WorldWideScience

Sample records for thirteen unheralded contributors

  1. Contributors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Congdon

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Brief biographies about the contributors to this journal issue Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman";}

  2. Idiosyncrasies of volcanic sulfur viscosity and the triggering of unheralded volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa eScolamacchia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Unheralded blue-sky eruptions from dormant volcanoes cause serious fatalities, such as at Mt. Ontake (Japan on 27 September 2014. Could these events result from magmatic gas being trapped within hydrothermal system aquifers by elemental sulfur (Se clogging pores, due to sharp increases in its viscosity when heated above 159oC? This mechanism was thought to prime unheralded eruptions at Mt. Ruapehu in New Zealand. Impurities in sulfur (As, Te, Se are known to modify S-viscosity and industry experiments showed that organic compounds, H2S, and halogens dramatically influence Se viscosity under typical hydrothermal heating/cooling rates and temperature thresholds. However, the effects of complex sulfur compositions are currently ignored at volcanoes, despite its near ubiquity in long-lived volcano-hydrothermal systems. Models of impure S behavior must be urgently formulated to detect pre-eruptive warning signs before the next blue-sky eruption

  3. Contributors Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chief Editor

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTRIBUTOR FORMManuscript Title:________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________I/we certify that I/we have participated sufficiently in the intellectual content, conception and design of this work or the analysis and interpretation of the data (when applicable, as well as the writing of the manuscript, to take public responsibility for it and have agreed to have my/our name listed as a contributor. I/we believe the manuscript represents valid work. Neither this manuscript nor one with substantially similar content under my/our authorship has been published or is being considered for publication elsewhere, except as described in the covering letter. I/we certify that all the data collected during the study is presented in this manuscript and no data from the study has been or will be published separately. I/we attest that, if requested by the editors, I/we will provide the data/information or will cooperate fully in obtaining and providing the data/information on which the manuscript is based, for examination by the editors or their assignees. I/we also certify that we have taken all necessary permissions from our institution and/or department for conducting and publishing the present work.Financial interests, direct or indirect, that exist or may be perceived to exist for individual contributors in connection with the content of this paper have been disclosed in the cover letter. Sources of outside support of the project are named in the cover letter. I/We hereby transfer(s, assign(s, or otherwise convey(s all copyright ownership, including any and all rights incidental thereto, exclusively to the Journal, in the event that such work is published by the Journal. The Journal shall own the work, including 1 copyright; 2 the right to grant permission to republish the article in whole or in part, with or without fee; 3 the right

  4. Radiocarbon dating for contributors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, H.S.

    1984-06-01

    This report describes the radiocarbon facility at the Institute of Nuclear Sciences, and is written for potential contributors, current users, and for those who advise others. The report briefly outlines the principles and practices of C-14 dating; with emphasis on factors that enable contributors to judge whether C-14 work is appropriate, and to assist them with the procedures to be followed in order to get the best results. Age determinations, being the main requirements by contributors, have been discussed in detail

  5. Wastewater Industrial Contributors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Industrial contributors to municipal wastewater treatment facilities in Iowa for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program.

  6. Notes on Contributors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS. Samuel AMOAKO, Associate Researcher, South African Research Unit in Social Change. Contact Details: C/o Lucinda Bercony, Humanities Research Village (House No. 3). University of Johannesburg, P. O. Box 524. Bunting Road Campus, Auckland Park, 2006.

  7. Contributors to this Issue | Contributors | Ghana Journal of Linguistics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Contributors to this Issue. A LINGUISTIC DESCRIPTION OF THE LANGUAGE OF GHANAIAN NEWSPAPERS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE READABILITY, COMPREHENSIBILITY AND INFORMATION FUNCTION OF THE GHANAIAN PRESS. Author: Modestus Fosu. Institutional Affiliation: Ghana Institute of Journalism, Accra.

  8. EDS becoms CERN Openlab contributor

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "EDS announced that it has become an official contributor to CERN openlab. The purpose of the joint project beteween CERN and EDS is to carry out research and development in the field of monitoring, management and operation of grid services." (1 page)

  9. Thirteen-colour photometry of Be stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, M.; Schuster, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Thirteen-colour photometry made at the San Pedro Martir Observatory in Baja California, for a number of spectroscopically variable Be and shell stars is presented. Several of these stars also show photometric variability in the ultraviolet and/or infrared over a time base of two to three years. We analyze the more interesting stars in terms of colour-colour diagrams, colour excesses, spectral characteristics and changes in their energy distributions. Prospects for future research are discussed. (author)

  10. Thirteen new records of ferns from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Thais Elias; Salino, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Thirteen fern species are reported for the first time for Brazil. Among the new records, eight are from Acre state (Cyatheasubincisa, Cyclodiumtrianae, Elaphoglossumstenophyllum, Hypoderrisbrauniana, Pleopeltisstolzei, Thelypterisarcana, Thelypteriscomosa, Thelypterisvaldepilosa), two are from Pará state (Polypodiumflagellare, Tectariaheracleifolia), one from Minas Gerais state (Alsophilasalvinii), one from Ceará state (Campyloneurumcostatum) and one from Bahia state (Thelypterisrolandii). Part of the species shows a disjunct occurrence or illustrates floristic relations between Brazilian and Andean Mountains or Central American Mountains.

  11. Thirteen new records of ferns from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Almeida

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Thirteen fern species are reported for the first time for Brazil. Among the new records, eight are from Acre state (Cyathea subincisa, Cyclodium trianae, Elaphoglossum stenophyllum, Hypoderris brauniana, Pleopeltis stolzei, Thelypteris arcana, Thelypteris comosa, Thelypteris valdepilosa, two are from Pará state (Polypodium flagellare, Tectaria heracleifolia, one from Minas Gerais state (Alsophila salvinii, one from Ceará state (Campyloneurum costatum and one from Bahia state (Thelypteris rolandii. Part of the species shows a disjunct occurrence or illustrates floristic relations between Brazilian and Andean Mountains or Central American Mountains.

  12. Trust Based Evaluation of Wikipedia's Contributors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, Yann; Vercouter, Laurent; Hübner, Jomi Fred; Herzig, Andreas

    Wikipedia is an encyclopedia on which anybody can change its content. Some users, self-proclaimed "patrollers", regularly check recent changes in order to delete or correct those which are ruining articles integrity. The huge quantity of updates leads some articles to remain polluted a certain time before being corrected. In this work, we show how a multiagent trust model can help patrollers in their task of controlling the Wikipedia. To direct the patrollers verification towards suspicious contributors, our work relies on a formalisation of Castelfranchi & Falcone's social trust theory to assist them by representing their trust model in a cognitive way.

  13. Thirteen Week Oral Toxicity Study of WR238605 with a Thirteen Week Recovery Period in Dogs. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-11

    Neshesheim, (Boca Raton : CRC Press, 1982), Volume I, pp. 219-246. 3 J.A.D. Cooper, Jr., D.A. White, and R.A. Matthay, "Drug Induced Pulmonary Disease, Part...after a thirteen week recovery period. This wi 11 be accomp 1 i shed by sod i urn pentobarbital anesthesia and exsanguination. An extensive

  14. Characterization and antioxidant activities of polysaccharides from thirteen boletus mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lan; Hu, Yu; Duan, Xiaoyu; Tang, Tingting; Shen, Yingbin; Hu, Bin; Liu, Aiping; Chen, Hong; Li, Cheng; Liu, Yuntao

    2018-02-16

    Water-soluble polysaccharides were extracted from the caps and stipes of thirteen boletus mushrooms representing five different species collected in Southwest China. Investigations of their structures and antioxidant activities allowed an evaluation of structure-function relationships. The polysaccharides were composed mainly of the monosaccharides arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucose and galactose. Most samples displayed a broad molecular weight range, with significant differences observed between the molecular weight ranges of the polysaccharides from the caps and the stipes. FT-IR spectral analysis of the polysaccharides revealed that most of polysaccharides from boletus mushrooms (except Boletus edulis) contained a pyranose ring. The antioxidant activities of the polysaccharides in stipes showed a significant correlation with their monosaccharide composition, and were also related to their molecular weight and anomeric configuration. Suillellus luridus collected in Pingwu, Mianyang, Sichuan, China had remarkably superior antioxidant activity and might be developed as a natural antioxidant. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Thirteen Plus One. A Comparison of Global Climate Policy Architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldy, J.E.; Barrett, S.; Stavins, R.N.

    2003-07-01

    We critically review the Kyoto Protocol and thirteen alternative policy architectures for addressing the threat of global climate change. We employ six criteria to evaluate the policy proposals: environmental outcome, dynamic efficiency, cost effectiveness, equity, flexibility in the presence of new information, and incentives for participation and compliance. The Kyoto Protocol does not fare well on a number of criteria, but none of the alternative proposals fare well along all six dimensions. We identify several major themes among the alternative proposals: Kyoto is t oo little, too fast ; developing countries should play a more substantial role and receive incentives to participate; implementation should focus on market-based approaches, especially those with price mechanisms; and participation and compliance incentives are inadequately addressed by most proposals. Our investigation reveals tensions among several of the evaluative criteria, such as between environmental outcome and efficiency, and between cost-effectiveness and incentives for participation and compliance

  16. Thirteen plus one. A comparison of global climate policy architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldy, Joseph E.; Barrett, Scott; Stavins, Robert N.

    2003-01-01

    We critically review the Kyoto Protocol and thirteen alternative policy architectures for addressing the threat of global climate change. We employ six criteria to evaluate the policy proposals: environmental outcome, dynamic efficiency, cost-effectiveness, equity, flexibility in the presence of new information, and incentives for participation and compliance. The Kyoto Protocol does not fare well on a number of criteria, but none of the alternative proposals fare well along all six dimensions. We identify several major themes among the alternative proposals: Kyoto is 'too little, too fast'; developing countries (DCs) should play a more substantial role and receive incentives to participate; implementation should focus on market-based approaches, especially those with price mechanisms; and participation and compliance incentives are inadequately addressed by most proposals. Our investigation reveals tensions among several of the evaluative criteria, such as between environmental outcome and efficiency, and between cost-effectiveness and incentives for participation and compliance

  17. 26 CFR 1.507-6 - Substantial contributor defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...)), whether or not exempt from taxation under section 501(a), who contributed or bequeathed an aggregate... contributions and bequests from all sources. As of June 1, 1969, A is a substantial contributor to M for... from all sources. B is a substantial contributor to N as of March 15, 1970, since that is the first...

  18. Traumatic tricuspid valve insufficiency. Experience in thirteen patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Son, J A; Danielson, G K; Schaff, H V; Miller, F A

    1994-11-01

    From 1964 through June 1993, thirteen patients with traumatic tricuspid insufficiency were treated surgically; all were male, and the ages ranged from 17 to 64 years (median 39 years). The condition was associated with blunt chest trauma in all patients: motor vehicle accidents in twelve and an explosion of a tank of compressed air in one. The median duration between trauma and operation was 17 years (range 1 month to 37 years). Preoperatively, six patients were in sinus rhythm and seven were in atrial fibrillation. At operation, the right ventricular function appeared moderately to severely depressed in twelve patients. In twelve patients, the anterior leaflet was flail because of chordal rupture (n = 9), rupture of anterior papillary muscle (n = 3), or tear in the anterior leaflet (n = 1). In one patient, the septal leaflet was missing and in another it was retracted and adherent to the ventricular septum. In five patients the tricuspid valve was repaired and in eight it was replaced. In seven patients in the latter group, the chordae, papillary muscles, and/or tricuspid valve leaflet(s) were found to be in a contracted and atrophic state, precluding repair. No early or late deaths occurred. At follow-up extending to 26 years (median 12 years), 12 patients are in New York Heart Association class I and one patient is in class II. Nine patients were in sinus rhythm and four were in atrial fibrillation. Although our experience indicates that good functional results can still be achieved many years after the onset of traumatic tricuspid valve insufficiency, earlier diagnosis and surgical treatment should increase the feasibility of tricuspid valve insufficiency, earlier diagnosis and surgical treatment should increase the feasibility of tricuspid valve repair, prevent progressive deterioration of right ventricular function, and increase the possibility of maintaining late sinus rhythm in a greater number of patients.

  19. Peripheral circadian misalignment: contributor to systemic insulin resistance and potential intervention to improve bariatric surgical outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Kyle N.; Hanlon, Erin C.; Prachand, Vivek N.

    2016-01-01

    Thirteen percent of the world's population suffers from obesity and 39% from being overweight, which correlates with an increase in numerous secondary metabolic complications, such as Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe obesity and results in significant weight loss and the amelioration of obesity-related comorbidities through changes in enteroendocrine activity, caloric intake, and alterations in gut microbiota composition. The circadian system has recently been found to be a critical regulatory component in the control of metabolism and, thus, may potentially play an important role in inappropriate weight gain. Indeed, some behaviors and lifestyle factors associated with an increased risk of obesity are also risk factors for misalignment in the circadian clock system and for the metabolic syndrome. It is thus possible that alterations in peripheral circadian clocks in metabolically relevant tissues are a contributor to the current obesity epidemic. As such, it is plausible that postsurgical alterations in central circadian alignment, as well as peripheral gene expression in metabolic tissues may represent another mechanism for the beneficial effects of bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery may represent an opportunity to identify changes in the circadian expression of clock genes that have been altered by environmental factors, allowing for a better understanding of the mechanism of action of surgery. These studies could also reveal an overlooked target for behavioral intervention to improve metabolic outcomes following bariatric surgery. PMID:27465735

  20. Guidelines for Contributors | Editor | Ghana Journal of Linguistics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GUIDELINES FOR CONTRIBUTORS. PLEASE follow these guidelines closely when preparing your paper for submission. The editors reserve the right to reject inadequately prepared papers. All areas of linguistics are invited – the journal is not limited to articles on languages of or in Ghana or Africa. ALL CONTRIBUTIONS ...

  1. HIV-associated cellular senescence: A contributor to accelerated aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Justin; Torres, Claudio

    2017-07-01

    Due to the advent of antiretroviral therapy HIV is no longer a terminal disease and the HIV infected patients are becoming increasingly older. While this is a major success, with increasing age comes an increased risk for disease. The age-related comorbidities that HIV infected patients experience suggest that they suffer from accelerated aging. One possible contributor to this accelerated aging is cellular senescence, an age-associated response that can occur prematurely in response to stress, and that is emerging as a contributor to disease and aging. HIV patients experience several stressors such as the virus itself, antiretroviral drugs and to a lesser extent, substance abuse that can induce cellular senescence. This review summarizes the current knowledge of senescence induction in response to these stressors and their relation to the comorbidities in HIV patients. Cellular senescence may be a possible therapeutic target for these comorbidities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. China's rise as a major contributor to science and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yu; Zhang, Chunni; Lai, Qing

    2014-07-01

    In the past three decades, China has become a major contributor to science and technology. China now employs an increasingly large labor force of scientists and engineers at relatively high earnings and produces more science and engineering degrees than the United States at all levels, particularly bachelor's. China's research and development expenditure has been rising. Research output in China has been sharply increasing since 2002, making China the second largest producer of scientific papers after the United States. The quality of research by Chinese scientists has also been improving steadily. However, China's rise in science also faces serious difficulties, partly attributable to its rigid, top-down administrative system, with allegations of scientific misconduct trending upward.

  3. "Everything...Affects Everything": Promoting Critical Perspectives toward Bullying with "Thirteen Reasons Why"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, James S.; Trent, Brandie

    2012-01-01

    "Everything...affects everything," from Jay Asher's young adult novel, "Thirteen Reasons Why," captures a central message of this text in which a young woman named Hannah Baker leaves behind a series of tapes addressed to particular individuals who played a part in producing the snowball effect that led to her suicide. "Everything...affects…

  4. Physical activity levels and patterns of thirteen to fifteen year old ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is worldwide concern over the decline in physical activity (PA) levels among school children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the (PA) levels and PA patterns of thirteen to fifteen year old boys from different race groups in the North- West Province and to determine to what degree this physical activity profile ...

  5. Bacterial components are the major contributors to the macrophage stimulating activity exhibited by extracts of common edible mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Heather L; Haron, Mona H; Pugh, Nirmal D; Zhang, Jin; Jackson, Colin R; Pasco, David S

    2016-10-12

    Recent studies have indicated that a major contributor to the innate immune enhancing properties of some medicinal plants is derived from the cell wall components of bacteria colonizing these plants. The purpose of the current study was to assess if the bacteria present within edible and medicinal mushrooms substantially contribute to the innate immune stimulating potential of these mushrooms. Whole mushrooms from thirteen types of edible fungi and individual parts from Agaricus bisporus were analyzed for in vitro macrophage activation as well as bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) content, cell load, and community composition. Substantial variation between samples was observed in macrophage activation (over 500-fold), total bacterial load (over 200-fold), and LPS content (over 10 million-fold). Both LPS content (ρ = 0.832, p mushroom extracts. Extract activity was negated by treatment with NaOH, conditions that inactivate LPS and other bacterial components. Significant correlations between macrophage activation and total bacterial load (ρ = 0.723, p = 0.0001) and LPS content (ρ = 0.951, p mushroom associated bacteria contribute substantially to the innate immune enhancing activity exhibited by mushrooms and may result in similar therapeutic actions as reported for ingestion of bacterial preparations such as probiotics.

  6. The effect of varying the number of contributors on likelihood ratios for complex DNA mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benschop, Corina C G; Haned, Hinda; Jeurissen, Loes; Gill, Peter D; Sijen, Titia

    2015-11-01

    Interpretation of DNA mixtures with three or more contributors, defined here as high order mixtures, is difficult because of the inevitability of allele sharing. Allele sharing complicates the estimation of the number of contributors, which is an important parameter to assess the probative value. Consequently, these mixtures may not be deemed suitable for interpretation and reporting. In this study, we generated three-, four- and five-person mixtures with little or no drop-out and with varying levels of allele sharing. For these DNA mixtures we computed likelihood ratios (LRs) using the LRmix model, and always using persons of interest that are true contributors. We assessed the influence of different scenarios on the LR, and used (1) the true or an incorrect number of contributors, (2) zero, one or two anchored individuals and (3) an equal number of contributors under Hp and Hd or an extra contributor under Hd. It was shown that the LR varied considerably when the hypotheses used an incorrect number of contributors, especially when individuals were anchored under the hypotheses. Overall, when analysing high order mixtures, there may occur a transition from LR greater than one to less than one if an incorrect number of contributors is conditioned. This is a result of allele sharing among the multiple contributors rather than allele drop-out, since this study only utilised samples with little or no drop-out. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Determinants of perceived and actual knowledge of commission paid by contributors in the pension funds industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Farías

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the determinants of perceived and actual knowledge of commission paid by contributors in the Chilean pension funds industry. Results show that price consciousness and brand credibility are positively associated with perceived and actual knowledge of commission paid by pension fund contributors. Results also show that financial literacy is only positively associated with actual knowledge of commission paid by contributors. Additionally, results show that price based advertising exposure is only positively associated with perceived knowledge of commission paid by contributors. This association is stronger for contributors with a high use of the price-quality cue. Based on the findings presented, implications for managers, regulators and researchers are drawn.

  8. Feeding ecology of thirteen syntopic species of anurans in a seasonal tropical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toft, Catherine A

    1980-04-01

    Thirteen species of anurans belonging to three families forage diurnally for arthropods in the leaf litter of the lowland rainforest at the Río Llullapichis in Amazonian Perú. This paper investigates the diets and patterns of coexistence in this group of ecologically similar species. All thirteen species use the forest floor habitat without apparent differentiation. Most species take prey in proportions significantly different from those occurring in the leaf litter and comprise two specialist guilds: dendrobatids and bufonids that eat hard-bodied, slow-moving arthropods such as ants and mites; and leptodactylids that eat soft-bodied, mobile arthropods, primarily orthopterans and large spiders. Dendrobates femoralis (Boulenger) is a generalist, taking prey in proportions not significantly different from those in the leaf litter. Within specialist guilds, body sizes of species vary and are correlated with the size of prey taken. Foraging behavior and predator defense also correlate with the type and sizes of prey taken. Ant specialists tend to be poisonous and active searchers, taking many small prey per day. Non-ant specialists are cryptic, sit-and-wait foragers that take few large prey per day. Similarity in diet within guilds tends tobe lowest in the dry season when food is less abundant, suggesting that food is in short supply in the dry season.

  9. CT features of peritoneal and mesenteric involvement in pediatric malignancies. Experience from thirteen cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, N.; Filiatrault, D.; Garel, L.; Dube, J.; Paille, P.; Grenier, N.

    1986-01-01

    A retrospective study of all patients presenting with abdominal malignancies since November 1982 was undertaken in order to assess the CT features of peritoneal and mesenteric involvement in childhood. Thirteen cases, including 4 cases of malignant lymphomas, 1 case of Hodgkin's disease, 5 cases of adrenal tumors and 3 cases of ovarian tumors, were selected. Providing a good technique, CT appears as the best imaging modality of the mesentery. CT is also reliable in showing peritoneal implants, even without ascites. A high quality vascular opacification is needed in order to recognize the involvement of the lesser omentum (6/13 cases in our series). Precise knowledge of the intra-abdominal extension of the primary neoplasm has a definite impact upon the surgical indications and therefore upon the prognosis [fr

  10. Structure-activity relationships and molecular docking of thirteen synthesized flavonoids as horseradish peroxidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoudi, Reguia; Djeridane, Amar; Benarous, Khedidja; Gaydou, Emile M; Yousfi, Mohamed

    2017-10-01

    For the first time, the structure-activity relationships of thirteen synthesized flavonoids have been investigated by evaluating their ability to modulate horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalytic activity. Indeed, a modified spectrophotometrically method was carried out and optimized using 4-methylcatechol (4-MC) as peroxidase co-substrate. The results show that these flavonoids exhibit a great capacity to inhibit peroxidase with Ki values ranged from 0.14±0.01 to 65±0.04mM. Molecular docking has been achieved using Auto Dock Vina program to discuss the nature of interactions and the mechanism of inhibition. According to the docking results, all the flavonoids have shown great binding affinity to peroxidase. These molecular modeling studies suggested that pyran-4-one cycle acts as an inhibition key for peroxidase. Therefore, potent peroxidase inhibitors are flavonoids with these structural requirements: the presence of the hydroxyl (OH) group in 7, 5 and 4' positions and the absence of the methoxy (O-CH 3 ) group. Apigenin contributed better in HRP inhibitory activity. The present study has shown that the studied flavonoids could be promising HRP inhibitors, which can help in developing new molecules to control thyroid diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Carbon budgets of thirteen years at the FLUXNET cropland site Oensingen, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmel, Carmen; Revill, Andrew; Hörtnagl, Lukas; Eugster, Werner

    2017-04-01

    The FLUXNET cropland site at Oensingen, Switzerland (CH-Oe2) is located on the Swiss Plateau, which is representative for the average domain of agricultural crop production in Switzerland. The site is managed under the low pesticide integrated production (IP) farming protocol and features a crop rotation focusing on winter wheat, but also includes winter barley, rapeseed, peas and potatoes as well as intermediate cover crops. Thirteen years of eddy covariance and meteorological measurements are available for the site. The carbon imports through manure applications and sowing, along with the exports through harvests, were quantified. In this study, we analyze the carbon budgets of all crop types and measurement years. These results will be compared to changes in soil carbon content. We will answer the questions: (1) Has the crop rotation and field management resulted in a net carbon source or sink? (2) To what extent are the different crop types linked to net carbon exchanges? (3) What are the climatic potential drivers for the interannual cropland carbon budget? (4) Is the carbon budget reflected in the changes in soil carbon content?

  12. Physiological status and intersex in the endobenthic bivalve Scrobicularia plana from thirteen estuaries in northwest France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossi Tankoua, O.; Amiard-Triquet, C.; Denis, F.; Minier, C.; Mouneyrac, C.; Berthet, B.

    2012-01-01

    The bivalve Scrobicularia plana, an important species for the structure and functioning of estuarine and coastal mudflats, was studied in thirteen sites from NW France differing by their degree of contamination to document the presence of reproduction impairments (intersex, sex ratio, gonadosomatic indices) in relation to the condition revealed by using hepatosomatic and condition indices. In agreement with recent studies in other European estuaries, intersex was revealed in all the studied estuaries, including sites the chemical and ecological status of which is considered “good” according to the criteria of the European Water Framework Directive. The presence of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) could result in such disturbances. Our results re-inforce the concern linked to the subtle effects of EDCs, which are active at very low doses, often in the absence of any major sign of toxicity. However at this stage, no clear link may be established between intersex and population effects. - Highlights: ► Clams were collected from 13 estuaries differing by their degree of contamination. ► Gonadosomatic, hepatosomatic and condition indices were determined. ► Reproduction impairments (intersex, biased sex ratio, asynchronism) were shown. ► Intersex shown even at sites with good ecological status (Water Framework Directive). ► No clear links between intersex and populational effects. - Intersex in clams from estuaries, the chemical/ecological status of which was considered as good under the EC Water Framework Directive.

  13. Effects of hibernation on bone marrow transcriptome in thirteen-lined ground squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Scott T; Sell, Shawn S; Fahrenkrog, Molly; Wilkinson, Kory; Howard, David R; Bergen, Hannah; Cruz, Estefania; Cash, Steve E; Andrews, Matthew T; Hampton, Marshall

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian hibernators adapt to prolonged periods of immobility, hypometabolism, hypothermia, and oxidative stress, each capable of reducing bone marrow activity. In this study bone marrow transcriptomes were compared among thirteen-lined ground squirrels collected in July, winter torpor, and winter interbout arousal (IBA). The results were consistent with a suppression of acquired immune responses, and a shift to innate immune responses during hibernation through higher complement expression. Consistent with the increase in adipocytes found in bone marrow of hibernators, expression of genes associated with white adipose tissue are higher during hibernation. Genes that should strengthen the bone by increasing extracellular matrix were higher during hibernation, especially the collagen genes. Finally, expression of heat shock proteins were lower, and cold-response genes were higher, during hibernation. No differential expression of hematopoietic genes involved in erythrocyte or megakaryocyte production was observed. This global view of the changes in the bone marrow transcriptome over both short term (torpor vs. IBA) and long term (torpor vs. July) hypothermia can explain several observations made about circulating blood cells and the structure and strength of the bone during hibernation. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Borehole P- and S-wave velocity at thirteen stations in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, James F.; Boore, David M.; Tinsley, John C.; Mueller, Charles S.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as part of a program to acquire seismic velocity data at locations of strong-ground motion in earthquakes (e.g., Gibbs et al., 2000), has investigated thirteen additional sites in the Southern California region. Of the thirteen sites, twelve are in the vicinity of Whittier, California, and one is located in San Bernardino, California. Several deployments of temporary seismographs were made after the Whittier Narrows, California earthquake of 1 October 1987 (Mueller et al., 1988). A deployment, between 2 October and 9 November 1987, was the motivation for selection of six of the drill sites. Temporary portable seismographs at Hoover School (HOO), Lincoln School (LIN), Corps of Engineers Station (NAR), Olive Junior High School (OLV), Santa Anita Golf Course (SAG), and Southwestern Academy (SWA) recorded significant aftershock data. These portable sites, with the exception of Santa Anita Golf Course, were co-sited with strong-motion recorders. Stations at HOO, Lincoln School Whittier (WLB), Saint Paul High School (STP), Alisos Adult School (EXC), Cerritos College Gymnasium (CGM), Cerritos College Physical Science Building (CPS), and Cerritos College Police Building (CPB) were part of an array of digital strong-motion stations deployed from "bedrock" in Whittier to near the deepest part of the Los Angeles basin in Norwalk. Although development and siting of this new array (partially installed at the time of this writing) was generally motivated by the Whittier Narrows earthquake, these new sites (with the exception of HOO) were not part of any Whittier Narrows aftershock deployments. A similar new digital strong-motion site was installed at the San Bernardino Fire Station during the same time frame. Velocity data were obtained to depths of about 90 meters at two sites, 30 meters at seven sites, and 18 to 25 meters at four sites. Lithology data from the analysis of cuttings and samples was obtained from the two 90-meter deep holes and

  15. [The outcome of thirteen patients with nonmalignant hematologic diseases treated with HLA haploidentical stem cell transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yuan; Wu, Bingyi; Du, Qingfeng; Sun, Can; Lin, Xia; Huang, Yuxian; Tu, Sanfang; Song, Chaoyang; Lu, Zhigang; Chen, Tuzhen; Sun, Caixia

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haploidentical stem cell transplantation in nonmalignant hematologic diseases. To analyze the outcome of 13 patients with nonmalignant hematologic diseases who underwent HLA haploidentical stem cell transplantation from September 2001 to October 2013. Thirteen patients including 9 of severe aplastic anemia, 3 of severe β thalassemia, 1 of congenital pure red cell aplastic anemia underwent HLA haploidentical stem cell transplantation. Three HLA loci mismatched in 4 cases, two HLA loci mismatched in 8 cases and one HLA locus mismatched in 1 case. The conditioning regime consisted of Fludarabine (30 mg×m(-2)×d(-1)×5 d ), Busulfan(0.8 mg×kg(-1)×6h(-1)×4 d), Cyclophosphamide (60 mg×kg(-1)×d(-1)×2 d ), rabbit anti-human lymphocyte globulin ( 2.5 mg×kg(-1)×d(-1)×5 d ). To prevent from graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), cyclosporin A and short term methotrexate (MTX) were used. All patients were successfully engrafted. The incidence of grade 1-2 acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) was 3/13, and that of grade 3-4 was 1/13. The cumulative incidence of total chronic GVHD (cGVHD) was 3/13. Eleven patients survived free of disease at a median follow-up period of 13 months (2-145). HLA haploidentical stem cell transplantation is an effective and safe therapy for nonmalignant hematologic diseases.

  16. Performance of thirteen clinical rules to distinguish bacterial and presumed viral meningitis in Vietnamese children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Tien Huy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Successful outcomes from bacterial meningitis require rapid antibiotic treatment; however, unnecessary treatment of viral meningitis may lead to increased toxicities and expense. Thus, improved diagnostics are required to maximize treatment and minimize side effects and cost. Thirteen clinical decision rules have been reported to identify bacterial from viral meningitis. However, few rules have been tested and compared in a single study, while several rules are yet to be tested by independent researchers or in pediatric populations. Thus, simultaneous test and comparison of these rules are required to enable clinicians to select an optimal diagnostic rule for bacterial meningitis in settings and populations similar to ours. METHODS: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted at the Infectious Department of Pediatric Hospital Number 1, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The performance of the clinical rules was evaluated by area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC using the method of DeLong and McNemar test for specificity comparison. RESULTS: Our study included 129 patients, of whom 80 had bacterial meningitis and 49 had presumed viral meningitis. Spanos's rule had the highest AUC at 0.938 but was not significantly greater than other rules. No rule provided 100% sensitivity with a specificity higher than 50%. Based on our calculation of theoretical sensitivity and specificity, we suggest that a perfect rule requires at least four independent variables that posses both sensitivity and specificity higher than 85-90%. CONCLUSIONS: No clinical decision rules provided an acceptable specificity (>50% with 100% sensitivity when applying our data set in children. More studies in Vietnam and developing countries are required to develop and/or validate clinical rules and more very good biomarkers are required to develop such a perfect rule.

  17. Institutional Affiliation of Contributors to the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, 1973–83

    OpenAIRE

    James R. Simpson; John T. Steele

    1985-01-01

    History of reviews of contributions to the American Journal of Agricultural Economics are examined. Total pages, pages per capita all faculty, and per teaching research faculty of contributors to the American Journal of Agricultural Economics for 1979–83 are reported for land grant institutions. Rankings are provided. There are also averages for 1973–79 and 1980–83.

  18. Following "Teaching of Psychology" into Middle Age: Changes, Contributors, and Contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Richard A.; Collisson, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Honoring "Teaching of Psychology" ("ToP") as it approaches its 40th anniversary, we extend prior overviews of its development and growth into 2012. We describe changes in editorial staff and journal organization, identify and describe the top 20 most frequent contributors to "ToP," and present the results of a content…

  19. Contributors and Inhibitors of Resilience Among Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, Abby R.; Yi-Frazier, Joyce P.; Wharton, Claire; Gordon, Karen; Jones, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Self-perceived resilience may enable coping and mitigate poor psychosocial outcomes among adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer. In order to inform the development of resilience-promoting interventions, we aimed to: (1) describe AYA patient-reported resilience and (2) identify AYA patient-reported contributors and inhibitors of resilience.

  20. 47 CFR 54.712 - Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contributor recovery of universal service costs... its federal universal service contribution costs through a line item on a customer's bill the amount of the federal universal service line-item charge may not exceed the interstate telecommunications...

  1. Nutrigenomics of Body Weight Regulation: A Rationale for Careful Dissection of Individual Contributors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijer, Jaap; Hoevenaars, Femke P. M.; Nieuwenhuizen, Arie; van Schothorst, Evert M.

    2014-01-01

    Body weight stability may imply active regulation towards a certain physiological condition, a body weight setpoint. This interpretation is ill at odds with the world-wide increase in overweight and obesity. Until now, a body weight setpoint has remained elusive and the setpoint theory did not provide practical clues for body weight reduction interventions. For this an alternative theoretical model is necessary, which is available as the settling point model. The settling point model postulates that there is little active regulation towards a predefined body weight, but that body weight settles based on the resultant of a number of contributors, represented by the individual’s genetic predisposition, in interaction with environmental and socioeconomic factors, such as diet and lifestyle. This review refines the settling point model and argues that by taking body weight regulation from a settling point perspective, the road will be opened to careful dissection of the various contributors to establishment of body weight and its regulation. This is both necessary and useful. Nutrigenomic technologies may help to delineate contributors to body weight settling. Understanding how and to which extent the different contributors influence body weight will allow the design of weight loss and weight maintenance interventions, which hopefully are more successful than those that are currently available. PMID:25338273

  2. Nutrigenomics of body weight regulation: a rationale for careful dissection of individual contributors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijer, Jaap; Hoevenaars, Femke P M; Nieuwenhuizen, Arie; van Schothorst, Evert M

    2014-10-21

    Body weight stability may imply active regulation towards a certain physiological condition, a body weight setpoint. This interpretation is ill at odds with the world-wide increase in overweight and obesity. Until now, a body weight setpoint has remained elusive and the setpoint theory did not provide practical clues for body weight reduction interventions. For this an alternative theoretical model is necessary, which is available as the settling point model. The settling point model postulates that there is little active regulation towards a predefined body weight, but that body weight settles based on the resultant of a number of contributors, represented by the individual's genetic predisposition, in interaction with environmental and socioeconomic factors, such as diet and lifestyle. This review refines the settling point model and argues that by taking body weight regulation from a settling point perspective, the road will be opened to careful dissection of the various contributors to establishment of body weight and its regulation. This is both necessary and useful. Nutrigenomic technologies may help to delineate contributors to body weight settling. Understanding how and to which extent the different contributors influence body weight will allow the design of weight loss and weight maintenance interventions, which hopefully are more successful than those that are currently available.

  3. Contributors to Secondary Osteoporosis in Patients Referred for Treatment with Teriparatide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İnan Anaforoğlu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Teriparatide is an anabolic agent belonging to a new class of antiosteoporosis drugs. The Turkish Social Security Institution covers teriparatide for patients with osteoporosis who have 2 osteoporotic fractures, are older than 65 years, and have a T-score of less than -4. We evaluated possible secondary contributors to osteoporosis in patients referred for treatment with this agent. Material and Method: All patients referred to our center for teriparatide treatment over 2 year were evaluated for clinical risk factors for osteoporosis, medical history, and medications. Results: Sixty-eight patients (63 women and 5 men, mean age:71.3±9.4 (50-89 years were referred. Twenty-nine patients (42.6% had received osteoporosis therapy before referral, consisting of bisphosphonate (n=20, strontium ranelate (n=6, calcitonin (n=2, or calcitonin and bisphosphonate (n=1. The mean duration of the previous therapy was 46.4± 38.5 (3-120 months. In all, 50 of the 68 patients (73.5%, including all of the men, had a contributor to secondary osteoporosis. Vitamin D deficiency was the most frequent contributor in 34 patients (52.3%. Other common contributors were hyperthyroidism and hypogonadism. Only 3 of 18 patients with hyperthyroidism and none of the patients with hypogonadism had been diagnosed previously, and 16 of the 24 patients receiving vitamin D supplementation still had deficiency of this vitamin. Discussion: Most of our patients had a contributor to secondary osteoporosis, which often had not been identified previously. Identifying and correcting such disorders might improve the treatment of osteoporosis and reduce the risk of subsequent fracture. Turk Jem 2013; 17: 98-101

  4. Risk-based ranking of dominant contributors to maritime pollution events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes a conceptual approach for identifying dominant contributors to risk from maritime shipping of hazardous materials. Maritime transportation accidents are relatively common occurrences compared to more frequently analyzed contributors to public risk. Yet research on maritime safety and pollution incidents has not been guided by a systematic, risk-based approach. Maritime shipping accidents can be analyzed using event trees to group the accidents into 'bins,' or groups, of similar characteristics such as type of cargo, location of accident (e.g., harbor, inland waterway), type of accident (e.g., fire, collision, grounding), and size of release. The importance of specific types of events to each accident bin can be quantified. Then the overall importance of accident events to risk can be estimated by weighting the events' individual bin importance measures by the risk associated with each accident bin. 4 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs

  5. Identifying the most likely contributors to a Y-STR mixture using the discrete Laplace method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel Meyer; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2015-01-01

    demonstrate how the discrete Laplace method can be used to separate a two person Y-STR mixture, where the Y-STR profiles of the true contributors are not present in the reference dataset, which is often the case for Y-STR profiles in real case work. We also briefly discuss how to calculate the weight...... of the number of loci. For each of these datasets, an out of sample simulation study was performed: A total of 550 mixtures were composed by randomly sampling two haplotypes, h1 and h2, from the dataset. We then used the discrete Laplace method on the remaining data (excluding h1 and h2) to rank the contributor...... or less depending on the dataset and how the discrete Laplace model was chosen. Y-STR mixtures with many loci are difficult to separate, but even haplotypes with 21 Y-STR loci can be separated....

  6. Activity, content, contributors, and influencers of the twitter discussion on urologic oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgmann, Hendrik; Loeb, Stacy; Salem, Johannes; Thomas, Christian; Haferkamp, Axel; Murphy, Declan G; Tsaur, Igor

    2016-09-01

    To analyse the activity, content, contributors, and influencers of the Twitter discussion on urologic oncology. We performed a comprehensive quantitative and qualitative Twitter analysis for the hashtags #prostatecancer, #bladdercancer, #kidneycancer, and #testicularcancer. Symplur was used to analyse activity over different time periods and the top influencers of the Twitter discussion. Tweet Archivist and Twitonomy analysis tools were used to assess characteristics of content and contributors. Twitter discussion on urologic oncology in 2014 contained 100,987 tweets created by 39,326 participants. Mean monthly tweet activity was 6,603±2,183 for #prostatecancer, 866±923 for #testicularcancer, 457±477 for #bladdercancer and 401±504 for #kidneycancer. Twitter activity increased by 41% in 2013 and by 122% in 2014. The content analysis detected awareness, cancer, and risk as frequently mentioned words in urologic oncology tweets. Prevalently used related hashtags were the general hashtag #cancer, awareness hashtags, and the respective cancer/urology tag ontology hashtags. Contributors originated from 41 countries on 6 continents and had a mean of 5,864±4,747 followers. They tweeted from platforms on exclusively mobile devices (39%) more frequently than from desktop devices (29%). Health care organizations accounted for 58% of the top influencers in all cancers. The largest proportion of physicians were among the #prostatecancer and #kidneycancer (each 9%) influencers and individual contributors were most frequent in the discussion on #kidneycancer (57%) and #testicularcancer (50%). There is a significant and growing activity in the Twitter discussion on urologic oncology, particularly on #prostatecancer. The Twitter discussion is global, social, and mobile, and merits attention of stakeholders in health care as a promising communication tool. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Beyond fast food and slow motion: Weighty contributors to the obesity epidemic

    OpenAIRE

    Cizza, G.; Rother, K.I.

    2011-01-01

    Decreased physical activity and marketing-driven increased consumption of “junk” food, dubbed “The Big Two”, are generally regarded as the most important contributors to the obesity epidemic. However, the full picture contains many more pieces of the puzzle. We address several additional issues and review current clinical developments in obesity research. In spite of dramatic advancements in our understanding of the adipose organ and its endocrine and immune products, the ultimate causes of t...

  8. Maternal morbidity and mortality in Pakistan - an overview of major contributors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.; Izhar, V.; Viqar, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the trend of the proportion of maternal mortality ratio (MMR) due to common direct causes that are the major contributors in Pakistan. Study Design: Descriptive method study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted in Jun 2014. Material and Methods: Descriptive method study was conducted in June 2014. Data collected in different time periods from articles published between 01 Jan 2005 to 31 Dec 2012 in medical journals, proceedings of workshops/conferences as well as from newsletters of the National Committee of Maternal Health (NCMH) along with global burden of disease (GBD) 2013 to estimate MMR. Data were later tabulated accordingly in June 2014. Results: In the hospitals over 80% of the deaths are due to direct causes. Direct causes account for 78.1 percent of deaths, hemorrhage being the most common followed by sepsis, eclampsia, rupture of the uterus, and abortions. The contributors were greater in booked multi-gravid as of 20 to 40 years, para 3 to 5, under matric education and with less than Rs. 10,000 monthly income. Conclusion: Massive hemorrhage and uncontrolled hypertension are major contributors of maternal morbidity in Pakistan. (author)

  9. The Case for DUF1220 Domain Dosage as a Primary Contributor to Anthropoid Brain Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathon eKeeney

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Here we present the hypothesis that increasing copy number (dosage of sequences encoding DUF1220 protein domains is a major contributor to the evolutionary increase in brain size, neuron number and cognitive capacity that is associated with the primate order. We further propose that this relationship is restricted to the anthropoid sub-order of primates, with DUF1220 copy number markedly increasing in monkeys, further in apes, and most extremely in humans where the greatest number of copies (~272 haploid copies is found. We show that this increase closely parallels the increase in brain size and neuron number that has occurred among anthropoid primate species. We also provide evidence linking DUF1220 copy number to brain size within the human species, both in normal populations and in individuals associated with brain size pathologies (1q21-associated microcephaly and macrocephaly. While we believe these and other findings presented here strongly suggest increase in DUF1220 copy number is a key contributor to anthropoid brain expansion, the data currently available rely on correlative measures that, though considerable, do not yet provide direct evidence for a causal connection. Nevertheless, we believe the evidence presented is sufficient to provide the basis for a testable model which proposes that DUF1220 protein domain dosage increase is a main contributor to the increase in brain size and neuron number found among the anthropoid primate species and that is at its most extreme in human.

  10. Contributors and Inhibitors of Resilience Among Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Abby R; Yi-Frazier, Joyce P; Wharton, Claire; Gordon, Karen; Jones, Barbara

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Self-perceived resilience may enable coping and mitigate poor psychosocial outcomes among adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer. In order to inform the development of resilience-promoting interventions, we aimed to: (1) describe AYA patient-reported resilience and (2) identify AYA patient-reported contributors and inhibitors of resilience. Methods: The "Resilience in Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer" study was a prospective longitudinal mixed-methods study. Consecutive Caucasian patients aged 14-25 years old enrolled 14-60 days following their diagnosis of cancer and completed one-on-one semi-structured interviews both at the time of enrollment and 3-6 months later. Constant comparative analyses identified salient themes describing modifiable contributors and inhibitors to patient-perceived resilience. Results: Seventeen patients (85% of those approached) enrolled in the study. The mean age was 17 years (SD=2.6) and 53% were female. All patient definitions of resilience inferred an ability to handle adversity. Five themes emerged as predominant contributors or inhibitors of resilience: (1) stress and coping; (2) goals, purpose, and planning; (3) optimism; (4) gratitude and meaning; and (5) connection and belonging. Merged analyses suggested that AYA resilience was a balance that may be enabled by promoting certain skills. Conclusion: AYA patients with cancer perceive resilience as a balance. Learned skills in stress management, goal-setting, and benefit-finding may empower AYAs during their cancer experience, in turn improving long-term psychosocial outcomes.

  11. Contributors and Inhibitors of Resilience Among Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi-Frazier, Joyce P.; Wharton, Claire; Gordon, Karen; Jones, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Self-perceived resilience may enable coping and mitigate poor psychosocial outcomes among adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer. In order to inform the development of resilience-promoting interventions, we aimed to: (1) describe AYA patient-reported resilience and (2) identify AYA patient-reported contributors and inhibitors of resilience. Methods: The “Resilience in Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer” study was a prospective longitudinal mixed-methods study. Consecutive Caucasian patients aged 14–25 years old enrolled 14–60 days following their diagnosis of cancer and completed one-on-one semi-structured interviews both at the time of enrollment and 3–6 months later. Constant comparative analyses identified salient themes describing modifiable contributors and inhibitors to patient-perceived resilience. Results: Seventeen patients (85% of those approached) enrolled in the study. The mean age was 17 years (SD=2.6) and 53% were female. All patient definitions of resilience inferred an ability to handle adversity. Five themes emerged as predominant contributors or inhibitors of resilience: (1) stress and coping; (2) goals, purpose, and planning; (3) optimism; (4) gratitude and meaning; and (5) connection and belonging. Merged analyses suggested that AYA resilience was a balance that may be enabled by promoting certain skills. Conclusion: AYA patients with cancer perceive resilience as a balance. Learned skills in stress management, goal-setting, and benefit-finding may empower AYAs during their cancer experience, in turn improving long-term psychosocial outcomes. PMID:25969794

  12. Evaluating the Training, Responsibilities, and Practices of P&T Committee Members and Nonmember Contributors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ryan; Kelly, Brett J; Moody, Mary

    2017-08-01

    Pharmacy and therapeutics (P&T) committees are responsible for managing drug formularies in numerous health care settings. Although pharmacy practice and health care organizations provide general recommendations of responsibilities and skills for members and nonmember contributors of P&T committees, the study investigators hypothesized that there is diversity in the training, responsibilities, and practices of these members and contributors. To describe the training, responsibilities, and practices of members and nonmember contributors of P&T committees in a variety of health care settings, using an online survey. In December 2015, an online survey was delivered to clinicians who were considered likely to be involved in P&T committee service from hospitals ranked by U.S. News & World Report and a convenience sample of clinicians practicing in managed care settings. The survey instrument was designed to assess various domains and perceptions of P&T committee processes. Sixty-nine respondents representing various health care delivery settings in the United States were eligible for and completed the survey. The majority of the respondents were pharmacists (94.2%), and 72.5% of the respondents were P&T committee members. The remainder of the respondents were nonmember P&T committee contributors. Approximately 60% of the respondents had served in P&T committee roles for ≥ 10 years. Specialized postgraduate training incorporating literature evaluation and formulary management was possessed by 21.7% and 17.4% of the respondents, respectively; however, most of the respondents received on-the-job training. Approximately half of the respondents were responsible for preparation of P&T committee documents, and 58% reported that nonmember contributors typically write and prepare these documents. Skill in literature evaluation was the most important criterion in selecting authors of P&T committee documents, while 10.1% of the respondents indicated that their committees did not

  13. Retrotransposons Are the Major Contributors to the Expansion of the Drosophila ananassae Muller F Element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Wilson; Shaffer, Christopher D; Chen, Elizabeth J; Quisenberry, Thomas J; Ko, Kevin; Braverman, John M; Giarla, Thomas C; Mortimer, Nathan T; Reed, Laura K; Smith, Sheryl T; Robic, Srebrenka; McCartha, Shannon R; Perry, Danielle R; Prescod, Lindsay M; Sheppard, Zenyth A; Saville, Ken J; McClish, Allison; Morlock, Emily A; Sochor, Victoria R; Stanton, Brittney; Veysey-White, Isaac C; Revie, Dennis; Jimenez, Luis A; Palomino, Jennifer J; Patao, Melissa D; Patao, Shane M; Himelblau, Edward T; Campbell, Jaclyn D; Hertz, Alexandra L; McEvilly, Maddison F; Wagner, Allison R; Youngblom, James; Bedi, Baljit; Bettincourt, Jeffery; Duso, Erin; Her, Maiye; Hilton, William; House, Samantha; Karimi, Masud; Kumimoto, Kevin; Lee, Rebekah; Lopez, Darryl; Odisho, George; Prasad, Ricky; Robbins, Holly Lyn; Sandhu, Tanveer; Selfridge, Tracy; Tsukashima, Kara; Yosif, Hani; Kokan, Nighat P; Britt, Latia; Zoellner, Alycia; Spana, Eric P; Chlebina, Ben T; Chong, Insun; Friedman, Harrison; Mammo, Danny A; Ng, Chun L; Nikam, Vinayak S; Schwartz, Nicholas U; Xu, Thomas Q; Burg, Martin G; Batten, Spencer M; Corbeill, Lindsay M; Enoch, Erica; Ensign, Jesse J; Franks, Mary E; Haiker, Breanna; Ingles, Judith A; Kirkland, Lyndsay D; Lorenz-Guertin, Joshua M; Matthews, Jordan; Mittig, Cody M; Monsma, Nicholaus; Olson, Katherine J; Perez-Aragon, Guillermo; Ramic, Alen; Ramirez, Jordan R; Scheiber, Christopher; Schneider, Patrick A; Schultz, Devon E; Simon, Matthew; Spencer, Eric; Wernette, Adam C; Wykle, Maxine E; Zavala-Arellano, Elizabeth; McDonald, Mitchell J; Ostby, Kristine; Wendland, Peter; DiAngelo, Justin R; Ceasrine, Alexis M; Cox, Amanda H; Docherty, James E B; Gingras, Robert M; Grieb, Stephanie M; Pavia, Michael J; Personius, Casey L; Polak, Grzegorz L; Beach, Dale L; Cerritos, Heaven L; Horansky, Edward A; Sharif, Karim A; Moran, Ryan; Parrish, Susan; Bickford, Kirsten; Bland, Jennifer; Broussard, Juliana; Campbell, Kerry; Deibel, Katelynn E; Forka, Richard; Lemke, Monika C; Nelson, Marlee B; O'Keeffe, Catherine; Ramey, S Mariel; Schmidt, Luke; Villegas, Paola; Jones, Christopher J; Christ, Stephanie L; Mamari, Sami; Rinaldi, Adam S; Stity, Ghazal; Hark, Amy T; Scheuerman, Mark; Silver Key, S Catherine; McRae, Briana D; Haberman, Adam S; Asinof, Sam; Carrington, Harriette; Drumm, Kelly; Embry, Terrance; McGuire, Richard; Miller-Foreman, Drew; Rosen, Stella; Safa, Nadia; Schultz, Darrin; Segal, Matt; Shevin, Yakov; Svoronos, Petros; Vuong, Tam; Skuse, Gary; Paetkau, Don W; Bridgman, Rachael K; Brown, Charlotte M; Carroll, Alicia R; Gifford, Francesca M; Gillespie, Julie Beth; Herman, Susan E; Holtcamp, Krystal L; Host, Misha A; Hussey, Gabrielle; Kramer, Danielle M; Lawrence, Joan Q; Martin, Madeline M; Niemiec, Ellen N; O'Reilly, Ashleigh P; Pahl, Olivia A; Quintana, Guadalupe; Rettie, Elizabeth A S; Richardson, Torie L; Rodriguez, Arianne E; Rodriguez, Mona O; Schiraldi, Laura; Smith, Joanna J; Sugrue, Kelsey F; Suriano, Lindsey J; Takach, Kaitlyn E; Vasquez, Arielle M; Velez, Ximena; Villafuerte, Elizabeth J; Vives, Laura T; Zellmer, Victoria R; Hauke, Jeanette; Hauser, Charles R; Barker, Karolyn; Cannon, Laurie; Parsamian, Perouza; Parsons, Samantha; Wichman, Zachariah; Bazinet, Christopher W; Johnson, Diana E; Bangura, Abubakarr; Black, Jordan A; Chevee, Victoria; Einsteen, Sarah A; Hilton, Sarah K; Kollmer, Max; Nadendla, Rahul; Stamm, Joyce; Fafara-Thompson, Antoinette E; Gygi, Amber M; Ogawa, Emmy E; Van Camp, Matt; Kocsisova, Zuzana; Leatherman, Judith L; Modahl, Cassie M; Rubin, Michael R; Apiz-Saab, Susana S; Arias-Mejias, Suzette M; Carrion-Ortiz, Carlos F; Claudio-Vazquez, Patricia N; Espada-Green, Debbie M; Feliciano-Camacho, Marium; Gonzalez-Bonilla, Karina M; Taboas-Arroyo, Mariela; Vargas-Franco, Dorianmarie; Montañez-Gonzalez, Raquel; Perez-Otero, Joseph; Rivera-Burgos, Myrielis; Rivera-Rosario, Francisco J; Eisler, Heather L; Alexander, Jackie; Begley, Samatha K; Gabbard, Deana; Allen, Robert J; Aung, Wint Yan; Barshop, William D; Boozalis, Amanda; Chu, Vanessa P; Davis, Jeremy S; Duggal, Ryan N; Franklin, Robert; Gavinski, Katherine; Gebreyesus, Heran; Gong, Henry Z; Greenstein, Rachel A; Guo, Averill D; Hanson, Casey; Homa, Kaitlin E; Hsu, Simon C; Huang, Yi; Huo, Lucy; Jacobs, Sarah; Jia, Sasha; Jung, Kyle L; Wai-Chee Kong, Sarah; Kroll, Matthew R; Lee, Brandon M; Lee, Paul F; Levine, Kevin M; Li, Amy S; Liu, Chengyu; Liu, Max Mian; Lousararian, Adam P; Lowery, Peter B; Mallya, Allyson P; Marcus, Joseph E; Ng, Patrick C; Nguyen, Hien P; Patel, Ruchik; Precht, Hashini; Rastogi, Suchita; Sarezky, Jonathan M; Schefkind, Adam; Schultz, Michael B; Shen, Delia; Skorupa, Tara; Spies, Nicholas C; Stancu, Gabriel; Vivian Tsang, Hiu Man; Turski, Alice L; Venkat, Rohit; Waldman, Leah E; Wang, Kaidi; Wang, Tracy; Wei, Jeffrey W; Wu, Dennis Y; Xiong, David D; Yu, Jack; Zhou, Karen; McNeil, Gerard P; Fernandez, Robert W; Menzies, Patrick Gomez; Gu, Tingting; Buhler, Jeremy; Mardis, Elaine R; Elgin, Sarah C R

    2017-08-07

    The discordance between genome size and the complexity of eukaryotes can partly be attributed to differences in repeat density. The Muller F element (∼5.2 Mb) is the smallest chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster , but it is substantially larger (>18.7 Mb) in D. ananassae To identify the major contributors to the expansion of the F element and to assess their impact, we improved the genome sequence and annotated the genes in a 1.4-Mb region of the D. ananassae F element, and a 1.7-Mb region from the D element for comparison. We find that transposons (particularly LTR and LINE retrotransposons) are major contributors to this expansion (78.6%), while Wolbachia sequences integrated into the D. ananassae genome are minor contributors (0.02%). Both D. melanogaster and D. ananassae F-element genes exhibit distinct characteristics compared to D-element genes ( e.g. , larger coding spans, larger introns, more coding exons, and lower codon bias), but these differences are exaggerated in D. ananassae Compared to D. melanogaster , the codon bias observed in D. ananassae F-element genes can primarily be attributed to mutational biases instead of selection. The 5' ends of F-element genes in both species are enriched in dimethylation of lysine 4 on histone 3 (H3K4me2), while the coding spans are enriched in H3K9me2. Despite differences in repeat density and gene characteristics, D. ananassae F-element genes show a similar range of expression levels compared to genes in euchromatic domains. This study improves our understanding of how transposons can affect genome size and how genes can function within highly repetitive domains. Copyright © 2017 Leung et al.

  14. Retrotransposons Are the Major Contributors to the Expansion of the Drosophila ananassae Muller F Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Leung

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The discordance between genome size and the complexity of eukaryotes can partly be attributed to differences in repeat density. The Muller F element (∼5.2 Mb is the smallest chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster, but it is substantially larger (>18.7 Mb in D. ananassae. To identify the major contributors to the expansion of the F element and to assess their impact, we improved the genome sequence and annotated the genes in a 1.4-Mb region of the D. ananassae F element, and a 1.7-Mb region from the D element for comparison. We find that transposons (particularly LTR and LINE retrotransposons are major contributors to this expansion (78.6%, while Wolbachia sequences integrated into the D. ananassae genome are minor contributors (0.02%. Both D. melanogaster and D. ananassae F-element genes exhibit distinct characteristics compared to D-element genes (e.g., larger coding spans, larger introns, more coding exons, and lower codon bias, but these differences are exaggerated in D. ananassae. Compared to D. melanogaster, the codon bias observed in D. ananassae F-element genes can primarily be attributed to mutational biases instead of selection. The 5′ ends of F-element genes in both species are enriched in dimethylation of lysine 4 on histone 3 (H3K4me2, while the coding spans are enriched in H3K9me2. Despite differences in repeat density and gene characteristics, D. ananassae F-element genes show a similar range of expression levels compared to genes in euchromatic domains. This study improves our understanding of how transposons can affect genome size and how genes can function within highly repetitive domains.

  15. Risk assessment in the European Community (EC); perspective as partial contributor in decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinck, W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is oriented towards the use of nuclear power for electricity production. The subject is discussed under the following headings: preamble; survey of practice and trends in reliability analyses and risk assessment:general (the risk concept; the types of reliability and risk analysis; the present state and trends of a probabilistic approach in safety analysis); risk analysis, partial contributor in the acceptability-problem (the political scene; technological society; cost effectiveness of risk reduction, cost-risk-benefit balancing; risk perception and acceptance; comparison of energy systems); need for and limitations of quantified safety objectives. (U.K.)

  16. Presumed Innocent: The Paradox of 'Coming of Age' and the Problem of Youth Sexuality in Lolita and Thirteen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleur Gabriel

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses a post-structuralist perspective to articulate the conceptual limits of the discourse of 'coming of age' as a means of examining concerns about the representation of young female sexuality in the media. Through analysis of the content and production contexts of the films Lolita (1997 and Thirteen (2003, it argues that the discourse of 'coming of age' is grounded in a contradictory logic that produces conflicting aims: a desire to preserve the innocence of youth and a simultaneous expectation that they 'grow up'. Using techniques of Derridean deconstruction, the paper examines the effects that this logic produces in terms of how key aspects of 'coming of age' contradict what the discourse sets out to determine and how this contributes to perceptions of youth sexuality as problematic. It will be shown that these conceptual contradictions remain unseen in attempts to make sense of the controversial aspects of the two films: the issue of pedophilia in Lolita and the problem of teenage rebellion in Thirteen. Importantly, the deconstructive reading suggests that it is the paradoxical underpinnings of this approach to youth identity that enables the discourse to be thought at all. By working to recognise this, it is possible to move beyond the limits of the discourse and think differently about youth in response to the perceived threat posed to young people by media representations of adolescent sex and sexuality.

  17. Systematic and Open Identification of Researchers and Authors: Focus on Open Researcher and Contributor ID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akazhanov, Nurbek A.; Voronov, Alexander A.; Kitas, George D.

    2014-01-01

    Unique identifiers of researchers and authors can help all stakeholders of scientific communications improve their workflows. There have been several attempts to establish professional networks of scholars and list their scholarly achievements on digital platforms. Some of these platforms such as Google Scholar, Web of Knowledge and PubMed are searched to pick relevant peer reviewers, assess authors' publication history or choose suitable candidates for research and academic projects. However, each of these hubs has its specific applications, limiting the universal use for permanent tagging of researcher profiles. The Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID) initiative, launched in 2012, is aimed at registering scholarly contributors and averting the persistent ambiguity of recorded author names. The ORCID registry is growing fast and integrating with other ID-generating platforms, thereby increasing the functionality of the integrated systems. ORCID identifiers are increasingly used for selecting peer reviewers and acknowledging various scholarly contributions (e.g., published articles, reviewer comments, conference presentations). The initiative offers unique opportunities for transparent disclosures of author contributions and competing interests and improving ethical standards of research, editing, and publishing. PMID:25408574

  18. CosmoQuest: Building a Community of Skilled Citizen Science Contributors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, P.; Lehan, C.; Bracey, G.; Durrell, P.; Komatsu, T.; Yamani, A.; Francis, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    The CosmoQuest Virtual Research Facility invites the public to participate in NASA Science Mission Directorate related research that leads to publishable results and data catalogues. CosmoQuest projects range in difficulty from simple crater and transient marking tasks to more complicated mapping tasks. To successfully engage contributors in creating usable results, training and validation are required. This is accomplished through activities that are designed to mirror the experiences students would have in a university, and include mentoring by team scientists, feedback on contributor efforts, seminars to learn about new science, and even formal classes to provide needed background. Recruitment is accomplished using new and social media, and planetarium and Science on the Sphere™ trailers and shows, and community is built through online and real-world collaboration spaces and events. In this presentation, we detail CosmoQuest's four-pronged approach of media recruitment, science education, citizen science, and community collaboration. We also discuss how it is leveraged to create a skilled collaboration of citizen scientists. Training and data validation activities will be be emphasized, with examples of both what can go right and lessons learned from when things go wrong. We conclude with strategies on how to utilize best practices in user interface design to create virtual experiences that allow major citizen science efforts to be scalable to large audiences.

  19. Topology and parameter data of thirteen non-natural amino acids for molecular simulations with CHARMM22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olujide O. Olubiyi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we provide a data package containing the topology files and parameters compatible with the CHARMM22 force field for thirteen non-natural amino acids. The force field parameters were derived based on quantum mechanical (QM calculations involving geometry optimization and potential energy surface scanning at the HF 6-31G(d and HF 6-311G(d,p levels of theory. The resulting energy data points were fitted to mathematical functions representing each component of the CHARMM22 force field. Further fine-tuning of the parameters utilized molecular mechanics energies, which were iteratively calculated and compared to the corresponding QM values until the latter were satisfactorily reproduced. The final force field data were validated with molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent conditions.

  20. A shock-layer theory based on thirteen-moment equations and DSMC calculations of rarefied hypersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, H. K.; Wong, Eric Y.; Dogra, V. K.

    1991-01-01

    Grad's thirteen-moment equations are applied to the flow behind a bow shock under the formalism of a thin shock layer. Comparison of this version of the theory with Direct Simulation Monte Carlo calculations of flows about a flat plate at finite attack angle has lent support to the approach as a useful extension of the continuum model for studying translational nonequilibrium in the shock layer. This paper reassesses the physical basis and limitations of the development with additional calculations and comparisons. The streamline correlation principle, which allows transformation of the 13-moment based system to one based on the Navier-Stokes equations, is extended to a three-dimensional formulation. The development yields a strip theory for planar lifting surfaces at finite incidences. Examples reveal that the lift-to-drag ratio is little influenced by planform geometry and varies with altitudes according to a 'bridging function' determined by correlated two-dimensional calculations.

  1. Inequalities in Open Source Software Development: Analysis of Contributor's Commits in Apache Software Foundation Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chełkowski, Tadeusz; Gloor, Peter; Jemielniak, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    While researchers are becoming increasingly interested in studying OSS phenomenon, there is still a small number of studies analyzing larger samples of projects investigating the structure of activities among OSS developers. The significant amount of information that has been gathered in the publicly available open-source software repositories and mailing-list archives offers an opportunity to analyze projects structures and participant involvement. In this article, using on commits data from 263 Apache projects repositories (nearly all), we show that although OSS development is often described as collaborative, but it in fact predominantly relies on radically solitary input and individual, non-collaborative contributions. We also show, in the first published study of this magnitude, that the engagement of contributors is based on a power-law distribution.

  2. Quantification of megastigmatrienone, a potential contributor to tobacco aroma in spirits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaghenaufi, Davide; Perello, Marie-Claire; Marchand, Stéphanie; de Revel, Gilles

    2016-07-15

    A SPME-GC-MS method was adapted and validated in order to quantify 5 megastigmatrienones and related odorous compounds from oak wood: guaiacol, cis-whisky lactone, trans-whisky lactone, γ-nonalactone, eugenol, vanillin, and acetovanillone in a single run. The five megastigmatrienone isomers (tabanones) were quantified, for the first time, in Cognac, Armagnac and rum, as contributors to tobacco-like aromas. Spirits aged in oak barrels contain higher amounts, but megastigmatrienones are also present in freshly-distilled spirits. Statistical analysis revealed that freshly-distilled and barrel-aged spirits were differentiated by their megastigma-4,7E,9-trien-3-one levels. The Armagnac and Cognac samples were distinguished by their concentrations of the megastigma-4,6Z,8E-trien-3-one isomer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Beyond fast food and slow motion: weighty contributors to the obesity epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizza, G; Rother, K I

    2012-02-01

    Decreased physical activity and marketing-driven increased consumption of "junk" food, dubbed "The Big Two", are generally regarded as the most important contributors to the obesity epidemic. However, the full picture contains many more pieces of the puzzle. We address several additional issues and review current clinical developments in obesity research. In spite of dramatic advancements in our understanding of the adipose organ and its endocrine and immune products, the ultimate causes of the obesity epidemic remain elusive. Treatment is plagued by poor adherence to life style modifications, and available pharmacological options are marginally effective, often also associated with major side effects. Surgical treatments, albeit effective in decreasing body weight, are invasive and expensive. Thus, our approaches to finding the causes, improving the existing treatments, and inventing novel therapies must be manifold.

  4. Enhanced natural radiation exposure enhanced by human activity: the largest contributor to the Chinese population dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Ziqiang; Liu Yanyang

    2011-01-01

    For the radiation exposure caused by human activities, the enhanced natural radiation exposure is the largest contributor to Chinese population dose. This problem has attracted social attention in recent years. Efforts have been made in several fields, such as radon indoors and in workplace, environmental problems associated with NORMs, occupational radiation hazards of non-uranium mine, and radiation dose evaluation for energy chain, but there are still many problems to be solved. In order to protect the health of workers and the public, while ensuring industrial production and economic development, it is also necessary to continue to strengthen research in all aspects above mentioned, and gradually promote the control of natural radiation exposure enhanced by human activities. (authors)

  5. Beyond fast food and slow motion: Weighty contributors to the obesity epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizza, G.; Rother, K.I.

    2012-01-01

    Decreased physical activity and marketing-driven increased consumption of “junk” food, dubbed “The Big Two”, are generally regarded as the most important contributors to the obesity epidemic. However, the full picture contains many more pieces of the puzzle. We address several additional issues and review current clinical developments in obesity research. In spite of dramatic advancements in our understanding of the adipose organ and its endocrine and immune products, the ultimate causes of the obesity epidemic remain elusive. Treatment is plagued by poor adherence to life style modifications, and available pharmacological options are marginally effective, often also associated with major side effects. Surgical treatments, albeit effective in decreasing body weight, are invasive and expensive. Thus, our approaches to finding the causes, improving the existing treatments, and inventing novel therapies must be manifold. PMID:22183119

  6. An Evaluation of Industry Relationships Among Contributors to AAOS Clinical Practice Guidelines and Appropriate Use Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checketts, Jake X; Cook, Courtney; Vassar, Matt

    2018-01-17

    A long-standing relationship between orthopaedic surgeons and industry has made financial conflicts of interest a concerning issue. Research supports that financial conflicts of interest can influence both medical research and clinical practice. Financial conflicts of interest may also influence clinical practice guideline recommendations and their corresponding appropriate use criteria. Because of the influential nature of these guidelines, it is imperative that care be taken to minimize bias during guideline development. We retrieved clinical practice guidelines and their corresponding appropriate use criteria from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery that were published or revised between 2013 and 2016. We extracted industry payments received by physicians using the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Open Payments database. We then evaluated the value and types of these payments. We also used these data to determine whether disclosure statements were accurate and whether guideline development was in adherence with the Institute of Medicine's (IOM's) standards. Of the 106 physicians that were evaluated, 85 (80%) received at least 1 industry payment, 56 (53%) accepted >$1,000, and 35 (33%) accepted >$10,000. Financial payments amounted to a mean of $93,512 per physician. Total reimbursement for the 85 clinical practice guideline and appropriate use criteria contributors was $9,912,309. We found that disclosure statements disagreed with the Open Payments data and that the IOM standards were not completely enforced. Clinical practice guideline and appropriate use criteria contributors received substantial payments from industry, many disclosure statements were inaccurate, and the IOM standards were not completely met. Clinical practice guidelines and appropriate use criteria are critical for practicing evidence-based medicine. If financial conflicts of interest are present during their development, it is possible that patient care may be compromised.

  7. Lightning-triggered electroporation and electrofusion as possible contributors to natural horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotnik, Tadej

    2013-09-01

    Phylogenetic studies show that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a significant contributor to genetic variability of prokaryotes, and was perhaps even more abundant during the early evolution. Hitherto, research of natural HGT has mainly focused on three mechanisms of DNA transfer: conjugation, natural competence, and viral transduction. This paper discusses the feasibility of a fourth such mechanism--cell electroporation and/or electrofusion triggered by atmospheric electrostatic discharges (lightnings). A description of electroporation as a phenomenon is followed by a review of experimental evidence that electroporation of prokaryotes in aqueous environments can result in release of non-denatured DNA, as well as uptake of DNA from the surroundings and transformation. Similarly, a description of electrofusion is followed by a review of experiments showing that prokaryotes devoid of cell wall can electrofuse into hybrids expressing the genes of their both precursors. Under sufficiently fine-tuned conditions, electroporation and electrofusion are efficient tools for artificial transformation and hybridization, respectively, but the quantitative analysis developed here shows that conditions for electroporation-based DNA release, DNA uptake and transformation, as well as for electrofusion are also present in many natural aqueous environments exposed to lightnings. Electroporation is thus a plausible contributor to natural HGT among prokaryotes, and could have been particularly important during the early evolution, when the other mechanisms might have been scarcer or nonexistent. In modern prokaryotes, natural absence of the cell wall is rare, but it is reasonable to assume that the wall has formed during a certain stage of evolution, and at least prior to this, electrofusion could also have contributed to natural HGT. The concluding section outlines several guidelines for assessment of the feasibility of lightning-triggered HGT. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  8. Room number thirteen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos López Narváez

    1960-10-01

    Full Text Available Aquella hermosa y recia fábrica monumental de la Universidad de Virginia cuenta entre sus muchos timbres de nobleza y gloria el de haber sido madre espiritual -alma mater, como se dice académicamente- de un extraño estudiante cuyas huellas y reliquias s e conservan allí, en el aposento que ocupara, no sabría decir si como trofeo o como estigma; si para e moción o para mera curiosidad de visitante s y turistas que asomen a conocer las historiadas aulas universitarias fundadas, organizadas y a prestigiadas por Thomas Jefferson.

  9. Oceanic Tidal Mixing As a Contributor to Milankovitch-scale Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Walter; Bills, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    We propose that changes in the magnitude of oceanic tidal mixing on long time scales is an important, but previously unrecognized, contributor to global climate change. it is well known that Earth's orbital and rotational state changes significantly on 10(exp 4)-10(exp 5) year time scales, and that this influences the spatial and temporal pattern of incident radiation. It is widely supposed that climatic variations on these same time scales are, in large part, a response of the ocean-atmosphere-cryosphere system to this radiative forcing. Our proposal is that variations in the luni-solar tidal potential, induced by these same orbital and rotational variations, influences oceanic mixing and thus modulates meridional heat transport, by amounts which are competitive with the radiative forcing. There are some obvious differences between tidal potential and insolation. First is that the Sun and Moon both contribute to tides, whereas the radiation is entirely of solar origin. Second is that the Earth is transparent to gravity but opaque to radiation. Clipping associated with this opacity makes the radiation pattern temporal spectrum rather more complex than the tidal spectrum. A third point is that solar radiation directly delivers energy to Earth's surface whereas tidal mixing will only expedite lateral transport of heat in association with oceanic thermohaline circulation. The diurnal average insolation pattern is best parameterized via a Fourier series in time of year and Legendre polynomials in sine of latitude. Our present focus will be on the annual average terms. The Legendre degree n=0 term describes the global average insolation, and is nearly constant. The degree n=l term describes differences between northern and southern hemispheres, and the annual mean is zero. The degree n=2 term is the main contributor to the equator to pole variations, and varies with obliquity and orbital eccentricity, with the obliquity variation dominating. The lowest order

  10. Mental models and language registers in the psychoanalysis of psychosis: an overview of a thirteen-year analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Riccardo

    2003-08-01

    The author suggests that the use of mental models and language registers may help an analysis to proceed, especially in psychosis, when the patient has not yet developed a mental space that will allow him/her the functions of knowledge and containment of emotions. Models, according to Bion, are a primitive approach to abstraction and a manifestation of the analyst's reverie that enables him/her to transform sense data into alpha-elements. Ferrari, in a further development of Bion's theories, hypothesises a relationship between the transference and the internal level of body-mind communication, and proposes the use of language registers to sustain the psychoanalytic process. The author presents several clinical examples from a thirteen-year, four-session-a-week analysis of a psychotic analysand who was initially confused, paranoid and altogether unable to bring self-reflective thought to bear on her overwhelming emotions and had, by the end of the analysis, completely recovered from her psychotic symptoms. The clinical material shows how the technical tools of mental models and language registers helped in the construction of a mental space and spatio-temporal parameters, permitting the patient to tolerate overwhelming concrete emotions and finally to recognise and work through the emotions of an intense transference.

  11. A study of the impact of thirteen celebrity suicides on subsequent suicide rates in South Korea from 2005 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, King-wa; Chan, C H

    2013-01-01

    A number of ecological studies have found a pattern of increasing suicide rates after suicides of several Asian entertainment celebrities. However, the finding may be subject to positive outcome bias where cases with no perceived impact may be routinely excluded. In this study, we deploy interrupted time-series analysis using ARIMA transfer function models to investigate systematically the impact of thirteen celebrity suicides on subsequent suicide rates in South Korea. We find that three out of eleven cases were found to be followed by a significant increase in suicide rate, while controlling for seasonality, secular trends, and unemployment rates. Such significant increases could last for nine weeks. Non-significance cases may be attributable to the small amount of media coverage, the "displacement" effect of preceding case, and the negative connotation of celebrity deaths. We therefore conclude that whether or not the impacts were detected may be largely conditioned by various contextual factors. Current evidence based on ecological studies is insufficient to draw a firm conclusion. Further studies using multiple approaches should be developed.

  12. Substrate-specific changes in mitochondrial respiration in skeletal and cardiac muscle of hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jason C L; Staples, James F

    2014-04-01

    During torpor, the metabolic rate (MR) of thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) is considerably lower relative to euthermia, resulting in part from temperature-independent mitochondrial metabolic suppression in liver and skeletal muscle, which together account for ~40% of basal MR. Although heart accounts for very little (respiration rates were decreased up to 60% during torpor in both subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IM) mitochondria from cardiac muscle. We further demonstrated pronounced seasonal (summer vs. winter [i.e., interbout] euthermia) changes in respiration rates in both mitochondrial subpopulations in this tissue, consistent with a shift in fuel use away from carbohydrates and proteins and towards fatty acids and ketones. By contrast, these seasonal changes in respiration rates were not observed in either SS or IM mitochondria isolated from hind limb skeletal muscle. Both populations of skeletal muscle mitochondria, however, did exhibit metabolic suppression during torpor, and this suppression was 2- to 3-fold greater in IM mitochondria, which provide ATP for Ca(2+)- and myosin ATPases, the activities of which are likely quite low in skeletal muscle during torpor because animals are immobile. Finally, these changes in mitochondrial respiration rates were still evident when standardized to citrate synthase activity rather than to total mitochondrial protein.

  13. Up-regulation of Long Non-coding RNA TUG1 in Hibernating Thirteen-lined Ground Squirrels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques J. Frigault

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian hibernation is associated with multiple physiological, biochemical, and molecular changes that allow animals to endure colder temperatures. We hypothesize that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, a group of non-coding transcripts with diverse functions, are differentially expressed during hibernation. In this study, expression levels of lncRNAs H19 and TUG1 were assessed via qRT-PCR in liver, heart, and skeletal muscle tissues of the hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus. TUG1 transcript levels were significantly elevated 1.94-fold in skeletal muscle of hibernating animals when compared with euthermic animals. Furthermore, transcript levels of HSF2 also increased 2.44-fold in the skeletal muscle in hibernating animals. HSF2 encodes a transcription factor that can be negatively regulated by TUG1 levels and that influences heat shock protein expression. Thus, these observations support the differential expression of the TUG1–HSF2 axis during hibernation. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence for differential expression of lncRNAs in torpid ground squirrels, adding lncRNAs as another group of transcripts modulated in this mammalian species during hibernation.

  14. Up-regulation of Long Non-coding RNA TUG1 in Hibernating Thirteen-lined Ground Squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigault, Jacques J; Lang-Ouellette, Daneck; Morin, Pier

    2016-04-01

    Mammalian hibernation is associated with multiple physiological, biochemical, and molecular changes that allow animals to endure colder temperatures. We hypothesize that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), a group of non-coding transcripts with diverse functions, are differentially expressed during hibernation. In this study, expression levels of lncRNAsH19 and TUG1 were assessed via qRT-PCR in liver, heart, and skeletal muscle tissues of the hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus). TUG1 transcript levels were significantly elevated 1.94-fold in skeletal muscle of hibernating animals when compared with euthermic animals. Furthermore, transcript levels of HSF2 also increased 2.44-fold in the skeletal muscle in hibernating animals. HSF2 encodes a transcription factor that can be negatively regulated by TUG1 levels and that influences heat shock protein expression. Thus, these observations support the differential expression of the TUG1-HSF2 axis during hibernation. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence for differential expression of lncRNAs in torpid ground squirrels, adding lncRNAs as another group of transcripts modulated in this mammalian species during hibernation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Dietary contributors to glycemic load in the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikany, James M.; Judd, Suzanne E.; Letter, Abraham J.; Ard, Jamy D.; Newby, P. K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective High dietary glycemic load (GL) has been associated with an increased risk of chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, and selected cancers. We sought to identify the main food and food group contributors to dietary GL in a representative sample of US adults to inform future interventions. Methods Participants were from the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study, a longitudinal cohort of 30,239 community-dwelling black and white women and men age ≥45 years across the US. Diet was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. The amount of each carbohydrate food, and its glycemic index, were used to calculate GL values for each carbohydrate food reported. These were totaled to estimate the mean total daily GL for each participant. Individual carbohydrate foods also were collapsed into 18 carbohydrate food groups, and the portion of the total GL contributed by each carbohydrate food and food group was determined. Analyses were conducted overall, by race/sex groups, and by region. Results Sweetened beverages were the main contributors to GL overall (12.14 median % of daily GL), by far the largest contributors in black men (17.79 median %) and black women (16.43 median %), and major contributors in white men (12.02 median %) and white women (11.22 median %). Other important contributors to GL overall and in all race/sex groups and regions included breads, starchy side dishes, and cereals. Conclusions In this US cohort of white and black adults, sweetened beverages were major contributors to GL overall, and especially in black participants. This information may help to inform future interventions targeting reduction in dietary GL. PMID:25837217

  16. In vitro bioassays reveal that additives are significant contributors to the toxicity of commercial household pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Merwe, Jason P; Neale, Peta A; Melvin, Steven D; Leusch, Frederic D L

    2018-03-28

    Pesticides commonly used around households can contain additives of unknown concentrations and toxicity. Given the likelihood of these chemicals washing into urban waterways, it is important to understand the effects that these additives may have on aquatic organisms. The aim of this study was to compare the toxicity of commercially available household pesticides to that of the active ingredient(s) alone. The toxicity of five household pesticides (three herbicides and two insecticides) was investigated using a bacterial cytotoxicity bioassay and an algal photosynthesis bioassay. The commercial products were up to an order of magnitude more toxic than the active ingredient(s) alone. In addition, two commercial products with the same listed active ingredients in the same ratio had a 600× difference in potency. These results clearly demonstrate that additives in commercial formulations are significant contributors to the toxicity of household pesticides. The toxicity of pesticides in aquatic systems is therefore likely underestimated by conventional chemical monitoring and risk assessment when only the active ingredients are considered. Regulators and customers should require more clarity from pesticide manufacturers about the nature and concentrations of not only the active ingredients, but also additives used in commercial formulations. In addition, monitoring programmes and chemical risk assessments schemes should develop a structured approach to assessing the toxic effects of commercial formulations, including additives, rather than simply those of the listed active ingredients. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Association of NOS3 gene variants and clinical contributors of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmanić Šamija, R. [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Primorac, D. [School of Medicine Split, University of Split, Split (Croatia); Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Osijek, Osijek (Croatia); Eberly College of Science, Penn State University, University Park, PA (United States); St. Catherine Speciality Hospital, Zabok (Croatia); Rešić, B. [School of Medicine Split, University of Split, Split (Croatia); Pavlov, V. [Department of Neonatology, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Čapkun, V. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Punda, H. [School of Medicine Split, University of Split, Split (Croatia); Lozić, B. [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Zemunik, T. [Department of Medical Biology, School of Medicine Split, University of Split, Split (Croatia)

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association of different clinical contributors of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy with NOS3 gene polymorphisms. A total of 110 children with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and 128 control children were selected for this study. Association of gender, gestational age, birth weight, Apgar score, cranial ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings with genotypic data of six haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms and the most commonly investigated rs1800779 and rs2070744 polymorphisms was analyzed. The TGT haplotype of rs1800783, rs1800779, and rs2070744 polymorphisms was associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Children with the TGT haplotype were infants below 32 weeks of gestation and they had the most severe brain damage. Increased incidence of the TT genotype of the NOS3 rs1808593 SNP was found in the group of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy patients with medium and severe brain damage. The probability of brain damage was twice as high in children with the TT genotype than in children with the TG genotype of the same polymorphism. Furthermore, the T allele of the same polymorphism was twice as frequent in children with lower Apgar scores. This study strongly suggests associations of NOS3 gene polymorphism with intensity of brain damage and severity of the clinical picture in affected children.

  18. The personal and contextual contributors to school belongingness among primary school students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila Vaz

    Full Text Available School belongingness has gained currency among educators and school health professionals as an important determinant of adolescent health. The current cross-sectional study presents the 15 most significant personal and contextual factors that collectively explain 66.4% (two-thirds of the variability in 12-year old students' perceptions of belongingness in primary school. The study is part of a larger longitudinal study investigating the factors associated with student adjustment in the transition from primary to secondary school. The study found that girls and students with disabilities had higher school belongingness scores than boys, and their typically developing counterparts respectively; and explained 2.5% of the variability in school belongingness. The majority (47.1% out of 66.4% of the variability in school belongingness was explained by student personal factors, such as social acceptance, physical appearance competence, coping skills, and social affiliation motivation; followed by parental expectations (3% out of 66.4%, and school-based factors (13.9% out of 66.4% such as, classroom involvement, task-goal structure, autonomy provision, cultural pluralism, and absence of bullying. Each of the identified contributors of primary school belongingness can be shaped through interventions, system changes, or policy reforms.

  19. Impact Analysis of Economic Contributors on Knowledge Creation Activity by Using the Symmetric Decomposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyunam Kim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, several studies using various methods for analysis have tried to evaluate factors affecting knowledge creation activity, but few analyses quantitatively account for the impact that economic determinants have on them. This paper introduces a non-parametric method to structurally analyze changes in information and communication technology (ICT patenting trends as representative outcomes of knowledge creation activity with economic indicators. For this, the authors established a symmetric model that enables several economic contributors to be decomposed through the perspective of ICTs’ research and development (R&D performance, industrial change, and overall manufacturing growth. Additionally, an empirical analysis of some countries from 2001 to 2009 was conducted through this model. This paper found that all countries except the United States experienced an increase of 10.5–267.4% in ICT patent applications, despite fluctuations in the time series. It is interesting that the changes in ICT patenting of each country generally have a negative relationship with the intensity of each country’s patent protection system. Positive determinants include ICT R&D productivity and overall manufacturing growth, while ICT industrial change is a negative determinant in almost all countries. This paper emphasizes that each country needs to design strategic plans for effective ICT innovation. In particular, ICT innovation activities need to be promoted by increasing ICT R&D investment and developing the ICT industry, since ICT R&D intensity and ICT industrial change generally have a low contribution to ICT patenting.

  20. Periodontal disease and subgingival microbiota as contributors for rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis: modifiable risk factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Jose U; Bretz, Walter A; Abramson, Steven B

    2014-07-01

    Since the early 1900s, the role of periodontal disease in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis has been a matter of intense research. The last decade has witnessed many advances supporting a link between periodontitis, the presence of specific bacterial species (i.e. Porphyromonas gingivalis) and their effects in immune response. This review will examine available evidence on the individuals. Epidemiological studies have stressed the commonalities shared by periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Many groups have focused their attention toward understanding the periodontal microbiota and its alterations in states of health and disease. The presence of circulating antibodies against periodontopathic bacteria and associated inflammatory response has been found in both rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and individuals at-risk for disease development. Most recently, the periodontal microbiota of smokers and patients with RA has been elucidated, revealing profound changes in the bacterial communities compared with those of healthy controls. This has led to several small clinical trials of progressive disease treatment as adjuvant for disease-modifying therapy in RA. Smoking and periodontal disease are emerging risk factors for the development of RA. Epidemiological, clinical, and basic research has further strengthened this association, pointing toward changes in the oral microbiota as possible contributors to systemic inflammation and arthritis.

  1. Retrosplenial cortical thinning as a possible major contributor for cognitive impairment in HIV patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Na-Young; Hong, Jinwoo; Yoon, Uicheul; Choi, Jun Yong; Lee, Seung-Koo; Lim, Soo Mee

    2017-01-01

    To identify brain cortical regions relevant to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) in HIV patients. HIV patients with HAND (n = 10), those with intact cognition (HIV-IC; n = 12), and age-matched, seronegative controls (n = 11) were recruited. All participants were male and underwent 3-dimensional T1-weighted imaging. Both vertex-wise and region of interest (ROI) analyses were performed to analyse cortical thickness. Compared to controls, both HIV-IC and HAND showed decreased cortical thickness mainly in the bilateral primary sensorimotor areas, extending to the prefrontal and parietal cortices. When directly comparing HIV-IC and HAND, HAND showed cortical thinning in the left retrosplenial cortex, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, left inferior parietal lobule, bilateral superior medial prefrontal cortices, right temporoparietal junction and left hippocampus, and cortical thickening in the left middle occipital cortex. Left retrosplenial cortical thinning showed significant correlation with slower information processing, declined verbal memory and executive function, and impaired fine motor skills. This study supports previous research suggesting the selective vulnerability of the primary sensorimotor cortices and associations between cortical thinning in the prefrontal and parietal cortices and cognitive impairment in HIV-infected patients. Furthermore, for the first time, we propose retrosplenial cortical thinning as a possible major contributor to HIV-associated cognitive impairment. (orig.)

  2. The personal and contextual contributors to school belongingness among primary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Sharmila; Falkmer, Marita; Ciccarelli, Marina; Passmore, Anne; Parsons, Richard; Tan, Tele; Falkmer, Torbjorn

    2015-01-01

    School belongingness has gained currency among educators and school health professionals as an important determinant of adolescent health. The current cross-sectional study presents the 15 most significant personal and contextual factors that collectively explain 66.4% (two-thirds) of the variability in 12-year old students' perceptions of belongingness in primary school. The study is part of a larger longitudinal study investigating the factors associated with student adjustment in the transition from primary to secondary school. The study found that girls and students with disabilities had higher school belongingness scores than boys, and their typically developing counterparts respectively; and explained 2.5% of the variability in school belongingness. The majority (47.1% out of 66.4%) of the variability in school belongingness was explained by student personal factors, such as social acceptance, physical appearance competence, coping skills, and social affiliation motivation; followed by parental expectations (3% out of 66.4%), and school-based factors (13.9% out of 66.4%) such as, classroom involvement, task-goal structure, autonomy provision, cultural pluralism, and absence of bullying. Each of the identified contributors of primary school belongingness can be shaped through interventions, system changes, or policy reforms.

  3. Issues regarding Risk Effect Analysis of Digitalized Safety Systems and Main Risk Contributors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hyun Gook; Jang, Seung-Cheol

    2008-01-01

    Risk factors of safety-critical digital systems affect overall plant risk. In order to assess this risk effect, a risk model of a digitalized safety system is required. This article aims to provide an overview of the issues when developing a risk model and demonstrate their effect on plant risk quantitatively. Research activities in Korea for addressing these various issues, such as the software failure probability and the fault coverage of self monitoring mechanism are also described. The main risk contributors related to the digitalized safety system were determined in a quantitative manner. Reactor protection system and engineered safety feature component control system designed as part of the Korean Nuclear I and C System project are used as example systems. Fault-tree models were developed to assess the failure probability of a system function which is designed to generate an automated signal for actuating both of the reactor trip and the complicated accident-mitigation actions. The developed fault trees were combined with a plant risk model to evaluate the effect of a digitalized system's failure on the plant risk. (authors)

  4. Association of NOS3 gene variants and clinical contributors of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmanić Šamija, R.; Primorac, D.; Rešić, B.; Pavlov, V.; Čapkun, V.; Punda, H.; Lozić, B.; Zemunik, T.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association of different clinical contributors of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy with NOS3 gene polymorphisms. A total of 110 children with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and 128 control children were selected for this study. Association of gender, gestational age, birth weight, Apgar score, cranial ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings with genotypic data of six haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms and the most commonly investigated rs1800779 and rs2070744 polymorphisms was analyzed. The TGT haplotype of rs1800783, rs1800779, and rs2070744 polymorphisms was associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Children with the TGT haplotype were infants below 32 weeks of gestation and they had the most severe brain damage. Increased incidence of the TT genotype of the NOS3 rs1808593 SNP was found in the group of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy patients with medium and severe brain damage. The probability of brain damage was twice as high in children with the TT genotype than in children with the TG genotype of the same polymorphism. Furthermore, the T allele of the same polymorphism was twice as frequent in children with lower Apgar scores. This study strongly suggests associations of NOS3 gene polymorphism with intensity of brain damage and severity of the clinical picture in affected children

  5. Translational control is a major contributor to hypoxia induced gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beucken, Twan van den; Magagnin, Michael G.; Jutten, Barry; Seigneuric, Renaud; Lambin, Philippe; Koritzinsky, Marianne; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors that is associated with an aggressive phenotype, resistance to therapy and poor prognosis. Major contributors to these adverse effects are the transcriptional program activated by the HIF family of transcription factors as well as the translational response mediated by PERK-dependent phosphorylation of eIF2α and inhibition of mTORC1 activity. In this study we determined the relative contribution of both transcriptional and translational responses to changes in hypoxia induced gene expression. Material and methods: Total and efficiently translated (polysomal) mRNA was isolated from DU145 prostate carcinoma cells that were exposed for up to 24 h of hypoxia ( 2 ). Changes in transcription and translation were assessed using affymetrix microarray technology. Results: Our data reveal an unexpectedly large contribution of translation control on both induced and repressed gene expression at all hypoxic time points, particularly during acute hypoxia (2-4 h). Gene ontology analysis revealed that gene classes like transcription and signal transduction are stimulated by translational control whereas expression of genes involved in cell growth and protein metabolism are repressed during hypoxic conditions by translational control. Conclusions: Our data indicate that translation influences gene expression during hypoxia on a scale comparable to that of transcription.

  6. Psoriasis strikes back! Epicardial adipose tissue: another contributor to the higher cardiovascular risk in psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo, Inês; Torres, Tiago

    2015-10-01

    For many years psoriasis was considered an inflammatory condition restricted to the skin. However, nowadays it is considered an immune-mediated, systemic inflammatory condition associated with numerous medical comorbidities, particularly cardiometabolic diseases, and overall cardiovascular mortality. Several studies have suggested that psoriasis may be an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis, indicating that psoriasis itself poses an intrinsic risk for cardiovascular disease, probably due to the disease's inflammatory burden. However, other causes beyond systemic inflammation and traditional cardiovascular risk factors may be implicated in cardiovascular disease in psoriasis. Recently, epicardial adipose tissue, an emerging cardiovascular risk factor, has been shown to be increased in psoriasis patients and to be associated with subclinical atherosclerosis, providing another possible link between psoriasis and atherosclerosis. The reason for the increase in epicardial adipose tissue in patients with psoriasis is unknown, but it is probably multifactorial, with genetic, immune-mediated and behavioral factors having a role. Thus, along with the increased prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors and systemic inflammation in psoriasis, epicardial adipose tissue is probably another important contributor to the higher cardiovascular risk observed in psoriasis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Kinematic analysis of hip and knee rotation and other contributors to ballet turnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanbeck, Amy E; Russell, Jeffrey A; Handley, Sara C; Quanbeck, Deborah S

    2017-02-01

    Turnout, or external rotation (ER) of the lower extremities, is essential in ballet. The purpose of this study was to utilise physical examination and a biomechanical method for obtaining functional kinematic data using hip and knee joint centres to identify the relative turnout contributions from hip rotation, femoral anteversion, knee rotation, tibial torsion, and other sources. Ten female dancers received a lower extremity alignment assessment, including passive hip rotation, femoral anteversion, tibial torsion, weightbearing foot alignment, and Beighton hypermobility score. Next, turnout was assessed using plantar pressure plots and three-dimensional motion analysis; participants performed turnout to ballet first position on both a plantar pressure mat and friction-reducing discs. A retro-reflective functional marker motion capture system mapped the lower extremities and hip and knee joint centres. Mean total turnout was 129±15.7° via plantar pressure plots and 135±17.8° via kinematics. Bilateral hip ER during turnout was 49±10.2° (36% of total turnout). Bilateral knee ER during turnout was 41±5.9° (32% of total turnout). Hip ER contribution to total turnout measured kinematically was less than expected compared to other studies, where hip ER was determined without functional kinematic data. Knee ER contributed substantially more turnout than expected or previously reported. This analysis method allows precise assessment of turnout contributors.

  8. Retrosplenial cortical thinning as a possible major contributor for cognitive impairment in HIV patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Na-Young [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jinwoo; Yoon, Uicheul [Catholic University of Daegu, Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Health and Medical Science, Gyeongsan-si, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jun Yong [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and AIDS Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung-Koo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Soo Mee [Ewha Womans University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    To identify brain cortical regions relevant to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) in HIV patients. HIV patients with HAND (n = 10), those with intact cognition (HIV-IC; n = 12), and age-matched, seronegative controls (n = 11) were recruited. All participants were male and underwent 3-dimensional T1-weighted imaging. Both vertex-wise and region of interest (ROI) analyses were performed to analyse cortical thickness. Compared to controls, both HIV-IC and HAND showed decreased cortical thickness mainly in the bilateral primary sensorimotor areas, extending to the prefrontal and parietal cortices. When directly comparing HIV-IC and HAND, HAND showed cortical thinning in the left retrosplenial cortex, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, left inferior parietal lobule, bilateral superior medial prefrontal cortices, right temporoparietal junction and left hippocampus, and cortical thickening in the left middle occipital cortex. Left retrosplenial cortical thinning showed significant correlation with slower information processing, declined verbal memory and executive function, and impaired fine motor skills. This study supports previous research suggesting the selective vulnerability of the primary sensorimotor cortices and associations between cortical thinning in the prefrontal and parietal cortices and cognitive impairment in HIV-infected patients. Furthermore, for the first time, we propose retrosplenial cortical thinning as a possible major contributor to HIV-associated cognitive impairment. (orig.)

  9. A computer model to determine the primary contributors to relative radiation dose received by astronauts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazareth, O.W.; Divadeenam, M.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R. (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Department of Nuclear Energy, Upton, New York (USA))

    1991-01-10

    This paper describes a computer model which was used to determine the relative radiation dose of protons of different energies. In the future, the model will be extended to calculate the dosage received by an astronaut during a specific mission to Mars, and within a spacecraft with specific materials and with a specific geometry. The framework for the calculations centered on the computer program HETC, a Monte Carlo transport code for computing the properties of high energy nucleon-meson cascades in matter. It is valid up to several hundred GeV. It was found that protons in the energy range from 50 to 200 MeV are the largest contributor to the radiation dose to a human inside an Al structure 1 cm thick. Other studies have predicted a dose-equivalent of several Sv (several hundred rem) to each crew member during the voyage. LD{sub 50} is the amount of radiation required to produce death in 50% of the organisms within 30 days. Since LD{sub 50} is 4.5 Sv (450 rem) for people, several Sv is a relatively high value.

  10. Ischemic tissue injury and progenitor cell tropism: significant contributors to the pathogenesis of pterygium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Woo; Ha, Hyo Shin; Kim, Jae Chan

    2015-03-01

    Pterygium is a common ocular surface disease characterized by triangular wing-like growth consisting of subconjunctival hypertrophic connective tissue. Pterygium is easily complicated by adhesion to the eyelid and diplopia related to motility restriction of the eyeball. Beyond the cosmetic problems, this condition has a catastrophic effect on quality of life. Post-surgical recurrence rates of pterygium excision have been reported to be very high. Therefore, identifying the distinct pathogenic pathways of the disease may lead to new therapeutic strategies with lower risk of treatment failure. Based on the relatively low vascularity and known-predominance of disease occurrence in the nasal conjunctiva of normal eyes, we proposed that hypoxic ischemic injury can elicit the development of pterygium. Here, we review hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha-induced activation of the stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) signaling pathway as a possible mechanism. Supporting this concept of pathogenic mechanism, we also highlight bone marrow-derived progenitor cell tropism as a main contributor to pterygium pathogenesis.

  11. Physio-behavioral coupling in a cooperative team task: contributors and relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Adam J; Funke, Gregory J; Russell, Sheldon M; Dukes, Allen W; Middendorf, Matthew S

    2014-02-01

    Research indicates that coactors performing cooperative tasks often exhibit spontaneous and unintended similarities in their physiological and behavioral responses--a phenomenon referred to here as physio-behavioral coupling (PBC). The purpose of this research was to identify contributors to PBC; examine relationships between PBC, team performance, and perceived team attributes (e.g., cohesion, trust); and compare a set of time-series measures(cross-correlation [CC], cross-recurrence quantification analysis [CRQA], and cross-fuzzy entropy [CFEn]) in their characterization of PBC across comparisons. To accomplish this, PBC was examined in human postural sway (PS) and cardiac interbeat intervals (IBIs) from dyadic teams performing a fast-paced puzzle task (Quadra--a variant of the video game Tetris). Results indicated that observed levels of PBC were not a chance occurrence, but instead driven by features of the team-task environment, and that PBC was likely influenced by similar individual task demands and interpersonal coordination dynamics that were not "unique" to a particular team. Correlation analysis revealed that PBC exhibited negative relationships with team performance and team attributes, which were interpreted to reflect complementary coordination (as opposed to mimicry) during task performance, potentially due to differentiated team roles. Finally, qualitative comparison of time-series measures used to characterize PBC indicated that CRQA percent recurrence and CFEn (both nonlinear measures) settled on mostly analogous characterizations, whereas linear CC did not. The disparity observed between the linear and nonlinear measures highlights underlying computational and interpretational differences between the two families of statistics and supports the use of multiple metrics for characterizing PBC. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Ice/Bedrock Feedbacks as a Principle Contributor to Glacial-Interglacial Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, J.; Lee, K.; Jackson, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    Since the mid-Pleistocene, the oscillation between glacial and interglacial climate states occurs with a period of approximately 100 kyr. Each cycle is comprised of a slow glaciation with a subsequent rapid deglaciation. While the solar forcing is clearly an important driver for these transitions, the power spectrum of the solar forcing is quite different from the subsequent climate response and, in general, does not have a noticeable correlation with global ice volume. Instead, previous studies have shown that internal climate processes and their interactions (e.g., CO2, water vapor, isostatic bed response) play a significant role in producing these global climate cycles. The rapid retreat of large ice sheets at the start of an interglacial is often attributed to the interaction between surface and atmospheric processes. While calving is thought to amplify this retreat, it is not typically considered a principle driver of the ice sheet response. Our study investigates the potential for ice/bedrock feedbacks to be a principle contributor in shaping the glacial-interglacial climate oscillation -- particularly the rapid deglaciation that precedes an interglacial. The ice sheet model we develop includes a piecewise linear ice/bedrock feedback while atmospheric and surface processes are taken to be as simple as possible. Due to the long timescale of the bedrock response and the rapid mass loss due to calving, the model ice sheet exhibits rapid deglaciation from a stable maximum when it retreats through an overdeepening. However, ice sheet advance is also shown to be as rapid unless a more complex bedrock response is considered. In particular, we show that a forebulge created by the displacement of the mantle adds a new stable branch to the volume/equilibrium line bifurcation diagram that results in slower growth of the ice sheet during glaciation.

  13. Contributors to ozone episodes in three US/Mexico border twin-cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chune; Fernando, H J S; Yang, Jie

    2009-09-01

    The Process Analysis tools of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system together with back-trajectory analysis were used to assess potential contributors to ozone episodes that occurred during June 1-4, 2006, in three populated U.S.-Mexico border twin cities: San Diego/Tijuana, Imperial/Mexicali and El Paso/Ciudad Juárez. Validation of CMAQ output against surface ozone measurements indicates that the predictions are acceptable with regard to commonly recommended statistical standards and comparable to other reported studies. The mean normalized bias test (MNBT) and mean normalized gross error (MNGE) for hourly ozone fall well within the US EPA suggested range of +/-15% and 35%, respectively, except MNBT for El Paso. The MNBTs for maximum 8-h average ozone are larger than those for hourly ozone, but all the simulated maximum 8-h average ozone are within a factor of 2 of those measured in all three regions. The process and back-trajectory analyses indicate that the main sources of daytime ground-level ozone are the local photochemical production and regional transport. By integrating the effects of each process over the depth of the daytime planetary boundary layer (PBL), it is found that in the San Diego area (SD), chemistry and vertical advection contributed about 36%/48% and 64%/52% for June 2 and 3, respectively. This confirms the previous finding that high-altitude regional transport followed by fumigation contributes significantly to ozone in SD. The back-trajectory analysis shows that this ozone was mostly transported from the coastal area of southern California. For the episodes in Imperial Valley and El Paso, respectively, ozone was transported from the coastal areas of southern California and Mexico and from northern Texas and Oklahoma.

  14. Perspective: Is Random Monoallelic Expression a Contributor to Phenotypic Variability of Autosomal Dominant Disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoheng Gui

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Several factors have been proposed as contributors to interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic variability in autosomal dominant disorders, including allelic variation, modifier genes, environmental factors and complex genetic and environmental interactions. However, regardless of the similarity of genetic background and environmental factors, asymmetric limb or trunk anomalies in a single individual and variable manifestation between monozygotic twins have been observed, indicating other mechanisms possibly involved in expressivity of autosomal dominant diseases. One such example is Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS, which is characterized by congenital cardiac defects and forelimb anomalies, mainly attributed to mutations in the TBX5 gene. We hypothesize that monoallelic expression of the TBX5 gene occurs during embryo development, and, in the context of a mutation, random monoallelic expression (RME can create discrepant functions in a proportion of cells and thus contribute to variable phenotypes. A hybrid mouse model was used to investigate the occurrence of RME with the Tbx5 gene, and single-cell reverse transcription PCR and restriction digestion were performed for limb bud cells from developing embryos (E11.5 of the hybrid mice. RME of Tbx5 was observed in approximately two-thirds of limb bud cells. These results indicate that RME of the Tbx5 gene occurs frequently during embryo development, resulting in a mosaic expression signature (monoallelic, biallelic, or null that may provide a potential explanation for the widespread phenotypic variability in HOS. This model will further provide novel insights into the variability of autosomal dominant traits and a better understanding of the complex expressivity of disease conditions.

  15. The Role of Comets as Possible Contributors of Water and Prebiotic Organics to Terrestrial Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumma, Michael J.; Charnley, S. B.

    2011-01-01

    The question of exogenous delivery of organics and water to Earth and other young planets is of critical importance for understanding the origin of Earth's water, and for assessing the prospects for existence of Earth-like exo-planets. Viewed from a cosmic perspective, Earth is a dry planet yet its oceans are enriched in deuterium by a large factor relative to nebular hydrogen. Can comets have delivered Earth's water? The deuterium content of comets is key to ,assessing their role as contributors of water to Earth. Icy bodies today reside in two distinct reservoirs, the Oort Cloud and the Kuiper Disk (divided into the classical disk, the scattered disk, and the detached or extended disk populations). Orbital parameters can indicate the cosmic storage reservoir for a given comet. Knowledge of the diversity of comets within a reservoir assists in assessing their possible contribution to early Earth, but requires quantitative knowledge of their components - dust and ice. Strong gradients in temperature and chemistry in the proto-planetary disk, coupled with dynamical dispersion of an outer disk of icy planetesimals, imply that comets from KD and OC reservoirs should have diverse composition. The primary volatiles (native to the nucleus) provide the preferred metric for building a taxonomy for comets, and the number of comets so quantified is growing rapidly. Taxonomies based on native species (primary volatiles) are now beginning to emerge [1, 2, 3]. The measurement of cosmic parameters such as the nuclear spin temperatures for H2O, NH3 and CH4, and of enrichment factors for isotopologues (D/H in water and hydrogen cyanide, N-14/N-15 in CN and hydrogen cyanide) provide additional tests of the origin of cometary material. I will provide an overview of these aspects, and implications for the origin of Earth's water and prebiotic organics.

  16. Nodular melanoma: a distinct clinical entity and the largest contributor to melanoma deaths in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Victoria; Roberts, Hugh; Wolfe, Rory; English, Dallas R; Kelly, John W

    2013-04-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that nodular melanoma (NM), because of its association with increased growth rate and thickness at diagnosis, accounts for a substantial proportion of melanoma deaths. We sought to assess the contribution of NM to melanoma deaths in comparison with other tumor subtypes. Four cohorts were established comprising 5775 cases of invasive primary cutaneous melanoma reported to the Victorian Cancer Registry during 1989, 1994, 1999, and 2004. Original pathology reports were reviewed. Age-standardized melanoma incidence rates were compared from 1989 to 2004 with annual percentage change using Poisson regression. The incidence of thick tumors (>4 mm) increased by 3.8% (95% confidence interval 1.4 to 6.2) and 2.5% (95% confidence interval -0.5 to 5.5) per year for male and female patients, respectively. The median thickness of NM at diagnosis was 2.6 mm compared with 0.6 mm for superficial spreading melanoma. A third of patients who died from melanoma during the follow-up period had thick tumors (>4 mm), most of which were nodular subtype (61%). NM accounted for 14% of invasive melanomas, but was responsible for 43% of melanoma deaths in a total of 57,461 person-years of follow-up. By comparison, superficial spreading melanoma contributed 56% of invasive melanoma but only 30% of deaths. Pathology review was limited to reports only. Mortality information relied mostly on death certificate information. The incidence of thick melanomas continues to increase. Nodular melanoma is clinically distinct and the predominant contributor to melanoma-related deaths, representing a public health challenge in reducing skin cancer mortality. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Lack of sleep as a contributor to obesity in adolescents: impacts on eating and activity behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Dutil, Caroline

    2016-09-26

    Sleep is an important contributor to physical and mental health; however, chronic sleep deprivation has become common in adolescents, especially on weekdays. Adolescents aged 14-17 years are recommended to sleep between 8 and 10 h per night to maximize overall health and well-being. Although sleep needs may vary between individuals, sleep duration recommendations are important for surveillance and help inform policies, interventions, and the population of healthy sleep behaviors. Long sleepers are very rare among teenagers and sleeping too much is not a problem per se; only insufficient sleep is associated with adverse health outcomes in the pediatric population. Causes of insufficient sleep are numerous and chronic sleep deprivation poses a serious threat to the academic success, health and safety of adolescents. This article focuses on the link between insufficient sleep and obesity in adolescents. This "call to action" article argues that sleep should be taken more seriously by the public health community and by our society in general, i.e., given as much attention and resources as nutrition and physical activity. Not only that having a good night's sleep is as important as eating a healthy diet and being regularly physically active for overall health, but sleeping habits also impact eating and screen time behaviors and, therefore, can influence body weight control. Short sleep duration, poor sleep quality, and late bedtimes are all associated with excess food intake, poor diet quality, and obesity in adolescents. Sleep, sedentary behavior, physical activity and diet all interact and influence each other to ultimately impact health. A holistic approach to health (i.e., the whole day matters) targeting all of these behaviors synergistically is needed to optimize the impact of our interventions. Sleep is not a waste of time and sleep hygiene is an important factor to consider in the prevention and treatment of obesity.

  18. Contributor and Victim - Indonesia’s Role in Global Climate Change with Special Reference to Kalimantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Prinz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Through rapid deforestation, forest fires, degrading peatlands, and diminishing carbon ‘sinks’ Indonesia is one of the main contributors to the phenomenon of Global Climate Change. On the other hand, Indonesia will also be a major victim of Climate Change. The combination of high population density on some islands and high levels of biodiversity, together with 80,000 kilometres of coastline and 17,500 islands, makes Indonesia one of the most vulnerable countries to the impacts of Climate Change. Experts expect a warming from 0.2 to 0.3°C per decade in Indonesia during this century, together with an increase in annual precipitation across the majority of the Indonesian islands. Additionally there will be a change in the seasonality of precipitation; Borneo may become 10 to 30% wetter by the 2080’s during December-February. As rainfall decreases during critical times of the year this translates into higher drought risk, consequently a decrease in crop yields, economic instability and drastically more undernourished people. On the other hand, increased rainfall during already wet times of the year will lead to high flood risk. Rising sea levels and many more extreme weather events will contribute to the many problems caused by Global Climate Change. Indonesia, and Kalimantan in the first instance, has to take up the challenge of climate change in taking actions at all levels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, including promoting sustainable use of land and water resources, and putting adaptation into the development agenda.

  19. S3 HMBC: Spin-State-Selective HMBC for accurate measurement of homonuclear coupling constants. Application to strychnine yielding thirteen hitherto unreported JHH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerulff, Louise; Benie, Andrew J.; Hoeck, Casper

    2016-01-01

    A novel method, Spin-State-Selective (S3) HMBC, for accurate measurement of homonuclear coupling constants is introduced. As characteristic for S3 techniques, S3 HMBC yields independent subspectra corresponding to particular passive spin states and thus allows determination of coupling constants ...... are demonstrated by an application to strychnine where thirteen JHH coupling constants not previously reported could be measured....

  20. Social determinants of health and tobacco use in thirteen low and middle income countries: evidence from Global Adult Tobacco Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna M Palipudi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tobacco use has been identified as the single biggest cause of inequality in morbidity. The objective of this study is to examine the role of social determinants on current tobacco use in thirteen low-and-middle income countries. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used nationally representative data from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS conducted during 2008-2010 in 13 low-and-middle income countries: Bangladesh, China, Egypt, India, Mexico, Philippines, Poland, Russian Federation, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, Uruguay, and Viet Nam. These surveys provided information on 209,027 respondent's aged 15 years and above and the country datasets were analyzed individually for estimating current tobacco use across various socio-demographic factors (gender, age, place of residence, education, wealth index, and knowledge on harmful effects of smoking. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to predict the impact of these determinants on current tobacco use status. Current tobacco use was defined as current smoking or use of smokeless tobacco, either daily or occasionally. Former smokers were excluded from the analysis. Adjusted odds ratios for current tobacco use after controlling other cofactors, was significantly higher for males across all countries and for urban areas in eight of the 13 countries. For educational level, the trend was significant in Bangladesh, Egypt, India, Philippines and Thailand demonstrating decreasing prevalence of tobacco use with increasing levels of education. For wealth index, the trend of decreasing prevalence of tobacco use with increasing wealth was significant for Bangladesh, India, Philippines, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, Uruguay and Viet Nam. The trend of decreasing prevalence with increasing levels of knowledge on harmful effects of smoking was significant in China, India, Philippines, Poland, Russian Federation, Thailand, Ukraine and Viet Nam. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings demonstrate a

  1. Using dissolved gases to observe the evolution of groundwater age in a mountain watershed over a period of thirteen years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Andrew H.

    2011-01-01

    Baseflows in snowmelt-dominated mountain streams are critical for sustaining ecosystems and water resources during periods of greatest demand. Future climate predictions for mountainous areas throughout much of the western U.S. include increasing temperatures, declining snowpacks, and earlier snowmelt periods. The degree to and rate at which these changes will affect baseflows in mountain streams remains unknown, largely because baseflows are groundwater-fed and the relationship between climate and groundwater recharge/discharge rates in mountain watersheds is uncertain. We use groundwater age determinations from multiple dissolved gas tracers (CFCs, SF6, and 3H/3He) to track changes in groundwater age over a period of thirteen years in the Sagehen Creek watershed, Sierra Nevada Mountains, CA. Data were collected from springs and wells in 2009 and 2010 and combined with those obtained in prior studies from 1997 to 2003. Apparent ages range from 0 to >60 years. Comparison between variations in age and variations in snow water equivalent (SWE) and mean annual air temperature reveals the degree of correlation between these climate variables and recharge rate. Further, comparison of apparent ages from individual springs obtained at different times and using different tracers helps constrain the age distribution in the sampled waters. The age data are generally more consistent with an exponential age distribution than with piston-flow. However, many samples, even those with relatively old mean ages, must have a disproportionately large very young fraction that responds directly to annual SWE variations. These findings have important implications for how future baseflows may respond to decreasing SWE.

  2. Social determinants of health and tobacco use in thirteen low and middle income countries: evidence from Global Adult Tobacco Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palipudi, Krishna M; Gupta, Prakash C; Sinha, Dhirendra N; Andes, Linda J; Asma, Samira; McAfee, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco use has been identified as the single biggest cause of inequality in morbidity. The objective of this study is to examine the role of social determinants on current tobacco use in thirteen low-and-middle income countries. We used nationally representative data from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) conducted during 2008-2010 in 13 low-and-middle income countries: Bangladesh, China, Egypt, India, Mexico, Philippines, Poland, Russian Federation, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, Uruguay, and Viet Nam. These surveys provided information on 209,027 respondent's aged 15 years and above and the country datasets were analyzed individually for estimating current tobacco use across various socio-demographic factors (gender, age, place of residence, education, wealth index, and knowledge on harmful effects of smoking). Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to predict the impact of these determinants on current tobacco use status. Current tobacco use was defined as current smoking or use of smokeless tobacco, either daily or occasionally. Former smokers were excluded from the analysis. Adjusted odds ratios for current tobacco use after controlling other cofactors, was significantly higher for males across all countries and for urban areas in eight of the 13 countries. For educational level, the trend was significant in Bangladesh, Egypt, India, Philippines and Thailand demonstrating decreasing prevalence of tobacco use with increasing levels of education. For wealth index, the trend of decreasing prevalence of tobacco use with increasing wealth was significant for Bangladesh, India, Philippines, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, Uruguay and Viet Nam. The trend of decreasing prevalence with increasing levels of knowledge on harmful effects of smoking was significant in China, India, Philippines, Poland, Russian Federation, Thailand, Ukraine and Viet Nam. These findings demonstrate a significant but varied role of social determinants on current tobacco use within and

  3. Evaluation of thirteen haloacetic acids and ten trihalomethanes formation by peracetic acid and chlorine drinking water disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Runmiao; Shi, Honglan; Ma, Yinfa; Yang, John; Hua, Bin; Inniss, Enos C; Adams, Craig D; Eichholz, Todd

    2017-12-01

    Free chlorine is a commonly used disinfectant in drinking water treatment. However, disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed during water disinfection. Haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs) are two major groups of DBPs. Iodo-HAAs and iodo-THMs (I-HAAs and I-THMs) are formed during the disinfection of the water containing high levels of iodide and are much more toxic than their chlorinated and brominated analogs. Peracetic acid (PAA) is a strong antimicrobial disinfectant that is expected to reduce the formation of HAAs and THMs during disinfection. In this study, the formations of thirteen HAAs and ten THMs, including the iodinated forms, have been investigated during PAA disinfection and chlorination as the comparison. The DBP formations under different iodide concentrations, pHs, and contact times were systematically investigated. Two types of commercial PAAs containing different concentrations of PAA and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) were studied. A solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was upgraded for THM analysis including I-THMs. HAAs were analyzed by following a recently developed high performance ion chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Results show that the ratio of PAA and H 2 O 2 concentration significantly affect the formation of I-THMs and I-HAAs. During PAA disinfection with lower PAA than H 2 O 2 , no detectable levels of THMs and HAAs were observed. During PAA disinfection with higher PAA than H 2 O 2 , low levels of monoiodoacetic acid, diiodoacetic acid, and iodoform were formed, and these levels were enhanced with the increase of iodide concentration. No significant quantities of chloro- or bromo-THMs and HAAs were formed during PAA disinfection treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Amateur or Professional: Assessing the Expertise of Major Contributors in OpenStreetMap Based on Contributing Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anran Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Volunteered geographic information (VGI projects, such as OpenStreetMap (OSM, provide an alternative way to produce geographic data. Research has proven that the resulting data in some areas are of decent quality, which guarantees their usability in various applications. Though these achievements are normally attributed to the huge heterogeneous community mainly consisting of amateurs, it is in fact a small percentage of major contributors who make nearly all contributions. In this paper, we investigate the contributing behaviors of these contributors to deduce whether they are actually professionals. Various indicators are used to depict the behaviors on three themes: practice, skill and motivation, aiming to identify solid evidence for expertise. Our case studies show that most major contributors in Germany, France and the United Kingdom are hardly amateurs, but are professionals instead. These contributors have rich experiences on geographical data editing, have a decent grasp of professional software and work on the project with enthusiasm and concentration. It is less unexpected that they can create geographic data of high quality.

  5. Contributors to suicidality in rural communities: beyond the effects of depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Rural populations experience a higher suicide rate than urban areas despite their comparable prevalence of depression. This suggests the identification of additional contributors is necessary to improve our understanding of suicide risk in rural regions. Investigating the independent contribution of depression, and the impact of co-existing psychiatric disorders, to suicidal ideation and suicide attempts in a rural community sample may provide clarification of the role of depression in rural suicidality. Methods 618 participants in the Australian Rural Mental Health Study completed the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, providing assessment of lifetime suicidal ideation and attempts, affective disorders, anxiety disorders and substance-use disorders. Logistic regression analyses explored the independent contribution of depression and additional diagnoses to suicidality. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to illustrate the benefit of assessing secondary psychiatric diagnoses when determining suicide risk. Results Diagnostic criteria for lifetime depressive disorder were met by 28% (174) of the sample; 25% (154) had a history of suicidal ideation. Overall, 41% (63) of participants with lifetime suicidal ideation and 34% (16) of participants with a lifetime suicide attempt had no history of depression. When lifetime depression was controlled for, suicidal ideation was predicted by younger age, being currently unmarried, and lifetime anxiety or post-traumatic stress disorder. In addition to depression, suicide attempts were predicted by lifetime anxiety and drug use disorders, as well as younger age; being currently married and employed were significant protective factors. The presence of comorbid depression and PTSD significantly increased the odds of reporting a suicide attempt above either of these conditions independently. Conclusions While depression contributes significantly to suicidal ideation, and is a key

  6. Contributors to suicidality in rural communities: beyond the effects of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handley Tonelle E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rural populations experience a higher suicide rate than urban areas despite their comparable prevalence of depression. This suggests the identification of additional contributors is necessary to improve our understanding of suicide risk in rural regions. Investigating the independent contribution of depression, and the impact of co-existing psychiatric disorders, to suicidal ideation and suicide attempts in a rural community sample may provide clarification of the role of depression in rural suicidality. Methods 618 participants in the Australian Rural Mental Health Study completed the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, providing assessment of lifetime suicidal ideation and attempts, affective disorders, anxiety disorders and substance-use disorders. Logistic regression analyses explored the independent contribution of depression and additional diagnoses to suicidality. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis was performed to illustrate the benefit of assessing secondary psychiatric diagnoses when determining suicide risk. Results Diagnostic criteria for lifetime depressive disorder were met by 28% (174 of the sample; 25% (154 had a history of suicidal ideation. Overall, 41% (63 of participants with lifetime suicidal ideation and 34% (16 of participants with a lifetime suicide attempt had no history of depression. When lifetime depression was controlled for, suicidal ideation was predicted by younger age, being currently unmarried, and lifetime anxiety or post-traumatic stress disorder. In addition to depression, suicide attempts were predicted by lifetime anxiety and drug use disorders, as well as younger age; being currently married and employed were significant protective factors. The presence of comorbid depression and PTSD significantly increased the odds of reporting a suicide attempt above either of these conditions independently. Conclusions While depression contributes significantly to suicidal

  7. Contributors to childhood obesity in Iran: the views of parents and school staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour-Ahranjani, B; Pallan, M J; Rashidi, A; Adab, P

    2014-01-01

    To explore the contextual influences on childhood obesity in Tehran, Iran to inform future development of an obesity prevention intervention for Iranian primary school children. Qualitative study. Focus groups and interviews with parents and school staff were convened to explore their perceptions of the causes of childhood obesity. Eleven focus groups and three interviews were held with parents and school staff (88 participants in total) from three different socio-economic areas in Iran's capital city, Tehran. All the discussions were transcribed verbatim in Persian. An iterative thematic approach was used for data analysis. Overall, the causes of childhood obesity were perceived to relate to macro-level policy influences, the school environment, sociocultural factors, and family and individual behavioural factors, acting in combination. A key emergent theme was the pervasive influence of Government policies on children's food intake and physical activity. Another key theme was the political and sociocultural context that does not support girls and women in Iran in having active lifestyles. The findings suggest that parents and school staff have sophisticated views on the possible causes of childhood overweight and obesity which encompassed behavioural, structural and social causes. A prominent emerging theme was the need for state level intervention and support for a healthy environment. Any local initiatives in Iran are unlikely to be successful without such support. Childhood obesity is growing in Iran and it is seen as one of the features of the nutrition transition in developing countries. Findings from cross-sectional studies suggest a range of lifestyle factors contribute to obesity in the Iranian population. This qualitative study explores the socioenvironmental changes contributing to childhood obesity in primary school-aged children in Iran. Findings have provided important contextual data on the perceived contributors to childhood obesity in Iran, such

  8. Thirteen years of observations on primary sugars and sugar alcohols over remote Chichijima Island in the western North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Santosh Kumar; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Chen, Jing; Fu, Pingqing

    2018-01-01

    In order to understand the atmospheric transport of bioaerosols, we conducted long-term observations of primary sugars and sugar alcohols over remote Chichijima Island in the western North Pacific from 2001 to 2013. Our results showed that concentrations of total sugar compounds for 13 years ranged from 1.2 to 310 ng m-3 (average of 46 ± 49 ng m-3). We found that atmospheric circulations significantly affect the seasonal variations of bioaerosol distributions over the western North Pacific. The primary sugars (glucose and fructose) maximized in summer, possibly due to an increased emission of the vegetation products from local vascular plants in Chichijima. We also found higher concentrations of sugar components (arabitol, mannitol, and trehalose) in more recent years during summer and autumn, suggesting an enhanced emission of fungal and microbial species over the island. Sucrose peaked in late winter to early spring, indicating a springtime pollen contribution by long-range atmospheric transport, while elevated concentrations of sucrose in early summer could be explained by long-range transport of soil dust from Southeast Asia to Chichijima. Sucrose and trehalose were found to present increasing trends from 2001 to 2013, while total sugar components did not show any clear trends during the 13-year period. Positive matrix factorization analyses suggested the locally emitted sugar compounds as well as long-range-transported airborne pollen grains, microbes, and fungal spores are the major contributors to total sugar compounds in the Chichijima aerosols. Backward air mass trajectories support the atmospheric transport of continental aerosols from the Asian continent during winter and spring over Chichijima.

  9. Thirteen years of observations on primary sugars and sugar alcohols over remote Chichijima Island in the western North Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Verma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the atmospheric transport of bioaerosols, we conducted long-term observations of primary sugars and sugar alcohols over remote Chichijima Island in the western North Pacific from 2001 to 2013. Our results showed that concentrations of total sugar compounds for 13 years ranged from 1.2 to 310 ng m−3 (average of 46 ± 49 ng m−3. We found that atmospheric circulations significantly affect the seasonal variations of bioaerosol distributions over the western North Pacific. The primary sugars (glucose and fructose maximized in summer, possibly due to an increased emission of the vegetation products from local vascular plants in Chichijima. We also found higher concentrations of sugar components (arabitol, mannitol, and trehalose in more recent years during summer and autumn, suggesting an enhanced emission of fungal and microbial species over the island. Sucrose peaked in late winter to early spring, indicating a springtime pollen contribution by long-range atmospheric transport, while elevated concentrations of sucrose in early summer could be explained by long-range transport of soil dust from Southeast Asia to Chichijima. Sucrose and trehalose were found to present increasing trends from 2001 to 2013, while total sugar components did not show any clear trends during the 13-year period. Positive matrix factorization analyses suggested the locally emitted sugar compounds as well as long-range-transported airborne pollen grains, microbes, and fungal spores are the major contributors to total sugar compounds in the Chichijima aerosols. Backward air mass trajectories support the atmospheric transport of continental aerosols from the Asian continent during winter and spring over Chichijima.

  10. Flow-by-flow chemical stratigraphy and evolution of thirteen Serra Geral Group basalt flows from Vista Alegre, southernmost Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viter M Pinto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The geochemical characterization of thirteen Serra Geral Group flows in the Vista Alegre region (RS-SC, southern Brazil, displays the homogeneous basaltic composition near 50 wt.% SiO2. Each of the five basal flows (Pitanga-type, high-Ti/Y ~600, TiO2 > 3 wt.% and eight upper flows (Paranapanema-type, medium Ti/Y ~400, TiO2 > 2 wt.% can be identified from their chemical composition; sets of flows have parallel variation in chemical composition. The flow-by-flowcorrelation in four sections shows the horizontal position of the flows in three profiles and an approximately 200-m downdrop of the Itapiranga block with respect to the Frederico Westphalen block. The world-class amethyst geode mineralization and the systematic presence of native copper in the basalts make the correlation of great geological and economic significance.A caracterização geoquímica de treze derrames do Grupo Serra Geral na região de Vista Alegre (RS e SC, sul do Brasil, exibe uma composição basáltica homogênea próxima a 50% de SiO2. Os cinco derrames basais são classificados quimicamente como tipo Pitanga (alto Ti/Y ~600 e TiO2 > 3 em peso percentual, os demais oito derrames possuem médio Ti/Y ~400 com TiO2 ~2.5 em peso percentual, sendo classificados como magma tipo Paranapanema. Cada derrame pode ser identificado através de sua composição química e correlacionado, com variação paralela entre os perfis estudados. A correlação derrame a derrame nos quatro perfis demonstra uma posição horizontal em três perfis e um rejeito vertical de aproximadamente 200 m do bloco Itapiranga em relação ao bloco Frederico Westphalen. A presença de jazidas de ametista em geodos e a sistemática ocorrência de cobre nativo nos basaltos da região tornam a correlação de grande significado geológico e econômico.

  11. Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Performance in Subelite Gaelic Football Players From Under Thirteen to Senior Age Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Mark; Malone, Shane

    2016-11-01

    Roe, M and Malone, S. Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test performance in subelite Gaelic football players from under thirteen to senior age groups. J Strength Cond Res 30 (11): 3187-3193, 2016-Gaelic football is indigenous to Ireland and has similar locomotion profiles to soccer and Australian Football. Given the increasing attention on long-term player development, investigations on age-related variation in Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (Yo-YoIR1) performance may provide useful information in talent identification, program design, and player monitoring. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate Yo-YoIR1 performance across Gaelic football age groups. Male participants (n = 355) were recruited from division one, Gaelic football teams. Participants were allocated to one of the 7 groups according to respective age groups from under 13 (U13), under 14, under 15 (U15), under 16 (U16), minor, under 21 (U21), to senior age groups. Total Yo-YoIR1 distance (m) increased progressively from U13 (885 ± 347 m) to U16 (1,595 ± 380 m) equating to a rate of change of 180.2%. In comparison to U13, total distance at minor (1,206 ± 327 m) increased by 136.4%. Subsequent increases were observed in U21 (1,585 ± 445 m) and senior players (2,365 ± 489). Minimum (800-880 m) and maximum (2,240-2,280 m) total distances were comparable for U15, U16, and U21 players. Differences in total distance (m) for all age groups were statistically significant when compared to U13 players (p age groups for total distance was deemed to be large (effect size > 0.8). Similar trends were observed for maximum velocity and estimated V[Combining Dot Above]O2max. The evolution of Yo-YoIR1 performance in Gaelic football players from adolescents to adulthood highlights how maturation may influence sport-related running ability. Changes in Yo-YoIR1 performance should be closely monitored to optimize interventions for individuals transitioning across age groups.

  12. Quantifying the Twitter Influence of Third Party Commercial Entities versus Healthcare Providers in Thirteen Medical Conferences from 2011 - 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejas Desai

    Full Text Available Twitter channels are increasingly popular at medical conferences. Many groups, including healthcare providers and third party entities (e.g., pharmaceutical or medical device companies use these channels to communicate with one another. These channels are unregulated and can allow third party commercial entities to exert an equal or greater amount of Twitter influence than healthcare providers. Third parties can use this influence to promote their products or services instead of sharing unbiased, evidence-based information. In this investigation we quantified the Twitter influence that third party commercial entities had in 13 major medical conferences.We analyzed tweets contained in the official Twitter hashtags of thirteen medical conferences from 2011 to 2013. We placed tweet authors into one of four categories based on their account profile: healthcare provider, third party commercial entity, none of the above and unknown. We measured Twitter activity by the number of tweet authors per category and the tweet-to-author ratio by category. We measured Twitter influence by the PageRank of tweet authors by category.We analyzed 51159 tweets authored by 8778 Twitter account holders in 13 conferences that were sponsored by 5 medical societies. A quarter of all authors identified themselves as healthcare providers, while only 18% could be identified as third party commercial entities. Healthcare providers had a greater tweet-to-author ratio than their third party commercial entity counterparts (8.98 versus 6.93 tweets. Despite having less authors and composing less tweets, third party commercial entities had a statistically similar PageRank as healthcare providers (0.761 versus 0.797.The Twitter influence of third party commercial entities (PageRank is similar to that of healthcare providers. This finding is interesting because the number of tweets and third party commercial entity authors required to achieve this PageRank is far fewer than that

  13. Quantifying the Twitter Influence of Third Party Commercial Entities versus Healthcare Providers in Thirteen Medical Conferences from 2011 - 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Tejas; Dhingra, Vibhu; Shariff, Afreen; Shariff, Aabid; Lerma, Edgar; Singla, Parteek; Kachare, Swapnil; Syed, Zoheb; Minhas, Deeba; Madanick, Ryan; Fang, Xiangming

    Twitter channels are increasingly popular at medical conferences. Many groups, including healthcare providers and third party entities (e.g., pharmaceutical or medical device companies) use these channels to communicate with one another. These channels are unregulated and can allow third party commercial entities to exert an equal or greater amount of Twitter influence than healthcare providers. Third parties can use this influence to promote their products or services instead of sharing unbiased, evidence-based information. In this investigation we quantified the Twitter influence that third party commercial entities had in 13 major medical conferences. We analyzed tweets contained in the official Twitter hashtags of thirteen medical conferences from 2011 to 2013. We placed tweet authors into one of four categories based on their account profile: healthcare provider, third party commercial entity, none of the above and unknown. We measured Twitter activity by the number of tweet authors per category and the tweet-to-author ratio by category. We measured Twitter influence by the PageRank of tweet authors by category. We analyzed 51159 tweets authored by 8778 Twitter account holders in 13 conferences that were sponsored by 5 medical societies. A quarter of all authors identified themselves as healthcare providers, while only 18% could be identified as third party commercial entities. Healthcare providers had a greater tweet-to-author ratio than their third party commercial entity counterparts (8.98 versus 6.93 tweets). Despite having less authors and composing less tweets, third party commercial entities had a statistically similar PageRank as healthcare providers (0.761 versus 0.797). The Twitter influence of third party commercial entities (PageRank) is similar to that of healthcare providers. This finding is interesting because the number of tweets and third party commercial entity authors required to achieve this PageRank is far fewer than that needed by

  14. Quantifying the Twitter Influence of Third Party Commercial Entities versus Healthcare Providers in Thirteen Medical Conferences from 2011 – 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Vibhu; Shariff, Afreen; Shariff, Aabid; Lerma, Edgar; Singla, Parteek; Kachare, Swapnil; Syed, Zoheb; Minhas, Deeba; Madanick, Ryan; Fang, Xiangming

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Twitter channels are increasingly popular at medical conferences. Many groups, including healthcare providers and third party entities (e.g., pharmaceutical or medical device companies) use these channels to communicate with one another. These channels are unregulated and can allow third party commercial entities to exert an equal or greater amount of Twitter influence than healthcare providers. Third parties can use this influence to promote their products or services instead of sharing unbiased, evidence-based information. In this investigation we quantified the Twitter influence that third party commercial entities had in 13 major medical conferences. Methods We analyzed tweets contained in the official Twitter hashtags of thirteen medical conferences from 2011 to 2013. We placed tweet authors into one of four categories based on their account profile: healthcare provider, third party commercial entity, none of the above and unknown. We measured Twitter activity by the number of tweet authors per category and the tweet-to-author ratio by category. We measured Twitter influence by the PageRank of tweet authors by category. Results We analyzed 51159 tweets authored by 8778 Twitter account holders in 13 conferences that were sponsored by 5 medical societies. A quarter of all authors identified themselves as healthcare providers, while only 18% could be identified as third party commercial entities. Healthcare providers had a greater tweet-to-author ratio than their third party commercial entity counterparts (8.98 versus 6.93 tweets). Despite having less authors and composing less tweets, third party commercial entities had a statistically similar PageRank as healthcare providers (0.761 versus 0.797). Conclusion The Twitter influence of third party commercial entities (PageRank) is similar to that of healthcare providers. This finding is interesting because the number of tweets and third party commercial entity authors required to achieve this Page

  15. Part I: Sound color in the music of Gyorgy Kurtag, Part II: "Leopard's Path," thirteen visions for chamber ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iachimciuc, Igor

    The dissertation is in two parts, a theoretical study and a musical composition. In Part I the music of Gyorgy Kurtag is analyzed from the point of view of sound color. A brief description of what is understood by the term sound color, and various ways of achieving specific coloristic effects, are presented in the Introduction. An examination of Kurtag's approaches to the domain of sound color occupies the chapters that follow. The musical examples that are analyzed are selected from Kurtag's different compositional periods, showing a certain consistency in sound color techniques, the most important of which are already present in the String Quartet, Op. 1. The compositions selected for analysis are written for different ensembles, but regardless of the instrumentation, certain principles of the formation and organization of sound color remain the same. Rather than relying on extended instrumental techniques, Kurtag creates a large variety of sound colors using traditional means such as pitch material, register, density, rhythm, timbral combinations, dynamics, texture, spatial displacement of the instruments, and the overall musical context. Each sound color unit in Kurtag's music is a separate entity, conceived as a complete microcosm. Sound color units can either be juxtaposed as contrasting elements, forming sound color variations, or superimposed, often resulting in a Klangfarbenmelodie effect. Some of the same gestural figures (objets trouves) appear in different compositions, but with significant coloristic modifications. Thus, the principle of sound color variations is not only a strong organizational tool, but also a characteristic stylistic feature of the music of Gyorgy Kurtag. Part II, Leopard's Path (2010), for flute, clarinet, violin, cello, cimbalom, and piano, is an original composition inspired by the painting of Jesse Allen, a San Francisco based artist. The composition is conceived as a cycle of thirteen short movements. Ten of these movements are

  16. Deep axial reflux, an important contributor to skin changes or ulcer in chronic venous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Gudmundur; Eklof, Bo; Grandinetti, Andrew; Lurie, Fedor; Kistner, Robert L

    2003-12-01

    with 29 legs with popliteal reflux alone (P =.025). Legs with skin changes or ulcer had significantly higher total peak reverse flow velocity (P =.006), but the difference for total reflux time did not reach significance (P =.084) compared with legs without skin changes. In contrast, presence of axial reflux in superficial veins did not increase prevalence of skin changes (OR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.44-1.2). Incompetent perforator veins were observed as often in patients with no skin changes (C0-C3, 215 of 274, 78%) as in patients with skin changes (C4-C6, 106 of 127, 83%; P =.25). Continuous axial deep venous reflux is a major contributor to increased prevalence of skin changes or ulcer in patients with chronic venous disease compared with segmental deep venous reflux above or below the knee only. The total peak reverse flow velocity score is significantly higher in patients with skin changes or ulcer. It is questionable whether peak reverse flow velocity and reflux time can be used to quantify venous reflux; however, if they are used, peak reverse flow velocity seems to reflect venous malfunction more appropriately.

  17. Levothyroxine therapy and impaired clearance are the strongest contributors to small intestinal bacterial overgrowth: Results of a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechmann, Thorsten; Sperlbaum, Andre; Schmiegel, Wolff

    2017-02-07

    To identify a set of contributors, and weight and rank them on a pathophysiological basis. Patients who have undergone a lactulose or glucose hydrogen breath test to rule out small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) for various clinical symptoms, including diarrhoea, weight loss, abdominal pain, cramping or bloating, were seen as eligible for inclusion in a retrospective single-centre study. Clinical data such as co-morbidities, medication, laboratory parameters and other possible risk factors have been identified from the electronic data system. Cases lacking or with substantially incomplete clinical data were excluded from the analysis. Suspected contributors were summarised under four different pathophysiological pathways (impaired gastric acid barrier, impaired intestinal clearance, immunosuppression and miscellaneous factors including thyroid gland variables) and investigated using the χ 2 test, Student's t -test and logistic regression models. A total of 1809 patients who had undergone hydrogen breath testing were analysed. Impairment of the gastric acid barrier (gastrectomy, odds ratio: OR = 3.5, PPI therapy OR = 1.4), impairment of intestinal clearance (any resecting gastric surgery OR = 2.6, any colonic resection OR = 1.9, stenosis OR = 3.4, gastroparesis OR = 3.4, neuropathy 2.2), immunological factors (any drug-induced immunosuppression OR = 1.8), altered thyroid gland metabolism (hypothyroidism OR = 2.6, levothyroxine therapy OR = 3.0) and diabetes mellitus (OR = 1.9) were associated significantly to SIBO. Any abdominal surgery, ileocecal resection, vagotomy or IgA-deficiency did not have any influence, and a history of appendectomy decreased the risk of SIBO. Multivariate analysis revealed gastric surgery, stenoses, medical immunosuppression and levothyroxine to be the strongest predictors. Levothyroxine therapy was the strongest contributor in a simplified model (OR = 3.0). The most important contributors for the development of SIBO in ascending

  18. A sensitive HPLC-MS method for simultaneous determination of thirteen components in rat plasma and its application to pharmacokinetic study of Tanreqing injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Su-Xiang; Li, Xian-He; Wang, Meng-Meng; Hao, Rui; Li, Meng-Meng; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Zhe

    2018-01-30

    A rapid, sensitive and selective method based on high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with Q-Exactive mass spectrometry was developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of thirteen components in rat plasma, including chlorogenic acid, 5-caffeoylquinic acid, 4-caffeoylquinic acid, luteoloside, isochlorogenic acid A, B and C, scutellarin, baicalin, wogonin, baicalein, phillyrin and forsythoside A. After precipitating proteins from the plasma samples with methanol, chromatographic separation of the thirteen components was achieved by using an XBridge™ C 18 column (2.1mm×150mm, 5μm) with the mobile phase consisting of methanol and 0.1% formic acid in water at a flow rate of 0.3mL/min. High-resolution MS quantification was adopted with detection on a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer in full-scan mode, and the results were obtained using a mass extraction window of 10ppm at a mass resolution of 70, 000. All the calibration curves exhibited good linearity (r 2 >0.991) over the measured ranges. The lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) was in the range of 1.05-8.13ng/mL. The intra- and inter-day precision (RSD) was less than 11.70% and the accuracy (RE) ranged from -5.58% to 12.29%. No significant matrix effect was observed and the extraction recoveries of all the analytes were more than 79.36%. The developed method was applied to a pharmacokinetic study of the thirteen ingredients in rats after intravenous administration of Tanreqing at three doses of 3, 6 and 12mL/kg. The results indicated that 8 of the 13 components, isochlorogenic acid A, B and C, chlorogenic acid, baicalin, wogonin, luteoloside and forsythoside A, had linear pharmacokinetic properties in the tested dosage range. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High performance liquid chromatographic separation of thirteen drugs collected in Chinese Pharmacopoeia 2010(Ch.P2010 on cellulose ramification chiral stationary phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhou

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The enantiomers separation of thirteen drugs collected in Ch.P2010 was performed on chiral stationary phase of cellulose ramification (chiralpak OD and chiralpak OJ by high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC methods, which included ibuprofen (C1, ketoprofen (C2, nitrendipine (C3, nimodipine (C4, felodipine (C5, omeprazole (C6, praziquantel (C7, propranolol hydrochloride (C8, atenolol (C9, sulpiride (C10, clenbuterol hydrochloride (C11, verapamil hydrochloride (C12, and chlorphenamine maleate (C13. The mobile phase consisted of isopropanol and n-hexane. The detection wavelength was set at 254 nm and the flow rate was 0.7 mL/min. The enantiomers separation of these thirteen racemates on chiralpak OD column and chiralpak OJ column was studied, while the effects of proportion of organic additives, alcohol displacer and temperature on the separation were studied. And the mechanism of some of racemates was discussed. The results indicated that thirteen chiral drugs could be separated on chiral stationary phase of cellulose ramification in normal phase chromatographic system. The chromatographic retention and resolution of enantiomers could be adjusted by factors including column temperature and the concentration of alcohol displacer and organic alkaline modifier in mobile phase. It was shown that the resolution was improved with reducing concentration of alcohol displacer. When concentration of organic alkaline modifier was 0.2% (v/v, the resolution and the peak shape were fairly good. Most racemates mentioned above had better resolution at column temperature of 25 °C. When racemates were separated, the temperature should be kept so as to obtain stable separation results. Keywords: HPLC, Chiral stationary phase, Optical enantiomers, Cellulose ramification

  20. Unheralded failure of Riata defibrillator lead identified at defibrillation threshold testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Webber, MB ChB, FRACP

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: Riata lead failure may be unrecognised until there is failure to deliver necessary therapy. Strong consideration ought to be given to lead examination under high-voltage shock delivery through the device.

  1. The Second Factory of Havana before the War of Independence of the Thirteen Colonies 1760-1779. A Reading from the Spanish Estanco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago de LUXÁN MELÉNDEZ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Our main objective is to verify the Spanish problems of Spanish estanco relative to its main supplier, the Island of Cuba. The return to direct management by the Monarchy of the production, sale and export of Cuban tobacco as a leading provider of Metropolitan estanco, once passed the accident of taking of Havana by the English, was accompanied by the expansion of culture in the Island, but not the increase in longterm consumption of the product in the Metropolitan estanco. Two types of tobacco, the Virginian, and especially the Brazilian one, continued to maintain a privileged position in the Spanish market. On the other hand, the more opening of Havana to American market coincides with the creation of estancos in the rest of America. According to the known estimations, at least until the period of the War of Independence of the Thirteen Colonies, the solution to the problems of excess production did not take place in the Antillean Island

  2. Responses to the contributors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett Barden

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A set of responses to the papers on Garrett Barden's and Tim Murphy's book Law and Justice in Community (Oxford: OUP, 2010 published in this special issue of Nordicum-Mediterraneum.

  3. Notes on Contributors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    He is a Fellow of the Cambridge Commonwealth Society and member of the International Society for Third Sector Research (ISTR). Daniel Eseme Gberevbie, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and International Relations, Covenant University, Ota Ogun State, Nigeria. AJOL African Journals Online.

  4. CADDIS Authors & Contributors

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Causal Analysis/Diagnosis Decision Information System, or CADDIS, is a website developed to help scientists and engineers in the Regions, States, and Tribes conduct causal assessments in aquatic systems.

  5. GUIDELINES FOR CONTRIBUTORS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    paragraph, indented .5״ on both sides. The source reference should come immediately after the quotation or in the sentence immediately before it. Paragraphs should be spaced at Exactly 14 pt and the first line of paragraphs should be indented .5״. FIGURES, TABLES AND DIAGRAMS should be created in such a way that ...

  6. Notes on Contributors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Idowu Biao (PhD) is Professor of Lifelong Learning at the Department of Adult Education, University of Botswana. He has served as Ag. Dean, Director, and Head of Department in several Universities. idowubiao2014@gmail.com. Dominic Azuh is at the Department of Economics and Development Studies, Covenant ...

  7. CONTRIBUTORS TO THIS ISSUE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of Ghana in 2012 winning the prestigious Vice Chancellor's award for Best PhD Thesis. He also won the 2016 Provost's Publications Award for best article in the Humanities. He has worked on Africanisms in Contemporary English (specifically AAA) for The. SAGE Encyclopedia of African Cultural Heritage in North America ...

  8. A salting out-acetonitrile homogeneous extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous determination of thirteen N-nitrosamines in skin care cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hao; Guo, Xindong; Xian, Yanping; Luo, Haiying; Wang, Bin; Wu, Yuluan

    2015-11-27

    A sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was established for the simultaneous determination of thirteen N-nitrosamines (NAs) in skin care cosmetics. The cosmetics samples were firstly dispersed by water and subsequently extracted and purified using salting out-acetonitrile homogeneous extraction method. Finally, the extracting solution was concentrated by slow nitrogen gas blowing. All of the samples were separated by INNOWAX capillary chromatographic column, and detected by selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and quantified by isotope internal standard method. The method was validated for linearity and range, accuracy, precision and sensitivity. Under the optimized condition, the calibration curves were linear over the selected concentration ranges of 2-500μg/L for all the thirteen analytes, with calculated coefficients of determination (R(2)) of greater than 0.996. The limits of detection (LODs) and the limits of quantitation (LOQs) of the method were 3-15μg/kg and 10-50μg/kg, respectively. Recoveries were calculated at three levels of concentration spiked in two kinds of cosmetics (skin care cream and water). The values were found between 93.8% and 121.0% with relative standard deviation (RSD) values of 2.5-7.2% for intra-day precision (n=6) and 3.3-6.7% for inter-day precision (n=5). The method was successfully applied to analyze twenty-two cosmetics samples and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) was detected in one sample with the concentration of 207μg/kg. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. An expert system model for mapping tropical wetlands and peatlands reveals South America as the largest contributor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbricht, Thomas; Roman-Cuesta, Rosa Maria; Verchot, Louis; Herold, Martin; Wittmann, Florian; Householder, Ethan; Herold, Nadine; Murdiyarso, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Wetlands are important providers of ecosystem services and key regulators of climate change. They positively contribute to global warming through their greenhouse gas emissions, and negatively through the accumulation of organic material in histosols, particularly in peatlands. Our understanding of wetlands' services is currently constrained by limited knowledge on their distribution, extent, volume, interannual flood variability and disturbance levels. We present an expert system approach to estimate wetland and peatland areas, depths and volumes, which relies on three biophysical indices related to wetland and peat formation: (1) long-term water supply exceeding atmospheric water demand; (2) annually or seasonally water-logged soils; and (3) a geomorphological position where water is supplied and retained. Tropical and subtropical wetlands estimates reach 4.7 million km 2 (Mkm 2 ). In line with current understanding, the American continent is the major contributor (45%), and Brazil, with its Amazonian interfluvial region, contains the largest tropical wetland area (800,720 km 2 ). Our model suggests, however, unprecedented extents and volumes of peatland in the tropics (1.7 Mkm 2 and 7,268 (6,076-7,368) km 3 ), which more than threefold current estimates. Unlike current understanding, our estimates suggest that South America and not Asia contributes the most to tropical peatland area and volume (ca. 44% for both) partly related to some yet unaccounted extended deep deposits but mainly to extended but shallow peat in the Amazon Basin. Brazil leads the peatland area and volume contribution. Asia hosts 38% of both tropical peat area and volume with Indonesia as the main regional contributor and still the holder of the deepest and most extended peat areas in the tropics. Africa hosts more peat than previously reported but climatic and topographic contexts leave it as the least peat-forming continent. Our results suggest large biases in our current understanding of

  10. Thirteen Secrets of the Deal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2011-01-01

    Whether one is on Wall Street, in Congress, or working in an IT shop on campus, negotiating a good deal is hard work. As higher education enters its purchasing season, "Campus Technology" talks to deal makers who have "been there and done that." This article presents their tips for getting the most value from vendors the next time one buys…

  11. Effects of Food Additives on Immune Cells As Contributors to Body Weight Gain and Immune-Mediated Metabolic Dysregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula Neto, Heitor A.; Ausina, Priscila; Gomez, Lilian S.; Leandro, João G. B.; Zancan, Patricia; Sola-Penna, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Food additives are compounds used in order to improve food palatability, texture, and shelf life. Despite a significant effort to assure safety of use, toxicological analysis of these substances, generally, rely on their direct toxicity to target organs (liver and kidney) or their genotoxic effects. Much less attention is paid to the effects of these compounds on cells of the immune system. This is of relevance given that metabolic dysregulation and obesity have a strong immune-mediated component. Obese individuals present a state of chronic low-grade inflammation that contributes to the establishment of insulin resistance and other metabolic abnormalities known as the metabolic syndrome. Obesity and metabolic syndrome are currently recognized as worldwide epidemics that pose a profound socioeconomic impact and represent a concern to public health. Cells of the immune system contribute to both the maintenance of “lean homeostasis” and the metabolic dysregulation observed in obese individuals. Although much attention has been drawn in the past decades to obesity and metabolic syndrome as a result of ingesting highly processed food containing large amounts of fat and simple sugars, mounting evidence suggest that food additives may also be important contributors to metabolic derangement. Herein, we review pieces of evidence from the literature showing that food additives have relevant effects on cells of the immune system that could contribute to immune-mediated metabolic dysregulation. Considering their potential to predispose individuals to develop obesity and metabolic syndrome, their use should be taken with caution or maybe revisited. PMID:29163542

  12. Excessive homework, inadequate sleep, physical inactivity and screen viewing time are major contributors to high paediatric obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hong; Zhou, Zhixiong; Liu, Wenxi Kevin; Wang, Xiujiang; Yin, Zenong

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between energy balance-related behaviours (EBRBs) outside school hours and obesity in Chinese primary school students. We also explored the influence of gender on those relationships. The study sample was a cross-sectional cohort of 5032 Chinese children who were enrolled in grades 1-6 in primary schools in five Chinese cities and whose mean ages ranged from seven years and three months to 11.9 years. The children's parents completed a survey on their child's height, weight and EBRBs outside school hours. The response rate was 97%, and the reported rates of overweight and obesity were 13.6% and 13.8%, respectively. The obesity rates were higher in boys and lower grade children. Most EBRBs varied between boys and girls and with increased grade levels. The amount of time spent on academic-related activities, screen viewing, outdoor activities and sleep was mostly associated with obesity on weekdays and varied by gender. Rate of obesity was alarmingly high in the primary school Chinese children in this cohort, especially in younger children. Excessive time spent on academic-related activities outside school hours, inadequate sleep, physical inactivity and higher levels of screen viewing were major contributors to obesity in these Chinese children. ©2016 The Authors. Acta Paediatrica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  13. Kinase control of latent HIV-1 infection: PIM-1 kinase as a major contributor to HIV-1 reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duverger, Alexandra; Wolschendorf, Frank; Anderson, Joshua C; Wagner, Frederic; Bosque, Alberto; Shishido, Takao; Jones, Jennifer; Planelles, Vicente; Willey, Christopher; Cron, Randall Q; Kutsch, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Despite the clinical relevance of latent HIV-1 infection as a block to HIV-1 eradication, the molecular biology of HIV-1 latency remains incompletely understood. We recently demonstrated the presence of a gatekeeper kinase function that controls latent HIV-1 infection. Using kinase array analysis, we here expand on this finding and demonstrate that the kinase activity profile of latently HIV-1-infected T cells is altered relative to that of uninfected T cells. A ranking of altered kinases generated from these kinome profile data predicted PIM-1 kinase as a key switch involved in HIV-1 latency control. Using genetic and pharmacologic perturbation strategies, we demonstrate that PIM-1 activity is indeed required for HIV-1 reactivation in T cell lines and primary CD4 T cells. The presented results thus confirm that kinases are key contributors to HIV-1 latency control. In addition, through mutational studies we link the inhibitory effect of PIM-1 inhibitor IV (PIMi IV) on HIV-1 reactivation to an AP-1 motif in the CD28-responsive element of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR). The results expand our conceptual understanding of the dynamic interactions of the host cell and the latent HIV-1 integration event and position kinome profiling as a research tool to reveal novel molecular mechanisms that can eventually be targeted to therapeutically trigger HIV-1 reactivation.

  14. Effects of Food Additives on Immune Cells As Contributors to Body Weight Gain and Immune-Mediated Metabolic Dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heitor A. Paula Neto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Food additives are compounds used in order to improve food palatability, texture, and shelf life. Despite a significant effort to assure safety of use, toxicological analysis of these substances, generally, rely on their direct toxicity to target organs (liver and kidney or their genotoxic effects. Much less attention is paid to the effects of these compounds on cells of the immune system. This is of relevance given that metabolic dysregulation and obesity have a strong immune-mediated component. Obese individuals present a state of chronic low-grade inflammation that contributes to the establishment of insulin resistance and other metabolic abnormalities known as the metabolic syndrome. Obesity and metabolic syndrome are currently recognized as worldwide epidemics that pose a profound socioeconomic impact and represent a concern to public health. Cells of the immune system contribute to both the maintenance of “lean homeostasis” and the metabolic dysregulation observed in obese individuals. Although much attention has been drawn in the past decades to obesity and metabolic syndrome as a result of ingesting highly processed food containing large amounts of fat and simple sugars, mounting evidence suggest that food additives may also be important contributors to metabolic derangement. Herein, we review pieces of evidence from the literature showing that food additives have relevant effects on cells of the immune system that could contribute to immune-mediated metabolic dysregulation. Considering their potential to predispose individuals to develop obesity and metabolic syndrome, their use should be taken with caution or maybe revisited.

  15. Subtidal stromatolites in Monterey Formation and other organic-rich rocks as suggested source contributors to petroleum formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, L.A.

    1984-12-01

    The Miocene Monterey Formation contains thin organic-rich laminations that mimic benthic mats forming today in coastal upwelling regimes of the eastern Pacific. Modern mats are comprised dominantly of filamentous sulfur-oxidizing bacteria of the family Beggiatoaceae. The characteristic spongy texture imparted to the sediments by these bacterial mats is most readily recognized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The spongy network becomes progressively compressed with increasing compaction and diagenesis, but is still distinguishable. Rock-Eval pyrolysis of modern mats reveals high S1 peaks and unusually high oxygen indices. Both parameters decrease gradually with diagenesis, as evidenced by mat-laminated Monterey Formation samples of different thermal grades. In addition, anomalously light nitrogen isotopic signatures of modern mats may be retained. The deltaN/sup 15/ values of mat-laminated Monterey Formation samples, although diagenetically enriched in /sup 15/N, are still lighter than would be expected for algally dominated organic matter in marine low-oxygen environments. On the basis of organic richness and high hydrogen indices of mat-laminated samples, and coincidence of mat-laminated rocks and oil in some fields in the San Joaquin Valley of California, the organic-matter assemblage contained within filamentous bacterial mats is suggested to be a significant contributor to petroleum formation. Additional evidence for this conclusion is provided by similar investigations of subtidal cyanobacterial mats in carbonate rocks such as the Green River Formation oil shales.

  16. Effects of Food Additives on Immune Cells As Contributors to Body Weight Gain and Immune-Mediated Metabolic Dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula Neto, Heitor A; Ausina, Priscila; Gomez, Lilian S; Leandro, João G B; Zancan, Patricia; Sola-Penna, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Food additives are compounds used in order to improve food palatability, texture, and shelf life. Despite a significant effort to assure safety of use, toxicological analysis of these substances, generally, rely on their direct toxicity to target organs (liver and kidney) or their genotoxic effects. Much less attention is paid to the effects of these compounds on cells of the immune system. This is of relevance given that metabolic dysregulation and obesity have a strong immune-mediated component. Obese individuals present a state of chronic low-grade inflammation that contributes to the establishment of insulin resistance and other metabolic abnormalities known as the metabolic syndrome. Obesity and metabolic syndrome are currently recognized as worldwide epidemics that pose a profound socioeconomic impact and represent a concern to public health. Cells of the immune system contribute to both the maintenance of "lean homeostasis" and the metabolic dysregulation observed in obese individuals. Although much attention has been drawn in the past decades to obesity and metabolic syndrome as a result of ingesting highly processed food containing large amounts of fat and simple sugars, mounting evidence suggest that food additives may also be important contributors to metabolic derangement. Herein, we review pieces of evidence from the literature showing that food additives have relevant effects on cells of the immune system that could contribute to immune-mediated metabolic dysregulation. Considering their potential to predispose individuals to develop obesity and metabolic syndrome, their use should be taken with caution or maybe revisited.

  17. Examining cumulative victimization, community violence exposure, and stigma as contributors to PTSD symptoms among high-risk young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Angie C; Bybee, Deborah; Greeson, Megan R

    2014-05-01

    This study examines patterns of lifetime victimization within the family, community violence exposure, and stigma as contributors to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms within a sample of 198 high-risk young women who are pregnant or parenting. We used cluster analysis to identify 5 profiles of cumulative victimization, based on participants' levels of witnessing intimate partner violence (IPV), physical abuse by an adult caregiver, and sexual victimization, all beginning by age 12. Hierarchical regression was used to examine these 5 clusters (ranging from a High All Victimization cluster characterized by high levels of all 3 forms of violence, to a Low All Victimization cluster characterized by low levels of all 3 forms), along with community violence exposure and stigma, as predictors of PTSD symptoms. We found that 3 of the cumulative victimization clusters, in comparison with Low All Victimization, were significant predictors of PTSD symptoms, as was stigma, while community violence exposure was not a significant predictor. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved

  18. CYP2R1 is a major, but not exclusive, contributor to 25-hydroxyvitamin D production in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinge G.; Ochalek, Justin T.; Kaufmann, Martin; Jones, Glenville; DeLuca, Hector F.

    2013-01-01

    Bioactivation of vitamin D consists of two sequential hydroxylation steps to produce 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. It is clear that the second or 1α-hydroxylation step is carried out by a single enzyme, 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1α-hydroxylase CYP27B1. However, it is not certain what enzyme or enzymes are responsible for the initial 25-hydroxylation. An excellent case has been made for vitamin D 25-hydroxylase CYP2R1, but this hypothesis has not yet been tested. We have now produced Cyp2r1−/− mice. These mice had greater than 50% reduction in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. Curiously, the 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 level in the serum remained unchanged. These mice presented no health issues. A double knockout of Cyp2r1 and Cyp27a1 maintained a similar circulating level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Our results support the idea that the CYP2R1 is the major enzyme responsible for 25-hydroxylation of vitamin D, but clearly a second, as-yet unknown, enzyme is another contributor to this important step in vitamin D activation. PMID:24019477

  19. S3 HMBC: Spin-State-Selective HMBC for accurate measurement of homonuclear coupling constants. Application to strychnine yielding thirteen hitherto unreported JHH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaerulff, Louise; Benie, Andrew J.; Hoeck, Casper; Gotfredsen, Charlotte H.; Sørensen, Ole W.

    2016-02-01

    A novel method, Spin-State-Selective (S3) HMBC, for accurate measurement of homonuclear coupling constants is introduced. As characteristic for S3 techniques, S3 HMBC yields independent subspectra corresponding to particular passive spin states and thus allows determination of coupling constants between detected spins and homonuclear coupling partners along with relative signs. In the presented S3 HMBC experiment, spin-state selection occurs via large one-bond coupling constants ensuring high editing accuracy and unequivocal sign determination of the homonuclear long-range relative to the associated one-bond coupling constant. The sensitivity of the new experiment is comparable to that of regular edited HMBC and the accuracy of the J/RDC measurement is as usual for E.COSY and S3-type experiments independent of the size of the homonuclear coupling constant of interest. The merits of the method are demonstrated by an application to strychnine where thirteen JHH coupling constants not previously reported could be measured.

  20. Effect of multiple alcohol-based hand rub applications on the tensile properties of thirteen brands of medical exam nitrile and latex gloves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Pengfei; Horvatin, Matthew; Niezgoda, George; Weible, Robyn; Shaffer, Ronald

    2016-12-01

    Current CDC guidance for the disinfection of gloved hands during the doffing of personal protective equipment (PPE) following the care of a patient with Ebola recommends for multiple applications of alcohol-based hand rub (ABHR) on medical exam gloves. To evaluate possible effects of ABHR applications on glove integrity, thirteen brands of nitrile and latex medical exam gloves from five manufacturers and two different ABHRs were included in this study. A pair of gloves were worn by a test operator and the outside surfaces of the gloves were separately treated with an ABHR for 1-6 applications. Tensile strength and ultimate elongation of the gloves without any ABHR treatments (control gloves) and gloves after 1-6 ABHR applications were measured based on the ASTM D412 standard method. In general, tensile strength decreased with each ABHR application. ABHRs had more effect on the tensile strength of the tested nitrile than latex gloves, while ethanol-based ABHR (EBHR) resulted in lesser changes in tensile strength compared to isopropanol-based ABHR (IBHR). The results show that multiple EBHR applications on the latex gloves and some of the nitrile gloves tested should be safe for Ebola PPE doffing based on the CDC guidance. Appropriate hospital staff practice using ABHR treatment and doffing gloves is recommended to become more familiar with changes in glove properties.

  1. An exploratory curriculum analysis of thirteen virtual schools, online homeschools and online curriculum providers' science curriculum from kindergarten through twelfth grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dussy L.

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe and examine various Internet-based science curricula in terms of their educational value and comprehensiveness. Thirteen online homeschool providers' science curricula were analyzed through an examination of the content and organization of instruction and through a comparison with the seven National Science Education Standards (NSES) in order to assess the pedagogical and developmental appropriateness of online science curriculum, to find the ideological perspectives exhibited by each curriculum, and to identify implications for the future of homeschooling regarding children who use an online science curriculum as the basis of their science education. The results reveal that only a few online schools incorporate all seven NSES in their science curriculum; most online schools' content and instruction have a traditional/behavioral perspective; and the Systematizer theoretical perspective was prevalent in online schools' science curricula. This study investigates the issue of whether online homeschooling can accurately be termed homeschooling. A discussion of education and schooling according to Holt (1976), Illich (1972), and Moore and Moore (1975) explore this issue. The findings from this discussion suggest that the online homeschool movement may be an undiscovered form of "schooling" and that parents, educators, researchers, curriculum developers, and specialists should be aware of the implications online homeschooling has on homeschooling's philosophy of education.

  2. The effects of hibernation on the contractile and biochemical properties of skeletal muscles in the thirteen-lined ground squirrel, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Rob S; Staples, James F; Brown, Jason C L; Tessier, Shannon N; Storey, Kenneth B

    2013-07-15

    Hibernation is a crucial strategy of winter survival used by many mammals. During hibernation, thirteen-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, cycle through a series of torpor bouts, each lasting more than a week, during which the animals are largely immobile. Previous hibernation studies have demonstrated that such natural models of skeletal muscle disuse cause limited or no change in either skeletal muscle size or contractile performance. However, work loop analysis of skeletal muscle, which provides a realistic assessment of in vivo power output, has not previously been undertaken in mammals that undergo prolonged torpor during hibernation. In the present study, our aim was to assess the effects of 3 months of hibernation on contractile performance (using the work loop technique) and several biochemical properties that may affect performance. There was no significant difference in soleus muscle power output-cycle frequency curves between winter (torpid) and summer (active) animals. Total antioxidant capacity of gastrocnemius muscle was 156% higher in torpid than in summer animals, suggesting one potential mechanism for maintenance of acute muscle performance. Soleus muscle fatigue resistance was significantly lower in torpid than in summer animals. Gastrocnemius muscle glycogen content was unchanged. However, state 3 and state 4 mitochondrial respiration rates were significantly suppressed, by 59% and 44%, respectively, in mixed hindlimb skeletal muscle from torpid animals compared with summer controls. These findings in hindlimb skeletal muscles suggest that, although maximal contractile power output is maintained in torpor, there is both suppression of ATP production capacity and reduced fatigue resistance.

  3. Heart and/or soul : reality and fiction in the association between the two strongest contributors to the global burden of disease - ischemic heart disease and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Peter

    Depression and heart disease are the strongest contributors to the global burden of disease and are often intertwined: depression is a risk factor for heart disease and vice versa. Moreover, depression in patients with established heart disease is associated with cardiovascular disease progression.

  4. Proinsulin maturation disorder is a contributor to the defect of subsequent conversion to insulin in β-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jie; Osei, Kwame

    2011-01-01

    somehow. The findings demonstrate that the perturbation of PIHO results in defects in the subsequent conversion process of proinsulin and is a contributor to the occurrence of disproportionate hyperproinsulinemia in diabetes.

  5. KCNJ10 may not be a contributor to nonsyndromic enlargement of vestibular aqueduct (NSEVA in Chinese subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiandong Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nonsyndromic enlargement of vestibular aqueduct (NSEVA is an autosomal recessive hearing loss disorder that is associated with mutations in SLC26A4. However, not all patients with NSEVA carry biallelic mutations in SLC26A4. A recent study proposed that single mutations in both SLC26A4 and KCNJ10 lead to digenic NSEVA. We examined whether KCNJ10 excert a role in the pathogenesis of NSEVA in Chinese patients. METHODS: SLC26A4 was sequenced in 1056 Chinese patients with NSEVA. KCNJ10 was screened in 131 patients who lacked mutations in either one or both alleles of SLC26A4. Additionally, KCNJ10 was screened in 840 controls, including 563 patients diagnosed with NSEVA who carried biallelic SLC26A4 mutations, 48 patients with nonsyndromic hearing loss due to inner ear malformations that did not involve enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct (EVA, 96 patients with conductive hearing loss due to various causes, and 133 normal-hearing individuals with no family history of hereditary hearing loss. RESULTS: 925 NSEVA patients were found carrying two-allele pathogenic SLC26A4 mutations. The most frequently detected KCNJ10 mutation was c.812G>A (p.R271H. Compared with the normal-hearing control subjects, the occurrence rate of c.812G>A in NSEVA patients with lacking mutations in one or both alleles of SLC26A4 had no significant difference(1.53% vs. 5.30%, χ(2 = 2.798, p = 0.172, which suggested that it is probably a nonpathogenic benign variant. KCNJ10 c.1042C>T (p.R348C, the reported EVA-related mutation, was not found in patients with NSEVA who lacked mutations in either one or both alleles of SLC26A4. Furthermore, the normal-hearing parents of patients with NSEVA having two SLC26A4 mutations carried the KCNJ10 c.1042C>T or c.812G>A mutation and a SLC26A4 pathogenic mutation. CONCLUSION: SLC26A4 is the major genetic cause in Chinese NSEVA patients, accounting for 87.59%. KCNJ10 may not be a contributor to NSEVA in Chinese population. Other

  6. Spatial variability of streamwater chemistry and specific discharge during low flow periods - First results from snapshot sampling campaigns in thirteen Swiss catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floriancic, Marius; Fischer, Benjamin; van Meerveld, Ilja

    2017-04-01

    Catchments consist of different landscape elements that store and release water differently. Few studies looked at which landscape elements contribute to streamflow during extended dry periods and whether these elements are similar in different catchments. We present a unique dataset from snapshot field campaigns in thirteen watersheds in Switzerland during low flow conditions in winter and summer 2016. The 10 to 110 km2 catchments varied from predominantly agricultural to alpine environments. In each campaign streamflow was measured and stream water was collected at a high spatial resolution using a nested sampling approach. Streamflow during the campaigns was less than the 65th percentile. We analyzed the water samples for the main ions and isotopic composition (Ca, Mg, SO4, F, NO3, Na, K, δ18O and δ2H) and compared the results with long-term datasets from the Swiss National Groundwater and River Monitoring Program (NAQUA and NADUF). For every sampling location, we calculated local and upslope catchment characteristics, including area, slope, flow length, topographic wetness index and elevation. Additionally, we determined land use, soil type and depth, geological and geomorphological characteristics from existing geodata for every sampling location. First analyses show that the spatial variation in water chemistry, isotopic composition and specific discharge is very high: Neighboring sampling locations could differ significantly in their specific discharge and isotopic and ion composition (up to a factor of 10), indicating different contributing sources. Water at the outlet was a mixture of water from different parts of the catchment. These first results suggest that the combination of snapshot water sampling and discharge measurements provides a valuable tool for identifying the spatial variability of contributing sources to streamflow. This information can then later be used to better constrain hydrological models and predict available water resources during

  7. CT Scan of Thirteen Natural Mummies Dating Back to the XVI-XVIII Centuries: An Emerging Tool to Investigate Living Conditions and Diseases in History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrella, Enrico; Piciucchi, Sara; Feletti, Francesco; Barone, Domenico; Piraccini, Antonella; Minghetti, Caterina; Gruppioni, Giorgio; Poletti, Venerino; Bertocco, Mauro; Traversari, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To correlate the radiologic findings detected with computed tomography scan with anthropological data in 13 naturally mummified bodies discovered during works of recovery of an ancient church in a crypt in Roccapelago, in the Italian Apennines. Methods From a group of about sixty not-intentionally mummified bodies, thirteen were selected to be investigated with volumetric computed tomography (CT). Once CT scan was performed, axial images were processed to gather MPR and Volume Rendering reconstructions. Elaborations of these images provided anthropometric measurements and a non-invasive analysis of the residual anatomical structures. For each body the grade of preservation and the eventual pathological changes were recorded. Furthermore, in order to identify nutritional and occupational markers, radiologic signs of bone tropism and degenerative changes were analysed and graded. Results Mummies included seven females and six males, with an estimated age ranging from 20 to 60 years. The first relevant finding identified was a general low grade of preservation, due to the lack of anatomic tissues different from bones, tendons and dehydrated skin. The low grade of preservation was related to the natural process of mummification. Analysing bone degenerative changes on CT scan, the majority of the bodies had significant occupational markers consisting of arthritis in the spine, lower limbs and shoulders even in young age. Few were the pathological findings identified. Among these, the most relevant included a severe bilateral congenital hip dysplasia and a wide osteolytic lesion involving left orbit and petrous bone that was likely the cause of death. Conclusions Although the low grade of preservation of these mummies, the multidisciplinary approach of anthropologists and radiologists allowed several important advances in knowledge for the epidemiology of Roccapelago. First of all, a profile of living conditions was delineated. It included occupational and

  8. CT Scan of Thirteen Natural Mummies Dating Back to the XVI-XVIII Centuries: An Emerging Tool to Investigate Living Conditions and Diseases in History.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Petrella

    Full Text Available To correlate the radiologic findings detected with computed tomography scan with anthropological data in 13 naturally mummified bodies discovered during works of recovery of an ancient church in a crypt in Roccapelago, in the Italian Apennines.From a group of about sixty not-intentionally mummified bodies, thirteen were selected to be investigated with volumetric computed tomography (CT. Once CT scan was performed, axial images were processed to gather MPR and Volume Rendering reconstructions. Elaborations of these images provided anthropometric measurements and a non-invasive analysis of the residual anatomical structures. For each body the grade of preservation and the eventual pathological changes were recorded. Furthermore, in order to identify nutritional and occupational markers, radiologic signs of bone tropism and degenerative changes were analysed and graded.Mummies included seven females and six males, with an estimated age ranging from 20 to 60 years. The first relevant finding identified was a general low grade of preservation, due to the lack of anatomic tissues different from bones, tendons and dehydrated skin. The low grade of preservation was related to the natural process of mummification. Analysing bone degenerative changes on CT scan, the majority of the bodies had significant occupational markers consisting of arthritis in the spine, lower limbs and shoulders even in young age. Few were the pathological findings identified. Among these, the most relevant included a severe bilateral congenital hip dysplasia and a wide osteolytic lesion involving left orbit and petrous bone that was likely the cause of death.Although the low grade of preservation of these mummies, the multidisciplinary approach of anthropologists and radiologists allowed several important advances in knowledge for the epidemiology of Roccapelago. First of all, a profile of living conditions was delineated. It included occupational and nutritional conditions

  9. Characterization of the SIRT family of NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases in the context of a mammalian model of hibernation, the thirteen-lined ground squirrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouble, Andrew N; Storey, Kenneth B

    2015-10-01

    Hibernating mammals employ strong metabolic rate depression to survive the winter, thereby avoiding the high energy costs of maintaining a euthermic lifestyle in the face of low seasonal temperatures and limited food resources. Characteristics of this natural torpor include a significant reduction in body temperature, a shift to a lipid-based metabolism, global suppression of ATP-expensive activities, and the upregulation of selected genes that mediate biochemical reorganization and cytoprotection. Sirtuin (SIRT) proteins, an evolutionarily conserved family of NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylases, have been shown to play important roles in the post-translational regulation of many metabolic and cytoprotective processes, suggesting a potential function for these enzymes in the control of hibernation. To assess this possibility, protein levels of the seven mammalian SIRTs (SIRT1, SIRT2, SIRT3, SIRT4, SIRT5, SIRT6 and SIRT7), total SIRT activity, and the acetylation status of two downstream SIRT targets (SOD2K68 and NF-κB p65K310) were measured in skeletal muscle, liver, brown adipose and white adipose tissues of the hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) over the course of the torpor-arousal cycle. The analysis revealed tissue-specific responses of different SIRTs at various points throughout hibernation, including a potentially interesting correlation between increased levels of SIRT3 protein, heightened total SIRT activity, and decreased acetylation of SIRT3 downstream target SOD2K68 in skeletal muscle during late torpor. These results provide evidence to suggest a possible role for the SIRT family of protein deacetylases in the regulation of the metabolic and cellular protective pathways that mediate the process of mammalian hibernation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dynamic changes in global and gene-specific DNA methylation during hibernation in adult thirteen-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Sebastian; Mak, Timothy; Liu, Sara; Storey, Kenneth B; Szyf, Moshe

    2015-06-01

    Hibernating mammals conserve energy in the winter by undergoing prolonged bouts of torpor, interspersed with brief arousals back to euthermia. These bouts are accompanied by a suite of reversible physiological and biochemical changes; however, much remains to be discovered about the molecular mechanisms involved. Given the seasonal nature of hibernation, it stands to reason that underlying plastic epigenetic mechanisms should exist. One such form of epigenomic regulation involves the reversible modification of cytosine bases in DNA by methylation. DNA methylation is well known to be a mechanism that confers upon DNA its cellular identity during differentiation in response to innate developmental cues. However, it has recently been hypothesized that DNA methylation also acts as a mechanism for adapting genome function to changing external environmental and experiential signals over different time scales, including during adulthood. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DNA methylation is altered during hibernation in adult wild animals. This study evaluated global changes in DNA methylation in response to hibernation in the liver and skeletal muscle of thirteen-lined ground squirrels along with changes in expression of DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1/3B) and methyl binding domain proteins (MBDs). A reduction in global DNA methylation occurred in muscle during torpor phases whereas significant changes in DNMTs and MBDs were seen in both tissues. We also report dynamic changes in DNA methylation in the promoter of the myocyte enhancer factor 2C (mef2c) gene, a candidate regulator of metabolism in skeletal muscle. Taken together, these data show that genomic DNA methylation is dynamic across torpor-arousal bouts during winter hibernation, consistent with a role for this regulatory mechanism in contributing to the hibernation phenotype. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Working with public contributors to improve the patient experience at the Manchester Clinical Research Facility: an evaluation of the Experience Based Design approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Kerin; Prince, Rebecca; Dewhurst, Hal; Parsons, Suzanne; Holmes, Leah; Brown, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The Experience Based Design (EBD) approach involves patients, staff and members of the public working together to improve a service. This paper evaluates the methods that are used to involve patients and members of the public in a project that aimed to improve the patient experience at Manchester Clinical Research Facility (MCRF). The aim was to explore what helps staff and members of the public to work well together. An evaluation questionnaire was used to get feedback from staff and public contributors. Questions included whether each person felt that they were able to shape the project; if they received enough training; whether they had enough time to complete each task; how well they thought the group worked together; and what could be improved. The findings showed that both staff and public contributors felt valued and that they were able to shape the project from the beginning. Training in EBD and research methodology, and providing enough time to complete each task helped to build relationships and increase confidence when contributing to the project. Personal benefits included a feeling of ownership over a worthwhile and rewarding project, increased awareness of public involvement and gaining new skills. The recommendations for successful involvement of patients and the public in EBD projects will hopefully be helpful for similar projects in the future. Background The Experience Based Design (EBD) approach promotes the effective involvement of patients and public contributors by enabling patients, public contributors and staff to co-design projects that aim to improve the patient experience. This approach allows patients and members of the public to have a role in shaping and improving current services. This paper aims to evaluate the EBD process from a public involvement perspective, exploring the barriers and facilitators to building successful working relationships. Methods An open-ended evaluation questionnaire was developed to gain feedback from staff

  12. The Impact of Contributor Confidence, Expertise and Distance on the Crowdsourced Land Cover Data Quality. GI_Forum 2014 – Geospatial Innovation for Society|

    OpenAIRE

    Comber, Alexis; See, Linda

    2014-01-01

    There is much interest in the opportunities for formal scientific investigations afforded by crowdsourcing and citizen sensing activities. However, one of the critical research issues relates to the ‘quality’ of the data collected in this way. This paper uses volunteer data on land cover collected under the Geo-Wiki system, where contributors label the land cover class at a series of locations, with expert labels at the same locations. It examines the statistical relationships between the acc...

  13. Thirteen Iron Meteorites Found at Gale Crater, Meridiani Planum, and Gusev Crater — Exogenic Witnesses to Weathering Processes Near the Martian Equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, J.

    2014-12-01

    At least 20 meteorites and meteorite candidates have now been found by science teams at three Mars rover landing sites, all within 15 degrees of the martian equator. Thirteen of these are iron meteorites, comprising 65% of the population — an order of magnitude greater abundance than found among witnessed iron falls in Earth-based collections (~6%). Chondritic meteorites, which comprise some 86% of Earth-based falls, are conspicuously absent from the Mars inventory. The reasons for this disproportion may involve a) post-fall environmental resistance differences favoring iron survivability; b) fragmentation from impact shock (and possibly internal weathering stresses associated with oxide production in desert environments [1]); combined with c) selection biases arising from residual chondritic fragments appearing less conspicuous. Impact features along rover traverses often show evidence of dark materials likely to be impactor fragments [e.g., 2], which could represent the missing chondritic fraction. The reactivity of reduced (metallic) iron to aqueous alteration, combined with the near equatorial and widely distributed locations of these rocks, makes them particularly useful to the assessment of climate models arguing for geologically recent ice at the martian equator. Exposure histories involving alternating wind/water cycles are imprinted on several Meridiani irons, for example [3]. Evidence for oxide coating removal demonstrates the current epoch to be one of coating destruction, not production, showing that atmospheric exposure alone is insufficient to produce the coating. Cavernous weathering is likely associated with acidic corrosion, while evidence of aeolian scouring is found in Widmanstätten patterns, sharp-crested scallops, regmaglypt enlargement, and abundant pitting. Further study of these features could help constrain wind direction and velocity during epochs of sculpting [e.g., 4], and assist in exposure age estimation. References: [1] Ashley J. W

  14. Framing of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict in thirteen months of New York Times editorials surrounding the attack of September 11, 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Dente Ross

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to determine whether U.S. newspaper framing of international conflict shifted following the Sept. 11 terrorist attack and the U.S. government's initiation of a global war on terrorism. Palestinian/Israeli violence, long a focus of international media and scholarly attention, has been rhetorically tied to terrorism and is the topic of this research. The questions motivating this study include: How did the terrorist attack on U.S. soil alter the nature and/or quantity of U.S. media commentary about the Israeli/Palestinian conflict? What does this commentary suggest about the nature of U.S. media framing of international conflict that is rhetorically tied to U.S. policy objectives and socio-cultural interests but does not involve direct U.S. military intervention? How far-reaching are the effects of a cataclysmic event on media framing, and what are they? Media effects theory, social construction theory, and framing theory are primary foundations for this study. Thus, media messages are presumed to affect the audience, and significant changes in media content are presumed to alter audience understanding of the world. However, this study looks not at the effects of media coverage but at the semantic and narrative elements of media content (the frames that construct and transmit meanings. A close qualitative reading, supplemented by limited quantitative descriptions, of thirteen months of unsigned editorial comment in The New York Times provides the data for this analysis. Although much framing research focuses on news content, editorial-page commentary is a useful bellwether of a newspaper's dominant frames because unsigned editorials express the newspaper's public stance on issues and establish a context for reader decoding of news stories. This study found the attack of Sept. 11 did not influence the frequency of New York Times editorial comment on the Palestinian/Israeli conflict. However, this and other dramatic events during

  15. Biological soil crusts are the main contributor to winter soil respiration in a temperate desert ecosystem of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, M. Z.

    2012-04-01

    horizon. Our results indicate that winter Rs of BSCs-dominated areas are the main contributor to the total carbon released by soil respiration and, therefore, which we should considered when estimating carbon budgets in desert ecosystems. Key words: Winter Soil Respiration; Biological Soil Crust (BSCs); Q10

  16. Superior mesenteric venous thrombosis: a retrospective study of thirteen cases Trombosis de vena mesentérica superior: estudio retrospectivo de trece casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Muñoz

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the epidemiology, associated risk factors, clinical presentation, diagnostic methods, treatment, and evolution of patients diagnosed with superior mesenteric venous thrombosis (SMVT at an university hospital in Madrid. Experimental design: retrospective and descriptive study. We review the medical records of patients with this diagnosis in our hospital from January 1998 to December 2002. Data were processed by using the SPSS vs. 11 software. Patients: all thirteen subjects diagnosed with SMVT in that period were included. Results: associated risk factors included tumoral conditions (5 patients, acute abdominal pathology (2, polyglobulia (1, prothrombin gene mutation (1, and anticardiolipin antibodies (1. No predisposing factor was found in 3 patients. Clinical presentation for all patients was abdominal pain, with nausea and vomiting being the second symptom in frequency (7. The diagnosis was reached by abdominal CT (9, arteriography (2, ultrasounds (1, and histology after intestinal resection (1. Treatment with only anticoagulation was initiated in 4 patients, whereas anticoagulation and surgery were performed in 5 cases. In 4 subjects no specific treatment was prescribed and only palliative measures were established due to a baseline end-stage condition. Five patients died, and four of them had a neoplasic condition as associated risk factor. Mortality in our series was 38.5%. Conclusions: SMVT is a very rare disease that is often associated with neoplasic pathology, which influences its high mortality. Due to non specific symptoms, imaging is essential for the diagnosis and the detection of associated risk factors. In our series, computed tomography imaging was the most profitable test.Objetivo: analizar la epidemiología, factores de riesgo asociados, presentación clínica, métodos diagnósticos, tratamiento y evolución en pacientes diagnosticados de trombosis de vena mesentérica superior (TVMS en un hospital

  17. EuroForMix: An open source software based on a continuous model to evaluate STR DNA profiles from a mixture of contributors with artefacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleka, Øyvind; Storvik, Geir; Gill, Peter

    2016-03-01

    We have released a software named EuroForMix to analyze STR DNA profiles in a user-friendly graphical user interface. The software implements a model to explain the allelic peak height on a continuous scale in order to carry out weight-of-evidence calculations for profiles which could be from a mixture of contributors. Through a properly parameterized model we are able to do inference on mixture proportions, the peak height properties, stutter proportion and degradation. In addition, EuroForMix includes models for allele drop-out, allele drop-in and sub-population structure. EuroForMix supports two inference approaches for likelihood ratio calculations. The first approach uses maximum likelihood estimation of the unknown parameters. The second approach is Bayesian based which requires prior distributions to be specified for the parameters involved. The user may specify any number of known and unknown contributors in the model, however we find that there is a practical computing time limit which restricts the model to a maximum of four unknown contributors. EuroForMix is the first freely open source, continuous model (accommodating peak height, stutter, drop-in, drop-out, population substructure and degradation), to be reported in the literature. It therefore serves an important purpose to act as an unrestricted platform to compare different solutions that are available. The implementation of the continuous model used in the software showed close to identical results to the R-package DNAmixtures, which requires a HUGIN Expert license to be used. An additional feature in EuroForMix is the ability for the user to adapt the Bayesian inference framework by incorporating their own prior information. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Malnutrition at Hospital Admission-Contributors and Effect on Length of Stay: A Prospective Cohort Study From the Canadian Malnutrition Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Johane P; Keller, Heather; Jeejeebhoy, Khursheed N; Laporte, Manon; Duerksen, Don R; Gramlich, Leah; Payette, Helene; Bernier, Paule; Vesnaver, Elisabeth; Davidson, Bridget; Teterina, Anastasia; Lou, Wendy

    2016-05-01

    In hospitals, length of stay (LOS) is a priority but it may be prolonged by malnutrition. This study seeks to determine the contributors to malnutrition at admission and evaluate its effect on LOS. This is a prospective cohort study conducted in 18 Canadian hospitals from July 2010 to February 2013 in patients ≥ 18 years admitted for ≥ 2 days. Excluded were those admitted directly to the intensive care unit; obstetric, psychiatry, or palliative wards; or medical day units. At admission, the main nutrition evaluation was subjective global assessment (SGA). Body mass index (BMI) and handgrip strength (HGS) were also performed to assess other aspects of nutrition. Additional information was collected from patients and charts review during hospitalization. One thousand fifteen patients were enrolled: based on SGA, 45% (95% confidence interval [CI], 42%-48%) were malnourished, and based on BMI, 32% (95% CI, 29%-35%) were obese. Independent contributors to malnutrition at admission were Charlson comorbidity index > 2, having 3 diagnostic categories, relying on adult children for grocery shopping, and living alone. The median (range) LOS was 6 (1-117) days. After controlling for demographic, socioeconomic, and disease-related factors and treatment, malnutrition at admission was independently associated with prolonged LOS (hazard ratio, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.62-0.86). Other nutrition-related factors associated with prolonged LOS were lower HGS at admission, receiving nutrition support, and food intake Malnutrition at admission is prevalent and associated with prolonged LOS. Complex disease and age-related social factors are contributors. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  19. Endogenous levels of Echinacea alkylamides and ketones are important contributors to the inhibition of prostaglandin E2 and nitric oxide production in cultured macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaLone, Carlie A; Rizshsky, Ludmila; Hammer, Kimberly D P; Wu, Lankun; Solco, Avery K S; Yum, Manyu; Nikolau, Basil J; Wurtele, Eve S; Murphy, Patricia A; Kim, Meehye; Birt, Diane F

    2009-10-14

    Because of the popularity of Echinacea as a dietary supplement, researchers have been actively investigating which Echinacea constituent or groups of constituents are necessary for immune-modulating bioactivities. Our prior studies indicate that alkylamides may play an important role in the inhibition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE(2)) production. High-performance liquid chromatography fractionation, employed to elucidate interacting anti-inflammatory constituents from ethanol extracts of Echinacea purpurea, Echinacea angustifolia, Echinacea pallida, and Echinacea tennesseensis, identified fractions containing alkylamides and ketones as key anti-inflammatory contributors using lipopolysaccharide-induced PGE(2) production in RAW264.7 mouse macrophage cells. Nitric oxide (NO) production and parallel cytotoxicity screens were also employed to substantiate an anti-inflammatory response. E. pallida showed significant inhibition of PGE(2) with a first round fraction, containing gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) peaks for Bauer ketones 20, 21, 22, 23, and 24, with 23 and 24 identified as significant contributors to this PGE(2) inhibition. Chemically synthesized Bauer ketones 21 and 23 at 1 microM each significantly inhibited both PGE(2) and NO production. Three rounds of fractionation were produced from an E. angustifolia extract. GC-MS analysis identified the presence of Bauer ketone 23 in third round fraction 3D32 and Bauer alkylamide 11 making up 96% of third round fraction 3E40. Synthetic Bauer ketone 23 inhibited PGE(2) production to 83% of control, and synthetic Bauer alkylamide 11 significantly inhibited PGE(2) and NO production at the endogenous concentrations determined to be present in their respective fraction; thus, each constituent partially explained the in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of their respective fraction. From this study, two key contributors to the anti-inflammatory properties of E. angustifolia were identified as Bauer alkylamide 11 and

  20. EuroForMix: An open source software based on a continuous model to evaluate STR DNA profiles from a mixture of contributors with artefacts

    OpenAIRE

    Bleka, Øyvind; Storvik, Geir Olve; Gill, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have released a software named EuroForMix to analyze STR DNA profiles in a user-friendly graphical user interface. The software implements a model to explain the allelic peak height on a continuous scale in order to carry out weight-of-evidence calculations for profiles which could be from a mixture of contributors. Through a properly parameterized model we are able to do inference on mixture proportions, the peak height properties, stutter proportion and degradation. In addition, EuroForM...

  1. Extreme nonfasting remnant cholesterol vs extreme LDL cholesterol as contributors to cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in 90000 individuals from the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Freiberg, Jacob J; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased nonfasting remnant cholesterol, like increased LDL cholesterol, is causally associated with increased risk for ischemic heart disease (IHD). We tested the hypothesis that extreme concentrations of nonfasting remnant and LDL cholesterol are equal contributors to the risk of IHD......, myocardial infarction (MI), and all-cause mortality. METHODS: We compared stepwise increasing concentrations of nonfasting remnant and LDL cholesterol for association with risk of IHD, MI, and all-cause mortality in approximately 90 000 individuals from the Danish general population. During up to 22 years.......4 (1.9-2.9) for remnant cholesterol of ≥1.5 mmol/L (58 mg/dL) (P for trend LDL cholesterol LDL cholesterol of 3-3.99 mmol/L (115.8-154 mg/dL) to 2.3 (1.9-2.8) for LDL cholesterol...

  2. Contributors to this Issue | Contributors | Ghana Journal of Linguistics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ghana Journal of Linguistics. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 1, No 2 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  3. Contributors to this Issue | Contributors | Ghana Journal of Linguistics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ghana Journal of Linguistics. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 4, No 2 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  4. Contributors to this Issue | Contributors | Ghana Journal of Linguistics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ghana Journal of Linguistics. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 2, No 2 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  5. Contributors to this Issue | Contributors | Ghana Journal of Linguistics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ghana Journal of Linguistics. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 2, No 1 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. Contributors to this issue | Contributors | Ghana Journal of Linguistics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ghana Journal of Linguistics. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 4, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  7. Contributors to this Issue | Contributors | Ghana Journal of Linguistics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ghana Journal of Linguistics. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 1, No 1 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Contributors to this issue | Contributors | Ghana Journal of Linguistics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would like more information about how to print, save, and work with PDFs, Highwire Press provides a helpful Frequently Asked Questions about PDFs.

  9. Original Abstracts - Supplementary | Conference Contributors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All abstracts from the The Annual Medical Research Day (AMRD) held at the University of Zimbabwe. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about ...

  10. Ten Years of Medicinal Chemistry (2005-2014) in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry: Country of Contributors, Topics, and Public-Private Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Luca; Barlocco, Daniela

    2016-08-25

    This review analyzes the articles that have appeared during the past 10 years in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, the leading journal in the field of medicinal chemistry, to provide a picture of the changing trends in this research area. Our analysis involved the country of the corresponding author, assuming that he/she was the leader of the research group, the interaction between private and public sectors, and the research topics. This analysis provides information on the contributions to the journal of authors from each country and highlights the differences between the public and private sectors regarding the research topics pursued. Moreover, changes in the number of articles that describe work on hits, leads, or clinical candidates during these years have been correlated with the affiliation of the contributors (public or private). An analysis of top-cited articles that have appeared in the journal has also been included. The data will provide the basis for understanding the evolution that is taking place in medicinal chemistry.

  11. Germline CDH1 mutations are a significant contributor to the high frequency of early-onset diffuse gastric cancer cases in New Zealand Māori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkaart, Christopher; Ellison-Loschmann, Lis; Day, Robert; Sporle, Andrew; Koea, Jonathan; Harawira, Pauline; Cheng, Soo; Gray, Michelle; Whaanga, Tracey; Pearce, Neil; Guilford, Parry

    2018-03-27

    New Zealand Māori have a considerably higher incidence of gastric cancer compared to non-Māori, and are one of the few populations worldwide with a higher prevalence of diffuse-type disease. Pathogenic germline CDH1 mutations are causative of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer, a cancer predisposition syndrome primarily characterised by an extreme lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric cancer. Pathogenic CDH1 mutations are well described in Māori families in New Zealand. However, the contribution of these mutations to the high incidence of gastric cancer is unknown. We have used next-generation sequencing, Sanger sequencing, and Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification to examine germline CDH1 in an unselected series of 94 Māori gastric cancer patients and 200 healthy matched controls. Overall, 18% of all cases, 34% of cases diagnosed with diffuse-type gastric cancer, and 67% of cases diagnosed aged less than 45 years carried pathogenic CDH1 mutations. After adjusting for the effect of screening known HDGC families, we estimate that 6% of all advanced gastric cancers and 13% of all advanced diffuse-type gastric cancers would carry germline CDH1 mutations. Our results demonstrate that germline CDH1 mutations are a significant contributor to the high frequency of diffuse gastric cancer in New Zealand Māori.

  12. Bile-acid-mediated decrease in endoplasmic reticulum stress: a potential contributor to the metabolic benefits of ileal interposition surgery in UCD-T2DM rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Bethany P; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Graham, James L; Kim, Jaehyoung; Ma, Fangrui; Shibata, Noreene; Stanhope, Kimber L; Giulivi, Cecilia; Hansen, Frederik; Jelsing, Jacob; Vrang, Niels; Kowala, Mark; Chouinard, Michael L; Haj, Fawaz G; Havel, Peter J

    2013-03-01

    Post-operative increases in circulating bile acids have been suggested to contribute to the metabolic benefits of bariatric surgery; however, their mechanistic contributions remain undefined. We have previously reported that ileal interposition (IT) surgery delays the onset of type 2 diabetes in UCD-T2DM rats and increases circulating bile acids, independently of effects on energy intake or body weight. Therefore, we investigated potential mechanisms by which post-operative increases in circulating bile acids improve glucose homeostasis after IT surgery. IT, sham or no surgery was performed on 2-month-old weight-matched male UCD-T2DM rats. Animals underwent an oral fat tolerance test (OFTT) and serial oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT). Tissues were collected at 1.5 and 4.5 months after surgery. Cell culture models were used to investigate interactions between bile acids and ER stress. IT-operated animals exhibited marked improvements in glucose and lipid metabolism, with concurrent increases in postprandial glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion during the OFTT and OGTTs, independently of food intake and body weight. Measurement of circulating bile acid profiles revealed increases in circulating total bile acids in IT-operated animals, with a preferential increase in circulating cholic acid concentrations. Gut microbial populations were assessed as potential contributors to the increases in circulating bile acid concentrations, which revealed proportional increases in Gammaproteobacteria in IT-operated animals. Furthermore, IT surgery decreased all three sub-arms of ER stress signaling in liver, adipose and pancreas tissues. Amelioration of ER stress coincided with improved insulin signaling and preservation of β-cell mass in IT-operated animals. Incubation of hepatocyte, adipocyte and β-cell lines with cholic acid decreased ER stress. These results suggest that postoperative increases in circulating cholic acid concentration contribute to improvements in

  13. Extreme nonfasting remnant cholesterol vs extreme LDL cholesterol as contributors to cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in 90000 individuals from the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varbo, Anette; Freiberg, Jacob J; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-03-01

    Increased nonfasting remnant cholesterol, like increased LDL cholesterol, is causally associated with increased risk for ischemic heart disease (IHD). We tested the hypothesis that extreme concentrations of nonfasting remnant and LDL cholesterol are equal contributors to the risk of IHD, myocardial infarction (MI), and all-cause mortality. We compared stepwise increasing concentrations of nonfasting remnant and LDL cholesterol for association with risk of IHD, MI, and all-cause mortality in approximately 90 000 individuals from the Danish general population. During up to 22 years of complete follow-up, 4435 participants developed IHD, 1722 developed MI, and 8121 died. Compared with participants with nonfasting remnant cholesterol cholesterol of 0.5-0.99 mmol/L (19.3-38.2 mg/dL) to 2.4 (1.9-2.9) for remnant cholesterol of ≥1.5 mmol/L (58 mg/dL) (P for trend LDL cholesterol LDL cholesterol of 3-3.99 mmol/L (115.8-154 mg/dL) to 2.3 (1.9-2.8) for LDL cholesterol of ≥5 mmol/L (193 mg/dL) (P cholesterol (P LDL cholesterol (P cholesterol concentrations were associated stepwise with all-cause mortality ranging from hazard ratio 1.0 (0.9-1.1) to 1.6 (1.4-1.9) (P LDL cholesterol concentrations were associated with decreased all-cause mortality risk in a U-shaped pattern, with hazard ratios from 0.8 (0.7-0.8) to 0.9 (0.8-1.0) (P = 0.002). After mutual adjustment, LDL cholesterol best predicted MI, and remnant cholesterol best predicted all-cause mortality. Both lipoproteins were associated equally with risk of IHD and MI; however, only nonfasting remnant cholesterol concentrations were associated stepwise with increased all-cause mortality risk. © 2015 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  14. Bile-acid-mediated decrease in endoplasmic reticulum stress: a potential contributor to the metabolic benefits of ileal interposition surgery in UCD-T2DM rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany P. Cummings

    2013-03-01

    Post-operative increases in circulating bile acids have been suggested to contribute to the metabolic benefits of bariatric surgery; however, their mechanistic contributions remain undefined. We have previously reported that ileal interposition (IT surgery delays the onset of type 2 diabetes in UCD-T2DM rats and increases circulating bile acids, independently of effects on energy intake or body weight. Therefore, we investigated potential mechanisms by which post-operative increases in circulating bile acids improve glucose homeostasis after IT surgery. IT, sham or no surgery was performed on 2-month-old weight-matched male UCD-T2DM rats. Animals underwent an oral fat tolerance test (OFTT and serial oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT. Tissues were collected at 1.5 and 4.5 months after surgery. Cell culture models were used to investigate interactions between bile acids and ER stress. IT-operated animals exhibited marked improvements in glucose and lipid metabolism, with concurrent increases in postprandial glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 secretion during the OFTT and OGTTs, independently of food intake and body weight. Measurement of circulating bile acid profiles revealed increases in circulating total bile acids in IT-operated animals, with a preferential increase in circulating cholic acid concentrations. Gut microbial populations were assessed as potential contributors to the increases in circulating bile acid concentrations, which revealed proportional increases in Gammaproteobacteria in IT-operated animals. Furthermore, IT surgery decreased all three sub-arms of ER stress signaling in liver, adipose and pancreas tissues. Amelioration of ER stress coincided with improved insulin signaling and preservation of β-cell mass in IT-operated animals. Incubation of hepatocyte, adipocyte and β-cell lines with cholic acid decreased ER stress. These results suggest that postoperative increases in circulating cholic acid concentration contribute to improvements in

  15. Retroconversion is a minor contributor to increases in eicosapentaenoic acid following docosahexaenoic acid feeding as determined by compound specific isotope analysis in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metherel, Adam H; Chouinard-Watkins, Raphaël; Trépanier, Marc-Olivier; Lacombe, R J Scott; Bazinet, Richard P

    2017-01-01

    Dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) not only increases blood and tissue levels of DHA, but also eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3). It is generally believed that this increase is due to DHA retroconversion to EPA, however, a slower conversion of α-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3) derived EPA to downstream metabolic products (i.e. slower turnover of EPA) is equally plausible. In this study, 21-day old Long Evans rats were weaned onto an ALA only or DHA + ALA diet for 12 weeks. Afterwards, livers were collected and the natural abundance 13 C-enrichment was determined by compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of liver EPA by isotope ratio mass-spectrometry and compared to dietary ALA and DHA 13 C-enrichment. Isotopic signatures (per mil, ‰) for liver EPA were not different ( p  > 0.05) between the ALA only diet (-25.89 ± 0.39 ‰, mean ± SEM) and the DHA + ALA diet (-26.26 ± 0.40 ‰), suggesting the relative contribution from dietary ALA and DHA to liver EPA did not change. However, with DHA feeding estimates of absolute EPA contribution from ALA increased 4.4-fold (147 ± 22 to 788 ± 153 nmol/g) compared to 3.2-fold from DHA (91 ± 14 to 382 ± 13 nmol/g), respectively. In conclusion, CSIA of liver EPA in rats following 12-weeks of dietary DHA suggests that retroconversion of DHA to EPA is a relatively small contributor to increases in EPA, and that this increase in EPA is largely coming from elongation/desaturation of ALA.

  16. Isolation and characterization of thirteen polymorphic microsatellite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Takara, Dalian, China). Recombinant clones were identified using blue/white screening on Luria-. Bertani agar plates. Insert positive bacterial clones were amplified using M13 primers and visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis. Sixty positive ...

  17. Isolation and characterization of thirteen polymorphic microsatellite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    perfect repeat motifs, 36 of these were suitable for design- ing locus-specific primers using the Primer3 web interface program (Rozen and Skaletsky 2000). The characterization of microsatellites was ..... eral users and for biologist programmers. In Bioinformatics meth- ods and protocols (ed. S. Krawetz and S. Misener), pp.

  18. The thirteen books of Euclid's elements

    CERN Document Server

    Euclid

    2012-01-01

    Volume 3 of three-volume set containing complete English text of all 13 books of the Elements plus critical apparatus analyzing each definition, postulate, and proposition in great detail. Covers textual and linguistic matters; mathematical analyses of Euclid's ideas; classical, medieval, Renaissance and modern commentators; refutations, supports, extrapolations, reinterpretations and historical notes. Vol. 3 includes Books 10-13: Commensurable magnitudes, solids, cones, cylinders.

  19. Thirteen international workshop on nuclear theory. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This brochure contains the abstracts of reports delivered by 40 participants at the 13. International Workshop on Nuclear Theory organized by the Nuclear Theory Group in the Institute for Nuclear research and Nuclear Energy of the Bulgarian academy of Sciences. The main topics treated in the lectures were nucleon correlation effects in nuclei, collective nuclear motions, Wigner quantum systems, pre-equilibrium neutron and photon emission from nuclei, particle-nuclei collision processes at high energies, few-body states, optical potential for neutron-nucleus scattering, relativistic generator coordinate calculations and variational nuclear structure calculations. All reports are included in INIS separately

  20. French petroleum demand stable since thirteen years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvot, M.

    2005-01-01

    The French union of petroleum industries (Ufip) has presented a globally satisfactory status of the French petroleum situation. However, the refining capacities are not always well adapted to the evolution of the demand and the production of diesel fuels remains insufficient while France exports gasoline. Short paper. (J.S.)

  1. Subluxation of the Carpus in Thirteen Horses

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, J.V.; Barber, S.M.; Fretz, P.B.; Jacobs, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    The records of 13 horses of various breeds with subluxation of the radiocarpal, intercarpal or carpometacarpal joint, or combinations of these were reviewed. Subluxation was most common at the carpometacarpal joint (n = 10) and concomitant fractures of individual carpal bones or metacarpus II and IV were seen (n = 12).

  2. Treze passos para o juízo final: a nova era do desarmamento nuclear dos Estados Unidos e da Rússia Thirteen steps to judgement day: the new era of Russian and North American nuclear disarmament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Santos Vieira de Jesus

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo procura explicar por que os líderes dos EUA e da Rússia não implementaram total e efetivamente o plano de ação de treze pontos práticos para o desarmamento nuclear, estabelecido na Conferência de Revisão do Tratado de Não-Proliferação Nuclear em 2000. As decisões relacionadas aos treze pontos, tomadas pelos membros dos Executivos das duas maiores potências nucleares, são vistas como resultado da conciliação de imperativos internos e externos por esses indivíduos, que enfrentam oportunidades e dilemas estratégicos distintos simultaneamente nos âmbitos doméstico e internacional. São consideradas as escolhas políticas de membros dos Executivos nacionais e estrangeiros, Legislativos e principais grupos de interesse desses países, bem como a distribuição de poder sobre a formulação da decisão nacional, estabelecida pelas instituições políticas domésticas. As hipóteses apontam que os membros dos Executivos desses países - apoiados por grande parte dos membros dos Legislativos e dos principais grupos de interesse envolvidos, como as Forças Armadas - procuraram garantir autonomia para definir a estrutura e a composição de forças estratégicas e táticas, modernizar arsenais atômicos e operar uma força capaz de lidar com contingências que envolvam não apenas potências nucleares tradicionais, mas principalmente novos Estados detentores de armas de destruição em massa e organizações terroristas.This article aims to explain why U.S. and Russian leaders have not implemented totally and effectively the thirteen practical-step plan of action on nuclear disarmament agreed at the 2000 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference. The decisions with regard to the thirteen steps, taken by members of U.S. and Russian Executives, are seen as the result of the conciliation of internal and external imperatives by those individuals, who face distinctive strategic opportunities and dilemmas simultaneously

  3. Thirteen nodule-specific or nodule-enhanced genes encoding products homologous to cysteine cluster proteins or plant lipid transfer proteins are identified in Astragalus sinicus L. by suppressive subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Min-Xia; Wei, Xin-Yuan; Chen, Da-Song; Zhou, Jun-Chu

    2006-01-01

    Thirteen nodule-specific or nodule-enhanced genes have been revealed by suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) with two mRNA populations of infected and uninfected control roots of Astragalus sinicus. Eleven of them encode small polypeptides showing homology to cysteine cluster proteins (CCPs) that contain a putative signal peptide and conserved cysteine residues. Among these CCP-like genes, AsG257 codes for a homologue of the defensin 2 family and AsD255 contains a scorpion toxin-like domain at the C-terminus. Sequence analysis of a genomic AsD255 fragment which was isolated revealed that one intron separates the first exon encoding the signal peptide from the second exon encoding the cysteine cluster domain of this nodulin. Another two genes, AsE246 and AsIB259, encode two different products similar to lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). Virtual northern blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis indicated that the other genes except AsIB259 and AsC2411 were expressed exclusively in inoculated roots and that their expression was 2-4 d later than that of the leghaemoglobin (Lb) gene during nodule development. Transcription of AsIB259 was also detected in uninfected control roots but with a significant decline in expression and a temporal expression similar to Lb. AsC2411 had a basal expression in control roots identified by RT-PCR. Sequence alignment showed that the putative proteins AsE246 and AsIB259 show lower homology with LTPs from legumes than with those from other plants.

  4. Lithofacies and Diagenetic Controls on Formation-scale Mechanical, Transport, and Sealing Behavior of Caprocks: A Case Study of the Morrow shale and Thirteen Finger Limestone, Farnsworth Unit, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, N. A.; Heath, J. E.; Mozley, P.; Dewers, T. A.; Cather, M.

    2016-12-01

    Assessment of caprock sealing behavior for secure CO2 storage is a multiscale endeavor. Sealing behavior arises from the nano-scale capillarity of pore throats, but sealing lithologies alone do not guarantee an effective seal since bypass systems, such as connected, conductive fractures can compromise the integrity of the seal. We apply pore-to-formation-scale data to characterize the multiscale caprock sealing behavior of the Morrow shale and Thirteen Finger Limestone. This work is part of the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration's Phase III project at the Farnsworth Unit, Texas. The caprock formations overlie the Morrow sandstone, the target for enhanced oil recovery and injection of over one million metric tons of anthropogenically-sourced CO2. Methods include: focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy; laser scanning confocal microscopy; electron and optical petrography; multi-stress path mechanical testing and constitutive modeling; core examinations of sedimentary structures and fractures; and a noble gas profile for formation-scale transport of the sealing lihologies and the reservoir. We develop relationships between diagenetic characteristics of lithofacies to mechanical and petrophysical measurements of the caprocks. The results are applied as part of a caprock sealing behavior performance assessment. Funding for this project is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory through the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) under Award No. DE-FC26-05NT42591. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Sistemas de produção de mandioca em treze municípios da Região Sudoeste da Bahia Cassava production systems in thirteen counties of the southwest area of Bahia State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Martins de Carvalho

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi o de avaliar as práticas culturais utilizadas no cultivo da mandioca em 13 municípios da Região Sudoeste da Bahia. Foram aplicados 848 questionários durante o primeiro semestre de 2005. A amostragem foi realizada por município, com coleta de informações sobre variedades utilizadas, origem do material de plantio, época de plantio, método de plantio e espaçamento, consorciação, manejo de plantas daninhas, ocorrência de pragas e doenças e época de colheita. Os dados foram submetidos à análise de frequência simples de ocorrência das alternativas apresentadas nos questionários, usando-se os programas SAEG 9.1 e Excel 2003. O sistema de produção foi caracterizado pela reduzida adoção de tecnologias agronômicas. A maioria dos produtores não usa técnicas como plantio em espaçamento apropriado e regular, predominando o cultivo de variedades tradicionais, colhidas geralmente com 18 a 24 meses após o plantio, feito em sistema de consórcio, predominando o uso do feijão e do milho.The aim of this research was to evaluate cassava crop management practices in thirteen counties of Southwest area of Bahia State. There were used 848 questionnaires during the first semester of 2005. The sampling was taken in each one of counties, with data about utilized varieties, source of the cassava cuttings, planting period, planting method and spacing, intercropping, weed management, pests and diseases control, and harvest time. The data were submitted to simple frequency analysis of the alternatives showed in the questionaires using the SAEG 9.1 and Excel software. The production system was characterized by low adoption of agricultural technologies. Most of the farmers do not use proper and regular plant spacing, prevailing the cultivation of traditional varieties, harvested generally with 18 a 24 months after the planting which is done mainly in intercropping with common bean and maize.

  6. Manejo de solo em cultvo com mandioca em treze municípios da região sudoes da Bahia Soil management with cassava cropping in thirteen counties in the Southwest of Bahia's Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Martins de Carvalho

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available O Estado da Bahia, por vários anos, destaca-se na produção de mandioca no Brasil, sendo a Região Sudoeste uma das principais produtoras. Em 2003 e 2004, o município de Cândido Sales foi o maior produtor baiano e o segundo maior produtor do Brasil. Entretanto, sua produtividade, assim como a de outros municípios da região, é baixa. As causas para este baixo desempenho são as mais diversas e de difícil detecção, principalmente quando o sistema de produção assume características locais. Com o objetivo de diagnosticar o manejo de solos cultivados com mandioca em 13 municípios da Região Sudoeste da Bahia, foram aplicados 848 questionários, durante o primeiro semestre de 2005, nos municípios de Vitória da Conquista, Barra do Choça, Planalto, Poções, Ribeirão do Largo, Encruzilhada, Cândido Sales, Belo Campo, Tremedal, Piripá, Condeúba, Anagé e Caraíbas. A amostragem foi realizada em cada município, com coleta de informações sobre preparo do solo, utilização de práticas conservacionistas e uso de calagem e adubação. Os dados foram submetidos à análise de freqüência simples. Constatou-se baixa adoção de práticas de conservação do solo, calagem e adubação, predominando nos municípios o preparo do solo manual.For many years Bahia-Brasil has a highlighted cassava production and the Southwest region of this state is one of the major producer. In 2003 and 2004, Cândido Sales county was the major producer in the state of Bahia and the second higher producer in Brasil. However, its productivity as well as the production from others counties in that region is low. There are many causes for that low performace and can be difficult to be detected, mainly, when the production system ensue local characteristics. With the purpose to diagnosis the soil management cultivated with cassava in thirteen counties in southwest Bahia's region, 848 questionaires were used during the first semester of 2005 in the following

  7. Extracellular Vesicles: Evolving Contributors in Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Katsiougiannis, Stergios

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles, including microvesicles, exosomes and apoptotic bodies are recognized as carriers of pathogen-associated molecules with direct involvement in immune signaling and inflammation. Those observations have enforced the way these membranous vesicles are being considered as promising immunotherapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the emerging roles of extracellular vesicles in autoimmunity and highlights their potential use as disease biomarkers as well as targets for ...

  8. NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS H. Johnson Nenty, Professor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    , Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife. He is a Fellow of the Cambridge Commonwealth Society and member of the International Society for Third Sector. Research (ISTR). Daniel Eseme Gberevbie, Associate Professor, Department of Political ...

  9. BWR flood risk - The human contributor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragola, J.R.; Paccione, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The development of approaches to address the human contribution to nuclear plant risk has come a long way since the days of WASH-1400. More systematic approaches to procedural error evaluation now exist, and promising techniques for addressing errors in decision making have been proposed. Human interaction with the development, progress, and mitigation of accident sequences are now addressed directly if not routinely in many current Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) projects. No longer is the Human Reliability Analyst relegated only to the minor role of supporting fault tree models developed by others, now he is often a member of the team who participates early on in the development of the initiating events sets, and the construction of the event tree. This integrated involvement which has come about recently has led to a greater understanding of how the human might participate in the initiation of an accident, in the enabling or disabling of mitigating systems subsequent to its initiation (thereby either ameliorating or exacerbating its development), or in the recovery efforts once it has developed

  10. Key contributors: Ernst von Glasersfeld's radical constructivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Kenneth

    2007-07-01

    This article reviews the significance of the contributions of Ernst von Glasersfeld to research in science education, especially through his theoretical contributions on radical constructivism. As a field shaper, Glasersfeld's subversive ideas catalyzed debate in the science education community and fuelled transformation of many facets including research methods, ways of thinking about teaching and learning, curriculum, and science teacher education. Perturbations emanating from the debates on constructivism forged new pathways that led to the development and use of many of the sociocultural frameworks employed by authors in Cultural Studies of Science Education.

  11. Users as essential contributors to spatial cyberinfrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poore, B.S.

    2011-01-01

    Current accounts of spatial cyberinfrastructure development tend to overemphasize technologies to the neglect of critical social and cultural issues on which adoption depends. Spatial cyberinfrastructures will have a higher chance of success if users of many types, including nonprofessionals, are made central to the development process. Recent studies in the history of infrastructures reveal key turning points and issues that should be considered in the development of spatial cyberinfrastructure projects. These studies highlight the importance of adopting qualitative research methods to learn how users work with data and digital tools, and how user communities form. The author's empirical research on data sharing networks in the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis at the turn of the 21st century demonstrates that ordinary citizens can contribute critical local knowledge to global databases and should be considered in the design and construction of spatial cyberinfrastructures.

  12. Physician burnout: contributors, consequences and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, C P; Dyrbye, L N; Shanafelt, T D

    2018-03-05

    Physician burnout, a work-related syndrome involving emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and a sense of reduced personal accomplishment, is prevalent internationally. Rates of burnout symptoms that have been associated with adverse effects on patients, the healthcare workforce, costs and physician health exceed 50% in studies of both physicians-in-training and practicing physicians. This problem represents a public health crisis with negative impacts on individual physicians, patients and healthcare organizations and systems. Drivers of this epidemic are largely rooted within healthcare organizations and systems and include excessive workloads, inefficient work processes, clerical burdens, work-home conflicts, lack of input or control for physicians with respect to issues affecting their work lives, organizational support structures and leadership culture. Individual physician-level factors also play a role, with higher rates of burnout commonly reported in female and younger physicians. Effective solutions align with these drivers. For example, organizational efforts such as locally developed practice modifications and increased support for clinical work have demonstrated benefits in reducing burnout. Individually focused solutions such as mindfulness-based stress reduction and small-group programmes to promote community, connectedness and meaning have also been shown to be effective. Regardless of the specific approach taken, the problem of physician burnout is best addressed when viewed as a shared responsibility of both healthcare systems and individual physicians. Although our understanding of physician burnout has advanced considerably in recent years, many gaps in our knowledge remain. Longitudinal studies of burnout's effects and the impact of interventions on both burnout and its effects are needed, as are studies of effective solutions implemented in combination. For medicine to fulfil its mission for patients and for public health, all stakeholders in healthcare delivery must work together to develop and implement effective remedies for physician burnout. © 2018 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  13. Acknowledgement of manuscript reviewers, the underappreciated contributors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Lucy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Contributing reviewers We and the Editorial Board acknowledge and thank all reviewers for their active participation and contribution during 2012. We greatly appreciate their dedication and behind the scenes contribution. It is largely due to their support and expertise that we have been able to publish high-standard manuscripts. We would also like to thank authors for choosing Nutrition & Metabolism and contributing their cherished work.

  14. Mast Cells: Key Contributors to Cardiac Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P. Levick

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Historically, increased numbers of mast cells have been associated with fibrosis in numerous cardiac pathologies, implicating mast cells in the development of cardiac fibrosis. Subsequently, several approaches have been utilised to demonstrate a causal role for mast cells in animal models of cardiac fibrosis including mast cell stabilising compounds, rodents deficient in mast cells, and inhibition of the actions of mast cell-specific proteases such as chymase and tryptase. Whilst most evidence supports a pro-fibrotic role for mast cells, there is evidence that in some settings these cells can oppose fibrosis. A major gap in our current understanding of cardiac mast cell function is identification of the stimuli that activate these cells causing them to promote a pro-fibrotic environment. This review will present the evidence linking mast cells to cardiac fibrosis, as well as discuss the major questions that remain in understanding how mast cells contribute to cardiac fibrosis.

  15. Certain Grain Foods Can Be Meaningful Contributors to Nutrient Density in the Diets of U.S. Children and Adolescents: Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanni Papanikolaou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Grain foods may play an important role in delivering nutrients to the diet of children and adolescents. The present study determined grain food sources of energy/nutrients in U.S. children and adolescents using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009–2012. Analyses of grain food sources were conducted using a 24-h recall in participants 2–18 years old (N = 6109. Sources of nutrients contained in grain foods were determined using U.S. Department of Agriculture nutrient composition databases and excluded mixed dishes. Mean energy and nutrient intakes from the total diet and from various grain foods were adjusted for the sample design using appropriate weights. All grains provided 14% ± 0.2% kcal/day (263 ± 5 kcal/day, 22.5% ± 0.3% (3 ± 0.1 g/day dietary fiber, 39.3% ± 0.5% (238 ± 7 dietary folate equivalents (DFE/day folate and 34.9% ± 0.5% (5.6 ± 0.1 mg/day iron in the total diet in children and adolescents. The current analyses showed that certain grain foods, in particular breads, rolls and tortillas, ready-to-eat cereals and quick breads and bread products, are meaningful contributors of folate, iron, thiamin, niacin and dietary fiber, a nutrient of public health concern as outlined by the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Thus, specific grain foods contribute to nutrient density and have the potential to increase the consumption of several under-consumed nutrients in children and adolescents.

  16. Recurrent Ectopic Pregnancies: Analysis of Risk Factors of Thirteen Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Gün Eryılmaz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A prior ectopic pregnancy increases the risk of consequent ectopic pregnancies. In this study risk factors and treatment modalities of recurrent ectopic pregnancies were analyzed in a tertiary hospital setting. Material and Method: Between January 2006 and December 2008, 13 recurrent ectopic pregnancies were retrospectively evaluated for demographic features, risk factors and treatment modalities. One year after the last ectopic pregnancy, patients were called back for their reproductive outcomes. Results: Ten out of 13 patients (76.9 % were second repeat ectopic and 3 ( 23.1 % were third repeat ectopic pregnancies. Five patients had miscarriages after previous ectopic pregnancies and these patients were performed uterine currettage after miscarriages. Eleven out of 13 patients (84.6 % were treated with surgical approach. Ten out of 11 patients (90,9 % had laparoscopic approach. One emergent laparotomy was performed for a patient in the third repeat ectopic group. Salpingostomy was performed for the four patients in the second repeat ectopic pregnancy group. Salpingectomy was the only technique for all three patients in third repeat ectopic group and also for the four patients in second repeat ectopic group. There were no pregnancies among these 13 patients one year after the ectopic attacks. None of the patients were intrauterine device user, only one patient was smoker, and one patient had experienced a previous pelvic inflammatory disease. Discussion: Risk factors for recurrent ectopic pregnancy were previous miscarriages and uterine currettages. Second repeat ectopic pregnancy was better to be managed with salpingostomy by laparoscopic approach for the future fertility expectations.

  17. Thirteen ways to say nothing with scientific visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, AL; Raible, E.

    1992-01-01

    Scientific visualization can be used to produce very beautiful images. Frequently, users and others not properly initiated into mysteries of visualization research fail to appreciate the artistic qualities of these images. Scientists will frequently use our work to needlessly understand the data from which it is derived. This paper describes a number of effective techniques to confound such pernicious activity.

  18. A thirteen week ad libitum administration toxicity study of tartrazine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tartrazine is a colorant widely used in food products, drugs and cosmetics. The current study evaluates the effect of sub-chronic ingestion of tartrazine in drinking water at doses of 0, 0.1, 0.45, 1 and 2.5% for 13 weeks in mice. Our results show that female body weight gain and food consumption decreased in all treated ...

  19. Thirteen textbooks of basic chemistry and their treatment of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, G.; Navarrete, M.; Martinez, T.; Cabrera, L.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear chemistry is usually associated with great disasters, especially the atomic bomb; this without reflecting that knowledge of nuclear chemistry has also had many benefits in the field of medicine and health. Whereas in technologically advanced countries, nuclear chemistry is considered to be an important part of the syllabus, including topics such as radioactivity with the emphasis in making conscience in the common citizen of the inherent benefits. (author)

  20. Thirteen[th] European TRIGA users conference. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The conference covers topic related to TRIGA reactor, such as reactor operation and maintenance experience - safety aspects; research activities and applications; boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) projects and other design operational and safety issues

  1. Total Knee Replacement: a Preliminary Report Thirteen (13) Cases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: This is a prospective report of 13 cases of primary Total Knee Replacement (TKR) at the National Orthopaedic Hospital Lagos between August, 2001 and September, 2005. There were a total of 13 knee replacement surgeries in 11 patients. Ten were females while 1 was male. Consecutive patients with severe ...

  2. Thirteen cases of jaw osteonecrosis in patients on bisphosphonate therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieillard, Marie-Hélène; Maes, Jean-Michel; Penel, Guillaume; Facon, Thierry; Magro, Leonardo; Bonneterre, Jacques; Cortet, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    We report on our experience with 13 cases of jaw osteonecrosis in patients treated with amino-bisphosphonates. Data were collected by a regional observatory for jaw osteonecrosis in northern France via letters sent to all physicians likely to manage patients with this condition. All study patients were evaluated at a multidisciplinary jaw osteonecrosis clinic between June and December 2005. We identified 13 cases, in 12 women and 1 man, with a mean age of 62.6 years. Intravenous amino-bisphosphonate therapy was given for metastatic bone disease from breast cancer in 7 patients and multiple myeloma in 5 patients; the remaining patient was on oral alendronate for osteoporosis. Mean treatment duration was 24 months. A history of dental extraction was found in 11 (84.6%) patients. The mandible was involved in all 13 patients and the maxillary in 3 (23%) patients. Amino-bisphosphonate therapy was discontinued in all 13 patients. We suggest a classification scheme for the clinical and computed-tomography patterns seen in our patients. Jaw osteonecrosis is a severe complication of amino-bisphosphonate therapy. In addition to the application of published guidelines, we propose discontinuing bisphosphonate therapy whenever possible. We are evaluating our classification scheme to identify early diagnostic criteria and/or clinical and computed-tomography outcome criteria that would improve the management of patients with jaw osteonecrosis.

  3. Relation between Temperature and Mortality in Thirteen Spanish Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñiguez, Carmen; Ballester, Ferran; Ferrandiz, Juan; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Sáez, Marc; López, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    In this study we examined the shape of the association between temperature and mortality in 13 Spanish cities representing a wide range of climatic and socio-demographic conditions. The temperature value linked with minimum mortality (MMT) and the slopes before and after the turning point (MMT) were calculated. Most cities showed a V-shaped temperature-mortality relationship. MMTs were generally higher in cities with warmer climates. Cold and heat effects also depended on climate: effects were greater in hotter cities but lesser in cities with higher variability. The effect of heat was greater than the effect of cold. The effect of cold and MMT was, in general, greater for cardio-respiratory mortality than for total mortality, while the effect of heat was, in general, greater among the elderly. PMID:20948955

  4. Thirteen years of the fight against doping in figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Millán; Muñoz-Guerra, Jesús; Plata, María Del Mar; Del Coso, Juan

    2017-06-01

    Every year, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) publishes the main statistics reported by the accredited laboratories, which provide very valuable information for assessing changes in the patterns of doping in sports over time. Using the information provided since 2003 as the basis for the analysis, the evolution of doping/anti-doping figures over the last decade can be examined in reasonable detail, at least in reference to samples analyzed and categories of substances more commonly found in athletes' samples. This brief analysis of the WADA statistical reports leads us to the following outcomes: the increase in anti-doping pressure from 2003 to 2015, as evidenced by increased numbers of samples analyzed and banned substances, has not directly produced a higher frequency of adverse/atypical findings. Although this could be interpreted as steady state in the capacity to detect doping through this whole period, it also resulted in a significant increase in the absolute number of samples catalogued as doping (from 2247 in 2003 to 5912 in 2015). Anabolic agents have been the most common doping substances detected in all statistics reports while the remaining groups of substances are much less frequently found in doping control samples. Given that one might have expected the enhancement of the anti-doping programme led by WADA over this last decade to have increased the percentage of adverse/atypical findings, the fact that it did not might indicate the need to take another step in sampling strategies, such as 'more intelligent testing' based on the differences in the prevalence of doping substances among sports. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Whole-Genome Sequences of Thirteen Isolates of Borrelia burgdorferi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schutzer S. E.; Dunn J.; Fraser-Liggett, C. M.; Casjens, S. R.; Qiu, W.-G.; Mongodin, E. F.; Luft, B. J.

    2011-02-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is a causative agent of Lyme disease in North America and Eurasia. The first complete genome sequence of B. burgdorferi strain 31, available for more than a decade, has assisted research on the pathogenesis of Lyme disease. Because a single genome sequence is not sufficient to understand the relationship between genotypic and geographic variation and disease phenotype, we determined the whole-genome sequences of 13 additional B. burgdorferi isolates that span the range of natural variation. These sequences should allow improved understanding of pathogenesis and provide a foundation for novel detection, diagnosis, and prevention strategies.

  6. Thirteen and two fairy tales on the energy turning point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keil, Guenter

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by the choices and changes in the German energy policy, the author proposes controversial texts under the form of tales on the German policy and situation regarding energy. These tales ironically address the German energy model, the uselessness of the seven stopped nuclear power plants, the low cost of the energy turnaround made by the German government, the environmental benefit of renewable energies, the high potential of energy savings, the new means of electricity storage, the electric car as means to store electricity, the low cost of solar energy ('Sun does not send any bill'), the wind energy (the wind turbine fleet in such place can supply so much households), the geothermal energy, the so-called technological leap, the benefit of decentralized energy production, the numerous jobs created by renewable energies, the ecologic electric current, and the search for a final nuclear waste disposal site

  7. Maths Games Workshop--Part Thirteen: Types of Mathematical Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Dave

    1989-01-01

    Presented are mathematical games in six categories of mathematical objectives: learn the language of mathematics; use mathematical notation; know facts; develop skills; understand concepts; and devise strategies. Numbers of players, rules, and diagrams are provided for each problem. (YP)

  8. A thirteen week ad libitum administration toxicity study of tartrazine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nabila

    2013-07-10

    Jul 10, 2013 ... 1Laboratory of Physiology of Nutrition and Food Safety, Department of Biology, University of Oran,. El Menaouer 31000 Oran, Algeria. 2Laboratory of Developmental Biology, Department of Biology, University of Oran, El Menaouer 31000 Oran, Algeria. Accepted 5 July ... Acute oral exposure to tartrazine did ...

  9. Thirteen Week Oral Toxicity Study of WR242511 with a Thirteen Week Recovery Period in Dogs. Volume 1 of 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-03-07

    pharmacologic effect, was produced in a dose-dependent fashion and was accompanied by clinical signs of cyanosis (blue gums, tongue and sclera ). Mild anemia as... sclera ). Mild anemia as supported by reticulocytosis, secondary splenic hematopoiesis and bone marrow hyperplasia occurred primarily in high dose...from the jugular vein to measure the following parameters. The samples were processed in the same random order as collected. Water was available ad

  10. Thirteen Week Oral Toxicity Study of WR238605 with a Thirteen Week Recovery Period in Rats. Volume 1 of 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-18

    renal hemosiderosis . The aforementioned changes were also seen at the end of the dosing period as discussed below. Alveolar proteinosis was observed...anemia was accompanied by several histologic changes including splenic hyperplasia, renal and bone marrow hemosiderosis , and hemoglobin nephropathy...lesions were generally reversible after cessation of treatment, except for renal hemosiderosis which was still in the process of resolution as judged by a

  11. Thirteen Week Oral Toxicity Study of WR238605 with a Thirteen Week Recovery Period in Rats. Volume 3 of 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-18

    These granules were identified as hemosiderin . Hemosiderin can be distinguished Draft Pathology Report Toxicology Research Laboratory Study Number...C98 from lipofuscin by iron and acid-fast stains. Hemosiderin is iron (Perl’s stain) positive and acid- fast negative, while lipofuscin is iron...cytoplasmic droplets, cytoplasmic vacuolation, and necrosis. Hemosiderin was deposited as variably-sized golden-brown granules in the cytoplasm of

  12. Thirteen Week Oral Toxicity Study of WR238605 with a Thirteen Week Recovery Period in Dogs. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-11

    Creatinine Triglycerides Creatine kinase (CK) Urea nitrogen (BUN) Urine specimens were collected in Weeks -1, 2, 4, 8 and 13, and during the recovery period...Globulin (calculated) Glucose Haptoglobin Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) Inorganic phosphorus Potassium Sodium Page 11 ®SM tr? Contract No.: DAMD17-92...but not females in Week 2 (Tables 7.13 and 7.14). This was supported by increased levels of bilirubin in the urine of these animals and in mid dose

  13. Avionics : The main contributor to innovation in aviation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theunissen, E.

    2010-01-01

    Avionics refers to Electronic systems used in Aviation, and the word itself is a blend of Aviation and Electronics. Avionics are not only essential for today’s commercial and military aircraft to fly, but also enable their integration into the overall traffic management system. For safety critical

  14. Transposable Elements: Powerful Contributors to Angiosperm Evolution and Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Keith R.; McComb, Jen A.; Greene, Wayne K.

    2013-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are a dominant feature of most flowering plant genomes. Together with other accepted facilitators of evolution, accumulating data indicate that TEs can explain much about their rapid evolution and diversification. Genome size in angiosperms is highly correlated with TE content and the overwhelming bulk (>80%) of large genomes can be composed of TEs. Among retro-TEs, long terminal repeats (LTRs) are abundant, whereas DNA-TEs, which are often less abundant than retro-TEs, are more active. Much adaptive or evolutionary potential in angiosperms is due to the activity of TEs (active TE-Thrust), resulting in an extraordinary array of genetic changes, including gene modifications, duplications, altered expression patterns, and exaptation to create novel genes, with occasional gene disruption. TEs implicated in the earliest origins of the angiosperms include the exapted Mustang, Sleeper, and Fhy3/Far1 gene families. Passive TE-Thrust can create a high degree of adaptive or evolutionary potential by engendering ectopic recombination events resulting in deletions, duplications, and karyotypic changes. TE activity can also alter epigenetic patterning, including that governing endosperm development, thus promoting reproductive isolation. Continuing evolution of long-lived resprouter angiosperms, together with genetic variation in their multiple meristems, indicates that TEs can facilitate somatic evolution in addition to germ line evolution. Critical to their success, angiosperms have a high frequency of polyploidy and hybridization, with resultant increased TE activity and introgression, and beneficial gene duplication. Together with traditional explanations, the enhanced genomic plasticity facilitated by TE-Thrust, suggests a more complete and satisfactory explanation for Darwin’s “abominable mystery”: the spectacular success of the angiosperms. PMID:24065734

  15. Antibiotic misuse in the community--a contributor to resistance?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carey, B

    2012-02-03

    The problem of antibiotic resistance is associated with the indiscriminate usage of antibiotics. Efforts have been directed at encouraging the rational use of these drugs to reduce the volume of antibiotic consumption and decrease resistance rates. There is evidence to suggest that the misuse of antibiotics by patients may also contribute to the problem. We describe a survey of a random selection of patients attending a General Practitioners\\' surgery over a six week period in an effort to estimate the level of non-compliance to antibiotic therapy in the community. The results suggest that there may be a significant level of antibiotic misuse prevalent in the local community. We discuss these results and present evidence in the literature suggesting how antibiotic misuse may affect resistance in the community. The factors affecting patient compliance to therapy are outlined along with suggested measures to improve compliance among patients.

  16. THE MILITARY AS A CONTRIBUTOR TO NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Even in Israel, where the defence force now has a highly developed social role ... neighbouring Arab states. 1. Yet in Israel, and elsewhere, .... If a war is 'being conducted simultaneously in all spheres - political, economic, diplomatic and military', as one definition of 'total war' puts it,6 it would seem logical that the military ...

  17. Nuclear power. A key contributor to a decarbonised European Union

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-12-15

    The European energy sector is currently facing a new set of challenges in the light of the COP21 Paris agreement, the Energy Union initiative and new market design projections. Nuclear energy sector understands the post COP21 constellation as a unique opportunity for all low carbon technologies which will be basic for transition towards COP21 commitments. A new policy outlook for Europe is needed in order to provide low carbon capacity, lead to the modernisation of technical processes and contribute to the prosperity of Europeans. The benefits of nuclear are highlighted for a low carbon future and for the security of supply and recommend actions for supporting new investments.

  18. Interpersonal violence as a major contributor towards the skewed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trauma secondary to interpersonal violence (IPV) predominated. A disproportionately high level of pedestrian-motor vehicle collisions (PMVCs) in relation to total road traffic collisions was noted. Blunt force trauma secondary to motor vehicle collisions was the leading cause of death, while blunt force trauma secondary to ...

  19. Body iron is a contributor to oxidative damage of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuomainen, T.P.; Loft, Steffen Huitfeldt; Nyyssonen, K.

    2007-01-01

    with daily urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine excretion, a marker of oxidative stress, in 48 mildly dyslipidemic men in East Finland. In multivariate linear regression analyses allowing for age, smoking, body mass index and physical exercise, serum ferritin concentration predicted the excretion rate at B = 0......The transition metal iron is catalytically highly active in vitro, and not surprisingly, body iron has been suggested to promote oxidative stress in vivo. In the current analysis we studied the association of serum ferritin concentration and serum soluble transferrin receptor concentration.......17 (95% CI 0.08-0.26, P = 0.001), and serum soluble transferrin receptor to ferritin concentration ratio (TfR/ferritin) predicted the excretion rate at B = - 0.13 (95% CI - 0.21 to - 0.05, P = 0.002). Our data suggest that body iron contributes to excess oxidative stress already at non-iron overload...

  20. Fuel cells - a new contributor to stationary power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Angelo U.

    Stationary power generation historically started as distributed generation near the user, with the configuration of a very open market, where a lot of small competing utilities were offering electricity to the customers. At a second time it became a `monopolistic' business because of technical reasons. Big steam turbines and electric generators, allowing better efficiencies, were more conveniently installed in very large power plants, necessarily located in sites far away from where the power was needed, and the transmission losses were bounded by AC high voltage technology. The Governments were, therefore, trying to balance the power of monopolies, that were limiting the economical development of the countries, by strengthening the concept of electrical energy price public control and, alternatively, by establishing rules to allow a free flow of electricity from one region to the other, or taking direct control through ownership of big and small utilities. The most effective way of making the electric energy system competitive has proved to be the opening of a partial competition in the generation field by forcing the utilities to compare the cost of their energy, produced with new centralised plants, to the price of the available energy, coming from combined heat and power dispersed generators. In fact, with reference to this cost, all the peculiar features of large central stations and dispersed generators were taken into account, like the widespread use of natural gas, the investment risk reduction with single smaller increments of capacity, the transmission and distribution siting difficulties and high costs, the improved system reliability, and, finally, the high quality electric power. Fuel Cells are a recently become available technology for distributed electrical energy production, because they share the main typical aspects, relevant for a distributed power system, like compatibility with other modular subsystem packages, fully automation possibility, very low noise and emissions release, high efficiency both directly as fuel cell (38-55%) and in integrated cycles (50-65% with fossil fuels), delivered `power quality' and reliability. Focus is principally kept on the impact fuel cells could have on electrical grid management and control, for their voltage support and active filtering capabilities, for their response speed and for quick load connection capabilities. The cost for the moment is high, but some technology, like phosphoric acid, is in the market entry phase. Cost analysis for the main subsystems, that is fuel cell stacks, fuel processors, and power electronics and controls, indicates that the prices will be driven down to the required levels both through technology refinements and increase of production volumes. Anyhow, a new phase is beginning, where centralised power plants are facing the competition of distributed generators, like fuel cells, small gas turbines and internal combustion engines, and of other renewable energy generators, like photovoltaics and wind generators. They all are modular, dispersed throughout the utility distribution system to provide power closer to end user, and are not in competition with existing transmission and distribution systems, but they improve the systems' utilisation. The plants will initially be directly owned and operated by gas or energy distributors, and the customers could easily supersede their mistrusts by only paying for the energy they are really utilising, leaving away the worries about the investment costs and the risks of a bad operation. An `intelligent grid', delivering high quality electrical energy to millions of electrical household consumers, which, a second later, become non-polluting energy producers, appears to be giving a very relevant contribution to `the town of the future', envisaged also by the European Commission, where the quality of our lives is mainly depending on the quality of the energy.

  1. Note: Contributors to this Issue | Dwivedi | Ghana Journal of Linguistics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ghana Journal of Linguistics. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 2 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  2. 76 FR 16233 - Interpretive Rule Regarding Electronic Contributor Redesignations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ..., as amended, 2 U.S.C. 431 et seq. (``the Act'') and its regulations ``consistent with contemporary....'' Advisory Opinion 1999-09 (Bradley for President); see also Advisory Opinions 2007-30 (Dodd); 2007-17 (DSCC... requirements of 11 CFR 110.1(b)(5). The Commission believes it is important to inform the public, including...

  3. Thrombosis: A major contributor to global disease burden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raskob, G. E.; Angchaisuksiri, P.; Blanco, A. N.; Buller, H.; Gallus, A.; Hunt, B. J.; Hylek, E. M.; Kakkar, A.; Konstantinides, S. V.; McCumber, M.; Ozaki, Y.; Wendelboe, A.; Weitz, J. I.

    2014-01-01

    Thrombosis is a common pathology underlying ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke, and venous thromboembolism (VTE). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 (GBD 2010) documented that ischemic heart disease and stroke collectively caused one in four deaths worldwide. GBD 2010 did not report data

  4. Thrombosis: A major contributor to global disease burden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raskob, G. E.; Angchaisuksiri, P.; Blanco, A. N.; Buller, H.; Gallus, A.; Hunt, B. J.; Hylek, E. M.; Kakkar, A.; Konstantinides, S. V.; McCumber, M.; Ozaki, Y.; Wendelboe, A.; Weitz, J. I.

    2014-01-01

    Thrombosis is a common pathology underlying ischaemic heart disease, ischaemic stroke, and venous thromboembolism (VTE). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 (GBD 2010) documented that ischaemic heart disease and stroke collectively caused one in four deaths worldwide. GBD 2010 did not report

  5. Thrombosis: a major contributor to global disease burden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raskob, G. E.; Angchaisuksiri, P.; Blanco, A. N.; Buller, H.; Gallus, A.; Hunt, B. J.; Hylek, E. M.; Kakkar, A.; Konstantinides, S. V.; McCumber, M.; Ozaki, Y.; Wendelboe, A.; Weitz, J. I.

    2014-01-01

    Thrombosis is the common pathology underlying ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke, and venous thromboembolism (VTE). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 (GBD 2010) documented that ischemic heart disease and stroke collectively caused 1 in 4 deaths worldwide. GBD 2010 did not report data for

  6. Thrombosis: a major contributor to the global disease burden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raskob, G. E.; Angchaisuksiri, P.; Blanco, A. N.; Buller, H.; Gallus, A.; Hunt, B. J.; Hylek, E. M.; Kakkar, A.; Konstantinides, S. V.; McCumber, M.; Ozaki, Y.; Wendelboe, A.; Weitz, J. I.

    2014-01-01

    Thrombosis is a common pathology underlying ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke, and venous thromboembolism (VTE). The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors (GBD) Study 2010 documented that ischemic heart disease and stroke collectively caused one in four deaths worldwide. GBD

  7. Thrombosis: a major contributor to global disease burden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raskob, Gary E.; Angchaisuksiri, Pantep; Blanco, Alicia N.; Büller, Harry; Gallus, Alexander; Hunt, Beverley J.; Hylek, Elaine M.; Kakkar, The Lord; Konstantinides, Stavros V.; McCumber, Micah; Ozaki, Yukio; Wendelboe, Aaron; Weitz, Jeffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    Thrombosis is a common pathology underlying ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke, and venous thromboembolism (VTE). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 (GBD 2010) documented that ischemic heart disease and stroke collectively caused one in four deaths worldwide. GBD 2010 did not report data

  8. Is sleep deprivation a contributor to obesity in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, Jean-Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Chronic lack of sleep (called "sleep deprivation") is common in modern societies with 24/7 availability of commodities. Accumulating evidence supports the role of reduced sleep as contributing to the current obesity epidemic in children and youth. Longitudinal studies have consistently shown that short sleep duration is associated with weight gain and the development of obesity. Recent experimental studies have reported that sleep restriction leads to weight gain in humans. Increased food intake appears to be the main mechanism by which insufficient sleep results in weight gain. Voluntary sleep restriction has been shown to increase snacking, the number of meals eaten per day, and the preference for energy-dense foods. Although the causes of sleep loss in the pediatric population are numerous, more research looking at screen exposure before bedtime and its effects on sleep is needed given the pervasiveness of electronic media devices in today's environment. Health professionals should routinely ask questions about sleep and promote a good night's sleep because insufficient sleep impacts activity and eating behaviors. Future research should examine the clinical benefits of increasing sleep duration on eating behaviors and body weight control and determine the importance of adequate sleep to improve the treatment of obesity.

  9. Body iron is a contributor to oxidative damage of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuomainen, T.P.; Loft, Steffen Huitfeldt; Nyyssonen, K.

    2007-01-01

    The transition metal iron is catalytically highly active in vitro, and not surprisingly, body iron has been suggested to promote oxidative stress in vivo. In the current analysis we studied the association of serum ferritin concentration and serum soluble transferrin receptor concentration.......17 (95% CI 0.08-0.26, P = 0.001), and serum soluble transferrin receptor to ferritin concentration ratio (TfR/ferritin) predicted the excretion rate at B = - 0.13 (95% CI - 0.21 to - 0.05, P = 0.002). Our data suggest that body iron contributes to excess oxidative stress already at non-iron overload...

  10. Early life circumstances as contributors to HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Karolynn; Lekas, Helen-Maria; Ramjohn, Destiny; Schrimshaw, Eric; VanDevanter, Nancy

    2014-10-01

    Adolescents may come from family settings that heighten their vulnerability to early sexual initiation, promiscuity and sexual exploitation. Using qualitative data, we illustrated how early life and family circumstances including neglectful or dysfunctional parenting, sexual abuse, and unstable housing placed young women on a risk trajectory for HIV infection. Five representative cases from a sample of 26 adolescent and young adult HIV-infected females (ages 16-24) who participated in a study about the disease-related adaptive challenges they faced are discussed. Study participants were recruited from five New York City adolescent HIV clinics that provided comprehensive specialty medical and ancillary social services to adolescents and young adults with the disease. The findings revealed that these young women's unmet need for love, protection, and feeling valued left them vulnerable to exploitive relationships with men who were often significantly older and resulted in their HIV infection.

  11. Body iron is a contributor to oxidative damage of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Loft, Steffen; Nyyssönen, Kristiina

    2007-01-01

    The transition metal iron is catalytically highly active in vitro, and not surprisingly, body iron has been suggested to promote oxidative stress in vivo. In the current analysis we studied the association of serum ferritin concentration and serum soluble transferrin receptor concentration with d...

  12. 47 CFR 54.711 - Contributor reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the truth and accuracy of historical data included in the Telecommunications Reporting Worksheet, and... issues that arise and provide any suggested response. (b) The Commission shall have access to all data... administrators of the North American Numbering Plan administration cost recovery (See 47 CFR 52.16 of this...

  13. Biotic stress: a significant contributor to organic aerosol in Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, R.; Hallquist, M.; Simpson, D.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, T. F.

    2014-12-01

    We have investigated the potential impact on organic aerosol formation from biotic stress-induced emissions (SIE) of organic molecules from forests in Europe (north of lat. 45° N). Emission estimates for sesquiterpenes (SQT), methyl salicylate (MeSA) and unsaturated C17 compounds, due to different stressors, are based on experiments in the Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber (JPAC), combined with estimates of the fraction of stressed trees in Europe based on reported observed tree damage. SIE were introduced in the EMEP MSC-W chemical transport model and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields from the SIE were taken from the JPAC experiments. Based on estimates of current levels of infestation and the JPAC aerosol yields, the model results suggest that the contribution to SOA in large parts of Europe may be substantial. It is possible that SIE contributes as much, or more, to organic aerosol than the constitutive biogenic VOC emissions, at least during some periods. Based on the assumptions in this study, SIE-SOA are estimated to constitute between 50 and 70 % of the total biogenic SOA (BSOA) in a current-situation scenario where the biotic stress in northern and central European forests causes large SIE of MeSA and SQT. An alternative current-situation scenario with lower SIE, consisting solely of SQT, leads to lower SIE-SOA, between 20 and 40 % of the total BSOA. Hypothetical future scenarios with increased SIE, due to higher degrees of biotic stress, show that SOA formation due to SIE can become even larger. Unsaturated C17 BVOC (biogenic volatile organic compounds) emitted by spruce infested by the forest-honey generating bark louse, Cinara pilicornis, have a high SOA-forming potential. A model scenario investigating the effect of a regional, episodic infestation of Cinara pilicornis in Baden-Württemberg, corresponding to a year with high production of forest honey, shows that these types of events could lead to very large organic aerosol formation in the infested region. We have used the best available laboratory data on biotic SIE applicable to northern and central European forests. Using these data and associated assumptions, we have shown that SIE are potentially important for SOA formation but the magnitude of the impact is uncertain and needs to be constrained by further laboratory, field and modelling studies. As an example, the MeSA, which is released as a consequence of various types of biotic stress, is found to have a potentially large impact on SIE-SOA in Europe, but different assumptions regarding the nighttime chemistry of MeSA can change its SOA potential substantially. Thus, further investigations of the atmospheric chemistry of MeSA and observational field studies are needed to clarify the role of this compound in the atmosphere.

  14. Guidelines for Contributors | Editor | Ghana Journal of Linguistics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ghana Journal of Linguistics. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 1 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  15. Contributors to this Issue | Chief | Ghana Journal of Linguistics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ghana Journal of Linguistics. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 6, No 3 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  16. Contributors to this Issue | Chief | Ghana Journal of Linguistics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ghana Journal of Linguistics. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 6, No 2 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. The Major Contributors to Quality of Life for the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, John C.

    Factors contributing to the quality of life of older adults were investigated. A national survey provided the data which were collected in four-hour interviews from a representative national sample of 800 persons 68 to 72 years old when interviewed. The respondents reported on aspects of their quality of life related to their family, education,…

  18. Contributors to this Issue | Chief | Ghana Journal of Linguistics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    He is also interested in the morphophonological study of some phenomena such as personal names, language games, reduplication, etc. ... 37129 Verona VR. Email address: onbroohm@gmail.com; obednii.broohm@univr.it. Bio Statement: Obed Nii Broohm is a final-year PhD student at the University of Verona, Italy.

  19. Guidelines for Contributors | Chief | Ghana Journal of Linguistics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ghana Journal of Linguistics. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 6, No 2 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  20. Guidelines for Contributors | Editor-in-Chief | Ghana Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PLEASE follow these guidelines closely when preparing your paper for submission. The editors reserve the right to reject inadequately prepared papers. All areas of linguistics are invited – the journal is not limited to articles on languages of or in Ghana or Africa.

  1. HIV antiretroviral medication stock-outs in Ghana: contributors and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although using ARVs produced in-country could reduce supply problems, the domestically-manufactured product currently does not meet World Health Organization (WHO) standards. We recommend focused efforts to produce WHO standard ARVs in Ghana, and a review of current supply chain management to identify and ...

  2. Personal and Social Contributors to Dropout Risk for Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaha, Valerie; Fitzpatrick, Jacki

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine how personal characteristics (e.g., loneliness, interpersonal competence) and social characteristics (e.g., marginality) contributed to dropout risk among undergraduate students. The respondents (n=127 undergraduates) completed a questionnaire packet to assess all of the variables. Regression…

  3. Important TQM Implementation Contributors in Pakistani Petrochemical Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasir Latif

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses quality practices in Pakistani Petrochemical sector to understand TQM practices and their implementation in Pakistan. It helps to understand the role of leadership, vision & plan statement, employee participation and education & training as important constructs of TQM. It shows how these constructs help to speed up the TQM implementation in petrochemical sector like other constructs of TQM and finally company moves towards quality approach. The responses of executives, managerial staff and workers were received using questionnaire and online surveys which are sent through Google Drive. Data of 106 respondents was taken in this study and analyzed by SPSS18. Study shows that Total Quality Management culture is less understood by employees, thus less adopted and implemented in Pakistan. Petrochemical companies fail to adopt the TQM philosophy and processes, hence reducing productivity and profits. This research paper is very helpful for executives for TQM implementation in petrochemical sector.

  4. Cortical thickness as a contributor to abnormal oscillations in schizophrenia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Christopher Edgar

    2014-01-01

    Discussion: Left STG low-frequency and steady-state gamma abnormalities distinguish SZ and HC. Disease-associated damage to STG gray matter in schizophrenia may disrupt the age-related left STG gamma-band function–structure relationships observed in controls.

  5. The privatization of EEB: From cash drain to major contributor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavaliere, Christianne; Larsen, Erik R.; Dyner, Isaac

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we describe the successful part-privatization of Empresa de Energia de Bogota (EEB), the city-owned electricity company in Bogota, Colombia. We describe the reason, the preparation and the actual sale process as well as the outcome following the part-privatization. EEB went from being a company on the edge of bankruptcy to one of the most financially secure electricity companies in South America. We also place the case in relation to the standard views on direct foreign investment and their social benefit. Finally, we aim to generalize the experience to see what other organizations in a similar position can learn

  6. Environmental and genetic contributors to salivary testosterone levels in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai eXia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Transient activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in early infancy plays an important role in male genital development and sexual differentiation of the brain, but factors contributing to individual variation in testosterone levels during this period are poorly understood. We measured salivary testosterone levels in 222 infants (119 males, 103 females, 108 singletons, 114 twins between 2.70 and 4.80 months of age. We tested 16 major demographic and medical history variables for effects on inter-individual variation in salivary testosterone. Using the subset of twins, we estimated genetic and environmental contributions to salivary testosterone levels. Finally, we tested single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within ± 5kb of genes involved in testosterone synthesis, transport, signaling, and metabolism for associations with salivary testosterone using univariate tests and random forest (RF analysis. We report an association between 5 minute APGAR scores and salivary testosterone levels in males. Twin modelling indicated that individual variability in testosterone levels was primarily explained by environmental factors. Regarding genetic variation, univariate tests did not reveal any variants significantly associated with salivary testosterone after adjusting for false discovery rate. The top hit in males was rs10923844, a SNP of unknown function located downstream of HSD3B1 and HSD3B2. The top hits in females were two SNPs located upstream of ESR1 (rs3407085 and rs2295190. RF analysis, which reflects joint and conditional effects of multiple variants, indicated that genes involved in regulation of reproductive function, particularly LHCGR, are related to salivary testosterone levels in male infants, as are genes involved in cholesterol production, transport, and removal, while genes involved in estrogen signaling are related to salivary testosterone levels in female infants.

  7. Editing Dialogics: Ethical Issues Concerning Student Contributors in Edited Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassoni, John Paul; Tayko, Gail

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the authors' attempts to enact a process they have come to call "editing dialogics" and its relation to the Conference on College Composition and Communication's "Guidelines for the Ethical Treatment of Students and Student Writing in Composition Studies." Makes their roles explicit to expose elements of scholarly…

  8. Maternal smoking-A contributor to the obesity epidemic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Morris, Margaret J

    2007-10-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing worldwide, and the rising number of obese children and adolescents is of particular concern. In humans, smoking is a predisposing factor for abdominal obesity, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Maternal smoking is associated with preterm birth and low birth weight. On the other hand, the incidence of obesity is higher in children and adults born of smoking mothers. Disorders in eating behaviour, reduced physical activity, and increased risk of hypertension and nicotine addiction have been observed in the offspring of smoking mothers. Evidence from animal and human studies suggests that intrauterine smoke exposure may alter peripheral and central mediators involved in the regulation of appetite and energy metabolism. Smoking cessation during pregnancy is desirable to improve health outcomes in offspring.: © Crown Copyright 2007 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Asia Oceania Assoc. for the Study of Obesity. All rights reserved.

  9. Developmental theories of parental contributors to antisocial behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, D S; Bell, R Q

    1993-10-01

    In view of the increased interest in a developmental approach to psychopathology, and mounting evidence of the importance of parent-child interactions in the etiology of early antisocial behavior, the following questions were posed for this review. What theories of parent-child relationships and family management techniques are available? How developmental are they, how specific and transactional are they relative to parent and child behaviors involved? And how well do they cover the period in which antisocial behavior develops? Six theories have some developmental features but the attachment theories (by L. A. Sroufe, B. Egeland, and M. T. Greenberg) and two social learning theories (by G. R. Patterson and J. Martin) are most clearly developmental. They postulate reciprocal interactions of parent and child, and transformations in the form of normative changes in the child or changes in family processes. The social learning theories of Patterson and Martin are most specific, microanalytic in fact, as to the interaction processes involved, and the attachment theories at least specify kinds of behavior involved and also do not rely on traits or types of influence as their units of analysis. Conceptualization is most weak and overly general between late infancy and the preschool years. This gap makes it difficult to link attachment and social learning theories, both of which have driven a large number of studies. A bridging theory is offered to link the two sets of theories in the critical period involved.

  10. Mechanical contributors to sex differences in idiopathic knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolella Daniel P

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The occurrence of knee osteoarthritis (OA increases with age and is more common in women compared with men, especially after the age of 50 years. Recent work suggests that contact stress in the knee cartilage is a significant predictor of the risk for developing knee OA. Significant gaps in knowledge remain, however, as to how changes in musculoskeletal traits disturb the normal mechanical environment of the knee and contribute to sex differences in the initiation and progression of idiopathic knee OA. To illustrate this knowledge deficit, we summarize what is known about the influence of limb alignment, muscle function, and obesity on sex differences in knee OA. Observational data suggest that limb alignment can predict the development of radiographic signs of knee OA, potentially due to increased stresses and strains within the joint. However, these data do not indicate how limb alignment could contribute to sex differences in either the development or worsening of knee OA. Similarly, the strength of the knee extensor muscles is compromised in women who develop radiographic and symptomatic signs of knee OA, but the extent to which the decline in muscle function precedes the development of the disease is uncertain. Even less is known about how changes in muscle function might contribute to the worsening of knee OA. Conversely, obesity is a stronger predictor of developing knee OA symptoms in women than in men. The influence of obesity on developing knee OA symptoms is not associated with deviation in limb alignment, but BMI predicts the worsening of the symptoms only in individuals with neutral and valgus (knock-kneed knees. It is more likely, however, that obesity modulates OA through a combination of systemic effects, particularly an increase in inflammatory cytokines, and mechanical factors within the joint. The absence of strong associations of these surrogate measures of the mechanical environment in the knee joint with sex differences in the development and progression of knee OA suggests that a more multifactorial and integrative approach in the study of this disease is needed. We identify gaps in knowledge related to mechanical influences on the sex differences in knee OA.

  11. Assessment of hospitalization and mortality of scleroderma in-patients: a thirteen-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenavandeh, Saeedeh; Naseri, Razieh

    2017-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an uncommon non-hereditary sporadic disease that increases the risk of premature death, especially in diffuse type. We determined the prevalence of SSc in the last 13 years in our rheumatologic hospitals as a referral center for southern Iranian patients, the causes of hospitalization, the average length of stay (LOS), the mortality rate, and the reason for their mortality. A cross-sectional study was performed in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The studied population included all patients diagnosed with systemic sclerosis. We calculated the hospitalization rates, in-hospital mortality rates, and mean LOS. There were 446 admissions by 181 patients with SSc. The female to male ratio was about 10.7 : 1. The overall mean LOS was 5.95 days. Digital ulcer and interstitial lung disease (ILD) were the most common causes of hospitalizations among the SSc-related events. For those with a non-SSc-related condition, infection was the most prevalent event. Most of the deaths were due to ILD and pulmonary artery hypertension(PAH), and the overall in-hospital mortality rate was 16.5%. Women with SSc had higher rates of hospitalization but lower in-hospital mortality than men.There were some differences between our study and other similar studies in the causes of hospitalization and in-hospital death among SSc patients, especially the lower age of death. The patients with digital ulcers and those with intestinal lung disease or pulmonary hipertension were most commonly admitted to the hospital in our study group. Probably, increasing the skin care of these patients and asking other specialty groups to cooperate will decrease the high rate of hospitalizations in our population.

  12. Thirteen-year hardwood tree performance on a Midwest surface mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, W.C.; Kolar, C.A.

    1998-01-01

    Black walnut (Juglans nigra L.), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.), tuliptree (Liriodendron tulipifera L.), white oak (Quercus alba L.), bur oak (Q. macrocarpa Michx.), and pin oak (Q. palustris Muenchh.) seedlings were planted both fall 1980 and spring 1981 on mixed overburden strip-mining banks (ungraded), mixed overburden graded to approximate original contour (AOC) (graded), mixed overburden graded to AOC wit h 60 cm of replaced pre-mining surface soil materials (topsoil), and on old fields near the strip-mine (unmined). Black walnut and pin oak were also planted as seed, with a total of 6000 seedlings/seed spots in the study. Initial species field viability ranged from 86 to 100%. With one exception, after 3 growing seasons oak seedlings had 50% or greater survival. Survival was mostly lower after 3 years with some additional mortality by years 8 and 13. Height and diameter breast height were measured after 13 years. Survival and growth of trees planted fall or spring was similar overall with variable performance by species. Seedlings of several species on the ungraded site had over 50% survival after 13 years, with fewer trees where planted as seed. Mean height of all species combined was significantly greater on the ungraded than on any other site and was lowest on the topsoil site. The unmined sites had high variability in species survival and height. Better reclamation with trees resulted from a deep, well-drained rooting medium with minimal compaction and a mineral-rich surface soil including coarse fragments over 2 mm in size for long-term productivity

  13. [Meals consumption among thirteen years olds and selected family socio-economic correlates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzycka-Stalmach, Magdalena; Mikiel-Kostyra, Krystyna; Oblacińska, Anna; Jodkowska, Maria; Wojdan-Godek, Elzbieta

    2010-01-01

    To analyse the influence of selected family socioeconomic factors on the regularity of meals consumption among 13-years aged adolescents. Group of 605 13-years olds identified in the prospective cohort study in 2008 was analysed. Data was gathered with use of posted questionnaires. On the basis of information given by children the regularity (4-5 times a week) of meals consumption on school days and eating meals with parents were correlated with parents' educational level, occupational status and perceived family wealth. The study also recognised the distinction between urban and rural residents. Most questionnaires were filled out by mothers (95%), only 5% by fathers. In urban area, the mother's occupation and the perceived family wealth, correlate with children meals consumption and eating meals with parents. Children whose mothers have a job eat breakfast 1.5 times and supper 3 times less regularly, than children whose mothers don't work. Children from poor families eat breakfast 14 times less regularly than children from rich families as well as eat supper 3 times less regularly than children from average wealthy families. In the rural area, the regularity of meals consumption significantly influence the mother's education. Children whose mothers have a secondary education, compared with children of mothers with basic education, are 4 times more likely to eat dinner and supper regularly. The family socioeconomic factors significantly correlate with regularity of 13-years olds meals consumption and regularity of family meals. The place of residence involve the different factors influencing meals consumption habits. It was shown that children and fathers were too little engaged in family life, including family meals preparation and consumption.

  14. Thirteen years of integrated precipitable water derived by GPS at Mario Zucchelli Station, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierguido Sarti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Since 1998, the Italian Antarctic Programme has been funding space geodetic activities based on the use of episodic and permanent global positioning system (GPS observations. As well as their exploitation in geodynamics, these data can be used to sense the atmosphere and to retrieve and monitor its water vapor content and variations. The surface pressure p and temperature Ts at the GPS tracking sites are necessary to compute the zenith hydrostatic delay (ZHD, and consequently, the precipitable water. At sites where no surface information is recorded, the p and Ts values can be retrieved from, e.g., global numerical weather prediction models. Alternatively, the site-specific ZHD values can be computed by interpolation of the ZHD values provided in a grid model (2.5° × 2.0°. We have processed the data series of the permanent GPS site TNB1 (Mario Zucchelli Station, Antarctica from 1998 to 2010, with the purpose of comparing the use of grid ZHD values as an alternative to the use of real surface records. With these approaches, we estimate almost 7 × 104 hourly values of precipitable water over 13 years, and we find discrepancies that vary between 1.8 (±0.2 mm in summer and 3.3 (±0.5 mm in winter. In addition, the discrepancies of the two solutions show a clear seasonal dependency. Radiosounding measurements were used to derive an independent series of precipitable water. These agree better with the GPS precipitable water derived from real surface data. However, the GPS precipitable water time series is dry biased, as it is ca. 77% of the total moisture measured by the radiosoundings. Both the GPS and radiosounding observations are processed through the most up-to-date strategies, to reduce known systematic errors.

  15. Development of an Outreach Group for Children Ages Five through Thirteen Who Have Witnessed Domestic Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Corinne

    This practicum took place at a spouse abuse shelter located in a county classified as urban in the southeast United States. It was found that once a family left the shelter, support groups were not available to help the children with feelings related to living in a home where domestic violence has occurred. Most of these children were already…

  16. Thirteen-year hardwood tree performance on a Midwest surface mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, W.C.; Kolar, C.A. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Plant Biology

    1998-12-31

    Black walnut (Juglans nigra L.), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.), tuliptree (Liriodendron tulipifera L.), white oak (Quercus alba L.), bur oak (Q. macrocarpa Michx.), and pin oak (Q. palustris Muenchh.) seedlings were planted both fall 1980 and spring 1981 on mixed overburden strip-mining banks (ungraded), mixed overburden graded to approximate original contour (AOC) (graded), mixed overburden graded to AOC wit h 60 cm of replaced pre-mining surface soil materials (topsoil), and on old fields near the strip-mine (unmined). Black walnut and pin oak were also planted as seed, with a total of 6000 seedlings/seed spots in the study. Initial species field viability ranged from 86 to 100%. With one exception, after 3 growing seasons oak seedlings had 50% or greater survival. Survival was mostly lower after 3 years with some additional mortality by years 8 and 13. Height and diameter breast height were measured after 13 years. Survival and growth of trees planted fall or spring was similar overall with variable performance by species. Seedlings of several species on the ungraded site had over 50% survival after 13 years, with fewer trees where planted as seed. Mean height of all species combined was significantly greater on the ungraded than on any other site and was lowest on the topsoil site. The unmined sites had high variability in species survival and height. Better reclamation with trees resulted from a deep, well-drained rooting medium with minimal compaction and a mineral-rich surface soil including coarse fragments over 2 mm in size for long-term productivity.

  17. Trace elements in two Oxisols after annual application of sewage sludge for thirteen years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Gomes de Andrade

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This experiment aim was to evaluate the contamination of the trace elements (TE arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, lead, selenium, and zinc considered in the CONAMA resolution 375 after 13 years long using sewage sludge (SS as fertilizer in two soils: an Eutroferric Clayed Red Latosol (Rhodic Eutrudox – RE and a Dystrophic Red Latosol (Typic Haplorthox – TH. Experiment in the field under maize cultivation had four treatments (0, 5, 10, and 20 t of SS ha-1, dry weight, five replications and an experimental design in randomized blocks. The agrochemicals (dolomitic limestone, single superphosphate, and potassium chloride, SS, soils, and the certified reference materials were digested according to the USEPA 3051A method and the chemical elements were quantified by ICP OES. The TE contents found in the agrochemicals used should not cause immediate environmental impact. The higher TE values were found in the RE and they did not reach the agricultural (more stringent Investigation Level (IL yet, according to 420 CONAMA resolution. Persisting the actual SS fertilization amount applied in the soil and the TE concentration in the SS is foreseen that Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Zn will be the first elements to reach the IL in the RE.

  18. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Thirteen. Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L

    1981-01-01

    A detailed description is given of the laws and programs of the State of Hawaii governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  19. An Account of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thirteen Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, Murray Wilford [ORNL

    2009-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has built and operated 13 nuclear reactors in its 66-year history. The first was the graphite reactor, the world's first operational nuclear reactor, which served as a plutonium production pilot plant during World War II. It was followed by two aqueous-homogeneous reactors and two red-hot molten-salt reactors that were parts of power-reactor development programs and by eight others designed for research and radioisotope production. One of the eight was an all-metal fast burst reactor used for health physics studies. All of the others were light-water cooled and moderated, including the famous swimming-pool reactor that was copied dozens of times around the world. Two of the reactors were hoisted 200 feet into the air to study the shielding needs of proposed nuclear-powered aircraft. The final reactor, and the only one still operating today, is the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that was built particularly for the production of californium and other heavy elements. With the world's highest flux and recent upgrades that include the addition of a cold neutron source, the 44-year-old HFIR continues to be a valuable tool for research and isotope production, attracting some 500 scientific visitors and guests to Oak Ridge each year. This report describes all of the reactors and their histories.

  20. The Speed of Invasion: Rates of Spread for Thirteen Exotic Forest Insects and Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Evans

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Invasive, exotic insects and diseases have a devastating effect on North American forests. The rate of spread, or range expansion, is one of the main determinants of an invasive organism’s impact, and can play a major role in structuring management response options. To better understand how exotic organisms have spread through our forests, this study employs a consistent, rigorous analytical framework to analyze a comprehensive geospatial database for the spread of seven exotic insects and six diseases. This study includes new data for six insects and two diseases in combination with five invasive species previously analyzed using the same technique. The quantile regression analysis of over 3000 records of infestation over the preceding century show that the rate of spread of invasive forest insects and diseases ranges from 4.2 km·year−1 to 57.0 km·year−1. The slowest disease spread was white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola at 7.4 km·year−1 while the most rapid disease spread was chestnut blight (Cryphonectria parasitica at 31.3 km·year−1. The slowest insect spread was balsam woolly adelgid (Adelges piceae (4.2 km·year−1 while the fastest was emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis at 57.0 km·year−1. Species that can fly long distances or are vectored by flying insects have spread faster than those that are passively dispersed. This analysis highlights the difficulty of estimating spread rates from studies of individual dispersal or flight distances, but the estimated spread rates in this study are generally in line with previous estimates.

  1. Scientific and normative foundations for the valuation of alien species impacts: thirteen core principles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Essl, F.; Hulme, P. E.; Jeschke, J.M.; Saul, W.-C.; Keller, R. P.; Pyšek, Petr; Richardson, D. M.; Bacher, S.; Dullinger, S.; Estévez, R. A.; Kueffer, C.; Roy, H. E.; Seebens, H.; Rabitsch, W.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 2 (2017), s. 166-178 ISSN 0006-3568 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36079G Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1002 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : biologival invasions * impact * time lags Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Biodiversity conservation Impact factor: 5.378, year: 2016

  2. Thirteen decades of foliar isotopes indicate declining nitrogen availability in central North American grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLauchlan, Kendra K; Ferguson, Carolyn J; Wilson, Iris E; Ocheltree, Troy W; Craine, Joseph M

    2010-09-01

    *Humans are increasing both the deposition of reactive nitrogen (N) and concentrations of atmospheric CO(2) on Earth, but the combined effects on terrestrial ecosystems are not clear. In the absence of historical records, it is difficult to know if N availability is currently increasing or decreasing on regional scales. *To determine the nature and timing of past changes in grassland ecosystem dynamics, we measured the composition of stable carbon (C) and N isotopes in leaf tissue from 545 herbarium specimens of 24 vascular plant species collected in Kansas, USA from 1876 to 2008. We also parameterized a simple model of the terrestrial N cycle coupled with a stable isotope simulator to constrain processes consistent with observed patterns. *A prolonged decline in foliar N concentrations began in 1926, while a prolonged decline in foliar delta(15)N values began in 1940. Changes in the difference between foliar and atmospheric C isotopes reveal slightly increased photosynthetic water use efficiency since 1876. *The declines in foliar N concentrations and foliar delta(15)N suggest declining N availability in these grasslands during the 20th century despite decades of anthropogenic N deposition. Our results are consistent with progressive-nitrogen-limitation-type hypotheses where declines in N availability are driven by increased ecosystem N storage as a result of increased atmospheric CO(2).

  3. Assessment of hospitalization and mortality of scleroderma in-patients: a thirteen-year study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Razieh

    2017-01-01

    Objective Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an uncommon non-hereditary sporadic disease that increases the risk of premature death, especially in diffuse type. We determined the prevalence of SSc in the last 13 years in our rheumatologic hospitals as a referral center for southern Iranian patients, the causes of hospitalization, the average length of stay (LOS), the mortality rate, and the reason for their mortality. Material and methods A cross-sectional study was performed in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The studied population included all patients diagnosed with systemic sclerosis. We calculated the hospitalization rates, in-hospital mortality rates, and mean LOS. Results There were 446 admissions by 181 patients with SSc. The female to male ratio was about 10.7 : 1. The overall mean LOS was 5.95 days. Digital ulcer and interstitial lung disease (ILD) were the most common causes of hospitalizations among the SSc-related events. For those with a non-SSc-related condition, infection was the most prevalent event. Most of the deaths were due to ILD and pulmonary artery hypertension(PAH), and the overall in-hospital mortality rate was 16.5%. Conclusions Women with SSc had higher rates of hospitalization but lower in-hospital mortality than men.There were some differences between our study and other similar studies in the causes of hospitalization and in-hospital death among SSc patients, especially the lower age of death. The patients with digital ulcers and those with intestinal lung disease or pulmonary hipertension were most commonly admitted to the hospital in our study group. Probably, increasing the skin care of these patients and asking other specialty groups to cooperate will decrease the high rate of hospitalizations in our population. PMID:29056770

  4. A Thirteen-Year Comparison in Patterns of Attitudes toward Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, Warren R.; Gandy, Gerald L.

    1994-01-01

    Administered survey of attitudes toward counseling to college students in 1976 and 1989, rating likelihood of seeking counseling, likelihood of seeking help from professional and nonprofessional helpers, likelihood of seeking help for differing problems, degree of responsibility professional should assume, and preferences for five counseling…

  5. Insights From Flutracking: Thirteen Tips to Growing a Web-Based Participatory Surveillance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Craig; Carlson, Sandra; Butler, Michelle; Cassano, Daniel; Clarke, Stephen; Fejsa, John; Durrheim, David

    2017-08-17

    Flutracking is a weekly Web-based survey of influenza-like illness (ILI) in Australia that has grown from 400 participants in 2006 to over 26,000 participants every week in 2016. Flutracking monitors both the transmission and severity of ILI across Australia by documenting symptoms (cough, fever, and sore throat), time off work or normal duties, influenza vaccination status, laboratory testing for influenza, and health seeking behavior. Recruitment of Flutrackers commenced via health department and other organizational email systems, and then gradually incorporated social media promotion and invitations from existing Flutrackers to friends to enhance participation. Invitations from existing participants typically contribute to over 1000 new participants each year. The Flutracking survey link was emailed every Monday morning in winter and took less than 10 seconds to complete. To reduce the burden on respondents, we collected only a minimal amount of demographic and weekly data. Additionally, to optimize users' experiences, we maintained a strong focus on "obvious design" and repeated usability testing of naïve and current participants of the survey. In this paper, we share these and other insights on recruitment methods and user experience principles that have enabled Flutracking to become one of the largest online participatory surveillance systems in the world. There is still much that could be enhanced in Flutracking; however, we believe these principles could benefit others developing similar online surveillance systems. ©Craig Dalton, Sandra Carlson, Michelle Butler, Daniel Cassano, Stephen Clarke, John Fejsa, David Durrheim. Originally published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance (http://publichealth.jmir.org), 17.08.2017.

  6. Facial nerve palsy in a thirteen-year-old male youth with Kawasaki disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biezeveld, Maarten H.; Voorbrood, Bas S.; Clur, Sally-Ann B.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2002-01-01

    A 13-year-old male youth was hospitalized with Kawasaki disease. In the course of the disease he developed a facial nerve palsy and an aneurysm of the right coronary artery. After treatment with immunoglobulins both complications disappeared within 10 days and 1 month, respectively

  7. “Muscled Presence”: Douglas Livingstone\\'s poem “Thirteen Ways of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Why do animals matter in art? What relation do cultural representations of animals have to real animals? What ethical relationship and responsibility does the artist have to the animal subject? How can art about animals serve as a metaphor, or a testing ground, or a microcosm, for our real-world interactions with animals?

  8. Energy conversion of animal manures: Feasibility analysis for thirteen western states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittier, J.; Haase, S.; Milward, R.; Churchill, G.; Searles, M.B. [NEOS Corp., Lakewood, CO (United States); Moser, M. [Resource Conservation Management, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States); Swanson, D.; Morgan, G. [Western Regional Biomass Energy Program, Golden, CO (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The growth and concentration of the livestock industry has led to environmental disposal problems for large quantities of manure at feedlots, dairies, poultry production plants, animal holding areas and pasturelands. Consequently, waste management systems that facilitate energy recovery are becoming increasingly attractive since they address pollution problems and allow for energy generation from manure resources. This paper presents a manure resource assessment for the 13 US Department of Energy, Western Regional Biomass Energy Program states, describes and evaluates available energy conversion technologies, identifies environmental and regulatory factors associated with manure collection, storage and disposal, and identifies common disposal practices specific to animal types and areas within the WRBEP region. The paper also presents a pro forma economic analysis for selected manure-to-energy conversion technologies. The annual energy potential of various manures within the WRBEP region is equivalent to approximately 111 {times} 10{sup 13} Btu. Anaerobic digestion systems, both lagoon and plug flow, offer positive economic returns in a broad range of utility service territories.

  9. 75 FR 54697 - Unblocking of Thirteen Specially Designated Nationals Pursuant to Executive Order 13224

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... Property and Prohibiting Transactions With Persons Who Commit, Threaten To Commit, or Support Terrorism... acts of terrorism. The President identified in the Annex to the Order various individuals and entities... HONEY CENTER), Sanaa, Yemen . AL-KADR, Ahmad Sa'id (a.k.a. AL-KANADI, Abu Abd Al-Rahman); DOB 01 Mar...

  10. Marsh Creation in a Northern Pacific Estuary: Is Thirteen Years of Monitoring Vegetation Dynamics Enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil K. Dawe

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation changes were monitored over a 13-yr period (1982-1994 in the Campbell River estuary following the development of marshes on four intertidal islands. The marshes were created to mitigate the loss of a natural estuarine marsh resulting from the construction of a dry land log-sorting facility. Plant species coverage was measured along 23 permanent transects in planted and unplanted blocks on the constructed islands, and in naturally occurring low-marsh and mid-to-high marsh reference communities on nearby Nunn's Island. Five dominant species, Carex lyngbyei, Juncus balticus, Potentilla pacifica, Deschampsia caespitosa, and Eleocharis palustris established successfully and increased in cover in both planted and unplanted areas. The planted, unplanted, and Nunn's Island low-marsh sites had similar total plant cover and species richness by the 13th year. Principal components analysis of the transects through time indicated successful establishment of mid-to-low marsh communities on the constructed islands by the fourth year. Vegetation fluctuations on the constructed islands were greater than in the mid-to-high and low-marsh reference communities on Nunn's Island. Results showed that substrate elevation and island configuration were major influences on the successful establishment and subsequent dynamics of created marsh communities. Aboveground biomass estimates of marshes on the created islands attained those of the reference marshes on Nunn's Island between years 6 and 13. However, Carex lyngbyei biomass on the created islands had not reached that of the reference marshes by year 13. Despite the establishment of what appeared to be a productive marsh, with species composition and cover similar to those of the reference marshes on Nunn's Island, vegetation on the created islands was still undergoing changes that, in some cases, were cause for concern. On three of the islands, large areas devoid of vegetation formed between years 6 and 13, probably a result of water ponding. Adaptive management has allowed us to modify the island configuration through the creation of channels to drain these sites in an attempt to reverse the vegetation dieback. These changes, occurring even after 13 years, further underscore the need for caution when considering the trading of existing natural, healthy, productive wetlands for the promise of created marshes that may or may not prove to be equal to the natural systems. Where marsh creation is warranted, we recommend that management of created marshes be adaptive and flexible, including a long-term monitoring program that should continue at least until the annual variation in vegetation of the created marsh is similar to that of natural, nearby systems.

  11. Thirteen Week Oral Toxicity Study of WR242511 in Rats. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-14

    MUSCLE # Ex 10 0 1 10 EPIDIDYMIS Granuloma , sperm Hypospermia # Ex 10 0 0 (0) (0) 0 0 0 1 0 0 (0) (0) 10 1 (10) 1 (10) SEMINAL...365 366 367 368 369 370 RECTUM NNNNNNNNNN SCIATIC NERVE UNNNNUUNNN SKELETAL MUSCLE NNNNNNNNNN EPIDIDYMIS NNNNNNN NN Granuloma , sperm...TEST:14 REFERENCE TO NECROPSY RECORD: RELATED HISTOPATHOLOGY: >LUNG, APICAL LOBE - LESION, LUNG - Pleura, inflam, chronic, DIFFUSE, PALE, FIRM fr bd

  12. Partnering for long-term management of radioactive waste. Evolution and current practice in thirteen countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    National radioactive waste management programmes are in various phases of siting facilities and rely on distinct technical approaches for different categories of waste. In all cases, it is necessary for institutional actors and the potential or actual host community to build a meaningful, workable relationship. Partnership approaches are effective in achieving a balance between the requirements of fair representation and competent participation. With host community support, they also help ensure the desirable combination of a licensable site and management concept as well as a balance between compensation, local control and development opportunities. This report provides up-to-date information on experience with local partnership arrangements in 13 countries. The characteristics, advantages and aims of community partnerships are also described in addition to the concept's evolution over the past decade. (authors)

  13. The non-enzymatic inactivation of thirteen beta-lactam antibiotics in human faeces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, G; Weissing, F; de Vries-Hospers, H; Tonk, R; van der Waaij, D

    1992-01-01

    In order to obtain a method that could predict the in vitro inactivation of an antibiotic in the digestive tract, the non-enzymatic inactivation of 13 beta-lactam antibiotics by human faeces was investigated. Benzylpenicillin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, cloxacillin, piperacillin,

  14. The non-enzymatic inactivation of thirteen β-lactam antibiotics in human faeces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, G; Weissing, F; de Vries Hospers, H; Tonk, R; van der Waaij, D

    1992-01-01

    In order to obtain a method that could predict the in vitro inactivation of an antibiotic in the digestive tract, the non-enzymatic inactivation of 13 beta-lactam antibiotics by human faeces was investigated. Benzylpenicillin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, cloxacillin, piperacillin,

  15. A Retrospective Examination of a University's Thirteen Years in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, Ronald E.; And Others

    The context of educational reform within which U.S. higher education has worked in selected Latin American countries is examined, with attention directed to the specific experience of the University of New Mexico. The evolution of the Latin American Programs in Education office (LAPE) in the university setting, the organizational milieu in which…

  16. A revision of thirteen species of Triatominae (Hemiptera: Reduviidae vectors of Chagas disease in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salazar-Schettino Paz Maria

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, parasite responsible for Chagas disease, are divided in intradomestic, peridomestic and sylvatic. The intradomestic are Triatoma barberi and Triatoma dimidiata, two species that represent the highest health risk among the Mexican population. Triatoma dimidiata is a species found mainly inside human habitats, but in Yucatan, it corresponds to the peridomicile vectors. Also in the peridomicile most of Chagas disease vectors are found: Meccus bassolsae, M. longipennis, M. mazzottii, M pallidipennis, M. phyllosomus, M picturata, Triatoma gerstaeckeri, T mexicana, T rubida, Dipetalogaster máxima (the last two are in the process of becoming adapted to the domicile, Panstrongylus rufotuberculatus which occasionally enters the domicile in its adult stage, and Rhodnius prolixus, which is practically controlled in the country. Peridomestic vectors are of lower risk in the transmission dynamics, as compared to the intradomestic ones. For the control of the intradomestic vectors, health education programs, improvements of housing, and the use of pesticides are essential To control the peridomestic vectors, health education programs are required, as well as the use of mosquito nets on doors and windows and around beds, aside from cementing the stone wall fences.

  17. Management of penetrating ocular injuries and endophthalmitis in thirteen-year follow-up period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukosavljević Miroslav

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ocular trauma is one of the most common causes of unilateral morbidity and blindness in the world today. Objective: Frequency of penetrating ocular injuries and endophthalmitis after injuries caused by explosive weapons during the war in former Yugoslavia in the period 1991-1999 as well as eye injuries in the period 2000-2004 was examined. Method: During 1991-1999, 647 patients with eye injuries were hospitalized at Eye Clinic, MMA, out of whom 500 cases with penetrating eye injuries. In 2000-2004 period, 601 patients with eye injuries were treated, out of whom 297 had penetrating eye injuries (including patients from Montenegro and Republica Srpska. All patients underwent thorough ophthalmological examination, antibiotic treatment and VPP or other required surgical interventions. Results: All 500 patients from the first period had severe penetrating eye injuries. Intrabulbar foreign bodies (IFB were detected in 286 cases, while 214 cases with penetrating eye injuries had no intrabulbar foreign bodies. Almost all patients had multiple head and body injuries as well. Endophthalmitis was observed in 29 eyes (5.2% upon admission to hospital. In the second observed period (2000-2004, 196 (66% out of 297 penetrating eye injuries had IOFB, and 101 (34% was without IOFB. Endophthalmitis was observed in 34 eyes (8.4%. Conclusion: War eye injuries are a special group of injuries. Relatively low percent of posttraumatic endophthalmitis is definitely worth attention, especially in comparison with peacetime eye penetrating injuries.

  18. The Joint Capabilities Integration and Development System: Its Impact on Air Force Acquisition Thirteen Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Development System (JCIDS). A fully interoperable and integrated joint force was now on the horizon due to JCIDS, but what was the resultant impact of JCIDS...Force’s stagnating operation and maintenance account faces increasing pressure in the coming years and fielding the right mix of affordable, modernized...from the Director, Operational Test and Evaluation available from the DoD’s webpage and Government Accountability Office (GAO) reports, including

  19. 77 FR 14596 - Supplemental Identification Information for Thirteen Individuals and One Entity Designated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    ..., acts of terrorism that threaten the security of U.S. nationals or the national security, foreign policy... Buildings, Mogadishu, Somalia; 26 Urtegata Street, Oslo 0187, Norway; DOB 22 Sep 1959; POB Mogadishu, Somalia; nationality Norway; National ID No. 22095919778 (Norway); Passport 26941812 (Norway) issued 23...

  20. Thirteen treated of acute renal failure secondary to multiple myeloma with high cut off filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni Wennekers, Ana; Martín Azara, María Pilar; Dourdil Sahun, Victoria; Bergasa Liberal, Beatriz; Ruiz Laiglesia, José Esteban; Vernet Perna, Patricia; Alvarez Lipe, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a haematological tumour that is characterised by uncontrolled proliferation of plasma cells and a significant volume of serum free light chains (sFLCs), which can cause acute renal failure due to intratubular precipitation, resulting in cast nephropathy. Acute renal failure is a complication that can arise in more than 20% of patients with multiple myeloma, half of which will require dialysis. We report our experience with 13 patients who were treated with dialysis using high cut off filters (HCO) between July 2011 and February 2015. A total of 6 consecutive 6-hour sessions were performed using a 2.1 m(2) HCO filter (Theralite® by Gambro®). Afterwards, further 6-hour sessions were continued on alternate days. A total of 151 sessions were conducted, with an average of 11.6 sessions per patient (range 6-27). The treatment proved to be effective in removing both kappa and lambda sFLCs, resulting in a 93.7% fall in sFLCs by the end of treatment. The average reduction was 57.7% per dialysis session. 10 out of the 13 cases recovered sufficient renal function to become independent of dialysis. There were no major changes in albumin levels using an infusion protocol of 2 50-mL vials of 20% albumin at the end of the dialysis session. Combination treatment with chemotherapy and long dialysis with HCO filters was effective in reducing the sFLC levels and recovering sufficient renal function in 77% of cases. With HCO filters, significant cost savings are achieved, contrary to what was previously believed. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment of hospitalization and mortality of scleroderma in-patients: a thirteen-year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Shenavandeh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Systemic sclerosis (SSc is an uncommon non-hereditary sporadic disease that increases the risk of premature death, especially in diffuse type. We determined the prevalence of SSc in the last 13 years in our rheumatologic hospitals as a referral center for southern Iranian patients, the causes of hospitalization, the average length of stay (LOS, the mortality rate, and the reason for their mortality. Material and methods : A cross-sectional study was performed in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The studied population included all patients diagnosed with systemic sclerosis. We calculated the hospitalization rates, in-hospital mortality rates, and mean LOS. Results: There were 446 admissions by 181 patients with SSc. The female to male ratio was about 10.7 : 1. The overall mean LOS was 5.95 days. Digital ulcer and interstitial lung disease (ILD were the most common causes of hospitalizations among the SSc-related events. For those with a non-SSc-related condition, infection was the most prevalent event. Most of the deaths were due to ILD and pulmonary artery hypertension(PAH, and the overall in-hospital mortality rate was 16.5%. Conclusions : Women with SSc had higher rates of hospitalization but lower in-hospital mortality than men.There were some differences between our study and other similar studies in the causes of hospitalization and in-hospital death among SSc patients, especially the lower age of death. The patients with digital ulcers and those with intestinal lung disease or pulmonary hipertension were most commonly admitted to the hospital in our study group. Probably, increasing the skin care of these patients and asking other specialty groups to cooperate will decrease the high rate of hospitalizations in our population.

  2. Assessing the prognoses on Health care in the information society 2013--thirteen years after

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knaup, Petra; Ammenwerth, Elske; Dujat, Carl; Grant, Andrew; Hasman, Arie; Hein, Andreas; Hochlehnert, Achim; Kulikowski, Casimir; Mantas, John; Maojo, Victor; Marschollek, Michael; Moura, Lincoln; Plischke, Maik; Röhrig, Rainer; Stausberg, Jürgen; Takabayashi, Katsuhiko; Uckert, Frank; Winter, Alfred; Wolf, Klaus-Hendrik; Haux, Reinhold

    2014-01-01

    Health care and information technology in health care is advancing at tremendous speed. We analysed whether the prognoses by Haux et al. - first presented in 2000 and published in 2002 - have been fulfilled in 2013 and which might be the reasons for match or mismatch. Twenty international experts in

  3. Nutritional quality of the seed oil in thirteen Asphodeline species (Xanthorrhoeaceae from Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengin, G.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The fatty acid composition of the seed oil from 13 Turkish Asphodeline species was analyzed. The seed oil content ranged between 0.9% and 4.6%, and included 26 different fatty acids from C12:0to C22:5. The most abundant saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty acids were C16:0 (5.7% to 23.7% of their total fatty acid content, C18:1ω9 (11.3% to 30.3%, and C18:2ω6 (49.2% to 66.1%. A. tenuior subsp. tenuiflora, which had the highest content of unsaturated fatty acids, also had the best fatty acid profile from a nutritional point of view. Asphodeline seed oil composition was similar to that of local, related vegetables such as onion seeds. Asphodeline species, which are most frequently grown to use the leaves in salads, may also be a good source of seed oil with good nutritional properties. Results of a cluster analysis using data on the fatty acid composition are consistent with the taxonomic classification of genus Asphodeline.Se ha analizado la composición en ácidos grasos del aceite de las semillas de 13 especies de Asphodeline de Turquía. El contenido en aceite de las semillas osciló entre el 0.9% y el 4.6% e incluyó 26 ácidos grasos distintos entre C12:0y C22:5. Los ácidos grasos saturados, monoinsaturados y poliinsaturados más abundantes fueron C16:0 (5.7% a 23.7%, C18:1ω9 (11.3% a 30.3% y C18:2ω6 (49.2% a 66.1%. A. tenuior subsp. tenuiflora, que presentó el contenido más alto en ácidos grasos insaturados, también tenía el mejor perfil en ácidos grasos desde un punto de vista nutricional. La composición del aceite de las semillas de Asphodeline fue similar a la de vegetales relacionados como la cebolla. Asphodeline, cuyas hojas son consumidas en ensaladas, puede representar también una buena fuente de aceite de las semillas con buenas propiedades nutricionales. Los resultados del análisis de grupos usando los datos de la composición en ácidos grasos son consistentes con la clasificación taxonómica del género Asphodeline.

  4. Thirteen pump-probe resonances of the sodium D1 line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Vincent; Boyd, Robert W.; Stroud, C. R. Jr.; Bennink, Ryan S.; Marino, Alberto M.

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of a pump-probe laser spectroscopic investigation of the Doppler-broadened sodium D1 resonance line. We find 13 resonances in the resulting spectra. These observations are well described by the numerical predictions of a four-level atomic model of the hyperfine structure of the sodium D1 line. We also find that many, but not all, of these features can be understood in terms of processes originating in a two-level or three-level subset of the full four-level model. The processes we observed include forward near-degenerate four-wave mixing and saturation in a two-level system, difference-frequency crossing and nondegenerate four-wave mixing in a three-level V system, electromagnetically induced transparency and optical pumping in a three-level lambda system, cross-transition resonance in a four-level double-lambda system, and conventional optical pumping. Most of these processes lead to sub-Doppler or even subnatural linewidths. The dependence of these resonances on the pump intensity and pump detuning from atomic resonance are also studied

  5. Radiocesium activity in turkish tea followed the Chernobly after thirteen years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaprak, G.; Guer, F.; Epik Oe.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the distribution of ''1''3''7Cs activity levels in Turkish tea widely consumed in the Country in 2000. The results obtained from gamma radiometric measurements were shown that the avarage radiocesium level in marketing tea was 72 Bq/kg. The accident in April 1986 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station in the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics in which large amounts of radioactive materials were released into the environment was the most serious ever to have occured in connection with the use of nuclear energy to generate electricity. Changing mateorological conditions during the active phase of accident with winds from different directions at various altitutes and continuing releases over a ten day period, resulted in a very complex dispersion pattern. After the accident at chernobyl, large areas in northern Turkey were heavily contaminated with radiocesium by wet deposition in early May 1986. During this emergency, Cekmece Nuclear Research and Traing Center performed analyses of various substances, including foodstuffs to asses population risk

  6. Unexpected course of treatment in a thirteen-year-old boy with unilateral vision disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorobisz, A.T.; Rucinski, A.; Ujma-Czapska, B.; Grotowska, M.; Zaleska-Dorobisz, U.

    2005-01-01

    Monocular vision disorder is a characteristic symptom of brain ischemia of the second to fourth stage of Milikan's scale. Partial occipital epilepsy, where optic symptoms are usually bilateral and convulsion or automatisms appear later, is seldom the cause. In this paper the authors present a special case of a vision disorder in a 13-year-old boy in whom kinking of the internal carotid artery (ICA) was recognized in the first stage of diagnostic examination and treatment as the basic cause of the disorder. Other causes were not affirmed. Surgical angioplasty of the carotid artery was performed with the restoration of proper circulation. Despite the treatment, the symptoms persisted. In the further course of the disease, after repeated diagnostic imaging, childhood epilepsy with occipital spikes was recognized as the cause of the monocular anopsy. All the symptoms disappeared after pharmacological treatment. The surgeon must prove that the neurological symptoms are caused by kinking of the internal carotid artery and that no other etiology exists. (author)

  7. Comparison of outcomes from smoking and nonsmoking donors: thirteen-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Marius; Goldsmith, Kim; Jenkins, David; Sudarshan, Catherine; Catarino, Pedro; Sukumaran, Nair; Dunning, John; Sharples, Linda D; Tsui, Steven; Parmar, Jasvir

    2010-12-01

    Lung transplantation remains the best treatment option for a variety of end-stage lung diseases. Pressure on the limited donor pool has led to the use of extended criteria donors. One aspect of this has been the liberalization of the use of smoking donors (SmD). This study is a retrospective review of lung transplants performed between April 1995 and August 2008 at a single institute. We examined the impact of donor smoking on short-term and long-term survival in relationship to recipient and donor demographics such as ischemic time, cytomegalovirus status, rates of rejection and infection, ventilation, and intensive care stay. Endpoints were survival, infection, and rejection. During this 13-year period, 454 lung transplants were performed. Smoking history was available on 424 (93.4%) of these (SmD, n = 184; NSmD, n = 240). Seventy-one patients died within 3 months of transplant leaving 353 alive at 3 months posttransplant. Fatalities within the first 3 months were significantly higher in the SmD group (21% vs 13%, odds ratio 1.9, hazard ratio 3.3, p = 0.04). No significant difference in rejection and infection rates between recipients of lungs from SmD and NSmD at 3 months and at 1 year posttransplantation (p = 0.51 and 0.09) was found. Although recipients of lungs from SmD had higher odds of ventilation for more than 10 hours, the odds were only increased by 20%, which was not statistically significant. Recipients from SmD had significantly longer stays in the intensive care (odds ratio 1.9, p = 0.002). There was little evidence for an effect of SmD on the development of bronchiolitis obliterans. In this large cohort of patients, donor smoking history has an effect on early survival but no effect on long-term survival. The cause of this early mortality is independent of infection and rejection. However, these data suggest that overall outcomes from the use of donor lungs from smokers are acceptable, particularly in the current era with limited donor organs. Copyright © 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Serum Uric Acid Levels and Onset of Cardiovascular Diseases: a CALIBER Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-06

    Stable Angina; Unstable Angina; Myocardial Infarction; Unheralded Coronary Heart Disease Death; Heart Failure; Cardiac Arrest; Transient Ischaemic Attack; Ischemic Stroke; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage; Intracerebral Hemorrhage; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Atrial Fibrillation

  9. Non-bee insects are important contributors to global crop pollination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rader, Romina; Bartomeus, Ignasi; Garibaldi, Lucas A.; Kleijn, David; Scheper, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Wild andmanaged bees arewell documented as effective pollinators of global crops of economic importance. However, the contributions by pollinators other than bees have been little explored despite their potential to contribute to crop production and stability in the face of environmental change.

  10. Oocyte Activation and Fertilisation: Crucial Contributors from the Sperm and Oocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeste, Marc; Jones, Celine; Amdani, Siti Nornadhirah; Coward, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    This chapter intends to summarise the importance of sperm- and oocyte-derived factors in the processes of sperm-oocyte binding and oocyte activation. First, we describe the initial interaction between sperm and the zona pellucida, with particular regard to acrosome exocytosis. We then describe how sperm and oocyte membranes fuse, with special reference to the discovery of the sperm protein IZUMO1 and its interaction with the oocyte membrane receptor JUNO. We then focus specifically upon oocyte activation, the fundamental process by which the oocyte is alleviated from metaphase II arrest by a sperm-soluble factor. The identity of this sperm factor has been the source of much debate recently, although mounting evidence, from several different laboratories, provides strong support for phospholipase C ζ (PLCζ), a sperm-specific phospholipase. Herein, we discuss the evidence in support of PLCζ and evaluate the potential role of other candidate proteins, such as post-acrosomal WW-binding domain protein (PAWP/WBP2NL). Since the cascade of downstream events triggered by the sperm-borne oocyte activation factor heavily relies upon specialised cellular machinery within the oocyte, we also discuss the critical role of oocyte-borne factors, such as the inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP 3 R), protein kinase C (PKC), store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), during the process of oocyte activation. In order to place the implications of these various factors and processes into a clinical context, we proceed to describe their potential association with oocyte activation failure and discuss how clinical techniques such as the in vitro maturation of oocytes may affect oocyte activation ability. Finally, we contemplate the role of artificial oocyte activating agents in the clinical rescue of oocyte activation deficiency and discuss options for more endogenous alternatives.

  11. Investigation of the contributors to wrong unit or wrong train events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persinko, D.; Ramey-Smith, A.

    1986-04-01

    This report presents information on human error in nuclear power plants causing actions to be performed on the wrong train of systems with redundant trains or on the wrong unit of a multi-unit facility. 10 refs

  12. Environmental and Genetic Contributors to Hypospadias: A Review of the Epidemiologic Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Suzan L.; Shaw, Gary M.; Lammer, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    This review evaluates current knowledge related to trends in the prevalence of hypospadias, the association of hypospadias with endocrine-disrupting exposures, and the potential contribution of genetic susceptibility to its etiology. The review focuses on epidemiologic evidence. Increasing prevalence of hypospadias has been observed, but such increases tend to be localized to specific regions or time periods. Thus, generalized statements that hypospadias is increasing are unsupported. Due to limitations of study designs and inconsistent results, firm conclusions cannot be made regarding the association of endocrine-disrupting exposures with hypospadias. Studies with more rigorous study designs (e.g., larger and more detailed phenotypes) and exposure assessment that encompasses more breadth as well as depth (e.g., specific endocrine-related chemicals) will be critical to make better inferences about these important environmental exposures. Many candidate genes for hypospadias have been identified, but few of them have been examined to an extent that enables solid conclusions. Further studies are needed that include larger sample sizes, comparison groups that are more representative of the populations from which the cases were derived, phenotype-specific analyses, and more extensive exploration of variants. In conclusion, examining the associations of environmental and genetic factors with hypospadias remain important areas of inquiry, although our actual understanding of their contribution to hypospadias risk in humans is currently limited. PMID:22678668

  13. Impact and contributors to cost of managing long term conditions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Burden of long term non-communicable conditions in low and middle income countries are on the increase and poor access to care leaves poorer ... Conclusion: Study found a high prevalence of catastrophic health expenditure and near absence of financial risk protection for patients with long term conditions.

  14. Surface water change as a significant contributor to global evapotranspiration change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, S.; Song, C.

    2017-12-01

    Water comprises a critical component of global/regional hydrological and biogeochemical cycles and is essential to all organisms including humans. In the past several decades, climate change has intensified the hydrological cycle, with significant implications for ecosystem services and feedback to regional and global climate. Evapotranspiration (ET) as a linking mechanism between land surface and atmosphere is central to the water cycle and an excellent indicator of the intensity of water cycle. Knowledge of the temporal changes of ET is crucial for accurately estimating global or regional water budgets and better understanding climate and hydrological interactions. While studies have examined changes in global ET, they were conducted using a constant land and surface water (SW) area. However, as many studies have found that global SW is very dynamic and their surface areas have generally been increasing since the 1980s. The conversion from land to water and vice versa significantly changes the local ET since water bodies evaporate at a rate that can be much higher than that of the land. Here, we quantify the global changes in ET caused by such land-water conversion using remotely-sensed SW area and various ET and potential ET products. New SW and lost SW between circa-1985 and circa-2015 were derived from remote sensing and were used to modify the local ET estimates. We found an increase in ET in all continents as consistent with the net increase in SW area. The increasing SW area lead to a global increase in ET by 30.38 ± 5.28 km3/yr. This is a significant contribution when compared to the 92.95 km3/yr/yr increase in ET between 1982-1997 and 103.43 km3/yr/yr decrease between 1998-2008 by Jung et al., (2010) assuming a constant SW. The results enhance our understanding of the water fluxes between the land and atmosphere and supplement land water budget estimates. We conclude that changes in SW lead to a significant change in global ET that cannot be neglected in global ET trend studies and should also be included in global water budget studies.

  15. Food Safety as a contributor to Food Security: global policy concerns & challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay Kumar Chattu

    2015-01-01

    The theme for World Health Day campaign for this year 2015 is “Food safety: from farm to plate, make food safe”. The day focuses on demonstrating the importance of food safety along the whole length of the food chain in a globalized world, from production and transport, to preparation and consumption (1). Everyone needs food and needs it every day either plant sources or animal sources or both. The food we eat must be nutritious and safe but we often ignore or overlook the issue of food safet...

  16. Grafted bone marrow stromal cells: a contributor to glial repair after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Xin; Yin, Yan-Mei; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Deng, Ling-Xiao

    2015-06-01

    In the CNS, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglias are involved in not only development but also pathology such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Glial cells play dual roles (negative vs. positive effects) in these processes. After SCI, detrimental effects usually dominate and significantly retard functional recovery, and curbing these effects is critical for promoting neurological improvement. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) represent a new therapeutic approach for SCI by enabling improved sensory and motor functions in animal models. Although transdifferentiation to spinal neurons was poor, because of their pleiotropic nature, the protective effects of BMSCs are broad and are primarily mediated through modulation of transdifferentiation into host spinal glial components. Transplantation of BMSCs can positively alter the spinal microenvironment and enhance recovery. The objective of this review is to discuss these and other related mechanisms. Since BMSCs transplantation has been applied in other clinical fields, we hope to provide useful clues for the clinical application of BMSCs to treat the SCI in the near future. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Contributors to Pediatric Obesity in Adolescence: More than just Energy Imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardel, Michelle; Dulin-Keita, Akilah; Casazza, Krista

    2011-01-01

    Disentangling the etiology of pediatric obesity continues to challenge researchers. Due to rapid growth and development, changes in the hormonal milieu, increased autonomy in feeding practices and greater interactions with environmental factors, adolescence is a particularly important period for the determination of body composition trajectories and the relationship to current and future obesity outcomes. A plethora of studies have focused on excess energy consumption and physical inactivity as they relate to weight and fat gain in adolescence. Although these "Big Two" have an impact, the increasing trends in pediatric obesity are not accounted for solely by increased energy intake and decreased physical activity. Indeed, under similar conditions of energy balance, inter-individual variation in fat accumulation has been consistently noted. It is becoming more evident that additional factors may contribute independently and/or synergistically to the increase in obesity. Such factors include (but are not limited to) metabolic programming in utero and in early childhood, the hormonal environment, endocrine disruptors, parental feeding practices, and the built environment. Our objective, therefore, is to investigate possible factors, particularly in adolescence that contributes to the increase in pediatric obesity beyond "The Big Two".

  18. Enhanced UV Absorption in Carbonaceous Aerosols during MILAGRO and Identification of Potential Organic Contributors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangu, A.; Kelley, K. L.; Marchany-Rivera, A.; Kilaparty, S.; Gunawan, G.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.

    2007-12-01

    Measurements of aerosol absorption were obtained as part of the MAX-Mex component of the MILAGRO field campaign at site T0 (Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City) during the month of March, 2006 by using a 7- channel aethalometer (Thermo-Anderson). These measurements, obtained at 370, 470, 520, 590, 660, 880, and 950 nm at a 5 minute time resolution, showed an enhanced absorption in the UV over that expected from carbon soot alone. Samples of fine atmospheric aerosols (less than 0.1micron) were also collected at site T0 and T1 (Universidad Technologica de Tecamac, State of Mexico) from 5 am to 5 pm (day) and from 5 pm to 5 am (night) during the month of March 2006. The samples were collected on quartz fiber filters with high volume impactor samplers. The samples have been characterized for total carbon content (stable isotope ratio mass spectroscopy) and natural radionuclide tracers (210Pb, 210Po, 210Bi, 7Be, 13C, 14C, 40K, 15N). Continuous absorption spectra of these aerosol samples have been obtained in the laboratory from 280 to 900nm with the use of an integrating sphere coupled to a UV-visible spectrometer (Beckman DU with a Labsphere accessory). The integrating sphere allows the detector to collect and spatially integrate the total radiant flux reflected from the sample and therefore allows for the measurement of absorption on highly reflective or diffusely scattering samples (1). The continuous spectra also show an enhanced UV absorption over that expected from carbon soot and the general profiles are quite similar to those observed for humic and fulvic acids found as colloidal materials in surface and groundwaters (2), indicating the presence of humic-like substances (HULIS) in the fine aerosols. The spectra also show evidence of narrow band absorbers below 400 nm typical of polycyclic aromatics (PAH) and nitrated aromatic compounds. Spectra were also obtained on NIST standard diesel soot (SRM 2975), NIST standard air particulate matter (SRM 8785), and nitrated PAH compounds for comparison. Potential organic aerosol components are identified which contribute to the enhanced absorption observed in the field. The wavelength dependence of the mass specific absorption is obtained from these spectra and total carbon measurements. The wavelength dependence of the aerosol complex refractive index (m = n +ik) in the UV-visible spectral region is determined by application of the Kramers Kronig function. The importance of the aerosol absorption in the infrared spectral region to radiative forcing will be discussed. 1. Marley, N.A., J.S. Gaffney, J.C. Baird, C.A. Blazer, P.J. Drayton, and J.E. Frederick, Aerosol Sci. Technol., 34, 535-549, (2001). 2. N.A. Marley, J.S. Gaffney, and K.A. Orlandini, Chapter 7 in Humic/Fulvic Acids and Organic Colloidal Materials in the Environment, ACS Symposium Series 651, American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C., pp. 96-107, 1996. This work was conducted as part of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Science Program as part of the Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City during MILAGRO. This research was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64329. We also wish to thank Mexican Scientists and students for their assistance from the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo (IMP) and CENICA.

  19. Food Safety as a contributor to Food Security: global policy concerns & challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Chattu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The theme for World Health Day campaign for this year 2015 is “Food safety: from farm to plate, make food safe”. The day focuses on demonstrating the importance of food safety along the whole length of the food chain in a globalized world, from production and transport, to preparation and consumption (1. Everyone needs food and needs it every day either plant sources or animal sources or both. The food we eat must be nutritious and safe but we often ignore or overlook the issue of food safety. Many cases of food borne diseases either acute poisoning or chronic exposure are largely under reported. In this globalized world, though the food chain extends over thousands of miles from different continents, an error or contamination in one country can affect the health of consumers on the other part of the world. To ensure full impact, these actions must build on principles of government stewardship, engagement of civil society, (2.According to UN, access to a safe and secure food supply is a basic human right. Food safety and food security are interrelated concepts which have an impact on the health outcomes and quality of human lives. As per Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO, Food security is a situation that exists when all people, at all times, have physical, social and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food that meets their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life, (3. Based on the definition of Food security, four food security dimensions can be identified: food availability, economic and physical access to food, food utilization and stability over time. Apart from that food security is also affected by Poverty and Climate change.Food safety is an umbrella term that encompasses many aspects like food items handling, preparation and storage of food to prevent illness and injury. The other important issues are chemical, microphysical and microbiological aspects of food safety, (4. Control of allergens which can be life threatening to some people that are highly sensitive is the priority of food chemical control. Other chemical properties of food such as vitamin and mineral content are also important and affect the overall quality of the food but are not as significant in terms of food safety.Microphysical particles such as glass and metal can be hazardous and cause serious injury to consumers. Pathogenic bacteria, viruses and toxins produced by microorganisms are all possible contaminants of food and impact food safety. Like food security, food safety is also effected by poverty and climate change. Hence Foo

  20. The effect of siblings on early development: a potential contributor to personality differences in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Robyn; Bautista, Amando; Reyes-Meza, Verónica; Montor, Jorge Morales; Rödel, Heiko G

    2011-09-01

    Although most mammals grow up in the company of same or different age sibs (or half sibs), surprisingly little attention has been given to how relations among them might influence the development of individual differences in morphology, physiology, and behavior. Here we review evidence from our work on domestic and wild European rabbits, and more recently on laboratory rats, mice, and domestic cats, supporting the proposition that in mammals early sibling relations contribute to the development of individual differences in these three domains and thereby to long-term behavioral differences of the kind we might consider part of an animal's behavioral style or personality. First we report a consistent and marked negative relation between litter size and individuals' body mass at birth and weaning, as well as marked within-litter differences in prenatal body mass and placental efficiency. We then report individual differences in preweaning behaviors associated with these morphological variables such as position occupied in the litter huddle and development of motor ability, as well as physiological differences in thermoregulation, immune parameters, and endocrine indicators of stress. Finally, we report first evidence from wild rabbits that early relations among littermates may have long-term consequences for individual differences in behavioral style. We conclude that in mammals, individual differences in early growth, physiology and behavior potentially important for the development of animal personality, are shaped to an appreciable extent by early sibling relations and that this little-researched field deserves closer attention. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Incense, sparklers and cigarettes are significant contributors to indoor benzene and particle levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Tirler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The increased use of incense, magic candles and other flameless products often produces indoor pollutants that may represent a health risk for humans. Today, in fact, incense and air fresheners are used inside homes as well as in public places including stores, shopping malls and places of worship. As a source of indoor contamination, the impact of smoke, incense and sparklers on human health cannot be ignored. Aim. In the present work, we report the results of an emission study regarding particles (PM10 and particle number concentration, PNC and benzene, produced by various incense sticks and sparklers. Results and discussion.The results obtained for benzene, PM10 and PNC, showed a strong negative influence on air quality when these products were used indoors. Various incense sticks gave completely different benzene results: from a small increase of the benzene concentration in the air, just slightly above the background levels of ambient air, to very high concentrations, of more than 200 µg/m³ of benzene in the test room after the incense sticks had been tested.

  2. Incense, sparklers and cigarettes are significant contributors to indoor benzene and particle levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirler, Werner; Settimo, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of incense, magic candles and other flameless products often produces indoor pollutants that may represent a health risk for humans. Today, in fact, incense and air fresheners are used inside homes as well as in public places including stores, shopping malls and places of worship. As a source of indoor contamination, the impact of smoke, incense and sparklers on human health cannot be ignored. In the present work, we report the results of an emission study regarding particles (PM10 and particle number concentration, PNC) and benzene, produced by various incense sticks and sparklers. The results obtained for benzene, PM10 and PNC, showed a strong negative influence on air quality when these products were used indoors. Various incense sticks gave completely different benzene results: from a small increase of the benzene concentration in the air, just slightly above the background levels of ambient air, to very high concentrations, of more than 200 µg/m of benzene in the test room after the incense sticks had been tested.

  3. Sleep as a potential fundamental contributor to disparities in cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Chandra L; Redline, Susan; Emmons, Karen M

    2015-03-18

    Optimal sleep is integral to health but is commonly not obtained. Despite its wide-ranging public health impact, sleep health is considered only rarely by policy makers, employers, schools, and others whose policies and structures can adversely affect sleep. An inadequate duration of sleep and poor-quality sleep are prevalent in minority and low-income populations, and may be fundamental to racial and socioeconomic status inequities that contribute to a range of health conditions, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). This review examines the relationship between sleep and disparities in CVD. We describe the public health importance of sleep and the role of sleep duration, as well as the two most common disorders (sleep apnea and insomnia) as risk factors for a number of chronic diseases. We use a multilevel model focused on population health and health disparities, which is based on the notion that individual behaviors, such as sleep, are influenced by complex and dynamic interrelations among individuals and their physical and social environments. We also describe modifiable factors that contribute to insufficient sleep and circadian misalignment, propose potential interventions in various sectors (e.g., neighborhoods, schools, workplaces) that can address social structures that contribute to disparities, and recommend areas for future research. Integrating sleep into public health research will identify novel approaches for closing gaps in health disparities.

  4. Prospects of and requirements for nuclear power as a contributor toward managing greenhouse gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassberger, J.A.; Schock, R.N.; Isaacs, T.H.

    1997-01-01

    The world's population, energy demand, and rate of carbon emissions are increasing, but the rates of increase are uncertain. Even modest growth rates present significant challenges to existing and developing technologies for reducing carbon and greenhouse gas emissions while meeting growing energy demands. Nuclear power is currently the most developed alternative to fossil fuel combustion and is one of the options for meeting these challenges. However, there remain significant technical, economic and institutional barriers inhibiting growth of nuclear capacity in the U.S. and slowing implementation worldwide. In the near-term, the major barriers to nuclear power, especially in the U.S., appear to be economic and institutional, with the risks such as safety, waste management and proliferation having reasonably acceptable limits considering the current installed capacity. Future growth of nuclear power, however, may well hinge on continuous evolutionary and perhaps revolutionary reduction of these risks such that the overall risk of nuclear power, aggregated over the entire installed capacity, remains at or below today's risks

  5. The seaweeds Fucus vesiculosus and Ascophyllum nodosum are significant contributors to coastal iodine emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.-J. Huang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Based on the results of a pilot study in 2007, which found high mixing ratios of molecular iodine (I2 above the intertidal macroalgae (seaweed beds at Mweenish Bay (Ireland, we extended the study to nine different locations in the vicinity of Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station on the west coast of Ireland during a field campaign in 2009. The mean values of chem{I_2} mixing ratio found above the macroalgae beds at nine different locations ranged from 104 to 393 ppt, implying a high source strength of I2. Such mixing ratios are sufficient to result in photochemically driven coastal new-particle formation events. Mixing ratios above the Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus beds increased with exposure time: after 6 h exposure to ambient air the mixing ratios were one order of magnitude higher than those initially present. This contrasts with the emission characteristics of Laminaria digitata, where most I2 was emitted within the first half hour of exposure. Discrete in situ measurements (offline of I2 emission from ambient air-exposed chamber experiments of L. digitata, A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus substantially supported the field observations. Further online and time-resolved measurements of the I2 emission from O3-exposed macroalgal experiments in a chamber confirmed the distinct I2 emission characteristics of A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus compared to those of L. digitata. The emission rates of A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus were comparable to or even higher than L. digitata after the initial exposure period of ~20–30 min. We suggest that A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus may provide an important source of photolabile iodine in the coastal boundary layer and that their impact on photochemistry and coastal new-particle formation should be reevaluated in light of their longer exposure at low tide and their widespread distribution.

  6. Timing and Targeting of PSS Methods and Tools: An Empirical Study amongst Academic Contributors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr Hinz, Hector; Bey, Niki; McAloone, Tim C.

    2013-01-01

    surveyed is when a given method is meant to be used in the development of a product/service-system. This aspect has been determined through a qualitative assessment of each method. The second aspect surveyed is which persons in an organisation who are seen as the main drivers in the use of the methods...

  7. Contributors to dietary glycaemic index and glycaemic load in the Netherlands: the role of beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluik, Diewertje; Atkinson, Fiona S; Brand-Miller, Jennie C; Fogelholm, Mikael; Raben, Anne; Feskens, Edith J M

    2016-04-14

    Diets high in glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) have been associated with a higher diabetes risk. Beer explained a large proportion of variation in GI in a Finnish and an American study. However, few beers have been tested according to International Organization for Standardization (ISO) methodology. We tested the GI of beer and estimated its contribution to dietary GI and GL in the Netherlands. GI testing of pilsner beer (Pilsner Urquell) was conducted at The University of Sydney according to ISO international standards with glucose as the reference food. Subsequently, GI and GL values were assigned to 2556 food items in the 2011 Dutch food composition table using a six-step methodology and consulting four databases. This table was linked to dietary data from 2106 adults in the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey 2007-2010. Stepwise linear regression identified contribution to inter-individual variation in dietary GI and GL. The GI of pilsner beer was 89 (SD 5). Beer consumption contributed to 9·6 and 5·3% inter-individual variation in GI and GL, respectively. Other foods that contributed to the inter-individual variation in GI and GL included potatoes, bread, soft drinks, sugar, candy, wine, coffee and tea. The results were more pronounced in men than in women. In conclusion, beer is a high-GI food. Despite its relatively low carbohydrate content (approximately 4-5 g/100 ml), it still made a contribution to dietary GL, especially in men. Next to potatoes, bread, sugar and sugar-sweetened beverages, beer captured a considerable proportion of between-person variability in GI and GL in the Dutch diet.

  8. Narrative centrality and negative affectivity: independent and interactive contributors to stress reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, David C; Boals, Adriel; Hoyle, Rick H

    2014-06-01

    Reactions to stressful negative events have long been studied using approaches based on either the narrative interpretation of the event or the traits of the individual. Here, we integrate these 2 approaches by using individual-differences measures of both the narrative interpretation of the stressful event as central to one's life and the personality characteristic of negative affectivity. We show that they each have independent contributions to stress reactions and that high levels on both produce greater than additive effects. The effects on posttraumatic stress symptoms are substantial for both undergraduates (Study 1, n = 2,296; Study 3, n = 488) and veterans (Study 2, n = 104), with mean levels for participants low on both measures near floor on posttraumatic stress symptoms and those high on both measures scoring at or above diagnostic thresholds. Study 3 included 3 measures of narrative centrality and 3 of negative affectivity to demonstrate that the effects were not limited to a single measure. In Study 4 (n = 987), measures associated with symptoms of posttraumatic stress correlated substantially with either measures of narrative centrality or measures of negative affectivity. The concepts of narrative centrality and negative affectivity and the results are consistent with findings from clinical populations using similar measures and with current approaches to therapy. In broad nonclinical populations, such as those used here, the results suggest that we might be able to substantially increase our ability to account for the severity of stress response by including both concepts. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Contributors to dietary glycaemic index and glycaemic load in the Netherlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sluik, Diewertje; Atkinson, Fiona S; Brand-Miller, Jennie

    2016-01-01

    -individual variation in dietary GI and GL. The GI of pilsner beer was 89 (sd 5). Beer consumption contributed to 9·6 and 5·3 % inter-individual variation in GI and GL, respectively. Other foods that contributed to the inter-individual variation in GI and GL included potatoes, bread, soft drinks, sugar, candy, wine...... assigned to 2556 food items in the 2011 Dutch food composition table using a six-step methodology and consulting four databases. This table was linked to dietary data from 2106 adults in the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey 2007-2010. Stepwise linear regression identified contribution to inter......, coffee and tea. The results were more pronounced in men than in women. In conclusion, beer is a high-GI food. Despite its relatively low carbohydrate content (approximately 4-5 g/100 ml), it still made a contribution to dietary GL, especially in men. Next to potatoes, bread, sugar and sugar...

  10. Coral diseases are major contributors to coral mortality in Shingle Island, Gulf of Mannar, southeastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thinesh, T; Diraviya Raj, K; Mathews, G; Patterson Edward, J K

    2013-09-24

    The present study reports coral mortality, driven primarily by coral diseases, around Shingle Island, Gulf of Mannar (GOM), Indian Ocean. In total, 2910 colonies were permanently monitored to assess the incidence of coral diseases and consequent mortality for 2 yr. Four types of lesions consistent with white band disease (WBD), black disease (BD), white plaque disease (WPD), and pink spot disease (PSD) were recorded from 4 coral genera: Montipora, Pocillopora, Acropora, and Porites. Porites were affected by 2 disease types, while the other 3 genera were affected by only 1 disease type. Overall disease prevalence increased from 8% (n = 233 colonies) to 41.9% (n = 1219) over the 2 yr study period. BD caused an unprecedented 100% mortality in Pocillopora, followed by 20.4 and 13.1% mortality from WBD in Montipora and Acropora, respectively. Mean disease progression rates of 0.8 ± 1.0 and 0.6 ± 0.5 cm mo-1 over live coral colonies were observed for BD and WBD. Significant correlations between temperature and disease progression were observed for BD (r = 0.86, R2 = 0.75, p < 0.001) and WBD (R2 = 0.76, p < 0.001). This study revealed the increasing trend of disease prevalence and progression of disease over live coral in a relatively limited study area; further study should investigate the status of the entire coral reef in the GOM and the role of diseases in reef dynamics.

  11. Oxidative Stress Is Not a Major Contributor to Somatic Mitochondrial DNA Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itsara, Leslie S.; Kennedy, Scott R.; Fox, Edward J.; Yu, Selina; Hewitt, Joshua J.; Sanchez-Contreras, Monica; Cardozo-Pelaez, Fernando; Pallanck, Leo J.

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations is implicated in aging and common diseases of the elderly, including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. However, the mechanisms that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations are poorly understood. To develop a simple invertebrate model system to address this matter, we used the Random Mutation Capture (RMC) assay to characterize the age-dependent frequency and distribution of mtDNA mutations in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Because oxidative stress is a major suspect in the age-dependent accumulation of somatic mtDNA mutations, we also used the RMC assay to explore the influence of oxidative stress on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. We found that many of the features associated with mtDNA mutations in vertebrates are conserved in Drosophila, including a comparable somatic mtDNA mutation frequency (∼10−5), an increased frequency of mtDNA mutations with age, and a prevalence of transition mutations. Only a small fraction of the mtDNA mutations detected in young or old animals were G∶C to T∶A transversions, a signature of oxidative damage, and loss-of-function mutations in the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, Sod2, had no detectable influence on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. Moreover, a loss-of-function mutation in Ogg1, which encodes a DNA repair enzyme that removes oxidatively damaged deoxyguanosine residues (8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine), did not significantly influence the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency of Sod2 mutants. Together, these findings indicate that oxidative stress is not a major cause of somatic mtDNA mutations. Our data instead suggests that somatic mtDNA mutations arise primarily from errors that occur during mtDNA replication. Further studies using Drosophila should aid in the identification of factors that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations. PMID:24516391

  12. Reciprocal Peer Coaching: A Critical Contributor to Implementing Individual Leadership Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Ellen; Wesner, Marilyn; Karnchanomai, Ornpawee

    2013-01-01

    Billions of dollars are spent annually on programs to develop organizational leaders, yet the effectiveness of these programs is poorly understood. Scholars advise that value is enhanced by the development of individual leadership plans at program completion, followed by implementation experience with subsequent coaching and reflection. The…

  13. Sediment movement from forest road systems-roads: a major contributor to erosion and stream sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnny M. Grace

    2002-01-01

    Nonpoint source pollution is a major concern related to natural resource management throughout the United States. Undisturbed forest lands typically have minimal erosion, less than 0.13 ton/acre (0.30 ton/hectare), due to the increased cover and surface roughness found in these areas. However, disturbances caused by forest management practices can result in...

  14. Involving the animal as a contributor in design to overcome animal welfare related trade-offs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeghel, van Ellen; Bos, Bram; Spoelstra, Sierk; Groot Koerkamp, Peter W.G.

    2016-01-01

    Allowing farm animals to have active control and influence over their environment through the expression of intrinsically motivated behaviours contributes to their (positive)welfare. However, farm animals are predominantly seen as passive receivers of what husbandry systems should provide for

  15. The Study of the Role of Contributor Factors in Addiction Withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Kianipour

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present paper investigated the factors contributing to addiction withdrawal so as to it would be possible to set preventive and rehabilitative programs for addicts. Method: The study was ex-post facto and causal-comparative one. Population included all addicts referred to addiction withdrawal centers of Kahnouj city and the sample was selected of addicts of Yaran addiction withdrawal Center by voluntary sampling. Bar-on emotional intelligence inventory, family boundary questionnaire and demographic information were administered among selected sample. Results: The results showed that normal family boundaries, higher emotional intelligence and opium use in comparison of crack and crystal glass are effective on addiction withdrawal. But disengaged family boundaries, crack and crystal glass use can be led to addiction recursion. Age, addiction duration, marital status, and education level are not effective on addiction withdrawal. Conclusion: Altogether, the results represented the role and importance of variables namely: family, emotional intelligence, and the kind of used material in addiction withdrawal.

  16. Clostridium perfringens Sialidases: Potential Contributors to Intestinal Pathogenesis and Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihong Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens is a major cause of histotoxic and intestinal infections of humans and other animals. This Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium can produce up to three sialidases named NanH, NanI, and NanJ. The role of sialidases in histotoxic infections, such as gas gangrene (clostridial myonecrosis, remains equivocal. However, recent in vitro studies suggest that NanI may contribute to intestinal virulence by upregulating production of some toxins associated with intestinal infection, increasing the binding and activity of some of those toxins, and enhancing adherence of C. perfringens to intestinal cells. Possible contributions of NanI to intestinal colonization are further supported by observations that the C. perfringens strains causing acute food poisoning in humans often lack the nanI gene, while other C. perfringens strains causing chronic intestinal infections in humans usually carry a nanI gene. Certain sialidase inhibitors have been shown to block NanI activity and reduce C. perfringens adherence to cultured enterocyte-like cells, opening the possibility that sialidase inhibitors could be useful therapeutics against C. perfringens intestinal infections. These initial in vitro observations should be tested for their in vivo significance using animal models of intestinal infections.

  17. Psychological, lifestyle and coping contributors to chronic fatigue in shift-worker nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaha, Elias; Lal, Sara; Samaha, Najwa; Wyndham, Jennifer

    2007-08-01

    This paper is a report of a study to assess the following in shift-worker nurses: (1) the relationships amongst chronic fatigue and psychological variables including anxiety, mood and locus of control; (2) the relationships amongst chronic fatigue and a number of lifestyle factors such as shiftwork, sleep and exercise; and (3) various coping behaviours that best predict chronic fatigue. In the shift-working population, individual psychological, lifestyle and coping differences influence fatigue levels. However, some of these factors are somewhat unexplored and their relative contribution to fatigue remains poorly understood. Methods. An exploratory design was adopted with 111 eldercare shift-worker nurses. Data were collected during 2006. Nurses completed self-administered questionnaires examining fatigue, anxiety, mood disturbance, locus of control, sleep, work, lifestyle and coping characteristics. Multiple regressions showed that mood disturbance, locus of control and trait anxiety are statistically significant predictors of chronic fatigue. Poor sleep quality was the lifestyle factor which most strongly contributed to fatigue. Other lifestyle predictors included higher workload perception, lack of exercise and the non-availability of support. Whilst problem-focused coping behaviours were not associated with fatigue, coping by using alcohol, letting emotions out and avoiding the situation significantly predicted chronic fatigue. The challenge for improving the fatigue outcomes requires further investigation of the profile of a nurse who is at a high risk of fatigue, and then integrating this profile into a fatigue management programme which considers relative contributions of the psychological, lifestyle and coping factors.

  18. Understanding Socioenvironmental Contributors to Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Disability Among Older Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Allison B; Clarke, Philippa J

    2018-02-01

    Our understanding of the mechanisms through which racial/ethnic disparities in disability in older adults develop and are maintained is limited. We examined the role of physical impairment, socioeconomic factors and health for racial/ethnic disparities in activities of daily living (ADL), and the modifying role of the indoor home environment. Data come from the National Health and Aging Trends Study ( N = 5,640), and negative binomial regression models were specified separately for men and women. Blacks and Hispanics reported more ADL difficulty than Whites. Living in homes with clutter was associated with higher rates of ADL difficulty, but it was not related to racial/ethnic disparities. Racial/ethnic differences were explained by physical impairment for men, but not for women. Socioeconomic factors and health accounted for remaining disparities for Black, but not for Hispanic women. Attention to individual and environmental factors is necessary to fully understand and address race/ethnic disparities in disability in older Americans.

  19. Short sleep duration as a contributor to racial disparities in breast cancer tumor grade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Allan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although African Americans (AAs are less likely to get breast cancer than European Americans (EAs, they get more aggressive forms. We previously showed that short sleep is associated with higher tumor grade. It is well documented that AAs get less sleep, on average, than EAs. We studied the contribution of short sleep to racial disparities in breast cancer aggressiveness among 809 invasive breast cancer patients who responded to a survey on their lifestyle. Multivariable regressions and mediation analyses were performed to assess the effect of sleep duration on the association of race with tumor grade. AAs reported shorter average sleep (mean [standard deviation] 6.57 [1.47] h than EAs (mean [standard deviation] 7.11 [1.16] h; P<0.0001 and were almost twice as likely to report less than 6 h of sleep per night (48.0% vs. 25.3%, P<0.0001. AA patients were more likely to have high-grade tumors (52.6% vs. 28.7% in EAs, P=0.0002. In multivariate analysis, race was associated with tumor grade (P<0.0001. On adjustment for sleep duration, the effect of race was reduced by 7.1%, but remained statistically significant (P=0.0006. However, the Sobel test did not indicate statistical significance (z=1.69, P=0.091. In other models accounting for these and additional confounders, we found similar results. Because of the conservative nature of the mediation analysis and smaller sample size, replication of our results in larger studies with more AA patients is warranted.

  20. Non-bee insects are important contributors to global crop pollination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Romina; Bartomeus, Ignasi; Garibaldi, Lucas A; Garratt, Michael P D; Howlett, Brad G; Winfree, Rachael; Cunningham, Saul A; Mayfield, Margaret M; Arthur, Anthony D; Andersson, Georg K S; Bommarco, Riccardo; Brittain, Claire; Carvalheiro, Luísa G; Chacoff, Natacha P; Entling, Martin H; Foully, Benjamin; Freitas, Breno M; Gemmill-Herren, Barbara; Ghazoul, Jaboury; Griffin, Sean R; Gross, Caroline L; Herbertsson, Lina; Herzog, Felix; Hipólito, Juliana; Jaggar, Sue; Jauker, Frank; Klein, Alexandra-Maria; Kleijn, David; Krishnan, Smitha; Lemos, Camila Q; Lindström, Sandra A M; Mandelik, Yael; Monteiro, Victor M; Nelson, Warrick; Nilsson, Lovisa; Pattemore, David E; Pereira, Natália de O; Pisanty, Gideon; Potts, Simon G; Reemer, Menno; Rundlöf, Maj; Sheffield, Cory S; Scheper, Jeroen; Schüepp, Christof; Smith, Henrik G; Stanley, Dara A; Stout, Jane C; Szentgyörgyi, Hajnalka; Taki, Hisatomo; Vergara, Carlos H; Viana, Blandina F; Woyciechowski, Michal

    2016-01-05

    Wild and managed bees are well documented as effective pollinators of global crops of economic importance. However, the contributions by pollinators other than bees have been little explored despite their potential to contribute to crop production and stability in the face of environmental change. Non-bee pollinators include flies, beetles, moths, butterflies, wasps, ants, birds, and bats, among others. Here we focus on non-bee insects and synthesize 39 field studies from five continents that directly measured the crop pollination services provided by non-bees, honey bees, and other bees to compare the relative contributions of these taxa. Non-bees performed 25-50% of the total number of flower visits. Although non-bees were less effective pollinators than bees per flower visit, they made more visits; thus these two factors compensated for each other, resulting in pollination services rendered by non-bees that were similar to those provided by bees. In the subset of studies that measured fruit set, fruit set increased with non-bee insect visits independently of bee visitation rates, indicating that non-bee insects provide a unique benefit that is not provided by bees. We also show that non-bee insects are not as reliant as bees on the presence of remnant natural or seminatural habitat in the surrounding landscape. These results strongly suggest that non-bee insect pollinators play a significant role in global crop production and respond differently than bees to landscape structure, probably making their crop pollination services more robust to changes in land use. Non-bee insects provide a valuable service and provide potential insurance against bee population declines.

  1. [Vladimir Zederbaum" (1883-1942): Physician, journalist, contributor to the Russian "Jewish, Encyclopedia". A research report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipova, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Vol. 15 o f the "Jewish Encyclopedia" (St. Petersburg 1908-1913) contains an article on Freud, signed by Vladimir Zederbaum. The data for the article were provided by Max Eitingon. This paper addresses the question of whether Zederbaum himself was Eitingon's contact. Several archives produced a lot of information about Zederbaum's medical and journalistic activities in St. Petersburg. However, to date no connection between the two men could be established.

  2. Land radiative management as contributor to regional-scale climate adaptation and mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Sonia I.; Phipps, Steven J.; Pitman, Andrew J.; Hirsch, Annette L.; Davin, Edouard L.; Donat, Markus G.; Hirschi, Martin; Lenton, Andrew; Wilhelm, Micah; Kravitz, Ben

    2018-02-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions urgently need to be reduced. Even with a step up in mitigation, the goal of limiting global temperature rise to well below 2 °C remains challenging. Consequences of missing these goals are substantial, especially on regional scales. Because progress in the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions has been slow, climate engineering schemes are increasingly being discussed. But global schemes remain controversial and have important shortcomings. A reduction of global mean temperature through global-scale management of solar radiation could lead to strong regional disparities and affect rainfall patterns. On the other hand, active management of land radiative effects on a regional scale represents an alternative option of climate engineering that has been little discussed. Regional land radiative management could help to counteract warming, in particular hot extremes in densely populated and important agricultural regions. Regional land radiative management also raises some ethical issues, and its efficacy would be limited in time and space, depending on crop growing periods and constraints on agricultural management. But through its more regional focus and reliance on tested techniques, regional land radiative management avoids some of the main shortcomings associated with global radiation management. We argue that albedo-related climate benefits of land management should be considered more prominently when assessing regional-scale climate adaptation and mitigation as well as ecosystem services.

  3. Sex-specific placental differences as a contributor to sex-specific metabolic programming?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruis, M. G. M.; Gellhaus, A.; Kuehnel, E.; Lendvai, A.; Bloks, V. W.; Groen, A. K.; Ploesch, T.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades maternal nutritional intake has been proven to affect the prenatal and postnatal development of the fetus as well as its long-term health (see (Jimenez-Chillaron et al. 2012) and (Lillycrop & Burdge. 2015) for recent overviews). In this journal, we have recently shown that

  4. Coal and nuclear wastes: both potential contributors to environmental and health problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The Chairman, Subcommittee on Energy Conservation and Power, House Committee on Energy and Commerce, asked GAO to answer eight questions regarding waste produced by coal and nuclear fuels during the generation of electricity. This report primarily discusses the first two items in the Chairman's request: what are the types and quantities of wastes generated at each step of the coal and nuclear fuel cycles. What are the health and environmental problems associated with these wastes. Based on a comprehensive literature search GAO found that wastes produced by both the coal and nuclear fuel cycles present the potential for significant environmental and health hazards. Because the waste types present different types of hazards, however, it is not possible to determine if either waste type is more of a hazard than the other. Nonetheless, most of the hazards from both fuel cycles can be lessened, or in some cases eliminated, if properly controlled and regulated

  5. TRPV3 and TRPV4 ion channels are not major contributors to mouse heat sensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Juan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of heat-sensitive Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV ion channels provided a potential molecular explanation for the perception of innocuous and noxious heat stimuli. TRPV1 has a significant role in acute heat nociception and inflammatory heat hyperalgesia. Yet, substantial innocuous and noxious heat sensitivity remains in TRPV1 knockout animals. Here we investigated the role of two related channels, TRPV3 and TRPV4, in these capacities. We studied TRPV3 knockout animals on both C57BL6 and 129S6 backgrounds, as well as animals deficient in both TRPV3 and TRPV4 on a C57BL6 background. Additionally, we assessed the contributions of TRPV3 and TRPV4 to acute heat nociception and inflammatory heat hyperalgesia during inhibition of TRPV1. Results TRPV3 knockout mice on the C57BL6 background exhibited no obvious alterations in thermal preference behavior. On the 129S6 background, absence of TRPV3 resulted in a more restrictive range of occupancy centered around cooler floor temperatures. TRPV3 knockout mice showed no deficits in acute heat nociception on either background. Mice deficient in both TRPV3 and TRPV4 on a C57BL6 background showed thermal preference behavior similar to wild-type controls on the thermal gradient, and little or no change in acute heat nociception or inflammatory heat hyperalgesia. Masking of TRPV1 by the TRPV1 antagonist JNJ-17203212 did not reveal differences between C57BL6 animals deficient in TRPV3 and TRPV4, compared to their wild-type counterparts. Conclusions Our results support the notion that TRPV3 and TRPV4 likely make limited and strain-dependent contributions to innocuous warm temperature perception or noxious heat sensation, even when TRPV1 is masked. These findings imply the existence of other significant mechanisms for heat perception.

  6. Prospective large-scale field study generates predictive model identifying major contributors to colony losses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merav Gleit Kielmanowicz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, unusually high losses of colonies have been reported by beekeepers across the USA. Multiple factors such as Varroa destructor, bee viruses, Nosema ceranae, weather, beekeeping practices, nutrition, and pesticides have been shown to contribute to colony losses. Here we describe a large-scale controlled trial, in which different bee pathogens, bee population, and weather conditions across winter were monitored at three locations across the USA. In order to minimize influence of various known contributing factors and their interaction, the hives in the study were not treated with antibiotics or miticides. Additionally, the hives were kept at one location and were not exposed to potential stress factors associated with migration. Our results show that a linear association between load of viruses (DWV or IAPV in Varroa and bees is present at high Varroa infestation levels (>3 mites per 100 bees. The collection of comprehensive data allowed us to draw a predictive model of colony losses and to show that Varroa destructor, along with bee viruses, mainly DWV replication, contributes to approximately 70% of colony losses. This correlation further supports the claim that insufficient control of the virus-vectoring Varroa mite would result in increased hive loss. The predictive model also indicates that a single factor may not be sufficient to trigger colony losses, whereas a combination of stressors appears to impact hive health.

  7. Depressive Symptoms and Violence Exposure: Contributors to Repeat Pregnancies Among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Cheryl A.; Pierce, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Depressive symptoms and violence exposure (VE) often cooccur and have been recognized to influence childbearing; contribution to repeat pregnancy is unclear and examined in this article. This cross-sectional, descriptive, study screened for depressive symptoms and VE among 193 adolescent mothers at a large county hospital in Southwestern United States. Repeat pregnancy and depressive symptoms characterized one-third and one-quarter of adolescents, respectively. Despite minimal disclosure of VE, repeat pregnancy was significantly influenced by child abuse and past traumatic life experiences. Assessments and interventions with adolescents should focus on frequency of repeat pregnancies and symptoms of depression and VE. Nurses and childbirth educators are poised to offer birth control information and education, support, and resources highlighting depression and VE to adolescents. PMID:26834444

  8. Sporadic colorectal cancer: microbial contributors to disease prevention, development and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, Julia L; Housseau, Franck; Sears, Cynthia L

    2016-07-26

    The gut microbiota has been hailed as an accessory organ, with functions critical to the host including dietary metabolic activities and assistance in the development of a proper functioning immune system. However, an aberrant microbiota (dysbiosis) may influence disease processes such as colorectal cancer. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the contributions of the microbiota to prevention, initiation/progression, and treatment of colorectal cancer, with a major focus on biofilms and the antimicrobial and antitumoural immune response.

  9. γδ T cells as potential contributors to the progression of parapsoriasis to mycosis fungoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordignon, Matteo; Belloni Fortina, Anna; Pigozzi, Barbara; Alaibac, Mauro

    2008-01-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that γδ T lymphocytes play a role in innate immunity to the neoplastic process; however, the significance of this subset of T lymphocytes in the pathophysiology of the most common form of cutaneous T cell lymphomas, mycosis fungoides, has yet to be investigated. In order to identify whether γδ T lymphocytes play a role in the progression of a pre-lymphomatous stage (parapsoriasis) to frank lymphoma (mycosis fungoides), we evaluated their presence in the skin biopsies of patients affected by mycosis fungoides and parapsoriasis. The skin biopsies of ten patients with mycosis fungoides and nine patients with parapsoriasis were analyzed using immunohistochemistry with a panel of different antibodies for T cell-associated markers (CD3, CD4, CD5, CD8 and γδ TCR). The percentage of T cells expressing γδ T cell receptors (TCR) was similar in the biopsies from both groups of skin disorders, ranging from 1 to 5% of the total T cell population. We observed a constant presence of T cells bearing γδ TCR in parapsoriasis and mycosis fungoides that did not differ between the two conditions. This presence is consistent with the role played by this subgroup of T cells of the innate immunity system in the development and maintenance of the two skin disorders. However, the contribution of γδ T cells to the progression of parapsoriasis to mycosis fungoides remains to be elucidated.

  10. Contributors to self-reported health in a racially and ethnically diverse population: focus on Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Jessica V V; Miyasato, Gavin S; Gates, Margaret A; Curto, Teresa M; Hall, Susan A; McKinlay, John B

    2013-01-01

    To understand if Hispanics report health differently than other racial and ethnic groups after controlling for demographics and risk factors for poor health. The sample (N = 5502) included 3201 women, 1767 black, 1859 white, and 1876 Hispanic subjects from the Boston Area Community Health Survey, a population-based survey of English- and Spanish-speaking residents of Boston, Massachusetts, United States, aged 30-79 years in 2002-2005. Multiple logistic regression models were used to examine the association between race/ethnicity (including interview language for Hispanics) and fair/poor self-reported health (F/P SRH) adjusting for gender, age, socioeconomic status, depression, nativity, and comorbidities. Compared with whites, Hispanics interviewed in Spanish were seven times as likely to report F/P SRH (odds ratio, 7.7; 95% confidence interval, 4.9-12.2) after adjusting for potential confounders and those interviewed in English were twice as likely. In analyses stratified by depression and nativity, we observed stronger associations with Hispanic ethnicity in immigrants and nondepressed individuals interviewed in Spanish. Increased odds of F/P SRH persisted in the Hispanic group even when accounting for interview language and controlling for socioeconomic status, age, depression, and nativity, with interview language mitigating the association. These findings have methodological implications for epidemiologists using SRH across diverse populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. False Positive Functional Analysis Results as a Contributor of Treatment Failure during Functional Communication Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Amanda J.; Mueller, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    Research has shown that functional analysis results are beneficial for treatment selection because they identify reinforcers for severe behavior that can then be used to reinforce replacement behaviors either differentially or noncontingently. Theoretically then, if a reinforcer is identified in a functional analysis erroneously, a well researched…

  12. Diet-Gene Interactions and PUFA Metabolism: A Potential Contributor to Health Disparities and Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floyd H. Chilton

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The “modern western” diet (MWD has increased the onset and progression of chronic human diseases as qualitatively and quantitatively maladaptive dietary components give rise to obesity and destructive gene-diet interactions. There has been a three-fold increase in dietary levels of the omega-6 (n-6 18 carbon (C18, polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6, with the addition of cooking oils and processed foods to the MWD. Intense debate has emerged regarding the impact of this increase on human health. Recent studies have uncovered population-related genetic variation in the LCPUFA biosynthetic pathway (especially within the fatty acid desaturase gene (FADS cluster that is associated with levels of circulating and tissue PUFAs and several biomarkers and clinical endpoints of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Importantly, populations of African descent have higher frequencies of variants associated with elevated levels of arachidonic acid (ARA, CVD biomarkers and disease endpoints. Additionally, nutrigenomic interactions between dietary n-6 PUFAs and variants in genes that encode for enzymes that mobilize and metabolize ARA to eicosanoids have been identified. These observations raise important questions of whether gene-PUFA interactions are differentially driving the risk of cardiovascular and other diseases in diverse populations, and contributing to health disparities, especially in African American populations.

  13. Contributors to this Issue | to this Issue | Ghana Journal of Linguistics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ghana Journal of Linguistics. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 6, No 1 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  14. Non-bee insects are important contributors to global crop pollination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartomeus, Ignasi; Garibaldi, Lucas A.; Garratt, Michael P. D.; Howlett, Brad G.; Winfree, Rachael; Cunningham, Saul A.; Mayfield, Margaret M.; Arthur, Anthony D.; Andersson, Georg K. S.; Bommarco, Riccardo; Brittain, Claire; Carvalheiro, Luísa G.; Chacoff, Natacha P.; Entling, Martin H.; Foully, Benjamin; Freitas, Breno M.; Gemmill-Herren, Barbara; Ghazoul, Jaboury; Griffin, Sean R.; Gross, Caroline L.; Herbertsson, Lina; Herzog, Felix; Hipólito, Juliana; Jaggar, Sue; Jauker, Frank; Klein, Alexandra-Maria; Kleijn, David; Krishnan, Smitha; Lemos, Camila Q.; Lindström, Sandra A. M.; Mandelik, Yael; Monteiro, Victor M.; Nelson, Warrick; Nilsson, Lovisa; Pattemore, David E.; de O. Pereira, Natália; Pisanty, Gideon; Potts, Simon G.; Reemer, Menno; Rundlöf, Maj; Sheffield, Cory S.; Scheper, Jeroen; Schüepp, Christof; Smith, Henrik G.; Stanley, Dara A.; Stout, Jane C.; Szentgyörgyi, Hajnalka; Taki, Hisatomo; Vergara, Carlos H.; Viana, Blandina F.; Woyciechowski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Wild and managed bees are well documented as effective pollinators of global crops of economic importance. However, the contributions by pollinators other than bees have been little explored despite their potential to contribute to crop production and stability in the face of environmental change. Non-bee pollinators include flies, beetles, moths, butterflies, wasps, ants, birds, and bats, among others. Here we focus on non-bee insects and synthesize 39 field studies from five continents that directly measured the crop pollination services provided by non-bees, honey bees, and other bees to compare the relative contributions of these taxa. Non-bees performed 25–50% of the total number of flower visits. Although non-bees were less effective pollinators than bees per flower visit, they made more visits; thus these two factors compensated for each other, resulting in pollination services rendered by non-bees that were similar to those provided by bees. In the subset of studies that measured fruit set, fruit set increased with non-bee insect visits independently of bee visitation rates, indicating that non-bee insects provide a unique benefit that is not provided by bees. We also show that non-bee insects are not as reliant as bees on the presence of remnant natural or seminatural habitat in the surrounding landscape. These results strongly suggest that non-bee insect pollinators play a significant role in global crop production and respond differently than bees to landscape structure, probably making their crop pollination services more robust to changes in land use. Non-bee insects provide a valuable service and provide potential insurance against bee population declines. PMID:26621730

  15. Yogurt can beneficially affect blood contributors of cardiovascular health status in hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchandran, Lata; Shah, Nagendra P

    2011-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the single leading cause of death in the world and elevated blood pressure is one of the major independent risk factors. Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme-inhibitors have received considerable attention for their effectiveness in both the prevention and the treatment of hypertension. To confirm the antihypertensive effect, the influence of yogurt- and probiotic yogurt-based diets on the weight gain, serum lipid profile, and blood pressure (BP) were investigated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (14 wk old). A total of 3 dietary treatments were fed for 8 wk: skim milk diet (Feed-C), skim milk diet supplemented with freeze dried low fat yogurt (Feed-Y), and with freeze dried low-fat probiotic yogurt (Feed-PY). The total weight gain for the 8-wk period was maximum in rats fed Feed-C (90 g) followed by those fed Feed-PY (85.7 g) and Feed-Y (78.7 g), indicating that the overall weight gains were lesser (statistically non-significant) in the groups fed yogurt containing diets. At the end of the feeding period the reduction in systolic BP of rats fed Feed-Y was 3.7% (-9.5 mm Hg) and 2.7% (-6.4 mm Hg) in those fed Feed-PY while reduction in diastolic BP was 30% (-9.4 mm Hg) and 44% (-13.8 mm Hg), respectively, in comparison to those fed Feed-C. The levels of total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol of rats fed the supplemented diets were lower than those fed Feed-C while no changes in the levels of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol were observed. It was concluded that feeding diets supplemented with yogurts exhibited antihypertensive and hypocholesterolemic effects in spontaneously hypertensive rats. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  16. New Teachers' Perspectives of Informal Mentoring: Quality of Mentoring and Contributors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fengning; Wang, Qi

    2017-01-01

    As an individual socialization initiative, informal mentoring has often been lauded as an effective tool to provide spontaneous and immediate social-emotional and career-related assistance to new teachers. Little is known about how informal mentoring is perpetuated in workplace. Through the conceptual lens of dynamic process theory of mentoring,…

  17. Hyperlink Format, Categorization Abilities and Memory Span as Contributors to Deaf Users Hypertext Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjardo, Inmaculada; Arfe, Barbara; Benedetti, Patrizia; Altoe, Gianmarco

    2008-01-01

    Sixty deaf and hearing students were asked to search for goods in a Hypertext Supermarket with either graphical or textual links of high typicality, frequency, and familiarity. Additionally, they performed a picture and word categorization task and two working memory span tasks (spatial and verbal). Results showed that deaf students were faster in…

  18. Empathy-Related Responding in Chinese Toddlers: Factorial Structure and Cognitive Contributors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Heqing; Su, Yanjie; Jin, Jian

    2017-01-01

    The critical role of the second year of life in the development of empathy is well accepted by psychologists. However, the developmental trends of the different components of empathy and the potential factors underlying these components during this critical period remain unclear. Eighty-four Chinese toddlers in the second year of life participated…

  19. Investigating bacterial sources of toxicity as an environmental contributor to dopaminergic neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim A Caldwell

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease (PD involves progressive neurodegeneration, including loss of dopamine (DA neurons from the substantia nigra. Select genes associated with rare familial forms of PD function in cellular pathways, such as the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS, involved in protein degradation. The misfolding and accumulation of proteins, such as alpha-synuclein, into inclusions termed Lewy Bodies represents a clinical hallmark of PD. Given the predominance of sporadic PD among patient populations, environmental toxins may induce the disease, although their nature is largely unknown. Thus, an unmet challenge surrounds the discovery of causal or contributory neurotoxic factors that could account for the prevalence of sporadic PD. Bacteria within the order Actinomycetales are renowned for their robust production of secondary metabolites and might represent unidentified sources of environmental exposures. Among these, the aerobic genera, Streptomyces, produce natural proteasome inhibitors that block protein degradation and may potentially damage DA neurons. Here we demonstrate that a metabolite produced by a common soil bacterium, S. venezuelae, caused DA neurodegeneration in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, which increased as animals aged. This metabolite, which disrupts UPS function, caused gradual degeneration of all neuronal classes examined, however DA neurons were particularly vulnerable to exposure. The presence of DA exacerbated toxicity because neurodegeneration was attenuated in mutant nematodes depleted for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, the rate-limiting enzyme in DA production. Strikingly, this factor caused dose-dependent death of human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, a dopaminergic line. Efforts to purify the toxic activity revealed that it is a highly stable, lipophilic, and chemically unique small molecule. Evidence of a robust neurotoxic factor that selectively impacts neuronal survival in a progressive yet moderate manner is consistent with the etiology of age-associated neurodegenerative diseases. Collectively, these data suggest the potential for exposures to the metabolites of specific common soil bacteria to possibly represent a contributory environmental component to PD.

  20. Greater Engagement among Members of Gay-Straight Alliances: Individual and Structural Contributors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteat, V. Paul; Heck, Nicholas C.; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Calzo, Jerel P.

    2016-01-01

    Using youth program models to frame the study of Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs), we identified individual and structural predictors of greater engagement in these settings with a cross-sectional sample of 295 youth in 33 GSAs from the 2014 Massachusetts GSA Network Survey (69% LGBQ, 68% cisgender female, 68% White, M[subscript age] =16.07).…

  1. Ludwik Zamenhof: a major contributor to world culture, on the 150(th) anniversary of his birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    More than 200 universal languages have been proposed to replace the nearly 3,000 existing languages. Esperanto, developed by the Polish-Jewish ophthalmologist Ludwik Zamenhof in 1887, became the most widely used artificial language of the 20(th) century. It is estimated that between one million and 15 million people in the world can speak or read Esperanto. Zamenhof was nominated 14 times for the Nobel Peace Prize, and also received the French Legion of Honor, and the Medal of Isabelle of Spain the Catholic. Ludwik Zamenhof started his professional training in ophthalmology at the Jewish Hospital in Warsaw, later spent several months in Vienna, and finally started a private ophthalmology practice in Warsaw, where he remained for most of his life. His son Adam was an associate professor of ophthalmology at the University of Warsaw and head of ophthalmology in the Jewish Hospital in Czyste, the biggest and most modern hospital in Warsaw at that time. Some lesser known aspects of Zamenhof's life and work drawn from the original 19(th) century Russian and 20(th) century Esperanto documents are described. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Insulin Delivery Into the Peripheral Circulation: A Key Contributor to Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Guillaume; Scott, Melanie F.; Neal, Doss W.; Farmer, Ben; Smith, Marta S.; Hastings, Jon R.; Allen, Eric J.; Donahue, E. Patrick; Rivera, Noelia; Winnick, Jason J.; Edgerton, Dale S.; Nishimura, Erica; Fledelius, Christian; Brand, Christian L.; Cherrington, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia limits optimal glycemic control in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), making novel strategies to mitigate it desirable. We hypothesized that portal (Po) vein insulin delivery would lessen hypoglycemia. In the conscious dog, insulin was infused into the hepatic Po vein or a peripheral (Pe) vein at a rate four times of basal. In protocol 1, a full counterregulatory response was allowed, whereas in protocol 2, glucagon was fixed at basal, mimicking the diminished α-cell response to hypoglycemia seen in T1DM. In protocol 1, glucose fell faster with Pe insulin than with Po insulin, reaching 56 ± 3 vs. 70 ± 6 mg/dL (P = 0.04) at 60 min. The change in area under the curve (ΔAUC) for glucagon was similar between Pe and Po, but the peak occurred earlier in Pe. The ΔAUC for epinephrine was greater with Pe than with Po (67 ± 17 vs. 36 ± 14 ng/mL/180 min). In protocol 2, glucose also fell more rapidly than in protocol 1 and fell faster in Pe than in Po, reaching 41 ± 3 vs. 67 ± 2 mg/dL (P < 0.01) by 60 min. Without a rise in glucagon, the epinephrine responses were much larger (ΔAUC of 204 ± 22 for Pe vs. 96 ± 29 ng/mL/180 min for Po). In summary, Pe insulin delivery exacerbates hypoglycemia, particularly in the presence of a diminished glucagon response. Po vein insulin delivery, or strategies that mimic it (i.e., liver-preferential insulin analogs), should therefore lessen hypoglycemia. PMID:26085570

  3. Key contributors to variations in fish mercury within and among freshwater reservoirs in Oklahoma, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhao; Lynch, Robert A; Schaider, Laurel A

    2016-02-01

    Elevated fish mercury (Hg) concentrations in freshwater ecosystems worldwide are a significant human and ecological health concern. Mercury bioaccumulation and biomagnification in lakes and reservoirs are controlled by numerous biogeochemical and ecological factors, contributing to variability in fish Hg concentrations both within and among systems. We measured total mercury concentrations ([THg]) and stable isotopes (δ(15)N, δ(13)C) in over 30 fish species in two connected subtropical freshwater reservoirs (Grand Lake and Lake Hudson, Oklahoma, USA), their tributaries, and local farm ponds, all of which are potentially impacted by nearby atmospheric Hg sources. We also conducted an inter-system analysis among 61 reservoirs in Oklahoma to explore biological, chemical and physical factors associated with fish [THg] across systems. We found that [THg] for most species in Grand Lake and Lake Hudson were relatively low compared to other reservoirs in Oklahoma. There were significant spatial variations in many species within and between Grand Lake and Lake Hudson, even after accounting for length and/or trophic position (based on δ(15)N). Fish in local farm ponds, commonly used in agricultural regions for raising game fish, had 2-17 times higher [THg] than fish of a similar length in nearby reservoirs. The inter-system analysis revealed that pH, water color, rainfall, and nutrients are the best predictors of fish [THg] across systems. Our results provide insight into the key factors associated with fish [THg] variations both within and across systems, and may be useful for exposure assessment and for identifying sites and water bodies prone to high fish [THg] as monitoring priorities.

  4. Key Contributors to Variations in Fish Mercury Within and Among Freshwater Reservoirs in Oklahoma, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Zhao; Lynch, Robert A.; Schaider, Laurel A.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated fish mercury (Hg) concentrations in freshwater ecosystems worldwide are a significant human and ecological health concern. Mercury bioaccumulation and biomagnification in lakes and reservoirs are controlled by numerous biogeochemical and ecological factors, contributing to variability in fish Hg concentrations both within and among systems. We measured total mercury concentrations ([THg]) and stable isotopes (δ15N, δ13C) in over 30 fish species in two connected subtropical freshwater...

  5. Contrast monitoring techniques in CT pulmonary angiography: An important and underappreciated contributor to breast dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, D.P., E-mail: dpmmitchell@gmail.com; Rowan, M., E-mail: mrowan@mater.ie; Loughman, E., E-mail: eloughman@mater.ie; Ridge, C.A., E-mail: cridge@mater.ie; MacMahon, P.J., E-mail: pmacmahon@mater.ie

    2017-01-15

    Objective: The aims of our study were to evaluate the contribution of contrast-monitoring techniques to breast dose in pregnant and non-pregnant women, and to investigate the effect of a reduced peak kilovoltage (kV) monitoring scan protocol on breast dose and Computed Tomography Pulmonary Angiography (CTPA) diagnostic quality. Materials and methods: Single center retrospective study of 221 female patients undergoing a reduced kV 80 kV contrast-monitoring CTPA protocol compared to 281 patients using the conventional 120 kV contrast-monitoring protocol (Siemens Somatom Definition AS + ). 99 pregnant patients analyzed separately. ImPACT dosimetry software was used to calculate dose. Group subsets were evaluated to assess CTPA diagnostic quality. Results: The contrast-monitoring component of a CTPA study constituted 27% of the overall breast dose when using a standard 120 kV protocol compared to only 7% of the overall breast dose in the 80 kV study group. The dose to the breast from the contrast-monitoring component alone was reduced by 79% in the non-pregnant patients (0.36mGy ± 0.37 versus 1.7mGy ± 1.02; p < 0.001), and by 88% in the pregnant population (0.25 mGy ± 0.67 versus 2.24mGy ± 1.61; p < 0.001). There was no statistical difference in CTPA diagnostic quality or timing. Conclusion: Despite a short scan length and relatively small DLP, contrast-monitoring techniques (test-bolus or bolus-tracked) set at 120 kV can account for 27% of the overall breast dose accrued from a CTPA study. By decreasing the kilovoltage of the contrast-monitoring component, a significant reduction in breast dose for pregnant and non-pregnant female patients can be achieved without affecting CTPA quality or timing.

  6. AZO DYES ARE MAJOR CONTRIBUTORS TO THE MUTAGENIC ACTIVITY DETECTED IN THE CRISTAIS RIVER WATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine if compounds from a dye processing plant were contributing to the mutagenicity repeatedly found in the Cristais River, Sao Paulo, Brazil, we chemically characterized the treated industrial effluent, raw and treated water, and the sludge produced by a Drinking Water T...

  7. Cognitive and emotional contributors to intimate partner violence perpetration following trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Amy D; Robinson, Lara R; Azar, Sandra T

    2011-10-01

    Exposure to potentially traumatic events often leads to a wide range of interpersonal difficulties, including the perpetration of intimate partner violence. Maladaptive, threat-relevant thoughts and beliefs regarding the trauma or its sequelae can play an important role in a person's emotional and behavioral responses. Among 185 trauma-exposed study participants who were currently in an intimate relationship, levels of maladaptive posttraumatic cognitions were associated with the perpetration of psychological aggression and physical violence in their current relationships. These links were mediated by misappraisal of anger in auditory emotion stimuli and emotion-regulation deficits. Results support a cognitive model of posttraumatic pathology, with implications for clinical intervention and a broad conceptualization of the effects of trauma. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  8. Angiogenic imbalance as a contributor to the pathophysiology of preeclampsia among black African women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeme, Allen; Buga, Geoffrey A; Mammen, MaryKutty; Namugowa, Ambrose V

    2017-06-01

    The pathogenesis of preeclampsia remains unclear despite extensive research. Altered angiogenic balance has been hypothesized to play a significant role in the clinical manifestations of this syndrome. However this imbalance has not been investigated extensively among black African women. The aim of this study was to investigate the maternal levels of the angiogenic factors soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (sFLT1) and placental growth factor (PlGF) among black African women with preeclampsia. A case control study was conducted in the Mthatha hospital complex in South Africa including 51 women with preeclampsia and 82 women with uncomplicated pregnancies. Blood samples were drawn from participants and serum was used to assess sFLT1, and PlGF levels quantified using specific enzyme linked immunosorbent assays. Non- parametric statistics were used for analysis. Black African women with preeclampsia were found to have significantly lower levels of PlGF (90.3 ± 8.9 pg/ml versus 172.8 ± 20.2 pg/ml; p preeclampsia among black African women as reported in other populations.

  9. Job dissatisfaction as a contributor to stress-related mental health problems among Japanese civil servants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuse, Takashi; Sekine, Michikazu

    2013-01-01

    Although studies on the association of job dissatisfaction with mental health have been conducted in the past, few studies have dealt with the complicated links connecting job stress, job dissatisfaction, and stress-related illness. This study seeks to determine how job dissatisfaction is linked to common mental health issues. This study surveyed 3,172 civil servants (2,233 men and 939 women) in 1998, taking poor mental functioning, fatigue, and sleep disturbance as stress-related mental health problems. We examine how psychosocial risk factors at work and job dissatisfaction are associated independently with poor mental functioning, fatigue, and sleep disturbance after adjustment for other known risk factors, and how job dissatisfaction contributes to change in the degree of association between psychosocial risk factors at work and mental health problems. In general, psychosocial risk factors were independently associated with mental health problems. When adjusted for job dissatisfaction, not only was job satisfaction independently associated with mental health problems but it was also found that the association of psychosocial risk factors with mental health problems declined. Our results suggest that, although longitudinal research is necessary, attitudes toward satisfaction at work can potentially decrease the negative effects of psychosocial risk factors at work on mental health.

  10. Medical adherence and childhood chronic illness: family daily management skills and emotional climate as emerging contributors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiese, Barbara H; Everhart, Robin S

    2006-10-01

    To describe recent research that examines family factors that promote or derail adherence to medical regimens for children with chronic health conditions, primarily asthma, diabetes, and cystic fibrosis. From the past 2 years, eight correlational studies were identified which specifically examined the links between family management strategies, family climate and medical adherence. Findings from the studies suggest that team-based management strategies and cohesive family climate promote adherence to medical treatments over time. Family interactions that are characterized by conflict and disengagement tend to disrupt adherence and inevitably cause a decline in child health. Moreover, these findings seem to be moderated by child age in that poorer adherence often occurs when a child reaches adolescence and is searching for greater autonomy. Future research should consider the challenges in measuring medical adherence in the family context as well as incorporating more naturalistic studies of family interactions. Randomized controlled trials using family-based interventions may consider focusing on medical adherence as an important mediator between family process and child health outcomes.

  11. Eccrine Sweat Glands are Major Contributors to Reepithelialization of Human Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittié, Laure; Sachs, Dana L.; Orringer, Jeffrey S.; Voorhees, John J.; Fisher, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    Eccrine sweat glands are skin-associated epithelial structures (appendages) that are unique to some primates including humans and are absent in the skin of most laboratory animals including rodents, rabbits, and pigs. On the basis of the known importance of other skin appendages (hair follicles, apocrine glands, and sebaceous glands) for wound repair in model animals, the present study was designed to assess the role of eccrine glands in the repair of wounded human skin. Partial-thickness wounds were generated on healthy human forearms, and epidermal repair was studied in skin biopsy samples obtained at precise times during the first week after wounding. Wound reepithelialization was assessed using immunohistochemistry and computer-assisted 3-dimensional reconstruction of in vivo wounded skin samples. Our data demonstrate a key role for eccrine sweat glands in reconstituting the epidermis after wounding in humans. More specifically, i) eccrine sweat glands generate keratinocyte outgrowths that ultimately form new epidermis; ii) eccrine sweat glands are the most abundant appendages in human skin, outnumbering hair follicles by a factor close to 3; and iii) the rate of expansion of keratinocyte outgrowths from eccrine sweat glands parallels the rate of reepithelialization. This novel appreciation of the unique importance of eccrine sweat glands for epidermal repair may be exploited to improve our approaches to understanding and treating human wounds. PMID:23159944

  12. Temperamental, Parental, and Contextual Contributors to Early-Emerging Internalizing Problems: A New Integrative Analysis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Rosemary S. L.; Hastings, Paul D.; Helm, Jonathan; Serbin, Lisa A.; Etezadi, Jamshid; Stack, Dale M.; Schwartzman, Alex E.; Li, Hai Hong

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated a comprehensive model of factors associated with internalizing problems (IP) in early childhood, hypothesizing direct, mediated, and moderated pathways linking child temperamental inhibition, maternal overcontrol and rejection, and contextual stressors to IP. In a novel approach, three samples were integrated to form a large…

  13. Inadequate sleep as a contributor to type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutil, C; Chaput, J-P

    2017-05-08

    Lack of sleep is a modifiable risk factor for adverse health in humans. Short sleep duration and poor sleep quality are common in the pediatric population; the largest decline in sleep duration over the past decades has been seen in children and adolescents. The objective of the present narrative review was to provide for the first time an overview of the literature on sleep and its association with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) biomarkers in children and adolescents. For this narrative review, 23 studies were retained (21 observational and 2 experimental studies). Notwithstanding the conflicting results found in these studies and despite being attenuated by adiposity level, maturity, sex and age, there is still some compelling evidence for an association between sleep duration (for both objective or subjective measurements of duration) and architecture with one or more T2D biomarkers in children and adolescents. The majority of the studies reviewed did focus on sleep duration and one or more T2D biomarkers in children and adolescents, but sleep architecture, more precisely the suppression of slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep, has also been shown to be associated with insulin resistance. Only two studies looked at sleep quality, and the association between sleep quality and insulin resistance was not independent of level of adiposity. Future experimental studies will help to better understand the mechanisms linking insufficient sleep with T2D. Work also needs to be carried out on finding novel and effective strategies aimed at improving sleep hygiene and health outcomes of children and adolescents.

  14. Habitual sleep as a contributor to racial differences in cardiometabolic risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller-Rowell, Thomas E.; El-Sheikh, Mona; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Ryff, Carol D.

    2017-01-01

    Insufficient and disrupted sleep is linked with cardiovascular and metabolic dysregulation and morbidity. The current study examines the degree to which differences in sleep between black/African American (AA) and white/European American (EA) adults explain racial differences in cardiometabolic (CMB) disease risk. Total sleep time and sleep efficiency (percent of time in bed asleep) were assessed via seven nights of wrist actigraphy among 426 participants in the Midlife in the United States Study (31% AA; 69% EA; 61% female; mean age = 56.8 y). CMB risk was indexed as a composite of seven biomarkers [blood pressure, waist circumference, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), insulin resistance, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), and C-reactive protein]. Covariates included sociodemographic characteristics and relevant health behaviors. Results indicated that AAs relative to EAs obtained less sleep (341 vs. 381 min) and had lower sleep efficiency (72.3 vs. 82.2%) (P values < 0.001). Further, 41% and 58% of the racial difference in CMB risk was explained by sleep time and sleep efficiency, respectively. In models stratified by sex, race was indirectly associated with CMB risk via sleep time and efficiency only among females (explaining 33% and 65% of the race difference, respectively). Indirect effects were robust to alternative model specifications that excluded participants with diabetes or heart disease. Consideration of sleep determinants and sleep health is therefore needed in efforts to reduce racial differences in CMB disease. PMID:28760970

  15. Brettanomyces yeasts--From spoilage organisms to valuable contributors to industrial fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steensels, Jan; Daenen, Luk; Malcorps, Philippe; Derdelinckx, Guy; Verachtert, Hubert; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2015-08-03

    Ever since the introduction of controlled fermentation processes, alcoholic fermentations and Saccharomyces cerevisiae starter cultures proved to be a match made in heaven. The ability of S. cerevisiae to produce and withstand high ethanol concentrations, its pleasant flavour profile and the absence of health-threatening toxin production are only a few of the features that make it the ideal alcoholic fermentation organism. However, in certain conditions or for certain specific fermentation processes, the physiological boundaries of this species limit its applicability. Therefore, there is currently a strong interest in non-Saccharomyces (or non-conventional) yeasts with peculiar features able to replace or accompany S. cerevisiae in specific industrial fermentations. Brettanomyces (teleomorph: Dekkera), with Brettanomyces bruxellensis as the most commonly encountered representative, is such a yeast. Whilst currently mainly considered a spoilage organism responsible for off-flavour production in wine, cider or dairy products, an increasing number of authors report that in some cases, these yeasts can add beneficial (or at least interesting) aromas that increase the flavour complexity of fermented beverages, such as specialty beers. Moreover, its intriguing physiology, with its exceptional stress tolerance and peculiar carbon- and nitrogen metabolism, holds great potential for the production of bioethanol in continuous fermentors. This review summarizes the most notable metabolic features of Brettanomyces, briefly highlights recent insights in its genetic and genomic characteristics and discusses its applications in industrial fermentation processes, such as the production of beer, wine and bioethanol. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Contributors to dietary glycaemic index and glycaemic load in the Netherlands: the role of beer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluik, D.; Atkinson, Fiona S.; Brand-Miller, J.; Fogelholm, M.; Raben, A.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Diets high in glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) have been associated with a higher diabetes risk. Beer explained a large proportion of variation in GI in a Finnish and an American study. However, few beers have been tested according to International Organization for Standardization (ISO)

  17. Psychological contributors to noncompletion of an adolescent preoperative bariatric surgery program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Megan J; Curran, Jennifer L; Phan, Thao-Ly T; Reichard, Kirk; Datto, George A

    2017-01-01

    Noncompletion of preoperative bariatric programs is a significant problem among adolescents. Adult studies suggest that psychological factors contribute to noncompletion of preoperative bariatric programs. The aim of this study was to determine the association between adolescent psychological functioning and completion of the preoperative phase of a bariatric program. The study was conducted at a tertiary care children's hospital affiliated with a university medical center. Seventy-four adolescents and their parents completed an assessment measure of psychological functioning with the Behavior Assessment System for Children, Second Edition. We compared these scores between adolescents who completed the preoperative phase of the bariatric program and proceeded to surgery (completers) to those who did not (noncompleters) using multivariate analysis of covariance and logistic regression analyses, adjusting for demographic characteristics and baseline body mass index. The mean age was 16.0 (1.1) years, most were female (79.8%), and the group was diverse (48.6%, Caucasian; 33.8%, black; 17.6%, other, including Hispanic, Asian, and biracial). Average body mass index was 50.5 (7.6) kg/m 2 . Forty-two percent of participants were noncompleters. Noncompleters were reported by parents to have more clinically significant externalizing and internalizing behaviors and fewer adaptive behaviors. Noncompleters self-reported more clinically significant internalizing symptoms, emotional problems, and poor personal adjustment. Adolescents who did not complete the preoperative phase of a bariatric surgery program had more clinically significant psychological symptoms across multiple domains compared with those who successfully proceeded to bariatric surgery. Early identification and treatment of psychological symptoms may be important in helping adolescents successfully proceed to surgery. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Visuomotor correction is a robust contributor to force variability during index finger abduction by older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian L Tracy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We examined aging-related differences in the contribution of visuomotor correction to force fluctuations during index finger abduction via the analysis of two datasets from similar subjects. Study 1 Young (N= 27, 23+/-8 yrs and older adults (N=14, 72+/- 9 yrs underwent assessment of maximum voluntary contraction force (MVC and force steadiness during constant-force (CF index finger abduction (2.5, 30, 65% MVC. For each trial, visual feedback of the force (VIS was provided for 8-10 s and removed for 8-10s (NOVIS. Visual gain of the force feedback at 2.5% MVC was high; 12- and 26-fold greater than the 30% and 65% MVC targets. Mean force, standard deviation (SD of force, and coefficient of variation (CV of force was calculated for detrended (<0.5Hz drift removed VIS and NOVIS data segments. Study 2 A similar group of 14 older adults performed discrete, randomly-ordered VIS or NOVIS trials at low target forces (1-3% MVC and high visual gain. Study 1 For young adults the CV of force was similar between VIS and NOVIS for the 2.5% (4.8 vs. 4.3%, 30% (3.2 vs. 3.2% and 65% (3.5 vs. 4.2% target forces. In contrast, for older adults the CV of force was greater for VIS than NOVIS for 2.5% MVC (6.6 vs. 4.2%, P<0.001, but not for the 30% (2.4 vs. 2.4% and 65% (3.1 vs. 3.3% target forces. At 2.5% MVC, the increase in CV of force for VIS compared with NOVIS was significantly greater (age x visual condition P=0.008 for older than young adults. Study 2 Similarly, for older adults performing discrete, randomly ordered trials the CV of force was greater for VIS than NOVIS (6.04 vs. 3.81%, P=0.01. When visual force feedback was a dominant source of information at low forces, normalized force variability was ~58% greater for older adults, but only 11% greater for young adults. The significant effect of visual feedback for older adults was not dependent on the order of presentation of visual conditions. The results indicate that impaired processing of visuomotor information underlies the greater motor variability observed in older adults during lab-based isometric contractions

  19. Bilingualism as a contributor to cognitive reserve: evidence from brain atrophy in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Tom A; Ware, Jenna; Fischer, Corinne E; Craik, Fergus I M; Bialystok, Ellen

    2012-09-01

    Much of the research on delaying the onset of symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has focused on pharmacotherapy, but environmental factors have also been acknowledged to play a significant role. Bilingualism may be one factor contributing to 'cognitive reserve' (CR) and therefore to a delay in symptom onset. If bilingualism is protective, then the brains of bilinguals should show greater atrophy in relevant areas, since their enhanced CR enables them to function at a higher level than would be predicted from their level of disease. We analyzed a number of linear measurements of brain atrophy from the computed tomography (CT) scans of monolingual and bilingual patients diagnosed with probable AD who were matched on level of cognitive performance and years of education. Bilingual patients with AD exhibited substantially greater amounts of brain atrophy than monolingual patients in areas traditionally used to distinguish AD patients from healthy controls, specifically, the radial width of the temporal horn and the temporal horn ratio. Other measures of brain atrophy were comparable for the two groups. Bilingualism appears to contribute to increased CR, thereby delaying the onset of AD and requiring the presence of greater amounts of neuropathology before the disease is manifest. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  20. Soft tissue conduction as a possible contributor to the limited attenuation provided by hearing protection devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shai Chordekar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Damage to the auditory system by loud sounds can be avoided by hearing protection devices (HPDs such as earmuffs, earplugs, or both for maximum attenuation. However, the attenuation can be limited by air conduction (AC leakage around the earplugs and earmuffs by the occlusion effect (OE and by skull vibrations initiating bone conduction (BC. Aims: To assess maximum attenuation by HPDs and possible flanking pathways to the inner ear. Subjects and Methods: AC attenuation and resulting thresholds were assessed using the real ear attenuation at threshold (REAT procedure on 15 normal-hearing participants in four free-field conditions: (a unprotected ears, (b ears covered with earmuffs, (c ears blocked with deeply inserted customized earplugs, and (d ears blocked with both earplugs and earmuffs. BC thresholds were assessed with and without earplugs to assess the OE. Results: Addition of earmuffs to earplugs did not cause significantly greater attenuation than earplugs alone, confirming minimal AC leakage through the external meatus and the absence of the OE. Maximum REATs ranged between 40 and 46 dB, leading to thresholds of 46–54 dB HL. Furthermore, calculation of the acoustic impedance mismatch between air and bone predicted at least 60 dB attenuation of BC. Conclusion: Results do not support the notion that skull vibrations (BC contributed to the limited attenuation provided by traditional HPDs. An alternative explanation, supported by experimental evidence, suggests transmission of sound to inner ear via non-osseous pathways such as skin, soft tissues, and fluid. Because the acoustic impedance mismatch between air and soft tissues is smaller than that between air and bone, air-borne sounds would be transmitted to soft tissues more effectively than to bone, and therefore less attenuation is expected through soft tissue sound conduction. This can contribute to the limited attenuation provided by traditional HPDs. The present study has practical implications for hearing conservation protocols.

  1. Yeast Tok1p channel is a major contributor to membrane potential maintenance under chemical stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zahumenský, J.; Jančíková, I.; Drietomská, A.; Švenkrtová, Andrea; Hlaváček, Otakar; Hendrych, T.; Plášek, J.; Sigler, Karel; Gášková, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1859, č. 10 (2017), s. 1974-1985 ISSN 0005-2736 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-08225S; GA MŠk LH13049; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Chemical stress * Depolarization * Fluorescent probe diS-C-3(3) Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 3.498, year: 2016

  2. The seaweeds Fucus vesiculosus and Ascophyllum nodosum are significant contributors to coastal iodine emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, R.-J.; Thorenz, U. R.; Kundel, M.; Venables, D. S.; Ceburnis, D.; Ho, K. F.; Chen, J.; Vogel, A. L.; Küpper, F. C.; Smyth, P. P. A.; Nitschke, U.; Stengel, D. B.; Berresheim, H.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Hoffmann, T.

    2013-05-01

    Based on the results of a pilot study in 2007, which found high mixing ratios of molecular iodine (I2) above the intertidal macroalgae (seaweed) beds at Mweenish Bay (Ireland), we extended the study to nine different locations in the vicinity of Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station on the west coast of Ireland during a field campaign in 2009. The mean values of \\chem{I_2} mixing ratio found above the macroalgae beds at nine different locations ranged from 104 to 393 ppt, implying a high source strength of I2. Such mixing ratios are sufficient to result in photochemically driven coastal new-particle formation events. Mixing ratios above the Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus beds increased with exposure time: after 6 h exposure to ambient air the mixing ratios were one order of magnitude higher than those initially present. This contrasts with the emission characteristics of Laminaria digitata, where most I2 was emitted within the first half hour of exposure. Discrete in situ measurements (offline) of I2 emission from ambient air-exposed chamber experiments of L. digitata, A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus substantially supported the field observations. Further online and time-resolved measurements of the I2 emission from O3-exposed macroalgal experiments in a chamber confirmed the distinct I2 emission characteristics of A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus compared to those of L. digitata. The emission rates of A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus were comparable to or even higher than L. digitata after the initial exposure period of 20-30 min. We suggest that A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus may provide an important source of photolabile iodine in the coastal boundary layer and that their impact on photochemistry and coastal new-particle formation should be reevaluated in light of their longer exposure at low tide and their widespread distribution.

  3. Fucus and Ascophyllum seaweeds are significant contributors to coastal iodine emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, R.-J.; Thorenz, U. R.; Kundel, M.; Venables, D. S.; Ceburnis, D.; Chen, J.; Vogel, A. L.; Küpper, F. C.; Smyth, P. P. A.; Berresheim, H.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-09-01

    Based on the results of a pilot study in 2007, which found high mixing ratios of molecular iodine (I2) above the intertidal macroalgae (seaweed) beds at Mweenish Bay (Ireland), we extended the study to nine different locations in the vicinity of Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station on the west coast of Ireland during a field campaign in 2009. I2 mixing ratios from 104 to 393 ppt were found above the macroalgae beds, implying a high source strength of I2. Such mixing ratios are sufficient to result in photochemically-driven coastal new-particle formation events. Mixing ratios above the Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus beds increased with exposure time - after 6 h exposure to ambient air the mixing ratios were one order of magnitude higher than those initially present. This contrasts with the emission characteristics of Laminaria digitata, where most I2 was emitted within the first half hour of exposure. Discrete in situ measurements (off-line) of I2 emission from ambient air-exposed chamber experiments of L. digitata, A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus substantially supported the field observations. Further online and time-resolved measurements of the I2 emission from O3-exposed macroalgal experiments in chamber confirmed the distinct I2 emission characteristics of A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus compared to that of L. digitata. The emission rates of A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus were comparable to or even higher than L. digitata after the initial exposure period of ~20-30 min. We suggest that A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus may provide an unaccounted and important source of photolabile iodine in the coastal boundary layer and that their impact on photochemistry and coastal new particle formation should be reevaluated in light of their longer exposure at low-tide and their widespread distribution.

  4. Diet-gene interactions and PUFA metabolism: a potential contributor to health disparities and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Floyd H; Murphy, Robert C; Wilson, Bryan A; Sergeant, Susan; Ainsworth, Hannah; Seeds, Michael C; Mathias, Rasika A

    2014-05-21

    The "modern western" diet (MWD) has increased the onset and progression of chronic human diseases as qualitatively and quantitatively maladaptive dietary components give rise to obesity and destructive gene-diet interactions. There has been a three-fold increase in dietary levels of the omega-6 (n-6) 18 carbon (C18), polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6), with the addition of cooking oils and processed foods to the MWD. Intense debate has emerged regarding the impact of this increase on human health. Recent studies have uncovered population-related genetic variation in the LCPUFA biosynthetic pathway (especially within the fatty acid desaturase gene (FADS) cluster) that is associated with levels of circulating and tissue PUFAs and several biomarkers and clinical endpoints of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Importantly, populations of African descent have higher frequencies of variants associated with elevated levels of arachidonic acid (ARA), CVD biomarkers and disease endpoints. Additionally, nutrigenomic interactions between dietary n-6 PUFAs and variants in genes that encode for enzymes that mobilize and metabolize ARA to eicosanoids have been identified. These observations raise important questions of whether gene-PUFA interactions are differentially driving the risk of cardiovascular and other diseases in diverse populations, and contributing to health disparities, especially in African American populations.

  5. D90: The Strongest Contributor to Setting Time in Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Portland Cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, William N; Bentz, Dale P; Kahler, Bill; Walsh, Laurence J

    2015-07-01

    The setting times of commercial mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Portland cements vary. It was hypothesized that much of this variation was caused by differences in particle size distribution. Two gram samples from 11 MTA-type cements were analyzed by laser diffraction to determine their particle size distributions characterized by their percentile equivalent diameters (the 10th percentile, the median, and the 90th percentile [d90], respectively). Setting time data were received from manufacturers who performed indentation setting time tests as specified by the standards relevant to dentistry, ISO 6786 (9 respondents) or ISO 9917.1 (1 respondent), or not divulged to the authors (1 respondent). In a parallel experiment, 6 samples of different size graded Portland cements were produced using the same cement clinker. The measurement of setting time for Portland cement pastes was performed using American Society for Testing and Materials C 191. Cumulative heat release was measured using isothermal calorimetry to assess the reactions occurring during the setting of these pastes. In all experiments, linear correlations were assessed between setting times, heat release, and the 3 particle size parameters. Particle size varied considerably among MTA cements. For MTA cements, d90 was the particle size characteristic showing the highest positive linear correlation with setting time (r = 0.538). For Portland cement, d90 gave an even higher linear correlation for the initial setting time (r = 0.804) and the final setting time (r = 0.873) and exhibited a strong negative linear correlation for cumulative heat release (r = 0.901). Smaller particle sizes result in faster setting times, with d90 (the largest particles) being most closely correlated with the setting times of the samples. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. All rights reserved.

  6. Diet-Gene Interactions and PUFA Metabolism: A Potential Contributor to Health Disparities and Human Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Floyd H.; Murphy, Robert C.; Wilson, Bryan A.; Sergeant, Susan; Ainsworth, Hannah; Seeds, Michael C.; Mathias, Rasika A.

    2014-01-01

    The “modern western” diet (MWD) has increased the onset and progression of chronic human diseases as qualitatively and quantitatively maladaptive dietary components give rise to obesity and destructive gene-diet interactions. There has been a three-fold increase in dietary levels of the omega-6 (n-6) 18 carbon (C18), polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6), with the addition of cooking oils and processed foods to the MWD. Intense debate has emerged regarding the impact of this increase on human health. Recent studies have uncovered population-related genetic variation in the LCPUFA biosynthetic pathway (especially within the fatty acid desaturase gene (FADS) cluster) that is associated with levels of circulating and tissue PUFAs and several biomarkers and clinical endpoints of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Importantly, populations of African descent have higher frequencies of variants associated with elevated levels of arachidonic acid (ARA), CVD biomarkers and disease endpoints. Additionally, nutrigenomic interactions between dietary n-6 PUFAs and variants in genes that encode for enzymes that mobilize and metabolize ARA to eicosanoids have been identified. These observations raise important questions of whether gene-PUFA interactions are differentially driving the risk of cardiovascular and other diseases in diverse populations, and contributing to health disparities, especially in African American populations. PMID:24853887

  7. Elevated RNA Editing Activity Is a Major Contributor to Transcriptomic Diversity in Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurit Paz-Yaacov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Genomic mutations in key genes are known to drive tumorigenesis and have been the focus of much attention in recent years. However, genetic content also may change farther downstream. RNA editing alters the mRNA sequence from its genomic blueprint in a dynamic and flexible way. A few isolated cases of editing alterations in cancer have been reported previously. Here, we provide a transcriptome-wide characterization of RNA editing across hundreds of cancer samples from multiple cancer tissues, and we show that A-to-I editing and the enzymes mediating this modification are significantly altered, usually elevated, in most cancer types. Increased editing activity is found to be associated with patient survival. As is the case with somatic mutations in DNA, most of these newly introduced RNA mutations are likely passengers, but a few may serve as drivers that may be novel candidates for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes.

  8. HIV antiretroviral medication stock-outs in Ghana: contributors and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poku, Rebecca A; Owusu, Adobea Yaa; Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Markham, Christine; McCurdy, Sheryl A

    2017-09-01

    Drug stock-outs are an unfortunate yet common reality for patients living in low and middle income countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa where trouble with consistent stock of antiretroviral medications (ARVs) continues. Our study takes a snapshot of this problem in Ghana. Although the country launched its antiretroviral therapy (ART) programme in 2003, progress toward realising the full benefit of ART for treated individuals has been limited, in part, because of stock-outs. In Ghana's Greater Accra region, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 40 women living with HIV (WLHIV) and 15 individuals with a history of HIV-related work in government or non-governmental organisations, or healthcare facilities. We used repeated review with coding and mapping techniques to analyse the transcripts and identify common themes. Stock-outs of ARVs result in inconsistent administration of therapy, increased indirect medical costs for WLHIV, and negative labelling of patients. Inefficiencies in drug supply, poor coordination with port authorities, inadequate government funding and dependence on international aid contribute to the stock-outs experienced in Ghana. Although using ARVs produced in-country could reduce supply problems, the domestically-manufactured product currently does not meet World Health Organization (WHO) standards. We recommend focused efforts to produce WHO standard ARVs in Ghana, and a review of current supply chain management to identify and mend pitfalls in the system.

  9. NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS Millicent Quarcoo (BA, MPhil, PhD) is ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    He is currently a senior lecturer and Head of Department of Linguistics,. School of ... Augustina Pokua Owusu studied Linguistics and English at the University of Cape Coast, Ghana (BA). She is ... Uyilawa Usuanlele (PhD) is an associate professor at the Department of History, 443 Mahar Hall, State University of New.

  10. Jatropha Suppliers as Contributors to the Sustainability of the Production of Bioelectricity in Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn A. Muñoz Mayorga

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The “Jatropha for Galápagos” (JFG project in Ecuador aims to progressively replace diesel with jatropha oil in the generation of electricity in The Galápagos Islands. Thus, understanding and motivating the participation of jatropha suppliers is a priority for the sustainability of JFG. For this reason, the factors influencing their decision-making to participate in the project have been identified and analyzed using a binomial logit model. The results show that factors found to positively influence the likelihood of participation include, amongst others, the supplier’s experience within the project, their participation in local organizations, and the degree of satisfaction with the price of jatropha oil. In addition, children from producer families’ collaboration in the harvest of jatropha increases the overall likelihood of participation within the project. Similarly, the distance to the collection center positively influences the chances of participation. Conversely, those suppliers with higher wages and those who declared that jatropha harvest starts in April have a reduced likelihood of participating in the project. The findings obtained from this project can help decision-makers develop new measures to improve the sustainability of the project through initiatives to motivate the participation of jatropha suppliers in the program.

  11. Organic nitrogen uptake is a significant contributor to nitrogen economy of subtropical epiphytic bryophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Liang; Lu, Hua-Zheng; Xu, Xing-Liang; Li, Su; Shi, Xian-Meng; Chen, Xi; Wu, Yi; Huang, Jun-Biao; Chen, Quan; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Chuan-Sheng; Liu, Wen-Yao

    2016-07-01

    Without any root contact with the soil, epiphytic bryophytes must experience and explore poor, patchy, and heterogeneous habitats; while, the nitrogen (N) uptake and use strategies of these organisms remain uncharacterized, which obscures their roles in the N cycle. To investigate the N sources, N preferences, and responses to enhanced N deposition in epiphytic bryophytes, we carried out an in situ manipulation experiment via the 15N labelling technique in an Asian cloud forest. Epiphytic bryophytes obtained more N from air deposition than from the bark, but the contribution of N from the bark was non-negligible. Glycine accounted for 28.4% to 44.5% of the total N in bryophyte tissue, which implies that organic N might serve as an important N source. Increased N deposition increased the total N uptake, but did not alter the N preference of the epiphytic bryophytes. This study provides sound evidence that epiphytic bryophytes could take up N from the bark and wet deposition in both organic and inorganic N forms. It is thus important to consider organic N and bark N sources, which were usually neglected, when estimating the role of epiphytic bryophytes in N cycling and the impacts of N deposition on epiphytic bryophytes in cloud forests.

  12. Haemodialysis work environment contributors to job satisfaction and stress: a sequential mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Bronwyn; Bonner, Ann; Douglas, Clint

    2015-01-01

    Haemodialysis nurses form long term relationships with patients in a technologically complex work environment. Previous studies have highlighted that haemodialysis nurses face stressors related to the nature of their work and also their work environments leading to reported high levels of burnout. Using Kanters (1997) Structural Empowerment Theory as a guiding framework, the aim of this study was to explore the factors contributing to satisfaction with the work environment, job satisfaction, job stress and burnout in haemodialysis nurses. Using a sequential mixed-methods design, the first phase involved an on-line survey comprising demographic and work characteristics, Brisbane Practice Environment Measure (B-PEM), Index of Work Satisfaction (IWS), Nursing Stress Scale (NSS) and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The second phase involved conducting eight semi-structured interviews with data thematically analyzed. From the 417 nurses surveyed the majority were female (90.9 %), aged over 41 years of age (74.3 %), and 47.4 % had worked in haemodialysis for more than 10 years. Overall the work environment was perceived positively and there was a moderate level of job satisfaction. However levels of stress and emotional exhaustion (burnout) were high. Two themes, ability to care and feeling successful as a nurse, provided clarity to the level of job satisfaction found in phase 1. While two further themes, patients as quasi-family and intense working teams, explained why working as a haemodialysis nurse was both satisfying and stressful. Nurse managers can use these results to identify issues being experienced by haemodialysis nurses working in the unit they are supervising.

  13. Dietary vitamin D₂--a potentially underestimated contributor to vitamin D nutritional status of adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Kevin D; Kinsella, Michael; McNulty, Breige A; Walton, Janette; Gibney, Michael J; Flynn, Albert; Kiely, Mairead

    2014-07-28

    It has been suggested that vitamin D₂ is not very prevalent in the human food chain. However, data from a number of recent intervention studies suggest that the majority of subjects had measurable serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D₂ (25(OH)D₂) concentrations. Serum 25(OH)D₂, unlike 25(OH)D₃, is not directly influenced by exposure of skin to sun and thus has dietary origins; however, quantifying dietary vitamin D₂ is difficult due to the limitations of food composition data. Therefore, the present study aimed to characterise serum 25(OH)D₂ concentrations in the participants of the National Adult Nutrition Survey (NANS) in Ireland, and to use these serum concentrations to estimate the intake of vitamin D₂ using a mathematical modelling approach. Serum 25(OH)D₂ concentration was measured by a liquid chromatography-tandem MS method, and information on diet as well as subject characteristics was obtained from the NANS. Of these participants, 78.7 % (n 884) had serum 25(OH)D₂ concentrations above the limit of quantification, and the mean, maximum, 10th, 50th (median) and 90th percentile values of serum 25(OH)D₂ concentrations were 3.69, 27.6, 1.71, 2.96 and 6.36 nmol/l, respectively. To approximate the intake of vitamin D₂ from these serum 25(OH)D₂ concentrations, we used recently published data on the relationship between vitamin D intake and the responses of serum 25(OH)D concentrations. The projected 5th to 95th percentile intakes of vitamin D₂ for adults were in the range of 0.9-1.2 and 5-6 μg/d, respectively, and the median intake ranged from 1.7 to 2.3 μg/d. In conclusion, the present data demonstrate that 25(OH)D₂ concentrations are present in the sera of adults from this nationally representative sample. Vitamin D₂ may have an impact on nutritional adequacy at a population level and thus warrants further investigation.

  14. Estimating how extra calories from alcohol consumption are likely an overlooked contributor to youth obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista, Kate; Leatherdale, Scott T

    2017-06-01

    Youth obesity rates in Canada continue to rise. In this study, we produced conservative estimates of the potential excess calories from alcohol use across different alcohol consumption patterns common among Canadian youth to assess whether alcohol use should be considered in future obesity prevention strategies. Using data from 10 144 Grade 12 students participating in the COMPASS study (2013/14), we estimated the number of calories consumed per year from alcohol consumption. Our estimates were based on three different generic types of alcoholic beverages, which were grouped according to average calorie content (vodka coolers; beer [5%]; and beer [4%], wine and liquor) across different frequencies of alcohol use and binge drinking. Results indicated high potential caloric intake for students who binge drank, as well as high variability in the estimates for calories consumed based on common consumption patterns for the different beverage types. For instance, 27.2% of students binge drank once per month, meaning they consumed between 6000 and 13 200 calories in one year (equivalent to 0.78 - 1.71 kg of fat). For the 4.9% of students who binge drank twice per week, the total calories in one year would range from 52 000 to 114 400 (equivalent to 6.74 - 14.83 kg of fat). Current recommendations for preventing youth obesity do not generally include any consideration of alcohol use. The high prevalence of frequent alcohol consumption and binge drinking by youth in this study and the substantial number of calories contained in alcoholic beverages suggest alcohol use among youth may warrant consideration in relation to youth obesity prevention.

  15. Unravelling the beneficial role of microbial contributors in reducing the allelopathic effects of weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sandhya; Upadhyay, Ram Sanmukh; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2013-07-01

    The field of allelopathy is one of the most fascinating but controversial processes in plant ecology that offers an exciting, interdisciplinary, complex, and challenging study. In spite of the established role of soil microbes in plant health, their role has also been consolidated in studies of allelopathy. Moreover, allelopathy can be better understood by incorporating soil microbial ecology that determines the relevance of allelopathy phenomenon. Therefore, while discussing the role of allelochemicals in plant-plant interactions, the dynamic nature of soil microbes should not be overlooked. The occurrence and toxicity of allelochemicals in soil depend on various factors, but the type of microflora in the surroundings plays a crucial role because it can interfere with its allelopathic nature. Such microbes could be of prime importance for biological control management of weeds reducing the cost and ill effects of chemical herbicides. Among microbes, our main focus is on bacteria--as they are dominant among other microbes and are being used for enhancing crop production for decades--and fungi. Hence, to refer to both bacteria and fungi, we have used the term microbes. This review discusses the beneficial role of microbes in reducing the allelopathic effects of weeds. The review is mainly focused on various functions of bacteria in (1) reducing allelopathic inhibition caused by weeds to reduce crop yield loss, (2) building inherent defense capacity in plants against allelopathic weed, and (3) deciphering beneficial rhizospheric process such as chemotaxis/biofilm, degradation of toxic allelochemicals, and induced gene expression.

  16. Discovery of CDH23 as a Significant Contributor to Progressive Postlingual Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Koreans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong Jik Kim

    Full Text Available CDH23 mutations have mostly been associated with prelingual severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL in either syndromic or nonsyndromic SNHL (DFNB12. Herein, we demonstrate the contribution of CDH23 mutations to postlingual nonsyndromic SNHL (NS-SNHL. We screened 32 Korean adult probands with postlingual NS-SNHL sporadically or in autosomal recessive fashion using targeted panel or whole exome sequencing. We identified four (12.5%, 4/32 potential postlingual DFNB12 families that segregated the recessive CDH23 variants, qualifying for our criteria along with rapidly progressive SNHL. Three of the four families carried one definite pathogenic CDH23 variant previously known as the prelingual DFNB12 variant in a trans configuration with rare CDH23 variants. To determine the contribution of rare CDH23 variants to the postlingual NS-SNHL, we checked the minor allele frequency (MAF of CDH23 variants detected from our postlingual NS-SNHL cohort and prelingual NS-SNHL cohort, among the 2040 normal control chromosomes. The allele frequency of these CDH23 variants in our postlingual cohort was 12.5%, which was significantly higher than that of the 2040 control chromosomes (5.53%, confirming the contribution of these rare CDH23 variants to postlingual NS-SNHL. Furthermore, MAF of rare CDH23 variants from the postlingual NS-SNHL group was significantly higher than that from the prelingual NS-SNHL group. This study demonstrates an important contribution of CDH23 mutations to poslingual NS-SNHL and shows that the phenotypic spectrum of DFNB12 can be broadened even into the presbycusis, depending on the pathogenic potential of variants. We also propose that pathogenic potential of CDH23 variants and the clinical fate of DFNB12 may be predicted by MAF.

  17. Cars Gone Wild: The Major Contributor to Unintended Acceleration in Automobiles is Pedal Error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Richard A; Young, Douglas E

    2010-01-01

    "Unintended-acceleration" automobile accidents typically begin when the driver first enters the car, starts the engine, and intends to press his/her right foot on the brake while shifting from Park to a drive gear (Drive or Reverse). The driver reports an unintended (uncommanded) full-throttle acceleration, coupled with a loss of braking, until the episode ends in a crash. Pedal misapplications - where the right foot contacts the accelerator instead of the brake that was intended - have been linked to these accidents (Schmidt, 1989, 1993) which, in the 1980s, were thought to occur only at the start of a driving cycle (and/or with the car in Park). But, in 1997, we identified over 200 pedal errors as the cause of accidents reported in the North Carolina database; these crashes occurred during the driving cycle (Schmidt et al., 1997), and/or with the vehicle in a gear other than Park. Our present work provides a more thorough analysis of these North Carolina Police Accident Reports from 1979 to 1995. The vast majority of pedal misapplications (over 92%) (a) occurred during the driving cycle, (b) were generally in "unhurried" conditions, and (c) were categorically separate from those events referred to as unintended-acceleration episodes at start-up. These ideas are explanatory for the recent (2009-2010) surge of unintended-acceleration reports, perhaps even suggesting that all of these crashes are caused by pedal errors, and that none of them are based on some vehicle defect(s).

  18. Early Childhood Teachers' Socialization of Emotion: Contextual and Individual Contributors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko H.; Miller, Susanne L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Preschoolers' emotional competence is of prime importance in their concurrent and later social and academic success. Parents are primary socializers of these abilities, but more and more early childhood educators are also important in their development. However, their means of socializing emotional competence are understudied, and…

  19. Prospective Large-Scale Field Study Generates Predictive Model Identifying Major Contributors to Colony Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielmanowicz, Merav Gleit; Inberg, Alex; Lerner, Inbar Maayan; Golani, Yael; Brown, Nicholas; Turner, Catherine Louise; Hayes, Gerald J. R.; Ballam, Joan M.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, unusually high losses of colonies have been reported by beekeepers across the USA. Multiple factors such as Varroa destructor, bee viruses, Nosema ceranae, weather, beekeeping practices, nutrition, and pesticides have been shown to contribute to colony losses. Here we describe a large-scale controlled trial, in which different bee pathogens, bee population, and weather conditions across winter were monitored at three locations across the USA. In order to minimize influence of various known contributing factors and their interaction, the hives in the study were not treated with antibiotics or miticides. Additionally, the hives were kept at one location and were not exposed to potential stress factors associated with migration. Our results show that a linear association between load of viruses (DWV or IAPV) in Varroa and bees is present at high Varroa infestation levels (>3 mites per 100 bees). The collection of comprehensive data allowed us to draw a predictive model of colony losses and to show that Varroa destructor, along with bee viruses, mainly DWV replication, contributes to approximately 70% of colony losses. This correlation further supports the claim that insufficient control of the virus-vectoring Varroa mite would result in increased hive loss. The predictive model also indicates that a single factor may not be sufficient to trigger colony losses, whereas a combination of stressors appears to impact hive health. PMID:25875764

  20. Toward interaction of affective and cognitive contributors to creativity in bipolar disorders: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shefali; Childers, Meredith E; Baek, Ji Hyun; Strong, Connie M; Hill, Shelley J; Warsett, Kimberley S; Wang, Po W; Akiskal, Hagop S; Akiskal, Kareen K; Ketter, Terence A

    2010-09-01

    Enhanced creativity in bipolar disorder patients may be related to affective and cognitive phenomena. 32 bipolar disorder patients (BP), 21 unipolar major depressive disorder patients (MDD), 22 creative controls (CC), and 42 healthy controls (HC) (all euthymic) completed the Revised Neuroticism Extraversion Openness Personality Inventory (NEO), the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego Autoquestionnaire (TEMPS-A), the Myers-Briggs Type Inventory (MBTI); the Barron-Welsh Art Scale (BWAS), the Adjective Check List Creative Personality Scale, and the Figural and Verbal Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking. Mean scores were compared across groups, and relationships between temperament/personality and creativity were assessed with bivariate correlation and hierarchical multiple linear regression. BP and CC (but not MDD) compared to HC had higher BWAS-Total (46% and 42% higher, respectively, pcreativity, as well as that of intuitive processes. Further studies are needed to clarify relationships between creativity and affective and cognitive processes in bipolar disorder patients. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Estimating how extra calories from alcohol consumption are likely an overlooked contributor to youth obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Battista

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Youth obesity rates in Canada continue to rise. In this study, we produced conservative estimates of the potential excess calories from alcohol use across different alcohol consumption patterns common among Canadian youth to assess whether alcohol use should be considered in future obesity prevention strategies. Methods: Using data from 10 144 Grade 12 students participating in the COMPASS study (2013/14, we estimated the number of calories consumed per year from alcohol consumption. Our estimates were based on three different generic types of alcoholic beverages, which were grouped according to average calorie content (vodka coolers; beer [5%]; and beer [4%], wine and liquor across different frequencies of alcohol use and binge drinking. Results: Results indicated high potential caloric intake for students who binge drank, as well as high variability in the estimates for calories consumed based on common consumption patterns for the different beverage types. For instance, 27.2% of students binge drank once per month, meaning they consumed between 6000 and 13 200 calories in one year (equivalent to 0.78 – 1.71 kg of fat. For the 4.9% of students who binge drank twice per week, the total calories in one year would range from 52 000 to 114 400 (equivalent to 6.74 – 14.83 kg of fat. Conclusion: Current recommendations for preventing youth obesity do not generally include any consideration of alcohol use. The high prevalence of frequent alcohol consumption and binge drinking by youth in this study and the substantial number of calories contained in alcoholic beverages suggest alcohol use among youth may warrant consideration in relation to youth obesity prevention.

  2. MAJOR CONTRIBUTOR TO AGN FEEDBACK: VLT X-SHOOTER OBSERVATIONS OF S IV BALQSO OUTFLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borguet, Benoit C. J.; Arav, Nahum; Edmonds, Doug; Chamberlain, Carter [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Benn, Chris, E-mail: b.borguet@alumni.ulg.ac.be [Isaac Newton Group, Apartado 321, E-38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma (Spain)

    2013-01-01

    We present the most energetic BALQSO outflow measured to date, with a kinetic luminosity of at least 10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}, which is 5% of the bolometric luminosity of this high Eddington ratio quasar. The associated mass-flow rate is 400 solar masses per year. Such kinetic luminosity and mass-flow rate should provide strong active galactic nucleus feedback effects. The outflow is located at about 300 pc from the quasar and has a velocity of roughly 8000 km s{sup -1}. Our distance and energetic measurements are based in large part on the identification and measurement of S IV and S IV* broad absorption lines (BALs). The use of this high-ionization species allows us to generalize the result to the majority of high-ionization BALQSOs that are identified by their C IV absorption. We also report the energetics of two other outflows seen in another object using the same technique. The distances of all three outflows from the central source (100-2000 pc) suggest that we observe BAL troughs much farther away from the central source than the assumed acceleration region of these outflows (0.01-0.1 pc).

  3. Female Citizen Soldiers and Airmen: Key Contributors to Worldwide Peaceand Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    relations, and senior leader visits. Joseph Nye , who introduced the term “smart power,” stated that “[b]y complementing its military and economic...www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/ files/email-files/US_National_Action_Plan_on_ Women_Peace_and_Security.pdf>. 12 Bill Hewitt, “On 9/11, F-16 Pilot...interview with Major Heather Penney. 14 Joseph S. Nye Jr., “Get Smart: Combining Hard and Soft Power,” Foreign Affairs, July/August 2009. <https

  4. Nutrigenomics of Body Weight Regulation: A Rationale for Careful Dissection of Individual Contributors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijer, J.; Hoevenaars, F.P.M.; Nieuwenhuizen, A.G.; Schothorst, van E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Body weight stability may imply active regulation towards a certain physiological condition, a body weight setpoint. This interpretation is ill at odds with the world-wide increase in overweight and obesity. Until now, a body weight setpoint has remained elusive and the setpoint theory did not

  5. Identifying Contributors of DNA Mixtures by Means of Quantitative Information of STR Typing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Estimating the weight of evidence in forensic genetics is often done in terms of a likelihood ratio, LR. The LR evaluates the probability of the observed evidence under competing hypotheses. Most often, probabilities used in the LR only consider the evidence from the genomic variation...... identified using polymorphic genetic markers. However, modern typing techniques supply additional quantitative data, which contain very important information about the observed evidence. This is particularly true for cases of DNA mixtures, where more than one individual has contributed to the observed...... of combinations of profiles needed for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Online tool is available at http://people.math.aau.dk/~tvede/dna/ ....

  6. Biosynthesis and metabolic engineering of palmitoleate production, an important contributor to human health and sustainable industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yongmei; Li, Runzhi; Hildebrand, David F

    2012-10-01

    Palmitoleate (cis-Δ9-16:1) shows numerous health benefits such as increased cell membrane fluidity, reduced inflammation, protection of the cardiovascular system, and inhibition of oncogenesis. Plant oils containing this unusual fatty acid can also be sustainable feedstocks for producing industrially important and high-demand 1-octene. Vegetable oils rich in palmitoleate are the ideal candidates for biodiesel production. Several wild plants are known that can synthesize high levels of palmitoleate in seeds. However, low yields and poor agronomic characteristics of these plants limit their commercialization. Metabolic engineering has been developed to create oilseed crops that accumulate high levels of palmitoleate or other unusual fatty acids, and significant advances have been made recently in this field, particularly using the model plant Arabidopsis as the host. The engineered targets for enhancing palmitoleate synthesis include overexpression of Δ9 desaturase from mammals, yeast, fungi, and plants, down-regulating KASII, coexpression of an ACP-Δ9 desaturase in plastids and CoA-Δ9 desaturase in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and optimizing the metabolic flux into triacylglycerols (TAGs). This review will mainly describe the recent progress towards producing palmitoleate in transgenic plants by metabolic engineering along with our current understanding of palmitoleate biosynthesis and its regulation, as well as highlighting the bottlenecks that require additional investigation by combining lipidomics, transgenics and other "-omics" tools. A brief review of reported health benefits and non-food uses of palmitoleate will also be covered. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Accurate identification of neutralizing antibodies to adenovirus Ad36, -a putative contributor of obesity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuisson, Olga; Day, Rena Sue; Dhurandhar, Nikhil V

    2015-01-01

    In children and adults, human adenovirus serotype 36 (Ad36) is linked with increased adiposity, and important metabolic alterations. Since this property is not shared by many other human adenovirus serotypes, it is imperative to specifically identify exposure to Ad36. Although serum neutralization assay (SNA) is the gold standard to specifically detect neutralizing antibodies (NA) to Ad36, it requires 2-weeks to complete and considerable training to interpret the results. Whereas, an enzyme-immuno assay (EIA) may provide a quicker and objective determination. Evaluate the accuracy of commercially available EIA kits to detect NA to Ad36. Modify SNA to reduce time and increase objectivity. Sera of 15 seropositive or 16 seronegative subjects confirmed by SNA were used to test: 1) reproducibility of SNA to detect Ad36 exposure, by repeating assays twice; 2) an EIA that detects antibodies to all human adenovirus serotypes (NS-EIA) (Abcam-108705); 3) an EIA supposedly specific for Ad36 antibody (Ad36-EIA) (MyBioSource,#MBS705802), and 4) the concordance of SNA with a novel combination of SNA and immune-staining (SN-IS) kit (Cell BioLabs,#VPK-111). The SNA showed exact reproducibility. NS-EIA detected adenovirus antibodies in 94% samples, confirming the non-specificity of the assay for Ad36 serotype. All seronegative samples (as determined by SNA) were false positive by Ad36-EIA. In 97% samples, SN-IS showed fidelity with Ad36-antibody status as determined by SNA. The available EIA kits are not specific for detecting NA to Ad36. The modified SNA with immune-staining reduces assay time and increases accuracy of detecting by reducing subjectivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mechanisms in endocrinology: vitamin D as a potential contributor in endocrine health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Mitri, Joanna; Mathieu, Chantal; Badenhoop, Klaus; Tamer, Gonca; Orio, Francesco; Mezza, Teresa; Vieth, Reinhold; Colao, Annamaria; Pittas, Anastassios

    2014-09-01

    It has been suggested that vitamin D may play a role in the pathogenesis of several endocrine diseases, such as hyperparathyroidism, type 1 diabetes (T1DM), type 2 diabetes (T2DM), autoimmune thyroid diseases, Addison's disease and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In this review, we debate the role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of endocrine diseases. Narrative overview of the literature synthesizing the current evidence retrieved from searches of computerized databases, hand searches and authoritative texts. Evidence from basic science supports a role for vitamin D in many endocrine conditions. In humans, inverse relationships have been reported not only between blood 25-hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone concentrations but also with risk of T1DM, T2DM, and PCOS. There is less evidence for an association with Addison's disease or autoimmune thyroid disease. Vitamin D supplementation may have a role for prevention of T2DM, but the available evidence is not consistent. Although observational studies support a potential role of vitamin D in endocrine disease, high quality evidence from clinical trials does not exist to establish a place for vitamin D supplementation in optimizing endocrine health. Ongoing randomized controlled trials are expected to provide insights into the efficacy and safety of vitamin D in the management of endocrine disease. © 2014 European Society of Endocrinology.

  9. Contributors to this Issue | to this Issue | Ghana Journal of Linguistics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Until 2015, she taught Distance Learning Students at the Department of Linguistics and African Languages, University of Ibadan. ... studies including: language and cognition, language, culture and cognition, the sociolinguistics of bi/multilingualism, language policy, language and politics, and second language acquisition.

  10. Perturbation of the Human Microbiome as a Contributor to Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayan Missaghi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The human microbiome consist of the composite genome of native flora that have evolved with humanity over millennia and which contains 150-fold more genes than the human genome. A “healthy” microbiome plays an important role in the maintenance of health and prevention of illness, inclusive of autoimmune disease such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. IBD is a prevalent spectrum of disorders, most notably defined by Crohn’s disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, which are associated with considerable suffering, morbidity, and cost. This review presents an outline of the loss of a normal microbiome as an etiology of immune dysregulation and IBD pathogenesis initiation. We, furthermore, summarize the knowledge on the role of a healthy microbiome in terms of its diversity and important functional elements and, lastly, conclude with some of the therapeutic interventions and modalities that are now being explored as potential applications of microbiome-host interactions.

  11. Household electricity access a trivial contributor to CO2 emissions growth in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachauri, Shonali

    2014-12-01

    Impetus to expand electricity access in developing nations is urgent. Yet aspirations to provide universal access to electricity are often considered potentially conflicting with efforts to mitigate climate change. How much newly electrified, largely poor, households raise emissions, however, remains uncertain. Results from a first retrospective analysis show that improvements in household electricity access contributed 3-4% of national emissions growth in India over the past three decades. Emissions from both the direct and indirect electricity use of more than 650 million people connected since 1981 accounted for 11-25% of Indian emissions growth or, on average, a rise of 0.008-0.018 tons of CO2 per person per year between 1981 and 2011. Although this is a marginal share of global emissions, it does not detract from the importance for developing countries to start reducing the carbon intensities of their electricity generation to ensure sustainable development and avoid future carbon lock-in. Significant ancillary benefits for air quality, health, energy security and efficiency may also make this attractive for reasons other than climate mitigation alone.

  12. Abortion, substance abuse and mental health in early adulthood: Thirteen-year longitudinal evidence from the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Paul Sullins

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the links between pregnancy outcomes (birth, abortion, or involuntary pregnancy loss and mental health outcomes for US women during the transition into adulthood to determine the extent of increased risk, if any, associated with exposure to induced abortion. Method: Panel data on pregnancy history and mental health history for a nationally representative cohort of 8005 women at (average ages 15, 22, and 28 years from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health were examined for risk of depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation, alcohol abuse, drug abuse, cannabis abuse, and nicotine dependence by pregnancy outcome (birth, abortion, and involuntary pregnancy loss. Risk ratios were estimated for time-dynamic outcomes from population-averaged longitudinal logistic and Poisson regression models. Results: After extensive adjustment for confounding, other pregnancy outcomes, and sociodemographic differences, abortion was consistently associated with increased risk of mental health disorder. Overall risk was elevated 45% (risk ratio, 1.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.30–1.62; p < 0.0001. Risk of mental health disorder with pregnancy loss was mixed, but also elevated 24% (risk ratio, 1.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.13–1.37; p < 0.0001 overall. Birth was weakly associated with reduced mental disorders. One-eleventh (8.7%; 95% confidence interval, 6.0–11.3 of the prevalence of mental disorders examined over the period were attributable to abortion. Conclusion: Evidence from the United States confirms previous findings from Norway and New Zealand that, unlike other pregnancy outcomes, abortion is consistently associated with a moderate increase in risk of mental health disorders during late adolescence and early adulthood.

  13. Derivation of Grad’s Thirteen Regularized Moment Equations Using a Hermite Polynomial Representation of Velocity Distribution Function (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    B4) Substituting tui  / and tVT  /2 from the momentum and energy conservation law equations, Eqs...B9) Substituting tui  / and tVT  /2 from the momentum and energy conservation law equations, Eqs. (15...Substituting tui  / and tVT  /2 from the momentum and energy conservation law equations, Eqs. (15) and (16), into Eq. (B13) and then dropping all

  14. The COSMOS2015 galaxy stellar mass function . Thirteen billion years of stellar mass assembly in ten snapshots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidzon, I.; Ilbert, O.; Laigle, C.; Coupon, J.; McCracken, H. J.; Delvecchio, I.; Masters, D.; Capak, P.; Hsieh, B. C.; Le Fèvre, O.; Tresse, L.; Bethermin, M.; Chang, Y.-Y.; Faisst, A. L.; Le Floc'h, E.; Steinhardt, C.; Toft, S.; Aussel, H.; Dubois, C.; Hasinger, G.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Scoville, N.; Silverman, J. D.

    2017-09-01

    We measure the stellar mass function (SMF) and stellar mass density of galaxies in the COSMOS field up to z 6. We select them in the near-IR bands of the COSMOS2015 catalogue, which includes ultra-deep photometry from UltraVISTA-DR2, SPLASH, and Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam. At z> 2.5 we use new precise photometric redshifts with error σz = 0.03(1 + z) and an outlier fraction of 12%, estimated by means of the unique spectroscopic sample of COSMOS ( 100 000 spectroscopic measurements in total, more than one thousand having robust zspec> 2.5). The increased exposure time in the DR2, along with our panchromatic detection strategy, allow us to improve the completeness at high z with respect to previous UltraVISTA catalogues (e.g. our sample is >75% complete at 1010 ℳ⊙ and z = 5). We also identify passive galaxies through a robust colour-colour selection, extending their SMF estimate up to z = 4. Our work provides a comprehensive view of galaxy-stellar-mass assembly between z = 0.1 and 6, for the first time using consistent estimates across the entire redshift range. We fit these measurements with a Schechter function, correcting for Eddington bias. We compare the SMF fit with the halo mass function predicted from ΛCDM simulations, finding that at z> 3 both functions decline with a similar slope in thehigh-mass end. This feature could be explained assuming that mechanisms quenching star formation in massive haloes become less effective at high redshifts; however further work needs to be done to confirm this scenario. Concerning the SMF low-mass end, it shows a progressive steepening as it moves towards higher redshifts, with α decreasing from -1.47+0.02-0.02 at z ≃ 0.1 to -2.11+0.30-0.13 at z ≃ 5. This slope depends on the characterisation of the observational uncertainties, which is crucial to properly remove the Eddington bias. We show that there is currently no consensus on the method to quantify such errors: different error models result in different best-fit Schechter parameters. Based on data products from observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under ESO programme ID 179.A-2005 and on data products produced by TERAPIX and the Cambridge Astronomy Survey Unit on behalf of the UltraVISTA consortium (http://ultravista.org/). Based on data produced by the SPLASH team from observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope (http://splash.caltech.edu).

  15. Management of complaints in blood establishments: thirteen years of experience at the Croatian Institute of Transfusion Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuk, Tomislav; Barišić, Marijan; Očić, Tihomir; Đogić, Vesna; Bingulac-Popović, Jasna; Sarlija, Dorotea; Balija, Melita; Jukić, Irena

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the study is to present the results and experience in the management of complaints in a transfusion service in order to draw attention to the importance of this segment of quality management and to stimulate publication of other studies on the topic. This study is based on data from the Croatian Institute of Transfusion Medicine obtained by analysis of complaints recorded during a 13-year period (1998-2010). The distribution of the types and frequencies of complaints is presented, along with the level of their justifiability and criticality. The dynamics of the complaints is analysed overall and within particular categories. In addition, corrective actions and other factors that may have influenced the trends observed are discussed. During the study period, 817 complaints were received, most of which (40.9%) referred to the positive direct antiglobulin test in red cell concentrates, followed by blood product issuing and distribution (12.9%) and blood product quality (9.4%). Of the 817 complaints, 177 (21.7%) were assessed as serious and 645 (78.9%) as justified based on the testing performed. Data collected by systematic recording and analysis of complaints provide a basis for problem identification, implementation of corrective and preventive actions, and improvement of product and service quality, and, thereby, customer satisfaction.

  16. A thirteen year audit of manuscripts related to medical education published in leading medical journals of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Farooq Azam; Waqas, Ahmed; Zia, Ahmed Marjan

    2016-04-01

    To audit the number and type of published articles related to medical education in leading Pakistani biomedical journals. The audit covered the period from January 2001 to December 2013. Journals either indexed in Medline or having an impact factor were selected. The audit was done in two phases. First, articles related to medical education were screened by reading the titles. Then abstracts were studied and articles were placed into several pre-defined categories based on article type and research topic. Data was analysed using SPSS 20. A total of 118 relevant articles were published. Of them, 60(51%) articles were published in the Journal of Pakistan Medical Association, 42(35.6%) in the Journal of College of Physicians and Surgeons Pakistan, 4(3.4%) in Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences, and 12(10.2%) in the Journal of Ayub Medical College. Articles related to curriculum development were 33(28.0 %), teaching 28(23.7%), assessment 29(24.6%), faculty training 5(4.2%), continuous medical education 4(3.4%), ethics 3(2.5%), and others 16(13.6%). There is a need to increase the quality of health profession education research, documentation and audit of the global contribution of Pakistani medical educationists.

  17. A Weapon in the Wrong Hands: Strategic Mismanagement and How the Royal Navy Lost the Thirteen American Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    The marriage of national policy with operational-level activities proved elusive during an era where British political and naval leaders were more...disposed to quarreling than acquiescence. A study of the readiness and capability of the British fleet before the war, the political environment existent

  18. Prevalence of traumatic dental injuries to the anterior teeth among three to thirteen-year-old school children of Tamilnadu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Mohan; Reddy, Venugopal N; Ramalingam, Krishnakumar; Durai, Kaliyamoorthy Sugumaran; Rao, Prasad Arun; Prabhu, Anand

    2012-04-01

    Dental trauma has become an important attribute of dental public health. The primary requisite before actively dealing with such problems is to describe the extent, distribution, and associated variables with the specific condition. The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence and distribution of traumatic dental injuries (TDI) to anterior teeth among 3 to 13 years old Chidambaram school children. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Data was collected through a survey form and clinical examination. A total of 3200 school children in the age group of 3-13 years were selected from 10 schools of Chidambaram, Tamilnadu. Information concerning sex, age, cause of trauma, number of injured teeth, type of the teeth, lip competence, terminal plane relationship and the molar relationship were recorded. The statistical software EPIINFO (Version 6.0) was used for statistical analysis. In the present study, P≤0.05 was considered as the level of significance. The trauma prevalence in the present study was 10.13%. Children with class I type 2 and mesial step molar relationship exhibited more number of dental injuries. Enamel fracture was the most common injury recorded. Only 3.37% of the children had undergone treatment. The high level of dental trauma and low percentage of children with trauma seeking treatment stresses the need for increased awareness in Chidambaram population.

  19. [Evaluation of the main intestinal parasitosis in 860 Ivory Coast children from thirteen different villages (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozais, J P; Dunand, J; Doucet, J

    1981-01-01

    A survey has been carried out in 2 forest villages, 9 savanna villages and 2 Abidjan suburb districts. A total sample of 860 children aged between 6 and 15, has been examined. Data tabulation indicated a prevalence of the main intestinal nematodes, of S. mansoni and of E. histolytica, with variable respective percentage. Ascaris lumbricoides affected 26 p. 100 of children but is less frequent in the savanna areas than in the forest areas. Trichiuris trichiura affected 1 child out of 4 but infestation rate reached 76 p. 100 in the Abidjan suburb district. Necator americanus is the most frequently detected parasite (67 p. 100) and is more frequent in the forest areas than in the 2 savanna villages. E. histolytica has an uniform and low (5 p. 100) geographical distribution. S. mansoni has such an irregular distribution that no extrapolation is possible from the results obtained to the geographical area considered. Its infestation rates is from 1 p. 100 to 60 p. 100 with important differences inside small geographical zones.

  20. Diffusion and Perfusion Characteristics of MELAS (Mitochondrial Myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-Like Episode) in Thirteen Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hye; Jeon, Tae Yeon; Eo, Hong; Yoo, So Young; Lim, Myung Kwan; Rha, Jung Ho; Shu, Chang Hae

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the diffusion and perfusion characteristics of acute MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode) lesions in a large series to investigate the controversial changes of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) that were reported in prior studies. We analyzed 44 newly appearing lesions during 28 stroke-like episodes in 13 patients with MELAS. We performed a visual assessment of the MR images including the ADC and perfusion maps, comparison of the ADC between the normal and abnormal areas, comparison of % ADC between the 44 MELAS lesions and the 30 acute ischemic infarcts. In addition, the patterns of evolution on follow-up MR images were analyzed. Decreased, increased, and normal ADCs were noted in 16 (36%), 16 (36%), and 12 (27%) lesions, respectively. The mean % ADC was 102 ± 40.9% in the MELAS and 64 ± 17.8% in the acute vascular infarcts (p < 0.001), while perfusion imaging demonstrated hyper-perfusion in six acute MELAS lesions. On follow-up images, resolution, progression, and tissue loss were noted in 10, 4, and 17 lesions, respectively. The cytotoxic edema gradually evolves following an acute stroke-like episode in patients with MELAS, and this may overlap with hyper-perfusion and vasogenic edema. The edematous swelling may be reversible or it may evolve to encephalomalacia, suggesting irreversible damage

  1. Thirteen new patients with guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency and functional characterization of nineteen novel missense variants in the GAMT gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet; Ndika, Joseph; Kanhai, Warsha

    2014-01-01

    Guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency (GAMT-D) is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder of creatine biosynthesis. Creatine deficiency on cranial proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and elevated guanidinoacetate levels in body fluids are the biomarkers of GAMT-D. In 74 patients 50...... and 20% a mild phenotype. The effect of these variants on GAMT enzyme activity was overexpressed using primary GAMT-D fibroblasts: 17 variants retained no significant activity and are therefore considered pathogenic. Two additional variants, c.22C>A (p.Pro8Thr) and c.79T>C (p.Tyr27His) (the latter...

  2. Prevalence of traumatic dental injuries to the anterior teeth among three to thirteen-year-old school children of Tamilnadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Govindarajan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Dental trauma has become an important attribute of dental public health. The primary requisite before actively dealing with such problems is to describe the extent, distribution, and associated variables with the specific condition. Aims: The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence and distribution of traumatic dental injuries (TDI to anterior teeth among 3 to 13 years old Chidambaram school children. Settings and Design : A cross-sectional study was conducted. Data was collected through a survey form and clinical examination. Materials and Methods: A total of 3200 school children in the age group of 3-13 years were selected from 10 schools of Chidambaram, Tamilnadu. Information concerning sex, age, cause of trauma, number of injured teeth, type of the teeth, lip competence, terminal plane relationship and the molar relationship were recorded. Statistical Analysis Used: The statistical software EPIINFO (Version 6.0 was used for statistical analysis. In the present study, P≤0.05 was considered as the level of significance. Results: The trauma prevalence in the present study was 10.13%. Children with class I type 2 and mesial step molar relationship exhibited more number of dental injuries. Enamel fracture was the most common injury recorded. Only 3.37% of the children had undergone treatment. Conclusion: The high level of dental trauma and low percentage of children with trauma seeking treatment stresses the need for increased awareness in Chidambaram population.

  3. A review of the South Pacific Manota Williston (Diptera, Mycetophilidae), with the description of thirteen new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurina, Olavi; Hippa, Heikki

    2015-09-22

    The genus Manota is found to consist of 37 species in the South Pacific region. The following 13 species are described as new: M. acris sp. n. (Papua New Guinea (PNG)), M. alulata sp. n. (PNG), M. apentachaeta sp. n. (PNG), M. clivicola sp. n. (PNG), M. cordata sp. n. (PNG), M. feminea sp. n. (PNG), M. kaindiensis sp. n. (PNG), M. lunata sp. n. (PNG), M. nimia sp. n. (Solomon Is.), M. pentachaeta sp. n. (PNG), M. siciliculata sp. n. (PNG), M. sigma sp. n. (PNG) and M. unisetata sp. n. (Solomon Is.). New records of the following 11 species are presented: M. bicuspis Hippa, 2007 (PNG, Solomon Is.), M. biunculata Hippa, 2007 (PNG), M. evexa Hippa, 2007 (PNG), M. explicans Hippa, 2007 (PNG), M. hamulata Colless, 1966 (PNG), M. pacifica Edwards, 1928 (Samoa), M. parilis Hippa, 2007 (PNG, Vanuatu), M. perissochaeta Hippa, 2007 (PNG), M. serawei Hippa, 2007 (PNG), M. spathula Hippa, 2007 (PNG) and M. subspathula Hippa, 2007 (Australia). The latter is the first described species of Manota recorded from continental Australia. A redescription of M. pacifica Edwards, 1928 is given.

  4. The political economy of the public-private mix in heath expenditure: an empirical review of thirteen OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Haizhen

    2013-12-01

    This study investigates the factors that may have influenced the public-private mix of health expenditure in 13 OECD countries from 1981 to 2007. The degree to which health services are socialized is regarded as the product of a trade-off between the desire to redistribute income through the fiscal system and the losses some citizens will incur when the public health care system expands. The estimation results show that, greater income inequality and population aging are associated with a smaller share of public health expenditure in total health expenditure. The more ideologically left-leaning the electorate is, the larger the share of public health expenditure. Private health insurance tends to erode the political support for the public health care systems in countries with private duplicate health insurance, but not in countries with private primary health insurance. The findings suggest that the role of private sources of funding for health care is likely to grow in developed countries. The expansion of public coverage to include pharmaceuticals and long-term care in some countries may (theoretically) encounter less opposition if the current insurance holders have no duplicate coverage, if the voters as a whole share more left-leaning political ideology, and if low-income voters are more politically mobilized. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of Heritability and Shared Heritability Based on Genome-Wide Association Studies for Thirteen Cancer Types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampson, Joshua N; Wheeler, William A; Yeager, Meredith; Panagiotou, Orestis; Wang, Zhaoming; Berndt, Sonja I; Lan, Qing; Abnet, Christian C; Amundadottir, Laufey T; Figueroa, Jonine D; Landi, Maria Teresa; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A; Taylor, Philip R; Vivo, Immaculata De; McGlynn, Katherine A; Purdue, Mark P; Rajaraman, Preetha; Adami, Hans-Olov; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Amary, Maria Fernanda; An, She-Juan; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L; Angelucci, Emanuele; Ansell, Stephen M; Arici, Cecilia; Armstrong, Bruce K; Arslan, Alan A; Austin, Melissa A; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A; Bassig, Bryan A; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Benhamou, Simone; Berg, Christine; Van Den Berg, David; Bernstein, Leslie; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Birmann, Brenda M; Black, Amanda; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M; Brinton, Louise; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chan, John K C; Chang, Ellen T; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang, Jiang; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chu; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Hongyan; Chen, Kexin; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Chen, Ying; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Song; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chien, Li-Hsin; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Choi, Jin Eun; Choi, Yi Young; Chow, Wong-Ho; Chung, Charles C; Clavel, Jacqueline; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Cocco, Pierluigi; Colt, Joanne S; Comperat, Eva; Conde, Lucia; Connors, Joseph M; Conti, David; Cortessis, Victoria K; Cotterchio, Michelle; Cozen, Wendy; Crouch, Simon; Crous-Bou, Marta; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G; Ding, Ti; Diver, W Ryan; Dorronsoro, Miren; Dossus, Laure; Duell, Eric J; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Erickson, Ralph L; Feychting, Maria; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Foretova, Lenka; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Freedman, Neal D; Beane Freeman, Laura E; Fuchs, Charles; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; García-Closas, Reina; Gascoyne, Randy D; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Gaudet, Mia M; Gaziano, J Michael; Giffen, Carol; Giles, Graham G; Giovannucci, Edward; Glimelius, Bengt; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M; Gorlick, Richard; Gross, Myron; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Gunter, Marc; Guo, Huan; Habermann, Thomas M; Haiman, Christopher A; Halai, Dina; Hallmans, Goran; Hassan, Manal; Hattinger, Claudia; He, Qincheng; He, Xingzhou; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Henderson, Brian; Henriksson, Roger; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holford, Theodore R; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N; Horn-Ross, Pamela L; Hosain, G M Monawar; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Huerta, Jose-Maria; Hung, Jen-Yu; Hutchinson, Amy; Inskip, Peter D; Jackson, Rebecca D; Jacobs, Eric J; Jenab, Mazda; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Ji, Bu-Tian; Jin, Guangfu; Jin, Li; Johansen, Christoffer; Johnson, Alison; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kaaks, Rudolph; Kamineni, Aruna; Kane, Eleanor; Kang, Chang Hyun; Karagas, Margaret R; Kelly, Rachel S; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Jun Suk; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Young-Chul; Kitahara, Cari M; Klein, Alison P; Klein, Robert J; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Kricker, Anne; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C; Kweon, Sun-Seog; LaCroix, Andrea; Lawrence, Charles; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Li, Donghui; Li, Haixin; Li, Jihua; Li, Yao-Jen; Li, Yuqing; Liao, Linda M; Liebow, Mark; Lightfoot, Tracy; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Chien-Chung; Lin, Dongxin; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S; Link, Brian K; Liu, Chenwei; Liu, Jianjun; Liu, Li; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lollo, Simonetta Di; Lu, Daru; Lund, Eiluv; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marchand, Loic Le; Marina, Neyssa; Masala, Giovanna; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Melbye, Mads; Melin, Beatrice S; Michaud, Dominique S; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Monnereau, Alain; Montalvan, Rebecca; Moore, Lee E; Mortensen, Lotte Maxild; Nieters, Alexandra; North, Kari E; Novak, Anne J; Oberg, Ann L; Offit, Kenneth; Oh, In-Jae; Olson, Sara H; Palli, Domenico; Pao, William; Park, In Kyu; Park, Jae Yong; Park, Kyong Hwa; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H M; Perng, Reury-Perng; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Qian, Biyun; Qiao, You-Lin; Rais, Marco; Riboli, Elio; Riby, Jacques; Risch, Harvey A; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Rodabough, Rebecca; Roman, Eve; Roupret, Morgan; Ruder, Avima M; Sanjose, Silvia de; Scelo, Ghislaine; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schwartz, Kendra; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Severi, Gianluca; Severson, Richard K; Shanafelt, Tait D; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Wei; Shin, Min-Ho; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Skibola, Christine F; Smith, Alex; Smith, Martyn T; Southey, Melissa C; Spinelli, John J; Staines, Anthony; Stampfer, Meir; Stern, Marianna C; Stevens, Victoria L; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S; Su, Jian; Su, Wu-Chou; Sund, Malin; Sung, Jae Sook; Sung, Sook Whan; Tan, Wen; Tang, Wei; Tardón, Adonina; Thomas, David; Thompson, Carrie A; Tinker, Lesley F; Tirabosco, Roberto; Tjønneland, Anne; Travis, Ruth C; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Tucker, Margaret; Turner, Jenny; Vajdic, Claire M; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Villano, Danylo J; Vineis, Paolo; Virtamo, Jarmo; Visvanathan, Kala; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Chih-Liang; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wang, Junwen; Wei, Fusheng; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weiner, George J; Weinstein, Stephanie; Wentzensen, Nicolas; White, Emily; Witzig, Thomas E; Wolpin, Brian M; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Guoping; Wu, Junjie; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Wei; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Jun; Xu, Ping; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Ye, Yuanqing; Yin, Zhihua; Yokota, Jun; Yoon, Ho-Il; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yu, Herbert; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zelenetz, Andrew; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Zhang, Yawei; Zhao, Xueying; Zhao, Zhenhong; Zheng, Hong; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Zhu, Meng; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Boca, Simina M; Cerhan, James R; Ferri, Giovanni M; Hartge, Patricia; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Magnani, Corrado; Miligi, Lucia; Morton, Lindsay M; Smedby, Karin E; Teras, Lauren R; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Sophia S; Brennan, Paul; Caporaso, Neil E; Hunter, David J; Kraft, Peter; Rothman, Nathaniel; Silverman, Debra T; Slager, Susan L; Chanock, Stephen J; Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of related individuals have consistently demonstrated notable familial aggregation of cancer. We aim to estimate the heritability and genetic correlation attributable to the additive effects of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for cancer at 13 anatomical sites.

  6. Algiers Point: Historical Ambience and Property Analysis of Squares Ten, Thirteen, and Twenty, with a View Toward Their Archaeological Potential,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-14

    to leave for a colder climate ." Admittance to the gathering place, the St. Charles Ballroom (in the IA) was on the basis of "Who were thought to be...cellar were 400 bottles of wine , twenty-two dozen bottles of beer, 400 empty bottles for filling, and barrels and demi-johns of syrup, salt, grease, tafia...plans for economic diversity in his suburb. The previous December he had begun a financial alliance with a family of Bordeaux shipbuilders, Pierre and

  7. Regulation of succinate-fuelled mitochondrial respiration in liver and skeletal muscle of hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jason C L; Chung, Dillon J; Cooper, Alex N; Staples, James F

    2013-05-01

    Hibernating ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) alternate between two distinct metabolic states throughout winter: torpor, during which metabolic rate (MR) and body temperature (Tb) are considerably suppressed, and interbout euthermia (IBE), during which MR and Tb briefly return to euthermic levels. Previous studies showed suppression of succinate-fuelled respiration during torpor in liver and skeletal muscle mitochondria; however, these studies used only a single, saturating succinate concentration. Therefore, they could not address whether mitochondrial metabolic suppression occurs under physiological substrate concentrations or whether differences in the kinetics of mitochondrial responses to changing substrate concentration might also contribute to mitochondrial metabolic regulation during torpor. The present study confirmed that succinate oxidation is reduced during torpor in liver and skeletal muscle at 37 and 10°C over a 100-fold range of succinate concentrations. At 37°C, this suppression resulted from inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), which had a greater affinity for oxaloacetate (an SDH inhibitor) during torpor. At 10°C, SDH was not inhibited, suggesting that SDH inhibition initiates but does not maintain mitochondrial suppression during torpor. Moreover, in both liver and skeletal muscle, mitochondria from torpid animals maintained relatively higher respiration rates at low succinate concentrations, which reduces the extent of energy savings that can be achieved during torpor, but may also maintain mitochondrial oxidative capacity above some lower critical threshold, thereby preventing cellular and/or mitochondrial injury during torpor and facilitating rapid recruitment of oxidative capacity during arousal.

  8. The effects of thirteen species of aphids on some life history parameters of the ladybird Coccinella septempunctata

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalushkov, P.; Hodek, Ivo

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 49, - (2004), s. 21-32 ISSN 1386-6141 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5007102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : adult fresh weight * essential food * fecundity Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.790, year: 2004

  9. Identification of Pm24, Pm35 and Pm37 in thirteen Egyptian bread wheat cultivars using SSR markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mahmoud Emara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Powdery mildew of wheat (Triticum spp. caused by Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici (DC E.O. Speer Em. Marchal is one of the most important bread wheat diseases in Egypt. All the Egyptian common bread wheat cultivars are susceptible to that disease at seedling and adult stages. Breeding of resistant cultivars is the most economical and environmentally safe method to eliminate the disease and reduce crop losses. Combinations of two or more effective resistance genes may lead to better, more durable resistance to that disease. Eight Pm genes i.e. Pm2, Pm6, Pm12, Pm16, Pm24, Pm35, Pm36 and Pm37 out of 21 powdery mildew monogenic wheat lines (Pm were resistant to 42 individual isolates of powdery mildew collected from different governorates in the Nile Delta area, Egypt, at seedling and adult stages. Only four DNA specific SSR markers (Xgwm337, Xcfd7 linked to Pm24, Pm35 and Xgwm332, Xwmc790 linked to Pm37 resistance genes were selected to detect these genes in 13 Egyptian common bread wheat cultivars. This study reveals the absence of Pm24, Pm35 and Pm37 in all the 13 Egyptian bread wheat cultivars. These results gave evidence that the Egyptian cultivars are not having resistance genes and need to further incorporate one, two or more resistant genes in a single genotype as all commercial cultivars defeated by the pathogen.

  10. Simultaneous determination of thirteen organophosphate esters in settled indoor house dust and a comparison between two sampling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xinghua; Kubwabo, Cariton; Rasmussen, Pat E; Wu, Fang

    2014-09-01

    An analytical method for the simultaneous determination of 13 organophosphate esters (OPEs) in house dust was developed. The method is based on solvent extraction by sonication, sample cleanup by solid phase extraction (SPE), and analysis by gas chromatography-positive chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (GC/PCI-MS/MS). Method detection limits (MDLs) ranged from 0.03 to 0.43 μg/g and recoveries from 60% to 118%. The inter- and intra-day variations ranged from 3% to 23%. The method was applied to dust samples collected using two vacuum sampling techniques from 134 urban Canadian homes: a sample of fresh or "active" dust (FD) collected by technicians and a composite sample taken from the household vacuum cleaner (HD). Results show that the two sampling methods (i.e., FD vs HD) provided comparable results. Tributoxyethyl phosphate (TBEP), triphenyl phosphate (TPhP), tris(chloropropyl) phosphate (TCPP), tri(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(dichloro-isopropyl) phosphate (TDCPP), tricresyl phosphate (TCrP), and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TnBP) were detected in the majority of samples. The most predominant OPE was TBEP, with median concentrations of 31.9 μg/g and 22.8 μg/g in FD and HD samples, respectively, 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than other OPEs. The method was also applied to the analysis of OPEs in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) standard reference material (NIST SRM 2585, organic contaminants in house dust). The results from SRM 2585 may contribute to the certification of OPE concentration values in this SRM. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Simultaneous analysis of thirteen endogenous steroid hormones by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure photoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to endocrine active chemicals can lead to perturbations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, ultimately leading to adverse reproductive effects. To evaluate potential reproductive effects, many aquatic toxicity assessments still rely on radioimmunoassay (RIA...

  12. Thirteen at the table again on the 1 January 2016. Why does Indonesia (re)join the OPEC?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hache, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Indonesia became an OPEC member in 1962 and left the organisation in 2009 after having become a net importing country. As this country decided to rejoin the OPEC while still being a net importer, this article first discusses which are the motivations of Indonesia for its come back when considering its situation. The author briefly indicates this situation regarding energy sources: the country is the tenth gas producer, possesses the second reserves in Asia, and aims at developing bio fuels to reduce its energy dependence. For the author, through this come back within the OPEC, Indonesia can have a direct access to the main exporting countries, and thus get better prices. From the perspective of OPEC members, the come back of Indonesia will very slightly increase the global OPEC production and its world share, but Indonesia will not be a competitor for them on the markets, and could be a bridgehead for OPEC members on the South-East Asia market. However, this come back could result in a change of role for the OPEC which would look like a large oil international forum

  13. Distribution and prevalence of Cytauxzoon felis in bobcats (Lynx rufus), the natural reservoir, and other wild felids in thirteen states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, Barbara C; Murphy, Staci M; Patton, Laura L; Shock, Philip M; Olfenbuttel, Colleen; Beringer, Jeff; Prange, Suzanne; Grove, Daniel M; Peek, Matt; Butfiloski, Joseph W; Hughes, Daymond W; Lockhart, J Mitchell; Bevins, Sarah N; VandeWoude, Sue; Crooks, Kevin R; Nettles, Victor F; Brown, Holly M; Peterson, David S; Yabsley, Michael J

    2011-02-10

    Cytauxzoon felis, a protozoan parasite of wild and domestic felids, is the causative agent of cytauxzoonosis in domestic and some exotic felids in the United States. The bobcat (Lynx rufus) is the natural reservoir for this parasite, but other felids such as Florida panthers (Puma concolor coryii) and domestic cats may maintain long-term parasitemias and serve as reservoirs. Experimentally, two tick species, Dermacentor variabilis and Amblyomma americanum, have demonstrated the ability to transmit C. felis. These two tick species have overlapping distributions throughout much of the southeastern United States. The objective of the current study was to determine the distribution and prevalence of C. felis in free-ranging bobcat populations from 13 states including California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and West Virginia. These states were selected because of differential vector presence; D. variabilis is present in each of these states except for the region of Colorado sampled and A. americanum is currently known to be present only in a subset of these states. Blood or spleen samples from 696 bobcats were tested for C. felis infection by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay which targeted the first ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region (ITS-1). Significantly higher prevalences of C. felis were detected from Missouri (79%, n=39), North Carolina (63%, n=8), Oklahoma (60%, n=20), South Carolina (57%, n=7), Kentucky (55%, n=74), Florida (44%, n=45), and Kansas (27%, n=41) compared with Georgia (9%, n=159), North Dakota (2.4%, n=124), Ohio (0%, n=19), West Virginia (0%, n=37), California (0%, n=26), and Colorado (0%, n=67). In addition to bobcats, seven cougars (Puma concolor) from Georgia, Louisiana, and North Dakota and one serval (Leptailurus serval) from Louisiana were tested for C. felis. Only one cougar from Louisiana was PCR positive, which represents the first report of an infected cougar outside of the Florida panther population. These data also indicate that C. felis is present in North Dakota where infection has not been reported in domestic cats. Based on a nonparametric analysis, prevalence rates were significantly higher in states where there are established populations of A. americanum, which supports recent data on the experimental transmission of C. felis by A. americanum and the fact that domestic cat clinical cases are temporally associated with A. americanum activity. Collectively, these data confirm that bobcats are a common reservoir for C. felis and that A. americanum is likely an epidemiologically important vector. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A survey of severe visual impairment and blindness in children attending thirteen schools for the blind in sri lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zoe; Muecke, James; Edussuriya, Kapila; Dayawansa, Ranasiri; Hammerton, Michael; Kong, Aimee; Sennanayake, Saman; Senaratne, Tissa; Marasinghe, Nirosha; Selva, Dinesh

    2011-02-01

    To identify the causes of blindness and severe visual impairment (BL/SVI) in children attending schools for the blind in Sri Lanka, and to provide optical devices and ophthalmic treatment where indicated. Two hundred and six children under 16 years from 13 schools for the blind in Sri Lanka were examined by a team of ophthalmologists and optometrists. Data were entered in the World Health Organization Prevention of Blindness Eye Examination Record for Childhood Blindness (WHO/PBL ERCB). Of the 206 children, 83.5% were blind (BL = Visual acuity [VA] children required an optical device to improve their vision. Just over one third of the children in schools for the blind in Sri Lanka had potentially avoidable causes of BL/SVI. Vision could also be improved in a third of children. The data support the need to develop specialized pediatric ophthalmic services, particularly in the face of advancing neonatal life support in Sri Lanka, and the need for increased provision of optical support.

  15. Identification of safety belt restraint usage characteristics related to four- to thirteen-year-olds : [technical summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Even though overall level of safety on United Sates roadways has improved over the last few decades because of significant vehicle and occupant safety regulations and programs, further improvement is needed. In 2009, 33,808 fatalities and another 2.2...

  16. Cloning and Characterization of a Forkhead Transcription Factor Gene, FoxOla From Thirteen-Lined Ground Squirrel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cai, Decheng; McCarron, Richard M; Hallenbeck, John

    2004-01-01

    ... (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus). Hibernation is studied because it represents a unique state of reversible suspended animation associated with tolerance to an otherwise lethal reduction of core body temperature and metabolism...

  17. Thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) show microstructural bone loss during hibernation but preserve bone macrostructural geometry and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Stoll, Danielle M; Mantila, Emily R; Fahrner, Bryna K; Carey, Hannah V; Donahue, Seth W

    2011-04-15

    Lack of activity causes bone loss In most animals. Hibernating bears have physiological processes to prevent cortical and trabecular bone loss associated with reduced physical activity, but different mechanisms of torpor among hibernating species may lead to differences in skeletal responses to hibernation. There are conflicting reports regarding whether small mammals experience bone loss during hibernation. To investigate this phenomenon, we measured cortical and trabecular bone properties in physically active and hibernating juvenile and adult 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, previous genus name Spermophilus). Cortical bone geometry, strength and mineral content were similar in hibernating compared with active squirrels, suggesting that hibernation did not cause macrostructural cortical bone loss. Osteocyte lacunar size increased (linear regression, P=0.001) over the course of hibernation in juvenile squirrels, which may indicate an osteocytic role in mineral homeostasis during hibernation. Osteocyte lacunar density and porosity were greater (+44 and +59%, respectively; Phibernating compared with active squirrels, which may reflect a decrease in osteoblastic activity (per cell) during hibernation. Trabecular bone volume fraction in the proximal tibia was decreased (-20%; P=0.028) in hibernating compared with physically active adult squirrels, but was not different between hibernating and active juvenile squirrels. Taken together, these data suggest that 13-lined ground squirrels may be unable to prevent microstructural losses of cortical and trabecular bone during hibernation, but importantly may possess a biological mechanism to preserve cortical bone macrostructure and strength during hibernation, thus preventing an increased risk of bone fracture during remobilization in the spring.

  18. Writing the City: Søren Kierkegaard’s Urban Walks in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Henriette

    2011-01-01

    and documenting spatial experience. The thirteen contributors to the book, most of whom live and work in Ireland and are associated with a range of different disciplines in Irish universities, show how the construction and representation of space, both real and imagined, contributes to the exploration...

  19. PM2.5 pollution episode and its contributors from 2011 to 2013 in urban Shanghai, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. L.; Qiao, L. P.; Lou, S. R.; Zhou, M.; Chen, J. M.; Wang, Q.; Tao, S. K.; Chen, C. H.; Huang, H. Y.; Li, L.; Huang, C.

    2015-12-01

    Shanghai has suffered from severe fine particle (PM2.5) pollution in recent years. The characterization and formation mechanism of PM2.5 pollution episodes were investigated in the present study based on 3-year on-line measurements of PM2.5 chemical compositions with the temporal resolution of 1 h from 2011 to 2013 in Shanghai. Pollution episodes with PM2.5 mass higher than 75 μg/m3 occurred ˜1400 h annually, which inserted the annual extra PM2.5 mass of 14 μg/m3 into the level of 33 μg/m3 without pollution episodes taken into account. Three kinds of typical episodes were identified as biomass burning events, suspended dust events, and fireworks events, which extra contributed ˜1.5 μg/m3 relative to PM2.5 mass of clean periods. Most of pollution episodes were attributed to multiple and complex mechanisms, characterized by high contribution of the secondary inorganic components (e.g. nitrate, sulfate and ammonium) and carbonaceous matters, which dominated the monthly variations of PM2.5 mass. During the complex episodes, the increasing contribution of nitrate mass concentration to PM2.5 burden was observed. The present study highlighted the necessity to pay more attention to the secondary pollution. The reduction of precursor gases emissions was essential to mediate the severe PM2.5 pollution in Shanghai megacity.

  20. Contributors to Women's Leadership Development in Christian Higher Education: A Model and Emerging Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlvig, Jolyn; Longman, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    A theory of women's leadership development within the context of Christian higher education is proposed, based on qualitative research involving 16 participants. Motivators to advance into leadership roles were: (a) a sense of relational responsibility; (b) awareness of calling and giftedness for leadership, and (c) a mentoring relationship…

  1. Functional contributors to poor movement and balance control in patients with low back pain: A descriptive analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayhan, Cigdem; Bilgin, Sevil; Aksoy, Songul; Yakut, Yavuz

    2016-08-10

    Automatic and voluntary body position control is essential for postural stability; however, little is known about individual factors that impair the sensorimotor system associated with low back pain (LBP). To evaluate automatic and voluntary motor control impairments causing postural instability in patients with LBP. Motor control impairments associated with poor movement and balance control were analyzed prospectively in 32 patients with LBP. Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for pain assessment, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) for disability measurement, and computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) for analysis of postural responses were used to measure outcomes of all patients. Computerized dynamic posturography tests including Sensory organization test (SOT), limits of stability test (movement velocity, directional control, endpoint, and maximum excursion), rhythmic weight shift (rhythmic movement speed and directional control), and adaptation test (toes-up and toes-down tests) were performed and the results compared with NeuroCom normative data. The mean age of the patients was 40.50 ± 12.28 years. Lower equilibrium scores were observed in SOT (p control, and endpoint excursion (p control was recorded in the anteroposterior direction (p controls (p control of body positioning, a reduction in movement control, delays in movement initiation, and a difficulty to adapt to sudden surface changes.

  2. Hypervariable Region 1 Shielding of Hepatitis C Virus Is a Main Contributor to Genotypic Differences in Neutralization Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prentoe, Jannick; Velazquez-Moctezuma, Rodrigo; Foung, Steven K. H.

    2016-01-01

    There are 3-4 million new hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections yearly. The extensive intergenotypic sequence diversity of envelope proteins E1 and E2 of HCV and shielding of important epitopes by hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) of E2 are believed to be major hindrances to developing universally...... protective HCV vaccines. Using cultured viruses expressing the E1/E2 complex of isolates H77 (genotype 1a), J6 (2a), or S52 (3a), with and without HVR1, we tested HVR1-mediated neutralization occlusion in vitro against a panel of 12 well-characterized human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) targeting diverse E1......, E2, and E1/E2 epitopes. Surprisingly, HVR1-mediated protection was greatest for S52, followed by J6 and then H77. HCV pulldown experiments showed that this phenomenon was caused by epitope shielding. Moreover, by regression analysis of HMAb binding and neutralization titer of HCV we found a strong...

  3. Spatially dependent seismic anisotropy in the Tonga subduction zone: A possible contributor to the complexity of deep earthquakes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavryčuk, Václav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 155, 1/2 (2006), s. 63-72 ISSN 0031-9201 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3012309; GA ČR GA205/02/0383 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : deep-focus earthquakes * seismic anisotropy * subduction zones Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 2.440, year: 2006

  4. Causes of and contributors to infant mortality in a rural community of North India: evidence from verbal and social autopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Sanjay Kumar; Kant, Shashi; Srivastava, Rahul; Gupta, Priti; Misra, Puneet; Pandav, Chandrakant Sambhaji; Singh, Arvind Kumar

    2017-08-11

    To identify the medical causes of death and contribution of non-biological factors towards infant mortality by a retrospective analysis of routinely collected data using verbal and social autopsy tools. The study site was Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS), Ballabgarh, North India PARTICIPANTS: All infant deaths during the years 2008-2012 were included for verbal autopsy and infant deaths from July 2012 to December 2012 were included for social autopsy. Cause of death ascertained by a validated verbal autopsy tool and level of delay based on a three-delay model using the INDEPTH social autopsy tool were the main outcome measures. The level of delay was defined as follows: level 1, delay in identification of danger signs and decision making to seek care; level 2, delay in reaching a health facility from home; level 3, delay in getting healthcare at the health facility. The infant mortality rate during the study period was 46.5/1000 live births. Neonatal deaths contributed to 54.3% of infant deaths and 39% occurred on the first day of life. Birth asphyxia (31.5%) followed by low birth weight (LBW)/prematurity (26.5%) were the most common causes of neonatal death, while infection (57.8%) was the most common cause of post-neonatal death. Care-seeking was delayed among 50% of neonatal deaths and 41.2% of post-neonatal deaths. Delay at level 1 was most common and occurred in 32.4% of neonatal deaths and 29.4% of post-neonatal deaths. Deaths due to LBW/prematurity were mostly followed by delay at level 1. A high proportion of preventable infant mortality still exists in an area which is under continuous health and demographic surveillance. There is a need to enhance home-based preventive care to enable the mother to identify and respond to danger signs. Verbal autopsy and social autopsy could be routinely done to guide policy interventions aimed at reduction of infant mortality. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Ectopic lipid accumulation: A potential cause for metabolic disturbances and a contributor to the alteration of kidney function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guebre-Egziabher, Fitsum; Alix, Pascaline M; Koppe, Laetitia; Pelletier, Caroline C; Kalbacher, Emilie; Fouque, Denis; Soulage, Christophe O

    2013-11-01

    Ectopic lipid accumulation is now known to be a mechanism that contributes to organ injury in the context of metabolic diseases. In muscle and liver, accumulation of lipids impairs insulin signaling. This hypothesis accounts for the mechanism of insulin resistance in obesity, type 2 diabetes, aging and lipodystrophy. Increasing data suggest that lipid accumulation in the kidneys could also contribute to the alteration of kidney function in the context of metabolic syndrome and obesity. Furthermore and more unexpectedly, animal models of kidney disease exhibit a decreased adiposity and ectopic lipid redistribution suggesting that kidney disease may be a state of lipodystrophy. However, whether this abnormal lipid partitioning during chronic kidney disease (CKD) may have any functional impact in these tissues needs to be investigated. Here, we provide a perspective by defining the problem and analyzing the possible causes and consequences. Further human studies are required to strengthen these observations, and provide novel therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Wellbeing-enhancing occupation and organizational and environmental contributors in long-term dementia care facilities: an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, D.; Willemse, B.M.; de Lange, J.; Pot, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Occupation remains an unmet need in long-term dementia care. To increase residents' occupation, knowledge of types of occupation related to wellbeing, and organizational and environmental characteristics encouraging involvement in these types of occupation, is indispensable.

  7. An expert system model for mapping tropical wetlands and peatlands reveals South America as the largest contributor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gumbricht, Thomas; Roman-Cuesta, Rosa Maria; Verchot, Louis; Herold, Martin; Wittmann, Florian; Householder, Ethan; Herold, Nadine; Murdiyarso, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Wetlands are important providers of ecosystem services and key regulators of climate change. They positively contribute to global warming through their greenhouse gas emissions, and negatively through the accumulation of organic material in histosols, particularly in peatlands. Our understanding of

  8. Vection is the main contributor to motion sickness induced by visual yaw rotation: Implications for conflict and eye movement theories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne A E Nooij

    Full Text Available This study investigated the role of vection (i.e., a visually induced sense of self-motion, optokinetic nystagmus (OKN, and inadvertent head movements in visually induced motion sickness (VIMS, evoked by yaw rotation of the visual surround. These three elements have all been proposed as contributing factors in VIMS, as they can be linked to different motion sickness theories. However, a full understanding of the role of each factor is still lacking because independent manipulation has proven difficult in the past. We adopted an integrative approach to the problem by obtaining measures of potentially relevant parameters in four experimental conditions and subsequently combining them in a linear mixed regression model. To that end, participants were exposed to visual yaw rotation in four separate sessions. Using a full factorial design, the OKN was manipulated by a fixation target (present/absent, and vection strength by introducing a conflict in the motion direction of the central and peripheral field of view (present/absent. In all conditions, head movements were minimized as much as possible. Measured parameters included vection strength, vection variability, OKN slow phase velocity, OKN frequency, the number of inadvertent head movements, and inadvertent head tilt. Results show that VIMS increases with vection strength, but that this relation varies among participants (R2 = 0.48. Regression parameters for vection variability, head and eye movement parameters were not significant. These results may seem to be in line with the Sensory Conflict theory on motion sickness, but we argue that a more detailed definition of the exact nature of the conflict is required to fully appreciate the relationship between vection and VIMS.

  9. The good, the bad or the ugly: Microbial biomass of biogas residues as a contributor to soil carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coban, H.; Miltner, A.; Kaestner, M.

    2013-12-01

    Loss of soil organic matter is a recent problem in soils all over the world. This can be related to enhanced mineralization of the soil organic matter due to land use change, which is a source of anthropogenic carbon dioxide increase. For example, the carbon input from plant residues is reduced because of the increased cultivation of bioenergy crops. In order to avoid soil degradation, application of biogas residues is a common practice in such areas. Biogas residues are side products of biogas production and contain microbial biomass. Application of these residues as soil additive influences the soil microorganisms as well as the carbon cycle. We study this effect by incubating 13C-labeled biogas residues in an arable soil from the Static Fertilization Experiment in Bad Lauchstaedt, Germany. Labeled residues were produced via labeling of active microbial biomass by addition of KH13CO3 to biogas reactors. High enrichment in the various phospholipid fatty acids proved the successful labeling of the biomass. The labeled biogas residues are being long-term incubated in the soil. During incubation, we monitor the fate of the carbon by analyzing the label in phospholipid fatty acids, amino acids as well as carbon dioxide. This allows us to trace the fate of the biogas residues-derived C in soil and to quantify the effect on the transformation of the natural soil organic matter (e.g. negative effects such as priming effects). Also, microbial community dynamics will be determined using molecular biology tools such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and real-time quantitative PCR (Q-PCR). In order to prevent potentially negative effects, various additives such as charred biomaterials, clays and chopped bark will be tested to improve the carbon storage in soil. In conclusion, this study investigates the fate and impact of biogas residues used as a soil additive on the soil microbial community and amount of soil organic matter. It is aimed to understand and clarify whether the biogas residues play the good, the bad or just the ugly in soil carbon cycling. Thus, recommendations about the use of biogas residues as fertilizers or soil additives in agriculture will be contributed. Furthermore, the data will be a potential input to a landscape generator model which will predict soil quality development in Central Germany.

  10. Low platelet count is potentially the most important contributor to severe bleeding in patients newly diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Y

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Yu-hua Song,1,2 Peng Peng,3 Chun Qiao,1 Run Zhang,1 Jian-yong Li,1 Hua Lu1 1Department of Hematology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Jiangsu Province Hospital, 2Department of Hematology, 3Department of Oncology, The Second Hospital of Nanjing, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The objective of the current study was to provide more appropriate therapeutic strategies for reducing severe hemorrhaging by assessing the recovery of abnormal coagulation indexes in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL during induction therapy. Retrospective analyses of 112 patients newly diagnosed with APL were performed during initial treatment. In our study, the early death rate was 5.36%. Hemorrhage was the leading cause of death during the induction period (4/6. The values of white blood cell count, lactate dehydrogenase, prothrombin time (PT, fibrinogen (Fbg, hemoglobin, and bone marrow leukemic promyelocytes were significantly different in the high-risk group compared to the low/intermediate-risk groups. There were significant differences in the white blood cell count, bone marrow leukemic promyelocytes, platelet (PLT count, and the levels of lactate dehydrogenase, d-dimer, PT, and Fbg, as well as in FLT3-ITD mutations between patients with major bleeding and those with minor bleeding. Hemostatic variables significantly improved over time during induction therapy. The recovery times of the PLT, PT, and Fbg values were significantly slower in patients with major bleeding than in those with minor bleeding. Specifically, the PLT level in patients with major bleeding was not similar to that in the minor bleeding group until after 4 weeks of treatment. Hemorrhages were the most common cause of induction death in this study. High-risk patients were more prone to serious clinical bleeding symptoms. Patients with major bleeding had more rapid proliferation characteristics and an increased incidence of FLT3-ITD mutations compared to patients with minor bleeding. Hemostatic variables recovered significantly more slowly in patients with major bleeding than in those with minor bleeding. Active induction therapy and blood product infusion are effective in preventing severe bleeding. Our results suggested that low PLT count might be the leading cause of fatal bleeding in patients newly diagnosed with APL. Keywords: acute promyelocytic leukemia, all-trans retinoic acid, arsenic trioxide, coagulation, hemorrhage 

  11. DUST IN THE POLAR REGION AS A MAJOR CONTRIBUTOR TO THE INFRARED EMISSION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoenig, S. F.; Antonucci, R. [Department of Physics, University of California in Santa Barbara, Broida Hall, Santa Barbara, CA 93109 (United States); Kishimoto, M.; Tristram, K. R. W.; Asmus, D.; Weigelt, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Prieto, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Gandhi, P. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Burtscher, L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrae, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Duschl, W. J., E-mail: shoenig@physics.ucsb.edu [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, Leibnizstr. 15, D-24098, Kiel (Germany)

    2013-07-10

    Dust around active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is distributed over a wide range of spatial scales and can be observed in the infrared (IR). It is generally assumed that the distribution on parsec scales forms a geometrically and optically thick entity in the equatorial plane around the accretion disk and broad-line region-dubbed {sup d}ust torus{sup -}that emits the bulk of the subarcsecond-scale IR emission and gives rise to orientation-dependent obscuration. However, recent IR interferometry studies with unprecedented position angle (P.A.) and baseline coverage on these small scales in two obscured (type 2) AGNs have revealed that the majority of the mid-IR emission in these objects is elongated in the polar direction. These observations are difficult to reconcile with the standard interpretation that most of the parsec-scale mid-IR emission in AGNs originate from the torus and challenges the justification of using simple torus models to model the broadband IR emission. Here, we report detailed interferometry observations of the unobscured (type 1) AGN in NGC 3783 that allow us to constrain the size, elongation, and direction of the mid-IR emission with high accuracy. The mid-IR emission is characterized by a strong elongation toward position angle P.A. -52 Degree-Sign , closely aligned with the polar axis (P.A. -45 Degree-Sign ). We determine half-light radii along the major and minor axes at 12.5 {mu}m of (20.0 {+-} 3.0) mas Multiplication-Sign (6.7 {+-} 1.0) mas or (4.23 {+-} 0.63) pc Multiplication-Sign (1.42 {+-} 0.21) pc, which corresponds to intrinsically scaled sizes of (69.4 {+-} 10.8) r{sub in} Multiplication-Sign (23.3 {+-} 3.5) r{sub in} for the inner dust radius of r{sub in} = 0.061 pc as inferred from near-IR reverberation mapping. This implies an axis ratio of 3:1, with about 60%-90% of the 8-13 {mu}m emission associated with the polar-elongated component. It is quite likely that the hot-dust emission as recently resolved by near-IR interferometry is misaligned with the mid-IR emitting source, which also finds a correspondence in the two distinct 3-5 {mu}m and 20 {mu}m bumps seen in the high angular resolution spectral energy distribution (SED). Based on this SED, we determine covering factors for the hot and warm dust components of C{sub hot}= 0.42{sup +0.42}{sub -0.21} and C{sub warm}= 0.92{sup +0.92}{sub -0.46}, respectively. We conclude that these observations support a scenario where the majority of the mid-IR emission in Seyfert AGNs originate from a dusty wind in the polar region of the AGN.

  12. Dams on Mekong tributaries as significant contributors of hydrological alterations to the Tonle Sap Floodplain in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, M. E.; Piman, T.; Lauri, H.; Cochrane, T. A.; Kummu, M.

    2014-12-01

    River tributaries have a key role in the biophysical functioning of the Mekong Basin. Of particular interest are the Sesan, Srepok, and Sekong (3S) rivers, which contribute nearly a quarter of the total Mekong discharge. Forty two dams are proposed in the 3S, and once completed they will exceed the active storage of China's large dam cascade in the Upper Mekong. Given their proximity to the Lower Mekong floodplains, the 3S dams could alter the flood-pulse hydrology driving the productivity of downstream ecosystems. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to quantify how hydropower development in the 3S, together with definite future (DF) plans for infrastructure development through the basin, would alter the hydrology of the Tonle Sap's Floodplain, the largest wetland in the Mekong and home to one of the most productive inland fisheries in the world. We coupled results from four numerical models representing the basin's surface hydrology, water resources development, and floodplain hydrodynamics. The scale of alterations caused by hydropower in the 3S was compared with the basin's DF scenario driven by the Upper Mekong dam cascade. The DF or the 3S development scenarios could independently increase Tonle Sap's 30-day minimum water levels by 30 ± 5 cm and decrease annual water level fall rates by 0.30 ± 0.05 cm day-1. When analyzed together (DF + 3S), these scenarios are likely to eliminate all baseline conditions (1986-2000) of extreme low water levels, a particularly important component of Tonle Sap's environmental flows. Given the ongoing trends and large economic incentives in the hydropower business in the region, there is a high possibility that most of the 3S hydropower potential will be exploited and that dams will be built even in locations where there is a high risk of ecological disruption. Hence, retrofitting current designs and operations to promote sustainable hydropower practices that optimize multiple river services - rather than just maximize hydropower generation - appear to be the most feasible alternative to mitigate hydropower-related disruptions in the Mekong.

  13. How can contributors to open-source communities be trusted? On the assumption, inference, and substitution of trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, P.B.

    2010-01-01

    Open-source communities that focus on content rely squarely on the contributions of invisible strangers in cyberspace. How do such communities handle the problem of trusting that strangers have good intentions and adequate competence? This question is explored in relation to communities in which

  14. A systematic review of posture and psychosocial factors as contributors to upper quadrant musculoskeletal pain in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Yolandi; Crous, Lynette; Louw, Q A

    2008-01-01

    Musculoskeletal pain has become a major symptomatic complaint among children and adolescents and is increasingly occurring at a younger age. This systematic review was done to evaluate the evidence for the contribution of posture and psychosocial factors to the development of upper quadrant musculoskeletal pain in children and adolescents. The review describes the measurement tools used to assess musculoskeletal pain, sitting posture, and psychosocial factors. Two independent reviewers searched seven databases for observational studies that included prospective and cross-sectional study designs. Ten studies were extracted and assessed by two reviewers using the Critical Appraisal Form-Quantitative Studies (Law et al, 1998). The studies measured upper quadrant musculoskeletal pain as an outcome measure. Five studies evaluated sitting posture and found an association between the duration of static sitting and upper quadrant musculoskeletal pain. Six studies measured psychosocial factors of which depression, stress, and psychosomatic symptoms were the factors most commonly found to influence the development of upper quadrant musculoskeletal pain. The eligible studies used different pain measurement tools and different measurement tools to assess sitting posture and psychosocial factors. This review concludes that the duration of sitting posture and psychosocial factors may influence the experience of musculoskeletal pain among children and adolescents.

  15. High-Resolution Analysis of Seismic Air Gun Impulses and Their Reverberant Field as Contributors to an Acoustic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Melania; Dugan, Peter J; Ponirakis, Dimitri W; Popescu, Marian; Shiu, Yu; Rice, Aaron N; Clark, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    In September and October 2011, a seismic survey took place in Baffin Bay, Western Greenland, in close proximity to a marine protected area (MPA). As part of the mitigation effort, five bottom-mounted marine acoustic recording units (MARUs) collected data that were used for the purpose of measuring temporal and spectral features from each impulsive event, providing a high-resolution record of seismic reverberation persistent after the direct impulse. Results were compared with ambient-noise levels as computed after the seismic survey to evidence that as a consequence of a series of repeating seismic impulses, sustained elevated levels create the potential for masking.

  16. Investigating Social Ecological Contributors to Diabetes within Hispanics in an Underserved U.S.-Mexico Border Community

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Jean; Guy, Mignonne C.; Rosales, Cecilia; de Zapien, Jill G.; Staten, Lisa K.; Fernandez, Maria L.; Carvajal, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    Hispanics bear a disproportionate burden of diabetes in the United States, yet relations of structural, socio-cultural and behavioral factors linked to diabetes are not fully understood across all of their communities. The current study examines disparities and factors associated with diabetes in adult Hispanics of Mexican-descent (N = 648) participating in a population survey of an underserved rural U.S.-Mexico border community. The overall rate of diabetes prevalence rate in the sample, bas...

  17. Investigating social ecological contributors to diabetes within Hispanics in an underserved U.S.-Mexico border community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jean; Guy, Mignonne C; Rosales, Cecilia; de Zapien, Jill G; Staten, Lisa K; Fernandez, Maria L; Carvajal, Scott C

    2013-07-31

    Hispanics bear a disproportionate burden of diabetes in the United States, yet relations of structural, socio-cultural and behavioral factors linked to diabetes are not fully understood across all of their communities. The current study examines disparities and factors associated with diabetes in adult Hispanics of Mexican-descent (N = 648) participating in a population survey of an underserved rural U.S.-Mexico border community. The overall rate of diabetes prevalence rate in the sample, based on self-report and a glucose testing, was 21%; much higher than rates reported for U.S. adults overall, for all Hispanic adults, or for Mexican American adults specifically. Acculturation markers and social determinants of health indicators were only significantly related to diabetes in models not accounting for age. Older age, greater BMI (>30), greater waist-to-hip ratio as well as lower fruit and vegetable consumption were significantly related to increased likelihood of diabetes when all structural, cultural, behavioral, and biological factors were considered. Models with sets of behavioral factors and biological factors each significantly improved explanation of diabetes relative to prior social ecological theory-guided models. The findings show a critical need for diabetes prevention efforts in this community and suggest that health promotion efforts should particularly focus on increasing fruit and vegetable consumption.

  18. Investigating Social Ecological Contributors to Diabetes within Hispanics in an Underserved U.S.-Mexico Border Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott C. Carvajal

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Hispanics bear a disproportionate burden of diabetes in the United States, yet relations of structural, socio-cultural and behavioral factors linked to diabetes are not fully understood across all of their communities. The current study examines disparities and factors associated with diabetes in adult Hispanics of Mexican-descent (N = 648 participating in a population survey of an underserved rural U.S.-Mexico border community. The overall rate of diabetes prevalence rate in the sample, based on self-report and a glucose testing, was 21%; much higher than rates reported for U.S. adults overall, for all Hispanic adults, or for Mexican American adults specifically. Acculturation markers and social determinants of health indicators were only significantly related to diabetes in models not accounting for age. Older age, greater BMI (>30, greater waist-to-hip ratio as well as lower fruit and vegetable consumption were significantly related to increased likelihood of diabetes when all structural, cultural, behavioral, and biological factors were considered. Models with sets of behavioral factors and biological factors each significantly improved explanation of diabetes relative to prior social ecological theory-guided models. The findings show a critical need for diabetes prevention efforts in this community and suggest that health promotion efforts should particularly focus on increasing fruit and vegetable consumption.

  19. Glutathione S-Transferase (GST Gene Diversity in the Crustacean Calanus finmarchicus--Contributors to Cellular Detoxification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittoria Roncalli

    Full Text Available Detoxification is a fundamental cellular stress defense mechanism, which allows an organism to survive or even thrive in the presence of environmental toxins and/or pollutants. The glutathione S-transferase (GST superfamily is a set of enzymes involved in the detoxification process. This highly diverse protein superfamily is characterized by multiple gene duplications, with over 40 GST genes reported in some insects. However, less is known about the GST superfamily in marine organisms, including crustaceans. The availability of two de novo transcriptomes for the copepod, Calanus finmarchicus, provided an opportunity for an in depth study of the GST superfamily in a marine crustacean. The transcriptomes were searched for putative GST-encoding transcripts using known GST proteins from three arthropods as queries. The identified transcripts were then translated into proteins, analyzed for structural domains, and annotated using reciprocal BLAST analysis. Mining the two transcriptomes yielded a total of 41 predicted GST proteins belonging to the cytosolic, mitochondrial or microsomal classes. Phylogenetic analysis of the cytosolic GSTs validated their annotation into six different subclasses. The predicted proteins are likely to represent the products of distinct genes, suggesting that the diversity of GSTs in C. finmarchicus exceeds or rivals that described for insects. Analysis of relative gene expression in different developmental stages indicated low levels of GST expression in embryos, and relatively high expression in late copepodites and adult females for several cytosolic GSTs. A diverse diet and complex life history are factors that might be driving the multiplicity of GSTs in C. finmarchicus, as this copepod is commonly exposed to a variety of natural toxins. Hence, diversity in detoxification pathway proteins may well be key to their survival.

  20. The Mobilome; A Major Contributor to Escherichia coli stx2-Positive O26:H11 Strains Intra-Serotype Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delannoy, Sabine; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Webb, Hattie E.; Bonacorsi, Stephane; Fach, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli of serotype O26:H11/H- constitute a diverse group of strains and several clones with distinct genetic characteristics have been identified and characterized. Whole genome sequencing was performed using Illumina and PacBio technologies on eight stx2-positive O26:H11 strains circulating in France. Comparative analyses of the whole genome of the stx2-positive O26:H11 strains indicate that several clones of EHEC O26:H11 are co-circulating in France. Phylogenetic analysis of the French strains together with stx2-positive and stx-negative E. coli O26:H11 genomes obtained from Genbank indicates the existence of four clonal complexes (SNP-CCs) separated in two distinct lineages, one of which comprises the “new French clone” (SNP-CC1) that appears genetically closely related to stx-negative attaching and effacing E. coli (AEEC) strains. Interestingly, the whole genome SNP (wgSNP) phylogeny is summarized in the cas gene phylogeny, and a simple qPCR assay targeting the CRISPR array specific to SNP-CC1 (SP_O26-E) can distinguish between the two main lineages. The PacBio sequencing allowed a detailed analysis of the mobile genetic elements (MGEs) of the strains. Numerous MGEs were identified in each strain, including a large number of prophages and up to four large plasmids, representing overall 8.7–19.8% of the total genome size. Analysis of the prophage pool of the strains shows a considerable diversity with a complex history of recombination. Each clonal complex (SNP-CC) is characterized by a unique set of plasmids and phages, including stx-prophages, suggesting evolution through separate acquisition events. Overall, the MGEs appear to play a major role in O26:H11 intra-serotype clonal diversification. PMID:28932209

  1. Is the absence or intermittent YF vaccination the major contributor to its persistent outbreaks in eastern Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Marycelin Mandu; Ikusemoran, Mayomi

    2017-10-28

    Despite the availability of a safe and efficacious yellow fever vaccine since 1937, yellow fever remains a public health threat as a re-emerging disease in Africa and South America. We reviewed the trend of reported yellow fever outbreaks in eastern African countries, identified the risk epidemiological factors associated with the outbreaks and assessed the current situation of Yellow Fever vaccination in Africa. Surveillance and case finding for yellow fever in Africa are insufficient primarily due to lack of appropriate diagnostic capabilities, poor health infrastructure resulting in under-recognition, underreporting and underestimation of the disease. Despite these challenges, Ethiopia reported 302,614 cases (30,505 deaths) in 1943-2015, Kenya had 207 cases (38 deaths) in 1992-2016, Sudan experienced 31,750 suspected cases (1855 deaths) from 1940 to 2012 and Uganda had 452 cases (65 deaths) in 1941-2016. Major risk factors associated with past yellow fever outbreaks include climate, human practices and virus genetics. Comparisons between isolates from different outbreaks after 45 years have revealed the genetic stability of the structural proteins of YFV which are the primary targets of the host immune cells. This probably explains why yellow fever 17D vaccine is considered as outstandingly efficacious and safe after being used for 75 years. However, the 14 amino-acid changes among these isolates may have a greater impact on the changing disease epidemiology, virulence and transmission rate. Low population immunity against YF influences outbreak frequency especially in countries where the incorporation of YF vaccination is not combined with mass vaccination campaigns or vaccination is limited to international travellers. Understanding Yellow fever virus epidemiology as determined by its evolution underscores appropriate disease mitigation strategies and immunization policies. Mobilizing scarce resources to enhance population immunity through sufficient vaccination, promoting environmental sanitation/hygienic practices, driving behavioral change and community-based vector control are significant to preventing future epidemics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of dimethyl fumarate (Tecfidera™) on lymphocyte counts: A potential contributor to progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Bhupendra O; Garland, Jeffery; Berger, Joseph; Kramer, John; Sershon, Lisa; Olapo, Tayo; Sesing, Jean; Dukic, Mary; Rehn, Eileen

    2015-07-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (Tecfidera™) is an effective therapy for relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Our study suggests that this drug may have immunosuppressive properties evidenced by significant sustained reduction in CD8 lymphocyte counts and, to a lesser extent, CD4 lymphocyte counts. This observation is relevant in light of the recent case of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in a patient receiving this drug. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Advanced glycation end-products produced systemically and by macrophages: A common contributor to inflammation and degenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Kyunghee; Yoo, YongCheol; Son, Myeongjoo; Lee, Jaesuk; Jeong, Goo-Bo; Park, Young Mok; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Lee, Bonghee

    2017-09-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor have been implicated in the progressions of many intractable diseases, such as diabetes and atherosclerosis, and are also critical for pathologic changes in chronic degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and alcoholic brain damage. Recently activated macrophages were found to be a source of AGEs, and the most abundant form of AGEs, AGE-albumin excreted by macrophages has been implicated in these diseases and to act through common pathways. AGEs inhibition has been shown to prevent the pathogenesis of AGEs-related diseases in human, and therapeutic advances have resulted in several agents that prevent their adverse effects. Recently, anti-inflammatory molecules that inhibit AGEs have been shown to be good candidates for ameliorating diabetic complications as well as degenerative diseases. This review was undertaken to present, discuss, and clarify current understanding regarding AGEs formation in association with macrophages, different diseases, therapeutic and diagnostic strategy and links with RAGE inhibition. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Heat stress: a major contributor to poor animal welfare associated with long-haul live export voyages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Malcolm P; Cambridge, Heather; Foster, Susan F; McGreevy, Paul D

    2014-02-01

    Recent investigations by the Australian Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry into high mortalities on live export voyages from Australia to the Middle East during the Northern hemisphere summer suggest that animal welfare may be compromised by heat stress. The live export industry has generated a computer model that aims to assess the risk of heat stress and to contain mortality levels on live export ships below certain arbitrary limits. Although the model must be complied with under Australian law, it is not currently available for independent scientific scrutiny, and there is concern that model and the mandated space allowances are inadequate. This review appraises the relevant literature on heat stress in sheep and cattle, including laboratory studies aimed at mimicking the ambient temperatures and humidity levels likely to be encountered on live export voyages. Animal welfare is likely to be very poor as a result of heat stress in some shipments. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Poor sitting posture and a heavy schoolbag as contributors to musculoskeletal pain in children: an ergonomic school education intervention program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syazwan AI

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available AI Syazwan1, MN Mohamad Azhar1, AR Anita1, HS Azizan1, MS Shaharuddin2, J Muhamad Hanafiah3, AA Muhaimin4, AM Nizar5, B Mohd Rafee1,6, A Mohd Ibthisham7, Adam Kasani71Environmental and Occupational Medicine Unit, Department of Community Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 2Environmental and Occupational Health Unit, Department of Community Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 3Health Services Management Unit, Department of Community Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 4Department of Environmental Management, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 5Pharmacology Unit, Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 6Ergonomic Division, National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia; 7Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, Johor, MalaysiaObjectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a multidisciplinary, interventional, ergonomic education program designed to reduce the risk of musculoskeletal problems by reducing schoolbag weight and correcting poor sitting posture.Methods: Data were collected twice before and twice following intervention using the Standardized Nordic Body Map Questionnaire, a rapid upper limb assessment for posture evaluation, and schoolbag weight measurement in children aged 8 and 11 years attending two schools within the central region of Malaysia.Results: Students who received the ergonomic intervention reported significant improvements in their sitting posture in a classroom environment and reduction of schoolbag weight as compared with the controls.Conclusion: A single-session, early intervention, group ergonomics education program for children aged 8 and 11 years is appropriate and effective, and should be considered as a strategy to reduce musculoskeletal pain among schoolchildren in this age group.Keywords: ergonomic, education, intervention, assessment, musculoskeletal pain, school children, awareness

  6. Porphyromonas gingivalis peptidylarginine deiminase, a key contributor in the pathogenesis of experimental periodontal disease and experimental arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gully, Neville; Bright, Richard; Marino, Victor; Marchant, Ceilidh; Cantley, Melissa; Haynes, David; Butler, Catherine; Dashper, Stuart; Reynolds, Eric; Bartold, Mark

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the suggested role of Porphyromonas gingivalis peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) in the relationship between the aetiology of periodontal disease and experimentally induced arthritis and the possible association between these two conditions. A genetically modified PAD-deficient strain of P. gingivalis W50 was produced. The effect of this strain, compared to the wild type, in an established murine model for experimental periodontitis and experimental arthritis was assessed. Experimental periodontitis was induced following oral inoculation with the PAD-deficient and wild type strains of P. gingivalis. Experimental arthritis was induced via the collagen antibody induction process and was monitored by assessment of paw swelling and micro-CT analysis of the radio-carpal joints. Experimental periodontitis was monitored by micro CT scans of the mandible and histological assessment of the periodontal tissues around the mandibular molars. Serum levels of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) and P. gingivalis were assessed by ELISA. The development of experimental periodontitis was significantly reduced in the presence of the PAD-deficient P. gingivalis strain. When experimental arthritis was induced in the presence of the PAD-deficient strain there was less paw swelling, less erosive bone damage to the joints and reduced serum ACPA levels when compared to the wild type P. gingivalis inoculated group. This study has demonstrated that a PAD-deficient strain of P. gingivalis was associated with significantly reduced periodontal inflammation. In addition the extent of experimental arthritis was significantly reduced in animals exposed to prior induction of periodontal disease through oral inoculation of the PAD-deficient strain versus the wild type. This adds further evidence to the potential role for P. gingivalis and its PAD in the pathogenesis of periodontitis and exacerbation of arthritis. Further studies are now needed to elucidate the mechanisms which drive these processes.

  7. An Integrated H-G Scheme Identifying Areas for Soil Remediation and Primary Heavy Metal Contributors: A Risk Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Bin; Jiang, Xiaolu; Duan, Xiaoli; Zhao, Xiuge; Zhang, Jing; Tang, Jingwen; Sun, Guoqing

    2017-03-23

    Traditional sampling for soil pollution evaluation is cost intensive and has limited representativeness. Therefore, developing methods that can accurately and rapidly identify at-risk areas and the contributing pollutants is imperative for soil remediation. In this study, we propose an innovative integrated H-G scheme combining human health risk assessment and geographical detector methods that was based on geographical information system technology and validated its feasibility in a renewable resource industrial park in mainland China. With a discrete site investigation of cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg) and zinc (Zn) concentrations, the continuous surfaces of carcinogenic risk and non-carcinogenic risk caused by these heavy metals were estimated and mapped. Source apportionment analysis using geographical detector methods further revealed that these risks were primarily attributed to As, according to the power of the determinant and its associated synergic actions with other heavy metals. Concentrations of critical As and Cd, and the associated exposed CRs are closed to the safe thresholds after remediating the risk areas identified by the integrated H-G scheme. Therefore, the integrated H-G scheme provides an effective approach to support decision-making for regional contaminated soil remediation at fine spatial resolution with limited sampling data over a large geographical extent.

  8. Strategies and Attributes of Highly Productive Scholars and Contributors to the School Psychology Literature: Recommendations for Increasing Scholarly Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Rebecca S.; Floyd, Randy G.; Erichsen, Luke W.

    2011-01-01

    In all academic fields, there are scholars who contribute to the research literature at exceptionally high levels. The goal of the current study was to discover what school psychology researchers with remarkably high levels of journal publication do to be so productive. In Study 1, 94 highly productive school psychology scholars were identified…

  9. The Abundance of Toxic Genotypes Is a Key Contributor to Anatoxin Variability in Phormidium-Dominated Benthic Mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Susanna A; Puddick, Jonathan

    2017-10-11

    The prevalence of benthic proliferations of the anatoxin-producing cyanobacterium Phormidium are increasing in cobble-bed rivers worldwide. Studies to date have shown high spatial and temporal variability in anatoxin concentrations among mats. In this study we determined anatoxin quotas (toxins per cell) in field samples and compared these results to the conventionally-used concentrations (assessed per dry weight of mat). Three mats were selected at sites in two rivers and were sampled every 2-3 h for 24-26 h. The samples were lyophilized and ground to a fine homogenous powder. Two aliquots of known weights were analyzed for anatoxin congeners using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, or digital droplet PCR with Phormidium -specific anaC primers to measure absolute quantities of gene copies. Anatoxin concentrations in the mats varied 59- and 303-fold in the two rivers over the study periods. A similar pattern was observed among gene copies (53- and 2828-fold). When converted to anatoxin quotas there was markedly less variability (42- and 16-fold), but significantly higher anatoxin quotas were observed in mats from the second river ( p < 0.001, Student's t -test). There were no obvious temporal patterns with high and low anatoxin concentrations or quotas measured at each sampling time and across the study period. These results demonstrate that variability in anatoxin concentrations among mats is primarily due to the abundance of toxic genotypes. No consistent modulation in anatoxin production was observed during the study, although significant differences in anatoxin quotas among rivers suggest that site-specific physiochemical or biological factors may influence anatoxin production.

  10. Copy number variation of human AMY1 is a minor contributor to variation in salivary amylase expression and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Danielle; Mitchell, Laura M; Armour, John A L

    2017-02-20

    Salivary amylase in humans is encoded by the copy variable gene AMY1 in the amylase gene cluster on chromosome 1. Although the role of salivary amylase is well established, the consequences of the copy number variation (CNV) at AMY1 on salivary amylase protein production are less well understood. The amylase gene cluster is highly structured with a fundamental difference between odd and even AMY1 copy number haplotypes. In this study, we aimed to explore, in samples from 119 unrelated individuals, not only the effects of AMY1 CNV on salivary amylase protein expression and amylase enzyme activity but also whether there is any evidence for underlying difference between the common haplotypes containing odd numbers of AMY1 and even copy number haplotypes. AMY1 copy number was significantly correlated with the variation observed in salivary amylase production (11.7% of variance, P < 0.0005) and enzyme activity (13.6% of variance, P < 0.0005) but did not explain the majority of observed variation between individuals. AMY1-odd and AMY1-even haplotypes showed a different relationship between copy number and expression levels, but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.052). Production of salivary amylase is correlated with AMY1 CNV, but the majority of interindividual variation comes from other sources. Long-range haplotype structure may affect expression, but this was not significant in our data.

  11. Biarticular elements as a contributor to energy efficiency: biomechanical review and application in bio-inspired robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junius, Karen; Moltedo, Marta; Cherelle, Pierre; Rodriguez-Guerrero, Carlos David; Vanderborght, Bram; Lefeber, Dirk

    2017-07-18

    Despite the increased interest in exoskeleton research in the last decades, not much progress has been made on the successful reduction of user effort. In humans, biarticular elements have been identied as one of the reasons for the energy economy of locomotion. This document gives an extensive literature overview concerning the function of biarticular mus- cles in human beings. The exact role of these muscles in the efficiency of human locomotion is reduced to three elementary functions: energy transfer towards distal joints, efficient control of output force direction and double joint actuation. This information is used to give an insight in the application of biarticular elements in bio-inspired robotics, i.e. bipedal robots, exoskeletons, robotic manipulators and prostheses. Additionally an attempt is made to nd an answer on the question whether the biar- ticular property leads to a unique contribution to energy eciency of lo- comotion, unachievable by mono-articular alternatives. This knowledge is then further utilised to indicate how biarticular actuation of exoskeletons can contribute to an increased performance in reducing user effort. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. The Renal Sodium Bicarbonate Cotransporter NBCe2: Is It a Major Contributor to Sodium and pH Homeostasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Robin A; Jose, Pedro A; Xu, Peng; Gildea, John J

    2016-09-01

    The sodium bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe2, aka NBC4) was originally isolated from the human testis and heart (Pushkin et al. IUBMB Life 50:13-19, 2000). Subsequently, NBCe2 was found in diverse locations where it plays a role in regulating sodium and bicarbonate transport, influencing intracellular, extracellular, interstitial, and ultimately plasma pH (Boron et al. J Exp Biol. 212:1697-1706, 2009; Parker and Boron, Physiol Rev. 93:803-959, 2013; Romero et al. Mol Asp Med. 34:159-182, 2013). NBCe2 is located in human and rodent renal-collecting duct and proximal tubule. While much is known about the two electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporters, NBCe1 and NBCe2, in the regulation of sodium homeostasis and pH balance in the rodent kidney, little is known about their roles in human renal physiology. NBCe2 is located in the proximal tubule Golgi apparatus under basal conditions and then disperses throughout the cell, but particularly into the apical membrane microvilli, during various maneuvers that increase intracellular sodium. This review will summarize our current understanding of the distribution and function of NBCe2 in the human kidney and how genetic variants of its gene, SLC4A5, contribute to salt sensitivity of blood pressure.

  13. The Abundance of Toxic Genotypes Is a Key Contributor to Anatoxin Variability in Phormidium-Dominated Benthic Mats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna A. Wood

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of benthic proliferations of the anatoxin-producing cyanobacterium Phormidium are increasing in cobble-bed rivers worldwide. Studies to date have shown high spatial and temporal variability in anatoxin concentrations among mats. In this study we determined anatoxin quotas (toxins per cell in field samples and compared these results to the conventionally-used concentrations (assessed per dry weight of mat. Three mats were selected at sites in two rivers and were sampled every 2–3 h for 24–26 h. The samples were lyophilized and ground to a fine homogenous powder. Two aliquots of known weights were analyzed for anatoxin congeners using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, or digital droplet PCR with Phormidium-specific anaC primers to measure absolute quantities of gene copies. Anatoxin concentrations in the mats varied 59- and 303-fold in the two rivers over the study periods. A similar pattern was observed among gene copies (53- and 2828-fold. When converted to anatoxin quotas there was markedly less variability (42- and 16-fold, but significantly higher anatoxin quotas were observed in mats from the second river (p < 0.001, Student’s t-test. There were no obvious temporal patterns with high and low anatoxin concentrations or quotas measured at each sampling time and across the study period. These results demonstrate that variability in anatoxin concentrations among mats is primarily due to the abundance of toxic genotypes. No consistent modulation in anatoxin production was observed during the study, although significant differences in anatoxin quotas among rivers suggest that site-specific physiochemical or biological factors may influence anatoxin production.

  14. Dairy Products as Essential Contributors of (Micro-) Nutrients in Reference Food Patterns: An Outline for Elderly People

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staveren, van W.A.; Steijns, J.M.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    he nutrient richness of dairy products is widely recognized, but mainly low fat or skimmed versions are generally advocated given the proportion of saturated fatty acids in milk fat. The question arises how to appraise this nutrient richness relative to the contribution of the saturated fraction of

  15. Is snow-ice now a major contributor to sea ice mass balance in the western Transpolar Drift region?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, R. M.; Merkouriadi, I.; Cheng, B.; Rösel, A.; Granskog, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    During the Norwegian young sea ICE (N-ICE2015) campaign, which took place in the first half of 2015 north of Svalbard, a deep winter snow pack (50 cm) on sea ice was observed, that was 50% thicker than earlier climatological studies suggested for this region. Moreover, a significant fraction of snow contributed to the total ice mass in second-year ice (SYI) (9% on average). Interestingly, very little snow (3% snow by mass) was present in first-year ice (FYI). The combination of sea ice thinning and increased precipitation north of Svalbard is expected to promote the formation of snow-ice. Here we use the 1-D snow/ice thermodynamic model HIGHTSI forced with reanalysis data, to show that for the case study of N-ICE2015, snow-ice would even form over SYI with an initial thickness of 2 m. In current conditions north of Svalbard, snow-ice is ubiquitous and contributes to the thickness growth up to 30%. This contribution is important, especially in the absence of any bottom thermodynamic growth due to the thick insulating snow cover. Growth of FYI north of Svalbard is mainly controlled by the timing of growth onset relative to snow precipitation events and cold spells. These usually short-lived conditions are largely determined by the frequency of storms entering the Arctic from the Atlantic Ocean. In our case, a later freeze onset was favorable for FYI growth due to less snow accumulation in early autumn. This limited snow-ice formation but promoted bottom thermodynamic growth. We surmise these findings are related to a regional phenomenon in the Atlantic sector of the Arctic, with frequent storm events which bring increasing amounts of precipitation in autumn and winter, and also affect the duration of cold temperatures required for ice growth in winter. We discuss the implications for the importance of snow-ice in the future Arctic, formerly believed to be non-existent in the central Arctic due to thick perennial ice.

  16. Childhood adversities as specific contributors to the co-occurrence of posttraumatic stress and alcohol use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Mario; Vandeleur, Caroline; Rodgers, Stephanie; Rössler, Wulf; Castelao, Enrique; Preisig, Martin; Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta

    2015-08-30

    There is much evidence that alcohol use disorders (AUD) often co-occur with posttraumatic stress disorders (PTSD), and that the comorbid condition is associated with a more severe clinical profile than that of PTSD without AUD. However, little is known about the role of childhood adversities as specific risk factors for the development of AUD in individuals presenting with PTSD. The aim of the study was to explore whether specific stressors from the spectrum of trauma and childhood adversities contribute to the development of AUD among subjects with PTSD. From a large community sample, of N=140 individuals with PTSD, N=24 (17.14%) received an additional diagnosis of AUD with an onset after the onset of PTSD. Those with comorbid PTSD/AUD and those with PTSD only were compared regarding type and features of their trauma, childhood adversities and psychiatric comorbidity. Compared to PTSD alone, PTSD/AUD was associated with higher levels of stress in terms of childhood adversities; in particular, sexual abuse below the age of 16, but also with having been brought up in a foster home. PTSD/AUD was also associated with an earlier age of adverse events. Treatment of AUD should include standardized assessments of trauma, especially of trauma experienced during childhood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An Overlooked Contributor to a Unique Colombian Periodical. Enrique Pérez and the revista Hispania (1912-1916

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane M. Rausch

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hispania, a cultural periodical published in London between 1912 and 1916, was an important Colombian endeavor that reflected widely-shared Latin American concerns before and during the outbreak of the First World War. After a brief review of the role of literary periodicals in Colombian humanities, this essay analyzes the numerous contributions published by Enrique Pérez Lleras in Hispania. It concludes that Pérez believed Hispanic America could have avoided the threat of United States and/or European imperialism by spurning despotic rule, educating a governing elite, developing a trained civil service, and establishing strict controls over foreign investment and immigration.

  18. Poor medication adherence in type 2 diabetes: recognizing the scope of the problem and its key contributors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polonsky WH

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available William H Polonsky,1,2 Robert R Henry2,3 1Behavioral Diabetes Institute, San Diego, 2University of California, San Diego, 3Center for Metabolic Research, VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, CA, USA Abstract: At least 45% of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D fail to achieve adequate glycemic control (HbA1c <7%. One of the major contributing factors is poor medication adherence. Poor medication adherence in T2D is well documented to be very common and is associated with inadequate glycemic control; increased morbidity and mortality; and increased costs of outpatient care, emergency room visits, hospitalization, and managing complications of diabetes. Poor medication adherence is linked to key nonpatient factors (eg, lack of integrated care in many health care systems and clinical inertia among health care professionals, patient demographic factors (eg, young age, low education level, and low income level, critical patient beliefs about their medications (eg, perceived treatment inefficacy, and perceived patient burden regarding obtaining and taking their medications (eg, treatment complexity, out-of-pocket costs, and hypoglycemia. Specific barriers to medication adherence in T2D, especially those that are potentially modifiable, need to be more clearly identified; strategies that target poor adherence should focus on reducing medication burden and addressing negative medication beliefs of patients. Solutions to these problems would require behavioral innovations as well as new methods and modes of drug delivery. Keywords: glycemic control, HbA1c, hypoglycemia, medication adherence, psychosocial, type 2 diabetes

  19. Intracellular Cleavage of the Cx43 C-Terminal Domain by Matrix-Metalloproteases: A Novel Contributor to Inflammation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke De Bock

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The coordination of tissue function is mediated by gap junctions (GJs that enable direct cell-cell transfer of metabolic and electric signals. GJs are formed by connexin (Cx proteins of which Cx43 is most widespread in the human body. Beyond its role in direct intercellular communication, Cx43 also forms nonjunctional hemichannels (HCs in the plasma membrane that mediate the release of paracrine signaling molecules in the extracellular environment. Both HC and GJ channel function are regulated by protein-protein interactions and posttranslational modifications that predominantly take place in the C-terminal domain of Cx43. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs are a major group of zinc-dependent proteases, known to regulate not only extracellular matrix remodeling, but also processing of intracellular proteins. Together with Cx43 channels, both GJs and HCs, MMPs contribute to acute inflammation and a small number of studies reports on an MMP-Cx43 link. Here, we build further on these reports and present a novel hypothesis that describes proteolytic cleavage of the Cx43 C-terminal domain by MMPs and explores possibilities of how such cleavage events may affect Cx43 channel function. Finally, we set out how aberrant channel function resulting from cleavage can contribute to the acute inflammatory response during tissue injury.

  20. Two overlooked contributors to abandonment of childhood cancer treatment in Kenya: parents' social network and experiences with hospital retention policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostert, S; Njuguna, F; Langat, S C; Slot, A J M; Skiles, J; Sitaresmi, M N; van de Ven, P M; Musimbi, J; Vreeman, R C; Kaspers, G J L

    2014-06-01

    The principal reason for childhood cancer treatment failure in low-income countries is treatment abandonment, the most severe form of nonadherence. Two often neglected factors that may contribute to treatment abandonment are as follows: (a) lack of information and guidance by doctors, along with the negative beliefs of family and friends advising parents, which contributes to misconceptions regarding cancer and its treatment, and (b) a widespread policy in public hospitals by which children are retained after doctor's discharge until medical bills are settled. This study explored parents' experiences with hospital retention policies in a Kenyan academic hospital and the impact of attitudes of family and friends on parents' decisions about continuing cancer treatment for their child. Home visits were conducted to interview parents of childhood cancer patients who had been diagnosed between 2007 and 2009 and who had abandoned cancer treatment. Retrospective chart review revealed 98 children diagnosed between 2007 and 2009 whose parents had made the decisions to abandon treatment. During 2011-2012, 53 families (54%) could be reached, and 46 (87%) of these agreed to be interviewed. Parents reported the attitudes of community members (grandparents, relatives, friends, villagers, and church members); 61% believed that the child had been bewitched by some individual, and 74% advised parents to seek alternative treatment or advised them to stop medical treatment (54%). Parents also reported that they were influenced by discussions with other parents who had a child being treated, including that their child's life was in God's hands (87%), the trauma to the child and family of forced hospital stays (84%), the importance of completing treatment (81%), the financial burden of treatment (77%), and the incurability of cancer (74%). These discussions influenced their perceptions of cancer treatment and its usefulness (65%). Thirty-six families (78%) had no health insurance, and 19 of these parents (53%) could not pay their medical bills and were not allowed to take their child home when treatment ended. Parents reported feelings of desperation (95%), powerlessness (95%), and sadness (84%) and that their child has been imprisoned (80%), during the period of retention. The majority of parents (87%) felt that hospital retention of children must cease. The attitudes and beliefs of parents of children with cancer are impacted by those close to them and their community and may influence their perceptions of cancer treatment and decisions to stop treatment. Hospital retention policies are highly distressing for parents and may contribute to both treatment delays and treatment abandonment. These factors jeopardize treatment outcomes for young patients and require attention and modification. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Uncontrolled burning of solid waste by households in Mexico is a significant contributor to climate change in the country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyna-Bensusan, Natalia; Wilson, David C; Smith, Stephen R

    2018-02-22

    Uncontrolled burning of municipal solid waste (MSW) is an important source of air pollution and is wide spread in many developing countries, but only limited data quantify the extent of domestic open burning of household waste. Here, we present some of the first field data to be reported on the uncontrolled domestic burning of waste. A representative community of Mexico (Huejutla de Reyes Municipality) was investigated and household surveys, interviews with waste operators and a waste characterisation analysis were completed to assess the extent of, and factors controlling, the open burning of waste. Waste collection provision to rural communities was very limited and, consequently 92% of households in rural areas reported that they disposed of waste by uncontrolled burning in backyards or unofficial dumps. Overall, 24% of the total MSW generated in the Municipality was disposed by uncontrolled burning. Urban and periurban areas received twice-weekly collections and the rate of uncontrolled burning was considerably smaller compared to rural households, corresponding to approximately 2% of total waste generation. Carbon equivalency calculations showed that burning waste in backyards represented approximately 6% of the total and 8.5% of fuel related CO 2 Eq emissions by the municipality. Moreover, the equivalent carbon dioxide (CO 2 Eq) from black carbon (BC) emitted by uncontrolled burning in backyards was over fifteen times larger compared to methane (CH 4 ) potentially released from equivalent amounts of combustible biodegradable waste disposal at the official dumpsite. An assessment of local respiratory health data showed the incidence of disease was higher in rural than in urban areas, when the opposite trend is typically observed in the international literature; given the high rate of burning activity found in rural areas we suggest that open burning of waste could be a major reason for the apparent poorer respiratory health status of the rural population and requires further investigation. The results emphasise the importance of including BC from uncontrolled burning of waste in international emission inventories of greenhouse gases and in the assessment of the health status of local communities in developing countries where this practice is prevalent. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Removal of 8-oxo-GTP by MutT hydrolase is not a major contributor to transcriptional fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Alasdair J E; Satory, Dominik; Wang, Mengyu; Halliday, Jennifer A; Golding, Ido; Herman, Christophe

    2014-10-29

    Living in an oxygen-rich environment is dangerous for a cell. Reactive oxygen species can damage DNA, RNA, protein and lipids. The MutT protein in Escherichia coli removes 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine triphosphate (8-oxo-dGTP) and 8-oxo-guanosine triphosphate (8-oxo-GTP) from the nucleotide pools precluding incorporation into DNA and RNA. While 8-oxo-dGTP incorporation into DNA is mutagenic, it is not clear if 8-oxo-GTP incorporation into RNA can have phenotypic consequences for the cell. We use a bistable epigenetic switch sensitive to transcription errors in the Escherichia coli lacI transcript to monitor transient RNA errors. We do not observe any increase in epigenetic switching in mutT cells. We revisit the original observation of partial phenotypic suppression of a lacZamber allele in a mutT background that was attributed to RNA errors. We find that Lac+ revertants can completely account for the increase in β-galactosidase levels in mutT lacZamber cultures, without invoking participation of transient transcription errors. Moreover, we observe a fluctuation type of distribution of β-galactosidase appearance in a growing culture, consistent with Lac+ DNA revertant events. We conclude that the absence of MutT produces a DNA mutator but does not equally create an RNA mutator. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Historical inability to control Aedes aegypti as a main contributor of fast dispersal of chikungunya outbreaks in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Salas, Ildefonso; Danis-Lozano, Rogelio; Casas-Martínez, Mauricio; Ulloa, Armando; Bond, J Guillermo; Marina, Carlos F; Lopez-Ordóñez, Teresa; Elizondo-Quiroga, Armando; Torres-Monzón, Jorge A; Díaz-González, Esteban E

    2015-12-01

    The arrival of chikungunya fever (CHIKF) in Latin American countries has been expected to trigger epidemics and challenge health systems. Historically considered as dengue-endemic countries, abundant Aedes aegypti populations make this region highly vulnerable to chikungunya virus (CHIKV) circulation. This review describes the current dengue and CHIKF epidemiological situations, as well as the role of uncontrolled Ae. aegypti and Aedes albopictus vectors in spreading the emerging CHIKV. Comments are included relating to the vector competence of both species and failures of surveillance and vector control measures. Dengue endemicity is a reflection of these abundant and persistent Aedes populations that are now spreading CHIKV in the Americas. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "Chikungunya discovers the New World." Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Seasonality of service provision in hip and knee surgery: A possible contributor to waiting times? A time series analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Upshur Ross EG; Moineddin Rahim; Crighton Eric J; Mamdani Muhammad

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The question of how best to reduce waiting times for health care, particularly surgical procedures such as hip and knee replacements is among the most pressing concern of the Canadian health care system. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that significant seasonal variation exists in the performance of hip and knee replacement surgery in the province of Ontario. Methods We performed a retrospective, cross-sectional time series analysis examining all hip...

  5. Seasonality of service provision in hip and knee surgery: A possible contributor to waiting times? A time series analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upshur Ross EG

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The question of how best to reduce waiting times for health care, particularly surgical procedures such as hip and knee replacements is among the most pressing concern of the Canadian health care system. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that significant seasonal variation exists in the performance of hip and knee replacement surgery in the province of Ontario. Methods We performed a retrospective, cross-sectional time series analysis examining all hip and knee replacement surgeries in people over the age of 65 in the province of Ontario, Canada between 1992 and 2002. The main outcome measure was monthly hospitalization rates per 100 000 population for all hip and knee replacements. Results There was a marked increase in the rate of hip and knee replacement surgery over the 10-year period as well as an increasing seasonal variation in surgeries. Highly significant (Fisher Kappa = 16.05, p 2Autoreg = 0.85 seasonality was identified in the data. Conclusion Holidays and utilization caps appear to exert a significant influence on the rate of service provision. It is expected that waiting times for hip and knee replacement could be reduced by reducing seasonal fluctuations in service provision and benchmarking services to peak delivery. The results highlight the importance of system behaviour in seasonal fluctuation of service delivery.

  6. Seasonality of service provision in hip and knee surgery: A possible contributor to waiting times? A time series analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upshur, Ross EG; Moineddin, Rahim; Crighton, Eric J; Mamdani, Muhammad

    2006-01-01

    Background The question of how best to reduce waiting times for health care, particularly surgical procedures such as hip and knee replacements is among the most pressing concern of the Canadian health care system. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that significant seasonal variation exists in the performance of hip and knee replacement surgery in the province of Ontario. Methods We performed a retrospective, cross-sectional time series analysis examining all hip and knee replacement surgeries in people over the age of 65 in the province of Ontario, Canada between 1992 and 2002. The main outcome measure was monthly hospitalization rates per 100 000 population for all hip and knee replacements. Results There was a marked increase in the rate of hip and knee replacement surgery over the 10-year period as well as an increasing seasonal variation in surgeries. Highly significant (Fisher Kappa = 16.05, p Holidays and utilization caps appear to exert a significant influence on the rate of service provision. It is expected that waiting times for hip and knee replacement could be reduced by reducing seasonal fluctuations in service provision and benchmarking services to peak delivery. The results highlight the importance of system behaviour in seasonal fluctuation of service delivery. PMID:16509992

  7. Postglacial recolonization history of the European crabapple (Malus sylvestris Mill.), a wild contributor to the domesticated apple

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornille, A.; Giraud, T.; Bellard, C.; Tellier, A.; Cam, le B.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Kleinschmit, J.; Roldan-Ruiz, I.; Gladieux, P.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the way in which the climatic oscillations of the Quaternary Period have shaped the distribution and genetic structure of extant tree species provides insight into the processes driving species diversification, distribution and survival. Deciphering the genetic consequences of past

  8. Genetic Variability in Platelet Integrin α2β1 Density: Possible Contributor to Plasmodium vivax–induced Severe Thrombocytopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Fernanda M. F.; Santos, Marina L. S.; Kano, Flora S.; Fontes, Cor J. F.; Lacerda, Marcus V. G.; Brito, Cristiana F. A.; Carvalho, Luzia H.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the pathogenesis of Plasmodium vivax malaria is challenging. We hypothesized that susceptibility to P. vivax-induced thrombocytopenia could be associated with polymorphisms on relevant platelet membrane integrins: integrin α2 (C807T), and integrin β3 (T1565C). Although β3 polymorphism was not related with P. vivax malaria, α2 807T carriers, which show high levels of integrin α2β1, had a higher probability for severe thrombocytopenia than wild-type carriers. This evidence of the association of integrin polymorphism and P. vivax morbidity was further demonstrated by a moderate but significant correlation between clinical disease and surface levels of the integrin α2β1. PMID:23249684

  9. Sewage treatment effluents in Delhi: A key contributor of β-lactam resistant bacteria and genes to the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamba, Manisha; Ahammad, Shaikh Ziauddin

    2017-12-01

    Rapid emergence of antibiotic resistance (AR) in developing countries is posing a greater health risk and increasing the global disease burden. Lack of access to safe drinking water, poor sanitation and inadequate sewage treatment facilities in these countries are fueling the problem associated with emergence of AR. Rapid proliferation of AR mediated by treated and untreated discharges from sewage treatment plants (STPs) is a prime public health concern. This study aims to understand the occurrence, fate, and routes of proliferation of carbapenem (KPC) and extended spectrum β-lactam (ESBL) resistant bacteria, and selected resistant genes in the samples collected from different unit operations in 12 STPs in New Delhi over two seasons. Strong correlation observed between faecal coliform levels and KPC (R = 0.95, p = 0.005, n = 60) and ESBL (R = 0.94, p = 0.004, n = 60) resistant bacteria levels indicates possible association of resistant bacteria with faecal matter. Different unit operations in STPs proved inefficient in treating resistant bacteria and genes present in the wastewater. However, inclusion of tertiary treatment (chlorination) unit and anaerobic digester in the present STPs resulted in better removal of AR. Significant correlations between antibiotic resistant genes (ARGs) and integron levels indicates a potential for higher rate of AR proliferation in the environment. Microbial culturing indicated the presence of clinically significant drug-resistant pathogens such as Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Acinetobacter baumannii, Shigella dysentery and Aeromonas caviae in the STP effluents. The emergence and spread of resistant bacteria through STP effluents poses exposure risk for the residents of the city. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A tribute to Dr. Paul A. J. Janssen: entrepreneur extraordinaire, innovative scientist, and significant contributor to anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Theodore H; Egan, Talmage D; Van Aken, Hugo

    2008-02-01

    Dr. Paul Janssen was the founder of Janssen Pharmaceutica and the developer of over 80 pharmaceutical compounds that proved useful in human, botanical, and veterinary medicine. He and his coworkers synthesized the fentanyl family of drugs, many other potent analgesics, droperidol, etomidate, and numerous other important medicines that were extremely useful in psychiatry, parasitology, gastroenterology, cardiology, virology, and immunology. Anesthesiology and medicine as a whole have benefited a great deal from his resourcefulness, creativity, and entrepreneurial spirit.

  11. Heavy-Atom Tunneling Calculations in Thirteen Organic Reactions: Tunneling Contributions are Substantial, and Bell's Formula Closely Approximates Multidimensional Tunneling at ≥250 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubleday, Charles; Armas, Randy; Walker, Dana; Cosgriff, Christopher V; Greer, Edyta M

    2017-10-09

    Multidimensional tunneling calculations are carried out for 13 reactions, to test the scope of heavy-atom tunneling in organic chemistry, and to check the accuracy of one-dimensional tunneling models. The reactions include pericyclic, cycloaromatization, radical cyclization and ring opening, and S N 2. When compared at the temperatures that give the same effective rate constant of 3×10 -5  s -1 , tunneling accounts for 25-95 % of the rate in 8 of the 13 reactions. Values of transmission coefficients predicted by Bell's formula, κ Bell  , agree well with multidimensional tunneling (canonical variational transition state theory with small curvature tunneling), κ SCT . Mean unsigned deviations of κ Bell vs. κ SCT are 0.08, 0.04, 0.02 at 250, 300 and 400 K. This suggests that κ Bell is a useful first choice for predicting transmission coefficients in heavy-atom tunnelling. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. ABO hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn: thirteen years of data after implementing a universal bilirubin screening and management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, R D; Baer, V L; MacQueen, B C; O'Brien, E A; Ilstrup, S J

    2018-02-06

    ABO hemolytic disease occurs among neonates with blood groups A or B delivered to group O women. Extreme neonatal hyperbilirubinemia due to ABO disease has been reported, but its frequency is not well known. We sought to determine the odds of developing severe ABO hemolytic disease in the 13 years since adopting universal bilirubin screening/management in the Intermountain Healthcare system. We conducted a retrospective analysis of neonates born between 2004 and 2016, defining "severe hemolytic disease" as; (1) total serum bilirubin (TSB) >25 mg/dL, or (2) hospital readmission for jaundice, or (3) bilirubin encephalopathy. Neonates born to group O (+) mothers were included and considered either; (1) Controls (not at risk for ABO disease because they were group O), (2) Study subjects (at risk for ABO disease because they were group A or B). Of 400,531 live births, 47% were to group O women; 86% of whom were group O (+). Overall, 42,529 (27%) neonates born to group O (+) women had their blood group determined; 29,729 (68%) were O, 10,682 (25%) A, and 3109 (7%) B. Peak TSBs during the first 10 days were higher in group A (11.0 ± 4.2 mg/dL) and B (11.5 ± 4.3) than group O neonates (10.3 ± 4.1). However the relative risks of a TSB ≥25 mg/dL, readmission for jaundice, or kernicterus, were the same in the control vs. study groups. In our health system, severe hemolytic disease in neonates born to group O (+) woman is not more likely in group A or B neonates than in controls (group O). We recognize that in other practices, particularly those who do not have a universal bilirubin screening/management program, ABO hemolytic disease severity might be different than in our system.

  13. Measurement bias detection with Kronecker product restricted models for multivariate longitudinal data: an illustration with health-related quality of life data from thirteen measurement occasions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdam, Mathilde G. E.; Oort, Frans J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights Application of Kronecker product to construct parsimonious structural equation models for multivariate longitudinal data. A method for the investigation of measurement bias with Kronecker product restricted models. Application of these methods to health-related quality of life data from bone metastasis patients, collected at 13 consecutive measurement occasions. The use of curves to facilitate substantive interpretation of apparent measurement bias. Assessment of change in common factor means, after accounting for apparent measurement bias. Longitudinal measurement invariance is usually investigated with a longitudinal factor model (LFM). However, with multiple measurement occasions, the number of parameters to be estimated increases with a multiple of the number of measurement occasions. To guard against too low ratios of numbers of subjects and numbers of parameters, we can use Kronecker product restrictions to model the multivariate longitudinal structure of the data. These restrictions can be imposed on all parameter matrices, including measurement invariance restrictions on factor loadings and intercepts. The resulting models are parsimonious and have attractive interpretation, but require different methods for the investigation of measurement bias. Specifically, additional parameter matrices are introduced to accommodate possible violations of measurement invariance. These additional matrices consist of measurement bias parameters that are either fixed at zero or free to be estimated. In cases of measurement bias, it is also possible to model the bias over time, e.g., with linear or non-linear curves. Measurement bias detection with Kronecker product restricted models will be illustrated with multivariate longitudinal data from 682 bone metastasis patients whose health-related quality of life (HRQL) was measured at 13 consecutive weeks. PMID:25295016

  14. Lack of replication of thirteen single-nucleotide polymorphisms implicated in Parkinson’s disease: a large-scale international study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbaz, Alexis; Nelson, Lorene M; Payami, Haydeh; Ioannidis, John P A; Fiske, Brian K; Annesi, Grazia; Belin, Andrea Carmine; Factor, Stewart A; Ferrarese, Carlo; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Higgins, Donald S; Kawakami, Hideshi; Krüger, Rejko; Marder, Karen S; Mayeux, Richard P; Mellick, George D; Nutt, John G; Ritz, Beate; Samii, Ali; Tanner, Caroline M; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Wirdefeldt, Karin; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Dehem, Marie; Montimurro, Jennifer S; Southwick, Audrey; Myers, Richard M; Trikalinos, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background A genome-wide association study identified 13 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with Parkinson’s disease. Small-scale replication studies were largely non-confirmatory, but a meta-analysis that included data from the original study could not exclude all SNP associations, leaving relevance of several markers uncertain. Methods Investigators from three Michael J Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research-funded genetics consortia—comprising 14 teams—contributed DNA samples from 5526 patients with Parkinson’s disease and 6682 controls, which were genotyped for the 13 SNPs. Most (88%) participants were of white, non-Hispanic descent. We assessed log-additive genetic effects using fixed and random effects models stratified by team and ethnic origin, and tested for heterogeneity across strata. A meta-analysis was undertaken that incorporated data from the original genome-wide study as well as subsequent replication studies. Findings In fixed and random-effects models no associations with any of the 13 SNPs were identified (odds ratios 0·89 to 1·09). Heterogeneity between studies and between ethnic groups was low for all SNPs. Subgroup analyses by age at study entry, ethnic origin, sex, and family history did not show any consistent associations. In our meta-analysis, no SNP showed significant association (summary odds ratios 0·95 to 1.08); there was little heterogeneity except for SNP rs7520966. Interpretation Our results do not lend support to the finding that the 13 SNPs reported in the original genome-wide association study are genetic susceptibility factors for Parkinson’s disease. PMID:17052658

  15. Shedding Light on Thirteen Years of Darkness: Content Analysis of Articles Pertaining to Transgender Issues in Marriage/Couple and Family Therapy Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Markie L. C.; Green, Mary S.; Knowles, Sarah J.; Williams, April

    2012-01-01

    What is the extent to which marriage/couple and family therapy (M/CFT) journals address transgender issues and how many of them say they are inclusive of transgender persons when they are not? To answer these queries, a content analysis was conducted on articles published in M/CFT literature from 1997 through 2009. Of the 10,739 articles examined…

  16. HERITAGE SURVEY AND SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS OF THE WATCHTOWERS THAT DEFENDED THE LAST ISLAMIC KINGDOM IN THE IBERIAN PENINSULA (THIRTEEN TO FIFETEENTH CENTURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. García-Pulido

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Islamic Nasrid kingdom of Granada occupied the mountainous areas of the southeastern area of the Iberian Peninsula. There, a natural border was established between the Nasrid kingdom and the Christian kingdom of Castile from 1232 to 1492. To control this frontier and establish visual communication between it and the Nasrid center at the Alhambra citadel, an extensive network of watchtowers and defensive towers was constructed. Studies have been done of individual towers, but no comparative study has been undertaken of all of them. Graphic, homogenous, and exhaustively planimetric documentation would bring together existing information on the majority of them and enable comparative analysis. For this reason, this work conducts systematic architectural surveys of all these military structures, using photogrammetry. In addition to studying the construction typology and techniques, the structural capacity of these towers has been analyzed. It examines how they have been affected by human and natural destructive forces, especially earthquakes, which are common in eastern Andalusia. Although all the historical military architecture is protected by the Spanish and Andalusian Heritage laws, many of these medieval towers and their cultural landscapes are in severe risk. The towers are being studied as individual specimens (emphasizing their differences and as a unit in a typological group (looking for similarities and unifying characteristics. New technologies for Information and Communication are being used in order to disseminate the results among specialists and to make them available to the general public. Guidelines for restoration projects are also being formulated from the cases analyzed.

  17. A serological, parasitological and clinical evaluation of untreated Chagas disease patients and those treated with benznidazole before and thirteen years after intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-de-Assis, Girley Francisco; Diniz, Glaucia Alessio; Montoya, Roberto Araújo; Dias, João Carlos Pinto; Coura, José Rodrigues; Machado-Coelho, George Luiz Lins; Albajar-Viñas, Pedro; Torres, Rosália Morais; de Lana, Marta

    2013-01-01

    The etiological treatment of Chagas disease is recommended for all patients with acute or recent chronic infection, but controversies remain regarding the benefit of chemotherapy and interpretations of the parasitological cure after etiological treatment. This study compares the laboratory and clinical evaluations of Chagas disease patients who were diagnosed 13 years earlier. Fifty-eight Chagas disease patients (29 treated with benznidazole and 29 untreated) were matched at the time of treatment based on several variables. Conventional serology revealed the absence of seroconversion in all patients. However, lower serological titres were verified in the treated group, primarily among patients who had the indeterminate form of the disease. Haemoculture performed 13 years after the intervention was positive for 6.9% and 27.6% of the treated and untreated patients, respectively. Polymerase chain reaction tests were positive for 44.8% and 13.8% of the treated and untreated patients, respectively. Patients who presented with the indeterminate form of the disease at the beginning of the study exhibited less clinical progression (17.4%) compared with the untreated group (56.5%). Therefore, this global analysis revealed that etiological treatment with benznidazole may benefit patients with respect to the clinical progression of Chagas disease and the prognosis, particularly when administered to patients with the indeterminate form of the disease. PMID:24037109

  18. Building the vision, a series of AZTech ITS model deployment success stories for the Phoenix metropolitan area : number thirteen : permanent record, documenting and archiving the AZTech project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In many ways, AZTech is a monumental accomplishment. As one of four national initiatives selected by the federal government to showcase the leading edge of intelligent transportation systems, AZTech fostered : an unprecedented and extensive partnersh...

  19. Measurement bias detection with Kronecker product restricted models for multivariate longitudinal data: an illustration with health-related quality of life data from thirteen measurement occasions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdam, Mathilde G E; Oort, Frans J

    2014-01-01

    Application of Kronecker product to construct parsimonious structural equation models for multivariate longitudinal data.A method for the investigation of measurement bias with Kronecker product restricted models.Application of these methods to health-related quality of life data from bone metastasis patients, collected at 13 consecutive measurement occasions.The use of curves to facilitate substantive interpretation of apparent measurement bias.Assessment of change in common factor means, after accounting for apparent measurement bias.Longitudinal measurement invariance is usually investigated with a longitudinal factor model (LFM). However, with multiple measurement occasions, the number of parameters to be estimated increases with a multiple of the number of measurement occasions. To guard against too low ratios of numbers of subjects and numbers of parameters, we can use Kronecker product restrictions to model the multivariate longitudinal structure of the data. These restrictions can be imposed on all parameter matrices, including measurement invariance restrictions on factor loadings and intercepts. The resulting models are parsimonious and have attractive interpretation, but require different methods for the investigation of measurement bias. Specifically, additional parameter matrices are introduced to accommodate possible violations of measurement invariance. These additional matrices consist of measurement bias parameters that are either fixed at zero or free to be estimated. In cases of measurement bias, it is also possible to model the bias over time, e.g., with linear or non-linear curves. Measurement bias detection with Kronecker product restricted models will be illustrated with multivariate longitudinal data from 682 bone metastasis patients whose health-related quality of life (HRQL) was measured at 13 consecutive weeks.

  20. Thirteen years of observations on biomass burning organic tracers over Chichijima Island in the western North Pacific: An outflow region of Asian aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Santosh Kumar; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Chen, Jing; Fu, Pingqing; Zhu, Chunmao

    2015-05-01

    East Asia is the world's greatest source region for the emission of anthropogenic aerosols and their precursors due to the rapid industrialization and intensive biomass burning (BB) activities. BB emits specific organic tracers such as levoglucosan, mannosan, and galactosan, which are produced by pyrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose and then transported downwind to the western North Pacific by westerly winds. Here we present long-term observations of BB tracers over the remote Chichijima Island in the western North Pacific (WNP) from 2001 to 2013. Elevated concentrations of BB tracers by an order of magnitude were found in midautumn to midspring with winter maxima, which are strongly involved with the atmospheric transport by westerly winds from the Asian continent to the WNP, as supported by backward trajectory analyses. Throughout the observations, we found an increase in the averaged concentrations of BB tracers from 2006 to 2013, which is mainly caused by enhanced BB events in Asian urban and rural areas, as supported by enhanced fire/hot spots in East Asia via satellite images. We also found that the period of the high concentrations was prolonged from 2006 to 2013. Comparison between monthly averaged concentrations of BB tracers and backward air mass trajectories clearly demonstrates that the winter/spring maxima over Chichijima are involved with the seasonal shifting of atmospheric circulation followed by downwind transport of BB aerosols to the WNP. High abundances of BB tracers over the WNP indicate that BB-laden air masses can be transported to remote marine environments.

  1. Bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from buried shoreline oil residues thirteen years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill: a multispecies assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Jerry M; Bence, A Edward; Parker, Keith R; Page, David S; Brown, John S; Boehm, Paul D

    2006-04-01

    Seven taxa of intertidal plants and animals were sampled at 17 shoreline sites in Prince William Sound ([PWS]; AK, USA), that were heavily oiled in 1989 by the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS) to determine if polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from buried oil in intertidal sediments are sufficiently bioavailable to intertidal prey organisms that they might pose a health risk to populations of birds and wildlife that forage on the shore. Buried residues of EVOS oil are present in upper and middle intertidal sediments at 16 sites. Lower intertidal (0 m) sediments contain little oil. Much of the PAH in lower intertidal sediments are from combustion sources. Mean tissue total PAH (TPAH) concentrations in intertidal clams, mussels, and worms from oiled sites range from 24 to 36 ng/g (parts per billion) dry weight; sea lettuce, whelks, hermit crabs, and intertidal fish contain lower concentrations. Concentrations of TPAH are similar or slightly lower in biota from unoiled reference sites. The low EVOS PAH concentrations detected in intertidal biota at oiled shoreline sites indicate that the PAH from EVOS oil buried in intertidal sediments at these sites have a low bioavailability to intertidal plants and animals. Individual sea otters or shorebirds that consumed a diet of intertidal clams and mussels exclusively from the 17 oiled shores in 2002 were at low risk of significant health problems. The low concentrations of EVOS PAH found in some intertidal organisms at some oiled shoreline sites in PWS do not represent a health risk to populations of marine birds and mammals that forage in the intertidal zone.

  2. Thirteen-Year Evaluation of Highly Cross-Linked Polyethylene Articulating With Either 28-mm or 36-mm Femoral Heads Using Radiostereometric Analysis and Computerized Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nebergall, Audrey K; Greene, Meridith E; Rubash, Harry E

    2016-01-01

    ' CT scans showed radiolucent regions in the acetabulum of 4.51 cm(3) and 11.25 cm(3), respectively. In one patient, this area corresponded to a partially healed degenerative cyst treated with autograft during surgery. The second patient had an acetabular protrusio treated with autograft, and the CT...... scan revealed areas of remodeling of this graft. One patient's 13-year plain radiographs showed evidence of cup loosening and linear radiolucencies in zones 2 and 3. CONCLUSION: There was no evidence of significant wear over time using RSA. The CT scans did not show evidence of osteolysis due to wear...

  3. Effectiveness of Seven and Thirteen Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccines in a Schedule without a Booster dose: a Ten Year Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Sanjay; Chiu, Clayton; Quinn, Helen; Menzies, Rob; Gilmour, Robin; McIntyre, Peter

    2018-02-17

    Uniquely among high income countries, Australia uses a 3+0 schedule (3 primary doses; no booster) for infant pneumococcal conjugate vaccine since January 2005, initially 7-valent (PCV7) then 13-valent (PCV13) from July 2011. We measured vaccine effectiveness (VE) of both PCVs against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) by two methods. Cases were IPD notifications to national surveillance system in children eligible for respective PCVs. For the case-control method, up to ten age-matched controls were derived from Australian Childhood Immunisation Register. For the indirect-cohort method, controls were IPD cases due to serotypes not in PCVs. VE was calculated as (1-odds ratio)x100 by logistic regression. VE waning was estimated as odds ratios of vaccine type (VT) IPD in consecutive 12 month periods post dose three. Between 2005 and 2014, there were 1209 and 308 IPD cases in PCV7-eligible and PCV13-eligible cohorts respectively. Both methods gave comparable VE estimates. In infants, VE for three doses against VT IPD was 92.9% (95%CI 27.7 to 99.3%) for PCV7 and 86.5% (11.7 to 97.9%) for PCV13. PCV13 VE against 19A IPD was 90.0% (95%CI 71.8 to 96.5%). From 12 months post-dose three odd ratio of VT IPD by 24-36 months increased significantly for PCV7 (5.6 95% CI 1.2- 25.4) and PCV13 (5.9 95% CI 1.0-35.2). For both PCVs in a 3+0 schedule, despite similar VE progressive increase in breakthrough cases only occurred post PCV13. This supports the importance of a booster dose of PCV13 in the second year of life to maintain direct protection.

  4. Directional wave and temperature data from thirteen buoys at San Nicolas Island, Dana Point and Oceanside, CA, 1997-2002 (NODC Accession 0000774)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) is an extensive network for monitoring waves along the coastlines of the United States, with a strong emphasis on our...

  5. Instructional Media Initiatives: Focusing on the Educational Resources Center at Thirteen/wnet, New York, New York-- Slavery and the Making of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlevy, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Slavery and the Making of America, a four-part series from PBS, is airing throughout the United States during February 2005. This landmark series examines the history of slavery in the United States and the significant role it played in shaping the development of the Nation. This article describes the series, including online resources, and…

  6. Corporate Career Demonstration Project: Impact of a Thirteen-Week Training Program on the Personal, Interpersonal, and Academic Skills of Economically Disadvantaged Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berneman, Louis P.; And Others

    The Corporate Career Demonstration Project is a Federally funded program designed to provide economically disadvantaged young adults with specialized training, counseling and educational experiences. The project's major goal is to prepare these youth for entry level corporate career positions they would otherwise be unable to obtain. Applicants…

  7. Vitamin D deficiency and its predictors in a country with thirteen months of sunshine: the case of school children in central Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolassa Wakayo

    Full Text Available Studies examining vitamin D status among children living in sunny climates indicated that children did not receive adequate vitamin D, however, this has not been looked at among children living in Ethiopia. In this study, we determined vitamin D deficiency and its predictors among school children aged 11-18 years, examining circulating 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OHD]. The school-based cross-sectional study was conducted in schools in Adama Town (n = 89 and in rural Adama (n = 85 for a total sample of 174. Students were randomly selected using multi-stage stratified sampling method from both settings. Socioeconomic status of parents and demographic, anthropometric, sun exposure status and blood 25(OHD levels were obtained. Vitamin D deficiency, defined as circulating levels of 25(OHD <50 nmol/L, was found in 42% of the entire study participants. Prevalence of deficiency was significantly higher among students in urban setting compared to rural (61.8% vs 21.2%, respectively, p<0.001. After controlling for potential confounders using multivariable logistic regression model, duration of exposure to sunlight, amount of body part exposed to sunlight, place of residence, maternal education, body fatness, having TV/computer at home and socioeconomic status were significant predictors of vitamin D deficiency. The findings suggest that Vitamin D deficiency was prevalent in healthy school children living both in urban and rural areas of a country with abundant year round sunshine providing UVB, with the prevalence of deficiency being significantly higher among urban school children who were less exposed to sunlight. Behaviour change communication to enhance exposure to ultraviolet light is critical to prevent vitamin D deficiency in tropical country like Ethiopia. Further study is required to assess the deleterious effect of its deficiency on bone mineral homeostasis of growing children in Ethiopia during their most critical period of bone development.

  8. Construction-employment opportunities of four oil-replacing space-heating alternatives for core areas of thirteen major northeastern and midwestern cities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santini, D.J.; Wernette, D.R.

    1980-07-01

    Construction employment opportunities are compared for four oil-replacing technologies providing equivalent space-heating services to the core areas of 13 major northeastern and midwestern cities. The four technologies are: cogeneration district heating, coal gasification, coal liquefaction and electrification (coal-fired power plant). It is observed that the district-heating option places a higher percentage of its capital stock within the center city. It also requires lower occupational skills for its construction than the other three alternatives. In view of the lower average educational level of minorities and their concentration in urban areas, substantially more minority employment should occur if district heating is implemented. This alternative also will provide employment opportunities for unemployed nonminority construction laborers and contribute indirectly to the improvement of inner-city neighborhoods where many unemployed construction laborers live.

  9. Thirteen-year randomized controlled clinical trial of a two-step self-etch adhesive in non-carious cervical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peumans, M; De Munck, J; Van Landuyt, K; Van Meerbeek, B

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this randomized controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the 13-year clinical performance of a mild two-step self-etch adhesive in non-carious cervical lesions with and without prior selective phosphoric acid-etching of the enamel cavity margins. A total of 100 non-carious cervical lesions in 29 patients were restored with Clearfil AP-X (Kuraray Noritake). The composite restorations were bonded following two different approaches: (1) application of Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Noritake) following a self-etch approach (CSE-NE); (2) selective phosphoric acid-etching of enamel cavity margins before application of Clearfil SE Bond (CSE-E). The restorations were evaluated after 6 months, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8 and 13 years of clinical service regarding retention, marginal integrity and discoloration, caries occurrence, preservation of tooth vitality and post-operative sensitivity. The patient recall rate at 13 years was 62%. Six restorations, 4 of the CSE-NE group and 2 of the CSE-E group, were clinically unacceptable due to loss of retention (1 CSE-NE, 1 CSE-E), a severe marginal defect (2 CSE-NE, 1 CSE-E) and caries occurrence in combination with a severe marginal defect (1 CSE-NE) leading to a clinical success rate of 86% (CSE-NE) and 93% (CSE-E). Ageing of the restorations was characterized by a further increase in the percentage of restorations with a clinically acceptable small marginal defect (CSE-NE: 87%; CSE-E: 83%) and/or superficial marginal discoloration (CSE-NE: 53%; CSE-E: 56%). The presence of small marginal defects (CSE-NE: 86%; CSE-E: 68%) and superficial marginal discoloration (CSE-NE: 41%; CSE-E: 20%) at the incisal enamel side was more frequently noticed in the CSE-NE group than in the CSE-E group. The difference, however, was not statistically significant (McNemar, p>0.05). After 13 years, the clinical effectiveness of Clearfil SE Bond in non-carious Class-V lesions remained excellent, with selective acid-etching of the enamel cavity margins only having some minor positive effect on marginal integrity and absence of marginal discoloration. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Heritage Survey and Scientific Analysis of the Watchtowers that Defended the Last Islamic Kingdom in the Iberian Peninsula (thirteen to Fifeteenth Century)

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pulido, L. J.; Ruiz Jaramillo, J.; Alba Dorado, M. I.

    2017-08-01

    The Islamic Nasrid kingdom of Granada occupied the mountainous areas of the southeastern area of the Iberian Peninsula. There, a natural border was established between the Nasrid kingdom and the Christian kingdom of Castile from 1232 to 1492. To control this frontier and establish visual communication between it and the Nasrid center at the Alhambra citadel, an extensive network of watchtowers and defensive towers was constructed. Studies have been done of individual towers, but no comparative study has been undertaken of all of them. Graphic, homogenous, and exhaustively planimetric documentation would bring together existing information on the majority of them and enable comparative analysis. For this reason, this work conducts systematic architectural surveys of all these military structures, using photogrammetry. In addition to studying the construction typology and techniques, the structural capacity of these towers has been analyzed. It examines how they have been affected by human and natural destructive forces, especially earthquakes, which are common in eastern Andalusia. Although all the historical military architecture is protected by the Spanish and Andalusian Heritage laws, many of these medieval towers and their cultural landscapes are in severe risk. The towers are being studied as individual specimens (emphasizing their differences) and as a unit in a typological group (looking for similarities and unifying characteristics). New technologies for Information and Communication are being used in order to disseminate the results among specialists and to make them available to the general public. Guidelines for restoration projects are also being formulated from the cases analyzed.

  11. Hydrogeologic controls on the transport and fate of nitrate in ground water beneath riparian buffer zones: Results from thirteen studies across the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, L.J.

    2004-01-01

    During the last two decades there has been growing interest in the capacity of riparian buffer zones to remove nitrate from ground waters moving through them. Riparian zone sediments often contain organic carbon, which favors formation of reducing conditions that can lead to removal of nitrate through denitrification. Over the past decade the National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program has investigated the transport and fate of nitrate in ground and surface waters in study areas across the United States. In these studies riparian zone efficiency in removing nitrate varied widely as a result of variations in hydrogeologic factors. These factors include (1) denitrification in the up-gradient aquifer due to the presence of organic carbon or other electron donors, (2) long residence times (>50 years) along ground-water flow paths allowing even slow reactions to completely remove nitrate, (3) dilution of nitrate enriched waters with older water having little nitrate, (4) bypassing of riparian zones due to extensive use of drains and ditches, and (5) movement of ground water along deep flow paths below reducing zones. By developing a better understanding of the hydrogeologic settings in which riparian buffer zones are likely to be inefficient we can develop improved nutrient management plans. ?? US Government 2004.

  12. A thirteen-week oral toxicity study of So-ochim-tang-gami-bang, a traditional Korean medicine, in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Ju; Kim, Myoung Jun; Park, Yang-Chun; Choi, Jeong June; Jin, Mirim; Jung, In Chul

    2018-03-01

    So-ochim-tang-gamibang (SOCG) is a traditional Korean medicine formulated to control internal energy flow (Qi) and has been prescribed to improve stress-induced depressive disorders. SOCG has been used in clinical practice for the last two decades and its efficacy against stress-induced thoracic pain has been suggested. Although SOCG has been used as an herbal formula in Korean medicine, its toxicity has not yet been evaluated. In this study, we evaluated the safety of SOCG through a 13-week general toxicity study in rats. SOCG was administered by oral gavage to rats at doses of 0 (control), 800, 2000, and 5000mg/kg/day over a 13-week period. Toxicity testing was conducted by evaluating mortality, clinical signs, body weight, food consumption, urinalysis, hematology, serum biochemistry, organ weight, necropsy, and histopathology compared with the concurrent control. SOCG-related changes were noted in clinical signs and urinalysis. The observed clinical signs were compound-colored stool and salivation. Urinalysis results revealed brown or amber colored urine and elevated levels of protein. However, these changes were not considered to be adverse. The no-observed-adverse-effect-level of SOCG was determined to be above 5000mg/kg in both male and female rats. The result of this study can lay the foundation for the application of SOCG in humans and prove useful for detailed investigations on the toxicity or pharmacological effects of SOCG. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Thirteen-year follow-up of patients with tri-ortho-cresyl phosphate poisoning in northern suburbs of Xi'an in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lian; Liu, Yong-Hong; Xu, Yan; Yin, Wen; Huang, Yuan-Gui

    2009-11-01

    Based on reports published so far, organophosphorus (OP) compounds do remarkable harm to human health. In 1995 there was an outbreak of organophosphorus-ester induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) due to tri-ortho-cresyl phosphate (TOCP) poisoning in northern suburbs of Xi'an in China. The 74 affected patients were treated and followed up after definite diagnosis. 13 years later, all the epidemiological data obtained from 61 survivors were evaluated, and 15 patients underwent clinical, laboratory, neuroimaging and electrophysiological examinations. In addition, a review of the literature about the possible mechanism of OPIDN was made. According to our investigation, of 61 survivors, 35 patients almost regained normal function of limbs and work outside; 23 patients walked with bilateral support and could perform housework; and 3 patients could not self-care. The patients undergoing examinations presented spasticity and minor lower leg muscle atrophy without sensory impairment. Laboratory investigations and brain and spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging examinations were normal. Neurophysiological investigations also showed normal electroencephalogram and visual, brainstem auditory and somatosensory evoked potentials. Motor evoked potential (MEP) obtained from the upper limbs had normal central motor conduction time (CMCT). However, the CMCT of MEP response recorded from the bilateral lower limbs was delayed, or showed even no MEP responses. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity and electromyography studies were normal except for two severely affected patients. TOCP showed long-term effects on the nervous system and influenced the quality of life. OP compounds should be strictly regulated to prevent similar occurrences.

  14. Review of Cycadophila Xu, Tang & Skelley (Coleoptera: Erotylidae: Pharaxonothinae) inhabiting Cycas (Cycadaceae) in Asia, with descriptions of a new subgenus and thirteen new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelley, Paul; Xu, Guang; Tang, William; Lindström, Anders J; Marler, Thomas; Khuraijam, Jibankumar Singh; Singh, Rita; Radha, P; Rich, Stephen

    2017-05-12

    The genus Cycadophila Xu, Tang & Skelley (Coleoptera: Erotylidae: Pharaxonothinae) associated with Cycas L. (Cycadacaeae) in Asia is reviewed. Strobilophila, new subgenus, with five species is described: Cycadophila (Strobilophila) assamensis new species, C. (S.) hiepi new species, C. (S.) kwaiensis new species, C. (S.) tansachai new species and C. (S.) yangi new species, all associated with Cycas. For the nominate subgenus Cycadophila eight new species are described, Cycadophila (Cycadophila) abyssa new species, C. (C.) collina new species,C. (C.) samara new species, C. (C.) convexa new species, C. (C.) cyclochasma new species, C. (C.) eurynota new species, C. (C.) papua new species, and C. (C.) torquata new species and four new generic combinations are proposed: C. (C.) vittata (Arrow) new combination, C. (C.) discimaculata (Mader) new combination, C. (C.) intermedia (Chûjô) new combination, and C. (C.) lata (Grouvelle) new combination. Only the first three listed species of the nominate subgenus have known associations with Cycas. Species are distinguished on the basis of morphology and/or by analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. The larva of subgenus Strobilophila is described based on individuals collected together with adults and matched with analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Keys to subgenera and species of known adults and larvae are provided.

  15. Kate Steinitz, Librarian, Artist, Scholar; Being a Thirteen-Part Tribute to One Whose Verve Has Enlivened Some Eight Decades on Two Continents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson Libr Bull, 1970

    1970-01-01

    Personal reminiscences about the Dada artist, expert on Leonardo da Vinci, and librarian at the UCLA Library of Vinciana by museum directors, scholars, and friends. Includes selected bibliography of her works, a chronology, poems, sketches, and photographs. (JS)

  16. Development of Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase PCR Assays for the Detection of Punta Toro Virus and Pichinde Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-09

    tested against a panel of 153 extracted viral nucleic acid samples. West Nile virus (UCC# Flavi022) and dengue virus 154 serotypes 1-4 (UCC# Flavi029...256 phlebotomus fever virus (Sicilian type). Am J Trop Med Hyg 25, 456-462. 257 Birmingham, K., Kenyon, G., 2001. Lassa fever is unheralded problem in

  17. Nursing leadership: a concise encyclopedia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feldman, Harriet R

    2008-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii Foreword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxv...

  18. Is proglacial field an important contributor to runoff in glacierized watershed? Lesson learned from a case study in Duke River watershed, Yukon, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnokova, A.; Baraer, M.

    2017-12-01

    Sub-Arctic glacierized catchments are complex hydrological systems of paramount importance not only for water resources management but also for various ecosystem services. Those areas are environmentally fragile and host many climate-sensitive components of hydrological cycle. In a context of shifting from glacial to non-glacial regimes in Sub-Arctic, this study focuses on understanding hydrological role of proglacial field in runoff generation in headwaters of Duke River watershed, Canada, by comparing to that of alpine meadow (area that is not recently reworked by glacier). Duke Glacier, as many glaciers in St. Elias Mountains, is a surging glacier, and produced debris-charged dead-ice masses once the last surge has seized. In addition, such features as ice-cored moraines and taluses are found in proglacial field. Those features are hypothesised to cause high storage capacity and complex groundwater distribution systems which might affect significantly watershed hydrology. In order to estimate the contribution of different components of the alpine meadow and the proglacial field to runoff, HBCM, a multi-component distributed hydrochemical mixing model (Baraer et al., 2015) was applied. During field campaign in June 2016, 157 samples were taken from possible hydrological sources (end-members) and from main stream, and analysed for major ions, dissolved organic compounds and heavy stable water isotopes. End-members contribution was quantified based on tracer concentration at mixing points. Discharge was measured 6 km downstream from the glacier snout so that both proglacial field and alpine meadow occupy comparable areas of the catchment. Results show the difference between main water sources for the two hydrological systems: buried ice, ice-cored moraines and groundwater sources within proglacial field, and groundwater and supra-permafrost water within alpine meadow. Overall contribution of glaciers during June 2016 exceeded the contribution of the rest of the components of hydrological system. However, water production from both proglacial field and alpine meadow was significant, with proglacial field yielding more water than alpine meadow. Since the Duke Glacier keeps retreating, the area of proglacial field is increasing as well as it role in runoff generation in the area.

  19. Dietary pattern and other lifestyle factors as potential contributors to hypertension prevalence in Arusha City, Tanzania: a population-based descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katalambula, L K; Meyer, D N; Ngoma, T; Buza, J; Mpolya, E; Mtumwa, A H; Petrucka, P

    2017-08-16

    High blood pressure is increasing worldwide, disproportionately so in developing countries. Inadequate health care systems and adoption of unhealthy lifestyles have been linked to this emergent pattern. To better understand this trend, it is imperative we measure prevalence of hypertension, and examine specific risk factors, at a local level. This study provides a cross-sectional view of urban residents of Arusha City to determine prevalence and associated risk factors. Blood pressure was measured using a digital sphygmomanometer. Interviews were conducted using the WHO STEPwise survey questionnaire to assess lifestyle factors. Dietary intake information was collected by a standardized Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). Descriptive statistics were used to analyze demographic characteristics. Means and standard deviations were calculated for continuous variables and percentages for categorical variables. Pearson's Chi Square (χ 2 ) tests were used to determine significant risk factors for hypertension, and multivariate log binomial regression was used to reveal potential predictors of hypertension. Dietary patterns were analyzed by principal component analysis. Approximately 45% of the study population was found to be hypertensive. The mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) of the sample was 102.3 mmHg (SD = 18.3). Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure were 136.3 (SD = 30.5) and 85.3 (SD = 16.1) mmHg, respectively. Through multivariate analysis, age and body mass index were found to be independently, positively, associated with hypertension. Adherence to 'healthy' dietary pattern was negatively independently associated with hypertension. With nearly half of participants being hypertensive, this study suggests that hypertension is a significant health risk in Arusha, Tanzania. Obesity, healthy diet, and age were found to be positively associated with hypertension risk. This study did not establish any significant association between increased blood pressure and Western-dietary pattern, cigarette smoking, alcohol intake, and physical activities.

  20. Binge Eating, But Not Other Disordered Eating Symptoms, Is a Significant Contributor of Binge Drinking Severity: Findings from a Cross-Sectional Study among French Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Rolland

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have suggested the co-occurrence of eating disorders and alcohol use disorders but in which extent binge eating (BE and other disordered eating symptoms (DES are associated with the severity of binge drinking (BD remains unknown. We conducted a online cross-sectional study among 1,872 French students. Participants were asked their age, gender, tobacco and cannabis use status. They completed the Alcohol Use Questionnaire (AUQ, Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q, and UPPS impulsive behavior questionnaire. BD score was calculated using the AUQ. Three items of the EDE-Q were used to construct a BE score. The predictors of the BD score were determined using a linear regression model. Our results showed that the BE score was correlated with the BD score (β0 = 0.051 ± 0.022; p = 0.019, but no other DES was associated with BD, including purging behaviors. The severity of BD was also correlated with younger age, male gender, tobacco and cannabis use, and with the ‘positive urgency,’ ‘premeditation,’ and ‘sensation seeking’ UPPS subscores (R2 of the model: 25%. Within DES, BE appeared as an independent determinant of the BD severity. This is in line with the recent hypothesis that BE is not a subtype of DES, but more a general vulnerability factor of emotional dysregulation, which could be shared by different behavioral and addictive disorders.