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Sample records for thm coupled processes

  1. MOUNTAIN-SCALE COUPLED PROCESSES (TH/THC/THM) MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y.S. Wu

    2005-01-01

    This report documents the development and validation of the mountain-scale thermal-hydrologic (TH), thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC), and thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) models. These models provide technical support for screening of features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842], Section 2.1.1.1). The purpose and validation criteria for these models are specified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Drift-Scale Abstraction) Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842]). Model results are used to support exclusion of certain FEPs from the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model on the basis of low consequence, consistent with the requirements of 10 CFR 63.342 [DIRS 173273]. Outputs from this report are not direct feeds to the TSPA-LA. All the FEPs related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale UZ and SZ flow are discussed in Sections 6 and 7 of this report. The mountain-scale coupled TH/THC/THM processes models numerically simulate the impact of nuclear waste heat release on the natural hydrogeological system, including a representation of heat-driven processes occurring in the far field. The mountain-scale TH simulations provide predictions for thermally affected liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature (together called the flow fields). The main focus of the TH model is to predict the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes, and drainage between drifts. The TH model captures mountain-scale three-dimensional flow effects, including lateral diversion and mountain-scale flow patterns. The mountain-scale THC model evaluates TH effects on water and gas

  2. MOUNTAIN-SCALE COUPLED PROCESSES (TH/THC/THM)MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y.S. Wu

    2005-08-24

    This report documents the development and validation of the mountain-scale thermal-hydrologic (TH), thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC), and thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) models. These models provide technical support for screening of features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842], Section 2.1.1.1). The purpose and validation criteria for these models are specified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Drift-Scale Abstraction) Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842]). Model results are used to support exclusion of certain FEPs from the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model on the basis of low consequence, consistent with the requirements of 10 CFR 63.342 [DIRS 173273]. Outputs from this report are not direct feeds to the TSPA-LA. All the FEPs related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale UZ and SZ flow are discussed in Sections 6 and 7 of this report. The mountain-scale coupled TH/THC/THM processes models numerically simulate the impact of nuclear waste heat release on the natural hydrogeological system, including a representation of heat-driven processes occurring in the far field. The mountain-scale TH simulations provide predictions for thermally affected liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature (together called the flow fields). The main focus of the TH model is to predict the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes, and drainage between drifts. The TH model captures mountain-scale three-dimensional flow effects, including lateral diversion and mountain-scale flow patterns. The mountain-scale THC model evaluates TH effects on

  3. Mountain-Scale Coupled Processes (TH/THC/THM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, P.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the development of the Mountain-Scale Thermal-Hydrological (TH), Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical (THC), and Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical (THM) Models and evaluate the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale UZ flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This Model Report was planned in ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2002 [160819], Section 1.12.7), and was developed in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, Models. In this Model Report, any reference to ''repository'' means the nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, and any reference to ''drifts'' means the emplacement drifts at the repository horizon. This Model Report provides the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses for analyzing mountain-scale hydrological/chemical/mechanical changes and predict flow behavior in response to heat release by radioactive decay from the nuclear waste repository at the Yucca Mountain site. The mountain-scale coupled TH/THC/THM processes models numerically simulate the impact of nuclear waste heat release on the natural hydrogeological system, including a representation of heat-driven processes occurring in the far field. The TH simulations provide predictions for thermally affected liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature (together called the flow fields). The main focus of the TH Model is to predict the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes, and drainage between drifts. The TH Model captures mountain-scale three dimensional (3-D) flow effects, including lateral diversion at the PTn/TSw interface and mountain-scale flow patterns. The Mountain-Scale THC Model evaluates TH effects on water and gas chemistry, mineral dissolution/precipitation, and the resulting impact to UZ hydrological properties, flow and transport. The THM Model addresses changes in permeability due to mechanical and thermal disturbances in

  4. Thermally-driven Coupled THM Processes in Shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutqvist, J.

    2017-12-01

    Temperature changes can trigger strongly coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes in shales that are important to a number of subsurface energy applications, including geologic nuclear waste disposal and hydrocarbon extraction. These coupled processes include (1) direct pore-volume couplings, by thermal expansion of trapped pore-fluid that triggers instantaneous two-way couplings between pore fluid pressure and mechanical deformation, and (2) indirect couplings in terms of property changes, such as changes in mechanical stiffness, strength, and permeability. Direct pore-volume couplings have been studied in situ during borehole heating experiments in shale (or clay stone) formations at Mont Terri and Bure underground research laboratories in Switzerland and France. Typically, the temperature changes are accompanied with a rapid increase in pore pressure followed by a slower decrease towards initial (pre-heating) pore pressure. Coupled THM modeling of these heater tests shows that the pore pressure increases because the thermal expansion coefficient of the fluid is much higher than that of the porous clay stone. Such thermal pressurization induces fluid flow away from the pressurized area towards areas of lower pressure. The rate of pressure increase and magnitude of peak pressure depends on the rate of heating, pore-compressibility, and permeability of the shale. Modeling as well as laboratory experiments have shown that if the pore pressure increase is sufficiently large it could lead to fracturing of the shale or shear slip along pre-existing bedding planes. Another set of data and observations have been collected associated with studies related to concentrated heating and cooling of oil-shales and shale-gas formations. Heating may be used to enhance production from tight oil-shale, whereas thermal stimulation has been attempted for enhanced shale-gas extraction. Laboratory experiments on shale have shown that strength and elastic deformation

  5. Current Status of Research Activities Related to THM-Coupled Processes in Buffer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Heui Joo; Lee, Changsoo; Choi, Young Chul; Lee, Minsoo; Kim, Jin Seop

    2015-01-01

    For the purpose of enhancing the understanding of THM-coupled behavior in and around buffer, a computer code, KAERI-SIMULATOR, is being developed and verified by participating in Decovalex-2015 project. The THM data collected from this facility will be used to validate the KAERI-SIMULATOR

  6. Current Status of Research Activities Related to THM-Coupled Processes in Buffer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Heui Joo; Lee, Changsoo; Choi, Young Chul; Lee, Minsoo; Kim, Jin Seop [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    For the purpose of enhancing the understanding of THM-coupled behavior in and around buffer, a computer code, KAERI-SIMULATOR, is being developed and verified by participating in Decovalex-2015 project. The THM data collected from this facility will be used to validate the KAERI-SIMULATOR.

  7. Modeling Coupled THM Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Blanco-Martin, Laura [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Molins, Sergi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Trebotich, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we present FY2015 progress by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) related to modeling of coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. This is a combined milestone report related to milestone Salt R&D Milestone “Modeling Coupled THM Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures” (M3FT-15LB0818012) and the Salt Field Testing Milestone (M3FT-15LB0819022) to support the overall objectives of the salt field test planning.

  8. Modeling Coupled THM Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco-Martin, Laura; Molins, Sergi; Trebotich, David; Birkholzer, Jens

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we present FY2015 progress by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) related to modeling of coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. This is a combined milestone report related to milestone Salt R&D Milestone ''Modeling Coupled THM Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures'' (M3FT-15LB0818012) and the Salt Field Testing Milestone (M3FT-15LB0819022) to support the overall objectives of the salt field test planning.

  9. Results From an International Simulation Study on Coupled Thermal, Hydrological, and Mechanical (THM) Processes Near Geological Nuclear Waste Repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Rutqvist; D. Barr; J.T. Birkholzer; M. Chijimatsu; O. Kolditz; Q. Liu; Y. Oda; W. Wang; C. Zhang

    2006-01-01

    As part of the ongoing international DECOVALEX project, four research teams used five different models to simulate coupled thermal, hydrological, and mechanical (THM) processes near waste emplacement drifts of geological nuclear waste repositories. The simulations were conducted for two generic repository types, one with open and the other with back-filled repository drifts, under higher and lower postclosure temperatures, respectively. In the completed first model inception phase of the project, a good agreement was achieved between the research teams in calculating THM responses for both repository types, although some disagreement in hydrological responses is currently being resolved. In particular, good agreement in the basic thermal-mechanical responses was achieved for both repository types, even though some teams used relatively simplified thermal-elastic heat-conduction models that neglected complex near-field thermal-hydrological processes. The good agreement between the complex and simplified process models indicates that the basic thermal-mechanical responses can be predicted with a relatively high confidence level

  10. Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in Engineering Barrier Systems (EBS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steefel, Carl; Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Liu, Hui-Hai; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Geological repositories for disposal of high-level nuclear wastes generally rely on a multi-barrier system to isolate radioactive wastes from the biosphere. The multi-barrier system typically consists of a natural barrier system, including repository host rock and its surrounding subsurface environment, and an engineering barrier system (EBS). EBS represents the man-made, engineered materials placed within a repository, including the waste form, waste canisters, buffer materials, backfill and seals (OECD, 2003). EBS plays a significant role in the containment and long-term retardation of radionuclide release. EBS is involved in complex thermal, hydrogeological, mechanical, chemical and biological processes, such as heat release due to radionuclide decay, multiphase flow (including gas release due to canister corrosion), swelling of buffer materials, radionuclide diffusive transport, waste dissolution and chemical reactions. All these processes are related to each other. An in-depth understanding of these coupled processes is critical for the performance assessment (PA) for EBS and the entire repository. Within the EBS group of Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign, LBNL is currently focused on (1) thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in buffer materials (bentonite) and (2) diffusive transport in EBS associated with clay host rock, with a long-term goal to develop a full understanding of (and needed modeling capabilities to simulate) impacts of coupled processes on radionuclide transport in different components of EBS, as well as the interaction between near-field host rock (e.g., clay) and EBS and how they effect radionuclide release. This final report documents the progress that LBNL has made in its focus areas. Specifically, Section 2 summarizes progress on literature review for THMC processes and reactive-diffusive radionuclide transport in bentonite. The literature review provides a picture of the state-of-the-art of the relevant research areas

  11. Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in Engineering Barrier Systems (EBS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steefel, Carl; Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Liu, Hui-Hai; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    Geological repositories for disposal of high-level nuclear wastes generally rely on a multi-barrier system to isolate radioactive wastes from the biosphere. The multi-barrier system typically consists of a natural barrier system, including repository host rock and its surrounding subsurface environment, and an engineering barrier system (EBS). EBS represents the man-made, engineered materials placed within a repository, including the waste form, waste canisters, buffer materials, backfill and seals (OECD, 2003). EBS plays a significant role in the containment and long-term retardation of radionuclide release. EBS is involved in complex thermal, hydrogeological, mechanical, chemical and biological processes, such as heat release due to radionuclide decay, multiphase flow (including gas release due to canister corrosion), swelling of buffer materials, radionuclide diffusive transport, waste dissolution and chemical reactions. All these processes are related to each other. An in-depth understanding of these coupled processes is critical for the performance assessment (PA) for EBS and the entire repository. Within the EBS group of Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign, LBNL is currently focused on (1) thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in buffer materials (bentonite) and (2) diffusive transport in EBS associated with clay host rock, with a long-term goal to develop a full understanding of (and needed modeling capabilities to simulate) impacts of coupled processes on radionuclide transport in different components of EBS, as well as the interaction between near-field host rock (e.g., clay) and EBS and how they effect radionuclide release. This final report documents the progress that LBNL has made in its focus areas. Specifically, Section 2 summarizes progress on literature review for THMC processes and reactive-diffusive radionuclide transport in bentonite. The literature review provides a picture of the state-of-the-art of the relevant research areas

  12. Review of SKB's Work on Coupled THM Processes Within SR-Can. External review contribution in support of SKI's and SSI's review of SR-Can

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2008-03-01

    In this report, we scrutinize the work by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) related to coupled thermal, hydrological and mechanical (THM) processes within the SR-Can project. SR-Can is SKB's preliminary assessment of long-term safety for a KBS-3 nuclear waste repository, and is a preparation stage for the SR-Site assessment, the report that will be used in SKB's application for a final repository. We scrutinize SKB's work related to THM processes through review and detailed analysis, using an independent modeling tool. The modeling tool is applied to analyze coupled THM processes at the two candidate sites, Forsmark and Laxemar, using data defined in SKB's site description models for respective sites. In this report, we first provide a brief overview of SKB's work related to analysis of the evolution of coupled THM processes as presented in SRCan, as well as supporting documents. In this overview we also identify issues and assumptions that we then analyze using our modeling tool. The overview and subsequent independent model analysis addresses issues related to near-field behavior, such as buffer resaturation and the evolution of the excavation-disturbed zone, as well as far-field behavior, such as stress induced changes in hydrologic properties. Based on the review and modeling conducted in this report, we conclude by identifying a number of areas of weaknesses, where we believe further work and clarifications are needed. Some of the most important ones are summarized below: 1) We found that SKB's calculation of peak temperature might not have been conducted for the most conservative case of extreme drying of the buffer under dry rock conditions and an unexpectedly high thermal diffusion coefficient. Our alternative analysis indicates that temperatures close to 100 might be achieved under unfavorable (and perhaps unexpected) conditions in which the buffer is dried to below 20% near the canister. We believe SKB should conduct further

  13. On the importance of coupled THM processes to predict the long-term response of a generic salt repository for high-level nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco Martin, L.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2013-12-01

    Salt is a potential medium for the underground disposal of nuclear waste because it has several assets, in particular its ability to creep and heal fractures generated by excavation and its water and gas tightness in the undisturbed state. In this research, we focus on disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste (such as spent fuel) and we consider a generic salt repository with in-drift emplacement of waste packages and subsequent backfill of the drifts with run-of-mine crushed salt. As the natural salt creeps, the crushed salt backfill gets progressively compacted and an engineered barrier system is subsequently created. In order to evaluate the integrity of the natural and engineered barriers over the long-term, it is important to consider the coupled effects of the thermal, hydraulic and mechanical processes that take place. In particular, the results obtained so far show how the porosity reduction of the crushed salt affects the saturation and pore pressure evolution throughout the repository, both in time and space. Such compaction is induced by the stress and temperature regime within the natural salt. Also, transport properties of the host rock are modified not only by thermo-mechanically and hydraulically-induced damaged processes, but also by healing/sealing of existing fractures. In addition, the THM properties of the backfill evolve towards those of the natural salt during the compaction process. All these changes are based on dedicated laboratory experiments and on theoretical considerations [1-3]. Different scenarios are modeled and compared to evaluate the relevance of different processes from the perspective of effective nuclear waste repositories. The sensitivity of the results to some parameters, such as capillarity, is also addressed. The simulations are conducted using an updated version of the TOUGH2-FLAC3D simulator, which is based on a sequential explicit method to couple flow and geomechanics [4]. A new capability for large strains and creep

  14. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Aespoe Task Force on Engineered Barrier System. Modelling of THM-coupled processes for benchmark 2.2 with the code GeoSys/RockFlow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, Thomas; Kunz, Herbert

    2010-02-01

    In 2004 the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) initiated the project 'Task Force on Engineered Barrier Systems'. This project has the objective to verify the feasibility of modelling THM-coupled processes (task 1) and gas migration processes (task 2) in clay-rich buffer materials. The tasks are performed on the basis of appropriate benchmarks. This report documents the modelling results of the THM-benchmark 2.2 - the Canister Retrieval Test - using the code GeoSys/RockFlow. The Temperature Buffer Test which was performed in the immediate vicinity of the Canister Retrieval Test is included in the model. Especially the heat transport requires the handling of the problem in 3-D. Due to limitations imposed by post-processing different spatial discretisations of the model had to be used during the processing of the benchmark. The calculated temperatures agree well with measured data. Concerning hydraulic parameters the values of permeability and tortuosity were varied in the calculations. The time necessary to saturate the buffer is very sensitive to both of these values. In comparison to thermal and hydraulic processes the model only has limited capacity to predict the measured evolution of total pressure

  15. Numerical Analysis of a Class of THM Coupled Model for Porous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tangwei; Zhou, Jingying; Lu, Hongzhi

    2018-01-01

    We consider the coupled models of the Thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) problem for porous materials which arises in many engineering applications. Firstly, mathematical models of the THM coupled problem for porous materials were discussed. Secondly, for different cases, some numerical difference schemes of coupled model were constructed, respectively. Finally, aassuming that the original water vapour effect is neglectable and that the volume fraction of liquid phase and the solid phase are constants, the nonlinear equations can be reduced to linear equations. The discrete equations corresponding to the linear equations were solved by the Arnodli method.

  16. DECOVALEX - Mathematical models of coupled T-H-M processes for nuclear waste repositories. Executive summary for Phases I,II and III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, L.; Stephansson, O.; Tsang, C.F.; Kautsky, F.

    1996-06-01

    This executive summary presents the motivation, structure, objectives, methodologies and results of the first stage of the international DECOVALEX project - DECOVALEX I (1992-1995). The acronym stands for Development of Coupled Models and their Validation against Experiment in Nuclear Waste Isolation, and the project is an international effort to develop mathematical models, numerical methods and computer codes for coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in fractured rocks and buffer materials for geological isolation of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive wastes, and validate them against laboratory and field experiments. 24 refs

  17. Modelling fully-coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical (THM) processes in fractured reservoirs using GOLEM: a massively parallel open-source simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquey, Antoine; Cacace, Mauro

    2017-04-01

    Utilization of the underground for energy-related purposes have received increasing attention in the last decades as a source for carbon-free energy and for safe storage solutions. Understanding the key processes controlling fluid and heat flow around geological discontinuities such as faults and fractures as well as their mechanical behaviours is therefore of interest in order to design safe and sustainable reservoir operations. These processes occur in a naturally complex geological setting, comprising natural or engineered discrete heterogeneities as faults and fractures, span a relatively large spectrum of temporal and spatial scales and they interact in a highly non-linear fashion. In this regard, numerical simulators have become necessary in geological studies to model coupled processes and complex geological geometries. In this study, we present a new simulator GOLEM, using multiphysics coupling to characterize geological reservoirs. In particular, special attention is given to discrete geological features such as faults and fractures. GOLEM is based on the Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE). The MOOSE framework provides a powerful and flexible platform to solve multiphysics problems implicitly and in a tightly coupled manner on unstructured meshes which is of interest for the considered non-linear context. Governing equations in 3D for fluid flow, heat transfer (conductive and advective), saline transport as well as deformation (elastic and plastic) have been implemented into the GOLEM application. Coupling between rock deformation and fluid and heat flow is considered using theories of poroelasticity and thermoelasticity. Furthermore, considering material properties such as density and viscosity and transport properties such as porosity as dependent on the state variables (based on the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam models) increase the coupling complexity of the problem. The GOLEM application aims

  18. Review of SKB's Work on Coupled THM Processes Within SR-Can. External review contribution in support of SKI's and SSI's review of SR-Can

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Chin-Fu Tsang (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (US))

    2008-03-15

    In this report, we scrutinize the work by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) related to coupled thermal, hydrological and mechanical (THM) processes within the SR-Can project. SR-Can is SKB's preliminary assessment of long-term safety for a KBS-3 nuclear waste repository, and is a preparation stage for the SR-Site assessment, the report that will be used in SKB's application for a final repository. We scrutinize SKB's work related to THM processes through review and detailed analysis, using an independent modeling tool. The modeling tool is applied to analyze coupled THM processes at the two candidate sites, Forsmark and Laxemar, using data defined in SKB's site description models for respective sites. In this report, we first provide a brief overview of SKB's work related to analysis of the evolution of coupled THM processes as presented in SRCan, as well as supporting documents. In this overview we also identify issues and assumptions that we then analyze using our modeling tool. The overview and subsequent independent model analysis addresses issues related to near-field behavior, such as buffer resaturation and the evolution of the excavation-disturbed zone, as well as far-field behavior, such as stress induced changes in hydrologic properties. Based on the review and modeling conducted in this report, we conclude by identifying a number of areas of weaknesses, where we believe further work and clarifications are needed. Some of the most important ones are summarized below: 1) We found that SKB's calculation of peak temperature might not have been conducted for the most conservative case of extreme drying of the buffer under dry rock conditions and an unexpectedly high thermal diffusion coefficient. Our alternative analysis indicates that temperatures close to 100 might be achieved under unfavorable (and perhaps unexpected) conditions in which the buffer is dried to below 20% near the canister. We believe

  19. Drift Scale THM Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Rutqvist

    2004-10-07

    This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because

  20. Numerical analysis of thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes in the clay based material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xuerui

    2016-10-06

    Clay formations are investigated worldwide as potential host rock for the deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Usually bentonite is preferred as the buffer and backfill material in the disposal system. In the disposal of HLW, heat emission is one of the most important issues as it can generate a series of complex thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes in the surrounding materials and thus change the material properties. In the context of safety assessment, it is important to understand the thermally induced THM interactions and the associated change in material properties. In this work, the thermally induced coupled THM behaviours in the clay host rock and in the bentonite buffer as well as the corresponding coupling effects among the relevant material properties are numerically analysed. A coupled non-isothermal Richards flow mechanical model and a non-isothermal multiphase flow model were developed based on the scientific computer codes OpenGeoSys (OGS). Heat transfer in the porous media is governed by thermal conduction and advective flow of the pore fluids. Within the hydraulic processes, evaporation, vapour diffusion, and the unsaturated flow field are considered. Darcy's law is used to describe the advective flux of gas and liquid phases. The relative permeability of each phase is considered. The elastic deformation process is modelled by the generalized Hooke's law complemented with additional strain caused by swelling/shrinkage behaviour and by temperature change. In this study, special attention has been paid to the analysis of the thermally induced changes in material properties. The strong mechanical and hydraulic anisotropic properties of clay rock are described by a transversely isotropic mechanical model and by a transversely isotropic permeability tensor, respectively. The thermal anisotropy is described by adoption of the bedding-orientation-dependent thermal conductivity. The dependency of the thermal

  1. Modification of growth interface of CdZnTe crystals in THM process by ACRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Boru; Jie, Wanqi; Wang, Tao; Yin, Liying; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Binbin; Xi, Shouzhi; Dong, Jiangpeng

    2018-02-01

    The accelerated crucible rotation technique (ACRT) was introduced in the traveling heater method (THM) growth process of detector-grade CdZnTe (CZT) crystals to regulate the convection in the melt and to modify the growth interface morphology. Several ingots with the diameter of 53 mm were grown by THM with/without ACRT. The ingots were quenched during the growth to show both macroscopic and microscopic morphologies of the growth interfaces. The results show that by using ACRT the growth interface can be changed from a concave one to the flat or even convex one depending on the ACRT parameters, which is favorable for reducing nucleation in the melt to get larger CZT grains. Meanwhile, by using ACRT in THM process, the microscopic interface was changed from a diffused one to cellular or even planar one (at suitable ACRT parameters), through which the trapped Te inclusions was decreased for one order. An ingot grown by THM with constant rotation rate of 40 rpm was also grown, which have also reduced the interface curvature in macro-scale and Te inclusions to some extent, but the effects are not as significant as ACRT with high crucible rotation rate.

  2. DECOVALEX-THMC Project. Task A. Influence of near-field coupled THM phenomena on the performance of a spent fuel repository. Report of Task A2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.S.; Jing, L.

    2008-06-01

    This report presents the research works performed for the Phase 2 of Task A of the international co-operative research project DECOVALEX-THMC (2003-2007), in which the development and calibration of mathematical models for Lac-du-Bonnet granite and the MX-80 bentonite, using a variety of laboratory and field experiments are the major topics of research. The objective is to assess the implications of coupled THM processes in the near field of a typical repository on its long-term performance, with special concerns on the impact of rock damage and bentonite behaviours on the performance and safety assessments of underground nuclear waste repositories. The mathematical models used by all teams are based on the framework of Biot's theory of poroelasticity. However, the models are extended beyond the classical Biot's theory, in order to include such effects as thermal effects, unsaturated behaviour of the bentonite and damage behaviour of the granite. The results show that the behaviour of both materials are very complex, and an accurate scientific understanding is not currently achieved for repository safety assessment. However, the achievement have clarified a number of scientific and technical issues related to rock damage and bentonite behaviour and helped to establish adequate confidence in identifying the key safety features in the near field of a hypothetical repository, using coupled THM scoping calculations. These key features would be the temperature evolution, the resaturation and stresses in the bentonite, the extent of the inner damage zone in the rock, and the change in hydraulic and mechanical properties in the rock

  3. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Coupled Processes in Safety Assessments. Report of Task 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan [JA Streamflow AB, Aelvsjoe (Sweden)

    2005-02-15

    A part (Task 4) of the International DECOVALEX III project on coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (T-H-M) processes focuses on T-H-M modelling applications in safety and performance assessment of deep geological nuclear waste repositories. A previous phase, DECOVALEX II, saw a need to improve such modelling. In order to address this need Task 4 of DECOVALEX III has: Analysed two major T-H-M experiments (Task 1 and Task 2) and three different Bench Mark Tests (Task 3) set-up to explore the significance of T-H-M in some potentially important safety assessment applications. Compiled and evaluated the use of T-H-M modelling in safety assessments at the time of the year 2000. Organised a forum a forum of interchange between PA-analysts and THM modelers at each DECOVALEX III workshop. Based on this information the current report discusses the findings and strives for reaching recommendations as regards good practices in addressing coupled T-H-M issues in safety assessments. The full development of T-H-M modelling is still at an early stage and it is not evident whether current codes provide the information that is required. However, although the geosphere is a system of fully coupled processes, this does not directly imply that all existing coupled mechanisms must be represented numerically. Modelling is conducted for specific purposes and the required confidence level should be considered. It is necessary to match the confidence level with the modelling objective. Coupled THM modelling has to incorporate uncertainties. These uncertainties mainly concern uncertainties in the conceptual model and uncertainty in data. Assessing data uncertainty is important when judging the need to model coupled processes. Often data uncertainty is more significant than the coupled effects. The emphasis on the need for THM modelling differs among disciplines. For geological radioactive waste disposal in crystalline and other similar hard rock formations DECOVALEX III shows it is essential to

  4. A numerical model for modeling microstructure and THM couplings in fault gouges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veveakis, M.; Rattez, H.; Stefanou, I.; Sulem, J.; Poulet, T.

    2017-12-01

    When materials are subjected to large deformations, most of them experience inelastic deformations, accompanied by a localization of these deformations into a narrow zone leading to failure. Localization is seen as an instability from the homogeneous state of deformation. Therefore a first approach to study it consists at looking at the possible critical conditions for which the constitutive equations of the material allow a bifurcation point (Rudnicki & Rice 1975). But in some cases, we would like to know the evolution of the material after the onset of localization. For example, a fault in the crustal part of the lithosphere is a shear band and the study of this localized zone enables to extract information about seismic slip. For that, we need to approximate the solution of a nonlinear boundary value problem numerically. It is a challenging task due to the complications that arise while dealing with a softening behavior. Indeed, the classical continuum theory cannot be used because the governing system of equations is ill-posed (Vardoulakis 1985). This ill-posedness can be tracked back to the fact that constitutive models don't contain material parameters with the dimension of a length. It leads to what is called "mesh dependency" for numerical simulations, as the deformations localize in only one element of the mesh and the behavior of the system depends thus on the mesh size. A way to regularize the problem is to resort to continuum models with microstructure, such as Cosserat continua (Sulem et al. 2011). Cosserat theory is particularly interesting as it can explicitly take into account the size of the microstructure in a fault gouge. Basically, it introduces 3 degrees of freedom of rotation on top of the 3 translations (Godio et al. 2016). The original work of (Mühlhaus & Vardoulakis 1987) is extended in 3D and thermo-hydro mechanical couplings are added to the model to study fault system in the crustal part of the lithosphere. The system of equations is

  5. A case study on the influence of THM coupling on the near field safety of a spent fuel repository in sparsely fractured granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh Son; Börgesson, Lennart; Chijimatsu, Masakazu; Hernelind, Jan; Jing, Lanru; Kobayashi, Akira; Rutqvist, Jonny

    2009-05-01

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of geological disposal of spent CANDU fuel in Canada, a safety assessment was performed for a hypothetical repository in the Canadian Shield. The assessment shows that the maximum long term radionuclide release from such repository would meet international criteria for dose rate; however, uncertainties in the assumed evolution of the repository were identified. Such uncertainties could be resolved by the consideration of coupled Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) processes. In Task A of the DECOVALEX-THMC project, THM models were developed within the framework of the theory of poroelasticity. Such model development was performed in an iterative manner, using experimental data from laboratory and field tests. The models were used to perform near-field simulations of the evolution of the repository in order to address the above-mentioned uncertainties. This paper presents the definition and rationale of task A and the results of the simulations. From a repository safety point of view, the simulations predict that the maximum temperature would be well below the design target of 100°C; however, the stress on the container can marginally exceed the design value of 15 MPa. However, the most important finding from the simulations is that a rock damage zone could form around the emplacement borehole. Such damage zone can extend a few metres from the walls of the emplacement holes, with permeability values that are orders of magnitude higher than the initial values. The damage zone has the potential to increase the radionuclide transport flux from the geosphere; the effect of such an increase should be taken into account in the safety assessment and mitigated if necessary by the provision of sealing systems.

  6. T-H-M couplings in rock. Overview of results of importance to the SR-Can safety assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoekmark, Harald; Faelth, Billy [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Wallroth, Thomas [BERGAB, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2006-09-15

    This report deals with THM processes in rock hosting a KBS-nuclear waste repository. The issues addressed are mechanically and thermo-mechanically induced changes of the hydraulic conditions in the near-field and in the far-field, and the risk of stress-induced failure, spalling, in the walls of deposition holes. These changes are examined for the construction and operational phases, the initial temperate period and a subsequent glacial cycle. The report was compiled to be used as reference and background for corresponding parts of the safety report SR-Can. The near-field is analyzed using thermo-mechanical DEC models. There are a number of models for each of the three sites Forsmark, Simpevarp and Laxemar. Parameter values of intact rock and rock mass mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties were obtained from the site descriptive models. Layout data, i.e. the number of canisters, the geometry of the repository openings, the tunnel spacing and the canister spacing are in accordance with rules and guidelines given in general design- and layout documents. Heat generation data, i.e. the initial canister power and the canister power decay are in accordance with data given in the SR-Can main report. The effects of changes in nearfield stresses during the different phases of the repository's lifetime are evaluated by comparing numerically obtained stresses and deformations on a number of explicitly modelled near-field fractures with empirical and theoretical stress-transmissivity laws and with empirically based slip-transmissivity estimates. For the near-field it is concluded that substantial transmissivity increases are found only very close to the repository openings. Bounding estimates, judged to be valid for the entire load sequence, are made of the extent and magnitude of the hydraulic disturbance. At distances larger than about 1.5 m from the tunnel periphery, transmissivity increases are concluded to be too small and unsystematic to be of any concern. The

  7. THM modelling of buffer, backfill and other system components. Critical processes and scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aakesson, Mattias; Kristensson, Ola; Boergesson, Lennart; Dueck, Ann; Hernelind, Jan

    2010-03-01

    A number of critical thermo-hydro-mechanical processes and scenarios for the buffer, tunnel backfill and other filling components in the repository have been identified. These processes and scenarios representing different aspects of the repository evolution have been pinpointed and modelled. In total, 22 cases have been modelled. Most cases have been analysed with finite element (FE) calculations, using primarily the two codes Abaqus and Code B right. For some cases analytical methods have been used either to supplement the FE calculations or due to that the scenario has a character that makes it unsuitable or very difficult to use the FE method. Material models and element models and choice of parameters as well as presumptions have been stated for all modelling cases. In addition, the results have been analysed and conclusions drawn for each case. The uncertainties have also been analysed. Besides the information given for all cases studied, the codes and material models have been described in a separate so called data report

  8. Transient boundary conditions in the frame of THM-processes at nuclear waste repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schanz Tom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In nuclear waste repositories, initially unsaturated buffer is subjected to constant heat emitted by waste canister in conjunction with peripheral hydration through water from host rock. The transient hydration process can be potraied as transformation of initial heterogeneity towards homogeneity as final stage. In this context, this paper addresses the key issue of hydro mechanical behaviour of compacted buffer in context of clay microstructure and its evolution under repository relevant loading paths and material heterogeneity. This paper also introduces a unique column experiment facility available at Ruhr Universität Bochum, Germany. The facility has been designed as a forerunner of field scale testing program to simulate the transient hydration process of compacted buffer as per German reference disposal concept. The device is unique in terms of having proficiency to capture the transient material response under various possible repository relevant loading paths with higher precision level by monitor the key parameters like temperature, total suction, water content and axial & radial swelling pressure at three different sections along the length of compacted soil sample. In general, a larger spectrum of loading paths/scenarios, which may arise in the nuclear repository, can be covered precisely with existing device.

  9. THM modelling of buffer, backfill and other system components. Critical processes and scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakesson, Mattias; Kristensson, Ola; Boergesson, Lennart; Dueck, Ann (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)); Hernelind, Jan (5T-Engineering AB, Vaesteraas (Sweden))

    2010-03-15

    A number of critical thermo-hydro-mechanical processes and scenarios for the buffer, tunnel backfill and other filling components in the repository have been identified. These processes and scenarios representing different aspects of the repository evolution have been pinpointed and modelled. In total, 22 cases have been modelled. Most cases have been analysed with finite element (FE) calculations, using primarily the two codes Abaqus and Code-Bright. For some cases analytical methods have been used either to supplement the FE calculations or due to that the scenario has a character that makes it unsuitable or very difficult to use the FE method. Material models and element models and choice of parameters as well as presumptions have been stated for all modelling cases. In addition, the results have been analysed and conclusions drawn for each case. The uncertainties have also been analysed. Besides the information given for all cases studied, the codes and material models have been described in a separate so called data report

  10. DECOVALEX-THMC Project. Task A. Influence of near field coupled THM phenomena on the performance of a spent fuel repository. Report of Task A1: Preliminary scoping calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Son (ed.) [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (Canada); Lanru Jing (ed.) [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Boergesson, Lennart [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Chijimatzu, Masakazu [Hazama Corporation (Japan); Jussila, Petri [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Helsinki (Finland); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory CA (United States)

    2007-02-15

    The DECOVALEX-THMC project is an ongoing international co-operative project that was stared in 2004 to support the development of mathematical models of coupled Thermal (T), Hydrological (H), Mechanical (M) and Chemical (C) processes in geological media for siting potential nuclear fuel waste repositories. The general objective is to characterise and evaluate the coupled THMC processes in the near field and far field of a geological repository and to assess their impact on performance assessment: - during the three phases of repository development: excavation phase, operation phase and post-closure phase; - for three different rocks types: crystalline, argillaceous and tuff; - with specific focus on the issues of: Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ), permanent property changes of rock masses, and glaciation and permafrost phenomena. The project involves a large number of research teams supported by radioactive waste management agencies or governmental regulatory bodies in Canada, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Sweden and USA, who conducted advanced studies and numerical modelling of coupled THMC processes under five tasks. This report presents the definition of the first phase, Task A-1, of the Task A of the project. The task is a working example of how interaction between THMC modelling and SA analysis could be performed. Starting with the technical definition of the Task A, the report presents the results of preliminary THM calculations with a purpose of an initial appreciation of the phenomena and material properties that must be better understood in subsequent phases. Many simplifications and assumptions were introduced and the results should be considered under these assumptions. Based on the evaluation of the multiple teams' results, a few points of concern were identified that may guide the successive phases of Task A studies: 1. The predicted maximum total stress in the MX-80 bentonite could slightly exceed the 15 MPa design pressure for the

  11. DECOVALEX-THMC Project. Task D. Long-Term Permeability/Porosity Changes in the EDZ and Near Field due to THM and THC Processes in Volcanic and Crystalline-Bentonite Systems. Phase 1 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Sonnenthal, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA (United States); Barr, D. [Office of Repository Development, DOE (United States)

    2007-02-15

    The general goal of this project is to encourage multidisciplinary interactive and cooperative research on modeling coupled processes in geologic formations in support of the performance assessment for underground storage of radioactive waste. Three multi-year project stages of DECOVALEX have been completed in the past decade, mainly focusing on coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical processes. Currently, a fourth three-year project stage of DECOVALEX is under way, referred to as DECOVALEX-THMC. THMC stands for Thermal, Hydrological, Mechanical, and Chemical processes. The new project stage aims at expanding the traditional geomechanical scope of the previous DECOVALEX project stages by incorporating geochemical processes important for repository performance. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) leads Task D of the new DECOVALEX phase, entitled 'Long-term Permeability/Porosity Changes in the EDZ and Near Field due to THC and THM Processes for Volcanic and Crystalline-Bentonite Systems.' In its leadership role for Task D, DOE coordinates and sets the direction for the cooperative research activities of the international research teams engaged in Task D. The research program developed for Task D of DECOVALEX-THMC involves geomechanical and geochemical research areas. THM and THC processes may lead to changes in hydrological properties that are important for performance because the flow processes in the vicinity of emplacement tunnels will be altered from their initial state. Some of these changes can be permanent (irreversible), in which case they persist after the thermal conditions have returned to ambient; i.e., they will affect the entire regulatory compliance period. Geochemical processes also affect the water and gas chemistry close to the waste packages, which are relevant for waste package corrosion, buffer stability, and radionuclide transport. Research teams participating in Task D evaluate long-term THM and THC processes in two generic geologic

  12. Thermal-Hydraulic-Mechanical (THM) Coupled Simulation of a Generic Site for Disposal of High Level Nuclear Waste in Claystone in Germany: Exemplary Proof of the Integrity of the Geological Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massmann, J.; Ziefle, G.; Jobmann, M.

    2016-12-01

    Claystone is investigated as a potential host rock for the disposal of high level nuclear waste (HLW). In Germany, DBE TECHNOLOGY GmbH, the BGR and the "Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS)" are developing an integrated methodology for safety assessment within the R&D project "ANSICHT". One part herein is the demonstration of integrity of the geological barrier to ensure safe containment of radionuclides over 1 million years. The mechanical excavation of an underground repository, the ex­po­si­tion of claystone to at­mos­pheric air, the insertion of backfill, buffer, sealing and supporting material as well as the deposition of heat producing waste constitute a sig­nif­i­cant disturbance of the underground system. A complex interacting scheme of thermal, hydraulic and mechanical (THM) processes can be expected. In this work, the finite element software OpenGeoSys, main­ly de­vel­oped at the "Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research GmbH (UFZ)", is used to simulate and evaluate several THM coupled effects in the repository surroundings up to the surface over a time span of 1 million years. The numerical setup is based on two generic geological models inspired by the representative geology of potentially suitable regions in North- and South Germany. The results give an insight into the evolution of temperature, pore pressure, stresses as well as deformation and enables statements concerning the extent of the significantly influenced area. One important effect among others is the temperature driven change in the densities of the solid and liquid phase and its influence on the stress field. In a further step, integrity criteria have been quantified, based on specifications of the German federal ministry of the environment. The exemplary numerical evaluation of these criteria demonstrates, how numerical simulations can be used to prove the integrity of the geological barrier and detect potential vulnerabilities. Fig.: Calculated zone of

  13. DECOVALEX-THMC Task D: Long-Term Permeability/Porosity Changes inthe EDZ and Near Field due to THM and THC Processes in Volcanic andCrystaline-Bentonite Systems, Status Report October 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Sonnenthal, E.; Barr, D.

    2005-11-01

    The DECOVALEX project is an international cooperativeproject initiated by SKI, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, withparticipation of about 10 international organizations. The name DECOVALEXstands for DEvelopment of COupled models and their VALidation againstExperiments. The general goal of this project is to encouragemultidisciplinary interactive and cooperative research on modelingcoupled processes in geologic formations in support of the performanceassessment for underground storage of radioactive waste. Three multi-yearproject stages of DECOVALEX have been completed in the past decade,mainly focusing on coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanicalprocesses.Currently, a fourth three-year project stage of DECOVALEX isunder way, referred to as DECOVALEX-THMC. THMC stands for Thermal,Hydrological, Mechanical, and Chemical processes. The new project stageaims at expanding the traditional geomechanical scope of the previousDECOVALEX project stages by incorporating geochemical processes importantfor repository performance. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) leadsTask D of the new DECOVALEX phase, entitled "Long-termPermeability/Porosity Changes in the EDZ and Near Field due to THC andTHM Processes for Volcanic and Crystalline-Bentonite Systems." In itsleadership role for Task D, DOE coordinates and sets the direction forthe cooperative research activities of the international research teamsengaged in Task D.

  14. The coupled process laboratory test of highly compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Zhenyao; Li Guoding; Li Shushen; Wang Chengzu

    2004-01-01

    Highly compacted bentonite blocks have been heated and hydrated in the laboratory in order to simulate the thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) coupled processes of buffer material in a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository. The experiment facility, which is composed of experiment barrel, heated system, high pressure water input system, temperature measure system, water content measure system and swelling stress system, is introduced in this paper. The steps of the THM coupled experiment are also given out in detail. There are total 10 highly compacted bentonite blocks used in this test. Experimental number 1-4 are the tests with the heater and the hydrated process, which temperature distribution vs. time and final moisture distribution are measured. Experimental number 5-8 are the tests with the heater and without the hydrated process, which temperature distribution vs. time and final moisture distribution are measured. Experimental number 9-10 are the tests with the heater and the hydrated process, which temperature distribution vs. time, final moisture distribution and the swelling stress distribution at some typical points vs. time are measured. The maximum test time is nearly 20 days and the minimum test time is only 8 hours. The results show that the temperature field is little affected by hydration process and stress condition, but moisture transport and stress distribution are a little affected by the thermal gradient. The results also show that the water head difference is the mainly driving force of hydration process and the swelling stress is mainly from hydration process. It will great help to understand better about heat and mass transfer in porous media and the THM coupled process in actual HLW disposal. (author)

  15. CONCENTRATION OF TRIHALOMETHANES (THM AND PRECURSORS IN DRINKING WATER WITHIN DISTRIBUTION NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CORNELIA DIANA ROMAN

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Concentration of trihalomethanes (THM and precursors in drinking water within distribution networks. Water chlorination is the disinfection method most widely used, having however the disadvantage of producing trihalomethanes (THM as secondary compounds, which are included in the list of priority hazardous substances in water. THM formation is influenced by the raw water composition and chlorine from the disinfection process. This paper intends to highlight the individual values of the chemical compounds precursors of THM in the water network in order to correlate them with the evolution of THM concentration. The cities of Targu Mures and Zalau were chosen as the study area having surface waters with different degrees of contamination as the water source. Pre-treatment with potassium permanganate is used at the water treatment plant in Targu Mures, while pre-chlorination is used at the water treatment plant in Zalau. Water sampling was performed weekly between March-May, 2011 in three sampling points of each city, maintained during the period of study. Total THM and their compounds as well as THM precursors (oxidability, ammonium content, nitrites and nitrates were measured. The water supplied in the distribution network corresponded integrally to the quality standards in terms of the analyzed indicators, including THM concentrations. The higher average THM concentrations in Zalau (52.01±14 μg/L compared to Targu Mures (36.43±9.14 μg/L were expected as a result of precursors concentration. In terms of THM compounds, they had similar proportions in the two localities, chloroform being clearly predominant, followed by dichlorobromoform and dibromochloroform, while bromoform was not identified. Statistical data analysis showed that the presence of THM precursors is correlated with the THM levels but not sufficient for their generation, even if they can be considered in general the basis of a valid prediction.

  16. A Comparative Study of Selected Trace Element Content in Malay and Chinese Traditional Herbal Medicine (THM Using an Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifah Mohamad

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A total of 60 products of traditional herbal medicine (THM in various dosage forms of herbal preparation were analyzed to determine selected trace elements (i.e., Zn, Mn, Cu, Cd, and Se using ICP-MS. Thirty types of both Chinese and Malay THMs were chosen to represent each population. The closed vessel acid microwave digestion method, using CEM MARS 5, was employed for the extraction of the selected trace elements. The digestion method applied was validated by using certified reference material from the Trace Element in Spinach Leaves (SRM1570a. The recoveries of all elements were found to be in the range of 85.3%–98.9%. The results indicated that Zn, Mn, Cu, Cd and Se have their own trends of concentrations in all samples studied. The daily intake concentrations of the elements were in the following order: Mn > Zn > Cu > Se > Cd. Concentrations of all five elements were found to be dominant in Chinese THMs. The essentiality of the selected trace elements was also assessed, based on the recommended daily allowance (RDA, adequate intake (AI and the United States Pharmacopeia (USP for trace elements as reference. The concentrations of all elements studied were below the RDA, AI and USP values, which fall within the essential concentration range, except for cadmium.

  17. Sensitivity analysis of coupled processes and parameters on the performance of enhanced geothermal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, S N; Vishal, Vikram

    2017-12-06

    3-D modeling of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes in enhanced geothermal systems using the control volume finite element code was done. In a first, a comparative analysis on the effects of coupled processes, operational parameters and reservoir parameters on heat extraction was conducted. We found that significant temperature drop and fluid overpressure occurred inside the reservoirs/fracture that affected the transport behavior of the fracture. The spatio-temporal variations of fracture aperture greatly impacted the thermal drawdown and consequently the net energy output. The results showed that maximum aperture evolution occurred near the injection zone instead of the production zone. Opening of the fracture reduced the injection pressure required to circulate a fixed mass of water. The thermal breakthrough and heat extraction strongly depend on the injection mass flow rate, well distances, reservoir permeability and geothermal gradients. High permeability caused higher water loss, leading to reduced heat extraction. From the results of TH vs THM process simulations, we conclude that appropriate coupling is vital and can impact the estimates of net heat extraction. This study can help in identifying the critical operational parameters, and process optimization for enhanced energy extraction from a geothermal system.

  18. DECOVALEX - Mathematical models of coupled T-H-M processes for nuclear waste repositories. Report of phase III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, L.; Rutqvist, J.; Stephansson, O.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents the methodologies and results of the field/laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling defined for the phase III of the project. Results from test cases 2-6 are given in separate chapters of the report (which have been indexed separately), and the last chapter discusses the lessons learned from the three phases of the DECOVALEX project

  19. Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hui -Hai [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Houseworth, Jim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Li, Lianchong [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Asahina, Daisuke [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chen, Fei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world. Coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical (THMC) processes have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For example, the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) near repository tunnels can modify local permeability (resulting from induced fractures), potentially leading to less confinement capability. This report documents results from three R&D activities: (1) implementation and validation of constitutive relationships, (2) development of a discrete fracture network (DFN) model for investigating coupled processes in the EDZ, and (3) development of a THM model for the FE tests at Mont Terri, Switzerland, for the purpose of model validation. The overall objective of these activities is to provide an improved understanding of EDZ evolution in clay repositories and the associated coupled processes, and to develop advanced relevant modeling capabilities.

  20. Performance assessment of coupled processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigford, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    The author considers all processes to be coupled. For example, a waste package heats the surrounding rock and its pore water, creating gradients in density and pressure that result in increased water flow. That process can be described as coupled, in that the flow is a consequence of heating. In a narrower sense, one speaks also of the more weakly coupled transport processes, expressed by the Onsager reciprocal relations, that state that a transport current, i.e., flux, of heat is accompanied by a small transport current of material, as evidenced in isotope separation by thermal diffusion, the Thompson effect in thermoelectricity, etc. This paper presents a performance assessment of coupled processes

  1. BENCHPAR PROJECT. How to Incorporate ThermaI-Hydro-Mechanical Coupled Processes into Performance Assessments and Design Studies for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Geological Formations. Guidance Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephansson, O. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Engineering Geology; Hudson, J.A. [Rock Engineering Consultants, Welwyn Garden City (United Kingdom); Andersson, Johan [JA Streamflow AB, Aelvsjoe (Sweden)

    2005-02-15

    The objective of this Guidance Document is to provide advice on how to incorporate thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) coupled processes into Performance Assessments (PAS) and design studies for radioactive waste disposal in geological formations to be experienced in a European context. The document has been generated by the EU research project BENCHPAR: Benchmark Tests and Guidance on Coupled Processes for Performance Assessment of Nuclear Waste Repositories. The document starts in Section 1 with an explanation of why numerical analyses incorporating THM mechanisms are required for radioactive waste studies and provides background material on the subject. Then, the THM processes and their interactions are explained in Section 2. Three case examples of THM numerical analysis are presented in Section 3 to illustrate the type of work that can be conducted to study the near-field, upscaling, and the far-field. For the three cases, there is discussion on the main findings, the relevance to a safety case, the relative importance of the different couplings, and the uncertainties involved. The importance and priority of the THM couplings are then summarized in Section 4. It is especially important to be able to technically audit the numerical analyses in order to establish that all the relevant variables, parameters and mechanisms have been included in the modelling and hence that the numerical model adequately represents the rock and engineering reality. Accordingly, recommended soft and hard auditing procedures are presented in Section 5. In this Guidance Document, we emphasize especially that the most important step in numerical modelling is not executing the calculations per se, but the earlier conceptualization of the problem regarding the dominant processes, the material properties and parameters, the engineering perturbations, and their mathematical presentations. The associated modelling component of addressing the uncertainties and estimating their influence on the

  2. BENCHPAR PROJECT. How to Incorporate ThermaI-Hydro-Mechanical Coupled Processes into Performance Assessments and Design Studies for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Geological Formations. Guidance Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephansson, O.; Andersson, Johan

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this Guidance Document is to provide advice on how to incorporate thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) coupled processes into Performance Assessments (PAS) and design studies for radioactive waste disposal in geological formations to be experienced in a European context. The document has been generated by the EU research project BENCHPAR: Benchmark Tests and Guidance on Coupled Processes for Performance Assessment of Nuclear Waste Repositories. The document starts in Section 1 with an explanation of why numerical analyses incorporating THM mechanisms are required for radioactive waste studies and provides background material on the subject. Then, the THM processes and their interactions are explained in Section 2. Three case examples of THM numerical analysis are presented in Section 3 to illustrate the type of work that can be conducted to study the near-field, upscaling, and the far-field. For the three cases, there is discussion on the main findings, the relevance to a safety case, the relative importance of the different couplings, and the uncertainties involved. The importance and priority of the THM couplings are then summarized in Section 4. It is especially important to be able to technically audit the numerical analyses in order to establish that all the relevant variables, parameters and mechanisms have been included in the modelling and hence that the numerical model adequately represents the rock and engineering reality. Accordingly, recommended soft and hard auditing procedures are presented in Section 5. In this Guidance Document, we emphasize especially that the most important step in numerical modelling is not executing the calculations per se, but the earlier conceptualization of the problem regarding the dominant processes, the material properties and parameters, the engineering perturbations, and their mathematical presentations. The associated modelling component of addressing the uncertainties and estimating their influence on the

  3. Coupled processes in geomechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, N.G.W.

    1987-01-01

    The safe operation of an underground repository for the disposal of nuclear wastes, and the isolation of these wastes form the accessible environment, may be affected adversely by the formation of new fractures in the rock close to these excavations or by movements across pre-existing fractures. Both phenomena may so enhance the permeability of the rock as to allow possibly contaminated groundwater to reach the accessible environment. For hard rocks, the formation of new fractures in the regions of high stress concentration adjacent to excavations is analyzed in terms of breakouts or spalling. In rocksalt, creep may allow the stress adjacent to excavations to decrease below the hydrostatic pressure so that hydraulic fractures may form, or the extension of layers other than salt may produce new hydraulic conduits. The deformation of fractures in response to changes in stress pore pressure and temperature are analyzed for pre-existing fractures, as is also the shear stability of the fractures. Experience and in situ testing are seen to be of the greatest importance in identifying and understanding coupled phenomenon in geomechanics

  4. Coupled processes in geomechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, N.G.W.

    1985-01-01

    The safe operation of an underground repository for the disposal of nuclear wastes and the isolation of these wastes from the accessible environment, may be affected adversely by the formation of new fractures in the rock close to these excavations or by movements across pre-existing fractures. Both phenomena may so enhance the permeability of the rock as to allow possibly contaminated groundwater to reach the accessible environment. For hard rocks, the formation of new fractures in the regions of high stress concentration adjacent to excavations is analyzed in terms of breakouts or spalling. In rocksalt, creep may allow the stress adjacent to excavations to decrease below the hydrostatic pressure so that hydraulic fractures may form, or the extension of layers other than salt may produce new hydraulic conduits. The deformation of fractures in response to changes in stress pore pressure, and temperature are analyzed for pre-existing fractures, as is also the shear stability of the fractures. Experience and in situ testing are seen to be of the greatest importance in identifying and understanding coupled phenomenon in geomechanics

  5. Temperature Buffer Test. Final THM modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakesson, Mattias; Malmberg, Daniel; Boergesson, Lennart; Hernelind, Jan [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Ledesma, Alberto; Jacinto, Abel [UPC, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-01-15

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modelling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aespoe HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report presents the final THM modelling which was resumed subsequent to the dismantling operation. The main part of this work has been numerical modelling of the field test. Three different modelling teams have presented several model cases for different geometries and different degree of process complexity. Two different numerical codes, Code{sub B}right and Abaqus, have been used. The modelling performed by UPC-Cimne using Code{sub B}right, has been divided in three subtasks: i) analysis of the response observed in the lower part of the test, by inclusion of a number of considerations: (a) the use of the Barcelona Expansive Model for MX-80 bentonite; (b) updated parameters in the vapour diffusive flow term; (c) the use of a non-conventional water retention curve for MX-80 at high temperature; ii) assessment of a possible relation between the cracks observed in the bentonite blocks in the upper part of TBT, and the cycles of suction and stresses registered in that zone at the start of the experiment; and iii) analysis of the performance, observations and interpretation of the entire test. It was however not possible to carry out a full THM analysis until the end of the test due to

  6. Temperature Buffer Test. Final THM modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aakesson, Mattias; Malmberg, Daniel; Boergesson, Lennart; Hernelind, Jan; Ledesma, Alberto; Jacinto, Abel

    2012-01-01

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modelling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aespoe HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report presents the final THM modelling which was resumed subsequent to the dismantling operation. The main part of this work has been numerical modelling of the field test. Three different modelling teams have presented several model cases for different geometries and different degree of process complexity. Two different numerical codes, Code B right and Abaqus, have been used. The modelling performed by UPC-Cimne using Code B right, has been divided in three subtasks: i) analysis of the response observed in the lower part of the test, by inclusion of a number of considerations: (a) the use of the Barcelona Expansive Model for MX-80 bentonite; (b) updated parameters in the vapour diffusive flow term; (c) the use of a non-conventional water retention curve for MX-80 at high temperature; ii) assessment of a possible relation between the cracks observed in the bentonite blocks in the upper part of TBT, and the cycles of suction and stresses registered in that zone at the start of the experiment; and iii) analysis of the performance, observations and interpretation of the entire test. It was however not possible to carry out a full THM analysis until the end of the test due to

  7. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-01-01

    example, the excavation-damaged zone (EDZ) near repository tunnels can modify local permeability (resulting from induced fractures), potentially leading to less confinement capability (Tsang et al., 2005). Because of clay's swelling and shrinkage behavior (depending on whether the clay is in imbibition or drainage processes), fracture properties in the EDZ are quite dynamic and evolve over time as hydromechanical conditions change. To understand and model the coupled processes and their impact on repository performance is critical for the defensible performance assessment of a clay repository. Within the Natural Barrier System (NBS) group of the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign at DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, LBNL's research activities have focused on understanding and modeling such coupled processes. LBNL provided a report in this April on literature survey of studies on coupled processes in clay repositories and identification of technical issues and knowledge gaps (Tsang et al., 2010). This report will document other LBNL research activities within the natural system work package, including the development of constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock (Section 2), a THM modeling study (Section 3) and a THC modeling study (Section 4). The purpose of the THM and THC modeling studies is to demonstrate the current modeling capabilities in dealing with coupled processes in a potential clay repository. In Section 5, we discuss potential future R and D work based on the identified knowledge gaps. The linkage between these activities and related FEPs is presented in Section 6.

  8. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    example, the excavation-damaged zone (EDZ) near repository tunnels can modify local permeability (resulting from induced fractures), potentially leading to less confinement capability (Tsang et al., 2005). Because of clay's swelling and shrinkage behavior (depending on whether the clay is in imbibition or drainage processes), fracture properties in the EDZ are quite dynamic and evolve over time as hydromechanical conditions change. To understand and model the coupled processes and their impact on repository performance is critical for the defensible performance assessment of a clay repository. Within the Natural Barrier System (NBS) group of the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign at DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, LBNL's research activities have focused on understanding and modeling such coupled processes. LBNL provided a report in this April on literature survey of studies on coupled processes in clay repositories and identification of technical issues and knowledge gaps (Tsang et al., 2010). This report will document other LBNL research activities within the natural system work package, including the development of constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock (Section 2), a THM modeling study (Section 3) and a THC modeling study (Section 4). The purpose of the THM and THC modeling studies is to demonstrate the current modeling capabilities in dealing with coupled processes in a potential clay repository. In Section 5, we discuss potential future R&D work based on the identified knowledge gaps. The linkage between these activities and related FEPs is presented in Section 6.

  9. OpenGeoSys: An open-source initiative for numerical simulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical/chemical (THM/C) processes in porous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolditz, O.; Bauer, S.; Bilke, L.

    In this paper we describe the OpenGeoSys (OGS) project, which is a scientific open-source initiative for numerical simulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical/chemical processes in porous media. The basic concept is to provide a flexible numerical framework (using primarily the Finite Element Method (FEM...

  10. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Mathematical Models of Coupled Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Processes for Nuclear Waste Repositories. Executive Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, L.; Stephansson, O.; Kautzky, F.

    2005-02-01

    DECOVALEX is an international consortium of governmental agencies associated with the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a number of countries. The consortium's mission is the DEvelopment of COupled models and their VALidation against EXperiments. Hence the acronym/name DECOVALEX. Currently, agencies from Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Spain, Switzerland, Sweden, United Kingdom, and the United States are in DECOVALEX. Emplacement of nuclear waste in a repository in geologic media causes a number of physical processes to be intensified in the surrounding rock mass due to the decay heat from the waste. The four main processes of concern are thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical. Interactions or coupling between these heat-driven processes must be taken into account in modeling the performance of the repository for such modeling to be meaningful and reliable. DECOVALEX III is organized around four tasks. The FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barriers EXperiment) in situ experiment being conducted at the Grimsel site in Switzerland is to be simulated and analyzed in Task 1. Task 2, centered around the Drift Scale Test (DST) at Yucca Mountain in Nevada, USA, has several sub-tasks (Task 2A, Task 2B, Task 2C and Task 2D) to investigate a number of the coupled processes in the DST. Task 3 studies three benchmark problems: a) the effects of thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) coupling on the performance of the near-field of a nuclear waste repository (BMT1); b) the effect of upscaling THM processes on the results of performance assessment (BMT2); and c) the effect of glaciation on rock mass behavior (BMT3). Task 4 is on the direct application of THM coupled process modeling in the performance assessment of nuclear waste repositories in geologic media. This executive summary presents the motivation, structure, objectives, approaches, and the highlights of the main achievements and outstanding issues of the tasks studied in the DECOVALEX III project. The

  11. Modeling Coupled THMC Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-08-14

    In this report, we present FY2014 progress by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) related to modeling of coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. LBNL’s work on the modeling of coupled THMC processes in salt was initiated in FY2012, focusing on exploring and demonstrating the capabilities of an existing LBNL modeling tool (TOUGH-FLAC) for simulating temperature-driven coupled flow and geomechanical processes in salt. This work includes development related to, and implementation of, essential capabilities, as well as testing the model against relevant information and published experimental data related to the fate and transport of water. we provide more details on the FY2014 work, first presenting updated tools and improvements made to the TOUGH-FLAC simulator, and the use of this updated tool in a new model simulation of long-term THM behavior within a generic repository in a salt formation. This is followed by the description of current benchmarking and validations efforts, including the TSDE experiment. We then present the current status in the development of constitutive relationships and the dual-continuum model for brine migration. We conclude with an outlook for FY2015, which will be much focused on model validation against field experiments and on the use of the model for the design studies related to a proposed heater experiment.

  12. Modelling of the THM-evolution of Olkiluoto nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toprak, Erdem; Olivella, Sebastia; Mokni, Nadia; Pintado, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. This paper presents preliminary analyses of coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical (THM) processes in the future nuclear waste repository in Olkiluoto (www.posiva.fi). A finite element program Code-Bright is used to perform modeling calculations of disposal tunnels in an underground repository for spent nuclear fuel. The repository will consist of a series of deposition holes in the bedrock. Bentonite buffer rings will surround the copper canisters containing spent fuel. As a protecting and isolating barrier between the waste canisters and the surrounding host rock, MX80 bentonite will be used as buffer material. Friedland clay is considered one of the best candidates to be used as drift backfill material to meet the long-term performance requirements set for backfilling of a disposal tunnel in the repository. Figure 1 shows a cross section of the spent nuclear final disposal facility. The time required for reaching full saturation, maximum temperature reached in canister, deformations in the buffer-backfill interface and stress-deformation balance in this interaction and also modeling of gap between canister and buffer ring are the main issued addressed of this study. A fundamental issue in modeling was to determine relevant thermal boundary conditions so that the details of THM-behavior could be captured by defining proper near-field thermal boundaries. In this study, it has been shown that temperature on the considered close boundaries depends on initial canister power, fuel power decay characteristic and rock thermal properties. The thermal boundary conditions fixed at the THM modeling have been calculated solving the thermal problem for the entire repository with the analytical solution (Ikonen, 2005). With regard to the hydraulic analyses, the time required for full saturation is sensitive to vapor diffusion, hydraulic conductivity and water retention curve of the buffer and the hydraulic conductivity of the rock. A

  13. THM and primordial nucleosynthesis: Results and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzone, R. G.; Spartá, R.; Bertulani, C.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Tumino, A.

    2017-09-01

    Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) requires several nuclear physics inputs and nuclear reaction rates. An up-to-date compilation of direct cross sections of d(d,p)t, d(d,n) 3 He and 3 He(d,p) 4 He reactions is given, being these ones among the most uncertain bare-nucleus cross sections. An intense experimental effort has been carried on in the last decade to apply the Trojan Horse Method (THM) to study reactions of relevance for the BBN and measure their astrophysical S( E) -factor. The reaction rates and the relative error for the four reactions of interest are then numerically calculated in the temperature ranges of relevance for BBN ( 0.01

  14. Clinical processes in behavioral couples therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Daniel J; Fink, Brandi C

    2014-03-01

    Behavioral couples therapy is a broad term for couples therapies that use behavioral techniques based on principles of operant conditioning, such as reinforcement. Behavioral shaping and rehearsal and acceptance are clinical processes found across contemporary behavioral couples therapies. These clinical processes are useful for assessment and case formulation, as well as teaching couples new methods of conflict resolution. Although these clinical processes assist therapists in achieving efficient and effective therapeutic change with distressed couples by rapidly stemming couples' corrosive affective exchanges, they also address the thoughts, emotions, and issues of trust and intimacy that are important aspects of the human experience in the context of a couple. Vignettes are provided to illustrate the clinical processes described. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. How initial representations shape coupled learning processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puranam, Phanish; Swamy, M.

    2016-01-01

    Coupled learning processes, in which specialists from different domains learn how to make interdependent choices among alternatives, are common in organizations. We explore the role played by initial representations held by the learners in coupled learning processes using a formal agent-based model...... one that does not discriminate among alternatives, or even a mix of correct and incorrect representations among the learners. We draw implications for the design of coupled learning processes in organizations. © 2016 INFORMS....

  16. FEBEX Full-Scalle Engineered barriers experiment in crystalline host rock Preoperational thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) modelling of the in situ test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This report contains the results of a set of 1-D and 2-D coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) analyses carried out during the preoperational stage simulating the in situ FEBEX test. The analyses incorporate available information concerning rock and bentonite properties as well as the final test layout and conditions. The main goals are: -To provide the best estimate of test performance given current models and information - To define a basis for future model improvements. The theoretical bases of the analyses and the computer code used are reviewed. Special reference is made to the process of parameter estimation that tries to incorporate available information on material behaviour obtained in the characterisation work carried out both in the laboratory and in the field. Data obtained in the characterisation stage is also used to define initial and boundary conditions. The results of the 1-D THM Base Case analysis are used to gain a good understanding of expected test behaviour concerning thermal, hydraulic and mechanical problems. A quite extensive programme of sensitivity analyses is also reported in which the effect of a number of parameters and boundary conditions are examined. The results of the sensitivity analyses place an appropriate context the information obtained from the Base Case showing, for instance, that rock desaturation and degree of buffer hydration depend on some critical parameters in a complex way. Two-dimensional effects are discussed on the basis of the results of 2-D axisymmetric THM analysis performed using a longitudinal section that provides a better representation of real test geometry. Quantitative but not qualitative differences are found with respect to the 1-D results. Finally, a 2-D THM cross section analysis has been performed under plane strain conditions. No specific 2-D effects are observed in this case as quasi-axisymmetric conditions have been prescribed. The models employed in the analyses included in this report have not

  17. Spectral response of THM grown CdZnTe crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H.; Awadalla, S.A.; Harris, F.

    2008-01-01

    The spectral response of several crystals grown by the Traveling Heater Method (THM) were investigated. An energy resolution of 0.98% for a Pseudo Frisch-Grid of 4 × 4 × 9 mm3 and 2.1% FWHM for a coplanar-grid of size 11 × 11 × 5 mm3 were measured using 137Cs-662 keV. In addition a 4% FWHM at 122...

  18. Comparison of three solid phase extraction sorbents for the isolation of THM precursors from manitoban surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, C D; Wiens, R; Gorczyca, B; Gough, K M

    2017-02-01

    Three prepackaged solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridges: two modified styrene divinylbenzene, Bond Elut ENV and Bond Elut PPL (Varian), and one N-vinylpyrrolidone (Strata-X, Phenomenex), were assessed for isolation of THM precursors from three surface waters in Manitoba, Canada. The dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the La Salle River (LR), Lake Winnipegosis (LW) and the Waterhen River (WR) were fractionated into hydrophobic (HPO) and hydrophilic (HPI) parts. ENV isolated less DOM (LR = 46.6 ± 1.5%; LW = 36.2 ± 1.4%; WR = 28.6 ± 2.2%) compared to PPL (LR = 50.2 ± 4.4%; LW = 47.9 ± 2.2%; WR = 37.3 ± 2.8%) and Strata (LR = 46.4% ± 1.0; LW = 51.6 ± 0.3%; WR = 31.9 ± 3.9%). The HPO fraction isolated by each SPE was characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrochemical imaging. The FTIR spectra confirmed the HPO fractions were typical of humic-material and largely resembled fulvic acids; however, the PPL and Strata HPO isolates contained slightly more polysaccharides. The THM formation potential (THMFP) confirmed that the HPO fraction formed more THMs than the HPI. The HPO fraction isolated using ENV was found to have the lowest THMFP of all three SPEs in each waterbody; however, the specific THMFP (μgTHM/mgDOM) results indicated that ENV isolated THM precursors more effectively, as the Strata and PPL isolated a greater amount of non-THM forming material. All three SPE showed significant potential for implementation at water treatment plants as a simple tool to monitor THM precursors in source waters, enabling operators to adapt processes to improve drinking water quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Processivity and coupling in messenger RNA transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Aitken

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of messenger RNA processing is now being uncovered by experimental techniques that are capable of detecting individual copies of mRNA in cells, and by quantitative real-time observations that reveal the kinetics. This processing is commonly modelled by permitting mRNA to be transcribed only when the promoter is in the on state. In this simple on/off model, the many processes involved in active transcription are represented by a single reaction. These processes include elongation, which has a minimum time for completion and processing that is not captured in the model.In this paper, we explore the impact on the mRNA distribution of representing the elongation process in more detail. Consideration of the mechanisms of elongation leads to two alternative models of the coupling between the elongating polymerase and the state of the promoter: Processivity allows polymerases to complete elongation irrespective of the promoter state, whereas coupling requires the promoter to be active to produce a full-length transcript. We demonstrate that these alternatives have a significant impact on the predicted distributions. Models are simulated by the Gillespie algorithm, and the third and fourth moments of the resulting distribution are computed in order to characterise the length of the tail, and sharpness of the peak. By this methodology, we show that the moments provide a concise summary of the distribution, showing statistically-significant differences across much of the feasible parameter range.We conclude that processivity is not fully consistent with the on/off model unless the probability of successfully completing elongation is low--as has been observed. The results also suggest that some form of coupling between the promoter and a rate-limiting step in transcription may explain the cell's inability to maintain high mRNA levels at low noise--a prediction of the on/off model that has no supporting evidence.

  20. A Pore-Scale Simulation on Thermal-Hydromechanical Coupling Mechanism of Rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal-hydromechanical (THM coupling process is a key issue in geotechnical engineering emphasized by many scholars. Most existing studies are conducted at macroscale or mesoscale. This paper presents a pore-scale THM coupling study of the immiscible two-phase flow in the perfect-plastic rock. Assembled rock matrix and pore space models are reconstructed using micro-CT image. The rock deformation and fluid flow are simulated using ANSYS and CFX software, respectively, in which process the coupled physical parameters will be exchanged by ANSYS multiphysics platform at the end of each iteration. Effects of stress and temperature on the rock porosity, permeability, microstructure, and the displacing mechanism of water flooding process are analyzed and revealed.

  1. Synthesis report on thermally driven coupled processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, E.L.

    1997-10-15

    The main purpose of this report is to document observations and data on thermally coupled processes for conditions that are expected to occur within and around a repository at Yucca Mountain. Some attempt is made to summarize values of properties (e.g., thermal properties, hydrologic properties) that can be measured in the laboratory on intact samples of the rock matrix. Variation of these properties with temperature, or with conditions likely to be encountered at elevated temperature in the host rock, is of particular interest. However, the main emphasis of this report is on direct observation of thermally coupled processes at various scales. Direct phenomenological observations are vitally important in developing and testing conceptual models. If the mathematical implementation of a conceptual model predicts a consequence that is not observed, either (1) the parameters or the boundary conditions used in the calculation are incorrect or (2) the conceptual basis of the model does not fit the experiment; in either case, the model must be revised. For example, the effective continuum model that has been used in thermohydrology studies combines matrix and fracture flow in a way that is equivalent to an assumption that water is imbibed instantaneously from fractures into adjacent, partially saturated matrix. Based on this approximation, the continuum-flow response that is analogous to fracture flow will not occur until the effective continuum is almost completely saturated. This approximation is not entirely consistent with some of the experimental data presented in this report. This report documents laboratory work and field studies undertaken in FY96 and FY97 to investigate thermally coupled processes such as heat pipes and fracture-matrix coupling. In addition, relevant activities from past years, and work undertaken outside the Yucca Mountain project are summarized and discussed. Natural and artificial analogs are also discussed to provide a convenient source of

  2. Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, N.D.; Sassani, D.

    2000-01-01

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) describes an abstraction, for the performance assessment total system model, of the near-field host rock water chemistry and gas-phase composition. It also provides an abstracted process model analysis of potentially important differences in the thermal hydrologic (TH) variables used to describe the performance of a geologic repository obtained from models that include fully coupled reactive transport with thermal hydrology and those that include thermal hydrology alone. Specifically, the motivation of the process-level model comparison between fully coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) and thermal-hydrologic-only (TH-only) is to provide the necessary justification as to why the in-drift thermodynamic environment and the near-field host rock percolation flux, the essential TH variables used to describe the performance of a geologic repository, can be obtained using a TH-only model and applied directly into a TSPA abstraction without recourse to a fully coupled reactive transport model. Abstraction as used in the context of this AMR refers to an extraction of essential data or information from the process-level model. The abstraction analysis reproduces and bounds the results of the underlying detailed process-level model. The primary purpose of this AMR is to abstract the results of the fully-coupled, THC model (CRWMS M andO 2000a) for effects on water and gas-phase composition adjacent to the drift wall (in the near-field host rock). It is assumed that drift wall fracture water and gas compositions may enter the emplacement drift before, during, and after the heating period. The heating period includes both the preclosure, in which the repository drifts are ventilated, and the postclosure periods, with backfill and drip shield emplacement at the time of repository closure. Although the preclosure period (50 years) is included in the process models, the postclosure performance assessment starts at the end of this initial period

  3. Determining the 13C(α, n)16O absolute cross section through the concurrent application of ANC and THM and astrophysical consequences for the s-process in AGB-LMSs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippella, Oscar; La Cognata, Marco

    2018-01-01

    The 13C(α, n)16O reaction is considered to be the most important neutron source for the s-process main component in low-mass asymptotic giant branch stars. No direct experimental data exist at very low energies and measurements performed through direct techniques show inconsistent results, mostly in their absolute values. In this context, we reversed the usual normalization procedure combining two indirect approaches, the asymptotic normalization coefficient and the Trojan Horse Method, to unambiguously determine the absolute value of the 13C(α, n)16O astrophysical S(E)-factor in the most relevant energy-region for astrophysics. Adopting the new reaction rate for the n-source in the NEWTON s-process nucleosynthesis code, astrophysical calculations show only limited variations, less than 1%, for those nuclei whose production is considered to be totally due to slow neutron captures.

  4. Processes of Change in Self-Directed Couple Relationship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Keithia L.; Halford, W. Kim

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined the learning processes involved in professionally supported self-directed couple relationship education (CRE). Fifty-nine couples completed Couple CARE, a systematic, self-directed CRE program designed in flexible delivery mode to be completed at home. Couples watched a DVD introducing key relationship ideas and skills…

  5. Coupled cellular automata for frozen soil processes

    OpenAIRE

    R. M. Nagare; P. Bhattacharya; J. Khanna; R. A. Schincariol

    2015-01-01

    Heat and water movement in variably saturated freezing soils is a strongly coupled phenomenon. The coupling is a result of the effects of sub-zero temperature on soil water potential, heat carried by water moving under pressure gradients, and dependency of soil thermal and hydraulic properties on soil water content. This study presents a one-dimensional cellular automata (direct solving) model to simulate coupled heat and water transport with phase change in variably satura...

  6. Numerical Investigation on the Heat Extraction Capacity of Dual Horizontal Wells in Enhanced Geothermal Systems Based on the 3-D THM Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixue Sun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS constructs an artificial thermal reservoir by hydraulic fracturing to extract heat economically from hot dry rock. As the core element of the EGS heat recovery process, mass and heat transfer of working fluid mainly occurs in fractures. Since the direction of the natural and induced fractures are generally perpendicular to the minimum principal stress in the formation, as an effective stimulation approach, horizontal well production could increase the contact area with the thermal reservoir significantly. In this paper, the thermal reservoir is developed by a dual horizontal well system and treated as a fractured porous medium composed of matrix rock and discrete fracture network. Using the local thermal non-equilibrium theory, a coupled THM mathematical model and an ideal 3D numerical model are established for the EGS heat extraction process. EGS heat extraction capacity is evaluated in the light of thermal recovery lifespan, average outlet temperature, heat production, electricity generation, energy efficiency and thermal recovery rate. The results show that with certain reservoir and production parameters, the heat production, electricity generation and thermal recovery lifespan can achieve the commercial goal of the dual horizontal well system, but the energy efficiency and overall thermal recovery rate are still at low levels. At last, this paper puts forward a series of optimizations to improve the heat extraction capacity, including production conditions and thermal reservoir construction design.

  7. THM reduction on water distribution network with chlorine dioxide as disinfectant; Reduccion de THM en red de distribucion utilizando dioxido de cloro como desinfectante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ventura, G.; Gorriz, D.; Pascual, E.; Romero, M.

    2009-07-01

    A disinfectant change on water distribution network, by chlorine dioxide in that case, avoids THM formation. In the other hand it creates big doubts about utilization and analytical determination of another oxidant different to chlorine. Just a need to comply the current legislation points us to make a change as the one mentioned above and carried out in DWTP Rio Verde, being managed by Acosol, where the THM formation is been reduced to 80%, according to the new limit of 100{mu}g/l, along the 200 km of the supply network. (Author) 13 refs.

  8. Extracellular Electron Transport Coupling Biogeochemical Processes Centimeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Fossing, Henrik; Christensen, Peter Bondo

    2010-01-01

    Recent observations in marine sediment have revealed  conductive networks transmitting electrons from oxidation processes in the anoxic zone to oxygen reduction in the oxiczone [1]. The electrochemical processes and conductors seem to be biologically controlled and may account for more than half...

  9. Coupling Computer-Aided Process Simulation and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A methodology is described for developing a gate-to-gate life cycle inventory (LCI) of a chemical manufacturing process to support the application of life cycle assessment in the design and regulation of sustainable chemicals. The inventories were derived by first applying process design and simulation of develop a process flow diagram describing the energy and basic material flows of the system. Additional techniques developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for estimating uncontrolled emissions from chemical processing equipment were then applied to obtain a detailed emission profile for the process. Finally, land use for the process was estimated using a simple sizing model. The methodology was applied to a case study of acetic acid production based on the Cativa tm process. The results reveal improvements in the qualitative LCI for acetic acid production compared to commonly used databases and top-down methodologies. The modeling techniques improve the quantitative LCI results for inputs and uncontrolled emissions. With provisions for applying appropriate emission controls, the proposed method can provide an estimate of the LCI that can be used for subsequent life cycle assessments. As part of its mission, the Agency is tasked with overseeing the use of chemicals in commerce. This can include consideration of a chemical's potential impact on health and safety, resource conservation, clean air and climate change, clean water, and sustainable

  10. Fostering new relational experience: clinical process in couple psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmarosh, Cheri L

    2014-03-01

    One of the most critical goals for couple psychotherapy is to foster a new relational experience in the session where the couple feels safe enough to reveal more vulnerable emotions and to explore their defensive withdrawal, aggressive attacking, or blaming. The lived intimate experience in the session offers the couple an opportunity to gain integrative insight into their feelings, expectations, and behaviors that ultimately hinder intimacy. The clinical processes that are necessary include empathizing with the couple and facilitating safety within the session, looking for opportunities to explore emotions, ruptures, and unconscious motivations that maintain distance in the relationship, and creating a new relational experience in the session that has the potential to engender integrative insight. These clinical processes will be presented with empirical support. Experts from a session will be used to highlight how these processes influence the couple and promote increased intimacy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Thermodynamically coupled mass transport processes in a saturated clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    Gradients of temperature, pressure, and fluid composition in saturated clays give rise to coupled transport processes (thermal and chemical osmosis, thermal diffusion, ultrafiltration) in addition to the direct processes (advection and diffusion). One-dimension transport of water and a solute in a saturated clay subjected to mild gradients of temperature and pressure was simulated numerically. When full coupling was accounted for, volume flux (specific discharge) was controlled by thermal osmosis and chemical osmosis. The two coupled fluxes were oppositely directed, producing a point of stagnation within the clay column. Solute flows were dominated by diffusion, chemical osmosis, and thermal osmosis. Chemical osmosis produced a significant flux of solute directed against the gradient of solute concentration; this effect reduced solute concentrations relative to the case without coupling. Predictions of mass transport in clays at nuclear waste repositories could be significantly in error if coupled transport processes are not accounted for. 14 refs., 8 figs

  12. Hydrogen Process Coupling to Modular Helium Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenoy, Arkal; Richards, Matt; Buckingham, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the helium-cooled High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) as the concept to be used for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), because it is the most advanced Generation IV concept with the capability to provide process heat at sufficiently high temperatures for production of hydrogen with high thermal efficiency. Concurrently with the NGNP program, the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) was established to develop hydrogen production technologies that are compatible with advanced nuclear systems and do not produce greenhouse gases. The current DOE schedule for the NGNP Project calls for startup of the NGNP plant by 2021. The General Atomics (GA) NGNP pre-conceptual design is based on the GA Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR), which utilizes a direct Brayton cycle Power Conversion System (PCS) to produce electricity with a thermal efficiency of 48%. The nuclear heat source for the NGNP consists of a single 600-MW(t) MHR module with two primary coolant loops for transport of the high-temperature helium exiting the reactor core to a direct cycle PCS for electricity generation and to an Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for hydrogen production. The GA NGNP concept is designed to demonstrate hydrogen production using both the thermochemical sulfur-iodine (SI) process and high-temperature electrolysis (HTE). The two primary coolant loops can be operated independently or in parallel. The reactor design is essentially the same as that for the GT-MHR, but includes the additional primary coolant loop to transport heat to the IHX and other modifications to allow operation with a reactor outlet helium temperature of 950 .deg. C (vs. 850 .deg. C for the GT-MHR). The IHX transfers a nominal 65 MW(t) to the secondary heat transport loop that provides the high-temperature heat required by the SI-based and HTE-based hydrogen production facilities. Two commercial nuclear hydrogen plant variations were evaluated with

  13. Solar terrestrial coupling through space plasma processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birn, J.

    2000-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project investigates plasma processes that govern the interaction between the solar wind, charged particles ejected from the sun, and the earth's magnetosphere, the region above the ionosphere governed by the terrestrial magnetic field. Primary regions of interest are the regions where different plasma populations interact with each other. These are regions of particularly dynamic plasma behavior, associated with magnetic flux and energy transfer and dynamic energy release. The investigations concerned charged particle transport and energization, and microscopic and macroscopic instabilities in the magnetosphere and adjacent regions. The approaches combined space data analysis with theory and computer simulations

  14. Dissociative identity disorder and the process of couple therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintosh, Heather B

    2013-01-01

    Couple therapy in the context of dissociative identity disorder (DID) has been neglected as an area of exploration and development in the couple therapy and trauma literature. What little discussion exists focuses primarily on couple therapy as an adjunct to individual therapy rather than as a primary treatment for couple distress and trauma. Couple therapy researchers have begun to develop adaptations to provide effective support to couples dealing with the impact of childhood trauma in their relationships, but little attention has been paid to the specific and complex needs of DID patients in couple therapy (H. B. MacIntosh & S. Johnson, 2008 ). This review and case presentation explores the case of "Lisa," a woman diagnosed with DID, and "Don," her partner, and illustrates the themes of learning to communicate, handling conflicting needs, responding to child alters, and addressing sexuality and education through their therapy process. It is the hope of the author that this discussion will renew interest in the field of couple therapy in the context of DID, with the eventual goal of developing an empirically testable model of treatment for couples.

  15. Fluorescence spectroscopy for field surveillance of THM formation precursors to increase sustainable drinking water treatment for the water industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutter, Marc; Cooper, Pat; Wyness, Adam; Allan, Richard; Weir, Paul; Frogbrook, Zoe; Haffey, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Our understanding of the composition and diversity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in natural waters is improving rapidly with techniques such as fluorescence spectroscopy. For the water industry issues of the reaction of DOM and different processes used to reduce microbial contamination in water for public supply are a pressing concern. A range of processes can be used but the common disinfection by free chlorine can react with DOM to produce a group of substances referred to as disinfection by-products (DBPs) that have been linked to health concerns. Hence, management at water treatment works aims to remove DOM prior to the disinfection reaction or change the treatment method. Both are costly financially and in terms of process chemical, such as coagulents that work variably with different DOM forms. Hence, enabling methods of catchment management, which have long been associated with tackling other forms of pollution (e.g. N, P) through source-pathway-receptor concepts, are options for the water industry where catchment raw water source management is a possible sustainable addition to conventional treatment. This presentation looks at the requirements and ongoing work to inform source water management options using bench-top fluorescence excitation-emission spectroscopy and hand-held sensors to detect DBP precursors, namely trihalomethanes (THMs), in complex multi-source environments. We start by introducing the forms of DOM discernible in the fluorescence excitation-emission matrix, how these have been ascribed to different compounds by previous studies and what wavelengths are available for in-situ detection. We then discuss methodology issues for sample storage and standard materials. Then we draw on results from a national set of Scottish catchments and a small catchment study to evaluate relationships between THM compounds from standard assay and GC-MS detection against spectral DOM surrogates, including catchment hydrochemical and spatial data covariates

  16. Dyadic Coping in Couple Therapy Process: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margola, Davide; Donato, Silvia; Accordini, Monica; Emery, Robert E; Snyder, Douglas K

    2017-07-10

    This study aimed at moving beyond previous research on couple therapy efficacy by examining moment-by-moment proximal couple and therapist interactions as well as final treatment outcomes and their reciprocal association. Seven hundred four episodes of dyadic coping within 56 early therapy sessions, taken from 28 married couples in treatment, were intensively analyzed and processed using a mixed-methods software (T-LAB). Results showed that negative dyadic coping was self-perpetuating, and therapists tended to passively observe the negative couple interaction; on the contrary, positive dyadic coping appeared to require a therapist's intervention to be maintained, and successful interventions mainly included information gathering as well as interpreting. Couples who dropped out of treatment were not actively engaged from the outset of therapy, and they used more negative dyadic coping, whereas couples who successfully completed treatment showed more positive dyadic coping very early in therapy. Results highlight the role of therapist action and control as critical to establishing rapport and credibility in couple therapy and suggest that dyadic coping patterns early in therapy may contribute to variable treatment response. © 2017 Family Process Institute.

  17. The Experience of Couples in the Process of Treatment of Pathological Gambling: Couple vs. Individual Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Joël; Dufour, Magali; Bertrand, Karine; Blanchette-Martin, Nadine; Ferland, Francine; Savard, Annie-Claude; Saint-Jacques, Marianne; Côté, Mélissa

    2018-01-01

    Context: Couple treatment for pathological gambling is an innovative strategy. There are some results supporting its potential effectiveness, but little is known about the subjective experiences of the participants. Objective: The aim of this article is to document the experiences of gamblers and their partners participating in one of two treatments, namely individual or couple. Method: In a study aiming to evaluate the efficacy of the Integrative Couple Treatment for Pathological Gambling (ICT-PG), couples who were entering specialized treatment for the addiction of one member who was a pathological gambler were randomly assigned to individual or ICT-PG. Nine months after their admission to treatment, gamblers and partners (n = 21 couples; n = 13 ICT-PG; n = 8 individual treatment) were interviewed in semi-structured interviews. A sequenced thematization method was used to extract the major themes. Results: This study highlighted five major themes in the therapeutic process noted by the gamblers and their partners mainly after the couple treatment but also partly through the individual therapy. These were: (1) the gamblers' anxiety about having to reveal their gambling problems in couple therapy; (2) the wish to develop a mutually beneficial understanding of gambling and its effects on the partners in the two types of treatments; (3) the transformation of negative attributions through a more effective intra-couple communication fostered by the couple therapy; (4) the partners' contribution to changes in gambling behavior and prevention of relapses, which were both better supported in couple therapy; and (5) the interpersonal nature of gambling and its connections with the couples' relationship. However, gamblers who were in individual treatment were more likely to mention that their partners' involvement was not necessary. Participants likewise made a few recommendations about the conditions underlying the choice of one treatment method or the other. Discussion

  18. The Experience of Couples in the Process of Treatment of Pathological Gambling: Couple vs. Individual Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël Tremblay

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Couple treatment for pathological gambling is an innovative strategy. There are some results supporting its potential effectiveness, but little is known about the subjective experiences of the participants.Objective: The aim of this article is to document the experiences of gamblers and their partners participating in one of two treatments, namely individual or couple.Method: In a study aiming to evaluate the efficacy of the Integrative Couple Treatment for Pathological Gambling (ICT-PG, couples who were entering specialized treatment for the addiction of one member who was a pathological gambler were randomly assigned to individual or ICT-PG. Nine months after their admission to treatment, gamblers and partners (n = 21 couples; n = 13 ICT-PG; n = 8 individual treatment were interviewed in semi-structured interviews. A sequenced thematization method was used to extract the major themes.Results: This study highlighted five major themes in the therapeutic process noted by the gamblers and their partners mainly after the couple treatment but also partly through the individual therapy. These were: (1 the gamblers' anxiety about having to reveal their gambling problems in couple therapy; (2 the wish to develop a mutually beneficial understanding of gambling and its effects on the partners in the two types of treatments; (3 the transformation of negative attributions through a more effective intra-couple communication fostered by the couple therapy; (4 the partners' contribution to changes in gambling behavior and prevention of relapses, which were both better supported in couple therapy; and (5 the interpersonal nature of gambling and its connections with the couples' relationship. However, gamblers who were in individual treatment were more likely to mention that their partners' involvement was not necessary. Participants likewise made a few recommendations about the conditions underlying the choice of one treatment method or the other

  19. Global land-atmosphere coupling associated with cold climate processes

    OpenAIRE

    Dutra, Emanuel, 1983-

    2011-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Ciências Geofísicas e da Geoinformação (Meteorologia), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2011 This dissertation constitutes an assessment of the role of cold processes, associated with snow cover, in controlling the land-atmosphere coupling. The work was based on model simulations, including offline simulations with the land surface model HTESSEL, and coupled atmosphere simulations with the EC-EARTH climate model. A revised snow scheme was developed and t...

  20. Gene regulation and noise reduction by coupling of stochastic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Alexandre F; Hornos, José Eduardo M; Reinitz, John

    2015-02-01

    Here we characterize the low-noise regime of a stochastic model for a negative self-regulating binary gene. The model has two stochastic variables, the protein number and the state of the gene. Each state of the gene behaves as a protein source governed by a Poisson process. The coupling between the two gene states depends on protein number. This fact has a very important implication: There exist protein production regimes characterized by sub-Poissonian noise because of negative covariance between the two stochastic variables of the model. Hence the protein numbers obey a probability distribution that has a peak that is sharper than those of the two coupled Poisson processes that are combined to produce it. Biochemically, the noise reduction in protein number occurs when the switching of the genetic state is more rapid than protein synthesis or degradation. We consider the chemical reaction rates necessary for Poisson and sub-Poisson processes in prokaryotes and eucaryotes. Our results suggest that the coupling of multiple stochastic processes in a negative covariance regime might be a widespread mechanism for noise reduction.

  1. Investigation of Coupled Processes and Impact of High Temperature Limits in Argillite Rock: FY17 Progress. Predecisional Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liange; Rutqvist, Jonny; Xu, Hao; Kim, Kunwhi; Voltolini, Marco; Cao, Xiaoyuan

    2017-07-03

    The focus of research within the Spent Fuel and Waste Science and Technology (SFWST) (formerly called Used Fuel Disposal) Campaign is on repository-induced interactions that may affect the key safety characteristics of EBS bentonite and an argillaceous rock. These include thermal-hydrologicalmechanical- chemical (THMC) process interactions that occur as a result of repository construction and waste emplacement. Some of the key questions addressed in this report include the development of fracturing in the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) and THMC effects on the near-field argillaceous rock and buffer materials and petrophysical characteristics, particularly the impacts of temperature rise caused by waste heat. This report documents the following research activities. Section 2 presents THM model developments and validation, including modeling of underground heater experiments at Mont Terri and Bure underground research laboratories (URLs). The heater experiments modeled are the Mont Terri FE (Full-scale Emplacement) Experiment, conducted as part of the Mont Terri Project, and the TED in heater test conducted in Callovo-Oxfordian claystone (COx) at the Meuse/Haute-Marne (MHM) underground research laboratory in France. The modeling of the TED heater test is one of the Tasks of the DEvelopment of COupled Models and their VAlidation against EXperiments (DECOVALEX)-2019 project. Section 3 presents the development and application of thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) modeling to evaluate EBS bentonite and argillite rock responses under different temperatures (100 °C and 200 °C). Model results are presented to help to understand the impact of high temperatures on the properties and behavior of bentonite and argillite rock. Eventually the process model will support a robust GDSA model for repository performance assessments. Section 4 presents coupled THMC modeling for an in situ test conducted at Grimsel underground laboratory in Switzerland in the Full

  2. Coupled processes in NRC high-level waste research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costanzi, F.A.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses NRC research effort in support of evaluating license applications for disposal of nuclear waste and for promulgating regulations and issuing guidance documents on nuclear waste management. In order to do this they fund research activities at a number of laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial organizations. One of our research efforts is the coupled processes study. This paper discusses interest in coupled processes and describes the target areas of research efforts over the next few years. The specific research activities relate to the performance objectives of NRC's high-level waste (HLW) regulation and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) HLW standard. The general objective of the research program is to ensure the NRC has a sufficient independent technical base to make sound regulatory decisions

  3. GTRF Calculations Using Hydra-TH (L3 Milestone THM.CFD.P5.05)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakosi, Jozsef; Christon, Mark A.; Francois, Marianne M.; Lowrie, Robert B.; Nourgaliev, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the work carried out for completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) Level 3 Milestone THM.CFD.P5.05 for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). A series of body-fitted computational meshes have been generated by Numeca's Hexpress/Hybrid, a.k.a. 'Spider', meshing technology for the V5H 3 x 3 and 5 x 5 rod bundle geometries and subsequently used to compute the fluid dynamics of grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF). Spider is easy to use, fast, and automatically generates high-quality meshes for extremely complex geometries, required for the GTRF problem. Hydra-TH has been used to carry out large-eddy simulations on both 3 x 3 and 5 x 5 geometries, using different mesh resolutions. The results analyzed show good agreement with Star-CCM+ simulations and experimental data.

  4. GTRF Calculations Using Hydra-TH (L3 Milestone THM.CFD.P5.05)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakosi, Jozsef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Christon, Mark A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Francois, Marianne M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lowrie, Robert B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nourgaliev, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-05

    This report describes the work carried out for completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) Level 3 Milestone THM.CFD.P5.05 for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). A series of body-fitted computational meshes have been generated by Numeca's Hexpress/Hybrid, a.k.a. 'Spider', meshing technology for the V5H 3 x 3 and 5 x 5 rod bundle geometries and subsequently used to compute the fluid dynamics of grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF). Spider is easy to use, fast, and automatically generates high-quality meshes for extremely complex geometries, required for the GTRF problem. Hydra-TH has been used to carry out large-eddy simulations on both 3 x 3 and 5 x 5 geometries, using different mesh resolutions. The results analyzed show good agreement with Star-CCM+ simulations and experimental data.

  5. Coupled process analyses for salt repository performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.K.; Bloom, S.G.; Monti, A.M.; Raines, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Salt sites are being investigated as potential candidates for a deep geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. To assess the performance of a repository in salt it is necessary to estimate the potential for naturally occurring and/or intrusive fluids to contact the radioactive waste and transport it to the accessible environment. The long-term performance assessment of a salt repository consists of multidisciplinary studies of the coupled physical and chemical interactions in geologic systems involving heat transfer, ground-water hydrology, geomechanics, geochemistry, and radionuclide transport. The coupled process analyses performed or planned to be conducted include coupled thermal, stress, and pressure-induced brine migration; flow, thermal, mechanical, and geomechanical (corrosion and leach rate) analyses for waste package and waste form performance; flow, thermal, and mechanical analyses for shaft seals and near-field performance; flow, thermal, dissolution, and salt creep analyses for borehole scenarios; flow, energy, and solute transport analyses of the groundwater system in the vicinity of site; and coupled analyses of hydrologic, mechanical, geochemical, and radionuclide transport

  6. Coupled process analyses for salt repository performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.K.; Bloom, S.G.; Monti, A.M.; Baines, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    Salt sites are investigated as potential candidates for a deep geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. To assess the performance of a repository in salt it is necessary to estimate the potential for naturally occurring and/or intrusive fluids to contact the radioactive waste and transport it to the accessible environment. The long-term performance assessment of a salt repository consists of multidisciplinary studies of the coupled physical and chemical interactions in geologic systems involving heat transfer, groundwater hydrology, geomechanics, geochemistry, and radionuclide transport. The coupled process analyses performed or planned to be conducted include coupled thermal, stress, and pressure-induced brine migration; flow, thermal, mechanical, and geomechanical (corrosion and leach rate) analyses for waste package and waste form performance; flow, thermal, and mechanical analyses for shaft seals and near-field performance; flow, thermal, dissolution, and salt creep analyses for borehole scenarios; flow, energy, and solute transport analyses of the groundwater system in the vicinity of the site; and coupled analyses of hydrologic, mechanical, geochemical, and radionuclide transport

  7. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnenthale, E.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Near-Field Environment (NFE) and Unsaturated Zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes on unsaturated zone flow and transport. This is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'', Addendum D, Attachment D-4 (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) 2000 [1534471]) and ''Technical Work Plan for Nearfield Environment Thermal Analyses and Testing'' (CRWMS M and O 2000 [153309]). These models include the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model and several THC seepage models. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal loading conditions, and predict the chemistry of waters and gases entering potential waste-emplacement drifts. The intended use of this AMR is to provide input for the following: Performance Assessment (PA); Near-Field Environment (NFE) PMR; Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes AMR (ANL-NBS-HS-000029); and UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). The work scope for this activity is presented in the TWPs cited above, and summarized as follows: Continue development of the repository drift-scale THC seepage model used in support of the TSPA in-drift geochemical model; incorporate heterogeneous fracture property realizations; study sensitivity of results to changes in input data and mineral assemblage; validate the DST model by comparison with field data; perform simulations to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation and their effects on fracture properties and chemistry of water (but not flow rates) that may seep into drifts; submit modeling results to the TDMS and document the models. The model development, input data, sensitivity and validation studies described in this AMR are

  8. Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloroethylene Co-Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rick Colwell; Corey Radtke; Mark Delwiche; Deborah Newby; Lynn Petzke; Mark Conrad; Eoin Brodie; Hope Lee; Bob Starr; Dana Dettmers; Ron Crawford; Andrzej Paszczynski; Nick Bernardini; Ravi Paidisetti; Tonia Green

    2006-06-01

    Chlorinated solvent wastes (e.g., trichloroethene or TCE) often occur as diffuse subsurface plumes in complex geological environments where coupled processes must be understood in order to implement remediation strategies. Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) warrants study as a remediation technology because it minimizes worker and environment exposure to the wastes and because it costs less than other technologies. However, to be accepted MNA requires different ?lines of evidence? indicating that the wastes are effectively destroyed. We are studying the coupled biogeochemical processes that dictate the rate of TCE co-metabolism first in the medial zone (TCE concentration: 1,000 to 20,000 ?g/L) of a plume at the Idaho National Laboratory?s Test Area North (TAN) site and then at Paducah or the Savannah River Site. We will use flow-through in situ reactors (FTISR) to investigate the rate of methanotrophic co-metabolism of TCE and the coupling of the responsible biological processes with the dissolved methane flux and groundwater flow velocity. TCE co-metabolic rates at TAN are being assessed and interpreted in the context of enzyme activity, gene expression, and cellular inactivation related to intermediates of TCE co-metabolism. By determining the rate of TCE co-metabolism at different groundwater flow velocities, we will derive key modeling parameters for the computational simulations that describe the attenuation, and thereby refine such models while assessing the contribution of microbial co-metabolism relative to other natural attenuation processes. This research will strengthen our ability to forecast the viability of MNA at DOE and other sites contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons.

  9. Coupling the modular helium reactor to hydrogen production processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, M.B.; Shenoy, A.S.; Schultz, K.R.

    2004-01-01

    Steam reforming of natural gas (methane) currently produces the bulk of hydrogen gas used in the world today. Because this process depletes natural gas resources and generates the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide as a by-product, there is a growing interest in using process heat and/or electricity generated by nuclear reactors to generate hydrogen by splitting water. Process heat from a high temperature nuclear reactor can be used directly to drive a set of chemical reactions, with the net result of splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen. For example, process heat at temperatures in the range 850 deg C to 950 deg C can drive the sulphur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical process to produce hydrogen with high efficiency. The S-I process produces highly pure hydrogen and oxygen, with formation, decomposition, regeneration, and recycle of the intermediate chemical reagents. Electricity can also 1)e used directly to split water, using conventional, low-temperature electrolysis (LTE). Hydrogen can also be produced with hybrid processes that use both process heat and electricity to generate hydrogen. An example of a hybrid process is high-temperature electrolysis (HTE), in which process heat is used to generate steam, which is then supplied to an electrolyzer to generate hydrogen. This process is of interest because the efficiency of electrolysis increases with temperature. Because of its high temperature capability, advanced stage of development relative to other high-temperature reactor concepts, and passive-safety features, the modular helium reactor (MHR) is well suited for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy. In this paper we investigate the coupling of the MHR to the S-I process, LTE, and HTE. These concepts are referred to as the H2-MHR. (author)

  10. Anomalous couplings in the Higgs-strahlung process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilian, W.; Kraemer, M.; Zerwas, P.M.

    1995-12-01

    The angular distributions in the Higgs-strahlung process e + e - →HZ→H anti ff are uniquely determined in the Standard Model. We study how these predictions are modified if non-standard couplings are present in the ZZH vertex, as well as lepton-boson contact terms. We restrict ourselves to the set of operators which are singlets under standard SU 3 x SU 2 x U 1 transformations, CP conserving, dimension 6, helicity conserving, and custodial SU 2 conserving. (orig.)

  11. User's Guide of TOUGH2-EGS. A Coupled Geomechanical and Reactive Geochemical Simulator for Fluid and Heat Flow in Enhanced Geothermal Systems Version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakcharoenphol, Perapon [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Xiong, Yi [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Hu, Litang [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Winterfeld, Philip H. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Xu, Tianfu [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wu, Yu-Shu [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-05-01

    TOUGH2-EGS is a numerical simulation program coupling geomechanics and chemical reactions for fluid and heat flows in porous media and fractured reservoirs of enhanced geothermal systems. The simulator includes the fully-coupled geomechanical (THM) module, the fully-coupled geochemical (THC) module, and the sequentially coupled reactive geochemistry (THMC) module. The fully-coupled flow-geomechanics model is developed from the linear elastic theory for the thermo-poro-elastic system and is formulated with the mean normal stress as well as pore pressure and temperature. The chemical reaction is sequentially coupled after solution of flow equations, which provides the flow velocity and phase saturation for the solute transport calculation at each time step. In addition, reservoir rock properties, such as porosity and permeability, are subjected to change due to rock deformation and chemical reactions. The relationships between rock properties and geomechanical and chemical effects from poro-elasticity theories and empirical correlations are incorporated into the simulator. This report provides the user with detailed information on both mathematical models and instructions for using TOUGH2-EGS for THM, THC or THMC simulations. The mathematical models include the fluid and heat flow equations, geomechanical equation, reactive geochemistry equations, and discretization methods. Although TOUGH2-EGS has the capability for simulating fluid and heat flows coupled with both geomechanical and chemical effects, it is up to the users to select the specific coupling process, such as THM, THC, or THMC in a simulation. There are several example problems illustrating the applications of this program. These example problems are described in details and their input data are presented. The results demonstrate that this program can be used for field-scale geothermal reservoir simulation with fluid and heat flow, geomechanical effect, and chemical reaction in porous and fractured media.

  12. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Gonnenthal; N. Spyoher

    2001-02-05

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Near-Field Environment (NFE) and Unsaturated Zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes on unsaturated zone flow and transport. This is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'', Addendum D, Attachment D-4 (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) 2000 [153447]) and ''Technical Work Plan for Nearfield Environment Thermal Analyses and Testing'' (CRWMS M and O 2000 [153309]). These models include the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model and several THC seepage models. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal loading conditions, and predict the chemistry of waters and gases entering potential waste-emplacement drifts. The intended use of this AMR is to provide input for the following: (1) Performance Assessment (PA); (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes AMR (ANL-NBS-HS-000029); (3) UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR); and (4) Near-Field Environment (NFE) PMR. The work scope for this activity is presented in the TWPs cited above, and summarized as follows: continue development of the repository drift-scale THC seepage model used in support of the TSPA in-drift geochemical model; incorporate heterogeneous fracture property realizations; study sensitivity of results to changes in input data and mineral assemblage; validate the DST model by comparison with field data; perform simulations to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation and their effects on fracture properties and chemistry of water (but not flow rates) that may seep into drifts; submit modeling results to the TDMS and document the models. The model development, input data

  13. A Fully Coupled Computational Model of the Silylation Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. H. Evans; R. S. Larson; V. C. Prantil; W. S. Winters

    1999-02-01

    This report documents the development of a new finite element model of the positive tone silylation process. Model development makes use of pre-existing Sandia technology used to describe coupled thermal-mechanical behavior in deforming metals. Material properties and constitutive models were obtained from the literature. The model is two-dimensional and transient and focuses on the part of the lithography process in which crosslinked and uncrosslinked resist is exposed to a gaseous silylation agent. The model accounts for the combined effects of mass transport (diffusion of silylation agent and reaction product), chemical reaction resulting in the uptake of silicon and material swelling, the generation of stresses, and the resulting material motion. The influence of stress on diffusion and reaction rates is also included.

  14. Nonequilibrium critical behavior in unidirectionally coupled stochastic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, Y.Y.; Hinrichsen, H.; Howard, M.; Taeuber, U.C.

    1999-01-01

    Phase transitions from an active into an absorbing, inactive state are generically described by the critical exponents of directed percolation (DP), with upper critical dimension d c =4. In the framework of single-species reaction-diffusion systems, this universality class is realized by the combined processes A→A+A, A+A→A, and A→0. We study a hierarchy of such DP processes for particle species A,B,hor-ellipsis, unidirectionally coupled via the reactions A→B,hor-ellipsis (with rates μ AB ,hor-ellipsis). When the DP critical points at all levels coincide, multicritical behavior emerges, with density exponents β i which are markedly reduced at each hierarchy level i≥2. This scenario can be understood on the basis of the mean-field rate equations, which yield β i =1/2 i-1 at the multicritical point. Using field-theoretic renormalization-group techniques in d=4-ε dimensions, we identify a new crossover exponent φ, and compute φ=1+O(ε 2 ) in the multicritical regime (for small μ AB ) of the second hierarchy level. In the active phase, we calculate the fluctuation correction to the density exponent on the second hierarchy level, β 2 =1/2-ε/8+O(ε 2 ). Outside the multicritial region, we discuss the crossover to ordinary DP behavior, with the density exponent β 1 =1-ε/6+O(ε 2 ). Monte Carlo simulations are then employed to confirm the crossover scenario, and to determine the values for the new scaling exponents in dimensions d≤3, including the critical initial slip exponent. Our theory is connected to specific classes of growth processes and to certain cellular automata, and the above ideas are also applied to unidirectionally coupled pair annihilation processes. We also discuss some technical as well as conceptual problems of the loop expansion, and suggest some possible interpretations of these difficulties. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  15. Coupled Modeling of Rhizosphere and Reactive Transport Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque-Malo, S.; Kumar, P.

    2017-12-01

    The rhizosphere, as a bio-diverse plant root-soil interface, hosts many hydrologic and biochemical processes, including nutrient cycling, hydraulic redistribution, and soil carbon dynamics among others. The biogeochemical function of root networks, including the facilitation of nutrient cycling through absorption and rhizodeposition, interaction with micro-organisms and fungi, contribution to biomass, etc., plays an important role in myriad Critical Zone processes. Despite this knowledge, the role of the rhizosphere on watershed-scale ecohydrologic functions in the Critical Zone has not been fully characterized, and specifically, the extensive capabilities of reactive transport models (RTMs) have not been applied to these hydrobiogeochemical dynamics. This study uniquely links rhizospheric processes with reactive transport modeling to couple soil biogeochemistry, biological processes, hydrologic flow, hydraulic redistribution, and vegetation dynamics. Key factors in the novel modeling approach are: (i) bi-directional effects of root-soil interaction, such as simultaneous root exudation and nutrient absorption; (ii) multi-state biomass fractions in soil (i.e. living, dormant, and dead biological and root materials); (iii) expression of three-dimensional fluxes to represent both vertical and lateral interconnected flows and processes; and (iv) the potential to include the influence of non-stationary external forcing and climatic factors. We anticipate that the resulting model will demonstrate the extensive effects of plant root dynamics on ecohydrologic functions at the watershed scale and will ultimately contribute to a better characterization of efflux from both agricultural and natural systems.

  16. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Dixon

    2004-04-05

    The purpose of this Model Report (REV02) is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes on UZ flow and transport. This Model Report has been developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC (BSC) 2002 [160819]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this Model Report in Section 1.12, Work Package AUZM08, ''Coupled Effects on Flow and Seepage''. The plan for validation of the models documented in this Model Report is given in Attachment I, Model Validation Plans, Section I-3-4, of the TWP. Except for variations in acceptance criteria (Section 4.2), there were no deviations from this TWP. This report was developed in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models''. This Model Report documents the THC Seepage Model and the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model. The THC Seepage Model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral alteration on flow in rocks surrounding drifts. The DST THC model is a drift-scale process model relying on the same conceptual model and much of the same input data (i.e., physical, hydrological, thermodynamic, and kinetic) as the THC Seepage Model. The DST THC Model is the primary method for validating the THC Seepage Model. The DST THC Model compares predicted water and gas compositions, as well as mineral alteration patterns, with observed data from the DST. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal-loading conditions, and predict the evolution of mineral alteration and fluid chemistry around potential waste emplacement drifts. The

  17. Evaluation of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical phenomena in the near field for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chijimatsu, Masakazu; Fujita, Tomoo; Sugita, Yutaka; Taniguchi, Wataru [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai Works, Waste Management and Fuel Cycle Research Center, Waste Isolation Research Division, Barrier Performance Group, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-01-01

    Geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in Japan is based on a multibarrier system composed of engineered and natural barriers. The engineered barriers are composed of vitrified waste confined within a canister, overpack and buffer material. Highly compacted bentonite clay is considered one of the most promising candidate buffer material mainly because of its low hydraulic conductivity and high adsorption capacity of radionuclides. In a repository of HLW, complex thermal, hydraulic and mechanical (T-H-M) phenomena will take place, involving the interactive processes between radioactive decay heat from the vitrified waste, infiltration of ground water and stress generation due to the earth pressure, the thermal loading and the swelling pressure of the buffer material. In order to evaluate the performance of the buffer material, the coupled T-H-M behaviors within the compacted bentonite have to be modelled. Before establishing a fully coupled T-H-M model, the mechanism of each single phenomenon or partially coupled phenomena should be identified. Furthermore, in order to evaluate the coupled T-H-M phenomena, the analysis model was developed physically and numerically and the adequacy and the applicability was tested though the engineered scale laboratory test and in-situ test. In this report, the investigative results for the development of coupled T-H-M model were described. This report consists of eight chapters. In Chapter 1, the necessity of coupled T-H-M model in the geological disposal project of the high-level radioactive waste was described . In Chapter 2, the laboratory test results of the rock sample and the buffer material for the coupled T-H-M analysis were shown. The rock samples were obtained from the in-situ experimental site at Kamaishi mine. As the buffer material, bentonite clay (Kunigel V1 and Kunigel OT-9607) and bentonite-sand mixture were used. In Chapter 3, in-situ tests to obtain the rock property were shown. As in-situ tests

  18. Evaluation of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical phenomena in the near field for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chijimatsu, Masakazu; Fujita, Tomoo; Sugita, Yutaka; Taniguchi, Wataru

    2000-01-01

    Geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in Japan is based on a multibarrier system composed of engineered and natural barriers. The engineered barriers are composed of vitrified waste confined within a canister, overpack and buffer material. Highly compacted bentonite clay is considered one of the most promising candidate buffer material mainly because of its low hydraulic conductivity and high adsorption capacity of radionuclides. In a repository of HLW, complex thermal, hydraulic and mechanical (T-H-M) phenomena will take place, involving the interactive processes between radioactive decay heat from the vitrified waste, infiltration of ground water and stress generation due to the earth pressure, the thermal loading and the swelling pressure of the buffer material. In order to evaluate the performance of the buffer material, the coupled T-H-M behaviors within the compacted bentonite have to be modelled. Before establishing a fully coupled T-H-M model, the mechanism of each single phenomenon or partially coupled phenomena should be identified. Furthermore, in order to evaluate the coupled T-H-M phenomena, the analysis model was developed physically and numerically and the adequacy and the applicability was tested though the engineered scale laboratory test and in-situ test. In this report, the investigative results for the development of coupled T-H-M model were described. This report consists of eight chapters. In Chapter 1, the necessity of coupled T-H-M model in the geological disposal project of the high-level radioactive waste was described . In Chapter 2, the laboratory test results of the rock sample and the buffer material for the coupled T-H-M analysis were shown. The rock samples were obtained from the in-situ experimental site at Kamaishi mine. As the buffer material, bentonite clay (Kunigel V1 and Kunigel OT-9607) and bentonite-sand mixture were used. In Chapter 3, in-situ tests to obtain the rock property were shown. As in-situ tests

  19. SR-Site Data report. THM modelling of buffer, backfill and other system components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aakesson, Mattias; Boergesson, Lennart; Kristensson, Ola

    2010-03-01

    This report is a supplement to the SR-Site data report. Based on the issues raised in the Process reports concerning THM processes in buffer, backfill and other system components, 22 modelling tasks have been identified, representing different aspects of the repository evolution. The purpose of this data report is to provide parameter values for the materials included in these tasks. Two codes, Code B right and Abaqus, have been employed for the tasks. The data qualification has focused on the bentonite material for buffer, backfill and the seals for tunnel plugs and bore-holes. All these system components have been treated as if they were based on MX-80 bentonite. The sources of information and documentation of the data qualification for the parameters for MX-80 have been listed. A substantial part of the refinement, especially concerning parameters used for Code B right, is presented in the report. The data qualification has been performed through a motivated and transparent chain; from measurements, via evaluations, to parameter determinations. The measured data was selected to be as recent, traceable and independent as possible. The data sets from this process are thus regarded to be qualified. The conditions for which the data is supplied, the conceptual uncertainties, the spatial and temporal variability and correlations are briefly presented and discussed. A more detailed discussion concerning the data uncertainty due to precision, bias and representativity is presented for measurements of swelling pressure, hydraulic conductivity, shear strength, retention properties and thermal conductivity. The results from the data qualification are presented as a detailed evaluation of measured data. In order to strengthen the relevance of the parameter values and to confirm previously used relations, either newer or independent measurements have been taken into account in the parameter value evaluation. Previously used relations for swelling pressure, hydraulic

  20. SR-Site Data report. THM modelling of buffer, backfill and other system components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakesson, Mattias; Boergesson, Lennart; Kristensson, Ola (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2010-03-15

    This report is a supplement to the SR-Site data report. Based on the issues raised in the Process reports concerning THM processes in buffer, backfill and other system components, 22 modelling tasks have been identified, representing different aspects of the repository evolution. The purpose of this data report is to provide parameter values for the materials included in these tasks. Two codes, Code{_}Bright and Abaqus, have been employed for the tasks. The data qualification has focused on the bentonite material for buffer, backfill and the seals for tunnel plugs and bore-holes. All these system components have been treated as if they were based on MX-80 bentonite. The sources of information and documentation of the data qualification for the parameters for MX-80 have been listed. A substantial part of the refinement, especially concerning parameters used for Code{_}Bright, is presented in the report. The data qualification has been performed through a motivated and transparent chain; from measurements, via evaluations, to parameter determinations. The measured data was selected to be as recent, traceable and independent as possible. The data sets from this process are thus regarded to be qualified. The conditions for which the data is supplied, the conceptual uncertainties, the spatial and temporal variability and correlations are briefly presented and discussed. A more detailed discussion concerning the data uncertainty due to precision, bias and representativity is presented for measurements of swelling pressure, hydraulic conductivity, shear strength, retention properties and thermal conductivity. The results from the data qualification are presented as a detailed evaluation of measured data. In order to strengthen the relevance of the parameter values and to confirm previously used relations, either newer or independent measurements have been taken into account in the parameter value evaluation. Previously used relations for swelling pressure, hydraulic

  1. Anomalous diffusion and scaling in coupled stochastic processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bel, Golan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nemenman, Ilya [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Inspired by problems in biochemical kinetics, we study statistical properties of an overdamped Langevin processes with the friction coefficient depending on the state of a similar, unobserved, process. Integrating out the latter, we derive the Pocker-Planck the friction coefficient of the first depends on the state of the second. Integrating out the latter, we derive the Focker-Planck equation for the probability distribution of the former. This has the fonn of diffusion equation with time-dependent diffusion coefficient, resulting in an anomalous diffusion. The diffusion exponent can not be predicted using a simple scaling argument, and anomalous scaling appears as well. The diffusion exponent of the Weiss-Havlin comb model is derived as a special case, and the same exponent holds even for weakly coupled processes. We compare our theoretical predictions with numerical simulations and find an excellent agreement. The findings caution against treating biochemical systems with unobserved dynamical degrees of freedom by means of standandard, diffusive Langevin descritpion.

  2. Change processes in couple therapy: an intensive case analysis of one couple using a common factors lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blow, Adrian J; Morrison, Nancy C; Tamaren, Karen; Wright, Kristin; Schaafsma, Melanie; Nadaud, Alison

    2009-07-01

    The article describes a research study that explored the process of how change occurred for one distressed couple and a specific therapist in a naturalistic setting. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected on the couple at multiple points in the therapy. A research team comprised of five members met regularly to analyze the data and collectively they arrived at a theory of change for the couple posttherapy. Conclusions are made related to how change occurred for the couple with an emphasis on the role of extratherapeutic events, client motivational factors, the therapeutic alliance, hope and expectancy factors, therapist factors, specific techniques and interventions, and other surprise factors that contributed to change.

  3. The Experience of Couples in the Process of Treatment of Pathological Gambling: Couple vs. Individual Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Joël Tremblay; Magali Dufour; Karine Bertrand; Nadine Blanchette-Martin; Francine Ferland; Annie-Claude Savard; Marianne Saint-Jacques; Mélissa Côté

    2018-01-01

    Context: Couple treatment for pathological gambling is an innovative strategy. There are some results supporting its potential effectiveness, but little is known about the subjective experiences of the participants.Objective: The aim of this article is to document the experiences of gamblers and their partners participating in one of two treatments, namely individual or couple.Method: In a study aiming to evaluate the efficacy of the Integrative Couple Treatment for Pathological Gambling (ICT...

  4. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Birkholzer; S. Mukhopadhyay

    2004-09-29

    The purpose of this report is to document drift-scale modeling work performed to evaluate the thermal-hydrological (TH) behavior in Yucca Mountain fractured rock close to waste emplacement drifts. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in rock temperatures elevated from ambient for thousands of years after emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, giving rise to water redistribution and altered flow paths. The predictive simulations described in this report are intended to investigate fluid flow in the vicinity of an emplacement drift for a range of thermal loads. Understanding the TH coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally driven water saturation changes affect the potential seepage of water into waste emplacement drifts. Seepage of water is important because if enough water gets into the emplacement drifts and comes into contact with any exposed radionuclides, it may then be possible for the radionuclides to be transported out of the drifts and to the groundwater below the drifts. For above-boiling rock temperatures, vaporization of percolating water in the fractured rock overlying the repository can provide an important barrier capability that greatly reduces (and possibly eliminates) the potential of water seeping into the emplacement drifts. In addition to this thermal process, water is inhibited from entering the drift opening by capillary forces, which occur under both ambient and thermal conditions (capillary barrier). The combined barrier capability of vaporization processes and capillary forces in the near-field rock during the thermal period of the repository is analyzed and discussed in this report.

  5. DRIFT-SCALE COUPLED PROCESSES (DST AND TH SEEPAGE) MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.T. Birkholzer; S. Mukhopadhyay

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document drift-scale modeling work performed to evaluate the thermal-hydrological (TH) behavior in Yucca Mountain fractured rock close to waste emplacement drifts. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in rock temperatures elevated from ambient for thousands of years after emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, giving rise to water redistribution and altered flow paths. The predictive simulations described in this report are intended to investigate fluid flow in the vicinity of an emplacement drift for a range of thermal loads. Understanding the TH coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally driven water saturation changes affect the potential seepage of water into waste emplacement drifts. Seepage of water is important because if enough water gets into the emplacement drifts and comes into contact with any exposed radionuclides, it may then be possible for the radionuclides to be transported out of the drifts and to the groundwater below the drifts. For above-boiling rock temperatures, vaporization of percolating water in the fractured rock overlying the repository can provide an important barrier capability that greatly reduces (and possibly eliminates) the potential of water seeping into the emplacement drifts. In addition to this thermal process, water is inhibited from entering the drift opening by capillary forces, which occur under both ambient and thermal conditions (capillary barrier). The combined barrier capability of vaporization processes and capillary forces in the near-field rock during the thermal period of the repository is analyzed and discussed in this report

  6. Electric currents couple spatially separated biogeochemical processes in marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Peter; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Fossing, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    be coupled by electric currents in nature. Here we provide evidence that electric currents running through defaunated sediment couple oxygen consumption at the sediment surface to oxidation of hydrogen sulphide and organic carbon deep within the sediment. Altering the oxygen concentration in the sea water...

  7. PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT PROCESS APPLIED OF FLEXIBLE METALLIC MEMBRANE COUPLING DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DOBRE Daniel

    2014-07-01

    model is created by computer to provide the validation of the features and the performance of the structure. It is revealed that the study of flexible couplings based on elastic deformations is of great theoretical and practical importance today.

  8. THM-GTRF: New Spider meshes, New Hydra-TH runs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakosi, Jozsef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Christon, Mark A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Francois, Marianne M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lowrie, Robert B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nourgaliev, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-20

    Progress is reported on computational capabilities for the grid-to-rod-fretting (GTRF) problem of pressurized water reactors. Numeca's Hexpress/Hybrid mesh generator is demonstrated as an excellent alternative to generating computational meshes for complex flow geometries, such as in GTRF. Mesh assessment is carried out using standard industrial computational fluid dynamics practices. Hydra-TH, a simulation code developed at LANL for reactor thermal-hydraulics, is demonstrated on hybrid meshes, containing different element types. A series of new Hydra-TH calculations has been carried out collecting turbulence statistics. Preliminary results on the newly generated meshes are discussed; full analysis will be documented in the L3 milestone, THM.CFD.P5.05, Sept. 2012.

  9. Client Discourses on the Process of Seeking Same-Sex Couple Counselling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Jan; Peel, Elizabeth; Owen-Pugh, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    How same-sex couples manage the process of seeking help for their relationships is an under-researched area. Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 people who had engaged in same-sex couple counselling, and were analysed using discourse analysis. The ways in which the couples positioned themselves as part of a "minority…

  10. FEBEX Full-Scalle Engineered Barriers Experiment in Crystalline Host Rock Preoperational Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical (THM) Modelling of the Mock Up Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The object of this report is to present and discuss the results of a series of 1-D and 2-D coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) and 2-D coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) analyses modelling the FEBEX mock-up test. The analyses have been carried out during the preoperational storage of the test and attempt to incorporate all available information obtained from laboratory characterisation work. The aim is not only to offer the best estimate of test performance using current models and information but also to provide a basis for future model improvements. Both the theoretical framework adopted in the analysis and the computer code employed are briefly described. The set of parameters used in the computation is then presented with particular reference to the source from which they have been derived. Initial and boundary condition are also defined. The results of a 1-D radially symmetric analysis are used to examine the basic patterns of thermal, hydraulic and mechanical behaviour of the test. A set of sensitivity analyses has been carried out in order to check the effects that the variation of a number of important parameters has on test results. Only in this way it is possible to acquire a proper understanding of the internal structure of the problem and of the interactions between the various phenomena occurring in the buffer. A better reproduction of the geometry of the test is achieved by means of a 2-D mesh representing and axisymmetric longitudinal section. Due to two-dimensional effects, the analyses carried out using this geometry exhibit some differences when compared with the results of the 1-D case, but the basic test behaviour is very similar. The test was started with an initial flooding stage with the purpose of closing the gaps between bentonite blocks. A limited number of compilations using recently developed joint elements have been performed to assess approximately the effect of this initial step on subsequent test behaviour. The analyses reported

  11. A Study on the Principle of Maximum Dissipation for Coupled and Non-Coupled Non-Isothermal Processes in Materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hackl, K.; Fischer, F. D.; Svoboda, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 467, č. 2128 (2011), s. 1186-1196 ISSN 1364-5021 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC10029 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : dissipation * coupled processes * variational principles Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.971, year: 2011

  12. Panel discussion on near-field coupled processes with emphasis on performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codell, R.B.; Baca, R.G.; Ahola, M.P.

    1996-01-01

    The presentations in this panel discussion involve the general topic of near-field coupled processes and postclosure performance assessment with an emphasis on rock mechanics. The potential impact of near-field rock mass deformation on repository performance was discussed, as well as topics including long term excavation deterioration, the performance of geologic seals, and coupled processes concerning rock mechanics in performance assessments

  13. Process intensification by coupling the Joule effect with pervaporation and sweeping gas membrane distillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shukla, S.; Méricq, J. P.; Belleville, M.P.; Hengl, N.; Benes, N. E.; Vankelecom, I.; Sanchez Marcano, Jose

    2018-01-01

    This work concerns the intensification of membrane processes by coupling the Joule effect with two membrane processes: pervaporation and sweeping gas membrane distillation. For this purpose, conducting metallic hollow fibers impregnated or coated with polydimethyl siloxane were simultaneously used

  14. Coupling of two non-processive myosin 5c dimers enables processive stepping along actin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, Laura K; Furuta, Ken'ya; Bao, Jianjun; Urbanowski, Monica K; Kojima, Hiroaki; White, Howard D; Sakamoto, Takeshi

    2014-05-09

    Myosin 5c (Myo5c) is a low duty ratio, non-processive motor unable to move continuously along actin filaments though it is believed to participate in secretory vesicle trafficking in vertebrate cells. Here, we measured the ATPase kinetics of Myo5c dimers and tested the possibility that the coupling of two Myo5c molecules enables processive movement. Steady-state ATPase activity and ADP dissociation kinetics demonstrated that a dimer of Myo5c-HMM (double-headed heavy meromyosin 5c) has a 6-fold lower Km for actin filaments than Myo5c-S1 (single-headed myosin 5c subfragment-1), indicating that the two heads of Myo5c-HMM increase F-actin-binding affinity. Nanometer-precision tracking analyses showed that two Myo5c-HMM dimers linked with each other via a DNA scaffold and moved processively along actin filaments. Moreover, the distance between the Myo5c molecules on the DNA scaffold is an important factor for the processive movement. Individual Myo5c molecules in two-dimer complexes move stochastically in 30-36 nm steps. These results demonstrate that two dimers of Myo5c molecules on a DNA scaffold increased the probability of rebinding to F-actin and enabled processive steps along actin filaments, which could be used for collective cargo transport in cells.

  15. Recurrence Quantification for the Analysis of Coupled Processes in Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brick, Timothy R; Gray, Allison L; Staples, Angela D

    2017-12-15

    Aging is a complex phenomenon, with numerous simultaneous processes that interact with each other on a moment-to-moment basis. One way to quantify the interactions of these processes is by measuring how much a process is similar to its own past states or the past states of another system through the analysis of recurrence. This paper presents an introduction to recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) and cross-recurrence quantification analysis (CRQA), two dynamical systems analysis techniques that provide ways to characterize the self-similar nature of each process and the properties of their mutual temporal co-occurrence. We present RQA and CRQA and demonstrate their effectiveness with an example of conversational movements across age groups. RQA and CRQA provide methods of analyzing the repetitive processes that occur in day-to-day life, describing how different processes co-occur, synchronize, or predict each other and comparing the characteristics of those processes between groups. With intensive longitudinal data becoming increasingly available, it is possible to examine how the processes of aging unfold. RQA and CRQA provide information about how one process may show patterns of internal repetition or echo the patterning of another process and how those characteristics may change across the process of aging. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Laboratory studies on the effect of ozonation on THM formation in swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Cheema, Waqas Akram

    2015-01-01

    Water samples from indoor swimming pool were ozonated at different pH values to evaluate the effect of pH on decomposition of ozone in swimming pool water. Furthermore, drinking and pool water were repeatedly ozonated followed by chlorination to evaluate THM formation. Decomposition of ozone...... was not affected by pH in the range relevant to swimming pools (pH 6.8 – 7.8) and a half-life time at 10-12 min was obtained. Repeating the ozonation, the decomposition of ozone increased at the second dose of ozone added (t½,2=8 min) and then decreased again at the third and fourth dose of ozone (t½,3=17 min; t...... chlorine for drinking water as lower TTHM formation occurred than in non-ozonated samples. For pool water, a higher TTHM formation was observed in ozonated than non-ozonated pool water. Thus, it was observed that ozone reacts markedly different in swimming pool water from the known pattern in drinking...

  17. Potential Applications of Zeolite Membranes in Reaction Coupling Separation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daramola, Michael O.; Aransiola, Elizabeth F.; Ojumu, Tunde V.

    2012-01-01

    Future production of chemicals (e.g., fine and specialty chemicals) in industry is faced with the challenge of limited material and energy resources. However, process intensification might play a significant role in alleviating this problem. A vision of process intensification through multifunctional reactors has stimulated research on membrane-based reactive separation processes, in which membrane separation and catalytic reaction occur simultaneously in one unit. These processes are rather attractive applications because they are potentially compact, less capital intensive, and have lower processing costs than traditional processes. Therefore this review discusses the progress and potential applications that have occurred in the field of zeolite membrane reactors during the last few years. The aim of this article is to update researchers in the field of process intensification and also provoke their thoughts on further research efforts to explore and exploit the potential applications of zeolite membrane reactors in industry. Further evaluation of this technology for industrial acceptability is essential in this regard. Therefore, studies such as techno-economical feasibility, optimization and scale-up are of the utmost importance.

  18. Potential Applications of Zeolite Membranes in Reaction Coupling Separation Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunde V. Ojumu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Future production of chemicals (e.g., fine and specialty chemicals in industry is faced with the challenge of limited material and energy resources. However, process intensification might play a significant role in alleviating this problem. A vision of process intensification through multifunctional reactors has stimulated research on membrane-based reactive separation processes, in which membrane separation and catalytic reaction occur simultaneously in one unit. These processes are rather attractive applications because they are potentially compact, less capital intensive, and have lower processing costs than traditional processes. Therefore this review discusses the progress and potential applications that have occurred in the field of zeolite membrane reactors during the last few years. The aim of this article is to update researchers in the field of process intensification and also provoke their thoughts on further research efforts to explore and exploit the potential applications of zeolite membrane reactors in industry. Further evaluation of this technology for industrial acceptability is essential in this regard. Therefore, studies such as techno-economical feasibility, optimization and scale-up are of the utmost importance.

  19. An adaptive deep-coupled GNSS/INS navigation system with hybrid pre-filter processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mouyan; Ding, Jicheng; Zhao, Lin; Kang, Yingyao; Luo, Zhibin

    2018-02-01

    The deep-coupling of a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) with an inertial navigation system (INS) can provide accurate and reliable navigation information. There are several kinds of deeply-coupled structures. These can be divided mainly into coherent and non-coherent pre-filter based structures, which have their own strong advantages and disadvantages, especially in accuracy and robustness. In this paper, the existing pre-filters of the deeply-coupled structures are analyzed and modified to improve them firstly. Then, an adaptive GNSS/INS deeply-coupled algorithm with hybrid pre-filters processing is proposed to combine the advantages of coherent and non-coherent structures. An adaptive hysteresis controller is designed to implement the hybrid pre-filters processing strategy. The simulation and vehicle test results show that the adaptive deeply-coupled algorithm with hybrid pre-filters processing can effectively improve navigation accuracy and robustness, especially in a GNSS-challenged environment.

  20. Electromagnetically induced transparency from two-phonon processes in quadratically coupled membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Sumei; Agarwal, G. S.

    2011-01-01

    We describe how electromagnetically induced transparency can arise in quadratically coupled optomechanical systems. Due to quadratic coupling, the underlying optical process involves a two-phonon process in an optomechanical system, and this two-phonon process makes the mean displacement, which plays the role of atomic coherence in traditional electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), zero. We show how the fluctuation in displacement can play a role similar to atomic coherence and can lead to EIT-like effects in quadratically coupled optomechanical systems. We show how such effects can be studied using the existing optomechanical systems.

  1. Directed motion emerging from two coupled random processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjörnsson, T.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen; Metzler, R.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the translocation of a stiff polymer consisting of M monomers through a nanopore in a membrane, in the presence of binding particles (chaperones) that bind onto the polymer, and partially prevent backsliding of the polymer through the pore. The process is characterized by the rates......: k for the polymer to make a diffusive jump through the pore, q for unbinding of a chaperone, and the rate qκ for binding (with a binding strength κ); except for the case of no binding κ ≤ 0 the presence of the chaperones gives rise to an effective force that drives the translocation process. In more...... detail, we develop a dynamical description of the process in terms of a (2+1)-variable master equation for the probability of having m monomers on the target side of the membrane with n bound chaperones at time t. Emphasis is put on the calculation of the mean first passage time as a function of total...

  2. "The best is always yet to come": Relationship stages and processes among young LGBT couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macapagal, Kathryn; Greene, George J; Rivera, Zenaida; Mustanski, Brian

    2015-06-01

    Limited research has examined relationship development among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) couples in emerging adulthood. A better understanding of LGBT couples can inform the development of relationship education programs that reflect their unique needs. The following questions guided this study: (a) What are the stages and processes during young LGBT couples' relationship development? and (b) How do these compare with existing literature on heterosexual adults? A secondary goal was to explore similarities and differences between couples assigned male (MAAB) and female at birth (FAAB). Thirty-six couples completed interviews on their relationship history. Qualitative analyses showed that relationship stages and processes were similar to past research on heterosexuals, but participants' subjective experiences reflected their LGBT identities and emerging adulthood, which exerted additional stress on the relationship. These factors also affected milestones indicative of commitment among heterosexual adults (e.g., introducing partner to family). Mixed methods analyses indicated that MAAB couples described negotiating relationship agreements and safe sex in more depth than FAAB couples. Relationship development models warrant modifications to consider the impact of sexual and gender identity and emerging adulthood when applied to young LGBT couples. These factors should be addressed in interventions to promote relationship health among young LGBT couples. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Solute coupled diffusion in osmotically driven membrane processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Nathan T; Cath, Tzahi Y

    2009-09-01

    Forward osmosis (FO) is an emerging water treatment technology with potential applications in desalination and wastewater reclamation. In FO, water is extracted from a feed solution using the high osmotic pressure of a hypertonic solution that flows on the opposite side of a semipermeable membrane; however, solutes diffuse simultaneously through the membrane in both directions and may jeopardize the process. In this study, we have comprehensively explored the effects of different operating conditions on the forward diffusion of solutes commonly found in brackish water and seawater, and reverse diffusion of common draw solution solutes. Results show that reverse transport of solutes through commercially available FO membranes range between 80 mg to nearly 3,000 mg per liter of water produced. Divalent feed solutes have low permeation rates (less than 1 mmol/m2-hr) while monovalent ions and uncharged solutes exhibit higher permeation. Findings have significant implications on the performance and sustainability of the FO process.

  4. Coupling Spatiotemporal Community Assembly Processes to Changes in Microbial Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Emily B.; Crump, Alex R.; Resch, Charles T.; Fansler, Sarah; Arntzen, Evan; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Stegen, James C.

    2016-12-16

    Community assembly processes govern shifts in species abundances in response to environmental change, yet our understanding of assembly remains largely decoupled from ecosystem function. Here, we test hypotheses regarding assembly and function across space and time using hyporheic microbial communities as a model system. We pair sampling of two habitat types through hydrologic fluctuation with null modeling and multivariate statistics. We demonstrate that dual selective pressures assimilate to generate compositional changes at distinct timescales among habitat types, resulting in contrasting associations of Betaproteobacteria and Thaumarchaeota with selection and with seasonal changes in aerobic metabolism. Our results culminate in a conceptual model in which selection from contrasting environments regulates taxon abundance and ecosystem function through time, with increases in function when oscillating selection opposes stable selective pressures. Our model is applicable within both macrobial and microbial ecology and presents an avenue for assimilating community assembly processes into predictions of ecosystem function.

  5. Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yu-Shu [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Chen, Zizhong [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Kazemi, Hossein [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Yin, Xiaolong [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Pruess, Karsten [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Oldenburg, Curt [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Winterfeld, Philip [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Ronglei [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-09-30

    This report is the final scientific one for the award DE- FE0000988 entitled “Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers.” The work has been divided into six tasks. In task, “Development of a Three-Phase Non-Isothermal CO2 Flow Module,” we developed a fluid property module for brine-CO2 mixtures designed to handle all possible phase combinations of aqueous phase, sub-critical liquid and gaseous CO2, supercritical CO2, and solid salt. The thermodynamic and thermophysical properties of brine-CO2 mixtures (density, viscosity, and specific enthalpy of fluid phases; partitioning of mass components among the different phases) use the same correlations as an earlier fluid property module that does not distinguish between gaseous and liquid CO2-rich phases. We verified the fluid property module using two leakage scenarios, one that involves CO2 migration up a blind fault and subsequent accumulation in a secondary “parasitic” reservoir at shallower depth, and another investigating leakage of CO2 from a deep storage reservoir along a vertical fault zone. In task, “Development of a Rock Mechanical Module,” we developed a massively parallel reservoir simulator for modeling THM processes in porous media brine aquifers. We derived, from the fundamental equations describing deformation of porous elastic media, a momentum conservation equation relating mean stress, pressure, and temperature, and incorporated it alongside the mass and energy conservation equations from the TOUGH2 formulation, the starting point for the simulator. In addition, rock properties, namely permeability and porosity, are functions of effective stress and other variables that are obtained from the literature. We verified the simulator formulation and numerical implementation using analytical solutions and example problems from the literature. For

  6. Effects of coupled thermal, hydrological and chemical processes on nuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1987-03-01

    Coupled thermal, hydrological and chemical processes can be classified in two categories. One category consists of the ''Onsager'' type of processes driven by gradients of thermodynamic state variables. These processes occur simultaneously with the direct transport processes. In particular, thermal osmosis, chemical osmosis and ultrafiltration may be prominent in semipermeable materials such as clays. The other category consists of processes affected indirectly by magnitudes of thermodynamic state variables. An important example of this category is the effect of temperature on rates of chemical reactions and chemical equilibria. Coupled processes in both categories may affect transport of radionuclides. Although computational models of limited extent have been constructed, there exists no model that accounts for the full set of THC-coupled processes. In the category of Onsager coupled processes, further model development and testing is severely constrained by a deficient data base of phenomenological coefficients. In the second category, the lack of a general description of effects of heterogeneous chemical reactions on permeability of porous media inhibits progress in quantitative modeling of hydrochemically coupled transport processes. Until fundamental data necessary for further model development have been acquired, validation efforts will be limited necessarily to testing of incomplete models of nuclide transport under closely controlled experimental conditions. 34 refs., 2 tabs

  7. Coupling spatiotemporal community assembly processes to changes in microbial metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily B. Graham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Community assembly processes generate shifts in species abundances that influence ecosystem cycling of carbon and nutrients, yet our understanding of assembly remains largely separate from ecosystem-level functioning. Here, we investigate relationships between assembly and changes in microbial metabolism across space and time in hyporheic microbial communities. We pair sampling of two habitat types (i.e., attached and planktonic through seasonal and sub-hourly hydrologic fluctuation with null modeling and temporally-explicit multivariate statistics. We demonstrate that multiple selective pressures—imposed by sediment and porewater physicochemistry—integrate to generate changes in microbial community composition at distinct timescales among habitat types. These changes in composition are reflective of contrasting associations of Betaproteobacteria and Thaumarchaeota with ecological selection and with seasonal changes in microbial metabolism. We present a conceptual model based on our results in which metabolism increases when oscillating selective pressures oppose temporally-stable selective pressures. Our conceptual model is pertinent to both macrobial and microbial systems experiencing multiple selective pressures and presents an avenue for assimilating community assembly processes into predictions of ecosystem-level functioning.

  8. A novel integrated thermally coupled moving bed reactors for naphtha reforming process with hydrodealkylation of toluene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iranshahi, Davood; Saeedi, Reza; Azizi, Kolsoom; Nategh, Mahshid

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel thermally coupled reactor in CCR naphtha reforming process is modeled. • The required heat of Naphtha process is attained with toluene hydrodealkylation. • A new kinetic model involving 32 pseudo-component and 84 reactions is proposed. • The aromatics and hydrogen production increase 19% and 23%, respectively. - Abstract: Due to the importance of catalytic naphtha reforming process in refineries, development of this process to attain the highest yield of desired products is crucial. In this study, continuous catalyst regeneration naphtha reforming process with radial flow is coupled with hydrodealkylation of toluene to prevent energy loss while enhancing aromatics and hydrogen yields. In this coupled process, heat is transferred between hot and cold sections (from hydrodealkylation of toluene to catalytic naphtha reforming process) using the process integration method. A steady-state two-dimensional model, which considers coke formation on the catalyst pellets, is developed and 32 pseudo-components with 84 reactions are investigated. Kinetic model utilized for HDA process is homogeneous and non-catalytic. The modeling results reveal an approximate increase of 19% and 23% in aromatics and hydrogen molar flow rates, respectively, in comparison with conventional naphtha reforming process. The improvement in aromatics production evidently indicates that HDA is a suitable process to be coupled with naphtha reforming.

  9. CO2-ECBM related coupled physical and mechanical transport processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensterblum, Yves; Satorius, Michael; Busch, Andreas; Krooß, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    The interrelation of cleat transport processes and mechanical properties was investigated by permeability tests at different stress levels (60% to 130% of in-situ stress) with sorbing (CH4, CO2) and inert gases (N2, Ar, He) on a sub bituminous A coal from the Surat Basin, Queensland Australia. From the flow tests under controlled triaxial stress conditions the Klinkenberg-corrected "true" permeability coefficients and the Klinkenberg slip factors were derived. The "true"-, absolute or Klinkenberg corrected permeability shows a gas type dependence. Following the approach of Seidle et al. (1992) the cleat volume compressibility (cf) was calculated from observed changes in apparent permeability upon variation of external stress (at equal mean gas pressures). The observed effects also show a clear dependence on gas type. Due to pore or cleat compressibility the cleat aperture decreases with increasing effective stress. Vice versa we observe with increasing mean pressure at lower confining pressure an increase in permeability which we attribute to a cleat aperture widening. The cleat volume compressibility (cf) also shows a dependence on the mean pore pressure. Non-sorbing gases like helium and argon show higher apparent permeabilities than sorbing gases like methane. Permeability coefficients measured with successively increasing mean gas pressures were consistently lower than those determined at decreasing mean gas pressures. This permeability hysteresis is in accordance with results reported by Harpalani and McPherson (1985). The kinetics of matrix transport processes were studied by sorption tests on different particle sizes at various moisture contents and temperatures (cf. Busch et al., 2006). Methane uptake rates were determined from the pressure decline curves recorded for each particle-size fraction, and "diffusion coefficients" were calculated using several unipore and bidisperse diffusion models. While the CH4 sorption capacity of moisture-equilibrated coals

  10. Universal processes and common factors in couple therapy and relationship education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, W Kim; Snyder, Douglas K

    2012-03-01

    Across nearly all cultures, sharing a lifelong committed relationship with an intimate partner comprises an almost universal and strongly held ambition. Nevertheless, cross-national data reliably indicate a high prevalence of relationship distress and dissolution, with adverse emotional and physical health consequences for adult partners and their children. This introduction to the special section summarizes findings regarding the effectiveness of couple therapy for treating general relationship distress, couple-based interventions for individual mental or physical health problems, and couple relationship education programs aimed at helping couples sustain a healthy committed relationship. Within each of these approaches, evidence regarding potential mediators of interventions' effectiveness is reviewed, and critical unanswered questions are highlighted. Discussion concludes with a brief introduction to each of the articles comprising this special section on universal processes in couple therapy and relationship education. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Resonance Strength Measurement at Astrophysical Energies: The 17O(p,α14N Reaction Studied via THM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi M.L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α14N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. The mean value of the strengths obtained in the two measurements was calculated and compared with the direct data available in literature.

  12. Panel report on coupled thermo-mechanical-hydro-chemical processes associated with a nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, C.F.; Mangold, D.C.

    1984-07-01

    Four basic physical processes, thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical, are likely to occur in 11 different types of coupling during the service life of an underground nuclear waste repository. A great number of coupled processes with various degrees of importance for geological repositories were identified and arranged into these 11 types. A qualitative description of these processes and a tentative evaluation of their significance and the degree of uncertainty in prediction is given. Suggestions for methods of investigation generally include, besides theoretical work, laboratory and large scale field testing. Great efforts of a multidisciplinary nature are needed to elucidate details of several coupled processes under different temperature conditions in different geological formations. It was suggested that by limiting the maximum temperature to 100 0 C in the backfill and in the host rock during the whole service life of the repository the uncertainties in prediction of long-term repository behavior might be considerably reduced

  13. A General Strategy for Nanohybrids Synthesis via Coupled Competitive Reactions Controlled in a Hybrid Process

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Rongming; Yang, Wantai; Song, Yuanjun; Shen, Xiaomiao; Wang, Junmei; Zhong, Xiaodi; Li, Shuai; Song, Yujun

    2015-01-01

    A new methodology based on core alloying and shell gradient-doping are developed for the synthesis of nanohybrids, realized by coupled competitive reactions, or sequenced reducing-nucleation and co-precipitation reaction of mixed metal salts in a microfluidic and batch-cooling process. The latent time of nucleation and the growth of nanohybrids can be well controlled due to the formation of controllable intermediates in the coupled competitive reactions. Thus, spatiotemporal-resolved synthesi...

  14. Flexible simulation framework to couple processes in complex 3D models for subsurface utilization assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempka, Thomas; Nakaten, Benjamin; De Lucia, Marco; Nakaten, Natalie; Otto, Christopher; Pohl, Maik; Tillner, Elena; Kühn, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Utilization of the geological subsurface for production and storage of hydrocarbons, chemical energy and heat as well as for waste disposal requires the quantification and mitigation of environmental impacts as well as the improvement of georesources utilization in terms of efficiency and sustainability. The development of tools for coupled process simulations is essential to tackle these challenges, since reliable assessments are only feasible by integrative numerical computations. Coupled processes at reservoir to regional scale determine the behaviour of reservoirs, faults and caprocks, generally demanding for complex 3D geological models to be considered besides available monitoring and experimenting data in coupled numerical simulations. We have been developing a flexible numerical simulation framework that provides efficient workflows for integrating the required data and software packages to carry out coupled process simulations considering, e.g., multiphase fluid flow, geomechanics, geochemistry and heat. Simulation results are stored in structured data formats to allow for an integrated 3D visualization and result interpretation as well as data archiving and its provision to collaborators. The main benefits in using the flexible simulation framework are the integration of data geological and grid data from any third party software package as well as data export to generic 3D visualization tools and archiving formats. The coupling of the required process simulators in time and space is feasible, while different spatial dimensions in the coupled simulations can be integrated, e.g., 0D batch with 3D dynamic simulations. User interaction is established via high-level programming languages, while computational efficiency is achieved by using low-level programming languages. We present three case studies on the assessment of geological subsurface utilization based on different process coupling approaches and numerical simulations.

  15. Model development and calibration for the coupled thermal, hydraulic and mechanical phenomena of the bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chijimatsu, M.; Borgesson, L.; Fujita, T.; Jussila, P.; Nguyen, S.; Rutqvist, J.; Jing, L.; Hernelind, J.

    2009-02-01

    In Task A of the international DECOVALEX-THMC project, five research teams study the influence of thermal-hydro-mechanical (THM) coupling on the safety of a hypothetical geological repository for spent fuel. In order to improve the analyses, the teams calibrated their bentonite models with results from laboratory experiments, including swelling pressure tests, water uptake tests, thermally gradient tests, and the CEA mock-up THM experiment. This paper describes the mathematical models used by the teams, and compares the results of their calibrations with the experimental data.

  16. Benchmark initiative on coupled multiphase flow and geomechanical processes during CO2 injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benisch, K.; Annewandter, R.; Olden, P.; Mackay, E.; Bauer, S.; Geiger, S.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 injection into deep saline aquifers involves multiple strongly interacting processes such as multiphase flow and geomechanical deformation, which threat to the seal integrity of CO2 repositories. Coupled simulation codes are required to establish realistic prognoses of the coupled process during CO2 injection operations. International benchmark initiatives help to evaluate, to compare and to validate coupled simulation results. However, there is no published code comparison study so far focusing on the impact of coupled multiphase flow and geomechanics on the long-term integrity of repositories, which is required to obtain confidence in the predictive capabilities of reservoir simulators. We address this gap by proposing a benchmark study. A wide participation from academic and industrial institutions is sought, as the aim of building confidence in coupled simulators become more plausible with many participants. Most published benchmark studies on coupled multiphase flow and geomechanical processes have been performed within the field of nuclear waste disposal (e.g. the DECOVALEX project), using single-phase formulation only. As regards CO2 injection scenarios, international benchmark studies have been published comparing isothermal and non-isothermal multiphase flow processes such as the code intercomparison by LBNL, the Stuttgart Benchmark study, the CLEAN benchmark approach and other initiatives. Recently, several codes have been developed or extended to simulate the coupling of hydraulic and geomechanical processes (OpenGeoSys, ELIPSE-Visage, GEM, DuMuX and others), which now enables a comprehensive code comparison. We propose four benchmark tests of increasing complexity, addressing the coupling between multiphase flow and geomechanical processes during CO2 injection. In the first case, a horizontal non-faulted 2D model consisting of one reservoir and one cap rock is considered, focusing on stress and strain regime changes in the storage formation and the

  17. Differences in Pornography Use Among Couples: Associations with Satisfaction, Stability, and Relationship Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Brian J; Carroll, Jason S; Busby, Dean M; Brown, Cameron C

    2016-01-01

    The present study utilized a sample of 1755 adult couples in heterosexual romantic relationships to examine how different patterns of pornography use between romantic partners may be associated with relationship outcomes. While pornography use has been generally associated with some negative and some positive couple outcomes, no study has yet explored how differences between partners may uniquely be associated with relationship well-being. Results suggested that greater discrepancies between partners in pornography use were related to less relationship satisfaction, less stability, less positive communication, and more relational aggression. Mediation analyses suggested that greater pornography use discrepancies were primarily associated with elevated levels of male relational aggression, lower female sexual desire, and less positive communication for both partners which then predicted lower relational satisfaction and stability for both partners. Results generally suggest that discrepancies in pornography use at the couple level are related to negative couple outcomes. Specifically, pornography differences may alter specific couple interaction processes which, in turn, may influence relationship satisfaction and stability. Implications for scholars and clinicians interested in how pornography use is associated with couple process are discussed.

  18. Research on rural sewage treatment using biological-ecological coupling process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang SHI

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Developing low-investment, low-energy consumption and low-maintenance sewage treatment process is important for sewage treatment in rural areas. An upflow anaerobic filter (UAF without energy consumption and a subsurface flow wetland (SFW are utilized as a biological-ecological coupling process to treat rural domestic sewage. The effect of the coupling process on treatment performance of domestic sewage under different hydraulic retention time (HRT is investigated. The removal of nitrogen and phosphorus in the SFW is improved by increasing plant density. The results show that the coupling process of UAF and SFW has no power consumption and is maintenance-free, suitable for rural sewage treatment; the removal of nitrogen and phosphorus mainly happens in the SFW phase; increasing the density of reed plants in the SFW can obviously enhance the capacity to remove nitrogen and phosphorus, and ensure that the efficient performance of the coupling process of UAF and SFW is stabilized in a high level. When the HRTs of UAF and SFW are 18 h and 3 d, respectively, the concentrations of COD, ammonia nitrogen, total nitrogen and total phosphorus in the final effluent treated by UAF and SFW process are 44.07, 4.25, 13.36 and 0.44 mg/L, respectively, meeting the requirement of first grade class A in Discharge Standard of Pollutants for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant (GB 18918-2002.

  19. Investigations of coupled biogeochemical processes affecting the transformation of U: Integration of synchrotron-based approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ken Kemner; Ed O'Loughlin

    2007-01-01

    The summary of this paper is that: (1) An improved understanding of fundamental coupled biogeochemical processes obviously is critical for decision making for environmental remediation and long-term stewardship. (2) Synchrotron x-ray radiation provides the most versatile and powerful approach for directly determining the chemical speciation of the radionuclide and heavy metal contaminants of concern to DOE. (3) Integration of synchrotron approaches with integrated multidisciplinary scientific investigations provides a powerful way of understanding coupled biogeochemical processes whereby the scientific question drives the development of new synchrotron-based technologies and the unique information provided by the synchrotron-based technology enables the development of new scientific hypotheses and insights

  20. A Coupled Multiphysics Approach for Simulating Induced Seismicity, Ground Acceleration and Structural Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorney, Robert; Coleman, Justin; Wilkins, Amdrew; Huang, Hai; Veeraraghavan, Swetha; Xia, Yidong; Permann, Cody

    2017-04-01

    Numerical modeling has played an important role in understanding the behavior of coupled subsurface thermal-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes associated with a number of energy and environmental applications since as early as the 1970s. While the ability to rigorously describe all key tightly coupled controlling physics still remains a challenge, there have been significant advances in recent decades. These advances are related primarily to the exponential growth of computational power, the development of more accurate equations of state, improvements in the ability to represent heterogeneity and reservoir geometry, and more robust nonlinear solution schemes. The work described in this paper documents the development and linkage of several fully-coupled and fully-implicit modeling tools. These tools simulate: (1) the dynamics of fluid flow, heat transport, and quasi-static rock mechanics; (2) seismic wave propagation from the sources of energy release through heterogeneous material; and (3) the soil-structural damage resulting from ground acceleration. These tools are developed in Idaho National Laboratory's parallel Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment, and are integrated together using a global implicit approach. The governing equations are presented, the numerical approach for simultaneously solving and coupling the three coupling physics tools is discussed, and the data input and output methodology is outlined. An example is presented to demonstrate the capabilities of the coupled multiphysics approach. The example involves simulating a system conceptually similar to the geothermal development in Basel Switzerland, and the resultant induced seismicity, ground motion and structural damage is predicted.

  1. Childhood Emotional Abuse and Attachment Processes in the Dyadic Adjustment of Dating Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Shelley A.; Cusimano, Angela M.; Benson, Karen M.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to improve understanding of the mechanisms that link early maltreatment to later outcomes, this study investigated the mediation effects of adult attachment processes on the association between childhood emotional abuse and later romantic relationships among heterosexual couples. College students and their dating partners (N = 310;…

  2. COUPLED ATOMIZATION AND SPRAY MODELLING IN THE SPRAY FORMING PROCESS USING OPENFOAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjesing, Rasmus; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Fritsching, Udo

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a numerical model capable of simulating the atomization, break-up and in-flight spray phenomena in the spray forming process. The model is developed and implemented in the freeware code openFOAM. The focus is on studying the coupling effect of the melt break-up phenomena...

  3. Coupling of local texture and microstructure evolution during restoration processes in aluminum deformed to large strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels; Yu, Tianbo; Mishin, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    The coupling between local texture and microstructure is analyzed during restoration processes in aluminum cold-rolled to high and ultrahigh strains. The deformed microstructure is composed of lamellae with orientations of rolling texture components that occupy different volume fractions and vary...

  4. Coupled Deep Earth and surface processes and their impact on geohazards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cloetingh, S.; Tibaldi, A.; Burov, E.

    2012-01-01

    Better understanding of coupled Deep Earth and surface processes is the key for resolving the evolution of the continental lithosphere and its surface topography. The thermo-mechanical structure of the lithosphere exerts a prime control on the interaction of mantle instabilities and tectonic forces

  5. Fabrication of Coupling Structure and Composite Properties by Electro-brush Plating and Laser Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Jing

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To obtain a superhydrophobic aluminum alloy surface, a kind of special coupling structure was fabricated on the aluminum alloy surface by a couple ways which was electro-brush plating combined with laser processing. The surface has excellent anti-adhesion and corrosion resistance property. The contact angle can reach as high as 155.1°, while the sliding angle less than 5.6°. The morphological feature, chemical structures, and wettability of resultant surfaces were characterized by scanning electronic microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD and water contact angle measurements. The surface corrosion resistance was researched by a corrosion resistance experiment. The results show that surface consists of micro-scale grooves and like-cauliflower mastoids, the grooves in a regular arrangement with mastoid structures for a coupling structure on the surface. The special coupling structure makes the surface already have superhydrophobicity. The wettability of the surface changes from hydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity. There have no peaks from other phases can be detected between electro-brush plating surface and aluminum alloy substrates. The peak intensity is changed by laser processing, and the organization structure of the material is further refined. The corrosion resistance of the surface that is fabricated by couple ways improves.

  6. Numerical methods for TVD transport and coupled relaxing processes in gases and plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1990-01-01

    The construction of second-order upwind schemes for nonequilibrium plasmas, for both one- and two-fluid formulations is demonstrated. Coupled relaxation processes, including ionization kinetics and radiative processes and their algorithms for nonequilibrium, multiple temperature conditions are described as well. The paper applies the numerical techniques on some simple test cases, points out critical problems and their solutions, and makes qualitative comparisons with known results, whenever possible.

  7. Can neutron stars have auroras ? : electromagnetic coupling process between neutron star and magnetized accretion disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, T.; Iwakiri, W. B.; Enoto, T.; Wada, T.; Tao, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the binary neutron star system, angular momentum transfer from accretion disk to a star is essential process for spin-up/down of stars. The angular momentum transfer has been well formulated for the accretion disk strongly magnetized by the neutron star [e.g., Ghosh and Lamb, 1978, 1979a, b]. However, the electromagnetic (EM) coupling between the neutron star and accretion disk has not been self-consistently solved in the previous studies although the magnetic field lines from the star are strongly tied with the accretion disk. In this study, we applied the planet-magnetosphere coupling process established for Jupiter [Hill, 1979] to the binary neutron star system. Angular momentum distribution is solved based on the torque balance between the neutron star's surface and accretion disk coupled by the magnetic field tensions. We found the EM coupling can transfer significantly larger fraction of the angular momentum from the magnetized accretion disk to the star than the unmagnetized case. The resultant spin-up rate is estimated to ~10^-14 [sec/sec] for the nominal binary system parameters, which is comparable with or larger than the other common spin-down/up processes: e.g., the magnetic dipole radiation spin-down. The Joule heating energy dissipated in the EM coupling is estimated to be up to ~10^36 [erg/sec] for the nominal binary system parameters. The release is comparable to that of gravitation energy directly caused by the matters accreting onto the neutron star. This suggests the EM coupling at the neutron star can accompany the observable radiation as auroras with a similar manner to those at the rotating planetary magnetospheres like Jupiter, Saturn, and other gas giants.

  8. 3D numerical modeling of coupled phenomena in induced processes of heat treatment with malice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triwong Peeteenut

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a multi-method Malice package for three dimension coupled phenomena in induced processes of heat treatment by an algorithm weakly coupled with the Migen package integral method defining the electromagnetic model and the Flux-Expert package finite element method defining the thermal model. The integral method is well suited to inductive systems undergoing sinusoidal excitation at midrange or high frequency. The unknowns of both models are current density, scalar potential and temperature. Joule power in the electromagnetic model is generated by Eddy currents. It becomes the heat source in the thermal model.

  9. 3D modelling of coupled mass and heat transfer of a convection-oven roasting process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feyissa, Aberham Hailu; Adler-Nissen, Jens; Gernaey, Krist

    2013-01-01

    A 3D mathematical model of coupled heat and mass transfer describing oven roasting of meat has been developed from first principles. The proposed mechanism for the mass transfer of water is modified and based on a critical literature review of the effect of heat on meat. The model equations...... are based on a conservation of mass and energy, coupled through Darcy's equations of porous media - the water flow is mainly pressure-driven. The developed model together with theoretical and experimental assessments were used to explain the heat and water transport and the effect of the change...... in microstructure (permeability, water binding capacity and elastic modulus) that occur during the meat roasting process. The developed coupled partial differential equations were solved by using COMSOL Multiphysics®3.5 and state variables are predicted as functions of both position and time. The proposed mechanism...

  10. Phase separation coupled with damage processes analysis of phase field models in elastic media

    CERN Document Server

    Heinemann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The authors explore a unifying model which couples phase separation and damage processes in a system of partial differential equations. The model has technological applications to solder materials where interactions of both phenomena have been observed and cannot be neglected for a realistic description. The equations are derived in a thermodynamically consistent framework and suitable weak formulations for various types of this coupled system are presented. In the main part, existence of weak solutions is proven and degenerate limits are investigated. Contents Modeling of Phase Separation and Damage Processes Notion of Weak Solutions Existence of Weak Solutions Degenerate Limit Target Groups Researchers, academics and scholars in the field of (applied) mathematics Material scientists in the field of modeling damaging processes The Authors Christian Heinemann earned his doctoral degree at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Jürgen Sprekels and Dr. Christiane Kraus. He is a ...

  11. [Interior] Configuration options, habitability and architectural aspects of the transfer habitat module (THM) and the surface habitat on Mars (SHM)/ESA's AURORA human mission to Mars (HMM) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, Barbara

    2007-02-01

    This paper discusses the findings for [Interior] configuration options, habitability and architectural aspects of a first human spacecraft to Mars. In 2003 the space architecture office LIQUIFER was invited by the European Space Agency's (ESA) AURORA Program committee to consult the scientists and engineers from the European Space and Technology Center (ESTEC) and other European industrial communities with developing the first human mission to Mars, which will take place in 2030, regarding the architectural issues of crewed habitats. The task was to develop an interior configuration for a transfer vehicle (TV) to Mars, especially a transfer habitation module (THM) and a surface habitat module (SHM) on Mars. The total travel time Earth—Mars and back for a crew of six amounts to approximately 900 days. After a 200-day-flight three crewmembers will land on Mars in the Mars excursion vehicle (MEV) and will live and work in the SHM for 30 days. For 500 days before the 200-day journey back the spacecraft continues to circle the Martian orbit for further exploration. The entire mission program is based on our present knowledge of technology. The project was compiled during a constant feedback-design process and trans-disciplinary collaboration sessions in the ESA-ESTEC concurrent design facility. Long-term human space flight sets new spatial conditions and requirements to the design concept. The guidelines were developed from relevant numbers and facts of recognized standards, interviews with astronauts/cosmonauts and from analyses about habitability, sociology, psychology and configuration concepts of earlier space stations in combination with the topics of the individual's perception and relation of space. Result of this study is the development of a prototype concept for the THM and SHM with detailed information and complete plans of the interior configuration, including mass calculations. In addition the study contains a detailed explanation of the development of

  12. Hybrid models for the simulation of microstructural evolution influenced by coupled, multiple physical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikare, Veena [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hernandez-Rivera, Efrain [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Madison, Jonathan D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Holm, Elizabeth Ann [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Patterson, Burton R. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Homer, Eric R. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2013-09-01

    Most materials microstructural evolution processes progress with multiple processes occurring simultaneously. In this work, we have concentrated on the processes that are active in nuclear materials, in particular, nuclear fuels. These processes are coarsening, nucleation, differential diffusion, phase transformation, radiation-induced defect formation and swelling, often with temperature gradients present. All these couple and contribute to evolution that is unique to nuclear fuels and materials. Hybrid model that combines elements from the Potts Monte Carlo, phase-field models and others have been developed to address these multiple physical processes. These models are described and applied to several processes in this report. An important feature of the models developed are that they are coded as applications within SPPARKS, a Sandiadeveloped framework for simulation at the mesoscale of microstructural evolution processes by kinetic Monte Carlo methods. This makes these codes readily accessible and adaptable for future applications.

  13. Coupling of snow and permafrost processes using the Basic Modeling Interface (BMI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Overeem, I.; Jafarov, E. E.; Piper, M.; Stewart, S.; Clow, G. D.; Schaefer, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    We developed a permafrost modeling tool based by implementing the Kudryavtsev empirical permafrost active layer depth model (the so-called "Ku" component). The model is specifically set up to have a basic model interface (BMI), which enhances the potential coupling to other earth surface processes model components. This model is accessible through the Web Modeling Tool in Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System (CSDMS). The Kudryavtsev model has been applied for entire Alaska to model permafrost distribution at high spatial resolution and model predictions have been verified by Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) in-situ observations. The Ku component uses monthly meteorological forcing, including air temperature, snow depth, and snow density, and predicts active layer thickness (ALT) and temperature on the top of permafrost (TTOP), which are important factors in snow-hydrological processes. BMI provides an easy approach to couple the models with each other. Here, we provide a case of coupling the Ku component to snow process components, including the Snow-Degree-Day (SDD) method and Snow-Energy-Balance (SEB) method, which are existing components in the hydrological model TOPOFLOW. The work flow is (1) get variables from meteorology component, set the values to snow process component, and advance the snow process component, (2) get variables from meteorology and snow component, provide these to the Ku component and advance, (3) get variables from snow process component, set the values to meteorology component, and advance the meteorology component. The next phase is to couple the permafrost component with fully BMI-compliant TOPOFLOW hydrological model, which could provide a useful tool to investigate the permafrost hydrological effect.

  14. Comparison of Spot and Time Weighted Averaging (TWA Sampling with SPME-GC/MS Methods for Trihalomethane (THM Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don-Roger Parkinson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Water samples were collected and analyzed for conductivity, pH, temperature and trihalomethanes (THMs during the fall of 2014 at two monitored municipal drinking water source ponds. Both spot (or grab and time weighted average (TWA sampling methods were assessed over the same two day sampling time period. For spot sampling, replicate samples were taken at each site and analyzed within 12 h of sampling by both Headspace (HS- and direct (DI- solid phase microextraction (SPME sampling/extraction methods followed by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS. For TWA, a two day passive on-site TWA sampling was carried out at the same sampling points in the ponds. All SPME sampling methods undertaken used a 65-µm PDMS/DVB SPME fiber, which was found optimal for THM sampling. Sampling conditions were optimized in the laboratory using calibration standards of chloroform, bromoform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, 1,2-dibromoethane and 1,2-dichloroethane, prepared in aqueous solutions from analytical grade samples. Calibration curves for all methods with R2 values ranging from 0.985–0.998 (N = 5 over the quantitation linear range of 3–800 ppb were achieved. The different sampling methods were compared for quantification of the water samples, and results showed that DI- and TWA- sampling methods gave better data and analytical metrics. Addition of 10% wt./vol. of (NH42SO4 salt to the sampling vial was found to aid extraction of THMs by increasing GC peaks areas by about 10%, which resulted in lower detection limits for all techniques studied. However, for on-site TWA analysis of THMs in natural waters, the calibration standard(s ionic strength conditions, must be carefully matched to natural water conditions to properly quantitate THM concentrations. The data obtained from the TWA method may better reflect actual natural water conditions.

  15. Ultrafast spin exchange-coupling torque via photo-excited charge-transfer processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X.; Fang, F.; Li, Q.; Zhu, J.; Yang, Y.; Wu, Y. Z.; Zhao, H. B.; Lüpke, G.

    2015-10-01

    Optical control of spin is of central importance in the research of ultrafast spintronic devices utilizing spin dynamics at short time scales. Recently developed optical approaches such as ultrafast demagnetization, spin-transfer and spin-orbit torques open new pathways to manipulate spin through its interaction with photon, orbit, charge or phonon. However, these processes are limited by either the long thermal recovery time or the low-temperature requirement. Here we experimentally demonstrate ultrafast coherent spin precession via optical charge-transfer processes in the exchange-coupled Fe/CoO system at room temperature. The efficiency of spin precession excitation is significantly higher and the recovery time of the exchange-coupling torque is much shorter than for the demagnetization procedure, which is desirable for fast switching. The exchange coupling is a key issue in spin valves and tunnelling junctions, and hence our findings will help promote the development of exchange-coupled device concepts for ultrafast coherent spin manipulation.

  16. Ultrafast spin exchange-coupling torque via photo-excited charge-transfer processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X; Fang, F; Li, Q; Zhu, J; Yang, Y; Wu, Y Z; Zhao, H B; Lüpke, G

    2015-10-28

    Optical control of spin is of central importance in the research of ultrafast spintronic devices utilizing spin dynamics at short time scales. Recently developed optical approaches such as ultrafast demagnetization, spin-transfer and spin-orbit torques open new pathways to manipulate spin through its interaction with photon, orbit, charge or phonon. However, these processes are limited by either the long thermal recovery time or the low-temperature requirement. Here we experimentally demonstrate ultrafast coherent spin precession via optical charge-transfer processes in the exchange-coupled Fe/CoO system at room temperature. The efficiency of spin precession excitation is significantly higher and the recovery time of the exchange-coupling torque is much shorter than for the demagnetization procedure, which is desirable for fast switching. The exchange coupling is a key issue in spin valves and tunnelling junctions, and hence our findings will help promote the development of exchange-coupled device concepts for ultrafast coherent spin manipulation.

  17. Contribution to the optimization of the coupling of nuclear reactors to desalination processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dardour, S.

    2007-04-01

    This work deals with modelling, simulation and optimization of the coupling between nuclear reactors (PWR, modular high temperature reactors) and desalination processes (multiple effect distillation, reverse osmosis). The reactors considered in this study are PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) and GTMHR (Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor). The desalination processes retained are MED (Multi Effect Distillation) and SWRO (Sea Water Reverse Osmosis). A software tool: EXCELEES of thermodynamic modelling of coupled systems, based on the Engineering Algebraic Equation Solver has been developed. Models of energy conversion systems and of membrane desalination processes and distillation have been developed. Based on the first and second principles of thermodynamics, these models have allowed to determine the optimal running point of the coupled systems. The thermodynamic analysis has been completed by a first economic evaluation. Based on the use of the DEEP software of the IAEA, this evaluation has confirmed the interest to use these types of reactors for desalination. A modelling tool of thermal processes of desalination in dynamic condition has been developed too. This tool has been applied to the study of the dynamics of an existing plant and has given satisfying results. A first safety checking has been at last carried out. The transients able to jeopardize the integrated system have been identified. Several measures aiming at consolidate the safety have been proposed. (O.M.)

  18. Integrated Modeling and Experiments to Characterize Coupled Thermo-hydro-geomechanical-chemical processes in Hydraulic Fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, H. S.; Carey, J. W.; Karra, S.; Porter, M. L.; Rougier, E.; Kang, Q.; Makedonska, N.; Hyman, J.; Jimenez Martinez, J.; Frash, L.; Chen, L.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing phenomena involve fluid-solid interactions embedded within coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes over scales from microns to tens of meters. Feedbacks between processes result in complex dynamics that must be unraveled if one is to predict and, in the case of unconventional resources, facilitate fracture propagation, fluid flow, and interfacial transport processes. The proposed work is part of a broader class of complex systems involving coupled fluid flow and fractures that are critical to subsurface energy issues, such as shale oil, geothermal, carbon sequestration, and nuclear waste disposal. We use unique LANL microfluidic and triaxial core flood experiments integrated with state-of-the-art numerical simulation to reveal the fundamental dynamics of fracture-fluid interactions to characterize the key coupled processes that impact hydrocarbon production. We are also comparing CO2-based fracturing and aqueous fluids to enhance production, greatly reduce waste water, while simultaneously sequestering CO2. We will show pore, core and reservoir scale simulations/experiments that investigate the contolling mechanisms that control hydrocarbon production.

  19. Understanding Coupled Earth-Surface Processes through Experiments and Models (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overeem, I.; Kim, W.

    2013-12-01

    Traditionally, both numerical models and experiments have been purposefully designed to ';isolate' singular components or certain processes of a larger mountain to deep-ocean interconnected source-to-sink (S2S) transport system. Controlling factors driven by processes outside of the domain of immediate interest were treated and simplified as input or as boundary conditions. Increasingly, earth surface processes scientists appreciate feedbacks and explore these feedbacks with more dynamically coupled approaches to their experiments and models. Here, we discuss key concepts and recent advances made in coupled modeling and experimental setups. In addition, we emphasize challenges and new frontiers to coupled experiments. Experiments have highlighted the important role of self-organization; river and delta systems do not always need to be forced by external processes to change or develop characteristic morphologies. Similarly modeling f.e. has shown that intricate networks in tidal deltas are stable because of the interplay between river avulsions and the tidal current scouring with both processes being important to develop and maintain the dentritic networks. Both models and experiment have demonstrated that seemingly stable systems can be perturbed slightly and show dramatic responses. Source-to-sink models were developed for both the Fly River System in Papua New Guinea and the Waipaoa River in New Zealand. These models pointed to the importance of upstream-downstream effects and enforced our view of the S2S system as a signal transfer and dampening conveyor belt. Coupled modeling showed that deforestation had extreme effects on sediment fluxes draining from the catchment of the Waipaoa River in New Zealand, and that this increase in sediment production rapidly shifted the locus of offshore deposition. The challenge in designing coupled models and experiments is both technological as well as intellectual. Our community advances to make numerical model coupling more

  20. Modelling of coupled heat and mass transfer during a contact baking process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feyissa, Aberham Hailu; Gernaey, Krist; Ashokkumar, Saranya

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical model of coupled heat and mass transfer of a contact baking process is developed. In the current model formulation, a local evaporation of water is described with a reaction–diffusion approach, where a simultaneous diffusion and evaporation of water takes place. The resulting coupled...... model equations (unsteady state heat transfer, liquid water and water vapour) were solved using the Finite Element Method (COMSOL Multi-physics® version 3.5). During the baking process, local temperatures and overall moisture loss were measured continuously. The model – predicting temperature, liquid...... water content in the product and water in the vapour phase – was calibrated and partially validated using data obtained during baking of a representative food model (a pancake batter) under controlled conditions on a specially designed experimental rig. The unknown parameters in the model equations were...

  1. High Efficiency Coupling of Optical Fibres with SU8 Micro-droplet Using Laser Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardi, Seema; Gupta, Ankur; Sundriyal, Poonam; Bhatt, Geeta; Kant, Rishi; Boolchandani, D.; Bhattacharya, Shantanu

    2016-09-01

    Apart from micro- structure fabrication, ablation, lithography etc., lasers find a lot of utility in various areas like precision joining, device fabrication, local heat delivery for surface texturing and local change of microstructure fabrication of standalone optical micro-devices (like microspheres, micro-prisms, micro-scale ring resonators, optical switches etc). There is a wide utility of such systems in chemical/ biochemical diagnostics and also communications where the standalone optical devices exist at a commercial scale but chip based devices with printed optics are necessary due to coupling issues between printed structures and external optics. This paper demonstrates a novel fabrication strategy used to join standalone optical fibres to microchip based printed optics using a simple SU8 drop. The fabrication process is deployed for fiber to fiber optical coupling and coupling between fiber and printed SU-8 waveguides. A CO2 laser is used to locally heat the coupling made up of SU8 material. Optimization of various dimensional parameters using design of experiments (DOE) on the bonded assembly has been performed as a function of laser power, speed, cycle control, spot size so on so forth. Exclusive optical [RF] modelling has been performed to estimate the transmissibility of the optical fibers bonded to each other on a surface with SU8. Our studies indicate the formation of a Whispering gallery mode (WGM) across the micro-droplet leading to high transmissibility of the signal. Through this work we have thus been able to develop a method of fabrication for optical coupling of standalone fibers or coupling of on-chip optics with off-chip illumination/detection.

  2. Service Broker module to support composition of loosely coupled components for process/product Servitization

    OpenAIRE

    Brito, Guilherme Simões Calado de

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation presents the work done under the scope of the FP7 ProSEco project, regarding the design and development of the Service Broker module as foundation to support the runtime execution of composition of loosely coupled resources as services. ProSEco system stands as collaborative ICT solution, based on a Service Oriented Architecture, that enables companies the design and deployment of product-services (Meta-Products) as extension of their own products/processes, using Ambient In...

  3. Reactive transport modeling of coupled inorganic and organic processes in groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, Adam

    1997-12-31

    The main goals of this project are to develop and apply a reactive transport code for simulation of coupled organic and inorganic processes in the pollution plume in the ground water down-gradient from the Vejen landfill, Denmark. The detailed field investigations in this aquifer have previously revealed a complex pattern of strongly interdependent organic and inorganic processes. These processes occur simultaneously in a flow and transport system where the mixing of reactive species is influenced by the rather complex geology in the vicinity of the landfill. The removal of organic matter is influenced by the presence of various electron acceptors that also are involved in various inorganic geochemical reactions. It was concluded from the investigations that degradation of organic matter, complexation, mineral precipitation and dissolution, ion-exchange and inorganic redox reactions, as a minimum, should be included in the formulation of the model. The coupling of the organic and inorganic processes is developed based on a literature study. All inorganic processes are as an approximation described as equilibriumm processes. The organic processes are described by a maximum degradation rate that is decreased according to the availability of the participants in the processes, the actual pH, and the presence of inhibiting species. The reactive transport code consists of three separate codes, a flow and transport code, a geochemical code, and a biodegradation code. An iterative solution scheme couples the three codes. The coupled code was successfully verified for simple problems for which analytical solutions exist. For more complex problems the code was tested on synthetic cases and expected plume behavior was successfully simulated. Application of the code to the Vejen landfill aquifer was successful to the degree that the redox zonation down-gradient from the landfill was simulated correctly and that several of the simulated plumes showed a reasonable agreement with

  4. A three-dimensional coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical model for deformable fractured geothermal systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salimzadeh, Saeed; Paluszny, Adriana; Nick, Hamidreza M.

    2018-01-01

    A fully coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (THM) finite element model is presented for fractured geothermal reservoirs. Fractures are modelled as surface discontinuities within a three-dimensional matrix. Non-isothermal flow through the rock matrix and fractures are defined and coupled to a mec......A fully coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (THM) finite element model is presented for fractured geothermal reservoirs. Fractures are modelled as surface discontinuities within a three-dimensional matrix. Non-isothermal flow through the rock matrix and fractures are defined and coupled....... The model has been validated against several analytical solutions, and applied to study the effects of the deformable fractures on the injection of cold water in fractured geothermal systems. Results show that the creation of flow channelling due to the thermal volumetric contraction of the rock matrix...

  5. User's guide of TOUGH2-EGS-MP: A Massively Parallel Simulator with Coupled Geomechanics for Fluid and Heat Flow in Enhanced Geothermal Systems VERSION 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Yi [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Fakcharoenphol, Perapon [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Wang, Shihao [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Winterfeld, Philip H. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Keni [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wu, Yu-Shu [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-12-01

    TOUGH2-EGS-MP is a parallel numerical simulation program coupling geomechanics with fluid and heat flow in fractured and porous media, and is applicable for simulation of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). TOUGH2-EGS-MP is based on the TOUGH2-MP code, the massively parallel version of TOUGH2. In TOUGH2-EGS-MP, the fully-coupled flow-geomechanics model is developed from linear elastic theory for thermo-poro-elastic systems and is formulated in terms of mean normal stress as well as pore pressure and temperature. Reservoir rock properties such as porosity and permeability depend on rock deformation, and the relationships between these two, obtained from poro-elasticity theories and empirical correlations, are incorporated into the simulation. This report provides the user with detailed information on the TOUGH2-EGS-MP mathematical model and instructions for using it for Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical (THM) simulations. The mathematical model includes the fluid and heat flow equations, geomechanical equation, and discretization of those equations. In addition, the parallel aspects of the code, such as domain partitioning and communication between processors, are also included. Although TOUGH2-EGS-MP has the capability for simulating fluid and heat flows coupled with geomechanical effects, it is up to the user to select the specific coupling process, such as THM or only TH, in a simulation. There are several example problems illustrating applications of this program. These example problems are described in detail and their input data are presented. Their results demonstrate that this program can be used for field-scale geothermal reservoir simulation in porous and fractured media with fluid and heat flow coupled with geomechanical effects.

  6. Seawater desalination plant using nuclear heating reactor coupled with MED process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shaorong; Dong Duo; Zhang Dafang; Wang Xiuzhen

    2000-01-01

    A small size plant for seawater desalination using nuclear heating reactor coupled with MED process was developed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, China. this seawater desalination plant was designed to supply potable water demand to some coastal location or island where both fresh water and energy source are severely lacking. It is also recommended as a demonstration and training facility for seawater desalination using nuclear energy. The design of small size of seawater desalination plant couples two proven technologies: Nuclear Heating Reactor (NHR) and Multi-Effect Destination (MED) process. The NHR design possesses intrinsic and passive safety features, which was demonstrated by the experiences of the project NHR-5. the intermediate circuit and steam circuit were designed as the safety barriers between the NHR reactor and MED desalination system. Within 10-200 MWt of the power range of the heating reactor, the desalination plant could provide 8000 to 150,000 m 3 /d of high quality potable water. The design concept and parameters, safety features and coupling scheme are presented

  7. Coupled Environmental Processes and Long-term Performance of Landfill Covers in the northern Mojave Desert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Shafer; Michael Young; Stephen Zitzer; Eric McDonald; Todd Caldwell

    2004-05-12

    Evapotransiration (ET) covers have gained widespread acceptance as a closure feature for waste disposal sites, particularly in the arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern U.S. But as landforms, ET covers are subject to change over time because of processes such as pedogenesis, hydrologic processes, vegetation establishment and change, and biological processes. To better understand the effects of coupled process changes to ET covers, a series of four primary analog sites in Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site, along with measurements and observations from other locations in the Mojave Desert, were selected to evaluate changes in ET covers over time. The analog sites, of varying ages, were selected to address changes in the early post-institutional control period, the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and the 10,000-year compliance period for transuranic waste sites.

  8. Coupled Environmental Processes and Long-term Performance of Landfill Covers in the northern Mojave Desert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David Shafer; Michael Young; Stephen Zitzer; Eric McDonald; Todd Caldwell

    2004-01-01

    Evapotransiration (ET) covers have gained widespread acceptance as a closure feature for waste disposal sites, particularly in the arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern U.S. But as landforms, ET covers are subject to change over time because of processes such as pedogenesis, hydrologic processes, vegetation establishment and change, and biological processes. To better understand the effects of coupled process changes to ET covers, a series of four primary analog sites in Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site, along with measurements and observations from other locations in the Mojave Desert, were selected to evaluate changes in ET covers over time. The analog sites, of varying ages, were selected to address changes in the early post-institutional control period, the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and the 10,000-year compliance period for transuranic waste sites

  9. Inductively coupled hydrogen plasma processing of AZO thin films for heterojunction solar cell applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, H.P.; Xu, S.; Zhao, Z.; Xiang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A high-density plasma reactor of inductively coupled plasma source is used in this work. • The conductivity and transmittance can be enhanced simultaneously in the hydrogen process. • The formation of additional donors and passivation due to the hydrogen plasma processing. • The photovoltaic improvement due to the improved AZO layer and hetero-interface quality in the solar cells. - Abstract: Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films deposited by means of RF magnetron sputtering were processed in a low frequency inductively coupled plasma of H 2 , aiming at heterojunction (HJ) solar cell applications. A variety of characterization results show that the hydrogen plasma processing exerts a significant influence on the microstructures, electrical and optical properties of the AZO films. The incorporation of hydrogen under the optimum treatment simultaneously promoted the transmittance and conductivity due to the hydrogen associated passivation effect on the native defects and the formation of shallow donors in the films, respectively. A p-type c-Si based HJ solar cell with a front AZO contact was also treated in as-generated non-equilibrium hydrogen plasma and the photovoltaic performance of the solar cell was prominently improved. The underlying mechanism was discussed in terms of the beneficial impacts of high-density hydrogen plasma on the properties of AZO itself and the hetero-interfaces involved in the HJ structure (interface defect and energy band configuration)

  10. Understanding the pregnancy decision-making process among couples seeking induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costescu, Dustin J; Lamont, John A

    2013-10-01

    The role of partners in the abortion experience is complex and poorly understood. We sought to examine how women and their partners navigate the pregnancy decision-making process. Thirty couples presenting for abortion completed questionnaires exploring experiences leading to the abortion. Participants were sequestered from their partners during completion of the study, and booklets were coded to allow comparison within couples. This portion of the study explored partner involvement in the decision-making process. One half of women had decided on abortion before informing their partner of the pregnancy. Of those who were undecided at the time of disclosure, all sought their partner's advice. Most participants (84%) were happy with the amount of discussion that took place with their partners, although one fifth of women and nearly one third of men could have discussed it more. More women than men were happy with the discussions that took place (96.6% vs. 70.4%). Two thirds of respondents viewed the decision to have an abortion as being made by both partners, one quarter viewed the decision as being mostly the woman's choice, and 5% viewed the decision as being mostly the male partner's choice. Although making the choice to have an abortion rests with the woman, her partner may play a role in the decision-making process, particularly when the woman is undecided. For many couples presenting for abortion, the decision is seen as being made jointly by both partners. Further research may identify opportunities to foster greater partner support throughout a woman's abortion experience.

  11. Interpersonal forgiveness in emotion-focused couples' therapy: relating process to outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Catalina Woldarsky; Greenberg, Leslie S

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to relate the in-session processes involved in interpersonal forgiveness to outcome. The sample consisted of 33 couples who received 10-12 sessions of Emotion-focused couple therapy with the aim of resolving various forms of emotional injuries (i.e., transgression that violates the expectations of a close relationship, which leaves one partner feeling hurt and angry). The results of the present study were based on the analyses of 205 video-taped segments from 33 couples' therapies. Hypotheses relating the role of three in-session components of resolution, the injurer's "expression of shame"; the injured partner's "accepting response" to the shame, and the injured partner's "in-session expression of forgiveness", to outcome were tested using hierarchical linear regression analyses. Outcome measures included the Enright Forgiveness Inventory (The Enright Forgiveness Inventory user's manual. Madison: The International Forgiveness Institute, 2000), the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (Journal of Marriage and Family, 1976; 13: 723) and the The Interpersonal Trust Scale (Trust; Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1985; 49: 95). © 2012 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  12. Poroelastic Modeling as a Proof of Concept for Modular Representation of Coupled Geophysical Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, R. L., II; Knepley, M.; Aminzadeh, F.

    2017-12-01

    We seek to use the tools provided by the Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) to represent a multiphysics problem in a form that decouples the element definition from the fully coupled equation through the use of pointwise functions that imitate the strong form of the governing equation. This allows allows individual physical processes to be expressed as independent kernels that may be then coupled with the existing finite element framework, PyLith, and capitalizes upon the flexibility offered by the solver, data management, and time stepping algorithms offered by PETSc. To demonstrate a characteristic example of coupled geophysical simulation devised in this manner, we present a model of a synthetic poroelastic environment, with and without the consideration of inertial effects, with fluid initially represented as a single phase. Matrix displacement and fluid pressure serve as the desired unknowns, with the option for various model parameters represented as dependent variables of the central unknowns. While independent of PyLith, this model also serves to showcase the adaptability of physics kernels for synthetic forward modeling. In addition, we seek to expand the base case to demonstrate the impact of modeling fluid as single phase compressible versus a single incompressible phase. As a goal, we also seek to include multiphase fluid modeling, as well as capillary effects.

  13. Treatment of oilfield produced water by anaerobic process coupled with micro-electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Guo, Shuhai; Li, Fengmei

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of oilfield produced water was investigated using an anaerobic process coupled with micro-electrolysis (ME), focusing on changes in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biodegradability. Results showed that COD exhibited an abnormal change in the single anaerobic system in which it increased within the first 168 hr, but then decreased to 222 mg/L after 360 hr. The biological oxygen demand (five-day) (BODs)/COD ratio of the water increased from 0.05 to 0.15. Hydrocarbons in the wastewater, such as pectin, degraded to small molecules during the hydrolytic acidification process. Comparatively, the effect of ME was also investigated. The COD underwent a slight decrease and the BOD5/COD ratio of the water improved from 0.05 to 0.17 after ME. Removal of COD was 38.3% under the idealized ME conditions (pH 6.0), using iron and active carbon (80 and 40 g/L, respectively). Coupling the anaerobic process with ME accelerated the COD removal ratio (average removal was 53.3%). Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to analyze organic species conversion. This integrated system appeared to be a useful option for the treatment of water produced in oilfields.

  14. EUROPAIRS: The European project on coupling of High Temperature Reactors with industrial processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angulo, C., E-mail: carmen.angulo@gdfsuez.com [Tractebel Engineering S.A. (GDF SUEZ), Avenue Ariane 7, 1200 Brussels (Belgium); Bogusch, E. [AREVA NP GmbH, Paul-Gossen-Strasse 100, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Bredimas, A. [LGI Consulting, 37 rue de la Grange aux Belles, 75010 Paris (France); Delannay, N. [Tractebel Engineering S.A. (GDF SUEZ), Avenue Ariane 7, 1200 Brussels (Belgium); Viala, C. [AREVA NP SAS, 10 rue Juliette Recamier, 69456 Lyon Cedex 06 (France); Ruer, J.; Muguerra, Ph.; Sibaud, E. [SAIPEM S.A., 1/7 Avenue San Fernando, 78884 Saint Quentin en Yvelines Cedex (France); Chauvet, V. [LGI Consulting, 37 rue de la Grange aux Belles, 75010 Paris (France); Hittner, D. [AREVA NP Inc., 3315 Old Forest Road, Lynchburg, VA 24501 (United States); Fuetterer, M.A. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, 1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Groot, S. de [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, 1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Lensa, W. von; Verfondern, K. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Strasse,52425 Juelich (Germany); Moron, R. [Solvay SA, rue du Prince Albert 33, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Baudrand, O. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); Griffay, G. [Arcelor Mittal Maizieres Research SA, rue Luigi Cherubini 1A5, 39200 Saint Denis (France); Baaten, A. [USG/Baaten Energy Consulting, Burgermeester-Ceulen-Straat 78, 6212CT Maastricht (Netherlands); Segurado-Gimenez, J. [Tractebel Engineering S.A. (GDF SUEZ), Avenue Ariane 7, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-10-15

    Developers of High Temperature Reactors (HTR) worldwide acknowledge that the main asset for market breakthrough is its unique ability to address growing needs for industrial cogeneration of heat and power (CHP) owing to its high operating temperature and flexibility, adapted power level, modularity and robust safety features. A strong alliance between nuclear and process heat user industries is a necessity for developing such a nuclear system for the conventional process heat market, just as the electro-nuclear development required a close partnership with utilities. Initiating such an alliance is one of the objectives of the EUROPAIRS project ( (www.europairs.eu)) presently on-going in the frame of the Euratom 7th Framework Programme (FP7). Although small and of short duration (21 months), EUROPAIRS is of strategic importance: it generates the boundary conditions for rapid demonstration of collocating HTR with industrial processes as proposed by the European High Temperature Reactor Technology Network (HTR-TN). This paper presents the main goals, the organization and the working approach of EUROPAIRS. It also presents the status of the viability assessment studies for coupling HTR with industrial end-user systems as one of the main pillars of the project. The main goal of the viability assessment is to identify developments required to remove the last technological and licensing barriers for a viable coupling scheme. The study is expected to result in guidelines for directing the choice of an industrial scale prototype.

  15. EUROPAIRS: The European project on coupling of High Temperature Reactors with industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angulo, C.; Bogusch, E.; Bredimas, A.; Delannay, N.; Viala, C.; Ruer, J.; Muguerra, Ph.; Sibaud, E.; Chauvet, V.; Hittner, D.; Fütterer, M.A.; Groot, S. de; Lensa, W. von; Verfondern, K.; Moron, R.; Baudrand, O.; Griffay, G.; Baaten, A.; Segurado-Gimenez, J.

    2012-01-01

    Developers of High Temperature Reactors (HTR) worldwide acknowledge that the main asset for market breakthrough is its unique ability to address growing needs for industrial cogeneration of heat and power (CHP) owing to its high operating temperature and flexibility, adapted power level, modularity and robust safety features. A strong alliance between nuclear and process heat user industries is a necessity for developing such a nuclear system for the conventional process heat market, just as the electro-nuclear development required a close partnership with utilities. Initiating such an alliance is one of the objectives of the EUROPAIRS project ( (www.europairs.eu)) presently on-going in the frame of the Euratom 7th Framework Programme (FP7). Although small and of short duration (21 months), EUROPAIRS is of strategic importance: it generates the boundary conditions for rapid demonstration of collocating HTR with industrial processes as proposed by the European High Temperature Reactor Technology Network (HTR-TN). This paper presents the main goals, the organization and the working approach of EUROPAIRS. It also presents the status of the viability assessment studies for coupling HTR with industrial end-user systems as one of the main pillars of the project. The main goal of the viability assessment is to identify developments required to remove the last technological and licensing barriers for a viable coupling scheme. The study is expected to result in guidelines for directing the choice of an industrial scale prototype.

  16. The Experience of Chinese Couples Undergoing In Vitro Fertilization Treatment: Perception of the Treatment Process and Partner Support.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ying Ying

    Full Text Available Couples undergoing In Vitro Fertilization (IVF Treatment suffer as dyads from the stressful experience of the painful treatment and the fear that the IVF cycle will fail. They are likely to report that their marital relationship has become unstable due to the prolonged period of treatment.This is a qualitative study that was conducted to explore the experiences that Chinese couples have had with IVF treatment, especially their perceptions of the process and the support between couples.The interviews revealed that couples suffered from the process, experiencing physical and emotional pain, struggling with the urgency and inflexibility of bearing a child, and experiencing disturbances in their daily routines and work. The participants described how they endured the hardships as a couple and how it affected their relationship. The couples felt that sharing feelings and supporting each other contribute to psychological well-being and improves the marital relationship. They also identified some unfavorable aspects in their partner relationship. They were ambivalent about receiving social support from friends and family members.With the couples indicating that the support that they received from each other affected their experience during the treatment process, it is suggested that a supportive intervention that focuses on enhancing the partnership of the couples and dealing with their inflexibility on the issue of bearing a child might result in improvements in the psychological status and marital relationship of infertile couples undergoing IVF treatment.

  17. The Experience of Chinese Couples Undergoing In Vitro Fertilization Treatment: Perception of the Treatment Process and Partner Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Li-Ying; Wu, Lai Har; Loke, Alice Yuen

    2015-01-01

    Couples undergoing In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) Treatment suffer as dyads from the stressful experience of the painful treatment and the fear that the IVF cycle will fail. They are likely to report that their marital relationship has become unstable due to the prolonged period of treatment. This is a qualitative study that was conducted to explore the experiences that Chinese couples have had with IVF treatment, especially their perceptions of the process and the support between couples. The interviews revealed that couples suffered from the process, experiencing physical and emotional pain, struggling with the urgency and inflexibility of bearing a child, and experiencing disturbances in their daily routines and work. The participants described how they endured the hardships as a couple and how it affected their relationship. The couples felt that sharing feelings and supporting each other contribute to psychological well-being and improves the marital relationship. They also identified some unfavorable aspects in their partner relationship. They were ambivalent about receiving social support from friends and family members. With the couples indicating that the support that they received from each other affected their experience during the treatment process, it is suggested that a supportive intervention that focuses on enhancing the partnership of the couples and dealing with their inflexibility on the issue of bearing a child might result in improvements in the psychological status and marital relationship of infertile couples undergoing IVF treatment.

  18. COUPLED ATOMIZATION AND SPRAY MODELLING IN THE SPRAY FORMING PROCESS USING OPENFOAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjesing, Rasmus; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Fritsching, Udo

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a numerical model capable of simulating the atomization, break-up and in-flight spray phenomena in the spray forming process. The model is developed and implemented in the freeware code openFOAM. The focus is on studying the coupling effect of the melt break-up phenomena...... with the local gas and droplets flow fields. The work is based on an Eulerian-Lagrangian description, which is implemented in a full 3D representation. The gas is described by the incompressible RANS equations, whereas the movement of the droplets is modeled by a tracking approach, together with a full thermal...

  19. A Stable Clock Error Model Using Coupled First and Second Order Gauss-Markov Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Russell; Lee, Taesul

    2008-01-01

    Long data outages may occur in applications of global navigation satellite system technology to orbit determination for missions that spend significant fractions of their orbits above the navigation satellite constellation(s). Current clock error models based on the random walk idealization may not be suitable in these circumstances, since the covariance of the clock errors may become large enough to overflow flight computer arithmetic. A model that is stable, but which approximates the existing models over short time horizons is desirable. A coupled first- and second-order Gauss-Markov process is such a model.

  20. Poleward propagation of boreal summer intraseasonal oscillations in a coupled model: role of internal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayamohan, R. S.; Annamalai, H.; Luo, Jing-Jia; Hafner, Jan; Yamagata, Toshio

    2011-09-01

    The study compares the simulated poleward migration characteristics of boreal summer intraseasonal oscillations (BSISO) in a suite of coupled ocean-atmospheric model sensitivity integrations. The sensitivity experiments are designed in such a manner to allow full coupling in specific ocean basins but forced by temporally varying monthly climatological sea surface temperature (SST) adopted from the fully coupled model control runs (ES10). While the local air-sea interaction is suppressed in the tropical Indian Ocean and allowed in the other oceans in the ESdI run, it is suppressed in the tropical Pacific and allowed in the other oceans in the ESdP run. Our diagnostics show that the basic mean state in precipitation and easterly vertical shear as well as the BSISO properties remain unchanged due to either inclusion or exclusion of local air-sea interaction. In the presence of realistic easterly vertical shear, the continuous emanation of Rossby waves from the equatorial convection is trapped over the monsoon region that enables the poleward propagation of BSISO anomalies in all the model sensitivity experiments. To explore the internal processes that maintain the tropospheric moisture anomalies ahead of BSISO precipitation anomalies, moisture and moist static energy budgets are performed. In all model experiments, advection of anomalous moisture by climatological winds anchors the moisture anomalies that in turn promote the northward migration of BSISO precipitation. While the results indicate the need for realistic simulation of all aspects of the basic state, our model results need to be taken with caution because in the ECHAM family of coupled models the internal variance at intraseasonal timescales is indeed very high, and therefore local air-sea interactions may not play a pivotal role.

  1. Addendum to "A Study on the Principle of Maximum Dissipation for Coupled and Non-Coupled Non-Isothermal Processes in Materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hackl, K.; Fischer, F. D.; Svoboda, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 467, č. 2132 (2011), s. 2422-2426 ISSN 1364-5021 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC10029 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : dissipation * coupled processes * variational principles Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.971, year: 2011

  2. Air-processable silane-coupled polymers to modify a dielectric for solution-processed organic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Mi; Yu, Young Chang; Jeon, Hyeonyeol; Youk, Ji Ho; Yang, Hoichang

    2015-03-11

    Poly(styrene-r-3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane) (PSMPTS) copolymers were synthesized by the free radical polymerization of styrene and 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS) for use as surface modifiers. PSMPTS copolymers were spun-cast onto a hydrophilic SiO2 layer and were then annealed at 150 °C in ambient air. The polystyrene (PS)-based copolymer, with a molecular weight of 32 700 g mol(-1) and approximately 30 MPTS coupling sites, was easily grafted onto the SiO2 surface after annealing periods longer than 1 min, yielding a physicochemically stable layer. On the untreated and polymer-treated dielectrics, spin-casting of an ultrasonicated poly(3-hexyl thiophene) (P3HT) solution yielded highly interconnected crystal nanofibrils of P3HT. The resulting organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) showed similar mobility values of 0.01-0.012 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for all surfaces. However, the threshold voltage (Vth) drastically decreased from +13 (for bare SiO2) to 0 V by grafting the PSMPTS copolymers to the SiO2 surface. In particular, the interfacial charge traps that affect Vth were minimized by grafting the 11 mol % MPTS-loaded copolymer to the polar dielectric surface. We believe that this ambient-air-processable silane-coupled copolymer can be used as a solution-based surface modifier for continuous, large-scale OFET fabrication.

  3. Analysis of the deep rolling process on turbine blades using the FEM/BEM-coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäcker, V.; Klocke, F.; Wegner, H.; Timmer, A.; Grzhibovskis, R.; Rjasanow, S.

    2010-06-01

    Highly stressed components of aircraft engines, like turbine blades, have to satisfy stringent requirements regarding durability and reliability. The induction of compressive stresses and strain hardening in their surface layer has proven as a promising method to significantly increase their fatigue resistance. The required surface layer properties can be achieved by deep rolling. The determination of optimal process parameters still requires elaborate experimental set-up and subsequent time- and cost-extensive measurements. In previous works the application of the Finite Element Method (FEM) was proposed as an effective and cost reducing alternative to predict the surface layer state for given process parameters. However, FEM requires very fine mesh in the surface layer to resolve the high stress gradients with sufficient accuracy. The hereby caused high time and memory requirements render an efficient simulation of complete turbine components as impossible. In this article a solution is offered by coupling the FEM with the Boundary Elements Method (BEM). It enables the computing of large scale models at low computational cost and high result accuracy. Different approaches of the FEM/BEM-coupling for the simulation of deep rolling are examined with regard to their stability and required computing time.

  4. Coupled analysis on landscape pattern and hydrological processes in Yanhe watershed of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Zhou, Z X

    2015-02-01

    As a typical experimental Soil and Water Conservation District, Yanhe watershed has long been plagued by soil erosion due to severe human disturbances. Exerting remote sensing (RS) and geographic information system (GIS) technology, this paper firstly analyzed and simulated ecological hydrological process in Yanhe watershed based on SWAT model, constructed a comprehensive landscape indices which was closely related to soil erosion, and reflected the coupling relationship between regional landscape pattern change and soil erosion. The results are as follows: (1) Areas of different land use types remained relatively stable from 1990 to 2000 and then changed drastically from 2000 to 2010, which was characterized by lawn expansion and cultivated land shrinkage. (2) In terms of the spatial heterogeneity of hydrological response unit (HRUs), the correlation coefficient of seven selected landscape indices and runoff was very small, and cannot pass all significant testing. But correlation between the indices and sediment yield except for Total Core Area (TCA) and Interspersion and Juxtaposition Index (IJI) was remarkable. (3) According to 'the source-sink' theory of soil erosion, new landscape index-slope-HRU landscape index (SHLI) was built, and reflected the relationship between landscape pattern and soil erosion processes to a certain extent. (4) Coupling relationship between SHLI in 2010 and annual sediment was very prominent. In the sub-basin scale, SHLI has obvious regional differentiation from annual sediment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Thermodynamics of electron transfer and its coupling to vectorial processes in biological membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, H; Nishimura, M

    1980-11-01

    A method is developed to express the flux of an electron transfer reaction as a function of the conjugate force, the redox potential difference, throughout the nonlinear region. The flux can be expressed by a product of the hyperbolic sine of the force, a factor ("redox-poising parameter") determined by the redox potentials of subsystem (in certain cases by local pH's and pK's of subsystems), and some constants. This is analogous to the expression of the flux of a diffusion process by the product of its force and the concentration of the diffusing species. The redox-poising parameter corresponds to the concentration term. The expression is applied to redox chains in which electron transfers are coupled to vectorial processes such as proton translocation or electric current.

  6. Fenton Process Coupled to Ultrasound and UV Light Irradiation for the Oxidation of a Model Pollutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E. Barrera-Salgado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fenton process coupled to photosonolysis (UV light and Us, using Fe2O3 catalyst supported on Al2O3, was used to oxidize a model pollutant like acid green 50 textile dye (AG50. Dye degradation was followed by AG50 concentration decay analyses. It was observed that parameters like iron content on a fixed amount of catalyst supporting material, catalyst annealing temperature, initial dye concentration, and the solution pH influence the overall treatment efficiency. High removal efficiencies of the model pollutant are achieved. The stability and reusability tests of the Fe2O3 catalyst show that the catalyst can be used up to three cycles achieving high discoloration. Thus, this catalyst is highly efficient for the degradation of AG50 in the Fenton process.

  7. Modeling of excavation induced coupled hydraulic-mechanical processes in claystone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massmann, Jobst

    2009-07-01

    Concepts for the numerical modeling of excavation induced processes in claystone are investigated. The study has been motivated by the international discussion on the adequacy of claystone as a potential host rock for a final repository of radioactive waste. The processes, which could impact the safety of such a repository, are manifold and strongly interacting. Thus, a multiphysics approach is needed, regarding solid mechanics and fluid mechanics within a geological context. A coupled modeling concept is therefore indispensable. Based on observations and measurements at an argillaceous test site (the underground laboratory Tournemire, operated by the Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, France) the modeling concept is developed. Two main processes constitute the basis of the applied model: deformation (linear elasticity considering damage) and fluid flow (unsaturated one-phase flow). Several coupling phenomena are considered: Terzaghi 's effective stress concept, mass conservation of the liquid in a deformable porous media, drying induced shrinkage, and a permeability which depends on deformation and damage. In addition, transversely isotropic material behavior is considered. The numerical simulations are done with the finite element code RockFlow, which is extended to include: an orthotropic non-linear shrinkage model, a continuum damage model, and an orthotropic permeability model. For these new methods the theory and a literature review are presented, followed by applications, which illustrate the capability to model excavation induced processes in principle. In a comprehensive case study, the modeling concept is used to simulate the response of the Tournemire argillite to excavation. The results are compared with observations and measurements of three different excavations (century old tunnel, two galleries excavated in 1996 and 2003). In summary, it can be concluded that the developed model concept provides a prediction of the excavation

  8. Modeling of excavation induced coupled hydraulic-mechanical processes in claystone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massmann, Jobst

    2009-01-01

    Concepts for the numerical modeling of excavation induced processes in claystone are investigated. The study has been motivated by the international discussion on the adequacy of claystone as a potential host rock for a final repository of radioactive waste. The processes, which could impact the safety of such a repository, are manifold and strongly interacting. Thus, a multiphysics approach is needed, regarding solid mechanics and fluid mechanics within a geological context. A coupled modeling concept is therefore indispensable. Based on observations and measurements at an argillaceous test site (the underground laboratory Tournemire, operated by the Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, France) the modeling concept is developed. Two main processes constitute the basis of the applied model: deformation (linear elasticity considering damage) and fluid flow (unsaturated one-phase flow). Several coupling phenomena are considered: Terzaghi 's effective stress concept, mass conservation of the liquid in a deformable porous media, drying induced shrinkage, and a permeability which depends on deformation and damage. In addition, transversely isotropic material behavior is considered. The numerical simulations are done with the finite element code RockFlow, which is extended to include: an orthotropic non-linear shrinkage model, a continuum damage model, and an orthotropic permeability model. For these new methods the theory and a literature review are presented, followed by applications, which illustrate the capability to model excavation induced processes in principle. In a comprehensive case study, the modeling concept is used to simulate the response of the Tournemire argillite to excavation. The results are compared with observations and measurements of three different excavations (century old tunnel, two galleries excavated in 1996 and 2003). In summary, it can be concluded that the developed model concept provides a prediction of the excavation induced

  9. Coupled Inverse Fluidized Bed Bioreactor with Advanced Oxidation Processes for Treatment of Vinasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla E. Campos Díaz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Vinasse is the wastewater generated from ethanol distillation; it is characterized by high levels of organic and inorganic matter, high exit temperature, dissolved salts and low pH. In this work the treatment of undiluted vinasse was achieved using sequentially-coupled biological and advanced oxidation processes. The initial characterization of vinasse showed a high Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD, 32 kg m-3, high Total Organic Carbon (TOC, 24.5 kg m-3 and low pH (2.5. The first stage of the biological treatment of the vinasse was carried out in an inverse fluidized bed bioreactor with a microbial consortium using polypropylene as support material. The fluidized bed bioreactor was kept at a constant temperature (37 ± 1ºC and pH (6.0 ± 0.5 for 90 days. After the biological process, the vinasse was continuously fed to the photoreactor using a peristaltic pump 2.8 × 10-3 kg of FeSO4•7H2O were added to the vinasse and allowed to dissolve in the dark for five minutes; after this time, 15.3 m3 of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 (30% w/w were added, and subsequently, the UV radiation was allowed to reach the photoreactor to treat the effluent for 3600 s at pH = 3. Results showed that the maximum organic matter removed using the biological process, measured as COD, was 80% after 90 days. Additionally, 88% of COD removal was achieved using the photo-assisted Fenton oxidation. The overall COD removal after the sequentially-coupled processes reached a value as low as 0.194 kg m-3, achieving over 99% of COD removal as well as complete TOC removal.

  10. Report of the second meeting of the consultants on coupled processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Mangold, D.C.

    1985-09-01

    The second meeting of the Consultants on Coupled Processes Associated with Geological Disposal of Nuclear Waste occurred on January 15-16, 1985 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). All the consultants were present except Dr. K. Kovari, who presented comments in writing afterward. This report contains a brief summary of the presentations and discussions from the meeting. The main points of the speakers' topics are briefly summarized in the report. Some points that emerged during the discussions of the presentations are included in the text related to the respective talks. These comments are grouped under the headings: Comments on Coupled Processes in Unsaturated Fractured Porous Media, Comments on Overview of Coupled Processes, Presentations by Consultants on Selected Topics of Current Interest in Coupled Processes, and Recommendations for Underground Field Tests with Applications to Three Geologic Environments

  11. Modeling the coupled mechanics, transport, and growth processes in collagen tissues.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdych, David J.; Nguyen, Thao D.; Klein, Patrick A.; in' t Veld, Pieter J.; Stevens, Mark Jackson

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop tools to model and simulate the processes of self-assembly and growth in biological systems from the molecular to the continuum length scales. The model biological system chosen for the study is the tendon fiber which is composed mainly of Type I collagen fibrils. The macroscopic processes of self-assembly and growth at the fiber scale arise from microscopic processes at the fibrillar and molecular length scales. At these nano-scopic length scales, we employed molecular modeling and simulation method to characterize the mechanical behavior and stability of the collagen triple helix and the collagen fibril. To obtain the physical parameters governing mass transport in the tendon fiber we performed direct numerical simulations of fluid flow and solute transport through an idealized fibrillar microstructure. At the continuum scale, we developed a mixture theory approach for modeling the coupled processes of mechanical deformation, transport, and species inter-conversion involved in growth. In the mixture theory approach, the microstructure of the tissue is represented by the species concentration and transport and material parameters, obtained from fibril and molecular scale calculations, while the mechanical deformation, transport, and growth processes are governed by balance laws and constitutive relations developed within a thermodynamically consistent framework.

  12. Relevance of the time-quasi-polynomials in the classic linear thermodynamic theory of coupled transport processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészáros, Cs.; Kirschner, I.; Bálint, Á.

    2014-07-01

    A general description of the basic system of ordinary differential equations of coupled transport processes is given within framework of a linear approximation and treated by tools of matrix analysis and group representation theory. It is shown that the technique of hyperdyads directly generalizes the method of simple dyadic decomposition of operators used earlier in the classical linear irreversible thermodynamics and leads to possible new applications of the concept of quasi-polynomials at descriptions of coupled transport processes.

  13. Effect of medium on friction and wear properties of compacted graphite cast iron processed by biomimetic coupling laser remelting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Qingchun; Zhou Hong; Wang Chengtao; Zhang Wei; Lin Pengyu; Sun Na; Ren Luquan

    2009-01-01

    Stimulated by the cuticles of soil animals, an attempt to improve the wear resistance of compact graphite cast iron (CGI) with biomimetic units on the surface was made by using a biomimetic coupled laser remelting process in air and various thicknesses water film, respectively. The microstructures of biomimetic units were examined by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction was used to describe the microstructure and identify the phases in the melted zone. Microhardness was measured and the wear behaviors of biomimetic specimens as functions of different mediums as well as various water film thicknesses were investigated under dry sliding condition, respectively. The results indicated that the microstructure zones in the biomimetic specimens processed with water film are refined compared with that processed in air and had better wear resistance increased by 60%, the microhardness of biomimetic units has been improved significantly. The application of water film provided finer microstructures and much more regular grain shape in biomimetic units, which played a key role in improving the friction properties and wear resistance of CGI.

  14. [Performance optimization of property-improved biodiesel manufacturing process coupled with butanol extractive fermentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Longyun; Yang, Ying; Shi, Zhongping

    2008-11-01

    The products concentrations in traditional acetone-butanol (AB) fermentation are too low that large amount of energy has to be consumed in the distillation and product recovery process. Aiming at direct utilization of the fermentation products, in this study, optimization of property-improved biodiesel manufacturing process coupled with AB extractive fermentation was conducted, under the condition of using the biodiesel originated from waste cooking oil as the extractant and high concentrated corn flour medium. The effect of biodiesel/broth volume ratio, waste supernatant recycle ratio, and electronic carrier addition on the major process performance index was carefully investigated. Under the optimized condition, the biodiesel quality was improved with the cetane value increased from 51.4 to 54.4; "actual butanol yield" reached to a level of 18%, and waste supernatant recycle ratio exceeded 50%. In this way, elimination of energy-consuming product recovery process and realization of "energy-saving & waste minimization" industrial production target advocated by the state government, could be potentially expected.

  15. Impact of atmospheric model resolution on simulation of ENSO feedback processes: a coupled model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Lijuan; Chen, Lin; Rong, Xinyao; Su, Jingzhi; Wang, Lu; Li, Tim; Yu, Yongqiang

    2018-03-01

    This study examines El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-related air-sea feedback processes in a coupled general circulation model (CGCM) to gauge model errors and pin down their sources in ENSO simulation. Three horizontal resolutions of the atmospheric component (T42, T63 and T106) of the CGCM are used to investigate how the simulated ENSO behaviors are affected by the resolution. We find that air-sea feedback processes in the three experiments mainly differ in terms of both thermodynamic and dynamic feedbacks. We also find that these processes are simulated more reasonably in the highest resolution version than in the other two lower resolution versions. The difference in the thermodynamic feedback arises from the difference in the shortwave-radiation (SW) feedback. Due to the severely (mildly) excessive cold tongue in the lower (higher) resolution version, the SW feedback is severely (mildly) underestimated. The main difference in the dynamic feedback processes lies in the thermocline feedback and the zonal-advection feedback, both of which are caused by the difference in the anomalous thermocline response to anomalous zonal wind stress. The difference in representing the anomalous thermocline response is attributed to the difference in meridional structure of zonal wind stress anomaly in the three simulations, which is linked to meridional resolution.

  16. Si-compatible cleaning process for graphene using low-density inductively coupled plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yeong-Dae; Lee, Dae-Yeong; Shen, Tian-Zi; Ra, Chang-Ho; Choi, Jae-Young; Yoo, Won Jong

    2012-05-22

    We report a novel cleaning technique for few-layer graphene (FLG) by using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) of Ar with an extremely low plasma density of 3.5 × 10(8) cm(-3). It is known that conventional capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) treatments destroy the planar symmetry of FLG, giving rise to the generation of defects. However, ICP treatment with extremely low plasma density is able to remove polymer resist residues from FLG within 3 min at a room temperature of 300 K while retaining the carbon sp(2)-bonding of FLG. It is found that the carrier mobility and charge neutrality point of FLG are restored to their pristine defect-free state after the ICP treatment. Considering the application of graphene to silicon-based electronic devices, such a cleaning method can replace thermal vacuum annealing, electrical current annealing, and wet-chemical treatment due to its advantages of being a low-temperature, large-area, high-throughput, and Si-compatible process.

  17. Coupled sulfur isotopic and chemical mass transfer modeling: Approach and application to dynamic hydrothermal processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janecky, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    A computational modeling code (EQPSreverse arrowS) has been developed to examine sulfur isotopic distribution pathways coupled with calculations of chemical mass transfer pathways. A post processor approach to EQ6 calculations was chosen so that a variety of isotopic pathways could be examined for each reaction pathway. Two types of major bounding conditions were implemented: (1) equilibrium isotopic exchange between sulfate and sulfide species or exchange only accompanying chemical reduction and oxidation events, and (2) existence or lack of isotopic exchange between solution species and precipitated minerals, parallel to the open and closed chemical system formulations of chemical mass transfer modeling codes. All of the chemical data necessary to explicitly calculate isotopic distribution pathways is generated by most mass transfer modeling codes and can be input to the EQPS code. Routines are built in to directly handle EQ6 tabular files. Chemical reaction models of seafloor hydrothermal vent processes and accompanying sulfur isotopic distribution pathways illustrate the capabilities of coupling EQPSreverse arrowS with EQ6 calculations, including the extent of differences that can exist due to the isotopic bounding condition assumptions described above. 11 refs., 2 figs

  18. Flexible parallel implicit modelling of coupled thermal–hydraulic–mechanical processes in fractured rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cacace

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Theory and numerical implementation describing groundwater flow and the transport of heat and solute mass in fully saturated fractured rocks with elasto-plastic mechanical feedbacks are developed. In our formulation, fractures are considered as being of lower dimension than the hosting deformable porous rock and we consider their hydraulic and mechanical apertures as scaling parameters to ensure continuous exchange of fluid mass and energy within the fracture–solid matrix system. The coupled system of equations is implemented in a new simulator code that makes use of a Galerkin finite-element technique. The code builds on a flexible, object-oriented numerical framework (MOOSE, Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment which provides an extensive scalable parallel and implicit coupling to solve for the multiphysics problem. The governing equations of groundwater flow, heat and mass transport, and rock deformation are solved in a weak sense (either by classical Newton–Raphson or by free Jacobian inexact Newton–Krylow schemes on an underlying unstructured mesh. Nonlinear feedbacks among the active processes are enforced by considering evolving fluid and rock properties depending on the thermo-hydro-mechanical state of the system and the local structure, i.e. degree of connectivity, of the fracture system. A suite of applications is presented to illustrate the flexibility and capability of the new simulator to address problems of increasing complexity and occurring at different spatial (from centimetres to tens of kilometres and temporal scales (from minutes to hundreds of years.

  19. Flexible parallel implicit modelling of coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical processes in fractured rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacace, Mauro; Jacquey, Antoine B.

    2017-09-01

    Theory and numerical implementation describing groundwater flow and the transport of heat and solute mass in fully saturated fractured rocks with elasto-plastic mechanical feedbacks are developed. In our formulation, fractures are considered as being of lower dimension than the hosting deformable porous rock and we consider their hydraulic and mechanical apertures as scaling parameters to ensure continuous exchange of fluid mass and energy within the fracture-solid matrix system. The coupled system of equations is implemented in a new simulator code that makes use of a Galerkin finite-element technique. The code builds on a flexible, object-oriented numerical framework (MOOSE, Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment) which provides an extensive scalable parallel and implicit coupling to solve for the multiphysics problem. The governing equations of groundwater flow, heat and mass transport, and rock deformation are solved in a weak sense (either by classical Newton-Raphson or by free Jacobian inexact Newton-Krylow schemes) on an underlying unstructured mesh. Nonlinear feedbacks among the active processes are enforced by considering evolving fluid and rock properties depending on the thermo-hydro-mechanical state of the system and the local structure, i.e. degree of connectivity, of the fracture system. A suite of applications is presented to illustrate the flexibility and capability of the new simulator to address problems of increasing complexity and occurring at different spatial (from centimetres to tens of kilometres) and temporal scales (from minutes to hundreds of years).

  20. “The Best is Always Yet to Come”: Relationship Stages and Processes Among Young LGBT Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macapagal, Kathryn; Greene, George J.; Rivera, Zenaida A.; Mustanski, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Limited research has examined relationship development among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) couples in emerging adulthood. A better understanding of LGBT couples can inform the development of relationship education programs that reflect their unique needs. The following questions guided this study: 1) what are the stages and processes during young LGBT couples’ relationship development? and 2) how do these compare to existing literature on heterosexual adults? A secondary goal was to explore similarities and differences between couples assigned male (MAAB) and female at birth (FAAB). Thirty-six couples completed interviews on their relationship history. Qualitative analyses showed that relationship stages and processes were similar to past research on heterosexuals, but participants’ subjective experiences reflected their LGBT identities and emerging adulthood, which exerted additional stress on the relationship. These factors also affected milestones indicative of commitment among heterosexual adults (e.g., introducing partner to family). Mixed-methods analyses indicated that MAAB couples described negotiating relationship agreements and safe sex in more depth than FAAB couples. Relationship development models warrant modifications to consider the impact of sexual and gender identity and emerging adulthood when applied to young LGBT couples. These factors should be addressed in interventions to promote relationship health among young LGBT couples. PMID:26053345

  1. A Coupled Groundwater-Surface Water Modeling Framework for Simulating Transition Zone Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugunthan, Pradeep; Russell, Kevin T; Gong, Binglei; Riley, Michael J; Chin, Arthur; McDonald, Blair G; Eastcott, Linda J

    2017-05-01

    There is an identified need for fully representing groundwater-surface water transition zone (i.e., the sediment zone that connects groundwater and surface water) processes in modeling fate and transport of contaminants to assist with management of contaminated sediments. Most existing groundwater and surface water fate and transport models are not dynamically linked and do not consider transition zone processes such as bioturbation and deposition and erosion of sediments. An interface module is developed herein to holistically simulate the fate and transport by coupling two commonly used models, Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) and SEAWAT, to simulate surface water and groundwater hydrodynamics, while providing an enhanced representation of the processes in the transition zone. Transition zone and surface water contaminant processes were represented through an enhanced version of the EFDC model, AQFATE. AQFATE also includes SEDZLJ, a state-of-the-science surface water sediment transport model. The modeling framework was tested on a published test problem and applied to evaluate field-scale two- and three-dimensional contaminant transport. The model accurately simulated concentrations of salinity from a published test case. For the field-scale applications, the model showed excellent mass balance closure for the transition zone and provided accurate simulations of all transition zone processes represented in the modeling framework. The model predictions for the two-dimensional field case were consistent with site-specific observations of contaminant migration. This modeling framework represents advancement in the simulation of transition zone processes and can help inform risk assessment at sites where contaminant sources from upland areas have the potential to impact sediments and surface water. © 2016, National Ground Water Association.

  2. Influence of Multiple Bionic Unit Coupling on Sliding Wear of Laser-Processed Gray Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haifeng; Zhang, Peng; Sui, Qi; Zhao, Kai; Zhou, Hong; Ren, Luquan

    2017-04-01

    In this study, in effort to improve the sliding wear resistance of gray cast iron under wet lubrication conditions, specimens with different bionic units were manufactured and modified according to bionic theory. Inspired by the structure and appearance of biological wear-resistant skin, two kinds of bionic units were processed by laser on the specimen surfaces. We investigated the wear resistance properties of the samples via indentation method and then observed the wear surface morphology of specimens and the stress distributions. The results indicated that coupling the bionic units enhanced the wear resistance of the cast iron considerably compared to the other samples. We also determined the mechanism of wear resistance improvement according to the results.

  3. From individual to collective behaviour of coupled velocity jump processes: A locust example

    KAUST Repository

    Erban, Radek

    2012-11-01

    A class of stochastic individual-based models, written in terms of coupled velocity jump processes, is presented and analysed. This modelling approach incorporates recent experimental findings on the behaviour of locusts. It exhibits nontrivial dynamics with a pitchfork bifurcation and recovers the observed group directional switching. Estimates of the expected switching times, in terms of the number of individuals and values of the model coefi-cients, are obtained using the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation. In the limit of large populations, a system of two kinetic equations (with nonlocal and nonlinear right hand side) is derived and analyzed. The existence of its solutions is proven and the system\\'s long-time behaviour is investigated. Finally, a first step towards the mean field limit of topological interactions is made by studying the efiect of shrinking the interaction radius in the individual-based model. © American Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

  4. Some coupled processes which may be important for a nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neretnieks, I.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes some coupled processes of importance in connection with the migration of radionuclides. It illustrates one of the experiments performed in the Stripa mine in mid Sweden. The figure shows the waterflow from a fracture which intersects a drift at about 360 m depth in the mine. Because there is saturated flow and the water table is practically at the ground surface, one would expect the water to flow evenly all along the fracture if the fracture had the same hydraulic conductivity everywhere. Of the thirteen monitoring sections, eight carry no measurable water flow. Five monitoring sections carry water with strongly varying flow rates. One of the monitoring sections carries half the water. The flow rates in the second fracture are shown in the right hand figure. The distribution of flowrates is very uneven in this fracture also

  5. Coupling of glycerol processing with Fischer-Tropsch synthesis for production of liquid fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonetti, D.A.; Rass-Hansen, Jeppe; Kunkes, E.L.

    2007-01-01

    Liquid alkanes can be produced directly from glycerol by an integrated process involving catalytic conversion to H-2/CO gas mixtures (synthesis gas) combined with Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Synthesis gas can be produced at high rates and selectivities suitable for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (H-2/CO......, acetone, and acetol. Fischer -Tropsch synthesis experiments at 548 K and 5 bar over a Ru-based catalyst reveal that water, ethanol, and acetone in the synthesis gas feed have only small effects, whereas acetol can participate in Fischer -Tropsch chain growth, forming pentanones, hexanones, and heptanones...... in the liquid organic effluent stream and increasing the selectivity to C5+ alkanes by a factor of 2 ( from 0.30 to 0.60). Catalytic conversion of glycerol and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were coupled in a two-bed reactor system consisting of a Pt-Re/C catalyst bed followed by a Ru/TiO2 catalyst bed...

  6. Development of a Cryosphere Land Surface Model with Coupled Snow and Frozen Soil Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Sun, L.; Yang, K.; Tian, L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a land surface model with coupled snow and frozen soil physics has been developed by improving the formulations of snow and frozen soil for a hydrologically-improved land surface model (HydroSiB2). First, an energy-balance based 3-layer snow model has been incorporated into the HydroSiB2 (hereafter HydroSiB2-S) for an improved description of internal processes of snow pack. Second, a universal and simplified soil model has been coupled with HydroSiB2-S to enable the calculation of soil water freezing and thawing (hereafter HydroSiB2-SF). In order to avoid the instability caused by the uncertainty in estimating water phase changes, enthalpy is adopted as a prognostic variable instead of snow/soil temperature in the energy balance equation of the snow/frozen soil module. The newly developed models were then rigorously evaluated at two typical sites over Tibetan Plateau (one snowy and the other non-snowy, with both underlying frozen soil). At the snowy site in northeast TP (DY in the upper Hei River), HydroSiB2-SF demonstrated significant improvements over HydroSiB2-F (that is the model same as HydroSiB2-SF but using the original single-layer snow module of HydroSiB2), showing the importance of snow internal processes described by 3-layer snow parameterization. At the non-snowy site in southwest TP (Ngari, extremely dry), HydroSiB2-SF gave reasonable simulations of soil water phase changes while HydroSiB2-S did not, indicating the crucial role of frozen soil module in depicting the soil thermal and water dynamics. Finally, HydroSiB2-SF was proved capable of simulating upward moisture fluxes towards freezing front from the unfrozen soil layers below in winter.

  7. Influences of Coupled Hydrologic and Microbial Processes on River Corridor Biogeochemistry and Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, T. D.; Song, H. S.; Stegen, J.; Graham, E.; Bao, J.; Goldman, A.; Zhou, T.; Crump, A.; Hou, Z.; Hammond, G. E.; Chen, X.; Huang, M.; Zhang, X.; Nelson, W. C.; Garayburu-Caruso, V. A.

    2017-12-01

    The exchange of water between rivers and surrounding subsurface environments (hydrologic exchange flows or HEFs) is a vital aspect of river ecology and watershed function. HEFs play a key role in water quality, nutrient cycling, and ecosystem health, and they modulate water temperatures and enhance exchange of terrestrial and aquatic nutrients, which lead to elevated biogeochemical activity. However, these coupled hydrologic and microbiological processes are not well understood, particularly in the context of large managed river systems with highly variable discharge, and are poorly represented in system-scale quantitative models. Using the 75 km Hanford Reach of the Columbia River as the research domain, we apply high-resolution flow simulations supported by field observations to understand how variable river discharge interacts with hydromorphic and hydrogeologic structures to generate HEFs and distributions of subsurface residence times. We combine this understanding of hydrologic processes with microbiological activity measurements and reactive transport models to elucidate the holistic impacts of variable discharge on river corridor (surface and subsurface) ecosystems. In particular, our project seeks to develop and test new conceptual and numerical models that explicitly incorporate i) the character (chemical speciation and thermodynamics) of natural organic matter as it varies along flow paths and through mixing of groundwater and surface water, and ii) the history-dependent response of microbial communities to varying time scales of inundation associated with fluctuations in river discharge. The results of these high-resolution mechanistic models are guiding formulation and parameterization of reduced-order models applicable at reach to watershed scales. New understanding of coupled hydrology and microbiology in the river corridor will play a key role in reduction of uncertainties associated with major Earth system biogeochemical fluxes, improving

  8. Structural factors controlling inter-plate coupling and earthquake rupture process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodaira, S.

    2007-05-01

    Recent availability of a large number of ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs), a large volume of air-gun array and a long streamer cable for academics provide several new findings of lithospheric scale structures in subduction seismogenic zones. JAMSTEC has acquired long-offset seismic data using a super-densely deploy OBS (i.e. 1 - 5 km spacing OBSs along 100 - 500 km long profiles) in the Nankai seismogeinc zone, SW. Japan, since 1999. Long-offset multichannel seismic (MCS) data by a two-ship experiment, as well as conventional 2D MCS data, have been also acquired at a part of the profiles. Some of those profiles have been designed as combined onshore - offshore profiles for imaging a land-ocean transition zone. One of the most striking findings is an image of several scales of subducted seamounts/ridges in the Nankai trough seismogenic zone. We detected the subducted seamount/ridges, which are 50 - 100 km wide, distributing from near trough axis to ~ 40 km deep beneath the Japanese island. From a point of seismogenic process, an important aspect is that those structures are strongly correlated with slip zones of magnitude 8-class earthquakes, i.e.; subducted seamounts/ridge control the rupture propagations. Moreover, the most recent seismic study crossing the segmentation boundary between M=8 class earthquakes detected a high seismic velocity body forming a strongly coupled patch at the segmentation boundary. The numerical simulation incorporating all those structures explained the historic rupture patterns, and shows the occurrence of a giant earthquake along the entire Nankai trough, a distance of over 600 km long (Mw=8.7). The growth processes of a rupture revealed from the simulation are; 1) prior to the giant earthquake, a small slow event (or earthquake) occurs near the segmentation boundary, 2) this accelerates a very slow slip (slower than the plate convergent rate), at the strong patch, which reduces a degree of coupling, 3) then a rupture easily propagates

  9. Advanced low carbon-to-nitrogen ratio wastewater treatment by electrochemical and biological coupling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shihai; Li, Desheng; Yang, Xue; Zhu, Shanbin; Xing, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen pollution in ground and surface water significantly affects the environment and its organisms, thereby leading to an increasingly serious environmental problem. Such pollution is difficult to degrade because of the lack of carbon sources. Therefore, an electrochemical and biological coupling process (EBCP) was developed with a composite catalytic biological carrier (CCBC) and applied in a pilot-scale cylindrical reactor to treat wastewater with a carbon-to-nitrogen (C/N) ratio of 2. The startup process, coupling principle, and dynamic feature of the EBCP were examined along with the effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT), dissolved oxygen (DO), and initial pH on nitrogen removal. A stable coupling system was obtained after 51 days when plenty of biofilms were cultivated on the CCBC without inoculation sludge. Autotrophic denitrification, with [Fe(2+)] and [H] produced by iron-carbon galvanic cells in CCBC as electron donors, was confirmed by equity calculation of CODCr and nitrogen removal. Nitrogen removal efficiency was significantly influenced by HRT, DO, and initial pH with optimal values of 3.5 h, 3.5 ± 0.1 mg L(-1), and 7.5 ± 0.1, respectively. The ammonia, nitrate, and total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiencies of 90.1 to 95.3 %, 90.5 to 99.0 %, and 90.3 to 96.5 % were maintained with corresponding initial concentrations of 40 ± 2 mg L(-1) (NH3-N load of 0.27 ± 0.01 kg NH3-N m(-3) d(-1)), 20 ± 1 mg L(-1), and 60 ± 2 mg L(-1) (TN load of 0.41 ± 0.02 kg TN m(-3) d(-1)). Based on the Eckenfelder model, the kinetics equation of the nitrogen transformation along the reactor was N e  = N 0 exp (-0.04368 h/L(1.8438)). Hence, EBCP is a viable method for advanced low C/N ratio wastewater treatment.

  10. Coupling of Spinosad Fermentation and Separation Process via Two-Step Macroporous Resin Adsorption Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fanglong; Zhang, Chuanbo; Yin, Jing; Shen, Yueqi; Lu, Wenyu

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a two-step resin adsorption technology was investigated for spinosad production and separation as follows: the first step resin addition into the fermentor at early cultivation period to decrease the timely product concentration in the broth; the second step of resin addition was used after fermentation to adsorb and extract the spinosad. Based on this, a two-step macroporous resin adsorption-membrane separation process for spinosad fermentation, separation, and purification was established. Spinosad concentration in 5-L fermentor increased by 14.45 % after adding 50 g/L macroporous at the beginning of fermentation. The established two-step macroporous resin adsorption-membrane separation process got the 95.43 % purity and 87 % yield for spinosad, which were both higher than that of the conventional crystallization of spinosad from aqueous phase that were 93.23 and 79.15 % separately. The two-step macroporous resin adsorption method has not only carried out the coupling of spinosad fermentation and separation but also increased spinosad productivity. In addition, the two-step macroporous resin adsorption-membrane separation process performs better in spinosad yield and purity.

  11. Assessment of anti-fouling strategies for membrane coupled with upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (MUASB) process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thao Minh; Ye, Yun; Chen, Vicki; Stuetz, Richard; Le-Clech, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    In this novel process, domestic wastewater was filtered by a hollow-fibre membrane coupled with an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (MUASB) bioreactor. To improve the process sustainability and decrease energy costs, the membranes were operated under low fluxes with little, or no, shear. The efficiency of anti-fouling strategies, including relaxation, backwashing and supply of low aeration and stir rates, was assessed through detailed characterization of the fouling layers. Results indicated that backwashing was more efficient than relaxation, even when the systems were operated under the same flux productivity. In terms of shear supply, stir provided a better fouling limitation strategy compared to aeration, at similar shear stress values. Physical and chemical cleaning methods were applied to recover three fouling fractions (i.e. cake, residual and irreversible) for better characterization of the fouling layers. Under the sustainable operating conditions used in this study, most of the fouling was easily reversible by simple rinsing. In addition, permanent and irreversible fouling, resulting in the need for frequent chemical cleanings and potential membrane degradation, is limited once small shear stresses are applied. These outcomes are expected to form the basis for the future assessment of trade-off between operation, maintenance and replacement costs of membrane filtration processes used in wastewater treatment.

  12. MODELING COUPLED PROCESSES OF MULTIPHASE FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER IN UNSATURATED FRACTURED ROCK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Wu; S. Mukhopadhyay; K. Zhang; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2006-01-01

    A mountain-scale, thermal-hydrologic (TH) numerical model is developed for investigating unsaturated flow behavior in response to decay heat from the radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. The TH model, consisting of three-dimensional (3-D) representations of the unsaturated zone, is based on the current repository design, drift layout, and thermal loading scenario under estimated current and future climate conditions. More specifically, the TH model implements the current geological framework and hydrogeological conceptual models, and incorporates the most updated, best-estimated input parameters. This mountain-scale TH model simulates the coupled TH processes related to mountain-scale multiphase fluid flow, and evaluates the impact of radioactive waste heat on the hydrogeological system, including thermally perturbed liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature elevations, as well as the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes and drainage between drifts. For a better description of the ambient geothermal condition of the unsaturated zone system, the TH model is first calibrated against measured borehole temperature data. The ambient temperature calibration provides the necessary surface and water table boundary as well as initial conditions. Then, the TH model is used to obtain scientific understanding of TH processes in the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone under the designed schedule of repository thermal load

  13. Scaling analysis of the coupled heat transfer process in the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.C.

    1986-08-01

    The differential equations representing the coupled heat transfer from the solid nuclear core components to the helium in the coolant channels are scaled in terms of representative quantities. This scaling process identifies the relative importance of the various terms of the coupled differential equations. The relative importance of these terms is then used to simplify the numerical solution of the coupled heat transfer for two bounding cases of full-power operation and depressurization from full-system operating pressure for the Fort St. Vrain High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. This analysis rigorously justifies the simplified system of equations used in the nuclear safety analysis effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  14. The Experience of Chinese Couples Undergoing In Vitro Fertilization Treatment: Perception of the Treatment Process and Partner Support

    OpenAIRE

    Ying, Li-Ying; Wu, Lai Har; Loke, Alice Yuen

    2015-01-01

    Background Couples undergoing In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) Treatment suffer as dyads from the stressful experience of the painful treatment and the fear that the IVF cycle will fail. They are likely to report that their marital relationship has become unstable due to the prolonged period of treatment. Methods This is a qualitative study that was conducted to explore the experiences that Chinese couples have had with IVF treatment, especially their perceptions of the process and the support be...

  15. Chemo-Mechano Coupling Processes Inducing Evolution of Rock Permeability under Hydrothermal and Stressed Conditions (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, H.; Takahashi, M.; Kishida, K.; Nakashima, S.

    2013-12-01

    Coupled thermo-hydro-mechano-chemo (THMC) processes prevailing within fractured rocks are of significant importance in case of a long-term geo-sequestration of anthropogenic wastes of high level radioactive materials and carbon dioxide, and an effective recovery of energy from petroleum and geothermal reservoirs typically located in deep underground. The THMC processes should change the mechanical, hydraulic, and transport properties of the host rocks. Under even moderate pressure and temperature conditions, geochemical processes such as mineral dissolution should be active and may induce the change of those properties. Therefore, the effects should be examined in detail. In this work, a suite of long-term permeability experiments using granite, sandstone, and mudstone with or without a single fracture has been conducted under moderate confining pressures ranging 3 - 15 MPa and temperatures of 20 and 90 °C, and monitors the evolution in rock permeability and effluent chemistry throughout the experimental periods. Under net reduction or augmentation of pore/fracture volumes, the net permeability should alternatively increase or decrease with time, depending on the prevailing mechanical and geochemical processes. In granite samples, At 20 °C the observed fracture permeabilities monotonically reduce and reach quasi-steady state in two weeks, but after the temperature is increased to 90 °C those resume decreasing throughout the rest of experiments - the ultimate reductions are roughly two orders of magnitude within 40 days. In mudstone samples, similar results to those in granite samples are obtained (i.e., monotonic reduction and subsequent quasi-steady state). In contrast, in sandstone samples, a monotonic augmentation in permeability has been observed throughout the experiments. A chemo-mechanical model that accounts for temperature-dependent mineral dissolutions at contacting areas and free walls of pore spaces is applied to replicating the experimental

  16. Experimental and Computational Studies of Coupled Geomechanical and Hydrologic Processes in Wellbore Systems (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, J. W.; Mori, H.; Porter, M. L.; Lewis, K. C.; Kelkar, S.

    2013-12-01

    Potential leakage from wells is an important issue in the protection of groundwater resources, CO2 sequestration, and hydraulic fracturing. The first defense in all of these applications is a properly constructed well with adequate Portland cement that effectively isolates the subsurface. The chief threat for such wells is mechanical disruption of the cement, cement/steel, or cement/caprock interfaces. This can occur through wellbore operations that pressurize/depressurize the steel tubing or create temperature transients (e.g., injection, production, hydraulic fracturing, and mechanical testing) as well as reservoir-scale stresses (e.g., filling or depletion of the reservoir) and tectonic stresses (e.g., the mobility of salt). However, there is relatively limited information available on the hydrologic consequences of such processes. Toward this end, we discuss recent experiments and computational models of coupled geomechanical and hydrologic processes in wellbore systems. Triaxial coreflood experiments with tomography were conducted on synthetic wellbore systems including cement-steel, rock-cement and rock-cement-steel composites. The aim of the experiments was to induce stresses through application of axial loads in order to create defects within the cement or at the cement/steel or cement/rock interface. High injection fluid pressures (supercritical CO2 × brine) were applied to the base of the initially impermeable composites. Mechanical failure resulted in creation of permeability, which was measured as a function of time (allowing for the possibility of Portland cement to deform and modify permeability). In addition, fracture patterns were characterized using x-ray tomography. We used the computer code FEHM to study coupled hydrologic and mechanical processes in the near-wellbore environment. The wellbore model was developed as a wedge within a radially symmetric 3D volume. The grid elements consist of the steel casing, the casing-cement interface, the

  17. Numerical model of thermo-mechanical coupling for the tensile failure process of brittle materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A numerical model of thermal cracking with a thermo-mechanical coupling effect was established. The theory of tensile failure and heat conduction is used to study the tensile failure process of brittle materials, such as rock and concrete under high temperature environment. The validity of the model is verified by thick-wall cylinders with analytical solutions. The failure modes of brittle materials under thermal stresses caused by temperature gradient and different thermal expansion coefficient were studied by using a thick-wall cylinder model and an embedded particle model, respectively. In the thick-wall cylinder model, different forms of cracks induced by temperature gradient were obtained under different temperature boundary conditions. In the embedded particle model, radial cracks were produced in the medium part with lower tensile strength when temperature increased because of the different thermal expansion coefficient. Model results are in good agreement with the experimental results, thereby providing a new finite element method for analyzing the thermal damage process and mechanism of brittle materials.

  18. Process monitored spectrophotometric titration coupled with chemometrics for simultaneous determination of mixtures of weak acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Lifu; Yang, Jing; Yuan, Jintao

    2007-05-15

    A new spectrophotometric titration method coupled with chemometrics for the simultaneous determination of mixtures of weak acids has been developed. In this method, the titrant is a mixture of sodium hydroxide and an acid-base indicator, and the indicator is used to monitor the titration process. In a process of titration, both the added volume of titrant and the solution acidity at each titration point can be obtained simultaneously from an absorption spectrum by least square algorithm, and then the concentration of each component in the mixture can be obtained from the titration curves by principal component regression. The method only needs the information of absorbance spectra to obtain the analytical results, and is free of volumetric measurements. The analyses are independent of titration end point and do not need the accurate values of dissociation constants of the indicator and the acids. The method has been applied to the simultaneous determination of the mixtures of benzoic acid and salicylic acid, and the mixtures of phenol, o-chlorophenol and p-chlorophenol with satisfactory results.

  19. A transmission and reflection coupled ultrasonic process tomography based on cylindrical miniaturized transducers using PVDF films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, J.; Yang, H.; Fan, F.; Su, M.

    2017-12-01

    A transmission and reflection coupled ultrasonic process tomography has been developed, which is characterized by a proposed dual-mode (DM) reconstruction algorithm, as well as an adaptive search approach to determine an optimal image threshold during the image binarization. In respect of hardware, to improve the accuracy of time-of-flight (TOF) and extend the lowest detection limit of particle size, a cylindrical miniaturized transducer using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) films is designed. Besides, the development of range-gating technique for the identification of transmission and reflection waves in scanning is discussed. A particle system with four iron particles is then investigated numerically and experimentally to evaluate these proposed methods. The sound pressure distribution in imaging area is predicted numerically, followed by the analysis of the relationship between the emitting surface width of transducer and particle size. After the processing of experimental data for effective waveform extraction and fusion, the comparison between reconstructed results from transmission-mode (TM), reflection-mode (RM), and dual-mode reconstructions is carried out and the latter manifests obvious improvements from the blurring reduction to the enhancement of particle boundary.

  20. Modeling Coupled Processes for Multiphase Fluid Flow in Mechanically Deforming Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, S. A.; Pike, D. Q.

    2011-12-01

    Modeling of coupled hydrological-mechanical processes in fault zones is critical for understanding the long-term behavior of fluids within the shallow crust. Here we utilize a previously developed cellular-automata (CA) model to define the evolution of permeability within a 2-D fault zone under compressive stress. At each time step, the CA model calculates the increase in fluid pressure within the fault at every grid cell. Pressure surpassing a critical threshold (e.g., lithostatic stress) causes a rupture in that cell, and pressure is then redistributed across the neighboring cells. The rupture can cascade through the spatial domain and continue across multiple time steps. Stress continues to increase and the size and location of rupture events are recorded until a percolating backbone of ruptured cells exists across the fault. Previous applications of this model consider uncorrelated random fields for the compressibility of the fault material. The prior focus on uncorrelated property fields is consistent with development of a number of statistical physics models including percolation processes and fracture propagation. However, geologic materials typically express spatial correlation and this can have a significant impact on the results of the pressure and permeability distributions. We model correlation of the fault material compressibility as a multiGaussian random field with a correlation length defined as the full-width at half maximum (FWHM) of the kernel used to create the field. The FWHM is varied from contract DE-AC04-94AL85000

  1. Energy efficiency in waste water treatments plants: Optimization of activated sludge process coupled with anaerobic digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descoins, N.; Deleris, S.; Lestienne, R.; Trouvé, E.; Maréchal, F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a study concerning the optimization of a Waste Water Treatment process. The process deals with carbon and nitrogen removal and includes activated sludge reactors coupled with an anaerobic digestion reactor. Nitrification and de-nitrification biochemical reactions are due to the biological activity of heterotrophic and autotrophic micro-organisms occurring inside the reactors. Rigorous Plant-Wide models that represent the main biochemical transformations have been constructed as per the CEIT approach . The energy consumption for each Physical Unit Operation (P.U.O.) involved in the flow-sheet is evaluated and a full link is made between the biological activity and the electrical demand or production. Steady-state mathematical optimizations are then computed and the influence of primary settling efficiency on electrical autonomy is quantified and demonstrated. The ammonium recycling from digestion to activated sludge reactors is also demonstrated to be a limiting factor for the overall energy efficiency, as well as the C-substrate availability for denitrifying. Some conclusions are then drawn to improve the global electrical efficiency of the system.

  2. Numerical model of thermo-mechanical coupling for the tensile failure process of brittle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yu; Wang, Zhe; Ren, Fengyu; Wang, Daguo

    2017-10-01

    A numerical model of thermal cracking with a thermo-mechanical coupling effect was established. The theory of tensile failure and heat conduction is used to study the tensile failure process of brittle materials, such as rock and concrete under high temperature environment. The validity of the model is verified by thick-wall cylinders with analytical solutions. The failure modes of brittle materials under thermal stresses caused by temperature gradient and different thermal expansion coefficient were studied by using a thick-wall cylinder model and an embedded particle model, respectively. In the thick-wall cylinder model, different forms of cracks induced by temperature gradient were obtained under different temperature boundary conditions. In the embedded particle model, radial cracks were produced in the medium part with lower tensile strength when temperature increased because of the different thermal expansion coefficient. Model results are in good agreement with the experimental results, thereby providing a new finite element method for analyzing the thermal damage process and mechanism of brittle materials.

  3. Rocket experiment in a coupling process between neutral atmosphere and plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, S.; Liu, H.; Abe, T.; Ono, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Saito, A.; Yamamoto, M.; Yamamoto, M. Y.

    Rocket experiment is carried out to investigate a coupling process between neutral atmosphere and plasma of thermosphere and ionosphere at Kagoshima Space Center KSC of JAXA The rocket launch window is in the evening of July 31 - August 15 2007 Momentum transfer through collisional process of the neutral atmosphere and the plasma is a basic problem of atmospheric circulation and super rotation in the low latitude thermosphere and a medium scale traveling ionospheric disturbance MS-TID occurring in the mid-latitude ionosphere but the direct observation is not yet performed In the rocket experiment we observe plasma drift velocity plasma density and temperature and its fluctuations electric field magnetic field and neutral wind The neutral winds are estimated from the movements of Lithium clouds which are released at altitudes between 150km and 300km and scatter sunlight by resonance scattering with wavelength of 670 nm The Lithium clouds are observed by CCD imagers on ground The plan of rocket experiment ground observation system and science objectives are presented

  4. Urban street canyons: Coupling dynamics, chemistry and within-canyon chemical processing of emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Vivien Bianca; Bloss, William James; Cai, Xiaoming

    2013-04-01

    Street canyons, formed by rows of buildings in urban environments, are associated with high levels of atmospheric pollutants emitted primarily from vehicles, and substantial human exposure. The street canyon forms a semi-enclosed environment, within which emissions may be entrained in a re-circulatory system; chemical processing of emitted compounds alters the composition of the air vented to the overlying boundary layer, compared with the primary emissions. As the prevailing atmospheric chemistry is highly non-linear, and the canyon mixing and predominant chemical reaction timescales are comparable, the combined impacts of dynamics and chemistry must be considered to quantify these effects. Here we report a model study of the coupled impacts of dynamical and chemical processing upon the atmospheric composition in a street canyon environment, to assess the impacts upon air pollutant levels within the canyon, and to quantify the extent to which within-canyon chemical processing alters the composition of canyon outflow, in comparison to the primary emissions within the canyon. A new model for the simulation of street canyon atmospheric chemical processing has been developed, by integrating an existing Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) dynamical model of canyon atmospheric motion with a detailed chemical reaction mechanism, a Reduced Chemical Scheme (RCS) comprising 51 chemical species and 136 reactions, based upon a subset of the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM). The combined LES-RCS model is used to investigate the combined effects of mixing and chemical processing upon air quality within an idealised street canyon. The effect of the combination of dynamical (segregation) and chemical effects is determined by comparing the outputs of the full LES-RCS canyon model with those obtained when representing the canyon as a zero-dimensional box model (i.e. assuming mixing is complete and instantaneous). The LES-RCS approach predicts lower (canyon-averaged) levels of NOx, OH and HO

  5. A Process Review of the Indashyikirwa Couples Curriculum to Prevent Intimate Partner Violence and Support Healthy, Equitable Relationships in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Stern

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Indashyikirwa is a Rwandan intimate partner violence (IPV prevention program being implemented by CARE International Rwanda, Rwanda Women’s Network (RWN, and Rwanda Men’s Resource Centre (RWAMREC. A central aspect of the programme is a 20-session curriculum for heterosexual couples designed to support healthy, non-violent relationships. This paper draws on qualitative interviews with 15 couples (before and after the curriculum and 9 field staff to assess couples’ impressions, comprehension of, and engagement with this innovative training. Thematic analysis was conducted to compare key findings from both data sources. Couples and staff offered positive assessments of the curriculum including the contextual relevance, the participatory approach, and a high level of dedication to the training was shown by the majority of couples. Many couples appreciated being trained together, and although some men dominated the first few sessions, participation gradually became more gender-balanced, and facilitators emphasized creating a safe environment for equal participation. Curriculum content that was initially resisted or difficult reportedly became easier through couples learning and trying new skills and experiencing relationship benefits first-hand, which emphasizes the value of the skills building component and take home exercises. Important insights for couples-based, educational approaches to IPV prevention are identified from this process review.

  6. On the Coupling Time of the Heat-Bath Process for the Fortuin-Kasteleyn Random-Cluster Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collevecchio, Andrea; Elçi, Eren Metin; Garoni, Timothy M.; Weigel, Martin

    2018-01-01

    We consider the coupling from the past implementation of the random-cluster heat-bath process, and study its random running time, or coupling time. We focus on hypercubic lattices embedded on tori, in dimensions one to three, with cluster fugacity at least one. We make a number of conjectures regarding the asymptotic behaviour of the coupling time, motivated by rigorous results in one dimension and Monte Carlo simulations in dimensions two and three. Amongst our findings, we observe that, for generic parameter values, the distribution of the appropriately standardized coupling time converges to a Gumbel distribution, and that the standard deviation of the coupling time is asymptotic to an explicit universal constant multiple of the relaxation time. Perhaps surprisingly, we observe these results to hold both off criticality, where the coupling time closely mimics the coupon collector's problem, and also at the critical point, provided the cluster fugacity is below the value at which the transition becomes discontinuous. Finally, we consider analogous questions for the single-spin Ising heat-bath process.

  7. Stochastic process of pragmatic information for 2D spiral wave turbulence in globally and locally coupled Alief-Panfilov oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Jun; Miyata, Hajime; Konno, Hidetoshi

    2017-09-01

    Recently, complex dynamics of globally coupled oscillators have been attracting many researcher's attentions. In spite of their numerous studies, their features of nonlinear oscillator systems with global and local couplings in two-dimension (2D) are not understood fully. The paper focuses on 2D states of coherent, clustered and chaotic oscillation especially under the effect of negative global coupling (NGC) in 2D Alief-Panfilov model. It is found that the tuning NGC can cause various new coupling-parameter dependency on the features of oscillations. Then quantitative characterization of various states of oscillations (so called spiral wave turbulence) is examined by using the pragmatic information (PI) which have been utilized in analyzing multimode laser, solar activity and neuronal systems. It is demonstrated that the dynamics of the PI for various oscillations can be characterized successfully by the Hyper-Gamma stochastic process.

  8. Investigations on THM effects in buffer, EDZ and argillaceous host rock. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobmann, M.; Breustedt, M.; Li, S.; Polster, M.; Schirmer, S.

    2013-11-15

    especially valid for the most reactive rock components, which are the fine grained clay matrix and the organic components. A high amount of organic compounds is characteristic for clay formations. If the thermal maturation is advanced, an additional artificial heating over longer periods of time may have the effect that the limit where oil generation starts is exceeded. It is still to be clarified whether the heat input from the waste canisters is so high that this limit is exceeded and that oil in an amount worth extracting is generated. Depending on the pressure and temperature conditions, a mineral transformation or the formation of new minerals may occur, which would change the chemical and mineralogical conditions. Artificial heating could accelerate transformation processes and change the retardation properties of the host rock. Currently, there is no information available about the potential changes of the host rock properties due to the specific heat input of a repository in a clay formation in Germany. One important task to be performed with regard to the German safety requirements is the demonstration of the integrity of the geotechnical barriers and of the geological barrier. The only way to demonstrate the long-term integrity of the geological barrier is to carry out predictive calculations. These kinds of calculations must have a sound basis of rock-specific constitutive laws together with a well calibrated parameter set that represent the real physical host rock behaviour. To identify suitable constitutive laws and corresponding parameters, insitu experiments are being performed in the Mt. Terri and Meuse/Haute-Marne URLs in Switzerland and France. These experiments are well equipped with sensing systems that allow a comparison of measured and simulated results for rock parameter identification and corresponding model calibration.

  9. Self-consistent simulation study on magnetized inductively coupled plasma for 450 mm semiconductor wafer processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun; Kim, Yun-Gi

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of weakly magnetized inductively coupled plasma (MICP) are investigated using a self-consistent simulation based on the drift–diffusion approximation with anisotropic transport coefficients. MICP is a plasma source utilizing the cavity mode of the low-frequency branch of the right-hand circularly polarized wave. The model system is 700 mm in diameter and has a 250 mm gap between the radio-frequency window and wafer holder. The model chamber size is chosen to verify the applicability of this type of plasma source to the 450 mm wafer process. The effects of electron density distribution and external axial magnetic field on the propagation properties of the plasma wave, including the wavelength modulation and refraction toward the high-density region, are demonstrated. The restricted electron transport and thermal conductivity in the radial direction due to the magnetic field result in small temperature gradient along the field lines and off-axis peak density profile. The calculated impedance seen from the antenna terminal shows that MICP has a resistance component that is two to threefold higher than that of ICP. This property is practically important for large-size, low-pressure plasma sources because high resistance corresponds to high power-transfer efficiency and stable impedance matching characteristics. For the 0.665 Pa argon plasma, MICP shows a radial density uniformity of 6% within 450 mm diameter, which is much better than that of nonmagnetized ICP.

  10. Synthesis of ultrafine particles and processing of nano-structured films with inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutsch, G.; Blum, J.; Herrmann, A.; Schwenk, A.; Weiss, K.-H.

    2001-01-01

    The inductively coupled plasma (ICP) at atmospheric pressure is particularly suited for melting and evaporation of materials. The electrodeless ICP can be generated without limitation of the kind of plasma forming gases. Therefore, using an argon-oxygen gas mixture as sheath gas of the ICP nanoparticles can be processed by combustion of metal-organic liquid precursors injected in the hot plasma core. By this way, nanoparticles of alumina, titania and of a perovskite type oxide are produced. The powder particles are collected by an electrostatic filter. They are characterized by a log-normal size distribution with a median diameter of about 10 nm depending on the plasma parameters used. Interesting metastable phases and exactly doped, very pure materials can be obtained. Nanophase coatings synthesized by the ICP are made from the same precursor materials. For depositions, the plasma jet has to be supersonic. Impinging onto the substrate placed near the nozzle thin and dense coatings are obtained. The composition and the grain size of as-deposited coatings are analyzed by XRD. (author)

  11. On Entropy Generation and the Effect of Heat and Mass Transfer Coupling in a Distillation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos-Madrigal, Paulina; Mendoza, Diego F.; López de Haro, Mariano

    2018-01-01

    The entropy production rates as obtained from the exergy analysis, entropy balance and the nonequilibrium thermodynamics approach are compared for two distillation columns. The first case is a depropanizer column involving a mixture of ethane, propane, n-butane and n-pentane. The other is a weighed sample of Mexican crude oil distilled with a pilot scale fractionating column. The composition, temperature and flow profiles, for a given duty and operating conditions in each column, are obtained with the Aspen Plus V8.4 software by using the RateFrac model with a rate-based nonequilibrium column. For the depropanizer column the highest entropy production rate is found in the central trays where most of the mass transfer occurs, while in the second column the highest values correspond to the first three stages (where the vapor mixture is in contact with the cold liquid reflux), and to the last three stages (where the highest temperatures take place). The importance of the explicit inclusion of thermal diffusion in these processes is evaluated. In the depropanizer column, the effect of the coupling between heat and mass transfer is found to be negligible, while for the fractionating column it becomes appreciable.

  12. An approach to modeling coupled thermal-hydraulic-chemical processes in geothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palguta, Jennifer; Williams, Colin F.; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Hickman, Stephen H.; Sonnenthal, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between hydrothermal fluids and rock alter mineralogy, leading to the formation of secondary minerals and potentially significant physical and chemical property changes. Reactive transport simulations are essential for evaluating the coupled processes controlling the geochemical, thermal and hydrological evolution of geothermal systems. The objective of this preliminary investigation is to successfully replicate observations from a series of hydrothermal laboratory experiments [Morrow et al., 2001] using the code TOUGHREACT. The laboratory experiments carried out by Morrow et al. [2001] measure permeability reduction in fractured and intact Westerly granite due to high-temperature fluid flow through core samples. Initial permeability and temperature values used in our simulations reflect these experimental conditions and range from 6.13 × 10−20 to 1.5 × 10−17 m2 and 150 to 300 °C, respectively. The primary mineralogy of the model rock is plagioclase (40 vol.%), K-feldspar (20 vol.%), quartz (30 vol.%), and biotite (10 vol.%). The simulations are constrained by the requirement that permeability, relative mineral abundances, and fluid chemistry agree with experimental observations. In the models, the granite core samples are represented as one-dimensional reaction domains. We find that the mineral abundances, solute concentrations, and permeability evolutions predicted by the models are consistent with those observed in the experiments carried out by Morrow et al. [2001] only if the mineral reactive surface areas decrease with increasing clay mineral abundance. This modeling approach suggests the importance of explicitly incorporating changing mineral surface areas into reactive transport models.

  13. Numerical modelling of levee stability based on coupled mechanical, thermal and hydrogeological processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwornik Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical modelling of coupled mechanical, thermal and hydrogeological processes for a soil levee is presented in the paper. The modelling was performed for a real levee that was built in Poland as a part of the ISMOP project. Only four parameters were changed to build different flood waves: the water level, period of water increase, period of water decrease, and period of low water level after the experiment. Results of numerical modelling shows that it is possible and advisable to calculate simultaneously changes of thermal and hydro-mechanical fields. The presented results show that it is also possible to use thermal sensors in place of more expensive pore pressure sensors, with some limitations. The results of stability analysis show that the levee is less stable when the water level decreases, after which factor of safety decreases significantly. For all flooding wave parameters described in the paper, the levee is very stable and factor of safety variations for any particular stage were not very large.

  14. Coupled Transport/Reaction Modelling of Copper Canister Corrosion Aided by Microbial Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinsong Liu

    2006-04-01

    Copper canister corrosion is an important issue in the concept of a nuclear fuel repository. Previous studies indicate that the oxygen-free copper canister could hold its integrity for more than 100,000 years in the repository environment. Microbial processes may reduce sulphate to sulphide and considerably increase the amount of sulphides available for corrosion. In this paper, a coupled transport/reaction model is developed to account for the transport of chemical species produced by microbial processes. The corroding agents like sulphide would come not only from the groundwater flowing in a fracture that intersects the canister, but also from the reduction of sulphate near the canister. The reaction of sulphate-reducing bacteria and the transport of sulphide in the bentonite buffer are included in the model. The depth of copper canister corrosion is calculated by the model. With representative 'central values' of the concentrations of sulphate and methane at repository depth at different sites in Fennoscandian Shield the corrosion depth predicted by the model is a few millimetres during 10 5 years. As the concentrations of sulphate and methane are extremely site-specific and future climate changes may significantly influence the groundwater compositions at potential repository sites, sensitivity analyses have been conducted. With a broad perspective of the measured concentrations at different sites in Sweden and in Finland, and some possible mechanisms (like the glacial meltwater intrusion and interglacial seawater intrusion) that may introduce more sulphate into the groundwater at intermediate depths during future climate changes, higher concentrations of either/both sulphate and methane than what is used as the representative 'central' values would be possible. In worst cases. locally, half of the canister thickness could possibly be corroded within 10 5 years

  15. Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Processes in the Ionospheric Trough Region During Substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, S.; Moldwin, M.; Nicolls, M. J.; Ridley, A. J.; Coster, A. J.; Yizengaw, E.; Lyons, L. R.; Donovan, E.

    2013-12-01

    The ionospheric troughs are regions of remarkable electron density depression at the subauroral and auroral latitudes, and are categorized into the mid-latitude trough or high-latitude trough, depending on their relative location to the auroral oval. Substorms are one fundamental element of geomagnetic activity, during which structured field-aligned currents (FACs) and convection flows develop in the subauroral and auroral ionosphere. The auroral/trough region is expected to experience severe electron density variations during substorms. Accurate specification of the trough dynamics during substorms and understanding its relationship with the structured FACs and convection flows are of important practical purpose, including providing observational foundations for assessing the attendant impact on navigation and communication. In addition, troughs are important since they map to magnetospheric boundaries allowing the remote sensing of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling processes. In this talk, we discuss the dynamics of the mid-latitude and high-latitude troughs during substorms based on multi-instrument observations. Using GPS total electron content (TEC) data, we characterize the location and width of the mid-latitude trough through the substorm lifecycle and compare them with existing trough empirical models. Using a combination of incoherent scattering radar (ISR), GPS TEC, auroral imager and a data assimilative model, we investigate the relationship between the high-latitude trough and FACs as well as convection flows. The high-latitude trough is found to be collocated with a counter-clockwise convection flow vortex east of the Harang reversal region, and downward FACs as part of the substorm current system are suggested to be responsible for the high-latitude trough formation. In addition, complex ionospheric electron temperature within the high-latitude trough is found, i.e., increase in the E region while decrease in the F region. We discuss possible

  16. A Dual-Continuum Model for Brine Migration in Salt Associated with Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste: Fully Coupled Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, M.; Rutqvist, J.

    2017-12-01

    The disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt host rock establishes a thermal gradient around the waste package that may cause brine inclusions in the salt grains to migrate toward the waste package. In this study, a dual-continuum model is developed to analyze such a phenomenon. This model is based on the Finite Volume Method (FVM), and it is fully thermal-hydro-mechanical (THM) coupled. For fluid flow, the dual-continuum model considers flow in the interconnected pore space and also in the salt grains. The mass balance of salt and water in these two continua is separately established, and their coupling is represented by flux associated with brine migration. Together with energy balance, such a system produces a coupled TH model with strongly nonlinear features. For mechanical analysis, a new formulation is developed based on the Voronoi tessellated mesh. By relating each cell to several connected triangles, first-order approximation is constructed. The coupling between thermal and mechanical fields is only considered in terms of thermal expansion. And the coupling between the hydraulic and mechanical fields in terms of pore-volume effects is consistent with Biot's theory. Therefore, a fully coupled THM model is developed. Several demonstration examples are provided to verify the model. Last the new model is applied to analyze coupled THM behavior and the results are compared with experimental data.

  17. Coupled Environmental Processes in the Mojave Desert and Implications for ET Covers as Stable Landforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafer, D.; Young, M.; Zitzer, S.; McDonald, E.; Caldwell, T.

    2006-01-01

    Monolayer evapotranspiration (ET) covers are the baseline method for closure of disposal sites for low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed LLW, and transuranic (TRU) waste at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The regulatory timeline is typically 1,000 years for LLW and 10,000 years for TRU waste. Covers for such waste have different technical considerations than those with shorter timelines because they are subject to environmental change for longer periods of time, and because the environmental processes are often coupled. To evaluate these changes, four analog sites (approximately 30, 1,000 to 2,000, 7,000 to 12,500, and 125,000 years in age) on the NTS were analyzed to address the early post-institutional control period (the youngest site), the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of LLW, and the 10,000-year period for TRU waste. Tests included soil texture, structure, and morphology; surface soil infiltration and hydraulic conductivity; vegetation and faunal surveys; and literature reviews. Separate measurements were made in plant undercanopy and intercanopy areas. The results showed a progressive increase in silt and clay content of surface soils with age. Changes in soil texture and structure led to a fivefold decline in saturated hydraulic conductivity in intercanopy areas, but no change in undercanopies, which were subject to bioturbation. These changes may have been responsible for the reduction in total plant cover, most dramatically in intercanopy areas, primarily because more precipitation either runs off the site or is held nearer to the surface where plant roots are less common. The results suggest that covers may evolve over longer timeframes to stable landforms that minimize the need for active maintenance

  18. Forest succession and climate change: Coupling land-surface processes and ecological dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.

    1990-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the hypothesis that humans are in the process of inadvertently modifying the Earth's climate by increasing the atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other radiatively active trace gas. The present man-induced climate change, often referred to as the greenhouse effect, is different from natural changes because of its unprecedented pace and the incomplete knowledge of its consequences. As some scientists put it, humanity is performing on itself a 'global experiment' which may entail a number of surprises. The potential changes in the behavior of atmosphere/biosphere interactions are of particular importance. Such changes could affect atmospheric dynamics, the local and regional hydrology, the global bio-geochemistry, and therefore, human societies. Five distinct aspects of climate/vegetation interactions are examined. First, the climatically and physiologically mediated impacts of increases in the concentration of carbon dioxide on the evaporation from agricultural crops, grassland, and forests are investigated using the Penman-Monteith combination equation. Second, the degree of coupling between the vegetation and the atmosphere, as defined by Jarvis and McNaughton, is reexamined taking radiative losses from the vegetation to the atmosphere into account. Third, the effects of changes in the mean vs. the variance of climatic variables are investigated using a modified version of the forest dynamics model developed by Pastor and Post, LINK-AGES. Fourth, using the same model, changes in the production of non-methane hydrocarbons are estimated as climate and/or vegetation change. Finally, the main focus is on the response of forests to climatic changes using a model treating the physics of energy and water exchange in detail

  19. The time-dependent close-coupling method for atomic and molecular collision processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pindzola, M S [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL (United States); Robicheaux, F [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL (United States); Loch, S D [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL (United States); Berengut, J C [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL (United States); Topcu, T [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL (United States); Colgan, J [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Foster, M [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Griffin, D C [Department of Physics, Rollins College, Winter Park, FL (United States); Ballance, C P [Department of Physics, Rollins College, Winter Park, FL (United States); Schultz, D R [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Minami, T [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Badnell, N R [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Witthoeft, M C [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Plante, D R [Department of Mathematics, Stetson University, Deland, FL (United States); Mitnik, D M [Department of Physics, University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ludlow, J A [Department of Applied Mathematics, Queen' s University, Belfast (United Kingdom); Kleiman, U [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Dresden (Germany)

    2007-04-14

    We review the development of the time-dependent close-coupling method to study atomic and molecular few body dynamics. Applications include electron and photon collisions with atoms, molecules, and their ions. (topical review)

  20. Study of the e(+)e(-) -> Z gamma process at LEP and limits on triple neutral-gauge-boson couplings

    OpenAIRE

    Achard, P.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, V. P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.

    2004-01-01

    The process e(+)e(-) --> Zgamma, where the Z boson decays into hadrons or neutrinos, is studied with data collected with the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies from 189 up to 209 GeV The cross sections are measured and found to be in agreement with the Standard Model predictions. Limits on triple neutral-gauge-boson couplings, forbidden in the Standard Model at tree level, are derived. Limits on the energy scales at which the anomalous couplings could be manifest are set. They rang...

  1. A small floating seawater desalination plant by using a nuclear heating reactor coupled with the MED process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue Dazhi; Zhang Dafang; Dong Duo [Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2000-03-01

    Based on the experience of development of nuclear district heating reactor (NHR) a seawater desalination plant using NHR coupled with the multi-effect distillation (MED) process is being designed. With the same technology a floating desalination plant was proposed to supply potable water to remote areas or islands. With a 10 MWth NHR the floating plant could produce 4000 m{sup 3}/d of potable water and 750 kW of electricity. The design of NHR-10 and the safety features are described. The coupling scheme and parameters are given. Some special considerations for using in ship condition are also presented in this paper. (author)

  2. Modeling coupled thermal, flow, transport and geochemical processes controlling near field long-term evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, W.; Arthur, R.; Xu, T.; Pruess, K.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Bentonite is planned for use as a buffer material in the Swedish nuclear waste disposal concept (KBS-3). Upon emplacement, the buffer is expected to experience a complex set of coupled processes involving heating, re-saturation, reaction and transport of groundwater imbibed from the host rock. The effect of these processes may eventually lead to changes in desirable physical and rheological properties of the buffer, but these processes are not well understood. In this paper, a new quantitative model is evaluated to help improve our understanding of the long-term performance of buffer materials. This is an extension of a previous study [1] that involved simple thermal and chemical models applied to a fully saturated buffer. The thermal model in the present study uses heating histories for spent fuel in a single waste package [2]. The model uses repository dimensions, such as borehole and tunnel spacings [2], which affect the temperature distribution around the waste package. At the time of emplacement, bentonite is partially saturated with water having a different composition than the host-rock groundwater. The present model simulates water imbibition from the host rock into the bentonite under capillary and hydraulic pressure gradients. The associated chemical reactions and solute transport are simulated using Aespoe water composition [3]. The initial mineralogy of bentonite is assumed to be dominated by Na-smectite with much smaller amounts of anhydrite and calcite. Na-smectite dissolution is assumed to be kinetically-controlled while all other reactions are assumed to be at equilibrium controlled. All equilibrium and kinetic constants are temperature dependent. The modeling tool used is TOUGHREACT, developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory [4]. TOUGHREACT is a numerical model that is well suited for near-field simulations because it accounts for feedback between porosity and permeability changes from mineral

  3. A numerical study of synchronization in the process of biochemical substance exchange in a diffusively coupled ring of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailović, Dragutin T.; Balaž, Igor; Arsenić, Ilija

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we numerically investigate a model of a diffusively coupled ring of cells. To model the dynamics of individual cells we propose a map with cell affinity, which is a generalization of the logistic map. First, the basic features of a one-cell system are studied in terms of the Lyapunov exponent, Kolmogorov complexity and Sample Entropy. Second, the notion of observational heterarchy, which is a perpetual negotiation process between different levels of the description of a phenomenon, is reviewed. After these preliminaries, we study how the active coupling induced by the consideration of the observational heterarchy modifies the synchronization property of the model with N=100 cells. It is shown numerically that the active coupling enhances synchronization of biochemical substance exchange in several different conditions of cell affinity.

  4. Numerical Investigation of Simultaneously Deposition and Re-Entrainment Fouling Processes in Corrugated Tubes by Coupling CFD and DEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hærvig, Jakob; Condra, Thomas Joseph; Sørensen, Kim

    The deposition of particulate fouling on flue gas heat exchanger surfaces results in decreased heat transfer. Even though an increasingly amount of work is done on the design of clean heat exchanger surfaces, the effect of fouling remains a challenge. As some heat exchanger designs are more prone...... to fouling deposit than others, detailed fouling considerations have to be taken into account in the initial design process of new heat exchangers. This study presents initial simulations of particulate fouling in the corrugated tube heat exchanger type. Using a mechanistic Euler-Lagrange approach, where...... Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software OpenFOAM is coupled to the Discrete Element Method (DEM) software LIGGGHTS using the coupling software CFDEM. A four-way coupling is used to model fluid-particle and particle-particle interactions and thereby allowing for a particle fouling layer to build up along...

  5. Numerical simulation of interior ballistic process of railgun based on the multi-field coupled model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Lin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Railgun launcher design relies on appropriate models. A multi-field coupled model of railgun launcher was presented in this paper. The 3D transient multi-field was composed of electromagnetic field, thermal field and structural field. The magnetic diffusion equations were solved by a finite-element boundary-element coupling method. The thermal diffusion equations and structural equations were solved by a finite element method. A coupled calculation was achieved by the transfer data from the electromagnetic field to the thermal and structural fields. Some characteristics of railgun shot, such as velocity skin effect, melt-wave erosion and magnetic sawing, which are generated under the condition of large-current and high-speed sliding electrical contact, were demonstrated by numerical simulation.

  6. Vulnerable Emotional Expression In Emotion Focused Couples Therapy: Relating Interactional Processes To Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Jacqueline M; Greenberg, Leslie S

    2017-04-01

    This study examined whether interactions characterized by high expression of emotional vulnerability in one partner followed by a highly supportive response style by the other partner predicted greater improvement on domains of forgiveness, unfinished business, trust, and relationship satisfaction in a sample of 32 couples presenting for Emotion Focused Couples Therapy with unresolved emotional injuries. For each outcome measure, two separate hierarchical regression models were tested (injured partner vulnerability and offending partner supportiveness; offending partner vulnerability and injured partner supportiveness). Both models significantly predicted improvement on the majority of outcome measures. Practice suggestions for working with emotionally injured couples are provided in light of the findings. © 2017 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  7. Oxygen sensitivity of anammox and coupled N-cycle processes in oxygen minimum zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Jensen, Marlene M; Contreras, Sergio; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Lam, Phyllis; Günter, Marcel; LaRoche, Julie; Lavik, Gaute; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2011-01-01

    Nutrient measurements indicate that 30-50% of the total nitrogen (N) loss in the ocean occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). This pelagic N-removal takes place within only ~0.1% of the ocean volume, hence moderate variations in the extent of OMZs due to global warming may have a large impact on the global N-cycle. We examined the effect of oxygen (O(2)) on anammox, NH(3) oxidation and NO(3)(-) reduction in (15)N-labeling experiments with varying O(2) concentrations (0-25 µmol L(-1)) in the Namibian and Peruvian OMZs. Our results show that O(2) is a major controlling factor for anammox activity in OMZ waters. Based on our O(2) assays we estimate the upper limit for anammox to be ~20 µmol L(-1). In contrast, NH(3) oxidation to NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) reduction to NO(2)(-) as the main NH(4)(+) and NO(2)(-) sources for anammox were only moderately affected by changing O(2) concentrations. Intriguingly, aerobic NH(3) oxidation was active at non-detectable concentrations of O(2), while anaerobic NO(3)(-) reduction was fully active up to at least 25 µmol L(-1) O(2). Hence, aerobic and anaerobic N-cycle pathways in OMZs can co-occur over a larger range of O(2) concentrations than previously assumed. The zone where N-loss can occur is primarily controlled by the O(2)-sensitivity of anammox itself, and not by any effects of O(2) on the tightly coupled pathways of aerobic NH(3) oxidation and NO(3)(-) reduction. With anammox bacteria in the marine environment being active at O(2) levels ~20 times higher than those known to inhibit their cultured counterparts, the oceanic volume potentially acting as a N-sink increases tenfold. The predicted expansion of OMZs may enlarge this volume even further. Our study provides the first robust estimates of O(2) sensitivities for processes directly and indirectly connected with N-loss. These are essential to assess the effects of ocean de-oxygenation on oceanic N-cycling. © 2011 Kalvelage et al.

  8. Oxygen sensitivity of anammox and coupled N-cycle processes in oxygen minimum zones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Kalvelage

    Full Text Available Nutrient measurements indicate that 30-50% of the total nitrogen (N loss in the ocean occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs. This pelagic N-removal takes place within only ~0.1% of the ocean volume, hence moderate variations in the extent of OMZs due to global warming may have a large impact on the global N-cycle. We examined the effect of oxygen (O(2 on anammox, NH(3 oxidation and NO(3(- reduction in (15N-labeling experiments with varying O(2 concentrations (0-25 µmol L(-1 in the Namibian and Peruvian OMZs. Our results show that O(2 is a major controlling factor for anammox activity in OMZ waters. Based on our O(2 assays we estimate the upper limit for anammox to be ~20 µmol L(-1. In contrast, NH(3 oxidation to NO(2(- and NO(3(- reduction to NO(2(- as the main NH(4(+ and NO(2(- sources for anammox were only moderately affected by changing O(2 concentrations. Intriguingly, aerobic NH(3 oxidation was active at non-detectable concentrations of O(2, while anaerobic NO(3(- reduction was fully active up to at least 25 µmol L(-1 O(2. Hence, aerobic and anaerobic N-cycle pathways in OMZs can co-occur over a larger range of O(2 concentrations than previously assumed. The zone where N-loss can occur is primarily controlled by the O(2-sensitivity of anammox itself, and not by any effects of O(2 on the tightly coupled pathways of aerobic NH(3 oxidation and NO(3(- reduction. With anammox bacteria in the marine environment being active at O(2 levels ~20 times higher than those known to inhibit their cultured counterparts, the oceanic volume potentially acting as a N-sink increases tenfold. The predicted expansion of OMZs may enlarge this volume even further. Our study provides the first robust estimates of O(2 sensitivities for processes directly and indirectly connected with N-loss. These are essential to assess the effects of ocean de-oxygenation on oceanic N-cycling.

  9. Barrier distribution from 28Si+154Sm quasielastic scattering: Coupling effects in the fusion process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur Gurpreet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Barrier distribution for the 28Si+154Sm system has been extracted from large angle quasielastic scattering measurement to investigate the role of various channel couplings on fusion dynamics. The coupled channel calculations, including the collective excitation of the target and projectile, are observed to reproduce the experimental BD rather well. It seems that the role of neutron transfer, relative to collective excitation, is in fact weak in the 28Si+154Sm system even though it has positive Q-value for neutron transfer channels.

  10. Processing of poly-Si electrodes for charge-coupled devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherohman, J.W.; Cook, F.D.

    1978-12-06

    A technique has been developed to fabricate poly-Si electrodes for charge-coupled devices. By controlling the microstructure of a poly-Si film, an anisotropic etchant was selected to provide essentially uniform electrode width dimensions. The electrode widths have only a 6% variation for the majority of the devices over the area of a 2 inch silicon wafer.

  11. The feasibility of modelling coupled processes in safety analysis of spent nuclear fuel disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasilainen, K. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Luukkonen, A.; Niemi, A.; Poellae, J. [VTT Communities and Infrastructure, Espoo (Finland); Olin, M. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-07-01

    The potential of applying coupled modelling in the Finnish safety analysis programme has been reviewed. The study focused on the migration of radionuclides escaping from a spent fuel repository planned to be excavated in fractured bedrock. Two effects that can trigger various couplings in and around a spent fuel repository in Finland were studied in detail; namely heat generation in the spent fuel and the presence of deep, saline groundwaters. The latter have been observed in coastal areas. A systematic survey of the requirements of coupled modelling identified features that render such migration calculations a challenging task. In groundwater flow modelling there appears to be wide ranging uncertainty related to conceptualisation of flow systems and to the corresponding input data. In terms of migration related chemistry there appear to be large gaps in the underlying thermodynamic database for geochemical systems. Rock mechanical predictions are heavily dependent on knowing the location, structure and properties of dominant fractures; information which is extremely difficult to obtain. Conduction and convection of heat is understood well in principle. On the basis of this review, it appears that coupled migration modelling may not yet be at the stage of development that would allow its use as a standard modelling tool in performance assessments. However, a firmer basis for the conclusions reached can only be obtained after a systematic modelling exercise on a relevant and real migration problem has been carried out. (orig.)

  12. HIV transmission risk among HIV seroconcordant and serodiscordant couples: dyadic processes of partner selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Lisa A; West, Tessa V; Kenny, David A; Kalichman, Seth C

    2009-04-01

    Selecting sex partners of the same HIV status or serosorting is a sexual risk reduction strategy used by many men who have sex with men. However, the effectiveness of serosorting for protection against HIV is potentially limited. We sought to examine how men perceive the protective benefits of factors related to serosorting including beliefs about engaging in serosorting, sexual communication, and perceptions of risk for HIV. Participants were 94 HIV negative seroconcordant (same HIV status) couples, 20 HIV serodiscordant (discrepant HIV status) couples, and 13 HIV positive seroconcordant (same HIV status) couples recruited from a large gay pride festival in the southeastern US. To account for nonindependence found in the couple-level data, we used multilevel modeling which includes dyad in the analysis. Findings demonstrated that participants in seroconcordant relationships were more likely to believe that serosorting reduces concerns for condom use. HIV negative participants in seroconcordant relationships viewed themselves at relatively low risk for HIV transmission even though monogamy within relationships and HIV testing were infrequent. Dyadic analyses demonstrated that partners have a substantial effect on an individual's beliefs and number of unprotected sex partners. We conclude that relationship partners are an important source of influence and, thus, intervening with partners is necessary to reduce HIV transmission risks.

  13. The feasibility of modelling coupled processes in safety analysis of spent nuclear fuel disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasilainen, K.; Luukkonen, A.; Niemi, A.; Poellae, J.; Olin, M.

    1999-01-01

    The potential of applying coupled modelling in the Finnish safety analysis programme has been reviewed. The study focused on the migration of radionuclides escaping from a spent fuel repository planned to be excavated in fractured bedrock. Two effects that can trigger various couplings in and around a spent fuel repository in Finland were studied in detail; namely heat generation in the spent fuel and the presence of deep, saline groundwaters. The latter have been observed in coastal areas. A systematic survey of the requirements of coupled modelling identified features that render such migration calculations a challenging task. In groundwater flow modelling there appears to be wide ranging uncertainty related to conceptualisation of flow systems and to the corresponding input data. In terms of migration related chemistry there appear to be large gaps in the underlying thermodynamic database for geochemical systems. Rock mechanical predictions are heavily dependent on knowing the location, structure and properties of dominant fractures; information which is extremely difficult to obtain. Conduction and convection of heat is understood well in principle. On the basis of this review, it appears that coupled migration modelling may not yet be at the stage of development that would allow its use as a standard modelling tool in performance assessments. However, a firmer basis for the conclusions reached can only be obtained after a systematic modelling exercise on a relevant and real migration problem has been carried out. (orig.)

  14. The decision-making process for breast reconstruction after cancer surgery: Representations of heterosexual couples in long-standing relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasse, Léonor; Flahault, Cécile; Vioulac, Christel; Lamore, Kristopher; Van Wersch, Anna; Quintard, Bruno; Untas, Aurélie

    2017-05-01

    Most people deal with intrusive life events such as cancer and the care trajectory together with their intimate partners. To our knowledge, no research has studied the involvement of the partner in the decision-making process regarding breast reconstruction (BR) after cancer. This study aimed to gain a better understanding of the couples' decision-making process for BR in the cancer context and particularly to investigate the partners' involvement in this process. Eighteen participants (nine women who underwent a mastectomy following a first breast cancer and their intimate partners) took part in this study. We conducted semidirective interviews, and a general inductive approach was chosen to capture the representations of the couples. The women in the sample were aged between 33 and 66 years (M = 54, SD = 7.5) and their partner between 40 and 76 years (M = 59, SD = 11.6). The duration of their intimate relationship was on average 18 years (SD = 10.4; minimum = 4; maximum = 33). The analysis revealed 11 major themes. The two most salient ones were 'external influence' and 'implication of the partner'. The exploration of the subthemes revealed that the decision-making process is often reported as an interrelated experience by the couples and as a dyadic stressor. The partner's role is depicted as consultative and mostly supportive. These results provide new insights on the involvement of the partner in decision-making. Thus, it now seems crucial to develop a prospective study, which will help understand the progression of the decision-making process over time. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Most people deal with intrusive life events such as cancer and the care trajectory together with their intimate partners. Shared decision-making between patients and physicians is now the 'gold standard' in Western Europe and the United States. However, in the context of breast reconstruction (BR) after cancer, factors guiding

  15. A numerical manifold method model for analyzing fully coupled hydro-mechanical processes in porous rock masses with discrete fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mengsu; Rutqvist, Jonny; Wang, Yuan

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a numerical manifold method (NMM) model was developed for fully coupled analysis of hydro-mechanical (HM) processes in porous rock masses with discrete fractures. Using an NMM two-cover-mesh system of mathematical and physical covers, fractures are conveniently discretized by dividing the mathematical cover along fracture traces to physical cover, resulting in a discontinuous model on a non-conforming mesh. In this model, discrete fracture deformation (e.g. open and slip) and fracture fluid flow within a permeable and deformable porous rock matrix are rigorously considered. For porous rock, direct pore-volume coupling was modeled based on an energy-work scheme. For mechanical analysis of fractures, a fracture constitutive model for mechanically open states was introduced. For fluid flow in fractures, both along-fracture and normal-to-fracture fluid flow are modeled without introducing additional degrees of freedom. When the mechanical aperture of a fracture is changing, its hydraulic aperture and hydraulic conductivity is updated. At the same time, under the effect of coupled deformation and fluid flow, the contact state may dynamically change, and the corresponding contact constraint is updated each time step. Therefore, indirect coupling is realized under stringent considerations of coupled HM effects and fracture constitutive behavior transfer dynamically. To verify the new model, examples involving deformable porous media containing a single and two sets of fractures were designed, showing good accuracy. Last, the model was applied to analyze coupled HM behavior of fractured porous rock domains with complex fracture networks under effects of loading and injection.

  16. Coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical Modeling of Water Leak-Off Process during Hydraulic Fracturing in Shale Gas Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The water leak-off during hydraulic fracturing in shale gas reservoirs is a complicated transport behavior involving thermal (T, hydrodynamic (H, mechanical (M and chemical (C processes. Although many leak-off models have been published, none of the models fully coupled the transient fluid flow modeling with heat transfer, chemical-potential equilibrium and natural-fracture dilation phenomena. In this paper, a coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC model based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics, hydrodynamics, thermo-poroelastic rock mechanics, and non-isothermal chemical-potential equations is presented to simulate the water leak-off process in shale gas reservoirs. The THMC model takes into account a triple-porosity medium, which includes hydraulic fractures, natural fractures and shale matrix. The leak-off simulation with the THMC model involves all the important processes in this triple-porosity medium, including: (1 water transport driven by hydraulic, capillary, chemical and thermal osmotic convections; (2 gas transport induced by both hydraulic pressure driven convection and adsorption; (3 heat transport driven by thermal convection and conduction; and (4 natural-fracture dilation considered as a thermo-poroelastic rock deformation. The fluid and heat transport, coupled with rock deformation, are described by a set of partial differential equations resulting from the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. The semi-implicit finite-difference algorithm is proposed to solve these equations. The evolution of pressure, temperature, saturation and salinity profiles of hydraulic fractures, natural fractures and matrix is calculated, revealing the multi-field coupled water leak-off process in shale gas reservoirs. The influences of hydraulic pressure, natural-fracture dilation, chemical osmosis and thermal osmosis on water leak-off are investigated. Results from this study are expected to provide a better understanding of the

  17. Sensitivity testing practice on pre-processing parameters in hard and soft coupled modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ignaszak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper pays attention to the problem of practical applicability of coupled modeling with the use of hard and soft models types and necessity of adapted to that models data base possession. The data base tests results for cylindrical 30 mm diameter casting made of AlSi7Mg alloy were presented. In simulation tests that were applied the Calcosoft system with CAFE (Cellular Automaton Finite Element module. This module which belongs to „multiphysics” models enables structure prediction of complete casting with division of columnar and equiaxed crystals zones of -phase. Sensitivity tests of coupled model on the particular values parameters changing were made. On these basis it was determined the relations of CET (columnar-to-equaiaxed transition zone position influence. The example of virtual structure validation based on real structure with CET zone location and grain size was shown.

  18. Match properties of heat transfer and coupled heat and mass transfer processes in air-conditioning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tao; Liu Xiaohua; Zhang Lun; Jiang Yi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Investigates match properties of heat or mass transfer processes in HVAC system. ► Losses are caused by limited transfer ability, flow and parameter mismatching. ► Condition of flow matching is the same heat capacity of the fluids. ► Parameter matching is only reached along the saturation line in air–water system. ► Analytical solutions of heat and mass transfer resistance are derived. - Abstract: Sensible heat exchangers and coupled heat and mass transfer devices between humid air and water/desiccant are commonly used devices in air-conditioning systems. This paper focuses on the match properties of sensible heat transfer processes and coupled heat and mass transfer processes in an effort to understand the reasons for performance limitations in order to optimize system performance. Limited heat transfer capability and flow mismatching resulted in heat resistance of the sensible heat transfer process. Losses occurred during the heat and mass transfer processes due to limited transfer capability, flow mismatching, and parameter mismatching. Flow matching was achieved when the heat capacities of the fluids were identical, and parameter matching could only be reached along the saturation line in air–water systems or the iso-concentration line in air–desiccant systems. Analytical solutions of heat transfer resistance and mass transfer resistance were then derived. The heat and mass transfer process close to the saturation line is recommended, and heating sprayed water resulted in better humidification performance than heating inlet air in the air humidifier.

  19. Coupled processes of fluid flow, solute transport, and geochemical reactions in reactive barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeongkon; Schwartz, Franklin W.; Xu, Tianfu; Choi, Heechul, and Kim, In S.

    2004-01-02

    A complex pattern of coupling between fluid flow and mass transport develops when heterogeneous reactions occur. For instance, dissolution and precipitation reactions can change a porous medium's physical properties, such as pore geometry and thus permeability. These changes influence fluid flow, which in turn impacts the composition of dissolved constituents and the solid phases, and the rate and direction of advective transport. Two-dimensional modeling studies using TOUGHREACT were conducted to investigate the coupling between flow and transport developed as a consequence of differences in density, dissolution precipitation, and medium heterogeneity. The model includes equilibrium reactions for aqueous species, kinetic reactions between the solid phases and aqueous constituents, and full coupling of porosity and permeability changes resulting from precipitation and dissolution reactions in porous media. In addition, a new permeability relationship is implemented in TOUGHREACT to examine the effects of geochemical reactions and density difference on plume migration in porous media. Generally, the evolutions in the concentrations of the aqueous phase are intimately related to the reaction-front dynamics. Plugging of the medium contributed to significant transients in patterns of flow and mass transport.

  20. Thermal Phenomena in the Friction Process of the TG15 - Hard Anodic Coating Couple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Służałek G.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a one-dimensional model of heat conduction in a couple consisting of a cylinder made of a sliding plastic material, TG15, and a cuboid made of alloy AW 6061 coated with a hard anodic coating, where the couple is heated with the heat generated during friction. TG15 is a composite material based on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE with a 15% graphite filler, used for piston rings in oil-free air-compressors. Measurement of temperature in the friction zone is extremely important for the understanding and analysis of the phenomena occurring therein. It is practically impossible to introduce a temperature sensor in such a place. Therefore, the interaction taking place in such a couple was modelled using numerical methods. In order to simplify and accelerate the calculations, a one-dimensional model and constant thermophysical parameters of the materials participating in friction were adopted. To solve the proposed model, the finite difference method was used (FDM. The resultant system of equations was solved by means of an explicit scheme.

  1. Intimacy processes and psychological distress among couples coping with head and neck or lung cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, Sharon; Badr, Hoda

    2010-09-01

    Couples coping with head and neck and lung cancers are at increased risk for psychological and relationship distress given patients' poor prognosis and aggressive and sometimes disfiguring treatments. The relationship intimacy model of couples' psychosocial adaptation proposes that relationship intimacy mediates associations between couples' cancer-related support communication and psychological distress. Because the components of this model have not yet been evaluated in the same study, we examined associations between three types of cancer-related support communication (self-disclosure, perceived partner disclosure, and protective buffering), intimacy (global and cancer-specific), and global distress among patients coping with either head and neck or lung cancer and their partners. One hundred and nine patients undergoing active treatment and their partners whose average time since diagnosis was 15 months completed cross-sectional surveys. For both patients and their partners, multilevel analyses using the actor-partner interdependence model showed that global and cancer-specific intimacy fully mediated associations between self- and perceived partner disclosure and distress; global intimacy partially mediated the association between protective buffering and distress. Evidence for moderated mediation was found; specifically, lower levels of distress were reported as a function of global and cancer-specific intimacy, but these associations were stronger for partners than for patients. Enhancing relationship intimacy by disclosing cancer-related concerns may facilitate both partners' adjustment to these illnesses. (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Study of the $W^+ W^- \\gamma$ Process and Limits on Anomalous Quartic Gauge Boson Couplings at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Buijs, A.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duinker, P.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Ewers, A.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kafer, D.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Krenz, W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mangeol, D.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Palomares, C.; Pandoulas, D.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.O.; Prokofiev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M.A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rosenbleck, C.; Roux, B.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, M.P.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Violini, P.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zilizi, G.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2002-01-01

    The process e+e- --> W+ W- \\gamma is studied using the data collected by the L3 detector at LEP. New results, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 427.4 pb-1 at centre-of-mass energies from 192~GeV to 207~GeV, are presented. The W+W-\\gamma cross sections are measured to be in agreement with Standard Model expectations. No hints of anomalous quartic gauge boson couplings are observed. Limits at 95\\% confidence level are derived using also the process e+e- --> \

  3. Coupling microbial catabolic actions with abiotic redox processes: a new recipe for persistent organic pollutant (POP) removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Nam, In-Hyun; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2013-01-01

    The continuous release of toxic persistent organic pollutants (POPs) into the environment has raised a need for effective cleanup methods. The tremendous natural diversity of microbial catabolic mechanisms suggests that catabolic routes may be applied to the remediation of POP-contaminated fields. A large number of the recalcitrant xenobiotics have been shown to be removable via the natural catabolic mechanisms of microbes, and detailed biochemical studies of the catabolic methods, together with the development of sophisticated genetic engineering, have led to the use of synthetic microbes for the bioremediation of POPs. However, the steric effects of substituted halogen moieties, microbe toxicity, and the low bioavailability of POPs still deteriorate the efficiency of removal strategies based on natural and synthetic catabolic mechanisms. Recently, abiotic redox processes that induce rapid reductive dehalogenation, hydroxyl radical-based oxidation, or electron shuttling have been reasonably coupled with microbial catabolic actions, thereby compensating for the drawbacks of biotic processes in POP removal. In this review, we first compare the pros and cons of individual methodologies (i.e., the natural and synthetic catabolism of microbes and the abiotic processes involving zero-valent irons, advanced oxidation processes, and small organic stimulants) for POP removal. We then highlight recent trends in coupling the biotic-abiotic methodologies and discuss how the processes are both feasible and superior to individual methodologies for POP cleanup. Cost-effective and environmentally sustainable abiotic redox actions could enhance the microbial bioremediation potential for POPs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Future planning: default network activity couples with frontoparietal control network and reward-processing regions during process and outcome simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Kathy D; Spreng, R Nathan; Madore, Kevin P; Schacter, Daniel L

    2014-12-01

    We spend much of our daily lives imagining how we can reach future goals and what will happen when we attain them. Despite the prevalence of such goal-directed simulations, neuroimaging studies on planning have mainly focused on executive processes in the frontal lobe. This experiment examined the neural basis of process simulations, during which participants imagined themselves going through steps toward attaining a goal, and outcome simulations, during which participants imagined events they associated with achieving a goal. In the scanner, participants engaged in these simulation tasks and an odd/even control task. We hypothesized that process simulations would recruit default and frontoparietal control network regions, and that outcome simulations, which allow us to anticipate the affective consequences of achieving goals, would recruit default and reward-processing regions. Our analysis of brain activity that covaried with process and outcome simulations confirmed these hypotheses. A functional connectivity analysis with posterior cingulate, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior inferior parietal lobule seeds showed that their activity was correlated during process simulations and associated with a distributed network of default and frontoparietal control network regions. During outcome simulations, medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala seeds covaried together and formed a functional network with default and reward-processing regions. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Coupled model of deformation and gas flow process with temperature and slippage effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhui ZHANG

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of temperature, slippage effect and effective stress of coal on the coupled mechanism of deformation and gas glow are key issues to control coal and gas outburst and design the methane recovery engineering. Firstly, intact coal from Huaxing mine in Jilin Province is crushed and coal briquette specimen are made. Then the tri-axial coupled test setup of the deformation, gas flow and temperature developed by ourselves is adopted to investigate the effects of pore pressure, effective stress and temperature on the permeability of coal briquette specimen. The results show that: 1 Under the condition of low pore pressure, the permeability first reduces with pore pressure increasing, then at a threshold of pore pressure it rises with pore pressure increasing, which is called “slippage effect”. 2 The effective confining stress significantly influences the permeability. With increasing effective confining stress, the space of pores and cracks are compressed and the permeability reduces. 3 The temperature significantly influences the permeability and the permeability decreases with temperature increasing. The main reason is that the space of pores and cracks is compressed due to the temperature stress. Because of the constraint around, temperature compressive stress appears in internal coal samples. Coal pore and fracture space is compressed, and the sample permeability decreases. Besides, the viscosity of gas increases with temperature increasing. It decreases the trend of coal permeability . The temperature influence on coal permeability approximates to linear relationship. 4 The empirical permeability evolution equation with varying temperature, effective stress and slippage effects is presented. The coal is viewed as elastic medium, combined with effective stress principle and the empirical permeability equation, the coupled model of deformation and gas flow with varying temperature and slippage effects is built. Furthermore, the code

  6. Mathematical modeling of a multi-stage naphtha reforming process using novel thermally coupled recuperative reactors to enhance aromatic production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iranshahi, Davood; Bahmanpour, Ali Mohammad; Pourazadi, Ehsan; Rahimpour, Mohammad Reza [Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Shiraz University, P.O. Box 71345, Shiraz (Iran)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, a novel thermally coupled reactor containing the naphtha reforming process in the endothermic side and the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to aniline in the exothermic side has been investigated. Considering the higher thermal efficiency as well as the smaller size of the reactor, utilizing the recuperative coupled reactor is given priority. In this novel configuration, the first and the second reactor of the conventional naphtha reforming process have been substituted by the recuperative coupled reactors which contain the naphtha reforming reactions in the shell side, and the hydrogenation reaction in the tube side. The achieved results of this simulation have been compared with the results of the conventional fixed-bed naphtha reforming reactors. Acceptable enhancement can be noticed in the performance of the reactors. The production rate of the high octane aromatics and the consumption rate of the paraffins have improved 17% and 72%, respectively. The conversion of the nitrobenzene is acceptable and the effect of the number of the tubes also has been taken into account. However, the performance of the new configuration needs to be tested experimentally over a range of parameters under practical operating conditions. (author)

  7. Final Progress Report: Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloroethylene Cometabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Ronald L; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2010-02-19

    Our goal within the overall project is to demonstrate the presence and abundance of methane monooxygenases (MMOs) enzymes and their genes within the microbial community of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Area North (TAN) site. MMOs are thought to be the primary catalysts of natural attenuation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in contaminated groundwater at this location. The actual presence of the proteins making up MMO complexes would provide direct evidence for its participation in TCE degradation. The quantitative estimation of MMO genes and their translation products (sMMO and pMMO proteins) and the knowledge about kinetics and substrate specificity of MMOs will be used to develop mathematical models of the natural attenuation process in the TAN aquifer. The model will be particularly useful in prediction of TCE degradation rate in TAN and possibly in the other DOE sites. Bacteria known as methanotrophs produce a set of proteins that assemble to form methane monooxygenase complexes (MMOs), enzymes that oxidize methane as their natural substrate, thereby providing a carbon and energy source for the organisms. MMOs are also capable of co-metabolically transforming chlorinated solvents like TCE into nontoxic end products such as carbon dioxide and chloride. There are two known forms of methane monooxygenase, a membrane-bound particulate form (pMMO) and a cytoplasmic soluble form (sMMO). pMMO consists of two components, pMMOH (a hydroxylase comprised of 47-, 27-, and 24-kDa subunits) and pMMOR (a reductase comprised of 63 and 8-kDa subunits). sMMO consists of three components: a hydroxylase (protein A-250 kDa), a dimer of three subunits (α2β2γ2), a regulatory protein (protein B-15.8 kDa), and a reductase (protein C-38.6 kDa). All methanotrophs will produce a methanol dehydrogenase to channel the product of methane oxidation (methanol) into the central metabolite formaldehyde. University of Idaho (UI) efforts focused on proteomic analyses using mass

  8. Study of the $e^+ e^- \\to Z \\gamma$ Process at LEP and Limits on Triple Neutral-Gauge-Boson Couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosemann, C.; Rosenbleck, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.

    2004-01-01

    The process e^+e^- --> Z gamma, where the Z boson decays into hadrons or neutrinos, is studied with data collected with the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies from 189 GeV up to 209 GeV. The cross sections are measured and found to be in agreement with the Standard Model predictions. Limits on triple neutral-gauge-boson couplings, forbidden in the Standard Model at tree level, are derived. Limits on the energy scales at which the anomalous couplings could be manifest are set. They range from 0.3 TeV to 2.3 TeV depending on the new physics effect under consideration.

  9. A Compact P⁺ Contact Resistance Model for Characterization of Substrate Coupling in Modern Lightly Doped CMOS Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Ming; Mikkelsen, Jan H.; Jensen, Ole Kiel

    2012-01-01

    Compact modeling of P+ contact resistances is important for characterization of substrate noise coupling in mixed-signal System on Chips (SoCs). Existing contact resistance models can handle uniformly doped bulk or epitaxial substrates. However, compact contact resistance models feasible for modern......, and it is scalable to layout/substrate parameters. The proposed model can also be used to predict noise coupling in terms of S-parameters. The model validation has been done by both EM simulations and measurements, and satisfactory agreement is found between the modeled and measured resistances as well as S-parameters....... lightly-doped CMOS processes with P-well layers are still unavailable. This paper presents a new compact resistance model aiming at solving this problem. A Conformal Mapping(CM) method was used to derive the closed-form expressions for the resistances in the model. The model requires no fitting factors...

  10. Current status of the international DECOVALEX project: thermal-hydraulic-mechanical couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, C. H.; Hwang, Y. S.; Kim, J

    1998-01-01

    THM coupling is an important issue to assess the safety of the HLW repositories. In this art report the current status of the international DECOVALEX project was reviewed to understand the most updated R and D direction on the groundwater flow assessment coupled with the decay heat and mechanical stress around a repository. Important progresses of DECOVALEX I, II, III and 2 were studied. Results show that even though there are good agreements on the predictions of stress and temperature, still the prediction of flow in discrete fracture network is incomplete. (author). 21 refs., 28 tabs., 33 figs

  11. OGS#PETSc approach for robust and efficient simulations of strongly coupled hydrothermal processes in EGS reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Norihiro; Blucher, Guido; Cacace, Mauro; Kolditz, Olaf

    2016-04-01

    A robust and computationally efficient solution is important for 3D modelling of EGS reservoirs. This is particularly the case when the reservoir model includes hydraulic conduits such as induced or natural fractures, fault zones, and wellbore open-hole sections. The existence of such hydraulic conduits results in heterogeneous flow fields and in a strengthened coupling between fluid flow and heat transport processes via temperature dependent fluid properties (e.g. density and viscosity). A commonly employed partitioned solution (or operator-splitting solution) may not robustly work for such strongly coupled problems its applicability being limited by small time step sizes (e.g. 5-10 days) whereas the processes have to be simulated for 10-100 years. To overcome this limitation, an alternative approach is desired which can guarantee a robust solution of the coupled problem with minor constraints on time step sizes. In this work, we present a Newton-Raphson based monolithic coupling approach implemented in the OpenGeoSys simulator (OGS) combined with the Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) library. The PETSc library is used for both linear and nonlinear solvers as well as MPI-based parallel computations. The suggested method has been tested by application to the 3D reservoir site of Groß Schönebeck, in northern Germany. Results show that the exact Newton-Raphson approach can also be limited to small time step sizes (e.g. one day) due to slight oscillations in the temperature field. The usage of a line search technique and modification of the Jacobian matrix were necessary to achieve robust convergence of the nonlinear solution. For the studied example, the proposed monolithic approach worked even with a very large time step size of 3.5 years.

  12. Phosphorus Recovery from a Water Reservoir–Potential of Nanofiltration Coupled to Electrodialytic Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couto, N.; Guedes, P.; Mateus, E. P.

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide waste streams can represent an environmental problem if they are considered “deleterious material”. These streams may also be a source of secondary resources when enclosing compounds with potential to be recovered. Phosphorus (P) is one of those, with an increasing interest, as it is es......Worldwide waste streams can represent an environmental problem if they are considered “deleterious material”. These streams may also be a source of secondary resources when enclosing compounds with potential to be recovered. Phosphorus (P) is one of those, with an increasing interest....... 7 and 42 h experimental-period, depending on concentrate parameters. In less than 7 h of ED, 72 % of P was recovered in the anolyte and thereby separated from the concentrate stream. Nanofiltration coupled to ED can be considered a promising and sustainable technology to upgrade waste streams...

  13. SELF-EXCITED WAVE PROCESSES IN CHAINS OF UNIDIRECTIONALLY COUPLED IMPULSE NEURONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Glyzin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the mathematical modeling of neural activity. We propose new classes of singularly perturbed differential-difference equations with delay of Volterra type. With these systems, the models as a single neuron or neural networks are described. We study attractors of ring systems of unidirectionally coupled impulse neurons in the case where the number of links in the system increases indefinitely. In order to study periodic solutions of travelling wave type of this system, some special tricks are used which reduce the existence and stability problems for cycles to the investigation of auxiliary system with impulse actions. Using this approach, we establish that the number of stable self-excited waves simultaneously existing in the chain increases unboundedly as the number of links of the chain increases, that is, the well-known buffer phenomenon occurs.

  14. Starch extraction process coupled to protein recovery from leguminous tuberous roots (Pachyrhizus ahipa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Andrea; Dini, Cecilia; Viña, Sonia Z; García, María A

    2016-11-05

    The objective of this work was to fit together the starch extraction from Pachyrhizus ahipa roots and the recovery of the proteins present in these storage organs, making an improved use of this novel raw material. The replacement of water by buffer PO4(-3)/NaCl as solvent in the first extraction steps improved protein extraction without lowering the starch yield. The starches obtained from the traditional and the proposed methods exhibited some differences in appearance and technological and thermal properties, which were endorsed to the adjustment in the methodology of extraction rather than to the use of buffer as solvent. Thus, P. ahipa starch obtaining procedure could be coupled to protein extraction with a minimum change in the methodology. This innovation did not significantly shift the characteristics of the starch obtained and allowed to obtain a protein yield of 135.7mg BSA equivalent protein/100g of fresh roots. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Grey Relational Analysis Coupled with Principal Component Analysis for Optimization of Stereolithography Process to Enhance Part Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, B. S.; Sekhar, U. Chandra; Drakshayani, D. N.

    2017-08-01

    The paper investigates optimization of stereolithography process for SL5530 epoxy resin material to enhance part quality. The major characteristics indexed for performance selected to evaluate the processes are tensile strength, Flexural strength, Impact strength and Density analysis and corresponding process parameters are Layer thickness, Orientation and Hatch spacing. In this study, the process is intrinsically with multiple parameters tuning so that grey relational analysis which uses grey relational grade as performance index is specially adopted to determine the optimal combination of process parameters. Moreover, the principal component analysis is applied to evaluate the weighting values corresponding to various performance characteristics so that their relative importance can be properly and objectively desired. The results of confirmation experiments reveal that grey relational analysis coupled with principal component analysis can effectively acquire the optimal combination of process parameters. Hence, this confirm that the proposed approach in this study can be an useful tool to improve the process parameters in stereolithography process, which is very useful information for machine designers as well as RP machine users.

  16. A literature review of coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical-chemical processes pertinent to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manteufel, R.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Turner, D.R.; Chowdhury, A.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1993-07-01

    A literature review has been conducted to determine the state of knowledge available in the modeling of coupled thermal (T), hydrologic (H), mechanical (M), and chemical (C) processes relevant to the design and/or performance of the proposed high-level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The review focuses on identifying coupling mechanisms between individual processes and assessing their importance (i.e., if the coupling is either important, potentially important, or negligible). The significance of considering THMC-coupled processes lies in whether or not the processes impact the design and/or performance objectives of the repository. A review, such as reported here, is useful in identifying which coupled effects will be important, hence which coupled effects will need to be investigated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in order to assess the assumptions, data, analyses, and conclusions in the design and performance assessment of a geologic reposit``. Although this work stems from regulatory interest in the design of the geologic repository, it should be emphasized that the repository design implicitly considers all of the repository performance objectives, including those associated with the time after permanent closure. The scope of this review is considered beyond previous assessments in that it attempts with the current state-of-knowledge) to determine which couplings are important, and identify which computer codes are currently available to model coupled processes.

  17. A literature review of coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical-chemical processes pertinent to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manteufel, R.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Turner, D.R.; Chowdhury, A.H.

    1993-07-01

    A literature review has been conducted to determine the state of knowledge available in the modeling of coupled thermal (T), hydrologic (H), mechanical (M), and chemical (C) processes relevant to the design and/or performance of the proposed high-level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The review focuses on identifying coupling mechanisms between individual processes and assessing their importance (i.e., if the coupling is either important, potentially important, or negligible). The significance of considering THMC-coupled processes lies in whether or not the processes impact the design and/or performance objectives of the repository. A review, such as reported here, is useful in identifying which coupled effects will be important, hence which coupled effects will need to be investigated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in order to assess the assumptions, data, analyses, and conclusions in the design and performance assessment of a geologic reposit''. Although this work stems from regulatory interest in the design of the geologic repository, it should be emphasized that the repository design implicitly considers all of the repository performance objectives, including those associated with the time after permanent closure. The scope of this review is considered beyond previous assessments in that it attempts with the current state-of-knowledge) to determine which couplings are important, and identify which computer codes are currently available to model coupled processes

  18. Aluminium content of some processed foods, raw materials and food additives in China by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Gui-Fang; Li, Ke; Ma, Jing; Liu, Fen; Dai, Jing-Jing; Li, Hua-Bin

    2011-01-01

    The level of aluminium in 178 processed food samples from Shenzhen city in China was evaluated using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Some processed foods contained a concentration of up to 1226 mg/kg, which is about 12 times the Chinese food standard. To establish the main source in these foods, Al levels in the raw materials were determined. However, aluminium concentrations in raw materials were low (0.10-451.5 mg/kg). Therefore, aluminium levels in food additives used in these foods was determined and it was found that some food additives contained a high concentration of aluminium (0.005-57.4 g/kg). The results suggested that, in the interest of public health, food additives containing high concentrations of aluminium should be replaced by those containing less. This study has provided new information on aluminium levels in Chinese processed foods, raw materials and a selection of food additives.

  19. Optoelectronic properties of Black-Silicon generated through inductively coupled plasma (ICP) processing for crystalline silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Jens; Gaudig, Maria; Bernhard, Norbert; Lausch, Dominik

    2016-06-01

    The optoelectronic properties of maskless inductively coupled plasma (ICP) generated black silicon through SF6 and O2 are analyzed by using reflection measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and quasi steady state photoconductivity (QSSPC). The results are discussed and compared to capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) and industrial standard wet chemical textures. The ICP process forms parabolic like surface structures in a scale of 500 nm. This surface structure reduces the average hemispherical reflection between 300 and 1120 nm up to 8%. Additionally, the ICP texture shows a weak increase of the hemispherical reflection under tilted angles of incidence up to 60°. Furthermore, we report that the ICP process is independent of the crystal orientation and the surface roughness. This allows the texturing of monocrystalline, multicrystalline and kerf-less wafers using the same parameter set. The ICP generation of black silicon does not apply a self-bias on the silicon sample. Therefore, the silicon sample is exposed to a reduced ion bombardment, which reduces the plasma induced surface damage. This leads to an enhancement of the effective charge carrier lifetime up to 2.5 ms at 1015 cm-3 minority carrier density (MCD) after an atomic layer deposition (ALD) with Al2O3. Since excellent etch results were obtained already after 4 min process time, we conclude that the ICP generation of black silicon is a promising technique to substitute the industrial state of the art wet chemical textures in the solar cell mass production.

  20. Coupled processes affecting the performance of a nuclear waste repository. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, C.F.

    1985-09-01

    Contributed papers were in the following subject areas: geochemistry, geohydrology, and geomechanics. In addition to the contributed papers, current field projects were reviewed. Individual papers were processed separately. (LM)

  1. Transition from reversible to irreversible magnetic exchange-spring processes in antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled hard/soft/hard trilayer structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiguang; Guo Guanghua; Zhang Guangfu

    2011-01-01

    The demagnetization processes of antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled hard/soft/hard trilayer structures have been studied based on the discrete one-dimensional atomic chain model and the linear partial domain-wall model. It is found that, when the magnetic anisotropy of soft layer is taken into account, the changes of the soft layer thickness and the interfacial exchange coupling strength may lead a transition of demagnetization process in soft layer from the reversible to the irreversible magnetic exchange-spring process. For the trilayer structures with very thin soft layer, the demagnetization process exhibits typical reversible exchange-spring behavior. However, as the thickness of soft layer is increased, there is a crossover point t c , after which the process becomes irreversible. Similarly, there is also a critical interfacial exchange coupling constant A sh c , above which the exchange-spring process is reversible. When A sh sh c , the irreversible exchange-spring process is achieved. The phase diagram of reversible and irreversible exchange-spring processes is mapped in the plane of the interfacial exchange coupling A sh and soft layer thickness N s . - Research highlights: → A differing magnetic exchange-spring process is found in antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled hard/soft/hard trilayers if the magnetic anisotropy of the soft layers is taken into account. → The change of the soft layer thickness may lead to a transition of demagnetization process in soft layer from the reversible to the irreversible exchange-spring process. → The change of the soft-hard interfacial exchange coupling strength may lead a transition of demagnetization process in soft layer from the reversible to the irreversible exchange-spring process. → The phase diagram of reversible and irreversible exchange-spring processes is mapped in the plane of the interfacial exchange coupling and soft layer thickness.

  2. A coupled FVM-DEM method to simulate internal erosion process in micro scale granular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Q.; Man, T.; Hill, K. M.; Fu, X.

    2017-12-01

    This work presents a three dimensional coupling DEM-FVM method to simulate and analyze internal erosion behavior in a micro-scale granular system. The FVM (Finite Volume Method) part is set to simulate the seepage flow through the simulation field, providing the spatial distribution of fluid conditions (e.g., water discharge and confining pressure). The DEM (Discrete Element Method) part helps reproduce the details, such as the location, movement and rotation of soil particles driven by the resolved flow, and update the parameters used in the FVM part (e.g., porosity and grain size gradation). The simulation result is proved to be stable and reliable by verified convergence and symmetry in velocity profile as well as by reproduced rheology rules of granular flow. Then a series of cases with different boundary conditions were simulated. The value of critical shear stress, which is an essential parameter in macroscopic modeling framework, was statistically drawn within the granular system. It was shown that the value of critical shear stress remains a constant under given soil gradation and normal pressure, no matter how the hydraulic gradient changes. This finding is consistent with traditional assumption of being constant and shows the capability of reproducing macroscopic properties of soil through using the FVM-DEM modeling approach.

  3. Before and After "I Do": Marriage Processes for Mid-Life Gay and Lesbian Married Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosley-Smith, Emma R; Reczek, Corinne

    2018-04-03

    This qualitative study examines how mid-life gay and lesbian married individuals articulate their decision to marry. Using 2013 data from 30 mid-life couples in Massachusetts, this study challenges previous literature that conceptualized marriage as entirely positive or negative for same-sex individuals. Mid-life individuals' unique social and historical context influence their experiences of marriage, as mid-life individuals have witnessed the rise and feasibility of marriage equality, have formed relationships outside of the bounds of marriage, and have been in committed relationships long before they married. Using the framework of ambivalence, our findings provide three main contributions to the literature. First, we show that marital ambivalence is a common experience in our sample. Second, we detail how marital ambivalence is indicative of the age, life-course stage, and length of relationship for mid-life lesbian and gay individuals. Third, we explore ambivalence at the level of the relationship, not just as an individual experience. This study provides new insight into how sexuality shapes both intimate relationship dynamics as well as the effect of same-sex marriage on LGBT communities and identities.

  4. Modernization of the NESTLE-CANDU reactor simulator and coupling to scale-processed cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, S.; Maldonado, G.I.

    2012-01-01

    The original version of the NESTLE computer code for CANDU applications, herein referred as the NESTLE-CANDU or NESTLE-C program, was developed under sponsorship by the CNSC as a “stand-alone” program. In fact, NESTLE-C emerged from the original version of NESTLE, applicable to light water reactors, which was written in FORTRAN 77 to solve the few-group neutron diffusion equation utilizing the Nodal Expansion Method (NEM). Accordingly, NESTLE-C can solve the eigenvalue (criticality); eigenvalue adjoint; external fixed-source or eigenvalue initiated transient problems for CANDU reactor fuel arrangements and geometries. This article reports a recent conversion of the NESTLE-C code to the Fortran 90 standard, in addition, we highlight other code updates carried out to modularize and modernize NESTLE-C in a manner consistent with the latest updates performed with the parent NESTLE code for light water reactor (LWR) applications. Also reported herein, is a simulation of a CANDU reactor employing 37-element fuel bundles, which was carried out to highlight the SCALE to NESTLE-C coupling developed for two-group collapsed and bundle homogenized cross-section generation. The results presented are consistent with corresponding simulations that employed HELIOS generated cross-sections. (author)

  5. Application of coupled symbolic and numeric processing to an advanced scheduling system for plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Takamoto, Masanori; Nonaka, Hisanori; Yamada, Naoyuki

    1994-01-01

    A scheduling system has been developed by integrating symbolic processing functions for constraint handling and modification guidance, with numeric processing functions for schedule optimization and evaluation. The system is composed of an automatic schedule generation module, interactive schedule revision module and schedule evaluation module. The goal of the problem solving is the flattening of the daily resources requirement throughout the scheduling period. The automatic schedule generation module optimizes the initial schedule according to the formulatable portion of requirement description specified in a predicate-like language. A planning engineer refines the near-goal schedule through a knowledge-based interactive optimization process to obtain the goal schedule which fully covers the requirement description, with the interactive schedule revision module and schedule evaluation module. A scheduling system has been implemented on the basis of the proposed problem solving framework and experimentally applied to real-world sized scheduling problems for plant construction. With a result of the overall plant construction scheduling, a section schedule optimization process is described with the emphasis on the symbolic processing functions. (author)

  6. Investigation of cold extrusion process using coupled thermo-mechanical FEM analysis and adaptive friction modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görtan, Mehmet Okan

    2017-10-01

    Cold extrusion processes are known for their excellent material usage as well as high efficiency in the production of large batches. Although the process starts at room temperature, workpiece temperatures may rise above 200°C. Moreover, contact normal stresses can exceed 2500 MPa, whereas surface enlargement values can reach up to 30. These changes affects friction coefficients in cold extrusion processes. In the current study, friction coefficients between a plain carbon steel C4C (1.0303) and a tool steel (1.2379) are determined dependent on temperature and contact pressure using the sliding compression test (SCT). In order to represent contact normal stress and temperature effects on friction coefficients, an empirical adaptive friction model has been proposed. The validity of the model has been tested with experiments and finite element simulations for a cold forward extrusion process. By using the proposed adaptive friction model together with thermo-mechanical analysis, the deviation in the process loads between numerical simulations and model experiments could be reduced from 18.6% to 3.3%.

  7. Detection and Correction of Under-/Overexposed Optical Soundtracks by Coupling Image and Audio Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taquet, Jonathan; Besserer, Bernard; Hassaine, Abdelali; Decenciere, Etienne

    2008-12-01

    Film restoration using image processing, has been an active research field during the last years. However, the restoration of the soundtrack has been mainly performed in the sound domain, using signal processing methods, despite the fact that it is recorded as a continuous image between the images of the film and the perforations. While the very few published approaches focus on removing dust particles or concealing larger corrupted areas, no published works are devoted to the restoration of soundtracks degraded by substantial underexposure or overexposure. Digital restoration of optical soundtracks is an unexploited application field and, besides, scientifically rich, because it allows mixing both image and signal processing approaches. After introducing the principles of optical soundtrack recording and playback, this contribution focuses on our first approaches to detect and cancel the effects of under and overexposure. We intentionally choose to get a quantification of the effect of bad exposure in the 1D audio signal domain instead of 2D image domain. Our measurement is sent as feedback value to an image processing stage where the correction takes place, building up a "digital image and audio signal" closed loop processing. The approach is validated on both simulated alterations and real data.

  8. Detection and Correction of Under-/Overexposed Optical Soundtracks by Coupling Image and Audio Signal Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Decenciere

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Film restoration using image processing, has been an active research field during the last years. However, the restoration of the soundtrack has been mainly performed in the sound domain, using signal processing methods, despite the fact that it is recorded as a continuous image between the images of the film and the perforations. While the very few published approaches focus on removing dust particles or concealing larger corrupted areas, no published works are devoted to the restoration of soundtracks degraded by substantial underexposure or overexposure. Digital restoration of optical soundtracks is an unexploited application field and, besides, scientifically rich, because it allows mixing both image and signal processing approaches. After introducing the principles of optical soundtrack recording and playback, this contribution focuses on our first approaches to detect and cancel the effects of under and overexposure. We intentionally choose to get a quantification of the effect of bad exposure in the 1D audio signal domain instead of 2D image domain. Our measurement is sent as feedback value to an image processing stage where the correction takes place, building up a “digital image and audio signal” closed loop processing. The approach is validated on both simulated alterations and real data.

  9. Coupling of Petri Net Models of the Mycobacterial Infection Process and Innate Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael V. Carvalho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Computational and mathematical modeling is important in support of a better understanding of complex behavior in biology. For the investigation of biological systems, researchers have used computers to construct, verify, and validate models that describe the mechanisms behind biological processes in multi-scale representations. In this paper we combine Petri net models that represent the mycobacterial infection process and innate immune response at various levels of organization, from molecular interaction to granuloma dissemination. In addition to the conventional graphical representation of the Petri net, the outcome of the model is projected onto a 3D model representing the zebrafish embryo. In this manner we provide a visualization of the process in a simulation framework that portrays the infection in the living system.

  10. Controls on the Environmental Fate of Compounds Controlled by Coupled Hydrologic and Reactive Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hixson, J.; Ward, A. S.; McConville, M.; Remucal, C.

    2017-12-01

    Current understanding of how compounds interact with hydrologic processes or reactive processes have been well established. However, the environmental fate for compounds that interact with hydrologic AND reactive processes is not well known, yet critical in evaluating environmental risk. Evaluations of risk are often simplified to homogenize processes in space and time and to assess processes independently of one another. However, we know spatial heterogeneity and time-variable reactivities complicate predictions of environmental transport and fate, and is further complicated by the interaction of these processes, limiting our ability to accurately predict risk. Compounds that interact with both systems, such as photolytic compounds, require that both components are fully understood in order to predict transport and fate. Release of photolytic compounds occurs through both unintentional releases and intentional loadings. Evaluating risks associated with unintentional releases and implementing best management practices for intentional releases requires an in-depth understanding of the sensitivity of photolytic compounds to external controls. Lampricides, such as 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM), are broadly applied in the Great Lakes system to control the population of invasive sea lamprey. Over-dosing can yield fish kills and other detrimental impacts. Still, planning accounts for time of passage and dilution, but not the interaction of the physical and chemical systems (i.e., storage in the hyporheic zone and time-variable decay rates). In this study, we model a series of TFM applications to test the efficacy of dosing as a function of system characteristics. Overall, our results demonstrate the complexity associated with photo-sensitive compounds through stream-hyporheic systems, and highlight the need to better understand how physical and chemical systems interact to control transport and fate in the environment.

  11. Image processing using pulse-coupled neural networks applications in Python

    CERN Document Server

    Lindblad, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Image processing algorithms based on the mammalian visual cortex are powerful tools for extraction information and manipulating images. This book reviews the neural theory and translates them into digital models. Applications are given in areas of image recognition, foveation, image fusion and information extraction. The third edition reflects renewed international interest in pulse image processing with updated sections presenting several newly developed applications. This edition also introduces a suite of Python scripts that assist readers in replicating results presented in the text and to further develop their own applications.

  12. Coupling process-based models and plant architectural models: A key issue for simulating crop production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reffye, de P.; Heuvelink, E.; Guo, Y.; Hu, B.G.; Zhang, B.G.

    2009-01-01

    Process-Based Models (PBMs) can successfully predict the impact of environmental factors (temperature, light, CO2, water and nutrients) on crop growth and yield. These models are used widely for yield prediction and optimization of water and nutrient supplies. Nevertheless, PBMs do not consider

  13. Coupling socio-economic factors and eco-hydrological processes using a cascade-modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odongo, V.O.; Mulatu, D.W.; Muthoni, F.K.; Oel, van P.R.; Meins, F.M.; Tol, van der C.; Skidmore, A.K.; Groen, T.A.; Becht, R.; Onyando, J.O.; Veen, van der A.

    2014-01-01

    Most hydrological studies do not account for the socio-economic influences on eco-hydrological processes. However, socio-economic developments often change the water balance substantially and are highly relevant in understanding changes in hydrological responses. In this study a multi-disciplinary

  14. Technical basis and programmatic requirements for large block testing of coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological-chemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wunan.

    1993-09-01

    This document contains the technical basis and programmatic requirements for a scientific investigation plan that governs tests on a large block of tuff for understanding the coupled thermal- mechanical-hydrological-chemical processes. This study is part of the field testing described in Section 8.3.4.2.4.4.1 of the Site Characterization Plan (SCP) for the Yucca Mountain Project. The first, and most important objective is to understand the coupled TMHC processes in order to develop models that will predict the performance of a nuclear waste repository. The block and fracture properties (including hydrology and geochemistry) can be well characterized from at least five exposed surfaces, and the block can be dismantled for post-test examinations. The second objective is to provide preliminary data for development of models that will predict the quality and quantity of water in the near-field environment of a repository over the current 10,000 year regulatory period of radioactive decay. The third objective is to develop and evaluate the various measurement systems and techniques that will later be employed in the Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (EBSFT)

  15. Landfill Leachate Treatment Using Coupled, Sequential Coagulation-flocculation and Advanced Oxidation Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Álvarez Cruz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the efficiency of Fenton (Fe/H2O2 and photo-assisted Fenton (Fe2+/H2O2/UV reactions combined with coagulation-flocculation (C-F processes to remove the chemical oxygen demand (COD in a landfill leachate from Mexico at a laboratory scale. The C-F experiments were carried out in jar test equipment using different FeSO4 concentrations (0.0, 0.6, 1.0, 3, and 6 mM at pH = 3.0. The effluent from the C-F processes were then treated using the Fenton reaction. The experiments were carried out in a 500 mL glass reactor fillet with 250 mL of landfill leachate. Different molar ratio concentrations (Fe/H2O2 were tested (e.g., 1.6, 3.3, 30, 40 and 75, and the reaction was followed until COD analysis showed no significant further variation in concentration or until 90 min of reaction time were completed. The photo-assisted Fenton reaction was carried out using a UV lamp (365 nm, 5 mW with the same Fe/H2O2 molar ratio values described above. The results suggested that the photo-assisted Fenton process is the most efficient oxidation method for removing organic matter and color in the leachate. The photo-assisted Fenton process removed 68% of the COD and 90% of the color at pH = 3 over 30 minutes of reaction time using a H2O2/Fe molar ratio equal to 75 only using a third of the reaction time of the previous process.

  16. Bioelectricity Generation and Bioremediation of an Azo-Dye in a Microbial Fuel Cell Coupled Activated Sludge Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Danish; Abdulateif, Huda; Ismail, Iqbal M.; Sabir, Suhail; Khan, Mohammad Zain

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous bioelectricity generation and dye degradation was achieved in the present study by using a combined anaerobic-aerobic process. The anaerobic system was a typical single chambered microbial fuel cell (SMFC) which utilizes acid navy blue r (ANB) dye along with glucose as growth substrate to generate electricity. Four different concentrations of ANB (50, 100, 200 and 400 ppm) were tested in the SMFC and the degradation products were further treated in an activated sludge post treatment process. The dye decolorization followed pseudo first order kinetics while the negative values of the thermodynamic parameter ∆G (change in Gibbs free energy) shows that the reaction proceeds with a net decrease in the free energy of the system. The coulombic efficiency (CE) and power density (PD) attained peak values at 10.36% and 2,236 mW/m2 respectively for 200 ppm of ANB. A further increase in ANB concentrations results in lowering of cell potential (and PD) values owing to microbial inhibition at higher concentrations of toxic substrates. Cyclic voltammetry studies revealed a perfect redox reaction was taking place in the SMFC. The pH, temperature and conductivity remain 7.5–8.0, 27(±2°C and 10.6–18.2 mS/cm throughout the operation. The biodegradation pathway was studied by the gas chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy technique, suggested the preferential cleavage of the azo bond as the initial step resulting in to aromatic amines. Thus, a combined anaerobic-aerobic process using SMFC coupled with activated sludge process can be a viable option for effective degradation of complex dye substrates along with energy (bioelectricity) recovery. PMID:26496083

  17. A terrestrial ecosystem model (SOLVEG) coupled with atmospheric gas and aerosol exchange processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katata, Genki; Ota, Masakazu

    2017-01-01

    In order to predict the impact of atmospheric pollutants (gases and aerosols) to the terrestrial ecosystem, new schemes for calculating the processes of dry deposition of gases and aerosols, and water and carbon cycles in terrestrial ecosystems were implemented in the one-dimensional atmosphere-SOiL-VEGetation model, SOLVEG. We made performance tests at various vegetation areas to validate the newly developed schemes. In this report, the detail in each modeled process is described with an instruction how to use the modified SOLVEG. The framework of 'terrestrial ecosystem model' was developed for investigation of a change in water, energy, and carbon cycles associated with global warming and air pollution and its impact on terrestrial ecosystems. (author)

  18. Coupling Between Overlying Hydrodynamics, Bioturbation, and Biogeochemical Processes Controls Metal Mobility, Bioavailability, and Toxicity in Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    communities, and posing ongoing threats to larger pelagic organisms by food web contamination .2 Sediment contamination is a major concern worldwide and has...structural heterogeneity, and biogeochemical processes controls contaminant mobility, bioavailability, and toxicity in sediments. American Geophysical...Controls Contaminant Mobility, Bioavailability, and Toxicity in Sediments 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W912HQ-10-C-0024 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  19. Vector meson dominance and pointlike coupling of the photon in soft and hard processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, E.

    1990-05-01

    Recent experimental results on photoproduction of hadrons probe the nature of the interacting photon over a wide kinematical range from soft to hard processes. Single inclusive spectra and energy flows of the final state charged particles are well described by assuming that photon production data are built up by an incoherent superposition of a soft Vector-Meson-Dominance component and a hard pointlike photon component. (orig.)

  20. Enhancement of In Situ Bioremediation of Energetic Compounds by Coupled Abiotic/Biotic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    few sites have groundwater contamination of all three energetics in xx x x the same location. RDX and HMX are common groundwater contaminants due...contaminant with limited TNT subsurface migration because of aerobic and anaerobic degradation in soils and significantly greater sorption. TNT groundwater ...experiments with live, killed, and bioaugmented microbial communities (Task 3) • Upscale the process by aqueous flow experiments of energetic compounds

  1. Nanoscale Optical Emitters for High Density Information Processing using Photonic-Plasmonic Coupling in Coaxial Nanopillars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-10

    Air Force Office of Science and Research 875 Randolph Street Suite 325 Room 3112 Arlington, VA 22203 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11. SPONSOR...within the widespread CMOS processing technology. The developed materials platform is ideally suited to fabricate Si-based active (light emitting and...Sergienko, "High Capacity Quantum Fibonacci Coding for Key Distribution," Phys. Rev. A, 87, 032312 (2013). Books L. Dal Negro Ed. “Optics of Aperiodic

  2. [Analysis of changes in minerals contents during cider fermentation process by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Meng-qi; Yue, Tian-li; Gao, Zhen-peng; Yuan, Ya-hong; Nie, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The changes in mineral elements during cider fermentation process were determined using ICP-MS. The results showed that the main minerals in the fermentation liquor included K, Na, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Sr and B. The content of K was the highest in both the apple juice and the cider, being 1 853. 83 and 1 654. 38 mg . L-1 respectively. The content of minerals was in dynamic changes along with the fermentation process. As a whole, during 72-120 h and 144-216 h, most of the minerals contents underwent great fluctuation. Especially when fermented for 192 h, the content of most of the minerals reached peak value or valley value. The content of Fe and Zn achieved their peak value, while the content of K, Na, Ca, Mg, Mn and B achieved valley value. But during the following 24 h, the content of minerals underwent a sharp reversal. After fermentation, the content of K, Mg, Cu, Zn and B decreased significantly, while the content of Na, Ca, Mn, Fe and Sr did not change significantly. The correlational analysis was conducted to evaluate the correlation between the mineral elements, and the result showed that the correlation between Ca and Mn was the most significant, with the correlation index reaching 0. 924. The information of this study will supply sufficient data for the fermentation process control and quality improvement of cider.

  3. Reuse of Textile Dyeing Effluents Treated with Coupled Nanofiltration and Electrochemical Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Buscio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The reactive dye Cibacron Yellow S-3R was selected to evaluate the feasibility of combining nanofiltration membranes with electrochemical processes to treat textile wastewater. Synthetic dyeing effluents were treated by means of two nanofiltration membranes, Hydracore10 and Hydracore50. Up to 98% of dye removal was achieved. The influence of salt concentration and pH on membrane treatment was studied. The best dye removal yield was achieved at pH 3 in the presence of 60 g/L of NaCl. After the membrane filtration, the concentrate containing high dye concentration was treated by means of an electrochemical process at three different current densities: 33, 83, and 166 mA/cm2. Results showed a lineal relationship between treatment time and applied current density. Both permeates and electrochemically-decoloured effluents were reused in new dyeing processes (100% of permeate and 70% of decoloured concentrates. Dyed fabrics were evaluated with respect to original dyeing. Colour differences were found to be into the acceptance range.

  4. Investigation of Coupled Processes and Impact of High Temperature Limits in Argillite Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kim, Kunhwi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Houseworth, Jim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The focus of research within the UFD Campaign is on repository-induced interactions that may affect the key safety characteristics of an argillaceous rock. These include thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) process interactions that occur as a result of repository construction and waste emplacement. Some of the key questions addressed in this report include the development of fracturing in the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) and THMC effects on the near-field argillaceous rock and buffer minerals and petrophysical characteristics, particularly the impacts of induced temperature rise caused by waste heat.

  5. Thermodynamics of electron transfer and its coupling to vectorial processes in biological membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Arata, H.; Nishimura, M.

    1980-01-01

    A method is developed to express the flux of an electron transfer reaction as a function of the conjugate force, the redox potential difference, throughout the nonlinear region. The flux can be expressed by a product of the hyperbolic sine of the force, a factor ("redox-poising parameter") determined by the redox potentials of subsystem (in certain cases by local pH's and pK's of subsystems), and some constants. This is analogous to the expression of the flux of a diffusion process by the pro...

  6. Controllable process of nanostructured GaN by maskless inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yanfei; Wang, Hu; Shen, Yang; Huang, Zengli; Zhang, Jian; Dingsun, An; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jiadong

    2017-01-01

    This work improved the anisotropically etching profile of GaN with Cl 2 ICP by adjusting etching pressure and gas flow. High etching rate is achieved by lowering pressure and gas flow instead of increasing etching power. High etching power is unfavorable because it may cause physical damages on the surface. In addition, it is noticed that the material of the carrier, used for holding samples during etching, has significant effects on the morphology and profile of the etched GaN surface. A smooth and large-area GaN surface was achieved by proper ICP etching with a big piece of Si carrier; whereas, with other kinds of carriers, various nano-structures were formed on the GaN surfaces after etching. In fact, it is the etching resistance of carrier materials that impacts the surface profile of etched GaN. Needle-like and grass-like nanostructures on etched GaN surfaces were observed with Al and sapphire carriers, of which the process is very similar to RIE-grass or black-silicon technology. This controllable maskless dry-etching process for the GaN nanostructured surface may show more potential applications in GaN devices. (paper)

  7. Coupling image processing and stress analysis for damage identification in a human premolar tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreaus, U; Colloca, M; Iacoviello, D

    2011-08-01

    Non-carious cervical lesions are characterized by the loss of dental hard tissue at the cement-enamel junction (CEJ). Exceeding stresses are therefore generated in the cervical region of the tooth that cause disruption of the bonds between the hydroxyapatite crystals, leading to crack formation and eventual loss of enamel and the underlying dentine. Damage identification was performed by image analysis techniques and allowed to quantitatively assess changes in teeth. A computerized two-step procedure was generated and applied to the first left maxillary human premolar. In the first step, dental images were digitally processed by a segmentation method in order to identify the damage. The considered morphological properties were the enamel thickness and total area, the number of fragments in which the enamel is chipped. The information retrieved by the data processing of the section images allowed to orient the stress investigation toward selected portions of the tooth. In the second step, a three-dimensional finite element model based on CT images of both the tooth and the periodontal ligament was employed to compare the changes occurring in the stress distributions in normal occlusion and malocclusion. The stress states were analyzed exclusively in the critical zones designated in the first step. The risk of failure at the CEJ and of crack initiation at the dentin-enamel junction through the quantification of first and third principal stresses, von Mises stress, and normal and tangential stresses, were also estimated. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Destruction of commercial pesticides by cerium redox couple mediated electrochemical oxidation process in continuous feed mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaji, Subramanian; Chung, Sang Joon; Ryu, Jae-Yong; Moon, Il Shik

    2009-01-01

    Mediated electrochemical oxidation was carried out for the destruction of commercial pesticide formulations using cerium(IV) in nitric acid as the mediator electrolyte solution in a bench scale set up. The mediator oxidant was regenerated in situ using an electrochemical cell. The real application of this sustainable process for toxic organic pollutant destruction lies in its ability for long term continuous operation with continuous organic feeding and oxidant regeneration with feed water removal. In this report we present the results of fully integrated MEO system. The task of operating the continuous feed MEO system for a long time was made possible by continuously removing the feed water using an evaporator set up. The rate of Ce(IV) regeneration in the electrochemical cell and the consumption for the pesticide destruction was matched based on carbon content of the pesticides. It was found that under the optimized experimental conditions for Ce(III) oxidation, organic addition and water removal destruction efficiency of ca. 99% was obtained for all pesticides studied. It was observed that the Ce(IV) concentration was maintained nearly the same throughout the experiment. The stable operation for 6 h proved that the process can be used for real applications and for possible scale up for the destruction of larger volumes of toxic organic wastes.

  9. Controllable process of nanostructured GaN by maskless inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanfei; Wang, Hu; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jiadong; Shen, Yang; Huang, Zengli; Zhang, Jian; Dingsun, An

    2017-11-01

    This work improved the anisotropically etching profile of GaN with Cl2 ICP by adjusting etching pressure and gas flow. High etching rate is achieved by lowering pressure and gas flow instead of increasing etching power. High etching power is unfavorable because it may cause physical damages on the surface. In addition, it is noticed that the material of the carrier, used for holding samples during etching, has significant effects on the morphology and profile of the etched GaN surface. A smooth and large-area GaN surface was achieved by proper ICP etching with a big piece of Si carrier; whereas, with other kinds of carriers, various nano-structures were formed on the GaN surfaces after etching. In fact, it is the etching resistance of carrier materials that impacts the surface profile of etched GaN. Needle-like and grass-like nanostructures on etched GaN surfaces were observed with Al and sapphire carriers, of which the process is very similar to RIE-grass or black-silicon technology. This controllable maskless dry-etching process for the GaN nanostructured surface may show more potential applications in GaN devices.

  10. Coupling of an active middle-ear implant to the long process of the incus using an elastic clip attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraven, Sebastian P; Mlynski, Robert; Dalhoff, Ernst; Heyd, Andreas; Wildenstein, Daniela; Rak, Kristen; Radeloff, Andreas; Hagen, Rudolf; Gummer, Anthony W

    2016-10-01

    The active middle-ear implant Vibrant Soundbridge © (VSB) is used to treat mild-to-severe sensorineural hearing losses. The standard surgical approach for incus vibroplasty is a mastoidectomy and a posterior tympanotomy, crimping the Floating Mass Transducer (FMT) to the long process of the incus (LPI) (standard crimped application). However, tight crimping increases the risk of necrosis of the LPI, resulting in reduction of energy transfer and loss of amplification. The aim of this study was to develop a new coupling device for the LPI, that does not require crimping, and to test its vibrational transfer properties in temporal-bone preparations. An extended antrotomy and a posterior tympanotomy were performed in ten fresh human temporal bones. As a control for normal middle-ear function, the tympanic membrane was stimulated acoustically and the vibration of the stapes footplate was measured by laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV). FMT-induced vibration responses of the stapes were then measured for the standard crimped application at the LPI and for the newly designed elastic long process coupler (LP coupler). For the LP coupler, velocity-amplitude responses in temporal-bone preparations showed increased mean amplitudes at around 1 kHz (∼10 dB) and a reduction between 1.8 and 6 kHz (13 dB on average for 2 ≤ f ≤ 5 kHz). In conclusion, attachment of the FMT to the LPI with the LP coupler leads to generally good mechanical and functional coupling in temporal-bone preparations with a notable disadvantage between 1.8 and 6 kHz. Due to its elastic clip attachment it is expected that the LP coupler will reduce the risk of necrosis of the incus long process, which has to been shown in further studies. Clinical results of the LP coupler are pending. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Decomplexation efficiency and mechanism of Cu(II)-EDTA by H2O2 coupled internal micro-electrolysis process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dongfang; Hu, Yongyou; Guo, Qian; Yuan, Weiguang; Deng, Jiefan; Dang, Yapan

    2016-12-29

    Internal micro-electrolysis (IE) coupled with Fenton oxidation (IEF) was a very effective technology for copper (Cu)-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) wastewater treatment. However, the mechanisms of Cu 2+ removal and EDTA degradation were scarce and lack persuasion in the IEF process. In this paper, the decomplexation and removal efficiency of Cu-EDTA and the corresponding mechanisms during the IEF process were investigated by batch test. An empirical equation and the oxidation reduction potential (ORP) index were proposed to flexibly control IE and the Fenton process, respectively. The results showed that Cu 2+ , total organic carbon (TOC), and EDTA removal efficiencies were 99.6, 80.3, and 83.4%, respectively, under the proper operation conditions of iron dosage of 30 g/L, Fe/C of 3/1, initial pH of 3.0, Fe 2+ /H 2 O 2 molar ratio of 1/4, and reaction time of 20 min, respectively for IE and the Fenton process. The contributions of IE and Fenton to Cu 2+ removal were 91.2 and 8.4%, respectively, and those to TOC and EDTA removal were 23.3, 25.1, and 57, 58.3%, respectively. It was found that Fe 2+ -based replacement-precipitation and hydroxyl radical (•OH) were the most important effects during the IEF process. •OH played an important role in the degradation of EDTA, whose yield and productive rate were 3.13 mg/L and 0.157 mg/(L min -1 ), respectively. Based on the intermediates detected by GC-MS, including acetic acid, propionic acid, pentanoic acid, amino acetic acid, 3-(diethylamino)-1,2-propanediol, and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), a possible degradation pathway of Cu-EDTA in the IEF process was proposed. Graphical abstract The mechanism diagram of IEF process.

  12. Surface modification of magnesium hydroxide sulfate hydrate whiskers using a silane coupling agent by dry process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Donghai, E-mail: zhudonghai-2001@163.com [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810008 (China); Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810008 (China); Nai, Xueying [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810008 (China); Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810008 (China); Lan, Shengjie; Bian, Shaoju [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810008 (China); Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810008 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); Liu, Xin [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810008 (China); Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810008 (China); Li, Wu, E-mail: driverlaoli@163.com [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810008 (China); Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810008 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Dry process was adopted to modify the surface of MHSH whiskers using silane. • Si−O−Mg bonds were formed directly by the reaction between Si−OC{sub 2}H{sub 5} and −OH of MHSH. • Dispersibility and compatibility of modified whiskers greatly improved in organic phase. • Thermal stability of whiskers was enhanced after modified. - Abstract: In order to improve the compatibility of magnesium hydroxide sulfate hydrate (MHSH) whiskers with polymers, the surface of MHSH whiskers was modified using vinyltriethoxysilane (VTES) by dry process. The possible mechanism of the surface modification and the interfacial interactions between MHSH whiskers and VTES, as well as the effect of surface modification, were studied. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analyses showed that the agglomerations were effectively separated and a thin layer was formed on the surface of the whiskers after modification. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses showed that the VTES molecules were bound to the surface of MHSH whiskers after modification. Chemical bonds (Si−O−Mg) were formed by the reaction between Si−OC{sub 2}H{sub 5} or Si−OH and the hydroxyl group of MHSH whiskers. The effect of surface modification was evaluated by sedimentation tests, contact angle measurements and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that the surface of MHSH whiskers was transformed from hydrophilic to hydrophobic, and the dispersibility and the compatibility of MHSH whiskers were significantly improved in the organic phase. Additionally, the thermal stability of the VTES-modified MHSH whiskers was improved significantly.

  13. Degradation of benzalkonium chloride coupling photochemical advanced oxidation technologies with biological processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meichtry, J; Lamponi, A; Gautier, E; Acosta, T; Fiol, P; Curutchet, G; Candal, R; Litter, M

    2005-01-01

    The combination of Advanced Oxidation Technologies (AOTs) and biological processes can be visualized as a very successful technological option for treatment of effluents, because it combines high oxidizing technologies with a conventional, low-cost and well-established treatment technology.Photochemical AOTs, like UV-C with or without H 2 O 2 , photo-Fenton (PF, UV/H 2 O 2 /Fe(II-III)) and UV/TiO 2 heterogeneous photo catalysis involve the generation and use of powerful oxidizing species, mainly the hydroxyl radical.In almost all AOTs, it is possible to use sunlight. Benzalkonium chloride (dodecyldimetylbencylammonium chloride, BKC) is a widely used surfactant, which has many industrial applications.Due to its antibacterial effect, it cannot be eliminated from effluents by a biological treatment, and the complexity of its chemical structure makes necessary the use of drastic oxidizing treatments to achieve complete mineralization and to avoid the formation of byproducts even more toxic than the initial compound.In this study, different alternatives for BKC treatment using photochemical AOTs followed by bio catalytic techniques are presented.Three AOTs were tested: a) UV-C (254 nm, germicide lamp) with and without H 2 O 2 , b) PF (366 nm), c) UV/TiO 2 (254 and 366 nm). PF at a 15:1:1 H 2 O 2 total/BKC 0 /Fe 0 molar ratio at 55 degree C was the most efficient treatment in order to decrease the tensioactivity and the total organic carbon of the solution . The biocatalysis was studied in a reactor fitted with a biofilm of microorganisms coming from a sludge-water treatment plant. To evaluate the maximal BKC concentration that could be allowed to ingress to the biological reactor after the AOT treatment, the toxicity of solutions of different BKC concentrations was analyzed. The study of the relevant parameters of both processes and their combination allowed to establish the preliminary conditions for optimizing the pollutant degradation

  14. Geophysical Monitoring of Coupled Microbial and Geochemical Processes During Stimulated Subsurface Bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Kenneth H.; Kemna, Andreas; Wilkins, Michael J.; Druhan, Jennifer L.; Arntzen, Evan V.; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Long, Philip E.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how microorganisms alter their physical and chemical environment during bioremediation is hindered by our inability to resolve subsurface microbial activity with high spatial resolution. Here we demonstrate the use of a minimally invasive geophysical technique to monitor stimulated microbial activity during acetate amendment in an aquifer near Rifle, Colorado. During electrical induced polarization (IP) measurements, spatiotemporal variations in the phase response between imposed electric current and the resultant electric field correlated with changes in groundwater geochemistry accompanying stimulated iron and sulfate reduction and sulfide mineral precipitation. The magnitude of the phase response varied with measurement frequency (0.125 and 1 Hz) and was dependent upon the dominant metabolic process. The spectral effect was corroborated using a biostimulated column experiment containing Rifle sediments and groundwater. Fluids and sediments recovered from regions exhibiting an anomalous phase response were enriched in Fe(II), dissolved sulfide, and cell-associated FeS nanoparticles. The accumulation of mineral precipitates and electroactive ions altered the ability of pore fluids to conduct electrical charge, accounting for the anomalous IP response and revealing the usefulness of multifrequency IP measurements for monitoring mineralogical and geochemical changes accompanying stimulated subsurface bioremediation

  15. Enhancement of the c-axis texture of aluminum nitride by an inductively coupled plasma reactive sputtering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, C.-M.; Chen, C.H.; Gan, J.-Y.; Kou, C.S.; Hwang, J.

    2005-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma reactive sputtering technique has been applied to grow highly oriented aluminum nitride on Si(111) at high process pressure. An inductive coil of 3 and 1/4 turns was introduced to generate a plasma zone near the substrate holder, which provides additional energy to the radicals inside the plasma zone. The full width at half-maximum of the X-ray rocking curve of AlN(0002) is reduced from 7.90 deg. to 4.05 deg. when the inductive coil power is raised from 0 to 180 W. The enhancement of the c-axis texture of AlN is attributed to the increase of the density of the sputtered Al atoms of high energy

  16. Elimination of radiocontrast agent diatrizoic acid by photo-Fenton process and enhanced treatment by coupling with electro-Fenton process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocos, Elvira; Oturan, Nihal; Pazos, Marta; Sanromán, M Ángeles; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2016-10-01

    The removal of radiocontrast agent diatrizoic acid (DIA) from water was performed using photo-Fenton (PF) process. First, the effect of H2O2 dosage on mineralization efficiency was determined using ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The system reached a maximum mineralization degree of 60 % total organic carbon (TOC) removal at 4 h with 20 mM initial H2O2 concentration while further concentration values led to a decrease in TOC abatement efficiency. Then, the effect of different concentrations of Fenton's reagents was studied for homogeneous Fenton process. Obtained results revealed that 0.25 mM Fe(3+) and 20 mM H2O2 were the best conditions, achieving 80 % TOC removal efficiency at 4 h treatment. Furthermore, heterogeneous PF treatment was developed using iron-activated carbon as catalyst. It was demonstrated that this catalyst is a promising option, reaching 67 % of TOC removal within 4 h treatment without formation of iron leachate in the medium. In addition, two strategies of enhancement for process efficiency are proposed: coupling of PF with electro-Fenton (EF) process in two ways: photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) or PF followed by EF (PF-EF) treatments, achieving in both cases the complete mineralization of DIA solution within only 2 h. Finally, the Microtox tests revealed the formation of more toxic compounds than the initial DIA during PF process, while, it was possible to reach total mineralization by both proposed alternatives (PEF or PF-EF) and thus to remove the toxicity of DIA solution.

  17. Uncertainties in coupled thermal-hydrological processes associated with the drift scale test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Tsang, Y.W.

    2002-01-01

    Understanding thermally driven coupled hydrological, mechanical, and chemical processes in unsaturated fractured tuff is essential for evaluating the performance of the potential radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The Drift Scale Test (DST), intended for acquiring such an understanding of these processes, has generated a huge volume of temperature and moisture redistribution data. Sophisticated thermal hydrological (TH) conceptual models have yielded a good fit between simulation results and those measured data. However, some uncertainties in understanding the TH processes associated with the DST still exist. This paper evaluates these uncertainties and provides quantitative estimates of the range of these uncertainties. Of particular interest for the DST are the uncertainties resulting from the unmonitored loss of vapor through an open bulkhead of the test. There was concern that the outcome from the test might have been significantly altered by these losses. Using alternative conceptual models, we illustrate that predicted mean temperatures from the DST are within 1 degree C of the measured mean temperatures through the first two years of heating. The simulated spatial and temporal evolution of drying and condensation fronts is found to be qualitatively consistent with measured saturation data. Energy and mass balance computation shows that no more than 13 percent of the input energy is lost because of vapor leaving the test domain through the bulkhead. The change in average saturation in fractures is also relatively small. For a hypothetical situation in which no vapor is allowed to exit through the bulkhead, the simulated average fracture saturation is not qualitatively different enough to be discerned by measured moisture redistribution data. This leads us to conclude that the DST, despite the uncertainties associated with open field testing, has provided an excellent understanding of the TH processes

  18. The effect of dielectric top lids on materials processing in a low frequency inductively coupled plasma (LF-ICP) reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, J. W. M.; Chan, C. S.; Xu, L.; Xu, S.

    2014-08-01

    The advent of the plasma revolution began in the 1970's with the exploitation of plasma sources for anisotropic etching and processing of materials. In recent years, plasma processing has gained popularity, with research institutions adopting projects in the field and industries implementing dry processing in their production lines. The advantages of utilizing plasma sources would be uniform processing over a large exposed surface area, and the reduction of toxic emissions. This leads to reduced costs borne by manufacturers which could be passed down as consumer savings, and a reduction in negative environmental impacts. Yet, one constraint that plagues the industry would be the control of contaminants in a plasma reactor which becomes evident when reactions are conducted in a clean vacuum environment. In this work, amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films were grown on glass substrates in a low frequency inductively coupled plasma (LF-ICP) reactor with a top lid made of quartz. Even though the chamber was kept at high vacuum ( 10-4 Pa), it was evident through secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and Fourier-transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) that oxygen contaminants were present. With the aid of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) the contaminant species were identified. The design of the LF-ICP reactor was then modified to incorporate an Alumina (Al2O3) lid. Results indicate that there were reduced amounts of contaminants present in the reactor, and that an added benefit of increased power transfer to the plasma, improving deposition rate of thin films was realized. The results of this study is conclusive in showing that Al2O3 is a good alternative as a top-lid of an LF-ICP reactor, and offers industries a solution in improving quality and rate of growth of thin films.

  19. New Insights About Large-Scale Delta Morphodynamics from a Coupled Model of Fluvial-Coastal Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, A. B.; Ratliff, K. M.; Hutton, E.

    2017-12-01

    We use a newly developed delta model to explore the combined effects of sea-level rise (SLR) and variable wave influence on delta morphology, avulsion behavior, and autogenic sediment flux variability. Using the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System framework and tools, we couple the River Avulsion and Floodplain Evolution Model (RAFEM) to the Coastline Evolution Model (CEM). RAFEM models the fluvial processes, including river profile evolution, floodplain deposition, and avulsions. CEM uses gradients in alongshore sediment transport to distribute the fluvial sediment along the coastline. A suite of recent experiments using the coupled model and the Dakota software toolkit lead to several new insights: 1) A preferential avulsion location (which scales with the backwater length) can arise for geometric reasons that are independent of the recently suggested importance of alternation between flood and inter-flood periods. 2) The angular distribution of waves, as well as the wave height, affect the avulsion timescale. Previous work suggested that the time between avulsions will increase with greater wave influence, and we find that this is true for an angular mix of waves that tends to smooth a fairly straight coastline (coastline diffusion), where river mouth progradation is slowed and avulsions are delayed. However, if the angular distribution of waves leads to locally smooth shorelines but large amplitude coastline features (anti-diffusive coastline evolution), then avulsion timescales are barely affected, even when wave influence is high. 3) Increasing SLR rates are expected to cause more frequent avulsions, and it does in laboratory deltas. Unexpectedly, we find that this is not the case for the river-dominated deltas in our coupled model, in which SLR-related transgression effectively decreases progradation, offsetting base-level-rise effects. This finding raises potentially important questions about the geometric differences between prototypical and

  20. Redox zone II. Coupled modeling of groundwater flow, solute transport, chemical reactions and microbial processes in the Aespoe island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samper, Javier; Molinero, Jorge; Changbing Yang; Guoxiang Zhang

    2003-12-01

    The Redox Zone Experiment was carried out at the Aespoe HRL in order to study the redox behaviour and the hydrochemistry of an isolated vertical fracture zone disturbed by the excavation of an access tunnel. Overall results and interpretation of the Redox Zone Project were reported by Banwart et al. Later, Banwart presented a summary of the hydrochemistry of the Redox Zone Experiment. Coupled groundwater flow and reactive transport models of this experiment were carried out by Molinero who proposed a revised conceptual model for the hydrogeology of the Redox Zone Experiment which could explain simultaneously measured drawdown and salinity data. The numerical model was found useful to understand the natural system. Several conclusions were drawn about the redox conditions of recharge waters, cation exchange capacity of the fracture zone and the role of mineral phases such as pyrite, calcite, hematite and goethite. This model could reproduce the measured trends of dissolved species, except for bicarbonate and sulphate which are affected by microbially-mediated processes. In order to explore the role of microbial processes, a coupled numerical model has been constructed which accounts for water flow, reactive transport and microbial processes. The results of this model is presented in this report. This model accounts for groundwater flow and reactive transport in a manner similar to that of Molinero and extends the preliminary microbial model of Zhang by accounting for microbially-driven organic matter fermentation and organic matter oxidation. This updated microbial model considers simultaneously the fermentation of particulate organic matter by yeast and the oxidation of dissolved organic matter, a product of fermentation. Dissolved organic matter is produced by yeast and serves also as a substrate for iron-reducing bacteria. Model results reproduce the observed increase in bicarbonate and sulfaphe concentration, thus adding additional evidence for the possibility

  1. How do how internal and external processes affect the behaviors of coupled marsh mudflat systems; infill, stabilize, retreat, or drown?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, J. A.; Mariotti, G.; Wiberg, P.; Fagherazzi, S.; McGlathery, K.

    2013-12-01

    Intertidal coastal environments are prone to changes induced by sea level rise, increases in storminess, and anthropogenic disturbances. It is unclear how changes in external drivers may affect the dynamics of low energy coastal environments because their response is non-linear, and characterized by many thresholds and discontinuities. As such, process-based modeling of the ecogeomorphic processes underlying the dynamics of these ecosystems is useful, not only to predict their change through time, but also to generate new hypotheses and research questions. Here, a three-point dynamic model was developed to investigate how internal and external processes affect the behavior of coupled marsh mudflat systems. The model directly incorporates ecogeomorphological feedbacks between wind waves, salt marsh vegetation, allochthonous sediment loading, tidal flat vegetation and sea level rise. The model was applied to examine potential trajectories of salt marshes on the Eastern seaboard of the United States, including those in the Plum Island Ecosystems (PIE), Virginia Coast Reserve (VCR) and Georgia Coastal Ecosystems (GCE) long term ecological research (LTER) sites. While these sites are undergoing similar rates of relative sea level rise (RSLR), they have distinct differences in site specific environmental drivers including tides, wind waves, allochthonous sediment supply and the presence or absence of seagrass. These differences lead to the emergence of altered behaviors in the coupled salt marsh-tidal flat system. For marsh systems without seagrass or significant riverine sediment supply, conditions similar to those at PIE, results indicated that horizontal and vertical marsh evolution respond in opposing ways to wave induced processes. Marsh horizontal retreat is triggered by large mudflats and strong winds, whereas small mudflats and weak winds reduce the sediment supply to the salt marsh, decreasing its capability to keep pace with sea level rise. Marsh expansion and

  2. Coupled modeling of groundwater flow solute transport, chemical reactions and microbial processes in the 'SP' island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samper, Javier; Molinero, Jorg; Changbing, Yang; Zhang, Guoxiang

    2003-12-01

    The Redox Zone Experiment was carried out at the Aespoe HRL in order to study the redox behavior and the hydrochemistry of an isolated vertical fracture zone disturbed by the excavation of an access tunnel. Overall results and interpretation of the Redox Zone Project were reported by /Banwart et al, 1995/. Later, /Banwart et al, 1999/ presented a summary of the hydrochemistry of the Redox Zone Experiment. Coupled groundwater flow and reactive transport models of this experiment were carried out by /Molinero, 2000/ who proposed a revised conceptual model for the hydrogeology of the Redox Zone Experiment which could explain simultaneously measured drawdown and salinity data. The numerical model was found useful to understand the natural system. Several conclusions were drawn about the redox conditions of recharge waters, cation exchange capacity of the fracture zone and the role of mineral phases such as pyrite, calcite, hematite and goethite. This model could reproduce the measured trends of dissolved species, except for bicarbonate and sulfate which are affected by microbially-mediated processes. In order to explore the role of microbial processes, a coupled numerical model has been constructed which accounts for water flow, reactive transport and microbial processes. The results of this model is presented in this report. This model accounts for groundwater flow and reactive transport in a manner similar to that of /Molinero, 2000/ and extends the preliminary microbial model of /Zhang, 2001/ by accounting for microbially-driven organic matter fermentation and organic matter oxidation. This updated microbial model considers simultaneously the fermentation of particulate organic matter by yeast and the oxidation of dissolved organic matter, a product of fermentation. Dissolved organic matter is produced by yeast and serves also as a substrate for iron-reducing bacteria. Model results reproduce the observed increase in bicarbonate and sulfate concentration, thus

  3. Redox zone II. Coupled modeling of groundwater flow, solute transport, chemical reactions and microbial processes in the Aespoe island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samper, Javier; Molinero, Jorge; Changbing Yang; Guoxiang Zhang [Univ. Da Coruna (Spain)

    2003-12-01

    The Redox Zone Experiment was carried out at the Aespoe HRL in order to study the redox behaviour and the hydrochemistry of an isolated vertical fracture zone disturbed by the excavation of an access tunnel. Overall results and interpretation of the Redox Zone Project were reported by Banwart et al. Later, Banwart presented a summary of the hydrochemistry of the Redox Zone Experiment. Coupled groundwater flow and reactive transport models of this experiment were carried out by Molinero who proposed a revised conceptual model for the hydrogeology of the Redox Zone Experiment which could explain simultaneously measured drawdown and salinity data. The numerical model was found useful to understand the natural system. Several conclusions were drawn about the redox conditions of recharge waters, cation exchange capacity of the fracture zone and the role of mineral phases such as pyrite, calcite, hematite and goethite. This model could reproduce the measured trends of dissolved species, except for bicarbonate and sulphate which are affected by microbially-mediated processes. In order to explore the role of microbial processes, a coupled numerical model has been constructed which accounts for water flow, reactive transport and microbial processes. The results of this model is presented in this report. This model accounts for groundwater flow and reactive transport in a manner similar to that of Molinero and extends the preliminary microbial model of Zhang by accounting for microbially-driven organic matter fermentation and organic matter oxidation. This updated microbial model considers simultaneously the fermentation of particulate organic matter by yeast and the oxidation of dissolved organic matter, a product of fermentation. Dissolved organic matter is produced by yeast and serves also as a substrate for iron-reducing bacteria. Model results reproduce the observed increase in bicarbonate and sulfaphe concentration, thus adding additional evidence for the possibility

  4. Full-length mRNA sequencing uncovers a widespread coupling between transcription initiation and mRNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anvar, Seyed Yahya; Allard, Guy; Tseng, Elizabeth; Sheynkman, Gloria M; de Klerk, Eleonora; Vermaat, Martijn; Yin, Raymund H; Johansson, Hans E; Ariyurek, Yavuz; den Dunnen, Johan T; Turner, Stephen W; 't Hoen, Peter A C

    2018-03-29

    The multifaceted control of gene expression requires tight coordination of regulatory mechanisms at transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Here, we studied the interdependence of transcription initiation, splicing and polyadenylation events on single mRNA molecules by full-length mRNA sequencing. In MCF-7 breast cancer cells, we find 2700 genes with interdependent alternative transcription initiation, splicing and polyadenylation events, both in proximal and distant parts of mRNA molecules, including examples of coupling between transcription start sites and polyadenylation sites. The analysis of three human primary tissues (brain, heart and liver) reveals similar patterns of interdependency between transcription initiation and mRNA processing events. We predict thousands of novel open reading frames from full-length mRNA sequences and obtained evidence for their translation by shotgun proteomics. The mapping database rescues 358 previously unassigned peptides and improves the assignment of others. By recognizing sample-specific amino-acid changes and novel splicing patterns, full-length mRNA sequencing improves proteogenomics analysis of MCF-7 cells. Our findings demonstrate that our understanding of transcriptome complexity is far from complete and provides a basis to reveal largely unresolved mechanisms that coordinate transcription initiation and mRNA processing.

  5. Coupled process of plastics pyrolysis and chemical vapor deposition for controllable synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhou; Zhang, Qiang; Luo, Guohua; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Wei, Fei

    2010-08-01

    Efficient conversion of waste plastics into advanced materials is of conspicuous environmental, social and economic benefits. A coupled process of plastic pyrolysis and chemical vapor deposition for vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) array growth was proposed. Various kinds of plastics, such as polypropylene, polyethylene, and polyvinyl chloride, were used as carbon sources for the controllable growth of CNT arrays. The relationship between the length of CNT arrays and the growth time was investigated. It was found that the length of aligned CNTs increased with prolonged growth time. CNT arrays with a length of 500 μm were obtained for a 40-min growth and the average growth rate was estimated to be 12 μm/min. The diameter of CNTs in the arrays can be modulated by controlling the growth temperature and the feeding rate of ferrocene. In addition, substrates with larger specific surface area such as ceramic spheres, quartz fibers, and quartz particles, were adopted to support the growth of CNT arrays. Those results provide strong evidence for the feasibility of conversion from waste plastics into CNT arrays via this reported sustainable materials processing.

  6. Life cycle assessment of hydrogen production from S-I thermochemical process coupled to a high temperature gas reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraldi, M. R.; Francois, J. L.; Castro-Uriegas, D. [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac No. 8532, Col. Progreso, C.P. 62550, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to quantify the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated to the hydrogen produced by the sulfur-iodine thermochemical process, coupled to a high temperature nuclear reactor, and to compare the results with other life cycle analysis (LCA) studies on hydrogen production technologies, both conventional and emerging. The LCA tool was used to quantify the impacts associated with climate change. The product system was defined by the following steps: (i) extraction and manufacturing of raw materials (upstream flows), (U) external energy supplied to the system, (iii) nuclear power plant, and (iv) hydrogen production plant. Particular attention was focused to those processes where there was limited information from literature about inventory data, as the TRISO fuel manufacture, and the production of iodine. The results show that the electric power, supplied to the hydrogen plant, is a sensitive parameter for GHG emissions. When the nuclear power plant supplied the electrical power, low GHG emissions were obtained. These results improve those reported by conventional hydrogen production methods, such as steam reforming. (authors)

  7. A comprehensive mathematical model for estimating oil drainage rate in SAGD process considering wellbore/formation coupling effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Linsong; Gu, Hao; Huang, Shijun

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this work is to present a comprehensive mathematical model for estimating oil drainage rate in Steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) process, more importantly, wellbore/formation coupling effect is considered. Firstly, mass and heat transfer in vertical and horizontal wellbores are described briefly. Then, a function of steam chamber height is introduced and the expressions for oil drainage rate in rising and expanding steam chamber stages are derived in detail. Next, a calculation flowchart is provided and an example is given to introduce how to use the proposed method. Finally, after the mathematical model is validated, the effects of wellhead steam injection rate on simulated results are further analyzed. The results indicate that heat injection power per meter reduces gradually along the horizontal wellbore, which affects both steam chamber height and oil drainage rate in the SAGD process. In addition, when production time is the same, the calculated oil drainage rate from the new method is lower than that from Butler's method. Moreover, the paper shows that when wellhead steam injection rate is low enough, the steam chamber is not formed at the horizontal well's toe position and enhancing the wellhead steam injection rate can increase the oil drainage rate.

  8. Optimization of induced crystallization reaction in a novel process of nutrients removal coupled with phosphorus recovery from domestic wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Haiming

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus removal and recovery from domestic wastewater is urgent nowadays. A novel process of nutrients removal coupled with phosphorus recovery from domestic sewage was proposed and optimization of induced crystallization reaction was performed in this study. The results showed that 92.3% of phosphorus recovery via induced Hydroxyapatite crystallization was achieved at the optimum process parameters: reaction time of 80 min, seed crystal loads of 60 g/L, pH of 8.5, Ca/P mole ratio of 2.0 and 4.0 L/min aeration rate when the PO43--P concentration was 10 mg/L in the influent, displaying an excellent phosphorus recovery performance. Importantly, it was found that the effect of reaction temperature on induced Hydroxyapatite crystallization was slight, thus favoring practical application of phosphorus recovery method described in this study. From these results, the proposed method of induced HAP crystallization to recover phosphorus combined with nutrients removal can be an economical and effective technology, probably favoring the water pollution control and phosphate rock recycle.

  9. Recovery of salts from ion-exchange regeneration streams by a coupled nanofiltration-membrane distillation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiříček, Tomáš; De Schepper, Wim; Lederer, Tomáš; Cauwenberg, Peter; Genné, Inge

    2015-01-01

    Ion-exchange tap water demineralization for process water preparation results in a saline regeneration wastewater (20-100 mS cm(-1)) that is increasingly problematic in view of discharge. A coupled nanofiltration-membrane distillation (NF-MD) process is evaluated for the recovery of water and sodium chloride from this wastewater. NF-MD treatment of mixed regeneration wastewater is compared to NF-MD treatment of separate anion- and cation-regenerate fractions. NF on mixed regeneration wastewater results in a higher flux (30 L m(-2) h(-1) at 7 bar) compared to NF on the separate fractions (6-9 L m(-2) h(-1) at 30 bar). NF permeate recovery is strongly limited by scaling (50% for separate and 60% for mixed, respectively). Physical signs of scaling were found during MD treatment of the NF permeates but did not result in flux decline for mixed regeneration wastewater. Final salt composition is expected to qualify as a road de-icing salt. NF-MD is an economically viable alternative compared to external disposal of wastewater for larger-scale installations (1.4 versus 2.5 euro m(-3) produced demineralized water for a 10 m3 regenerate per day plant). The cost benefits of water re-use and salt recuperation are small when compared to total treatment costs for mixed regenerate wastewater.

  10. On the coupled unsaturated–saturated flow process induced by vertical, horizontal, and slant wells in unconfined aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liang

    2017-03-01

    established with special consideration of the coupled unsaturated–saturated flow process and the well orientation. Groundwater flow in the saturated zone is described by a three-dimensional governing equation and a linearized three-dimensional Richards' equation in the unsaturated zone. A solution in the Laplace domain is derived by the Laplace–finite-Fourier-transform and the method of separation of variables, and the semi-analytical solutions are obtained using a numerical inverse Laplace method. The solution is verified by a finite-element numerical model. It is found that the effects of the unsaturated zone on the drawdown of a pumping test exist at any angle of inclination of the pumping well, and this impact is more significant in the case of a horizontal well. The effects of the unsaturated zone on the drawdown are independent of the length of the horizontal well screen. The vertical well leads to the largest water volume drained from the unsaturated zone (W during the early pumping time, and the effects of the well orientation on W values become insignificant at the later time. The screen length of the horizontal well does not affect W for the whole pumping period. The proposed solutions are useful for the parameter identification of pumping tests with a general well orientation (vertical, horizontal, and slant in unconfined aquifers affected from above by the unsaturated flow process.

  11. A New Hybrid BFOA-PSO Optimization Technique for Decoupling and Robust Control of Two-Coupled Distillation Column Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha Abdelkarim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The two-coupled distillation column process is a physically complicated system in many aspects. Specifically, the nested interrelationship between system inputs and outputs constitutes one of the significant challenges in system control design. Mostly, such a process is to be decoupled into several input/output pairings (loops, so that a single controller can be assigned for each loop. In the frame of this research, the Brain Emotional Learning Based Intelligent Controller (BELBIC forms the control structure for each decoupled loop. The paper’s main objective is to develop a parameterization technique for decoupling and control schemes, which ensures robust control behavior. In this regard, the novel optimization technique Bacterial Swarm Optimization (BSO is utilized for the minimization of summation of the integral time-weighted squared errors (ITSEs for all control loops. This optimization technique constitutes a hybrid between two techniques, which are the Particle Swarm and Bacterial Foraging algorithms. According to the simulation results, this hybridized technique ensures low mathematical burdens and high decoupling and control accuracy. Moreover, the behavior analysis of the proposed BELBIC shows a remarkable improvement in the time domain behavior and robustness over the conventional PID controller.

  12. Development of the T+M coupled flow–geomechanical simulator to describe fracture propagation and coupled flow–thermal–geomechanical processes in tight/shale gas systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George J.

    2013-10-01

    We developed a hydraulic fracturing simulator by coupling a flow simulator to a geomechanics code, namely T+M simulator. Modeling of the vertical fracture development involves continuous updating of the boundary conditions and of the data connectivity, based on the finite element method for geomechanics. The T+M simulator can model the initial fracture development during the hydraulic fracturing operations, after which the domain description changes from single continuum to double or multiple continua in order to rigorously model both flow and geomechanics for fracture-rock matrix systems. The T+H simulator provides two-way coupling between fluid-heat flow and geomechanics, accounting for thermoporomechanics, treats nonlinear permeability and geomechanical moduli explicitly, and dynamically tracks changes in the fracture(s) and in the pore volume. We also fully accounts for leak-off in all directions during hydraulic fracturing. We first validate the T+M simulator, matching numerical solutions with the analytical solutions for poromechanical effects, static fractures, and fracture propagations. Then, from numerical simulation of various cases of the planar fracture propagation, shear failure can limit the vertical fracture propagation of tensile failure, because of leak-off into the reservoirs. Slow injection causes more leak-off, compared with fast injection, when the same amount of fluid is injected. Changes in initial total stress and contributions of shear effective stress to tensile failure can also affect formation of the fractured areas, and the geomechanical responses are still well-posed.

  13. A coupled THMC model of a heating and hydration laboratory experiment in unsaturated compacted FEBEX bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.; Fernandez, A.M.

    2010-05-01

    Unsaturated compacted bentonite is foreseen by several countries as a backfill and sealing material in high-level radioactive waste repositories. The strong interplays between thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes during the hydration stage of a repository call for fully coupled THMC models. Validation of such THMC models is prevented by the lack of comprehensive THMC experiments and the difficulties of experimental methods to measure accurately the chemical composition of bentonite porewater. We present here a non-isothermal multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive solute transport model for a deformable medium of a heating and hydration experiment performed on a sample of compacted FEBEX bentonite. Besides standard solute transport and geochemical processes, the model accounts for solute cross diffusion and thermal and chemical osmosis. Bentonite swelling is solved with a state-surface approach. The THM model is calibrated with transient temperature, water content and porosity data measured at the end of the experiment. The reactive transport model is calibrated with porewater chemical data derived from aqueous extract data. Model results confirm that thermal osmosis is relevant for the hydration of FEBEX bentonite while chemical osmosis can be safely neglected. Dilution and evaporation are the main processes controlling the concentration of conservative species. Dissolved cations are mostly affected by calcite dissolution-precipitation and cation exchange reactions. Dissolved sulphate is controlled by gypsum/anhydrite dissolution-precipitation. pH is mostly buffered by protonation/deprotonation via surface complexation. Computed concentrations agree well with inferred aqueous extract data at all sections except near the hydration boundary where cation data are affected by a sampling artifact. The fit of Cl{sup -} data is excellent except for the data near the heater. The largest deviations of the model from inferred aqueous

  14. THE ROLE OF PROTOTYPING AND SIMULATION IN THE DEVELOPMENT PROCESS OF AN ELASTIC COUPLING WITH FLEXIBLE MEMBRANES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DOBRE Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the conditions of a competitive market, the use of 3D modelling, visualisation and simulation tools enable the entire coupling to be designed and developed in the pre-manufacturing phase. Several advantages of introducing virtual prototyping are offered. The goal for the coupling prototype is to answer questions about performance and reliability in order to identify necessary engineering changes for the final coupling variant. Facilitating the virtual reality communication capability, different variations of the geometry and other characteristics can be studied and discussed in a more efficient mode. Virtual features of the coupling structure are described and analysed for the efficient realization of coupling project. At the end, the paper presents design simulations to prove the behaviour and functionality of the coupling for different operational scenarios: mechanical stress, buckling stability and modal analysis.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Plasma-Dynamical Processes in the Technological Inductively Coupled RF Plasmatron with Gas Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. M. Grishin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrodeless inductively coupled RF plasmatron (ICP torches became widely used in various fields of engineering, science and technology. Presently, owing to development of new technologies to produce very pure substances, nanopowders, etc., there is a steadily increasing interest in the induction plasma. This generates a need for a broad range of theoretical and experimental studies to optimize the design and technological parameters of different ICP equipment.The paper presents a numerical model to calculate parameters of inductively coupled RF plasmatron with gas-cooling flow. A finite volume method is used for a numerical solution of a system of Maxwell's and heat transfer equations in the application package ANSYS CFX (14.5. The pseudo-steady approach to solving problems is used.A numerical simulation has been computed in the application package ANSYS CFX (14.5 for a specific design option of the technological ICP, which has a three-coils inductor and current amplitude in the range J к = 50-170 A (3 MHz. The pure argon flows in the ICP. The paper discusses how the value of discharge current impacts on the thermodynamic parameters (pressure, temperature and the power energy in discharge zone. It shows that the ICP can generate a plasma stream with a maximum temperature of about 10 kK and an output speed of 10-15 m/s. The work determines a length of the plasma stream with a weight average temperature of more than 4 kK. It has been found that in order to keep the quartz walls in normal thermal state, the discharge current amplitude should not exceed 150 A. The paper shows the features of the velocity field distribution in the channel of the plasma torch, namely, the formation of vortex in the position of the first coil. The results obtained are important for calculating the dynamics of heating and evaporation of quartz particles in the manufacturing processes for plasma processing of quartz concentrate into high-purity quartz and

  16. Effects of Fe-S-As coupled redox processes on arsenic mobilization in shallow aquifers of Datong Basin, northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junwen; Ma, Teng; Yan, Yani; Xie, Xianjun; Abass, Olusegun K; Liu, Congqiang; Zhao, Zhiqi; Wang, Zhizhen

    2018-02-18

    High arsenic groundwater generally coexists with elevated Fe 2+ concentrations (mg L -1 levels) under reducing conditions, but an explanation for the extremely high arsenic (up to ∼2690) concentrations at very low Fe 2+ (i.e., μg L -1 levels) in groundwater of Datong Basin remains elusive. Field groundwater investigation and laboratory microcosm experiments were implemented in this study. The field groundwater was characterized by weakly alkaline (pH 7.69 to 8.34) and reducing conditions (Eh -221.7 to -31.9 mV) and arsenic concentration averages at 697 μg L -1 . Acinetobacter (5.9-51.3%), Desulfosporosinus (4.6-30.2%), Brevundimonas (3.9-19%) and Pseudomonas (3.2-14.6%) were identified as the dominant genera in the bacterial communities. Bacterially mediated arsenate reduction, Fe(III) reduction, and sulfate reduction are processes occurring (or having previously occurred) in the groundwater. Results from incubation experiment (27 d) revealed that nitrate, arsenate, and Fe(III)/sulfate reduced sequentially with time under anoxic conditions, while Fe(III) and sulfate reduction processes had no obvious differences, occurring almost simultaneously. Moreover, low Fe 2+ concentrations were attributed to initially high pH conditions, which relatively retarded Fe(III) reduction. In addition, arsenic behavior in relation to groundwater redox conditions, matrices, and solution chemistry were elaborated. Bacterial arsenate reduction process proceeded before Fe(III) and sulfate reduction in the incubation experiment, and the total arsenic concentration (dominated by arsenite) gradually increased from ∼7 to 115 μg L -1 as arsenate was reduced. Accordingly, bacterially mediated reductive desorption of arsenate is identified as the main process controlling arsenic mobility, while Fe(III) reduction coupled with sulfate reduction are secondary processes that have also contributed to arsenic enrichment in the study site. Overall, this study provide important

  17. Study of the adsorption/oxidation coupling for the processing of industrial gaseous effluents; Etude du couplage adsorption / oxydation pour le traitement des effluents gazeux industriels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monneyron, P.; Manero, M.H.; Foussard, J.N. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), Genie des Procedes Industriels, Lab. d' Ingenierie des Procedes de l' Environnement, 31 - Toulouse (France); Benoit-Marquie, F; Maurette, M.T. [Universite Paul Sabatier, Lab. des Interactions Moleculaires et Reactivite Chimique et Photochimique, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2001-07-01

    This study presents a process for the abatement of the volatile organic compounds of industrial gaseous effluents. This process uses hydrophobous zeolites as adsorbent in order to avoid any risk of ignition during the adsorption of ketones. Adsorption is coupled with oxidation in the same reactor for the regeneration of the adsorbent. Two oxidation processes are evaluated: the regeneration by ozonized air and the UV photo-catalysis. (J.S.)

  18. Investigation of pharmaceuticals in processed animal by-products by liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nácher-Mestre, Jaime; Ibáñez, María; Serrano, Roque; Boix, Clara; Bijlsma, Lubertus; Lunestad, Bjørn Tore; Hannisdal, Rita; Alm, Martin; Hernández, Félix; Berntssen, Marc H G

    2016-07-01

    There is an on-going trend for developing more sustainable salmon feed in which traditionally applied marine feed ingredients are replaced with alternatives. Processed animal products (PAPs) have been re-authorized as novel high quality protein ingredients in 2013. These PAPs may harbor undesirable substances such as pharmaceuticals and metabolites which are not previously associated with salmon farming, but might cause a potential risk for feed and food safety. To control these contaminants, an analytical strategy based on a generic extraction followed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS) using quadrupole time-of-flight mass analyzer (QTOF MS) was applied for wide scope screening. Quality control samples, consisting of PAP commodities spiked at 0.02, 0.1 and 0.2 mg/kg with 150 analytes, were injected in every sample batch to verify the overall method performance. The methodology was applied to 19 commercially available PAP samples from six different types of matrices from the EU animal rendering industry. This strategy allows assessing possible emergent risk exposition of the salmon farming industry to 1005 undesirables, including pharmaceuticals, several dyes and relevant metabolites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The thermal fatigue resistance of vermicular cast iron coupling with H13 steel units by cast-in process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chengtao; Zhou, Hong; Lin, Peng Yu; Sun, Na; Guo, Qingchun; Zhang, Peng; Yu, Jiaxiang; Liu, Yan; Wang, Mingxing; Ren, Luquan

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on improving the thermal fatigue resistance on the surface of vermicular cast iron coupling with inserted H13 steel blocks that had different cross sections, by cast-in processing. The microstructure of bionic units was examined by scanning electron microscope. Micro-hardness and thermal fatigue resistance of bionic samples with varied cross sections and spacings were investigated, respectively. Results show that a marked metallurgical bonding zone was produced at interface between the inserted H13 steel block and the parent material - a unique feature of the bionic structure in the vermicular cast iron samples. The micro-hardness of the bionic samples has been significantly improved. Thermal resistance of the samples with the circular cross section was the highest and the bionics sample with spacing of 2 mm spacing had a much longer thermal fatigue life, thus resulting in the improvement for the thermal fatigue life of the bionic samples, due to the efficient preclusion for the generation and propagation of crack at the interface of H13 block and the matrix.

  20. Development of Modeling Methods and Tools for Predicting Coupled Reactive Transport Processes in Porous Media at Multiple Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, T. Prabhakar [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Barnett, Mark O. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Zheng, Chunmiao [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Jones, Norman L. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    2010-05-05

    DE-FG02-06ER64213: Development of Modeling Methods and Tools for Predicting Coupled Reactive Transport Processes in Porous Media at Multiple Scales Investigators: T. Prabhakar Clement (PD/PI) and Mark O. Barnett (Auburn), Chunmiao Zheng (Univ. of Alabama), and Norman L. Jones (BYU). The objective of this project was to develop scalable modeling approaches for predicting the reactive transport of metal contaminants. We studied two contaminants, a radioactive cation [U(VI)] and a metal(loid) oxyanion system [As(III/V)], and investigated their interactions with two types of subsurface materials, iron and manganese oxyhydroxides. We also developed modeling methods for describing the experimental results. Overall, the project supported 25 researchers at three universities. Produced 15 journal articles, 3 book chapters, 6 PhD dissertations and 6 MS theses. Three key journal articles are: 1) Jeppu et al., A scalable surface complexation modeling framework for predicting arsenate adsorption on goethite-coated sands, Environ. Eng. Sci., 27(2): 147-158, 2010. 2) Loganathan et al., Scaling of adsorption reactions: U(VI) experiments and modeling, Applied Geochemistry, 24 (11), 2051-2060, 2009. 3) Phillippi, et al., Theoretical solid/solution ratio effects on adsorption and transport: uranium (VI) and carbonate, Soil Sci. Soci. of America, 71:329-335, 2007

  1. Impact of large solar zenith angles on lower stratospheric dynamical and chemical processes in a coupled chemistry-climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lamago

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Actinic fluxes at large solar zenith angles (SZAs are important for atmospheric chemistry, especially under twilight conditions in polar winter and spring. The results of a sensitivity experiment employing the fully coupled 3D chemistry-climate model ECHAM4.L39(DLR/CHEM have been analysed to quantify the impact of SZAs larger than 87.5º on dynamical and chemical processes in the lower stratosphere, in particular their influence on the ozone layer. Although the actinic fluxes at SZAs larger than 87.5º are small, ozone concentrations are significantly affected because daytime photolytic ozone destruction is switched on earlier, especially at the end of polar night the conversion of Cl2 and Cl2O2 into ClO in the lower stratosphere. Comparing climatological mean ozone column values of a simulation considering SZAs up to 93º with those of the sensitivity run with SZAs confined to 87.5º total ozone is reduced by about 20% in the polar Southern Hemisphere, i.e., the ozone hole is "deeper'' if twilight conditions are considered in the model because there is about 4 weeks more time for ozone destruction. This causes an additional cooling of the polar lower stratosphere (50 hPa up to -4 K with obvious consequences for chemical processes. In the Northern Hemisphere the impact of large SZAs cannot be determined on the basis of climatological mean values due to the pronounced dynamic variability of the stratosphere in winter and spring. This study clearly shows the necessity of considering large SZAs for the calculation of photolysis rates in atmospheric models.

  2. Fundamental studies of the plasma extraction and ion beam formation processes in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Hongsen.

    1995-01-01

    The fundamental and practical aspects are described for extracting ions from atmospheric pressure plasma sources into an analytical mass spectrometer. Methodologies and basic concepts of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are emphasized in the discussion, including ion source, sampling interface, supersonic expansion, slumming process, ion optics and beam focusing, and vacuum considerations. Some new developments and innovative designs are introduced. The plasma extraction process in ICP-MS was investigated by Langmuir measurements in the region between the skimmer and first ion lens. Electron temperature (T e ) is in the range 2000--11000 K and changes with probe position inside an aerosol gas flow. Electron density (n e ) is in the range 10 8 --10 10 -cm at the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 10 6 --10 8 cm -3 near the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 10 6 --10 8 cm -3 downstream further behind the skimmer. Electron density in the beam leaving the skimmer also depends on water loading and on the presence and mass of matrix elements. Axially resolved distributions of electron number-density and electron temperature were obtained to characterize the ion beam at a variety of plasma operating conditions. The electron density dropped by a factor of 101 along the centerline between the sampler and skimmer cones in the first stage and continued to drop by factors of 10 4 --10 5 downstream of skimmer to the entrance of ion lens. The electron density in the beam expansion behind sampler cone exhibited a 1/z 2 intensity fall-off (z is the axial position). An second beam expansion originated from the skimmer entrance, and the beam flow underwent with another 1/z 2 fall-off behind the skimmer. Skimmer interactions play an important role in plasma extraction in the ICP-MS instrument

  3. Modeling the influence of coupled mass transfer processes on mass flux downgradient of heterogeneous DNAPL source zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lurong; Wang, Xinyu; Mendoza-Sanchez, Itza; Abriola, Linda M

    2018-04-01

    Sequestered mass in low permeability zones has been increasingly recognized as an important source of organic chemical contamination that acts to sustain downgradient plume concentrations above regulated levels. However, few modeling studies have investigated the influence of this sequestered mass and associated (coupled) mass transfer processes on plume persistence in complex dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones. This paper employs a multiphase flow and transport simulator (a modified version of the modular transport simulator MT3DMS) to explore the two- and three-dimensional evolution of source zone mass distribution and near-source plume persistence for two ensembles of highly heterogeneous DNAPL source zone realizations. Simulations reveal the strong influence of subsurface heterogeneity on the complexity of DNAPL and sequestered (immobile/sorbed) mass distribution. Small zones of entrapped DNAPL are shown to serve as a persistent source of low concentration plumes, difficult to distinguish from other (sorbed and immobile dissolved) sequestered mass sources. Results suggest that the presence of DNAPL tends to control plume longevity in the near-source area; for the examined scenarios, a substantial fraction (43.3-99.2%) of plume life was sustained by DNAPL dissolution processes. The presence of sorptive media and the extent of sorption non-ideality are shown to greatly affect predictions of near-source plume persistence following DNAPL depletion, with plume persistence varying one to two orders of magnitude with the selected sorption model. Results demonstrate the importance of sorption-controlled back diffusion from low permeability zones and reveal the importance of selecting the appropriate sorption model for accurate prediction of plume longevity. Large discrepancies for both DNAPL depletion time and plume longevity were observed between 2-D and 3-D model simulations. Differences between 2- and 3-D predictions increased in the presence of

  4. Coupled physical/biogeochemical modeling including O2-dependent processes in the Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems: application in the Benguela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gutknecht

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS contribute to one fifth of the global catches in the ocean. Often associated with Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs, EBUS represent key regions for the oceanic nitrogen (N cycle. Important bioavailable N loss due to denitrification and anammox processes as well as greenhouse gas emissions (e.g, N2O occur also in these EBUS. However, their dynamics are currently crudely represented in global models. In the climate change context, improving our capability to properly represent these areas is crucial due to anticipated changes in the winds, productivity, and oxygen content. We developed a biogeochemical model (BioEBUS taking into account the main processes linked with EBUS and associated OMZs. We implemented this model in a 3-D realistic coupled physical/biogeochemical configuration in the Namibian upwelling system (northern Benguela using the high-resolution hydrodynamic ROMS model. We present here a validation using in situ and satellite data as well as diagnostic metrics and sensitivity analyses of key parameters and N2O parameterizations. The impact of parameter values on the OMZ off Namibia, on N loss, and on N2O concentrations and emissions is detailed. The model realistically reproduces the vertical distribution and seasonal cycle of observed oxygen, nitrate, and chlorophyll a concentrations, and the rates of microbial processes (e.g, NH4+ and NO2− oxidation, NO3− reduction, and anammox as well. Based on our sensitivity analyses, biogeochemical parameter values associated with organic matter decomposition, vertical sinking, and nitrification play a key role for the low-oxygen water content, N loss, and N2O concentrations in the OMZ. Moreover, the explicit parameterization of both steps of nitrification, ammonium oxidation to nitrate with nitrite as an explicit intermediate, is necessary to improve the representation of microbial activity linked with the OMZ. The simulated minimum oxygen

  5. Multiscale coupling of a Lattice Boltzmann simulation of blood flow to cell- and tissue-level processes: the case of in-stent restenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, A.G.; Pereira, J.C.F.; Sequeira, A.; Pereira, J.M.C.

    2010-01-01

    In-stent restenosis, the maladaptive response of a blood vessel to injury caused by the deployment of a stent, is a multiscale system involving a large number of biological and physical processes. We describe a Complex Automata Model for in-stent restenosis, coupling blood flow, drug diffusion, and

  6. Attack priming in female Syrian golden hamsters is associated with a c-fos-coupled process within the corticomedial amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potegal, M; Ferris, C F; Hebert, M; Meyerhoff, J; Skaredoff, L

    1996-12-01

    Allowing a resident hamster a single "priming" attack on a conspecific induces a transient aggressive arousal as indicated by a reduction in the latency and increase in the probability of attack on a second intruder presented within the next 30 min. We present two lines of evidence identifying the corticomedial amygdala as an important locus mediating this effect. (1) Attack priming significantly increases the number of neurons expressing immunocytochemically identified Fos protein in the corticomedial amygdala, but not elsewhere. Pursuit and biting of an inanimate object does not induce corticomedial amygdala c-fos expression of the same pattern or magnitude. The corticomedial amygdala contribution to the priming effect involves more than a non-specific arousal, since corticomedial amygdala c-fos expression does not correlate with locomotor activity, a standard indicator of such arousal. (2) Radiofrequency lesions of the corticomedial amygdala reduce aggression, the greatest reduction occurring with the more anterior lesions. Other behaviors, including a priming-like locomotor practice effect in a running wheel, are unaffected by corticomedial amygdala lesions. These findings suggest that attack priming is an aggression-specific effect resulting from a Fos-coupled change within neural circuitry of which the corticomedial amygdala is a part. From a theoretical point of view, these experiments suggest a new approach to the analysis of the mechanisms underlying aggressive behavior and the persistence of aggressive arousal. We present a sketch of a quantitative neurobehavioral model which relates attack probability to neural activation within the corticomedial amygdala. From a methodological viewpoint, these experiments extend the utility of mapping c-fos expression as a technique for localizing endogenous, behavior-specific processes within the central nervous system.

  7. Rockfall hazard assessment by coupling three-dimensional, process based models and field-based tree-ring data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappmann, Daniel; Stoffel, Markus; Corona, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    A realistic evaluation of the spatial and temporal patterns of rockfalls is fundamental for the management of this very common hazard in mountain environments. Process-based, three-dimensional simulation models are nowadays capable to reproduce the spatial probability of rockfalls with reasonable accuracy through the simulation of numerous individual trajectories on highly-resolved digital terrain models. At the same time, however, simulation models typically fail to quantify the real frequency of rockfalls. The analysis of impact scars on trees, in contrast, yields empirical rockfall frequencies but, trees may not be present at the location of interest and rare trajectories may not necessarily be captured due to the limited age of forest stands on rockfall slopes. In this article, we demonstrate that the coupling of modeling with tree-ring techniques may overcome the limitations inherent to both approaches. Based on the analysis of 64 cells (40 × 40 m) of a rockfall slope located above a 1631-m long road section in the Swiss Alps, we illustrate results from 488 rockfalls detected in 1260 trees. We illustrate that tree impact data cannot only be used (i) to reconstruct the frequency of rockfalls for individual cells, but that they also serve (ii) the calibration of the rockfall model Rockyfor3D, as well as (iii) the transformation of simulated trajectories into real empirical frequencies. Calibrated simulation results are in good agreement with empirical rockfall frequencies and exhibit significant differences in rockfall activity between the cells (zones) along the road section. Empirical frequencies, expressed as rock passages per meter road section, also enable quantification and direct comparison of the hazard potential between the zones. The contribution provides an approach for hazard zoning procedures that complements traditional methods with a quantification of rockfall frequencies through a systematic inclusion of impact records in trees.

  8. A Natural Analogue for Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical Coupled Processes at the Proposed Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bill Carey; Gordon Keating; Peter C. Lichtner

    1999-01-01

    Dike and sill complexes that intruded tuffaceous host rocks above the water table are suggested as natural analogues for thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Scoping thermal-hydrologic calculations of temperature and saturation profiles surrounding a 30-50 m wide intrusion suggest that boiling conditions could be sustained at distances of tens of meters from the intrusion for several thousand years. This time scale for persistence of boiling is similar to that expected for the Yucca Mountain repository with moderate heat loading. By studying the hydrothermal alteration of the tuff host rocks surrounding the intrusions, insight and relevant data can be obtained that apply directly to the Yucca Mountain repository and can shed light on the extent and type of alteration that should be expected. Such data are needed to bound and constrain model parameters used in THC simulations of the effect of heat produced by the waste on the host rock and to provide a firm foundation for assessing overall repository performance. One example of a possible natural analogue for the repository is the Paiute Ridge intrusive complex located on the northeastern boundary of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The complex consists of dikes and sills intruded into a partially saturated tuffaceous host rock that has stratigraphic sequences that correlate with those found at Yucca Mountain. The intrusions were emplaced at a depth of several hundred meters below the surface, similar to the depth of the proposed repository. The tuffaceous host rock surrounding the intrusions is hydrothermally altered to varying extents depending on the distance from the intrusions. The Paiute Ridge intrusive complex thus appears to be an ideal natural analogue of THC coupled processes associated with the Yucca Mountain repository. It could provide much needed physical and chemical data for understanding the influence of heat

  9. THM-issues in repository rock. Thermal, mechanical, thermo-mechanical and hydro-mechanical evolution of the rock at the Forsmark and Laxemar sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoekmark, Harald; Loennqvist, Margareta; Faelth, Billy

    2010-05-01

    The present report addresses aspects of the Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical (THM) evolution of the repository host rock that are of potential importance to the SR-Site safety assessment of a KBS-3 type spent nuclear fuel repository. The report covers the evolution of rock temperatures, rock stresses, pore pressures and fracture transmissivities during the excavation and operational phase, the temperate phase and a glacial cycle on different scales. The glacial cycle is assumed to include a period of pre-glacial permafrost with lowered temperatures and with increased pore pressures in the rock beneath the impermeable permafrost layer. The report also addresses the question of the peak temperature reached during the early temperate phase in the bentonite buffer surrounding the spent fuel canisters. The main text is devoted exclusively to the projected THM evolution of the rock at the Forsmark site in central Sweden. The focus is on the potential for stress-induced failures, i.e. spalling, in the walls of the deposition holes and on changes in the transmissivity of fractures and deformation zones. All analyses are conducted by a combination of numerical tools (3DEC) and analytical solutions. All phases are treated separately and independently of each other, although in reality construction will overlap with heat generation because of the step-by-step excavation/deposition approach with some 50 years between deposition of the first and last canisters. It is demonstrated here that the thermal and thermo-mechanical evolution of the near-field will be independent of heat generated by canisters that were deposited in the past, provided that deposition is made in an orderly fashion, deposition area by deposition area. Peak temperatures and near-field stresses can, consequently, be calculated as if all canisters were deposited simultaneously. The canister and tunnel spacing is specified such that the peak buffer temperature will not exceed 100 deg C in any deposition hole, i.e. not

  10. THM-issues in repository rock. Thermal, mechanical, thermo-mechanical and hydro-mechanical evolution of the rock at the Forsmark and Laxemar sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoekmark, Harald; Loennqvist, Margareta; Faelth, Billy (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2010-05-15

    The present report addresses aspects of the Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical (THM) evolution of the repository host rock that are of potential importance to the SR-Site safety assessment of a KBS-3 type spent nuclear fuel repository. The report covers the evolution of rock temperatures, rock stresses, pore pressures and fracture transmissivities during the excavation and operational phase, the temperate phase and a glacial cycle on different scales. The glacial cycle is assumed to include a period of pre-glacial permafrost with lowered temperatures and with increased pore pressures in the rock beneath the impermeable permafrost layer. The report also addresses the question of the peak temperature reached during the early temperate phase in the bentonite buffer surrounding the spent fuel canisters. The main text is devoted exclusively to the projected THM evolution of the rock at the Forsmark site in central Sweden. The focus is on the potential for stress-induced failures, i.e. spalling, in the walls of the deposition holes and on changes in the transmissivity of fractures and deformation zones. All analyses are conducted by a combination of numerical tools (3DEC) and analytical solutions. All phases are treated separately and independently of each other, although in reality construction will overlap with heat generation because of the step-by-step excavation/deposition approach with some 50 years between deposition of the first and last canisters. It is demonstrated here that the thermal and thermo-mechanical evolution of the near-field will be independent of heat generated by canisters that were deposited in the past, provided that deposition is made in an orderly fashion, deposition area by deposition area. Peak temperatures and near-field stresses can, consequently, be calculated as if all canisters were deposited simultaneously. The canister and tunnel spacing is specified such that the peak buffer temperature will not exceed 100 deg C in any deposition hole, i.e. not

  11. Modelling the evolution of compacted bentonite clays in engineered barrier systems: process model development of the bentonite-water-air system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, A.E.; Wilson, J.C.; Maul, P.R.; Robinson, P.C.; Savage, D.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. An adequate understanding of the short- and long-term evolution of compacted bentonite clays in engineered barrier systems (EBS) for radioactive waste based on the KBS-3 disposal concept is an essential requirement for demonstrating the safe performance of the system. Uncertainties in the way that the re-saturation process occurs are intrinsically tied to the thermal and mechanical evolution of the bentonite buffer and its interaction with the disposal canister and host-rock. Furthermore, the evolution of bentonite in the presence of changing ambient saturation states, groundwater chemistry and stress states could cause the bentonite re-saturation and long-term stability (including the so-called 'buffer erosion scenario') to deviate from the behaviour required by the safety case; this has emphasised the need to consider adequately coupled thermal (T), hydraulic(H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes. Historically, there have been fundamental differences in the representation of porosity and water disposition between geochemical modelling and coupled THM modelling studies. In this paper, a model for the porosity and water disposition in bentonite is presented that is more detailed than models used to date in most THM modelling studies under variably saturated conditions. The new model moves away from the conventional THM soils approach which treats bentonite as an elasto-plastic porous medium with water or air occupying a notional porosity with the inclusion of additional process models to take into account the very high observed water suctions, intrinsic permeability variation and macroscopic swelling of partially saturated compacted bentonite. It replaces the empirical parameterisation usually employed in THM models with a direct representation of the water disposition, pore structure and relevant processes, albeit at an abstracted level. The new model differentiates between water which can be

  12. Coupled behaviour of bentonite buffer results of PUSKURI project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olin, M.; Rasilainen, K.; Itaelae, A.

    2011-08-01

    In the report main results form a KYT2010 programme's project Coupled behaviour of bentonite buffer (PUSKURI) are presented. In THC modelling, Aku Itaelae made and published his Master of Science Thesis. Itaelae was able to successfully model the LOT-experiment. Additionally, he also listed problems and development proposals for THC-modelling of bentonite buffer. VTT and Numerola created in collaboration a model coupling saturation, diffusion and cation exchange; the model was implemented and tested in Numerrin, COMSOL and TOUGHREACT. Petri Jussila's PhD THM-model was implemented into COMSOL to facilitate further development. At GTK, the mineralogical characterisation of bentonite was planned. The previous THM model (Jussila's model) including only small deformations was successfully generalized to finite deformations in way at least formally preserving the original formalism. It appears that the theory allows also a possibility to include finite plastic deformations in the theory. In order to measure the relevant mechanical properties of compacted bentonite, two different experiments, namely hydrostatic compression experiment and one-dimensional compression experiment were designed. In the hydrostatic compression experiment, a cylindrical sample of compacted bentonite covered with liquid rubber coating is placed in the sample chamber equipped with a piston. The same device was also used in one-dimensional compression experiment. X-ray microtomographic techniques were used in order to study the basic mechanisms of water transport in bentonite. The preliminary results indicate that in the present experimental set-up, water transport is dominated by a dispersive mechanism such as diffusion of vapour in gas phase or diffusion of water in solid phase. (orig.)

  13. Implications for post-comminution processes in subglacial suspended sediment using coupled radiogenic strontium and neodymium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinger, Anna E.; Aciego, Sarah M.; Stevenson, Emily I.; Arendt, Carli A.; Robbins, Mark J.

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced physical weathering rates in subglacial systems promote high levels of comminution, transport, and deposition of fine-grained sediment within the subglacial drainage network. The impact of shifts in sediment loads from variations in meltwater flux, and their effects on downstream ecosystems, remains poorly quantified and places a fundamental importance on our ability to characterize subglacial depositional environments. Here, for the first time, we assess the seasonal evolution of the subglacial suspended sediment using coupled radiogenic strontium (87Sr/86Sr) and neodymium (143Nd/144Nd) isotopic ratios with elemental ratios and in situ measurements. Weathering rates in fluvial and riverine systems have been traditionally assessed using radiogenic isotopic tracers: 143Nd/144Nd ratios relate to the crustal age whereas 87Sr/86Sr ratios relate to age and preferential mineral dissolution. Thus relative shifts in these ratios will allow us to characterize distinct sediment transport networks. We apply this technique to the Lemon Creek Glacier (LCG), Alaska, USA, and to the Athabasca Glacier (AG), Alberta, CA. At the LCG, the 143Nd/144Nd values range from εNd of - 4.6 (0.9) to - 8.7 (0.2), which suggests a poorly mixed sediment flux. However, the greatest period of variability may correlate with the drainage of a supraglacial lake and suggests caution should be exerted in time-scale 143Nd/144Nd provenance studies that may be affected by climatic disturbances. In contrast, limited variation is observed within the AG 143Nd/144Nd seasonal record. A consistent, direct relation between the Rb/Sr elemental ratio and the 87Sr/86Sr ratio proves interesting as it enables us to unravel incongruent weathering trends in the radiogenic Sr record. Correlation between the 87Sr/86Sr and total discharge suggests that the process is partially controlled by mantling of the bedrock, which can be detected using post-comminution ages. While the subglacial structure may be enabled by

  14. Coupled Geochemical and Hydrological Processes Governing the Fate and Transport of Radionuclides and Toxic Metals Beneath the Hanford Tank Farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott Fendorf; Phil Jardine

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this research was to provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of coupled hydrological and geochemical mechanisms that are responsible for the accelerated migration and immobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals in the vadose zone beneath the Hanford Tank Farms

  15. Pairs for Pairs: A Theoretical Base for Co-Therapy as a Nonsexist Process in Couple Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese-Dukes, Judson; Reese-Dukes, Carolyn

    1983-01-01

    Reviews contemporary literature which provides a theoretical base for female-male co-therapy teams as the most likely modality to mediate sex bias in couple counseling. An egalitarian co-therapy team can encourage change by modeling independent yet mutually supportive and facilitative roles. (JAC)

  16. Contribution to the optimization of the coupling of nuclear reactors to desalination processes; Contribution a l'optimisation du couplage des reacteurs nucleaires aux procedes de dessalement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dardour, S

    2007-04-15

    This work deals with modelling, simulation and optimization of the coupling between nuclear reactors (PWR, modular high temperature reactors) and desalination processes (multiple effect distillation, reverse osmosis). The reactors considered in this study are PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) and GTMHR (Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor). The desalination processes retained are MED (Multi Effect Distillation) and SWRO (Sea Water Reverse Osmosis). A software tool: EXCELEES of thermodynamic modelling of coupled systems, based on the Engineering Algebraic Equation Solver has been developed. Models of energy conversion systems and of membrane desalination processes and distillation have been developed. Based on the first and second principles of thermodynamics, these models have allowed to determine the optimal running point of the coupled systems. The thermodynamic analysis has been completed by a first economic evaluation. Based on the use of the DEEP software of the IAEA, this evaluation has confirmed the interest to use these types of reactors for desalination. A modelling tool of thermal processes of desalination in dynamic condition has been developed too. This tool has been applied to the study of the dynamics of an existing plant and has given satisfying results. A first safety checking has been at last carried out. The transients able to jeopardize the integrated system have been identified. Several measures aiming at consolidate the safety have been proposed. (O.M.)

  17. Application of Large Eddy Simulation in the process of the Multi-Physics Field Coupling in a Combustion Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Rang-Shu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation is the main method to solve turbulence problems. As one of the three methods which are commonly used in large-eddy simulation model (LES is the most effective and promising research method. The basic idea of large-eddy simulation is that the large scale turbulent motion is directly simulated and we use the sub-grid scale model to simulate small-scale turbulent motion. Continuing alternative load exists in aero-engine combustion chamber during operation. This coupling phenomenon is an important reason to the combustion chamber fatigue failure. In this paper, the large-eddy simulation methods are described and applied in researching aero-engine combustion chamber multi-physics field coupling analysis. By comparing with the experimental results we verify the feasibility of this method and there is great significance of actual project.

  18. Investigation on the electrode process of the Mn(II)/Mn(III) couple in redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Fangqin; Wang Yongliang; Wang Wenhong; Wang Xindong

    2008-01-01

    The Mn(II)/Mn(III) couple has been recognized as a potential anode for redox flow batteries to take the place of the V(IV)/V(V) in all-vanadium redox battery (VRB) and the Br 2 /Br - in sodium polysulfide/bromine (PSB) because it has higher standard electrode potential. In this study, the electrochemical behavior of the Mn(II)/Mn(III) couple on carbon felt and spectral pure graphite were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, steady polarization curve, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, transient potential-step experiment, X-ray diffraction and charge-discharge experiments. Results show that the Mn(III) disproportionation reaction phenomena is obvious on the carbon felt electrode while it is weak on the graphite electrode owing to its fewer active sites. The reaction mechanism on carbon felt was discussed in detail. The reversibility of Mn(II)/Mn(III) is best when the sulfuric acid concentration is 5 M on the graphite electrode. Performance of a RFB employing Mn(II)/Mn(III) couple as anolyte active species and V(III)/V(II) as catholyte ones was evaluated with constant-current charge-discharge tests. The average columbic efficiency is 69.4% and the voltage efficiency is 90.4% at a current density of 20 mA cm -2 . The whole energy efficiency is 62.7% close to that of the all-vanadium battery and the average discharge voltage is about 14% higher than that of an all-vanadium battery. The preliminary exploration shows that the Mn(II)/Mn(III) couple is electrochemically promising for redox flow battery

  19. Coupled transfers; Transferts couples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolas, X.; Lauriat, G.; Jimenez-Rondan, J. [Universite de Marne-la-Vallee, Lab. d' Etudes des Transferts d' Energie et de Matiere (LETEM), 77 (France); Bouali, H.; Mezrhab, A. [Faculte des Sciences, Dept. de Physique, Lab. de Mecanique et Energetique, Oujda (Morocco); Abid, C. [Ecole Polytechnique Universitaire de Marseille, IUSTI UMR 6595, 13 Marseille (France); Stoian, M.; Rebay, M.; Lachi, M.; Padet, J. [Faculte des Sciences, Lab. de Thermomecanique, UTAP, 51 - Reims (France); Mladin, E.C. [Universitaire Polytechnique Bucarest, Faculte de Genie Mecanique, Bucarest (Romania); Mezrhab, A. [Faculte des Sciences, Lab. de Mecanique et Energetique, Dept. de Physique, Oujda (Morocco); Abid, C.; Papini, F. [Ecole Polytechnique, IUSTI, 13 - Marseille (France); Lorrette, C.; Goyheneche, J.M.; Boechat, C.; Pailler, R. [Laboratoire des Composites ThermoStructuraux, UMR 5801, 33 - Pessac (France); Ben Salah, M.; Askri, F.; Jemni, A.; Ben Nasrallah, S. [Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Monastir, Lab. d' Etudes des Systemes Thermiques et Energetiques (Tunisia); Grine, A.; Desmons, J.Y.; Harmand, S. [Laboratoire de Mecanique et d' Energetique, 59 - Valenciennes (France); Radenac, E.; Gressier, J.; Millan, P. [ONERA, 31 - Toulouse (France); Giovannini, A. [Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, 31 (France)

    2005-07-01

    This session about coupled transfers gathers 30 articles dealing with: numerical study of coupled heat transfers inside an alveolar wall; natural convection/radiant heat transfer coupling inside a plugged and ventilated chimney; finite-volume modeling of the convection-conduction coupling in non-stationary regime; numerical study of the natural convection/radiant heat transfer coupling inside a partitioned cavity; modeling of the thermal conductivity of textile reinforced composites: finite element homogenization on a full periodical pattern; application of the control volume method based on non-structured finite elements to the problems of axisymmetrical radiant heat transfers in any geometries; modeling of convective transfers in transient regime on a flat plate; a conservative method for the non-stationary coupling of aero-thermal engineering codes; measurement of coupled heat transfers (forced convection/radiant transfer) inside an horizontal duct; numerical simulation of the combustion of a water-oil emulsion droplet; numerical simulation study of heat and mass transfers inside a reactor for nano-powders synthesis; reduction of a combustion and heat transfer model of a direct injection diesel engine; modeling of heat transfers inside a knocking operated spark ignition engine; heat loss inside an internal combustion engine, thermodynamical and flamelet model, composition effects of CH{sub 4}H{sub 2} mixtures; experimental study and modeling of the evolution of a flame on a solid fuel; heat transfer for laminar subsonic jet of oxygen plasma impacting an obstacle; hydrogen transport through a A-Si:H layer submitted to an hydrogen plasma: temperature effects; thermal modeling of the CO{sub 2} laser welding of a magnesium alloy; radiant heat transfer inside a 3-D environment: application of the finite volume method in association with the CK model; optimization of the infrared baking of two types of powder paints; optimization of the emission power of an infrared

  20. Reappraisal of nuclear quadrupole moments of atomic halogens via relativistic coupled cluster linear response theory for the ionization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Rajat K; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Mahapatra, Uttam Sinha

    2013-11-27

    The coupled cluster based linear response theory (CCLRT) with four-component relativistic spinors is employed to compute the electric field gradients (EFG) of (35)Cl, (79)Br, and (127)I nuclei. The EFGs resulting from these calculations are combined with experimental nuclear quadrupole coupling constants (NQCC) to determine the nuclear quadrupole moments (NQM), Q of the halide nuclei. Our estimated NQMs [(35)Cl = -81.12 mb, (79)Br = 307.98 mb, and (127)I = -688.22 mb] agree well with the new atomic values [(35)Cl = -81.1(1.2), (79)Br = 302(5), and (127)I = -680(10) mb] obtained via Fock space multireference coupled cluster method with the Dirac-Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian. Although our estimated Q((79)Br) value deviates from the accepted reference value of 313(3) mb, it agrees well with the recently recommended value, Q((79)Br) = 308.7(20) mb. Good agreement with current reference data indicates the accuracy of the proposed value for these halogen nuclei and lends credence to the results obtained via CCLRT approach. The electron affinities yielded by this method with no extra cost are also in good agreement with experimental values, which bolster our belief that the NQMs values for halogen nuclei derived here are reliable.

  1. A longitudinal analysis of intimacy processes and psychological distress among couples coping with head and neck or lung cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, Sharon; Badr, Hoda; Kashy, Deborah A

    2012-06-01

    Individuals diagnosed with lung and head and neck (HN) cancers and their spouses are at increased risk for distress. This study assessed whether the way couples communicate about cancer and their perceptions of relationship intimacy influenced both partners' adjustment. One-hundred thirty-nine patients and their spouses [For purposes of clarity, we refer to the patients' intimate partner as the spouse, regardless of actual marital status and we reserve the term partner to refer to the other person in the couple (i.e., the patient's partner is the spouse and the spouse's partner is the patient)] completed measures of spousal communication, intimacy, and distress at three time points over 6 months. Using multilevel modeling, an over-time actor-partner interdependence model was specified that examined whether intimacy mediated associations between one's own and one's partner's reports of communication at baseline and later distress. Patients and spouses who reported greater baseline distress reported more negative baseline communication as well as lower levels of intimacy and greater distress over time. Mediation analyses showed patients' and spouses' reports of positive spousal communication were associated with less subsequent distress largely through their effects on intimacy. Clinicians working with head and neck or lung cancer patients should assess communication and intimacy because both impact couples' distress.

  2. Modeling Coupled Physical and Chemical Erosional Processes Using Structure from Motion Reconstruction and Multiphysics Simulation: Applications to Knickpoints in Bedrock Streams in Limestone Caves and on Earth's Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, R.; Ward, D.

    2017-12-01

    Investigation of erosion rates and processes at knickpoints in surface bedrock streams is an active area of research, involving complex feedbacks in the coupled relationships between dissolution, abrasion, and plucking that have not been sufficiently addressed. Even less research has addressed how these processes operate to propagate knickpoints through cave passages in layered sedimentary rocks, despite these features being common along subsurface streams. In both settings, there is evidence for mechanical and chemical erosion, but in cave passages the different hydrologic and hydraulic regimes, combined with an important role for the dissolution process, affect the relative roles and coupled interactions between these processes, and distinguish them from surface stream knickpoints. Using a novel approach of imaging cave passages using Structure from Motion (SFM), we create 3D geometry meshes to explore these systems using multiphysics simulation, and compare the processes as they occur in caves with those in surface streams. Here we focus on four field sites with actively eroding streambeds that include knickpoints: Upper River Acheron and Devil's Cooling Tub in Mammoth Cave, Kentucky; and two surface streams in Clermont County, Ohio, Avey's Run and Fox Run. SFM 3D reconstructions are built using images exported from 4K video shot at each field location. We demonstrate that SFM is a viable imaging approach for reconstructing cave passages with complex morphologies. We then use these reconstructions to create meshes upon which to run multiphysics simulations using STAR-CCM+. Our approach incorporates multiphase free-surface computational fluid dynamics simulations with sediment transport modeled using discrete element method grains. Physical and chemical properties of the water, bedrock, and sediment enable computation of shear stress, sediment impact forces, and chemical kinetic conditions at the bed surface. Preliminary results prove the efficacy of commercially

  3. Seasonal and spatial evolution of trihalomethanes in a drinking water distribution system according to the treatment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Tello, A; Arias-Borrego, A; García-Barrera, Tamara; Gómez-Ariza, J L

    2015-11-01

    This paper comparatively shows the influence of four water treatment processes on the formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) in a water distribution system. The study was performed from February 2005 to January 2012 with analytical data of 600 samples taken in Aljaraque water treatment plant (WTP) and 16 locations along the water distribution system (WDS) in the region of Andévalo and the coast of Huelva (southwest Spain), a region with significant seasonal and population changes. The comparison of results in the four different processes studied indicated a clear link of the treatment process with the formation of THM along the WDS. The most effective treatment process is preozonation and activated carbon filtration (P3), which is also the most stable under summer temperatures. Experiments also show low levels of THMs with the conventional process of preoxidation with potassium permanganate (P4), delaying the chlorination to the end of the WTP; however, this simple and economical treatment process is less effective and less stable than P3. In this study, strong seasonal variations were obtained (increase of THM from winter to summer of 1.17 to 1.85 times) and a strong spatial variation (1.1 to 1.7 times from WTP to end points of WDS) which largely depends on the treatment process applied. There was also a strong correlation between THM levels and water temperature, contact time and pH. On the other hand, it was found that THM formation is not proportional to the applied chlorine dose in the treatment process, but there is a direct relationship with the accumulated dose of chlorine. Finally, predictive models based on multiple linear regressions are proposed for each treatment process.

  4. Simulation of coupled geochemical reactions and hydrodynamical processes in porous media - application to CO2 storage and uranium exploitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagneau, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    This report is a snapshot after sixteen years of research in the field of reactive transport, since the beginning of my Ph.D. in 1997. The research revolves around two poles: on the one hand the development of the reactive transport code Hytec, on the other hand application of the code in different fields of the Earth Sciences. The first two parts of the report detail several key points from this research work, most of them published or being published, following the dual development/application logic. The last part opens towards interesting future work. Development of a reactive transport code: The first part, mostly numeric analysis, details the main features of the code Hytec, in which I have been heavily involved since I joined the laboratory. The underlying equations of the model are given. The resolution methods rely on a finite volume discretization over a Voronoi mesh for the whole hydrodynamic part (flow, transport, heat). Coupling between chemistry and transport is performed through a sequential iterative scheme. Specific developments are then presented. The feedback of chemistry on transport requires specific coupling treatment to ensure convergence to the correct solution: the effects need to be taken care of within the coupling iterations. Dual porosity simulation can be elegantly simulated by duplicating the chemical nodes. Integrating the simulation of gases have implications on the flow (simultaneous resolution of the pressure and saturation equations), and transport-solver (species in the gas phase independently of the water phase), and finally coupling with chemistry and gas-water equilibrium. Applications The Hytec code is used in various domains of the Earth Sciences, in and out our laboratory notably by the members of the consortium Pole Geochimie Transport (Reactive transport group). The document details two families of applications I have been particularly interested in over these years. The geologic storage of CO 2 is a potential technology

  5. The Hiccup: a dynamical coupling process during the autumn transition in the Northern Hemisphere – similarities and differences to sudden stratospheric warmings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Matthias

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs are the most prominent vertical coupling process in the middle atmosphere, which occur during winter and are caused by the interaction of planetary waves (PWs with the zonal mean flow. Vertical coupling has also been identified during the equinox transitions, and is similarly associated with PWs. We argue that there is a characteristic aspect of the autumn transition in northern high latitudes, which we call the "hiccup", and which acts like a "mini SSW", i.e. like a small minor warming. We study the average characteristics of the hiccup based on a superimposed epoch analysis using a nudged version of the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model, representing 30 years of historical data. Hiccups can be identified in about half the years studied. The mesospheric zonal wind results are compared to radar observations over Andenes (69° N, 16° E for the years 2000–2013. A comparison of the average characteristics of hiccups and SSWs shows both similarities and differences between the two vertical coupling processes.

  6. A Daily Process Examination of the Temporal Association Between Alcohol Use and Verbal and Physical Aggression in Community Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Maria; Derrick, Jaye L.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol use has been associated with intimate partner aggression perpetration and victimization; however, much of the evidence is based on survey research. Few studies have addressed the proximal effects of drinking episodes on the subsequent occurrence of partner aggression. The current study used daily diary methodology to consider the daily and temporal association between drinking episodes and episodes of partner verbal and physical aggression among a community sample of married and cohabiting couples (N = 118). Male and female partners each provided 56 days of independent daily reports of drinking and partner conflict episodes, including verbal and physical aggression, using interactive voice response technology. Dyadic data analyses, guided by the actor-partner interdependence model, were conducted using hierarchical generalized linear modeling with multivariate outcomes. Daily analyses revealed that alcohol consumption was associated with perpetration of verbal and physical aggression the same day, but not with victimization. Temporal analyses revealed that the likelihood of perpetrating verbal and physical aggression, and the likelihood of being verbally and physically victimized, increased significantly when alcohol was consumed in the previous four hours. Findings did not differ according to gender of perpetrator or victim, and the interaction between perpetrator and victim's alcohol use was not significant in any analysis. The study provides clear evidence that, within a sample of community couples without substance-use disorders or other psychopathology, alcohol consumption by men and women contributes to the occurrence of partner aggression episodes. PMID:24341618

  7. Marital Processes Linking Gender Role Attitudes and Marital Satisfaction Among Mexican-Origin Couples: Application of an Actor-Partner Interdependence Mediation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Heather M; Supple, Andrew J; Hengstebeck, Natalie D; Wood, Claire A; Rodriguez, Yuliana

    2018-01-24

    Informed by dyadic approaches and culturally informed, ecological perspectives of marriage, we applied an actor-partner interdependence mediation model (APIMeM) in a sample of 120 Mexican-origin couples to examine (a) the associations linking Mexican immigrant husbands' and wives' gender role attitudes to marital satisfaction directly and indirectly through marital processes (i.e., warmth and negativity) and (b) whether the associations between spouses' gender role attitudes and marital processes were moderated by wives' employment. Although previous research has identified spouses' gender role attitudes as potential predictors of spouses' marital satisfaction, no study has examined these links in a dyadic model that elucidates how gender role attitudes may operate through processes to shape marital satisfaction and conditions under which associations may differ. We found that when spouses reported less sex-typed attitudes, their partners reported feeling more connected to them and more satisfied with the marriage, regardless of whether wives were employed. Our results suggest that marital satisfaction was highest for those Mexican-origin couples in which marital partners were less sex-typed in their attitudes about marital roles to the extent that partners' attitudinal role flexibility promoted spouses' feelings of warmth and connection to their partner. © 2018 Family Process Institute.

  8. Self-powered gustation electronic skin for mimicking taste buds based on piezoelectric-enzymatic reaction coupling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tianming; Fu, Yongming; He, Haoxuan; Dong, Chuanyi; Zhang, Linlin; Zeng, Hui; Xing, Lili; Xue, Xinyu

    2018-02-01

    A new self-powered wearable gustation electronic skin for mimicking taste buds has been realized based on enzyme-modified/ZnO nanowire arrays on patterned-electrode flexible substrate. The e-skin can actively taste beverages or fruits without any external electric power. Through the piezoelectric-enzymatic reaction coupling effect, the nanowires can harvest the mechanical energy of body movement and output piezoelectric signal. The piezoelectric output is significantly dependent on the concentration of target analyte. The response for detecting 2 × 10-2 M ascorbic acid (ascorbate acid oxidase@ZnO) is up to 171.747, and the selectivity is high. The response for detecting 50% alcohol (alcohol oxidase@ZnO) is up to 45.867. Our results provide a new research direction for the development of multifunctional e-skin and expand the study scope for self-powered bionic systems.

  9. Touch as an interpersonal emotion regulation process in couples' daily lives: the mediating role of psychological intimacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrot, Anik; Schoebi, Dominik; Perrez, Meinrad; Horn, Andrea B

    2013-10-01

    Interpersonal touch seems to promote physical health through its effects on stress-sensitive parameters. However, less is known about the psychological effects of touch. The present study investigates associations between touch and romantic partners' affective state in daily life. We hypothesized that this association is established by promoting the recipient's experience of intimacy. Both partners of 102 dating couples completed an electronic diary 4 times a day during 1 week. Multilevel analyses revealed that touch was associated with enhanced affect in the partner. This association was mediated by the partner's psychological intimacy. Touch was also associated with intimacy and positive affect in the actor. Finally, participants who were touched more often during the diary study week reported better psychological well-being 6 months later. This study provides evidence that intimate partners benefit from touch on a psychological level, conveying a sense of strengthened bonds between them that enhances affect and well-being.

  10. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis: Mathematical model of coupled heat and mass transfer for a contact baking process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feyissa, Aberham Hailu; Gernaey, Krist; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    transfer model of a contact baking process. The Monte Carlo procedure was applied for propagating uncertainty in the input parameters to uncertainty in the model predictions. Monte Carlo simulations and the least squares method were used in the sensitivity analysis: for each model output, a linear...... be used to prioritize future experimental efforts, as discussed for the contact baking process....

  11. Influence of processing medium on frictional wear properties of ball bearing steel prepared by laser surface melting coupled with bionic principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Hong; Wang Chengtao; Guo Qingchun; Yu Jiaxiang; Wang Mingxing; Liao Xunlong; Zhao Yu; Ren Luquan

    2010-01-01

    Coupling with bionic principles, an attempt to improve the wear resistance of ball bearing steel (GCr15) with biomimetic units on the surface was made using a pulsed Nd: YAG laser. Air and water film was employed as processing medium, respectively. The microstructures of biomimeitc units were examined by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction was used to describe the microstructure and identify the phases as functions of different mediums as well as water film with different thicknesses. The results indicated that the microstructure zones in the biomimetic specimens processed with water film were more refined and had better wear resistance increased by 55.8% in comparison with that processed in air; a significant improvement in microhardness was achieved by laser surface melting. The application of water film provided considerable microstructural changes and much more regular grain shape in biomimetic units, which played a key role in improving the wear resistance of ball bearing steel.

  12. Life cycle assessment of coupling household biogas production to agricultural industry: A case study of biogas-linked persimmon cultivation and processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Bin; Chen, Shaoqing

    2013-01-01

    Biogas plant construction has been boosted in rural China not only due to the immediate merit from biogas production but also the succeeding benefit from by-product utilization in agro-industry, both of which are significant strategies to address energy shortage and global warming issues. However, little work has been done to evaluate the coupling of biogas projects to traditional agrosystems from a life-cycle perspective, which is most important in process and system optimization in different senses. By taking persimmon cultivation and processing with supports from a household biogas plant as a case study, this study conducts a life cycle assessment of coupling biogas production to agro-industry in terms of energy, environmental and economic performance. The results suggest that each production stage following the biogas/digestate utilization chain (biogas operation-persimmon cultivation-product processing) is beneficial across all three aspects. However, a tradeoff only exists in utilizing digestate as top-dressing and employing biogas utilization as engine fuel, while biogas application in fresh-keeping and digestate reuse as base fertilizer fails to increase either energy production or greenhouse gas mitigation. The coupled system can be hopefully optimized through increasing fermentation efficiency and joint operation of biogas digesters. -- Highlights: •Biogas/digestate utilization is overall beneficial in all production stages. •Each bioresource application may not be profitable in all respects. •Tradeoffs in using biogas and digestate vary among different utilization ways. •Multi-user operation and fermentation efficiency elevation optimize system

  13. Final Report DE-SC0006997; PI Sharp; Coupled Biological and Micro-XAS/XRF Analysis of In Situ Uranium Biogeochemical Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, Jonathan O. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-30

    Project Overview: The impact of the original seed award was substantially increased by leveraging a postdoctoral fellowship (Marie Curie Postdoctoral Fellowship) and parallel funds from (A) synergistic project supported by NSF and (B) with DOE collaborators (PI’s Ranville and Williams) as well as no-cost extension that greatly increased the impact and publications associated with the project. In aligning with SBR priorities, the project’s focus was extended more broadly to explore coupled biogeochemical analysis of metal (im)mobilization processes beyond uranium with a foundation in integrating microbial ecology with geochemical analyses. This included investigations of arsenic and zinc during sulfate reducing conditions in addition to direct microbial reduction of metals. Complimentary work with NSF funding and collaborative DOE interactions further increased the project scope to investigate metal (im)mobilization coupled to biogeochemical perturbations in forest ecosystems with an emphasis on coupled carbon and metal biogeochemistry. In total, the project was highly impactful and resulted in 9 publications and directly supported salary/tuition for 3 graduate students at various stages of their academic careers as well as my promotion to Associate Professor. In going forward, findings provided inspiration for a two subsequent proposals with collaborators at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and others that are currently in review (as of March 2016).

  14. Catalyst evaluation for high-purity H2 production by sorption-enhanced steam-methane reforming coupled to a Ca/Cu process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, M. V.; López, J. M.; García, T.; Grasa, G.; Murillo, R.

    2017-09-01

    The operational limits of a commercial nickel-based catalyst under the conditions of a sorption-enhanced steam-methane reforming process coupled to a Ca/Cu chemical loop are investigated for high-purity H2 production in a cyclic operation. The performance of the reforming catalyst is tested by means of a high number of oxidation-reduction-reforming cycles. After 100 oxidation-reduction cycles, this catalyst retains its exceptional reforming activity. The methane conversion values are close to the thermodynamic equilibrium under very demanding conditions: temperature between 500 °C - 700 °C and mass hourly space velocity of 8.8 kgCH4 h-1 kgcat-1. After 200 cycles, the sample shows reduction in its reforming activity in line with a lower dispersion of the Ni species. Sintering of Ni nanocrystals is evidenced during the oxidation-reduction multi-cycles. The performance of the catalyst after 200 oxidation-reduction cycles mixed with a CaO-based CO2 sorbent is studied under optimal conditions calculated for the sorption-enhanced reforming process coupled to a Ca/Cu cycle (temperature of 650 °C, steam/methane ratio of 4, sorbent/catalyst ratio of 4 and space velocity of 0.75 kgCH4 h-1 kgcat-1). Remarkably, an equilibrium value over 92 vol.% H2 concentration is achieved, highlighting this catalyst as a promising candidate for the next steps of the process development.

  15. Influence of dynamic coupled hydro-bio-mechanical processes on response of municipal solid waste and liner system in bioreactor landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Krishna R; Kumar, Girish; Giri, Rajiv K

    2017-05-01

    A two-dimensional (2-D) mathematical model is presented to predict the response of municipal solid waste (MSW) of conventional as well as bioreactor landfills undergoing coupled hydro-bio-mechanical processes. The newly developed and validated 2-D coupled mathematical modeling framework combines and simultaneously solves a two-phase flow model based on the unsaturated Richard's equation, a plain-strain formulation of Mohr-Coulomb mechanical model and first-order decay kinetics biodegradation model. The performance of both conventional and bioreactor landfill was investigated holistically, by evaluating the mechanical settlement, extent of waste degradation with subsequent changes in geotechnical properties, landfill slope stability, and in-plane shear behavior (shear stress-displacement) of composite liner system and final cover system. It is concluded that for the given specific conditions considered, bioreactor landfill attained an overall stabilization after a continuous leachate injection of 16years, whereas the stabilization was observed after around 50years of post-closure in conventional landfills, with a total vertical strain of 36% and 37% for bioreactor and conventional landfills, respectively. The significant changes in landfill settlement, the extent of MSW degradation, MSW geotechnical properties, along with their influence on the in-plane shear response of composite liner and final cover system, between the conventional and bioreactor landfills, observed using the mathematical model proposed in this study, corroborates the importance of considering coupled hydro-bio-mechanical processes while designing and predicting the performance of engineered bioreactor landfills. The study underscores the importance of considering the effect of coupled processes while examining the stability and integrity of the liner and cover systems, which form the integral components of a landfill. Moreover, the spatial and temporal variations in the landfill settlement, the

  16. An efficient process for pd-catalyzed C-N cross-coupling reactions of aryl iodides: insight into controlling factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fors, Brett P; Davis, Nicole R; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2009-04-29

    An investigation into Pd-catalyzed C-N cross-coupling reactions of aryl iodides is described. NaI is shown to have a significant inhibitory effect on these processes. By switching to a solvent system in which the iodide byproduct was insoluble, reactions of aryl iodides were accomplished with the same efficiencies as aryl chlorides and bromides. Using catalyst systems based on certain biarylphosphine ligands, aryl iodides were successfully reacted with an array of primary and secondary amines in high yields. Lastly, reactions of heteroarylamines and heteroaryliodides were also conducted in high yields.

  17. Wastewater resource recovery via the Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal and Recovery (EBP2R) process coupled with green microalgae cultivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valverde Perez, Borja

    completely counters the benefit of resource recovery. As an alternative, this thesis proposes a new fully biochemical resource recovery process, referred to as TRENS. The TRENS consists of an enhanced biological phosphorus removal and recovery (EBP2R) process combined with a photobioreactor (PBR). The EBP2R...... production. The fraction of nitrogen which cannot be recovered is removed via completely autotrophic nitrogen removal (CANR). First, a feasibility assessment of the EBP2R process as an algal culture media generator was carried out using continuous-flow and sequencing batch reactor (SBR) configurations....... Systems were modelled using the activated sludge model 2d (ASM-2d). Regardless of the process configuration, factors that can potentially limit nutrient recovery comprise the system SRT and the nitrate recirculated to the anaerobic phase/reactor. Additionally, continuous-flow EBP2R systems can suffer from...

  18. Ocean bio-geophysical modeling using mixed layer-isopycnal general circulation model coupled with photosynthesis process

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; Saito, H.; Muneyama, K.; Sato, T.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Kumar, A.; Frouin, R.

    into deep ocean and are converted into carbon dioxide, emitting heat that was originally stored in the body of phytoplanktons as a product of photosynthesis. The notion of these biological-chemical-physical processes in the ocean from the viewpoint...

  19. Type Ia Supernovae as Sites of the p-process: Two-dimensional Models Coupled to Nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travaglio, C.; Röpke, F. K.; Gallino, R.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2011-10-01

    Beyond Fe, there is a class of 35 proton-rich nuclides, between 74Se and 196Hg, called p-nuclei. They are bypassed by the s and r neutron capture processes and are typically 10-1000 times less abundant than the s- and/or r-isotopes in the solar system. The bulk of p-isotopes is created in the "gamma processes" by sequences of photodisintegrations and beta decays in explosive conditions in both core collapse supernovae (SNe II) and in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). SNe II contribute to the production of p-nuclei through explosive neon and oxygen burning. However, the major problem in SN II ejecta is a general underproduction of the light p-nuclei for A explosive nucleosynthesis with a detailed nuclear reaction network for all isotopes up to 209Bi. We select tracers within the typical temperature range for p-process production, (1.5-3.7) × 109 K, and analyze in detail their behavior, exploring the influence of different s-process distributions on the p-process nucleosynthesis. In addition, we discuss the sensitivity of p-process production to parameters of the explosion mechanism, taking into account the consequences on Fe and alpha elements. We find that SNe Ia can produce a large amount of p-nuclei, both the light p-nuclei below A = 120 and the heavy-p nuclei, at quite flat average production factors, tightly related to the s-process seed distribution. For the first time, we find a stellar source able to produce both light and heavy p-nuclei almost at the same level as 56Fe, including the debated neutron magic 92, 94Mo and 96, 98Ru. We also find that there is an important contribution from the p-process nucleosynthesis to the s-only nuclei 80Kr, 86Sr, to the neutron magic 90Zr, and to the neutron-rich 96Zr. Finally, we investigate the metallicity effect on p-process production in our models. Starting with different s-process seed distributions for two metallicities Z = 0.02 and Z = 0.001, running two-dimensional SN Ia models with different initial composition, we

  20. Coupled hydrological and biogeochemical processes controlling variability of nitrogen species in streamflow during autumn in an upland forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebestyen, Stephen D.; Shanley, James B.; Boyer, Elizabeth W.; Kendall, Carol; Doctor, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Autumn is a season of dynamic change in forest streams of the northeastern United States due to effects of leaf fall on both hydrology and biogeochemistry. Few studies have explored how interactions of biogeochemical transformations, various nitrogen sources, and catchment flow paths affect stream nitrogen variation during autumn. To provide more information on this critical period, we studied (1) the timing, duration, and magnitude of changes to stream nitrate, dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and ammonium concentrations; (2) changes in nitrate sources and cycling; and (3) source areas of the landscape that most influence stream nitrogen. We collected samples at higher temporal resolution for a longer duration than typical studies of stream nitrogen during autumn. This sampling scheme encompassed the patterns and extremes that occurred during base flow and stormflow events of autumn. Base flow nitrate concentrations decreased by an order of magnitude from 5.4 to 0.7 µmol L−1 during the week when most leaves fell from deciduous trees. Changes to rates of biogeochemical transformations during autumn base flow explained the low nitrate concentrations; in-stream transformations retained up to 72% of the nitrate that entered a stream reach. A decrease of in-stream nitrification coupled with heterotrophic nitrate cycling were primary factors in the seasonal nitrate decline. The period of low nitrate concentrations ended with a storm event in which stream nitrate concentrations increased by 25-fold. In the ensuing weeks, peak stormflow nitrate concentrations progressively decreased over closely spaced, yet similarly sized events. Most stormflow nitrate originated from nitrification in near-stream areas with occasional, large inputs of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate, which has rarely been reported for nonsnowmelt events. A maximum input of 33% unprocessed atmospheric nitrate to the stream occurred during one event. Large inputs of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate

  1. Transportation over long distance and thermal energy storage, coupling with energetic valuation processes from waste. State of art. Extended abstract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megret, O.; Bequet, L.; Manificat, A.; Weber, C.

    2011-12-01

    This study aims, on one hand, to realize a state of art about over long distance transport and heat energy storage and, on the other hand, to examine their coupling with waste valuation systems. After reminding the adequate context of development with those solutions and too showing the importance of the stake linked to the current work, we first expose the introductive elements in terms of storage and heat energy transport. The second chapter deals with the description of some materials, equipment and systems concerning heat storage energy. Afterward, the over long distance heat transport systems are detailed in the third chapter. In the fourth chapter, it is about waste valuation techniques and heat energy potentials users. The fifth chapter sums up the different techniques of storage and heat transport that are applicable to waste field according to the appropriate sector. Finally, the sixth chapter goes about 3 case-works in 3 fields: housing/commercial, industrial laundry and high temperature industry (steel industry). The purpose is to determine the implementation feasibility of the different techniques of storage and waste heat transport. (authors)

  2. Characterization of the fermentation process by gas chromatography Lasiodiplodia theobromae and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo Portela, Grolamys; Eng Sanchez, Felipe; Nogueiras Lima, Clara

    2014-01-01

    Lasiodiplodia theobromae is a fungus, which has been reported by some authors as a high yield producer of the phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA). An indigenous strain of this fungus has been used for producing a fermentation broth with a high JA concentration by the Cuban Research Institute for Sugar Cane Derivatives (ICIDCA), registered as BIOJAS. The broth has been applied to some agricultural crops and demonstrated its economic feasibility as plant growth regulator and biological control of various phytopathogenic microorganisms and pests. Both fermentation broth and biomass from this fungus contain some other metabolites having bioactive properties, for instance, fatty acids. This paper shows the composition and quantification of fatty acids in the biomass using Gas Chromatography (GC) and the identification of substances profile in fermentation broth by Gas Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). The most fatty acids in the biomass are palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids, being oleic acid the major component. On the other hand, 2,32 % of fatty acid esters; 2,47 % of alkenes; 14,40 % of alcohols; 30,15 % of aldehydes and 21,73 % of paraffins were detected in the composition of fermentation broth

  3. Mnemonic strategy training of the elderly at risk for dementia enhances integration of information processing via cross-frequency coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Stavros I; Tarnanas, Ioannis; Wiederhold, Mark; Wiederhold, Brenda; Tsolaki, Magda; Fleisch, Elgar

    2016-11-01

    We sought to identify whether intensive 10-week mobile health mnemonic strategy training (MST) could shift the resting-state brain network more toward cortical-level integration, which has recently been proven to reflect the reorganization of the brain networks compensating the cognitive decline. One hundred fifty-eight patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) were selected and participated in 10-week training lasting 90 min/d of memory training. They benefited from an initial and a follow-up neuropsychological evaluation and resting-state electroencephalography (EEG). At follow-up, MST revealed an extensive significant training effect that changed the network with an increase of synchronization between parietotemporal and frontal areas; frontal θ -parietal α2 causal strengthening as part of top-down inhibitory control; enhancement of sensorimotor connections in β band; and a general increase of cortical-level integration. More precisely, MST induced gain as an increase of the global cost efficiency (GCE) of the whole cortical network and a neuropsychological performance improvement, which was correlated with it (r = 0.32, P  = .0001). The present study unfolded intervention changes based on EEG source activity via novel neuroinformatic tools for revealing intrinsic coupling modes in both amplitude-phase representations and in the mixed spectrospatiotemporal domain. Further work should identify whether the GCE enhancement of the functional cortical brain networks is a compensation mechanism to the brain network dysfunction or a more permanent neuroplasticity effect.

  4. Behavior of leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-expressing cells in the reprogramming process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Arioka

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available It remains unclear what cells are proper for the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5 is well known as a tissue stem cell and progenitor marker, both of which are reported to be sensitive to reprogramming. In the present study, we examined the reprogramming behavior of Lgr5-expressing cells (Lgr5+ cells. First, we compared reprogramming behavior using mouse Lgr5+ and Lgr5 negative (Lgr5− hair follicles (HFs. The number of alkaline phosphatase staining-positive cells was lesser in a well of Lgr5+ HFs than in Lgr5− HFs; however, the ratio of Nanog+ SSEA1+ cells in the cell mixture derived from Lgr5+ HFs was much higher than that from Lgr5− HFs. Lgr5+ cells could be induced from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs after transduction with Yamanaka factors. As shown in HFs, the progeny of Lgr5+ cells arising from MEFs highly converted into Nanog+ cells and did not form Nanog− colonies. The progeny represented the status of the late reprogramming phase to a higher degree than the nonprogeny. We also confirmed this using human Lg5+ cells. Our findings suggest that the use of Lgr5+ cells will minimize sorting efforts for obtaining superior iPSCs.

  5. The Effect of Different Coupling Agents on Nano-ZnO Materials Obtained via the Sol-Gel Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcar, Violeta; Şomoghi, Raluca; Niţu, Sabina Georgiana; Nicolae, Cristian-Andi; Alexandrescu, Elvira; Gîfu, Ioana Cătălina; Gabor, Augusta Raluca; Stroescu, Hermine; Ianchiş, Raluca; Căprărescu, Simona; Cinteză, Ludmila Otilia

    2017-12-12

    Hybrid nanomaterials based on zinc oxide were synthesized via the sol-gel method, using different silane coupling agents: (3-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GPTMS), phenyltriethoxysilane (PhTES), octyltriethoxysilane (OTES), and octadecyltriethoxysilane (ODTES). Morphological properties and the silane precursor type effect on the particle size were investigated using dynamic light scattering (DLS), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The bonding characteristics of modified ZnO materials were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The final solutions were deposited on metallic substrate (aluminum) in order to realize coatings with various wettability and roughness. The morphological studies, obtained by ESEM and TEM analysis, showed that the sizes of the ZnO nanoparticles are changed as function of silane precursor used in synthesis. The thermal stability of modified ZnO materials showed that the degradation of the alkyl groups takes place in the 300-500 °C range. Water wettability study revealed a contact angle of 142 ± 5° for the surface covered with ZnO material modified with ODTES and showed that the water contact angle increases as the alkyl chain from the silica precursor increases. These modified ZnO materials, therefore, can be easily incorporated in coatings for various applications such as anti-corrosion and anti-icing.

  6. Thermal-hydraulic-geochemical coupled processes around disposed high level nuclear waste in deep granite hosted geological repositories: frontier areas of advanced groundwater research in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajpai, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    Indian policy for permanent disposal of high level nuclear wastes with radionuclide having very long half lives include their immobilization in a stable matrix i.e. glasses of suitable composition, its storage in high integrity steel canisters and subsequent disposal in suitable host rock like granites at a depth of 400-500m in stable geological set up. The site for such disposal facilities are selected after vigorous assessment of their stability implying an exhaustive site selection methodology based on a large number of criteria and attributes. In India, an area of about 70000 square kilometers occupied by granites has been subjected to such evaluation for generating comprehensive database on host rock parameters. The sites selected after such intensive analysis are expected to remain immune to processes like seismicity, volcanism, faulting, uplift, erosion, flooding etc. even in distant future spanning over tens of thousands of years. Nevertheless, groundwater has emerged as the only credible pathway through which disposed waste can eventually find its way to accessible biosphere. Hence groundwater research constitutes one of the most important aspects in demonstration of safety of such disposal. The disposed waste due to continuous emission of decay heat creates high temperature field around them with resultant increase in groundwater temperature in the vicinity. Hot groundwater on reacting with steel canisters, backfill clays and cement used around the disposed canister, produces geochemical environment characterized by altered Ph, Eh and groundwater compositions. Acceleration in geochemical interaction among waste-groundwater-clay-cement-granite often results in dissolution or precipitation reactions along the groundwater flow paths i.e. fractures with resultant increase or decrease in their permeability. Thus thermal, hydraulic and geochemical processes work interdependently around the disposed waste. These coupled processes also control the release and

  7. Two-stage continuous process of methyl ester from high free fatty acid mixed crude palm oil using static mixer coupled with high-intensity of ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somnuk, Krit; Smithmaitrie, Pruittikorn; Prateepchaikul, Gumpon

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Mixed crude palm oil was used in the two-step continuous process. • Two-step continuous process was performed using static mixer coupled with ultrasound. • The maximum obtained yield was 92.5 vol.% after the purification process. • The residence time less than 20 s was achieved in ultrasonic reactors. - Abstract: The two-stage continuous process of methyl ester from high free fatty acid (FFA) mixed crude palm oil (MCPO) was performed by using static mixer coupled with high-intensity of ultrasound. The 2 × 1000 W ultrasonic homogenizers were operated at 18 kHz frequency in the 2 × 100 mL continuous reactors. For the first-step, acid-catalyzed esterification was employed with 18 vol.% of methanol, 2.7 vol.% of sulfuric acid, 60 °C of temperature, and 20 L h −1 of MCPO flow rate, for reducing the acid value from 28 mg KOH g −1 to less than 2 mg KOH g −1 . For the second-step, base-catalyzed transesterification was carried out under 18 vol.% of methanol, 8 g KOH L −1 of oil, and 20 L h −1 of esterified oil flow rate at 30 °C. The high yields of esterified oil and crude biodiesel were attained within the residence time of less than 20 s in the ultrasonic reactors. The yields of each stage process were: 103.3 vol.% of esterified oil, 105.4 vol.% of crude biodiesel, and 92.5 vol.% of biodiesel when compared with 100 vol.% MCPO. The quality of the biodiesel meets the specification of biodiesel standard in Thailand

  8. Controlling the nitrite:ammonium ratio in a SHARON reactor in view of its coupling with an Anammox process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volcke, E I P; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Vanrolleghem, P A

    2006-01-01

    The combined SHARON-Anammox process for treating wastewater streams with high ammonia load is the focus of this paper. In particular, partial nitritation in the SHARON reactor should be performed to such an extent that a nitrite:ammonium ratio is generated which is optimal for full conversion in an Anammox process. In the simulation studies performed in this contribution, the nitrite:ammonium ratio produced in a SHARON process with fixed volume, as well as its effect on the subsequent Anammox process, is examined for realistic influent conditions and considering both direct and indirect pH effects on the SHARON process. Several possible operating modes for the SHARON reactor, differing in control strategies for O2, pH and the produced nitrite:ammonium ratio and based on regulating the air flow rate and/or acid/base addition, are systematically evaluated. The results are quantified through an operating cost index. Best results are obtained by means of cascade feedback control of the SHARON effluent nitrite:ammonium ratio through setting an O2 set-point that is tracked by adjusting the air flow rate, combined with single loop pH control through acid/base addition.

  9. Coupling Computer-Aided Process Simulation and Estimations of Emissions and Land Use for Rapid Life Cycle Inventory Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    A methodology is described for developing a gate-to-gate life cycle inventory (LCI) of a chemical manufacturing process to support the application of life cycle assessment in the design and regulation of sustainable chemicals. The inventories were derived by first applying proces...

  10. A novel polygeneration process to co-produce ethylene and electricity from shale gas with zero CO2 emissions via methane oxidative coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khojasteh Salkuyeh, Yaser; Adams, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Development of an ethylene plant from shale gases with zero CO 2 emissions. • Oxidative coupling of methane is used for the conversion of gas to ethylene. • Polygeneration strategy is used to improve the profitability of plant. - Abstract: A techno-economic analysis of a novel process to co-produce ethylene and electricity using a recently developed methane oxidative coupling catalyst is presented. Several design variants are considered, featuring the use of traditional gas turbines, chemical looping combustion, and 100% carbon dioxide capture. Mass and energy balance simulations were carried out using Aspen Plus simulations, and particle swarm optimization was used to determine the optimal process design under a variety of market scenarios. A custom model for the gas turbine section was used to ensure that the negative impacts of various cooling strategies were factored into the analysis. The results show that by synergistically co-producing power and ethylene using this catalyst, ethylene can be produced at costs close to traditional steam cracking methods with nearly zero carbon dioxide emissions, even when factoring in the relatively poor conversion and selectivity of the chosen catalyst

  11. Development of a parallel processing couple for calculations of control rod worth in terms of burn-up in a WWER-1000 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noori-Kalkhoran, Omid; Ahangari, R. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Reactor Research school; Shirani, A.S. [Shahid Beheshti Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Faculty of Engineering

    2017-03-15

    In this study a code based method has been developed for calculation of integral and differential control rod worth in terms of burn-up for a WWER-1000 reactor. Parallel processing of WIMSD-5B, PARCS V2.7 and COBRA-EN has been used for this purpose. WIMSD-5B has been used for cell calculation and handling burn-up of core at different days. PARCS V2.7?has been used for neutronic calculation of core and critical boron concentration search. Thermal-hydraulic calculation has been performed by COBRA-EN. A Parallel processing algorithm has been developed by MATLAB to couple and transfer suitable data between these codes in each step. Steady-State Power Picking Factors (PPFs) of the core and Control rod worth have been calculated from Beginning Of Cycle (BOC) to 289.7 Effective full Power Days (EFPDs) in some steps. Results have been compared with Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) results. The results show great similarity and confirm the ability of developed coupling in calculation of control rod worth in terms of burn-up.

  12. Use of the available energy in the re-gasification process of liquefied natural gas by coupling combined heat and power cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgarbi, P.V.; Schmeda Lopez, D.R.; Indrusiak, M.L.S.; Schneider, P. Smith [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering], Emails: guetuso@gmail.com, diego.schmeda@ufrgs.br, sperbindrusiak@via-rs.net, pss@mecanica.ufrgs.br

    2009-07-01

    This work evaluates the possibilities of taking advantage of the heat transferred in the re-gasification process of liquid natural gas (LNG). It is proposed the coupling of a Brayton-Rankine combined heat and power plant (CHP) to a LNG re-gasification plant in order to use the heat involved in this process as cold source for the CHP plant. For comparison, the same CHP is simulated exchanging heat with a reference environment. An analysis is performed assuming that the amount of natural gas fed to the Brayton sub-cycle combustion chamber is equal for both cases. The CHP coupled to the re-gasification plant present a net power generation of 22.7 MW and the efficiency is 45.5%. It represents a gain of 2.98 MW in the power generation and 15% in the cycle efficiency, when compared to the reference cycle. The exergetic efficiency with this proposal is 49.3%, which is 9% higher than the reference cycle. (author)

  13. Towards an integrated design of voluntary approaches and standardization processes: An analysis of issues and trends in the Italian regulation on ground coupled heat pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzi, Francesco; Frey, Marco; Iraldo, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We investigate GCHP regulation development from an entrepreneurial perspective. → Threats in booming market orient entrepreneurs toward green management. → Command and control regulation is not sufficient to guarantee market sustainability. → Voluntary regulation encourage best performers to invest in long-term strategies. → Bottom-up regulation design advances integration of process and product standards. - Abstract: Despite the lack of specific incentives, ground coupled heat pump (GCHP) installations are booming in Italy both in the private and public sectors. Such rapid growth is coupled with increasing concern for environmental and technical performances since no comprehensive regulation and reliable standards currently exist. This paper discusses potential schemes aimed at balancing mandatory and voluntary requirements by using SWOT-based techniques and examining the opinions of sectoral leaders. The analysis suggests that standardization and voluntary schemes are perceived as efficient and effective tools to encourage the greening of Italian GCHP-SMEs in the short-term while laying the foundations for sustainable policies in the longer run. A potential scheme is discussed that was simulated by reflecting the supply-side of the market, and which involves process and product standards.

  14. Clinical efficacy of a combination of Percoll continuous density gradient and swim-up techniques for semen processing in HIV-1 serodiscordant couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Inoue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the clinical efficacy of a procedure comprising a combination of Percoll continuous density gradient and modified swim-up techniques for the removal of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 from the semen of HIV-1 infected males, a total of 129 couples with an HIV-1 positive male partner and an HIV-1 negative female partner (serodiscordant couples who were treated at Keio University Hospital between January 2002 and April 2012 were examined. A total of 183 ejaculates from 129 HIV-1 infected males were processed. After swim-up, we successfully collected motile sperms at a recovery rate as high as 100.0% in cases of normozoospermia (126/126 ejaculates, oligozoospermia (6/6, and asthenozoospermia (36/36. The recovery rate of oligoasthenozoospermia was 86.7% (13/15. In processed semen only four ejaculates (4/181:2.2% showed viral nucleotide sequences consistent with those in the blood of the infected males. After using these sperms, no horizontal infections of the female patients and no vertical infections of the newborns were observed. Furthermore, no obvious adverse effects were observed in the offspring. This protocol allowed us to collect HIV-1 negative motile sperms at a high rate, even in male factor cases. We concluded that our protocol is clinically effective both for decreasing HIV-1 infections and for yielding a healthy child.

  15. Modelling the defrost process in complex geometries – part 2: wall-function based coupling to a multi-region CFD solver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hertle Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Presence of frost in air coolers reduces the performance and thus has to be removed frequently. A method commonly applied for frost removal is hot-gas defrosting. For the efficient design of this periodically performed operating sequence, a precise prediction of the process is essential. A CFD simulation is a capable tool for this evaluation. This paper presents an integration of a defrost model into a CFD solver of the software Open FOAM. The multi-region properties implemented in the existing code are adapted for the metal fin and tube structure and the air flow channel. The extension of the solver for evaluating the frost layer is accomplished by an interfacial wall function which models the frost characteristics and performs the thermal coupling. The extended solver is tested in a simplified environment, focusing on a fin-tube section. The simulated course of the defrost process and the total defrost time are discussed.

  16. An innovative bioelectrochemical-anaerobic digestion-coupled system for in-situ ammonia recovery and biogas enhancement: process performance and microbial ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    Ammonia (NH4+/NH3) inhibition during anaerobic digestion process is one of the most frequent problems existing in biogas plants, resulting in unstable process and reduced biogas production. In this study, we developed a novel hybrid system, consisted of a submersed microbial resource recovery cell...... (SMRC) and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), to prevent ammonia toxicity during anaerobic digestion by in-situ ammonia recovery and electricity production. In batch experiment, the ammonia concentration in the CSTR decreased from 6 to 0.7 g-N/L with an average recovery rate of 0.18 g...... of ammonia recovery on the microbial community composition in the integrated system. Results clearly indicate the great potential of the SMRC-CSTR-coupled system for efficient and cost-effective ammonia recovery, energy production and treatment of ammonia-rich residues....

  17. An MCDA and GIS coupling conceptual model to be used in a circular decision process by stakeholders involved in large wind farm projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, M. [Quebec Univ., Rimouski, PQ (Canada). Laboratoire de Recherche en Energie Eolienne; Quebec Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). GEIGER; Waaub, J.P. [Quebec Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). GEIGER; Ilinca, A. [Quebec Univ., Rimouski, PQ (Canada). Laboratoire de Recherche en Energie Eolienne

    2010-07-01

    This poster presentation described an MCDA and geographic information system (GIS) coupling conceptual model designed for use in stakeholder decision-making processes for large wind farm projects. The model was comprised of 4 modules and 4 stakeholder categories that considered the environment and communities involved in the project. The integrated modelling approach was designed to ensure a transparent decision-making process. The modules included: (1) an MCDA module, (2) a local expertise and scientific knowledge module, (3) a stakeholder involvement module, and (4) a participatory GIS module. The model can be used to structure issues during consultation procedures, as well as to conduct preference analyses and to identify indicators. Examples of stakeholder weighting were included. tabs., figs.

  18. Synergistic efficiency of the desilication of brackish underground water in Saudi Arabia by coupling γ-radiation and Fenton process: Membrane scaling prevention in reverse osmosis process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljohani, Mohammed S.

    2017-12-01

    One of the main water resources in arid Saudi Arabia is underground water. However, this brackish water has high silica content which can cause a recalcitrant deposit on the membrane in the reverse osmosis units during its desalination. In this study, we examined the synergistic efficiency of the removal of silica from the Buwaib water sample, when combining two advanced oxidation processes, γ-irradiation and the Fenton process, using hydrogen peroxide and zero valent metal iron as source of Fe3+. This latter adsorbs effectively on silica and co-precipitate. The influence of absorbed dose, iron dosage and pH effect were investigated. This preliminary study showed that these attractive and effective hybrid processes are very efficient in removing silica.

  19. Couplings in multiphasic geo-materials: temperature and chemistry effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghasemzadeh, H.

    2006-05-01

    Transport of chemical components in soil through water is the major cause of pollution of the soil. This transport takes place around landfills and nuclear waste storage areas, tailings and mine wastes, and so on. A great number of these sites are unsaturated of water and in some cases heat can change the fate of chemical species, that lead us to a coupled problem. In this dissertation, numerical simulation with an existent thermo-hydro-mechanical model and theoretical modeling and numerical simulation of transport and interactions of one chemical species in multiphase media are presented. Integrated THM model in the Code-Aster is presented. Excavation, engineering barrier and thermal load of waste nuclear storage well are modeled. Verification of model is presented with these simulations. A thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour coupled with chemical phenomena is presented with a fully coupled method that water, gas, chemical species and soil skeleton were considered as constituents and corresponding unknowns are temperature, water pressure, gas pressure, chemical concentration and displacements. For each constituent, mass balance equation and linear momentum equation are written and solved simultaneously to find related unknowns. The results of this model have been compared with the theoretical and experimental results existing in the literature. Furthermore, results of some applications of this model are included. Some areas where further work is required are identified. In particular, there is a need to perform experiments to obtain necessary soil parameters to permit accurate modelling of the heat and contaminant transport in unsaturated soils. (author)

  20. Hydrogen production coupled to nuclear waste treatment: the safe treatment of alkali metals through a well-demonstrated process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahier, A.; Mesrobian, G.

    2006-01-01

    In 1992, the United Nations emphasised the urgent need to act against the perpetuation of disparities between and within nations, the worsening of poverty, hunger, ill health and illiteracy and the continuing deterioration of ecosystems on which we depend for our well-being. In this framework, taking into account the preservation of both worldwide energy resources and ecosystems, the use of nuclear energy to produce clean energy carriers, such as hydrogen, is undoubtedly advisable. However, coping fully with the Agenda 21 statements requires defining adequate treatment processes for nuclear wastes. This paper discusses the possible use of a well-demonstrated process to convert radioactively contaminated alkali metals into sodium hydroxide while producing hydrogen. We conclude that a synergy between Chlor-Alkali specialists and nuclear specialists may help find an acceptable solution for radioactively contaminated sodium waste. (author)

  1. Modeling for the Calcination Process of Industry Rotary Kiln Using ANFIS Coupled with a Novel Hybrid Clustering Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchang Cai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotary kiln is important equipment in heavy industries and its calcination process is the key impact to the product quality. Due to the difficulty in obtaining the accurate algebraic model of the calcination process, an intelligent modeling method based on ANFIS and clustering algorithms is studied. In the model, ANFIS is employed as the core structure, and aiming to improve both its performance in reduced computation and accuracy, a novel hybrid clustering algorithm is proposed by combining FCM and Subtractive methods. A quasi-random data set is then hired to test the new hybrid clustering algorithm and results indicate its superiority to FCM and Subtractive methods. Further, a set of data from the successful control activity of sophisticated workers in manufacturing field is used to train the model, and the model demonstrates its advantages in both fast convergence and more accuracy approaching.

  2. A Fully Coupled Simulation and Optimization Scheme for the Design of 3D Powder Injection Molding Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayad, G.; Song, J.; Barriere, T.; Liu, B.; Gelin, J. C.

    2007-05-01

    The paper is concerned with optimization and parametric identification of Powder Injection Molding process that consists first in injection of powder mixture with polymer binder and then to the sintering of the resulting powders parts by solid state diffusion. In the first part, one describes an original methodology to optimize the injection stage based on the combination of Design Of Experiments and an adaptive Response Surface Modeling. Then the second part of the paper describes the identification strategy that one proposes for the sintering stage, using the identification of sintering parameters from dilatometer curves followed by the optimization of the sintering process. The proposed approaches are applied to the optimization for manufacturing of a ceramic femoral implant. One demonstrates that the proposed approach give satisfactory results.

  3. Query processing for the internet-of-things:Coupling of device energy consumption and cloud infrastructure billing

    OpenAIRE

    Renna, Francesco; Doyle, Joseph; Andreopoulos, Yiannis; Giotsas, Vasileios

    2016-01-01

    Audio/visual recognition and retrieval applications have recently garnered significant attention within Internetof-Things (IoT) oriented services, given that video cameras and audio processing chipsets are now ubiquitous even in low-end embedded systems. In the most typical scenario for such services, each device extracts audio/visual features and compacts them into feature descriptors, which comprise media queries. These queries are uploaded to a remote cloud computing service that performs ...

  4. Evaluation of Fenton Oxidation Process Coupled with Biological Treatment for the Removal of Reactive Black 5 from Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pegah Bahmani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradation of azo dyes is difficult due to their complex structures and low BOD to COD ratios. In the present study, the efficiency of using Fenton’s reagent (H2O2 + Fe2+ as a pretreatment process to enhance microbial transformation of reactive black 5 (RB5 in an aqueous system was evaluated. The RB5 with an initial concentration of 250 mg/L was decolorized up to 90% in 60 h by using a bacterial consortium. Fenton’s reagent at a Fe2+ concentration of 0.5 mM and H2O2 concentration of 2.9 mM (molar ratio, 1:5.8 was most effective for decolorization at pH = 3.0. The extent of RB5 removal by the combined Fenton–biotreatment was about 2 times higher than that of biotreatment alone. The production of some aromatic amines intermediates implied partial mineralization of the RB5 in Fenton treatment alone; in addition, decreasing of GC-MS peaks suggested that dearomatization occurred in Fenton-biological process. Fenton pretreatment seems to be a cost–effective option for the biotreatment of azo dyes, due mainly to the lower doses of chemicals, lower sludge generation, and saving of time. Our results demonstrated positive effects of inoculating bacterial consortium which was capable of dye biodegradation with a Fenton’s pretreatment step as well as the benefits of low time required for the biological process. In addition, the potential of field performance of Fenton-biological process because of using bacterial consortium is an other positive effect of it.

  5. Treatment of nanofiltration concentrates of mature landfill leachate by a coupled process of coagulation and internal micro-electrolysis adding hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingang; Chen, Jianjun; Xie, Zhengmiao; Xu, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a coupled process of coagulation and aerated internal micro-electrolysis (IME) with the in situ addition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was investigated for the treatment of nanofiltration (NF) concentrate from mature landfill leachate. The acceptable operating conditions were determined as follows: initial pH 4, polymeric aluminium chloride dosage of 525 mg-Al2O3/L in the coagulation process, H2O2 dosage of 0.75 mM and an hydraulic retention time of 2 h in an aerated IME reactor. As a result, the removal efficiencies for chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon, UV254 and colour were 79.2%, 79.6%, 81.8% and 90.8%, respectively. In addition, the ratio of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5)/COD in the final effluent increased from 0.03 to 0.31, and that of E2/E4 from 12.4 to 38.5, respectively. The results indicate that the combined process is an effective and economical way to remove organic matters and to improve the biodegradability of the NF concentrate. Coagulation process reduces the adverse impact of high-molecular-weight organic matters such as humic acids, on the aerated IME process. A proper addition of H2O2 in the aerated IME can promote the corrosion of solid iron (Fe2+/Fe3+) and cause a likely domino effect in the enhancement of removal efficiencies.

  6. Self-organization in a parametrically coupled logistic map network: a model for information processing in the visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashaie, Ramin; Farhat, Nabil H

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, a new model seeking to emulate the way the visual cortex processes information and interacts with subcortical areas to produce higher level brain functions is described. We developed a macroscopic approach that incorporates salient attributes of the cortex based on combining tools of nonlinear dynamics, information theory, and the known organizational and anatomical features of cortex. Justifications for this approach and demonstration of its effectiveness are presented. We also demonstrate certain capabilities of this model in producing efficient sparse representations and providing the cortical computational maps.

  7. Coupling technology and pedagogy to support the process of inclusion of kids with attention difficulties in mainstream schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard; Voldborg, Hanne

    2018-01-01

    This study addresses the challenge of inclusion in mainstream schools of learners with developmental and attention deficits and examines the potential of a digital structuring tool, MobilizeMe, to scaffold this process, including the impact and implications associated with the implementation....... The study focuses on the discrepancy arising from, on the one hand, the digital and pedagogical affordances for scaffolding the focus learners, and on the other hand, the lack of utilization of these affordances in the context of study. From a case study approach, the paper touches upon the digital...

  8. Dobly stochastic Poisson process in EMARG coupled with detection of β particles and internal conversion electrons emitted by a surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusov, V.D.; Zelentsova, T.N.; Grechan, V.I.; Semenov, M.Yu.; Kravchenko, S.N.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the theoretical simulation of the probability two-cascade process of β-particle and interral conversion electron detection by photoemulsion, and its experimental testing using plane 3 H, 69 Ni, 14 C, β-sources and thin plane radioactive isotope 125 I conversion electron source. Indication counting-rate statistics during β-particle and internal conversion electron detection by nuclear photoemulsion is determined. For the first time it is experimentally shown that the photographic β-particle and internal conversion electron detection obeys the A-type Neyman distribution and not the Poisson one, as was believed earlier

  9. Pure & crystallized 2D Boron Nitride sheets synthesized via a novel process coupling both PDCs and SPS methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Sheng; Linas, Sébastien; Journet, Catherine; Steyer, Philippe; Garnier, Vincent; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Brioude, Arnaud; Toury, Bérangère

    2016-02-01

    Within the context of emergent researches linked to graphene, it is well known that h-BN nanosheets (BNNSs), also referred as 2D BN, are considered as the best candidate for replacing SiO2 as dielectric support or capping layers for graphene. As a consequence, the development of a novel alternative source for highly crystallized h-BN crystals, suitable for a further exfoliation, is a prime scientific issue. This paper proposes a promising approach to synthesize pure and well-crystallized h-BN flakes, which can be easily exfoliated into BNNSs. This new accessible production process represents a relevant alternative source of supply in response to the increasing need of high quality BNNSs. The synthesis strategy to prepare pure h-BN is based on a unique combination of the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route with the Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) process. Through a multi-scale chemical and structural investigation, it is clearly shown that obtained flakes are large (up to 30 μm), defect-free and well crystallized, which are key-characteristics for a subsequent exfoliation into relevant BNNSs.

  10. A Online NIR Sensor for the Pilot-Scale Extraction Process in Fructus Aurantii Coupled with Single and Ensemble Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Pan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Model performance of the partial least squares method (PLS alone and bagging-PLS was investigated in online near-infrared (NIR sensor monitoring of pilot-scale extraction process in Fructus aurantii. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC was used as a reference method to identify the active pharmaceutical ingredients: naringin, hesperidin and neohesperidin. Several preprocessing methods and synergy interval partial least squares (SiPLS and moving window partial least squares (MWPLS variable selection methods were compared. Single quantification models (PLS and ensemble methods combined with partial least squares (bagging-PLS were developed for quantitative analysis of naringin, hesperidin and neohesperidin. SiPLS was compared to SiPLS combined with bagging-PLS. Final results showed the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP of bagging-PLS to be lower than that of PLS regression alone. For this reason, an ensemble method of online NIR sensor is here proposed as a means of monitoring the pilot-scale extraction process in Fructus aurantii, which may also constitute a suitable strategy for online NIR monitoring of CHM.

  11. C3a-derived peptide binds to the type I FcepsilonR and inhibits proximal-coupling signal processes and cytokine secretion by mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péterfy, Hajna; Tóth, Gábor; Pecht, Israel; Erdei, Anna

    2008-10-01

    A peptide with the natural sequence derived from the complement component C3a, designated C3a7, and C3a9, having a modified sequence of that, was previously shown to inhibit the high-affinity IgER (FcepsilonRI)-induced secretory response of both mucosal and serosal-type mast cells. In addition, several processes that couple the FcepsilonRI stimulus to the cellular response were all suppressed in the presence of these peptides. Here, we show that peptide C3a9 binds to the FcepsilonRI on the surface of unperturbed mast cells (rat mucosal-type RBL-2H3 cell line) and remains bound even after FcepsilonRI-IgE aggregation by antigen as assessed by confocal microscopy. Moreover, that peptide interferes the initial steps of FcepsilonRI-coupling network. Namely, peptide binding to the FcepsilonRI beta-chain interrupts this chain's association with both src family protein tyrosine kinases Lyn and Fyn and enhances the internalization of the receptor. C3a9 was further found to inhibit the phosphorylation of two members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38. Although ERK is usually activated via the ras-raf-mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase (MEK) pathway, our results show that C3a9 has no effect on the c-raf phosphorylation, suggesting that this complement-derived peptide inhibits ERK activation via an alternative route. C3a9 also inhibits the late-phase response to FcepsilonRI stimulus of bone marrow-derived mast cells, reducing secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Taken together, the consequence of its interference with the earliest steps of FcepsilonRI stimulus-response coupling and the C3a-derived peptide inhibits both the immediate and the late-phase responses of mast cells.

  12. Future climate change impact assessment of watershed scale hydrologic processes in Peninsular Malaysia by a regional climate model coupled with a physically-based hydrology modelo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, M Z M; Shaaban, A J; Ercan, A; Ishida, K; Kavvas, M L; Chen, Z Q; Jang, S

    2017-01-01

    Impacts of climate change on the hydrologic processes under future climate change conditions were assessed over Muda and Dungun watersheds of Peninsular Malaysia by means of a coupled regional climate and physically-based hydrology model utilizing an ensemble of future climate change projections. An ensemble of 15 different future climate realizations from coarse resolution global climate models' (GCMs) projections for the 21st century was dynamically downscaled to 6km resolution over Peninsular Malaysia by a regional climate model, which was then coupled with the watershed hydrology model WEHY through the atmospheric boundary layer over Muda and Dungun watersheds. Hydrologic simulations were carried out at hourly increments and at hillslope-scale in order to assess the impacts of climate change on the water balances and flooding conditions in the 21st century. The coupled regional climate and hydrology model was simulated for a duration of 90years for each of the 15 realizations. It is demonstrated that the increase in mean monthly flows due to the impact of expected climate change during 2040-2100 is statistically significant from April to May and from July to October at Muda watershed. Also, the increase in mean monthly flows is shown to be significant in November during 2030-2070 and from November to December during 2070-2100 at Dungun watershed. In other words, the impact of the expected climate change will be significant during the northeast and southwest monsoon seasons at Muda watershed and during the northeast monsoon season at Dungun watershed. Furthermore, the flood frequency analyses for both watersheds indicated an overall increasing trend in the second half of the 21st century. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Coupled Mo-U abundances and isotopes in a small marine euxinic basin: Constraints on processes in euxinic basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bura-Nakić, Elvira; Andersen, Morten B.; Archer, Corey; de Souza, Gregory F.; Marguš, Marija; Vance, Derek

    2018-02-01

    Sedimentary molybdenum (Mo) and uranium (U) abundances, as well as their isotope systematics, are used to reconstruct the evolution of the oxygenation state of the surface Earth from the geological record. Their utility in this endeavour must be underpinned by a thorough understanding of their behaviour in modern settings. In this study, Mo-U concentrations and their isotope compositions were measured in the water column, sinking particles, sediments and pore waters of the marine euxinic Lake Rogoznica (Adriatic Sea, Croatia) over a two year period, with the aim of shedding light on the specific processes that control Mo-U accumulation and isotope fractionations in anoxic sediment. Lake Rogoznica is a 15 m deep stratified sea-lake that is anoxic and euxinic at depth. The deep euxinic part of the lake generally shows Mo depletions consistent with near-quantitative Mo removal and uptake into sediments, with Mo isotope compositions close to the oceanic composition. The data also, however, show evidence for periodic additions of isotopically light Mo to the lake waters, possibly released from authigenic precipitates formed in the upper oxic layer and subsequently processed through the euxinic layer. The data also show evidence for a small isotopic offset (∼0.3‰ on 98Mo/95Mo) between particulate and dissolved Mo, even at highest sulfide concentrations, suggesting minor Mo isotope fractionation during uptake into euxinic sediments. Uranium concentrations decrease towards the bottom of the lake, where it also becomes isotopically lighter. The U systematics in the lake show clear evidence for a dominant U removal mechanism via diffusion into, and precipitation in, euxinic sediments, though the diffusion profile is mixed away under conditions of increased density stratification between an upper oxic and lower anoxic layer. The U diffusion-driven precipitation is best described with an effective 238U/235U fractionation of +0.6‰, in line with other studied euxinic

  14. Coupling aerosol-cloud-radiative processes in the WRF-Chem model: Investigating the radiative impact of elevated point sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Chapman

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The local and regional influence of elevated point sources on summertime aerosol forcing and cloud-aerosol interactions in northeastern North America was investigated using the WRF-Chem community model. The direct effects of aerosols on incoming solar radiation were simulated using existing modules to relate aerosol sizes and chemical composition to aerosol optical properties. Indirect effects were simulated by adding a prognostic treatment of cloud droplet number and adding modules that activate aerosol particles to form cloud droplets, simulate aqueous-phase chemistry, and tie a two-moment treatment of cloud water (cloud water mass and cloud droplet number to precipitation and an existing radiation scheme. Fully interactive feedbacks thus were created within the modified model, with aerosols affecting cloud droplet number and cloud radiative properties, and clouds altering aerosol size and composition via aqueous processes, wet scavenging, and gas-phase-related photolytic processes. Comparisons of a baseline simulation with observations show that the model captured the general temporal cycle of aerosol optical depths (AODs and produced clouds of comparable thickness to observations at approximately the proper times and places. The model overpredicted SO2 mixing ratios and PM2.5 mass, but reproduced the range of observed SO2 to sulfate aerosol ratios, suggesting that atmospheric oxidation processes leading to aerosol sulfate formation are captured in the model. The baseline simulation was compared to a sensitivity simulation in which all emissions at model levels above the surface layer were set to zero, thus removing stack emissions. Instantaneous, site-specific differences for aerosol and cloud related properties between the two simulations could be quite large, as removing above-surface emission sources influenced when and where clouds formed within the modeling domain. When summed spatially over the finest

  15. Advances in ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for sensitive detection of several food allergens in complex and processed foodstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planque, M; Arnould, T; Dieu, M; Delahaut, P; Renard, P; Gillard, N

    2016-09-16

    Sensitive detection of food allergens is affected by food processing and foodstuff complexity. It is therefore a challenge to detect cross-contamination in food production that could endanger an allergic customer's life. Here we used ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for simultaneous detection of traces of milk (casein, whey protein), egg (yolk, white), soybean, and peanut allergens in different complex and/or heat-processed foodstuffs. The method is based on a single protocol (extraction, trypsin digestion, and purification) applicable to the different tested foodstuffs: chocolate, ice cream, tomato sauce, and processed cookies. The determined limits of quantitation, expressed in total milk, egg, peanut, or soy proteins (and not soluble proteins) per kilogram of food, are: 0.5mg/kg for milk (detection of caseins), 5mg/kg for milk (detection of whey), 2.5mg/kg for peanut, 5mg/kg for soy, 3.4mg/kg for egg (detection of egg white), and 30.8mg/kg for egg (detection of egg yolk). The main advantage is the ability of the method to detect four major food allergens simultaneously in processed and complex matrices with very high sensitivity and specificity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification and characterization of the chemical constituents of Simiao Wan by ultra high performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry coupled to an automated multiple data processing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aihua; Zou, Di; Yan, Guangli; Tan, Yunlong; Sun, Hui; Wang, Xijun

    2014-07-01

    The chemical constituents of Simiao Wan (SW), a traditional Chinese medicine preparation, are difficult to determine and remain unclear. To more efficiently detect ions, a multiple data processing approach has been used in the characterization of the compounds. In this study, a rapid and sensitive method based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry and the multiple data processing approach was established to characterize the chemical constituents of SW. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry coupled with the multiple data processing approach could efficiently remove nonrelated ion signals from accurate mass data. We report the application of the multiple data processing approach for comprehensive detection and rapid identification of chemical constituents of SW. Of note, the total analysis time for separation was less than 20 min without losing any resolution. In the variable, importance in projection plot of orthogonal projection to latent structure-discriminant analysis, a total of 72 ions of interest (37 ions in positive mode, 38 ions in negative mode and three ions in both mode) were extracted or tentatively characterized based on their retention times, exact mass measurement for each molecular ion and subsequent fragment ions. In summary, the methodology proposed in this study could be valuable for the structural characterization and identification of the multiple constituents in the traditional Chinese medicine formula SW. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Proteomics Coupled with Metabolite and Cell Wall Profiling Reveal Metabolic Processes of a Developing Rice Stem Internode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Fan; Williams, Brad J.; Thangella, Padmavathi A. V.; Ladak, Adam; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Olivos, Hernando J.; Zhao, Kangmei; Callister, Stephen J.; Bartley, Laura E.

    2017-07-13

    Internodes of grass stems function in mechanical support, transport, and, in some species, are a major sink organ for carbon in the form of cell wall polymers. This study reports cell wall composition, proteomic and metabolite analyses of the rice elongating internode. Along eight segments of the second rice internode (internode II) at booting stage, cellulose, lignin, and xylose increase as a percentage of cell wall material from the younger to the older internode segments, indicating active cell wall synthesis. Liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) of trypsin-digested peptides of size-fractionated proteins extracted from this internode at booting reveals 2547proteins with at least two unique peptides. The dataset includes many glycosyltransferases, acyltransferases, glycosyl hydrolases, cell wall-localized proteins, and protein kinases that have or may have functions in cell wall biosynthesis or remodeling. Phospho-enrichment of the internode II peptides identified 21 unique phosphopeptides belonging to 20 phosphoproteins including an LRR-III family receptor like kinase. GO over-representation and KEGG pathway analyses highlight the abundances of internode proteins involved in biosynthetic processes, especially the synthesis of secondary metabolites such as phenylpropanoids and flavonoids. LC-MS of hot methanol-extracted secondary metabolites from internode II at four stages (elongation, early mature, mature and post mature) indicates that secondary metabolites in stems are distinct from those of roots and leaves, and differ during stem maturation. This work fills a void of knowledge of proteomics and metabolomics data for grass stems, specifically for rice, and provides baseline knowledge for more detailed studies of cell wall synthesis and other biological processes during internode development, toward improving grass agronomic properties.

  18. Improving Filler Dispersion And Physical Properties Of Epoxidized Natural Rubber/ Silica Compound By Using Dual fillers And Coupling Agent In Mixing Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teku Zakwan Zaeimoedin; Ahmad Kifli Che Aziz; Mazlina Mustafa Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of Green Tyre concept, in the early 90s, the use of silica as reinforcing fillers has spread and grown worldwide. The general advantages of silica as reinforcing filler over carbon black filler are better rolling resistance by achieving at least equal wet traction while tread wear should not be adversely affected. In general, high filler loading in ENR attributes poor dispersion and lack of adhesion to the rubber matrix which in turn affect the processability and physical properties of the rubber compounds. In this work, effect of dual fillers (silica and carbon black) and coupling agent in ENR/ silica compound was studied respectively. The mixing was done in a Banbury® BR 1600 internal mixer and the filler dispersion and physical properties were analysed. The carbon black filler was varied from 5 phr to 20 phr, where the total filler was fixed at 60 phr for truck tyre tread compound. The coupling agent was mixed in the mixing at two different stages which is first stage and finalizing stage of mixing. The rheological properties test was conducted by using Mooney Viscometer. The hardness, abrasion and tensile strength for physical properties evaluation were also conducted in this study. In addition, the filler dispersion property was determined by using disperGraderTM. The results showed that some of ENR/silica compound properties such as tensile, hardness, filler dispersion and abrasion resistance were slightly improved as compared to control compound. (author)

  19. FEM Analyses for T-H-M-M Coupling Processes in Dual-Porosity Rock Mass under Stress Corrosion and Pressure Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jun Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The models of stress corrosion and pressure solution established by Yasuhara et al. were introduced into the 2D FEM code of thermo-hydro-mechanical-migratory coupling analysis for dual-porosity medium developed by the authors. Aiming at a hypothetical model for geological disposal of nuclear waste in an unsaturated rock mass from which there is a nuclide leak, two computation conditions were designed. Then the corresponding two-dimensional numerical simulation for the coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-migratory processes were carried out, and the states of temperatures, rates and magnitudes of aperture closure, pore and fracture pressures, flow velocities, nuclide concentrations and stresses in the rock mass were investigated. The results show: the aperture closure rates caused by stress corrosion are almost six orders higher than those caused by pressure solution, and the two kinds of closure rates climb up and then decline, furthermore tend towards stability; when the effects of stress corrosion and pressure solution are considered, the negative fracture pressures in near field rise very highly; the fracture aperture and porosity are decreases in the case 1, so the relative permeability coefficients reduce, therefore the nuclide concentrations in pore and fracture in this case are higher than those in case 2.

  20. Air-Sea Interaction Processes in Low and High-Resolution Coupled Climate Model Simulations for the Southeast Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto da Silveira, I.; Zuidema, P.; Kirtman, B. P.

    2017-12-01

    The rugged topography of the Andes Cordillera along with strong coastal upwelling, strong sea surface temperatures (SST) gradients and extensive but geometrically-thin stratocumulus decks turns the Southeast Pacific (SEP) into a challenge for numerical modeling. In this study, hindcast simulations using the Community Climate System Model (CCSM4) at two resolutions were analyzed to examine the importance of resolution alone, with the parameterizations otherwise left unchanged. The hindcasts were initialized on January 1 with the real-time oceanic and atmospheric reanalysis (CFSR) from 1982 to 2003, forming a 10-member ensemble. The two resolutions are (0.1o oceanic and 0.5o atmospheric) and (1.125o oceanic and 0.9o atmospheric). The SST error growth in the first six days of integration (fast errors) and those resulted from model drift (saturated errors) are assessed and compared towards evaluating the model processes responsible for the SST error growth. For the high-resolution simulation, SST fast errors are positive (+0.3oC) near the continental borders and negative offshore (-0.1oC). Both are associated with a decrease in cloud cover, a weakening of the prevailing southwesterly winds and a reduction of latent heat flux. The saturated errors possess a similar spatial pattern, but are larger and are more spatially concentrated. This suggests that the processes driving the errors already become established within the first week, in contrast to the low-resolution simulations. These, instead, manifest too-warm SSTs related to too-weak upwelling, driven by too-strong winds and Ekman pumping. Nevertheless, the ocean surface tends to be cooler in the low-resolution simulation than the high-resolution due to a higher cloud cover. Throughout the integration, saturated SST errors become positive and could reach values up to +4oC. These are accompanied by upwelling dumping and a decrease in cloud cover. High and low resolution models presented notable differences in how SST

  1. High-resolution marine flood modelling coupling overflow and overtopping processes: framing the hazard based on historical and statistical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolae Lerma, Alexandre; Bulteau, Thomas; Elineau, Sylvain; Paris, François; Durand, Paul; Anselme, Brice; Pedreros, Rodrigo

    2018-01-01

    A modelling chain was implemented in order to propose a realistic appraisal of the risk in coastal areas affected by overflowing as well as overtopping processes. Simulations are performed through a nested downscaling strategy from regional to local scale at high spatial resolution with explicit buildings, urban structures such as sea front walls and hydraulic structures liable to affect the propagation of water in urban areas. Validation of the model performance is based on hard and soft available data analysis and conversion of qualitative to quantitative information to reconstruct the area affected by flooding and the succession of events during two recent storms. Two joint probability approaches (joint exceedance contour and environmental contour) are used to define 100-year offshore conditions scenarios and to investigate the flood response to each scenario in terms of (1) maximum spatial extent of flooded areas, (2) volumes of water propagation inland and (3) water level in flooded areas. Scenarios of sea level rise are also considered in order to evaluate the potential hazard evolution. Our simulations show that for a maximising 100-year hazard scenario, for the municipality as a whole, 38 % of the affected zones are prone to overflow flooding and 62 % to flooding by propagation of overtopping water volume along the seafront. Results also reveal that for the two kinds of statistic scenarios a difference of about 5 % in the forcing conditions (water level, wave height and period) can produce significant differences in terms of flooding like +13.5 % of water volumes propagating inland or +11.3 % of affected surfaces. In some areas, flood response appears to be very sensitive to the chosen scenario with differences of 0.3 to 0.5 m in water level. The developed approach enables one to frame the 100-year hazard and to characterize spatially the robustness or the uncertainty over the results. Considering a 100-year scenario with mean sea level rise (0.6 m), hazard

  2. High-resolution marine flood modelling coupling overflow and overtopping processes: framing the hazard based on historical and statistical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nicolae Lerma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A modelling chain was implemented in order to propose a realistic appraisal of the risk in coastal areas affected by overflowing as well as overtopping processes. Simulations are performed through a nested downscaling strategy from regional to local scale at high spatial resolution with explicit buildings, urban structures such as sea front walls and hydraulic structures liable to affect the propagation of water in urban areas. Validation of the model performance is based on hard and soft available data analysis and conversion of qualitative to quantitative information to reconstruct the area affected by flooding and the succession of events during two recent storms. Two joint probability approaches (joint exceedance contour and environmental contour are used to define 100-year offshore conditions scenarios and to investigate the flood response to each scenario in terms of (1 maximum spatial extent of flooded areas, (2 volumes of water propagation inland and (3 water level in flooded areas. Scenarios of sea level rise are also considered in order to evaluate the potential hazard evolution. Our simulations show that for a maximising 100-year hazard scenario, for the municipality as a whole, 38 % of the affected zones are prone to overflow flooding and 62 % to flooding by propagation of overtopping water volume along the seafront. Results also reveal that for the two kinds of statistic scenarios a difference of about 5 % in the forcing conditions (water level, wave height and period can produce significant differences in terms of flooding like +13.5 % of water volumes propagating inland or +11.3 % of affected surfaces. In some areas, flood response appears to be very sensitive to the chosen scenario with differences of 0.3 to 0.5 m in water level. The developed approach enables one to frame the 100-year hazard and to characterize spatially the robustness or the uncertainty over the results. Considering a 100-year scenario with mean

  3. Application of 2D-HPLC coupled with principal component analysis to study an industrial opiate processing stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Paul G; Burns, Niki K; Purcell, Stuart D; Francis, Paul S; Barnett, Neil W; Fry, Fiona; Conlan, Xavier A

    2017-05-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) loading plots were used to elucidate key differences between two-dimensional high performance liquid chromatography (2D-HPLC) fingerprint data from samples collected from stages along the Papaver somniferum industrial process chemistry workflow. Data reduction was completed using a 2D-HPLC peak picking approach as a precursor to chemometric analysis. Using comparisons of the final stages of product extraction as an example, PCA analysis of characteristic 2D-HPLC fingerprints accounted for 84.9% of variation between the two sample sets measured in triplicate, with 64.7% explained by PC1. Loadings plots of PC1 on each sample set identified where the significant changes were occurring and normalised bubble plots provided an indication of the relative importance of each of these changes. These findings highlight 2D-HPLC with appropriate chemometric analysis as a useful tool for the exploration of bioactive molecules within biomass. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Coupling biophysical processes and water rights to simulate spatially distributed water use in an intensively managed hydrologic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bangshuai; Benner, Shawn G.; Bolte, John P.; Vache, Kellie B.; Flores, Alejandro N.

    2017-07-01

    Humans have significantly altered the redistribution of water in intensively managed hydrologic systems, shifting the spatiotemporal patterns of surface water. Evaluating water availability requires integration of hydrologic processes and associated human influences. In this study, we summarize the development and evaluation of an extensible hydrologic model that explicitly integrates water rights to spatially distribute irrigation waters in a semi-arid agricultural region in the western US, using the Envision integrated modeling platform. The model captures both human and biophysical systems, particularly the diversion of water from the Boise River, which is the main water source that supports irrigated agriculture in this region. In agricultural areas, water demand is estimated as a function of crop type and local environmental conditions. Surface water to meet crop demand is diverted from the stream reaches, constrained by the amount of water available in the stream, the water-rights-appropriated amount, and the priority dates associated with particular places of use. Results, measured by flow rates at gaged stream and canal locations within the study area, suggest that the impacts of irrigation activities on the magnitude and timing of flows through this intensively managed system are well captured. The multi-year averaged diverted water from the Boise River matches observations well, reflecting the appropriation of water according to the water rights database. Because of the spatially explicit implementation of surface water diversion, the model can help diagnose places and times where water resources are likely insufficient to meet agricultural water demands, and inform future water management decisions.

  5. Optimization of Surface Roughness Parameters of Al-6351 Alloy in EDC Process: A Taguchi Coupled Fuzzy Logic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Siddhartha; Chakraborty, Sujoy; Dey, Vidyut; Ghosh, Subrata Kumar

    2017-10-01

    This paper investigates the application of Taguchi method with fuzzy logic for multi objective optimization of roughness parameters in electro discharge coating process of Al-6351 alloy with powder metallurgical compacted SiC/Cu tool. A Taguchi L16 orthogonal array was employed to investigate the roughness parameters by varying tool parameters like composition and compaction load and electro discharge machining parameters like pulse-on time and peak current. Crucial roughness parameters like Centre line average roughness, Average maximum height of the profile and Mean spacing of local peaks of the profile were measured on the coated specimen. The signal to noise ratios were fuzzified to optimize the roughness parameters through a single comprehensive output measure (COM). Best COM obtained with lower values of compaction load, pulse-on time and current and 30:70 (SiC:Cu) composition of tool. Analysis of variance is carried out and a significant COM model is observed with peak current yielding highest contribution followed by pulse-on time, compaction load and composition. The deposited layer is characterised by X-Ray Diffraction analysis which confirmed the presence of tool materials on the work piece surface.

  6. Hydrothermal treatment coupled with mechanical expression at increased temperature for excess sludge dewatering: influence of operating conditions and the process energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liping; Zhang, Lei; Li, Aimin

    2014-11-15

    Dewatering is very important for excess sludge treatment and disposal. Hydrothermal treatment coupled with mechanical expression is a novel technology, in which a conventional pressure dewatering is combined with hydrothermal effect to realize an improved liquid/solids separation with low energy consumption. In this study, the process was performed by way of that the excess sludge was hydrothermally treated first and then the mechanical expression was employed immediately at increased temperature in two separate cells respectively. The results demonstrated that the mechanical expression employed at increased temperature showed a significant advantage than that at room temperature, given a further reduction of 19-47% of the moisture content. The dewatering process at room temperature was mostly depended on the effect of mechanical expression. Hydrothermal process, more importantly than mechanical effect at increased temperatures, seemed to govern the extent to which the dewatering process occurred. The dewatering began to show a positive effect when the temperature was exceeded the threshold temperature (between 120 and 150 °C). The residence time of 30 min promoted a substantial conversion in the sludge surface properties. After dewatering at temperatures of 180-210 °C, the moisture content decreased from 52 to 20% and the corresponding total water removal as filtrate was between 81 and 93%. It was observed that the moisture content of filter cake correlated with surface charge (Rp = -0.93, p < 0.05) and relative hydrophobicity (Rp = -0.99, p < 0.05). The calculated energy balance suggested that no additional external energy input is needed to support the dewatering process for excess sludge. The dewatering process needs an obviously lower energy input compared to thermal drying and electro-dewatering to produce a higher solids content cake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Exchange processes at geosphere-biosphere interface. Current SKB approach and example of coupled hydrological-ecological approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woerman, Anders

    2003-09-01

    The design of the repository for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel proposed by SKB is based on a multi-barrier system, in which the geosphere and biosphere are the utmost barrier surrounding the engineer barriers. This report briefly reviews the current approach taken by SKB to account for hydrological and ecological processes at the geosphere-biosphere interface (GBI) and their future plans in this area. A simple analysis was performed to shift the focus of performance assessment involving geosphere-biosphere interface modelling from the very simplistic assumption that the quaternary sediments are bypassed to one in which a more detailed model for sub-surface flows is included. This study indicated that, for many assumed ecosystem descriptions, the presence of the GBI leads to lower maximum doses to individual humans compared to a case when the GBI is neglected. This effect is due to the additional 'barrier' offered by the GBI. The main exposure pathways were assumed to occur through the food web. However, particularly the leakage on land through the stream-network and lakes can lead to higher doses due to ecosystem interaction with arable land. A scenario that gives particularly long duration of doses occurs due to land rise and with the transformation of the former bay and lake bed sediments into agricultural land. This effect is due to the significant retention or accumulation in aquatic sediment, which causes high activities to build up with time. Particularly, in combination with changing conditions in climate, humans life-style or geographic conditions (land rise, deforestation,etc.) doses to individual humans can be large

  8. Exchange processes at geosphere-biosphere interface. Current SKB approach and example of coupled hydrological-ecological approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woerman, Anders [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Biometry and Technology

    2003-09-01

    The design of the repository for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel proposed by SKB is based on a multi-barrier system, in which the geosphere and biosphere are the utmost barrier surrounding the engineer barriers. This report briefly reviews the current approach taken by SKB to account for hydrological and ecological processes at the geosphere-biosphere interface (GBI) and their future plans in this area. A simple analysis was performed to shift the focus of performance assessment involving geosphere-biosphere interface modelling from the very simplistic assumption that the quaternary sediments are bypassed to one in which a more detailed model for sub-surface flows is included. This study indicated that, for many assumed ecosystem descriptions, the presence of the GBI leads to lower maximum doses to individual humans compared to a case when the GBI is neglected. This effect is due to the additional 'barrier' offered by the GBI. The main exposure pathways were assumed to occur through the food web. However, particularly the leakage on land through the stream-network and lakes can lead to higher doses due to ecosystem interaction with arable land. A scenario that gives particularly long duration of doses occurs due to land rise and with the transformation of the former bay and lake bed sediments into agricultural land. This effect is due to the significant retention or accumulation in aquatic sediment, which causes high activities to build up with time. Particularly, in combination with changing conditions in climate, humans life-style or geographic conditions (land rise, deforestation,etc.) doses to individual humans can be large.

  9. Dynamic modeling of nitrogen losses in river networks unravels the coupled effects of hydrological and biogeochemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Richard B.; Böhlke, John Karl; Boyer, Elizabeth W.; David, Mark B.; Harvey, Judson W.; Mulholland, Patrick J.; Seitzinger, Sybil P.; Tobias, Craig R.; Tonitto, Christina; Wollheim, Wilfred M.

    2009-01-01

    The importance of lotic systems as sinks for nitrogen inputs is well recognized. A fraction of nitrogen in streamflow is removed to the atmosphere via denitrification with the remainder exported in streamflow as nitrogen loads. At the watershed scale, there is a keen interest in understanding the factors that control the fate of nitrogen throughout the stream channel network, with particular attention to the processes that deliver large nitrogen loads to sensitive coastal ecosystems. We use a dynamic stream transport model to assess biogeochemical (nitrate loadings, concentration, temperature) and hydrological (discharge, depth, velocity) effects on reach-scale denitrification and nitrate removal in the river networks of two watersheds having widely differing levels of nitrate enrichment but nearly identical discharges. Stream denitrification is estimated by regression as a nonlinear function of nitrate concentration, streamflow, and temperature, using more than 300 published measurements from a variety of US streams. These relations are used in the stream transport model to characterize nitrate dynamics related to denitrification at a monthly time scale in the stream reaches of the two watersheds. Results indicate that the nitrate removal efficiency of streams, as measured by the percentage of the stream nitrate flux removed via denitrification per unit length of channel, is appreciably reduced during months with high discharge and nitrate flux and increases during months of low-discharge and flux. Biogeochemical factors, including land use, nitrate inputs, and stream concentrations, are a major control on reach-scale denitrification, evidenced by the disproportionately lower nitrate removal efficiency in streams of the highly nitrate-enriched watershed as compared with that in similarly sized streams in the less nitrate-enriched watershed. Sensitivity analyses reveal that these important biogeochemical factors and physical hydrological factors contribute nearly

  10. Hillslope surface deformation on chalky landscape under the influence of Quaternary tectonics coupled with periglacial processes, Picardy (NW France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duperret, Anne; Vandycke, Sara; Colbeaux, Jean-Pierre; Raimbault, Celine; Duguet, Timothée; Van vliet-lanoe, Brigitte

    2017-04-01

    Chalky hillslopes observed in Picardy region (NW Paris basin, France) evidence specific surficial ridges and steps, of several meters high and several ten-meters length, roughly parallel oriented to slopes on some dry valleys. They are locally named "rideaux" or strip-lynchets. Their origin is still discussed among the communities of geology, geography, archeology and pedology. Detailed observations of the Picardy coastal chalk cliffs using high resolution low-lying aerial LiDAR and field works allow us to precisely describe and understand ridges and steps formation. At Bois de Cise, a rectangular depression with ridges and steps was observed in 3D on the ground, due to its natural overlap by the cliff face. This structure proves to be a graben, controlled by conjugate normal faults, at the top of which the ridges and steps are developed. The set forms a "step-graben" composed of a system of faults in relay and ramps, involved in the superficial covering of quaternary loess. Steps formation will be discussed in relation with the tectonic context (paleo-constraint fields), the continental water circulation within the karst, the presence of break-up structures on the fault planes, the role of cryogenic processes during the last glacial epochs and the remobilization of loess surface deposits. Caves and temporary springs of fresh water along faults evidence a karstic behavior in the chalk and suggests step-graben structures as geological guides for hydrogeological circulation in the chalk of Picardy. In this context, chalky surficial step-structures appears as tectonically controlled and as the witness of a recent active tectonics in the NW european chalk basin. In addition, the field of steps developed on a coastal fossil cliff tends to prove the occurrence of a fractured system, developed according to a paleo-field of NW-SE extensive stresses. Data from the CROCOLIT-Leg1 (Duperret, 2013) campaign carried out on the offshore subtidal platform (shallow bathymetry, THR

  11. Coordinated polar spacecraft, geosynchronous spacecraft, and ground-based observations of magnetopause processes and their coupling to the ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Le

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present in-situ observations of processes occurring at the magnetopause and vicinity, including surface waves, oscillatory magnetospheric field lines, and flux transfer events, and coordinated observations at geosynchronous orbit by the GOES spacecraft, and on the ground by CANOPUS and 210° Magnetic Meridian (210MM magnetometer arrays. On 7 February 2002, during a high-speed solar wind stream, the Polar spacecraft was skimming the magnetopause in a post-noon meridian plane for ~3h. During this interval, it made two short excursions and a few partial crossings into the magnetosheath and observed quasi-periodic cold ion bursts in the region adjacent to the magnetopause current layer. The multiple magnetopause crossings, as well as the velocity of the cold ion bursts, indicate that the magnetopause was oscillating with an ~6-min period. Simultaneous observations of Pc5 waves at geosynchronous orbit by the GOES spacecraft and on the ground by the CANOPUS magnetometer array reveal that these magnetospheric pulsations were forced oscillations of magnetic field lines directly driven by the magnetopause oscillations. The magnetospheric pulsations occurred only in a limited longitudinal region in the post-noon dayside sector, and were not a global phenomenon, as one would expect for global field line resonance. Thus, the magnetopause oscillations at the source were also limited to a localized region spanning ~4h in local time. These observations suggest that it is unlikely that the Kelvin-Helmholz instability and/or fluctuations in the solar wind dynamic pressure were the direct driving mechanisms for the observed boundary oscillations. Instead, the likely mechanism for the localized boundary oscillations was pulsed reconnection at the magnetopause occurring along the X-line extending over the same 4-h region. The Pc5 band pressure fluctuations commonly seen in high-speed solar wind streams may modulate the reconnection rate as

  12. Coordinated polar spacecraft, geosynchronous spacecraft, and ground-based observations of magnetopause processes and their coupling to the ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Le

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present in-situ observations of processes occurring at the magnetopause and vicinity, including surface waves, oscillatory magnetospheric field lines, and flux transfer events, and coordinated observations at geosynchronous orbit by the GOES spacecraft, and on the ground by CANOPUS and 210° Magnetic Meridian (210MM magnetometer arrays. On 7 February 2002, during a high-speed solar wind stream, the Polar spacecraft was skimming the magnetopause in a post-noon meridian plane for ~3h. During this interval, it made two short excursions and a few partial crossings into the magnetosheath and observed quasi-periodic cold ion bursts in the region adjacent to the magnetopause current layer. The multiple magnetopause crossings, as well as the velocity of the cold ion bursts, indicate that the magnetopause was oscillating with an ~6-min period. Simultaneous observations of Pc5 waves at geosynchronous orbit by the GOES spacecraft and on the ground by the CANOPUS magnetometer array reveal that these magnetospheric pulsations were forced oscillations of magnetic field lines directly driven by the magnetopause oscillations. The magnetospheric pulsations occurred only in a limited longitudinal region in the post-noon dayside sector, and were not a global phenomenon, as one would expect for global field line resonance. Thus, the magnetopause oscillations at the source were also limited to a localized region spanning ~4h in local time. These observations suggest that it is unlikely that the Kelvin-Helmholz instability and/or fluctuations in the solar wind dynamic pressure were the direct driving mechanisms for the observed boundary oscillations. Instead, the likely mechanism for the localized boundary oscillations was pulsed reconnection at the magnetopause occurring along the X-line extending over the same 4-h region. The Pc5 band pressure fluctuations commonly seen in high-speed solar wind streams may modulate the reconnection rate as an

  13. Close-coupled Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process bench studies. Final report, [October 1, 1988--July 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.; Popper, G.A.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-06-01

    This is the final report of a four year and ten month contract starting on October 1, 1988 to July 31, 1993 with the US Department of Energy to study and improve Close-Coupled Catalytic Two-Stage Direct Liquefaction of coal by producing high yields of distillate with improved quality at lower capital and production costs in comparison to existing technologies. Laboratory, Bench and PDU scale studies on sub-bituminous and bituminous coals are summarized and referenced in this volume. Details are presented in the three topical reports of this contract; CTSL Process Bench Studies and PDU Scale-Up with Sub-Bituminous Coal-DE-88818-TOP-1, CTSL Process Bench Studies with Bituminous Coal-DE-88818-TOP-2, and CTSL Process Laboratory Scale Studies, Modelling and Technical Assessment-DE-88818-TOP-3. Results are summarized on experiments and studies covering several process configurations, cleaned coals, solid separation methods, additives and catalysts both dispersed and supported. Laboratory microautoclave scale experiments, economic analysis and modelling studies are also included along with the PDU-Scale-Up of the CTSL processing of sub-bituminous Black Thunder Mine Wyoming coal. During this DOE/HRI effort, high distillate yields were maintained at higher throughput rates while quality was markedly improved using on-line hydrotreating and cleaned coals. Solid separations options of filtration and delayed coking were evaluated on a Bench-Scale with filtration successfully scaled to a PDU demonstration. Directions for future direct coal liquefaction related work are outlined herein based on the results from this and previous programs.

  14. Coupled behaviour of bentonite buffer results of PUSKURI project; Bentoniittipuskurin kytketty kaeyttaeytyminen PUSKURI-hankkeen tuloksia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olin, M.; Rasilainen, K.; Itaelae, A. [and others

    2011-08-15

    In the report main results form a KYT2010 programme's project Coupled behaviour of bentonite buffer (PUSKURI) are presented. In THC modelling, Aku Itaelae made and published his Master of Science Thesis. Itaelae was able to successfully model the LOT-experiment. Additionally, he also listed problems and development proposals for THC-modelling of bentonite buffer. VTT and Numerola created in collaboration a model coupling saturation, diffusion and cation exchange; the model was implemented and tested in Numerrin, COMSOL and TOUGHREACT. Petri Jussila's PhD THM-model was implemented into COMSOL to facilitate further development. At GTK, the mineralogical characterisation of bentonite was planned. The previous THM model (Jussila's model) including only small deformations was successfully generalized to finite deformations in way at least formally preserving the original formalism. It appears that the theory allows also a possibility to include finite plastic deformations in the theory. In order to measure the relevant mechanical properties of compacted bentonite, two different experiments, namely hydrostatic compression experiment and one-dimensional compression experiment were designed. In the hydrostatic compression experiment, a cylindrical sample of compacted bentonite covered with liquid rubber coating is placed in the sample chamber equipped with a piston. The same device was also used in one-dimensional compression experiment. X-ray microtomographic techniques were used in order to study the basic mechanisms of water transport in bentonite. The preliminary results indicate that in the present experimental set-up, water transport is dominated by a dispersive mechanism such as diffusion of vapour in gas phase or diffusion of water in solid phase. (orig.)

  15. Understanding the interplays between Earth's shallow- and deep- rooted processes through global, quantitative model of the coupled brittle-lithosphere/viscous mantle system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotz, Ingo; Iaffaldano, Giampiero; Rhodri Davies, D.

    2016-04-01

    The volume of geophysical datasets has grown substantially, over recent decades. Our knowledge of continental evolution has increased due to advances in interpreting the records of orogeny and sedimentation. Ocean-floor observations now allow one to resolve past plate motions (e.g. in the North Atlantic and Indian Ocean over the past 20 Myr) at temporal resolutions of about 1 Myr. Altogether, these ever-growing datasets permit reconstructing the past evolution of Earth's lithospheric plates in greater detail. This is key to unravelling the dynamics of geological processes, because plate motions and their temporal changes are a powerful probe into the evolving force balance between shallow- and deep-rooted processes. However, such a progress is not yet matched by the ability to quantitatively model past plate-motion changes and, therefore, to test hypotheses on the dominant controls. The main technical challenge is simulating the rheological behaviour of the lithosphere/mantle system, which varies significantly from viscous to brittle. Traditionally computer models for viscous mantle flow and on the one hand, and for the motions of the brittle lithosphere on the other hand, have been developed separately. Coupling of these two independent classes of models has been accomplished only for neo-tectonic scenarios and with some limitations as to accounting for the impact of time-evolving mantle-flow and lithospheric slabs. Here we present results in this direction that permit simulating the coupled plates/mantle system through geological time. We build on previous work aimed at coupling two sophisticated codes for mantle flow and lithosphere dynamics: TERRA and SHELLS. TERRA is a global spherical finite-element code for mantle convection. It has been developed by Baumgardner (1985) and Bunge et al. (1996), and further advanced by Yang (1997; 2000) and Davies et al. (2013), among others. SHELLS is a thin-sheet finite-element code for lithosphere dynamics, developed by

  16. Coupling of Important Physical Processes in the Planetary Boundary Layer between Meteorological and Chemistry Models for Regional to Continental Scale Air Quality Forecasting: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pius Lee

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A consensus among many Air Quality (AQ modelers is that planetary boundary layer processes are the most influential processes for surface concentrations of air pollutants. Due to the many uncertainties intrinsically embedded in the parameterization of these processes, parameter optimization is often employed to determine an optimal set or range of values of the sensitive parameters. In this review study, we focus on the two of the most important physical processes: turbulent mixing and dry deposition. An emphasis was put on surveying AQ models that have been proven to resolve meso-scale features and cover a large geographical area, such as large regional, continental, or trans-continental boundary extents. Five AQ models were selected. Four of the models were run in real-time operational forecasting settings for continental scale AQ. The models use various forms of level 2.5 closure algorithms to calculate turbulent mixing. Tuning and parameter optimization has been used to tailor these algorithms to better suit their AQ models which are typically comprised of a coupled chemistry and meteorology model. Longer forecasts and long lead-times are inevitably under increasing demand for these models. Land Surface Models that have the capability for soil moisture and temperature data assimilation will have an advantage to constrain the key variables that govern the partitioning of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes and thus attain the potential to perform better in longer forecasts than those models that do not have this capability. Dry deposition velocity is a very significant model parameter that governs a major surface exchange activity. An exploratory study has been conducted to see the upper bound of roughness length in the similarity equation for aerodynamic resistance.

  17. Tropical land-sea couplings: Role of watershed deforestation, mangrove estuary processing, and marine inputs on N fluxes in coastal Pacific Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiela, Ivan; Elmstrom, Elizabeth; Lloret, Javier; Stone, Thomas; Camilli, Luis

    2018-02-21

    We review data from coastal Pacific Panama and other tropical coasts with two aims. First, we defined inputs and losses of nitrogen (N) mediating connectivity of watersheds, mangrove estuaries, and coastal sea. N entering watersheds-mainly via N fixation (79-86%)-was largely intercepted; N discharges to mangrove estuaries (3-6%), small compared to N inputs to watersheds, nonetheless significantly supplied N to mangrove estuaries. Inputs to mangrove estuaries (including watershed discharges, and marine inputs during flood tides) were matched by losses (mainly denitrification and export during ebb tides). Mangrove estuary subsidies of coastal marine food webs take place by export of forms of N [DON (62.5%), PN (9.1%), and litter N (12.9%)] that provide dissimilative and assimilative subsidies. N fixation, denitrification, and tidal exchanges were major processes, and DON was major form of N involved in connecting fluxes in and out of mangrove estuaries. Second, we assessed effects of watershed forest cover on connectivity. Decreased watershed forest cover lowered N inputs, interception, and discharge into receiving mangrove estuaries. These imprints of forest cover were erased during transit of N through estuaries, owing to internal N cycle transformations, and differences in relative area of watersheds and estuaries. Largest losses of N consisted of water transport of energy-rich compounds, particularly DON. N losses were similar in magnitude to N inputs from sea, calculated without considering contribution by intermittent coastal upwelling, and hence likely under-estimated. Pacific Panama mangrove estuaries are exposed to major inputs of N from land and sea, which emphasizes the high degree of bi-directional connectivity in these coupled ecosystems. Pacific Panama is still lightly affected by human or global changes. Increased deforestation can be expected, as well as changes in ENSO, which will surely raise watershed-derived loads of N, as well as significantly

  18. Piezoelectric and semiconducting coupled power generating process of a single ZnO belt/wire. A technology for harvesting electricity from the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jinhui; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents the experimental observation of piezoelectric generation from a single ZnO wire/belt for illustrating a fundamental process of converting mechanical energy into electricity at nanoscale. By deflecting a wire/belt using a conductive atomic force microscope tip in contact mode, the energy is first created by the deflection force and stored by piezoelectric potential, and later converts into piezoelectric energy. The mechanism of the generator is a result of coupled semiconducting and piezoelectric properties of ZnO. A piezoelectric effect is required to create electric potential of ionic charges from elastic deformation; semiconducting property is necessary to separate and maintain the charges and then release the potential via the rectifying behavior of the Schottky barrier at the metal-ZnO interface, which serves as a switch in the entire process. The good conductivity of ZnO is rather unique because it makes the current flow possible. This paper demonstrates a principle for harvesting energy from the environment. The technology has the potential of converting mechanical movement energy (such as body movement, muscle stretching, blood pressure), vibration energy (such as acoustic/ultrasonic wave), and hydraulic energy (such as flow of body fluid, blood flow, contraction of blood vessels) into electric energy that may be sufficient for self-powering nanodevices and nanosystems in applications such as in situ, real-time, and implantable biosensing, biomedical monitoring, and biodetection.

  19. Dynamic Behavior of CO2 in a Wellbore and Storage Formation: Wellbore-Coupled and Salt-Precipitation Processes during Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jize Piao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available For investigating the wellbore flow process in CO2 injection scenarios, coupled wellbore-reservoir (WR and conventional equivalent porous media (EPM models were compared with each other. In WR model, during the injection, conditions for the wellbore including pressure and temperature were dynamically changed from the initial pressure (7.45–8.33 MPa and temperature (52.0–55.9°C of the storage formation. After 3.35 days, the wellbore flow reached the steady state with adiabatic condition; temperature linearly increased from the well-head (35°C to the well-bottom (52°C. In contrast, the EPM model neglecting the wellbore process revealed that CO2 temperature was consistently 35°C at the screen interval. Differences in temperature from WR and EPM models resulted in density contrast of CO2 that entered the storage formation (~200 and ~600 kg/m3, resp.. Subsequently, the WR model causing greater density difference between CO2 and brine revealed more vertical CO2 migration and counterflow of brine and also developed the localized salt-precipitation. Finally, a series of sensitivity analyses for the WR model was conducted to assess how the injection conditions influenced interplay between flow system and the localized salt-precipitation in the storage formation.

  20. Primary processes of the electron-protic species coupling in pure aqueous phases: - femtosecond laser spectroscopy study; - quantum approach of the electron-water interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pommeret, Stanislas

    1991-01-01

    This thesis work deals with the coupling mechanisms between an electron, water molecules or protic species (hydronium ion, hydroxyl radical). Two complementary studies have been carry out in pure aqueous phases. The first one is concerned with the structural aspect of the hydrated electron which is studied via a semi-quantum approach Splitting Operator Method. The results indicates the importance of the second hydration shell in the localisation of an electron at 77 and 300 Kelvin. The second part of this work relates to the dynamic of the primary processes in light or heavy water at room temperature: the ion-molecule reaction, radical pair formation, geminate recombination of the hydrated electron with the hydronium ion and the hydroxyl radical. The dynamic of these reactions is studied by time resolved absorption spectroscopy from the near infrared to the near ultraviolet with a few tens femto-seconds temporal precision. The analysis of the primary processes takes into account the protic properties of water molecules. (author) [fr

  1. Enhancing the Process of Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Coupled to Iron Reduction in Constructed Wetland Mesocosms with Supplementation of Ferric Iron Hydroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, W.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2017-12-01

    Effective ammonium (NH4+) removal has been a challenge in wastewater treatment processes. Aeration, which is required for the conventional NH4+ removal approach by ammonium oxidizing bacteria, is an energy intensive process during the operation of wastewater treatment plant. The efficiency of NH4+ oxidation in natural systems is also limited by oxygen transfer in water and sediments. The objective of this study is to enhance NH4+ removal by applying a novel microbial process, anaerobic NH4+ oxidation coupled to iron (Fe) reduction (also known as Feammox), in constructed wetlands (CW). Our studies have shown that an Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium named A6 can carry out the Feammox process using ferric Fe (Fe(III)) minerals like ferrihydrite as their electron acceptor. To investigate the properties of the Feammox process in CW as well as the influence of electrodes, Feammox bacterium A6 was inoculated in planted CW mesocosms with electrodes installed at multiple depths. CW mesocosms were operated using high NH4+ nutrient solution as inflow under high or low sediment Fe(III) level. During the operation, NH4+ and ferrous Fe concentration, pore water pH, voltages between electrodes, oxidation reduction potential and dissolved oxygen were measured. At the end of the experiment, CW sediment samples at different depths were taken, DNAs were extracted and quantitative polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing were performed to analyze the microbial communities. The results show that the high Fe level CW mesocosm has much higher NH4+ removal ability than the low Fe level CW mesocosm after Fe-reducing conditions are developed. This indicates the enhanced NH4+ removal can be attributed to elevated Feammox activity in high Fe level CW mesocosm. The microbial community structures are different in high or low Fe level CW mesocosms and on or away from the installed electrodes. The voltages between cathode and anode increased after the injection of A6 enrichment culture in low Fe

  2. Detection of radiation-induced hydrocarbons in Camembert irradiated before and after the maturing process-comparison of florisil column chromatography and on-line coupled liquid chromatography-gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulzki, G.; Spiegelberg, A.; Bögl, K.W.; Schreiber, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of the maturing process on the detection of radiation-induced volatile hydrocarbons in the fat of Camembert has been investigated. Two analytical methods for separation of the hydrocarbon fraction from the lipid were applied: Florisil column chromatography with subsequent gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) determination as well as on-line coupled liquid chromatography-GC-MS. The maturing process had no influence on the detection of radiation-induced volatiles. Comparable results were achieved with both analytical methods. However, preference is given to the more effective on-line coupled LC-GC method

  3. Estimating the potential of energy saving and carbon emission mitigation of cassava-based fuel ethanol using life cycle assessment coupled with a biogeochemical process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dong; Hao, Mengmeng; Fu, Jingying; Tian, Guangjin; Ding, Fangyu

    2017-09-01

    Global warming and increasing concentration of atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) have prompted considerable interest in the potential role of energy plant biomass. Cassava-based fuel ethanol is one of the most important bioenergy and has attracted much attention in both developed and developing countries. However, the development of cassava-based fuel ethanol is still faced with many uncertainties, including raw material supply, net energy potential, and carbon emission mitigation potential. Thus, an accurate estimation of these issues is urgently needed. This study provides an approach to estimate energy saving and carbon emission mitigation potentials of cassava-based fuel ethanol through LCA (life cycle assessment) coupled with a biogeochemical process model—GEPIC (GIS-based environmental policy integrated climate) model. The results indicate that the total potential of cassava yield on marginal land in China is 52.51 million t; the energy ratio value varies from 0.07 to 1.44, and the net energy surplus of cassava-based fuel ethanol in China is 92,920.58 million MJ. The total carbon emission mitigation from cassava-based fuel ethanol in China is 4593.89 million kgC. Guangxi, Guangdong, and Fujian are identified as target regions for large-scale development of cassava-based fuel ethanol industry. These results can provide an operational approach and fundamental data for scientific research and energy planning.

  4. A fast and efficient adaptive parallel ray tracing based model for thermally coupled surface radiation in casting and heat treatment processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fainberg, J.; Schaefer, W.

    2015-06-01

    A new algorithm for heat exchange between thermally coupled diffusely radiating interfaces is presented, which can be applied for closed and half open transparent radiating cavities. Interfaces between opaque and transparent materials are automatically detected and subdivided into elementary radiation surfaces named tiles. Contrary to the classical view factor method, the fixed unit sphere area subdivision oriented along the normal tile direction is projected onto the surrounding radiation mesh and not vice versa. Then, the total incident radiating flux of the receiver is approximated as a direct sum of radiation intensities of representative “senders” with the same weight factor. A hierarchical scheme for the space angle subdivision is selected in order to minimize the total memory and the computational demands during thermal calculations. Direct visibility is tested by means of a voxel-based ray tracing method accelerated by means of the anisotropic Chebyshev distance method, which reuses the computational grid as a Chebyshev one. The ray tracing algorithm is fully parallelized using MPI and takes advantage of the balanced distribution of all available tiles among all CPU's. This approach allows tracing of each particular ray without any communication. The algorithm has been implemented in a commercial casting process simulation software. The accuracy and computational performance of the new radiation model for heat treatment, investment and ingot casting applications is illustrated using industrial examples.

  5. An adaptation of astronomical image processing enables characterization and functional 3D mapping of individual sites of excitation-contraction coupling in rat cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qinghai; Kaestner, Lars; Schröder, Laura; Guo, Jia; Lipp, Peter

    2017-11-14

    In beating cardiomyocytes, synchronized localized Ca 2+ transients from thousands of active excitation-contraction coupling sites (ECC couplons) comprising plasma and sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane calcium channels are important determinants of the heart's performance. Nevertheless, our knowledge about the properties of ECC couplons is limited by the lack of appropriate experimental and analysis strategies. We designed CaCLEAN to untangle the fundamental characteristics of ECC couplons by combining the astronomer's CLEAN algorithm with known properties of calcium diffusion. CaCLEAN empowers the investigation of fundamental properties of ECC couplons in beating cardiomyocytes without pharmacological interventions. Upon examining individual ECC couplons at the nanoscopic level, we reveal their roles in the negative amplitude-frequency relationship and in β-adrenergic stimulation, including decreasing and increasing firing reliability, respectively. CaCLEAN combined with 3D confocal imaging of beating cardiomyocytes provides a functional 3D map of active ECC couplons (on average, 17,000 per myocyte). CaCLEAN will further enlighten the ECC-couplon-remodelling processes that underlie cardiac diseases.

  6. Estimating the potential of energy saving and carbon emission mitigation of cassava-based fuel ethanol using life cycle assessment coupled with a biogeochemical process model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dong; Hao, Mengmeng; Fu, Jingying; Tian, Guangjin; Ding, Fangyu

    2017-09-14

    Global warming and increasing concentration of atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) have prompted considerable interest in the potential role of energy plant biomass. Cassava-based fuel ethanol is one of the most important bioenergy and has attracted much attention in both developed and developing countries. However, the development of cassava-based fuel ethanol is still faced with many uncertainties, including raw material supply, net energy potential, and carbon emission mitigation potential. Thus, an accurate estimation of these issues is urgently needed. This study provides an approach to estimate energy saving and carbon emission mitigation potentials of cassava-based fuel ethanol through LCA (life cycle assessment) coupled with a biogeochemical process model-GEPIC (GIS-based environmental policy integrated climate) model. The results indicate that the total potential of cassava yield on marginal land in China is 52.51 million t; the energy ratio value varies from 0.07 to 1.44, and the net energy surplus of cassava-based fuel ethanol in China is 92,920.58 million MJ. The total carbon emission mitigation from cassava-based fuel ethanol in China is 4593.89 million kgC. Guangxi, Guangdong, and Fujian are identified as target regions for large-scale development of cassava-based fuel ethanol industry. These results can provide an operational approach and fundamental data for scientific research and energy planning.

  7. Data processing correction of the irising effect of a fast-gating intensified charge-coupled device on laser-pulse-excited luminescence spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondic, L; Dohnalová, K; Pelant, I; Zídek, K; de Boer, W D A M

    2010-06-01

    Intensified charge-coupled devices (ICCDs) comprise the advantages of both fast gating detectors and spectrally broad CCDs into one device that enables temporally and spectrally resolved measurements with a few nanosecond resolution. Gating of the measured signal occurs in the image intensifier tube, where a high voltage is applied between the detector photocathode and a microchannel plate electron multiplier. An issue arises in time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy when signal onset characterization is required. In this case, the transient gate closing process that causes the detected signal always arises in the middle of the ICCD chip regardless of the spectral detection window--the so-called irising effect. We demonstrate that in case when the detection gate width is comparable to the opening/closing time and the gate is pretriggered with respect to the signal onset, the irising effect causes the obtained data to be strongly distorted. At the same time, we propose a software procedure that leads to the spectral correction of the irising effect and demonstrate its validity on the distorted data.

  8. Preliminary risk analysis of an Hydrogen production plant using the reformed process of methane with vapor coupled to a high temperature nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores y Flores, A.; Nelson E, P.F.; Francois L, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    It is necessary to identify the different types of dangers, as well as their causes, probabilities and consequences of the same ones, inside plants, industries and any process to classify the risks. This work is focused in particular to a study using the technical HAZOP (Hazard and Operability) for a plant of reformed of methane with vapor coupled to a nuclear reactor of the type HTTR (High Temperature Test Reactor), which is designed to be built in Japan. In particular in this study the interaction is analyzed between the nuclear reactor and the plant of reformed of methane with vapor. After knowing the possible causes of risk one it is built chart of results of HAZOP to have a better vision of the consequences of this faults toward the buildings and constructions, to people and the influence of the fault on each plant; for what there are proposed solutions to mitigate these consequences or to avoid them. The work is divided in three sections: a brief introduction about the technique of HAZOP; some important aspects of the plant of reformed of methane with vapor; and the construction of the chart of results of HAZOP. (Author)

  9. Impact of vegetation dynamics on hydrological processes in a semi-arid basin by using a land surface-hydrology coupled model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Yang; Lei, Huimin; Yang, Dawen; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Dengfeng; Yuan, Xing

    2017-08-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) are widely used to understand the interactions between hydrological processes and vegetation dynamics, which is important for the attribution and prediction of regional hydrological variations. However, most LSMs have large uncertainties in their representations of ecohydrological processes due to deficiencies in hydrological parameterizations. In this study, the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) LSM was modified with an advanced runoff generation and flow routing scheme, resulting in a new land surface-hydrology coupled model, CLM-GBHM. Both models were implemented in the Wudinghe River Basin (WRB), which is a semi-arid basin located in the middle reaches of the Yellow River, China. Compared with CLM, CLM-GBHM increased the Nash Sutcliffe efficiency for daily river discharge simulation (1965–1969) from 0.03 to 0.23 and reduced the relative bias in water table depth simulations (2010–2012) from 32.4% to 13.4%. The CLM-GBHM simulations with static, remotely sensed and model-predicted vegetation conditions showed that the vegetation in the WRB began to recover in the 2000s due to the Grain for G