate a broad overall down

  17. Low-flow antegrade cerebral perfusion attenuates early renal and intestinal injury during neonatal aortic arch reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algra, Selma O; Schouten, Antonius N J; van Oeveren, Wim; van der Tweel, Ingeborg; Schoof, Paul H; Jansen, Nicolaas J G; Haas, Felix

    2012-12-01

    Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) and antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) are 2 cardiopulmonary bypass strategies mainly used in aortic arch reconstructions. It has been suggested that during ACP, abdominal organs are better protected than during DHCA owing to partial perfusion via collaterals. We tested this hypothesis using intraoperative near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), lactate measurements, and biomarkers for early abdominal injury in neonates undergoing complex aortic arch repair. Neonates scheduled for aortic arch reconstruction via median sternotomy between 2009 and 2011 were randomized to either DHCA or ACP. During surgery, regional oxygen saturations of the abdomen were monitored using NIRS. Immediately aafter DHCA or ACP, lactate concentrations from the inferior vena cava were compared with those from the arterial cannula. Postoperatively, biomarkers for early abdominal organ injury were measured in urine. Twenty-five neonates were analyzed (DHCA, n = 12; ACP, n = 13). Procedures were performed at 18°C, and ACP flow was set at 35 to 50 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1). Median abdominal NIRS value during DHCA was 31% (IQR, 28%-41%) whereas during ACP it was 56% (IQR, 34%-64%; P intestinal damage (gluthatione s-transferase and intestinal fatty acid binding protein, respectively) were higher in the DHCA group than for the ACP group (P = .03, P = .04, respectively). These results substantiate earlier suggestions that ACP provides more abdominal organ protection than DHCA in neonates undergoing aortic arch reconstruction. Copyright © 2012 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Thoracic type Ia endoleak: direct percutaneous coil embolization of the aortic arch at the blood entry site after TEVAR and double-chimney stent-grafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangard, Christopher; Franke, Mareike; Maintz, David; Chang, De-Hua; Pfister, Roman; Deppe, Antje-Christin; Matoussevitch, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    To introduce a novel percutaneous technique to stop blood entry at the lesser aortic arch curvature by coil embolisation in type Ia endoleak after TEVAR. A 61-year-old Marfan patient presented with type Ia endoleak of the aortic arch and a growing aortic arch pseudoaneurysm after TEVAR. Multiple preceding operations and interventions made an endovascular approach unsuccessful. Direct percutaneous puncture of the aneurysmal sac would have cured the sign, but not the cause of blood entry at the lesser curvature of the aortic arch. Direct CT-guided percutaneous puncture of the blood entry site in the aortic arch with fluoroscopically guided coil embolisation using detachable extra-long coils was successfully performed. Three weeks after the intervention, the patient developed fever because of superinfection of the pseudoaneurysm. The blood cultures and CT-guided mediastinal aspirate were sterile. After intravenous administration of antibiotics, the fever disappeared and the patient recovered. Six-month follow-up showed permanent closure of the endoleak and a shrinking aneurysmal sac. Direct percutaneous puncture of the aortic arch at the blood entry site of a thoracic type Ia endoleak after TEVAR and double-chimney stent-grafts with coil embolisation of the wedge-shaped space between the lesser aortic curvature and the stent-graft is possible. (orig.)

  19. Rapid recovery of serratus anterior muscle function after microneurolysis of long thoracic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melcher Sonya E

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Injury to the long thoracic nerve is a common cause of winging scapula. When the serratus anterior muscle is unable to function, patients often lose the ability to raise their arm overhead on the affected side. Methods Serratus anterior function was restored through decompression, neurolysis, and tetanic electrical stimulation of the long thoracic nerve. This included partial release of constricting middle scalene fibers and microneurolysis of epineurium and perineurium of the long thoracic nerve under magnification. Abduction angle was measured on the day before and the day following surgery. Results In this retrospective study of 13 neurolysis procedures of the long thoracic nerve, abduction is improved by 10% or greater within one day of surgery. The average improvement was 59° (p Conclusion In a notable number of cases, decompression and neurolysis of the long thoracic nerve leads to rapid improvements in winging scapula and the associated limitations on shoulder movement. The duration of the injury and the speed of improvement lead us to conclude that axonal channel defects can potentially exist that do not lead to Wallerian degeneration and yet cause a clear decrease in function.

  20. "Thunderstruck": penetrating thoracic injury from lightning strike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Waes, Oscar J F; van de Woestijne, Pieter C; Halm, Jens A

    2014-04-01

    Lightning strike victims are rarely presented at an emergency department. Burns are often the primary focus. This case report describes the improvised explosive device like-injury to the thorax due to lightning strike and its treatment, which has not been described prior in (kerauno)medicine. Penetrating injury due to blast from lightning strike is extremely rare. These "shrapnel" injuries should however be ruled out in all patients struck by lightning. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Retrograde type A dissection: a serious complication due to thoracic aortic endovascular stent-graft repair for Stanford type B aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guoquan; Zhai Shuiting; Li Tianxiao; Shi Shuaitao; Zhang Kewei; Li Kun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to discuss the possible causes and prevention of retrograde type A dissection occurred after thoracic aortic endovascular stent-graft repair (TEVAR) for symptomatic type B dissection. Methods: During the period from January 2005 to January 2011, TEVAR was carried out in 189 patients (157 males and 32 females) with symptomatic type B dissection. The average age of the patients was (51.2±13.5) years, ranged from 26 to 78 years. A follow-up lasting for 3-63 months (mean 32 months) was conducted in 135 patients (71.43%). Fifty-four patients lost in touch with the authors (28.57%). The occurrence of retrograde type A dissection after TEVAR was calculated and the possible causes were analyzed. Results: After TEVAR retrograde type A dissection occurred in two patients (1.48%), and both were males. One patient developed retrograde type A dissection in perioperative period, and the patient refused to have surgery. Conservative treatment was employed for over three years and be was still alive so far. The other patient developed retrograde type A dissection one month after TEVAR, and emergency surgery was performed. The patient was followed up for three months and he was still alive. Conclusion: The retrograde type A dissection occurred after TEVAR may be closely related to the stent-graft device, to the interventional manipulations and to the vascular disorders. Close attention should be paid to the direct damage produced by the stent-graft device to the vascular wall. (authors)

  2. Thoracic Duct Chylous Fistula Following Severe Electric Injury Combined with Sulfuric Acid Burns: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fei; Cheng, Dasheng; Qian, Mingyuan; Lu, Wei; Li, Huatao; Tang, Hongtai; Xia, Zhaofan

    2016-10-11

    BACKGROUND As patients with thoracic duct injuries often suffer from severe local soft tissue defects, integrated surgical treatment is needed to achieve damage repair and wound closure. However, thoracic duct chylous fistula is rare in burn patients, although it typically involves severe soft tissue damage in the neck or chest. CASE REPORT A 32-year-old male patient fell after accidentally contacting an electric current (380 V) and knocked over a barrel of sulfuric acid. The sulfuric acid continuously poured onto his left neck and chest, causing combined electrical and sulfuric acid burn injuries to his anterior and posterior torso, and various parts of his limbs (25% of his total body surface area). During treatment, chylous fistula developed in the left clavicular region, which we diagnosed as thoracic duct chylous fistula. We used diet control, intravenous nutritional support, and continuous somatostatin to reduce the chylous fistula output, and hydrophilic silver ion-containing dressings for wound coverage. A boneless muscle flap was used to seal the left clavicular cavity, and, integrated, these led to resolution of the chylous fistula. CONCLUSIONS Patients with severe electric or chemical burns in the neck or chest may be complicated with thoracic duct injuries. Although conservative treatment can control chylous fistula, wound cavity filling using a muscle flap is an effective approach for wound healing.

  3. Association of left subclavian artery coverage without revascularization and spinal cord ischemia in patients undergoing thoracic endovascular aortic repair: A Vascular Quality Initiative® analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Pedro Gr; Woo, Karen; Beck, Adam W; Scali, Salvatore T; Weaver, Fred A

    2017-12-01

    Objectives Investigate the impact of left subclavian artery coverage without revascularization on spinal cord ischemia development in patients undergoing thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Methods The Vascular Quality Initiative thoracic endovascular aortic repair module (April 2011-July 2014) was analyzed. Patients undergoing left subclavian artery coverage were divided into two groups according to revascularization status. The association between left subclavian artery revascularization with the primary outcome of spinal cord ischemia and the secondary outcome of stroke was assessed with multivariable analysis adjusting for between-group baseline differences. Results The left subclavian artery was covered in 508 (24.6%) of the 2063 thoracic endovascular aortic repairs performed. Among patients with left subclavian artery coverage, 58.9% underwent revascularization. Spinal cord ischemia incidence was 12.1% in the group without revascularization compared to 8.5% in the group undergoing left subclavian artery revascularization (odds ratio (95%CI): 1.48(0.82-2.68), P = 0.189). Multivariable analysis adjustment identified an independent association between left subclavian artery coverage without revascularization and the incidence of spinal cord ischemia (adjusted odds ratio (95%CI): 2.29(1.03-5.14), P = 0.043). Although the incidence of stroke was also higher for the group with a covered and nonrevascularized left subclavian artery (12.1% versus 8.5%), this difference was not statistically significant after multivariable analysis (adjusted odds ratio (95%CI): 1.55(0.74-3.26), P = 0.244). Conclusion For patients undergoing left subclavian artery coverage during thoracic endovascular aortic repair, the addition of a revascularization procedure was associated with a significantly lower incidence of spinal cord ischemia.

  4. Concomitant aortic valve and internal mammary artery injuries in blunt chest trauma: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Hsieh, Chi-Hsun; Wang, Yu-Chun; Chung, Ping-Kuei; Chen, Ray-Jade

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of concomitant injury to the aortic valve and internal mammary artery (IMA) from nonpenetrating chest trauma. To our knowledge, this is the first such case to be reported. Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) following diagnostic angiography offers an effective and minimally invasive treatment for traumatic IMA injuries. Because there might be an asymptomatic interval after traumatic aortic valve injuries, serial physical examinations and repeated echocardiography should be mandatory for patients with de novo heart failure after blunt chest trauma. Transesophageal echocardiography can provide a clearer image of cardiac injuries than transthoracic echocardiography, particularly if there is extensive anterior mediastinal hematoma resulting from IMA trauma.

  5. In Vivo Effects of Quercetin in Association with Moderate Exercise Training in Improving Streptozotocin-Induced Aortic Tissue Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina C. Chis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM is a chronic endocrine-metabolic disorder associated with endothelial dysfunction. Hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and abnormal nitric oxide-mediated vasodilatation are the major causal factors in the development of endothelial dysfunction in DM. The prevention of endothelial dysfunction may be a first target against the appearance of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. We have investigated the synergistic protective effects of quercetin administration and moderate exercise training on thoracic aorta injuries induced by diabetes. Methods: Diabetic rats that performed exercise training were subjected to a swimming training program (1 h/day, 5 days/week, 4 weeks. The diabetic rats received quercetin (30 mg/kg body weight/day for 4 weeks. At the end of the study, the thoracic aorta was isolated and divided into two parts; one part was immersed in 10% formalin for histopathological evaluations and the other was frozen for the assessment of oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde, MDA and protein carbonyls groups, PC, the activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, SOD and catalase, CAT, nitrite plus nitrate (NOx production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS protein expression. Results: Diabetic rats showed significantly increased MDA and PC levels, NOx production and iNOS expression and a reduction of SOD and CAT activity in aortic tissues. A decrease in the levels of oxidative stress markers, NOx production and iNOS expression associated with elevated activity of antioxidant enzymes in the aortic tissue were observed in quercetin-treated diabetic trained rats. Conclusions: These findings suggest that quercetin administration in association with moderate exercise training reduces vascular complications and tissue injuries induced by diabetes in rat aorta by decreasing oxidative stress and restoring NO bioavailability.

  6. Trunk muscle activation in a person with clinically complete thoracic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerkefors, Anna; Carpenter, Mark G; Cresswell, Andrew G; Thorstensson, Alf

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess if, and how, upper body muscles are activated in a person with high thoracic spinal cord injury, clinically classified as complete, during maximal voluntary contractions and in response to balance perturbations. Data from one person with spinal cord injury (T3 level) and one able-bodied person were recorded with electromyography from 4 abdominal muscles using indwelling fine-wire electrodes and from erector spinae and 3 upper trunk muscles with surface electrodes. Balance perturbations were carried out as forward or backward support surface translations. The person with spinal cord injury was able to activate all trunk muscles, even those below the injury level, both in voluntary efforts and in reaction to balance perturbations. Trunk movements were qualitatively similar in both participants, but the pattern and timing of muscle responses differed: upper trunk muscle involvement and occurrence of co-activation of ventral and dorsal muscles were more frequent in the person with spinal cord injury. These findings prompt further investigation into trunk muscle function in paraplegics, and highlight the importance of including motor tests for trunk muscles in persons with thoracic spinal cord injury, in relation to injury classification, prognosis and rehabilitation.

  7. Multidimensional Analysis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Early Impairment in Thoracic and Thoracolumbar Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabray, Marc C.; Whetstone, William D.; Dhall, Sanjay S.; Phillips, David B.; Pan, Jonathan Z.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Beattie, Michael S.; Haefeli, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Literature examining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in acute spinal cord injury (SCI) has focused on cervical SCI. Reproducible systems have been developed for MRI-based grading; however, it is unclear how they apply to thoracic SCI. Our hypothesis is that MRI measures will group as coherent multivariate principal component (PC) ensembles, and that distinct PCs and individual variables will show discriminant validity for predicting early impairment in thoracic SCI. We undertook a retrospective cohort study of 25 patients with acute thoracic SCI who underwent MRI on admission and had American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) assessment at hospital discharge. Imaging variables of axial grade, sagittal grade, length of injury, thoracolumbar injury classification system (TLICS), maximum canal compromise (MCC), and maximum spinal cord compression (MSCC) were collected. We performed an analytical workflow to detect multivariate PC patterns followed by explicit hypothesis testing to predict AIS at discharge. All imaging variables loaded positively on PC1 (64.3% of variance), which was highly related to AIS at discharge. MCC, MSCC, and TLICS also loaded positively on PC2 (22.7% of variance), while variables concerning cord signal abnormality loaded negatively on PC2. PC2 was highly related to the patient undergoing surgical decompression. Variables of signal abnormality were all negatively correlated with AIS at discharge with the highest level of correlation for axial grade as assessed with the Brain and Spinal Injury Center (BASIC) score. A multiple variable model identified BASIC as the only statistically significant predictor of AIS at discharge, signifying that BASIC best captured the variance in AIS within our study population. Our study provides evidence of convergent validity, construct validity, and clinical predictive validity for the sampled MRI measures of SCI when applied in acute thoracic and thoracolumbar SCI. PMID:26414451

  8. A missed injury leading to delayed diagnosis and postoperative infection of an unstable thoracic spine fracture - case report of a potentially preventable complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stahel Philip F

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients suffering from polytrauma often present with altered mental status and have varying levels of examinability. This makes evaluation difficult. Physicians are often required to rely on advanced imaging techniques to make prompt and accurate diagnoses. Occasionally, injury detection on advanced imaging studies can be challenging given the subtle findings associated with certain conditions, such as diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH. Delayed or missed diagnoses in the setting of spinal fracture can lead to catastrophic neurological injury. Case presentation A man struck by a motor vehicle suffered multiple traumatic injuries including numerous rib fractures, a mechanically unstable pelvic fracture, and also had suspicion for an aortic injury. Unfortunately, the upper thoracic segment (T1-5 was only visualized with axial images based on the electronic data. Several days later, a contrast CT scan obtained to check the status of suspected aortic injury revealed T3-T4 subluxation indicative of an unstable extension-type fracture in the setting of DISH. Due to the missed injury and delay in diagnosis, surgery was not performed until eight days after the injury. At surgery, the patient was found to have left T3-T4 facet joint infection as well as infected hematoma surrounding a left T4 transverse process fracture and a traumatic T4 costo-transverse joint fracture-subluxation. Despite presence of infection, an instrumented posterior spinal fusion from T1-T6 was performed and the patient recovered well after antibiotic treatment. Conclusion A T3-T4 unstable DISH extension-type fracture was initially missed in a polytrauma patient due to inadequate imaging acquisition, which caused a delay in treatment and bacterial seeding of fracture hematoma. Complete imaging is especially needed in obtunded patients that cannot be thoroughly examined.

  9. Delayed Death from Complete Aortic Transection: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakda Sathirareuangchai, M.D.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Blunt chest trauma is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in road traffic accident. One of the life- threatening injuries is traumatic aortic injury. The authors reported a case of delayed death from blunt chest trauma in a young Thai male, who had a traffic accident 2 weeks prior to his death. The autopsy revealed complete transection of thoracic aorta at the isthmus and false aneurysm formation. The clinical findings and mechanism of traumatic aortic injury are reviewed. Traumatic aortic injury is a fatal blunt chest trauma in which the victims rarely survive to the hospital. Prompt diagnosis and early surgical treatment can decrease morbidity and mortality.

  10. Thoracic CT in the ED: a study of thoracic computed tomography utilisation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Williams, E

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the use of thoracic Computed Tomography (CT) in the Emergency Department of a Dublin Academic Teaching Hospital over a six month period. Data was retrieved using the hospital\\'s computerised information system. There were 202 referrals in total for thoracic CT from the Emergency Department during this time period. The most common indication for thoracic CT referral was for the investigation of pulmonary embolism with 127 (63%) referrals. There were 40 (25%) referrals for suspected malignancy and lung disease, whilst 8 (4%) of the referrals were for investigation of thoracic aortic dissection, 8 (4%) for infection, and 6 (3%) were for investigation of thoracic injury. Only 8 (4%) of all referrals were for investigation of injury as a result of chest trauma.

  11. Patient-specific analysis of post-operative aortic hemodynamics: a focus on thoracic endovascular repair (TEVAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auricchio, F.; Conti, M.; Lefieux, A.; Morganti, S.; Reali, A.; Sardanelli, F.; Secchi, F.; Trimarchi, S.; Veneziani, A.

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the impact of endovascular repair on aortic hemodynamics. The study addresses the assessment of post-operative hemodynamic conditions of a real clinical case through patient-specific analysis, combining accurate medical image analysis and advanced computational fluid-dynamics (CFD). Although the main clinical concern was firstly directed to the endoluminal protrusion of the prosthesis, the CFD simulations have demonstrated that there are two other important areas where the local hemodynamics is impaired and a disturbed blood flow is present: the first one is the ostium of the subclavian artery, which is partially closed by the graft; the second one is the stenosis of the distal thoracic aorta. Besides the clinical relevance of these specific findings, this study highlights how CFD analyses allow to observe important flow effects resulting from the specific features of patient vessel geometries. Consequently, our results demonstrate the potential impact of computational biomechanics not only on the basic knowledge of physiopathology, but also on the clinical practice, thanks to a quantitative extraction of knowledge made possible by merging medical data and mathematical models.

  12. Abnormal secretion or extracellular matrix incorporation of fibrillin by dermal fibroblasts from patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milewicz, D.; Cao, S.; Cosselli, J. [Univ. of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Abnormal synthesis, secretion, and extracellular matrix incorporation of fibrillin is observed in the majority of fibroblast cell strains obtained from individuals with the Marfan syndrome (>85%). These fibrillin protein abnormalities are due to mutations in the FBN1 gene. We have screened fibroblast cell strains from patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) without skeletal or ocular features of the Marfan syndrome for defects in fibrillin synthesis or processing. Dermal fibroblasts obtained from biopsies were pulse labeled with [{sup 35}S]cysteine for 30 minutes and then chased for 0, 4, and 20 hours. The media, cell lysate and extracellular matrix were harvested separately, then analyzed by SDS-PAGE. We selected fibroblasts from 17 TAA patients to study based on the development of a TAA at a young age or a family history of TAAs. Cells from 3 patients synthesized and secreted fibrillin normally, but did not incorporate the fibrillin in the extracellular matrix. None of the cell strains were found to have diminished synthesis of fibrillin when compared with control cells. We were unable to detect abnormalities in the synthesis, secretion, or matrix incorporation of fibrillin by cells from 9 of the 17 patients. These results indicate that fibrillin protein defects are found in a significant number of patients with TAAs who are young or have a family history of TAAs. Analysis of the FBN1 gene for mutations in these patients with fibrillin protein defects will determine if the observed protein abnormalities are the result of FBN1 gene mutations.

  13. Penetrating abdomino-thoracic injury with an iron rod: An anaesthetic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiranpreet Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Penetrating abdomino-thoracic injuries are potentially life-threatening due to the associated haemorrhagic shock and visceral injury. The management of these injuries poses specific challenges in pre-hospital care, transport, and management strategies. We report a 35-year-old male having impalement injury of the left thorax and left upper arm with a metallic rod used for construction of the house after a fall from height. One rod penetrated thorax from left shoulder and exit point was present just above the iliac crest and second rod was seen piercing left upper arm. Patient was successfully managed without any intraoperative, post-operative surgical complications, neurological damage or permanent injuries.

  14. Thoracic aortic cannulation with antegrade perfusion for the procurement of abdominal organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Rodríguez, Francisco Javier; Fernández Pérez, Aquilino; Conde Freire, Rogelio; Martínez, Jorge; Pérez, Evaristo Varo; Bustamante Montalvo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The definitive acceptance of an organ as valid for transplant depends on the surgical team performing the multiorgan recovery; and unexpected difficulties can occur. The demographic characteristics of donors has changed, and some accepted donors can present difficulties in surgical technique and risky decisions on the validity of the retrieved organ or organs. An alternative method to the cannulation of the abdominal aorta is proposed when there is evidence of disease in the infrarenal aorta during the multiorgan procurement. The retrocardiac descending thoracic aorta is cannulated using an antegrade perfusion; this technique allows an increase in organ recovery. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Thoracic CT findings at hypovolemic shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotondo, A.; Angelelli, G.; Catalano, O.; Grassi, R.; Scialpi, M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To describe and discuss the thoracic CT features of hypovolemic shock. Material and Methods: From a group of 18 patients with signs of hypovolemia on contrast-enhanced abdominal CT, 11 were selected for our study as having also undergone a complete chest examination. Pulse rate, blood pressure, trauma score value, Glasgow coma scale value, surgical result, and final outcome were retrospectively evaluated. The CT features analyzed were: decreased cardiac volume, reduced caliber of the thoracic aorta, aortic branches and caval venous system, increased enhancement of the aorta, and increased enhancement of the pulmonary collapses/contusions. Results: All 11 subjects presented severe injuries and hemodynamic instability; 7 were stable enough to undergo surgery; only 1 of the 11 survived. Two patients showed none of the features of thoracic hypovolemia. All the other patients presented at least two signs: reduced caliber of the thoracic aorta in 7 cases; decreased volume of the cardiac chambers and increased aortic enhancement in 6; decreased caliber of the aortic vessels in 4; decreased caliber of the caval veins in 3; and increased enhancement of the pulmonary collapses/contusions in 3. Conclusions: In patients with hypovolemia, CT may show several thoracic findings in addition to abdominal ones. Knowledge of these features is important for distinguishing them from traumatic injuries. (orig.)

  16. A systematic review and pooled analysis of CPR-associated cardiovascular and thoracic injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew C; Rosati, Shannon F; Suffredini, Anthony F; Schrump, David S

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of thoracic injuries resulting from cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is not well characterized. We describe a case in which a CPR-associated atrial rupture was identified with ultrasound and successfully managed in the intensive care unit with a bedside thoracotomy and atrial repair. We then describe a systematic review with pooled data analysis of CPR-associated cardiovascular, pulmonary, pleural, and thoracic wall injuries. PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, and Web of Science were searched to identify relevant published studies. Unpublished studies were identified by searching the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, Cochrane Library, ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials, and Google. Inclusion criteria for the pooled analysis were any clinical or autopsy study in which (a) patients underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation, (b) chest compressions were administered either manually or with the assistance of active compression-decompression devices, and (c) autopsy or dedicated imaging assessments were conducted to identify complications. Exclusion criteria for the pooled analysis were pre-clinical studies, case reports and abstracts. Nine-hundred twenty-eight potentially relevant references were identified. Twenty-seven references met inclusion criteria. A systematic review of the literature is provided with pooled data analysis. The incidence of reported CPR-associated cardiovascular and thoracic wall injuries varies widely. CPR with active compression-decompression devices has a higher reported incidence of cardiopulmonary injuries. Bedside ultrasound may be a useful adjunct to assess and risk-stratify patients to identify serious or life-threatening CPR-associated injuries. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Tactics of surgical treatment for thoracic and lumbar spinal injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Usikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of results of surgical treatment of 154 patients with a vertebral and spinal trauma of chest and lumbar departments of a backbone aged from 16 till 75 years is carried out. All patients were operated in Bryansk city hospital N 1. The volume and sequence of surgeries, and existence were defined with the combined damages, character of an injury of a backbone and a spinal cord or absence free part bone bodies of the injured vertebra compressing a spinal cord defined different accesses on a backbone. So, surgeries at 125 (81,2 % patients were carried out from one back access, at 23 (14,9 % patients - to the combined back and lobbies and at 6 (3,9 % patients - front and back access. In all cases for fixing of a spine implants “Sintez” firm (St. Petersburg were used. Results of treatment were estimated on neurologic dynamics, restoration of an axis of a backbone, a gleam of the vertebral channel and restoration possibility of a support of a backbone. Good results of treatment are received at 87 (56,5 %, satisfactory - at 55 (35,7 % and unsatisfactory - at 12 (7,8 % patients.

  18. Mid-term results of zone 0 thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair after ascending aorta wrapping and supra-aortic debranching in high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecoraro, Felice; Lachat, Mario; Hofmann, Michael; Cayne, Neal S; Chaykovska, Lyubov; Rancic, Zoran; Puippe, Gilbert; Pfammatter, Thomas; Mangialardi, Nicola; Veith, Frank J; Bettex, Dominique; Maisano, Francesco; Neff, Thomas A

    2017-06-01

    Surgical repair of aneurysmal disease involving the ascending aorta, aortic arch and eventually the descending aorta is generally associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A less invasive approach with the ascending wrapping technique (WT), supra-aortic vessel debranching (SADB) and thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) in zone 0 was developed to reduce the associated risk in these patients. During a 10-year period, consecutive patients treated by the ascending WT, SADB and TEVAR in zone 0 were included. All patients were considered at high risk for conventional surgery. Measured outcomes included perioperative deaths and morbidity, maximal aortic transverse diameter (TD) and its postoperative evolution, endoleak, survival, freedom from cardiovascular reinterventions, SADB freedom from occlusion and aortic valve function during follow-up. Median follow-up was 37.4 [mean = 34; range, 0-65; standard deviation (SD) = 20] months. Twenty-six cases were included with a mean age of 71.88 ( r  = 56-87; SD = 8) years. A mean of 2.9 supra-aortic vessels (75) per patient was debranched from the ascending aorta. The mean time interval from WT/SADB and TEVAR was 29 ( r  = 0-204; SD = 48) days. TEVAR was associated with chimney and/or periscope grafts in 6 (23%) patients, and extra-anatomical supra-aortic bypasses were performed in 6 (23%) patients. Perioperative mortality was 7.7% (2/26). Neurological events were registered in 3 (11.5%) cases, and a reintervention was required in 3 (11.5%) cases. After the WT, the ascending diameter remained stable during the follow-up period in all cases. At mean follow-up, significant shrinkage of the arch/descending aorta diameter was observed. A type I/III endoleak occurred in 3 cases. At 5 years, the rates of survival, freedom from cardiovascular reinterventions and SADB freedom from occlusion were 71.7, 82.3 and 96%, respectively. The use of the ascending WT, SADB and TEVAR in selected patients

  19. Variability of 4D flow parameters when subjected to changes in MRI acquisition parameters using a realistic thoracic aortic phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalba, Cristian; Urbina, Jesus; Sotelo, Julio; Andia, Marcelo E; Tejos, Cristian; Irarrazaval, Pablo; Hurtado, Daniel E; Valverde, Israel; Uribe, Sergio

    2018-04-01

    To assess the variability of peak flow, mean velocity, stroke volume, and wall shear stress measurements derived from 3D cine phase contrast (4D flow) sequences under different conditions of spatial and temporal resolutions. We performed controlled experiments using a thoracic aortic phantom. The phantom was connected to a pulsatile flow pump, which simulated nine physiological conditions. For each condition, 4D flow data were acquired with different spatial and temporal resolutions. The 2D cine phase contrast and 4D flow data with the highest available spatio-temporal resolution were considered as a reference for comparison purposes. When comparing 4D flow acquisitions (spatial and temporal resolution of 2.0 × 2.0 × 2.0 mm 3 and 40 ms, respectively) with 2D phase-contrast flow acquisitions, the underestimation of peak flow, mean velocity, and stroke volume were 10.5, 10 and 5%, respectively. However, the calculated wall shear stress showed an underestimation larger than 70% for the former acquisition, with respect to 4D flow, with spatial and temporal resolution of 1.0 × 1.0 × 1.0 mm 3 and 20 ms, respectively. Peak flow, mean velocity, and stroke volume from 4D flow data are more sensitive to changes of temporal than spatial resolution, as opposed to wall shear stress, which is more sensitive to changes in spatial resolution. Magn Reson Med 79:1882-1892, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. A clinical case study of long-term injury of the thoracic and lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V Zaretskov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Overestimation of the efficacy of conservative treatment of spine injuries children often leads to unsatisfactory long-term results. The effective correction of post-traumatic spinal column deformities occurs in patients who undergo the operation in the early post-traumatic period. While choosing treatment strategies for children, higher reparative opportunities, which provide early fracture consolidation, including those in faulty positions, should be considered. This study presents a case of surgical treatment for uncomplicated injury of the thoracic and lumbar spine, with long-term compression fragmental fracture of the L1 vertebra body in a 12-year-old child. Due to the long-standing character of the injury right thoraco-frenotomy was conducted with partial L1 vertebral body and resection of the adjacent discs, deformity correction of the thoracic and lumbar spine with a transpedicular system, and ventral spondylodesis with an autograft. This extensive intervention was justified by the peculiarities in the vertebral body damage and the post-traumatic segmental kyphotic deformity that resulted from delayed medical treatment. An anterior approach was chosen to achieve immobilization at the site of the damage before correction using the transpedicular system. Surgical correction of long-term spinal injuries in children, with the use of a combined approach, is usually laborious and traumatic. The prevention of rigid post-traumatic spine deformities with the help of timely diagnostics and appropriate treatment, including surgery, should be a priority to prevent such cases.

  1. Lumbar Myeloid Cell Trafficking into Locomotor Networks after Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Christopher N.; Norden, Diana M.; Faw, Timothy D.; Deibert, Rochelle; S.Wohleb, Eric; Sheridan, John F.; P.Godbout, Jonathan; Basso, D. Michele

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) promotes inflammation along the neuroaxis that jeopardizes plasticity, intrinsic repair and recovery. While inflammation at the injury site is well-established, less is known within remote spinal networks. The presence of bone marrow-derived immune (myeloid) cells in these areas may further impede functional recovery. Previously, high levels of the gelatinase, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) occurred within the lumbar enlargement after thoracic SCI and impeded activity-dependent recovery. Since SCI-induced MMP-9 potentially increases vascular permeability, myeloid cell infiltration may drive inflammatory toxicity in locomotor networks. Therefore, we examined neurovascular reactivity and myeloid cell infiltration in the lumbar cord after thoracic SCI. We show evidence of region-specific recruitment of myeloid cells into the lumbar but not cervical region. Myeloid infiltration occurred with concomitant increases in chemoattractants (CCL2) and cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1) around lumbar vasculature 24 hours and 7 days post injury. Bone marrow GFP chimeric mice established robust infiltration of bone marrow-derived myeloid cells into the lumbar gray matter 24 hours after SCI. This cell infiltration occurred when the blood-spinal cord barrier was intact, suggesting active recruitment across the endothelium. Myeloid cells persisted as ramified macrophages at 7 days post injury in parallel with increased inhibitory GAD67 labeling. Importantly, macrophage infiltration required MMP-9. PMID:27191729

  2. AO spine injury classification system: a revision proposal for the thoracic and lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, Maximilian; Audigé, Laurent; Schnake, Klaus John; Bellabarba, Carlo; Dai, Li-Yang; Oner, F Cumhur

    2013-10-01

    The AO Spine Classification Group was established to propose a revised AO spine injury classification system. This paper provides details on the rationale, methodology, and results of the initial stage of the revision process for injuries of the thoracic and lumbar (TL) spine. In a structured, iterative process involving five experienced spine trauma surgeons from various parts of the world, consecutive cases with TL injuries were classified independently by members of the classification group, and analyzed for classification reliability using the Kappa coefficient (κ) and for accuracy using latent class analysis. The reasons for disagreements were examined systematically during review meetings. In four successive sessions, the system was revised until consensus and sufficient reproducibility were achieved. The TL spine injury system is based on three main injury categories adapted from the original Magerl AO concept: A (compression), B (tension band), and C (displacement) type injuries. Type-A injuries include four subtypes (wedge-impaction/split-pincer/incomplete burst/complete burst); B-type injuries are divided between purely osseous and osseo-ligamentous disruptions; and C-type injuries are further categorized into three subtypes (hyperextension/translation/separation). There is no subgroup division. The reliability of injury types (A, B, C) was good (κ = 0.77). The surgeons' pairwise Kappa ranged from 0.69 to 0.90. Kappa coefficients κ for reliability of injury subtypes ranged from 0.26 to 0.78. The proposed TL spine injury system is based on clinically relevant parameters. Final evaluation data showed reasonable reliability and accuracy. Further validation of the proposed revised AO Classification requires follow-up evaluation sessions and documentation by more surgeons from different countries and backgrounds and is subject to modification based on clinical parameters during subsequent phases.

  3. Neurologic improvement after thoracic, thoracolumbar, and lumbar spinal cord (conus medullaris) injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, James S; Naroji, Swetha; Maltenfort, Mitchell Gil; Ratliff, John K; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula I; Frank, Brian; Anderson, D Greg; Albert, Todd; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2011-01-01

    Retrospective. With approximately 10,000 new spinal cord injury (SCI) patients in the United States each year, predicting public health outcomes is an important public health concern. Combining all regions of the spine in SCI trials may be misleading if the lumbar and sacral regions (conus) have a neurologic improvement at different rates than the thoracic or thoracolumbar spinal cord. Over a 10-year period between January 1995 to 2005, 1746 consecutive spinal injured patients were seen, evaluated, and treated through a level 1 trauma referral center. A retrospective analysis was performed on 150 patients meeting the criteria of T4 to S5 injury, excluding gunshot wounds. One-year follow-up data were available on 95 of these patients. Contingency table analyses (chi-squared statistics) and multivariate logistic regression. Variables of interest included level of injury, initial American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA), age, race, and etiology. A total of 92.9% of lumbar (conus) patients neurologically improved one ASIA level or more compared with 22.4% of thoracic or thoracolumbar spinal cord-injured patients. Only 7.7% of ASIA A patients showed neurologic improvement, compared with 95.2% of ASIA D patients; ASIA B patients demonstrated a 66.7% improvement rate, whereas ASIA C had a 84.6% improvement rate. When the two effects were considered jointly in a multivariate analysis, ASIA A and thoracic/thoracolumbar patients had only a 4.1% rate of improvement, compared with 96% for lumbar (conus) and incomplete patients (ASIA B-D) and 66.7% to 72.2% for the rest of the patients. All of these relationships were significant to P spinal cord have a greater neurologic improvement rate, which might be related to a greater proportion of lower motor neurons. Thus, defining the exact region of injury and potential for neurologic improvement should be considered in future clinical trial design. Combining all anatomic regions of the spine in SCI trials may be misleading if

  4. Risk model of thoracic aortic surgery in 4707 cases from a nationwide single-race population through a web-based data entry system: the first report of 30-day and 30-day operative outcome risk models for thoracic aortic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motomura, Noboru; Miyata, Hiroaki; Tsukihara, Hiroyuki; Takamoto, Shinichi

    2008-09-30

    The objective of this study was to collect integrated data from nationwide hospitals using a web-based national database system to build up our own risk model for the outcome from thoracic aortic surgery. The Japan Adult Cardiovascular Surgery Database was used; this involved approximately 180 hospitals throughout Japan through a web-based data entry system. Variables and definitions are almost identical to the STS National Database. After data cleanup, 4707 records were analyzed from 97 hospitals (between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2005). Mean age was 66.5 years. Preoperatively, the incidence of chronic lung disease was 11%, renal failure was 9%, and rupture or malperfusion was 10%. The incidence of the location along the aorta requiring replacement surgery (including overlapping areas) was: aortic root, 10%; ascending aorta, 47%; aortic arch, 44%; distal arch, 21%; descending aorta, 27%; and thoracoabdominal aorta, 8%. Raw 30-day and 30-day operative mortality rates were 6.7% and 8.6%, respectively. Postoperative incidence of permanent stroke was 6.1%, and renal failure requiring dialysis was 6.7%. OR for 30-day operative mortality was as follows: emergency or salvage, 3.7; creatinine >3.0 mg/dL, 3.0; and unexpected coronary artery bypass graft, 2.6. As a performance metric of the risk model, C-index of 30-day and 30-day operative mortality was 0.79 and 0.78, respectively. This is the first report of risk stratification on thoracic aortic surgery using a nationwide surgical database. Although condition of these patients undergoing thoracic aortic surgery was much more serious than other procedures, the result of this series was excellent.

  5. Impact of operative indication and surgical complexity on outcomes after thoracic endovascular aortic repair at National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Bryan A; Durham, Christopher A; Parker, Frank M; Bogey, William M; Powell, Charles S; Stoner, Michael C

    2011-12-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) devices are increasingly being utilized to treat aortic pathologies outside of the original Food & Drug Administration (FDA) approval for nonruptured descending thoracic aorta aneurysms (DTAs). The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of patients undergoing TEVAR, elucidating the role of surgical and pathologic variables on morbidity and mortality. National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) data were reviewed for all patients undergoing endovascular thoracic aorta repair from 2005 to 2007. The patients' operative indication and surgical complexity were used to divide them into study and control populations. Comorbid profiles were assessed utilizing a modified Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Thirty-day occurrences of mortality and serious adverse events (SAEs) were used as study endpoints. Univariate and multivariate models were created using demographic and clinical variables to assess for significant differences in endpoints (P ≤ .05). A total of 440 patients undergoing TEVAR were identified. When evaluating patients based on operative indication, the ruptured population had increased mortality and SAE rates compared to the nonruptured DTA population (22.6% vs 6.2%;P < .01 and 35.5% vs 9.1%;P < .01, respectively). Further analysis by surgical complexity revealed increased mortality and SAE rates when comparing the brachiocephalic aortic debranching population to the noncovered left subclavian artery population (23.1% vs 6.5%; P = .02 and 30.8% vs 9.1%; P < .01, respectively). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that operative indication was not a correlate of mortality or SAEs (odds ratio [OR], 0.95; P = .92 and OR, 1.42; P = .39, respectively); however, brachiocephalic aortic debranching exhibited a deleterious effect on mortality (OR, 8.75; P < .01) and SAE rate (OR, 6.67; P = .01). The operative indication for a TEVAR procedure was not found to be a predictor of poor patient outcome

  6. DIFFERENT TYPES OF INSPIRATORY MUSCLE TRAINING PROVIDES BETTERMENT IN ALTERED PULMONARY FUNCTIONS IN UPPER THORACIC SPINAL CORD INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muruganandam Periyasamy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Respiratory problems are usual in upper thoracic spinal cord injuries when compared to Lower thoracic spinal cord injuries. Generally there are frequent respiratory complications in the individuals with spinal cord injuries. The complications of the respiratory system are severe and more prevalent source of morbidity and mortality after the spinal cord injury due to the inefficient breathing capacity including inspiratory and expiratory abilities. The present study represents the inspiratory muscle training especially in upper thoracic spinal cord injury patients to assess the improvement in the pulmonary functions. Methods: Twenty five patients with the age between 25 -40 years with the upper spinal cord injuries were selected in the present study in order to assess the efficacy of the training. Several types of exercises were practiced including diaphragmatic breathing exercises, incentive spirometry, active cycle of breathing technique and weight training. COPD Conditions, Chest wall deformities, Hypertensive patients, Cardio vascular problems were excluded in the study. Results: The results from the study showed that significant changes were found in the patients treated with all the above mentioned techniques. Axillary level, nipple level, Xiphisternum levels were analysed and the results found to be significant after the treatment. Incentive spirometry and peak flow meter observations were also found to be significant when compare to the pretreatment. Conclusion: The present study conclude that the combined effect of incentive spriometry, diaphragmatic breathing exercises, and active cycle of breathing technique is more effective in improving the pulmonary functions in upper thoracic spinal cord injuries than single method efficiency.

  7. Recurrent Autonomic Dysreflexia due to Chronic Aortic Dissection in an Adult Male with Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic dysreflexia is a hypertensive clinical emergency for persons with spinal cord injury at T-6 level or above. Recurrent autonomic dysreflexia is uncommon in spinal cord injury patients and is usually caused by noxious stimuli that cannot be removed promptly, e.g., somatic pain, abdominal distension. A 61-year-old man, who sustained tetraplegia at C-5 (ASIA-A 38 years ago, was admitted with chest infection. Computerised tomography (CT of the chest showed the ascending aorta to measure 4 cm in anteroposterior diameter; descending thoracic aorta measured 3.5 cm. No dissection was seen. Normal appearances of abdominal aorta were seen. He was treated with noninvasive ventilation, antibiotics, and diuretics. Nineteen days later, when there was sudden deterioration in his clinical condition, CT of the pulmonary angiogram was performed to rule out pulmonary embolism. This showed no pulmonary embolus, but the upper abdominal aorta showed some dissection with thrombosis of the false lumen. Blood pressure was controlled with perindopril 2 mg, once a day, doxazosin 4 mg, twice a day, and furosemide 20 mg, twice a day. Since this patient did not show clinical features of mesenteric or lower limb ischaemia, the vascular surgeon did not recommend subdiaphragmatic aortic replacement.

  8. Double Level Extension-Distraction Thoracic Spine Injuries with Concomitant Double Level Sternal Fractures: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CK Lee

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Extension-distraction injury of the spine is rare. A majority of these cases occur in the cervical region and at an isolated level. Rare instances of this injury have been described in an ankylosed or fused spine. This case report describes a rare two level extension-distraction thoracic spine injury in an otherwise healthy adult resulting from a motor vehicle accident.

  9. Frequency and perforin expression of different lymphocyte subpopulations in patients with lower limb fracture and thoracic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzalja, Nikola; Cicvaric, Tedi; Knezevic, Danijel; Kuharic, Janja; Sustic, Alan; Bakota, Bore; Komen, Simona; Tokmadzic, Vlatka Sotosek

    2017-11-01

    Trauma with multiple injuries is associated with a high risk of complications, which may be related to excessive stimulation of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses. Although the effects of polytrauma on the immune response have been well established at the cellular and molecular levels, there is little information about the changes in the cytolytic potential of immunocompetent cells, including expression of cytotoxic molecules such as perforin. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to analyse and compare differences in the frequency and perforin expression of leukocyte subpopulations in the peripheral blood of patients with lower limb fracture, thoracic injury, and simultaneous lower limb fracture and thoracic injury. Forty-five patients with trauma injury (15 patients with lower limb injury, 15 patients with thoracic injury, and 15 patients with simultaneous lower limb and thoracic injury) were included in the study. Peripheral blood of 15 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers served as the control group. Peripheral blood samples were taken from all subjects included in the study and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated by gradient centrifugation. The frequency of T lymphocytes, natural killer (NK) and NK T cells, and their subsets, as well as their perforin expression levels were simultaneously detected and analysed by flow cytometry. There was a statistically significant decrease in the frequency of T lymphocytes, NK and NK T cells as well as perforin expression in the patients with simultaneous lower limb and thoracic injury compared with the other two groups, with a predominantly marked decrease in NK and NK T cells. The decrease in the frequency and cytotoxic potential of peripheral blood lymphocytes is related to the severity of trauma injury, which can explain the underlying mechanism contributing to complication occurrence. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A conservative approach to a thoracic duct injury caused by left subclavian vein catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedran Premuzic

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic duct injury is a rare complication of left subclavian vein catheterization. A significant injury could lead to chylothorax, a condition with high mortality rate if not treated. It is diagnosed with lymphography or by laboratory tests of pleural fluid aspirate. A 51 year old Caucasian male with a history of unregulated hypertension presented to our Emergency department (ED with anginous symptoms and increased serum creatinine level. After the placement of a temporary central venous catheter for hemodialysis in left subclavian vein, he developed lymph leakage on puncture site beside the catheter, at drainage rate of 75 ml/h. In the absence of more serious clinical symptoms, conservative treatment with close patient monitoring and diet changes was chosen, rather than more invasive treatment options.

  11. Neural progenitor cells but not astrocytes respond distally to thoracic spinal cord injury in rat models

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    Tara Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI is a detrimental condition that causes loss of sensory and motor function in an individual. Many complex secondary injury cascades occur after SCI and they offer great potential for therapeutic targeting. In this study, we investigated the response of endogenous neural progenitor cells, astrocytes, and microglia to a localized thoracic SCI throughout the neuroaxis. Twenty-five adult female Sprague-Dawley rats underwent mild-contusion thoracic SCI (n = 9, sham surgery (n = 8, or no surgery (n = 8. Spinal cord and brain tissues were fixed and cut at six regions of the neuroaxis. Immunohistochemistry showed increased reactivity of neural progenitor cell marker nestin in the central canal at all levels of the spinal cord. Increased reactivity of astrocyte-specific marker glial fibrillary acidic protein was found only at the lesion epicenter. The number of activated microglia was significantly increased at the lesion site, and activated microglia extended to the lumbar enlargement. Phagocytic microglia and macrophages were significantly increased only at the lesion site. There were no changes in nestin, glial fibrillary acidic protein, microglia and macrophage response in the third ventricle of rats subjected to mild-contusion thoracic SCI compared to the sham surgery or no surgery. These findings indicate that neural progenitor cells, astrocytes and microglia respond differently to a localized SCI, presumably due to differences in inflammatory signaling. These different cellular responses may have implications in the way that neural progenitor cells can be manipulated for neuroregeneration after SCI. This needs to be further investigated.

  12. Endovascular treatment of aortic pathologies - State of the art. Part 2 - Pathologies of thoracic aorta and other applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uribe, Carlos E; Calderon, Luis L; Gomez, German S; Castro, Pablo; Hurtado, Edgar F; Estrada, Gilberto

    2007-01-01

    Endovascular treatment of aortic pathologies is actually an alternative to open surgery. It has proven to be safe, showing similar or better results to those achieved by surgery. In this article, treatment of aortic pathologies by means of endoprosthesis is presented, as well as its indications, contraindications and future treatment with this kind of devices

  13. Mid-Thoracic Spinal Injuries during Horse Racing: Report of 3 Cases and Review of Causative Factors and Prevention Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Triantafyllopoulos, Ioannis; Panagopoulos, Andreas; Sapkas, George

    2013-01-01

    We report three cases of a rare pattern of mid-thoracic spine injuries after horse racing falls and discuss possible causative factors and prevention measurements to reduce injury rates in professional riding and racing. Three patients, 2 male and 1 female with a mean age of 28 years old, underwent surgical treatment for mid-thoracic fractures after professional equestrian activities. The ASIA scale was E in one patient, B in the other one and A in the third. Multilevel posterior fusion was u...

  14. Role of volume rendered 3-D computed tomography in conservative management of trauma-related thoracic injuries.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    OʼLeary, Donal Peter

    2012-09-01

    Pneumatic nail guns are a tool used commonly in the construction industry and are widely available. Accidental injuries from nail guns are common, and several cases of suicide using a nail gun have been reported. Computed tomographic (CT) imaging, together with echocardiography, has been shown to be the gold standard for investigation of these cases. We present a case of a 55-year-old man who presented to the accident and emergency unit of a community hospital following an accidental pneumatic nail gun injury to his thorax. Volume-rendered CT of the thorax allowed an accurate assessment of the thoracic injuries sustained by this patient. As there was no evidence of any acute life-threatening injury, a sternotomy was avoided and the patient was observed closely until discharge. In conclusion, volume-rendered 3-dimensional CT can greatly help in the decision to avoid an unnecessary sternotomy in patients with a thoracic nail gun injury.

  15. Measurements After Image Post-processing Are More Precise in the Morphometric Assessment of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms: An Intermodal and Intra-observer Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutersberg, B; Haller, B; Mariss, J; Eckstein, H-H; Ockert, S

    2016-10-01

    Precise pre-procedural anatomical analysis of aneurysmal anatomy is essential for successful thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Since surgeons and radiologists have to perform multiple measurements in the same patient, high intra-observer reliability of any imaging method is mandatory. Commercially available three dimensional (3D) post-processing techniques are expected to be superior to conventional two dimensional multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) derived from computed tomography angiograms (CTAs). However, few data exist to support this view. This study aims to evaluate the intermodal and intra-observer differences using 3D software (3surgery) in descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (dTAAs). Pre-operative CTAs (performed between 2004 and 2010) of 30 dTAAs (mean maximum diameter 61.4 ± 13 mm) were assessed by three independent investigators with different experience in the measurement of aortic pathologies. Intra-observer reliability and intermodal differences (3D vs. 2D) were investigated using pre-specified measurement points (distances of total length, maximum diameter, proximal and distal landing zones). Statistical analyses were performed using the Bland-Altman method and a mixed regression model. Intermodal comparison showed that 2D measurements significantly underestimate the measured distances (maximum diameter 3.7 mm [95% CI -5.3 to -2.1] and landing zone maximum 1.4 mm [95% CI -2.0 to -0.2] shorter with 2D, p post-processing software therefore leads to more precise device selection for TEVAR in TAA. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Thoracic Malignancies and Pulmonary Nodules in Patients under Evaluation for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI: Incidence, Follow Up and Possible Impact on Treatment Decision.

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    Lars Henning Schmidt

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI has become the treatment of choice in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis who are not eligible for operative replacement and an alternative for those with high surgical risk. Due to high age and smoking history in a high proportion of TAVI patients, suspicious findings are frequently observed in pre-procedural chest computer tomography (CCT.CCT scans of 484 consecutive patients undergoing TAVI were evaluated for incidentally discovered solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN.In the entire study population, SPN ≥ 5 mm were found in 87 patients (18%. These patients were compared to 150 patients who were incidentally collected from the 397 patients without SPN or with SPN 8 mm (p = 0.328 were significant predictors of overall survival.Despite the high prevalence of SPNs in this single center TAVI cohort lung cancer incidence at midterm follow-up seems to be low. Thus, aggressive diagnostic approaches for incidentally discovered SPN during TAVI evaluation should not delay the treatment of aortic stenosis. Unless advanced thoracic malignancy is obvious, the well documented reduction of morbidity and mortality by TAVI outweighs potentially harmful delays regarding further diagnostics. Standard guideline-approved procedure for SPN can be safely performed after TAVI.

  17. Initial experience with the treatment of concomitant aortic pseudoaneurysm and thoracolumbar spinal fracture: Case report

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    Viktor Zsolt Kovari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available One blunt abdominal aortic disruption (BAAD and one blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI case are presented. Both aortic injuries were combined with spinal fractures. In the BAAD case the aortic pseudoaneurysm manifested just above the lumbar fracture while in the BTAI case the aortic injury appeared several vertebras below the thoracal fracture site, suggesting different mechanisms in the aortic wall damage. In both cases the aortic wall first was sealed, successfully, by endovascularly-placed stents, meaning the risks of open aortic reconstructive surgery could be avoided. The adjacent crucial vessel's preservation, despite the stent covering the left subclavian artery and the left common carotid artery in one of the cases was verified by post-operative computed tomography angiography (CTA examination. In second stage those spinal fractures which were deemed unstable were stabilized by the fixateur interne (a transpedicular screw-rod system. With this treatment sequence we wanted to avoid the unnecessary risk of a possible rupture of the unsealed aortic wall during positioning for the spinal procedure and during the spinal surgery. Both patients recovered from their aortic and spinal injuries.

  18. Tomographic aspects of penetrating thoracic trauma: injuries from firearms and other weapons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves de; Moreira, Luiza Beatriz Melo; Pessoa, Fernanda Miraldi Clement; Saint-Martin, Nara; Ancilotti Filho, Roger [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Souza Junior, Arthur Soares [Faculdade de Medicina de São José do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil); Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-11-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the various computed tomography findings in penetrating chest trauma, as well as to determine the frequency and extent of the lesions. Material and Methods: We studied the computed tomography findings from 40 cases of penetrating thoracic trauma, of which 35 (85.8%) were gunshot wounds and 5 (14.2%) were caused by another type of weapon. Results: Pulmonary lesions were found in 39 cases (97.5%), manifesting as contusions in 34 cases (85%), atelectasis in 8 (20%), lacerations in 1 (2.5%) and hematomas in 1 (2.5%). Hemothorax was seen in 31 cases (77.5%), and pneumothorax was seen in 22 cases (55%). Mediastinal lesions were observed in 8 cases (20%), including mediastinal hematoma in 3 cases (7.5%), hemopericardium in 3 (7.5%), and pneumomediastinum in 2 (5%). Diaphragmatic rupture was seen in 2 cases (5%). Conclusion: In patients with penetrating thoracic trauma, computed tomography of the chest is an important tool for characterizing the affected organs and evaluating the path of injury, as well as the severity and extent of the lesions. The images obtained are also useful in estimating the risk of death and determining the best therapeutic approach. (author)

  19. Tomographic aspects of penetrating thoracic trauma: injuries from firearms and other weapons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Severo Alves de Melo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the various computed tomography findings in penetrating chest trauma, as well as to determine the frequency and extent of the lesions. Material and Methods: We studied the computed tomography findings from 40 cases of penetrating thoracic trauma, of which 35 (85.8% were gunshot wounds and 5 (14.2% were caused by another type of weapon. Results: Pulmonary lesions were found in 39 cases (97.5%, manifesting as contusions in 34 cases (85%, atelectasis in 8 (20%, lacerations in 1 (2.5% and hematomas in 1 (2.5%. Hemothorax was seen in 31 cases (77.5%, and pneumothorax was seen in 22 cases (55%. Mediastinal lesions were observed in 8 cases (20%, including mediastinal hematoma in 3 cases (7.5%, hemopericardium in 3 (7.5%, and pneumomediastinum in 2 (5%. Diaphragmatic rupture was seen in 2 cases (5%. Conclusion: In patients with penetrating thoracic trauma, computed tomography of the chest is an important tool for characterizing the affected organs and evaluating the path of injury, as well as the severity and extent of the lesions. The images obtained are also useful in estimating the risk of death and determining the best therapeutic approach.

  20. Mid-Thoracic Spinal Injuries during Horse Racing: Report of 3 Cases and Review of Causative Factors and Prevention Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Triantafyllopoulos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report three cases of a rare pattern of mid-thoracic spine injuries after horse racing falls and discuss possible causative factors and prevention measurements to reduce injury rates in professional riding and racing. Three patients, 2 male and 1 female with a mean age of 28 years old, underwent surgical treatment for mid-thoracic fractures after professional equestrian activities. The ASIA scale was E in one patient, B in the other one and A in the third. Multilevel posterior fusion was used in two patients and somatectomy plus fusion in the other. Follow up evaluation included changing of the ASIA scale, functional outcome and participation in equestrian activities. One patient fully recovered after surgery. Two patients remained paraplegic despite early surgical treatment and prolonged rehabilitation therapy. All patients had ended their professional equestrian career. This report analyzes possible mechanisms of injury and the pattern of mid-thoracic spine fractures after professional horse riding injuries. Despite skill improvements and continued safety education for horse riding, prophylactic measures for both the head and the spine should be refined. According to our study, additional mid-thoracic spinal protection should be added.

  1. Open Treatment of Blunt Injuries of Supra-Aortic Branches: Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladojevic, Milos; Markovic, Miroslav; Ilic, Nikola; Pejkic, Sinisa; Banzic, Igor; Djoric, Predrag; Koncar, Igor; Tomic, Ivan; Davidovic, Lazar

    2016-02-01

    Blunt injuries of the supra-aortic branches are rare entity, and majority of patients die before arrival at the hospital. Those who arrive alive require complex and fast procedure that requires sternotomy. We report 3 successfully managed cases. We report 3 patients with injury of supra-aortic branches. One was treated urgently due to longitudinal rupture on the posterior wall of innominate artery after car accident, and another 2 had chronic false aneurysm located at the very orifice of the right subclavian and left common carotid artery. In first and second patient bypass grafting with a hand-made, Y-shaped, 8-mm Dacron graft from the ascending aorta to the right common carotid and proximal right subclavian artery were performed, whereas in last 1 bypass grafting from the ascending aorta to the cervical part of the left common carotid artery was performed. In our facility, there were no possibilities for any endovascular treatment. When endovascular technology is not available, open surgical repair of blunt injuries of supra-aortic vessels can be performed without complications. No matter to that, endovascular and hybrid procedures should be considered whenever possible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm in patient with systemic lupus erythematosus Aneurisma roto da aorta descendente em paciente com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico

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    Daniel Oliveira De Conti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is reported a ruptured descending thoracic aortic aneurysm in a 25-year-old systemic lupus erythematosus woman who underwent 19 years steroid therapy. She was treated with 2 endovascular stent-grafts, discharged from hospital 13 days after the procedure in good health. Three months later she returned with hemorrhagic shock due to high digestive hemorrhage secondary to an aortic-esophageal fistula. She underwent to an open emergency surgery, and died during the post-operative period.Paciente de 25 anos, do sexo feminino, portadora de lúpus eritematoso sistêmico, fazendo uso de corticoesteroide havia 19 anos, deu entrada em unidade de emergência com aneurisma roto de aorta torácica descendente. Foi submetida a tratamento endovascular com 2 stents, recebeu alta hospitalar no 13º dia de pós-operatório, em boas condições de saúde. Três meses depois, retornou em choque hemorrágico secundário a hemorragia digestiva alta. Feito o diagnóstico de fístula aorto-esofágica, foi submetida à cirurgia aberta de emergência, indo a óbito durante o período pós-operatório.

  3. Multiple thoracic vertebral compression fractures caused by non-accidental injury: case report with radiological-pathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twomey, Eilish L.; Iemsawatdikul, Kriengkrai; Stephens, Boyd G.; Gooding, Charles A. [Department of Radiology, University of California at San Francisco, 505 Parnassus Avenue, Box 0628, 94143-0628, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2004-08-01

    We report a 21-month-old boy with multiple contiguous thoracic vertebral compression fractures involving eight vertebral bodies, attributable to non-accidental injury. No subluxation was associated, however, there was extensive injury to the upper cervical and lower lumbar regions of the spinal cord. Anterosuperior beaking, thought to represent a previous injury, was evident in a mid-lumbar vertebra. Clinical examination revealed bilateral retinal hemorrhages and retinoschisis. Death occurred as a result of severe brain edema with bilateral subdural and subarachnoid hemorrhages. Radiological-pathological correlation is presented. (orig.)

  4. The correlation between stabbing-related upper extremity wounds and survival of stabbing victims with abdominal and thoracic injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenfeld, Michael; Peleg, Kobi; Givon, Adi; Kessel, Boris

    2017-07-01

    When treating patients with stab injuries of the torso, clinicians often lack timely information about the degree and nature of internal organ damage. An externally observable sign significantly associated with characteristics of torso injuries may therefore be useful for practitioners. One such potential sign is the presence of wounds to the hands, sometimes sustained during victims' attempt to defend themselves during the violent altercation. Thus, the primary aim of this study was to evaluate the association between presence of upper extremity wounds and the severity of the thoracic and intra-abdominal injuries due to stabbing. This study was carried out retrospectively using data on 8714 patients with stabbing-related injuries from 19 trauma centers that participated in the Israeli National Trauma Registry (INTR) between January 1st1997 and December 31st 2013. Patients with wounds of upper extremities in addition to torso injuries (UE group) were compared to other patients with torso injuries (TO group) in terms of demographics, injury characteristics and clinical outcome. The compared groups were found to be homogeneous in terms of age and systolic blood pressure; the number of sustained torso injuries was also identical. The UE group comprised a slightly greater percentage of females, however both groups were predominantly male. Patients with upper extremity injuries had a lower proportion of internal organ damage (36% vs. 38.5%) and lower mortality (0.9% vs. 2%). The higher mortality of patients without upper extremity wounds remained significantly different even when adjusted by other epidemiological parameters (OR 2.46, 95% CI 1.33-5.08).The number of sustained upper extremity injuries was positively associated with deeper penetration of the torso by the stabbing instrument. Patients with stabbing-related upper extremity wounds had a significant survival advantage over patients without such injuries. However, a greater number of sustained upper extremity

  5. Acute aortic syndromes: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge, Carole A; Litmanovich, Diana E

    2015-05-01

    The term acute aortic syndrome comprises aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer. The most recent developments in acute aortic syndromes include (1) a change in the mindset that each entity is pathologically distinct, with a shift toward considering the acute aortic syndromes as points along a spectrum of aortic disease, (2) the optimization of aortic imaging quality and radiation dose, and (3) surgical or endovascular management. This review article focuses on how these developments pertain to thoracic radiologists.

  6. Myocardial ischemia due to compression of an unruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm in a patient with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hiroya; Asada, Tatsuro; Gan, Kunio; Abe, Koichiro; Izumi, Satoshi

    2007-06-01

    We report a 33-year-old woman who had a 60-mm thoracic aneurysm of the ascending aorta with Marfan syndrome and effort angina due to compression of the right coronary artery (RCA) by the aneurysm. Surgery was performed using the Bentall procedure and a coronary artery bypass graft to the RCA. Postoperatively, coronary angiography showed that the coronary flow of the RCA was restored by removing the aneurysmal compression. The patient was discharged without angina on postoperative day 21.

  7. Penetrating injury to the chest by an attenuated energy projectile: a case report and literature review of thoracic injuries caused by "less-lethal" munitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porto Leonardo BO

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present the case of a patient who sustained a penetrating injury to the chest caused by an attenuated energy rubber bullet and review the literature on thoracic injuries caused by plastic and rubber "less-lethal" munitions. The patient of this report underwent a right thoracotomy to extract the projectile as well as a wedge resection of the injured lung parenchyma. This case demonstrates that even supposedly safe riot control munition fired at close range, at the torso, can provoke serious injury. Therefore a thorough investigation and close clinical supervision are justified.

  8. Transient long thoracic nerve injury during posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: A report of two cases

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    Athanasios I Tsirikos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the transient long thoracic nerve (LTN injury during instrumented posterior spinal arthrodesis for idiopathic scoliosis. The suspected mechanism of injury, postoperative course and final outcome is discussed. The LTN is susceptible to injury due to its long and relatively superficial course across the thoracic wall through direct trauma or tension. Radical mastectomies with resection of axillary lymph nodes, first rib resection to treat thoracic outlet syndrome and cardiac surgery can be complicated with LTN injury. LTN injury producing scapular winging has not been reported in association with spinal deformity surgery. We reviewed the medical notes and spinal radiographs of two adolescent patients with idiopathic scoliosis who underwent posterior spinal arthrodesis and developed LTN neuropraxia. Scoliosis surgery was uneventful and intraoperative spinal cord monitoring was stable throughout the procedure. Postoperative neurological examination was otherwise normal, but both patients developed winging of the scapula at 4 and 6 days after spinal arthrodesis, which did not affect shoulder function. Both patients made a good recovery and the scapular winging resolved spontaneously 8 and 11 months following surgery with no residual morbidity. We believe that this LTN was due to positioning of our patients with their head flexed, tilted and rotated toward the contralateral side while the arm was abducted and extended. The use of heavy retractors may have also applied compression or tension to the nerve in one of our patients contributing to the development of neuropraxia. This is an important consideration during spinal deformity surgery to prevent potentially permanent injury to the nerve, which can produce severe shoulder dysfunction and persistent pain.

  9. Spinal cord blood flow and ischemic injury after experimental sacrifice of thoracic and abdominal segmental arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etz, Christian D; Homann, Tobias M; Luehr, Maximilian; Kari, Fabian A; Weisz, Donald J; Kleinman, George; Plestis, Konstadinos A; Griepp, Randall B

    2008-06-01

    Spinal cord blood flow (SCBF) after sacrifice of thoracoabdominal aortic segmental arteries (TAASA) during thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) repair remains poorly understood. This study explored SCBF for 72 h after sacrifice of all TAASA. Fourteen juvenile Yorkshire pigs underwent complete serial TAASA sacrifice (T4-L5). Six control pigs underwent anesthesia and cooling to 32 degrees C with no TAASA sacrifice. In the experimental animals, spinal cord function was continuously monitored using motor evoked potentials (MEPs) until 1h after clamping the last TAASA. Fluorescent microspheres enabled segmental measurement of SCBF along the entire spinal cord before, and 5 min, 1 h, 5 h, 24 h and 72 h after complete TAASA sacrifice. A modified Tarlov score was obtained for 3 days after surgery. All the pigs with complete TAASA sacrifice retained normal cord function (MEP) until 1h after TAASA ligation. Seven pigs (50%) with complete TAASA sacrifice recovered after 72 h; seven pigs suffered paraparesis or paraplegia. Intraoperatively, and until 1h postoperatively, SCBF was similar among the three groups along the entire cord. Postoperatively, SCBF did not decrease in any group, but significant hyperemia occurred at 5h in controls and recovery animals, but did not occur in pigs that developed paraparesis or paraplegia in the T8-L2 segments (p=0.0002) and L3-S segments (p=0.0007). At 24h, SCBF remained marginally lower from T8 caudally; at 72h, SCBF was similar among all groups along the entire cord. SCBF in the segments T8-L2 at 5h predicted functional recovery (p=0.003). This study suggests that critical spinal cord ischemia after complete TAASA sacrifice does not occur immediately (intraoperatively), but is delayed 1-5h or longer after clamping, and represents failure to mount a hyperemic response to rewarming and awakening. The short duration of low SCBF associated with spinal cord injury suggests that hemodynamic and metabolic manipulation lasting only 24-72 h may

  10. A progressive compression model of thoracic spinal cord injury in mice: function assessment and pathological changes in spinal cord

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    Guo-dong Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-traumatic injury accounts for approximately half of clinical spinal cord injury, including chronic spinal cord compression. However, previous rodent spinal cord compression models are mainly designed for rats, few are available for mice. Our aim is to develop a thoracic progressive compression mice model of spinal cord injury. In this study, adult wild-type C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups: in the surgery group, a screw was inserted at T9 lamina to compress the spinal cord, and the compression was increased by turning it further into the canal (0.2 mm post-surgery every 2 weeks up to 8 weeks. In the control group, a hole was drilled into the lamina without inserting a screw. The results showed that Basso Mouse Scale scores were lower and gait worsened. In addition, the degree of hindlimb dysfunction in mice was consistent with the degree of spinal cord compression. The number of motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord was reduced in all groups of mice, whereas astrocytes and microglia were gradually activated and proliferated. In conclusion, this progressive compression of thoracic spinal cord injury in mice is a preferable model for chronic progressive spinal cord compression injury.

  11. Sodium bicarbonate use and the risk of hypernatremia in thoracic aortic surgical patients with metabolic acidosis following deep hypothermic circulatory arrest

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    Kamrouz Ghadimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Metabolic acidosis after deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA for thoracic aortic operations is commonly managed with sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 . The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between total NaHCO 3 dose and the severity of metabolic acidosis, duration of mechanical ventilation, duration of vasoactive infusions, and Intensive Care Unit (ICU or hospital length of stay (LOS. Methods: In a single center, retrospective study, 87 consecutive elective thoracic aortic operations utilizing DHCA, were studied. Linear regression analysis was used to test for the relationships between the total NaHCO 3 dose administered through postoperative day 2, clinical variables, arterial blood gas values, and short-term clinical outcomes. Results: Seventy-five patients (86% received NaHCO 3 . Total NaHCO 3 dose averaged 136 ± 112 mEq (range: 0.0-535 mEq per patient. Total NaHCO 3 dose correlated with minimum pH (r = 0.41, P < 0.0001, minimum serum bicarbonate (r = −0.40, P < 0.001, maximum serum lactate (r = 0.46, P = 0.007, duration of metabolic acidosis (r = 0.33, P = 0.002, and maximum serum sodium concentrations (r = 0.29, P = 0.007. Postoperative hypernatremia was present in 67% of patients and peaked at 12 h following DHCA. Eight percent of patients had a serum sodium ≥ 150 mEq/L. Total NaHCO 3 dose did not correlate with anion gap, serum chloride, not the duration of mechanical ventilator support, vasoactive infusions, ICU or hospital LOS. Conclusion: Routine administration of NaHCO 3 was common for the management of metabolic acidosis after DHCA. Total dose of NaHCO 3 was a function of the severity and duration of metabolic acidosis. NaHCO 3 administration contributed to postoperative hypernatremia that was often severe. The total NaHCO 3 dose administered was unrelated to short-term clinical outcomes.

  12. Incidence, Results, and Our Current Intraoperative Technique to Control Major Vascular Injuries During Minimally Invasive Robotic Thoracic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerfolio, Robert J; Bess, Kyle M; Wei, Benjamin; Minnich, Douglas J

    2016-08-01

    Our objective is to report our incidence, results, and technique for the control of major vascular injuries during minimally invasive robotic thoracic surgery. This is a consecutive series of patients who underwent a planned robotic thoracic operation by one surgeon. Between February 2009 and September 2015, 1,304 consecutive patients underwent a robotic operation (lobectomy, n = 502; segmentectomy, n = 130; mediastinal resection, n = 115; Ivor Lewis, n = 103; thymectomy, n = 97; and others, n = 357) by one surgeon. Conversion to thoracotomy occurred in 61 patients (4.7%) and in 14 patients (1.1%) for bleeding (pulmonary artery, n = 13). The incidence of major vascular injury during anatomic pulmonary resection was 2.4% (15 of 632). Of these, 13 patients required thoracotomy performed in a nonurgent manner while the injury was displayed on a monitor, 2 had the vessel repaired minimally invasively, 2 required blood transfusion (0.15%), and 1 patient had 30-day mortality (0.16%). Techniques used to minimize morbidity include having a sponge available during vessel dissection and stapling, applying immediate pressure, delaying the opening until the bleeding is controlled without external pressure, and ensuring there is no bleeding while the chest is opened. Major vascular injuries can be safely managed during minimally invasive robotic surgery. Our evolving technique features initial packing of the bleeding for several minutes, maintaining calmness to provide time to prepare for thoracotomy, and reexamination of the injured vessel. If repair is not possible minimally invasively, the vessel is repacked and a nonhurried, elective thoracotomy is performed while the injury is displayed on a monitor to ensure active bleeding is not occurring. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. MFAP5 loss-of-function mutations underscore the involvement of matrix alteration in the pathogenesis of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Mathieu; Gross, Marie-Sylvie; Aubart, Mélodie; Hanna, Nadine; Kessler, Ketty; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Tosolini, Laurent; Ho-Tin-Noe, Benoit; Regalado, Ellen; Varret, Mathilde; Abifadel, Marianne; Milleron, Olivier; Odent, Sylvie; Dupuis-Girod, Sophie; Faivre, Laurence; Edouard, Thomas; Dulac, Yves; Busa, Tiffany; Gouya, Laurent; Milewicz, Dianna M; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine

    2014-12-04

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (TAAD) is an autosomal-dominant disorder with major life-threatening complications. The disease displays great genetic heterogeneity with some forms allelic to Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndrome, and an important number of cases still remain unexplained at the molecular level. Through whole-exome sequencing of affected members in a large TAAD-affected family, we identified the c.472C>T (p.Arg158(∗)) nonsense mutation in MFAP5 encoding the extracellular matrix component MAGP-2. This protein interacts with elastin fibers and the microfibrillar network. Mutation screening of 403 additional probands identified an additional missense mutation of MFAP5 (c.62G>T [p.Trp21Leu]) segregating with the disease in a second family. Functional analyses performed on both affected individual's cells and in vitro models showed that these two mutations caused pure or partial haploinsufficiency. Thus, alteration of MAGP-2, a component of microfibrils and elastic fibers, appears as an initiating mechanism of inherited TAAD. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Thoracic rat spinal cord contusion injury induces remote spinal gliogenesis but not neurogenesis or gliogenesis in the brain.

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    Steffen Franz

    Full Text Available After spinal cord injury, transected axons fail to regenerate, yet significant, spontaneous functional improvement can be observed over time. Distinct central nervous system regions retain the capacity to generate new neurons and glia from an endogenous pool of progenitor cells and to compensate neural cell loss following certain lesions. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether endogenous cell replacement (neurogenesis or gliogenesis in the brain (subventricular zone, SVZ; corpus callosum, CC; hippocampus, HC; and motor cortex, MC or cervical spinal cord might represent a structural correlate for spontaneous locomotor recovery after a thoracic spinal cord injury. Adult Fischer 344 rats received severe contusion injuries (200 kDyn of the mid-thoracic spinal cord using an Infinite Horizon Impactor. Uninjured rats served as controls. From 4 to 14 days post-injury, both groups received injections of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU to label dividing cells. Over the course of six weeks post-injury, spontaneous recovery of locomotor function occurred. Survival of newly generated cells was unaltered in the SVZ, HC, CC, and the MC. Neurogenesis, as determined by identification and quantification of doublecortin immunoreactive neuroblasts or BrdU/neuronal nuclear antigen double positive newly generated neurons, was not present in non-neurogenic regions (MC, CC, and cervical spinal cord and unaltered in neurogenic regions (dentate gyrus and SVZ of the brain. The lack of neuronal replacement in the brain and spinal cord after spinal cord injury precludes any relevance for spontaneous recovery of locomotor function. Gliogenesis was increased in the cervical spinal cord remote from the injury site, however, is unlikely to contribute to functional improvement.

  15. Traumatic partial avulsion of a single right subclavian artery from the aortic arch and definitive repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Sears-Rogan, Pamela; Young, Richard S; Kanda, Louis T; Ellis, Jennifer L

    2006-01-01

    Blunt injury to the right subclavian artery is a rare complication of severe deceleration trauma often associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We describe an atypical presentation in a patient who sustained a traumatic avulsion of his right subclavian artery arising off the aortic arch. An interposition graft was used to restore the continuity of the artery to the ascending thoracic aorta.

  16. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people with inherited connective tissue disorders, such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, get thoracic aortic aneurysms. ... Smoking . Some inherited connective tissue disorders, such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, can also increase your ...

  17. Pericardial and thoracic peri-aortic adipose tissues contribute to systemic inflammation and calcified coronary atherosclerosis independent of body fat composition, anthropometric measures and traditional cardiovascular risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Chun-Ho; Lin, Tin-Yu; Wu, Yih-Jer; Liu, Chuan-Chuan; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Yeh, Hung-I.; Yang, Fei-Shih; Chen, Su-Chiu; Hou, Charles Jia-Yin; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Hung, Chung-Lieh; Cury, Ricardo C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Coronary atherosclerosis has traditionally been proposed to be associated with several cardiovascular risk factors and anthropometric measures. However, clinical data regarding the independent value of visceral adipose tissue in addition to such traditional predictors remains obscure. Materials and methods: We subsequently studied 719 subjects (age: 48.1 ± 8.3 years, 25% females) who underwent multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for coronary calcium score (CCS) quantification. Baseline demographic data and anthropometric measures were taken with simultaneous body fat composition estimated. Visceral adipose tissue of pericardial and thoracic peri-aortic fat was quantified by MDCT using TeraRecon Aquarius workstation (San Mateo, CA). Traditional cardiovascular risk stratification was calculated by metabolic (NCEP ATP III) and Framingham (FRS) scores and high-sensitivity CRP (Hs-CRP) was taken to represent systemic inflammation. The independent value of visceral adipose tissue to systemic inflammation and CCS was assessed by utilizing multivariable regression analysis. Results: Of all subjects enrolled in this study, the mean values for pericardial and peri-aortic adipose tissue were 74.23 ± 27.51 and 7.23 ± 3.69 ml, respectively. Higher visceral fat quartile groups were associated with graded increase of risks for cardiovascular diseases. Both adipose burdens strongly correlated with anthropometric measures including waist circumference, body weight and body mass index (all p < 0.001). In addition, both visceral amount correlates well with ATP and FRS scores, all lipid profiles and systemic inflammation marker in terms of Hs-CRP (all p < 0.001). After adjustment for baseline variables, both visceral fat were independently related to Hs-CRP levels (all p < 0.05), but only pericardial fat exerted independent role in coronary calcium deposit. Conclusion: Both visceral adipose tissues strongly correlated with systemic inflammation beyond traditional

  18. Thoraco-lumbar fractures with blunt traumatic aortic injury in adult patients: correlations and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Giorgio; Ramieri, Alessandro; Chiarella, Vito; Vigliotta, Massimo; Domenicucci, Maurizio

    2018-04-16

    Traumatic thoraco-lumbar spine fracture spine with a concomitant blunt aortic injury is uncommon but potentially a fatal association. Our aim was to clarify: morphology of spinal fractures related to vascular damages and vice versa, diagnostic procedures and decision-making process for the best treatment options for spine and vessels. We enrolled 42 cases culled from the literature and five personal ones, reviewing in detail by AO Spine Classification, Society of Vascular Surgery classification and Abbreviated Injury Scale for neurological evaluation. Most fractures were at T11-L2 (29 cases; 62%) and type C (17; 70%). 17 (38%) were neurological. Most common vascular damage was the rupture (20; 43%), followed by intimal tear (13; 28%) and pseudoaneurysm (9; 19%). Vascular injury often required open or endovascular repair before spinal fixation. Distraction developed aortic intimal damage until rupture, while flexion-distraction lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm and rotation-torsion full laceration of collateral branches. CT and angio-CT were investigations of choice, followed by angiography. Neurological condition remained unchanged in 28 cases (90%). Overall mortality was 30%, but it was higher in AIS A. Relationship between thoraco-lumbar fracture and vascular lesion is rare, but potentially fatal. Comprehension of spinal biomechanics and vascular damages could be crucial to avoid poor results or decrease mortality. Frequently, traction of the aorta and its vessels is realized by C-dislocated fractures. CT and angio-CT are recommended. Spine stabilization should always follow the vascular repair. Early severe deficits worse the prognosis related to neurological recovery and survival. These slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.

  19. Significance and function of different spinal collateral compartments following thoracic aortic surgery: immediate versus long-term flow compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meffert, Philipp; Bischoff, Moritz S; Brenner, Robert; Siepe, Matthias; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Kari, Fabian A

    2014-05-01

    Iatrogenic paraplegia has been accompanying cardiovascular surgery since its beginning. As a result, surgeons have been developing many theories about the exact mechanisms of this devastating complication. Thus, the impact of single arteries that contribute to the spinal perfusion is one of the most discussed subjects in modern surgery. The subsequent decision of reattachment or the permanent disconnection of these intercostal arteries divides the surgical community. On the one hand, the anatomical or vascular approach pleads for the immediate reimplantation to reconstruct the anatomical situation. On the other hand, the decision of the permanent disconnection aims at avoiding stealing phenomenon away from the spinal vascular network. This spinal collateral network can be described as consisting of three components-the intraspinal and two paraspinal compartments-that feed the nutrient arteries of the spinal cord. The exact functional impact of the different compartments of the collateral network remains poorly understood. In this review, the function of the intraspinal compartment in the context of collateral network principle as an immediate emergency backup system is described. The exact structure and architectural principles of the intraspinal compartment are described. The critical parameters with regard to the risk of postoperative spinal cord ischaemia are the number of anterior radiculomedullary arteries (ARMAs) and the distance between them in relation to the longitudinal extent of aortic disease. The paraspinal network as a sleeping reserve is proposed as the long-term backup system. This sleeping reserve has to be activated by arteriogenic stimuli. These are presented briefly, and prior findings regarding arteriogenesis are discussed in the light of the collateral network concept. Finally, the role of preoperative visualization of the ARMAs in order to evaluate the risk of postoperative paraplegia is emphasized.

  20. Aortic ruptures in seat belt wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arajärvi, E; Santavirta, S; Tolonen, J

    1989-09-01

    Several investigations have indicated that rupture of the thoracic aorta is one of the leading causes of immediate death in victims of road traffic accidents. In Finland in 1983, 92% of front-seat passengers were seat belt wearers on highways and 82% in build-up areas. The mechanisms of rupture of the aorta have been intensively investigated, but the relationship between seat belt wearing and injury mechanisms leading to aortic rupture is still largely unknown. This study comprises 4169 fatally injured victims investigated by the Boards of Traffic Accident Investigation of Insurance Companies during the period 1972 to 1985. Chest injuries were recorded as the main cause of death in 1121 (26.9%) victims, 207 (5.0%) of those victims having worn a seat belt. Aortic ruptures were found at autopsy in 98 victims and the exact information of the location of the aortic tears was available in 68. For a control group, we analyzed 72 randomly chosen unbelted victims who had a fatal aortic rupture in similar accidents. The location of the aortic rupture in unbelted victims was more often in the ascending aorta, especially in drivers, whereas in seat belt wearers the distal descending aorta was statistically more often ruptured, especially in right-front passengers (p less than 0.05). The steering wheel predominated statistically as the part of the car estimated to have caused the injury in unbelted victims (37/72), and some interior part of the car was the most common cause of fatal thoracic impacts in seat belt wearers (48/68) (p less than 0.001). The mechanism of rupture of the aorta in the classic site just distal to the subclavian artery seems to be rapid deceleration, although complex body movements are also responsible in side impact collisions. The main mechanism leading to rupture of the ascending aorta seems to be severe blow to the bony thorax. This also often causes associated thoracic injuries, such as heart rupture and sternal fracture. Injuries in the ascending

  1. Patients with thoracic trauma and concomitant spinal cord injury have a markedly decreased mortality rate compared to patients without spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertling, Maren; Suero, Eduardo; Aach, Mirko; Schildhauer, Thomas; Meindl, Renate; Citak, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    The present study was performed to compare the clinical outcome, with special focus on the mortality rate of thoracic injuries, in patients with and without spinal cord injury. Patients who were treated for thoracic trauma at our institution between January 1998 and December 2007 were included in this retrospective cohort study. Patients were divided into two groups according to whether they had suffered a concomitant spinal cord injury (SCI) (N = 54) or not (N = 61). Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier function and the Cox proportional hazards model. Age, sex, injury severity score (ISS), Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), and infection with pneumonia were included as covariates in the final model. Patients with SCI have a 65 % reduction in the chance of dying compared to patients without SCI following thoracic trauma (HR = 0.35; 95%CI = 0.13-0.96; p = 0.041). Sex (HR = 0.67; 95 % CI: 0.26-1.71, P = 0.141), ISS > =25 (HR = 2.08 95 % CI: 0.58-7.49, P = 2.63) and a Charlson Comorbidity Index of 2 (HR = 1.82; 95 % CI: 0.58-7.22, P = 0.393) had no effect in the risk of dying. However, patients older than 60 years had four times the chance of dying than patients younger than 30 years (HR = 4.39; 95 % CI: 1.02-19, P = 0.048). Patients with pneumonia had a nonsignificant twofold increase in the risk of dying (HR = 2.28; 95 % CI: 0.97-5.34, P = 0.059). Our results demonstrate that patients with thoracic trauma and concomitant SCI had markedly decreased mortality compared to patients without SCI, even after adjusting for age, sex, injury severity, comorbidities and pneumonia infection.

  2. Four-Dimensional Visualization of Thoracic Blood Flow by Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Patient Following Correction of Transposition of the Great Arteries (d-TGA) and Uncorrected Aortic Coarctation

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    Ley-Zaporozhan, J.; Rengier, F.; Tengg-Kobligk, H. von (German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) Heidelberg, Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany)); Ley, S.; Unterhinninghofen, R. (Univ. of Karlsruhe, Inst. of Computer Science and Engineering, Karlsruhe (Germany)); Markl, M. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical Physics, Univ. Hospital Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)); Eichhorn, J. (Univ. Hospital, Pediatric Cardiology, Heidelberg (Germany))

    2009-10-15

    Recent advances in flow-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and data analysis allow for comprehensive noninvasive three-dimensional (3D) visualization of complex blood flow. Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated three-directional (3dir) flow measurements were employed to assess and visualize time-resolved 3D blood flow in the pulmonary arteries (PA) and thoracic aorta. We present findings in a juvenile patient with surgically corrected transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA) and aortic coarctation. For the first time, the complex flow patterns in the PA following d-TGA were visualized. Morphologically, a slight asymmetry of the PA was found, with considerable impact on vascular hemodynamics, resulting in diastolic retrograde flow in the larger vessel and diastolic filling of the smaller PA. Additionally, increased flow to the supraaortic vessels was found due to aortic coarctation.

  3. The anatomy of the thoracic duct at the level of the diaphragm: A cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defize, Ingmar L; Schurink, Bernadette; Weijs, Teus J; Roeling, Tom A P; Ruurda, Jelle P; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Bleys, Ronald L A W

    2018-03-03

    Injury and subsequent leakage of unrecognized thoracic duct tributaries during transthoracic esophagectomy may lead to chylothorax. Therefore, we hypothesized that thoracic duct anatomy at the diaphragm is more complex than currently recognized and aimed to provide a detailed description of the anatomy of the thoracic duct at the diaphragm. The thoracic duct and its tributaries were dissected in 7 (2 male and 5 female) embalmed human cadavers. The level of origin of the thoracic duct and the points where tributaries entered the thoracic duct were measured using landmarks easily identified during surgery: the aortic and esophageal hiatus and the arch of the azygos vein. The thoracic duct was formed in the thoracic cavity by the union of multiple abdominal tributaries in 6 cadavers. In 3 cadavers partially duplicated systems were present that communicated with interductal branches. The thoracic duct was formed by a median of 3 (IQR: 3-5) abdominal tributaries merging 8.3cm (IQR: 7.3-9.3cm) above the aortic hiatus, 1.8cm (IQR: -0.4 to 2.4cm) above the esophageal hiatus, and 12.3cm (IQR: 14.0 to -11.0cm) below the arch of the azygos vein. This study challenges the paradigm that abdominal lymphatics join in the abdomen to pass the diaphragm as a single thoracic duct. In this study, this occurred in 1/7 cadavers. Although small, the results of this series suggest that the formation of the thoracic duct above the diaphragm is more common than previously thought. This knowledge may be vital to prevent and treat post-operative chyle leakage. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Unexpected traumatic rupture of left atrium mimicking aortic rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah K Alameddine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Left atrial (LA rupture is rare following blunt chest injury. We describe a case of blunt LA rupture that was treated surgically. This report is intended to alert practitioners for a need of a close multiple disciplinary collaborations among them for optimal management of patients with this type of trauma; because other non-cardiac injuries involving the head, abdomen, or extremities are considered covariates for in-hospital mortality. As in the present case, the patient eventually died from associated extrathoracic injuries. The diagnosis of LA rupture is by exclusion. However, the initial radiological reading may be misinterpreted, because this injury can easily be mistaking for an aortic rupture. The final reappraisal of the chest imaging studies should be interpreted by a skilled radiologist to avoid misdiagnosis. Subtle radiological features can help distinguish aortic thoracic injury as illustrated in this patient. These factors may be useful to the practicing surgeon in deciding surgical approach.

  5. Selective coverage of the left subclavian artery without revascularization in patients with bilateral patent vertebrobasilar junctions during thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minwook; Lee, Do Yun; Kim, Man-Deuk; Won, Jong Yun; Yune, Young-Nam; Lee, Taek Yeon; Choi, Donghoon; Ko, Young-Guk

    2013-05-01

    The primary purpose of the current study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of selective coverage of the left subclavian artery (LSCA) without revascularization during thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with bilateral patent vertebrobasilar junctions. The secondary purpose was to assess morphologic change of the vertebral artery (VA) after the procedure. Among 126 patients who underwent TEVAR between 2006 and 2011, 29 patients requiring LSCA coverage without preemptive revascularization were retrospectively analyzed in this study. The patients were a mean age of 63.1 years (range, 45-84 years). The mean follow-up period was 19.9 months (range, 1-63 months). Bilateral patent vertebrobasilar junctions were evaluated by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), time-of flight magnetic resonance angiography, or conventional angiography. Neurologic complications, such as spinal cord ischemia (SCI) or cerebrovascular accidents, were analyzed. Preprocedural and postprocedural changes in VAs were evaluated on follow-up contrast-enhanced CT. The overall 30-day mortality was 6.9% (2 of 29). None of the patients had SCI or a stroke of posterior circulation alone. Cerebrovascular accidents from embolic infarctions occurred in two patients (7.4%). Transient left arm ischemic symptoms were present in five patients (18.5%), but none required secondary interventions. Delayed development of type I endoleak occurred due to stent deformity in one patient, who underwent surgery. One patient required reintervention after the 10-month follow-up contrast-enhanced CT showed a pseudoaneurysm had developed at the distal margin of the previously placed stent graft. Hypertrophy of the right VA after TEVAR was seen in seven of 27 patients (25.9%); two patients showed bilateral hypertrophy of VAs. LSCA coverage without revascularization can be safely performed during TEVAR in patients with bilateral patent vertebrobasilar junctions. Hypertrophy of the right VA

  6. Predictive Value of Aortic Valve Calcification for Periprocedural Myocardial Injury in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yohei; Ishii, Hideki; Suzuki, Susumu; Tanaka, Akihito; Tatami, Yosuke; Harata, Shingo; Ota, Tomoyuki; Shimbo, Yusaku; Takayama, Yohei; Kunimura, Ayako; Hirayama, Kenshi; Harada, Kazuhiro; Osugi, Naohiro; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2017-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that aortic valve calcification (AVC) was associated with cardiovascular events and mortality. On the other hand, periprocedural myocardial injury (PMI) in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is a well-known predictor of subsequent mortality and poor clinical outcomes. The purpose of the study was to assess the hypothesis that the presence of AVC could predict PMI in PCI. This study included 370 patients treated with PCI for stable angina pectoris. AVC was defined as bright echoes >1 mm on one or more cusps of the aortic valve on ultrasound cardiography (UCG). PMI was defined as an increase in high-sensitivity troponin T level of >5 times the upper normal limit (>0.070 ng/ml) at 24 hours after PCI. AVC was detected in 45.9% of the patients (n=170). The incidence of PMI was significantly higher in the patients with AVC than in those without AVC (43.5% vs 21.0%, p<0.001). The presence of AVC independently predicted PMI after adjusting for other significant variables (odds ratio 2.26, 95% confidence interval 1.37-3.74, p=0.002). Other predictors were male sex, age, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and total stent length. Furthermore to predict PMI, adding AVC to the established risk factors significantly improved the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves, from 0.68 to 0.72, of the PMI prediction model (p=0.025). The presence of AVC detected in UCG could predict the incidence of PMI.

  7. Endovascular management of lap belt-related abdominal aortic injury in a 9-year-old child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazoglou, Konstantinos O; Karkos, Christos D; Kalogirou, Thomas E; Giagtzidis, Ioakeim T

    2015-02-01

    Blunt abdominal aortic trauma is a rare occurrence in children with only a few patients having been reported in the literature. Most such cases have been described in the context of lap belt injuries. We report a 9-year-old boy who suffered lap belt trauma to the abdomen during a high-speed road traffic accident resulting to the well-recognized pattern of blunt abdominal injury, that is, the triad of intestinal perforation, fractures of the lumbar spine, and abdominal aortic injury. The latter presented with lower limb ischemia due to dissection of the infrarenal aorta and right common iliac artery. Revascularization was achieved by endovascular means using 2 self-expanding stents in the infrarenal aorta and the right common iliac artery. This case is one of the few reports of lap belt-related acute traumatic abdominal aortic dissection in a young child and highlights the feasibility of endovascular management in the pediatric population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Thoracic spine pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey Ivanovich Isaikin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic spine pain, or thoracalgia, is one of the common reasons for seeking for medical advice. The epidemiology and semiotics of pain in the thoracic spine unlike in those in the cervical and lumbar spine have not been inadequately studied. The causes of thoracic spine pain are varied: diseases of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and renal systems, injuries to the musculoskeletal structures of the cervical and thoracic portions, which require a thorough differential diagnosis. Facet, costotransverse, and costovertebral joint injuries and myofascial syndrome are the most common causes of musculoskeletal (nonspecific pain in the thoracic spine. True radicular pain is rarely encountered. Traditionally, treatment for thoracalgia includes a combination of non-drug and drug therapies. The cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor meloxicam (movalis may be the drug of choice in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain.

  9. Lap-belt syndrome: management of aortic intimal dissection in a 7-year-old child with a constellation of injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, Paritosh C.; Bulas, Dorothy I.; Rothenbach, Patricia; Guzzetta, Philip C.

    2007-01-01

    We present a case of lap-belt motor vehicle injury in a 7-year-old male who was admitted with abdominal ecchymoses and pain with associated aortic intimal flap, bowel injury, hemoperitoneum, and retroperitoneal hematoma at initial imaging with CT. Most of these findings were confirmed at subsequent laparotomy, and the patient underwent operative repair of bowel injuries. His aortic intimal flap was followed with US and color Doppler imaging during which time he was treated conservatively until there was sonographic evidence of intimal healing. This patient illustrates a multimodality approach to imaging and conservative management. (orig.)

  10. Lap-belt syndrome: management of aortic intimal dissection in a 7-year-old child with a constellation of injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanna, Paritosh C.; Bulas, Dorothy I. [George Washington University, Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Rothenbach, Patricia; Guzzetta, Philip C. [George Washington University, Pediatric Surgery, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2007-01-15

    We present a case of lap-belt motor vehicle injury in a 7-year-old male who was admitted with abdominal ecchymoses and pain with associated aortic intimal flap, bowel injury, hemoperitoneum, and retroperitoneal hematoma at initial imaging with CT. Most of these findings were confirmed at subsequent laparotomy, and the patient underwent operative repair of bowel injuries. His aortic intimal flap was followed with US and color Doppler imaging during which time he was treated conservatively until there was sonographic evidence of intimal healing. This patient illustrates a multimodality approach to imaging and conservative management. (orig.)

  11. Prediction and analysis of human thoracic impact responses and injuries in cadaver impacts using a full human body finite element model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Jesse; El-Jawahri, Raed; Chai, Li; Barbat, Saeed; Prasad, Priya

    2003-10-01

    Human thoracic dynamic responses and injuries associated with frontal impact, side impact, and belt loading were investigated and predicted using a complete human body finite element model for an average adult male. The human body model was developed to study the impact biomechanics of a vehicular occupant. Its geometry was based on the Visible Human Project (National Library of Medicine) and the topographies from human body anatomical texts. The data was then scaled to an average adult male according to available biomechanical data from the literature. The model includes details of the head, neck, ribcage, abdomen, thoracic and lumbar spine, internal organs of the chest and abdomen, pelvis, and the upper and lower extremities. The present study is focused on the dynamic response and injuries of the thorax. The model was validated at various impact speeds by comparing predicted responses with available experimental cadaver data in frontal and side pendulum impacts, as well as belt loading. Model responses were compared with similar individual cadaver tests instead of using cadaver corridors because the large differences between the upper and lower bounds of the corridors may confound the model validation. The validated model was then used to study thorax dynamic responses and injuries in various simulated impact conditions. Parameters that could induce injuries such as force, deflection, and stress were computed from model simulations and were compared with previously proposed thoracic injury criteria to assess injury potential for the thorax. It has been shown that the model exhibited speed sensitive impact characteristics, and the compressibility of the internal organs significantly influenced the overall impact response in the simulated impact conditions. This study demonstrates that the development of a validated FE human body model could be useful for injury assessment in various cadaveric impacts reported in the literature. Internal organ injuries, which are

  12. Microneurolysis and decompression of long thoracic nerve injury are effective in reversing scapular winging: Long-term results in 50 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyons Andrew B

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long thoracic nerve injury leading to scapular winging is common, often caused by closed trauma through compression, stretching, traction, direct extrinsic force, penetrating injury, or neuritides such as Parsonage-Turner syndrome. We undertook the largest series of long thoracic nerve decompression and neurolysis yet reported to demonstrate the usefulness of long thoracic nerve decompression. Methods Winging was bilateral in 3 of the 47 patients (26 male, 21 female, yielding a total of 50 procedures. The mean age of the patients was 33.4 years, ranging from 24–57. Causation included heavy weight-lifting (31 patients, repetitive throwing (5 patients, deep massage (2 patients, repetitive overhead movement (1 patient, direct trauma (1 patient, motor bike accident (1 patient, and idiopathic causes (9 patients. Decompression and microneurolysis of the long thoracic nerve were performed in the supraclavicular space. Follow-up (average of 25.7 months consisted of physical examination and phone conversations. The degree of winging was measured by the operating surgeon (RKN. Patients also answered questions covering 11 quality-of-life facets spanning four domains of the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire. Results Thoracic nerve decompression and neurolysis improved scapular winging in 49 (98% of the 50 cases, producing "good" or "excellent" results in 46 cases (92%. At least some improvement occurred in 98% of cases that were less than 10 years old. Pain reduction through surgery was good or excellent in 43 (86% cases. Shoulder instability affected 21 patients preoperatively and persisted in 5 of these patients after surgery, even in the 5 patients with persistent instability who experienced some relief from the winging itself. Conclusion Surgical decompression and neurolysis of the long thoracic nerve significantly improve scapular winging in appropriate patients, for whom these techniques should be considered

  13. The UK Military Experience of Thoracic Injury in the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Surgical intervention was largely limited to tube thor- acostomy, with few thoracotomies being performed, as patients often arrived at the hospitals in...haemorrhage and two broncho- pleural fistulas in LNs. There was significant difference between survivors and non-survivors in all approaches to the chest (right...admission for a broncho- pleural fistula on a background of massive blast lung. The Coalition soldier had sustained extensive thoraco-abdominal injuries

  14. Blunt thoracic trauma and cardiac injury in the athlete: contemporary management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE Gregorio, Cesare; Magaudda, Ludovico

    2017-09-29

    Commotion cordis and cardiac injuries are rare events usually following a chest blunt trauma during sports activities. Various aetiologies have been identified to cause electrical (commotion cordis) and/or structural (contusion and further injuries) damage, but high-velocity tools such as baseballs or hockey pucks (also called projectiles) have been chiefly identified. Clinical consequences are challenging, varying from uncomplicated supraventricular arrhythmias to cardiac wall rupture. Ventricular fibrillation is the most remarkable outcome leading to cardiac arrest in some individuals. In this article, up-to-date epidemiological and pathophysiological issues are discussed, along with the most suitable assistance protocols of the injured athlete in the sports arena. Current knowledge about traumatic sports injuries and ensuing cardiovascular sequelae made significant steps forwards than in the past. The majority of athletes (especially the youngest ones) wearing chest protectors are usually preserved from serious outcomes and sudden cardiac death, but further technical effort is encouraged to attain more satisfactory barriers against projectile's impact. Educational campaigns among students, closer team surveillance, implementation of the sports arenas with adequate rescue devices and medical assistance remain mandatory in every sports activity.

  15. Aortic Dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Follow a low-salt diet with plenty of fruits, vegetables and whole grains and exercise regularly. Wear a seat belt. This reduces the risk of traumatic injury to your chest area. Work with your doctor. If you have a family history of aortic dissection, a connective tissue disorder or ...

  16. Atrophy and Primary Somatosensory Cortical Reorganization after Unilateral Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury: A Longitudinal Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manxiu, Ma; Zhao, Can; Xi, Yue; Yang, Zhao-Yang; Li, Xiao-Guang

    2013-01-01

    The effects of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) on the changes in the central nervous system (CNS) over time may depend on the dynamic interaction between the structural integrity of the spinal cord and the capacity of the brain plasticity. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used in a longitudinal study on five rhesus monkeys to observe cerebral activation during upper limb somatosensory tasks in healthy animals and after unilateral thoracic SCI. The changes in the spinal cord diameters were measured, and the correlations among time after the lesion, structural changes in the spinal cord, and primary somatosensory cortex (S1) reorganization were also determined. After SCI, activation of the upper limb in S1 shifted to the region which generally dominates the lower limb, and the rostral spinal cord transverse diameter adjacent to the lesion exhibited obvious atrophy, which reflects the SCI-induced changes in the CNS. A significant correlation was found among the time after the lesion, the spinal cord atrophy, and the degree of contralateral S1 reorganization. The results indicate the structural changes in the spinal cord and the dynamic reorganization of the cerebral activation following early SCI stage, which may help to further understand the neural plasticity in the CNS. PMID:24490171

  17. [Traumatic aortic valve insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, J; Lemos, C; Marques, A M; Antunes, M J; Gonsalves, A

    1996-02-01

    The traumatic aortic valvular insufficiency (TAVI), through less frequent after a non-penetrating thoracic traumatism, is a serious entity with a very reserved prognosis. So it must be suspected in every patients with signs or symptoms of de novo heart failure post-traumatism. The transthoracic echocardiography and eventually transesophageal echocardiography have a fundamental role in the confirmation of the diagnosis. The clinical picture of traumatic aortic regurgitation is quickly evolutionary and the non efficacy of medical therapy has placed the valvular substitution surgery as the best succeeded treatment. With the advent of the aortic valve repairing surgery some TAVI cases has been submitted to this procedure. Nevertheless, the development of residual aortic regurgitation in these situations, usually requiring later valvular replacement surgery, make the aortic valvuloplasty a controversial surgical technique. The AA describe a recent clinical case of aortic regurgitation after a non-penetrant thoracic traumatism, discussing the aspects connected with physiopathology, diagnosis and therapy. The singularity of this case was based on the fact that the initial clinical diagnosis had been prejudiced by the context of a polytraumatism and there had been a time free of symptoms between the traumatism and the beginning of the symptomatology of left ventricular failure. Even though the identification of the problem allowed an intensive treatment of this serious situation that ended with the replacement of the aortic valve by mechanical aortic prosthesis, with the patient's total recovery.

  18. Comparison of functional electrical stimulation to long leg braces for upright mobility for children with complete thoracic level spinal injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaroti, D; Akers, J M; Smith, B T; Mulcahey, M J; Betz, R R

    1999-09-01

    To prospectively compare functional electrical stimulation (FES) to long leg braces (LLB) as a means of upright mobility for children with motor-complete thoracic level spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Intrasubject group comparison of two interventions. Nonprofit pediatric orthopedic rehabilitation facility specializing in SCI. Convenience sample of five children between 9 and 18 years old with motor-complete thoracic level SCI. The hip and knee extensors were excitable by electrical stimulation. The FES system consisted of percutaneous intramuscular electrodes implanted to the hip and knee extensors and a push-button activated stimulator worn about the waist. Standing was accomplished by simultaneous stimulation of all implanted muscles. For foot and ankle stability, either ankle-foot orthoses (AFO) or supramalleolar orthoses were used. The LLB system consisted of a custom knee-ankle foot orthosis (KAFO) for four subjects and a custom reciprocating gait orthosis (RGO) for one subject who required bracing at the hip. For both interventions, either a front-wheeled walker or Lofstrand crutches were used as assistive devices. Each subject was trained in the use of both FES and LLB in seven standardized upright mobility activities: stand and reach, high transfer, toilet transfer, floor to stand, 6-meter walk, stair ascent, and stair descent. For each mobility activity, five repeated measures of level of independence, using the 7-point Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scale, and time to completion were recorded for each intervention. Subjects were also asked which intervention they preferred. For 94% of comparisons, subjects required equal (70%) or less (24%) assistance using FES as compared with LLB. Six of the seven mobility activities required less time to complete using FES, two activities at significant levels. The FES system was preferred in 62% of the cases, LLB were desired 27% of the time, and there was no preference in 11% of the cases. The FES system

  19. Frequency and Effect of Access-Related Vascular Injury and Subsequent Vascular Intervention After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Taudorf, Mikkel; Luk, N H Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Vascular access and closure remain a challenge in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). This single-center study aimed to report the incidence, predictive factors, and clinical outcomes of access-related vascular injury and subsequent vascular intervention. During a 30-month period, 365...... patients underwent TAVR and 333 patients (94%) were treated by true percutaneous transfemoral approach. Of this latter group, 83 patients (25%) had an access-related vascular injury that was managed by the use of a covered self-expanding stent (n = 49), balloon angioplasty (n = 33), or by surgical...... for access-related vascular intervention. In addition, a high sheath/common femoral artery ratio as measured on preoperative CTA was associated with a higher rate of post-TAVR vascular intervention. The radiation dose, iodine contrast volume, transfusion need, length of hospitalization, and 30-day mortality...

  20. Thoracic CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through a vein (IV) in your hand or forearm. It may be given through the rectum using ... CT scan Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Normal lung anatomy Thoracic organs References Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden ...

  1. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and acute kidney injury in endovascular aneurysm repair or open aortic repair: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampoldi, Benedetta; Tessarolo, Serena; Giubbilini, Paola; Gaia, Paola; Corino, Samantha D; Mazza, Sarah; Rigolini, Roberta; Poli, Marco Dei; Vianello, Elena; Romanelli, Massimiliano M Corsi; Costa, Elena

    2018-02-15

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs frequently after abdominal aortic surgery and there is currently no effective marker able to detect early onset. The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) to early identify the development of acute renal damage in patients undergoing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) or open aortic repair (OAR). Serial samples of blood and urine were obtained from 25 patients undergoing both EVAR and OAR. Seven male subjects with AKI and 18 subjects with no-AKI (17 males, 1 female) were included in the study. We determined concentrations of serum creatinine (sCr) and urinary, serum and whole blood NGAL (uNGAL, sNGAL, bNGAL) collected at baseline, and after 4 and 18 hours. AKI was defined according to the RIFLE criteria (risk, injury, failure, loss of kidney function, and end-stage kidney disease): increase by 50% in sCr or reduction of at least 25% of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) from baseline. Seven patients developed AKI in the stage Risk. There was no significant difference in sNGAL concentrations in the AKI group as compared to no-AKI group. However, the uNGAL/uCreatinine ratio and bNGAL concentrations were significantly higher after 18 hours in the AKI group (no-AKI 1.69 (0.91 - 2.47) vs AKI 3.2 (2.08 - 5.92) ng/mg for uNGAL/uCreatinine ratio, P = 0.036; and no-AKI 83 (59 - 131) vs AKI 164 (126 - 263) ng/mL for bNGAL, P = 0.029). Our results suggest that uNGAL, sNGAL and bNGAL, after abdominal aortic surgery, are not suitable as early biomarkers of AKI.

  2. The effects of contrast media volume on acute kidney injury after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Podboy, Alexander J; Gillaspie, Erin A; Greason, Kevin L; Kashani, Kianoush B

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this systematic review was to assess the effects of contrast media volume on transcatheter aortic valve replacement-related acute kidney injury. A literature search was performed using Medline, EMbase, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and clinicaltrials.gov from the inception of these databases through December 2015. Studies that reported relative risk, odds ratio, or hazard ratio comparing the risks of acute kidney injury following transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients who received high contrast media volume were included. Pooled risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using a random-effect, generic inverse variance method. Four cohort studies composed of 891 patients were included in the analyses to assess the risk of acute kidney injury after transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients who received high contrast media volume. The pooled RR of acute kidney injury after transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients who received a large volume of contrast media was 1.41 (95% CI, 0.87 to 2.28) compared with low contrast media volume. The meta-analysis was limited to studies using standard acute kidney injury definitions, and the pooled RR of acute kidney injury in patients who received high contrast media volume is 1.12 (95% CI, 0.78 to 1.62). Our meta-analysis shows no significant association between contrast media volume and risk of acute kidney injury after transcatheter aortic valve replacement. © 2016 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Impact of Acute Kidney Injury on Short- and Long-term Outcomes After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes Filho, Antonio C B; Katz, Marcelo; Campos, Carlos M; Carvalho, Luiz A; Siqueira, Dimytri A; Tumelero, Rogério T; Portella, Antenor L F; Esteves, Vinícius; Perin, Marco A; Sarmento-Leite, Rogério; Lemos Neto, Pedro A; Tarasoutchi, Flavio; Bezerra, Hiram G; de Brito, Fábio S

    2018-01-18

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequently observed after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and is associated with higher mortality. However, the impact of AKI on long-term outcomes remains controversial. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the impact of AKI on short- and long-term outcomes following TAVI using the Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 criteria. Consecutive patients (n = 794) with severe aortic stenosis who underwent TAVI were included in a multicenter Brazilian registry. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors of AKI. Four-year outcomes were determined as Kaplan-Meier survival curves, and an adjusted landmark analysis was used to test the impact of AKI on mortality among survivors at 12 months. The incidence of AKI after TAVI was 18%. Independent predictors of AKI were age, diabetes mellitus, major or life-threatening bleeding and valve malpositioning. Acute kidney injury was independently associated with higher risk of all-cause death (adjusted HR, 2.8; 95%CI, 2.0-3.9; P cardiovascular mortality (adjusted HR, 2.9; 95%CI, 1.9-4.4; P < .001) over the entire follow-up period. However, when considering only survivors at 12 months, there was no difference in both clinical endpoints (adjusted HR, 1.2; 95%CI, 0.5-2.4; P = .71, and HR, 0.7; 95%CI, 0.2-2.1; P = .57, respectively). Acute kidney injury is a frequent complication after TAVI. Older age, diabetes, major or life-threatening bleeding, and valve malpositioning were independent predictors of AKI. Acute kidney injury is associated with worse short- and long-term outcomes. However, the major impact of AKI on mortality is limited to the first year after TAVI. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Sparing of descending axons rescues interneuron plasticity in the lumbar cord to allow adaptive learning after thoracic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Nelson Hansen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the role of spared axons on structural and behavioral neuroplasticity in the lumbar enlargement after a thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI. Previous work has demonstrated that recovery in the presence of spared axons after an incomplete lesion increases behavioral output after a subsequent complete spinal cord transection (TX. This suggests that spared axons direct adaptive changes in below-level neuronal networks of the lumbar cord. In response to spared fibers, we postulate that lumbar neuron networks support behavioral gains by preventing aberrant plasticity. As such, the present study measured histological and functional changes in the isolated lumbar cord after complete TX or incomplete contusion (SCI. To measure functional plasticity in the lumbar cord, we used an established instrumental learning paradigm. In this paradigm, neural circuits within isolated lumbar segments demonstrate learning by an increase in flexion duration that reduces exposure to a noxious leg shock. We employed this model using a proof-of-principle design to evaluate the role of sparing on lumbar learning and plasticity early (7 days or late (42 days after midthoracic SCI in a rodent model. Early after SCI or TX at 7d, spinal learning was unattainable regardless of whether the animal recovered with or without axonal substrate. Failed learning occurred alongside measures of cell soma atrophy and aberrant dendritic spine expression within interneuron populations responsible for sensorimotor integration and learning. Alternatively, exposure of the lumbar cord to a small amount of spared axons for 6 weeks produced near-normal learning late after SCI. This coincided with greater cell soma volume and fewer aberrant dendritic spines on interneurons. Thus, an opportunity to influence activity-based learning in locomotor networks depends on spared axons limiting maladaptive plasticity. Together, this work identifies a time dependent interaction between

  5. [Chest injury. Part II: Management of specific injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waydhas, C; Nast-Kolb, D

    2006-10-01

    Significant injuries to the thorax comprise pneumothorax, rib fractures, lung contusion, cardiac contusion, aortic laceration, ruptured diaphragm, and the very rare injuries to the tracheo-bronchial tree and the esophagus. A surgeon dealing with chest trauma patients needs to be familiar with the indications for and execution of chest tube insertion for thoracic drainage, pericardial puncture, and thoracoscopy and thoracotomy. Interventional techniques are gaining increasing acceptance in the management of major vascular injuries. The vast majority of patients with chest injury do not need an operative intervention, but it is necessary to place a thoracic drain in 10-15% of cases or to perform in a much lower proportion a pericardial puncture or a thoracotomy.

  6. [Analysis of pain management in a pre- and post-surgical periods performed for traumatic injury of the lower-thoracic and lumbar portions of the vertebral column].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnarchuk, Iu A; Tanasiĭchuk, O F; Tolstikhin, O V; Holovan', M V

    2013-11-01

    The results of managing of 129 injured persons, treated for injuries of the lower-thoracic and lumbar portions of vertebral column, are adduced. The puncture transcutaneous vertebroplasty was done in 58 patients, stabilizing systems "Sekstant" were installed in 15, the "Mantis" systems--in 13, rigid systems by the open method--in 43. The pain syndrome dynamics was estimated in of the patients in accordance to the visual analogue scale. Positive dynamics in a frame of the pain syndrome regression was noted postoperatively. Differentiated application of various methods of treatment in the patients, suffering nonstable compressional fracture of the lower-thoracic and lumbar portions of vertebral column, permits to reduce anesthesiological risk significantly, to improve the results of treatment, to reduce the patients rehabilitation duration.

  7. Frequency and Effect of Access-Related Vascular Injury and Subsequent Vascular Intervention After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dencker, Ditte; Taudorf, Mikkel; Luk, N H Vincent; Nielsen, Michael B; Kofoed, Klaus F; Schroeder, Torben V; Søndergaard, Lars; Lönn, Lars; De Backer, Ole

    2016-10-15

    Vascular access and closure remain a challenge in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). This single-center study aimed to report the incidence, predictive factors, and clinical outcomes of access-related vascular injury and subsequent vascular intervention. During a 30-month period, 365 patients underwent TAVR and 333 patients (94%) were treated by true percutaneous transfemoral approach. Of this latter group, 83 patients (25%) had an access-related vascular injury that was managed by the use of a covered self-expanding stent (n = 49), balloon angioplasty (n = 33), or by surgical intervention (n = 1). In 16 patients (5%), the vascular injury was classified as a major vascular complication. Absence of a preprocedural computed tomography angiography (CTA) of the iliofemoral arteries (OR 2.04, p = 0.007) and female gender (OR 2.18, p = 0.004) were independent predictors of the need for access-related vascular intervention. In addition, a high sheath/common femoral artery ratio as measured on preoperative CTA was associated with a higher rate of post-TAVR vascular intervention. The radiation dose, iodine contrast volume, transfusion need, length of hospitalization, and 30-day mortality were not significantly different between patients with versus without access-related vascular intervention. In conclusion, access-related vascular intervention in patients who underwent transfemoral-TAVR is not uncommon. Female gender and a high sheath/common femoral artery ratio are risk factors for access-related vascular injury, whereas preprocedural planning with CTA of the access vessels may reduce the risk of vascular injury. Importantly, most access-related vascular injuries may be treated by percutaneous techniques with similar clinical outcomes to patients without vascular injuries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Unoperated aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Nørgaard, M; Herzog, T M

    1995-01-01

    From 1984 to 1993, 1,053 patients were admitted with aortic aneurysm (AA) and 170 (15%) were not operated on. The most frequent reason for nonoperative management was presumed technical inoperability. Survivals for patients with thoracic, thoracoabdominal, and abdominal AA were comparable. No sig...

  9. RELEVANCIA DEL DIAGNÓSTICO DIFERENCIAL ENTRE EL SÍNDROME AÓRTICO AGUDO Y EL SÍNDROME CORONARIO AGUDO EN PACIENTES CON DOLOR TORÁCICO Y CRISIS HIPERTENSIVA: REVISIÓN A PROPÓSITO DE 2 CASOS / Relevance of the differential diagnosis between acute aortic syndrome and acute coronary syndrome in patients with thoracic pain and hypertensive crisis: review on 2 case reports

    OpenAIRE

    Borja Simó Sánchez; Maria Pilar Portero Pérez; Jose Ramón Ruiz Arroyo; Jose Antonio Linares Vicente

    2011-01-01

    Acute aortic syndrome is a pathological process with low incidence compared with acute coronary syndrome, although with a worse prognosis in the short term, which is why its early diagnosis and urgent treatment are essential to the favorable evolution of thepatient. Electrocardiographic changes suggestive of myocardial ischemia, with acute evolution, are rare in acute aortic syndrome. Even in the presence of a suggestive thoracic pain and high levels of blood pressure, an adequate differentia...

  10. “Don Juan-Fracture” as a Hint to Aortic Isthmus Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirilak Suksompong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of thoracic aortic rupture after blunt trauma in a 23-year-old male patient. The initial investigation found no external injury or bleeding, only a slightly widened mediastinum and a broken left calcaneus. Abdominal lavage was negative, biochemistry was normal, and breathing and oxygenation were not compromised. When changing his position during diagnostics, the patient all of a sudden developed cardiac arrest and typical signs of hypovolemic shock. An immediate sternotomy was done without any further diagnostics on suspicion of aortic isthmus injury. A circular avulsion at the ligamentum arteriosum was found as assumed and repaired under cardiopulmonary bypass. The patient left the hospital for rehabilitation after 12 days in adequate health status. Biodynamics of blunt trauma after high-speed frontal impact and the relationship between calcaneus fracture, called “Don-Juan fracture,” and aortic rupture at the site of ligamentum arteriosum are discussed.

  11. The potential risk of left subclavian artery injury from excessively long thoracic pedicle screws placed in the proximal thoracic regions of Lenke type 2 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients and normal teenagers: an anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun; Qian, Bang-Ping; Qiu, Yong; Wang, Bin; Yu, Yang; Zhu, Ze-Zhang

    2016-10-01

    The altered anatomic positions of important structures adjacent to the vertebrae in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients have been comprehensively investigated by previous radiographic studies. However, no study has evaluated the altered position of left subclavian artery (SA) in these patients. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the altered position of left subclavian artery in AIS patients with a double thoracic curve pattern. Nineteen Lenke type 2 AIS patients and thirteen normal teenagers were included in this study. Axial computed tomography images at T2 and T3 levels were obtained in all these subjects to evaluate the subclavian artery-vertebral angle (SAVA, defined as 0° when the artery was located directly lateral to the left and 180° when directly lateral to the right) and subclavian artery-vertebral distance (SAVD, the shortest distance between the artery and vertebral body). The percentage of left subclavian arteries at potential risk of injury from excessively long pedicle screws was calculated. The SAVA was significantly larger in AIS patients than that in normal teenagers at both T2 and T3 levels (P teenagers at both T2 and T3 levels (P teenagers. The left SA is located much closer to the vertebrae in the proximal thoracic curve of Lenke type 2 AIS patients when compared with normal teenagers. The spine surgeons should be aware of such altered position of left SA and choose appropriate pedicle length to avoid anterior cortical penetration in Lenke type 2 AIS patients.

  12. Short report Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalcin (NGAL) as a biomarker of dialysis-dependent acute kidney injury following infrarenal aortic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Helene Korvenius; Stæhr, Jannie Bisgaard; Gilsaa, Torben

    2013-01-01

    Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common following abdominal aortic surgery. NGAL might be useful in the early diagnosis of AKI since it responds rapidly to ischaemic damage. Methods: Twenty patients undergoing elective infrarenal aortic surgery. U-NGAL was measured before surgery and 24, 48...... and 72 hours postoperatively. Results: No significant rise in U-NGAL was seen in patients without AKI at any time. All patients who developed dialysisdependent AKI had a significant increase in U-NGAL. Conclusion: U-NGAL did not increase solely in response to the surgical trauma. U-NGAL may be a useful...

  13. [Valvular cardiopathies due to nonpenetrating injury. Apropos of a surgical case of aortic insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protais, E; Simon, J C; Herreman, F; Fouchard, J

    1986-05-01

    One case of traumatic aortic valve regurgitation operated upon is reported, and published cases of cardiac valve regurgitation caused by non-penetrating traumas are reviewed. This study demonstrates the relatively high frequency of traumatic heart diseases and among these, valve lesions. The dynamic disturbance occurs suddenly in a heart that is usually healthy and therefore without adaptation mechanism. This explains why such lesions are poorly tolerated and accounts for some peculiarities of semiology and haemodynamics. Plastic surgery seems to be successful in mitral valve lesions, whereas lesions of the aortic valve are such that valve replacement is required. The same applies to the tricuspid valve. The medico-legal aspects of the subject are mentioned.

  14. Ortner's Syndrome: Secondary Laryngeal Paralysis Caused by a Great Thoracic Aorta Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangirolami, Ana Claudia Alves; Oliveira, Frederico Vieira de; Tepedino, Miguel Soares

    2015-04-01

    Introduction Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury caused by cardiovascular disease is a rare condition, and often it is the only prominent sign of an imminent break of an aortic artery aneurysm. Objective To report left laryngeal paralysis caused by a great aortic arch aneurysm and to highlight the importance of an otorhinolaryngologic evaluation along with a thoracic radiologic study. Resumed Report A 42-year-old man complained of thickness of his voice and dysphagia for 3 months, but no thoracic pain or other relevant complaints. Video laryngoscopy revealed immobility of his left vocal fold in the paramedian position. Imaging was obtained for investigation, including magnetic resonance imaging of his thorax, which showed a fusiform aneurysm in the aortic arch, leading to recurrent compression of the left laryngeal nerve. The patient was successfully treated with endovascular repair of the aneurysm. At 2-month follow-up, there was still no recovery of the laryngeal mobility. Conclusion An aortic artery aneurysm can suddenly break, requiring emergency heart surgery, and the results can be fatal in many cases. We suggest routine exam of the vocal folds in all patients with a heart condition, and we review the literature and suggest the use of imaging to reduce the number of emergency procedures.

  15. Ortner's Syndrome: Secondary Laryngeal Paralysis Caused by a Great Thoracic Aorta Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zangirolami, Ana Claudia Alves

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury caused by cardiovascular disease is a rare condition, and often it is the only prominent sign of an imminent break of an aortic artery aneurysm. Objective To report left laryngeal paralysis caused by a great aortic arch aneurysm and to highlight the importance of an otorhinolaryngologic evaluation along with a thoracic radiologic study. Resumed Report A 42-year-old man complained of thickness of his voice and dysphagia for 3 months, but no thoracic pain or other relevant complaints. Video laryngoscopy revealed immobility of his left vocal fold in the paramedian position. Imaging was obtained for investigation, including magnetic resonance imaging of his thorax, which showed a fusiform aneurysm in the aortic arch, leading to recurrent compression of the left laryngeal nerve. The patient was successfully treated with endovascular repair of the aneurysm. At 2-month follow-up, there was still no recovery of the laryngeal mobility. Conclusion An aortic artery aneurysm can suddenly break, requiring emergency heart surgery, and the results can be fatal in many cases. We suggest routine exam of the vocal folds in all patients with a heart condition, and we review the literature and suggest the use of imaging to reduce the number of emergency procedures.

  16. Indication for resuscitative thoracotomy in thoracic injuries-Adherence to the ATLS guidelines. A forensic autopsy based evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohrt-Nissen, S; Colville-Ebeling, B; Kandler, K

    2016-01-01

    of deceased patients with potentially reversible thoracic lesions (PRTL). METHODS: The database at the Department of Forensic Medicine at Copenhagen University was queried for autopsy cases with thoracic lesions indicated by the SNOMED autopsy coding system. Patients were included if thoracic lesions were...... caused by a traumatic event with trauma team activation. Patient cases were blinded for any surgical intervention and evaluated independently by two reviewers for indications or contraindications for RT as determined by the ATLS guidelines. Second, autopsy reports were evaluated for the presence of PRTL...... and penetrating trauma, respectively. For patients who did not undergo RT the agreement with guidelines was 100%. In all cases where RT was performed in agreement between guidelines and the clinical decision the autopsy reports showed PRTL in 16 (84%) patients. In cases of non-agreement PRTL were found in 9 (82...

  17. Combination of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and cord blood mononuclear cells in the treatment of chronic thoracic spinal cord injury in 27 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian-zhong WANG

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate and evaluate therapeutic effects of transplantation of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in conjunction with cord blood mononuclear cells for late thoracic spinal cord injury. Methods Data from 27 patients with late thoracic spinal cord injury who received transplantation of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in conjunction with cord blood mononuclear cells in Neurosurgery Department of 463rd Hospital of PLA between July 2006 and July 2008 were collected and analyzed. The full treatment course consisted of 4 consecutive injections at one week apart. Indicators for evaluation followed that of the American Spiral Injury Association (ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS grade, ASIA motor and sensory scores, ASIA visual analog score, and the Ashworth score. The follow-up period was 6 months. Evaluations were made 6 weeks and 6 months after the treatment. Results Improvement from AIS A to AIS B was found in 4 patients. In one patient, improvement from AIS A to AIS C and in one patient from AIS B to AIS C was found 6 weeks after the treatment. The AIS improvement rate was 22.2%. In one patient improvement from AIS A to AIS B was found after 6 months. The overall AIS improvement rate was 25.9%. ASIA baseline motor scores of lower extremties were 0.5±1.5, 1.7±2.9, 3.1±3.6 before the treatment, 6 weeks and 6 months after the treatment, respectively, and showed a statistically significant improvement (P < 0.05. ASIA sensory scores including light touch and pinprick were 66.6±13.7 and 67.0±13.6 respectively before treatment, and they became 68.8±14.4, 68.4±14.7 and 70.5±14.4, 70.2±14.4 six weeks and six months after the treatment. The changes were statistically significant (P < 0.05; Modified Ashworth Scale scores were 1.8±1.5, 1.6±1.2,1.1±0.8 respectively at baseline, 6 weeks and 6months after the treatment, and showed a statistically significant descending trend (P < 0.05. Conclusion Transplantation of

  18. The Effect Of Supraphysiologic Blood Pressure on Traumatic Brain Injury and Proximal Tissue Beds During Resuscitative Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta and Variable Aortic Control in a Porcine Model (Sus scrofa) of Polytrauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-27

    Supraphysiologic Blood Pressure On Traumatic Brain Injury And Proximal Tissue Beds During Resuscitative Balloon Occlusion Of The Aorta And Variable Aortic...combined effects of increased proximal mean arterial pressure (pMAP), carotid blood flow (Qcarotid), and intracranial pressure (ICP) from REBOA would...Mandatory) The Effect of REBOA, Partial Aortic Occlusion and Aggressive Blood Transfusion on Traumatic Brain Injury in a Swine Polytrauma Model

  19. Acute Aortic Arch Perforation During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis and a Gothic Aortic Arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J; Bieliauskas, Gintautas; Chow, Danny H F; De Backer, Ole; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has evolved from a novel technology to an established therapy for high/intermediate-risk patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). Although TAVR is used to treat bicuspid severe AS, the large randomized trials typically excluded bicuspid AS because of its unique anatomic features. This case report describes an acute aortic perforation during delivery of a transcatheter heart valve to treat a severe bicuspid AS with a "gothic aortic arch"; more careful evaluation of the preprocedural multislice computed tomographic scan would have unveiled a sharply angulated aortic arch. This life-threatening complication was successfully treated by thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Endovascular Stent Grafting for Aortic Arch Aneurysm in Aortoiliac Occlusive Disease following Aortic Arch Debranching and Aortobifemoral Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didem Melis Oztas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms constitutes high mortality and morbidity rates despite improvements in surgery, anesthesia, and technology. Endovascular stent grafting may be an alternative therapy with lower risks when compared with conventional techniques. However, sometimes the branches of the aortic arch may require transport to the proximal segments prior to successful thoracic aortic endovascular stent grafting. Atherosclerosis is accounted among the etiology of both aneurysms and occlusive diseases that can coexist in the same patient. In these situations stent grafting may even be more complicated. In this report, we present the treatment of a 92-year-old patient with aortic arch aneurysm and proximal descending aortic aneurysm. For successful thoracic endovascular stent grafting, the patient needed an alternative route other than the native femoral and iliac arteries for the deployment of the stent graft. In addition, debranching of left carotid and subclavian arteries from the aortic arch was also required for successful exclusion of the thoracic aneurysm.

  1. Indication for resuscitative thoracotomy in thoracic injuries-Adherence to the ATLS guidelines. A forensic autopsy based evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrt-Nissen, S; Colville-Ebeling, B; Kandler, K; Hornbech, K; Steinmetz, J; Ravn, J; Lehnert, P

    2016-05-01

    The appropriate indications for Resuscitative Thoracotomy (RT) are still debated in the literature and various guidelines have been proposed. This study aimed to evaluate whether Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) guidelines for RT were applied correctly and to evaluate the proportion of deceased patients with potentially reversible thoracic lesions (PRTL). The database at the Department of Forensic Medicine at Copenhagen University was queried for autopsy cases with thoracic lesions indicated by the SNOMED autopsy coding system. Patients were included if thoracic lesions were caused by a traumatic event with trauma team activation. Patient cases were blinded for any surgical intervention and evaluated independently by two reviewers for indications or contraindications for RT as determined by the ATLS guidelines. Second, autopsy reports were evaluated for the presence of PRTL. Sixty-seven patients met the inclusion criteria. Two were excluded due to insufficient data. The overall agreement with guidelines was 86% and 77% for blunt and penetrating trauma, respectively. For patients submitted to RT the overall agreement with guidelines was 63% being 45% and 74% for blunt and penetrating trauma, respectively. For patients who did not undergo RT the agreement with guidelines was 100%. In all cases where RT was performed in agreement between guidelines and the clinical decision the autopsy reports showed PRTL in 16 (84%) patients. In cases of non-agreement PRTL were found in 9 (82%) patients. Agreement with ATLS guidelines for RT was 63% for intervention and 100% for non-intervention in deceased patients with thoracic trauma. Agreement was higher for penetrating trauma than for blunt trauma. The adherence to guidelines did not improve the ability to predict autopsy findings of PRTL. Although the study has methodical limitations it represents a novel approach to the evaluation of the clinical use of RT guidelines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of Aortic Insufficiency on Ascending Aortic Dilatation and Adverse Aortic Events After Isolated Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With a Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongshi; Wu, Boting; Li, Jun; Dong, Lili; Wang, Chunsheng; Shu, Xianhong

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant flow pattern and congenital fragility bestows bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) with a propensity toward ascending aorta dilatation, aneurysm, and dissection. Whether isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR) can prevent further dilatation in BAV ascending aorta and what indicates concurrent aortic intervention in the case of valve operation remain controversial. From June 2006 to January 2009, patients with a BAV who underwent isolated AVR were consecutively included and categorized into aortic insufficiency (BAV-AI, n = 84) and aortic stenosis (n = 112) groups, and another population of patients with a tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency (n = 149) was also recruited during the same period for comparison of annual aortic dilatation rate and adverse aortic events after isolated AVR. With a median follow-up period of 72 months (interquartile range, 66 to 78 months), ascending aorta dilatation rates were faster in the BAV-AI group than the BAV plus aortic stenosis and tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency groups (both p regression analysis identified aortic insufficiency (hazard ratio, 3.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.2 to 11.1; p = 0.019) as an independent risk factor for adverse aortic events among patients with BAV in general, whereas preoperative ascending aortic diameter larger than 45 mm (hazard ratio, 13.8; 95% confidence interval, 3.0 to 63.3; p = 0.001) served as a prognostic indicator in the BAV-AI group. An aggressive policy of preventive aortic interventions seemed appropriate in patients with BAV-AI during AVR, and BAV phenotype presenting as either insufficiency or stenosis should be taken into consideration when contemplating optimal surgical strategies for BAV aortopathy. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Device-Training for Individuals with Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Cord Injury Using a Powered Exoskeleton for Technically Assisted Mobility: Achievements and User Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Platz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Results of a device-training for nonambulatory individuals with thoracic and lumbar spinal cord injury (SCI using a powered exoskeleton for technically assisted mobility with regard to the achieved level of control of the system after training, user satisfaction, and effects on quality of life (QoL. Methods. Observational single centre study with a 4-week to 5-week intensive inpatient device-training using a powered exoskeleton (ReWalk™. Results. All 7 individuals with SCI who commenced the device-training completed the course of training and achieved basic competences to use the system, that is, the ability to stand up, sit down, keep balance while standing, and walk indoors, at least with a close contact guard. User satisfaction with the system and device-training was documented for several aspects. The quality of life evaluation (SF-12v2™ indicated that the use of the powered exoskeleton can have positive effects on the perception of individuals with SCI regarding what they can achieve physically. Few adverse events were observed: minor skin lesions and irritations were observed; no falls occurred. Conclusions. The device-training for individuals with thoracic and lumbar SCI was effective and safe. All trained individuals achieved technically assisted mobility with the exoskeleton while still needing a close contact guard.

  4. Device-Training for Individuals with Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Cord Injury Using a Powered Exoskeleton for Technically Assisted Mobility: Achievements and User Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platz, Thomas; Gillner, Annett; Borgwaldt, Nicole; Kroll, Sylvia; Roschka, Sybille

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Results of a device-training for nonambulatory individuals with thoracic and lumbar spinal cord injury (SCI) using a powered exoskeleton for technically assisted mobility with regard to the achieved level of control of the system after training, user satisfaction, and effects on quality of life (QoL). Methods. Observational single centre study with a 4-week to 5-week intensive inpatient device-training using a powered exoskeleton (ReWalk™). Results. All 7 individuals with SCI who commenced the device-training completed the course of training and achieved basic competences to use the system, that is, the ability to stand up, sit down, keep balance while standing, and walk indoors, at least with a close contact guard. User satisfaction with the system and device-training was documented for several aspects. The quality of life evaluation (SF-12v2™) indicated that the use of the powered exoskeleton can have positive effects on the perception of individuals with SCI regarding what they can achieve physically. Few adverse events were observed: minor skin lesions and irritations were observed; no falls occurred. Conclusions. The device-training for individuals with thoracic and lumbar SCI was effective and safe. All trained individuals achieved technically assisted mobility with the exoskeleton while still needing a close contact guard.

  5. Differences in aortic arch radius of curvature, neck size, and taper in patients with traumatic and aortic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta, Hillary B; Secor, Jessica L; Smits, Taylor C; Farber, Mark A; Jordan, William D; Matsumura, Jon S

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the differences in aortic morphology that would potentially affect the management of thoracic endovascular aneurysm/aortic repair between trauma and aneurysm patients. This was a prospective analysis of the pretreatment digital imaging of 98 traumatic injury patients and 63 aneurysm patients enrolled in multicenter regulatory studies of the Conformable GORE TAG Thoracic Device (CTAG Device) (manufactured by W.L. Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, AZ). A standardized protocol was used to perform an independent assessment of the images and measurements of the radius of curvature and proximal and distal neck diameters. The radius of curvature was measured using axial images and the proximal and distal intimal neck diameter measurements were completed using the orthogonal "centerline" view. Taper was measured over the entire treated aorta and was calculated by subtracting the distal neck diameter measurement from the proximal neck diameter. The results were analyzed with independent t-tests. The trauma patients had a significantly smaller radius of curvature than aneurysm patients. There was a significant difference in the aortic neck size, with trauma patients having smaller proximal and distal intimal neck diameters. Taper was noted in trauma patients but not in aneurysm patients. The aortic anatomy varies between treated aortic pathologies. Aneurysm patients have a wider arch and larger aortas when compared with trauma patients. Aneurysm patients have less taper than trauma patients. Despite these differences, both of these cohorts of patients are treatable under the broader oversizing ranges of the CTAG Device. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Contemporary Management Strategies for Chronic Type B Aortic Dissections: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamman, Arnoud V.; de Beaufort, Hector W. L.; van Bogerijen, Guido H W; Nauta, FJH; Heijmen, Robin H.; Moll, Frans L.; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Trimarchi, Santi

    2016-01-01

    Background Currently, the optimal management strategy for chronic type B aortic dissections (CBAD) is unknown. Therefore, we systematically reviewed the literature to compare results of open surgical repair (OSR), standard thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) or branched and fenestrated TEVAR

  7. Delayed rupture of thoracic aorta aneurysm following a kick to the abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Antonio; De Giorgio, Fabio; Partemi, Sara; Pascali, Vincenzo L; Carbone, Arnaldo

    2009-03-01

    Several theories have been proposed to explain the Blunt Traumatic Aortic Rupture (BTAR) because different mechanical forces act on the aorta, at anatomically susceptible sites, including shearing, torsion and stretching, but the origin, transduction and relative importance of these forces remain uncertain. We report a case of a 74-year-old man injured by a kick to the abdomen. After 2 days he felt chest pain paroxysm and weakness in his left leg. The patient was admitted to an emergency care department where he experienced sudden and severe hemodynamic deterioration, dying rapidly. The autopsy, performed 3 days later, showed haemorragic infarction of hypogastric subcutaneous tissues and revealed an extended dissecting aneurysm of the thoracic aorta with following haemopericardium. In our case we considered that a low energy compression to the abdomen, in presence of underlying atherosclerosis, caused aortic dissection rather than rupture and then the 48h time span after the traumatic event and the cardiac tamponade was enough to complete the aortic retrograde dissection. We finally emphasise the importance of the careful surveillance of any trauma close to the abdomen in view of initially unpredictable, as well as eventful injuries. The finding of early signs of neointima formation in thoracoabdominal portions of aortic dissection strongly supported our interpretation. The forensic interest of this case is correlated to the voluntary character of the inflicted injury. The culprit was thus charged with manslaughter.

  8. Development of Predictive Models of Injury for the Lower Extremity, Lumbar, and Thoracic Spine after Discharge from Physical Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    prediction models will vary by age and sex . Hypothesis 3: A multi-factorial prediction model that accurately predicts risk of new and recurring injuries...members for injury risk after they have been cleared to return to duty from an injury is of great importance. The purpose of this project is to determine...additional training sessions for the new research staff by the end of the 2016 year. The key investigators of this team presented a 2-hour educational

  9. Differences in the Thoracic Aorta by Region and Sex in a Murine Model of Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Altayó, Francesc; Siegert, Anna-Maria; Bonorino, Fabio; Meirelles, Thayna; Barberà, Laura; Dantas, Ana P; Vila, Elisabet; Egea, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    ascending aortas showed a greater number of elastic fiber breaks than the wild-types, and males exhibited more breaks than females. These results show regional and sex differences in Fbn1 C1039G/+ mice thoracic aorta contractility and aortic media injuries. The presence of more pronounced aortic alterations in male mice provides experimental evidence to support that male MFS patients are at increased risk of suffering aortic complications.

  10. Differences in the Thoracic Aorta by Region and Sex in a Murine Model of Marfan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Jiménez-Altayó

    2017-11-01

    , MFS ascending aortas showed a greater number of elastic fiber breaks than the wild-types, and males exhibited more breaks than females. These results show regional and sex differences in Fbn1C1039G/+ mice thoracic aorta contractility and aortic media injuries. The presence of more pronounced aortic alterations in male mice provides experimental evidence to support that male MFS patients are at increased risk of suffering aortic complications.

  11. Differences in the Thoracic Aorta by Region and Sex in a Murine Model of Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Altayó, Francesc; Siegert, Anna-Maria; Bonorino, Fabio; Meirelles, Thayna; Barberà, Laura; Dantas, Ana P.; Vila, Elisabet; Egea, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    aortas showed a greater number of elastic fiber breaks than the wild-types, and males exhibited more breaks than females. These results show regional and sex differences in Fbn1C1039G/+ mice thoracic aorta contractility and aortic media injuries. The presence of more pronounced aortic alterations in male mice provides experimental evidence to support that male MFS patients are at increased risk of suffering aortic complications. PMID:29187826

  12. Shared genetic risk factors of intracranial, abdominal, and thoracic aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Hof, Femke N G; Ruigrok, Ynte M; Lee, Cue Hyunkyu; Ripke, Stephan; Anderson, Graig; de Andrade, Mariza; Baas, Annette F; Blankensteijn, Jan D; Böttinger, Erwin P; Bown, Matthew J; Broderick, Joseph; Bijlenga, Philippe; Carrell, David S; Crawford, Dana C; Crosslin, David R; Ebeling, Christian; Eriksson, Johan G; Fornage, Myriam; Foroud, Tatiana; von Und Zu Fraunberg, Mikael; Friedrich, Christoph M; Gaál, Emília I; Gottesman, Omri; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Harrison, Seamus C; Hernesniemi, Juha; Hofman, Albert; Inoue, Ituro; Jääskeläinen, Juha E; Jones, Gregory T; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; Kivisaari, Riku; Ko, Nerissa; Koskinen, Seppo; Kubo, Michiaki; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Kurki, Mitja I; Laakso, Aki; Lai, Dongbing; Leal, Suzanne M; Lehto, Hanna; LeMaire, Scott A; Low, Siew-Kee; Malinowski, Jennifer; McCarty, Catherine A; Milewicz, Dianna M; Mosley, Thomas H; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Niemelä, Mika; Pacheco, Jennifer; Peissig, Peggy L; Pera, Joanna; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Rivadeneira, Fernando; van Rij, Andre M; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Saratzis, Athanasios; Slowik, Agnieszka; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tromp, Gerard; Uitterlinden, André G; Verma, Shefali S; Vermeulen, Sita H; Wang, Gao T; Han, Buhm; Rinkel, Gabriël J E; de Bakker, Paul I W

    2016-01-01

    Background--Intracranial aneurysms (IAs), abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), and thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) all have a familial predisposition. Given that aneurysm types are known to co-occur, we hypothesized that there may be shared genetic risk factors for IAs, AAAs, and TAAs. Methods and

  13. Shared Genetic Risk Factors of Intracranial, Abdominal, and Thoracic Aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Hof, Femke N G; Ruigrok, Ynte M; Lee, Cue Hyunkyu; Ripke, Stephan; Anderson, Graig; de Andrade, Mariza; Baas, Annette F; Blankensteijn, Jan D; Böttinger, Erwin P; Bown, Matthew J; Broderick, Joseph; Bijlenga, Philippe; Carrell, David S; Crawford, Dana C; Crosslin, David R; Ebeling, Christian; Eriksson, Johan G; Fornage, Myriam; Foroud, Tatiana; von Und Zu Fraunberg, Mikael; Friedrich, Christoph M; Gaál, Emília I; Gottesman, Omri; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Harrison, Seamus C; Hernesniemi, Juha; Hofman, Albert; Inoue, Ituro; Jääskeläinen, Juha E; Jones, Gregory T; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; Kivisaari, Riku; Ko, Nerissa; Koskinen, Seppo; Kubo, Michiaki; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Kurki, Mitja I; Laakso, Aki; Lai, Dongbing; Leal, Suzanne M; Lehto, Hanna; LeMaire, Scott A; Low, Siew-Kee; Malinowski, Jennifer; McCarty, Catherine A; Milewicz, Dianna M; Mosley, Thomas H; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Niemelä, Mika; Pacheco, Jennifer; Peissig, Peggy L; Pera, Joanna; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Rivadeneira, Fernando; van Rij, Andre M; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Saratzis, Athanasios; Slowik, Agnieszka; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tromp, Gerard; Uitterlinden, André G; Verma, Shefali S; Vermeulen, Sita H; Wang, Gao T; Han, Buhm; Rinkel, Gabriël J E; de Bakker, Paul I W

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intracranial aneurysms (IAs), abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), and thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) all have a familial predisposition. Given that aneurysm types are known to co-occur, we hypothesized that there may be shared genetic risk factors for IAs, AAAs, and TAAs. METHODS AND

  14. Circumferential ascending aortic strain and aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Rogério; Moreira, Nádia; Baptista, Rui; Barbosa, António; Martins, Rui; Castro, Graça; Providência, Luís

    2013-07-01

    Two-dimensional speckle tracking (2D-ST) echocardiography for the measurement of circumferential ascending thoracic aortic strain (CAAS) in the context of aortic stenosis (AS) is not elucidated. Purpose This study assesses the thoracic ascending aortic deformation using 2D-ST echocardiography in AS patients. Population and methods Forty-five consecutive patients with an aortic valvular area (AVA) ≤0.85 cm(2)/m(2) were included. Regarding aortic deformation, the global peak CAAS was the parameter used, and an average of six segments of arterial wall deformation was calculated. The corrected CAAS was calculated as the global CAAS/pulse pressure (PP). Aortic stiffness (β2) index was assessed according to ln(Ps/Pd)/CAAS. The sample was stratified according to the stroke volume index (SVI) as: Group A (low flow, SVI ≤35 mL/m(2); n = 19) and Group B (normal flow, SVI >35 mL/m(2); n = 26). The mean age was 76.8 ± 10.3 years, 53.3% were male, the mean indexed AVA was 0.43 ± 0.15 cm(2)/m(2), and the mean CAAS was 6.3 ± 3.0%. The CAAS was predicted by SVI (β = 0.31, P < 0.01) and by valvulo-arterial impedance (Zva). The corrected CAAS was correlated with the M-mode guided aortic stiffness index (β1) (r = -0.39, P < 0.01), and was predicted by SVI, Zva, and systemic arterial compliance (β = 0.15, P < 0.01). The β2 index was significantly higher for the low-flow patients (16.1 ± 4.8 vs. 9.8 ± 5.3, P < 0.01), and was predicted by SVI (β -0.58, P < 0.01) and PP (β = 0.17, P < 0.01). Global CAAS was more accurate to predict low flow than Zva, systolic function and systemic vascular resistance. In patients with moderate-to-severe aortic stenosis, SVI and LV afterload-related variables were the most important determinants of 2S-ST global CAAS.

  15. Cardiac tamponade associated with delayed ascending aortic perforation after blunt chest trauma: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ryu, Dae Woong; Lee, Mi Kyung

    2017-01-01

    Background Cardiac tamponade due to aortic injury after blunt trauma is a rare and potentially fatal injury. Most aortic injuries caused by blunt trauma present as aortic dissection or rupture of the aortic isthmus. Several cases of delayed aortic injury have been reported. However, all of these injuries were observed in the descending aorta because they had been caused by a posterior rib fracture. Case presentation We report the first case of cardiac tamponade associated with delayed ascendi...

  16. Tratamento endovascular de pseudoaneurisma de aorta torácica com fístula aorto-brônquica em pós-operatório tardio de cirurgia de correção de coarctação de aorta Endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm with aortobronchial fistula in the late postoperative period of surgical correction of the aortic coarctation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Augusta Gayoso Neves

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fístula aorto-brônquica é uma conexão entre a aorta e o brônquio, e mesmo quando imediatamente reconhecida e tratada possui alto risco de letalidade. Pode se desenvolver após cirurgias de aorta, e é geralmente uma consequência de pseudoaneurisma. A hemoptise, massiva ou intermitente, é o principal sintoma apresentado. O tratamento convencional da fístula aorto-brônquica é a cirurgia aberta de aorta torácica, com reconstrução traqueobrônquica. Recentemente, o reparo endovascular tem sido proposto como uma alternativa. Os autores apresentam um relato de tratamento endovascular, realizado com êxito, de pseudoaneurisma de aorta torácica com fístula aorto-brônquica 22 anos após cirurgia para correção de coarctação aórtica.Aortobronchial fistula is an abnormal passage between the aorta and the bronchus, and even when recognized and treated promptly, it carries a high risk of fatality. It can develop after aortic operations, and it is usually the result of a pseudoaneurysm. Massive or intermittent hemoptysis is the main symptom. Conventional treatment of aortobronchial fistula is open surgery of the thoracic aorta with tracheobronchial reconstruction. Recently, endovascular repair has been proposed as an alternative. The authors report a case of successful endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm with aortobronchial fistula, 22 years after surgical correction of the aortic coarctation.

  17. Construction and evaluation of thoracic injury risk curves for a finite element human body model in frontal car crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Vazquez, Manuel; Davidsson, Johan; Brolin, Karin

    2015-12-01

    There is a need to improve the protection to the thorax of occupants in frontal car crashes. Finite element human body models are a more detailed representation of humans than anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs). On the other hand, there is no clear consensus on the injury criteria and the thresholds to use with finite element human body models to predict rib fractures. The objective of this study was to establish a set of injury risk curves to predict rib fractures using a modified Total HUman Model for Safety (THUMS). Injury criteria at the global, structural and material levels were computed with a modified THUMS in matched Post Mortem Human Subjects (PMHSs) tests. Finally, the quality of each injury risk curve was determined. For the included PMHS tests and the modified THUMS, DcTHOR and shear stress were the criteria at the global and material levels that reached an acceptable quality. The injury risk curves at the structural level did not reach an acceptable quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/EACTS/HVS/SCA/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for the Treatment of Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis: A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, Heart Valve Society, Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonow, Robert O; Brown, Alan S; Gillam, Linda D; Kapadia, Samir R; Kavinsky, Clifford J; Lindman, Brian R; Mack, Michael J; Thourani, Vinod H; Dehmer, Gregory J; Bonow, Robert O; Lindman, Brian R; Beaver, Thomas M; Bradley, Steven M; Carabello, Blase A; Desai, Milind Y; George, Isaac; Green, Philip; Holmes, David R; Johnston, Douglas; Leipsic, Jonathon; Mick, Stephanie L; Passeri, Jonathan J; Piana, Robert N; Reichek, Nathaniel; Ruiz, Carlos E; Taub, Cynthia C; Thomas, James D; Turi, Zoltan G; Doherty, John U; Dehmer, Gregory J; Bailey, Steven R; Bhave, Nicole M; Brown, Alan S; Daugherty, Stacie L; Dean, Larry S; Desai, Milind Y; Duvernoy, Claire S; Gillam, Linda D; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Lindsay, Bruce D; Manning, Warren J; Mehrotra, Praveen; Patel, Manesh R; Sachdeva, Ritu; Wann, L Samuel; Winchester, David E; Allen, Joseph M

    2018-02-01

    The American College of Cardiology collaborated with the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, Heart Valve Society, Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons to develop and evaluate Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for the treatment of patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). This is the first AUC to address the topic of AS and its treatment options, including surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). A number of common patient scenarios experienced in daily practice were developed along with assumptions and definitions for those scenarios, which were all created using guidelines, clinical trial data, and expert opinion in the field of AS. The 2014 AHA/ACC guideline for the management of patients with valvular heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines(1) and its 2017 focused update paper (2) were used as the primary guiding references in developing these indications. The writing group identified 95 clinical scenarios based on patient symptoms and clinical presentation, and up to 6 potential treatment options for those patients. A separate, independent rating panel was asked to score each indication from 1 to 9, with 1-3 categorized as "Rarely Appropriate," 4-6 as "May Be Appropriate," and 7-9 as "Appropriate." After considering factors such as symptom status, left ventricular (LV) function, surgical risk, and the presence of concomitant coronary or other valve disease, the rating panel determined that either SAVR or TAVR is Appropriate in most patients with symptomatic AS at intermediate or high surgical risk; however, situations

  19. The influence of aortic valve calcification on the risk of periprocedural myocardial injury after elective coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhang-Wei; Yang, Hong-Bo; Chen, Ying-Hua; Qian, Ju-Ying; Shu, Xian-Hong; Ge, Jun-Bo

    2015-10-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is a common progressive condition that involves several inflammatory and atherosclerotic mediators. However, it is unclear whether the occurrence of periprocedural myocardial injury (PMI) after elective coronary intervention is associated with AVC in stable coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. A total of 530 stable CAD patients who underwent elective coronary intervention were enrolled in this clinical study. High sensitive cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) was detected before and after the procedure. PMI was defined as hs-cTnT after coronary intervention higher than 99th percentile upper reference limit (URL). All patients underwent echocardiography to detect the occurrence of AVC. Univariate and multivariate analyses were applied to analyze risk factors of PMI. A total of 210 patients (39.6 %) were diagnosed with PMI after elective coronary intervention. Compared with non-AVC patients (n = 386), AVC patients (n = 144) had higher rate of PMI (64.6 vs. 30.3 %, P AVC had higher Gensini score (39.9 ± 26.6 vs. 34.2 ± 22.1, P AVC patients had increased risk of PMI compared with non-AVC patients. Importantly, even after being adjusted by multivariate analysis, AVC still independently increased the risk of PMI (OR = 3.329, 95 % CI = 2.087-5.308, P AVC significantly increased the risk of PMI after elective coronary intervention. It could be one of the independent predictors for PMI in stable CAD patients.

  20. [Results of operations for ascending aortic aneurysm in Iceland 2000-2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brynjarsdottir, Helga Bjork; Melvinsdottir, Inga Hlif; Gudbjartsson, Tomas; Geirsson, Arnar

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is an uncommon disease where treatment is complex and associated with significant comorbidity. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of operations for TAA in Iceland with emphasis on postoperative complications, 30 day mortality and survival. A retrospective study on 105 patients (mean age 60.7 yrs., 69.5% males) that underwent operations for TAA between 2000 and 2014 in Iceland. Patients with aortic injury or acute aortic dissection were excluded. Clinical information was collected from hospital charts and long-term survival estimated by Kaplan-Meier method. Mean follow-up was 5.7 yrs. Bicuspid aortic valve was present in 52 patients (51.0%) and family history was positive in 10 of the cases (9.5%). Every other patient (50.5%) was asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally. The most common procedure was aortic root replacement using biological prosthesis. Two out of three patients had complications, that were regarded as major in 31.4% of cases, however, stroke was only detected in 2 (1.9%) patients. Two patients died within 30 days postoperatively (1.9%). The overall survival at one year was 95.1%; more favorable for males compared to females (97.2 vs. 90.4%, p=0.0012, log rank test) and at 5 years 90.3%. Outcome following surgery for TAA in Iceland is comparable to studies in neighbouring countries. The complications rate is high, however, the stroke rate was low, as was 30 day mortality. Longterm survival is favorable, and is more favorable for males than females. Key words: Thoracic aortic aneurysm, ascending aorta, open heart surgery, complications, operative mortality, survival. Correspondance: Arnar Geirsson, arnarge@landspitali.is.

  1. Surgery for acute Type I aortic dissection without resection of supra-aortic entry sites leads to unfavourable aortic remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Woon; Song, Suk-Won; Lee, Kwang-Hun; Lee, Shin-Young; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Baek, Min-Young; Yoo, Kyung-Jong

    2018-01-29

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of remnant re-entries in arch branches on postoperative change in the aortic arch and descending aortic diameters and the rate of major adverse aortic events. Between January 2010 and December 2016, 249 patients underwent surgery for acute Type I aortic dissection. Patients who underwent total arch replacement, had Marfan syndrome or had intramural haematoma were excluded. Seventy-two patients with predischarge and follow-up computed tomography scans were enrolled. Patients with and without re-entries in the arch branches after surgery were assigned to the supra-aortic entry (SAE, n = 21) and no supra-aortic entry (n = 51) groups, respectively. Diameters were measured at 7 levels: the innominate artery, left common carotid artery, left subclavian artery, 20 mm distal to the left subclavian artery, pulmonary artery bifurcation, coeliac axis and maximal diameter of the descending thoracic aorta. Growth rates at the levels of the pulmonary artery bifurcation and 20 mm distal to the left subclavian artery were significantly higher in the SAE group than in the no supra-aortic entry group. The rate of freedom from major adverse aortic events (annual growth >5 mm or maximal diameter of the descending thoracic aorta >50 mm) at 5 years was significantly higher in the no supra-aortic entry group than in the SAE group. Remnant SAE leads to unfavourable aortic remodelling after acute Type I aortic dissection repair. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  2. Thoracic trauma: analysis of 100 consecutive cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Benito Scapolan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze thoracic trauma assisted by the EmergencyService of Hospital da Irmandade da Santa Casa de Misericórdia deSão Paulo. Methods: One hundred patients with thoracic trauma wereassisted throughout six months in 2006. Data from their records werecollected and a protocol of thoracic trauma was fulfilled. The RevisedTrauma Score was used to evaluate gravity of injury and to calculatethe survival index. Results: Prevalence of trauma injury in male from20 to 29 years old was observed. Out of all patients, 44 had blunttrauma and 56 penetrating trauma (78.6% presented stab woundsand 21.4% gun shots. Up to the settings of injuries, 23% were in thethoracoabdominal transition, 7% in the precordium and 70% in theremainder thoracic area. In those with the thoracoabdominal transitioninjury, 22.7% were hemodynamically unstable and 77.3% stable.Thoracoabdominal injury patients presented 40.9% of diaphragmwound and all were stable. Of those with precordium wound, 37.5%presented cardiac injury. In cardiac onset, 66.7% presented stableand 33.3% unstable. Thoracic drainage was the most accomplishedsurgical procedure (71%. Conclusions: The thoracic trauma patientis most prevalently young male with stab wound penetrating injury,without associated injuries, hemodynamically stable, presentinghemothorax, with high probability of survival.

  3. RELEVANCIA DEL DIAGNÓSTICO DIFERENCIAL ENTRE EL SÍNDROME AÓRTICO AGUDO Y EL SÍNDROME CORONARIO AGUDO EN PACIENTES CON DOLOR TORÁCICO Y CRISIS HIPERTENSIVA: REVISIÓN A PROPÓSITO DE 2 CASOS / Relevance of the differential diagnosis between acute aortic syndrome and acute coronary syndrome in patients with thoracic pain and hypertensive crisis: review on 2 case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borja Simó Sánchez

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute aortic syndrome is a pathological process with low incidence compared with acute coronary syndrome, although with a worse prognosis in the short term, which is why its early diagnosis and urgent treatment are essential to the favorable evolution of thepatient. Electrocardiographic changes suggestive of myocardial ischemia, with acute evolution, are rare in acute aortic syndrome. Even in the presence of a suggestive thoracic pain and high levels of blood pressure, an adequate differential diagnosis is of utmost importance, since the administration of anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy in high doses can have a dramatic impact on patient outcome. Two cases are presented in which electrocardiographic changes determined the action to take in patients with acute aortic syndrome.

  4. Aortic dissection. Basic aspects and endovascular management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaramillo, Nicolas I; Alviar, Carlos I

    2005-01-01

    Treatment of thoracic aortic pathology is complicated by the morbidity associated to the surgical procedure and to the frailty of an elderly and difficult population. Surgical operation in this kind of population frequently bears a significant incidence of death and long-term disability. In an effort to reduce the incidence of negative outcomes, minimally invasive techniques in the form of endovascular stenting have been introduced during the past decade. The technology, originally described by Parodi, and initially designed for its use in abdominal aortic aneurysms, has been adapted for the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Furthermore, an improved understanding of the pathophysiology and the natural history of thoracic aortic disease as well as the analysis of the outcomes have facilitated our treatment decisions in terms of the timing for an appropriate intervention. Treatment of thoracic aortic dissection using endovascular Stent is one of the more recent advances in this condition and is receiving increasing attention, as it is a less invasive alternative to an open surgical repair. Although this technology is still innovative, significant improvements have been made lately in the design and deployment of the endovascular Stent-grafts. These prostheses have been increasingly used to treat aneurysms, dissections and traumatic ruptures, as well as giant penetrating ulcers and intramural hematomas of the descending thoracic aorta with good early and mid-term outcomes. The rareness, complexity and severity of the pathology and the theoretically high risk of complications should render the surgeon extremely cautious especially with young patients. Conceptually, the endo luminal treatment in the acute phase seems to be the solution and will probably become a preferred therapy while technical refinement is under way. Worldwide experience is growing and with this a better understanding of the indications and limitations of this innovative therapy will be

  5. Endoluminal treatment of thoracic aortic lesions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    known as the cranial neck; (iv) the length of the aorta from below the aneurysm down to the origin of the celiac trunk, known as the distal land- ing zone; (v) the total length of the aneurysm, or pseudo-aneurysm in the case of rupture; (vi) involvement of mesenteric branches and their ori- gin from either the false or true lumen.

  6. Surgical outcome of traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatou, E; Steinmetz, E; Jazayeri, S; Benhamiche, B; Brenot, R; David, M

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to point out the results of different techniques of spinal cord protection in surgically-treated patients with traumatic thoracic aorta (TTA). A multicentric study was carried out involving 182 patients with TTA. Four patients died before surgery. Two patients were operated on without any investigation and 2 had no aortic tear at thoracotomy. The remaining 174 patients had aortic isthmus disruption and were included in the study. The mean age was 32.3+/-14.29 years with 126 men (72.4%) and 48 women (27.6%). Road accidents were causal in 163 patients (93.66%); polytraumatism was frequent. A standard chest roentgenogram led to a diagnosis which was confirmed with aortography in 94.8% of cases. Surgical repair of visceral lesions was performed in 52 patients (29.9%) for traumatic spleen, liver, diaphragm, mesentery, and gut. These operations were done before or after aortic operation in 21.3% and 8.6% of cases, respectively. Thirty-three patients (19%) died and 9 (5.2%) had paraplegia. Sixty-nine patients had clamp and sew technique (group 1). Ninety-three patients had different types of extracorporeal circulation (group 2), and 12 patients had Gott shunt (group 3). No difference appeared between the 3 groups according to mortality and paraplegia. But the sex ratio, age, visceral lesions, craniocerebral lesions, the type of aortic repair, and cross-clamp time were discriminative. The univariate analysis point out age, cross-clamp time, hemothorax, and anatomical type of aortic injury as the risk factors of death. This was confirmed by a multivariable test which retained age, cross-clamp time, and hemothorax as risk factors. When not diagnosed in time, TTA is serious and has a bad prognosis. In spite of a high mortality and morbidity, the surgical management has improved. Immediate operation and medullar protection are the stumbling block in this operation. Operation can be delayed in some cases, but one must take care of hemodynamic

  7. Tailored endovascular repair of traumatic aortic disruptions with "stacked" abdominal aortic extension cuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Keith B; Borkon, A Michael; Laster, Steven B; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Davis, John R; Pak, Alexander F; Stewart, James R; Stuart, R Scott

    2012-01-01

    The management paradigm for traumatic aortic disruptions has evolved from open to endovascular repair. Thoracic stent grafts designed to treat aneurysmal disease, however, have disadvantages, including size mismatch in younger trauma patients and current standard lengths, which may needlessly necessitate coverage of at least 10 cm of thoracic aorta, increasing the risk of spinal cord ischemia. The "off-label" use of abdominal aortic extension cuffs to treat traumatic aortic disruptions may provide an advantage in this regard by better size matching for the younger trauma patient, reduced thoracic aortic coverage, and less cost to the institution. From 2008 to 2011, a total of 16 traumatic aortic disruptions were evaluated and managed with endovascular techniques. The last six were treated with abdominal aortic extensions cuffs (Excluder Extension Cuffs; W.L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ) rather than traditional thoracic stent grafts. In addition to demographics and trauma-related data, additional endpoints evaluated in this retrospective review included operative time, number of cuffs used, stent cost data, procedural complications, and follow-up. All six patients (five men/one woman) with traumatic aortic disruption were successfully treated with complete exclusion of the disruption using abdominal aortic cuffs. There were no complications including death or spinal cord ischemia. The average age was 27 years (range, 18-44 years). The average number of cuffs used to cover the traumatic tear was 2.6 per patient (range, 2-3 cuffs per patient), covering an average of 5.3 cm of thoracic aorta (range, 4-6 cm). Mean procedure time was 70 minutes. Hospital cost for each cuff was $2200 (average total stent cost per patient, $5720). For comparison, a single 10-cm conformable thoracic aortic graft (CTAG) (Gore) costs $14,500. Average follow-up of all six patients for up to 3 years demonstrates no complications or migration of the stent grafts. Traumatic aortic

  8. Immediate Outcomes of Covered Stent Placement for Treatment or Prevention of Aortic Wall Injury Associated With Coarctation of the Aorta (COAST II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, Nathaniel W; Minahan, Matthew; Cabalka, Allison K; Cetta, Frank; Usmani, Kudret; Ringel, Richard E

    2016-03-14

    This study aimed to describe the safety and short-term efficacy of the Covered Cheatham-Platinum stent (CCPS) in treating or preventing aortic wall injury (AWI) in patients with coarctation of the aorta (CoA). The COAST II trial (Covered Cheatham-Platinum Stents for Prevention or Treatment of Aortic Wall Injury Associated with Coarctation of the Aorta Trial) is a multicenter, single-arm trial using the CCPS for the treatment and/or prevention of AWI in patients with CoA and pre-existing AWI or increased risk of AWI. Patients were enrolled if they had a history of CoA with pre-existing AWI (Treatment group) or with increased risk of AWI (Prevention group). Pre/post-implant hemodynamics and angiography were reported. A core laboratory performed standardized review of all angiograms. One-month follow-up was reported. A total of 158 patients (male = 65%; median age 19 years) underwent placement of CCPS. Eighty-three patients had pre-existing AWI. The average ascending-to-descending aorta systolic gradient improved from 27 ± 20 mm Hg to 4 ± 6 mm Hg. Complete coverage of pre-existing AWI was achieved in 66 of 71 patients (93%) with AWI who received a single CCPS. Ultimately, complete coverage of AWI was achieved in 76 of 83 patients (92%); 7 patients had minor endoleaks that did not require repeat intervention. Four patients experienced important access site vascular injury. There were no acute AWI, repeat interventions, or deaths. The CCPS can effectively treat and potentially prevent AWI associated with CoA. Access site arterial injury is the most common important complication. Longer-term follow-up is necessary to define mid- and late-term outcomes. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Thoracic fractures and dislocations in motorcyclists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daffner, R.H.; Deeb, Z.L.; Rothfus, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    Motorcyclists who are involved in accidents generally suffer severe multiple injuries, some of which are not readily apparent on initial examination. One such subtle injury is fracture, with or without dislocation, in the upper thoracic spine. The severe spinal cord damage produced by the injury is often overshadowed by cerebral or cervical injury. Proper diagnosis is further hampered by the fact that the upper thoracic region is difficult to examine radiographically on plain films, particularly when using portable equipment. Of a group of 14 motorcyclists having 26 fractures and/or dislocations in the thoracic region, 12 had 24 injuries between T3 and T8. These 24 injuries represented 56% of the fractures and/or dislocations encountered in a larger study of trauma to the thoracic vertebral column. All of these were flexion injuries, suffered when the individual was thrown from the motorcycle and struck a large, solid object. In three cases, the diagnosis was delayed as much as 48 h because proper films were not obtained initially. Because of the serious consequences of delayed treatment, we recommended that all motorcyclists who have sustained severe trauma be examined by overpenetrated film of the upper thoracic region. (orig.)

  10. The vulnerable, rapidly growing thoracic spine of the adolescent

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    .2. Not unnaturally, the drama attached to injuries of such severity overshadows, almost to exclusion, the relatively minor and oft-repeated injuries involving the lower thoracic and upper lumbar venebrae, both at spon and at play (especially.

  11. Aortic Disease in the Young: Genetic Aneurysm Syndromes, Connective Tissue Disorders, and Familial Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many genetic syndromes associated with the aortic aneurysmal disease which include Marfan syndrome (MFS, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS, Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS, familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD, bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV, and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. In the absence of familial history and other clinical findings, the proportion of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and dissections resulting from a genetic predisposition is still unknown. In this study, we propose the review of the current genetic knowledge in the aortic disease, observing, in the results that the causative genes and molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm disease remain undiscovered and continue to be an area of intensive research.

  12. Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased acute kidney injury and 1-year mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, George S; Gill, Priyanka; Soliman, Demiana; Reddy, Pratap; Dominic, Paari

    2017-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with adverse outcomes after surgical aortic valve replacement. However, there are conflicting data on the impact of DM on outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). DM is associated with poor outcomes after different cardiac procedures. Therefore, DM can also be associated with poor outcomes after TAVR. We searched PubMed and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for studies that evaluated outcomes after TAVR and stratified at least 1 of the studied endpoints by DM status. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality at 1 year. Secondary endpoints were early (up to 30 days) mortality, acute kidney injury (AKI), cerebrovascular accident (CVA), major bleeding, and major vascular complications. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using random effects models. We included 64 studies with a total of 38 686 patients. DM was associated with significantly higher 1-year mortality (OR: 1.14, 95% CI: 1.04-1.26, P = 0.008) and periprocedural AKI (OR: 1.28, 95% CI: 1.08-1.52, P = 0.004). On the other hand, there were no significant differences between diabetics and nondiabetics in early mortality, CVAs, major bleeding, or major vascular complications. DM is associated with increased 1-year mortality and periprocedural AKI in patients undergoing TAVR. The results of this study suggest that DM is a predictor of adverse outcomes in patients undergoing TAVR. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Cardiac tamponade associated with delayed ascending aortic perforation after blunt chest trauma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Dae Woong; Lee, Mi Kyung

    2017-06-17

    Cardiac tamponade due to aortic injury after blunt trauma is a rare and potentially fatal injury. Most aortic injuries caused by blunt trauma present as aortic dissection or rupture of the aortic isthmus. Several cases of delayed aortic injury have been reported. However, all of these injuries were observed in the descending aorta because they had been caused by a posterior rib fracture. We report the first case of cardiac tamponade associated with delayed ascending aortic perforation 2 weeks after blunt trauma. The patient was an 81-year-old man. In cases of blunt chest trauma, delayed ascending aortic injury causing cardiac tamponade is possible associated with various causes such as direct injury by fractured rib or delayed aortic perforation of initial blunt injury.

  14. Unusual rapid evolution of type B aortic dissection in a marfan patient following heart transplantation: successful endovascular treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, L; Russo, V; Grigioni, F; Arpesella, G; Rocchi, G; Di Bartolomeo, R; Fattori, R

    2006-10-01

    A patient with Marfan syndrome with previous Bentall operation for mitral and tricuspid valve repair, required orthotopic cardiac transplantation for end stage cardiomyopathy. Postoperatively he suffered type-B aortic dissection, despite normal aortic diameters. Following sudden increase of aortic diameters, two years later, he underwent successful stent graft implantation. In patients with Marfan syndrome, post transplantation morbidity is high, with a 40% incidence of thoracic aortic dissection. This case highlights the potential of endovascular approach for treating post-transplantation aortic dissection.

  15. Specific elements of thoracic wound management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avaro, J-P; De Lesquen, H; Beranger, F; Cotte, J; Natale, C

    2017-12-01

    Damage control for thoracic trauma combines definitive and temporary surgical gestures specifically adapted to the lesions present. A systematic assessment of all injuries to prioritize the specific lesions and their treatments constitutes the first operative stage. Packing and temporary closure have a place in the care of chest injuries. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Mycotic Aneurysm of the Aortic Arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hye Seo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A mycotic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta is rare. We report a case of mycotic aneurysm that developed in the aortic arch. An 86-year-old man was admitted with fever and general weakness. Blood culture yielded methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Chest X-ray showed an enlarged aortic arch, and computed tomography scan revealed an aneurysm in the aortic arch. The patient was treated only with antibiotics and not surgically. The size of the aneurysm increased rapidly, resulting in bronchial obstruction and superimposed pneumonia. The patient died of respiratory failure.

  17. Development of a computer model to predict aortic rupture due to impact loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, C S; Yang, K H; Hardy, W; Wang, H K; King, A I

    2001-11-01

    Aortic injuries during blunt thoracic impacts can lead to life threatening hemorrhagic shock and potential exsanguination. Experimental approaches designed to study the mechanism of aortic rupture such as the testing of cadavers is not only expensive and time consuming, but has also been relatively unsuccessful. The objective of this study was to develop a computer model and to use it to predict modes of loading that are most likely to produce aortic ruptures. Previously, a 3D finite element model of the human thorax was developed and validated against data obtained from lateral pendulum tests. The model included a detailed description of the heart, lungs, rib cage, sternum, spine, diaphragm, major blood vessels and intercostal muscles. However, the aorta was modeled as a hollow tube using shell elements with no fluid within, and its material properties were assumed to be linear and isotropic. In this study fluid elements representing blood have been incorporated into the model in order to simulate pressure changes inside the aorta due to impact. The current model was globally validated against experimental data published in the literature for both frontal and lateral pendulum impact tests. Simulations of the validated model for thoracic impacts from a number of directions indicate that the ligamentum arteriosum, subclavian artery, parietal pleura and pressure changes within the aorta are factors that could influence aortic rupture. The model suggests that a right-sided impact to the chest is potentially more hazardous with respect to aortic rupture than any other impact direction simulated in this study. The aortic isthmus was the most likely site of aortic rupture regardless of impact direction. The reader is cautioned that this model could only be validated on a global scale. Validation of the kinematics and dynamics of the aorta at the local level could not be done due to a lack of experimental data. It is hoped that this model will be used to design

  18. Thoracic damage control surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Roberto; Saad, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The damage control surgery came up with the philosophy of applying essential maneuvers to control bleeding and abdominal contamination in trauma patients who are within the limits of their physiological reserves. This concept was extended to thoracic injuries, where relatively simple maneuvers can shorten operative time of in extremis patients. This article aims to revise the various damage control techniques in thoracic organs that must be known to the surgeon engaged in emergency care. RESUMO A cirurgia de controle de danos surgiu com a filosofia de se aplicar manobras essenciais para controle de sangramento e contaminação abdominal, em doentes traumatizados, nos limites de suas reservas fisiológicas. Este conceito se estendeu para as lesões torácicas, onde manobras relativamente simples, podem abreviar o tempo operatório de doentes in extremis. Este artigo tem como objetivo, revisar as diversas técnicas de controle de dano em órgãos torácicos, que devem ser de conhecimento do cirurgião que atua na emergência.

  19. Primary Intimal Sarcoma of Thoracic Aorta Presenting as Hypertensive Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-I; Su, Min-I; Tsai, Cheng-Ting

    2015-11-01

    We report a 45-year-old woman who presented to our facility in a hypertensive crisis. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a thoracic aortic tumor, and tissues obtained via endovascular biopsy revealed undifferentiated sarcoma. A final diagnosis of intimal sarcoma was made by intra-operative pathological examination. Despite undergoing surgical resection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, the patient died from progressive multiple metastasis and severe sepsis. Although aortic sarcoma is rarely diagnosed, it should be considered a possible etiology of hypertensive crisis. Aortic tumor; Endovascular biopsy; Hypertension crisis; Intimal sarcoma.

  20. MDCT angiography of thoracic aorta endovascular stent-grafts: pearls and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Jenny K; Martinez, Santiago; Hurwitz, Lynne M

    2009-02-01

    The objective of our study was to review expected findings and complications after thoracic endovascular aortic repair on CT angiography (CTA). Luminal and extraluminal changes to the thoracic aorta occur after endovascular stent-grafting. The radiologist can facilitate appropriate management by detecting and differentiating expected CTA findings from complications.

  1. Thoracic stent grafts with a distal fenestration for the celiac axis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielliu, IFJ; Verhoeven, ELG; Zeebregts, CJ; Prins, TR; van den Dungen, JJAM

    2005-01-01

    Descending thoracic aneurysms can be treated with a stent graft provided that there is sufficient proximal and distal aortic neck length above the celiac axis. One of the options for the treatment of thoracic aneurysms with a too short distal neck is described in this report. For this purpose, a

  2. Comminuted fracture of the thoracic spine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cashman, J P

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Road deaths fell initially after the introduction of the penalty points but despite this, the rate of spinal injuries remained unchanged. AIMS: We report a patient with a dramatic spinal injury, though without neurological deficit. We discuss the classification, management and economic impact of these injuries. METHODS: We describe the management of a patient with a comminuted thoracic spinal fracture without neurological injury. We conducted a literature review with regard to the availability of literature of the management of these injuries. RESULTS: This 17-year-old female was managed surgically and had a good functional outcome. There is no clear consensus in the published literature on the management of these injuries. CONCLUSIONS: Comminuted thoracic spinal factures are potentially devastating. Such a patient presents challenges in determining the appropriate treatment.

  3. Association Between Thoracic Aorta Calcium and Thoracic Aorta Geometry in a Cohort of Asymptomatic Participants at Increased Cardiovascular Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craiem, Damian; Alsac, Jean-Marc; Casciaro, Mariano E; El Batti, Salma; Mousseaux, Elie; Sirieix, Marie-Emmanuelle; Simon, Alain

    2016-09-01

    Thoracic aorta calcium detection is known to improve cardiovascular risk prediction for cardiac and noncardiac events beyond traditional risk factors. We investigated the influence of thoracic aorta morphometry on the presence and extent of aortic calcifications. Nonenhanced computed tomography heart scans were performed in 970 asymptomatic participants at increased cardiovascular risk. An automated algorithm estimated the geometry of the entire thoracic aorta and quantified the aortic calcium Agatston score. A nonparametric model was used to analyze the percentiles of calcium score by age. Logistic regression models were calculated to identify anatomical associations with calcium levels. Calcifications were concentrated in the aortic arch and descending portions. Higher amounts of calcium were associated with an enlarged, unfolded, less tapered and more tortuous aorta. The size of the ascending aorta was not correlated with aortic calcium score, whereas enlargement of the descending aorta had the strongest association: the risk of having a global calcium score > 90th percentile was 3.62 times higher (confidence interval, 2.30-5.91; P < .001) for each 2.5-mm increase in descending aorta diameter. Vessel taper, tortuosity, unfolding and aortic arch and descending volumes were also correlated with higher amounts of calcium. Thoracic aorta calcium was predominantly found at the arch and descending aorta and was positively associated with the size of the descending aorta and the aortic arch, but not with the size of the ascending aorta. These findings suggest that aortic dilatation may have different mechanisms and may consequently require different preventive strategies according to the considered segments. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of Thoracic Injury Risk in Frontal Car Crashes for Occupant Restrained without Belt Load Limiters and Those Restrained with 6 kN and 4 kN Belt Load Limiters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foret-Bruno, J Y; Trosseille, X; Page, Y; Huère, J F; Le Coz, J Y; Bendjellal, F; Diboine, A; Phalempin, T; Villeforceix, D; Baudrit, P; Guillemot, H; Coltat, J C

    2001-11-01

    In France, as in other countries, accident research studies show that a large proportion of restrained occupants who sustain severe or fatal injuries are involved in frontal impacts (65% and 50%, respectively). In severe frontal impacts with restrained occupants and where intrusion is not preponderant, the oldest occupants very often sustain severe thoracic injuries due to the conventional seat belt. As we have been observing over the last years, we will expect in the coming years developments which include more solidly-built cars, as offset crash test procedures are widely used to evaluate the passive safety of production vehicles. The reduction of intrusion for the most severe frontal impacts, through optimization of car deformation, usually translates into an increase in restraint forces and hence thoracic injury risk with a conventional retractor seat belt for a given impact severity. It is, therefore essential to limit the restraint forces exerted by the seat belt on the thorax in order to reduce the number of road casualties. In order to address thoracic injury risk in frontal impact, Renault cars have been equipped with the Programmed Restraint System (PRS) since 1995. The PRS is a restraint system that combines belt load limitation and pyrotechnic belt pretension. In an initial design of the Programmed Restraint System (PRS1), the belt load limiter was a steel component designed to shear at a given shoulder force, namely 6 kN. It was mounted between the retractor and the lower anchorage point of the belt. The design of the PRS was modified in 1998 (PRS2), but the principle of load limitation was maintained. The threshold was decreased to 4 kN and this lower belt belt-force limiter has been combined with a specially designed airbag. This paper reports on 347 real-world frontal accidents where the EES (Equivalent Energy Speed) ranged from 35 to 75 km/h. One hundred and ninety-eight (198) of these accidents involved cars equipped with the 6 kN load limiter

  5. Axillofemoral Bypass Markedly Improved Acute Decompensated Heart Failure and Kidney Injury in a Patient with Severely Calcified Stenosis of Thoracoabdominal Aorta (Atypical Aortic Coarctation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Masato; Yamada, Shintaro; Maemura, Sonoko; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Takizawa, Masataka; Uozumi, Hiroki; Minegishi, Sachito; Kobayashi, Jotaro; Ikenouchi, Hiroshi

    2017-10-21

    Atypical aortic coarctation (AAC) has been reported to occur anywhere along the aorta, except for the ascending aorta. The associated symptoms include hypotension in the lower half of the body, secondary hypertension in the upper half of the body, and heart failure. Here we present an 80-year-old Asian woman complaining of progressive exertional dyspnea. She was diagnosed with acute decompensated heart failure and kidney injury due to severely calcified stenosis of the thoracoabdominal aorta, the so called AAC. She received hemodiafiltration, and pulmonary congestion improved in part. Generally, surgical treatments are quite invasive in elderly patients. Endovascular stent graft placement is less invasive, however, fracture and rupture should be considered at severely calcified lesions like this case. Therefore, we selected extra-anatomical axillofemoral bypass. Her recovery after the surgery was remarkable. In a few days, she became free from hemodiafiltration, intravenous diuretics, and oxygen administration. We thought the contributive factors are the increase in kidney blood flow and the correction of afterload mismatch. The decrease in pulse pressure may reflect the reduction in systemic arterial compliance by axillofemoral bypass. The operative mortality of axillofemoral bypass was reported to be acceptable, although the patency of the axillofemoral bypass graft was not high enough. In conclusion, axillofemoral bypass is effective and feasible for elderly patients with acute decompensated heart failure and kidney injury due to AAC.

  6. A Mouse Model of Ischemic Spinal Cord Injury with Delayed Paralysis Caused by Aortic Cross-clamping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Hamdy; Ankeny, Daniel P.; Guan, Zhen; Wei, Ping; McTigue, Dana M.; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Spinal cord ischemia and paralysis are devastating perioperative complications that can accompany open or endovascular repair surgery for aortic aneurysms. Here, we report on the development of a new mouse model of spinal cord ischemia with delayed paralysis induced by cross-clamping the descending aorta. Methods Transient aortic occlusion was produced in mice by cross clamping the descending aorta through a lateral thoracotomy. To establish an optimal surgical procedure with limited mortality, variable cross-clamp times and core temperatures were tested between experiments. Results The onset of paresis or paralysis and postsurgical mortality varied as a function of cross-clamp time and core temperature that was maintained during the period of cross-clamp. Using optimal surgical parameters (7.5 min cross-clamp duration @ 33°C core temperature), the onset of paralysis is delayed 24–36 h postreperfusion and > 95% of mice survive through 9 weeks postsurgery. These mice are further stratified into two groups, with 70% (n = 19/27) of mice developing severe hindlimb paralysis and the remaining mice showing mild, though still permanent, behavioral deficits. Conclusion This new model should prove useful as a preclinical tool for screening neuroprotective therapeutics and for defining the basic biological mechanisms that cause delayed paralysis and neurodegeneration after transient spinal cord ischemia. PMID:20808212

  7. Left subclavian artery revascularization as part of thoracic stent grafting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saouti, N.; Hindori, V.; Morshuis, W.J.; Heijmen, R.H.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Intentional covering of the left subclavian artery (LSA) as part of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) can cause (posterior) strokes or left arm malperfusion. LSA revascularization can be done as prophylaxis against, or as treatment of, these complications. We report our

  8. The Risk of Acute Kidney Injury and Its Impact on 30-Day and Long-Term Mortality after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Gebauer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI is widely used in high risk patients (pts with aortic stenosis. Underlying chronic kidney disease implicates a high risk of postprocedural acute kidney injury (AKI. We analyzed its occurrence, impact on hospital stay, and mortality. Methods. 150 consecutive pts underwent TAVI in our institution (mean age 81 ± 7 years; logistic EuroSCORE 24 ± 15%. AKI definition was a creatinine rise of 26.5 μmol/L or more within 48 hours postprocedural. Ten patients on chronic hemodialysis were excluded. Results. AKI occurred in 28 pts (20%. Baseline creatinine was higher in AKI pts (126.4 ± 59.2 μmol/L versus 108.7 ± 45.1 μmol/L, P=0.09. Contrast media use was distributed evenly. Both, 30-day mortality (29% versus 7%, P<0.0001 and long-term mortality (43% versus 18%, P<0.0001 were higher; hospital stay was longer in AKI pts (20 ± 12 versus 15 ± 10 days, P=0.03. Predicted renal failure calculated STS Score was similar (8.0 ± 5.0% [AKI] versus 7.1 ± 4.0% [non-AKI], P=0.32 and estimated lower renal failure rates than observed. Conclusion. AKI remains a frequent complication with increased mortality in TAVI pts. Careful identification of risk factors and development of more suitable risk scores are essential.

  9. The Risk of Acute Kidney Injury and Its Impact on 30-Day and Long-Term Mortality after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Katrin; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Kaleschke, Gerrit; Kerckhoff, Gregor; Malyar, Nasser; Meyborg, Matthias; Reinecke, Holger; Baumgartner, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    Background. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is widely used in high risk patients (pts) with aortic stenosis. Underlying chronic kidney disease implicates a high risk of postprocedural acute kidney injury (AKI). We analyzed its occurrence, impact on hospital stay, and mortality. Methods. 150 consecutive pts underwent TAVI in our institution (mean age 81 ± 7 years; logistic EuroSCORE 24 ± 15%). AKI definition was a creatinine rise of 26.5 μmol/L or more within 48 hours postprocedural. Ten patients on chronic hemodialysis were excluded. Results. AKI occurred in 28 pts (20%). Baseline creatinine was higher in AKI pts (126.4 ± 59.2 μmol/L versus 108.7 ± 45.1 μmol/L, P = 0.09). Contrast media use was distributed evenly. Both, 30-day mortality (29% versus 7%, P < 0.0001) and long-term mortality (43% versus 18%, P < 0.0001) were higher; hospital stay was longer in AKI pts (20 ± 12 versus 15 ± 10 days, P = 0.03). Predicted renal failure calculated STS Score was similar (8.0 ± 5.0% [AKI] versus 7.1 ± 4.0% [non-AKI], P = 0.32) and estimated lower renal failure rates than observed. Conclusion. AKI remains a frequent complication with increased mortality in TAVI pts. Careful identification of risk factors and development of more suitable risk scores are essential. PMID:23365748

  10. Pseudoaneurysm of the thoracic aorta following botulinum toxin injection to the esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy P. Shiraev, MB, BS (Hons, BSc (Hons

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aortic pseudoaneurysms are uncommon and are usually secondary to penetrating trauma. We describe the presentation and management of an elderly woman who suffered a pseudoaneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta several days after receiving botulinum toxin injection to the esophagus. Urgent thoracic endovascular aortic repair was performed, and long-term antibiotic therapy was commenced. Despite a slow initial clinical recovery, she returned to an independent lifestyle, with radiographic resolution of the pseudoaneurysm seen at follow-up. This case illustrates that endovascular aortic repair is a suitable and safe treatment option for this unusual presentation.

  11. [Prognostic factors for in-hospital mortality in patients with acute kidney injury requiring continuous renal replacement therapy undergoing surgery for acute Stanford type A aortic dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, R; Liu, N

    2017-04-01

    Objective: To evaluate prognostic factors for in-hospital mortality in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) undergoing surgery for acute Stanford type A aortic dissection. Methods: Retrospective analysis were conducted for 60 patients diagnosed with AKI requiring CRRT undergoing surgery for acute Stanford type A aortic dissection at Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University from March 2015 to September 2016. There were 43 male and 17 female patients with an mean age of (50±14) years. Demographic characteristics, diagnosis, perioperative periodrelated data, clinical parameters during CRRT were collected to set up a database. The patients were divided into survival group and non-survival group according to in-hospital mortality. The prognostic factors of mortality in-hospital after AKI requiring CRRT were analyzed by multivariate Logistic regression analysis regression. Results: In the 60 adult patients who had received CRRT, 21 patients (35.0%) died. There were significant differences between died and survival patients on proportion of age>60 years (χ(2)=6.851, P =0.003), lactic acid levels at 12-hour after CRRT ( t =-3.631, P =0.004), lactic acid levels at 24 hours after CRRT ( t =-2.986, P =0.032), proportion of body mass index >25 kg/m(2) (χ(2)=5.660, P =0.041), cardiopulmonary bypass time ( t =-2.720, P =0.001). Multivariate Logistic regression analysis revealed that age≥60 years ( OR =16.450, 95% CI: 2.172 to 84.589); high lactic acid levels at 12-hour after CRRT ( OR =1.719, 95% CI: 1.998 to 2.960) and long cardiopulmonary bypass time ( OR =1.028, 95% CI: 1.004 to 1.052) (all P acid levels at 12-hour after CRRT and long cardiopulmonary bypass time were independent prognostic factors of patients with AKI requiring CRRT after aortic surgery. Proper identification and management shall improve the prognosis of patients.

  12. Fate of remnant sinuses of Valsalva in patients with bicuspid and trileaflet valves undergoing aortic valve, ascending aorta, and aortic arch replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Rita Karianna; Habertheuer, Andreas; Bavaria, Joseph E; Siki, Mary; Szeto, Wilson Y; Krause, Eric; Korutla, Varun; Desai, Nimesh D; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth

    2017-08-01

    the type of valvular pathology (aortic stenosis vs aortic insufficiency) or valvular morphology (bicuspid aortic valve vs tricuspid aortic valve). Aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement may have a stabilizing effect on the sinus segment over long-term follow-up in patients with tricuspid aortic valves or bicuspid aortic valves. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Thoracic outlet anatomy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is a rare condition that occurs when there is compression of vessels and nerves in the ... the last 3 fingers and inner forearm. Thoracic outlet syndrome is usually treated with physical therapy which ...

  14. Five-year experience with the peri-operative goal directed management for surgical repair of traumatic aortic injury in the eastern province, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haytham Z Al-Gameel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Traumatic aortic injury (TAI accounts for 1/3 of all trauma victims. Aim: We aimed to investigate the efficacy of the adopted standardized immediate pre-operative and intra-operative hemodynamic goal directed control, anesthetic technique and organs protection on the morbidity and mortality in patients presented with TAI. Settings and Design: An observational retrospective study at a single university teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Following ethical approval, we recruited the data of 44 patients admitted to the King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al Khobar, Saudi Arabia, with formal confirmation of diagnosis of blunt TAI during a 5-year period from February 2008 to April 2013 from the hospital medical records. Statistical Analysis: descriptive analysis. Results: A total of 44 victims (41 men, median (range age 29 (22-34 years with TAI who underwent surgical repair were recruited. Median (range post-operative chest tube output was 700 (200-1100 ml necessitated transfusion in 5 (11.4% of cases. Post-operative complications included transient renal failure (13.6%, pneumonia (6.8%, acute lung injury/distress syndrome (20.5%, sepsis (4.5%, wound infection (47.7% and air leak (6.8%. No patient developed end stage renal failure or spinal cord injury. Median intensive care unit stay was 6 (4-30 days and in-hospital mortality was 9.1%. Conclusion: We found that the implementation of a standardized early goal directed hemodynamic control for the peri-operative management of patients with TAI reduces the post-operative morbidity and mortality after surgical repair.

  15. Abdominal wall hernia and aortic injury secondary to blunt trauma: Case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Ballard

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: The patient with blunt trauma to the abdomen is at risk for TAWH and TAAI, which are often associated with other injuries. Investigations should include thorough clinical exam through secondary survey and radiologic imaging in the hemodynamically normal patient.

  16. Total Endovascular Aortic Repair in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amako, Mau; Spear, Rafaëlle; Clough, Rachel E; Hertault, Adrien; Azzaoui, Richard; Martin-Gonzalez, Teresa; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Haulon, Stéphan

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a total endovascular aortic repair with branched and fenestrated endografts in a young patient with Marfan syndrome and a chronic aortic dissection. Open surgery is the gold standard to treat aortic dissections in patients with aortic disease and Marfan syndrome. In 2000, a 38-year-old man with Marfan syndrome underwent open ascending aorta repair for an acute type A aortic dissection. One year later, a redo sternotomy was performed for aortic valve replacement. In 2013, the patient presented with endocarditis and pulmonary infection, which necessitated tracheostomy and temporary dialysis. In 2014, the first stage of the endovascular repair was performed using an inner branched endograft to exclude a 77-mm distal arch and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. In 2015, a 63-mm thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm was excluded by implantation of a 4-fenestrated endograft. Follow-up after both endovascular repairs was uneventful. Total aortic endovascular repair was successfully performed to treat a patient with arch and thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with chronic aortic dissection and Marfan syndrome. The postoperative images confirmed patency of the endograft and its branches, and complete exclusion of the aortic false lumen. Endovascular repair is a treatment option in patients with connective tissue disease who are not candidates for open surgery. Long-term follow-up is required to confirm these favorable early outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Thoracic trauma: presentation and management outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saaiq, M.; Shah, S. A.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the presentation and management outcome of thoracic trauma in a tertiary care setting. A total of 143 patients, who presented with chest trauma, were included in the study. All the patients were assessed by the history, physical examination and ancillary investigations. Appropriate managements were instituted as required. Data was described in percentages. out of 143 patients, 119 (83)% were males and 24 (17)% were females. Most of the patients belonged to the age group of 21-50 years. Ninety seven (66)% patients were admitted for indoor management. Blunt injury was found in 125 (87.4%) patients, while penetrating injuries in only 18 (12.6%) patients. Road Traffic Accidents (RTAs) were the commonest cause of trauma (n=103, 72%). Rib fracture was the commonest chest injury (74% patients). Head injury was the most frequently associated injury (18% of the patients). Tube thoracostomy was the commonest intervention undertaken in 65 (45%) patients. Seventeen (11.88%) patients were managed with mechanical ventilation. there were 17 deaths with a mortality rate of 11.88%. Thoracic trauma is an important cause of hospitalization, morbidity and mortality in the younger population. RTAs constitute the leading cause of thoracic trauma in our setup. Tube thoracostomy is the most frequent and at times the only invasive procedure required as a definitive measure in thoracic trauma patients. A policy of selective hospitalization helps to avoid unnecessary hospital admissions. (author)

  18. Aortic root and proximal aortic arch replacement (performed by a left-handed surgeon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    We present our standard technique of composite graft replacement performed by a left-handed surgeon. This procedure is performed with a 30-day mortality comparable to that of elective isolated aortic valve replacement. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  19. Chronic posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm of the thoracic aorta 55 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm of the thoracic aorta 55 Years after a blunt trauma - A case report with review of literature. M H Milad, A M Gamal, M M Rab. Abstract. Injuries of thoracic aorta due to blunt trauma carry very high mortality rates and studies estimated that less than 2% of people who sustain it remain ...

  20. Unoperated aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Nørgaard, M; Herzog, T M

    1995-01-01

    From 1984 to 1993, 1,053 patients were admitted with aortic aneurysm (AA) and 170 (15%) were not operated on. The most frequent reason for nonoperative management was presumed technical inoperability. Survivals for patients with thoracic, thoracoabdominal, and abdominal AA were comparable....... No significant differences in survival for patients with dissecting and nondissecting AA were detected. In all, 132 patients (78%) died and 78 (59%) of them died of rupture. Mean time to rupture was 1,300 +/- 8 days. Cumulative 5-year hazard of rupture for the dissecting AA was twice that of the nondissecting (p...... A dissections. The results suggest that type B dissections may have a more favorable course if operated on, but a prospective, randomized study is necessary to confirm this observation. We believe that older patients and those with a small aneurysm may benefit from early, elective operation....

  1. A Typical Immune T/B Subset Profile Characterizes Bicuspid Aortic Valve: In an Old Status?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela R. Balistreri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bicuspid valve disease is associated with the development of thoracic aortic aneurysm. The molecular mechanisms underlying this association still need to be clarified. Here, we evaluated the circulating levels of T and B lymphocyte subsets associated with the development of vascular diseases in patients with bicuspid aortic valve or tricuspid aortic valve with and without thoracic aortic aneurysm. We unveiled that the circulating levels of the MAIT, CD4+IL−17A+, and NKT T cell subsets were significantly reduced in bicuspid valve disease cases, when compared to tricuspid aortic valve cases in either the presence or the absence of thoracic aortic aneurysm. Among patients with tricuspid aortic valve, these cells were higher in those also affected by thoracic aortic aneurysm. Similar data were obtained by examining CD19+ B cells, naïve B cells (IgD+CD27−, memory unswitched B cells (IgD+CD27+, memory switched B cells (IgD−CD27+, and double-negative B cells (DN (IgD−CD27−. These cells resulted to be lower in subjects with bicuspid valve disease with respect to patients with tricuspid aortic valve. In whole, our data indicate that patients with bicuspid valve disease show a quantitative reduction of T and B lymphocyte cell subsets. Future studies are encouraged to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this observation and its pathophysiological significance.

  2. Selective renal blood perfusion induces renal tubules injury in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalder, Johannes; Kokozidou, Maria; Keschenau, Paula; Tamm, Miriam; Greiner, Andreas; Koeppel, Thomas A; Tolba, Rene; Jacobs, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Extracorporeal circulation is routinely used in thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair to preserve blood perfusion. Despite this protective measure, acute and chronic kidney disorders can develop. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish a new large-animal model to assess the efficacy of selective renal perfusion (SRP) with extracorporeal circulation in a setting of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Eighteen pigs underwent a thoracolaparotomy, during with the aorta and renal arteries were exposed. The animals were divided into three cohorts of six pigs each: cohort I--control; cohort II--thoracic aortic clamping with distal aortic perfusion (DAP) using a roller pump; and cohort III--thoracic aortic clamping with DAP plus SRP. Kidney metabolism, kidney injury, and red blood cell damage were measured by oxygen extraction ratio (O2ER), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, a marker for acute kidney damage, and serum free hemoglobin. With normal mean arterial blood pressures, flow rates in the renal arteries during perfusion decreased to 75% (group II) with DAP and to 50% (group III) with SRP compared with the control animals (group I; P = .0279 for I vs II; P = .0002 for I vs III). Microcirculation, measured by microspheres, did not differ significantly among the groups. In contrast, O2ER (P = .0021 for I vs III) and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (P = .0083 for I vs III) levels were significantly increased in group III, whereas free hemoglobin was increased in groups II and III (P = .0406 for I vs II; P = .0018 for I vs III). SRP with a roller pump induces kidney tubule injury. Thus, distal aortic and SRP in our model does not provide adequate kidney protection. Furthermore, the perfusion system provokes red blood cell damage with increased free hemoglobin. Hence, the SRP perfusion technique should be revised and tested. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical testing of Belarusian aortic stent graft system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. П. Шкет

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The study looks at the results of clinical testing of the first Belarusian aortic stent graft system developed and manufactured by a team of specialists from RSPC "Cardiology", Minsk, Belarus, and Belarusian Technical University.Methods. The original system of aortic stent graft includes a delivery system and an aortic stent graft itself. It is used in surgical treatment of complicated and common aneurysms of the thoracic aorta, as well as in cases of concomitant thoracic aneurysms and heart pathology to be treated under cardiopulmonary bypass. Clinical testing of the stent graft was carried out according to the requirements of Ministry of Health of the Republic of Belarus on the basis of three different cardiac hospitals of the country. Results. All the three hospitals treated one patient each. The first patient underwent implantation of the stent graft into the descending thoracic aorta, with the thoracic aorta aneurysm isolated and the aortic valve replaced with bioprosthesis. The second patient underwent ascending aorta and aortic valve replacement with a conduit and implantation of aortic stent graft into the descending thoracic aorta. In the third patient the domestic aortic stent graft was implanted into the descending thoracic aorta with isolation of the thoracic aneurysm; aortic valve and ascending aorta were replaced with ‘MedEng' conduit and the aortic arch was also replaced, with the brachiocephalic arteries re-implanted in place. All the patients were followed-up for both early and long-term outcomes for more than 1 year and were examined by using CT angiography in the early postoperative period and after 1 year. Uncomplicated postoperative course was observed in all the patients. There were no complications in the long-term follow-up as well. CT angiography data confirmed good positioning of the stent graft and good isolation of the aneurysm lumen. Preoperative and postoperative СТ data of one patient are presented in the

  4. Incidence and progression of mild aortic regurgitation after Tirone David reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Elizabeth H; Liang, David H; Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar; Kari, Fabian A; Fischbein, Michael P; Mitchell, R Scott; Miller, D Craig

    2014-01-01

    The study objective was to determine whether recurrent or residual mild aortic regurgitation, which occurs after valve-sparing aortic root replacement, progresses over time. Between 2003 and 2008, 154 patients underwent Tirone David-V valve-sparing aortic root replacement; 96 patients (62%) had both 1-year (median, 12 ± 4 months) and mid-term (62 ± 22 months) transthoracic echocardiograms available for analysis. Age of patients averaged 38 ± 13 years, 71% were male, 31% had a bicuspid aortic valve, 41% had Marfan syndrome, and 51% underwent aortic valve repair, predominantly cusp free margin shortening. Forty-one patients (43%) had mild aortic regurgitation on 1-year echocardiogram. In 85% of patients (n = 35), mild aortic regurgitation remained stable on the most recent echocardiogram (median, 57 ± 20 months); progression to moderate aortic regurgitation occurred in 5 patients (12%) at a median of 28 ± 18 months and remained stable thereafter; severe aortic regurgitation developed in 1 patient, eventually requiring reoperation. Five patients (5%) had moderate aortic regurgitation at 1 year, which did not progress subsequently. Two patients (2%) had more than moderate aortic regurgitation at 1 year, and both ultimately required reoperation. Although mild aortic regurgitation occurs frequently after valve-sparing aortic root replacement, it is unlikely to progress over the next 5 years and should not be interpreted as failure of the valve-preservation concept. Further, we suggest that mild aortic regurgitation should not be considered nonstructural valve dysfunction, as the 2008 valve reporting guidelines would indicate. We need 10- to 15-year follow-up to learn the long-term clinical consequences of mild aortic regurgitation early after valve-sparing aortic root replacement. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Extended replacement of the thoracic aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Yutaka; Okada, Kenji; Oka, Takanori; Inoue, Takeshi; Tanaka, Akiko; Omura, Atsushi; Kano, Hiroya; Okita, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    We present our experience of total aortic arch replacement. Twenty-nine patients (21 males and 8 females; mean age 63.3 ± 13.3 years) with extended thoracic aortic aneurysms underwent graft replacement. The pathology of the diseased aorta was non-dissecting aneurysm in 11 patients, including one aortitis and aortic dissection in 18 patients (acute type A: one, chronic type A: 11, chronic type B: six). Five patients had Marfan syndrome. In their previous operation, two patients had undergone the Bentall procedure, three had endovascular stenting, one had aortic root replacement with valve sparing and 12 had hemi-arch replacement for acute type A dissection. Approaches to the aneurysm were as follows: posterolateral thoracotomy with rib-cross incision in 16, posterolateral thoracotomy extended to the retroperitoneal abdominal aorta in seven, mid-sternotomy and left pleurotomy in three, anterolateral thoracotomy with partial lower sternotomy in two and clam-shell incision in one patient. Extension of aortic replacement was performed from the aortic root to the descending aorta in 4, from the ascending aorta to the descending aorta in 17 and from the ascending to the abdominal aorta in eight patients. Arterial inflow for cardiopulmonary bypass consisted of the femoral artery in 15 patients, ascending aorta and femoral artery in seven, descending or abdominal aorta in five and ascending aorta in two. Venous drainage site was the femoral vein in 10, pulmonary artery in eight, right atrium in five, femoral artery with right atrium/pulmonary artery in four and pulmonary artery with right atrium in two patients. The operative mortality, 30-day mortality and hospital mortality was one (cardiac arrest due to aneurysm rupture), one (rupture of infected aneurysm) and one (brain contusion), respectively. Late mortality occurred in three patients due to pneumonia, ruptured residual aneurysm and intracranial bleeding. Actuarial survival at 5 years after the operations was 80.6

  6. Long-Term Risk for Aortic Complications After Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve Versus Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itagaki, Shinobu; Chikwe, Joanna P; Chiang, Yuting P; Egorova, Natalia N; Adams, David H

    2015-06-09

    Bicuspid aortic valves are associated with valve dysfunction, ascending aortic aneurysm and dissection. Management of the ascending aorta at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR) in these patients is controversial and has been extrapolated from experience with Marfan syndrome, despite the absence of comparative long-term outcome data. This study sought to assess whether the natural history of thoracic aortopathy after AVR in patients with bicuspid aortic valve disease is substantially different from that seen in patients with Marfan syndrome. In this retrospective comparison, outcomes of 13,205 adults (2,079 with bicuspid aortic valves, 73 with Marfan syndrome, and 11,053 control patients with acquired aortic valve disease) who underwent primary AVR without replacement of the ascending aorta in New York State between 1995 and 2010 were compared. The median follow-up time was 6.6 years. The long-term incidence of thoracic aortic dissection was significantly higher in patients with Marfan syndrome (5.5 ± 2.7%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (0.55 ± 0.21%) and control group patients (0.41 ± 0.08%, p Marfan syndrome (10.8 ± 4.4%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (4.8 ± 0.8%) and control group patients (1.4 ± 0.2%) (p Marfan syndrome were significantly more likely to undergo thoracic aortic surgery in late follow-up (10.4 ± 4.3%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (2.5 ± 0.6%) and control group patients (0.50 ± 0.09%) (p Marfan syndrome compared with those with bicuspid aortic valves confirm that operative management of patients with bicuspid aortic valves should not be extrapolated from Marfan syndrome and support discrete treatment algorithms for these different clinical entities. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Altered aortic shape in bicuspid aortic valve relatives influences blood flow patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Susanne; Smith, Danielle A; Barker, Alex J; Entezari, Pegah; Honarmand, Amir R; Carr, Maria L; Malaisrie, S Chris; McCarthy, Patrick M; Collins, Jeremy; Carr, James C; Markl, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is known to exhibit familial inheritance and is associated with aortopathy and altered aortic haemodynamics. However, it remains unclear whether BAV-related aortopathy can be inherited independently of valve morphology. Four-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging for the in vivo assessment of thoracic aortic 3D blood flow was performed in 24 BAV relatives with trileaflet aortic valves (age = 40 ± 14 years) and 15 healthy controls (age = 37 ± 10 years). Data analysis included aortic dimensions, shape (round/gothic/cubic), and 3D blood flow characteristics (semi-quantitative vortex/helix grading and peak velocities). Cubic and gothic aortic shapes were markedly more prevalent in BAV relatives compared with controls (38 vs. 7%). Ascending aorta (AAo) vortex flow in BAV relatives was significantly increased compared with controls (grading = 1.5 ± 1.0 vs. 0.6 ± 0.9, P = 0.015). Aortic haemodynamics were influenced by aortic shape: peak velocities were reduced for gothic aortas vs. round aortas (P = 0.003); vortex flow was increased for cubic aortas in the AAo (P gothic aortas in the AAo and descending aorta (P = 0.003, P = 0.029). Logistic regression demonstrated significant associations of shape with severity of vortex flow in AAo (P < 0.001) and aortic arch (P = 0.016) in BAV relatives. BAV relatives expressed altered aortic shape and increased vortex flow despite the absence of valvular disease or aortic dilatation. These data suggest a heritable component of BAV-related aortopathy affecting aortic shape and aberrant blood flow, independent of valve morphology. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Traumatic rupture of the descending thoracic aorta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (N = 5) using a centrifugal vortex pump was used after. September 1988, and there were no haemorrhagic or para- plegic complications or mortality in this group. This technique is safe and appears to be superior to simple aortic cross- clamping in managing this condition. Patient characteristics and mechanism of injury.

  9. Thoracic posture, shoulder muscle activation patterns and isokinetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Shoulder injuries are the most severe injuries in rugby union players, accounting for almost 20% of injuries related to the sport and resulting in lost playing hours. Objective. To profile the thoracic posture, scapular muscle activation patterns and rotator cuff muscle isokinetic strength of semi-professional

  10. Colombian experience with transcatheter aortic valve implantation of medtronic CoreValve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dager, Antonio E; Nuis, Rutger-Jan; Caicedo, Bernardo; Fonseca, Jaime A; Arana, Camilo; Cruz, Lidsa; Benitez, Luis M; Nader, Carlos A; Duenas, Eduardo; de Marchena, Eduardo J; O'Neill, William W; de Jaegere, Peter P

    2012-01-01

    At our institutions, increasing numbers of aortic stenosis patients were not candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement. Accordingly, we initiated the Cali Colombian Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) program. From March 2008 through January 2011, 53 consecutive patients (mean age, 79 ± 6 yr; men, 58%) underwent TAVI with the Medtronic CoreValve System, and data were prospectively collected. Our study's endpoints conformed with Valve Academic Research Consortium recommendations. We report our clinical results.Predicted mortality rates were 25% (interquartile range, 17%-34%) according to logistic EuroSCORE and 6% (interquartile range, 3%-8%) according to the Society of Thoracic Surgeons score. The 30-day mortality rate was 9% (3 intraprocedural deaths, 5 total). The combined 30-day safety endpoint was 30% (major vascular sequelae, 23%; life-threatening bleeding, 12%; myocardial infarction, 4%; major stroke, 4%; and acute kidney injury [stage 3], 2%). Eight patients (15%) required post-implantation balloon dilation and 2 (4%) required valve-in-valve implantation, for a technical device success rate of 77%. Mean peak transvalvular gradient decreased from 74 ± 29 to 17 ± 8 mmHg and mean transvalvular gradient from 40 ± 17 to 8 ± 4 mmHg (both P=0.001). Moderate or severe aortic regurgitation decreased from 32% to 18% (P=0.12) and mitral regurgitation from 32% to 13% (P=0.002). The 1-year survival rate was 81%.We found that TAVI with the CoreValve prosthesis was safe and feasible, with sustained long-term results, for treating aortic stenosis in patients at excessive surgical risk; nonetheless, serious adverse events occurred in 30% of the patients.

  11. Digital subtraction angiography of the thoracic aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, L.B.; Buonocore, E.; Modic, M.T.; Meaney, T.F.

    1984-01-01

    Forty-three patients with acquired and congenital abnormalities of the thoracic aorta were studied using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) after an intravenous bolus injection of 40 ml of contrast material. Abnormalities studied included coarctation, pseudocoarctation, Marfan syndrome, cervical aorta, double aortic arch, aneurysm, dissection, and tumor. Twenty-four patients also had conventional angiography. DSA was accurate in 95% of cases; in the other 5%, involving patients with acute type I dissection, the coronary arteries could not be seen. The authors concluded that in 92% of their patients, DSA could have replaced the standard aortogram

  12. Digital subtraction angiography of the thoracic aorta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, L.B.; Buonocore, E.; Modic, M.T.; Meaney, T.F.

    1984-02-01

    Forty-three patients with acquired and congenital abnormalities of the thoracic aorta were studied using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) after an intravenous bolus injection of 40 ml of contrast material. Abnormalities studied included coarctation, pseudocoarctation, Marfan syndrome, cervical aorta, double aortic arch, aneurysm, dissection, and tumor. Twenty-four patients also had conventional angiography. DSA was accurate in 95% of cases; in the other 5%, involving patients with acute type I dissection, the coronary arteries could not be seen. The authors concluded that in 92% of their patients, DSA could have replaced the standard aortogram.

  13. Fístula aortoesofágica após correção endovascular da dissecção de aorta torácica tipo B de Stanford Aortic-esophageal fistula after endovascular repair of Stanford type B thoracic aortic dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Gurgel Marques

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A correção endovascular da dissecção de aorta tipo B tem se mostrado como uma nova alternativa para reduzir o trauma cirúrgico. No entanto, as complicações de médio e longo prazo, tais como a fístula aortoesofágica, são ainda pouco conhecidas e pouco relatadas. O objetivo deste trabalho é descrever três casos de fístula aortoesofágica após o tratamento endovascular de 23 casos de dissecção de aorta descendente conduzidos pela equipe de Cirurgia Vascular da Santa Casa de São Paulo em um estudo retrospectivo. Esses pacientes apresentavam características em comum, como dissecção crônica, pós-operatório imediato sem intercorrências, necessidade de reintervenções, oclusão de troncos arteriais como a artéria subclávia, mesentérica, tronco celíaco, e, ainda, uma rápida evolução para o óbito após os primeiros sinais de fístula. Portanto, embora raramente descrita na literatura, a ocorrência de fístula aortoesofágica é uma complicação de causa até o momento indefinida do tratamento endovascular da dissecção de aorta descendente que merece atenção, dada sua recorrência e evolução fatal.Endoluminal stent-graft for type B aortic dissection is a new alternative to reduce surgical trauma. However, medium- and long-term complications are still little known and poorly reported, such as the aortic-esophageal fistula. The objective of this study is to describe three cases of aortic-esophageal fistula after the endovascular treatment of 23 cases of descending aortic dissection conducted by the vascular surgery team of Santa Casa de São Paulo in a retrospective study. These patients presented some common characteristics: chronic dissection, successful early outcome, need of reinterventions, occlusion of arterial trunks such as subclavian artery, mesenteric artery, celiac trunk, and finally, a fast fatal course after the first fistula-related symptoms. Therefore, despite rarely described in the literature, aortic

  14. [Modern aortic surgery in Marfan syndrome--2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenbach, K; Schwill, S; Karck, M

    2011-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a hereditary disease with a prevalence of 2-3 in 10,000 births, leading to a fibrillin connective tissue disorder with manifestations in the skeleton, eye, skin, dura mater and in particular the cardiovascular system. Since other syndromes demonstrate similar vascular manifestations, but therapy may differ significantly, diagnosis should be established using the revised Ghent nosology in combination with genotypic analysis in specialized Marfan centres. The formation of aortic root aneurysms with the subsequent risk of acute aortic dissection type A (AADA) or aortic rupture limits life expectancy in patients with Marfan syndrome. Therefore, prophylactic replacement of the aortic root needs to be performed before the catastrophic event of AADA can occur. The goal of surgery is the complete resection of pathological aortic tissue. This can be achieved with excellent results by using a (mechanically) valved conduit that replaces both the aortic valve and the aortic root (Bentall operation). However, the need for lifelong anticoagulation with Coumadin can be avoided using the aortic valve sparing reimplantation technique according to David. The long-term durability of the reconstructed valve is favourable, and further technical improvements may improve longevity. Although results of prospective randomised long-term studies comparing surgical techniques are lacking, the David operation has become the surgical method of choice for aortic root aneurysms, not only at the Heidelberg Marfan Centre. Replacement of the aneurysmal dilated aortic arch is performed under moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest combined with antegrade cerebral perfusion using a heart-lung machine, which we also use in thoracic or thoracoabdominal aneurysms. Close post-operative follow-up in a Marfan centre is pivotal for the early detection of pathological changes on the diseased aorta.

  15. Effects of a cantaloupe melon extract/wheat gliadin biopolymer during aortic cross-clamping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kick, Jochen; Hauser, Balázs; Bracht, Hendrik; Albicini, Maura; Oter, Sükrü; Simon, Florian; Ehrmann, Ulrich; Garrel, Catherine; Sträter, Jörn; Brückner, Uwe B; Leverve, Xavier M; Schelzig, Hubert; Speit, Günter; Radermacher, Peter; Muth, Claus-Martin

    2007-04-01

    We previously reported in healthy volunteers that a cantaloupe melon extract chemically combined with wheat gliadin (melon extract/gliadin) and containing SOD, catalase and residual glutathione peroxidase (GPx), protected against DNA strand-break damage induced by hyperbaric oxygen (HBO), a well-established model of DNA damage resulting from oxidative stress. Aortic cross-clamping is a typical example of ischemia/reperfusion injury-related oxidative stress, and therefore we investigated whether this melon extract/gliadin would also reduce DNA damage after aortic cross-clamping and reperfusion. Prospective, randomized, controlled experimental study. Animal laboratory. 18 anesthetized, mechanically ventilated and instrumented pigs. After 14 days of oral administration of 1250 mg of the melon extract/gliadin (n=9) or vehicle (n=9), animals underwent 30 min of thoracic aortic cross-clamping and 4 h of reperfusion. Before clamping, immediately before declamping, and at 2 and 4 h of reperfusion, we measured blood isoprostane (immunoassay) and malondialdehyde concentrations (fluorimetric thiobarbituric acid test), SOD, catalase and GPx activities (spectrophotometric kits), NO formation (nitrate+nitrite; chemoluminescence), DNA damage in whole blood samples and isolated lymphocytes exposed to hyperbaric oxygen (comet assay). Organ function was also evaluated. Kidney and spinal cord specimen were analysed for apoptosis (TUNEL assay). The melon extract/gliadin blunted the DNA damage, reduced spinal cord apoptosis and attenuated NO release, however, without any effect on lipid peroxidation and organ function. Pre-treatment with the oral melon extract/gliadin may be a therapeutic option to reduce oxidative cell injury affiliated with aortic cross-clamping.

  16. Technical strategy in a patient with symptomatic thoracic aneurysm near the origin of the left subclavian artery and left internal thoracic artery coronary graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babic, Srdjan D; Radak, Djordje J; Sotirovic, Vuk A; Unic-Stojanovic, Dragana R; Babic, Dusan S; Popov, Petar Z; Sagic, Dragan Z

    2012-11-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is a safe and reliable technique utilized in the treatment for aortic aneurysms. However, in up to 40% of patients, devices are typically placed over the left subclavian artery (LSA) origin. In this report, we present a case of a successful TEVAR procedure following the transposition of the LSA with protective carotico-axillary/carotid bypass in a patient with a patent left internal thoracic artery (LITA)-left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery bypass graft and right internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Mutations in a TGF-β Ligand, TGFB3, Cause Syndromic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Bertoli Avella (Aida); E. Gillis (Elisabeth); H. Morisaki (Hiroko); J.M.A. Verhagen (Judith ); B.M. de Graaf (Bianca); G. Van De Beek (Gerarda); E. Gallo (Elena); B.P.T. Kruithof (Boudewijn); H. Venselaar (Hanka); L.A. Myers (Loretha); S. Laga (Steven); A.J. Doyle (Alexander); G. Oswald (Gretchen); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); I. Yamanaka (Itaru); R.M. van der Helm (Robert); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); J.E.M.M. de Klein (Annelies); L.M. Pardo (Luba); M. Lammens (Martin); C. Evers (Christina); K. Devriendt (Koenraad); M. Dumoulein (Michiel); J.M. Timmermans (Janneke); H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); F.W. Verheijen (Frans); I. Rodrigus (Inez); G. Baynam (Gareth); M.J.E. Kempers (Marlies); J. Saenen (Johan); E.M. Van Craenenbroeck (Emeline); K. Minatoya (Kenji); R. Matsukawa (Ritsu); T. Tsukube (Takuro); N. Kubo (Noriaki); R.M.W. Hofstra (Robert); M.-J. Goumans (Marie-José); J.A. Bekkers (Jos); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien); I.M.B.H. van de Laar (Ingrid); H.C. Dietz (Harry ); L. van Laer (Lut); T. Morisaki (Takayuki); M.W. Wessels (Marja); B.L. Loeys (Bart)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractBACKGROUND Aneurysms affecting the aorta are a common condition associated with high mortality as a result of aortic dissection or rupture. Investigations of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in syndromic types of thoracic aortic aneurysms, such as Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndromes,

  18. Mutations in a TGF-beta ligand, TGFB3, cause syndromic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertoli-Avella, A.M.; Gillis, E.; Morisaki, H.; Verhagen, J.M.A.; Graaf, B.M. de; Beek, G. van de; Gallo, E.; Kruithof, B.P.; Venselaar, H.; Myers, L.A.; Laga, S.; Doyle, A.J.; Oswald, G.; Cappellen, G.W. van; Yamanaka, I.; Helm, R.M. van der; Beverloo, B.; Klein, A.; Pardo, L.; Lammens, M.; Evers, C.; Devriendt, K.; Dumoulein, M.; Timmermans, J.; Bruggenwirth, H.T.; Verheijen, F.; Rodrigus, I.; Baynam, G.; Kempers, M.; Saenen, J.; Craenenbroeck, E.M. Van; Minatoya, K.; Matsukawa, R.; Tsukube, T.; Kubo, N.; Hofstra, R.; Goumans, M.J.; Bekkers, J.A.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.; Laar, I.M. van de; Dietz, H.C.; Laer, L. Van; Morisaki, T.; Wessels, M.W.; Loeys, B.L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aneurysms affecting the aorta are a common condition associated with high mortality as a result of aortic dissection or rupture. Investigations of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in syndromic types of thoracic aortic aneurysms, such as Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndromes, have revealed

  19. Correção de doenças da aorta torácica com utilização de hipotermia profunda e parada circulatória Surgical treatment of thoracic aortic lesions with deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayard Gontijo Filho

    1991-04-01

    Full Text Available São apresentados 14 casos de aneurismas e/ou dissecções da aorta torácica submetidos a correção cirúrgica com o emprego de hipotermia profunda e parada circulatória. Entre os 14 pacientes, seis eram portadores de aneurismas da aorta (um de aorta ascendente, três do arco aórtico, um de aorta ascendente + arco aórtico, um de aorta descendente e oito eram portadores de dissecção aórtica. A hipotermia foi induzida gradualmente até atingir 18ºC de temperatura nasofaríngea. O período médio de parada circulatória foi de 35 minutos. Houve quatro óbitos hospitalares, sendo um por problemas hemorrágicos, um por arritmia ventricular pós IAM, um por insuficiência renal aguda já existente no pré-operatório e um por AVC e infecção pulmonar secundária. Dos 10 pacientes, dois apresentaram insuficiência respiratória com assistência ventilatória prolongada e quatro apresentaram distúrbios neurológicos transitórios, com recuperação total. A técnica de hipotermia profunda e parada circulatória mostrou-se como boa alternativa na abordagem cirúrgica de lesões graves da aorta torácica.The authors report 14 cases of aneurysms and/or dissections of the thoracic aorta, treated with deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest. There were 6 aneurysms of the aorta (1 of the ascending aorta, 3 of the aortic arch, 1 of the ascending aorta and aortic arch, 1 of the descending aorta and 8 cases of aortic dissections. The patients were gradually colled down to 18ºC of nasopharingeal temperature. The mean circulatory arrest time was 35 minutes. There were 4 hospital deaths; 1 patient died in the operating room, from persistent surgical bleeding; 1 patient died from acute renal failure, which was already present in the pre-operative period; 1 patient died after an acute myocardial infarction followed by ventricular fibrillation; 1 patient died from pulmonary infection following a carebro-vascular accident. This was the only death directly

  20. Cisto tímico como diagnóstico diferencial de doença aguda da aorta torácica Thymic cyst as a differencial diagnosis of acute thoracic aortic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Gradim Tiveron

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Paciente encaminhada de outro serviço com história de dor torácica aguda de forte intensidade com diagnóstico de hematoma intramural na aorta ascendente para correção cirúrgica. Após investigação diagnóstica, identificou-se tumoração cística no mediastino anterior, que envolvia toda a aorta ascendente e que produzia restrição ao enchimento diastólico do ventrículo direito. A análise histológica do tumor ressecado revelou o diagnóstico de cisto tímico. Objetivo deste relato é descrever tumoração mediastinal de baixa prevalência, que pode produzir imagem radiológica com características de hematoma intramural e resultar em conduta terapêutica equivocada.Patient was referred to our Service with acute thoracic pain and diagnosis of intramural hematoma of the ascending aorta for surgical correction. The diagnostic investigation showed a cystic tumor involving the ascending aorta causing restriction of the right ventricular inflow. After resection, the histologic analysis disclosed the diagnosis of thymic cyst. The aim of this study is to describe a rare mediastinal tumor that may simulate a radiologic feature with characteristics of intramural hematoma and may result in a wrong therapeutic approach.

  1. Radiologic findings of thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akgul Ozmen C

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cihan Akgul Ozmen,1 Serdar Onat,2 Delal Aycicek3 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Chest Surgery, Dicle University School of Medicine, Diyarbakir, 3Radiology Unit, Siirt State Hospital, Siirt, Turkey Introduction: Chest trauma may be blunt or penetrating and the chest is the third most common trauma region. It is a significant cause of mortality. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT has been an increasingly used method to evaluate chest trauma because of its high success in detecting tissue and organ injuries. Herein, we aimed to present MDCT findings in patients with blunt and penetrating chest trauma admitted to our department. Methods: A total of 240 patients admitted to the emergency department of our hospital between April 2012 and July 2013 with a diagnosis of chest trauma who underwent MDCT evaluations were included. Most of the patients were male (83.3% and victims of a blunt chest trauma. The images were analyzed with respect to the presence of fractures of bony structures, hemothorax, pneumothorax, mediastinal organ injury, and pulmonary and vascular injuries. Results: MDCT images of the 240 patients yielded a prevalence of 41.7% rib fractures, 11.2% scapular fractures, and 7.5% clavicle fractures. The prevalence of thoracic vertebral fracture was 13.8% and that of sternal fracture was 3.8%. The prevalence of hemothorax, pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, and subcutaneous emphysema was 34.6%, 62.1%, 9.6%, and 35.4%, respectively. The prevalence of rib, clavicle, and thoracic vertebral fractures and pulmonary contusion was higher in the blunt trauma group, whereas the prevalence of hemothorax, subcutaneous emphysema, diaphragmatic injury, and other vascular lacerations was significantly higher in the penetrating trauma group than in the blunt trauma group (p<0.05. Conclusion: MDCT images may yield a high prevalence of fracture of bony structures, soft tissue lacerations, and vascular lesions, which should be well understood by

  2. Preoperative computer tomography evaluation in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groudeva, V.; Stoynova, V.; Trendafilova, D.; Dzhorgova, Y.; Nachev, G.

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is rapidly emerging technique alternative to surgery in high risk patients. Imaging and especially computer tomography is important in preoperative assessment of the aortic ring and the prosthetic valve choice. The aim of this study is to share authors initial experience in CT assessment of the aortic ring prior to Transcatheter aortic valve replacement. 49 patients (mean age 76,55) underwent 320 rows MDCT (Acquilon One) prior TAVI. Protocol involved scanning from thoracic inlet to common femoral arteries. Aortic root size, aortic diameter at the level of coronary sinuses and the sinotubular junction and distance to coronary ostia were evaluated on a Vitrea work station. MDCT established maximal aortic ring diameter from 18 to 31 mm mean 25,04 mm while the lesser rate was from 16 to 21 mm. Accordingly positioned prostheses were in 34,75% No. 23, in 49% - No. 26 and in16,3% - No. 29. MDCT is crucial in aortic valve assessment prior to TAVI in experienced hands and multidisciplinary team. (authors) Key words: TRANSCATHETER AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT (TAVI). MDCT AORTIC VALVE ASSESSMENT

  3. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Severe Aortic Regurgitation With Acute Refractory Cardiogenic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achkouty, Guy; Amabile, Nicolas; Zannis, Konstantinos; Veugeois, Aurélie; Caussin, Christophe

    2018-03-01

    From January 2013 to January 2017, 686 consecutive patients were referred to our centre for transcatheter aortic valve replacement, including 5 subjects with severe aortic regurgitation and acute refractory cardiogenic shock. These patients were contraindicated for surgical treatment by the heart team because of high surgical risk (median logistic EuroSCORE: 74.6/Society of Thoracic Surgeons score: 37.9). The success rate of valve implantation was 100% through transfemoral access with self-expandable devices. The observed 30-day mortality rate was 20%. Hence, the transcatheter aortic valve replacement procedure might represent a successful and life-saving intervention for treatment of patients with severe aortic regurgitation who present with acute refractory cardiogenic shock. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mutations in a TGF-β Ligand, TGFB3, Cause Syndromic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    OpenAIRE

    Bertoli Avella, Aida; Gillis, Elisabeth; Morisaki, Hiroko; Verhagen, Judith; Graaf, Bianca; Van De Beek, Gerarda; Gallo, Elena; Kruithof, Boudewijn; Venselaar, Hanka; Myers, Loretha; Laga, Steven; Doyle, Alexander; Oswald, Gretchen; Cappellen, Gert; Yamanaka, Itaru

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractBACKGROUND Aneurysms affecting the aorta are a common condition associated with high mortality as a result of aortic dissection or rupture. Investigations of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in syndromic types of thoracic aortic aneurysms, such as Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndromes, have revealed an important contribution of disturbed transforming growth factor (TGF)-b signaling. OBJECTIVES This study sought to discover a novel gene causing syndromic aortic aneurysms in order ...

  5. Erosion of elephant trunk Dacron graft limb by thoracic endograft causing acute aneurysm expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehrenbacher, John W; McCready, Robert A

    2009-02-01

    We recently treated a patient in whom a Gore TAG thoracic endograft (W.L. Gore and Assoc, Flagstaff, Arix) had been used to repair a descending thoracic aneurysm as the second stage of a hybrid procedure. This patient had previously undergone repair of ascending and aortic arch aneurysms, with an elephant trunk graft limb placed in the descending thoracic aorta for subsequent repair of the descending thoracic aneurysm. Eight months after placement of the thoracic endograft, the patient presented with an acutely expanding and symptomatic thoracic aneurysm. The patient was operated on urgently. The proximal portion of the endograft had eroded into the previously placed Dacron elephant trunk limb. The proximal portion of the endograft was removed and was replaced with a Dacron graft. The management of this patient forms the basis of this report.

  6. Aortic Dissection Type A in Alpine Skiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schachner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients and Methods. 140 patients with aortic dissection type A were admitted for cardiac surgery. Seventy-seven patients experienced their dissection in the winter season (from November to April. We analyzed cases of ascending aortic dissection associated with alpine skiing. Results. In 17 patients we found skiing-related aortic dissections. Skiers were taller (180 (172–200 cm versus 175 (157–191 cm, and heavier (90 (68–125 kg versus 80 (45–110 kg, than nonskiers. An extension of aortic dissection into the aortic arch, the descending thoracic aorta, and the abdominal aorta was found in 91%, 74%, and 69%, respectively, with no significant difference between skiers and nonskiers. Skiers experienced RCA ostium dissection requiring CABG in 17.6% while this was true for 5% of nonskiers (. Hospital mortality of skiers was 6% versus 13% in nonskiers (. The skiers live at an altitude of 170 (0–853 m.a.s.l. and experience their dissection at 1602 (1185–3105; m.a.s.l. In 82% symptom start was during recreational skiing without any trauma. Conclusion. Skiing associated aortic dissection type A is usually nontraumatic. The persons affected live at low altitudes and practice an outdoor sport at unusual high altitude at cold temperatures. Postoperative outcome is good.

  7. Aortic Dissection Type A in Alpine Skiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachner, Thomas; Fischler, Nikolaus; Dumfarth, Julia; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Krapf, Christoph; Schobersberger, Wolfgang; Grimm, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Patients and Methods. 140 patients with aortic dissection type A were admitted for cardiac surgery. Seventy-seven patients experienced their dissection in the winter season (from November to April). We analyzed cases of ascending aortic dissection associated with alpine skiing. Results. In 17 patients we found skiing-related aortic dissections. Skiers were taller (180 (172–200) cm versus 175 (157–191) cm, P = 0.008) and heavier (90 (68–125) kg versus 80 (45–110) kg, P = 0.002) than nonskiers. An extension of aortic dissection into the aortic arch, the descending thoracic aorta, and the abdominal aorta was found in 91%, 74%, and 69%, respectively, with no significant difference between skiers and nonskiers. Skiers experienced RCA ostium dissection requiring CABG in 17.6% while this was true for 5% of nonskiers (P = 0.086). Hospital mortality of skiers was 6% versus 13% in nonskiers (P = 0.399). The skiers live at an altitude of 170 (0–853) m.a.s.l. and experience their dissection at 1602 (1185–3105; P < 0.001) m.a.s.l. In 82% symptom start was during recreational skiing without any trauma. Conclusion. Skiing associated aortic dissection type A is usually nontraumatic. The persons affected live at low altitudes and practice an outdoor sport at unusual high altitude at cold temperatures. Postoperative outcome is good. PMID:23971024

  8. Comparison of ascending aortic cohesion between patients with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis and regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedik, Jaroslav; Dohle, Daniel S; Wendt, Daniel; Pilarczyk, Kevin; Price, Vivien; Mourad, Fanar; Zykina, Elizaveta; Stebner, Ferdinand; Tsagakis, Konstantinos; Jakob, Heinz

    2014-12-01

    A bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is commonly associated with aortic wall abnormalities, including dilatation of the ascending aorta and increased potential for aortic dissection. We compared the mechanical properties of the aortic wall of BAV patients with aortic valve stenosis (AS) and regurgitation (AR) using a dissectometer, a device mimicking transverse aortic wall shear stress. Between March 2010 and February 2013, 85 consecutive patients with bicuspid aortic valve undergoing open aortic valve replacement at our institution were prospectively enrolled, presenting either with stenosis (Group 1, n = 58) or regurgitation (Group 2, n = 27). Aortic wall cohesion measured by the dissectometer (Parameters P7, P8 and P9), aortic diameters measured by transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) and thickness of the wall were compared. One patient presenting with the Marfan syndrome was excluded from the study. Patients with aortic regurgitation were significantly younger (48.2 ± 15.8 vs 64.7 ± 10.7, P group (27.3 ± 3.6 vs 25.5 ± 2.4, P = 0.008; 41.1 ± 7.7 vs 36.7 ± 8.0, P = 0.011; 37.6 ± 9.7 vs 33.8 ± 9.1, P = 0.049). The ascending aortic diameter did not differ (43.2 ± 10.6 vs 40.3 ± 9.1, P = 0.292). Patients with AR had significantly worse aortic cohesion, as measured by shear stress testing (P7: 97.2 ± 45.0 vs 145.5 ± 84.9, P = 0.015; P8: 2.00 ± 0.65 vs 3.82 ± 1.56, P cohesion, a thicker aortic wall and a larger aortic root in patients presenting with bicuspid AR compared with patients with AS. These results suggest that bicuspid AR represents a different disease process with possible involvement of the ascending aorta, as demonstrated by dissectometer examination. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  9. Relation between thoracic aortic inflammation and features of plaque vulnerability in the coronary tree in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. An FDG-positron emission tomography and optical coherence tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taglieri, Nevio; Ghetti, Gabriele; Saia, Francesco; Bacchi Reggiani, Maria Letizia; Rapezzi, Claudio [Alma Mater Studiorum Universita di Bologna, Istituto di Cardiologia, Dipartimento di Medicina Specialistica, Diagnostica e Sperimentale, Bologna (Italy); Nanni, Cristina; Bonfiglioli, Rachele; Lima, Giacomo Maria; Fanti, Stefano [Alma Mater Studiorum Universita di Bologna, Istituto di Medicina Nucleare, Dipartimento di Medicina Specialistica, Diagnostica e Sperimentale, Bologna (Italy); Marco, Valeria [CLI Foundation, Rome (Italy); Prati, Francesco [CLI Foundation, Rome (Italy); Ettore Sansavini Health Science Foundation, GVM Care and Research, Cotignola (Italy)

    2017-10-15

    To evaluate the relationship between aortic inflammation as assessed by {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET) and features of plaque vulnerability as assessed by frequency domain-optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). We enrolled 30 consecutive non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. All patients underwent three-vessel OCT before intervention and {sup 18}F-FDG-PET before discharge. Univariable and C-reactive protein (CRP)-adjusted linear regression analyses were performed between features of vulnerability [namely:lipid-rich plaques with and without macrophages and thin cap fibroatheromas (TCFA)] and {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in both ascending (AA) and descending aorta (DA) [measured either as averaged mean and maximum target-to-blood ratio (TBR) or as active slices (TBR{sub max} ≥ 1.6)]. Mean age was 62 years, and 26 patients were male. On univariable linear regression analysis TBR{sub mean} and TBR{sub max} in DA was associated with the number of lipid-rich plaques (β = 4.22; 95%CI 0.05-8.39; p = 0.047 and β = 3.72; 95%CI 1.14-6.30; p = 0.006, respectively). TBR{sub max} in DA was also associated with the number of lipid-rich plaques containing macrophages (β = 2.40; 95%CI 0.07-4.72; p = 0.044). A significant CRP adjusted linear association between the TBR{sub max} in DA and the number of lipid-rich plaques was observed (CRP-adjusted β = 3.58; 95%CI -0.91-6.25; p = 0.01). TBR{sub max} in DA showed a trend towards significant CRP-adjusted association with number of lipid-rich plaques with macrophages (CRP-adjusted β = 2.30; 95%CI -0.11-4.71; p = 0.06). We also observed a CRP-adjusted (β = 2.34; 95%CI 0.22-4.47; p = 0.031) linear association between the number of active slices in DA and the number of lipid-rich plaques. No relation was found between FDG uptake in the aorta and the number of TCFAs. In patients with first NSTEACS{sup ,} {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in

  10. Aortic Graft at Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery as a Source of Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostina, Daria; Zverev, Dmitry; Grebennik, Vadim; Gordeev, Mikhail; Ignatieva, Elena; Voronkina, Irina; Kostareva, Anna; Malashicheva, Anna

    2017-10-01

    One of the serious obstacles of the aortopathies research is a considerable shortage of human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs), which can be used to model the disease. SMC in most cases come from the whole aorta of transplant donors, which are rather difficult to access. In the course of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, a fragment of aortic tissue is excised to make a bypass root. In this study, we show a possibility to use CABG leftover fragments of thoracic aorta as a source of human SMC for in vitro research. We isolated SMC from the fragments of aortic tissues obtained during CABG procedure and compared these cells to the cells that were isolated from aortic tissue of transplant donors. The content of key SMC contractile markers (SMA, SM22α, and vimentin) as well as proliferation and migration rates, metalloproteases MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities were similar in CABG-derived SMC and in transplant donor-derived SMC. In conclusion, leftovers of ascending thoracic aorta obtained during CABG can be used as a source of human aortic SMCs for in vitro research.

  11. Lower thoracic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Muhammad Nazim

    2017-01-01

    The role of thoracic spine related dysfunction in producing lower extremity symptoms is not clear. This case study describes the assessment and treatment of a patient with low back pain and bilateral lower extremity (BLE) symptoms. It was found that patient education about postural awareness and passive mobilization are valuable aids to decrease BLE symptoms due to sympathetic nervous system (SNS) dysfunction and lower thoracic hypomobility. The clinicians need to consider examination and treatment of the lower thoracic area in patients with BLE symptoms. More research is required to explore the role of SNS dysfunction in producing BLE symptoms.

  12. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/007684.htm Transcatheter aortic valve replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is surgery to replace the aortic valve. ...

  13. Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correct direction. These valves include the mitral valve, tricuspid valve, pulmonary valve and aortic valve. Each valve has ... Causes of aortic valve regurgitation include: Congenital heart valve disease. You may have been born with an aortic ...

  14. Re-interventions on the thoracic and thoracoabdominal aorta in patients with Marfan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenhoff, Florian S.; Carrel, Thierry P.

    2017-01-01

    The advent of multi-gene panel genetic testing and the discovery of new syndromic and non-syndromic forms of connective tissue disorders have established thoracic aortic aneurysms as a genetically mediated disease. Surgical results in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) provide an important benchmark for this patient population. Prophylactic aortic root surgery prevents acute dissection and has contributed to the improved survival of MFS patients. In the majority of patients, re-interventions...

  15. Predictors of aortic growth in uncomplicated type B aortic dissection from the Acute Dissection Stent Grafting or Best Medical Treatment (ADSORB) database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamman, Arnoud V; Brunkwall, Jan; Verhoeven, Eric L

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The high-risk patient cohort of uncomplicated type B aortic dissections (uTBADs) needs to be clarified. We compared uTBAD patients treated with best medical treatment (BMT), with and without aortic growth, from the Acute Dissection Stent Grafting or Best Medical Treatment (ADSORB) trial...... database. Furthermore, we looked for trends in outcome for aortic growth and remodeling after BMT and thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) and BMT (TEVAR+BMT). METHODS: BMT patients with available baseline and a 1-year follow-up arterial computed tomography scan were identified. True lumen and false...

  16. Thoracic Insufficiency Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radiation Exposure in Scoliosis Kyphosis Adolescent Back Pain Spondylolysis For Adolescents For Adults Common Questions & Glossary Resources ... Radiation Exposure in Scoliosis Kyphosis Adolescent Back Pain Spondylolysis For Adolescents For Adults Thoracic Insufficiency Syndrome (TIS) ...

  17. Lesão oculta da articulação manúbrio-esternal associada à fratura da coluna torácica Occult manubriosternal joint injury associated with fracture of the thoracic spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Fernando Pereira da Silva Herrero

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam a ocorrência de lesão oculta da articulação manúbrio-esternal na avaliação inicial de um paciente com fratura da coluna torácica (T9. Foi diagnosticada fratura de T9 no paciente do sexo masculino de 37 anos de idade associada a déficit neurológico parcial. No atendimento inicial, as radiografias realizadas não demonstraram a lesão da articulação manúbrioesternal. Durante a reabilitação, após a estabilização cirúrgica da fratura da coluna torácica, subitamente o paciente sentiu dor intensa, acompanhada de deformidade ao nível do esterno, tendo sido diagnosticada luxação manúbrio-esternal nos exames de imagem. Devido à recidiva da luxação e de dor incapacitante, foi necessária a realização da redução aberta e fixação da articulação manúbrio-esternal. Na avaliação após 12 meses, o paciente apresentou recuperação completa da lesão neurológica, consolidação da artrodese do segmento vertebral T7-T11, e manutenção da redução da articulação manúbrio-esternal, que era assintomática durante a realização das atividades cotidianas.The authors report the occurrence of an occult manubriosternal joint injury in the initial evaluation on a patient with a thoracic spine fracture (T9. This T9 fracture was diagnosed in a 37-year-old man and was associated with a partial neurological deficit. At the initial evaluation, the radiographs produced did not show the manubriosternal joint injury. During rehabilitation, after surgical stabilization of the thoracic spine fracture, the patient suddenly felt an intense pain accompanied by deformation at the sternal level. From imaging examinations, manubriosternal dislocation was diagnosed. Because of recurrence of the dislocation and the incapacitating pain, open reduction and fixation of the manubriosternal joint had to be performed. At the 12-month follow-up, the patient presented complete recovery of the neurological lesion, consolidation of the

  18. Nanotechnology in Thoracic Surgery*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Morgan D.; Khullar, Onkar; Frangioni, John V.; Grinstaff, Mark W.; Colson, Yolonda L.

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an exciting and rapidly progressive field offering potential solutions to multiple challenges in the diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer, with the potential for improving imaging and mapping techniques, drug delivery and ablative therapy. With promising preclinical results in many applications directly applicable to thoracic oncology, it is possible that the frontiers of minimally invasive thoracic surgery will eventually be explored on a nanoscale. PMID:20494008

  19. Understanding Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Freischlag, Julie; Orion, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome was once debated in the world of vascular surgery. Today, it is more understood and surprisingly less infrequent than once thought. Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is composed of three types: neurogenic, venous, and arterial. Each type is in distinction to the others when considering patient presentation and diagnosis. Remarkable advances have been made in surgical approach, physical therapy, and rehabilitation of these patients. Dedicated centers of e...

  20. 2D MR angiography of the aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amanuma, Makoto; Hasegawa, Makoto; Watabe, Tsuneya; Heshiki, Atsuko

    1992-01-01

    2D time-of-flight MR angiography was performed in 6 cases of thoracic aortic aneurysm. Oblique saturation pulses were used to suppress the signals of the pulmonary artery and SVC, providing excellent selective MR aortograms. Three dimensional extension of the aneurysm and its relation with cervical branches were easily assessed. It could be possible to replace invasive aortography by this technique. (author)

  1. Thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, John E; Lebus V, George F; Bible, Jesse E

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is a well-described disorder caused by thoracic outlet compression of the brachial plexus and/or the subclavian vessels. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome is the most common manifestation, presenting with pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, and vasomotor changes of the upper extremity. Vascular complications of thoracic outlet syndrome are uncommon and include thromboembolic phenomena and swelling. The clinical presentation is highly variable, and no reproducible study exists to confirm the diagnosis; instead, the diagnosis is based on a physician's judgment after a meticulous history and physical examination. Both nonsurgical and surgical treatment methods are available for thoracic outlet syndrome. Whereas nonsurgical management appears to be effective in some persons, surgical treatment has been shown to provide predictable long-term cure rates for carefully selected patients. In addition, physicians who do not regularly treat patients with thoracic outlet syndrome may not have an accurate view of this disorder, its treatment, or the possible success rate of treatment. Copyright 2015 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  2. Selective Aortic Arch and Root Replacement in Repair of Acute Type A Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischman, Fernando; Elsayed, Ramsey S; Cohen, Robbin G; Tatum, James M; Kumar, S Ram; Kazerouni, Kayvan; Mack, Wendy J; Barr, Mark L; Cunningham, Mark J; Hackmann, Amy E; Baker, Craig J; Starnes, Vaughn A; Bowdish, Michael E

    2018-02-01

    Controversy exists regarding the optimal extent of repair for type A aortic dissection. Our approach is to replace the ascending aorta, and only replace the aortic root or arch when intimal tears are present in those areas. We examined intermediate outcomes with this approach to acute type A aortic dissection repair. Between March 2005 and October 2016, 195 patients underwent repair of acute type A aortic dissection. Repair was categorized by site of proximal and distal anastomosis and extent of repair. Mean follow-up was 31.0 ± 30.9 months. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess survival. Multiple variable Cox proportional hazards modeling was utilized to identify factors associated with overall mortality. Overall survival was 85.1%, 83.9%, 79.1%, and 74.4% at 6, 12, 36, and 60 months, respectively. Eight patients required reintervention. The cumulative incidence of aortic reintervention at 1 year with death as a competing outcome was 3.95%. Multiple variable regression analysis identified factors such as age, preoperative renal failure, concomitant thoracic endograft, postoperative myocardial infarction and sepsis, and need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as predictive of overall mortality. Neither proximal or distal extent of repair, nor need for reintervention affected overall survival (proximal: hazard ratio 1.63, 95% confidence interval: 0.75 to 3.51, p = 0.22; distal: hazard ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval: 0.43 to 2.97, p = 0.81; reintervention: hazard ratio 0.03, 95% confidence interval: 0.002 to 0.490, p < 0.01). A selective approach to root and arch repair in acute type A aortic dissection is safe. If aortic reintervention is needed, survival does not appear to be affected. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Aortic regurgitation after valve-sparing aortic root replacement: modes of failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Takanori; Okita, Yutaka; Matsumori, Masamichi; Okada, Kenji; Minami, Hitoshi; Munakata, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takeshi; Tanaka, Akiko; Sakamoto, Toshihito; Omura, Atsushi; Nomura, Takuo

    2011-11-01

    Despite the positive clinical results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement, little is known about the causes of reoperations and the modes of failure. From October 1999 to June 2010, 101 patients underwent valve-sparing aortic root replacement using the David reimplantation technique. The definition of aortic root repair failure included the following: (1) intraoperative conversion to the Bentall procedure; (2) reoperation performed because of aortic regurgitation; and (3) aortic regurgitation equal to or greater than a moderate degree at the follow-up. Sixteen patients were considered to have repair failure. Three patients required intraoperative conversion to valve replacement, 3 required reoperation within 3 months, and another 8 required reoperation during postoperative follow-up. At initial surgery 5 patients had moderate to severe aortic regurgitation, 6 patients had acute aortic dissections, 3 had Marfan syndrome, 2 had status post Ross operations, 3 had bicuspid aortic valves, and 1 had aortitis. Five patients had undergone cusp repair, including Arantius plication in 3 and plication at the commissure in 2. The causes of early failure in 6 patients included cusp perforation (3), cusp prolapse (3), and severe hemolysis (1). The causes of late failure in 10 patients included cusp prolapse (4), commissure dehiscence (3), torn cusp (2), and cusp retraction (1). Patients had valve replacements at a mean of 23 ± 20.9 months after reimplantation and survived. Causes of early failure after valve-sparing root replacement included technical failure, cusp lesions, and steep learning curve. Late failure was caused by aortic root wall degeneration due to gelatin-resorcin-formalin glue, cusp degeneration, or progression of cusp prolapse. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging-derived ascending aortic flow eccentricity and flow compression are linked to aneurysm morphology†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari, Fabian A; Kocher, Nadja; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Tscheuschler, Anke; Meffert, Philipp; Rylski, Bartosz; Siepe, Matthias; Russe, Maximilian F; Hope, Michael D

    2015-05-01

    The impact of specific blood flow patterns within ascending aortic and/or aortic root aneurysms on aortic morphology is unknown. We investigated the interrelation of ascending aortic flow compression/peripheralization and aneurysm morphology with respect to sinotubuar junction (STJ) definition. Thirty-one patients (aortic root/ascending aortic aneurysm >45 mm) underwent flow-sensitive 4D magnetic resonance thoracic aortic flow measurement at 3 Tesla (Siemens, Germany) at two different institutions (Freiburg, Germany, and San Francisco, CA, USA). Time-resolved image data post-processing and visualization of mid-systolic, mid-ascending aortic flow were performed using local vector fields. The Flow Compression Index (FCI) was calculated individually as a fraction of the area of high-velocity mid-systolic flow over the complete cross-sectional ascending aortic area. According to aortic aneurysm morphology, patients were grouped as (i) small root, eccentric ascending aortic aneurysm (STJ definition) and (ii) enlarged aortic root, non-eccentric ascending aortic aneurysm with diffuse root and tubular enlargement. The mean FCI over all patients was 0.47 ± 0.5 (0.37-0.99). High levels of flow compression/peripheralization (FCI 0.8) occurred more often in Group B (n = 20). The FCI was 0.48 ± 0.05 in Group A and 0.78 ± 0.14 in Group B (P valve (P = 0.6) and type of valve dysfunction (P = 0.22 for aortic stenosis) was not found to be different between groups. Irrespective of aortic valve morphology and function, ascending aortic blood flow patterns are linked to distinct patterns of ascending aortic aneurysm morphology. Implementation of quantitative local blood flow analyses might help to improve aneurysm risk stratification in the future. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  5. Reconstruction of Thoracic Wall Defect with Polytetrafluoroethylene Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Akar

    2014-03-01

    The most common causes of major thoracic traumas are stabwounds, traffic accidents and gunshot wounds. Thoracic wall defects developing due to these injuries should be repaired if they lead to paradoxal respiration. We repaired the thoracic wall defect of the 25-year-old male patient who was admitted to our clinic with gunshot wound with Polytetrafluoroethylene graft as expansion dysfunction and paradoxal respiration developed. No complications developed and he was discharged with recovery.  In conclusion, Polytetrafluoroethylene graft is a good reconstruction tool at present because it prevents paradoxal respiration successfully, applied easily and cosmetic. 

  6. Aortic valve bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens T; Jensen, Maiken Brit; Arendrup, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In aortic valve bypass (AVB) a valve-containing conduit is connecting the apex of the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Candidates are patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis rejected for conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). ...

  7. Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    with tricuspid aortic valves matched for age, gender and grade of valvular disease . These studies suggest that the predisposition for aortic...enlargement in healthy patients with normally functioning BAV when compared to healthy subjects with normally functioning tricuspid aortic valves ...ascending aorta but also in the pulmonary arteries of patients with BAV, compared to that of patients with tricuspid aortic valves . These studies

  8. Equine pericardial roll graft replacement of infected pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubota Hiroshi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Resection of the infected aorta, debridement of the surrounding tissue, in situ graft replacement, and omentopexy is the standard procedure for treating infected aortic aneurysms, but the question of which graft material is optimal is still a matter of controversy. We recently treated a patient with an infected thoracic aortic aneurysm. The aneurysm was located in the proximal aortic arch. Because the patients had previously undergone abdominal surgery, the aortic arch were replaced in situ with a branched equine pericardial roll grafts. The patient is alive and well 23 months after the operation.

  9. Research of Customized Aortic Stent Graft Manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Xin; Liu, Muhan

    2017-03-01

    Thoracic descending aorta diseases include aortic dissection and aortic aneurysm, of which the natural mortality rate is extremely high. At present, endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has been widely used as an effective means for the treatment of descending aortic disease. Most of the existing coating stents are standard design, which are unable to meet the size or structure of different patients. As a result, failure of treatment would be caused by dimensional discrepancy between stent and vessels, which could lead to internal leakage or rupture of blood vessels. Therefore, based on rapid prototyping sacrificial core - coating forming (RPSC-CF), a customized aortic stent graft manufactured technique has been proposed in this study. The aortic stent graft consists of film and metallic stent, so polyether polyurethane (PU) and nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy with good biocompatibility were chosen. To minimum film thickness without degrading performance, effect of different dip coating conditions on the thickness of film were studied. To make the NiTi alloy exhibit super-elasticity at body temperature (37°C), influence of different heat treatment conditions on austenite transformation temperature (Af) and mechanical properties were studied. The results show that the customized stent grafts could meet the demand of personalized therapy, and have good performance in blasting pressure and radial support force, laying the foundation for further animal experiment and clinical experiment.

  10. Not at random location of atherosclerotic lesions in thoracic aorta and their prognostic significance in relation to the risk of cardiovascular events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasilewski, Jarosław; Głowacki, Jan; Poloński, Lech

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic aortic calcium deposits are frequently detected on tomography of the chest, and in other imaging modalities. Numerous studies indicated the correlation of hemodynamic parameters such as wall shear stress in relation to distribution aortic calcifications. This publication discusses similarities and differences of two distinct pathomechanisms of arterial calcifications: intimal associated with atherosclerosis and medial knows as Mönckeberg’s arteriosclerosis. This review also analyzes the frequent coexistence of aortic calcification and coronary artery disease in terms of risk of cardiovascular events

  11. Congenital thoracic vascular anomalies: evaluation with state-of-the-art MR imaging and MDCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellinger, Jeffrey C; Daubert, Melissa; Lee, Edward Y; Epelman, Monica

    2011-09-01

    Congenital thoracic vascular anomalies include embryologic developmental disorders of the thoracic aorta, aortic arch branch arteries, pulmonary arteries, thoracic systemic veins, and pulmonary veins. Diagnostic evaluation of these anomalies in pediatric patients has evolved with innovations in diagnostic imaging technology. State-of-the-art magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, MR angiography multidetector-row computed tomographic (MDCT) angiography, and advanced postprocessing visualization techniques offer accurate and reliable high-resolution two-dimensional and three-dimensional noninvasive anatomic displays for interpretation and clinical management of congenital thoracic vascular anomalies. This article reviews vascular MR imaging, MR angiography, MDCT angiography, and advanced visualization techniques and applications for the assessment of congenital thoracic vascular anomalies, emphasizing clinical embryology and the characteristic imaging findings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prosthesis-patient mismatch in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis: A randomized trial of a self-expanding prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, George L; Little, Stephen H; Tadros, Peter; Deeb, G Michael; Gleason, Thomas G; Heiser, John; Kleiman, Neal S; Oh, Jae K; Popma, Jeffrey J; Adams, David; Huang, Jian; Reardon, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    We compared the incidence of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) between transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) using a self-expanding bioprosthesis and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in the CoreValve US High Risk Pivotal Trial. We sought to determine the influence of PPM on clinical outcomes. Patients with severe aortic stenosis and at increased risk for surgery were randomized 1:1 to TAVR or SAVR. Postoperative PPM was defined by the effective orifice area index (EOAi) as severe PPM (EOAi ≤ 0.65 cm(2)/m(2)) and no severe PPM (EOAi > 0.65 cm(2)/m(2)); clinical outcomes were analyzed in the TAVR arm (n = 389) and SAVR arm (n = 353). Left ventricular mass index and regression were analyzed at baseline and 1 year. The incidence of severe PPM in the SAVR group at 1 year was 25.7% versus 6.2% in the TAVR group (P < .0001). Left ventricular mass index regression at 1 year was 6.8% for TAVR and 15.1% for SAVR in patients with severe PPM. At 1 year the rate of all-cause mortality and acute kidney injury were significantly greater in all patients (TAVR + SAVR) with severe PPM compared with no severe PPM (20.6% vs 12.0% [P = .0145] for death and 19.2% vs 8.5% [P = .0008] for acute kidney injury). In patients with high surgical risk and severe aortic stenosis, severe PPM is more common in patients treated with SAVR than those treated with TAVR. Patients with severe PPM are a greater risk for death and acute kidney injury than patients without severe PPM. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Surgical results for aortic involvement in Marfan syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiiya, N; Matsuzaki, K; Maruyama, R; Kunihara, T; Murashita, T; Aoki, H; Yasuda, K

    2002-07-01

    From 1991 through 2001, 21 Marfan patients underwent aortic operations in our hospital. They received a total of 36 aortic operations, 31 by ourselves including 4 non-elective operations and 2 operations before 1991. Extent of replacement was Bentall + total arch (4), Bentall (8), valve sparing aortic root (reimplantation) (2), re-anastomosis + coronary aortic bypass grafting (CABG) after Bentall (1), ascending + total arch (3), ascending (1), total arch (1), total thoracoabdominal (10), thoracoabdominal (1), descending thoracic (2), distal arch (1), abdominal (2). Multiple operations were required in 11 patients (2 operations in 7, 3 operations in 4). Eight reoperations in 6 patients were for adjacent lesion, 5 reoperations were for remote lesion, and 2 others were for complication of Bentall (initial operation elsewhere). Among the 8 reoperations for adjacent lesion, 3 were scheduled operation (2 with elephant trunk), 4 were for residual dissection, and 1 was for annulo-aortic ectasia (AAE). Total aortic replacement was achieved in 4 and subtotal replacement excluding the root in 2. There was no hospital mortality. Paraparesis occurred in 1 who died 4.7 years after operation. The remaining patients are currently alive. No other aortic event occurred. Aortic reoperation-free survival was 83% at 5 year and 28% at 10 year.

  14. The significance of removing ruptured intervertebral discs for interbody fusion in treating thoracic or lumbar type B and C spinal injuries through a one-stage posterior approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Shi Zhang

    Full Text Available To identify the negative effect on treatment results of reserving damaged intervertebral discs when treating type B and type C spinal fracture-dislocations through a one-stage posterior approach.This is a retrospective review of 53 consecutive patients who were treated in our spine surgery center from January 2005 to May 2012 due to severe thoracolumbar spinal fracture-dislocation. The patients in Group A (24 patients underwent long-segment instrumentation laminectomy with pedicle screw-rod fixators for neural decompression. In Group B (29 patients, the patients underwent long-segment instrumentation laminectomy with pedicle screw-rod fixators for neural decompression evacuating of the ruptured disc and inserting of a bone graft into the evacuated disc space for interbody fusion. The mean time between injury and operation was 4.1 days (range 2-15 days. The clinical, radiologic and complication outcomes were analyzed retrospectively.Periodic follow-ups were carried out until an affirmative union or treatment failure took place. A progressive kyphosis angle larger than 10°, loss of disc height, pseudoarthrosis, recurrence of dislocation or subluxation, or instrument failure before fusion were considered treatment failures. Treatment failures were detected in 13 cases in Group A (failure rate was 54.2%. In Group B, there were 28 cases in which definitive bone fusion was demonstrated on CT scans, and CT scans of the other cases demonstrated undefined pseudoarthrosis without hardware failure. There were statistically significant differences between the two groups (p0.05 Fisher's exact test.Intervertebral disc damage is a common characteristic in type B and C spinal fracture-dislocation injuries. The damaged intervertebral disc should be removed and substituted with a bone graft because reserving the damaged disc in situ increases the risk of treatment failure.

  15. Idiopathic chylopericardium treated by percutaneous thoracic duct embolization after failed surgical thoracic duct ligation

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    Courtney, Malachi; Ayyagari, Raj R. [Yale School of Medicine, Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (United States); Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, 789 Howard Avenue, P.O. Box 208042, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Chylopericardium rarely occurs in pediatric patients, but when it does it is most often a result of lymphatic injury during cardiothoracic surgery. Primary idiopathic chylopericardium is especially rare, with few cases in the pediatric literature. We report a 10-year-old boy who presented with primary idiopathic chylopericardium after unsuccessful initial treatment with surgical lymphatic ligation and creation of a pericardial window. Following readmission to the hospital for a right-side chylothorax resulting from the effluent from the pericardial window, he had successful treatment by interventional radiology with percutaneous thoracic duct embolization. This case illustrates the utility of thoracic duct embolization as a less-invasive alternative to surgical thoracic duct ligation, or as a salvage procedure when surgical ligation fails. (orig.)

  16. Ascending Aorta Stenting After Off-Pump Aortic Wrapping in Stanford A Retrograde Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verscheure, Dorian; Ramadan, Ramzi; Azmoun, Alexandre; Guihaire, Julien; Angel, Claude; Brenot, Philippe; Deleuze, Philippe

    2017-08-01

    We report 4 cases of off-pump ascending aorta wrapping combined with ascending aorta stenting in retrograde Stanford A acute aortic dissection (SAAD). Since 2008, 18 patients have undergone wrapping of the ascending aorta at our institution. Four patients had a persistent circulating false lumen in the ascending aorta after wrapping, with a threat to the aortic root. We chose an endovascular approach with ascending aorta stenting. Follow-up computed tomography showed a reapplication of the intimal flap in the reinforced aorta. Ascending aorta stenting after aortic wrapping for retrograde SAAD is a safe and efficient technique to prevent proximal progression of the dissection. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Thoracic endografting is a viable option for the octogenarian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preventza, Ourania; Bavaria, Joseph; Ramaiah, Venkatesh; Moser, G William; Szeto, Wilson; Wheatley, Grayson; Moeller, Patrick; Rodriquez-Lopez, Julio; Diethrich, Edward

    2010-07-01

    The objective of our study is to determine the feasibility of thoracic aortic endografting in octogenarians. Between 2000 and 2006 a total of 504 consecutive patients from two high-volume institutions underwent thoracic endoluminal graft repair for various thoracic aortic pathologies. The following devices were used: Gore TAG (W.L. Gore, Flagstaff, AZ); Talent (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN); and Zenith (Cook, Inc, Bloomington, IN). One hundred one (101 of 504; 20%) patients were octogenarians; 60 males (1.5:1, M:F) with a mean age of 83.7 years. Indications for intervention included the following: atherosclerotic aneurysms, 75 (75 of 101, 74%); acute and chronic dissections, 11(11 of 101, 11%); penetrating aortic ulcers, 9 (9 of 101, 9%); contained ruptures, 5 (5 of 101, 5%); and 1 transection (1 of 101, 1%). Mean length of follow-up was 3.4 +/- 2.1 years. No intraoperative deaths were noted. Thirty-day mortality was 10% (10 of 101 patients) with an overall late mortality of 26.7% (27 of 101 patients). Mean hospital stay was 6.3 days. A total of 12 neurologic events were noticed: 2 paraplegia (2 of 101, 2%); 4 paraparesis (4 of 101, 4%), 3 with full recovery; and 6 (6 of 101, 6%) cerebrovascular accidents with full recovery in half. A total of 15 endoleaks (15 of 101, 15%) were seen and, in 11, interventions were required. Our data suggest that technical success is high and age-specific outcomes in this group of patients are favorable. Further studies are warranted. Copyright 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Quadricuspid Aortic Valve Combined with Moderate Ascending Aortic Dilatation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenskiy, Vladimir E.; Osadchii, Alexei M.; Gordeev, Mikhail L.

    2015-01-01

    The quadricuspid aortic valve is a very uncommon malformation associated with aortic insufficiency, aortic stenosis, endocarditis, and ascending aortic dilatation. We report four cases of this aortic valve malformation. One patient with severe aortic regurgitation and moderate aortic dilatation required aortic valve replacement. Three patients had mild or moderate aortic insufficiency combined with moderate ascending aortic dilatation. These patients were referred to follow-up. The presented cases demonstrate that this aortic valve malformation may not be as rare as it appears and that attention must be paid to any quadricuspid findings during computed tomographic angiography and echocardiography. PMID:27390747

  19. New predictor of aortic enlargement in uncomplicated type B aortic dissection based on elliptic Fourier analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Ito, Toshiro; Kuroda, Yosuke; Uchiyama, Hiroki; Watanabe, Toshitaka; Yasuda, Naomi; Nakazawa, Junji; Harada, Ryo; Kawaharada, Nobuyoshi

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to re-examine the conventional predictive factors for dissected aortic enlargement, such as the aortic and false lumen diameter and to consider whether the morphological elements of the dissected aorta could be predictors by quantifying the 'shape' of the true lumen based on elliptic Fourier analysis. A total of 80 patients with uncomplicated type B aortic dissection were included. The patients were divided into 'Enlargement group' and 'No Change group.' Between the 2 groups, the mean systolic blood pressure during follow-up, aortic and false lumen maximum diameters, and analysed morphological data were compared using each statistical method. The maximum aortic and false lumen diameters were significantly larger in the Enlargement group than in the No Change group (39.3 vs 35.9 mm; P = 0.0058) (23.5 vs 18.2 mm; P = 0.000095). The principal component 1, which is the data calculated by elliptic Fourier analysis, was significantly lower in the Enlargement group than in the No Change group (0.020 vs - 0.072; P = 0.000049). The mean systolic blood pressure ≥130 mmHg, aortic diameter, false lumen diameter and principal component 1 were included in the Cox proportional hazard model as covariates to determine the significant predictive variable. Principal component 1 demonstrated the only significance with aortic enlargement on multivariate analysis (odds ratio = 0.32; P = 0.048). The analysed and calculated morphological data of the shape of the true lumen can be more effective predictive factors of aortic enlargement of type B dissection than the conventional factors. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  20. Modelling of aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection through 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Daniel; Squelch, Andrew; Sun, Zhonghua

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess if the complex anatomy of aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection can be accurately reproduced from a contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan into a three-dimensional (3D) printed model. Contrast-enhanced cardiac CT scans from two patients were post-processed and produced as 3D printed thoracic aorta models of aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection. The transverse diameter was measured at five anatomical landmarks for both models, compared across three stages: the original contrast-enhanced CT images, the stereolithography (STL) format computerised model prepared for 3D printing and the contrast-enhanced CT of the 3D printed model. For the model with aortic dissection, measurements of the true and false lumen were taken and compared at two points on the descending aorta. Three-dimensional printed models were generated with strong and flexible plastic material with successful replication of anatomical details of aortic structures and pathologies. The mean difference in transverse vessel diameter between the contrast-enhanced CT images before and after 3D printing was 1.0 and 1.2 mm, for the first and second models respectively (standard deviation: 1.0 mm and 0.9 mm). Additionally, for the second model, the mean luminal diameter difference between the 3D printed model and CT images was 0.5 mm. Encouraging results were achieved with regards to reproducing 3D models depicting aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection. Variances in vessel diameter measurement outside a standard deviation of 1 mm tolerance indicate further work is required into the assessment and accuracy of 3D model reproduction. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy and New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology.

  1. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Society of Thoracic Surgeons Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Instagram Flickr About STS Governance and Leadership Bylaws Policies ... Tweets by @STS_CTsurgery Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Instagram Flickr Footer menu Home Contact Us CT Surgery ...

  2. Orthotopic branched endovascular aortic arch repair in patients who cannot undergo classical surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerny, Martin; Rylski, Bartosz; Morlock, Julia; Schröfel, Holger; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Saint Lebes, Bertrand; Meyrignac, Olivier; Mokrane, Fatima; Lescan, Mario; Schlensak, Christian; Hazenberg, Constatijn; Bloemert-Tuin, Trijntje; Braithwaite, Sue; van Herwaarden, Joost; Rousseau, Herve

    2018-01-16

    Our goal was to assess the results after orthotopic branched endovascular aortic arch repair using a new double-branch endoprosthesis in patients with thoracic aortic disease affecting the aortic arch who cannot undergo classical surgery. Within a 4-year period, 15 patients with thoracic aortic disease affecting the aortic arch were treated with the Bolton Relay plus double-branch endoprosthesis (Bolton Medical, Sunrise, FL, USA). We assessed clinical outcome, occurrence of endoleaks and the need for secondary interventions. The median logistic EuroSCORE I level was 13.6 (4.2; 22.8). The in-hospital mortality rate was 6.7%. A disabling stroke was observed in 1 (6.7%) patient, whereas non-disabling strokes occurred in 2 (13.3%) patients. Type I and III endoleaks occurred in 6.7%. The median follow-up period was 263 (1st quartile 84; 2nd quartile 564) days. Four patients died during the follow-up period. Aortic-related survival was 100%. Orthotopic branched endovascular aortic arch repair using the Bolton Relay Plus double-branch endoprosthesis is a safe and feasible technique enriching the armamentarium to treat patients with thoracic aortic disease who cannot undergo classical surgery. Aortic-related survival is excellent, and the occurrence of disabling stroke and endoleaks warranting treatment is low. Further studies are needed to assess the long-term durability of this new method. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  3. Transcarotid Artery Endovascular Reconstruction of the Aortic Arch by Modified Bifurcated Stent Graft for Stanford Type A Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A 40-year-old man with Stanford type B dissection underwent his first endovascular repair (EVAR in April 2004 by Talent thoracic stent graft. He had an uncomplicated recovery and maintained good blood pressure control. However, a new retrograde dissection appeared in September 2004. The new dissection involved his aortic arch and ascending thoracic aorta to the opening of the coronary arteries. To reconstruct the aortic arch, bypasses between the right common carotid artery (RCCA, left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery were performed before endovascular repair. A modified bifurcated Talent stent graft was deployed from the RCCA to the ascending thoracic aorta with a long limb in the innominate artery and a short limb in the aortic arch. A further two pieces of graft were deployed via the common femoral artery. The ascending thoracic aorta and aortic arch were reconstructed completely by the bifurcated stent graft. The final angiography confirmed that there was good stent graft configuration, normal blood flow, and stable haemodynamics. No endoleak or other major complications were encountered. This result indicated that it is possible to reconstruct the aortic arch with a bifurcated stent graft and could be a new endovascular repair model for complex thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection.

  4. RADIOGRAPHIC THORACIC ANATOMY OF THE RED PANDA (AILURUS FULGENS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makungu, Modesta; du Plessis, Wencke M; Barrows, Michelle; Groenewald, Hermanus B; Koeppel, Katja N

    2016-09-01

    The red panda ( Ailurus fulgens ) is classified as an endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. The natural distribution of the red panda is in the Himalayas and southern China. Thoracic diseases such as dirofilariasis, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, tracheal obstruction, lung worm infestation, and pneumonia have been reported in the red panda. The aim of this study was to describe the normal radiographic thoracic anatomy of captive red pandas as a species-specific reference for routine health examinations and clinical cases. Right lateral (RL) and dorsoventral (DV) inspiratory phase views of the thorax were obtained in 11 adult captive red pandas. Measurements were made and ratios calculated to establish reference ranges for the mean vertebral heart score on the RL (8.34 ± 0.25) and DV (8.78 ± 0.34) views and the mean ratios of the caudal vena cava diameter to the vertebral body length above tracheal bifurcation (0.67 ± 0.05) and tracheal diameter to the width of the third rib (2.75 ± 0.24). The majority of animals (10/11) had 14 thoracic vertebrae, except for one animal that had 15 thoracic vertebrae. Rudimentary clavicles were seen in 3/11 animals. The ovoid, oblique cardiac silhouette was more horizontally positioned and elongated in older animals. A redundant aortic arch was seen in the oldest animal. The trachea was seen with mineralized cartilage rings in all animals. The carina was clearly seen in the majority of animals (10/11). Variations exist in the normal radiographic thoracic anatomy of different species. Knowledge of the normal radiographic thoracic anatomy of the red panda should prove useful for routine health examinations and in the diagnosis of thoracic diseases.

  5. Diagnostic radiology of thoracic diseases. Textbook and atlas. 4. compl. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    The book on diagnostic radiology of thoracic diseases covers the following topics: diagnostic techniques and normal diagnostic findings using x-ray radiography, CT, scintigraphy, angiography, bronchography, ultrasonography and NMR imaging; malformations; infections; emphysema, chronic lung diseases and asthma; inhalation damage and pneumoconiosis; neoplasm; vascular diseases; thorax injuries, pleura diseases, heart diseases, mediastinum diseases; midriff diseases; thoracic wall diseases; pathological pattern in CT; radiological indications and differential diagnostics; thoracic interventions.

  6. Outcomes following operative management of thoracic outlet syndrome in the pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Jesus M; Gonzalez, Lorena; Kfoury, Elias; Echeverria, Angela; Bechara, Carlos F; Lin, Peter H

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Thoracic outlet syndrome, a condition commonly reported in adults, occurs infrequently in the pediatric population. The objective of this study was to assess the outcome of surgical interventions of thoracic outlet syndrome in pediatric patients. Methods Clinical records of all pediatric patients with thoracic outlet syndrome who underwent operative repair from 2002 to 2015 in a tertiary pediatric hospital were reviewed. Pertinent clinical variables and treatment outcomes were analyzed. Results Sixty-eight patients underwent a total of 72 thoracic outlet syndrome operations (mean age 15.7 years). Venous, neurogenic, and arterial thoracic outlet syndromes occurred in 39 (57%), 21 (31%), and 8 (12%) patients, respectively. Common risk factors for children with venous thoracic outlet syndrome included sports-related injuries (40%) and hypercoagulable disorders (33%). Thirty-five patients (90%) with venous thoracic outlet syndrome underwent catheter-based interventions followed by surgical decompression. All patients underwent first rib resection with scalenectomy via either a supraclavicular approach (n = 60, 88%) or combined supraclavicular and infraclavicular incisions (n = 8, 12%). Concomitant temporary arteriovenous fistula creation was performed in 14 patients (36%). Three patients with arterial thoracic outlet syndrome underwent first rib resection with concomitant subclavian artery aneurysm repair. The mean follow-up duration was 38.4 ± 11.6 months. Long-term symptomatic relief was achieved in 94% of patients. Conclusions Venous thoracic outlet syndrome is the most common form of thoracic outlet syndrome in children, followed by neurogenic and arterial thoracic outlet syndromes. Competitive sports-related injuries remain the most common risk factor for venous and neurogenic thoracic outlet syndromes. Temporary arteriovenous fistula creation was useful in venous thoracic outlet syndrome patients in selective children. Surgical

  7. CT and MR imaging of the thoracic aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Cesare Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At present time, both CT and MRI are valuable techniques in the study of the thoracic aorta. Nowadays, CT represents the most widely employed technique for the study of the thoracic aorta. The new generation CTs show sensitivities up to 100% and specificities of 98-99%. Sixteen and wider row detectors provide isotropic pixels, mandatory for the ineludible longitudinal reconstruction. The main limits are related to the X-ray dose expoure and the use of iodinated contrast media. MRI has great potential in the study of the thoracic aorta. Nevertheless, if compared to CT, acquisition times remain longer and movement artifact susceptibility higher. The main MRI disadvantages are claustrophobia, presence of ferromagnetic implants, pacemakers, longer acquisition times with respect to CT, inability to use contrast media in cases of renal insufficiency, lower spatial resolution and less availability than CT. CT is preferred in the acute aortic disease. Nevertheless, since it requires iodinated contrast media and X-ray exposure, it may be adequately replaced by MRI in the follow up of aortic diseases. The main limitation of MRI, however, is related to the scarce visibility of stents and calcifications.

  8. A technique of aortic annulus enlargement with a Freestyle stentless bioprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bical, Olivier M; Nutu, Ovidiu; Deleuze, Philippe

    2012-02-01

    We describe our surgical technique to manage a small aortic annulus during aortic valve replacement. Starting with the posterior annular enlargement incision described by Manouguian, a stentless porcine aortic root, with excision of the left and right porcine coronary segments and conservation of the mural wall (Freestyle MS design, Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN ), was used. The Freestyle bioprosthesis enlarges the aortic annulus using a direct suture of the valve on the enlarged annulus, and the aorta is closed by a direct suture of the mural wall of the bioprosthesis. Therefore, the aortic annulus enlargement is made only using the aortic bioprosthesis, without other material. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. New paradigms in the management of acute type B aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Rosario; Secco, Gioel Gabrio; Fattori, Rossella

    2015-11-01

    Type B aortic dissection is a relatively uncommon and multifaceted disease, whose management is ongoing debated. Its wide range of clinical presentations and anatomical features hamper the early identification and medical management. In the past few years, the introduction of endovascular techniques opened new paradigms in comprehension and management of aortic diseases. Aim of this review is to discuss contemporary therapeutic approaches of acute type B aortic dissections highlighting the growing role of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in focusing its complex physiopathology. Prompt medical therapy followed by endovascular repair should be considered as the gold standard in complicated acute type B aortic dissection. Moreover, recent findings also suggest a potential benefit in case of uncomplicated cases. Management of acute type B aortic dissection is progressively shifting into endovascular approach. However, further studies are warranted to define the optimal treatment strategy in each subset of patients and anatomical features.

  10. Aortic Annular Enlargement during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selman Dumani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the surgery of aortic valve replacement is always attempted, as much as possible, to implant the larger prosthesis with the mains goals to enhance the potential benefits, to minimise transvalvular gradient, decrease left ventricular size and avoid the phenomenon of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Implantation of an ideal prosthesis often it is not possible, due to a small aortic annulus. A variety of aortic annulus enlargement techniques is reported to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch. We present the case that has submitted four three times open heart surgery. We used Manouguian technique to enlarge aortic anulus with excellent results during the fourth time of surgery.

  11. Aortography following subdiaphragmal aortic biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmler, J.

    1982-01-01

    A juxtaposition of the subdiaphragmal and infrarenal translumbar aortic biopsy sites showed decisive advantages in favour of the higher site: a more stable position because of better anatomic fixation and rarer incidence of vascular alterations, a wider vascular lumen. Disadvantages lie in the fact that the large visceral arteries (especially Tr. coeliacus) branch off nearly and in the close anatomic relationship to large abdominal organs and the thoracal region. Evaluation of the radiographical image of the vascular tree after subdiaphragmal aortic biopsy showed an average 82% of the vessels to the area of the Knees to be assessable (renal arteries approximately 93%, popliteal arteries approximately 70%). Beyong, the method proved unsatisfactory: 52% of the vessels could not, or not safety, be evaluated. A relatively broad spectrum of indications by comparison with transfemoral catheter aortography had no influence on the rate of complications with reference to either method. A comparison of the topographic conditions shows the need for even more scrupulons observation of the technique in subdiaphragmal biopsy than in the infrarenal one. To sum up the results obtained, subdiaphregmal translumbar aortography is to be preferred to the infrarenal one where transfemoral catheter aortography is contra-indicated, within the limits mentioned. (orig.) [de

  12. Transport of 125I-albumin across normal and deendothelialized rabbit thoracic aorta in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, C.A.; Colton, C.K.; Smith, K.A.; Stemerman, M.B.; Lees, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    Transmural concentration profiles of 125 I-albumin in vivo were measured across the normal and balloon catheter-deendothelialized rabbit descending thoracic aorta as a function of time following intravenous injection. A tracer was injected 5 or 60 minutes after deendothelialization, and the animals were sacrificed after circulation times of 10, 30 or 60 minutes. The aorta was immediately excised and frozen flat between glass slides. Samples were serially sectioned parallel to the intimal surface in a refrigerated microtome, washed with trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and counted. Relative tissue concentration profiles of TCA-precipitable radioactivity from the media of control animals showed entry from both luminal and adventitial sides, as previously found with conscious normal rabbits, but spatial gradients at both luminal and medial-adventitial borders were less steep. Relative concentration levels in ballooned animals were 10- to 40-fold higher than in controls, and the profiles were flatter. Uptake rates at equivalent circulation times were greater in experiments initiated 60 minutes, as compared with 5 minutes, after deendothelialization, suggesting that progressive medial edema may have occurred following balloon injury. These results show that the intact endothelium is the dominant mass transfer resistance for 125 I-albumin transport across the aortic wall. The data also suggest that the incomplete monolayer of platelets adherent to the subendothelium after balloon deendothelialization is not a substantial resistance to transport, as compared to that of the media, and that convection plays a more important role than diffusion for 125 I-albumin transport across the deendothelialized aortic wall

  13. THE IMPACT OF DIAGNOSTIC DISCREPANCIES IN AORTIC DISSECTION MANAGEMENT

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    Abdalla Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aortic dissection is uncommon with high mortality rate if untreated. We report a challenging case of long segment aortic dissection in which the dissection type was very difficult to identify due to limitations of the available imaging studies. 66-year-old male presented to us with 3 days history of chest pain and difficulty breathing. He is known to be hypertensive. In the emergency room, patient has systolic blood pressure >190. Chest X-ray showed widening of mediastinum. CT angiography of chest and abdomen showed an acute dissection of the thoracic aorta extending from the mid ascending aorta to the infra-renal aorta suggestive of Stanford type A aortic dissection. Transthoracic and Trans-esophageal echocardiography revealed a partially calcified intimal flap in the distal portion of the arch and in the descending thoracic aorta suggestive of Stanford type B aortic dissection. Medical treatment started, and repeated CT angiography was obtained and it confirmed type B aortic dissection. One week after discharge, patient was readmitted with severe neck pain and difficulty breathing. CT chest without contrast showed grossly stable appearance of type A dissection consistent with the first CT angiography. Cardiothoracic surgery immediately reevaluated the situation and recommended surgical intervention.

  14. Consumption coagulopathy in acute aortic dissection: principles of management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuyong; Han, Lu; Li, Jiachen; Gong, Ming; Zhang, Hongjia; Guan, Xinliang

    2017-06-12

    The effect of acute aortic dissection itself on coagulopathy or surgery-related coagulopathy has never been specifically studied. The aim of the present study was to perioperatively describe consumption coagulopathy in patients with acute aortic dissection. Sixty-six patients with acute type A aortic dissection were enrolled in this study from January 2015 to September 2016. Thirty-six patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms were used as a control group during the same period. Consumption coagulopathy was evaluated using standard laboratory tests, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and thromboelastograghy at five perioperative time-points. A significant reduction in clotting factors and fibrinogen was observed at the onset of acute aortic dissection. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and thromboelastograghy also revealed a persistent systemic activation of the coagulation system and the consumption of clotting factors. In contrast, although platelet counts were consistently low, we did not find that platelet function was more impaired in the acute aortic dissection group than the control group. After surgery, clotting factors and fibrinogen were more impaired than platelet function. Thus, we proposed that hemostatic therapy should focus on the rapid and sufficient supplementation of clotting factors and fibrinogen to improve consumption coagulopathy in patients with acute aortic dissection.

  15. Comparing American, European and Asian practice guidelines for aortic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozado, Jose; Martin, Maria; Pascual, Isaac; Hernandez-Vaquero, Daniel; Moris, Cesar

    2017-05-01

    The aortic disease comprises a group of different pathologies of high prevalence, seriousness and ever changing by the medical and surgical investigations. Therefore cardiovascular scientific societies in USA, Europe and Asia have created Task Force on practice guidelines (PG) to develop, update and revise PG for aortic diseases. These documents issue recommendations on the diagnosis and management of different aortic diseases. The three societies agree on the recommendations about diagnostic tests and on the value of computed tomography and magnetic resonance as the main tools for the diagnosis and follow-up of aortic disease. Concerning to acute aortic syndromes (AAS), American and European GPs recognize intramural hematoma (IMH) as a type of AAS with surgery indication; however Asian guidelines consider IMH a pathological process different from AAS and indicate medical treatment. In thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA), all express the need for an adequate control of cardiovascular risk factors, emphasizing strict control of blood pressure, smoking cessation and recommend the use of beta-blockers and statins. The threshold for asymptomatic repair is 5.5 cm in European and American and 6 cm for Asian PG, with lower thresholds in Marfan and bicuspid aortic valve (BAV). As regards the abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), the PGs recognize the adequate control of cardiovascular risk factors, but there are differences in class of recommendation on statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or beta-blockers to prevent progression of AAA. For intervention, the threshold diameter in asymptomatic is 5.5 cm but can be reduced to 5 cm in women as recommended by Asian PG. Moreover the specific diseases such as Marfan, BAV, pregnancy or atherosclerosis aortic present specific recommendations with small differences between PGs. In conclusion, PGs are interesting and appropriate documents at present. They issue recommendations based on evidence that help the clinician and

  16. Aortic root surgery in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheick-Yousif, Basheer; Sheinfield, Ami; Tager, Salis; Ghosh, Probal; Priesman, Sergey; Smolinsky, Aram K; Raanani, Ehud

    2008-03-01

    As the shortcomings of the Bentall operation and its variants in the Marfan syndrome have become apparent, the recent cusp-sparing techniques (remodeling or reimplantation) bear promise of better mid-term and long-term outcomes. To examine the results of aortic root surgery in patients with Marfan syndrome. During the period March 1994 to September 2007, 220 patients underwent aortic valve-sparing surgery; 20 were Marfan patients (group 1) who were compared with another 20 Marfan patients undergoing composite aortic root replacement (group 2). Fourteen patients had aortic dissection and 26 had thoracic aortic aneurysm. There were 31 males and 9 females with a mean age of 37.9 +/- 13.8 years. In group 1, reimplantation was used in 13 patients, remodeling in 4, and aortic valve repair with sinotubular junction replacement in 3. In group 2, a mechanical valve conduit was used. Mean logistic Euroscore was 12.27 +/- 14.6% for the whole group, five of whom were emergent cases Group 2 had more previous cardiac procedures compared to group 1 (9 vs. 2, P = 0.03) and shorter cross-clamp time (122 +/- 27.1 vs. 153.9 +/- 23.7 minutes, P = 0.0004). Overall mortality was 10%. Early mortality was 10% in group 2 and 5% in group 1 (NS). Mean follow-up time was 25 months for group 2 and 53 months for group 1. Three patients were reoperated; all had undergone the remodeling. Five year freedom from reoperation and death was 86% and 90% in group 2 and 70% and 95% in group 1 (P = 0.6, P = 0.6), respectively. Late survival of patients with Marfan syndrome was similar in both groups. Root reconstruction tends towards a higher incidence of late reoperations if the remodeling technique is used. We now prefer to use the reimplantation technique.

  17. Spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulineau, Theresa Marie; Andrews-Jones, Lydia; Van Alstine, William

    2005-09-01

    This report describes 2 cases of spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in young Border Collie and Border Collie crossbred dogs. Histology was performed in one of the cases involving an unusual splitting of the elastin present within the wall of the aorta, consistent with elastin dysplasia as described in Marfan syndrome in humans. The first case involved a young purebred Border Collie that died suddenly and the second case involved a Border Collie crossbred dog that died after a 1-month history of seizures. Gross lesions included pericardial tamponade with dissection of the ascending aorta in the former case and thoracic cavity hemorrhage, mediastinal hematoma, and aortic dissection in the latter. Histologic lesions in the case of the Border Collie crossbred dog included a dissecting hematoma of the ascending aorta with elastin dysplasia and right axillary arterial intimal proliferation.

  18. Characterization of atherosclerotic disease in thoracic aorta: A 3D, multicontrast vessel wall imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Changwu [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Department of Radiology, The Second Clinical Medical College, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China); Qiao, Huiyu; He, Le [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Yuan, Chun [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Chen, Huijun; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Rui [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Wang, Wei; Du, Fang [Department of Radiology, The Second Clinical Medical College, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China); Li, Cheng, E-mail: cjr.licheng@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Zhao, Xihai, E-mail: xihaizhao@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the characteristics of plaque in the thoracic aorta using three dimensional multicontrast magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: Elderly subjects (≥60 years) were recruited in this study. Thoracic aorta was imaged on a 3.0T MR scanner by acquiring multicontrast sequences. The plaque burden was evaluated by measuring lumen area, wall area, wall thickness, and normalized wall index. The presence or absence of plaque and intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH)/mural thrombus (MT) were identified. The characteristics of atherosclerosis among different thoracic aorta segments (AAO: ascending aorta; AOA: aortic arch, and DOA: descending aorta) were determined. Results: Of 66 recruited subjects (mean age 72.3 ± 6.2 years, 30 males), 55 (83.3%) had plaques in the thoracic aorta. The prevalence of plaque in AAO, AOA, and DAO was 5.4%, 72.7%, and 71.2%, respectively. In addition, 21.2% of subjects were found to have lesions with IPH/MT in the thoracic aorta. The prevalence of IPH/MT in segment of AAO, AOA and DAO was 0%, 13.6%, and 12.1%, respectively. The aortic wall showed the highest NWI in DAO (34.1% ± 4.8%), followed by AOA (31.2% ± 5%), and AAO (26.8% ± 3.3%) (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Three dimensional multicontrast MR imaging is capable of characterizing atherosclerotic plaques in the thoracic aorta. The findings of high prevalence of plaques and the presence of high risk plaques in the thoracic aorta suggest early screening for aortic vulnerable lesions in the elderly.

  19. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Glaucia; Araujo Neto, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza Junior, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Hospital Universitario Antonio Pedro (HUAP/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: the aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. Methods: this was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. Results: the majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). Conclusions: it is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. (author)

  20. Acute Aortic Dissection: Is There Something Better than Physician Gestalt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lane M; Miller, Chadwick D

    2018-03-02

    Acute aortic dissection (AAD) sits at the intersection of rare, deadly, and expensive to diagnose conditions. It is a disease that every emergency physician (EP) considers on a daily basis, but encounters only a handful during a career. Considerable attention has been given to this disease after the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and 10 cosponsoring professional societies published the 2010 thoracic aortic disease guidelines to improve the missed or delayed treatment of AAD (1). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Transluminal endovascular stent-graft for the treatment of aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Do Yun; Chang, Byung Chul; Shim, Won Heum; Cho, Seung Yun; Chung, Nam Sik; Kwon, Hyuk Moon; Lee, Young Joon; Lee, Jong Tae

    1995-01-01

    The standard treatment for aortic aneurysms is surgical replacement with a prosthetic graft. Currently there is great interest in endoluminal intervention for treatment of aortic aneurysm. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of endoluminally placed Stent-graft for the treatment of aortic aneurysms. Transluminal endovascular Stent-graft placements were attempted in 9 patients with infra-renal aortic aneurysms(n 6), thoracic aortic aneurysm(n = 1), and aortic dissection(n = 2). The endovascular Stent-grafts were custom-designed for each patient and were constructed of self-expandable modified Gianturco Stents covered with polytetrafluroethylene. The Stent-grafts were introduced through a 16-18 French sheath and expanded to 17-30 mm in diameter. The endovascular therapy was performed using a common femoral artery cutdown with local anesthesia. The endovascular Stent-graft deployment was achieved in 7 of 9 patients. Two cases failed deployment of the Stent-graft due to iliac artery stenosis and tortousity. There were complete thrombosis of the thoracic and infra-renal aortic aneurysm surround the Stent-graft in 3 patients, and persistent leak with partial thrombosis in 2. Two patients with aortic dissection were successfully treated by obliteration of entry tears. There were no major complication associated with Stent-graft placement. These preliminary results show that transluminal endovascular Stent-grafts offer great promise and good results. Further investigation is needed to establish its long-term safety and efficacy

  2. Hybrid treatment of a huge complex aortic pseudo-aneurysm subsequent to a coarctation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizza, Antonio; Barletta, Valentina; Palmieri, Cataldo; Berti, Sergio

    2017-07-01

    Endovascular treatment of pseudo-aneurysms subsequent to a pre-existing aortic coarctation is becoming a well-accepted technical solution especially in patients presenting anatomical challenges involving the aortic arch. We report the case of a 65-year-old woman with a huge pseudo-aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta. Diagnostic imaging assessment documented also the presence of an aneurysmatic aberrant right subclavian artery. Due to patient's anatomical arterial condition, we decided to treat the aneurysm applying a hybrid approach. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical evaluation of atherosclerosis and mechanical properties of the thoracic aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiki, Atsushi

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate the aortic wall atherosclerosis, X-ray CT and ECG gated radionuclide angiography were performed in 25 subjects. They were classified into 17 normotensive group (N) and 8 hypertensive group (HT). The time-activity curve was generated using radionuclide angiography in the portion of the thoracic aorta. The aortic wall distensibility was expressed as 100ΔV/V 0 / PP, where ΔV was difference between maximum and minimum (V 0 ) counts of the aorta, and PP was pulse pressure. The degree of the aortic wall atherosclerosis was evaluated by X-ray CT. The aortic wall CT-score was calculated from the CT-scores measured whithin the region of interest of the other margin of the aorta and of the background by X-ray CT. There was a significant correlation between aortic wall CT-score and systolic blood pressure (r=0.59, p<0.01) or aortic wall distensibility (r=-0.74, p<0.01)), but no correlation existed between aortic wall CT-score and diastolic blood pressure (r=0.11, p:NS). The aortic wall distensibility was higher and the aortic wall CT-score was lower in N-group than in HT-group, whereas there was no difference of the radius of the aorta between both groups. These results suggest that the aortic wall atherosclerosis advanced progressively in hypertensive patients and systolic blood pressure was a good predictor of the degree of the aortic atherosclerosis. (author)

  4. Invasive aspergillosis in the aortic arch with infectious Aspergillus lesions in pulmonary bullae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Watanabe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A patient with pulmonary bullae died of massive hemoptysis. At autopsy a hole was observed in the aortic wall. A microscopic examination indicated small Aspergillus lesions in pulmonary bullae and extensive necrotic lesions with Aspergillus hyphae in the media of the thoracic aorta. These findings led to a diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis in the aortic arch. This is a rare case in which Aspergillus invaded the aorta in a patient without hematologic neoplasms or neutropenia.

  5. A new technique for interrupted aortic arch repair: the Neville tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergoënd, Eric; Bouissou, Antoine; Paoli, Florent; Roullet-Renoleau, Nicolas; Duchalais, Alain; Neville, Paul

    2010-10-01

    We have developed a new technique for interrupted aortic arch repair in which the pulmonary artery anterior wall is cut off and tailored so as to re-establish aortic continuity with an autologous tube. We are describing this method herein, with an 8-year follow-up of the first patient. Copyright © 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Trans-apical aortic valve implantation in a patient with stentless valve degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; MacCarthy, Philip; Monaghan, Mark; Wendler, Olaf

    2011-06-01

    Trans-apical valve-in-valve trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has successfully been performed in selected, high-risk patients, who suffered prosthetic degeneration after aortic valve replacement using stented xenografts. We report the case of a 79-year-old male patient who underwent one of the first successful TAVIs in a failing stentless bioprosthesis. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Endovascular Repair of Ascending Aortic Pseudoaneurysm With Custom-Designed Endograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piffaretti, Gabriele; Cottini, Marzia; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Castelli, Patrizio; Beghi, Cesare; Mariscalco, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    Open repair of ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm (AscAP) carries high risks and mortality rate. Previous papers reported the off-label use of standard thoracic or abdominal endograft in very selected cases. We present the case of a 57-year-old man with an AscAP successfully managed with a new custom-designed endograft. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. MR imaging of the thoracic aorta in patients with Marfan syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommerhoff, B.A.; Sechtem, U.P.; Schiller, N.B.; Higgins, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    Gated MR imaging was used to evaluate the thoracic aorta in 11 with Marfan syndrome, eight patients with aneurysm of the ascending aorta, and 20 healthy subjects. The aortic diameter was measured on transverse and sagittal images at the levels of the sinuses of Valsalva, the caudal portion of the ascending aorta, the prearch region, the middle arch, and the descending aorta. The sinus of Valsalva-prearch region aortic diameter ratio in patients with Marfan syndrome was significantly greater than in the two other groups, indicating the characteristic shape of the Maranoid aorta. MR imaging allows definitive measurements' of aortic dimensions and is a valuable noninvasive method for monitoring the course of aortic enlargement

  9. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for acute thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Goodman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Operative intervention for thoracic trauma typically requires thoracotomy. We hypothesized that thoracoscopy may be safely and effectively utilized for the acute management of thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: The Trauma Registry of a Level I trauma center was queried from 1999 through 2010 for all video-assisted thoracic procedures within 24 h of admission. Data collected included initial vital signs, operative indication, intraoperative course, and postoperative outcome. Results: Twenty-three patients met inclusion criteria: 3 (13% following blunt injury and 20 (87% after penetrating trauma. Indications for urgent thoracoscopy included diaphragmatic/esophageal injury, retained hemothorax, ongoing hemorrhage, and open/persistent pneumothorax. No conversions to thoracotomy were required and no patient required re-operation. Mean postoperative chest tube duration was 2.9 days and mean length of stay was 5.6 days. Conclusion: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is safe and effective for managing thoracic trauma in hemodynamically stable patients within the first 24 h post-injury.

  10. Cobb angle changes in thoracic and lumbar spine fractures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This is a retrospective study to evaluate the short-term clinical outcome of conservative treatment of all consecutive patients that were treated for closed thoracic and lumbar spine fractures following Road Traffic Injury (RTI) at the University of Abuja Teaching Hospital (UATH) Gwagwalada, Abuja Nigeria.

  11. Cobb Angle Changes in Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Fractures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The annual incidence of spinal column fracture is 350 per million populations. with Motor vehicular accident being the major single cause of spine injuries. The victims are predominantly young and male. The aim of this study to evaluate the clinical outcome of conservative treatment of closed thoracic and lumbar spine ...

  12. The pattern of thoracic trauma after suicide terrorist bombing attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Miklosh; Shussman, Noam; Rivkind, Avraham I; Izhar, Uzi; Almogy, Gidon

    2010-11-01

    The worldwide escalation in the volume of suicide terrorist bombing attacks warrants special attention to the specific pattern of injury associated with such attacks. The goal of this study was to characterize thoracic injuries inflicted by terrorist-related explosions and compare pattern of injury to penetrating and blunt thoracic trauma. Prospectively collected database of patients with chest injury who were admitted to Hadassah Hospital Level I trauma centre, in Jerusalem, Israel, from October 2000 to December 2005. Patients were divided into three groups according to the mechanism of injury: terrorist explosions (n = 55), gunshot wounds (GSW; n = 78), and blunt trauma (n = 747). There were many female victims after suicide bombing attacks (49.1%) compared with GSW (21.8%) and blunt trauma (24.6%; p = 0.009). The number of body regions injured was significantly higher in the terror group compared with the GSW and blunt groups (median, 4, 2, and 3, respectively, p attacks was caused by a unique combination of the effects of the blast wave and penetrating shrapnel. More than half (52.7%) of the terror victims suffered from lung contusion and 25 (45.5%) required tube thoracostomy. Five patients (9.1%) underwent thoracotomy for lung lacerations (n = 3), injury to great vessels (n = 2), cardiac lacerations (n = 1), and esophageal injury (n = 1). Penetrating shrapnel was the mechanism of injury in all these cases. Injury inflicted by terrorist bombings causes a unique pattern of thoracic wounds. Victims are exposed to a combination of lung injury caused by the blast wave and penetrating injury caused by metallic objects.

  13. The Flail and Pulseless Upper Limb: an Extreme Case of Traumatic Scapulo-thoracic Dissociation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria SW

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Scapulo-thoracic dissociation is an infrequent injury resulting from high energy trauma which is often associated with severe neurological and vascular injuries which may be unrecognised at the time of presentation. A 24 year-old female presented with bilateral rib fractures, pneumothorax, liver and kidney injuries following a road traffic accident. She also sustained fractures of her right scapula, odontoid, right transverse processes of the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae and a closed fracture of her right femur. Her right upper limb was later noted to be flail and pulseless, due to complete right brachial plexus injury, scapula-thoracic dissociation and subclavian artery avulsion. We managed the upper limb injuries non-operatively, and focused on resuscitation of the patient. Early exploration of the complete brachial plexus injury was not undertaken in spite of the possible associated poor functional outcome as there was no life-threatening indication.

  14. Determination of Effective Thoracic Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey H. Marcus

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective thoracic mass is an important parameter in specifying mathematical and mechanical models (such as crash dummies of humans exposed to impact conditions. A method is developed using a numerical optimizer to determine effective thoracic mass (and mass distribution given a number of acceleration signals and a force signal response. Utilizing previously reported lateral and frontal impact tests with human cadaveric test specimens in a number of different conditions, the effective thoracic mass is computed. The effective thoracic masses are then computed for a variety of crash dummies exposed to identical test conditions.

  15. Evaluation of the normal thoracic and abdominal aorta diameters by computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucarelli, Claudio Luiz

    1995-01-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate, through computerized tomography, the diameters of the normal thoracic and abdominal aorta, as well as they are connected to gender, age and body surface area; and the ratio between measurements obtained at the ascending and descending limbs of the thoracic aorta, and between the abdominal aortic diameters. For that reason, we measured the widest anteroposterior diameters of the thoracic aortas at the levels of the arch, the root, the pulmonary artery, and the thoracic-abdominal transition, as well as the level of the emergence of the superior mesenteric artery, of the renal hila and just cephalad to the bifurcation of the abdominal aortas of 350 patients without cardiovascular diseases who had undergone computerized tomography of the thorax and/or abdomen for any other reasons. Observation and statistic analyses led us to conclude that: 1) both the thoracic and abdominal aortic diameters are reduced from their proximal to their distal portions; 2) the body surface influences the size of the aorta, although only extreme variations alter the vessel's caliber; 3) vessel diameter was observed to gradually increase with age; 4) men were found to have larger diameters than age matched women; 5) the ratio between the ascending and descending aortic diameters varies according to gender and age; 6) the relations between abdominal aortic diameters measured at the level of renal hila and cephalad to the bifurcation are independent from gender and age. But the relation between those measured at the level of the superior mesenteric artery and cephalad to the bifurcation are linked to gender, but not to age. (author)

  16. [Thoracic Outlet Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Sven; Sebesta, Pavel; Klenske, Marian; Esche, Mirko

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is one of the most extensively discussed diagnoses. There is neither a clear and homogenous clinical presentation nor an accepted definition. The term describes a complex of symptoms and complaints caused by the compression of nerves and vascular structures at one of the three defined constrictions of the upper thoracic aperture. Methods Based on a comprehensive literature review, this article presents the etiology, epidemiology and clinical diagnostics as well as the possibilities and outcomes of surgical treatment. Results The thoracic outlet syndrome is currently subdivided into three main forms: vascular TOS (vasTOS) including arterial TOS (aTOS) and venous TOS (vTOS), neurogenic TOS (nTOS), which is further subdivided into typical (nTOS) and atypical TOS (disTOS), and a mixed form of nTOS and vasTOS (nvasTOS). The diagnosis is complex and difficult since the disTOS group comprises over 90 % of all patients. In addition to conservative treatment attempts, nTOS may be treated by surgical procedures focusing on the decompression of neurovascular structures. A significant improvement after surgery was found in up to 92 % of cases. The most common access sites are supraclavicular and transaxillary. 50 to 80 % of patients benefit from surgery in the long run. The rates of vascular or neurological complications reported by specialised centres are 0 to 2 %; minor complications such as pneumothorax, bleeding and lymphatic fistula are reported in up to 25 % of cases. Summary Most patients suffering from any form of TOS benefit from surgical treatment. Duration of symptoms, socioeconomic factors and, most notably, stringent diagnostic workup and an adequate operative procedure performed by an experienced centre are crucial to success. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolbergen, David R; Manshanden, Johan S J; Bouma, Berto J; Blom, Nico A; Mulder, Barbara J M; de Mol, Bas A J M; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate our results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement and associated (multiple) valve repair. From September 2003 to September 2013, 97 patients had valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedures. Patient records and preoperative, postoperative and recent echocardiograms were reviewed. Median age was 40.3 (range: 13.4-68.6) years and 67 (69.1%) were male. Seven (7.2%) patients were younger than 18 years, the youngest being 13.4 years. Fifty-four (55.7%) had Marfan syndrome, 2 (2.1%) other fibrous tissue diseases, 15 (15.5%) bicuspid aortic valve and 3 (3.1%) had earlier Fallot repair. The reimplantation technique was used in all, with a straight vascular prosthesis in 11 (26-34 mm) and the Valsalva prosthesis in 86 (26-32 mm). Concomitant aortic valve repair was performed in 43 (44.3%), mitral valve repair in 10 (10.3%), tricuspid valve repair in 5 (5.2%) and aortic arch replacement in 3 (3.1%). Mean follow-up was 4.2 ± 2.4 years. Follow-up was complete in all. One 14-year old patient died 1.3 years post-surgery presumably of ventricular arrhythmia. One patient underwent reoperation for aneurysm of the proximal right coronary artery after 4.9 years and 4 patients required aortic valve replacement, 3 of which because of endocarditis after 0.1, 0.8 and 1.3 years and 1 because of cusp prolapse after 3.8 years. No thrombo-embolic complications occurred. Mortality, root reoperation and aortic regurgitation were absent in 88.0 ± 0.5% at 5-year follow-up. Results of valve-sparing root replacement are good, even in association with a high incidence of concomitant valve repair. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement can be performed at a very young age as long as an adult size prosthesis can be implanted. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  18. Unequal pressure distribution along the jaws of currently available vascular clamps: do we need a new aortic clamp?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylski, Bartosz; Schmid, Claudius; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Kari, Fabian Alexander; Kondov, Stoyan; Lutz, Lisa; Werner, Martin; Czerny, Martin; Siepe, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    The pressure along vascular clamp jaws may be unequally distributed, with greater pressure near the clamp hinge than at its top. Such unequal pressure distribution may cause aortic injury, especially in large aortas. We evaluated pressure distribution along different currently availably clamp jaws. Seven descending thoracic aortas from pigs (diameter 2.0-3.0 cm) were plainly dissected and all side arteries closed. Aortas were filled up with water and cross-clamped. The pressure inside the aorta was raised to 100 mmHg and the aorta was clamped so tightly that no water exited from the distal aortic end. Each aorta was clamped seven times at different sites with the following clamps: DeBakey, Satinsky, femoral, iliac, Chitwood, angled handle Fogarty and straight handle Fogarty. The pressure along the clamp jaws was measured with a pressure-detecting film placed between the clamp jaws and aorta. The collagen-fibre disorganization was examined in haemotoxylin-eosin- and Elastica van Gieson-stained tissue samples. The DeBakey clamp revealed the lowest maximum pressure along the clamp jaws after complete aortic occlusion (1.43 ± 0.49 MPa), whereas the Chitwood clamp's pressure was the highest (3.26 ± 1.93 MPa, P clamp displayed the lowest difference between maximum pressures across the jaws (33%), with the greatest difference measured in the iliac (72%) and Chitwood (66%) clamps. The highest collagen-fibre disorganization score was observed in the proximal-to-the-clamp-hinge quartile after clamping with the angled handle Fogarty (2.8 ± 0.4), straight handle Fogarty (2.3 ± 0.8) and Chitwood (2.3 ± 0.5) clamps. The pressure along clamp jaws is unequally distributed in all the currently available vascular clamps. The Chitwood clamp is associated with the highest maximum pressure during complete aortic occlusion and with the most unequal pressure distribution along the jaws. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association

  19. Thoracic organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Richard N; Barr, Mark L; McCullough, Keith P; Egan, Thomas; Garrity, Edward; Jessup, Mariell; Murray, Susan

    2004-01-01

    This article presents an overview of factors associated with thoracic transplantation outcomes over the past decade and provides valuable information regarding the heart, lung, and heart-lung waiting lists and thoracic organ transplant recipients. Waiting list and post-transplant information is used to assess the importance of patient demographics, risk factors, and primary cardiopulmonary disease on outcomes. The time that the typical listed patient has been waiting for a heart, lung, or heart-lung transplant has markedly increased over the past decade, while the number of transplants performed has declined slightly and survival after transplant has plateaued. Waiting list mortality, however, appears to be declining for each organ and for most diseases and high-severity subgroups, perhaps in response to recent changes in organ allocation algorithms. Based on perceived inequity in organ access and in response to a mandate from Health Resources and Services Administration, the lung transplant community is developing a lung allocation system designed to minimize deaths on the waiting list while maximizing the benefit of transplant by incorporating post-transplant survival and quality of life into the algorithm. Areas where improved data collection could inform evolving organ allocation and candidate selection policies are emphasized.

  20. A comparison of minimally invasive and standard aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoliński, Jarosław; Plicner, Dariusz; Grudzień, Grzegorz; Wąsowicz, Marcin; Musiał, Robert; Andres, Janusz; Kapelak, Bogusław

    2016-10-01

    The study objective was to compare aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy with aortic valve replacement through a median sternotomy. With propensity score matching, we selected 211 patients after aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy and 211 patients after aortic valve replacement who underwent operation between January 2010 and December 2013. Perioperative outcomes were analyzed, and multivariable logistic regression analysis of risk factors of postoperative morbidity was performed. For propensity score-matched patients, hospital mortality was 1.0% in the aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy group and 1.4% in the aortic valve replacement group (P = 1.000). Stroke occurred in 0.5% versus 1.4% (P = .615), myocardial infarction occurred in 1.4% versus 1.9% (P = 1.000), and new onset of atrial fibrillation occurred in 12.8% versus 24.2% (P = .003) of patients in the aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy and aortic valve replacement groups, respectively. Postoperative drainage was 353.5 ± 248.6 mL versus 544.3 ± 324.5 mL (P replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy and aortic valve replacement groups, respectively. Mediastinitis occurred in 2.8% of patients after aortic valve replacement and in 0.0% of patients after aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy surgery (P = .040). Intensive care unit stay (1.3 ± 1.2 days vs 2.6 ± 2.6 days) and hospital stay (5.7 ± 1.6 days vs 8.7 ± 4.4 days) were statistically significantly shorter in the aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy group. Aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy surgery resulted in reduced postoperative morbidity (odds ratio, 0.4; P replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy surgery resulted in a reduced infection rate, diminished postoperative bleeding and blood

  1. Transaortic gunshot wound through perivisceral segment successfully managed by placement of thoracic stent graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared T. Feyko, DO

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 36-year-old woman who presented to our facility after sustaining a gunshot wound to the epigastric region. The gunshot resulted in injury to the left lobe of the liver and the twelfth thoracic vertebral body as well as in a through-and-through injury to the abdominal aorta at the level of the celiac axis. The vascular injury was managed successfully by placement of a thoracic stent graft with coverage of the celiac axis. This case demonstrates the feasibility of managing this uncommon injury with endovascular techniques.

  2. Effect of thoracic stretching, thoracic extension exercise and exercises for cervical and scapular posture on thoracic kyphosis angle and upper thoracic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2013-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of thoracic stretching, a thoracic extension exercise and exercises for cervical and scapular posture on thoracic kyphosis angle and upper thoracic pain. [Subject] A 36-year-old male, who complained of upper thoracic pain at the T1-4 level with forward head and round shoulders, was the subject. [Methods] He performed thoracic stretching (session 1), a thoracic extension exercise (session 2), and muscle exercises for cervical and scapular posture (session 3). [Results] The upper thoracic pressure pain threshold increased after session 1, session 2, and session 3. The thoracic kyphosis angle decreased after session 1, session 2, and session 3. [Conclusion] We suggest that intervention for thoracic pain or kyphotic thoracic correction should use not only an approach for extending the thoracic muscles, but also an approach treating muscles in the cervical and scapular region.

  3. Outcomes for Low-Risk Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement: A Benchmark for Aortic Valve Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Lily E; Downs, Emily A; Hawkins, Robert B; Quader, Mohammed A; Speir, Alan M; Rich, Jeffrey B; Ghanta, Ravi K; Yarboro, Leora T; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2017-10-01

    Two large, randomized trials are underway evaluating transcatheter aortic valve replacement (AVR) against conventional surgical AVR. We analyzed contemporary, real-world outcomes of surgical AVR in low-risk patients to provide a practical benchmark of outcomes and cost for evaluating current and future transapical AVR technology. From 2010 to 2015, 2,505 isolated AVR operations were performed for severe aortic stenosis at 18 statewide cardiac institutions. Of these, 2,138 patients had a Society of Thoracic Surgeons predicted risk of mortality of less than 4%, and 1,119 met other clinical and hemodynamic criteria as outlined in the PARTNER 3 (The Placement of Transcatheter Aortic Valves) protocol. Patients with endocarditis, end-stage renal disease, ejection fraction of less than 0.45, bicuspid valves, and previous valve replacements were excluded. Outcomes of interest included operative death and postoperative adverse events. The median Society of Thoracic Surgeons predicted risk of mortality for the study-eligible patients was 1.44%, with a median age of 72 years (interquartile range [IQR], 65 to 78 years). Operative mortality was 1.3%, permanent stroke was 1.3%, and pacemaker requirement was 4.2%. The most common adverse events were transfusion of 2 or more units of red blood cells (18%) and atrial fibrillation (28%). The median length of stay was 6 days (IQR, 5 to 8 days). Median total hospital cost was $37,999 (IQR, $30,671 to $46,138). Examination of complications by age younger than 65 vs 65 or older demonstrated a significantly lower need for transfusion (11.2%, p risk patients undergoing surgical AVR in the current era have excellent results. The most common complications were atrial fibrillation and bleeding. These real-world results should provide additional context for upcoming transcatheter clinical trial data. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The hybrid stent-graft technique: a solution to complex aortic problems and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotsakis, John; Misthos, Panagiotis; Athanasiou, Thanos; Sakellaridis, Timotheos; Neofotistos, Kostas; Skouteli, Elian; Lioulias, Achilleas

    2008-01-01

    The frozen elephant trunk technique has been recently presented in the literature and has been considered as a novel surgical option for single-stage repair of complex aortic pathology such as combined arch and descending thoracic aortic aneurysms. The first patient, a 74-year-old male, was admitted severely symptomatic (interscapular pain), with aortic distal arch and proximal descending thoracic aortic aneurysm with a diameter of 6 cm. The second patient, a 72-year-old male, underwent descending aortic aneurysm stent grafting one year ago and was admitted gravely symptomatic (interscapular pain), with aortic arch aneurysm (diameter of 5.7 cm) and type I endoleak at the proximal end of the stent. The first patient developed paraplegia after the operation and died three months after the operation due to pneumonia while he was on a rehabilitation program. The second patient's recovery was uneventful and was discharged on postoperative day nine. This report summarizes our preliminary experience with this technique emphasizing two points: first, it offers the opportunity to manage efficiently complex aortic problems, and second, there is a potential risk of serious complications related to the limited stent sizes available of the device to match the patient's anatomical characteristics and pathology.

  5. Open repair of adult aortic coarctation mostly by a resection and graft replacement technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Codreanu, Maria E; Leake, Samuel S; Sandhu, Harleen K; Calderon, Daniel; Azizzadeh, Ali; Estrera, Anthony L; Safi, Hazim J

    2015-01-01

    We report on our experience with treatment of adults requiring de novo or redo open aortic coarctation repair mostly by a resection and interposition graft technique. We retrospectively reviewed all patients older than 16 years requiring open repair of aortic coarctation. Indications for repair, operative details, and outcomes were analyzed. Between 1996 and 2011, we treated 29 adult aortic coarctation patients with open repair. The mean age was 42 years (range, 17-69 years), and there were 15 men. Nine patients had previous repair with recurrence; the remaining 20 had native coarctation. Thoracic aortic aneurysms were present in 22 patients (76%), ranging in size from 3.0 to 9.6 cm (mean, 4.8 cm). Four patients had intercostal artery aneurysms (range, 1.0-2.5 cm), four had left subclavian artery aneurysms, and four had ascending/arch aneurysms. The most common repair was resection of aortic coarctation with interposition graft replacement (93%). Two patients without aneurysm had bypasses from the proximal descending thoracic aorta to the infrarenal aorta without aortic resection. There was no in-hospital mortality, stroke, or paraplegia. Long-term survival was 89% during a median follow-up of 81 months (interquartile range, 47-118 months), with no patient requiring reoperation on the repaired segment. Open repair of native and recurrent adult aortic coarctation has acceptable morbidity and low mortality. Especially in patients with concomitant aneurysm, resection with interposition graft replacement provides a safe and durable repair option. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Thoracic spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  7. Tissue engineering and biotechnology in general thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Tamas F; Pongracz, Judit E

    2010-06-01

    Public interest in the recent progress of tissue engineering, a special line of biotechnology, makes the current review on thoracic surgery highly relevant. In this article, techniques, materials and cellular processes are discussed alongside their potential applications in tissue repair. Different applications of tissue engineering in tracheo-bronchial replacement, lung tissue cultures and chest-wall reconstruction are also summarised in the article. Potential tissue engineering-based solutions for destructive, chronic lung-injury-related conditions and replacement of tubular structures in the central airways are also examined. Copyright 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Left atrial rupture due to blunt thoracic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, İlker; İnce, İlker; Aslan, Cemal; Çeber, Mehmet; Kaya, İlker

    2015-07-01

    Blunt traumatic cardiac rupture is rare and associated with high mortality. The most popular theory of cardiac rupture after blunt thoracic trauma is rapid deceleration with disruption of the atria from their connections to the vena cava and pulmonary veins. In cases with both massive hemothorax and hemopericardium, injury can usually originate from the heart and/or major vessels. Surgical approach through the median sternotomy can provide convenience to repair the defect. In this article, successful treatment with median sternotomy of a 33-year-old male case with a rupture of the left atrium after blunt thoracic trauma was reported.

  9. Aortic Endoprosthesis for the Treatment of Native Aortic Coarctation and Concomitant Aneurysm in an Octogenarian Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabellino, Martín; Kotowicz, Vadim; Kenny, Alberto; Kohan, Andres Alejandro; García-Mónaco, Ricardo

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of an 82-year-old female patient with native coarctation of the aorta and poststenotic aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta. On consultation, she was receiving 4 antihypertensive drugs, and physical examination revealed nonpalpable lower-limb pulses with intermittent claudication at 50 min. Because of her age, high surgical risk and combination of lesions, endovascular treatment was suggested. Placement of a Valiant thoracic aorta endoprosthesis followed by coarctation angioplasty was performed. At 48 hr, the patient was discharged on 1 antihypertensive drug, palpable pulses on both limbs and a normal ankle-brachial index. At 1 month follow-up, the patient remained as discharged and multislice computed tomography angiography depicted complete coarctation expansion without residual stenosis, exclusion of the aortic aneurysm, and no signs of endoleaks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of thoracic wall behavior in large animals and human cadavers submitted to an identical ballistic blunt thoracic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Nicolas; Rongieras, Frédéric; de Freminville, Humbert; Magnan, Pascal; Debord, Eric; Fusai, Thierry; Destombe, Casimir; Sarron, Jean-Claude; Voiglio, Eric J

    2012-10-10

    Several models of ballistic blunt thoracic trauma are available, including human cadavers and large animals. Each model has advantages and disadvantages regarding anatomy and physiology, but they have not been compared with identical ballistic aggression. To compare thoracic wall behavior in 40-kg pigs and human cadavers, the thorax of 12 human cadavers and 19 anesthetized pigs were impacted with two different projectiles at different speeds. On the thoracic wall, the peak acceleration, peak velocity, maximal compression, viscous criterion, and injury criteria (e.g. abbreviated injury scale and number of rib fractures) were recorded. The correlations between these motion and injury parameters and the blunt criterion were compared between the two groups. The bone mineral density of each subject was also measured. The peak acceleration, the peak velocity and the viscous criterion were significantly higher for the pigs. The AIS and the number of rib fractures were significantly higher for human cadavers. The bone mineral density was significantly higher for cadavers, but was, for the two groups, significantly lower than for 30-year-old human. The motion of the pig's thoracic wall is greater than that of the human cadaver, and the severity of the impact is always greater for human cadavers than for pigs. In addition, pig bone is more elastic and less brittle than older human cadaver bone. Due to the bone mineral density, the thoracic wall of human adults should be more rigid and more resistant than the thoracic wall of human cadavers or pigs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Aortic dimensions in girls and young women with turner syndrome: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleemann, Line; Mortensen, Kristian H; Holm, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    subjects. The mean age of the patients was 17 +/- 3.3 years. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed for all the patients. The thoracic aortic diameters of the patients were measured at nine positions. Adjustment for body surface area (BSA) was performed. The outcome for the patients was measured in terms...... of absolute and BSA-adjusted aortic dilation. In TS, both the absolute and the BSA-adjusted mean aortic diameters were smaller than or comparable with those of the control subjects. However, individual aortic dilation at one to four positions was found in four TS patients according to the uncorrected data...... and in five TS patients after BSA-adjustment. The aortic diameters correlated with height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and BSA at all positions (R = 0.34-0.60; all p

  12. Role of the frozen elephant trunk procedure for chronic aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselli, Eric E; Bakaeen, Faisal G; Johnston, Douglas R; Soltesz, Edward G; Tong, Michael Z

    2017-01-01

    Considering the chronic and progressive nature of aortic dissection, operative planning must anticipate the need for later interventions. We have increasingly used a modified version of the frozen elephant trunk repair operation to treat these patients. We review the indications, considerations for planning, and important operative details for performing frozen elephant trunk repair for chronic aortic dissection. Frozen elephant trunk repair is performed using selective antegrade brain perfusion, direct placement of commercially available stent grafts with suture fixation in the aortic arch, and proximal aortic replacement. Details are reviewed. We have published details related to the excellent results for the frozen elephant trunk procedure in patients with chronic dissection. The modified frozen elephant trunk repair is particularly well suited for patients with chronic aortic dissection who often require multiple operations to address their extensive disease. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  13. Aortic false aneurysm after double valve replacement in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Walters, Henry L; Forbes, Thomas J; Aggarwal, Sanjeev

    2013-06-01

    Aortic false aneurysm (AFA) is a rare but life threatening complication after aortic surgery. We report a 13-year-old boy who developed AFA after double valve replacement consisting of the following: (1) Bentall procedure utilizing a 25-mm St. Jude aortic valved composite Hemashield Dacron graft (Meadox Medicals, Oakland, NJ); and (2) replacement of right ventricle to pulmonary artery conduit with a 25-mm porcine valved conduit. The exterior metal ring of the pulmonary prosthetic valve conduit caused an abrasion of the Hemashield graft, resulting in the AFA. In addition to simple suture repair, the pulmonary conduit was wrapped with a Gore-Tex patch (W.L. Gore Assoc, Flagstaff, AZ) to prevent recurrence. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Endovascular repair of aortic disease: a venture capital perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Lucas W; Stavropoulos, S William; Resnick, Joshua B; Solomon, Jeffrey

    2009-03-01

    Endovascular devices for the treatment of abdominal and thoracic aortic disease are poised to become the next $1 billion medical device market. A shift from open repair to endovascular repair, advances in technology, screening initiatives, and new indications are driving this growth. Although billion-dollar medical device markets are rare, this field is fraught with risk and uncertainty for startups and their venture capital investors. Technological hurdles, daunting clinical and regulatory timelines, market adoption issues, and entrenched competitors pose significant barriers to successful new venture creation. In fact, the number of aortic endografts that have failed to reach commercialization or have been pulled from the market exceeds the number of Food and Drug Administration-approved endografts in the United States. This article will shed some light on the venture capital mind-set and decision-making paradigm in the context of aortic disease.

  15. Long-term results of aortic root repair using the reimplantation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Tirone E; Armstrong, Susan; Manlhiot, Cedric; McCrindle, Brian W; Feindel, Christopher M

    2013-03-01

    Aortic valve sparing is frequently performed to treat patients with aortic root aneurysm, but there is an inadequate amount of information regarding its long-term durability. This study examines the long-term results of reimplantation of the aortic valve in patients with aortic root aneurysms. From August 1989 to December 2010, 296 consecutive patients had reimplantation of the aortic valve into a tubular Dacron graft. Their mean age was 45 years (range, 11-79 years), and 78% were men. Of the patients, 36% had Marfan syndrome and 11% had bicuspid aortic valve. Patients were followed prospectively with periodic images of the aortic root and remaining aorta. The mean follow-up was 6.9 ± 4.5 years. There were 21 patients at risk at 15 years. There were 4 operative and 18 late deaths. The survival at 5, 10, and 15 years was 95.1% ± 3.5%, 93.1% ± 4.4%, and 76.5% ± 18%, respectively. Only 3 patients required reoperation on the aortic valve; all 3 patients had the Bentall procedure. Freedom from reoperation at 5, 10, and 15 years was 99.7% ± 2.0%, 97.8% ± 5.3%, and 97.8% ± 5.3%, respectively. During follow-up, moderate aortic insufficiency developed in 9 patients, and severe aortic insufficiency developed in 2 patients. Freedom from moderate or severe aortic insufficiency at 5, 10, and 15 years was 98.3% ± 3.5%, 92.9% ± 6.5%, and 89.4% ± 12%, respectively. The function of the aortic valve implanted inside a tubular Dacron graft remains normal at 15 years in most patients after this type of aortic valve-sparing operation. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of the entry site on late outcome in acute Stanford type B aortic dissection†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Tadashi; Torii, Shinzo; Oka, Norihiko; Horai, Tetsuya; Itatani, Keiichi; Yoshii, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yuki; Shibata, Miyuki; Tamura, Tomoki; Araki, Haruna; Matsunaga, Yoshikiyo; Sato, Hajime; Miyaji, Kagami

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether the entry site of acute type B aortic dissection affects late outcomes. Inpatient and outpatient records were retrospectively reviewed. We identified 224 cases of acute type B aortic dissection between 1998 and 2013. Of these 224 patients, 168 were men and the age was 64.2 ± 12.6 (range 23-94) years, from which 130 presented with the entry at a location downstream of the distal aortic arch, 67 with the entry at the outer curvature of the distal aortic arch and 27 with the entry at the inner curvature. At the initial presentation, 127 patients had descending false lumen thrombosis. The 30-day mortality rate was 2%, and 8% of patients had malperfusion. The entry at the outer curvature was associated with a higher risk of 30-day mortality. Patients with the entry at a location downstream were significantly older, and had a higher chance for primarily thrombosed descending false lumen and a lower risk of malperfusion. At follow-up (6.0 ± 4.1 years), the actuarial survival rates were 97, 83 and 60%, freedoms from open aortic surgery were 96, 91 and 86%, aortic intervention were 73, 66 and 63% and aortic events were 71, 60 and 52% at 1, 5 and 10 years, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the outer curvature entry and maximum aortic diameter were correlated with open aortic surgery, aortic intervention and aortic events. Of the 127 patients with primarily thrombosed false lumen, the outer curvature entry was significantly correlated with aortic events. The primary entry at the outer curvature of the distal aortic arch, as well as the large aortic diameter, is associated with a higher risk of late open aortic surgery, aortic intervention and aortic events in acute type B aortic dissection. Thus, the entry site should be taken into consideration in the establishment of an appropriate treatment indication of type B aortic dissection. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf

  17. Primary metastasizing aortic endothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, E; Port, S J; Carroll, R M; Friedman, N B

    1984-10-01

    An instance of malignant endothelioma, primary in the aorta, metastasizing to intestine and bone, is reported. The aortic tumor was successfully resected. The unexpected finding of a large hepatic growth at autopsy raised the possibility that the aortic neoplasm was a metastasis. Histochemical, immunologic, and ultrastructural studies supported the diagnosis of an endothelial neoplasm. Although a number of malignant aortic and large vessel tumors have been reported, only four previous instances appear to be endotheliomatous.

  18. Aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Athanasiou, Thanos; Mestres, Carlos A

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS OF THE STUDY: Prompted by anecdotal evidence and observations by surgeons, an investigation was undertaken into the potential differences in implanted aortic valve prosthesis sizes, during aortic valve replacement (AVR) procedures, between northern and southern European...... assigned to the 'small' aortic size subset. Effective orifice area indices were calculated for all patients to assess the geographic distribution of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses adjusting for possible confounding variables were performed. RESULTS...

  19. Vascular Thoracic Outlet Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Mohamad Anas; Aljabri, Badr; Al-Omran, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Two distinct terms are used to describe vascular thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) depending on which structure is predominantly affected: venous TOS (due to subclavian vein compression) and arterial TOS (due to subclavian artery compression). Although the venous and arterial subtypes of TOS affect only 3% and <1% of all TOS patients respectively, the diagnostic and management approaches to venous and arterial TOS have undergone considerable evolution due to the recent emergence of minimally invasive endovascular techniques such as catheter-directed arterial and venous thrombolysis, and balloon angioplasty. In this review, we discuss the anatomical factors, etiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of vascular TOS patients. In addition, we use the most up to date observational evidence available to provide a contemporary approach to the diagnosis and management of venous TOS and arterial TOS patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Thoracic manifestation of tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzl-Palma, D.; Prosch, H.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a granulomatous disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and transmission is via an airborne route by droplet infection. In the majority of cases patients have thoracic TB, which most frequently presents with hilar lymphadenopathy and pulmonary manifestation. Due to the rise in incidence of TB in central Europe to be expected over the coming years, it is essential to be acquainted with the radiological manifestations of pulmonary TB, particularly to be able to discriminate active from inactive TB. Due to the use of molecular techniques entailing DNA fingerprinting, the traditional classification of TB in primary and postprimary TB is being challenged. These genetic studies have revealed that variations in the clinical and radiographic appearance of TB are mainly affected by the immune status of the patients. Due to the low prevalence of TB in central Europe and the wide variation of radiological presentations, the diagnosis and therapy of TB is often delayed. In this article, the radiographic manifestations of thoracic TB are summarized and discussed. Together with the medical history and bacteriological tests, chest X-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) play a major role not only in the detection of TB but also in the follow-up during and after therapy. Chest X-radiographs should be the primary diagnostic method in patients with suspected TB in screening as well as for diagnosis and therapy monitoring. The use of CT is more sensitive than chest radiographs and is frequently performed after chest radiographs to obtain detailed information about subtle parenchymal changes or lymph node manifestation. When active TB is suspected CT should be performed. Tree in bud, lobular consolidations, centrilobular nodules, cavities and ground-glass opacification are typical changes in active TB. (orig.) [de

  1. Hybrid Approach of Aortic Diseases: Zone 1 Delivery and Volumetric Analysis on the Descending Aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, José Augusto; Dias, Ricardo Ribeiro; Dinato, Fabrício José; Fernandes, Fábio; Ramirez, Félix José Álvares; Mady, Charles; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2017-01-01

    Conventional techniques of surgical correction of arch and descending aortic diseases remains as high-risk procedures. Endovascular treatments of abdominal and descending thoracic aorta have lower surgical risk. Evolution of both techniques - open debranching of the arch and endovascular approach of the descending aorta - may extend a less invasive endovascular treatment for a more extensive disease with necessity of proximal landing zone in the arch. To evaluate descending thoracic aortic remodeling by means of volumetric analysis after hybrid approach of aortic arch debranching and stenting the descending aorta. Retrospective review of seven consecutive patients treated between September 2014 and August 2016 for diseases of proximal descending aorta (aneurysms and dissections) by hybrid approach to deliver the endograft at zone 1. Computed tomography angiography were analyzed using a specific software to calculate descending thoracic aorta volumes pre- and postoperatively. Follow-up was done in 100% of patients with a median time of 321 days (range, 41-625 days). No deaths or permanent neurological complications were observed. There were no endoleaks or stent migrations. Freedom from reintervention was 100% at 300 days and 66% at 600 days. Median volume reduction was of 45.5 cm3, representing a median volume shrinkage by 9.3%. Hybrid approach of arch and descending thoracic aorta diseases is feasible and leads to a favorable aortic remodeling with significant volume reduction.

  2. Hybrid Approach of Aortic Diseases: Zone 1 Delivery and Volumetric Analysis on the Descending Aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Augusto Duncan

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Conventional techniques of surgical correction of arch and descending aortic diseases remains as high-risk procedures. Endovascular treatments of abdominal and descending thoracic aorta have lower surgical risk. Evolution of both techniques - open debranching of the arch and endovascular approach of the descending aorta - may extend a less invasive endovascular treatment for a more extensive disease with necessity of proximal landing zone in the arch. Objective: To evaluate descending thoracic aortic remodeling by means of volumetric analysis after hybrid approach of aortic arch debranching and stenting the descending aorta. Methods: Retrospective review of seven consecutive patients treated between September 2014 and August 2016 for diseases of proximal descending aorta (aneurysms and dissections by hybrid approach to deliver the endograft at zone 1. Computed tomography angiography were analyzed using a specific software to calculate descending thoracic aorta volumes pre- and postoperatively. Results: Follow-up was done in 100% of patients with a median time of 321 days (range, 41-625 days. No deaths or permanent neurological complications were observed. There were no endoleaks or stent migrations. Freedom from reintervention was 100% at 300 days and 66% at 600 days. Median volume reduction was of 45.5 cm3, representing a median volume shrinkage by 9.3%. Conclusion: Hybrid approach of arch and descending thoracic aorta diseases is feasible and leads to a favorable aortic remodeling with significant volume reduction.

  3. Impact of current cryopreservation procedures on mechanical and functional properties of human aortic homografts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langerak, S. E.; Groenink, M.; van der Wall, E. E.; Wassenaar, C.; VanBavel, E.; van Baal, M. C.; Spaan, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated the impact f standard cryopreservation on mechanical and functional properties of human aortic homografts. From 14 human heart-valve donors, the thoracic descending aorta was obtained. Effects of cryopreservation on mechanical (elastic properties and breaking stress) and smooth muscle

  4. Contemporary spinal cord protection during thoracic and thoracoabdominal aortic surgery and endovascular aortic repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etz, Christian D; Weigang, Ernst; Hartert, Marc

    2015-01-01

    devastating complication. The aim of this position paper is to provide physicians with broad information regarding spinal cord blood supply, to share strategies for shortening intraprocedural spinal cord ischaemia and to increase spinal cord tolerance to transitory ischaemia through detection of ischaemia...... publications available in the PubMed database, which are cohort studies, experimental research reports, case reports, reviews, short series and meta-analyses. Individual chapters of this position paper were assigned and after delivery harmonized by Christian D. Etz, Ernst Weigang and Martin Czerny....... Consequently, further writing assignments were distributed within the group and delivered in August 2014. The final version was submitted to the EJCTS for review in September 2014...