WorldWideScience

Sample records for third-order turbulence closures

  1. Climate Simulations from Super-parameterized and Conventional General Circulation Models with a Third-order Turbulence Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kuan-Man; Cheng, Anning

    2014-05-01

    A high-resolution cloud-resolving model (CRM) embedded in a general circulation model (GCM) is an attractive alternative for climate modeling because it replaces all traditional cloud parameterizations and explicitly simulates cloud physical processes in each grid column of the GCM. Such an approach is called "Multiscale Modeling Framework." MMF still needs to parameterize the subgrid-scale (SGS) processes associated with clouds and large turbulent eddies because circulations associated with planetary boundary layer (PBL) and in-cloud turbulence are unresolved by CRMs with horizontal grid sizes on the order of a few kilometers. A third-order turbulence closure (IPHOC) has been implemented in the CRM component of the super-parameterized Community Atmosphere Model (SPCAM). IPHOC is used to predict (or diagnose) fractional cloudiness and the variability of temperature and water vapor at scales that are not resolved on the CRM's grid. This model has produced promised results, especially for low-level cloud climatology, seasonal variations and diurnal variations (Cheng and Xu 2011, 2013a, b; Xu and Cheng 2013a, b). Because of the enormous computational cost of SPCAM-IPHOC, which is 400 times of a conventional CAM, we decided to bypass the CRM and implement the IPHOC directly to CAM version 5 (CAM5). IPHOC replaces the PBL/stratocumulus, shallow convection, and cloud macrophysics parameterizations in CAM5. Since there are large discrepancies in the spatial and temporal scales between CRM and CAM5, IPHOC used in CAM5 has to be modified from that used in SPCAM. In particular, we diagnose all second- and third-order moments except for the fluxes. These prognostic and diagnostic moments are used to select a double-Gaussian probability density function to describe the SGS variability. We also incorporate a diagnostic PBL height parameterization to represent the strong inversion above PBL. The goal of this study is to compare the simulation of the climatology from these three

  2. Scale separation closure and Alfven wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.Y.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1985-04-01

    Based on the concept of scale separation between coherent response function and incoherent source for renormalized turbulence theories, a closure scheme is proposed. A model problem dealing with shear-Alfven wave turbulence is numerically solved; the solution explicitly shows expected turbulence features such as frequency shift from linear modes, band-broadening, and a power law dependence for the turbulence spectrum

  3. Some Recent Developments in Turbulence Closure Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Paul A.

    2018-01-01

    Turbulence closure models are central to a good deal of applied computational fluid dynamical analysis. Closure modeling endures as a productive area of research. This review covers recent developments in elliptic relaxation and elliptic blending models, unified rotation and curvature corrections, transition prediction, hybrid simulation, and data-driven methods. The focus is on closure models in which transport equations are solved for scalar variables, such as the turbulent kinetic energy, a timescale, or a measure of anisotropy. Algebraic constitutive representations are reviewed for their role in relating scalar closures to the Reynolds stress tensor. Seamless and nonzonal methods, which invoke a single closure model, are reviewed, especially detached eddy simulation (DES) and adaptive DES. Other topics surveyed include data-driven modeling and intermittency and laminar fluctuation models for transition prediction. The review concludes with an outlook.

  4. Improving Boundary-layer Turbulence and Cloud Processes in CAM with a Higher-order Turbulence Closure Scheme and ASR Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Kuan-Man [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Cheng, Anning [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States)

    2015-11-24

    The intermediately-prognostic higher-order turbulence closure (IPHOC) introduces a joint double-Gaussian distribution of liquid water potential temperature (θl ), total water mixing ratio (qt), and vertical velocity (w) to represent any skewed turbulence circulation. The distribution is inferred from the first-, second-, and third-order moments of the variables given above, and is used to diagnose cloud fraction and gridmean liquid water mixing ratio, as well as the buoyancy term and fourth-order terms in the equations describing the evolution of the second- and third-order moments. Only three third-order moments, i.e., the triple moments of θl, qt, and w, are predicted in IPHOC.

  5. Turbulence closure for mixing length theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jermyn, Adam S.; Lesaffre, Pierre; Tout, Christopher A.; Chitre, Shashikumar M.

    2018-05-01

    We present an approach to turbulence closure based on mixing length theory with three-dimensional fluctuations against a two-dimensional background. This model is intended to be rapidly computable for implementation in stellar evolution software and to capture a wide range of relevant phenomena with just a single free parameter, namely the mixing length. We incorporate magnetic, rotational, baroclinic, and buoyancy effects exactly within the formalism of linear growth theories with non-linear decay. We treat differential rotation effects perturbatively in the corotating frame using a novel controlled approximation, which matches the time evolution of the reference frame to arbitrary order. We then implement this model in an efficient open source code and discuss the resulting turbulent stresses and transport coefficients. We demonstrate that this model exhibits convective, baroclinic, and shear instabilities as well as the magnetorotational instability. It also exhibits non-linear saturation behaviour, and we use this to extract the asymptotic scaling of various transport coefficients in physically interesting limits.

  6. Turbulence closure: turbulence, waves and the wave-turbulence transition – Part 1: Vanishing mean shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Z. Baumert

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper extends a turbulence closure-like model for stably stratified flows into a new dynamic domain in which turbulence is generated by internal gravity waves rather than mean shear. The model turbulent kinetic energy (TKE, K balance, its first equation, incorporates a term for the energy transfer from internal waves to turbulence. This energy source is in addition to the traditional shear production. The second variable of the new two-equation model is the turbulent enstrophy (Ω. Compared to the traditional shear-only case, the Ω-equation is modified to account for the effect of the waves on the turbulence time and space scales. This modification is based on the assumption of a non-zero constant flux Richardson number in the limit of vanishing mean shear when turbulence is produced exclusively by internal waves. This paper is part 1 of a continuing theoretical development. It accounts for mean shear- and internal wave-driven mixing only in the two limits of mean shear and no waves and waves but no mean shear, respectively.

    The new model reproduces the wave-turbulence transition analyzed by D'Asaro and Lien (2000b. At small energy density E of the internal wave field, the turbulent dissipation rate (ε scales like ε~E2. This is what is observed in the deep sea. With increasing E, after the wave-turbulence transition has been passed, the scaling changes to ε~E1. This is observed, for example, in the highly energetic tidal flow near a sill in Knight Inlet. The new model further exhibits a turbulent length scale proportional to the Ozmidov scale, as observed in the ocean, and predicts the ratio between the turbulent Thorpe and Ozmidov length scales well within the range observed in the ocean.

  7. Analysis of turbulent conical diffuser flow using second moment closures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adane, K.K.; Tachie, M.F.; Ormiston, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    A commercial CFD code, CFX-TASCflow, is used to predict a turbulent conical diffuser flow. The computation was performed using a low-Reynolds number k-ω model, a low-Reynolds number k-ω based non-linear algebraic Reynolds stress model, and a second moment closure with a wall-function. The experimental data of Kassab are used to validate the numerical results. The results show that all the turbulence models reproduce the static pressure coefficient distribution reasonably well. The low Reynolds number k-ω models give better prediction of the friction velocity than the second moment closure. The models also predict the Reynolds shear stress reasonably well but fail to reproduce the correct level of the turbulent kinetic energy. (author)

  8. Application of statistical dynamical turbulence closures to data assimilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Kane, Terence J; Frederiksen, Jorgen S

    2010-01-01

    We describe the development of an accurate yet computationally tractable statistical dynamical closure theory for general inhomogeneous turbulent flows, coined the quasi-diagonal direct interaction approximation closure (QDIA), and its application to problems in data assimilation. The QDIA provides prognostic equations for evolving mean fields, covariances and higher-order non-Gaussian terms, all of which are also required in the formulation of data assimilation schemes for nonlinear geophysical flows. The QDIA is a generalization of the class of direct interaction approximation theories, initially developed by Kraichnan (1959 J. Fluid Mech. 5 497) for isotropic turbulence, to fully inhomogeneous flows and has been further generalized to allow for both inhomogeneous and non-Gaussian initial conditions and long integrations. A regularization procedure or empirical vertex renormalization that ensures correct inertial range spectra is also described. The aim of this paper is to provide a coherent mathematical description of the QDIA turbulence closure and closure-based data assimilation scheme we have labeled the statistical dynamical Kalman filter. The mathematical formalism presented has been synthesized from recent works of the authors with some additional material and is presented in sufficient detail that the paper is of a pedagogical nature.

  9. Autonomic Closure for Turbulent Flows Using Approximate Bayesian Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronina, Olga; Christopher, Jason; Hamlington, Peter; Dahm, Werner

    2017-11-01

    Autonomic closure is a new technique for achieving fully adaptive and physically accurate closure of coarse-grained turbulent flow governing equations, such as those solved in large eddy simulations (LES). Although autonomic closure has been shown in recent a priori tests to more accurately represent unclosed terms than do dynamic versions of traditional LES models, the computational cost of the approach makes it challenging to implement for simulations of practical turbulent flows at realistically high Reynolds numbers. The optimization step used in the approach introduces large matrices that must be inverted and is highly memory intensive. In order to reduce memory requirements, here we propose to use approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) in place of the optimization step, thereby yielding a computationally-efficient implementation of autonomic closure that trades memory-intensive for processor-intensive computations. The latter challenge can be overcome as co-processors such as general purpose graphical processing units become increasingly available on current generation petascale and exascale supercomputers. In this work, we outline the formulation of ABC-enabled autonomic closure and present initial results demonstrating the accuracy and computational cost of the approach.

  10. Eigenspace perturbations for structural uncertainty estimation of turbulence closure models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jofre, Lluis; Mishra, Aashwin; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2017-11-01

    With the present state of computational resources, a purely numerical resolution of turbulent flows encountered in engineering applications is not viable. Consequently, investigations into turbulence rely on various degrees of modeling. Archetypal amongst these variable resolution approaches would be RANS models in two-equation closures, and subgrid-scale models in LES. However, owing to the simplifications introduced during model formulation, the fidelity of all such models is limited, and therefore the explicit quantification of the predictive uncertainty is essential. In such scenario, the ideal uncertainty estimation procedure must be agnostic to modeling resolution, methodology, and the nature or level of the model filter. The procedure should be able to give reliable prediction intervals for different Quantities of Interest, over varied flows and flow conditions, and at diametric levels of modeling resolution. In this talk, we present and substantiate the Eigenspace perturbation framework as an uncertainty estimation paradigm that meets these criteria. Commencing from a broad overview, we outline the details of this framework at different modeling resolution. Thence, using benchmark flows, along with engineering problems, the efficacy of this procedure is established. This research was partially supported by NNSA under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program (PSAAP) II, and by DARPA under the Enabling Quantification of Uncertainty in Physical Systems (EQUiPS) project (technical monitor: Dr Fariba Fahroo).

  11. Comparison of PDF and Moment Closure Methods in the Modeling of Turbulent Reacting Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Andrew T.; Hsu, Andrew T.

    1994-01-01

    In modeling turbulent reactive flows, Probability Density Function (PDF) methods have an advantage over the more traditional moment closure schemes in that the PDF formulation treats the chemical reaction source terms exactly, while moment closure methods are required to model the mean reaction rate. The common model used is the laminar chemistry approximation, where the effects of turbulence on the reaction are assumed negligible. For flows with low turbulence levels and fast chemistry, the difference between the two methods can be expected to be small. However for flows with finite rate chemistry and high turbulence levels, significant errors can be expected in the moment closure method. In this paper, the ability of the PDF method and the moment closure scheme to accurately model a turbulent reacting flow is tested. To accomplish this, both schemes were used to model a CO/H2/N2- air piloted diffusion flame near extinction. Identical thermochemistry, turbulence models, initial conditions and boundary conditions are employed to ensure a consistent comparison can be made. The results of the two methods are compared to experimental data as well as to each other. The comparison reveals that the PDF method provides good agreement with the experimental data, while the moment closure scheme incorrectly shows a broad, laminar-like flame structure.

  12. Defining Higher-Order Turbulent Moment Closures with an Artificial Neural Network and Random Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGibbon, J.; Bretherton, C. S.

    2017-12-01

    Unresolved turbulent advection and clouds must be parameterized in atmospheric models. Modern higher-order closure schemes depend on analytic moment closure assumptions that diagnose higher-order moments in terms of lower-order ones. These are then tested against Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) higher-order moment relations. However, these relations may not be neatly analytic in nature. Rather than rely on an analytic higher-order moment closure, can we use machine learning on LES data itself to define a higher-order moment closure?We assess the ability of a deep artificial neural network (NN) and random forest (RF) to perform this task using a set of observationally-based LES runs from the MAGIC field campaign. By training on a subset of 12 simulations and testing on remaining simulations, we avoid over-fitting the training data.Performance of the NN and RF will be assessed and compared to the Analytic Double Gaussian 1 (ADG1) closure assumed by Cloudy Layers Unified By Binormals (CLUBB), a higher-order turbulence closure currently used in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). We will show that the RF outperforms the NN and the ADG1 closure for the MAGIC cases within this diagnostic framework. Progress and challenges in using a diagnostic machine learning closure within a prognostic cloud and turbulence parameterization will also be discussed.

  13. Optofluidic third order distributed feedback dye laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Morten; Kristensen, Anders

    2006-01-01

    which has a refractive index lower than that of the polymer. In combination with a third order DFB grating, formed by the array of nanofluidic channels, this yields a low threshold for lasing. The laser is straightforward to integrate on lab-on-a-chip microsystems where coherent, tunable light......This letter describes the design and operation of a polymer-based third order distributed feedback (DFB) microfluidic dye laser. The device relies on light confinement in a nanostructured polymer film where an array of nanofluidic channels is filled by capillary action with a liquid dye solution...

  14. Third-order differential ladder operators and supersymmetric quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateo, J; Negro, J

    2008-01-01

    Hierarchies of one-dimensional Hamiltonians in quantum mechanics admitting third-order differential ladder operators are studied. Each Hamiltonian has associated three-step Darboux (pseudo)-cycles and Painleve IV equations as a closure condition. The whole hierarchy is generated applying some operations on the cycles. These operations are investigated in the frame of supersymmetric quantum mechanics and mainly involve algebraic manipulations. A consistent geometric representation for the hierarchy and cycles is built that also helps in understanding the operations. Three kinds of hierarchies are distinguished and a realization based on the harmonic oscillator Hamiltonian is supplied, giving an interpretation for the spectral properties of the Hamiltonians of each hierarchy

  15. Third order differential equations with delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Liška

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the oscillation and asymptotic properties of solutions of certain nonlinear third order differential equations with delay. In particular, we extend results of I. Mojsej (Nonlinear Analysis 68, 2008 and we improve conditions on the property B of N. Parhi and S. Padhi (Indian J. Pure Appl. Math., 33, 2002.

  16. Decay ratio for third order Brownian oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, H.; Kanemoto, S.

    1998-01-01

    We have obtained the analytical expressions of the decay ratios for two types of third order Brownian oscillators which are generalizations of the second order Brownian oscillator driven by the Gaussian-white noise. The resulting expressions will provide us useful baseline information for more complicated practical problems and their applications

  17. Turbulent mass flux closure modeling for variable density turbulence in the wake of an air-entraining transom stern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Kelli; Yue, Dick

    2016-11-01

    This work presents the development and a priori testing of closure models for the incompressible highly-variable density turbulent (IHVDT) flow in the near wake region of a transom stern. This complex, three-dimensional flow includes three regions with distinctly different flow behavior: (i) the convergent corner waves that originate from the body and collide on the ship center plane; (ii) the "rooster tail" that forms from the collision; and (iii) the diverging wave train. The characteristics of these regions involve violent free-surface flows and breaking waves with significant turbulent mass flux (TMF) at Atwood number At = (ρ2 -ρ1) / (ρ2 +ρ1) 1 for which there is little guidance in turbulence closure modeling for the momentum and scalar transport along the wake. Utilizing datasets from high-resolution simulations of the near wake of a canonical three-dimensional transom stern using conservative Volume-of-Fluid (cVOF), implicit Large Eddy Simulation (iLES), and Boundary Data Immersion Method (BDIM), we develop explicit algebraic turbulent mass flux closure models that incorporate the most relevant physical processes. Performance of these models in predicting the turbulent mass flux in all three regions of the wake will be presented. Office of Naval Research.

  18. Uncertainty Quantification of Turbulence Model Closure Coefficients for Transonic Wall-Bounded Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, John; West, Thomas; Hosder, Serhat; Rumsey, Christopher; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Kleb, William

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this work was to quantify the uncertainty and sensitivity of commonly used turbulence models in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes codes due to uncertainty in the values of closure coefficients for transonic, wall-bounded flows and to rank the contribution of each coefficient to uncertainty in various output flow quantities of interest. Specifically, uncertainty quantification of turbulence model closure coefficients was performed for transonic flow over an axisymmetric bump at zero degrees angle of attack and the RAE 2822 transonic airfoil at a lift coefficient of 0.744. Three turbulence models were considered: the Spalart-Allmaras Model, Wilcox (2006) k-w Model, and the Menter Shear-Stress Trans- port Model. The FUN3D code developed by NASA Langley Research Center was used as the flow solver. The uncertainty quantification analysis employed stochastic expansions based on non-intrusive polynomial chaos as an efficient means of uncertainty propagation. Several integrated and point-quantities are considered as uncertain outputs for both CFD problems. All closure coefficients were treated as epistemic uncertain variables represented with intervals. Sobol indices were used to rank the relative contributions of each closure coefficient to the total uncertainty in the output quantities of interest. This study identified a number of closure coefficients for each turbulence model for which more information will reduce the amount of uncertainty in the output significantly for transonic, wall-bounded flows.

  19. Fluid simulation of tokamak ion temperature gradient turbulence with zonal flow closure model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagishi, Osamu, E-mail: yamagisi@nifs.ac.jp; Sugama, Hideo [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Nonlinear fluid simulation of turbulence driven by ion temperature gradient modes in the tokamak fluxtube configuration is performed by combining two different closure models. One model is a gyrofluid model by Beer and Hammett [Phys. Plasmas 3, 4046 (1996)], and the other is a closure model to reproduce the kinetic zonal flow response [Sugama et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 022502 (2007)]. By including the zonal flow closure, generation of zonal flows, significant reduction in energy transport, reproduction of the gyrokinetic transport level, and nonlinear upshift on the critical value of gradient scale length are observed.

  20. Fluid simulation of tokamak ion temperature gradient turbulence with zonal flow closure model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Osamu; Sugama, Hideo

    2016-03-01

    Nonlinear fluid simulation of turbulence driven by ion temperature gradient modes in the tokamak fluxtube configuration is performed by combining two different closure models. One model is a gyrofluid model by Beer and Hammett [Phys. Plasmas 3, 4046 (1996)], and the other is a closure model to reproduce the kinetic zonal flow response [Sugama et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 022502 (2007)]. By including the zonal flow closure, generation of zonal flows, significant reduction in energy transport, reproduction of the gyrokinetic transport level, and nonlinear upshift on the critical value of gradient scale length are observed.

  1. Novel third-order Lovelock wormhole solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we consider wormhole geometries in third-order Lovelock gravity and investigate the possibility that these solutions satisfy the energy conditions. In this framework, by applying a specific equation of state, we obtain exact wormhole solutions, and by imposing suitable values for the parameters of the theory, we find that these geometries satisfy the weak energy condition in the vicinity of the throat, due to the presence of higher-order curvature terms. Finally, we trace out a numerical analysis, by assuming a specific redshift function, and find asymptotically flat solutions that satisfy the weak energy condition throughout the spacetime.

  2. Elliptic blending model : A new near-wall Reynolds-stress turbulence closure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manceau, R.; Hanjali?, K.

    2001-01-01

    A new approach to modeling the effects of a solid wall in one-point second-moment (Reynolds-stress) turbulence closures is presented. The model is based on the relaxation of an inhomogeneous (near-wall) formulation of the pressure–strain tensor towards the chosen conventional homogeneous

  3. Numerical schemes for one-point closure turbulence models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larcher, Aurelien

    2010-01-01

    First-order Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models are studied in this thesis. These latter consist of the Navier-Stokes equations, supplemented with a system of balance equations describing the evolution of characteristic scalar quantities called 'turbulent scales'. In so doing, the contribution of the turbulent agitation to the momentum can be determined by adding a diffusive coefficient (called 'turbulent viscosity') in the Navier-Stokes equations, such that it is defined as a function of the turbulent scales. The numerical analysis problems, which are studied in this dissertation, are treated in the frame of a fractional step algorithm, consisting of an approximation on regular meshes of the Navier-Stokes equations by the nonconforming Crouzeix-Raviart finite elements, and a set of scalar convection-diffusion balance equations discretized by the standard finite volume method. A monotone numerical scheme based on the standard finite volume method is proposed so as to ensure that the turbulent scales, like the turbulent kinetic energy (k) and its dissipation rate (ε), remain positive in the case of the standard k - ε model, as well as the k - ε RNG and the extended k - ε - ν 2 models. The convergence of the proposed numerical scheme is then studied on a system composed of the incompressible Stokes equations and a steady convection-diffusion equation, which are both coupled by the viscosities and the turbulent production term. This reduced model allows to deal with the main difficulty encountered in the analysis of such problems: the definition of the turbulent production term leads to consider a class of convection-diffusion problems with an irregular right-hand side belonging to L 1 . Finally, to step towards the unsteady problem, the convergence of the finite volume scheme for a model convection-diffusion equation with L 1 data is proved. The a priori estimates on the solution and on its time derivative are obtained in discrete norms, for

  4. Towards a collisionless fluid closure in plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dif Pradalier, G

    2005-07-01

    In this work 2 generic possible descriptions of a plasma have been compared namely the kinetic and the fluid approaches. The latter focuses on the successive moments (n, u, p, q,...) of the distribution function, whereas the former describes the time-evolution in phase space of this distribution function, both being based on the Vlasov equation. The fluid description is attractive for the Vlasov equation is tractable with great difficulties. Nevertheless it rests on a major difficulty: as the set of fluid equations constitute an infinite hierarchy, a closure equation must be chosen. The first chapter details physical characteristics of a fundamental kinetic interaction mechanism between waves and particles. In chapter 2 we propose a fluid closure that allows analytic comparison with a linear fully kinetic result, near an homogeneous, electrostatic, Maxwellian equilibrium. This approach consists in adjusting chosen parameters in order to minimize the discrepancies between fluid and kinetic linear response functions. In chapter 3 we present a general frame for a fluid closure in a magnetized plasma. This is attempted in a linear, simplified model with low dimensionality.

  5. Transposes, L-Eigenvalues and Invariants of Third Order Tensors

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Liqun

    2017-01-01

    Third order tensors have wide applications in mechanics, physics and engineering. The most famous and useful third order tensor is the piezoelectric tensor, which plays a key role in the piezoelectric effect, first discovered by Curie brothers. On the other hand, the Levi-Civita tensor is famous in tensor calculus. In this paper, we study third order tensors and (third order) hypermatrices systematically, by regarding a third order tensor as a linear operator which transforms a second order t...

  6. A mapping closure for turbulent scalar mixing using a time-evolving reference field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.

    1992-01-01

    A general mapping-closure approach for modeling scalar mixing in homogeneous turbulence is developed. This approach is different from the previous methods in that the reference field also evolves according to the same equations as the physical scalar field. The use of a time-evolving Gaussian reference field results in a model that is similar to the mapping closure model of Pope (1991), which is based on the methodology of Chen et al. (1989). Both models yield identical relationships between the scalar variance and higher-order moments, which are in good agreement with heat conduction simulation data and can be consistent with any type of epsilon(phi) evolution. The present methodology can be extended to any reference field whose behavior is known. The possibility of a beta-pdf reference field is explored. The shortcomings of the mapping closure methods are discussed, and the limit at which the mapping becomes invalid is identified.

  7. Development of a three-dimensional local scale atmospheric model with turbulence closure model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazawa, Hiromi

    1989-05-01

    Through the study to improve SPEEDI's capability, a three-dimensional numerical atmospheric model PHYSIC (Prognostic HYdroStatic model Including turbulence Closure model) was developed to apply it to the transport and diffusion evaluation over complex terrains. The detailed description of the atmospheric model was given. This model consists of five prognostic equations; the momentum equations of horizontal components with the so-called Boussinesq and hydrostatic assumptions, the conservation equations of heat, turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence length scale. The coordinate system used is the terrain following z * coordinate system which allows the existence of complex terrain. The minute formula of the turbulence closure calculation, the surface layer process, the ground surface heat budget, and the atmospheric and solar radiation were also presented. The time integration method used in this model is the Alternating Direction Implicit (A.D.I.) method with a vertically and horizontally staggered grid system. The memory storage needed to execute this model with 31 x 31 x 16 grid points, five layers in soil and double precision variables is about 5.3 MBytes. The CPU time is about 2.2 x 10 -5 s per one step per one grid point with a vector processor FACOM VP-100. (author)

  8. Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the major problems of turbulence and turbulent processes, including  physical phenomena, their modeling and their simulation. After a general introduction in Chapter 1 illustrating many aspects dealing with turbulent flows, averaged equations and kinetic energy budgets are provided in Chapter 2. The concept of turbulent viscosity as a closure of the Reynolds stress is also introduced. Wall-bounded flows are presented in Chapter 3, and aspects specific to boundary layers and channel or pipe flows are also pointed out. Free shear flows, namely free jets and wakes, are considered in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 deals with vortex dynamics. Homogeneous turbulence, isotropy, and dynamics of isotropic turbulence are presented in Chapters 6 and 7. Turbulence is then described both in the physical space and in the wave number space. Time dependent numerical simulations are presented in Chapter 8, where an introduction to large eddy simulation is offered. The last three chapters of the book summarize remarka...

  9. Cloud-turbulence interactions: Sensitivity of a general circulation model to closure assumptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkop, S.; Roeckner, E.

    1993-01-01

    Several approaches to parameterize the turbulent transport of momentum, heat, water vapour and cloud water for use in a general circulation model (GCM) have been tested in one-dimensional and three-dimensional model simulations. The schemes differ with respect to their closure assumptions (conventional eddy diffusivity model versus turbulent kinetic energy closure) and also regarding their treatment of cloud-turbulence interactions. The basis properties of these parameterizations are discussed first in column simulations of a stratocumulus-topped atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) under a strong subsidence inversion during the KONTROL experiment in the North Sea. It is found that the K-models tend to decouple the cloud layer from the adjacent layers because the turbulent activity is calculated from local variables. The higher-order scheme performs better in this respect because internally generated turbulence can be transported up and down through the action of turbulent diffusion. Thus, the TKE-scheme provides not only a better link between the cloud and the sub-cloud layer but also between the cloud and the inversion as a result of cloud-top entrainment. In the stratocumulus case study, where the cloud is confined by a pronounced subsidence inversion, increased entrainment favours cloud dilution through enhanced evaporation of cloud droplets. In the GCM study, however, additional cloud-top entrainment supports cloud formation because indirect cloud generating processes are promoted through efficient ventilation of the ABL, such as the enhanced moisture supply by surface evaporation and the increased depth of the ABL. As a result, tropical convection is more vigorous, the hydrological cycle is intensified, the whole troposphere becomes warmer and moister in general and the cloudiness in the upper part of the ABL is increased. (orig.)

  10. Modelling turbulence around and inside porous media based on the second moment closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwata, Yusuke; Suga, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel turbulence model for flows in porous media is proposed. • Three stress tensors emerging in double averaging N–S are individually modelled. • The most advanced second moment closure is applied for the macro-scale stress. • A one equation and the Smagorinsky models are applied to the other stresses. • Promising results are obtained in test flows around and inside porous media. -- Abstract: To predict turbulence in porous media, a new approach is discussed. By double (both volume and Reynolds) averaging Navier–Stokes equations, there appear three unknown covariant terms in the momentum equation. They are namely the dispersive covariance, the macro-scale and the micro-scale Reynolds stresses, in the present study. For the macro-scale Reynolds stress, the TCL (two-component-limit) second moment closure is applied whereas the eddy viscosity models are applied to the other covariant terms: the Smagorinsky model and the one-equation eddy viscosity model, respectively for the dispersive covariance and the micro-scale Reynolds stress. The presently proposed model is evaluated in square rib array flows and porous wall channel flows with reasonable accuracy though further development is required

  11. How Difficult is it to Reduce Low-Level Cloud Biases With the Higher-Order Turbulence Closure Approach in Climate Models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kuan-Man

    2015-01-01

    Low-level clouds cover nearly half of the Earth and play a critical role in regulating the energy and hydrological cycle. Despite the fact that a great effort has been put to advance the modeling and observational capability in recent years, low-level clouds remains one of the largest uncertainties in the projection of future climate change. Low-level cloud feedbacks dominate the uncertainty in the total cloud feedback in climate sensitivity and projection studies. These clouds are notoriously difficult to simulate in climate models due to its complicated interactions with aerosols, cloud microphysics, boundary-layer turbulence and cloud dynamics. The biases in both low cloud coverage/water content and cloud radiative effects (CREs) remain large. A simultaneous reduction in both cloud and CRE biases remains elusive. This presentation first reviews the effort of implementing the higher-order turbulence closure (HOC) approach to representing subgrid-scale turbulence and low-level cloud processes in climate models. There are two HOCs that have been implemented in climate models. They differ in how many three-order moments are used. The CLUBB are implemented in both CAM5 and GDFL models, which are compared with IPHOC that is implemented in CAM5 by our group. IPHOC uses three third-order moments while CLUBB only uses one third-order moment while both use a joint double-Gaussian distribution to represent the subgrid-scale variability. Despite that HOC is more physically consistent and produces more realistic low-cloud geographic distributions and transitions between cumulus and stratocumulus regimes, GCMs with traditional cloud parameterizations outperform in CREs because tuning of this type of models is more extensively performed than those with HOCs. We perform several tuning experiments with CAM5 implemented with IPHOC in an attempt to produce the nearly balanced global radiative budgets without deteriorating the low-cloud simulation. One of the issues in CAM5-IPHOC

  12. Some third order rotatable designs in five dimensions | Mutiso | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... performed according to our dimensional designs need not be discarded. These deisgns require a smaller number of points than most of the available five dimensional third order rotatable designs. Keywords: third order; rotatable designs; four dimensions; five dimensions; sequential > East African Journal of Statistics Vol.

  13. Application of third order stochastic dominance algorithm in investments ranking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lončar Sanja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the use of third order stochastic dominance in ranking Investment alternatives, using TSD algorithms (Levy, 2006for testing third order stochastic dominance. The main goal of using TSD rule is minimization of efficient investment set for investor with risk aversion, who prefers more money and likes positive skew ness.

  14. Ghost imaging with third-order correlated thermal light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou, L-H; Kuang, L-M

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a ghost imaging scheme with third-order correlated thermal light. We show that it is possible to produce the spatial information of an object at two different places in a nonlocal fashion by means of a third-order correlated imaging process with a third-order correlated thermal source and third-order correlation measurement. Concretely, we propose a protocol to create two ghost images at two different places from one object. This protocol involves two optical configurations. We derive the Gaussian thin lens equations and plot the geometrical optics of the ghost imaging processes for the two configurations. It is indicated that third-order correlated ghost imaging with thermal light exhibits richer correlated imaging effects than second-order correlated ghost imaging with thermal light

  15. Embedded solitons in the third-order nonlinear Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Debabrata; Ali, Sk Golam; Talukdar, B

    2008-01-01

    We work with a sech trial function with space-dependent soliton parameters and envisage a variational study for the nonlinear Schoedinger (NLS) equation in the presence of third-order dispersion. We demonstrate that the variational equations for pulse evolution in this NLS equation provide a natural basis to derive a potential model which can account for the existence of a continuous family of embedded solitons supported by the third-order NLS equation. Each member of the family is parameterized by the propagation velocity and co-efficient of the third-order dispersion

  16. Third order TRANSPORT with MAD [Methodical Accelerator Design] input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes computer-aided design codes for particle accelerators. Among the topics discussed are: input beam description; parameters and algebraic expressions; the physical elements; beam lines; operations; and third-order transfer matrix

  17. Anisotropic Third-Order Regularization for Sparse Digital Elevation Models

    KAUST Repository

    Lellmann, Jan; Morel, Jean-Michel; Schö nlieb, Carola-Bibiane

    2013-01-01

    features of the contours while ensuring smoothness across level lines. We propose an anisotropic third-order model and an efficient method to adaptively estimate both the surface and the anisotropy. Our experiments show that the approach outperforms AMLE

  18. Oscillation criteria for third order delay nonlinear differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Elabbasy

    2012-01-01

    via comparison with some first differential equations whose oscillatory characters are known. Our results generalize and improve some known results for oscillation of third order nonlinear differential equations. Some examples are given to illustrate the main results.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and third-order nonlinear optical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-09-20

    Sep 20, 2016 ... the past, several strategies have been evolved to enhance the third-order nonlinear ..... retical fit using the formulation given in ref. [22]. Fit param- ..... Acknowledgement. The corresponding author acknowledges the financial.

  20. Application of a k-epsilon closure to a heated turbulent offset jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghunath, G.; Kumar, R.; Liburdy, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The complex flow which occurs when a heated turbulent jet discharges above a cool, isothermal surface was investigated numerically. This flow is influenced by significant flow curvature, buoyancy, impingement, and recirculation. The main features of the flow have been characterized in the literature by the exit Reynolds number and offset ratio. It is the purpose of this study to assess the applicability of a modified k-epsilon closure model to this flow. Comparisons with limited data for the unheated case and flow predictions for the heated case are presented. The impingement distance is determined to within 2 percent of the experimental results. However, detailed velocity profiles are not well predicted near the wall. Curvature modification and the wall boundary condition for epsilon significantly affect the solution. 15 references

  1. Inertial-range structure of Gross–Pitaevskii turbulence within a spectral closure approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kyo; Arimitsu, Toshihico

    2013-01-01

    The inertial-range structure of turbulence obeying the Gross–Pitaevskii equation, the equation of motion for quantum fluids, is analyzed by means of a spectral closure approximation. It is revealed that, for the energy-transfer range, the spectrum of the order parameter field ψ obeys k −2 law for k ≪ k * and k −1 law for k ≫ k * , where k * is the wavenumber where the characteristic timescales associated with linear and nonlinear terms are of the same order. It is also shown that, for the particle-number-transfer range, the spectrum obeys k −1 law for k ≪ k *, n and k −1/3 law for k ≫ k *,n , where k *,n is the wavenumber corresponding to k * in the particle-number-transfer range. (paper)

  2. Modelling complex draft-tube flows using near-wall turbulence closures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ventikos, Y.; Sotiropoulos, F. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Patel, V.C. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States). Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a finite-volume method for simulating flows through complex hydroturbine draft-tube configurations using near-wall turbulence closures. The method employs the artificial-compressibility pressure-velocity coupling approach in conjunction with multigrid acceleration for fast convergence on very fine grids. Calculations are carried out for a draft tube with two downstream piers on a computational mesh consisting of 1.2x10{sup 6} nodes. Comparisons of the computed results with measurements demonstrate the ability of the method to capture most experimental trends with reasonable accuracy. Calculated three-dimensional particle traces reveal very complex flow features in the vicinity of the piers, including horse-shoe longitudinal vortices and and regions of flow reversal.

  3. Mapping closure for probability distribution function in low frequency magnetized plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.; Kaw, P.

    1995-01-01

    Recent numerical studies on the Hasegawa--Mima equation and its variants describing low frequency magnetized plasma turbulence indicate that the potential fluctuations have a Gaussian character whereas the vorticity exhibits non-Gaussian features. A theoretical interpretation for this observation using the recently developed mapping closure technique [Chen, Chen, and Kraichnan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 2657 (1989)] has been provided here. It has been shown that non-Gaussian statistics for the vorticity arises because of a competition between nonlinear straining and diffusive damping whereas the Gaussianity of the statistics of φ arises because the only significant nonlinearity is associated with divergence free convection, which produces no strain terms. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  4. Hojman's theorem of the third-order ordinary differential equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong-Sheng, Lü; Hong-Bin, Zhang; Shu-Long, Gu

    2009-01-01

    This paper extends Hojman's conservation law to the third-order differential equation. A new conserved quantity is constructed based on the Lie group of transformation generators of the equations of motion. The generators contain variations of the time and generalized coordinates. Two independent non-trivial conserved quantities of the third-order ordinary differential equation are obtained. A simple example is presented to illustrate the applications of the results. (general)

  5. Dynamics of platicons due to third-order dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, Valery E.; Cherenkov, Artem V.; Shitikov, Artem E.; Bilenko, Igor A.; Gorodetsky, Michael L.

    2017-07-01

    Dynamics of platicons caused by the third-order dispersion is studied. It is shown that under the influence of the third-order dispersion platicons obtain angular velocity depending both on dispersion and on detuning value. A method of tuning of platicon associated optical frequency comb repetition rate is proposed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Theory and Applications of the Lugiato-Lefever Equation", edited by Yanne K. Chembo, Damia Gomila, Mustapha Tlidi, Curtis R. Menyuk.

  6. Applying an economical scale-aware PDF-based turbulence closure model in NOAA NCEP GCMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belochitski, A.; Krueger, S. K.; Moorthi, S.; Bogenschutz, P.; Cheng, A.

    2017-12-01

    A novel unified representation of sub-grid scale (SGS) turbulence, cloudiness, and shallow convection is being implemented into the NOAA NCEP Global Forecasting System (GFS) general circulation model. The approach, known as Simplified High Order Closure (SHOC), is based on predicting a joint PDF of SGS thermodynamic variables and vertical velocity, and using it to diagnose turbulent diffusion coefficients, SGS fluxes, condensation, and cloudiness. Unlike other similar methods, comparatively few new prognostic variables needs to be introduced, making the technique computationally efficient. In the base version of SHOC it is SGS turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), and in the developmental version — SGS TKE, and variances of total water and moist static energy (MSE). SHOC is now incorporated into a version of GFS that will become a part of the NOAA Next Generation Global Prediction System based around NOAA GFDL's FV3 dynamical core, NOAA Environmental Modeling System (NEMS) coupled modeling infrastructure software, and a set novel physical parameterizations. Turbulent diffusion coefficients computed by SHOC are now used in place of those produced by the boundary layer turbulence and shallow convection parameterizations. Large scale microphysics scheme is no longer used to calculate cloud fraction or the large-scale condensation/deposition. Instead, SHOC provides these quantities. Radiative transfer parameterization uses cloudiness computed by SHOC. An outstanding problem with implementation of SHOC in the NCEP global models is excessively large high level tropical cloudiness. Comparison of the moments of the SGS PDF diagnosed by SHOC to the moments calculated in a GigaLES simulation of tropical deep convection case (GATE), shows that SHOC diagnoses too narrow PDF distributions of total cloud water and MSE in the areas of deep convective detrainment. A subsequent sensitivity study of SHOC's diagnosed cloud fraction (CF) to higher order input moments of the SGS PDF

  7. Role of pseudo-turbulent stresses in shocked particle clouds and construction of surrogate models for closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, O.; Gaul, N. J.; Davis, S.; Choi, K. K.; Jacobs, G.; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2018-05-01

    Macroscale models of shock-particle interactions require closure terms for unresolved solid-fluid momentum and energy transfer. These comprise the effects of mean as well as fluctuating fluid-phase velocity fields in the particle cloud. Mean drag and Reynolds stress equivalent terms (also known as pseudo-turbulent terms) appear in the macroscale equations. Closure laws for the pseudo-turbulent terms are constructed in this work from ensembles of high-fidelity mesoscale simulations. The computations are performed over a wide range of Mach numbers ( M) and particle volume fractions (φ ) and are used to explicitly compute the pseudo-turbulent stresses from the Favre average of the velocity fluctuations in the flow field. The computed stresses are then used as inputs to a Modified Bayesian Kriging method to generate surrogate models. The surrogates can be used as closure models for the pseudo-turbulent terms in macroscale computations of shock-particle interactions. It is found that the kinetic energy associated with the velocity fluctuations is comparable to that of the mean flow—especially for increasing M and φ . This work is a first attempt to quantify and evaluate the effect of velocity fluctuations for problems of shock-particle interactions.

  8. Extension of relativistic dissipative hydrodynamics to third order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El, Andrej; Xu Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    Following the procedure introduced by Israel and Stewart, we expand the entropy current up to the third order in the shear stress tensor π αβ and derive a novel third-order evolution equation for π αβ . This equation is solved for the one-dimensional Bjorken boost-invariant expansion. The scaling solutions for various values of the shear viscosity to the entropy density ratio η/s are shown to be in very good agreement with those obtained from kinetic transport calculations. For the pressure isotropy starting with 1 at τ 0 =0.4 fm/c, the third-order corrections to Israel-Stewart theory are approximately 10% for η/s=0.2 and more than a factor of 2 for η/s=3. We also estimate all higher-order corrections to Israel-Stewart theory and demonstrate their importance in describing highly viscous matters.

  9. Convergence of third order correlation energy in atoms and molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Kalju; Granovsky, Alex A; Noga, Jozef

    2007-01-30

    We have investigated the convergence of third order correlation energy within the hierarchies of correlation consistent basis sets for helium, neon, and water, and for three stationary points of hydrogen peroxide. This analysis confirms that singlet pair energies converge much slower than triplet pair energies. In addition, singlet pair energies with (aug)-cc-pVDZ and (aug)-cc-pVTZ basis sets do not follow a converging trend and energies with three basis sets larger than aug-cc-pVTZ are generally required for reliable extrapolations of third order correlation energies, making so the explicitly correlated R12 calculations preferable.

  10. Flow and transport simulation of Madeira River using three depth-averaged two-equation turbulence closure models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-ren Yu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a numerical simulation in the Amazon water system, aiming to develop a quasi-three-dimensional numerical tool for refined modeling of turbulent flow and passive transport of mass in natural waters. Three depth-averaged two-equation turbulence closure models, k˜−ε˜,k˜−w˜, and k˜−ω˜ , were used to close the non-simplified quasi-three dimensional hydrodynamic fundamental governing equations. The discretized equations were solved with the advanced multi-grid iterative method using non-orthogonal body-fitted coarse and fine grids with collocated variable arrangement. Except for steady flow computation, the processes of contaminant inpouring and plume development at the beginning of discharge, caused by a side-discharge of a tributary, have also been numerically investigated. The three depth-averaged two-equation closure models are all suitable for modeling strong mixing turbulence. The newly established turbulence models such as the k˜−ω˜ model, with a higher order of magnitude of the turbulence parameter, provide a possibility for improving computational precision.

  11. Taub-NUT black holes in third order Lovelock gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendi, S.H.; Dehghani, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    We consider the existence of Taub-NUT solutions in third order Lovelock gravity with cosmological constant, and obtain the general form of these solutions in eight dimensions. We find that, as in the case of Gauss-Bonnet gravity and in contrast with the Taub-NUT solutions of Einstein gravity, the metric function depends on the specific form of the base factors on which one constructs the circle fibration. Thus, one may say that the independence of the NUT solutions on the geometry of the base space is not a robust feature of all generally covariant theories of gravity and is peculiar to Einstein gravity. We find that when Einstein gravity admits non-extremal NUT solutions with no curvature singularity at r=N, then there exists a non-extremal NUT solution in third order Lovelock gravity. In 8-dimensional spacetime, this happens when the metric of the base space is chosen to be CP 3 . Indeed, third order Lovelock gravity does not admit non-extreme NUT solutions with any other base space. This is another property which is peculiar to Einstein gravity. We also find that the third order Lovelock gravity admits extremal NUT solution when the base space is T 2 xT 2 xT 2 or S 2 xT 2 xT 2 . We have extended these observations to two conjectures about the existence of NUT solutions in Lovelock gravity in any even-dimensional spacetime

  12. Third-Order Matching in the Polymorphic Lambda Calculus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Springintveld, J.

    We show that it is decidable whether a third-order matching problem in the polymorphic lambda calculus has a solution. The proof is constructive in the sense that an algorithm can be extracted from it that, given such a problem, returns a substitution if it has a solution and fail otherwise.

  13. A new third order rotatable design in five dimensions through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experiments of this kind could be widely applicable in human medicine, veterinary medicine, agriculture and in general, product research-innovation development for optimum resource utilisation based industrialisation process in line with the Kenya Vision 2030. In this paper, a third order rotatable design in five dimensions ...

  14. An accurate scheme by block method for third order ordinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    problems of ordinary differential equations is presented in this paper. The approach of collocation approximation is adopted in the derivation of the scheme and then the scheme is applied as simultaneous integrator to special third order initial value problem of ordinary differential equations. This implementation strategy is ...

  15. MPDATA: Third-order accuracy for variable flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waruszewski, Maciej; Kühnlein, Christian; Pawlowska, Hanna; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2018-04-01

    This paper extends the multidimensional positive definite advection transport algorithm (MPDATA) to third-order accuracy for temporally and spatially varying flows. This is accomplished by identifying the leading truncation error of the standard second-order MPDATA, performing the Cauchy-Kowalevski procedure to express it in a spatial form and compensating its discrete representation-much in the same way as the standard MPDATA corrects the first-order accurate upwind scheme. The procedure of deriving the spatial form of the truncation error was automated using a computer algebra system. This enables various options in MPDATA to be included straightforwardly in the third-order scheme, thereby minimising the implementation effort in existing code bases. Following the spirit of MPDATA, the error is compensated using the upwind scheme resulting in a sign-preserving algorithm, and the entire scheme can be formulated using only two upwind passes. Established MPDATA enhancements, such as formulation in generalised curvilinear coordinates, the nonoscillatory option or the infinite-gauge variant, carry over to the fully third-order accurate scheme. A manufactured 3D analytic solution is used to verify the theoretical development and its numerical implementation, whereas global tracer-transport benchmarks demonstrate benefits for chemistry-transport models fundamental to air quality monitoring, forecasting and control. A series of explicitly-inviscid implicit large-eddy simulations of a convective boundary layer and explicitly-viscid simulations of a double shear layer illustrate advantages of the fully third-order-accurate MPDATA for fluid dynamics applications.

  16. Third-order theory for multi-directional irregular waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Per A.; Fuhrman, David R.

    2012-01-01

    A new third-order solution for multi-directional irregular water waves in finite water depth is presented. The solution includes explicit expressions for the surface elevation, the amplitude dispersion and the vertical variation of the velocity potential. Expressions for the velocity potential at...

  17. Third-order monochromatic aberrations via Fermat's principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marasco, A.; Romano, A.

    2006-01-01

    By Fermat's principle and particular optical paths, which are not rays, a new aberration function is introduced. This function allows to derive, without resorting to the whole Hamiltonian formalism, the third-order geometrical aberrations of an optical system with a symmetry of revolution

  18. Magnetic field induced third order susceptibility of third order harmonic generation in a ZnMgSe strained quantum well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark, J. Abraham Hudson, E-mail: a.john.peter@gmail.com; Peter, A. John, E-mail: a.john.peter@gmail.com [Dept. of Physics, SSM Institute of Engineering and Technology, Dindigul-624002 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Third order susceptibility of third order harmonic generation is investigated in a Zn{sub 0.1}Mg{sub 0.9}Se/Zn{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}Se/Zn{sub 0.1}Mg{sub 0.9}Se quantum well in the presence of magnetic field strength. The confinement potential is considered as the addition of energy offsets of the conduction band (or valence band) and the strain-induced potential in our calculations. The material dependent effective mass is followed throughout the computation because it has a high influence on the electron energy levels in low dimensional semiconductor systems.

  19. The conditional moment closure method for modeling lean premixed turbulent combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Scott Montgomery

    Natural gas fired lean premixed gas turbines have become the method of choice for new power generation systems due to their high efficiency and low pollutant emissions. As emission regulations for these combustion systems become more stringent, the use of numerical modeling has become an important a priori tool in designing clean and efficient combustors. Here a new turbulent combustion model is developed in an attempt to improve the state of the art. The Conditional Moment Closure (CMC) method is a new theory that has been applied to non-premixed combustion with good success. The application of the CMC method to premixed systems has been proposed, but has not yet been done. The premixed CMC method replaces the species mass fractions as independent variables with the species mass fractions that are conditioned on a reaction progress variable (RPV). Conservation equations for these new variables are then derived and solved. The general idea behind the CMC method is that the behavior of the chemical species is closely coupled to the reaction progress variable. Thus, species conservation equations that are conditioned on the RPV will have terms involving the fluctuating quantities that are much more likely to be negligible. The CMC method accounts for the interaction between scalar dissipation (micromixing) and chemistry, while de-coupling the kinetics from the bulk flow (macromixing). Here the CMC method is combined with a commercial computational fluid dynamics program, which calculates the large-scale fluid motions. The CMC model is validated by comparison to 2-D reacting backward facing step data. Predicted species, temperature and velocity fields are compared to experimental data with good success. The CMC model is also validated against the University of Washington's 3-D jet stirred reactor (JSR) data, which is an idealized lean premixed combustor. The JSR results are encouraging, but not as good as the backward facing step. The largest source of error is from

  20. Third-order gap plasmon based metasurfaces for visible light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshpande, Rucha Anil; Pors, Anders; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2017-01-01

    with different dimensions, to operate as a polarization beam splitter for linearly polarized light. The fabricated polarization beam splitter is characterized using a super-continuum light source at normal light incidence and found to exhibit a polarization contrast ratio of up to 40 dB near the design...... of the performance of polarization beam splitters based on third-order GSP resonance as well as other potential applications of the suggested approach....... by an optically thick gold film are calculated for the operation wavelength of 633 nm. Exploiting the occurrence of the third-order GSP resonance for nanobricks having their lengths close to 300 nm, we design the phase-gradient metasurface, representing an array of (450 x 2250 nm2) supercells made of 5 nanobricks...

  1. Brown's TRANSPORT up to third order aberration by artificial intelligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Jiawen; Xie Xi; Qiao Qingwen

    1991-01-01

    Brown's TRANSPORT is a first and second order matrix multiplication computer program intended for the design of accelerator beam transport systems, neglecting the third order aberration. Recently a new method was developed to derive analytically any order aberration coefficients of general charged particle optic system, applicable to any practical systems, such as accelerators, electron microscopes, lithographs, etc., including those unknown systems yet to be invented. An artificial intelligence program in Turbo Prolog was implemented on IBM-PC 286 or 386 machine to generate automatically the analytical expression of any order aberration coefficients of general charged particle optic system. Based on this new method and technique, Brown's TRANSPORT is extended beyond the second order aberration effects by artificial intelligence, outputing automatically all the analytical expressions up to the third order aberration coefficients

  2. Brown's transport up to third order aberration by artificial intelligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Jiawen; Xie Xi; Qiao Qingwen

    1992-01-01

    Brown's TRANSPORT is a first and second order matrix multiplication computer program intended for the design of accelerator beam transport systems, neglecting the third order aberration. Recently a new method was developed to derive analytically any order aberration coefficients of general charged particle optic system, applicable to any practical systems, such as accelerators, electron microscopes, lithographs, including those unknown systems yet to be invented. An artificial intelligence program in Turbo Prolog was implemented on IBM-PC 286 or 386 machine to generate automatically the analytical expression of any order aberration coefficients of general charged particle optic system. Based on this new method and technique, Brown's TRANSPORT is extended beyond the second order aberration effect by artificial intelligence, outputting automatically all the analytical expressions up to the third order aberration coefficients

  3. Computer program 'TRIO' for third order calculation of ion trajectory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Takekiyo; Matsuda, Hisashi; Fujita, Yoshitaka; Wollnik, H.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program for the calculation of ion trajectory is described. This program ''TRIO'' (Third Order Ion Optics) is applicable to any ion optical system consisting of drift spaces, cylindrical or toroidal electric sector fields, homogeneous or inhomogeneous magnetic sector fields, magnetic and electrostatic Q-lenses. The influence of the fringing field is taken into consideration. A special device is introduced to the method of matrix multiplication to shorten the calculation time and the required time proves to be about 40 times shorter than the ordinary method as a result. The trajectory calculation is possible to execute with accuracy up to third order. Any one of three dispersion bases, momentum, energy, mass and energy, is possible to be selected. Full LIST of the computer program and an example are given. (auth.)

  4. Ultrafast third-order nonlinearity of silver nanospheres and nanodiscs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayabalan, J; Singh, Asha; Chari, Rama; Oak, Shrikant M [Ultrafast Studies Section, Laser Physics Application Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013 (India)

    2007-08-08

    We have measured and compared the absolute values of nonlinear susceptibility of colloidal solutions containing silver nanospheres and nanodiscs at their respective plasmon peaks using a femtosecond laser. The nonlinear process responsible for the laser-induced grating formation in the sample is determined to be of third order. The ratio between the third-order susceptibility (|{chi}{sup (3)}|) and the linear absorption coefficient ({alpha}) of the nanodiscs at 590 nm is three times than that of the similar ratio for nanospheres at 398 nm. Using a randomly oriented ellipsoidal model, we have shown that the increase in |{chi}{sup (3)}|/{alpha} for a nanodisc at 590 nm can be attributed to the change in the field enhancement factor with shape.

  5. Ultrafast third-order nonlinearity of silver nanospheres and nanodiscs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayabalan, J; Singh, Asha; Chari, Rama; Oak, Shrikant M

    2007-01-01

    We have measured and compared the absolute values of nonlinear susceptibility of colloidal solutions containing silver nanospheres and nanodiscs at their respective plasmon peaks using a femtosecond laser. The nonlinear process responsible for the laser-induced grating formation in the sample is determined to be of third order. The ratio between the third-order susceptibility (|χ (3) |) and the linear absorption coefficient (α) of the nanodiscs at 590 nm is three times than that of the similar ratio for nanospheres at 398 nm. Using a randomly oriented ellipsoidal model, we have shown that the increase in |χ (3) |/α for a nanodisc at 590 nm can be attributed to the change in the field enhancement factor with shape

  6. A memristor-based third-order oscillator: beyond oscillation

    KAUST Repository

    Talukdar, Abdul Hafiz Ibne

    2012-10-06

    This paper demonstrates the first third-order autonomous linear time variant circuit realization that enhances parametric oscillation through the usage of memristor in conventional oscillators. Although the output has sustained oscillation, the linear features of the conventional oscillators become time dependent. The poles oscillate in nonlinear behavior due to the oscillation of memristor resistance. The mathematical formulas as well as SPICE simulations are introduced for the memristor-based phase shift oscillator showing a great matching.

  7. Third-order susceptibility of gold for ultrathin layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysenko, Oleg; Bache, Morten; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    This Letter presents an experimental study of nonlinear plasmonic effects in gold-stripe waveguides. The optical characterization is performed by a picosecond laser and reveals two nonlinear effects related to propagation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons: nonlinear power transmission...... of plasmonic modes and spectral broadening of plasmonic modes. The experimental values of the third-order susceptibility of the gold layers are extracted. They exhibit a clear dependence on layer thickness. (C) 2016 Optical Society of America...

  8. Experimental determination of third-order elastic constants of diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, J M; Gupta, Y M

    2011-03-25

    To determine the nonlinear elastic response of diamond, single crystals were shock compressed along the [100], [110], and [111] orientations to 120 GPa peak elastic stresses. Particle velocity histories and elastic wave velocities were measured by using laser interferometry. The measured elastic wave profiles were used, in combination with published acoustic measurements, to determine the complete set of third-order elastic constants. These constants represent the first experimental determination, and several differ significantly from those calculated by using theoretical models.

  9. A memristor-based third-order oscillator: beyond oscillation

    KAUST Repository

    Talukdar, Abdul Hafiz Ibne; Radwan, Ahmed G.; Salama, Khaled N.

    2012-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the first third-order autonomous linear time variant circuit realization that enhances parametric oscillation through the usage of memristor in conventional oscillators. Although the output has sustained oscillation, the linear features of the conventional oscillators become time dependent. The poles oscillate in nonlinear behavior due to the oscillation of memristor resistance. The mathematical formulas as well as SPICE simulations are introduced for the memristor-based phase shift oscillator showing a great matching.

  10. Anisotropic Third-Order Regularization for Sparse Digital Elevation Models

    KAUST Repository

    Lellmann, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We consider the problem of interpolating a surface based on sparse data such as individual points or level lines. We derive interpolators satisfying a list of desirable properties with an emphasis on preserving the geometry and characteristic features of the contours while ensuring smoothness across level lines. We propose an anisotropic third-order model and an efficient method to adaptively estimate both the surface and the anisotropy. Our experiments show that the approach outperforms AMLE and higher-order total variation methods qualitatively and quantitatively on real-world digital elevation data. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.

  11. Systems of conservation laws with third-order Hamiltonian structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferapontov, Evgeny V.; Pavlov, Maxim V.; Vitolo, Raffaele F.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate n-component systems of conservation laws that possess third-order Hamiltonian structures of differential-geometric type. The classification of such systems is reduced to the projective classification of linear congruences of lines in P^{n+2} satisfying additional geometric constraints. Algebraically, the problem can be reformulated as follows: for a vector space W of dimension n+2 , classify n-tuples of skew-symmetric 2-forms A^{α } \\in Λ ^2(W) such that φ _{β γ }A^{β }\\wedge A^{γ }=0, for some non-degenerate symmetric φ.

  12. Driven similarity renormalization group: Third-order multireference perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenyang; Evangelista, Francesco A

    2017-03-28

    A third-order multireference perturbation theory based on the driven similarity renormalization group (DSRG-MRPT3) approach is presented. The DSRG-MRPT3 method has several appealing features: (a) it is intruder free, (b) it is size consistent, (c) it leads to a non-iterative algorithm with O(N 6 ) scaling, and (d) it includes reference relaxation effects. The DSRG-MRPT3 scheme is benchmarked on the potential energy curves of F 2 , H 2 O 2 , C 2 H 6 , and N 2 along the F-F, O-O, C-C, and N-N bond dissociation coordinates, respectively. The nonparallelism errors of DSRG-MRPT3 are consistent with those of complete active space third-order perturbation theory and multireference configuration interaction with singles and doubles and show significant improvements over those obtained from DSRG second-order multireference perturbation theory. Our efficient implementation of the DSRG-MRPT3 based on factorized electron repulsion integrals enables studies of medium-sized open-shell organic compounds. This point is demonstrated with computations of the singlet-triplet splitting (Δ ST =E T -E S ) of 9,10-anthracyne. At the DSRG-MRPT3 level of theory, our best estimate of the adiabatic Δ ST is 3.9 kcal mol -1 , a value that is within 0.1 kcal mol -1 from multireference coupled cluster results.

  13. Criticality in third order lovelock gravity and butterfly effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qaemmaqami, Mohammad M.

    2018-01-01

    We study third order Lovelock Gravity in D = 7 at the critical point which three (A)dS vacua degenerate into one. We see there is not propagating graviton at the critical point. And also we compute the butterfly velocity for this theory at the critical point by considering the shock wave solutions near horizon, this is important to note that although there is no propagating graviton at the critical point, due to boundary gravitons the butterfly velocity is non-zero. Finally we observe that the butterfly velocity for third order Lovelock Gravity at the critical point in D = 7 is less than the butterfly velocity for Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet Gravity at the critical point in D = 7 which is less than the butterfly velocity in D = 7 for Einstein Gravity, v B E.H > v B E.G.B > v B 3rdLovelock . Maybe we can conclude that by adding higher order curvature corrections to Einstein Gravity the butterfly velocity decreases. (orig.)

  14. Effect of third-order aberrations on dynamic accommodation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gil, Norberto; Rucker, Frances J; Stark, Lawrence R; Badar, Mustanser; Borgovan, Theodore; Burke, Sean; Kruger, Philip B

    2007-03-01

    We investigate the potential for the third-order aberrations coma and trefoil to provide a signed cue to accommodation. It is first demonstrated theoretically (with some assumptions) that the point spread function is insensitive to the sign of spherical defocus in the presence of odd-order aberrations. In an experimental investigation, the accommodation response to a sinusoidal change in vergence (1-3D, 0.2Hz) of a monochromatic stimulus was obtained with a dynamic infrared optometer. Measurements were obtained in 10 young visually normal individuals with and without custom contact lenses that induced low and high values of r.m.s. trefoil (0.25, 1.03 microm) and coma (0.34, 0.94 microm). Despite variation between subjects, we did not find any statistically significant increase or decrease in the accommodative gain for low levels of trefoil and coma, although effects approached or reached significance for the high levels of trefoil and coma. Theoretical and experimental results indicate that the presence of Zernike third-order aberrations on the eye does not seem to play a crucial role in the dynamics of the accommodation response.

  15. Criticality in third order lovelock gravity and butterfly effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qaemmaqami, Mohammad M. [Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Particles and Accelerators, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2018-01-15

    We study third order Lovelock Gravity in D = 7 at the critical point which three (A)dS vacua degenerate into one. We see there is not propagating graviton at the critical point. And also we compute the butterfly velocity for this theory at the critical point by considering the shock wave solutions near horizon, this is important to note that although there is no propagating graviton at the critical point, due to boundary gravitons the butterfly velocity is non-zero. Finally we observe that the butterfly velocity for third order Lovelock Gravity at the critical point in D = 7 is less than the butterfly velocity for Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet Gravity at the critical point in D = 7 which is less than the butterfly velocity in D = 7 for Einstein Gravity, v{sub B}{sup E.H} > v{sub B}{sup E.G.B} > v{sub B}{sup 3rdLovelock}. Maybe we can conclude that by adding higher order curvature corrections to Einstein Gravity the butterfly velocity decreases. (orig.)

  16. Criticality in third order lovelock gravity and butterfly effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaemmaqami, Mohammad M.

    2018-01-01

    We study third order Lovelock Gravity in D=7 at the critical point which three (A)dS vacua degenerate into one. We see there is not propagating graviton at the critical point. And also we compute the butterfly velocity for this theory at the critical point by considering the shock wave solutions near horizon, this is important to note that although there is no propagating graviton at the critical point, due to boundary gravitons the butterfly velocity is non-zero. Finally we observe that the butterfly velocity for third order Lovelock Gravity at the critical point in D=7 is less than the butterfly velocity for Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet Gravity at the critical point in D=7 which is less than the butterfly velocity in D = 7 for Einstein Gravity, vB^{E.H}>vB^{E.G.B}>vB^{3rd Lovelock} . Maybe we can conclude that by adding higher order curvature corrections to Einstein Gravity the butterfly velocity decreases.

  17. Implementation of second moment closure turbulence model for incompressible flows in the industrial finite element code N3S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pot, G.; Laurence, D.; Rharif, N.E.; Leal de Sousa, L.; Compe, C.

    1995-12-01

    This paper deals with the introduction of a second moment closure turbulence model (Reynolds Stress Model) in an industrial finite element code, N3S, developed at Electricite de France.The numerical implementation of the model in N3S will be detailed in 2D and 3D. Some details are given concerning finite element computations and solvers. Then, some results will be given, including a comparison between standard k-ε model, R.S.M. model and experimental data for some test case. (authors). 22 refs., 3 figs

  18. Einstein-Weyl spaces and third-order differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tod, K. P.

    2000-08-01

    The three-dimensional null-surface formalism of Tanimoto [M. Tanimoto, "On the null surface formalism," Report No. gr-qc/9703003 (1997)] and Forni et al. [Forni et al., "Null surfaces formation in 3D," J. Math Phys. (submitted)] are extended to describe Einstein-Weyl spaces, following Cartan [E. Cartan, "Les espaces généralisées et l'integration de certaines classes d'equations différentielles," C. R. Acad. Sci. 206, 1425-1429 (1938); "La geometria de las ecuaciones diferenciales de tercer order," Rev. Mat. Hispano-Am. 4, 1-31 (1941)]. In the resulting formalism, Einstein-Weyl spaces are obtained from a particular class of third-order differential equations. Some examples of the construction which include some new Einstein-Weyl spaces are given.

  19. Third order nonlinear optical properties of a paratellurite single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclère, J.-R.; Hayakawa, T.; Roginskii, E. M.; Smirnov, M. B.; Mirgorodsky, A.; Couderc, V.; Masson, O.; Colas, M.; Noguera, O.; Rodriguez, V.; Thomas, P.

    2018-05-01

    The (a,b) plane angular dependence of the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility, χ(3) , of a c-cut paratellurite (α-TeO2) single crystal was quantitatively evaluated here by the Z-scan technique, using a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser operated at 800 nm. In particular, the mean value Re( ⟨χ(3)⟩a,b )(α-TeO2) of the optical tensor has been extracted from such experiments via a direct comparison with the data collected for a fused silica reference glass plate. A R e (⟨χ(3)⟩(a,b )(α-TeO2)):R e (χ(3))(SiO2 glass) ratio roughly equal to 49.1 is found, and our result compares thus very favourably with the unique experimental value (a ratio of ˜50) reported by Kim et al. [J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 76, 2486 (1993)] for a pure TeO2 glass. In addition, it is shown that the angular dependence of the phase modulation within the (a,b) plane can be fully understood in the light of the strong dextro-rotatory power known for TeO2 materials. Taking into account the optical activity, some analytical model serving to estimate the diagonal and non-diagonal components of the third order nonlinear susceptibility tensor has been thus developed. Finally, Re( χxxxx(3) ) and Re( χxxyy(3) ) values of 95.1 ×10-22 m 2/V2 and 42.0 ×10-22 m2/V2 , respectively, are then deduced for a paratellurite single crystal, considering fused silica as a reference.

  20. Numerical analysis of turbulent flow and heat transfer in a square sectioned U-bend duct by elliptic-blending second moment closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jong Keun; Choi, Young Don; An, Jeong Soo

    2007-01-01

    A second moment turbulence closure using the elliptic-blending equation is introduced to analyze the turbulence and heat transfer in a square sectioned U-bend duct flow. The turbulent heat flux model based on the elliptic concept satisfies the near-wall balance between viscous diffusion, viscous dissipation and temperature-pressure gradient correlation, and also has the characteristics of approaching its respective conventional high Reynolds number model far away from the wall. Also, the traditional GGDH heat flux model is compared with the present elliptic concept-based heat flux model. The turbulent heat flux models are closely linked to the elliptic blending second moment closure which is used for the prediction of Reynolds stresses. The predicted results show their reasonable agreement with experimental data for a square sectioned U-bend duct flow field adopted in the present study

  1. Quadratic third-order tensor optimization problem with quadratic constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixing Yang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Quadratically constrained quadratic programs (QQPs problems play an important modeling role for many diverse problems. These problems are in general NP hard and numerically intractable. Semidenite programming (SDP relaxations often provide good approximate solutions to these hard problems. For several special cases of QQP, e.g., convex programs and trust region subproblems, SDP relaxation provides the exact optimal value, i.e., there is a zero duality gap. However, this is not true for the general QQP, or even the QQP with two convex constraints, but a nonconvex objective.In this paper, we consider a certain QQP where the variable is neither vector nor matrix but a third-order tensor. This problem can be viewed as a generalization of the ordinary QQP with vector or matrix as it's variant. Under some mild conditions, we rst show that SDP relaxation provides exact optimal solutions for the original problem. Then we focus on two classes of homogeneous quadratic tensor programming problems which have no requirements on the constraints number. For one, we provide an easily implemental polynomial time algorithm to approximately solve the problem and discuss the approximation ratio. For the other, we show there is no gap between the SDP relaxation and itself.

  2. Third-order nonlinear optical properties of ADP crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengxia; Wang, Zhengping; Chai, Xiangxu; Sun, Yuxiang; Sui, Tingting; Sun, Xun; Xu, Xinguang

    2018-05-01

    By using the Z-scan method, we investigated the third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of ADP crystal at different wavelengths (355, 532, and 1064 nm) and different orientations ([001], [100], [110], I and II). The experimental data were fitted by NLO theory, to give out the two photon absorption (TPA) coefficient β 2 and the nonlinear refractive index n 2. When the light source changed from a 40 ps, 1064 nm fundamental laser to a 30 ps, 355 nm third-harmonic-generation (THG) laser, the β 2 value increased about 5 times (0.2 × 10‑2 → 1 × 10‑2 cm GW‑1), and the n 2 value increased about 1.5 times (1.5 × 10‑16 → 2.2 × 10‑16 cm2 W‑1). Among all of the orientations, the [110] sample exhibits the smallest β 2, and the second smallest n 2. It indicates that this orientation and its surroundings will be the preferred directions for high-power laser applications of ADP crystal.

  3. Testing quantum mechanics using third-order correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsler, P.

    1996-01-01

    Semiclassical theories similar to stochastic electrodynamics are widely used in optics. The distinguishing feature of such theories is that the quantum uncertainty is represented by random statistical fluctuations. They can successfully predict some quantum-mechanical phenomena; for example, the squeezing of the quantum uncertainty in the parametric oscillator. However, since such theories are not equivalent to quantum mechanics, they will not always be useful. Complex number representations can be used to exactly model the quantum uncertainty, but care has to be taken that approximations do not reduce the description to a hidden variable one. This paper helps show the limitations of open-quote open-quote semiclassical theories,close-quote close-quote and helps show where a true quantum-mechanical treatment needs to be used. Third-order correlations are a test that provides a clear distinction between quantum and hidden variable theories in a way analogous to that provided by the open-quote open-quote all or nothing close-quote close-quote Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger test of local hidden variable theories. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  4. Optical nonclassicality test based on third-order intensity correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigovacca, L.; Kolthammer, W. S.; Di Franco, C.; Kim, M. S.

    2018-03-01

    We develop a nonclassicality criterion for the interference of three delayed, but otherwise identical, light fields in a three-mode Bell interferometer. We do so by comparing the prediction of quantum mechanics with those of a classical framework in which independent sources emit electric fields with random phases. In particular, we evaluate third-order correlations among output intensities as a function of the delays, and show how the presence of a correlation revival for small delays cannot be explained by the classical model of light. The observation of a revival is thus a nonclassicality signature, which can be achieved only by sources with a photon-number statistics that is highly sub-Poissonian. Our analysis provides strong evidence for the nonclassicality of the experiment discussed by Menssen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 118, 153603 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.153603], and shows how a collective "triad" phase affects the interference of any three or more light fields, irrespective of their quantum or classical character.

  5. Stabilization of third-order bilinear systems using constant controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Golubev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the zero equilibrium stabilization for dynamical systems that have control input singularities. A dynamical system with scalar control input is called nonregular if the coefficient of input becomes null on a subset of the phase space that contains the origin. One of the classes of nonregular dynamical systems is represented by bilinear systems. In case of second-order bilinear systems the necessary and sufficient conditions for the zero equilibrium stabilizability are known in the literature. However, in general case the stabilization problem in the presence of control input singularities has not been solved yet.In this note we solve the problem of the zero equilibrium stabilization for the third-order bilinear dynamical systems given in a canonical form. The solution is found in the class of constant controls. The necessary and sufficient conditions are obtained for the zero equilibrium stabilizability of the bilinear systems in question.The dependence of the zero equilibrium stabilizability on system parameter values is analyzed. The general criteria of stabilizability by means of constant controls are given for the bilinear systems in question. In case when all the system parameters have nonzero values the necessary and sufficient stabilizability conditions are proved. The case when some of the parameters are equal to zero is also considered.Further research can be focused on extending the obtained results to a higher-order case of bilinear and affine dynamical systems. The solution of the considered stabilization problem should also be found not only within constant controls but also in a class of state feedbacks, particularly, in the case when stabilizing constant control does not exist.One of the potential application areas for the obtained theoretical results is automatic control of technical plants like unmanned aerial vehicles and mobile robots.

  6. Cloud Feedbacks on Greenhouse Warming in a Multi-Scale Modeling Framework with a Higher-Order Turbulence Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Anning; Xu, Kuan-Man

    2015-01-01

    Five-year simulation experiments with a multi-scale modeling Framework (MMF) with a advanced intermediately prognostic higher-order turbulence closure (IPHOC) in its cloud resolving model (CRM) component, also known as SPCAM-IPHOC (super parameterized Community Atmospheric Model), are performed to understand the fast tropical (30S-30N) cloud response to an instantaneous doubling of CO2 concentration with SST held fixed at present-day values. SPCAM-IPHOC has substantially improved the low-level representation compared with SPCAM. It is expected that the cloud responses to greenhouse warming in SPCAM-IPHOC is more realistic. The change of rising motion, surface precipitation, cloud cover, and shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing in SPCAM-IPHOC from the greenhouse warming will be presented in the presentation.

  7. Large-eddy simulation of stable atmospheric boundary layers to develop better turbulence closures for climate and weather models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou-Zeid, Elie; Huang, Jing; Golaz, Jean-Christophe

    2011-11-01

    A disconnect remains between our improved physical understanding of boundary layers stabilized by buoyancy and how we parameterize them in coarse atmospheric models. Most operational climate models require excessive turbulence mixing in such conditions to prevent decoupling of the atmospheric component from the land component, but the performance of such a model is unlikely to be satisfactory under weakly and moderately stable conditions. Using Large-eddy simulation, we revisit some of the basic challenges in parameterizing stable atmospheric boundary layers: eddy-viscosity closure is found to be more reliable due to an improved alignment of vertical Reynolds stresses and mean strains under stable conditions, but the dependence of the magnitude of the eddy viscosity on stability is not well represented by several models tested here. Thus, we propose a new closure that reproduces the different stability regimes better. Subsequently, tests of this model in the GFDL's single-column model (SCM) are found to yield good agreement with LES results in idealized steady-stability cases, as well as in cases with gradual and sharp changes of stability with time.

  8. Conditional Moment Closure Modelling of a Lifted H2/N2 Turbulent Jet Flame Using the Presumed Mapping Function Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad El Sayed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A lifted hydrogen/nitrogen turbulent jet flame issuing into a vitiated coflow is investigated using the conditional moment closure (CMC supplemented by the presumed mapping function (PMF approach for the modelling of conditional mixing and velocity statistics. Using a prescribed reference field, the PMF approach yields a presumed probability density function (PDF for the mixture fraction, which is then used in closing the conditional scalar dissipation rate (CSDR and conditional velocity in a fully consistent manner. These closures are applied to a lifted flame and the findings are compared to previous results obtained using β-PDF-based closures over a range of coflow temperatures (Tc. The PMF results are in line with those of the β-PDF and compare well to measurements. The transport budgets in mixture fraction and physical spaces and the radical history ahead of the stabilisation height indicate that the stabilisation mechanism is susceptible to Tc. As in the previous β-PDF calculations, autoignition around the “most reactive” mixture fraction remains the controlling mechanism for sufficiently high Tc. Departure from the β-PDF predictions is observed when Tc is decreased as PMF predicts stabilisation by means of premixed flame propagation. This conclusion is based on the observation that lean mixtures are heated by downstream burning mixtures in a preheat zone developing ahead of the stabilization height. The spurious sources, which stem from inconsistent CSDR modelling, are further investigated. The findings reveal that their effect is small but nonnegligible, most notably within the flame zone.

  9. Third-order nonlinear differential operators preserving invariant subspaces of maximal dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Gai-Zhu; Zhang Shun-Li; Li Yao-Long

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, third-order nonlinear differential operators are studied. It is shown that they are quadratic forms when they preserve invariant subspaces of maximal dimension. A complete description of third-order quadratic operators with constant coefficients is obtained. One example is given to derive special solutions for evolution equations with third-order quadratic operators. (general)

  10. Modelling of Non-Premixed Turbulent Combustion of Hydrogen using Conditional Moment Closure Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor, M M; Hairuddin, A Aziz; Wandel, Andrew P; Yusaf, T F

    2012-01-01

    Most of the electricity generation and energy for transport is still generated by the conversion of chemical to mechanical energy by burning the fuels in the combustion chamber. Regulation for pollution and the demand for more fuel economy had driven worldwide researcher to focus on combustion efficiency. In order to reduce experimental cost, accurate modelling and simulation is very critical step. Taylor series expansion was utilised to reduce the error term for the discretization. FORTRAN code was used to execute the discretized partial differential equation. Hydrogen combustion was simulated using Conditional Moment Closure (CMC) model. Combustion of hydrogen with oxygen was successfully simulated and reported in this paper.

  11. Conditional dissipation of scalars in homogeneous turbulence: Closure for MMC modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandel, Andrew P.

    2013-08-01

    While the mean and unconditional variance are to be predicted well by any reasonable turbulent combustion model, these are generally not sufficient for the accurate modelling of complex phenomena such as extinction/reignition. An additional criterion has been recently introduced: accurate modelling of the dissipation timescales associated with fluctuations of scalars about their conditional mean (conditional dissipation timescales). Analysis of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) results for a passive scalar shows that the conditional dissipation timescale is of the order of the integral timescale and smaller than the unconditional dissipation timescale. A model is proposed: the conditional dissipation timescale is proportional to the integral timescale. This model is used in Multiple Mapping Conditioning (MMC) modelling for a passive scalar case and a reactive scalar case, comparing to DNS results for both. The results show that this model improves the accuracy of MMC predictions so as to match the DNS results more closely using a relatively-coarse spatial resolution compared to other turbulent combustion models.

  12. Predictions for heat transfer characteristics in a natural draft reactor cooling system using a second moment closure turbulence model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, M.; Maekawa, I.

    2004-01-01

    A numerical study is performed on the natural draft reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS). In the cooling system, buoyancy driven heated upward flow could be in the mixed convection regime that is accompanied by heat transfer impairment. Also, the heating wall condition is asymmetric with regard to the channel cross section. These flow regime and thermal boundary conditions may invalidate the use of design correlation. To precisely simulate the flow and thermal fields within the RCCS, the second moment closure turbulence model is applied. Two types of the RCCS channel geometry are selected to make a comparison: an annular duct with fins on the outer surface of the inner circular wall, and a multi-rectangular duct. The prediction shows that the local heat transfer coefficient on the RCCS with finned annular duct is less than 1/6 of that estimated with Dittus-Boelter correlation. Much portion of the natural draft airflow does not contribute cooling at all because mainstream escapes from the narrow gaps between the fins. This result and thus the finned annulus design are unacceptable from the viewpoint for structural integrity of the RCCS wall boundary. The performance of the multi-rectangular duct design is acceptable that the RCCS maximum temperature is less than 400 degree centigrade even when the flow rate is halved from the designed condition. (author)

  13. Comparison of third-order plasma wave echoes with ballistic second-order plasma wave echoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leppert, H.D.; Schuelter, H.; Wiesemann, K.

    1982-01-01

    The apparent dispersion of third-order plasma wave echoes observed in a high frequency plasma is compared with that of simultaneously observed ballistic second-order echoes. Amplitude and wavelength of third-order echoes are found to be always smaller than those of second-order echoes, however, the dispersion curves of both types of echoes are very similar. These observations are in qualitative agreement with calculations of special ballistic third-order echoes. The ballistic nature of the observed third-order echoes may, therefore, be concluded from these measurements. (author)

  14. Periodic solutions of certain third order nonlinear differential systems with delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejumola, H.O.; Afuwape, A.U.

    1990-12-01

    This paper investigates the existence of 2π-periodic solutions of systems of third-order nonlinear differential equations, with delay, under varied assumptions. The results obtained extend earlier works of Tejumola and generalize to third order systems those of Conti, Iannacci and Nkashama as well as DePascale and Iannacci and Iannacci and Nkashama. 16 refs

  15. Blind third-order dispersion estimation based on fractional Fourier transformation for coherent optical communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Guo, Peng; Yang, Aiying; Qiao, Yaojun

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a blind third-order dispersion estimation method based on fractional Fourier transformation (FrFT) in optical fiber communication system. By measuring the chromatic dispersion (CD) at different wavelengths, this method can estimation dispersion slope and further calculate the third-order dispersion. The simulation results demonstrate that the estimation error is less than 2 % in 28GBaud dual polarization quadrature phase-shift keying (DP-QPSK) and 28GBaud dual polarization 16 quadrature amplitude modulation (DP-16QAM) system. Through simulations, the proposed third-order dispersion estimation method is shown to be robust against nonlinear and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise. In addition, to reduce the computational complexity, searching step with coarse and fine granularity is chosen to search optimal order of FrFT. The third-order dispersion estimation method based on FrFT can be used to monitor the third-order dispersion in optical fiber system.

  16. Final Report to the U.S. Department of Energy for studies of Evaluation of Turbulence Parameterizations for Cloud-Resolving Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, David A. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Science; Cheng, Anning [Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (SSAI), Lanham, MD (United States); NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Ghan, Steve [Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (SSAI), Lanham, MD (United States); NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Khairoutdinov, Marat [Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (SSAI), Lanham, MD (United States); NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Larson, Vince [Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (SSAI), Lanham, MD (United States); NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Moeng, Chin-Hoh [Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (SSAI), Lanham, MD (United States); NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)

    2015-07-27

    The intermediately-prognostic higher-order turbulence closure (IPHOC) introduces a joint double-Gaussian distribution of liquid water potential temperature (θl ), total water mixing ratio (qt ), and vertical velocity (w ) to represent any skewed turbulence circulations .The distribution is inferred from the first-, second-, and third-order moments of the variables given above, and is used to diagnose cloud fraction and grid-mean liquid water mixing ratio, as well as the buoyancy and fourth-order terms in the equations describing the evolution of the second- and third-order moments. Only three third-order moments (those of θl , qt , and w ) are predicted in the IPHOC.

  17. Correlation effects of third-order perturbation in the extended Hubbard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, G.Z.; Nie, H.Q.; Li, L.; Zhang, K.Y.

    1989-01-01

    Using the local approach, a third-order perturbation calculation has been performed to investigate the effects of intra-atomic electron correlation and electron and spin correlation between nearest neighbour sites in the extended Hubbard model. It was found that significant correction of the third order over the second order results and, in comparison with the results of the third-order perturbation where only the intra-atomic electron correlation is included, the influence of the electron and spin correlation between nearest neighbour sites on the correlation energy is non-negligible. 17 refs., 3 figs

  18. Free vibration analysis of beams by using a third-order shear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Free vibrations of beams; the third-order shear deformation theory; ... Thus, a shear correction factor is required to compensate for the error because of ...... Wang C M, Kitipornchai S 2003 Vibration of Timoshenko beams with internal hinge.

  19. Two new solutions to the third-order symplectic integration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwatsu, Reima

    2009-01-01

    Two new solutions are obtained for the symplecticity conditions of explicit third-order partitioned Runge-Kutta time integration method. One of them has larger stability limit and better dispersion property than the Ruth's method.

  20. ON THE BOUNDEDNESS AND THE STABILITY OF SOLUTION TO THIRD ORDER NON-LINEAR DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the global asymptotic stability,boundedness as well as the ultimate boundedness of solutions to a general third order nonlinear differential equation,using complete Lyapunov function.

  1. Third-order ordinary differential equations Y”' = f(x, y, y'', y′”) with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dimensional symmetry algebra. Mathematics Subject Classication (2010): 34A05, 34A25, 53A55, 76M60. Key words: Linearization, third order ODEs, point transformation, contact transformation, Lie symmetries, relative differential invariants.

  2. Z-scan: A simple technique for determination of third-order optical nonlinearity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Vijender, E-mail: chahal-gju@rediffmail.com [Department of Applied Science, N.C. College of Engineering, Israna, Panipat-132107, Haryana (India); Aghamkar, Praveen, E-mail: p-aghamkar@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Chaudhary Devi Lal University, Sirsa-125055, Haryana (India)

    2015-08-28

    Z-scan is a simple experimental technique to measure intensity dependent nonlinear susceptibilities of third-order nonlinear optical materials. This technique is used to measure the sign and magnitude of both real and imaginary part of the third order nonlinear susceptibility (χ{sup (3)}) of nonlinear optical materials. In this paper, we investigate third-order nonlinear optical properties of Ag-polymer composite film by using single beam z-scan technique with Q-switched, frequency doubled Nd: YAG laser (λ=532 nm) at 5 ns pulse. The values of nonlinear absorption coefficient (β), nonlinear refractive index (n{sub 2}) and third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility (χ{sup (3)}) of permethylazine were found to be 9.64 × 10{sup −7} cm/W, 8.55 × 10{sup −12} cm{sup 2}/W and 5.48 × 10{sup −10} esu, respectively.

  3. Third-order-accurate numerical methods for efficient, large time-step solutions of mixed linear and nonlinear problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobb, J.W.

    1995-02-01

    There is an increasing need for more accurate numerical methods for large-scale nonlinear magneto-fluid turbulence calculations. These methods should not only increase the current state of the art in terms of accuracy, but should also continue to optimize other desired properties such as simplicity, minimized computation, minimized memory requirements, and robust stability. This includes the ability to stably solve stiff problems with long time-steps. This work discusses a general methodology for deriving higher-order numerical methods. It also discusses how the selection of various choices can affect the desired properties. The explicit discussion focuses on third-order Runge-Kutta methods, including general solutions and five examples. The study investigates the linear numerical analysis of these methods, including their accuracy, general stability, and stiff stability. Additional appendices discuss linear multistep methods, discuss directions for further work, and exhibit numerical analysis results for some other commonly used lower-order methods.

  4. A time correlation function theory describing static field enhanced third order optical effects at interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neipert, Christine; Space, Brian

    2006-12-14

    Sum vibrational frequency spectroscopy, a second order optical process, is interface specific in the dipole approximation. At charged interfaces, there exists a static field, and as a direct consequence, the experimentally detected signal is a combination of enhanced second and static field induced third order contributions. There is significant evidence in the literature of the importance/relative magnitude of this third order contribution, but no previous molecularly detailed approach existed to separately calculate the second and third order contributions. Thus, for the first time, a molecularly detailed time correlation function theory is derived here that allows for the second and third order contributions to sum frequency vibrational spectra to be individually determined. Further, a practical, molecular dynamics based, implementation procedure for the derived correlation functions that describe the third order phenomenon is also presented. This approach includes a novel generalization of point atomic polarizability models to calculate the hyperpolarizability of a molecular system. The full system hyperpolarizability appears in the time correlation functions responsible for third order contributions in the presence of a static field.

  5. Third-order elastic moduli for alkali-halide crystals possessing the sodium chloride structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, U.

    2010-01-01

    The values of third-order elastic moduli for alkali halides, having NaCl-type crystal structure are calculated according to the Born-Mayer potential model, considering the repulsive interactions up to the second nearest neighbours and calculating the values of the potential parameters for each crystal, independently, from the compressibility data. This work presents the first published account of the calculation of the third-order elastic moduli taking the actual value of the potential parameter unlike the earlier works. Third-order elastic constants have been computed for alkali halides at 0 and 300 K. The results of the third-order elastic constants are compared with the available experimental and theoretical data. Very good agreement between experimental and theoretical third-order elastic constant data (except C 123 ) is found. We have also computed the values of the pressure derivatives of second-order elastic constants and Anderson-Grueneisen parameter for alkali halides, which agree reasonably well with the experimental values, indicating the satisfactory nature of our computed data for third-order elastic constants.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Biskamp, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to, and modern account of, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, an active field both in general turbulence theory and in various areas of astrophysics. The book starts by introducing the MHD equations, certain useful approximations and the transition to turbulence. The second part of the book covers incompressible MHD turbulence, the macroscopic aspects connected with the different self-organization processes, the phenomenology of the turbulence spectra, two-point closure theory, and intermittency. The third considers two-dimensional turbulence and compressi

  7. Validity testing of third-order nonlinear models for synchronous generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arjona, M.A. [Division de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion, Instituto Tecnologico de La Laguna Torreon, Coah. (Mexico); Escarela-Perez, R. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco, Departamento de Energia, Av. San Pablo 180, Col. Reynosa, C.P. 02200 (Mexico); Espinosa-Perez, G. [Division de Estudios Posgrado de la Facultad de Ingenieria Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico); Alvarez-Ramirez, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana -Iztapalapa, Division de Ciencias Basicas e Ingenieria (Mexico)

    2009-06-15

    Third-order nonlinear models are commonly used in control theory for the analysis of the stability of both open-loop and closed-loop synchronous machines. However, the ability of these models to describe the electrical machine dynamics has not been tested experimentally. This work focuses on this issue by addressing the parameters identification problem for third-order models for synchronous generators. For a third-order model describing the dynamics of power angle {delta}, rotor speed {omega} and quadrature axis transient EMF E{sub q}{sup '}, it is shown that the parameters cannot be identified because of the effects of the unknown initial condition of E{sub q}{sup '}. To avoid this situation, a model that incorporates the measured electrical power dynamics is considered, showing that state measurements guarantee the identification of the model parameters. Data obtained from a 7 kVA lab-scale synchronous generator and from a 150 MVA finite-element simulation were used to show that, at least for the worked examples, the estimated parameters display only moderate variations over the operating region. This suggests that third-order models can suffice to describe the main dynamical features of synchronous generators, and that third-order models can be used to design and tune power system stabilizers and voltage regulators. (author)

  8. Algebraic Properties of First Integrals for Scalar Linear Third-Order ODEs of Maximal Symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Mahomed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available By use of the Lie symmetry group methods we analyze the relationship between the first integrals of the simplest linear third-order ordinary differential equations (ODEs and their point symmetries. It is well known that there are three classes of linear third-order ODEs for maximal cases of point symmetries which are 4, 5, and 7. The simplest scalar linear third-order equation has seven-point symmetries. We obtain the classifying relation between the symmetry and the first integral for the simplest equation. It is shown that the maximal Lie algebra of a first integral for the simplest equation y′′′=0 is unique and four-dimensional. Moreover, we show that the Lie algebra of the simplest linear third-order equation is generated by the symmetries of the two basic integrals. We also obtain counting theorems of the symmetry properties of the first integrals for such linear third-order ODEs. Furthermore, we provide insights into the manner in which one can generate the full Lie algebra of higher-order ODEs of maximal symmetry from two of their basic integrals.

  9. Characterization of Symmetry Properties of First Integrals for Submaximal Linearizable Third-Order ODEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Mahomed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between first integrals of submaximal linearizable third-order ordinary differential equations (ODEs and their symmetries is investigated. We obtain the classifying relations between the symmetries and the first integral for submaximal cases of linear third-order ODEs. It is known that the maximum Lie algebra of the first integral is achieved for the simplest equation and is four-dimensional. We show that for the other two classes they are not unique. We also obtain counting theorems of the symmetry properties of the first integrals for these classes of linear third-order ODEs. For the 5 symmetry class of linear third-order ODEs, the first integrals can have 0, 1, 2, and 3 symmetries, and for the 4 symmetry class of linear third-order ODEs, they are 0, 1, and 2 symmetries, respectively. In the case of submaximal linear higher-order ODEs, we show that their full Lie algebras can be generated by the subalgebras of certain basic integrals.

  10. Lagrangian analysis of invariant third-order equations of motion in relativistic classical particle mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsyuk, R.Ya.

    1985-01-01

    The problem on the existence of the invariant third-order Euler-Poisson equations in the pseudo-Euclidean space is investigated. The locally variational problem is determined by the Lagrangian density over the space of the second-order jets. The one - parameter family of the invariant third-order Euler-Poisson equations is groved to be the only one in the three-dimensional pseudo-Euclidean space. No invariant third-order Euler-Poisson equations exist in the four-dimensional pseudo-Euclidean space. It is shown that the Mathisson equation and the equation of geodesic circles in particular cases may be considered in the context of the Ostrogradiskij mechanics and the Kavaguchi geometry

  11. Third-order nonlinear optical properties of thin sputtered gold films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenogiannopoulou, E.; Aloukos, P.; Couris, S.; Kaminska, E.; Piotrowska, A.; Dynowska, E.

    2007-07-01

    Au films of thickness ranging between 5 and 52 nm were prepared by sputtering on quartz substrates and their third-order nonlinear optical response was investigated by Optical Kerr effect (OKE) and Z-scan techniques using 532 nm, 35 ps laser pulses. All prepared films were characterized by XRD, AFM and UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometry while their third-order susceptibility χ(3) was measured and found to be of the order of 10 -9 esu. The real and imaginary parts of the third-order susceptibility were found in very good agreement with experimental results and theoretical predictions reported by Smith et al. [D.D. Smith, Y. Yoon, R.W. Boyd, Y.K. Cambell, L.A. Baker, R.M. Crooks, M. George, J. Appl. Phys. 86 (1999) 6200].

  12. Third-order aberration-free ion-optical system for an electromagnetic isotope separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavet, I.

    1982-12-01

    The essential qualities required of a production isotope separator are high output and high enrichment factor. For this purpose, the imaging system should have as little geometric aberration as possible. In the proposed system, consisting of a homogeneous sector-type analyzing magnet, the beam is crossed in the axial direction at the entrance boundary of the magnetic field and the incidence to this boundary is normal. It is shown that for this case all radial aberrations to the ''practical'' third order can be eliminated provided four optical conditions are satisfied: two related to heterogeneous aberration terms in addition to the two conditions related to the second and third order homogeneous aperture aberration terms. The resulting equations take into account the magnetic fringe-field effects to the third order. (author)

  13. Surface plasmon enhanced third-order optical nonlinearity of Ag nanocomposite film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Vijender [Department of Applied Science, N.C. College of Engineering, Israna, Panipat 132107, Haryana (India); Aghamkar, Praveen, E-mail: p-aghamkar@yahoo.in [Department of Physics, Chaudhary Devi Lal University, Sirsa 125055, Haryana (India)

    2014-03-17

    We obtain a large third-order optical nonlinearity (χ{sup (3)} ≈ 10{sup −10}esu) of silver nanoparticles dispersed in polyvinyl alcohol/tetraethyl orthosilicate matrix using single beam z-scan technique at 532 nm by Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. We have shown that mechanisms responsible for third-order optical nonlinearity of Ag nanocomposite film are reverse saturable absorption (RSA) and self-defocusing in the purlieu of surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Optical band-gap and width of SPR band of Ag nanocomposite film decrease with increasing silver concentration, which leads to enhancement of local electric field and hence third-order optical nonlinearity. Optical limiting, due to RSA has also been demonstrated at 532 nm.

  14. Surface plasmon enhanced third-order optical nonlinearity of Ag nanocomposite film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Vijender; Aghamkar, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    We obtain a large third-order optical nonlinearity (χ (3)  ≈ 10 −10 esu) of silver nanoparticles dispersed in polyvinyl alcohol/tetraethyl orthosilicate matrix using single beam z-scan technique at 532 nm by Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. We have shown that mechanisms responsible for third-order optical nonlinearity of Ag nanocomposite film are reverse saturable absorption (RSA) and self-defocusing in the purlieu of surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Optical band-gap and width of SPR band of Ag nanocomposite film decrease with increasing silver concentration, which leads to enhancement of local electric field and hence third-order optical nonlinearity. Optical limiting, due to RSA has also been demonstrated at 532 nm

  15. Instability of black strings in the third-order Lovelock theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomini, Alex; Henríquez-Báez, Carla; Lagos, Marcela; Oliva, Julio; Vera, Aldo

    2016-05-01

    We show that homogeneous black strings of third-order Lovelock theory are unstable under s-wave perturbations. This analysis is done in dimension D =9 , which is the lowest dimension that allows the existence of homogeneous black strings in a theory that contains only the third-order Lovelock term in the Lagrangian. As is the case in general relativity, the instability is produced by long wavelength perturbations and it stands for the perturbative counterpart of a thermal instability. We also provide a comparative analysis of the instabilities of black strings at a fixed radius in general relativity, Gauss-Bonnet, and third-order Lovelock theories. We show that the minimum critical wavelength that triggers the instability grows with the power of the curvature defined in the Lagrangian. The maximum exponential growth during the time of the perturbation is the largest in general relativity and it decreases with the number of curvatures involved in the Lagrangian.

  16. Evaluation of third order nonlinear optical parameters of CdS/PVA nanocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Mamta; Tripathi, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    CdS nanoparticles dispersed in PVA are prepared by Chemical method at room temperature. The nonlinear optical parameters such as nonlinear absorption (β), nonlinear refractive index (n 2 ) and nonlinear susceptibility (χ 3 ) are calculated for this sample by using Z-scan technique. CdS/PVA samples show the two photon absorption mechanism. The third order nonlinear susceptibility is calculated from n 2 and β and is found to be of the order of 10 −7 – 10 −8 m 2 /V 2 . The larger value of third order nonlinear susceptibility is due to dielectric and quantum confinement effect

  17. The third order nonlinear susceptibility of InAs at infrared region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musayev, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Nonlinear susceptibilities of the third order and coefficient of nonlinear absorption in InAs n-type with a different degree of a doping have been measured. The values of the third order nonlinear susceptibilities have derived from these measurements essentially exceed the values calculated on the basis of model featuring nonlinear susceptibility of electrons, being in conduction-band nonparabolicity. It has been shown that the observable discrepancy has been eliminated, if in calculation a dissipation of energy of electrons has been considered. Growth of efficiency at four-wave mixingin narrow-gap semiconductors has been restricted to nonlinear absorption of interacting waves

  18. Mixed convection peristaltic flow of third order nanofluid with an induced magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen, Saima

    2013-01-01

    This research is concerned with the peristaltic flow of third order nanofluid in an asymmetric channel. The governing equations of third order nanofluid are modelled in wave frame of reference. Effect of induced magnetic field is considered. Long wavelength and low Reynolds number situation is tackled. Numerical solutions of the governing problem are computed and analyzed. The effects of Brownian motion and thermophoretic diffusion of nano particles are particularly emphasized. Physical quantities such as velocity, pressure rise, temperature, induced magnetic field and concentration distributions are discussed.

  19. Alkali-Responsive Absorption Spectra and Third-Order Optical Nonlinearities of Imino Squaramides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhong-Yu; Xu Song; Zhou Xin-Yu; Zhang Fu-Shi

    2012-01-01

    Third-order optical nonlinearities and dynamic responses of two imino squaramides under neutral and base conditions were studied using the femtosecond degenerate four-wave mixing technique at 800 nm. Ultrafast optical responses have been observed and the magnitude of the second-order hyperpolarizabilities of the squaramides has been measured to be as large as 10 −31 esu. The absorption spectra, color of solution, and third-order optical nonlinearities of two imino squaramides change with the addition of sodium hydroxide. The γ value under the base condition for each dye is approximately 1.25 times larger than that under neutral conditions. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  20. Mixed convection peristaltic flow of third order nanofluid with an induced magnetic field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima Noreen

    Full Text Available This research is concerned with the peristaltic flow of third order nanofluid in an asymmetric channel. The governing equations of third order nanofluid are modelled in wave frame of reference. Effect of induced magnetic field is considered. Long wavelength and low Reynolds number situation is tackled. Numerical solutions of the governing problem are computed and analyzed. The effects of Brownian motion and thermophoretic diffusion of nano particles are particularly emphasized. Physical quantities such as velocity, pressure rise, temperature, induced magnetic field and concentration distributions are discussed.

  1. Turbulent mass transfer in electrochemical systems: Turbulence for electrochemistry, electrochemistry for turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorotyntsev, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Key problems of turbulent mass transfer at a solid wall are reviewed: closure problem for the concentration field, information on wall turbulence, applications of microelectrodes to study the structure of turbulence, correlation properties of current fluctuations. (author). 26 refs

  2. An algorithm for solving initial value problems of third order ordinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. We propose an implicit multi-step method for the solution of initial value problems (IVPs) of third order ordinary differential equations (ODE) which does not require reducing the ODE to first order before solving. The development of the method is based on collocation of the differential system and interpolation of the ...

  3. Multi-octave analog photonic link with improved second- and third-order SFDRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qinggui; Gao, Yongsheng; Fan, Yangyu; He, You

    2018-03-01

    The second- and third-order spurious free dynamic ranges (SFDRs) are two key performance indicators for a multi-octave analogy photonic link (APL). The linearization methods for either second- or third-order intermodulation distortion (IMD2 or IMD3) have been intensively studied, but the simultaneous suppression for the both were merely reported. In this paper, we propose an APL with improved second- and third-order SFDRs for multi-octave applications based on two parallel DPMZM-based sub-APLs. The IMD3 in each sub-APL is suppressed by properly biasing the DPMZM, and the IMD2 is suppressed by balanced detecting the two sub-APLs. The experiment demonstrates significant suppression ratios for both the IMD2 and IMD3 after linearization in the proposed link, and the measured second- and third-order SFDRs with the operating frequency from 6 to 40 GHz are above 91 dB ṡHz 1 / 2 and 116 dB ṡHz 2 / 3, respectively.

  4. A Three Step Explicit Method for Direct Solution of Third Order ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study produces a three step discrete Linear Multistep Method for Direct solution of third order initial value problems of ordinary differential equations of the form y'''= f(x,y,y',y''). Taylor series expansion technique was adopted in the development of the method. The differential system from the basis polynomial function to ...

  5. Breakdown of the single-exchange approximation in third-order symmetry-adapted perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Ka Un; Herbert, John M

    2012-03-22

    We report third-order symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) calculations for several dimers whose intermolecular interactions are dominated by induction. We demonstrate that the single-exchange approximation (SEA) employed to derive the third-order exchange-induction correction (E(exch-ind)((30))) fails to quench the attractive nature of the third-order induction (E(ind)((30))), leading to one-dimensional potential curves that become attractive rather than repulsive at short intermolecular separations. A scaling equation for (E(exch-ind)((30))), based on an exact formula for the first-order exchange correction, is introduced to approximate exchange effects beyond the SEA, and qualitatively correct potential energy curves that include third-order induction are thereby obtained. For induction-dominated systems, our results indicate that a "hybrid" SAPT approach, in which a dimer Hartree-Fock calculation is performed in order to obtain a correction for higher-order induction, is necessary not only to obtain quantitative binding energies but also to obtain qualitatively correct potential energy surfaces. These results underscore the need to develop higher-order exchange-induction formulas that go beyond the SEA. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  6. Third-order operator-differential equations with discontinuous coefficients and operators in the boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araz R. Aliev

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We study a third-order operator-differential equation on the semi-axis with a discontinuous coefficient and boundary conditions which include an abstract linear operator. Sufficient conditions for the well-posed and unique solvability are found by means of properties of the operator coefficients in a Sobolev-type space.

  7. On method of solving third-order ordinary differential equations directly using Bernstein polynomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khataybeh, S. N.; Hashim, I.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we propose for the first time a method based on Bernstein polynomials for solving directly a class of third-order ordinary differential equations (ODEs). This method gives a numerical solution by converting the equation into a system of algebraic equations which is solved directly. Some numerical examples are given to show the applicability of the method.

  8. Third-order least squares modelling of milling state term for improved computation of stability boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.G. Ozoegwu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The general least squares model for milling process state term is presented. A discrete map for milling stability analysis that is based on the third-order case of the presented general least squares milling state term model is first studied and compared with its third-order counterpart that is based on the interpolation theory. Both numerical rate of convergence and chatter stability results of the two maps are compared using the single degree of freedom (1DOF milling model. The numerical rate of convergence of the presented third-order model is also studied using the two degree of freedom (2DOF milling process model. Comparison gave that stability results from the two maps agree closely but the presented map demonstrated reduction in number of needed calculations leading to about 30% savings in computational time (CT. It is seen in earlier works that accuracy of milling stability analysis using the full-discretization method rises from first-order theory to second-order theory and continues to rise to the third-order theory. The present work confirms this trend. In conclusion, the method presented in this work will enable fast and accurate computation of stability diagrams for use by machinists.

  9. Synthesis, crystal structure, growth, optical and third order nonlinear optical studies of 8HQ2C5N single crystal - An efficient third-order nonlinear optical material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divya Bharathi, M.; Ahila, G.; Mohana, J. [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Chennai 600005 (India); Chakkaravarthi, G. [Department of Physics, CPCL Polytechnic College, Chennai 600068 (India); Anbalagan, G., E-mail: anbu24663@yahoo.co.in [Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Madras, Chennai 600025 (India)

    2017-05-01

    A neoteric organic third order nonlinear optical material 8-hydroxyquinolinium 2-chloro-5-nitrobenzoate dihydrate (8HQ2C5N) was grown by slow cooling technique using ethanol: water (1:1) mixed solvent. The calculated low value of average etch pit solidity (4.12 × 10{sup 3} cm{sup −2}) indicated that the title crystal contain less defects. From the single crystal X-ray diffraction data, it was endowed that 8HQ2C5N crystal belongs to the monoclinic system with centrosymmetric space group P2{sub 1}/c and the cell parameters values, a = 9.6546 (4) Ǻ, b = 7.1637(3) Ǻ, c = 24.3606 (12) Ǻ, α = γ = 90°, β = 92.458(2)° and volume = 1683.29(13) Ǻ{sup 3}. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectrum were used to affirm the functional group of the title compound. The chemical structure of 8HQ2C5N was scrutinized by {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR spectral analysis and thermal stability through the differential scanning calorimetry study. Using optical studies the lower cut-off wavelength and optical band gap of 8HQ2C5N were found to be 364 nm and 3.17 eV respectively. Using the single oscillator model suggested by Wemple – Didomenico, the oscillator energy (E{sub o}), the dispersion energy (E{sub d}) and static dielectric constant (ε{sub o}) were estimated. The third-order susceptibility were determined as Im χ{sup (3)} = 2.51 × 10{sup −5} esu and Re χ{sup (3)} = 4.46 × 10{sup −7} esu. The theoretical third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility χ{sup (3)} was calculated and the results were compared with experimental value. Photoluminescence spectrum of 8HQ2C5N crystal showed the yellow emission. The crystal had the single shot laser damage threshold of 5.562 GW/cm{sup 2}. Microhardness measurement showed that 8HQ2C5N belongs to a soft material category. - Highlights: • A new organic single crystals were grown and the crystal structure was reported. • Crystal possess, good transmittance, thermal and mechanical stability. • Single shot LDT value is found to be

  10. A Third-Order p-Laplacian Boundary Value Problem Solved by an SL(3,ℝ Lie-Group Shooting Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chein-Shan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The boundary layer problem for power-law fluid can be recast to a third-order p-Laplacian boundary value problem (BVP. In this paper, we transform the third-order p-Laplacian into a new system which exhibits a Lie-symmetry SL(3,ℝ. Then, the closure property of the Lie-group is used to derive a linear transformation between the boundary values at two ends of a spatial interval. Hence, we can iteratively solve the missing left boundary conditions, which are determined by matching the right boundary conditions through a finer tuning of r∈[0,1]. The present SL(3,ℝ Lie-group shooting method is easily implemented and is efficient to tackle the multiple solutions of the third-order p-Laplacian. When the missing left boundary values can be determined accurately, we can apply the fourth-order Runge-Kutta (RK4 method to obtain a quite accurate numerical solution of the p-Laplacian.

  11. Evaluation of third order nonlinear optical parameters of CdS/PVA nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Mamta [Department of Physics, Center of Advanced Study in Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India); Department of Applied Sciences (Physics), UIET, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India); Tripathi, S. K., E-mail: surya@pu.ac.in, E-mail: surya-tr@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Center of Advanced Study in Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India)

    2015-06-24

    CdS nanoparticles dispersed in PVA are prepared by Chemical method at room temperature. The nonlinear optical parameters such as nonlinear absorption (β), nonlinear refractive index (n{sub 2}) and nonlinear susceptibility (χ{sup 3}) are calculated for this sample by using Z-scan technique. CdS/PVA samples show the two photon absorption mechanism. The third order nonlinear susceptibility is calculated from n{sub 2} and β and is found to be of the order of 10{sup −7} – 10{sup −8} m{sup 2}/V{sup 2}. The larger value of third order nonlinear susceptibility is due to dielectric and quantum confinement effect.

  12. Participation of the Third Order Optical Nonlinearities in Nanostructured Silver Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Solid Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Torres-Torres

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the transmittance modulation of optical signals in a nanocomposite integrated by two different silver doped zinc oxide thin solid films. An ultrasonic spray pyrolysis approach was employed for the preparation of the samples. Measurements of the third-order nonlinear optical response at a nonresonant 532 nm wavelength of excitation were performed using a vectorial two-wave mixing. It seems that the separated contribution of the optical nonlinearity associated with each film noticeable differs in the resulting nonlinear effects with respect to the additive response exhibited by the bilayer system. An enhancement of the optical Kerr nonlinearity is predicted for prime number arrays of the studied nanoclusters in a two-wave interaction. We consider that the nanostructured morphology of the thin solid films originates a strong modification of the third-order optical phenomena exhibited by multilayer films based on zinc oxide.

  13. Computationally efficient near-field source localization using third-order moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Liu, Guohong; Sun, Xiaoying

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a third-order moment-based estimation of signal parameters via rotational invariance techniques (ESPRIT) algorithm is proposed for passive localization of near-field sources. By properly choosing sensor outputs of the symmetric uniform linear array, two special third-order moment matrices are constructed, in which the steering matrix is the function of electric angle γ, while the rotational factor is the function of electric angles γ and ϕ. With the singular value decomposition (SVD) operation, all direction-of-arrivals (DOAs) are estimated from a polynomial rooting version. After substituting the DOA information into the steering matrix, the rotational factor is determined via the total least squares (TLS) version, and the related range estimations are performed. Compared with the high-order ESPRIT method, the proposed algorithm requires a lower computational burden, and it avoids the parameter-match procedure. Computer simulations are carried out to demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  14. The third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility of C{sub 60}-derived nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiangang, Wan [Nanjing Univ. (China). National Lab. of Solid State Microstructures; [Center for Advanced Studies in Science and Technology of Microstructures, Nanjing (China); Jinming, Dong [Nanjing Univ. (China). National Lab. of Solid State Microstructures; [Center for Advanced Studies in Science and Technology of Microstructures, Nanjing (China); Jie, Jiang [Nanjing Univ., JS (China). Dept. of Physics; Xing, D Y [Nanjing Univ., JS (China). Dept. of Physics

    1997-02-01

    Using the extended Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model and the sum-over-state (SOS) method, we have calculated the third-order nonlinear polarizability {gamma} and its dispersion spectra for C{sub 60}-derived nanotubes, which is one of the narrowest tubes. Our numerical calculations indicate that both symmetry and size of the nanotubes have great effect on the third-order nonlinear polarizability {gamma} spectra. We find that with increasing size, both static {gamma} values and dynamical response peak values increase. When the atom number of the C{sub 60}-derived nanotubes is 140, the static {gamma} value is about 65 times larger than that of C{sub 60}, and the highest peak value of {gamma} (at 3{omega} = 3.52 eV) is about three orders larger than that of C{sub 60}. So, C{sub 60}-derived nanotubes may become a kind of good nonlinear optical materials. (orig.)

  15. The third order correction on Hawking radiation and entropy conservation during black hole evaporation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Hao-Peng; Liu, Wen-Biao, E-mail: wbliu@bnu.edu.cn

    2016-08-10

    Using Parikh–Wilczek tunneling framework, we calculate the tunneling rate from a Schwarzschild black hole under the third order WKB approximation, and then obtain the expressions for emission spectrum and black hole entropy to the third order correction. The entropy contains four terms including the Bekenstein–Hawking entropy, the logarithmic term, the inverse area term, and the square of inverse area term. In addition, we analyse the correlation between sequential emissions under this approximation. It is shown that the entropy is conserved during the process of black hole evaporation, which consists with the request of quantum mechanics and implies the information is conserved during this process. We also compare the above result with that of pure thermal spectrum case, and find that the non-thermal correction played an important role.

  16. Third-order nonlinearity of Er3+-doped lead phosphate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, C. C. [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Ceara, Brazil; Guedes Da Silva, Ilde [ORNL; Siqueira, J. P. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil; Misoguti, L. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil; Zilio, S. C. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil; Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The third-order optical susceptibility and dispersion of the linear refractive index of Er3+-doped lead phosphate glass were measured in the wavelength range between 400 and 1940 nm by using the spectrally resolved femtosecond Maker fringes technique. The nonlinear refractive index obtained from the third-order susceptibility was found to be five times higher than that of silica, indicating that Er3+-doped lead phosphate glass is a potential candidate to be used as the base component for the fabrication of photonic devices. For comparison purposes, the Z-scan technique was also employed to obtain the values of the nonlinear refractive index of E-doped lead phosphate glass at several wavelengths, and the values obtained using the two techniques agree to within 15%.

  17. Third-order optical intensity correlation measurements of pseudo-thermal light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xi-Hao; Wu Wei; Meng Shao-Ying; Li Ming-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Third-order Hanbrury Brown—Twiss and double-slit interference experiments with a pseudo-thermal light are performed by recording intensities in single, double and triple optical paths, respectively. The experimental results verifies the theoretical prediction that the indispensable condition for achieving a interference pattern or ghost image in Nth-order intensity correlation measurements is the synchronous detection of the same light field by each reference detector, no matter the intensities recorded in one, or two, or N optical paths. It is shown that, when the reference detectors are scanned in the opposite directions, the visibility and resolution of the third-order spatial correlation function of thermal light is much better than that scanned in the same direction, but it is no use for obtaining the Nth-order interference pattern or ghost image in the thermal Nth-order interference or ghost imaging. (general)

  18. Zeolite Y Films as Ideal Platform for Evaluation of Third-Order Nonlinear Optical Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Sung Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Zeolites are ideal host material for generation and stabilization of regular ultrasmall quantum dots (QDs array with the size below 1.5 nm. Quantum dots (QDs with high density and extinction absorption coefficient have been expected to give high level of third-order nonlinear optical (3rd-NLO and to have great potential applications in optoelectronics. In this paper, we carried out a systematic elucidation of the third-order nonlinear optical response of various types of QDs including PbSe, PbS, CdSe, CdS, ZnSe, ZnS, Ag2Se, and Ag2S by manipulation of QDs into zeolites Y pores. In this respect, we could demonstrate that the zeolite offers an ideal platform for capability comparison 3rd-NLO response of various types of QDs with high sensitivities.

  19. Models for Master-Slave Clock Distribution Networks with Third-Order Phase-Locked Loops

    OpenAIRE

    Piqueira, José Roberto Castilho; de Carvalho Freschi, Marcela

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the processing and transmission of clock signals in networks of geographically distributed nodes, in order to derive conditions for frequency and phase synchronization between the nodes. The focus is on the master-slave architecture, which presents a priority scheme of clock distribution. One-way master-slave (OWMS ) and two-way master-slave (TWMS) chains are studied, considering that the slave nodes are third-order phase-locked loops...

  20. Comparison of second and third orders Runge-Kutta methods for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work is concerned with the analysis of second and third orders Runge- Kutta formulae capable of solving initial value problems in Ordinary Differential Equations of the form: y1 = f(x, y), y(x0) = y0, a £ x £ b. The intention is to find out which of these two orders can improve the performance of results when implemented ...

  1. Third order mode laser diode: design of a twin photon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducci, S.; Berger, V.; Rossi, A. de; Ortiz, V.; Calligaro, M.; Vinter, B.; Nagle, J.; Berger, V.

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate the lasing action on a third order waveguide mode in a laser diode. The AlGaAs heterostructure has been designed to achieve a parametric emission of photons pairs through modal phase matching. This device is very compact and does not generate coupling loss between the laser source and the non-linear waveguide. It is the first step on the way to design a twin photon micro-source. (A.C.)

  2. Symplectic and trigonometrically fitted symplectic methods of second and third order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monovasilis, Th.; Simos, T.E.

    2006-01-01

    The numerical integration of Hamiltonian systems by symplectic and trigonometrically symplectic method is considered in this Letter. We construct new symplectic and trigonometrically symplectic methods of second and third order. We apply our new methods as well as other existing methods to the numerical integration of the harmonic oscillator, the 2D harmonic oscillator with an integer frequency ratio and an orbit problem studied by Stiefel and Bettis

  3. Enhancement of third-order harmonic generation by interaction of two IR femtosecond filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Z Y; Ding, P J; Shi, Y C; Lu, X; Liu, Q C; Sun, S H; Ding, B W; Hu, B T; Liu, X L

    2012-01-01

    Three orders of magnitude in the enhancement of the third-order harmonic (TH) generation induced by the interaction of two femtosecond filaments crossing with small angles in the air is achieved. The dependences of the TH generation on the time delay, the relative polarization, the input laser intensity ratios between the probe and pump beam are measured with the crossing angle of 3.5deg , and the results with quasi-vertical crossing angle are also shown for comparison

  4. Third order effects generated by refractive lenses on sub 20 femtosecond optical pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada-Silva, F C; Rosete-Aguilar, M; Garduno-Mejia, J; Gonzalez-Galicia, M A; Bruce, N C; Ortega-Martinez, R

    2011-01-01

    When using lenses to focus ultra-short pulses, chromatic aberration produces pulse spreading, after propagation through the lens. The focusing of ultra-short pulses has been analyzed by using Fourier optics where the field amplitude of the pulse is evaluated around the focal region of the lens by performing a third order expansion on the wave number around the central frequency of the carrier. In the literature, the pulse focusing in the neighborhood of the focal region of the lens has been calculated by expanding the wave number up to second order. The second order approximation works for pulses with a duration greater than 20fs, or pulses propagating through low dispersion materials; but, it is necessary to do third order approximation for pulses with a shorter duration, or propagating through highly dispersive materials. In this paper we analyze 15fs and 20fs pulses, with a carrier wavelength of 810nm, at the paraxial focal plane of singlets and achromatic doublets. The analysis includes the third order GVD and the results are compared with those obtained when the wave number is expanded up to second order.

  5. Oscillation criteria for third order nonlinear delay differential equations with damping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said R. Grace

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This note is concerned with the oscillation of third order nonlinear delay differential equations of the form \\[\\label{*} \\left( r_{2}(t\\left( r_{1}(ty^{\\prime}(t\\right^{\\prime}\\right^{\\prime}+p(ty^{\\prime}(t+q(tf(y(g(t=0.\\tag{\\(\\ast\\}\\] In the papers [A. Tiryaki, M. F. Aktas, Oscillation criteria of a certain class of third order nonlinear delay differential equations with damping, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 325 (2007, 54-68] and [M. F. Aktas, A. Tiryaki, A. Zafer, Oscillation criteria for third order nonlinear functional differential equations, Applied Math. Letters 23 (2010, 756-762], the authors established some sufficient conditions which insure that any solution of equation (\\(\\ast\\ oscillates or converges to zero, provided that the second order equation \\[\\left( r_{2}(tz^{\\prime }(t\\right^{\\prime}+\\left(p(t/r_{1}(t\\right z(t=0\\tag{\\(\\ast\\ast\\}\\] is nonoscillatory. Here, we shall improve and unify the results given in the above mentioned papers and present some new sufficient conditions which insure that any solution of equation (\\(\\ast\\ oscillates if equation (\\(\\ast\\ast\\ is nonoscillatory. We also establish results for the oscillation of equation (\\(\\ast\\ when equation (\\(\\ast\\ast\\ is oscillatory.

  6. Third-order nonlinear optical properties of the poly(methyl methacrylate)-phenothiazinium dye hybrid thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Ru; Lu, Yue-Ting; Yan, Bao-Long; Lu, Jian-Mei; Wu, Xing-Zhi; Song, Ying-Lin; Ge, Jian-Feng

    2014-01-01

    The third-order nonlinear optical properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) films doped with charge flowable 3,7-di(piperidinyl)phenothiazin-5-ium chloride, which tested by Z-scan method with nanosecond laser beam at 532 nm, are reported. Large third-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities (up to 10 −7 esu) and high second hyperpolarizabilities (up to 10 −27 esu) are found. The third-order nonlinear absorptions change from reverse saturated absorptions to saturated absorptions with different percentage of the phenothiazinium dye in the poly(methyl methacrylate) films, which can be explained by the accumulation phenomenon of the phenothiazinium. The results suggest that the phenothiazinium salt is a promising material for third order non-linear applications. - Highlights: • Phenothiazinium containing optical films • Strong third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) absorption • Large third-order NLO susceptibilities

  7. Analysis of low-pass filters for approximate deconvolution closure modelling in one-dimensional decaying Burgers turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    San, O.

    2016-01-01

    The idea of spatial filtering is central in approximate deconvolution large-eddy simulation (AD-LES) of turbulent flows. The need for low-pass filters naturally arises in the approximate deconvolution approach which is based solely on mathematical approximations by employing repeated filtering operators. Two families of low-pass spatial filters are studied in this paper: the Butterworth filters and the Padé filters. With a selection of various filtering parameters, variants of the AD-LES are systematically applied to the decaying Burgers turbulence problem, which is a standard prototype for more complex turbulent flows. Comparing with the direct numerical simulations, it is shown that all forms of the AD-LES approaches predict significantly better results than the under-resolved simulations at the same grid resolution. However, the results highly depend on the selection of the filtering procedure and the filter design. It is concluded that a complete attenuation for the smallest scales is crucial to prevent energy accumulation at the grid cut-off.

  8. Interplay between Graph Topology and Correlations of Third Order in Spiking Neuronal Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojan Jovanović

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of processes evolving on networks has recently become a very popular research field, not only because of the rich mathematical theory that underpins it, but also because of its many possible applications, a number of them in the field of biology. Indeed, molecular signaling pathways, gene regulation, predator-prey interactions and the communication between neurons in the brain can be seen as examples of networks with complex dynamics. The properties of such dynamics depend largely on the topology of the underlying network graph. In this work, we want to answer the following question: Knowing network connectivity, what can be said about the level of third-order correlations that will characterize the network dynamics? We consider a linear point process as a model for pulse-coded, or spiking activity in a neuronal network. Using recent results from theory of such processes, we study third-order correlations between spike trains in such a system and explain which features of the network graph (i.e. which topological motifs are responsible for their emergence. Comparing two different models of network topology-random networks of Erdős-Rényi type and networks with highly interconnected hubs-we find that, in random networks, the average measure of third-order correlations does not depend on the local connectivity properties, but rather on global parameters, such as the connection probability. This, however, ceases to be the case in networks with a geometric out-degree distribution, where topological specificities have a strong impact on average correlations.

  9. Third-order perturbations of a zero-pressure cosmological medium: Pure general relativistic nonlinear effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim

    2005-01-01

    We consider a general relativistic zero-pressure irrotational cosmological medium perturbed to the third order. We assume a flat Friedmann background but include the cosmological constant. We ignore the rotational perturbation which decays in expanding phase. In our previous studies we discovered that, to the second-order perturbation, except for the gravitational wave contributions, the relativistic equations coincide exactly with the previously known Newtonian ones. Since the Newtonian second-order equations are fully nonlinear, any nonvanishing third- and higher-order terms in the relativistic analyses are supposed to be pure relativistic corrections. In this work, we derive such correction terms appearing in the third order. Continuing our success in the second-order perturbations, we take the comoving gauge. We discover that the third-order correction terms are of φ v order higher than the second-order terms where φ v is a gauge-invariant combination related to the three-space curvature perturbation in the comoving gauge; compared with the Newtonian potential, we have δΦ∼(3/5)φ v to the linear order. Therefore, the pure general relativistic effects are of φ v order higher than the Newtonian ones. The corrections terms are independent of the horizon scale and depend only on the linear-order gravitational potential (curvature) perturbation strength. From the temperature anisotropy of cosmic microwave background, we have (δT/T)∼(1/3)δΦ∼(1/5)φ v ∼10 -5 . Therefore, our present result reinforces our previous important practical implication that near the current era one can use the large-scale Newtonian numerical simulation more reliably even as the simulation scale approaches near (and goes beyond) the horizon

  10. Interplay between Graph Topology and Correlations of Third Order in Spiking Neuronal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Stojan; Rotter, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The study of processes evolving on networks has recently become a very popular research field, not only because of the rich mathematical theory that underpins it, but also because of its many possible applications, a number of them in the field of biology. Indeed, molecular signaling pathways, gene regulation, predator-prey interactions and the communication between neurons in the brain can be seen as examples of networks with complex dynamics. The properties of such dynamics depend largely on the topology of the underlying network graph. In this work, we want to answer the following question: Knowing network connectivity, what can be said about the level of third-order correlations that will characterize the network dynamics? We consider a linear point process as a model for pulse-coded, or spiking activity in a neuronal network. Using recent results from theory of such processes, we study third-order correlations between spike trains in such a system and explain which features of the network graph (i.e. which topological motifs) are responsible for their emergence. Comparing two different models of network topology-random networks of Erdős-Rényi type and networks with highly interconnected hubs-we find that, in random networks, the average measure of third-order correlations does not depend on the local connectivity properties, but rather on global parameters, such as the connection probability. This, however, ceases to be the case in networks with a geometric out-degree distribution, where topological specificities have a strong impact on average correlations.

  11. A covariant Poisson deformation quantization with separation of variables up to the third order

    OpenAIRE

    Karabegov, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    We give a simple formula for the operator C_3 of the standard deformation quantization with separation of variables on a K\\"ahler manifold M. Unlike C_1 and C_2, this operator can not be expressed in terms of the K\\"ahler-Poisson tensor on M. We modify C_3 to obtain a covariant deformation quantization with separation of variables up to the third order which is expressed in terms of the Poisson tensor on M and thus can be defined on an arbitrary complex manifold endowed with a Poisson bivecto...

  12. Limit cycles from a cubic reversible system via the third-order averaging method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linping Peng

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns the bifurcation of limit cycles from a cubic integrable and non-Hamiltonian system. By using the averaging theory of the first and second orders, we show that under any small cubic homogeneous perturbation, at most two limit cycles bifurcate from the period annulus of the unperturbed system, and this upper bound is sharp. By using the averaging theory of the third order, we show that two is also the maximal number of limit cycles emerging from the period annulus of the unperturbed system.

  13. First integrals and parametric solutions of third-order ODEs admitting {\\mathfrak{sl}(2, {R})}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, A.; Muriel, C.

    2017-05-01

    A complete set of first integrals for any third-order ordinary differential equation admitting a Lie symmetry algebra isomorphic to sl(2, {R}) is explicitly computed. These first integrals are derived from two linearly independent solutions of a linear second-order ODE, without additional integration. The general solution in parametric form can be obtained by using the computed first integrals. The study includes a parallel analysis of the four inequivalent realizations of sl(2, {R}) , and it is applied to several particular examples. These include the generalized Chazy equation, as well as an example of an equation which admits the most complicated of the four inequivalent realizations.

  14. Third-order WKBJ eigenvalues for Lennard-Jones and Varshni V potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesarwani, R.N.; Varshni, Y.P.

    1978-01-01

    The WKBJ method is applied to the third order for obtaining the eigenvalues for the fifth potential of Varshni, and the relevant integrals are analytically evaluated. Numerical results are obtained for the Lennard-Jones Potential, which is a special case of the Varshni V potential, and are compared to the results of Harrison and Bernstein obtained by a numerical integration of the wave equation. Error estimates are made. It is shown that for diatomic potentials, the Langer correction is not needed if the WKBJ approximation is carried to second and higher orders. (author)

  15. Nonlinear absorption and receptivity of the third order in InAs infrared region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musayev, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Nonlinear absorption and receptivity of the third order and coefficient nonlinear absorption in InAs n-type with different degree of alloying was measured. Obtained score considerably exceed sense, calculated on the basis of the models describing nonlinear receptivity of electrons, situated in the nonparabolic area of conductivity. It was shown that, observable deviations withdraw; if in the calculation apply energy dissipation of electrons. Growth of the efficiency under four-wave interaction in low-energy-gap semiconductors confines nonlinear absorption of interacting waves

  16. Third-order perturbation theory for van der Waals interaction coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Liyan; Shi Tingyun; Yan Zongchao; Mitroy, J.

    2011-01-01

    The third-order expression for the dispersion interaction between two atoms is written as a sum over lists of transition matrix elements. Particular attention is given to the C 9 /R 9 interaction which occurs in the homonuclear case when one atom is in an S state and the other is in a P state. Numerical values of the C 9 coefficient are given for the homonuclear alkali-metal dimers. The size of the C 9 :C 3 dispersion coefficient ratio increases for the heavier alkali-metal atoms. The C 11 and C 13 coefficients between two helium atoms and lithium atoms in their ground states are also given.

  17. Third-order TRANSPORT: A computer program for designing charged particle beam transport systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, D.C.; Brown, K.L.; Rothacker, F.

    1995-05-01

    TRANSPORT has been in existence in various evolutionary versions since 1963. The present version of TRANSPORT is a first-, second-, and third-order matrix multiplication computer program intended for the design of static-magnetic beam transport systems. This report discusses the following topics on TRANSPORT: Mathematical formulation of TRANSPORT; input format for TRANSPORT; summaries of TRANSPORT elements; preliminary specifications; description of the beam; physical elements; other transformations; assembling beam lines; operations; variation of parameters for fitting; and available constraints -- the FIT command

  18. Chaos control of third-order phase-locked loops using backstepping nonlinear controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harb, Ahmad M.; Harb, Bassam A.

    2004-01-01

    Previous study showed that a third-order phase-locked loop (PLL) with sinusoidal phase detector characteristics experienced a Hopf bifurcation point as well as chaotic behavior. As a result, this behavior drives the PLL to the out-of-lock (unstable) state. The analysis was based on a modern nonlinear theory such as bifurcation and chaos. The main goal of this paper is to control this chaotic behavior. A nonlinear controller based on the theory of backstepping is designed. The study showed the effectiveness of the designed nonlinear controller in controlling the undesirable unstable behavior and pulling the PLL back to the in-lock state

  19. Third-order correlator for measuring the time profile of petawatt laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginzburg, V N; Lozhkarev, V V; Luchinin, G A; Mironov, S Yu; Khazanov, Efim A; Yakovlev, I V [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation); Didenko, N V; Konyashchenko, Aleksandr V; Lutsenko, Andrei P [' Avesta-project' Ltd., Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2008-11-30

    A third-order correlator with a single-shot time window and a full dynamic range of 10{sup 8} is developed. The time contrast of radiation from the front-end system of a petawatt femtosecond laser complex measured with the correlator within time windows {+-}1 ps and {+-}100 ps was 10{sup 4} and more than 10{sup 8}, respectively. Based on the theoretical analysis of the cross-correlator operation, a number of requirements providing the optimal functioning of the cross-correlator are found. The reasons restricting the technical parameters of the correlator are discussed. (measurement of parameters of laser radiation)

  20. Dynamical Tangles in Third-Order Oscillator with Single Jump Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Petržela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution brings a deep and detailed study of the dynamical behavior associated with nonlinear oscillator described by a single third-order differential equation with scalar jump nonlinearity. The relative primitive geometry of the vector field allows making an exhaustive numerical analysis of its possible solutions, visualizations of the invariant manifolds, and basins of attraction as well as proving the existence of chaotic motion by using the concept of both Shilnikov theorems. The aim of this paper is also to complete, carry out and link the previous works on simple Newtonian dynamics, and answer the question how individual types of the phenomenon evolve with time via understandable notes.

  1. Third-order correlator for measuring the time profile of petawatt laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, V N; Lozhkarev, V V; Luchinin, G A; Mironov, S Yu; Khazanov, Efim A; Yakovlev, I V; Didenko, N V; Konyashchenko, Aleksandr V; Lutsenko, Andrei P

    2008-01-01

    A third-order correlator with a single-shot time window and a full dynamic range of 10 8 is developed. The time contrast of radiation from the front-end system of a petawatt femtosecond laser complex measured with the correlator within time windows ±1 ps and ±100 ps was 10 4 and more than 10 8 , respectively. Based on the theoretical analysis of the cross-correlator operation, a number of requirements providing the optimal functioning of the cross-correlator are found. The reasons restricting the technical parameters of the correlator are discussed. (measurement of parameters of laser radiation)

  2. Large third-order optical nonlinearity of silver colloids in silica glasses synthesized by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Binita; Chakraborty, Purushottam

    2011-01-01

    Silver ion implantations in fused silica glasses have been made to synthesize silver nanocluster-glass composites and a combination of 'Anti-Resonant Interferometric Nonlinear Spectroscopy (ARINS)' and 'Z-scan' techniques has been employed for the measurement of the third-order optical susceptibility of these nanocomposites. The ARINS technique utilizes the dressing of two unequal-intensity counter-propagating pulsed optical beams with differential nonlinear phases, which occurs upon traversing the sample. This difference in phase manifests itself in the intensity-dependent transmission, measurement of which enables us to extract the values of nonlinear refractive index (η 2 ) and nonlinear absorption coefficient (β), finally yielding the real and imaginary parts of the third-order dielectric susceptibility (χ (3) ). The real and imaginary parts of χ (3) are obtained in the orders of 10 -10 e.s.u for silver nanocluster-glass composites. The present value of χ (3) , to our knowledge, is extremely accurate and much more reliable compared to the values previously obtained by other workers for similar silver-glass nanocomposites using only Z-scan technique. Optical nonlinearity has been explained to be due to two-photon absorption in the present nanocomposite glasses and is essentially of electronic origin.

  3. Study of third order nonlinearity of chalcogenide thin films using third harmonic generation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Sunita; Mohan, Devendra; Kumar, Manish; Sanjay

    2018-05-01

    Third order nonlinear susceptibility of (GeSe3.5)100-xBix (x = 0, 10, 14) and ZnxSySe100-x-y (x = 2, y = 28; x = 4, y = 20; x = 6, y = 12; x = 8, y = 4) amorphous chalcogenide thin films prepared using thermal evaporation technique is estimated. The dielectric constant at incident and third harmonic wavelength is calculated using "PARAV" computer program. 1064 nm wavelength of Nd: YAG laser is incident on thin film and third harmonic signal at 355 nm wavelength alongwith fundamental light is obtained in reflection that is separated from 1064 nm using suitable optical filter. Reflected third harmonic signal is measured to trace the influence of Bi and Zn on third order nonlinear susceptibility and is found to increase with increase in Bi and Zn content in (GeSe3.5)100-xBix, and ZnxSySe100-x-y chalcogenide thin films respectively. The excellent optical nonlinear property shows the use of chalcogenide thin films in photonics for wavelength conversion and optical data processing.

  4. Third-order QCD corrections to the charged-current structure function F3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moch, S.; Vermaseren, J.A.M.; Vogt, A.

    2008-12-01

    We compute the coefficient function for the charge-averaged W ± -exchange structure function F 3 in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) to the third order in massless perturbative QCD. Our new three-loop contribution to this quantity forms, at not too small values of the Bjorken variable x, the dominant part of the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order corrections. It thus facilitates improved determinations of the strong coupling α s and of 1/Q 2 power corrections from scaling violations measured in neutrino-nucleon DIS. The expansion of F 3 in powers of α s is stable at all values of x relevant to measurements at high scales Q 2 . At small x the third-order coefficient function is dominated by diagrams with the colour structure d abc d abc not present at lower orders. At large x the coefficient function for F 3 is identical to that of F 1 up to terms vanishing for x→1. (orig.)

  5. Multi-objective optimization of GPU3 Stirling engine using third order analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toghyani, Somayeh; Kasaeian, Alibakhsh; Hashemabadi, Seyyed Hasan; Salimi, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A third-order analysis is carried out for optimization of Stirling engine. • The triple-optimization is done on a GPU3 Stirling engine. • A multi-objective optimization is carried out for a Stirling engine. • The results are compared with an experimental previous work for checking the model improvement. • The methods of TOPSIS, Fuzzy, and LINMAP are compared with each other in aspect of optimization. - Abstract: Stirling engine is an external combustion engine that uses any external heat source to generate mechanical power which operates at closed cycles. These engines are good choices for using in power generation systems; because these engines present a reasonable theoretical efficiency which can be closer to the Carnot efficiency, comparing with other reciprocating thermal engines. Hence, many studies have been conducted on Stirling engines and the third order thermodynamic analysis is one of them. In this study, multi-objective optimization with four decision variables including the temperature of heat source, stroke, mean effective pressure, and the engine frequency were applied in order to increase the efficiency and output power and reduce the pressure drop. Three decision-making procedures were applied to optimize the answers from the results. At last, the applied methods were compared with the results obtained of one experimental work and a good agreement was observed

  6. Third-order QCD corrections to the charged-current structure function F{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moch, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Vermaseren, J.A.M. [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vogt, A. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mathematical Sciences

    2008-12-15

    We compute the coefficient function for the charge-averaged W{sup {+-}}-exchange structure function F{sub 3} in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) to the third order in massless perturbative QCD. Our new three-loop contribution to this quantity forms, at not too small values of the Bjorken variable x, the dominant part of the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order corrections. It thus facilitates improved determinations of the strong coupling {alpha}{sub s} and of 1/Q{sup 2} power corrections from scaling violations measured in neutrino-nucleon DIS. The expansion of F{sub 3} in powers of {alpha}{sub s} is stable at all values of x relevant to measurements at high scales Q{sup 2}. At small x the third-order coefficient function is dominated by diagrams with the colour structure d{sup abc}d{sub abc} not present at lower orders. At large x the coefficient function for F{sub 3} is identical to that of F{sub 1} up to terms vanishing for x{yields}1. (orig.)

  7. A third-order asymptotic solution of nonlinear standing water waves in Lagrangian coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang-Yih, Chen; Hung-Chu, Hsu

    2009-01-01

    Asymptotic solutions up to third-order which describe irrotational finite amplitude standing waves are derived in Lagrangian coordinates. The analytical Lagrangian solution that is uniformly valid for large times satisfies the irrotational condition and the pressure p = 0 at the free surface, which is in contrast with the Eulerian solution existing under a residual pressure at the free surface due to Taylor's series expansion. In the third-order Lagrangian approximation, the explicit parametric equation and the Lagrangian wave frequency of water particles could be obtained. In particular, the Lagrangian mean level of a particle motion that is a function of vertical label is found as a part of the solution which is different from that in an Eulerian description. The dynamic properties of nonlinear standing waves in water of a finite depth, including particle trajectory, surface profile and wave pressure are investigated. It is also shown that the Lagrangian solution is superior to an Eulerian solution of the same order for describing the wave shape and the kinematics above the mean water level. (general)

  8. Traversable wormholes satisfying the weak energy condition in third-order Lovelock gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangeneh, Mahdi Kord; Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Dehghani, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we consider third-order Lovelock gravity with a cosmological constant term in an n -dimensional spacetime M4×Kn -4, where Kn -4 is a constant curvature space. We decompose the equations of motion to four and higher dimensional ones and find wormhole solutions by considering a vacuum Kn -4 space. Applying the latter constraint, we determine the second- and third-order Lovelock coefficients and the cosmological constant in terms of specific parameters of the model, such as the size of the extra dimensions. Using the obtained Lovelock coefficients and Λ , we obtain the four-dimensional matter distribution threading the wormhole. Furthermore, by considering the zero tidal force case and a specific equation of state, given by ρ =(γ p -τ )/[ω (1 +γ )], we find the exact solution for the shape function which represents both asymptotically flat and nonflat wormhole solutions. We show explicitly that these wormhole solutions in addition to traversibility satisfy the energy conditions for suitable choices of parameters and that the existence of a limited spherically symmetric traversable wormhole with normal matter in a four-dimensional spacetime implies a negative effective cosmological constant.

  9. Syntheses, structures and third-order non-linear optical properties of homometal clusters containing molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yong; Lu Jing; Cui Xiaobing; Xu Jiqing; Li Kechang; Sun Huaying; Li Guanghua; Pan Lingyun; Yang Qingxin

    2005-01-01

    Both the homometal cluster [P(ph 4 )] 2 [Mo 2 O 2 (μ-S) 2 (S 2 ) 2 ] (1) and [Mo 2 O 2 (μ-S) 2 (Et 2 dtc) 2 ] (2) (Et 2 dtc=diethyl-dithiocarbamate) were successfully synthesized by low-temperature solid-state reactions. X-ray single-crystal diffraction studies suggest that compound (1) is a dinuclear anion cluster, and compound (2) is a dinuclear neutral cluster. The two compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra and UV-Vis spectra. The third-order non-linear optical (NLO) properties of the clusters were also investigated and all exhibited nice non-linear absorption and self-defocusing performance with moduli of the hyperpolarizabilities 5.145x10 -30 esu for (1) and 5.428x10 -30 esu for (2)

  10. Diophantine non-integrability of a third-order recurrence with the Laurent property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hone, A N W

    2006-01-01

    We consider a one-parameter family of third-order nonlinear recurrence relations. Each member of this family satisfies the singularity confinement test, has a conserved quantity, and moreover has the Laurent property: all of the iterates are Laurent polynomials in the initial data. However, we show that these recurrences are not Diophantine integrable according to the definition proposed by Halburd (2005 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 38 L1). Explicit bounds on the asymptotic growth of the heights of iterates are obtained for a special choice of initial data. As a by-product of our analysis, infinitely many solutions are found for a certain family of Diophantine equations, studied by Mordell, that includes Markoff's equation. (letter to the editor)

  11. Spherically Symmetric Gravitational Collapse of a Dust Cloud in Third-Order Lovelock Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kang; Yang, Zhan-Ying; Zou, De-Cheng; Yue, Rui-Hong

    We investigate the spherically symmetric gravitational collapse of an incoherent dust cloud by considering a LTB-type spacetime in third-order Lovelock Gravity without cosmological constant, and give three families of LTB-like solutions which separately corresponding to hyperbolic, parabolic and elliptic. Notice that the contribution of high-order curvature corrections have a profound influence on the nature of the singularity, and the global structure of spacetime changes drastically from the analogous general relativistic case. Interestingly, the presence of high order Lovelock terms leads to the formation of massive, naked and timelike singularities in the 7D spacetime, which is disallowed in general relativity. Moveover, we point out that the naked singularities in the 7D case may be gravitational weak therefore may not be a serious threat to the cosmic censorship hypothesis, while the naked singularities in the D ≥ 8 inhomogeneous collapse violate the cosmic censorship hypothesis seriously.

  12. Third-order perturbation theory for van der Waals interaction coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Liyan; Shi Tingyun [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yan Zongchao [Center for Cold Atom Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Department of Physics, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3B 5A3 (Canada); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia)

    2011-11-15

    The third-order expression for the dispersion interaction between two atoms is written as a sum over lists of transition matrix elements. Particular attention is given to the C{sub 9}/R{sup 9} interaction which occurs in the homonuclear case when one atom is in an S state and the other is in a P state. Numerical values of the C{sub 9} coefficient are given for the homonuclear alkali-metal dimers. The size of the C{sub 9}:C{sub 3} dispersion coefficient ratio increases for the heavier alkali-metal atoms. The C{sub 11} and C{sub 13} coefficients between two helium atoms and lithium atoms in their ground states are also given.

  13. Third-order polynomial model for analyzing stickup state laminated structure in flexible electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xianhong; Wang, Zihao; Liu, Boya; Wang, Shuodao

    2018-02-01

    Laminated hard-soft integrated structures play a significant role in the fabrication and development of flexible electronics devices. Flexible electronics have advantageous characteristics such as soft and light-weight, can be folded, twisted, flipped inside-out, or be pasted onto other surfaces of arbitrary shapes. In this paper, an analytical model is presented to study the mechanics of laminated hard-soft structures in flexible electronics under a stickup state. Third-order polynomials are used to describe the displacement field, and the principle of virtual work is adopted to derive the governing equations and boundary conditions. The normal strain and the shear stress along the thickness direction in the bi-material region are obtained analytically, which agree well with the results from finite element analysis. The analytical model can be used to analyze stickup state laminated structures, and can serve as a valuable reference for the failure prediction and optimal design of flexible electronics in the future.

  14. Stability analysis of embedded solitons in the generalized third-order nonlinear Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelinovsky, Dmitry E.; Yang Jianke

    2005-01-01

    We study the generalized third-order nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS) equation which admits a one-parameter family of single-hump embedded solitons. Analyzing the spectrum of the linearization operator near the embedded soliton, we show that there exists a resonance pole in the left half-plane of the spectral parameter, which explains linear stability, rather than nonlinear semistability, of embedded solitons. Using exponentially weighted spaces, we approximate the resonance pole both analytically and numerically. We confirm in a near-integrable asymptotic limit that the resonance pole gives precisely the linear decay rate of parameters of the embedded soliton. Using conserved quantities, we qualitatively characterize the stable dynamics of embedded solitons

  15. A fluctuation method to calculate the third order elastic constants in crystalline solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zimu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Qu, Jianmin, E-mail: j-qu@northwestern.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2015-05-28

    This paper derives exact expressions of the isothermal third order elastic constants (TOE) in crystalline solids in terms of the kinetic and potential energies of the system. These expressions reveal that the TOE constants consist of a Born component and a relaxation component. The Born component is simply the third derivative of the system's potential energy with respect to the deformation, while the relaxation component is related to the non-uniform rearrangements of the atoms when the system is subject to a macroscopic deformation. Further, based on the general expressions derived here, a direct (fluctuation) method of computing the isothermal TOE constants is developed. Numerical examples of using this fluctuation method are given to compute the TOE constants of single crystal iron.

  16. Shooting method for third order simultaneous ordinary differential equations with application to magnetohydrodynamic boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, A.C.; Hazarika, G.C.

    1990-01-01

    An algorithm based on the shooting method has been developed for the solution of a two-point boundary value problem consisting of a system of third order simultaneous ordinary differential equations. The Falkner-Skan equations for electrically conducting viscous fluid with applied magnetic field has been solved by using this algorithm for various values of the wedge angle and magnetic parameters. The shooting method seems to be well convergent for a system as the results are in good agreement with those obtained by other methods. It is observed that both viscous boundary layer and magnetic boundary layer decrease while velocity as well as magnetic field increase with the increase of the wedge angle. (author). 6 tabs., 7 refs

  17. SIMPLE MODELS OF THREE COUPLED PT -SYMMETRIC WAVE GUIDES ALLOWING FOR THIRD-ORDER EXCEPTIONAL POINTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Schnabel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We study theoretical models of three coupled wave guides with a PT-symmetric distribution of gain and loss. A realistic matrix model is developed in terms of a three-mode expansion. By comparing with a previously postulated matrix model it is shown how parameter ranges with good prospects of finding a third-order exceptional point (EP3 in an experimentally feasible arrangement of semiconductors can be determined. In addition it is demonstrated that continuous distributions of exceptional points, which render the discovery of the EP3 difficult, are not only a feature of extended wave guides but appear also in an idealised model of infinitely thin guides shaped by delta functions.

  18. Third-order nonlinear optical studies of anthraquinone dyes using a CW He–Ne laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pramodini, S; Poornesh, P

    2014-01-01

    We present investigations on the third-order optical nonlinearity and optical power limiting of anthraquinone dyes. Z-scan measurements were performed using a continuous wave He–Ne laser at 633 nm wavelength as an excitation source. The nonlinear refraction studies exhibited self-defocusing behavior of the dyes. The nonlinear absorption in the dyes was dominated by a reverse saturable absorption process. Self-diffraction ring patterns were observed due to the change in refractive index and thermal lensing. Increase of the electron donating ability of the substituents resulted in enhanced values of the nonlinear optical parameters, establishing the structure–property relationship. The optical limiting study revealed that the dyes possess a lower limiting threshold and clamping level which is very important for eye and sensor protection. Hence, the dyes investigated here emerge as promising candidates for future opto-electronic and photonic device applications such as optical power limiters. (paper)

  19. Third-order nonlinear optical studies of anthraquinone dyes using a CW He-Ne laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramodini, S.; Poornesh, P.

    2014-05-01

    We present investigations on the third-order optical nonlinearity and optical power limiting of anthraquinone dyes. Z-scan measurements were performed using a continuous wave He-Ne laser at 633 nm wavelength as an excitation source. The nonlinear refraction studies exhibited self-defocusing behavior of the dyes. The nonlinear absorption in the dyes was dominated by a reverse saturable absorption process. Self-diffraction ring patterns were observed due to the change in refractive index and thermal lensing. Increase of the electron donating ability of the substituents resulted in enhanced values of the nonlinear optical parameters, establishing the structure-property relationship. The optical limiting study revealed that the dyes possess a lower limiting threshold and clamping level which is very important for eye and sensor protection. Hence, the dyes investigated here emerge as promising candidates for future opto-electronic and photonic device applications such as optical power limiters.

  20. Hopf bifurcation and chaos in a third-order phase-locked loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueira, José Roberto C.

    2017-01-01

    Phase-locked loops (PLLs) are devices able to recover time signals in several engineering applications. The literature regarding their dynamical behavior is vast, specifically considering that the process of synchronization between the input signal, coming from a remote source, and the PLL local oscillation is robust. For high-frequency applications it is usual to increase the PLL order by increasing the order of the internal filter, for guarantying good transient responses; however local parameter variations imply structural instability, thus provoking a Hopf bifurcation and a route to chaos for the phase error. Here, one usual architecture for a third-order PLL is studied and a range of permitted parameters is derived, providing a rule of thumb for designers. Out of this range, a Hopf bifurcation appears and, by increasing parameters, the periodic solution originated by the Hopf bifurcation degenerates into a chaotic attractor, therefore, preventing synchronization.

  1. Third-order nonlinear optical response of colloidal gold nanoparticles prepared by sputtering deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Hemerson P. S.; Alencar, Márcio A. R. C.; Hickmann, Jandir M. [Optics and Materials Group–OPTMA, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, CAIXA POSTAL 2051, 57061-970 Maceió (Brazil); Wender, Heberton [Brazilian Synchrotron National Laboratory (LNLS), CNPEM, Rua Giuseppe Máximo Scolfaro 10.000, 13083-970 Campinas (Brazil); Department of Physics, Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, 79070-900, Campo Grande (Brazil); Teixeira, Sergio R. [Institute of Physics, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501-970, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Dupont, Jairton [Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis, Institute of Chemistry, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501-970, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2013-11-14

    The nonlinear optical responses of gold nanoparticles dispersed in castor oil produced by sputtering deposition were investigated, using the thermally managed Z-scan technique. Particles with spherical shape and 2.6 nm of average diameter were obtained and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering. This colloid was highly stable, without the presence of chemical impurities, neither stabilizers. It was observed that this system presents a large refractive third-order nonlinear response and a negligible nonlinear absorption. Moreover, the evaluation of the all-optical switching figures of merit demonstrated that the colloidal nanoparticles prepared by sputtering deposition have a good potential for the development of ultrafast photonic devices.

  2. Third-order QCD corrections to heavy quark pair production near threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuller, Kurt

    2008-11-07

    The measurement of the top quark mass is an important task at the future International Linear Collider. The most promising process is the top quark pair production in the threshold region. In this region the top quarks behave non-relativistically and a perturbative treatment using effective field theories is possible. Current second order theoretical predictions in a fixed order approach show an uncertainty which is bigger than the expected experimental errors. Therefore, an improvement of the cross section calculation is desirable. There are two ways to incorporate higher order effects, one is to calculate the full next order in the fixed order approach, another possibility is to resum large logarithms. In this work, the fixed order calculation has been extended to the third order in perturbation theory for the QCD corrections. The result is a strongly improved scale behavior and a better understanding of heavy quarkonium systems. The Green function result is given in a semi-analytic form. The energy levels and wave functions for heavy quarkonium states have been calculated from the poles of the Green function and are presented for arbitrary quantum number n. The results have been implemented in a Mathematica program which makes the data easily accessible. Once some missing matching coefficients are calculated, and a complete electroweak calculation is available, the results of this work can be used to improve the precision of the top quark mass measurement to an uncertainty of less than 50 MeV. An inclusion of initial state radiation and beam effects are essential for a realistic observable. In the future, the results obtained could be used for a third order resummation of large logarithms. Further applications are also the extraction of the bottom quark mass with sum rules. (orig.)

  3. Radial distribution of power starting from the reactivity using nodal schemes of second and third order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfin L, A.; Alonso V, G.; Valle G, E. del

    2003-01-01

    In this work two nodal schemes of finite element are presented, one of second and the other of third order of accurate that allow to determine the radial distribution of power starting from the corresponding reactivities.The schemes here developed were obtained taking as starting point the equation developed by Driscoll et al, the one which is based on the diffusion approach of 1-1/2 energy groups. This equation relates the power fraction of an assemble with their reactivity and with the power fractions and reactivities of the assemblies that its surround it. Driscoll and collaborators they solve in form approximate such equation supposing that the reactivity of each assemble it is but a lineal function of the burnt one of the fuel. The spatial approach carries out it with the classic technique of finite differences centered in mesh. Nevertheless that the algebraic system to which its arrive it can be solved without more considerations introduce some additional suppositions and adjustment parameters that it allows them to predict results comparable to those contributed by three dimensions analysis and this way to reduce the one obtained error when its compare their results with those of a production code like CASMO. Also in the two schemes that here are presented the same approaches of Driscoll were used being obtained errors of the one 10% and of 5% for the second schemes and third order respectively for a test case that it was built starting from data of the Cycle 1 of the Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric plant. These errors its were obtained when comparing with a computer program based on the matrix response method. It is sought to have this way a quick and efficient tool for the multicycle analysis in the fuel management. However, this model presents problems in the appropriate prediction of the average burnt of the nucleus and of the burnt one by lot. (Author)

  4. Development and application of a third order scheme of finite differences centered in mesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfin L, A.; Alonso V, G.; Valle G, E. del

    2003-01-01

    In this work the development of a third order scheme of finite differences centered in mesh is presented and it is applied in the numerical solution of those diffusion equations in multi groups in stationary state and X Y geometry. Originally this scheme was developed by Hennart and del Valle for the monoenergetic diffusion equation with a well-known source and they show that the one scheme is of third order when comparing the numerical solution with the analytical solution of a model problem using several mesh refinements and boundary conditions. The scheme by them developed it also introduces the application of numeric quadratures to evaluate the rigidity matrices and of mass that its appear when making use of the finite elements method of Galerkin. One of the used quadratures is the open quadrature of 4 points, no-standard, of Newton-Cotes to evaluate in approximate form the elements of the rigidity matrices. The other quadrature is that of 3 points of Radau that it is used to evaluate the elements of all the mass matrices. One of the objectives of these quadratures are to eliminate the couplings among the Legendre moments 0 and 1 associated to the left and right faces as those associated to the inferior and superior faces of each cell of the discretization. The other objective is to satisfy the particles balance in weighed form in each cell. In this work it expands such development to multiplicative means considering several energy groups. There are described diverse details inherent to the technique, particularly those that refer to the simplification of the algebraic systems that appear due to the space discretization. Numerical results for several test problems are presented and are compared with those obtained with other nodal techniques. (Author)

  5. Modeling of turbulent chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on modeling turbulent reacting flows, regimes of turbulent combustion, regimes of premixed and regimes of non-premixed turbulent combustion, chemical closure models, flamelet model, conditional moment closure (CMC), NO(x) emissions from turbulent H2 jet flames, probability density function (PDF), departures from chemical equilibrium, mixing models for PDF methods, comparison of predicted and measured H2O mass fractions in turbulent nonpremixed jet flames, experimental evidence of preferential diffusion in turbulent jet flames, and computation of turbulent reacting flows.

  6. Decomposition of Polarimetric SAR Images Based on Second- and Third-order Statics Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, S.; Hensley, S.

    2012-12-01

    There are many papers concerning the research of the decomposition of polerimetric SAR imagery. Most of them are based on second-order statics analysis that Freeman and Durden [1] suggested for the reflection symmetry condition that implies that the co-polarization and cross-polarization correlations are close to zero. Since then a number of improvements and enhancements have been proposed to better understand the underlying backscattering mechanisms present in polarimetric SAR images. For example, Yamaguchi et al. [2] added the helix component into Freeman's model and developed a 4 component scattering model for the non-reflection symmetry condition. In addition, Arii et al. [3] developed an adaptive model-based decomposition method that could estimate both the mean orientation angle and a degree of randomness for the canopy scattering for each pixel in a SAR image without the reflection symmetry condition. This purpose of this research is to develop a new decomposition method based on second- and third-order statics analysis to estimate the surface, dihedral, volume and helix scattering components from polarimetric SAR images without the specific assumptions concerning the model for the volume scattering. In addition, we evaluate this method by using both simulation and real UAVSAR data and compare this method with other methods. We express the volume scattering component using the wire formula and formulate the relationship equation between backscattering echo and each component such as the surface, dihedral, volume and helix via linearization based on second- and third-order statics. In third-order statics, we calculate the correlation of the correlation coefficients for each polerimetric data and get one new relationship equation to estimate each polarization component such as HH, VV and VH for the volume. As a result, the equation for the helix component in this method is the same formula as one in Yamaguchi's method. However, the equation for the volume

  7. Third-Order Transport with MAD Input: A Computer Program for Designing Charged Particle Beam Transport Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Karl

    1998-10-28

    TRANSPORT has been in existence in various evolutionary versions since 1963. The present version of TRANSPORT is a first-, second-, and third-order matrix multiplication computer program intended for the design of static-magnetic beam transport systems.

  8. Electromotive force and large-scale magnetic dynamo in a turbulent flow with a mean shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogachevskii, Igor; Kleeorin, Nathan

    2003-09-01

    An effect of sheared large-scale motions on a mean electromotive force in a nonrotating turbulent flow of a conducting fluid is studied. It is demonstrated that in a homogeneous divergence-free turbulent flow the alpha effect does not exist, however a mean magnetic field can be generated even in a nonrotating turbulence with an imposed mean velocity shear due to a "shear-current" effect. A mean velocity shear results in an anisotropy of turbulent magnetic diffusion. A contribution to the electromotive force related to the symmetric parts of the gradient tensor of the mean magnetic field (the kappa effect) is found in nonrotating turbulent flows with a mean shear. The kappa effect and turbulent magnetic diffusion reduce the growth rate of the mean magnetic field. It is shown that a mean magnetic field can be generated when the exponent of the energy spectrum of the background turbulence (without the mean velocity shear) is less than 2. The shear-current effect was studied using two different methods: the tau approximation (the Orszag third-order closure procedure) and the stochastic calculus (the path integral representation of the solution of the induction equation, Feynman-Kac formula, and Cameron-Martin-Girsanov theorem). Astrophysical applications of the obtained results are discussed.

  9. Third-order non-Coulomb correction to the S-wave quarkonium wave functions at the origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beneke, M.; Kiyo, Y.; Schuller, K.

    2008-01-01

    We compute the third-order correction to the S-wave quarkonium wave functions |ψ n (0)| 2 at the origin from non-Coulomb potentials in the effective non-relativistic Lagrangian. Together with previous results on the Coulomb correction and the ultrasoft correction computed in a companion paper, this completes the third-order calculation up to a few unknown matching coefficients. Numerical estimates of the new correction for bottomonium and toponium are given

  10. The Reduction of Chazy Classes and Other Third-Order Differential Equations Related to Boundary Layer Flow Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhar, K.; Kara, A. H.

    2012-01-01

    We study the symmetries, conservation laws and reduction of third-order equations that evolve from a prior reduction of models that arise in fluid phenomena. These could be the ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that are reductions of partial differential equations (PDEs) or, alternatively, PDEs related to given ODEs. In this class, the analysis includes the well-known Blasius, Chazy, and other associated third-order ODEs. (general)

  11. Influence of Superparameterization and a Higher-Order Turbulence Closure on Rainfall Bias Over Amazonia in Community Atmosphere Model Version 5: How Parameterization Changes Rainfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kai [Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin TX USA; Fu, Rong [Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin TX USA; Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles CA USA; Shaikh, Muhammad J. [Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin TX USA; Ghan, Steven [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Wang, Minghuai [Institute for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing China; Collaborative Innovation Center of Climate Change, Nanjing China; Leung, L. Ruby [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Dickinson, Robert E. [Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin TX USA; Marengo, Jose [Centro Nacional de Monitoramento e Alertas aos Desastres Naturais, São Jose dos Campos Brazil

    2017-09-21

    We evaluate the Community Atmosphere Model Version 5 (CAM5) with a higher-order turbulence closure scheme, named Cloud Layers Unified By Binomials (CLUBB), and a Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF) with two different microphysics configurations to investigate their influences on rainfall simulations over Southern Amazonia. The two different microphysics configurations in MMF are the one-moment cloud microphysics without aerosol treatment (SAM1MOM) and two-moment cloud microphysics coupled with aerosol treatment (SAM2MOM). Results show that both MMF-SAM2MOM and CLUBB effectively reduce the low biases of rainfall, mainly during the wet season. The CLUBB reduces low biases of humidity in the lower troposphere with further reduced shallow clouds. The latter enables more surface solar flux, leading to stronger convection and more rainfall. MMF, especially MMF-SAM2MOM, unstablizes the atmosphere with more moisture and higher atmospheric temperatures in the atmospheric boundary layer, allowing the growth of more extreme convection and further generating more deep convection. MMF-SAM2MOM significantly increases rainfall in the afternoon, but it does not reduce the early bias of the diurnal rainfall peak; LUBB, on the other hand, delays the afternoon peak time and produces more precipitation in the early morning, due to more realistic gradual transition between shallow and deep convection. MMF appears to be able to realistically capture the observed increase of relative humidity prior to deep convection, especially with its two-moment configuration. In contrast, in CAM5 and CAM5 with CLUBB, occurrence of deep convection in these models appears to be a result of stronger heating rather than higher relative humidity.

  12. Third-order gas-liquid phase transition and the nature of Andrews critical point

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Ma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this article is to study the nature of the Andrews critical point in the gas-liquid transition in a physical-vapor transport (PVT system. A dynamical model, consistent with the van der Waals equation near the Andrews critical point, is derived. With this model, we deduce two physical parameters, which interact exactly at the Andrews critical point, and which dictate the dynamic transition behavior near the Andrews critical point. In particular, it is shown that 1 the gas-liquid co-existence curve can be extended beyond the Andrews critical point, and 2 the transition is first order before the critical point, second-order at the critical point, and third order beyond the Andrews critical point. This clearly explains why it is hard to observe the gas-liquid phase transition beyond the Andrews critical point. Furthermore, the analysis leads naturally the introduction of a general asymmetry principle of fluctuations and the preferred transition mechanism for a thermodynamic system. The theoretical results derived in this article are in agreement with the experimental results obtained in (K. Nishikawa and T. Morita, Fluid behavior at supercritical states studied by small-angle X-ray scattering, Journal of Supercritical Fluid, 13 (1998, pp. 143-148. Also, the derived second-order transition at the critical point is consistent with the result obtained in (M. Fisher, Specific heat of a gas near the critical point, Physical Review, 136:6A (1964, pp. A1599-A1604.

  13. Physical origin of third order non-linear optical response of porphyrin nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mongwaketsi, N.; Khamlich, S.; Pranaitis, M.; Sahraoui, B.; Khammar, F.; Garab, G.; Sparrow, R.; Maaza, M.

    2012-01-01

    The non-linear optical properties of porphyrin nanorods were studied using Z-scan, Second and Third harmonic generation techniques. We investigated in details the heteroaggregate behaviour formation of [H 4 TPPS 4 ] 2- and [SnTPyP] 2+ mixture by means of the UV-VIS spectroscopy and aggregates structure and morphology by transmission electron microscopy. The porphyrin nanorods under investigation were synthesized by self assembly and molecular recognition method. They have been optimized in view of future application in the construction of the light harvesting system. The focus of this study was geared towards understanding the influence of the type of solvent used on these porphyrins nanorods using spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. Highlights: ► We synthesized porphyrin nanorods by self assembly and molecular recognition method. ► TEM images confirmed solid cylindrical shapes. ► UV-VIS spectroscopy showed the decrease in the absorbance peaks of the precursors. ► The enhanced third-order nonlinearities were observed.

  14. Third-order nonlinear optical response of Ag-CdSe/PVA hybrid nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, S.K.; Kaur, Ramneek; Kaur, Jaspreet; Sharma, Mamta [Panjab University, Department of Physics, Center of Advanced Study in Physics, Chandigarh (India)

    2015-09-15

    Hybrid nanocomposites of II-VI semiconductor nanoparticles are gaining great interest in nonlinear optoelectronic devices. Present work includes the characterization of CdSe polymer nanocomposite prepared by chemical in situ technique. From X-ray diffraction, the hexagonal wurtzite structure of nanoparticles has been confirmed with spherical morphology from transmission electron microscopy. Ag-CdSe hybrid polymer nanocomposite has been prepared chemically at different Ag concentrations. The presence of Ag in hybrid nanocomposite has been confirmed with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The effect of varying Ag concentration on the linear and nonlinear optical properties of the nanocomposites has been studied. In linear optical parameters, the linear absorption coefficient, refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical conductivity have been calculated. The third-order nonlinear optical properties have been observed with open- and closed-aperture Z-scan technique. The large nonlinear refractive index ∝10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}/W with self-focusing behaviour is due to the combined effect of quantum confinement and thermo-optical effects. The enhanced nonlinearity with increasing Ag content is due to the surface plasmon resonance, which enhances the local electric field near the nanoparticle surface. Thus, Ag-CdSe hybrid polymer nanocomposite has favourable nonlinear optical properties for various optoelectronic applications. (orig.)

  15. Third-order nonlinear optical response of Ag-CdSe/PVA hybrid nanocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, S.K.; Kaur, Ramneek; Kaur, Jaspreet; Sharma, Mamta

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid nanocomposites of II-VI semiconductor nanoparticles are gaining great interest in nonlinear optoelectronic devices. Present work includes the characterization of CdSe polymer nanocomposite prepared by chemical in situ technique. From X-ray diffraction, the hexagonal wurtzite structure of nanoparticles has been confirmed with spherical morphology from transmission electron microscopy. Ag-CdSe hybrid polymer nanocomposite has been prepared chemically at different Ag concentrations. The presence of Ag in hybrid nanocomposite has been confirmed with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The effect of varying Ag concentration on the linear and nonlinear optical properties of the nanocomposites has been studied. In linear optical parameters, the linear absorption coefficient, refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical conductivity have been calculated. The third-order nonlinear optical properties have been observed with open- and closed-aperture Z-scan technique. The large nonlinear refractive index ∝10 -5 cm 2 /W with self-focusing behaviour is due to the combined effect of quantum confinement and thermo-optical effects. The enhanced nonlinearity with increasing Ag content is due to the surface plasmon resonance, which enhances the local electric field near the nanoparticle surface. Thus, Ag-CdSe hybrid polymer nanocomposite has favourable nonlinear optical properties for various optoelectronic applications. (orig.)

  16. Explicit formulation of second and third order optical nonlinearity in the FDTD framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varin, Charles; Emms, Rhys; Bart, Graeme; Fennel, Thomas; Brabec, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is a flexible and powerful technique for rigorously solving Maxwell's equations. However, three-dimensional optical nonlinearity in current commercial and research FDTD softwares requires solving iteratively an implicit form of Maxwell's equations over the entire numerical space and at each time step. Reaching numerical convergence demands significant computational resources and practical implementation often requires major modifications to the core FDTD engine. In this paper, we present an explicit method to include second and third order optical nonlinearity in the FDTD framework based on a nonlinear generalization of the Lorentz dispersion model. A formal derivation of the nonlinear Lorentz dispersion equation is equally provided, starting from the quantum mechanical equations describing nonlinear optics in the two-level approximation. With the proposed approach, numerical integration of optical nonlinearity and dispersion in FDTD is intuitive, transparent, and fully explicit. A strong-field formulation is also proposed, which opens an interesting avenue for FDTD-based modelling of the extreme nonlinear optics phenomena involved in laser filamentation and femtosecond micromachining of dielectrics.

  17. Role of third-order dispersion in chirped Airy pulse propagation in single-mode fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wangyang; Wang, Lei; Wen, Shuangchun

    2018-04-01

    The dynamic propagation of the initial chirped Airy pulse in single-mode fibers is studied numerically, special attention being paid to the role of the third-order dispersion (TOD). It is shown that for the positive TOD, the Airy pulse experiences inversion irrespective of the sign of initial chirp. The role of TOD in the dynamic propagation of the initial chirped Airy pulse depends on the combined sign of the group-velocity dispersion (GVD) and the initial chirp. If the GVD and chirp have the opposite signs, the chirped Airy pulse compresses first and passes through a breakdown area, then reconstructs a new Airy pattern with opposite acceleration, with the breakdown area becoming small and the main peak of the new Airy pattern becoming asymmetric with an oscillatory structure due to the positive TOD. If the GVD and chirp have the same signs, the finite-energy Airy pulse compresses to a focal point and then inverses its acceleration, in the case of positive TOD, the distance to the focal point becoming smaller. At zero-dispersion point, the finite-energy Airy pulse inverses to the opposite acceleration at a focal point, with the tight-focusing effect being reduced by initial chirp. Under the effect of negative TOD, the initial chirped Airy pulse disperses and the lobes split. In addition, in the anomalous dispersion region, for strong nonlinearity, the initial chirped Airy pulse splits and enters a soliton shedding regime.

  18. On the physical contributions to the third-order nonlinear optical response in plasmonic nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Hernández, Roberto Carlos; Gleason-Villagran, Roberto; Rodríguez-Fernández, Luis; Crespo-Sosa, Alejandro; Cheang-Wong, Juan Carlos; López-Suárez, Alejandra; Oliver, Alicia; Reyes-Esqueda, Jorge Alejandro; Torres-Torres, Carlos; Rangel-Rojo, Raúl

    2012-01-01

    Au and Ag isotropic and anisotropic nanocomposites were prepared using the ion implantation technique. Their optical properties were studied at several wavelengths in the optical range 300–800 nm, across their plasmon resonances. The linear regime was characterized by measuring the absorption spectrum and the third-order nonlinear regime by means of the Z-scan technique using a tunable picosecond pulsed laser system (26 ps). Open-aperture Z-scan traces show a superposition of different optical nonlinear absorption (NLA) processes in the whole range studied. We associate these phenomena with the excitation of inter- and intra-band electronic transitions, which contribute with a positive sign to NLA, and to the formation of hot-electrons, which contribute with opposite sign to NLA. Closed-aperture traces for measuring nonlinear refraction (NLR) show different signs for Au and Ag samples, and a change of sign in Au is found when purely inter-band transitions are excited. In this work, for the appropriate wavelength, it is worth remarking on the free-electron response to the exciting light and its strong contribution to the nonlinear optical properties for low (intra-band) and high (hot-electrons) irradiances. (paper)

  19. Stochastic, real-space, imaginary-time evaluation of third-order Feynman–Goldstone diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willow, Soohaeng Yoo; Hirata, So

    2014-01-01

    A new, alternative set of interpretation rules of Feynman–Goldstone diagrams for many-body perturbation theory is proposed, which translates diagrams into algebraic expressions suitable for direct Monte Carlo integrations. A vertex of a diagram is associated with a Coulomb interaction (rather than a two-electron integral) and an edge with the trace of a Green's function in real space and imaginary time. With these, 12 diagrams of third-order many-body perturbation (MP3) theory are converted into 20-dimensional integrals, which are then evaluated by a Monte Carlo method. It uses redundant walkers for convergence acceleration and a weight function for importance sampling in conjunction with the Metropolis algorithm. The resulting Monte Carlo MP3 method has low-rank polynomial size dependence of the operation cost, a negligible memory cost, and a naturally parallel computational kernel, while reproducing the correct correlation energies of small molecules within a few mE h after 10 6 Monte Carlo steps

  20. Stochastic, real-space, imaginary-time evaluation of third-order Feynman–Goldstone diagrams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willow, Soohaeng Yoo [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Center for Superfunctional Materials, Department of Chemistry, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyojadong, Namgu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Hirata, So, E-mail: sohirata@illinois.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2014-01-14

    A new, alternative set of interpretation rules of Feynman–Goldstone diagrams for many-body perturbation theory is proposed, which translates diagrams into algebraic expressions suitable for direct Monte Carlo integrations. A vertex of a diagram is associated with a Coulomb interaction (rather than a two-electron integral) and an edge with the trace of a Green's function in real space and imaginary time. With these, 12 diagrams of third-order many-body perturbation (MP3) theory are converted into 20-dimensional integrals, which are then evaluated by a Monte Carlo method. It uses redundant walkers for convergence acceleration and a weight function for importance sampling in conjunction with the Metropolis algorithm. The resulting Monte Carlo MP3 method has low-rank polynomial size dependence of the operation cost, a negligible memory cost, and a naturally parallel computational kernel, while reproducing the correct correlation energies of small molecules within a few mE{sub h} after 10{sup 6} Monte Carlo steps.

  1. A third-order class-D amplifier with and without ripple compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Stephen M.; du Toit Mouton, H.

    2018-06-01

    We analyse the nonlinear behaviour of a third-order class-D amplifier, and demonstrate the remarkable effectiveness of the recently introduced ripple compensation (RC) technique in reducing the audio distortion of the device. The amplifier converts an input audio signal to a high-frequency train of rectangular pulses, whose widths are modulated according to the input signal (pulse-width modulation) and employs negative feedback. After determining the steady-state operating point for constant input and calculating its stability, we derive a small-signal model (SSM), which yields in closed form the transfer function relating (infinitesimal) input and output disturbances. This SSM shows how the RC technique is able to linearise the small-signal response of the device. We extend this SSM through a fully nonlinear perturbation calculation of the dynamics of the amplifier, based on the disparity in time scales between the pulse train and the audio signal. We obtain the nonlinear response of the amplifier to a general audio signal, avoiding the linearisation inherent in the SSM; we thereby more precisely quantify the reduction in distortion achieved through RC. Finally, simulations corroborate our theoretical predictions and illustrate the dramatic deterioration in performance that occurs when the amplifier is operated in an unstable regime. The perturbation calculation is rather general, and may be adapted to quantify the way in which other nonlinear negative-feedback pulse-modulated devices track a time-varying input signal that slowly modulates the system parameters.

  2. Photo-physics of third-order nonlinear optical processes in organic dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delysse, Stephane

    1997-01-01

    We study some aspects of the nonlinear picosecond photo-physics in organic dyes using Kerr ellipsometry. The aim is to establish link between the photo-physics and nonlinear optics in these compounds. First, we study coherent processes directly linked to the third-order susceptibility. Thus, we measure two-photon absorption spectra of large internal charge transfer dyes. We take into account all coupling between three electronic states which can interfere to explain the particular response of some stilbene dyes. On the second hand, we expose a more photophysical approach to determine the S 1 → S n transition energies and moments using the measurement of excited state absorption cross sections. These results allow the prediction of the susceptibilities relevant to alternative nonlinear optical methods. Nevertheless, the stationary approach hides the complex relaxation processes which can take place in organic dyes. As an illustration, we study the formation and disappearance of a TICT (Twisted intramolecular charge transfer) in a pyrylium salt in solvents of increasing viscosity. (author) [fr

  3. Orientational and electronic contributions to the third-order susceptibilities of cryogenic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kildal, H.; Brueck, S.R.J.

    1980-01-01

    Alternating current Kerr effect and third-harmonic generation (THG) are reported for the cryogenic liquids CO, O 2 , N 2 , and Ar pumped by CO 2 TEA laser radiation. The THG experiments measure the hyperpolarizability, while the Kerr effect measurements probe the total nonresonant third-order susceptibility chi/sup( 3 ), arising from both molecular orientation and electronic hyperpolarizability. The THG process in liquid CO is dominated by a vibrational two-photon resonant contribution for the CO 2 R(6) pump line at 9.35 μm. By studying the interference between the resonant and nonresonant contributions in liquid CO--O 2 mixtures the hyperpolarizability of liquid O 2 has been determined relative to the two-photon resonant chi/sup( 3 ) of liquid CO. These measurements give the first experimental confirmation for liquid media that the two-photon resonance contribution to polarized scattering consists of both narrow and broad linewidth components associated with, respectively, the isotropic and anisotropic Raman polarizabilities

  4. Transfer function of radio over fiber multimode fiber optic links considering third-order dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capmany, J; Gasulla, Ivana

    2007-08-20

    Although a considerable number of multimode fiber (MMF) links operate in a wavelength region around 850 nm where chromatic dispersion of a given modal group mu is described adequately by the second derivative beta(mu) (2) of the propagation constant beta(mu)(omega), there is also an increasing interest in MMF links transmitting in the second spectral window (@1300nm) where this second derivative vanishes being thus necessary to consider the third derivative beta(mu) (3) in the evaluation of the transfer function of the multimode fiber link. We present in this paper, for the first time to our knowledge, an analytical model for the transfer function of a multimode fiber (MMF) optic link taken into account the impact of third-order dispersion. The model extends the operation of a previously reported one for second-order dispersion. Our results show that the performance of broadband radio over fiber transmission through middle-reach distances can be improved by working at the minimum-dispersion wavelength as long as low-linewidth lasers are employed.

  5. Third-order optical nonlinearity of N-doped graphene oxide nanocomposites at different GO ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimiagar, Salimeh; Abrinaei, Fahimeh

    2018-05-01

    In the present work, the influence of GO ratios on the structural, linear and nonlinear optical properties of nitrogen-doped graphene oxide nanocomposites (N-GO NCs) has been studied. N-GO NCs were synthesized by hydrothermal method. The XRD, FTIR, SEM, and TEM results confirmed the reduction of GO by nitrogen doping. The energy band gaps of N-GO NCs calculated from UV-Vis analyzed by using Tauc plot. To obtain further insight into potential optical changes in the N-GO NCs by increasing GO contents, Z-scan analysis was performed with nanosecond Nd-YAG laser at 532 nm. The nonlinear absorption coefficient, β, and nonlinear refractive index, n2, for N-GO NCs at the laser intensity of 113 MW/cm were measured and an increase was observed in both parameters after addition of nitrogen to GO. The third-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities of N-GO NCs were measured in the order of 10-9 esu. The results showed that N-GO NCs have negative nonlinearity which can be controlled by GO contents to obtain the highest values for nonlinear optical parameters. The nonlinear optical results not only imply that N-GO NCs can serve as an important material in the advancing of optoelectronics but also open new possibilities for the design of new graphene-based materials by variation of N and GO ratios as well as manufacturing conditions.

  6. Direct numerical simulation of natural convection in a vertical channel: a tool for second moment closure modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maupu, V.; Laurence, D.

    1996-01-01

    Natural turbulent convection in a differentially heated infinite vertical slot is computed with a mixed finite differences/Fourier code. At a Rayleigh number of 10 5 , in the case without mean stratification, periodic perturbations from the laminar solution develop and transition to a fully turbulent flow occurs. From then on, a database of one-point statistics is presented: mean velocity and temperature, Reynolds stress components, turbulent heat fluxes and variance of temperature, but also budgets of second moment equations. This database is then used for testing of a second moment closure based on the Launder-Reece-Rodi model on an elliptic relaxation for near wall effects on pressure redistribution. This level of modelling is required by the presence of counter gradient fluxes, which cannot be accounted for eddy viscosity and eddy diffusivity assumptions. Furthermore, an algebraic third order moment closure was found necessary because of counter gradient turbulent transport terms which appear to mainly originate from the mean velocity and temperature gradient terms usually neglected in conventional transport models, such as the standard Daly-Harlow or Hanjalic-Launder models. (authors)

  7. Microscopic cascading of second-order molecular nonlinearity: New design principles for enhancing third-order nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baev, Alexander; Autschbach, Jochen; Boyd, Robert W; Prasad, Paras N

    2010-04-12

    Herein, we develop a phenomenological model for microscopic cascading and substantiate it with ab initio calculations. It is shown that the concept of local microscopic cascading of a second-order nonlinearity can lead to a third-order nonlinearity, without introducing any new loss mechanisms that could limit the usefulness of our approach. This approach provides a new molecular design protocol, in which the current great successes achieved in producing molecules with extremely large second-order nonlinearity can be used in a supra molecular organization in a preferred orientation to generate very large third-order response magnitudes. The results of density functional calculations for a well-known second-order molecule, (para)nitroaniline, show that a head-to-tail dimer configuration exhibits enhanced third-order nonlinearity, in agreement with the phenomenological model which suggests that such an arrangement will produce cascading due to local field effects.

  8. Dynamics of solitons and quasisolitons of the cubic third-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karpman, V.I.; Juul Rasmussen, J.; Shagalov, A.G.

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of soliton and quasisoliton solutions of the cubic third-order nonlinear Schrodinger equation is studied. Regular solitons exist due to a balance between the nonlinear terms and (linear) third-order dispersion; they are not important at small alpha (3) (alpha (3) is the coefficient...... in the third derivative term) and vanish at alpha3 -->0. The most essential, at small alpha (3), is a quasisoliton emitting resonant radiation (resonantly radiating soliton). Its relationship with the other (steady) quasisoliton, called embedded soliton, is studied analytically and also in numerical...

  9. A Kramers-Moyal approach to the analysis of third-order noise with applications in option valuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Dan M; Lipan, Ovidiu

    2015-01-01

    We propose the use of the Kramers-Moyal expansion in the analysis of third-order noise. In particular, we show how the approach can be applied in the theoretical study of option valuation. Despite Pawula's theorem, which states that a truncated model may exhibit poor statistical properties, we show that for a third-order Kramers-Moyal truncation model of an option's and its underlier's price, important properties emerge: (i) the option price can be written in a closed analytical form that involves the Airy function, (ii) the price is a positive function for positive skewness in the distribution, (iii) for negative skewness, the price becomes negative only for price values that are close to zero. Moreover, using third-order noise in option valuation reveals additional properties: (iv) the inconsistencies between two popular option pricing approaches (using a "delta-hedged" portfolio and using an option replicating portfolio) that are otherwise equivalent up to the second moment, (v) the ability to develop a measure R of how accurately an option can be replicated by a mixture of the underlying stocks and cash, (vi) further limitations of second-order models revealed by introducing third-order noise.

  10. A third order accurate Lagrangian finite element scheme for the computation of generalized molecular stress function fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasano, Andrea; Rasmussen, Henrik K.

    2017-01-01

    A third order accurate, in time and space, finite element scheme for the numerical simulation of three- dimensional time-dependent flow of the molecular stress function type of fluids in a generalized formu- lation is presented. The scheme is an extension of the K-BKZ Lagrangian finite element me...

  11. On the periodic orbits of the Third-order differential equation x ' ' '- x ' ' x'- x= F(x,x',x ' ')

    OpenAIRE

    Llibre, Jaume

    2013-01-01

    Agraïments: The second author is partially supported by CAPES/MECD-DGU 222/2010 Brazil and Spain In this paper we study the periodic orbits of the third-order differential equation x''' − µx'' + x' − µx = εF(x, x', x''), where ε is a small parameter and the function F is of class C2.

  12. Time-dependent density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order expansion of electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Yoshio

    2015-09-07

    We develop a formalism for the calculation of excitation energies and excited state gradients for the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order contributions of a Taylor series of the density functional theory energy with respect to the fluctuation of electron density (time-dependent density-functional tight-binding (TD-DFTB3)). The formulation of the excitation energy is based on the existing time-dependent density functional theory and the older TD-DFTB2 formulae. The analytical gradient is computed by solving Z-vector equations, and it requires one to calculate the third-order derivative of the total energy with respect to density matrix elements due to the inclusion of the third-order contributions. The comparison of adiabatic excitation energies for selected small and medium-size molecules using the TD-DFTB2 and TD-DFTB3 methods shows that the inclusion of the third-order contributions does not affect excitation energies significantly. A different set of parameters, which are optimized for DFTB3, slightly improves the prediction of adiabatic excitation energies statistically. The application of TD-DFTB for the prediction of absorption and fluorescence energies of cresyl violet demonstrates that TD-DFTB3 reproduced the experimental fluorescence energy quite well.

  13. On the Asymptotic Properties of Nonlinear Third-Order Neutral Delay Differential Equations with Distributed Deviating Arguments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youliang Fu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the asymptotic properties of solutions to a third-order nonlinear neutral delay differential equation with distributed deviating arguments. Several new theorems are obtained which ensure that every solution to this equation either is oscillatory or tends to zero. Two illustrative examples are included.

  14. Mixed problem with nonlocal boundary conditions for a third-order partial differential equation of mixed type

    OpenAIRE

    Denche, M.; Marhoune, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    We study a mixed problem with integral boundary conditions for a third-order partial differential equation of mixed type. We prove the existence and uniqueness of the solution. The proof is based on two-sided a priori estimates and on the density of the range of the operator generated by the considered problem.

  15. The behavior of steady quasisolitons near the limit cases of third-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karpman, V.I.; Shagalov, A.G.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of steady quasisoliton solutions to the extended third-order nonlinear Schrodinger (NLS) equation is studied in two cases: (i) when the coefficients in the equation approach the Hirota conditions, and (ii) near the limit of the regular NLS equation. (C) 2002 Published by Elsevier...

  16. Third-order particle-hole ring diagrams with contact-interactions and one-pion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, N. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department T39, Garching (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    The third-order particle-hole ring diagrams are evaluated for a NN-contact interaction of the Skyrme type. The pertinent four-loop coefficients in the energy per particle anti E(k{sub f}) ∝ k{sub f}{sup 5+2n} are reduced to double integrals over cubic expressions in Euclidean polarization functions. Dimensional regularization of divergent integrals is performed by subtracting power divergences and the validity of this method is checked against the known analytical results at second order. The complete O(p{sup 2}) NN-contact interaction is obtained by adding two tensor terms and their third-order ring contributions are also calculated in detail. The third-order ring energy arising from long-range 1π-exchange is computed and it is found that direct and exchange contributions are all attractive. The very large size of the three-ring energy due to point-like 1π-exchange, anti E(k{sub f0}) ≅ -92 MeV at saturation density, is however in no way representative for that of realistic chiral NN-potentials. Moreover, the third-order (particle-particle and hole-hole) ladder diagrams are evaluated with the full O(p{sup 2}) contact interaction, and the simplest three-ring contributions to the isospin-asymmetry energy A(k{sub f}) ∝ k{sub f}{sup 5} are studied. (orig.)

  17. Progress in turbulence research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent developments in experiments and eddy simulations, as an introduction to a discussion of turbulence modeling for engineers is reviewed. The most important advances in the last decade rely on computers: microcomputers to control laboratory experiments, especially for multidimensional imaging, and supercomputers to simulate turbulence. These basic studies in turbulence research are leading to genuine breakthroughs in prediction methods for engineers and earth scientists. The three main branches of turbulence research: experiments, simulations (numerically-accurate three-dimensional, time-dependent solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations, with any empiricism confined to the smallest eddies), and modeling (empirical closure of time-averaged equations for turbulent flow) are discussed. 33 refs

  18. PDF methods for turbulent reactive flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Andrew T.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on computation of turbulent combustion, governing equations, closure problem, PDF modeling of turbulent reactive flows, validation cases, current projects, and collaboration with industry and technology transfer.

  19. Third-order transfer matrices calculated for an electrostatic toroidal sector condenser including fringing-field effects

    CERN Document Server

    Mordik, S N

    2002-01-01

    The third-order transfer matrices are calculated for an electrostatic toroidal sector condenser using a rigorously conserved matrix method that implies the conservation of the beam phase volume at each step in the calculations. The transfer matrices (matrizants) obtained, include the fringing-field effect due to the stray fields. In the case of a rectangular distribution of the field components along the optical axis, the analytical expressions for all aberration coefficients, including the dispersion ones, are derived accurate to the third-order terms. In simulations of real fields with the stray field width other than zero, a smooth distribution of the field components is used for which similar aberration coefficients were calculated by means of the conserved numerical method . It has been found that for a smooth model, as the stray field width tends to zero, the aberration coefficients approach the corresponding aberration values in the rectangular model.

  20. Non-singlet coefficient functions for charged-current deep-inelastic scattering to the third order in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, J.; Vogt, A.

    2016-06-01

    We have calculated the coefficient functions for the structure functions F_2, F_L and F_3 in ν- anti ν charged-current deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) at the third order in the strong coupling α_s, thus completing the description of unpolarized inclusive W"±-exchange DIS to this order of massless perturbative QCD. In this brief note, our new results are presented in terms of compact approximate expressions that are sufficiently accurate for phenomenological analyses. For the benefit of such analyses we also collect, in a unified notation, the corresponding lower-order contributions and the flavour non-singlet coefficient functions for ν+ anti ν charged-current DIS. The behaviour of all six third-order coefficient functions at small Bjorken-x is briefly discussed.

  1. Third-Order Elliptic Lowpass Filter for Multi-Standard Baseband Chain Using Highly Linear Digitally Programmable OTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elamien, Mohamed B.; Mahmoud, Soliman A.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a third-order elliptic lowpass filter is designed using highly linear digital programmable balanced OTA. The filter exhibits a cutoff frequency tuning range from 2.2 MHz to 7.1 MHz, thus, it covers W-CDMA, UMTS, and DVB-H standards. The programmability concept in the filter is achieved by using digitally programmable operational transconductors amplifier (DPOTA). The DPOTA employs three linearization techniques which are the source degeneration, double differential pair and the adaptive biasing. Two current division networks (CDNs) are used to control the value of the transconductance. For the DPOTA, the third-order harmonic distortion (HD3) remains below -65 dB up to 0.4 V differential input voltage at 1.2 V supply voltage. The DPOTA and the filter are designed and simulated in 90 nm CMOS technology with LTspice simulator.

  2. Third order nonlinear optical properties and optical limiting behavior of alkali metal complexes of p-nitrophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangaraj, M.; Vinitha, G.; Sabari Girisun, T. C.; Anandan, P.; Ravi, G.

    2015-10-01

    Optical nonlinearity of metal complexes of p-nitrophenolate (M=Li, Na and K) in ethanol is studied by using a continuous wave (cw) diode pumped Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 50 mW). The predominant mechanism of observed nonlinearity is thermal in origin. The nonlinear refractive index and the nonlinear absorption coefficient of the samples were found to be in the order of 10-8 cm2/W and 10-3 cm/W respectively. Magnitude of third-order optical parameters varies according to the choice of alkali metal chosen for metal complex formation of p-nitrophenolate. The third-order nonlinear susceptibility was found to be in the order of 10-6 esu. The observed saturable absorption and the self-defocusing effect were used to demonstrate the optical limiting action at 532 nm by using the same cw laser beam.

  3. Application of matriciant method for calculation of the third order aberration coefficients for magnetic field with regard to boundary effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mordik, S.N.; Ponomarev, A.G.

    2001-01-01

    To study nonlinear dynamics of charged particles in magnetic sector analyzers one applied the matriciant method. When calculating matriciants (transfer matrices) one took account of the boundary-value effects associated with the effect of scattering field, as well as, the higher harmonics of the sector magnetic field up to the third order inclusive. In case of the rectangular distribution of field components along the optical axis one obtained analytical expressions for all aberration coefficients up to the third order exclusive. To simulate the real field with the width of scattering field not equal to zero one applied smooth distribution of components for which calculation of similar aberration coefficients was conducted using the conservative numerical method [ru

  4. Third-order transfer matrices calculated for an electrostatic toroidal sector condenser including fringing-field effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mordik, S.N.; Ponomarev, A.G.

    2002-01-01

    The third-order transfer matrices are calculated for an electrostatic toroidal sector condenser using a rigorously conserved matrix method that implies the conservation of the beam phase volume at each step in the calculations. The transfer matrices (matrizants) obtained, include the fringing-field effect due to the stray fields. In the case of a rectangular distribution of the field components along the optical axis, the analytical expressions for all aberration coefficients, including the dispersion ones, are derived accurate to the third-order terms. In simulations of real fields with the stray field width other than zero, a smooth distribution of the field components is used for which similar aberration coefficients were calculated by means of the conserved numerical method . It has been found that for a smooth model, as the stray field width tends to zero, the aberration coefficients approach the corresponding aberration values in the rectangular model

  5. Semi-local machine-learned kinetic energy density functional with third-order gradients of electron density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seino, Junji; Kageyama, Ryo; Fujinami, Mikito; Ikabata, Yasuhiro; Nakai, Hiromi

    2018-06-01

    A semi-local kinetic energy density functional (KEDF) was constructed based on machine learning (ML). The present scheme adopts electron densities and their gradients up to third-order as the explanatory variables for ML and the Kohn-Sham (KS) kinetic energy density as the response variable in atoms and molecules. Numerical assessments of the present scheme were performed in atomic and molecular systems, including first- and second-period elements. The results of 37 conventional KEDFs with explicit formulae were also compared with those of the ML KEDF with an implicit formula. The inclusion of the higher order gradients reduces the deviation of the total kinetic energies from the KS calculations in a stepwise manner. Furthermore, our scheme with the third-order gradient resulted in the closest kinetic energies to the KS calculations out of the presented functionals.

  6. Effect of turbulent model closure and type of inlet boundary condition on a Large Eddy Simulation of a non-reacting jet with co-flow stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payri, Raul; López, J. Javier; Martí-Aldaraví, Pedro; Giraldo, Jhoan S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • LES in a non-reacting jet with co-flow is performed with OpenFoam. • Smagorinsky (SMAG) and One Equation Eddy (OEE) approaches are compared. • A turbulent pipe is used to generate and map coherent inlet turbulence structure. • Fluctuating inlet boundary condition requires much less computational cost. - Abstract: In this paper, the behavior and turbulence structure of a non-reacting jet with a co-flow stream is described by means of Large Eddy Simulations (LES) carried out with the computational tool OpenFoam. In order to study the influence of the sub-grid scale (SGS) model on the main flow statistics, Smagorinsky (SMAG) and One Equation Eddy (OEE) approaches are used to model the smallest scales involved in the turbulence of the jet. The impact of cell size and turbulent inlet boundary condition in resulting velocity profiles is analyzed as well. Four different tasks have been performed to accomplish these objectives. Firstly, the simulation of a turbulent pipe, which is necessary to generate and map coherent turbulence structure into the inlet of the non-reacting jet domain. Secondly, a structured mesh based on hexahedrons has been built for the jet and its co-flow. The third task consists on performing four different simulations. In those, mapping statistics from the turbulent pipe is compared with the use of fluctuating inlet boundary condition available in OpenFoam; OEE and SMAG approaches are contrasted; and the effect of changing cell size is investigated. Finally, as forth task, the obtained results are compared with experimental data. As main conclusions of this comparison, it has been proved that the fluctuating boundary condition requires much less computational cost, but some inaccuracies were found close to the nozzle. Also, both SGS models are capable to simulate this kind of jets with a co-flow stream with exactitude.

  7. Nonlinear perturbations of differential operators with nontrivial kernel and applications to third order periodic boundary value problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afuwape, A.U.; Omari, P.

    1987-11-01

    This paper deals with the solvability of the nonlinear operator equations in normed spaces Lx=EGx+f, where L is a linear map with possible nontrivial kernel. Applications are given to the existence of periodic solutions for the third order scalar differential equation x'''+ax''+bx'+cx+g(t,x)=p(t), under various conditions on the interaction of g(t,x)/x with spectral configurations of a, b and c. (author). 48 refs

  8. Collisions and turbulence in optical rogue wave formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genty, G.; de Sterke, C.M.; Bang, Ole

    2010-01-01

    We discuss optical rogue wave generation in terms of collisions and turbulence processes. Simulations of picosecond pulse propagation in optical fibres show rogue soliton generation from either third-order dispersion or Raman scattering independently. Simulations of rogue soliton emergence...

  9. Large third-order optical nonlinearity in vertically oriented mesoporous silica thin films embedded with Ag nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Min; Liu, Qiming, E-mail: qmliu@whu.edu.cn [Wuhan University, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology (China)

    2016-12-15

    Taking advantage of the channel confinement of mesoporous films to prevent the agglomeration of Ag nanoparticles to achieve large third-order optical nonlinearity in amorphous materials, Ag-loaded composite mesoporous silica film was prepared by the electrochemical deposition method on ITO substrate. Ag ions were firstly transported into the channels of mesoporous film by the diffusion and binding force of channels, which were reduced to nanoparticles by applying suitable voltage. The existence and uniform distribution of Ag nanoparticles ranging in 1–10 nm in the mesoporous silica thin films were exhibited by UV spectrophotometer, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. The third-order optical nonlinearity induced by Ag nanoparticles was studied by the Z-scan technique. Due to the local field surface plasmon resonance, the maximum third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility of Ag-loaded composite mesoporous silica film is 1.53×10{sup −10} esu, which is 1000 times larger than that of the Ag-contained chalcogenide glasses which showed large nonlinearity in amorphous materials.

  10. Green synthesis and third-order nonlinear optical properties of 6-(9H-carbazol-9-yl) hexyl acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baili; Geng, Feng; Luo, Xuan; Zhong, Quanjie; Zhang, Qingjun; Fang, Yu; Huang, Chuanqun; Yang, Ruizhuang; Shao, Ting; Chen, Shufan

    2016-10-01

    An extremely simple and green approach for the synthesis of photoelectric material 6-(9H-carbazol-9-yl) hexy-acetate (CHA) has been described in detail. The molecular structure of CHA was identified with Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra and 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy. The optical absorption of CHA was recorded using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrum. Notably, the reaction was accomplished in water medium instead of traditional toxic solvents (e.g., benzene and chloroform). The yield of CHA is up to 99%, which is increased by 13% compared with the traditional method. The approach developed by us makes it possible to achieve commercial production of CHA. Moreover, the thermal stability of CHA was studied with thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) method. The third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of CHAn (obtained by new method) and CHAt (obtained by traditional method) have been studied by a Z-scan technique at 440 nm. The thermal decomposition temperature is above 200 °C. The third-order NLO of CHAn and CHAt are the same. The third-order NLO susceptibility χ (3) and two photon Figures of Merit (FOMs) of CHA are 1.58 × 10-8 (esu) and 4.55, respectively. The results reveal that CHA may be a promising candidate for all-optical switching application.

  11. A third-order KdV solution for internal solitary waves and its application in the numerical wave tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qicheng Meng

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A third-order KdV solution to the internal solitary wave is derived by a new method based on the weakly nonlinear assumptions in a rigid-lid two-layer system. The solution corrects an error by Mirie and Su (1984. A two-dimensional numerical wave tank has been established with the help of the open source CFD library OpenFOAM and the third-party software waves2Foam. Various analytical solutions, including the first-order to third-order KdV solutions, the eKdV solution and the MCC solution, have been used to initialise the flow fields in the CFD simulations of internal solitary waves. Two groups including 11 numerical cases have been carried out. In the same group, the initial wave amplitudes are the same but the implemented analytical solutions are different. The simulated wave profiles at different moments have been presented. The relative errors in terms of the wave amplitude between the last time step and the initial input have been analysed quantitatively. It is found that the third-order KdV solution results in the most stable internal solitary wave in the numerical wave tank for both small-amplitude and finite-amplitude cases. The finding is significant for the further simulations involving internal solitary waves.

  12. Third-order nonlinear optical properties of GeSe2-Ga2Se3-PbI2 glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Gao; Liu Cunming; Luo Lan; Chen Wei

    2010-01-01

    The third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of new selenium-based GeSe 2 -Ga 2 Se 3 -PbI 2 glasses have been measured using the optical Kerr effect (OKE) technique, with picosecond and femtosecond laser pulses. The 0.70GeSe 2 -0.15Ga 2 Se 3 -0.15PbI 2 glass has the largest third-order optical nonlinear susceptibility in GeSe 2 -Ga 2 Se 3 -PbI 2 glass system with χ (3) of 5.28x10 12 esu. In addition, the response time of glasses is sub-picosecond, which is predominantly associated with electron cloud. Local structure of the glasses has been identified by using Raman studies, while the origins of the observed nonlinear optical response are discussed. The [Ge(Ga)Se 4 ] tetrahedral and lone-pair electrons from highly polarizable Pb atom in glasses play an important role in enhanced NLO response. These results as well as their good chemical stability indicate that GeSe 2 -Ga 2 Se 3 -PbI 2 glasses are promising materials for photonic applications of third-order nonlinear optical signal processing.

  13. Turbulence introduction to theory and applications of turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Westerweel, Jerry; Nieuwstadt, Frans T M

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a general introduction to the topic of turbulent flows. Apart from classical topics in turbulence, attention is also paid to modern topics. After studying this work, the reader will have the basic knowledge to follow current topics on turbulence in scientific literature. The theory is illustrated with a number of examples of applications, such as closure models, numerical simulations and turbulent diffusion, and experimental findings. The work also contains a number of illustrative exercises.

  14. Road Closures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This is an up to date map of current road closures in Montgomery County.This dataset is updated every few minutes from the Department of Transportation road closure...

  15. A third-order moving mesh cell-centered scheme for one-dimensional elastic-plastic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun-Bo; Huang, Weizhang; Jiang, Song; Tian, Baolin

    2017-11-01

    A third-order moving mesh cell-centered scheme without the remapping of physical variables is developed for the numerical solution of one-dimensional elastic-plastic flows with the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state, the Wilkins constitutive model, and the von Mises yielding criterion. The scheme combines the Lagrangian method with the MMPDE moving mesh method and adaptively moves the mesh to better resolve shock and other types of waves while preventing the mesh from crossing and tangling. It can be viewed as a direct arbitrarily Lagrangian-Eulerian method but can also be degenerated to a purely Lagrangian scheme. It treats the relative velocity of the fluid with respect to the mesh as constant in time between time steps, which allows high-order approximation of free boundaries. A time dependent scaling is used in the monitor function to avoid possible sudden movement of the mesh points due to the creation or diminishing of shock and rarefaction waves or the steepening of those waves. A two-rarefaction Riemann solver with elastic waves is employed to compute the Godunov values of the density, pressure, velocity, and deviatoric stress at cell interfaces. Numerical results are presented for three examples. The third-order convergence of the scheme and its ability to concentrate mesh points around shock and elastic rarefaction waves are demonstrated. The obtained numerical results are in good agreement with those in literature. The new scheme is also shown to be more accurate in resolving shock and rarefaction waves than an existing third-order cell-centered Lagrangian scheme.

  16. Positive solutions of boundary value problem for singular positone and semi-positone third-order difference equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gai Gongqi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article studies the boundary value problems for the third-order nonlinear singular difference equations Δ 3 u ( i - 2 + λ a ( i f ( i , u ( i = 0 , i ∈ [ 2 , T + 2 ] , satisfying five kinds of different boundary value conditions. This article shows the existence of positive solutions for positone and semi-positone type. The nonlinear term may be singular. Two examples are also given to illustrate the main results. The arguments are based upon fixed point theorems in a cone. MSC [2008]: 34B15; 39A10.

  17. Experimental study of the third-order nonlinearity of atomic and molecular gases using 10-μm laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigeon, J. J.; Tochitsky, S. Ya.; Welch, E. C.; Joshi, C.

    2018-04-01

    We present measurements of the third-order optical nonlinearity of Kr, Xe, N2, O2, and air at a wavelength near 10 µm by using four-wave mixing of ˜15 -GW /c m2 , 200-ps (full width at half maximum) C O2 laser pulses. Measurements in molecular gases resulted in an asymmetric four-wave mixing spectrum indicating that the nonlinear response is strongly affected by the delayed, rotational contribution to the effective nonlinear refractive index. Within the uncertainty of our measurements, we have found that the long-wavelength nonlinear refractive indices of these gases are consistent with measurements performed in the near IR.

  18. Third-Order Density Perturbation and One-Loop Power Spectrum in Dark-Energy-Dominated Universe

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Ryuichi

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the third-order density perturbation and the one-loop correction to the linear power spectrum in the dark-energy cosmological model. Our main interest is to understand the dark-energy effect on baryon acoustic oscillations in a quasi-nonlinear regime ($k \\approx 0.1h$/Mpc). Analytical solutions and simple fitting formulae are presented for the dark-energy model with the general time-varying equation of state $w(a)$. It turns out that the power spectrum coincides with the approx...

  19. Third order trace formula

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N. Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560 064, India. 2Indian Institute of ... for rational functions φ with poles off R. In [5,16], Koplienko's trace formula was derived ... be a sequence of complex numbers such that ..... Again if we set the sum of the second and fourth term inside the integral in (2.3) to be. I2 ≡.

  20. Bulk crystal growth and their effective third order nonlinear optical properties of 2-(4-fluorobenzylidene) malononitrile (FBM) single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadharshini, A.; Kalainathan, S.

    2018-04-01

    2-(4-fluorobenzylidene) malononitrile (FBM), an organic third order nonlinear (TONLO) single crystal with the dimensions of 32 × 7 × 11 mm3, has been successfully grown in acetone solution by slow evaporation technique at 35 °C. The crystal system (triclinic), space group (P-1) and crystalline purity of the titular crystal were measured by single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, respectively. The molecular weight and the multiple functional groups of the FBM material were confirmed through the mass and FT-IR spectral analysis. UV-Vis-NIR spectral study enroles that the FBM crystal exhibits excellent transparency (83%) in the entire visible and near infra-red region with a wide bandgap 2.90 eV. The low dielectric constant (εr) value of FBM crystal is appreciable for microelectronics industry applications. Thermal stability and melting point (130.09 °C) were ascertained by TGA-DSC analysis. The laser-induced surface damage threshold (LDT) value of FBM specimen is found to be 2.14 GW/cm2, it is fairly good compared to other reported NLO crystals. The third - order nonlinear optical character of the FBM crystal was confirmed through the typical single beam Z-scan technique. All these finding authorized that the organic crystal of FBM is favorably suitable for NLO applications.

  1. Calculated Third Order Rate Constants for Interpreting the Mechanisms of Hydrolyses of Chloroformates, Carboxylic Acid Halides, Sulfonyl Chlorides and Phosphorochloridates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. William Bentley

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolyses of acid derivatives (e.g., carboxylic acid chlorides and fluorides, fluoro- and chloroformates, sulfonyl chlorides, phosphorochloridates, anhydrides exhibit pseudo-first order kinetics. Reaction mechanisms vary from those involving a cationic intermediate (SN1 to concerted SN2 processes, and further to third order reactions, in which one solvent molecule acts as the attacking nucleophile and a second molecule acts as a general base catalyst. A unified framework is discussed, in which there are two reaction channels—an SN1-SN2 spectrum and an SN2-SN3 spectrum. Third order rate constants (k3 are calculated for solvolytic reactions in a wide range of compositions of acetone-water mixtures, and are shown to be either approximately constant or correlated with the Grunwald-Winstein Y parameter. These data and kinetic solvent isotope effects, provide the experimental evidence for the SN2-SN3 spectrum (e.g., for chloro- and fluoroformates, chloroacetyl chloride, p-nitrobenzoyl p-toluenesulfonate, sulfonyl chlorides. Deviations from linearity lead to U- or V-shaped plots, which assist in the identification of the point at which the reaction channel changes from SN2-SN3 to SN1-SN2 (e.g., for benzoyl chloride.

  2. Third-order optical susceptibility in polythiophene thin films prepared by spin-coating from high-boiling-point solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Shinke, Wataru; Nagase, Takashi; Murakami, Shuichi; Naito, Hiroyoshi

    2014-01-01

    We examined the enhancements in the third-order optical susceptibility (χ (3) ) of spin-coated thin films of poly(3-hexylthiophene) using an anhydrous solvent with a high boiling point. The χ (3) value was found to be enhanced as the boiling point of the solvent increased. In this study, the largest value of χ (3) was obtained for thin films that were spin-coated in an inert atmosphere using anhydrous dichlorobenzene and then was subsequently exposed to its vapor for 1 h. The maximum value of the imaginary part of χ (3) was determined to be 1.8 × 10 -9 esu, which is more than three times greater than that of thin films spin-coated in an ambient atmosphere using a solvent with a low boiling point, such as chloroform. - Highlights: • Enhancements in nonlinear optical properties of a conjugated polymer were examined. • Thin films were fabricated by spin-coating using a solvent with a high boiling point. • The third-order optical susceptibility increased with increasing boiling point. • An additional enhancement was obtained by the vapor-treatment technique. • These thin films were sufficiently homogeneous for use in nonlinear optical devices

  3. Third-order nonlinearities and structural features in Langmuir-Blodgett films of 1-benzyl-9-hydrofullerene-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shihong Ma; Liying Liu; Xingze Lu

    1995-01-01

    Third-order nonlinear susceptibilities χ xxxx (3) (-3ω; ω, ω, ω) have been deduced by measuring third-harmonic generation in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of 1-benzyl-9-hydrofullerene-60 (C 60 -Be). The structural features of the condensed layer at the air-water interface and LB films of the C 60 -Be were investigated by small angle x-ray diffraction (SAXD) and optical measurements. The third-order nonlinear susceptibilities (χ (3) ) were obtained by measuring the THG intensities in LB films of C 60 -Be and comparing with that of CS 2 used as the reference. The value of χ xxxx (3) (2.1 x 10 -11 esu) was deduced at a 65 nm thick films. The χ (3) is attributed to a three-photon near resonance at the energy level of 29410 cm -1 . A new-type of two-chain amphiphilic molecule 1,10-bistearyl-4,6,13, 15-tetra-18-nitrogencrown-6 (NC) was used as insert material to construct mixed C 60 -Be/NC LB films. Our π-A, UV-visible absorption and SAXD measurements showed that the structural improvement in the mixed C 60 -Be/NC LB films was realized by insertion of the C 60 -Be molecules between the two hydrophobic chains of the NC molecules

  4. Growth and Characterization of Lithium Potassium Phthalate (LiKP) Single Crystals for Third Order Nonlinear Optical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivakumar, B.; Mohan, R. [Preidency College, Bangalore (India); Raj, S. Gokul [RR and Dr. SR Technical Univ., Avadi (India); Kumar, G. Ramesh [Anna Univ., Arni (India)

    2012-11-15

    Single crystals of lithium potassium phthalate (LiKP) were successfully grown from aqueous solution by solvent evaporation technique. The grown crystals were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The lithium potassium phthalate C{sub 16} H{sub 12} K Li{sub 3} O{sub 11} belongs to triclinic system with the following unit-cell dimensions at 298(2) K; a = 7.405(5) A; b = 9.878(5) A; c = 13.396(5) A; α = 71.778(5) .deg.; β = 87.300(5) .deg.; γ = 85.405(5) .deg.; having a space group P1. Mass spectrometric analysis provides the molecular weight of the compound and possible ways of fragmentations occurs in the compound. Thermal stability of the crystal was also studied by both simultaneous TGA/DTA analyses. The UV-Vis-NIR spectrum shows a good transparency in the whole of Visible and as well as in the near IR range. Third order nonlinear optical studies have also been studied by Z-scan technique. Nonlinear absorption and nonlinear refractive index were found out and the third order bulk susceptibility of compound was also estimated.

  5. Near resonant and nonresonant third-order optical nonlinearities of colloidal InP/ZnS quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Yang, X.; He, T. C.; Gao, Y.; Demir, H. V.; Sun, X. W.; Sun, H. D.

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the third-order optical nonlinearities of high-quality colloidal InP/ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) using Z-scan technique with femtosecond pulses. The two-photon absorption cross-sections as high as 6.2 × 103 GM are observed at 800 nm (non-resonant regime) in InP/ZnS QDs with diameter of 2.8 nm, which is even larger than those of CdSe, CdS, and CdTe QDs at similar sizes. Furthermore, both of the 2.2 nm and 2.8 nm-sized InP/ZnS QDs exhibit strong saturable absorption in near resonant regime, which is attributed to large exciton Bohr radius in this material. These results strongly suggest the promising potential of InP/ZnS QDs for widespread applications, especially in two-photon excited bio-imaging and saturable absorbing.

  6. Third-order spontaneous parametric down-conversion in thin optical fibers as a photon-triplet source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corona, Maria [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, apdo. postal 70-543, DF 04510 Mexico City (Mexico); Departamento de Optica, Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Apartado Postal 2732, BC 22860 Ensenada (Mexico); Garay-Palmett, Karina; U' Ren, Alfred B. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, apdo. postal 70-543, DF 04510 Mexico City (Mexico)

    2011-09-15

    We study the third-order spontaneous parametric down-conversion (TOSPDC) process, as a means to generate entangled photon triplets. Specifically, we consider thin optical fibers as the nonlinear medium to be used as the basis for TOSPDC in configurations where phase matching is attained through the use of more than one fiber transverse modes. Our analysis in this paper, which follows from our earlier paper [Opt. Lett. 36, 190-192 (2011)], aims to supply experimentalists with the details required in order to design a TOSPDC photon-triplet source. Specifically, our analysis focuses on the photon triplet state, on the rate of emission, and on the TOSPDC phase-matching characteristics for the cases of frequency-degenerate and frequency nondegenerate TOSPDC.

  7. Design of an ultra low power third order continuous time current mode ΣΔ modulator for WLAN applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Kobra; Baghelani, Masoud

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a third order continuous time current mode ΣΔ modulator for WLAN 802.11b standard applications. The proposed circuit utilized feedback architecture with scaled and optimized DAC coefficients. At circuit level, we propose a modified cascade current mirror integrator with reduced input impedance which results in more bandwidth and linearity and hence improves the dynamic range. Also, a very fast and precise novel dynamic latch based current comparator is introduced with low power consumption. This ultra fast comparator facilitates increasing the sampling rate toward GHz frequencies. The modulator exhibits dynamic range of more than 60 dB for 20 MHz signal bandwidth and OSR of 10 while consuming only 914 μW from 1.8 V power supply. The FoM of the modulator is calculated from two different methods, and excellent performance is achieved for proposed modulator.

  8. Structural characterizations, Hirshfeld surface analyses, and third-order nonlinear optical properties of two novel chalcone derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidur, Shivaraj R.; Jahagirdar, Jitendra R.; Patil, Parutagouda Shankaragouda; Chia, Tze Shyang; Quah, Ching Kheng

    2018-01-01

    We report synthesis, characterizations, structure-property relationships, and third-order nonlinear optical studies for two new chalcone derivatives, (2E)-1-(anthracen-9-yl)-3-(4-bromophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (Br-ANC) and (2E)-1-(anthracen-9-yl)-3-(4-chlorophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (Cl-ANC). These derivatives were crystallized in the centrosymmetric monoclinic P21/c crystal structure. The intermolecular interactions of both the crystals were visualized by Hirshfeld surface analyses (HSA). The crystals are thermally stable up to their melting points (180.82 and 191.16 °C for Cl-ANC and Br-ANC, respectively). The geometry optimizations, FT-IR spectra, 1H and 13C NMR spectra, electronic absorption spectra, electronic transitions, and HOMO-LUMO energy gaps were studied by Density Functional Theory (DFT) at B3LYP/6-311+G(d, p) level. The theoretical results provide excellent agreement with experimental findings. The electric dipole moments, static polarizabilities, molecular electrostatic potentials (MEP) and global chemical reactivity descriptors (GCRD) were also theoretically computed. The materials exhibited good nonlinear absorption (NLA), nonlinear refraction (NLR) and optical limiting (OL) behavior under diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) continuous wave (CW) laser excitation (532 nm and 200 mW). The NLO parameters such as NLA coefficient (β∼10-5 cmW-1), NLR index (n2∼10-10 cm2 W-1) and third-order NLO susceptibilities (χ(3) ∼10-7 esu) were measured. Further, we estimated one-photon and two-photon figures of merit, which satisfy the demands (W > 1 and T < 1) for all-optical switching. Thus, the present chalcone derivatives with anthracene moiety are potential materials for OL and optical switching applications.

  9. On the prediction of turbulent secondary flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speziale, C. G.; So, R. M. C.; Younis, B. A.

    1992-01-01

    The prediction of turbulent secondary flows, with Reynolds stress models, in circular pipes and non-circular ducts is reviewed. Turbulence-driven secondary flows in straight non-circular ducts are considered along with turbulent secondary flows in pipes and ducts that arise from curvature or a system rotation. The physical mechanisms that generate these different kinds of secondary flows are outlined and the level of turbulence closure required to properly compute each type is discussed in detail. Illustrative computations of a variety of different secondary flows obtained from two-equation turbulence models and second-order closures are provided to amplify these points.

  10. Closure requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, I.P.G.; Ellison, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Closure of a waste management unit can be either permanent or temporary. Permanent closure may be due to: economic factors which make it uneconomical to mine the remaining minerals; depletion of mineral resources; physical site constraints that preclude further mining and beneficiation; environmental, regulatory or other requirements that make it uneconomical to continue to develop the resources. Temporary closure can occur for a period of several months to several years, and may be caused by factors such as: periods of high rainfall or snowfall which prevent mining and waste disposal; economic circumstances which temporarily make it uneconomical to mine the target mineral; labor problems requiring a cessation of operations for a period of time; construction activities that are required to upgrade project components such as the process facilities and waste management units; and mine or process plant failures that require extensive repairs. Permanent closure of a mine waste management unit involves the provision of durable surface containment features to protect the waters of the State in the long-term. Temporary closure may involve activities that range from ongoing maintenance of the existing facilities to the installation of several permanent closure features in order to reduce ongoing maintenance. This paper deals with the permanent closure features

  11. Third-order optical model analysis of e+-H(2s), e+-He(21S) and e+-He(23S) elastic scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vucic, S.; Potvliege, R.M.; Joachain, C.J.; Louvain Univ., Louvain-la-Neuve

    1987-01-01

    We study the elastic scattering of electrons by the metastable states H(2s), He(2 1 S) and He(2 3 S) at intermediate energies within the framework of the third-order optical potential theory. The first-, second- and third-order contributions to the optical potential are analysed separately, and are compared with the corresponding quantities for e - H(1s) and e - He(1 1 S) elastic scattering. Results for positron impact scattering are also presented. (author)

  12. Workshop on Engineering Turbulence Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Louis A. (Editor); Liou, W. W. (Editor); Shabbir, A. (Editor); Shih, T.-H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Discussed here is the future direction of various levels of engineering turbulence modeling related to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations for propulsion. For each level of computation, there are a few turbulence models which represent the state-of-the-art for that level. However, it is important to know their capabilities as well as their deficiencies in order to help engineers select and implement the appropriate models in their real world engineering calculations. This will also help turbulence modelers perceive the future directions for improving turbulence models. The focus is on one-point closure models (i.e., from algebraic models to higher order moment closure schemes and partial differential equation methods) which can be applied to CFD computations. However, other schemes helpful in developing one-point closure models, are also discussed.

  13. Ultrafast carrier dynamics and third-order nonlinear optical properties of AgInS2/ZnS nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kuai; Yang, Yang; Wang, Junzhong; Tang, Xiaosheng; Xu, Qing-Hua; Wang, Guo Ping

    2018-06-01

    Broad photoluminescence (PL) emission, a large Stokes shift and extremely long-lived radiative lifetimes are the characteristics of ternary I–III–VI semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs), such as CuInS2 and AgInS2. However, the lack of understanding regarding the intriguing PL mechanisms and photo-carrier dynamics limits their further applications. Here, AgInS2 and AgInS2/ZnS NCs were chemically synthesized and their carrier dynamics were studied by time-resolved PL spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that the surface defect state, which contributed dominantly to the non-radiative decay processes, was effectively passivated through ZnS alloying. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy was also used to investigate the carrier dynamics, revealing the electron storage at the surface state and donor state. Furthermore, the two photon absorption properties of AgInS2 and AgInS2/ZnS NCs were measured using an open-aperture Z-scan technique. The improved third-order nonlinear susceptibility {χ }(3) of AgInS2 through ZnS alloying demonstrates potential application in two photon PL biological imaging.

  14. Third-order optical nonlinearities in bulk and fs-laser inscribed waveguides in strengthened alkali aluminosilcate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Gustavo F. B.; Almeida, Juliana M. P.; Martins, Renato J.; De Boni, Leonardo; Arnold, Craig B.; Mendonca, Cleber R.

    2018-01-01

    The development of advanced photonics devices requires materials with large optical nonlinearities, fast response times and high optical transparency, while at the same time allowing for the micro/nano-processing needed for integrated photonics. In this context, glasses have been receiving considerable attention given their relevant optical properties which can be specifically tailored by compositional control. Corning Gorilla® Glass (strengthened alkali aluminosilicate glass) is well-known for its use as a protective screen in mobile devices, and has attracted interest as a potential candidate for optical devices. Therefore, it is crucial not only to expand the knowledge on the fabrication of waveguides in Gorilla Glass under different regimes, but also to determine its nonlinear optical response, both using fs-laser pulses. Thus, this paper reports, for the first time, characterization of the third-order optical nonlinearities of Gorilla Glass, as well as linear and nonlinear characterization of waveguide written with femtosecond pulses under the low repetition rate regime (1 kHz).

  15. A fresh look at the photoelectron spectrum of bromobenzene: A third-order non-Dyson electron propagator study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, M.; Wormit, M.; Dreuw, A.; Soshnikov, D. Yu.; Trofimov, A. B.; Holland, D. M. P.; Powis, I.; Antonsson, E.; Patanen, M.; Nicolas, C.; Miron, C.

    2015-01-01

    The valence-shell ionization spectrum of bromobenzene, as a representative halogen substituted aromatic, was studied using the non-Dyson third-order algebraic-diagrammatic construction [nD-ADC(3)] approximation for the electron propagator. This method, also referred to as IP-ADC(3), was implemented as a part of the Q-Chem program and enables large-scale calculations of the ionization spectra, where the computational effort scales as n 5 with respect to the number of molecular orbitals n. The IP-ADC(3) scheme is ideally suited for investigating low-lying ionization transitions, so fresh insight could be gained into the cationic state manifold of bromobenzene. In particular, the present IP-ADC(3) calculations with the cc-pVTZ basis reveal a whole class of low-lying low-intensity two-hole-one-particle (2h-1p) doublet and quartet states, which are relevant to various photoionization processes. The good qualitative agreement between the theoretical spectral profile for the valence-shell ionization transitions generated with the smaller cc-pVDZ basis set and the experimental photoelectron spectrum measured at a photon energy of 80 eV on the PLÉIADES beamline at the Soleil synchrotron radiation source allowed all the main features to be assigned. Some theoretical aspects of the ionization energy calculations concerning the use of various approximation schemes and basis sets are discussed

  16. Synthesis, growth, crystal structure, optical and third order nonlinear optical properties of quinolinium derivative single crystal: PNQI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthigha, S.; Krishnamoorthi, C.

    2018-03-01

    An organic quinolinium derivative nonlinear optical (NLO) crystal, 1-ethyl-2-[2-(4-nitro-phenyl)-vinyl]-quinolinium iodide (PNQI) was synthesized and successfully grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique. Formation of a crystalline compound was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The quinolinium compound PNQI crystallizes in the triclinic crystal system with a centrosymmetric space group of P-1 symmetry. The molecular structure of PNQI was confirmed by 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectral studies. The thermal properties of the crystal have been investigated by thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies. The optical characteristics obtained from UV-Vis-NIR spectral data were described and the cut-off wavelength observed at 506 nm. The etching study was performed to analyse the growth features of PNQI single crystal. The third order NLO properties such as nonlinear refractive index (n2), nonlinear absorption coefficient (β) and nonlinear susceptibility (χ (3)) of the crystal were investigated using Z-scan technique at 632.8 nm of Hesbnd Ne laser.

  17. A third-order gas-kinetic CPR method for the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations on triangular meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Li, Qibing; Fu, Song; Wang, Z. J.

    2018-06-01

    A third-order accurate gas-kinetic scheme based on the correction procedure via reconstruction (CPR) framework is developed for the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations on triangular meshes. The scheme combines the accuracy and efficiency of the CPR formulation with the multidimensional characteristics and robustness of the gas-kinetic flux solver. Comparing with high-order finite volume gas-kinetic methods, the current scheme is more compact and efficient by avoiding wide stencils on unstructured meshes. Unlike the traditional CPR method where the inviscid and viscous terms are treated differently, the inviscid and viscous fluxes in the current scheme are coupled and computed uniformly through the kinetic evolution model. In addition, the present scheme adopts a fully coupled spatial and temporal gas distribution function for the flux evaluation, achieving high-order accuracy in both space and time within a single step. Numerical tests with a wide range of flow problems, from nearly incompressible to supersonic flows with strong shocks, for both inviscid and viscous problems, demonstrate the high accuracy and efficiency of the present scheme.

  18. Preparation and third-order nonlinear optical property of poly(urethane-imide containing dispersed red chromophore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel poly(urethane-imide (PUI containing dispersed red chromophore was synthesized. The PUI was characterized by FT-IR, UV-Vis, DSC and TGA. The results of DSC and TGA indicated that the PUI exhibited high thermal stability up to its glass-transition temperature (Tg of 196°C and 5% heat weight loss temperature of 229°C. According to UV-Vis spectrum and working curve, the maximum molar absorption coefficient and absorption wavelength were measured. They were used to calculate the third-order nonlinear optical coefficient χ(3. At the same time, the chromophore density of PUI, nonlinear refractive index coefficient and molecular hyperpolarizability of PUI were obtained. The fluorescence spectra of PUI and model compound DR-19 were determined at excitation wavelength 300 nm. The electron donor and acceptor in polymer formed the exciplex through the transfer of the electric charges. The results show that the poly(urethane-imide is a promising candidate for application in optical devices.

  19. A boundary value problem for a third order hyperbolic equation with degeneration of order inside the domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruzanna Kh. Makaova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the boundary value problem for a degenerating third order equation of hyperbolic type in a mixed domain. The equation under consideration in the positive part of the domain coincides with the Hallaire equation, which is a pseudoparabolic type equation. Moreover, in the negative part of the domain it coincides with a degenerating hyperbolic equation of the first kind, the particular case of the Bitsadze–Lykov equation. The existence and uniqueness theorem for the solution is proved. The uniqueness of the solution to the problem is proved with the Tricomi method. Using the functional relationships of the positive and negative parts of the domain on the degeneration line, we arrive at the convolution type Volterra integral equation of the 2nd kind with respect to the desired solution by a derivative trace. With the Laplace transform method, we obtain the solution of the integral equation in its explicit form. At last, the solution to the problem under study is written out explicitly as the solution of the second boundary-value problem in the positive part of the domain for the Hallaire equation and as the solution to the Cauchy problem in the negative part of the domain for a degenerate hyperbolic equation of the first kind.

  20. Determination of Equilibrium Constant and Relative Brightness in FRET-FCS by Including the Third-Order Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingyi; He, Shanshan; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2017-12-21

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) encodes the information on the equilibrium constant (K), the relative fluorescence brightness of fluorophore (Q), and the forward and backward reaction rate constants (k + and k - ) on a physical or chemical relaxation. However, it has been a long-standing problem to completely resolve the FCS data to get the thermodynamic and kinetic information. Recently, we have solved the problem for fluorescence autocorrelation spectroscopy (FACS). Here, we extend the method to fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS), which appears when FCS is coupled with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Among 12 total second-order and third-order pre-exponential factors in a relaxation process probed by the FRET-FCS technique, 3 are independent. We presented and discussed 3 sets of explicit solutions to use these pre-exponential factors to calculate K and Q. Together with the relaxation time, the acquired K will allow people to obtain k + and k - , so that the goal of deciphering the FRET-FCS data will be fully reached. The theory is verified by extensive computer simulations and tested experimentally on a system of oligonucleotide hybridization.

  1. Impact of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux on electroosmotic transport of third-order fluids in a magnetic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, J. C.; Mallick, B.; Sinha, A.; Roy Chowdhury, A.

    2018-05-01

    In the case of steady flow of a fluid under the combined influence of external electric and magnetic fields, the fluid moves forward by forming an axial momentum boundary layer. With this end in view a study has been performed here to investigate the problem of entropy generation during electroosmotically modulated flow of a third-order electrically conducting fluid flowing on a microchannel bounded by silicon-made parallel plates under the influence of a magnetic field, by paying due consideration to the steric effect. The associated mechanism of heat transfer has also been duly taken care of, by considering Cattaneo-Christov heat flux. A suitable finite difference scheme has been developed for the numerical procedure. A detailed study of the velocity and temperature distributions has been made by considering their variations with respect to different physical parameters involved in the problem. The results of numerical computation have been displayed graphically. The computational work has been carried out by considering blood as the working fluid, with the motivation of exploring some interesting phenomena in the context of hemodynamical flow in micro-vessels. Among other variables, parametric variations of the important physical variables, viz. i) skin friction and ii) Nusselt number have been investigated. The study confirms that the random motion of the fluid particles can be controlled by a suitable adjustment of the intensity of an externally applied magnetic field in the transverse direction. It is further revealed that the Nusselt number diminishes, as the Prandtl number gradually increases; however, a steady increase in the Nusselt number occurs with increase in thermal relaxation. Entropy generation is also found to be enhanced with increase in Joule heating. The results of the present study have also been validated in a proper manner.

  2. Third-order nonlinear optical properties of open-shell supermolecular systems composed of acetylene linked phenalenyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Masayoshi; Kishi, Ryohei; Yoneda, Kyohei; Inoue, Yudai; Inui, Tomoya; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Kubo, Takashi; Champagne, Benoît

    2011-08-11

    The third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties, at the molecular level, the static second hyperpolarizabilities, γ, of supermolecular systems composed of phenalenyl and pyrene rings linked by acetylene units are investigated by employing the long-range corrected spin-unrestricted density functional theory, LC-UBLYP, method. The phenalenyl based superethylene, superallyl, and superbutadiene in their lowest spin states have intermediate diradical characters and exhibit larger γ values than the closed-shell pyrene based superpolyene systems. The introduction of a positive charge into the phenalenyl based superallyl radical changes the sign of γ and enhances its amplitude by a factor of 35. Although such sign inversion is also observed in the allyl radical and cation systems in their ground state equilibrium geometries, the relative amplitude of γ is much different, that is, |γ(regular allyl cation)/γ(regular allyl radical)| = 0.61 versus |γ(phenalenyl based superallyl cation)/γ(phenalenyl based superallyl radical)| = 35. In contrast, the model ethylene, allyl radical/cation, and butadiene systems with stretched carbon-carbon bond lengths (2.0 Å), having intermediate diradical characters, exhibit similar γ features to those of the phenalenyl based superpolyene systems. This exemplifies that the size dependence of γ as well as its sign change by introducing a positive charge on the phenalenyl based superpolyene systems originate from their intermediate diradical characters. In addition, the change from the lowest to the highest π-electron spin states significantly reduces the γ amplitudes of the neutral phenalenyl based superpolyene systems. For phenalenyl based superallyl cation, the sign inversion of γ (from negative to positive) is observed upon switching between the singlet and triplet states, which is predicted to be associated with a modification of the balance between the positive and negative contributions to γ. The present study paves the way

  3. Assessment of consistent two-equation closure for forest flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Cavar, Dalibor; Bechmann, Andreas

    of grid turbulence and wall-bounded flow, the closure suggested is also valid for homogeneous shear flows commonly observed inside tall vegetative canopies. The present work assess the plant drag closure by comparing results of two different CFD models against observations derived over the forested area...... and can be applied for any twoequation closure. Results derived by different CFD models with k-epsilon and k-omega closure are similar and in good comparison with observations. Overall, numerical results show that the closure performs well, opening new possibilities for application to tasks related...... to the atmospheric boundary layer—where it is important to adequately account for the influences of vegetation....

  4. Phase locking of a 3.4 THz third-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser using a room-temperature superlattice harmonic mixer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayton, D. J.; Khudchencko, A.; Pavelyev, D. G.; Hovenier, J. N.; Baryshev, A.; Gao, J. R.; Kao, T. Y.; Hu, Q.; Reno, J. L.; Vaks, V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the phase locking of a 3.4 THz third-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL) using a room temperature GaAs/AlAs superlattice diode as both a frequency multiplier and an internal harmonic mixer. A signal-to-noise level of 60 dB is observed in the intermediate frequency

  5. Phase locking of a 3.4 THz third-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser using a room-temperature superlattice harmonic mixer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayton, D.J.; Khudchenko, A.; Pavelyev, D.G.; Hovenier, J.N.; Baryshev, A.; Gao, J.R.; Kao, T.Y.; Hu, Q.; Reno, J.L.; Vaks, V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the phase locking of a 3.4 THz third-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL) using a room temperature GaAs/AlAs superlattice diode as both a frequency multiplier and an internal harmonic mixer. A signal-to-noise level of 60?dB is observed in the intermediate frequency

  6. A Third-Order Item Response Theory Model for Modeling the Effects of Domains and Subdomains in Large-Scale Educational Assessment Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijmen, Frank; Jeon, Minjeong; von Davier, Matthias; Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    Second-order item response theory models have been used for assessments consisting of several domains, such as content areas. We extend the second-order model to a third-order model for assessments that include subdomains nested in domains. Using a graphical model framework, it is shown how the model does not suffer from the curse of…

  7. Use of cycle stacking patterns to define third-order depositional sequences: Middle to Late Cambrian Bonanza King Formation, southern Great basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montanez, I.P.; Droser, M.L. (Univ. of California, Riverside (United States))

    1991-03-01

    The Middle to Late Cambrian Bonanza King Formation (CA, NV) is characterized by superimposed scales of cyclicity. Small-scale cycles (0.5 to 10m) occur as shallowing-upward peritidal and subtidal cycles that repeat at high frequencies (10{sup 4} to 10{sup 5}). Systematic changes in stacking patterns of meter-scale cycles define several large-scale (50-250 m) third-order depositional sequences in the Bonanza King Formation. Third-order depositional sequences can be traced within ranges and correlated regionally across the platform. Peritidal cycles in the Bonanza King Formation are both subtidal- and tidal flat-dominated. Tidal flat-dominated cycles consist of muddy bases grading upward into thrombolites or columnar stromatolites all capped by planar stromatolites. Subtidal cycles in the Bonanza King Formation consist of grainstone bases that commonly fine upward and contain stacked hardgrounds. These are overlain by digitate-algal bioherms with grainstone channel fills and/or bioturbated ribbon carbonates with grainstone lenses. Transgressive depositional facies of third-order depositional sequences consist primarily of stacks of subtidal-dominated pertidial cycles and subtidal cycles, whereas regressive depositional facies are dominated by stacks of tidal flat-dominated peritidal cycles and regoliths developed over laminite cycle caps. The use of high frequency cycles in the Bonanza King Formation to delineate regionally developed third-order depositional sequences thus provides a link between cycle stratigraphy and sequence stratigraphy.

  8. A circuit-level analysis of third order intermodulation mechanisms in CMOS mixers using time-invariant power and Volterra series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakian, P.; Mahmoudi, R.; Roermund, van A.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    An in-depth analysis is performed on the third-order intermodulation distortions (IMD3) in the switching pair of active CMOS mixers. The nonlinear time-varying switching pair is described by a hypothetical circuit composed of a nonlinear time-invariant circuit cascaded with a linear time-varying

  9. Restaurant closures

    CERN Document Server

    Novae Restauration

    2012-01-01

    Christmas Restaurant closures Please note that the Restaurant 1 and Restaurant 3 will be closed from Friday, 21 December at 5 p.m. to Sunday, 6 January, inclusive. They will reopen on Monday, 7 January 2013.   Restaurant 2 closure for renovation To meet greater demand and to modernize its infrastructure, Restaurant 2 will be closed from Monday, 17 December. On Monday, 14 January 2013, Sophie Vuetaz’s team will welcome you to a renovated self-service area on the 1st floor. The selections on the ground floor will also be expanded to include pasta and pizza, as well as snacks to eat in or take away. To ensure a continuity of service, we suggest you take your break at Restaurant 1 or Restaurant 3 (Prévessin).

  10. Facies-succession and architecture of the third-order sequences and their stratigraphic framework of the Devonian in Yunnan-Guizhou-Guangxi area, South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Mingxiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Caledonian orogeny at the end of the Silurian resulted in great changes in the palaeogeography in the Yunnan-Guizhou-Guangxi area of South China; the continental area of the Early Paleozoic evolved into the extensive Dian-Qian-Gui Sea in the Late Paleozoic. Early in the Devonian, as a result of a major transgression, seawater encroached gradually from the south to the north and clastic facies were deposited. Carbonate deposition was then established in the Yunnan-Guizhou-Guangxi area, with a palaeogeography marked by attached platforms, isolated platforms and narrow basins. As a result of the Ziyun movement towards the end of the Devonian, the Upper Devonian strata are regressive and thin out from the open-sea to the land areas. A study of the nature and distribution of sedimentary facies in space and time recognises 13 third-order sequences in the Devonian strata in Yunnan-Guizhou-Guangxi area, and these form two second-order sequences. The strata of the Lower Devonian comprise 5 third-order sequences (SQ1 to SQ5, which are dominated by transgressive clastics. 4 third-order sequences (SQ6 to SQ9 in the Middle Devonian are characterized by alternations of transgressive clastics and highstand carbonates. In the Upper Devonian, carbonates constitute 4 third-order sequences (SQ10 to SQ13, which are generally marked by the transgressive limestones and highstand dolomites. On the basis of earlier biostratigraphic studies, sea-level changes represented by the third-order sequences with their different facies successions are explored, and the sequence stratigraphic framework is established. Therefore, the Devonian strata in the study area provide an example for further understanding of depositional trends within the sequence-stratigraphic framework.

  11. Molecular mixing in turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerstein, A.R.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of a diffusive scalar field subject to turbulent stirring is investigated by comparing two new modeling approaches, the linear-eddy model and the clipped-laminar-profile representation, to results previously obtained by direct numerical simulation (DNS) and by mapping-closure analysis. The comparisons indicate that scalar field evolution is sensitive to the bandwidth of the stirring process, and they suggest that the good agreement between DNS and mapping closure reflects the narrowband character of both. The new models predict qualitatively new behaviors in the wideband stirring regime corresponding to high-Reynolds-number turbulence

  12. Stirring turbulence with turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cekli, H.E.; Joosten, R.; van de Water, W.

    2015-01-01

    We stir wind-tunnel turbulence with an active grid that consists of rods with attached vanes. The time-varying angle of these rods is controlled by random numbers. We study the response of turbulence on the statistical properties of these random numbers. The random numbers are generated by the

  13. Continuum methods of physical modeling continuum mechanics, dimensional analysis, turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Hutter, Kolumban

    2004-01-01

    The book unifies classical continuum mechanics and turbulence modeling, i.e. the same fundamental concepts are used to derive model equations for material behaviour and turbulence closure and complements these with methods of dimensional analysis. The intention is to equip the reader with the ability to understand the complex nonlinear modeling in material behaviour and turbulence closure as well as to derive or invent his own models. Examples are mostly taken from environmental physics and geophysics.

  14. Langmuir Turbulence: Proposal for a Closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dysthe, K. B.; Espedal, M. S.; Pécseli, Hans

    1986-01-01

    The Wigner formalism is applied to the standard equations for weakly nonlinear Langmuire waves. On the basis of this formulation, a closed set of equations is obtained to describe the statistical evolution of the average field intensity and the intensity correlation function. The analysis allows...

  15. Dynamic aperture calculation for 100 GeV Au-Au and 250 GeV pp lattices with near third order resonance working point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, X.; Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.

    2010-01-01

    In the preparation for the 2011 RHIC 250 GeV polarized proton (pp) run, both experiment and simulation were carried out to investigate the possibility to accelerate the proton beam with a vertical tune near 2/3. It had been found experimentally in Run-9 that accelerating the proton beam with a vertical tune close to 2/3 will greatly benefit the transmission of the proton polarization. In this note, we report the calculated dynamic apertures with the 100 GeV Au run and 250 GeV proton run lattices with vertical tunes close to the third order resonance. We will compare the third order resonance band width between the beam experiment and the simulation with the 100 GeV Au lattices. And we also will compare the calculated resonance band width between the 100 GeV Au and 250 GeV proton run lattices.

  16. Non-critically phase-matched second harmonic generation and third order nonlinearity in organic crystal glucuronic acid γ-lactone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saripalli, Ravi Kiran; Katturi, Naga Krishnakanth; Soma, Venugopal Rao; Bhat, H. L.; Elizabeth, Suja

    2017-12-01

    The linear, second order, and third order nonlinear optical properties of glucuronic acid γ-lactone single crystals were investigated. The optic axes and principal dielectric axes were identified through optical conoscopy and the principal refractive indices were obtained using the Brewster's angle method. Conic sections were observed which is perceived to be due to spontaneous non-collinear phase matching. The direction of collinear phase matching was determined and the deff evaluated in this direction was 0.71 pm/V. Open and closed aperture Z-scan measurements with femtosecond pulses revealed high third order nonlinearity in the form of self-defocusing, two-photon absorption, as well as saturable absorption.

  17. Absolute measurement of the subcriticality based on the third order neutron correlation in consideration of the finite nature of neutron counts data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Tomohiro; Kitamura, Yasunori; Yamane, Yoshihiro

    2003-01-01

    We have studied a measurement of subcriticality by using the neutron correlation method. Furuhashi proposed an absolute measurement of subcriticality by using the third order neutron correlation factor X in addition to the second order neutron correlation factor Y. In actual experiments, the number of neutron counts data is not infinity so that we take the effect of the finite nature of the neutron counts data into account. We derived new formulas in consideration of the number of data and verified them. (author)

  18. Differential and Difference Boundary Value Problem for Loaded Third-Order Pseudo-Parabolic Differential Equations and Difference Methods for Their Numerical Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshtokov, M. Kh.

    2017-12-01

    Boundary value problems for loaded third-order pseudo-parabolic equations with variable coefficients are considered. A priori estimates for the solutions of the problems in the differential and difference formulations are obtained. These a priori estimates imply the uniqueness and stability of the solution with respect to the initial data and the right-hand side on a layer, as well as the convergence of the solution of each difference problem to the solution of the corresponding differential problem.

  19. Difference method for solving a nonlocal boundary value problem for a degenerating third-order pseudo-parabolic equation with variable coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshtokov, M. Kh.

    2016-10-01

    A nonlocal boundary value problem for a degenerating third-order pseudo-parabolic equation with variable coefficients is considered. For solving this problem, a priori estimates in the differential and difference forms are obtained. The a priori estimates imply the uniqueness and stability of the solution on a layer with respect to the initial data and the right-hand side and the convergence of the solution of the difference problem to the solution of the differential problem.

  20. Twin Positive Solutions of a Nonlinear m-Point Boundary Value Problem for Third-Order p-Laplacian Dynamic Equations on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Han

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Several existence theorems of twin positive solutions are established for a nonlinear m-point boundary value problem of third-order p-Laplacian dynamic equations on time scales by using a fixed point theorem. We present two theorems and four corollaries which generalize the results of related literature. As an application, an example to demonstrate our results is given. The obtained conditions are different from some known results.

  1. Solitonic dynamics and excitations of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with third-order dispersion in non-Hermitian PT-symmetric potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Yan, Zhenya

    2016-03-22

    Solitons are of the important significant in many fields of nonlinear science such as nonlinear optics, Bose-Einstein condensates, plamas physics, biology, fluid mechanics, and etc. The stable solitons have been captured not only theoretically and experimentally in both linear and nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equations in the presence of non-Hermitian potentials since the concept of the parity-time -symmetry was introduced in 1998. In this paper, we present novel bright solitons of the NLS equation with third-order dispersion in some complex -symmetric potentials (e.g., physically relevant -symmetric Scarff-II-like and harmonic-Gaussian potentials). We find stable nonlinear modes even if the respective linear -symmetric phases are broken. Moreover, we also use the adiabatic changes of the control parameters to excite the initial modes related to exact solitons to reach stable nonlinear modes. The elastic interactions of two solitons are exhibited in the third-order NLS equation with -symmetric potentials. Our results predict the dynamical phenomena of soliton equations in the presence of third-order dispersion and -symmetric potentials arising in nonlinear fiber optics and other physically relevant fields.

  2. Photoionization and third-order susceptibility of a neutral donor in ZnS/InP/ZnSe core/shell spherical quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Wenfang

    2014-01-01

    The optical properties of a neutral donor in a ZnS/InP/ZnSe core/shell spherical quantum dot have been investigated using the variational method and the compact density-matrix approach. Two parametric potential is chosen as a confinement potential for the shell. Considering the band structure of the system it is assumed that electron is localized in InP shell. It is assumed that the impurity is located in the center of quantum dot core (ZnS). The photoionization cross section as well as the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility of third harmonic generation has been calculated. The results show that the photoionization and the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility of a donor in a core/shell spherical quantum dot are strongly affected by the shell thickness. We found that small applied shell thickness will lead to a significant blue shift of the peak positions in the optical spectrum. This kind of structure gives an opportunity to tune and control the photoionization and the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility of third harmonic generation of a donor impurity by changing the shell thickness

  3. A new modeling strategy for third-order fast high-performance liquid chromatographic data with fluorescence detection. Quantitation of fluoroquinolones in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaráz, Mirta R; Bortolato, Santiago A; Goicoechea, Héctor C; Olivieri, Alejandro C

    2015-03-01

    Matrix augmentation is regularly employed in extended multivariate curve resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS), as applied to analytical calibration based on second- and third-order data. However, this highly useful concept has almost no correspondence in parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) of third-order data. In the present work, we propose a strategy to process third-order chromatographic data with matrix fluorescence detection, based on an Augmented PARAFAC model. The latter involves decomposition of a three-way data array augmented along the elution time mode with data for the calibration samples and for each of the test samples. A set of excitation-emission fluorescence matrices, measured at different chromatographic elution times for drinking water samples, containing three fluoroquinolones and uncalibrated interferences, were evaluated using this approach. Augmented PARAFAC exploits the second-order advantage, even in the presence of significant changes in chromatographic profiles from run to run. The obtained relative errors of prediction were ca. 10 % for ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and danofloxacin, with a significant enhancement in analytical figures of merit in comparison with previous reports. The results are compared with those furnished by MCR-ALS.

  4. Reynolds Stress Closure for Inertial Frames and Rotating Frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Charles; Benard, Andre

    2017-11-01

    In a rotating frame-of-reference, the Coriolis acceleration and the mean vorticity field have a profound impact on the redistribution of kinetic energy among the three components of the fluctuating velocity. Consequently, the normalized Reynolds (NR) stress is not objective. Furthermore, because the Reynolds stress is defined as an ensemble average of a product of fluctuating velocity vector fields, its eigenvalues must be non-negative for all turbulent flows. These fundamental properties (realizability and non-objectivity) of the NR-stress cannot be compromised in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of turbulent flows in either inertial frames or in rotating frames. The recently developed universal realizable anisotropic prestress (URAPS) closure for the NR-stress depends explicitly on the local mean velocity gradient and the Coriolis operator. The URAPS-closure is a significant paradigm shift from turbulent closure models that assume that dyadic-valued operators associated with turbulent fluctuations are objective.

  5. Measurement of third-order nonlinear susceptibility tensor in InP using extended Z-scan technique with elliptical polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Masaki; Shinozaki, Tomohisa; Hara, Hikaru; Yamamoto, Kazunuki; Matsusue, Toshio; Bando, Hiroyuki

    2018-05-01

    The elliptical polarization dependence of the two-photon absorption coefficient β in InP has been measured by the extended Z-scan technique for thick materials in the wavelength range from 1640 to 1800 nm. The analytical formula of the Z-scan technique has been extended with consideration of multiple reflections. The Z-scan results have been fitted very well by the formula and β has been evaluated accurately. The three independent elements of the third-order nonlinear susceptibility tensor in InP have also been determined accurately from the elliptical polarization dependence of β.

  6. Diagnostic study of the roughness surface effect of zirconium on the third-order nonlinear-optical properties of thin films based on zinc oxide nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahedi, K.; Addou, M.; El Jouad, M.; Sofiani, Z.; Alaoui Lamrani, M.; El Habbani, T.; Fellahi, N.; Bayoud, S.; Dghoughi, L.; Sahraoui, B.; Essaidi, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) and zirconium doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Zr) thin films were deposited by reactive chemical pulverization spray pyrolysis technique on heated glass substrates at 500 deg. C using zinc and zirconium chlorides as precursors. Effects of zirconium doping agent and surface roughness on the nonlinear optical properties were investigated in detail using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and third harmonic generation (THG) technique. The best value of nonlinear optical susceptibility χ (3) was obtained from the doped films with less roughness. A strong third order nonlinear optical susceptibility χ (3) = 20.12 x 10 -12 (esu) of the studied films was found for the 3% doped sample.

  7. A Grid Synchronization PLL Method Based on Mixed Second- and Third-Order Generalized Integrator for DC-Offset Elimination and Frequency Adaptability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chunjiang; Zhao, Xiaojun; Wang, Xiaohuan

    2018-01-01

    in the grid voltages, the general SOGI’s performance suffers from its generated dc effect in the lagging sine signal at the output. Therefore, in this paper, a mixed second- and third-order generalized integrator (MSTOGI) is proposed to eliminate this effect caused by the dc offset of grid voltages......The second order generalized integrator (SOGI) has been widely used to implement grid synchronization for grid-connected inverters, and from grid voltages it is able to extract the fundamental components with an output of two orthogonal sinusoidal signals. However, if there is a dc offset existing...

  8. Third-Order Density Perturbation and One-Loop Power Spectrum in Dark-Energy-Dominated Universe(Astrophysics and Cosmology)

    OpenAIRE

    Ryuichi, TAKAHASHI; Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Nagoya University

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the third-order density perturbation and the one-loop correction to the linear power spectrum in the dark-energy cosmological model. Our main interest is to understand the dark-energy effect on baryon acoustic oscillations in a quasi-nonlinear regime (k≈0.1h/Mpc). Analytical solutions and simple fitting formulae are presented for the dark-energy model with the general time-varying equation of state w(a). It turns out that the power spectrum coincides with the approximate res...

  9. Third-order nonlinear optical properties of 1,3-bis(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl) prop-2-en-1-one under femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidur, Shivaraj R.; Patil, Parutagouda Shankaragouda; Rao, S. Venugopal

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we present the third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) studies of 1,3-bis(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (abbreviated as VDMC). The chalcone was synthesized by Claisen-Schmidt condensation method. The third-order nonlinear optical properties were evaluated using standard, well-known Z-scan technique under femtosecond laser regime (150 fs, 900 nm) with two different laser repetition rates 500 Hz and 80 MHz. Open aperture studies showed that the molecule possess two photon absorption with the coefficients in the order 10-9 cmW-1. The closed aperture studies have resulted the negative nonlinear refraction with the coefficients in the order 10-14 cm2W-1. The two-photon absorption cross sections were estimated. Optical limiting properties have been studied and the limiting threshold values were found to be in the range 0.86-2.3 mJ/cm2, which suggests that VDMC has better applications in the field of nonlinear optics.

  10. Nonlinear permittivity spectra of supercooled ionic liquids: Observation of a "hump" in the third-order permittivity spectra and comparison to double-well potential models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patro, L N; Burghaus, O; Roling, B

    2017-04-21

    We have measured the third-order permittivity spectra ε 3 3 of a monocationic and of a dicationic liquid close to the glass transition temperature by applying ac electric fields with large amplitudes up to 180 kV/cm. A peak ("hump") in the modulus of ε 3 3 is observed for a mono-cationic liquid after subtraction of the dc contribution from the imaginary part of ε 3 3 . We show that the origin of this experimental "hump" is a peak in the imaginary part of ε 3 3 , with the peak height strongly increasing with decreasing temperature. Overall, the spectral shape of the third-order permittivity of both ionic liquids is similar to the predictions of a symmetric double well potential model, although this model does not predict a "hump" in the modulus. In contrast, an asymmetric double well potential model predicts a "hump," but the spectral shape of both the real and imaginary part of ε 3 3 deviates significantly from the experimental spectra. These results show that not only the modulus of ε 3 3 but also its phase is an important quantity when comparing experimental results with theoretical predictions.

  11. Large third-order nonlinearity of nonpolar A-plane GaN film at 800 nm determined by Z-scan technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Han, Xiangyun

    2014-09-01

    We report an investigation on the optical third-order nonlinear property of the nonpolar A-plane GaN film. The film sample with a thickness of ~2 μm was grown on an r-plane sapphire substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition system. By performing the Z-scan method combined with a mode-locked femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser (800 nm, 50 fs), the optical nonlinearity of the nonpolar A-plane GaN film was measured with the electric vector E of the laser beam being polarized parallel (//) and perpendicular (⊥) to the c axis of the film. The results show that both the third-order nonlinear absorption coefficient β and the nonlinear refractive index n2 of the sample film possess negative and large values, i.e. β// = -135 ± 29 cm/GW, n2// = -(4.0 ± 0.3) × 10-3 cm2/GW and β⊥ = -234 ± 29 cm/GW, n2⊥ = -(4.9 ± 0.4) × 10-3 cm2/GW, which are much larger than those of conventional C-plane GaN film, GaN bulk, and even the other oxide semiconductors.

  12. Mechano-optic logic gate controlled by third-order nonlinear optical properties in a rotating ZnO:Au thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo-Delgado, C; Torres-Torres, C; García-Merino, J A; García-Gil, C I; Khomenko, A V; Trejo-Valdez, M; Martínez-Gutiérrez, H; Torres-Martínez, R

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of the third-order nonlinear optical properties exhibited by a ZnO thin solid film deposited on a SnO 2 substrate are presented. The samples were prepared by a spray pyrolysis processing route. Scanning electron microscopy analysis and UV–Vis spectroscopy studies were carried out. The picosecond response at 1064 nm was explored by the z-scan technique. A large optical Kerr effect with two-photon absorption was obtained. The inhibition of the nonlinear optical absorption together with a noticeable enhancement in the optical Kerr effect in the sample was achieved by the incorporation of Au nanoparticles into the ZnO film. Additionally, a two-wave mixing configuration at 532 nm was performed and an optical Kerr effect was identified as the main cause of the nanosecond third-order optical nonlinearity. The relaxation time of the photothermal response of the sample was estimated to be about 1 s when the sample was excited by nanosecond single-shots. The rotation of the sample during the nanosecond two-wave mixing experiments was analyzed. It was stated that a non-monotonic relation between rotating frequency and pulse repetition rate governs the thermal contribution to the nonlinear refractive index exhibited by a rotating film. Potential applications for switching photothermal interactions in rotating samples can be contemplated. A rotary logic system dependent on Kerr transmittance in a two-wave mixing experiment was proposed. (paper)

  13. Closure of the squared Zakharov--Shabat eigenstates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaup, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    By solution of the inverse scattering problem for a third-order (degenerate) eigenvalue problem, the closure of the squared eigenfunctions of the Zakharov--Shabat equations is found. The question of the completeness of squared eigenstates occurs in many aspects of ''inverse scattering transforms'' (solving nonlinear evolution equations exactly by inverse scattering techniques), as well as in various aspects of the inverse scattering problem. The method used here is quite suggestive as to how one might find the closure of the squared eigenfunctions of other eigenvalue equations, and the strong analogy between these results and the problem of finding the closure of the eigenvectors of a nonself-adjoint matrix is pointed out

  14. Exact statistical results for binary mixing and reaction in variable density turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristorcelli, J. R.

    2017-02-01

    analytic results relating several other second and third order moments and see coupling between odd and even order moments demonstrating a natural and inherent skewness in the mixing in variable density turbulence. The analytic results have applications in the areas of isothermal material mixing, isobaric thermal mixing, and simple chemical reaction (in progress variable formulation).

  15. Accurate adiabatic singlet-triplet gaps in atoms and molecules employing the third-order spin-flip algebraic diagrammatic construction scheme for the polarization propagator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefrancois, Daniel; Dreuw, Andreas, E-mail: dreuw@uni-heidelberg.de [Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing, Ruprecht-Karls University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 205, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rehn, Dirk R. [Departments of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2016-08-28

    For the calculation of adiabatic singlet-triplet gaps (STG) in diradicaloid systems the spin-flip (SF) variant of the algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) scheme for the polarization propagator in third order perturbation theory (SF-ADC(3)) has been applied. Due to the methodology of the SF approach the singlet and triplet states are treated on an equal footing since they are part of the same determinant subspace. This leads to a systematically more accurate description of, e.g., diradicaloid systems than with the corresponding non-SF single-reference methods. Furthermore, using analytical excited state gradients at ADC(3) level, geometry optimizations of the singlet and triplet states were performed leading to a fully consistent description of the systems, leading to only small errors in the calculated STGs ranging between 0.6 and 2.4 kcal/mol with respect to experimental references.

  16. Studies on third-order optical nonlinearity and power limiting of conducting polymers using the z-scan technique for nonlinear optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramodini, S.; Sudhakar, Y. N.; SelvaKumar, M.; Poornesh, P.

    2014-04-01

    We present the synthesis and characterization of third-order optical nonlinearity and optical limiting of the conducting polymers poly (aniline-co-o-anisidine) and poly (aniline-co-pyrrole). Nonlinear optical studies were carried out by employing the z-scan technique using a He-Ne laser operating in continuous wave mode at 633 nm. The copolymers exhibited a reverse saturable absorption process and self-defocusing properties under the experimental conditions. The estimated values of βeff, n2 and χ(3) were found to be of the order of 10-2 cm W-1, 10-5 esu and 10-7 esu respectively. Self-diffraction rings were observed due to refractive index change when exposed to the laser beam. The copolymers possess a lower limiting threshold and clamping level, which is essential to a great extent for power limiting devices. Therefore, copolymers of aniline emerge as a potential candidate for nonlinear optical device applications.

  17. Effects of Ni vacancy, Ni antisite, Cr and Pt on the third-order elastic constants and mechanical properties of NiAl

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Shaohua; Wu, Xiaozhi; Wang, Rui; Liu, Qing; Gan, Liyong

    2014-01-01

    Effects of Ni vacancy, Ni antisite in Al sublattice, Cr in Al sublattice, Pt in Ni sublattice on the second-order elastic constants (SOECs) and third-order elastic constants (TOECs) of the B2 NiAl have been investigated using the first-principles methods. Lattice constant and the SOECs of NiAl are in good agreement with the previous results. The brittle/ductile transition map based on Pugh ratio G/B and Cauchy pressure Pc shows that Ni antisite, Cr, Pt and pressure can improve the ductility of NiAl, respectively. Ni vacancy and lower pressure can enhance the Vickers hardness Hv of NiAl. The density of states (DOS) and the charge density difference are also used to analysis the effects of vacancy, Ni antisite, Cr and Pt on the mechanical properties of NiAl, and the results are in consistent with the transition map. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Diagnostic study of the roughness surface effect of zirconium on the third-order nonlinear-optical properties of thin films based on zinc oxide nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahedi, K., E-mail: bahedikhadija@yahoo.com [Laboratoire Optoelectronique et Physico-chimie des Materiaux Universite Ibn Tofail, Faculte des Sciences BP 133 Kenitra 14000, Maroc (Morocco); Addou, M.; El Jouad, M.; Sofiani, Z.; Alaoui Lamrani, M.; El Habbani, T.; Fellahi, N.; Bayoud, S.; Dghoughi, L. [Laboratoire Optoelectronique et Physico-chimie des Materiaux Universite Ibn Tofail, Faculte des Sciences BP 133 Kenitra 14000, Maroc (Morocco); Sahraoui, B.; Essaidi, Z. [Laboratoire POMA, UMR CNRS 6136, Universite d' Angers 2, Bd Lavoisier, 49045 France (France)

    2009-02-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) and zirconium doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Zr) thin films were deposited by reactive chemical pulverization spray pyrolysis technique on heated glass substrates at 500 deg. C using zinc and zirconium chlorides as precursors. Effects of zirconium doping agent and surface roughness on the nonlinear optical properties were investigated in detail using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and third harmonic generation (THG) technique. The best value of nonlinear optical susceptibility {chi}{sup (3)} was obtained from the doped films with less roughness. A strong third order nonlinear optical susceptibility {chi}{sup (3)} = 20.12 x 10{sup -12} (esu) of the studied films was found for the 3% doped sample.

  19. Synthesis, spectral and third-order nonlinear optical properties of terpyridine Zn(II) complexes based on carbazole derivative with polyether group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ming; Liu, Yanqiu; Wang, Hui; Luo, Junshan; Li, Dandan; Zhang, Shengyi; Li, Shengli; Wu, Jieying; Tian, Yupeng

    2015-01-01

    Four novel Zn(II) terpyridine complexes (ZnLCl2, ZnLBr2, ZnLI2, ZnL(SCN)2) based on carbazole derivative group were designed, synthesized and fully characterized. Their photophysical properties including absorption and one-photon excited fluorescence, two-photon absorption (TPA) and optical power limiting (OPL) were further investigated systematically and interpreted on the basis of theoretical calculations (TD-DFT). The influences of different solvents on the absorption and One-Photon Excited Fluorescence (OPEF) spectral behavior, quantum yields and the lifetime of the chromophores have been investigated in detail. The third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties were investigated by open/closed aperture Z-scan measurements using femtosecond pulse laser in the range from 680 to 1080 nm. These results revealed that ZnLCl2 and ZnLBr2 exhibited strong two-photon absorption and ZnLCl2 showed superior optical power limiting property.

  20. Studies on the growth aspects, structural, thermal, dielectric and third order nonlinear optical properties of solution grown 4-methylpyridinium p-nitrophenolate single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, S. Reena; Kalaiyarasi, S.; Zahid, I. MD.; Kumar, R. Mohan

    2016-11-01

    An ionic organic optical crystal of 4-methylpyridinium p-nitrophenolate was grown from methanol by slow evaporation method at ambient temperature. Powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies revealed the crystal system and its crystalline perfection. The rocking curve recorded from HRXRD study confirmed the crystal quality. FTIR spectral analysis confirmed the functional groups present in the title compound. UV-visible spectral study revealed the optical window and band gap of grown crystal. The thermal, electrical and surface laser damage threshold properties of harvested crystal were examined by using TGA/DTA, LCR/Impedance Analyzer and Nd:YAG laser system respectively. The third order nonlinear optical property of grown crystal was elucidated by Z-scan technique.

  1. A 1-V 60-μW 85-dB dynamic range continuous-time third-order sigma-delta modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuanwen; Qi Da; Dong Yifeng; Xu Jun; Ren Junyan

    2009-01-01

    A 1-V third order one-bit continuous-time (CT) EA modulator is presented. Designed in the SMIC mixed-signal 0.13-μm CMOS process, the modulator utilizes active RC integrators to implement the loop filter. An efficient circuit design methodology for the CT ΣΔ modulator is proposed and verified. Low power dissipation is achieved through the use of two-stage class A/AB amplifiers. The presented modulator achieves 81.4-dB SNDR and 85-dB dynamic range in a 20-kHz bandwidth with an over sampling ratio of 128. The total power consumption of the modulator is only 60 μW from a 1-V power supply and the prototype occupies an active area of 0.12 mm 2 . (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  2. Effects of Ni vacancy, Ni antisite, Cr and Pt on the third-order elastic constants and mechanical properties of NiAl

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Shaohua

    2014-12-01

    Effects of Ni vacancy, Ni antisite in Al sublattice, Cr in Al sublattice, Pt in Ni sublattice on the second-order elastic constants (SOECs) and third-order elastic constants (TOECs) of the B2 NiAl have been investigated using the first-principles methods. Lattice constant and the SOECs of NiAl are in good agreement with the previous results. The brittle/ductile transition map based on Pugh ratio G/B and Cauchy pressure Pc shows that Ni antisite, Cr, Pt and pressure can improve the ductility of NiAl, respectively. Ni vacancy and lower pressure can enhance the Vickers hardness Hv of NiAl. The density of states (DOS) and the charge density difference are also used to analysis the effects of vacancy, Ni antisite, Cr and Pt on the mechanical properties of NiAl, and the results are in consistent with the transition map. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Superfluid turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Most flows of fluids, in nature and in technology, are turbulent. Since much of the energy expended by machines and devices that involve fluid flows is spent in overcoming drag caused by turbulence, there is a strong motivation to understand the phenomena. Surprisingly, the peculiar, quantum-mechanical form of turbulence that can form in superfluid helium may turn out to be much simpler to understand that the classical turbulence that forms in normal fluids. It now seems that the study of superfluid turbulence may provide simplified model systems for studying some forms of classical turbulence. There are also practical motivations for studying superfluid turbulence. For example, superfuid helium is often used as a coolant in superconducting machinery. Superfluid turbulence is the primary impediment to the transfer of heat by superfluid helium; an understanding of the phenomena may make it possible to design more efficient methods of refrigeration for superconducting devices. 8 figs

  4. John Lumley's Contributions to Turbulence Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    We recall the contributions that John Lumley made to turbulence modeling in the 1970s and 1980s. In these early days, computer power was feeble by today's standards, and eddy-viscosity models were prevalent in CFD. Lumley recognized, however, that second-moment closures represent the simplest level at which the physics of turbulent flows can reasonably be represented. This is especially true when the velocity field is coupled to scalar fields through buoyancy, as in the atmosphere and oceans. While Lumley was not the first to propose second-moment closures, he can be credited with establishing the rational approach to constructing such closures. This includes the application of various invariance principles and tensor representation theorems, imposing the constraints imposed by realizability, and of course appealing to experimental data in simple, canonical flows. These techniques are now well-accepted and have found application far beyond second-moment closures.

  5. Synthesis, optical, experimental and theoretical investigation of third order nonlinear optical properties of 8-hydroxyquinolinium 2-carboxy-6-nitrophthalate monohydrate single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathi, M. Divya; Bhuvaneswari, R.; Srividya, J.; Vinitha, G.; Prithiviraajan, R. N.; Anbalagan, G.

    2018-02-01

    Single crystals of 8-hydroxyquinolinium 2-carboxy-6-nitrophthalate monohydrate (8HQNP) were obtained from slow evaporation solution growth method using methanol-water (1:1) as a solvent. Powder X-ray diffraction was utilized to compute the unit cell parameters and dislocation density of 8HQNP crystal. The crystalline perfection of the as-grown crystal was investigated by high-resolution X-ray diffraction at room temperature. The molecular structure was analyzed by identifying the functional groups from FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. The cut-off wavelength and the corresponding optical band gap obtained from an optical spectrum were 376 nm and 3.29 eV respectively. The dispersion nature of refractive index was investigated by the single-oscillator Wemple and Di-Domenico model. Red emission was observed in the photoluminescence spectrum when excited with 376 nm. The low birefringence and high laser damage threshold (8.538 GW/cm2) values dictate the suitability of the crystal for optical devices. Z-scan studies revealed the third order nonlinear absorption coefficient (β) and refractive index (n2) of the 8HQNP crystal. The theoretical value of third order nonlinear susceptibility obtained from density function theory is good accordance with the experimental value. The frontier molecular orbital energy gap decreases with increasing external electric field in different directions which attributed to the enhancement of the second hyperpolarizability. The grown title crystal is thermally stable up to 102 °C which was identified using thermal analysis. Mechanical strength of 8HQNP was estimated by using Vicker's microhardness studies.

  6. Bulk monocrystal growth, optical, dielectric, third order nonlinear, thermal and mechanical studies on HCl added L-alanine: An organic NLO material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkir, Mohd, E-mail: shkirphysics@gmail.com [Advanced Functional Materials & Optoelectronic Laboratory (AFMOL), Physics Department, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Yahia, I.S., E-mail: dr_isyahia@yahoo.com [Advanced Functional Materials & Optoelectronic Laboratory (AFMOL), Physics Department, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Nano-Science & Semiconductor Labs, Physics Department, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy, Cairo (Egypt); Al-Qahtani, A.M.A. [Advanced Functional Materials & Optoelectronic Laboratory (AFMOL), Physics Department, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, Abha (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-12-01

    In the current work, good quality bulk size (∼32 mm × 23 mm × 10 mm) single crystals of HCl added L-alanine with well-defined morphology are successfully grown using slow evaporation technique. Crystal structure and other structural parameters were evaluated from X-ray diffraction data. Vibrational assessment of the grown crystal was done by FT-Raman analysis. The presence of chlorine and good quality of the grown crystal was confirmed by SEM/EDX analysis. Solid state UV–Vis–NIR diffused reflectance was measured and direct and indirect optical band gap was calculated using Kubelka-Munk relation and found to be 5.64 and 5 eV respectively. Dielectric measurement was carried out in high frequency range. Third order nonlinear optical susceptibility value was found to be enhanced from 1.91 × 10{sup −6} (pure) to 8.6 × 10{sup −6} esu (LAHCl). Good thermal stability of grown crystals was confirmed from DSC analysis. The enhancement in mechanical strength and crystalline perfection was also observed. - Highlights: • Bulk size (32 mm × 23 mm × 10 mm), good crystalline perfection HCl added L-alanine monocrystal is grown. • The shift in X-ray diffraction and vibrational peaks confirms the interaction of HCl. • The high optical transparency and band gap confirms its application in optoelectronic devices. • Third order NLO properties are found to be enhanced in HCl added L-alanine crystals. • The mechanical strength of the grown crystals is found to be enhanced due HCl addition.

  7. Uncertainty Quantification of Multi-Phase Closures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadiga, Balasubramanya T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baglietto, Emilio [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-10-27

    In the ensemble-averaged dispersed phase formulation used for CFD of multiphase ows in nuclear reactor thermohydraulics, closures of interphase transfer of mass, momentum, and energy constitute, by far, the biggest source of error and uncertainty. Reliable estimators of this source of error and uncertainty are currently non-existent. Here, we report on how modern Validation and Uncertainty Quanti cation (VUQ) techniques can be leveraged to not only quantify such errors and uncertainties, but also to uncover (unintended) interactions between closures of di erent phenomena. As such this approach serves as a valuable aide in the research and development of multiphase closures. The joint modeling of lift, drag, wall lubrication, and turbulent dispersion|forces that lead to tranfer of momentum between the liquid and gas phases|is examined in the frame- work of validation of the adiabatic but turbulent experiments of Liu and Banko , 1993. An extensive calibration study is undertaken with a popular combination of closure relations and the popular k-ϵ turbulence model in a Bayesian framework. When a wide range of super cial liquid and gas velocities and void fractions is considered, it is found that this set of closures can be validated against the experimental data only by allowing large variations in the coe cients associated with the closures. We argue that such an extent of variation is a measure of uncertainty induced by the chosen set of closures. We also nd that while mean uid velocity and void fraction pro les are properly t, uctuating uid velocity may or may not be properly t. This aspect needs to be investigated further. The popular set of closures considered contains ad-hoc components and are undesirable from a predictive modeling point of view. Consequently, we next consider improvements that are being developed by the MIT group under CASL and which remove the ad-hoc elements. We use non-intrusive methodologies for sensitivity analysis and calibration (using

  8. Advancements in engineering turbulence modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, T.-H.

    1991-01-01

    Some new developments in two-equation models and second order closure models are presented. Two-equation models (k-epsilon models) have been widely used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for engineering problems. Most of low-Reynolds number two-equation models contain some wall-distance damping functions to account for the effect of wall on turbulence. However, this often causes the confusion and difficulties in computing flows with complex geometry and also needs an ad hoc treatment near the separation and reattachment points. A set of modified two-equation models is proposed to remove the aforementioned shortcomings. The calculations using various two-equation models are compared with direct numerical simulations of channel flow and flat boundary layers. Development of a second order closure model is also discussed with emphasis on the modeling of pressure related correlation terms and dissipation rates in the second moment equations. All the existing models poorly predict the normal stresses near the wall and fail to predict the 3-D effect of mean flow on the turbulence (e.g. decrease in the shear stress caused by the cross flow in the boundary layer). The newly developed second order near-wall turbulence model is described and is capable of capturing the near-wall behavior of turbulence as well as the effect of 3-D mean flow on the turbulence.

  9. Full closure strategic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The full closure strategic analysis was conducted to create a decision process whereby full roadway : closures for construction and maintenance activities can be evaluated and approved or denied by CDOT : Traffic personnel. The study reviewed current...

  10. Sternal exploration or closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAC - vacuum-assisted closure - sternal wound; Sternal dehiscence; Sternal infection ... in the wound to look for signs of infection Remove dead or infected ... use a VAC (vacuum-assisted closure) dressing. It is a negative ...

  11. Progress in modeling hypersonic turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Otto

    1993-01-01

    A good knowledge of the turbulence structure, wall heat transfer, and friction in turbulent boundary layers (TBL) at high speeds is required for the design of hypersonic air breathing airplanes and reentry space vehicles. This work reports on recent progress in the modeling of high speed TBL flows. The specific research goal described here is the development of a second order closure model for zero pressure gradient TBL's for the range of Mach numbers up to hypersonic speeds with arbitrary wall cooling requirements.

  12. Closure The Definitive Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Bolin, Michael

    2010-01-01

    If you're ready to use Closure to build rich web applications with JavaScript, this hands-on guide has precisely what you need to learn this suite of tools in depth. Closure makes it easy for experienced JavaScript developers to write and maintain large and complex codebases -- as Google has demonstrated by using Closure with Gmail, Google Docs, and Google Maps. Author and Closure contributor Michael Bolin has included numerous code examples and best practices, as well as valuable information not available publicly until now. You'll learn all about Closure's Library, Compiler, Templates, tes

  13. PDF approach for turbulent scalar field: Some recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng

    1993-01-01

    The probability density function (PDF) method has been proven a very useful approach in turbulence research. It has been particularly effective in simulating turbulent reacting flows and in studying some detailed statistical properties generated by a turbulent field There are, however, some important questions that have yet to be answered in PDF studies. Our efforts in the past year have been focused on two areas. First, a simple mixing model suitable for Monte Carlo simulations has been developed based on the mapping closure. Secondly, the mechanism of turbulent transport has been analyzed in order to understand the recently observed abnormal PDF's of turbulent temperature fields generated by linear heat sources.

  14. Study of the electrical and nanosecond third order nonlinear optical properties of ZnO films doped with Au and Pt nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trejo-Valdez, Martin, E-mail: martin.trejo@laposte.net [ESIQIE, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, D.F. 07738, México (Mexico); Sobral, Hugo [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-186, México, D.F. 04510, México (Mexico); Martínez-Gutiérrez, Hugo [Centro de Nanociencias y Micro y Nanotecnologías del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, D.F. 07738, México (Mexico); Torres-Torres, Carlos [Sección de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación, ESIME ZAC, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, D.F. 07738, México (Mexico)

    2016-04-30

    Zinc oxide films doped with platinum and gold nanoparticles were deposited by the spray pyrolysis technique on glass substrates. A titanium dioxide sol–gel solution containing gold and platinum aqueous ions was employed for synthesizing the nanoparticles by ultraviolet-light irradiation. The conductive properties of the samples were characterized by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique. Our results showed that the impedance of zinc oxide films doped with metallic nanoparticles was, by far, lower than typical measurements in zinc oxide films. A strong enhancement in the nanosecond nonlinear optical response was also obtained in the studied metallic doped films. A vectorial two-mixing experiment performed at 532 nm and 4 ns allowed us to evaluate the sample with a third order optical nonlinearity described by approximately | χ{sub 1111}{sup (3)}| = 2.6 × 10{sup −8} esu. - Highlights: • ZnO films doped with Pt and Au nanoparticles were synthetized. • The inclusion of metallic nanoparticles in the film improves optical nonlinearities. • Conductivity of the films was enhanced by the contribution of the nanoparticles.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and theoretical investigations of the structure, electronic properties and third-order nonlinearity optics (NLO) of M(DPIP)₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kang; Tang, Guodong; Kou, ShanShan; Culnane, Lance F; Zhang, Yu; Song, Yinglin; Li, Rongqing; Wei, Changmei

    2015-03-15

    Three complexes of M(DPIP)2 (M=Cu, Co, Zn as 1, 2, 3) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-Vis, thermogravimetry, and X-ray diffraction. Their nonlinear optical properties were measured by the Z-scan technique and yielded a normalized transmittance of about 70% for complex 1 (45 μJ pulse), and 93% for complex 3 (68 μJ pulse at the focus point). The nonlinear absorption coefficient, β, is 1.4×10(-11) m/W for 1 and 5.6×10(-13) m/W for 3, and the third-order nonlinear refraction index, n2, is 1.0×10(-18) m(2)/W for 3. Complex 1 shows self-defocusing property, while complex 3 exhibits self-focusing property. The thermogravimetric results show that the frame structure of compounds 1-3 begin to collapse at 400, 250 and 280°C, respectively, which suggests that they elicit excellent thermal stability. This research aims to provide better understanding of these compounds, and offer preliminary explanations for the significant differences between compounds 1-3, in order to potentially help in the designing of future novel materials with NLO properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and theoretical investigations of the structure, electronic properties and third-order nonlinearity optics (NLO) of M(DPIP)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kang; Tang, Guodong; Kou, ShanShan; Culnane, Lance F.; Zhang, Yu; Song, Yinglin; Li, Rongqing; Wei, Changmei

    2015-03-01

    Three complexes of M(DPIP)2 (M = Cu, Co, Zn as 1, 2, 3) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-Vis, thermogravimetry, and X-ray diffraction. Their nonlinear optical properties were measured by the Z-scan technique and yielded a normalized transmittance of about 70% for complex 1 (45 μJ pulse), and 93% for complex 3 (68 μJ pulse at the focus point). The nonlinear absorption coefficient, β, is 1.4 × 10-11 m/W for 1 and 5.6 × 10-13 m/W for 3, and the third-order nonlinear refraction index, n2, is 1.0 × 10-18 m2/W for 3. Complex 1 shows self-defocusing property, while complex 3 exhibits self-focusing property. The thermogravimetric results show that the frame structure of compounds 1-3 begin to collapse at 400, 250 and 280 °C, respectively, which suggests that they elicit excellent thermal stability. This research aims to provide better understanding of these compounds, and offer preliminary explanations for the significant differences between compounds 1-3, in order to potentially help in the designing of future novel materials with NLO properties.

  17. Studies on third-order optical nonlinearity and power limiting of conducting polymers using the z-scan technique for nonlinear optical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pramodini, S; Poornesh, P; Sudhakar, Y N; SelvaKumar, M

    2014-01-01

    We present the synthesis and characterization of third-order optical nonlinearity and optical limiting of the conducting polymers poly (aniline-co-o-anisidine) and poly (aniline-co-pyrrole). Nonlinear optical studies were carried out by employing the z-scan technique using a He–Ne laser operating in continuous wave mode at 633 nm. The copolymers exhibited a reverse saturable absorption process and self-defocusing properties under the experimental conditions. The estimated values of β eff , n 2 and χ (3) were found to be of the order of 10 −2  cm W −1 , 10 -5  esu and 10 −7  esu respectively. Self-diffraction rings were observed due to refractive index change when exposed to the laser beam. The copolymers possess a lower limiting threshold and clamping level, which is essential to a great extent for power limiting devices. Therefore, copolymers of aniline emerge as a potential candidate for nonlinear optical device applications. (paper)

  18. 基于三次B样条函数的SEM图像处理%SEM Image Processing Based on Third- order B- spline Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张健

    2011-01-01

    SEM images, for its unique practical testing significance, need in denoising also highlight its edges and accurate edge extraction positioning, So this paper adopts a partial differential method which can maintain the edges of the denoising and a extensive application of multi - scale wavelet analysis to detect edges, all based on third - order B - spline function as the core operator, for line width test of SEM image processing, This algorithm obtained the better denoising effect and maintained edge features for SEM images.%SEM图像由于其独特的实际测试意义,需要在去噪的同时突出边缘和准确的边缘提取定位,所以提出采用能够保持边缘的偏微分方法去噪和广泛应用的多尺度小波提取边缘,基于三次B样条函数作为核心算子,对用于线宽测试的SEM图像进行处理,获得了较好的去噪并保持边缘的效果以及清晰的图像边缘检测效果.

  19. Nonlinear Optical Properties of XPh4 (X = B-, C, N+, P+): A New Class of Molecules with a Negative Third-Order Polarizability

    KAUST Repository

    Gieseking, Rebecca L.

    2015-06-22

    Organic π-conjugated materials have been widely used for a variety of nonlinear optical (NLO) applications. Molecules with negative real components Re(γ) of the third-order polarizability, which leads to nonlinear refraction in macroscopic systems, have important benefits for several NLO applications. However, few organic systems studied to date have negative Re(γ) in the long wavelength limit, and all inorganic materials show positive nonlinear refraction in this limit. Here, we introduce a new class of molecules of the form X(C6H5)4, where X = B-, C, N+, and P+, that have negative Re(γ). The molecular mechanism for the NLO properties in these systems is very different from those in typical linear conjugated systems: these systems have a band of excited states involving single-electron excitations within the π-system, several of which have significant coupling to the ground state. Thus, Re(γ) cannot be understood in terms of a simplified essential-state model and must be analyzed in the context of the full sum-over-states expression. Although Re(γ) is significantly smaller than that of other commonly-studied NLO chromophores, the introduction of a new molecular architecture offering the potential for a negative Re(γ) introduces new avenues of molecular design for NLO applications.

  20. Speeding up spin-component-scaled third-order pertubation theory with the chain of spheres approximation: the COSX-SCS-MP3 method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izsák, Róbert; Neese, Frank

    2013-07-01

    The 'chain of spheres' approximation, developed earlier for the efficient evaluation of the self-consistent field exchange term, is introduced here into the evaluation of the external exchange term of higher order correlation methods. Its performance is studied in the specific case of the spin-component-scaled third-order Møller--Plesset perturbation (SCS-MP3) theory. The results indicate that the approximation performs excellently in terms of both computer time and achievable accuracy. Significant speedups over a conventional method are obtained for larger systems and basis sets. Owing to this development, SCS-MP3 calculations on molecules of the size of penicillin (42 atoms) with a polarised triple-zeta basis set can be performed in ∼3 hours using 16 cores of an Intel Xeon E7-8837 processor with a 2.67 GHz clock speed, which represents a speedup by a factor of 8-9 compared to the previously most efficient algorithm. Thus, the increased accuracy offered by SCS-MP3 can now be explored for at least medium-sized molecules.

  1. A High-Resolution Demodulation Algorithm for FBG-FP Static-Strain Sensors Based on the Hilbert Transform and Cross Third-Order Cumulant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhu Huang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Static strain can be detected by measuring a cross-correlation of reflection spectra from two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs. However, the static-strain measurement resolution is limited by the dominant Gaussian noise source when using this traditional method. This paper presents a novel static-strain demodulation algorithm for FBG-based Fabry-Perot interferometers (FBG-FPs. The Hilbert transform is proposed for changing the Gaussian distribution of the two FBG-FPs’ reflection spectra, and a cross third-order cumulant is used to use the results of the Hilbert transform and get a group of noise-vanished signals which can be used to accurately calculate the wavelength difference of the two FBG-FPs. The benefit by these processes is that Gaussian noise in the spectra can be suppressed completely in theory and a higher resolution can be reached. In order to verify the precision and flexibility of this algorithm, a detailed theory model and a simulation analysis are given, and an experiment is implemented. As a result, a static-strain resolution of 0.9 nε under laboratory environment condition is achieved, showing a higher resolution than the traditional cross-correlation method.

  2. Tunability of Open-Shell Character, Charge Asymmetry, and Third-Order Nonlinear Optical Properties of Covalently Linked (Hetero)Phenalenyl Dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamida, Yuka; Kishi, Ryohei; Fukuda, Kotaro; Matsui, Hiroshi; Takamuku, Shota; Yamane, Masaki; Tonami, Takayoshi; Nakano, Masayoshi

    2018-02-06

    Tunability of the open-shell character, charge asymmetry, and third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of covalently linked (hetero)phenalenyl dimers are investigated by using the density functional theory method. By changing the molecular species X and substitution position (i, j) for the linker part, a variety of intermonomer distances R and relative alignments between the phenalenyl dimers can be realized from the geometry optimizations, resulting in a wide-range tuning of diradical character y and charge asymmetry. It is found that the static second hyperpolarizabilities along the stacking direction, γ yyyy , are one-order enhanced for phenalenyl dimer systems exhibiting intermediate y, a feature that is in good agreement with the "y-γ correlation". By replacing the central carbon atoms of the phenalenyl rings with a boron or a nitrogen, we have also designed covalently linked heterophenalenyl dimers. The introduction of such a charge asymmetry to the open-shell systems, which leads to closed-shell ionic ground states, is found to further enhance the γ yyyy values of the systems having longer intermonomer distance R with intermediate ionic character, that is, charge asymmetry. The present results demonstrate a promising potential of covalently linked NLO dimers with intermediate open-shell/ionic characters as a new building block of highly efficient NLO systems. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Velocity and thermal slip effects on MHD third order blood flow in an irregular channel though a porous medium with homogeneous/ heterogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnaneswara Reddy, M.

    2017-09-01

    This communication presents the transportation of third order hydromagnetic fluid with thermal radiation by peristalsis through an irregular channel configuration filled a porous medium under the low Reynolds number and large wavelength approximations. Joule heating, Hall current and homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions effects are considered in the energy and species equations. The Second-order velocity and energy slip restrictions are invoked. Final dimensionless governing transport equations along the boundary restrictions are resolved numerically with the help of NDsolve in Mathematica package. Impact of involved sundry parameters on the non-dimensional axial velocity, fluid temperature and concentration characteristics have been analyzed via plots and tables. It is manifest that an increasing porosity parameter leads to maximum velocity in the core part of the channel. Fluid velocity boosts near the walls of the channel where as the reverse effect in the central part of the channel for higher values of first order slip. Larger values of thermal radiation parameter R reduce the fluid temperature field. Also, an increase in heterogeneous reaction parameter Ks magnifies the concentration profile. The present study has the crucial application of thermal therapy in biomedical engineering.

  4. Nonlinear Optical Properties of XPh4 (X = B-, C, N+, P+): A New Class of Molecules with a Negative Third-Order Polarizability

    KAUST Repository

    Gieseking, Rebecca L.; Ensley, Trenton R.; Hu, Honghua; Hagan, David J.; Risko, Chad; Van Stryland, Eric W.; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Organic π-conjugated materials have been widely used for a variety of nonlinear optical (NLO) applications. Molecules with negative real components Re(γ) of the third-order polarizability, which leads to nonlinear refraction in macroscopic systems, have important benefits for several NLO applications. However, few organic systems studied to date have negative Re(γ) in the long wavelength limit, and all inorganic materials show positive nonlinear refraction in this limit. Here, we introduce a new class of molecules of the form X(C6H5)4, where X = B-, C, N+, and P+, that have negative Re(γ). The molecular mechanism for the NLO properties in these systems is very different from those in typical linear conjugated systems: these systems have a band of excited states involving single-electron excitations within the π-system, several of which have significant coupling to the ground state. Thus, Re(γ) cannot be understood in terms of a simplified essential-state model and must be analyzed in the context of the full sum-over-states expression. Although Re(γ) is significantly smaller than that of other commonly-studied NLO chromophores, the introduction of a new molecular architecture offering the potential for a negative Re(γ) introduces new avenues of molecular design for NLO applications.

  5. 4-N, N-bis(4-methoxylphenyl) aniline substituted anthraquinone: X-ray crystal structures, theoretical calculations and third-order nonlinear optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Zhang, Dingfeng; Zhou, Yecheng; Zheng, Yusen; Cao, Liu; Jiang, Xiao-Fang; Lu, Fushen

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, mono- and di-4-N,N-bis(4-methoxylphenyl)aniline-substituted anthraquinone have been designed and synthesized through Suzuki reaction. For mono-4-N,N-bis(4-methoxylphenyl)aniline-substituted anthraquinone, polymorphous crystal structures have been obtained in different crystallization conditions. Electrochemical characterization combined with theoretical calculation suggests that the addition of a second triphenylamine unit causes a larger band gap with higher lying LUMO (Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital) and HOMO (Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital). The linear optical property shows that the introduction of a second triphenylamine unit bring about a significant hyperchromic effect with the extinction coefficients increasing from 11199 M-1 cm-1 to 22136 M-1 cm-1. The third-order nonlinear optical properties indicate that the introduction of a second triphenylamine unit lead to a much larger nonlinear absorption coefficient and two-photon absorption cross section, with the relevant value increasing from 2.04 × 10-12 cm W-1 to 3.91 × 10-12 cm W-1, and from 148 GM to 286 GM, respectively.

  6. A sum-over-paths algorithm for third-order impulse-response moment extraction within RC IC-interconnect networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, E. A.; Ni, D.; Lam, T. M.; Le Coz, Y. L.

    2015-07-01

    We have created the first stochastic SoP (Sum-over-Paths) algorithm to extract third-order impulse-response (IR) moment within RC IC interconnects. It employs a newly discovered Feynman SoP Postulate. Importantly, our algorithm maintains computational efficiency and full parallelism. Our approach begins with generation of s-domain nodal-voltage equations. We then perform a Taylor-series expansion of the circuit transfer function. These expansions yield transition diagrams involving mathematical coupling constants, or weight factors, in integral powers of complex frequency s. Our SoP Postulate enables stochastic evaluation of path sums within the circuit transition diagram to order s3-corresponding to the order of IR moment (m3) we seek here. We furnish, for the first time, an informal algebraic proof independently validating our SoP Postulate and algorithm. We list, as well, detailed procedural steps, suitable for coding, that define an efficient stochastic algorithm for m3 IR extraction. Origins of the algorithm's statistical "capacitor-number cubed" correction and "double-counting" weight factors are explained, for completeness. Our algorithm was coded and successfully tested against exact analytical solutions for 3-, 5-, and 10-stage RC lines. We achieved better than 0.65% 1-σ error convergence, after only 10K statistical samples, in less than 1 s of 2-GHz Pentium® execution time. These results continue to suggest that stochastic SoP algorithms may find useful application in circuit analysis of massively coupled networks, such as those encountered in high-end digital IC-interconnect CAD.

  7. CFHTLenS: a Gaussian likelihood is a sufficient approximation for a cosmological analysis of third-order cosmic shear statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, P.; Semboloni, E.; van Waerbeke, L.; Hoekstra, H.; Erben, T.; Fu, L.; Harnois-Déraps, J.; Heymans, C.; Hildebrandt, H.; Kilbinger, M.; Kitching, T. D.; Miller, L.; Schrabback, T.

    2015-05-01

    We study the correlations of the shear signal between triplets of sources in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) to probe cosmological parameters via the matter bispectrum. In contrast to previous studies, we adopt a non-Gaussian model of the data likelihood which is supported by our simulations of the survey. We find that for state-of-the-art surveys, similar to CFHTLenS, a Gaussian likelihood analysis is a reasonable approximation, albeit small differences in the parameter constraints are already visible. For future surveys we expect that a Gaussian model becomes inaccurate. Our algorithm for a refined non-Gaussian analysis and data compression is then of great utility especially because it is not much more elaborate if simulated data are available. Applying this algorithm to the third-order correlations of shear alone in a blind analysis, we find a good agreement with the standard cosmological model: Σ _8=σ _8(Ω _m/0.27)^{0.64}=0.79^{+0.08}_{-0.11} for a flat Λ cold dark matter cosmology with h = 0.7 ± 0.04 (68 per cent credible interval). Nevertheless our models provide only moderately good fits as indicated by χ2/dof = 2.9, including a 20 per cent rms uncertainty in the predicted signal amplitude. The models cannot explain a signal drop on scales around 15 arcmin, which may be caused by systematics. It is unclear whether the discrepancy can be fully explained by residual point spread function systematics of which we find evidence at least on scales of a few arcmin. Therefore we need a better understanding of higher order correlations of cosmic shear and their systematics to confidently apply them as cosmological probes.

  8. High Turbulence

    CERN Multimedia

    EuHIT, Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    As a member of the EuHIT (European High-Performance Infrastructures in Turbulence - see here) consortium, CERN is participating in fundamental research on turbulence phenomena. To this end, the Laboratory provides European researchers with a cryogenic research infrastructure (see here), where the first tests have just been performed.

  9. Plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates

  10. Wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarenko, Sergey [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Mathematics Inst.

    2011-07-01

    Wave Turbulence refers to the statistical theory of weakly nonlinear dispersive waves. There is a wide and growing spectrum of physical applications, ranging from sea waves, to plasma waves, to superfluid turbulence, to nonlinear optics and Bose-Einstein condensates. Beyond the fundamentals the book thus also covers new developments such as the interaction of random waves with coherent structures (vortices, solitons, wave breaks), inverse cascades leading to condensation and the transitions between weak and strong turbulence, turbulence intermittency as well as finite system size effects, such as ''frozen'' turbulence, discrete wave resonances and avalanche-type energy cascades. This book is an outgrow of several lectures courses held by the author and, as a result, written and structured rather as a graduate text than a monograph, with many exercises and solutions offered along the way. The present compact description primarily addresses students and non-specialist researchers wishing to enter and work in this field. (orig.)

  11. Flow simulation in piping system dead legs using second moment, closure and k-epsilon model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, E.; Mechitoua, N.; Mattei, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with an industrial application of second moment closure turbulence model in in numerical simulation of 3D turbulent flows in piping system dead legs. Calculations performed with the 3D ESTET code are presented which contrast the performance of k-epsilon eddy viscosity model and second moment closure turbulence models. Coarse (100 000), medium (400 000) and fine (1 500 000) meshes were used. The second moment closure performs significantly better than eddy viscosity model and predicts with a good agreement the vortex penetration in dead legs provided to use sufficiently refined meshes. The results point out the necessity to be able to perform calculations using fine mesh before introducing refined physical models such as second moment closure turbulence model in a numerical code. This study illustrates the ability of second moment closure turbulence model to simulate 3D turbulent industrial flows. Reynolds stress model computation does not require special care, the calculation is carried on as simply as the k-ξ one. The CPU time needed is less that twice the CPU time needed using k-ξ model. (authors)

  12. Preparation and characterization of RF magnetron sputtered CuO/CaTi{sub 4}O{sub 9} thin films with enhanced third-order nonlinear optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Congfei; Liang, Xiaojuan, E-mail: lxj6126@126.com; Hu, Guangcai; Hu, Xie; Chen, Xipeng; Li, Pengzhi; Xiang, Weidong, E-mail: xiangweidong001@126.com

    2017-04-15

    The titanate, is a material of interest for various energy applications, including photovoltaics, catalysts, and high-rate energy storage devices. Herein, its related materials, CuO/CaTi{sub 4}O{sub 9} [CCTO] thin films, were successfully fabricated on SrTiO{sub 3} (100) substrates by RF magnetron sputtering assisted with subsequent oxygen annealing. This obtained CCTO thin films were then systemically studied by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scan electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). It was found that CuO and CaTi{sub 4}O{sub 9} (001) particles were closely accumulated together on the surface of the substrate in the annealing process after comparing with that of the as-prepared thin film, which was verified by SEM and AFM results. Furthermore, we investigated the third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of the as-prepared and annealed CCTO thin film by means of the Z-scan technique using 650 nm femtosecond laser pulse. Post-deposition oxygen annealing was found to modify the morphological characteristics of the films, resulting in enhancing their NLO properties. The observation of NLO performance of annealed CCTO thin film indicates that RF magnetron sputtering is a feasible method for the fabrication of optical thin films, which can be expanded to fabricate other NLO materials from the corresponding dispersions. Naturally, we concluded that the CCTO thin film occupy a better NLO property, and thus enlarge its application in nonlinear optics. - Highlights: • The CCTO thin film was prepared using the RF magnetron sputtering and oxygen annealing. • The film was prepared on the SrTiO{sub 3}(100) substrates with a Ca{sub 2}CuO{sub 3} target. • The oxygen annealing was found can effectively enhance the film quality and NLO property. • The film was characterized using XPS, SEM, AFM, TEM, XRD and Z-scan techniques.

  13. Tubular closure device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klahn, F.C.; Nolan, J.H.; Wills, C.

    1982-01-01

    This invention relates to a closure mechanism for closing openings such as the bore of a conduit and for releasably securing members within the bore. More particularly, this invention relates to a closure mechanism for tubular irradiation surveillance specimen assembly holders used in nuclear reactors

  14. Modeling of Turbulent Swirling Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Zhu, Jiang; Liou, William; Chen, Kuo-Huey; Liu, Nan-Suey; Lumley, John L.

    1997-01-01

    Aircraft engine combustors generally involve turbulent swirling flows in order to enhance fuel-air mixing and flame stabilization. It has long been recognized that eddy viscosity turbulence models are unable to appropriately model swirling flows. Therefore, it has been suggested that, for the modeling of these flows, a second order closure scheme should be considered because of its ability in the modeling of rotational and curvature effects. However, this scheme will require solution of many complicated second moment transport equations (six Reynolds stresses plus other scalar fluxes and variances), which is a difficult task for any CFD implementations. Also, this scheme will require a large amount of computer resources for a general combustor swirling flow. This report is devoted to the development of a cubic Reynolds stress-strain model for turbulent swirling flows, and was inspired by the work of Launder's group at UMIST. Using this type of model, one only needs to solve two turbulence equations, one for the turbulent kinetic energy k and the other for the dissipation rate epsilon. The cubic model developed in this report is based on a general Reynolds stress-strain relationship. Two flows have been chosen for model evaluation. One is a fully developed rotating pipe flow, and the other is a more complex flow with swirl and recirculation.

  15. Wall Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  16. Cryogenic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    2005-01-01

    Understanding turbulence is vital in astrophysics, geophysics and many engineering applications, with thermal convection playing a central role. I shall describe progress that has recently been made in understanding this ubiquitous phenomenon by making controlled experiments using low-temperature helium, and a brief account of the frontier topic of superfluid turbulence will also be given. CERN might be able to play a unique role in experiments to probe these two problems.

  17. A computer model for dispersed fluid-solid turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.H.; Tulig, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    A computer model is being developed to simulate two-phase turbulent flow phenomena in fluids containing finely dispersed solids. The model is based on a dual-continuum picture of the individual phases and an extension of a two-equation turbulence closure theory. The resulting set of nonlinear partial differential equations are solved using a finite difference procedure with special treatment to promote convergence. The model has been checked against a number of idealized flow problems with known solutions. The authors are currently comparing model predictions with measurements to determine a proper set of turbulence parameters needed for simulating two-phase turbulent flows

  18. Eyelid closure at death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A D Macleod

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To observe the incidence of full or partial eyelid closure at death. Materials and Methods: The presence of ptosis was recorded in 100 consecutive hospice patient deaths. Results: Majority (63% of the patients died with their eyes fully closed, however, 37% had bilateral ptosis at death, with incomplete eye closure. In this study, central nervous system tumor involvement and/or acute hepatic encephalopathy appeared to be pre-mortem risk factors of bilateral ptosis at death. Conclusion: Organicity and not psychogenicity is, therefore, the likely etiology of failure of full eyelid closure at death.

  19. Recent results on analytical plasma turbulence theory: Realizability, intermittency, submarginal turbulence, and self-organized criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krommes, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    Recent results and future challenges in the systematic analytical description of plasma turbulence are described. First, the importance of statistical realizability is stressed, and the development and successes of the Realizable Markovian Closure are briefly reviewed. Next, submarginal turbulence (linearly stable but nonlinearly self-sustained fluctuations) is considered and the relevance of nonlinear instability in neutral-fluid shear flows to submarginal turbulence in magnetized plasmas is discussed. For the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations, a self-consistency loop that leads to steady-state vortex regeneration in the presence of dissipation is demonstrated and a partial unification of recent work of Drake (for plasmas) and of Waleffe (for neutral fluids) is given. Brief remarks are made on the difficulties facing a quantitatively accurate statistical description of submarginal turbulence. Finally, possible connections between intermittency, submarginal turbulence, and self-organized criticality (SOC) are considered and outstanding questions are identified

  20. RCRA corrective action and closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    This information brief explains how RCRA corrective action and closure processes affect one another. It examines the similarities and differences between corrective action and closure, regulators' interests in RCRA facilities undergoing closure, and how the need to perform corrective action affects the closure of DOE's permitted facilities and interim status facilities

  1. Scope and closures

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    No matter how much experience you have with JavaScript, odds are you don’t fully understand the language. This concise yet in-depth guide takes you inside scope and closures, two core concepts you need to know to become a more efficient and effective JavaScript programmer. You’ll learn how and why they work, and how an understanding of closures can be a powerful part of your development skillset.

  2. Soliton turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical works in atmospheric turbulence have used the Navier-Stokes fluid equations exclusively for describing large-scale motions. Controversy over the existence of an average temperature gradient for the very large eddies in the atmosphere suggested that a new theoretical basis for describing large-scale turbulence was necessary. A new soliton formalism as a fluid analogue that generalizes the Schrodinger equation and the Zakharov equations has been developed. This formalism, processing all the nonlinearities including those from modulation provided by the density fluctuations and from convection due to the emission of finite sound waves by velocity fluctuations, treats large-scale turbulence as coalescing and colliding solitons. The new soliton system describes large-scale instabilities more explicitly than the Navier-Stokes system because it has a nonlinearity of the gradient type, while the Navier-Stokes has a nonlinearity of the non-gradient type. The forced Schrodinger equation for strong fluctuations describes the micro-hydrodynamical state of soliton turbulence and is valid for large-scale turbulence in fluids and plasmas where internal waves can interact with velocity fluctuations.

  3. Exploiting similarity in turbulent shear flows for turbulence modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David F.; Harris, Julius E.; Hassan, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that current k-epsilon models cannot predict the flow over a flat plate and its wake. In an effort to address this issue and other issues associated with turbulence closure, a new approach for turbulence modeling is proposed which exploits similarities in the flow field. Thus, if we consider the flow over a flat plate and its wake, then in addition to taking advantage of the log-law region, we can exploit the fact that the flow becomes self-similar in the far wake. This latter behavior makes it possible to cast the governing equations as a set of total differential equations. Solutions of this set and comparison with measured shear stress and velocity profiles yields the desired set of model constants. Such a set is, in general, different from other sets of model constants. The rational for such an approach is that if we can correctly model the flow over a flat plate and its far wake, then we can have a better chance of predicting the behavior in between. It is to be noted that the approach does not appeal, in any way, to the decay of homogeneous turbulence. This is because the asymptotic behavior of the flow under consideration is not representative of the decay of homogeneous turbulence.

  4. Exploiting similarity in turbulent shear flows for turbulence modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David F.; Harris, Julius E.; Hassan, H. A.

    1992-12-01

    It is well known that current k-epsilon models cannot predict the flow over a flat plate and its wake. In an effort to address this issue and other issues associated with turbulence closure, a new approach for turbulence modeling is proposed which exploits similarities in the flow field. Thus, if we consider the flow over a flat plate and its wake, then in addition to taking advantage of the log-law region, we can exploit the fact that the flow becomes self-similar in the far wake. This latter behavior makes it possible to cast the governing equations as a set of total differential equations. Solutions of this set and comparison with measured shear stress and velocity profiles yields the desired set of model constants. Such a set is, in general, different from other sets of model constants. The rational for such an approach is that if we can correctly model the flow over a flat plate and its far wake, then we can have a better chance of predicting the behavior in between. It is to be noted that the approach does not appeal, in any way, to the decay of homogeneous turbulence. This is because the asymptotic behavior of the flow under consideration is not representative of the decay of homogeneous turbulence.

  5. An Optimal Parametrization of Turbulent Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalabard, S.

    2015-12-01

    To numerically capture the large-scale dynamics of atmospheric flows, geophysicists need to rely on reasonable parametrizations of the energy transfers to and from the non-resolved small scale eddies, mediated through turbulence. The task is notoriously not trivial, and is typically solved by ingenious but ad-hoc elaborations on the concept of eddy viscosities. The difficulty is tied into the intrinsic Non-Gaussianity of turbulence, a feature that may explain why standard Quasi-Normal cumulant discard statistical closure strategies can fail dramatically, an example being the development of negative energy spectra in Millionshtchikov's 1941 Quasi-Normal (QN) theory. While Orszag's 1977 Eddy Damped Quasi Normal Markovian closure (EDQNM) provides an ingenious patch to the issue, the reason why the QN theory fails so badly is not so clear. Are closures necessarily either trivial or ad-hoc, when proxies for true ensemble averages are taken to be Gaussian ? The purpose of the talk is to answer negatively, using the lights of a new ``optimal closure framework'' recently exposed by [Turkington,2013]. For turbulence problems, the optimal closure allows a consistent use of a Gaussian Ansatz (and corresponding vanishing third cumulant) that also retains an intrinsic damping. The key to this apparent paradox lies in a clear distinction between the true ensemble averages and their proxies, most easily grasped provided one uses the Liouville equation as a starting point, rather than the cumulant hierarchy. Schematically said, closure is achieved by minimizing a lack-of-fit residual, which retains the intrinsic features of the true dynamics. The optimal closure is not restricted to the Gaussian modeling. Yet, for the sake of clarity, I will discuss the optimal closure on a problem where it can be entirely implemented, and compared to DNS : the relaxation of an arbitrarily far from equilibrium energy shell towards the Gibbs equilibrium for truncated Euler dynamics. Predictive

  6. Turbulent diffusion downstream of a linear heat source installed in a turbulent boundary layer; Diffusion turbulente en aval d`une source lineaire de chaleur placee dans une couche limite turbulente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Kabiri, M.; Paranthoen, P.; Rosset, L.; Lecordier, J.C. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France)

    1997-12-31

    An experimental study of heat transport downstream of a linear source installed in a turbulent boundary layer is performed. Second and third order momenta of velocity and temperature fields are presented and compared to gradient-type modeling. (J.S.) 7 refs.

  7. Cosmic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, L.O.; Stewart, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    A generalization of a transformation due to Kurskov and Ozernoi is used to rewrite the usual equations governing subsonic turbulence in Robertson-Walker cosmological models as Navier-Stokes equations with a time-dependent viscosity. This paper first rederives some well-known results in a very simple way by means of this transformation. The main result however is that the establishment of a Kolmogorov spectrum at recombination appears to be incompatible with subsonic turbulence. The conditions after recombination are also discussed briefly. (author)

  8. Turbulent viscosity optimized by data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Leredde

    Full Text Available As an alternative approach to classical turbulence modelling using a first or second order closure, the data assimilation method of optimal control is applied to estimate a time and space-dependent turbulent viscosity in a three-dimensional oceanic circulation model. The optimal control method, described for a 3-D primitive equation model, involves the minimization of a cost function that quantifies the discrepancies between the simulations and the observations. An iterative algorithm is obtained via the adjoint model resolution. In a first experiment, a k + L model is used to simulate the one-dimensional development of inertial oscillations resulting from a wind stress at the sea surface and with the presence of a halocline. These results are used as synthetic observations to be assimilated. The turbulent viscosity is then recovered without the k + L closure, even with sparse and noisy observations. The problems of controllability and of the dimensions of the control are then discussed. A second experiment consists of a two-dimensional schematic simulation. A 2-D turbulent viscosity field is estimated from data on the initial and final states of a coastal upwelling event.

    Key words. Oceanography: general (numerical modelling · Oceanography: physical (turbulence · diffusion · and mixing processes

  9. Wind effect in turbulence parametrization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombini, M.; Stocchino, A.

    2005-09-01

    The action of wind blowing over a closed basin ultimately results in a steady shear-induced circulation pattern and in a leeward rising of the free surface—and a corresponding windward lowering—known as wind set-up. If the horizontal dimensions of the basin are large with respect to the average flow depth, the occurrence of local quasi-equilibrium conditions can be expected, i.e. the flow can be assumed to be locally driven only by the wind stress and by the opposing free surface gradient due to set-up. This wind-induced flow configuration shows a strong similarity with turbulent Couette-Poiseuille flow, the one dimensional flow between parallel plates generated by the simultaneous action of a constant pressure gradient and of the shear induced by the relative motion of the plates. A two-equation turbulence closure is then employed to perform a numerical study of turbulent Couette-Poiseuille flows for different values of the ratio of the shear stresses at the two walls. The resulting eddy viscosity vertical distributions are analyzed in order to devise analytical profiles of eddy viscosity that account for the effect of wind. The results of this study, beside allowing for a physical insight on the turbulence process of this class of flows, will allow for a more accurate description of the wind effect to be included in the formulation of quasi-3D and 3D models of lagoon hydrodynamics.

  10. Mean-Lagrangian formalism and covariance of fluid turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariki, Taketo

    2017-05-01

    Mean-field-based Lagrangian framework is developed for the fluid turbulence theory, which enables physically objective discussions, especially, of the history effect. Mean flow serves as a purely geometrical object of Lie group theory, providing useful operations to measure the objective rate and history integration of the general tensor field. The proposed framework is applied, on the one hand, to one-point closure model, yielding an objective expression of the turbulence viscoelastic effect. Application to two-point closure, on the other hand, is also discussed, where natural extension of known Lagrangian correlation is discovered on the basis of an extended covariance group.

  11. Turbulence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Peter; Shui, Wan; Johansson, Jens

    2011-01-01

    term with stresses depending linearly on the strain rates. This term takes into account the transfer of linear momentum from one part of the fluid to another. Besides there is another term, which takes into account the transfer of angular momentum. Thus the model implies a new definition of turbulence...

  12. Advances in engineering turbulence modeling. [computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, T.-H.

    1992-01-01

    Some new developments in two equation models and second order closure models are presented. In this paper, modified two equation models are proposed to remove shortcomings such as computing flows over complex geometries and the ad hoc treatment near the separation and reattachment points. The calculations using various two equation models are compared with direct numerical solutions of channel flows and flat plate boundary layers. Development of second order closure models will also be discussed with emphasis on the modeling of pressure related correlation terms and dissipation rates in the second moment equations. All existing models poorly predict the normal stresses near the wall and fail to predict the three dimensional effect of mean flow on the turbulence. The newly developed second order near-wall turbulence model to be described in this paper is capable of capturing the near-wall behavior of turbulence as well as the effect of three dimension mean flow on the turbulence.

  13. Modeling of turbulent bubbly flows; Modelisation des ecoulements turbulents a bulles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellakhal, Ghazi

    2005-03-15

    The two-phase flows involve interfacial interactions which modify significantly the structure of the mean and fluctuating flow fields. The design of the two-fluid models adapted to industrial flows requires the taking into account of the effect of these interactions in the closure relations adopted. The work developed in this thesis concerns the development of first order two-fluid models deduced by reduction of second order closures. The adopted reasoning, based on the principle of decomposition of the Reynolds stress tensor into two statistically independent contributions turbulent and pseudo-turbulent parts, allows to preserve the physical contents of the second order relations closure. Analysis of the turbulence structure in two basic flows: homogeneous bubbly flows uniform and with a constant shear allows to deduce a formulation of the two-phase turbulent viscosity involving the characteristic scales of bubbly turbulence, as well as an analytical description of modification of the homogeneous turbulence structure induced by the bubbles presence. The Eulerian two-fluid model was then generalized with the case of the inhomogeneous flows with low void fractions. The numerical results obtained by the application of this model integrated in the computer code MELODIF in the case of free sheared turbulent bubbly flow of wake showed a satisfactory agreement with the experimental data and made it possible to analyze the modification of the characteristic scales of such flow by the interfacial interactions. The two-fluid first order model is generalized finally with the case of high void fractions bubbly flows where the hydrodynamic interactions between the bubbles are not negligible any more. (author)

  14. Large eddy simulations of compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grete, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Supersonic, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is thought to play an important role in many processes - especially in astrophysics, where detailed three-dimensional observations are scarce. Simulations can partially fill this gap and help to understand these processes. However, direct simulations with realistic parameters are often not feasible. Consequently, large eddy simulations (LES) have emerged as a viable alternative. In LES the overall complexity is reduced by simulating only large and intermediate scales directly. The smallest scales, usually referred to as subgrid-scales (SGS), are introduced to the simulation by means of an SGS model. Thus, the overall quality of an LES with respect to properly accounting for small-scale physics crucially depends on the quality of the SGS model. While there has been a lot of successful research on SGS models in the hydrodynamic regime for decades, SGS modeling in MHD is a rather recent topic, in particular, in the compressible regime. In this thesis, we derive and validate a new nonlinear MHD SGS model that explicitly takes compressibility effects into account. A filter is used to separate the large and intermediate scales, and it is thought to mimic finite resolution effects. In the derivation, we use a deconvolution approach on the filter kernel. With this approach, we are able to derive nonlinear closures for all SGS terms in MHD: the turbulent Reynolds and Maxwell stresses, and the turbulent electromotive force (EMF). We validate the new closures both a priori and a posteriori. In the a priori tests, we use high-resolution reference data of stationary, homogeneous, isotropic MHD turbulence to compare exact SGS quantities against predictions by the closures. The comparison includes, for example, correlations of turbulent fluxes, the average dissipative behavior, and alignment of SGS vectors such as the EMF. In order to quantify the performance of the new nonlinear closure, this comparison is conducted from the

  15. Large eddy simulations of compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grete, Philipp

    2017-02-01

    Supersonic, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is thought to play an important role in many processes - especially in astrophysics, where detailed three-dimensional observations are scarce. Simulations can partially fill this gap and help to understand these processes. However, direct simulations with realistic parameters are often not feasible. Consequently, large eddy simulations (LES) have emerged as a viable alternative. In LES the overall complexity is reduced by simulating only large and intermediate scales directly. The smallest scales, usually referred to as subgrid-scales (SGS), are introduced to the simulation by means of an SGS model. Thus, the overall quality of an LES with respect to properly accounting for small-scale physics crucially depends on the quality of the SGS model. While there has been a lot of successful research on SGS models in the hydrodynamic regime for decades, SGS modeling in MHD is a rather recent topic, in particular, in the compressible regime. In this thesis, we derive and validate a new nonlinear MHD SGS model that explicitly takes compressibility effects into account. A filter is used to separate the large and intermediate scales, and it is thought to mimic finite resolution effects. In the derivation, we use a deconvolution approach on the filter kernel. With this approach, we are able to derive nonlinear closures for all SGS terms in MHD: the turbulent Reynolds and Maxwell stresses, and the turbulent electromotive force (EMF). We validate the new closures both a priori and a posteriori. In the a priori tests, we use high-resolution reference data of stationary, homogeneous, isotropic MHD turbulence to compare exact SGS quantities against predictions by the closures. The comparison includes, for example, correlations of turbulent fluxes, the average dissipative behavior, and alignment of SGS vectors such as the EMF. In order to quantify the performance of the new nonlinear closure, this comparison is conducted from the

  16. Large eddy simulations of compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grete, Philipp

    2016-09-09

    Supersonic, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is thought to play an important role in many processes - especially in astrophysics, where detailed three-dimensional observations are scarce. Simulations can partially fill this gap and help to understand these processes. However, direct simulations with realistic parameters are often not feasible. Consequently, large eddy simulations (LES) have emerged as a viable alternative. In LES the overall complexity is reduced by simulating only large and intermediate scales directly. The smallest scales, usually referred to as subgrid-scales (SGS), are introduced to the simulation by means of an SGS model. Thus, the overall quality of an LES with respect to properly accounting for small-scale physics crucially depends on the quality of the SGS model. While there has been a lot of successful research on SGS models in the hydrodynamic regime for decades, SGS modeling in MHD is a rather recent topic, in particular, in the compressible regime. In this thesis, we derive and validate a new nonlinear MHD SGS model that explicitly takes compressibility effects into account. A filter is used to separate the large and intermediate scales, and it is thought to mimic finite resolution effects. In the derivation, we use a deconvolution approach on the filter kernel. With this approach, we are able to derive nonlinear closures for all SGS terms in MHD: the turbulent Reynolds and Maxwell stresses, and the turbulent electromotive force (EMF). We validate the new closures both a priori and a posteriori. In the a priori tests, we use high-resolution reference data of stationary, homogeneous, isotropic MHD turbulence to compare exact SGS quantities against predictions by the closures. The comparison includes, for example, correlations of turbulent fluxes, the average dissipative behavior, and alignment of SGS vectors such as the EMF. In order to quantify the performance of the new nonlinear closure, this comparison is conducted from the

  17. Tubular closure mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalen, D.D.; Mitchem, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    This invention relates to a closure mechanism for tubular irradiation surveillance specimen assembly holder used in nuclear reactors. The closure mechanism is composed of a latching member which includes a generally circular chamber with a plurality of elongated latches depending therefrom. The latching member circumscribes part of an actuator member which is disposed within the latching member so as to be axially movable. The axial movement of the actuator actuates positioning of the latches between positions in which the latches are locked and secured within the actuator member. Means, capable of being remotely manipulated, are provided to move the actuator in order to position the latches and load the articles within the tube

  18. Tank closure reducing grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, T.B.

    1997-01-01

    A reducing grout has been developed for closing high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The grout has a low redox potential, which minimizes the mobility of Sr 90 , the radionuclide with the highest dose potential after closure. The grout also has a high pH which reduces the solubility of the plutonium isotopes. The grout has a high compressive strength and low permeability, which enhances its ability to limit the migration of contaminants after closure. The grout was designed and tested by Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc. Placement methods were developed by the Savannah River Site personnel

  19. Correlation Scales of the Turbulent Cascade at 1 au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Coburn, Jesse T.; Forman, Miriam A.; Stawarz, Julia E.

    2018-05-01

    We examine correlation functions of the mixed, third-order expressions that, when ensemble-averaged, describe the cascade of energy in the inertial range of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. Unlike the correlation function of primitive variables such as the magnetic field, solar wind velocity, temperature, and density, the third-order expressions decorrelate at a scale that is approximately 20% of the lag. This suggests the nonlinear dynamics decorrelate in less than one wavelength. Therefore, each scale can behave differently from one wavelength to the next. In the same manner, different scales within the inertial range can behave independently at any given time or location. With such a cascade that can be strongly patchy and highly variable, it is often possible to obtain negative cascade rates for short periods of time, as reported earlier for individual samples of data.

  20. Spectra of turbulent static pressure fluctuations in jet mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. G.; Adrian, R. J.; Nithianandan, C. K.; Planchon, H. P., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Spectral similarity laws are derived for the power spectra of turbulent static pressure fluctuations by application of dimensional analysis in the limit of large turbulent Reynolds number. The theory predicts that pressure spectra are generated by three distinct types of interaction in the velocity fields: a fourth order interaction between fluctuating velocities, an interaction between the first order mean shear and the third order velocity fluctuations, and an interaction between the second order mean shear rate and the second order fluctuating velocity. Measurements of one-dimensional power spectra of the turbulent static pressure fluctuations in the driven mixing layer of a subsonic, circular jet are presented, and the spectra are examined for evidence of spectral similarity. Spectral similarity is found for the low wavenumber range when the large scale flow on the centerline of the mixing layer is self-preserving. The data are also consistent with the existence of universal inertial subranges for the spectra of each interaction mode.

  1. Evaluation of Two Energy Balance Closure Parametrizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Fabian; De Roo, Frederik; Kohnert, Katrin; Desjardins, Raymond L.; Schmid, Hans Peter; Mauder, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    A general lack of energy balance closure indicates that tower-based eddy-covariance (EC) measurements underestimate turbulent heat fluxes, which calls for robust correction schemes. Two parametrization approaches that can be found in the literature were tested using data from the Canadian Twin Otter research aircraft and from tower-based measurements of the German Terrestrial Environmental Observatories (TERENO) programme. Our analysis shows that the approach of Huang et al. (Boundary-Layer Meteorol 127:273-292, 2008), based on large-eddy simulation, is not applicable to typical near-surface flux measurements because it was developed for heights above the surface layer and over homogeneous terrain. The biggest shortcoming of this parametrization is that the grid resolution of the model was too coarse so that the surface layer, where EC measurements are usually made, is not properly resolved. The empirical approach of Panin and Bernhofer (Izvestiya Atmos Oceanic Phys 44:701-716, 2008) considers landscape-level roughness heterogeneities that induce secondary circulations and at least gives a qualitative estimate of the energy balance closure. However, it does not consider any feature of landscape-scale heterogeneity other than surface roughness, such as surface temperature, surface moisture or topography. The failures of both approaches might indicate that the influence of mesoscale structures is not a sufficient explanation for the energy balance closure problem. However, our analysis of different wind-direction sectors shows that the upwind landscape-scale heterogeneity indeed influences the energy balance closure determined from tower flux data. We also analyzed the aircraft measurements with respect to the partitioning of the "missing energy" between sensible and latent heat fluxes and we could confirm the assumption of scalar similarity only for Bowen ratios 1.

  2. Large eddy simulation of bundle turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Y.A.; Barsamian, H.R.

    1995-01-01

    Large eddy simulation may be defined as simulation of a turbulent flow in which the large scale motions are explicitly resolved while the small scale motions are modeled. This results into a system of equations that require closure models. The closure models relate the effects of the small scale motions onto the large scale motions. There have been several models developed, the most popular is the Smagorinsky eddy viscosity model. A new model has recently been introduced by Lee that modified the Smagorinsky model. Using both of the above mentioned closure models, two different geometric arrangements were used in the simulation of turbulent cross flow within rigid tube bundles. An inlined array simulations was performed for a deep bundle (10,816 nodes) as well as an inlet/outlet simulation (57,600 nodes). Comparisons were made to available experimental data. Flow visualization enabled the distinction of different characteristics within the flow such as jet switching effects in the wake of the bundle flow for the inlet/outlet simulation case, as well as within tube bundles. The results indicate that the large eddy simulation technique is capable of turbulence prediction and may be used as a viable engineering tool with the careful consideration of the subgrid scale model. (author)

  3. Professional Closure Beyond State Authorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitte Sommer Harrits

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available For decades, the Weberian approach to the study of professions has been strong, emphasizing state authorization and market monopolies as constituting what is considered a profession. Originally, however, the Weberian conception of closure, or the ways in which a profession is constituted and made separate, was broader. This article suggests a revision of the closure concept, integrating insights from Pierre Bourdieu, and conceptualizing professional closure as the intersection of social, symbolic and legal closure. Based on this revision, this article demonstrates how to apply such a concept in empirical studies. This is done by exploring social, symbolic and legal closure across sixteen professional degree programs. The analyses show a tendency for some overlap between different forms of closure, with a somewhat divergent pattern for legal closure. Results support the argument that we need to study these processes as an intersection of different sources of closure, including capital, lifestyles and discourse

  4. MNC Subsidiary Closures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sofka, Wolfgang; Torres Preto, Miguel; de Faria, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the consequences of MNC subsidiary closures for employees who lose their jobs. In particular, we examine the extent to which the human capital that these employees acquired while employed by the MNC influences the wages they receive in their new jobs. We propose an employee...

  5. Friction or Closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundahl, Mikela

    2014-01-01

    Heritage is a discourse that aims at closure. It fixates the narrative of the past through the celebration of specific material (or sometimes immaterial non-) ob-jects. It organizes temporality and construct events and freezes time. How does this unfold in the case of the UNESCO World Heritage si...

  6. Mail Office annual closure

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    On the occasion of the annual closure of CERN, there will be no mail distributed on Friday 20 December 2013 but mail will be collected in the morning. Nevertheless, you will still be able to bring your outgoing mail to Building 555-R-002 until 12 noon.  

  7. Ring closure in actin polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Supurna, E-mail: supurna@rri.res.in [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore 560080 (India); Chattopadhyay, Sebanti [Doon University, Dehradun 248001 (India)

    2017-03-18

    We present an analysis for the ring closure probability of semiflexible polymers within the pure bend Worm Like Chain (WLC) model. The ring closure probability predicted from our analysis can be tested against fluorescent actin cyclization experiments. We also discuss the effect of ring closure on bend angle fluctuations in actin polymers. - Highlights: • Ring closure of biopolymers. • Worm like chain model. • Predictions for experiments.

  8. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reekers, Jim A.; Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zeleňák, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2011-01-01

    Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. The CIRSE registry of closure devices

  9. Crack closure, a literature study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, M.

    1993-08-01

    In this report crack closure is treated. The state of the art is reviewed. Different empirical formulas for determining the crack closure are compared with each other, and their benefits are discussed. Experimental techniques for determining the crack closure stress are discussed, and some results from fatigue tests are also reported. Experimental data from the literature are reported.

  10. Scale-similar clustering of heavy particles in the inertial range of turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariki, Taketo; Yoshida, Kyo; Matsuda, Keigo; Yoshimatsu, Katsunori

    2018-03-01

    Heavy particle clustering in turbulence is discussed from both phenomenological and analytical points of view, where the -4 /3 power law of the pair-correlation function is obtained in the inertial range. A closure theory explains the power law in terms of the balance between turbulence mixing and preferential-concentration mechanism. The obtained -4 /3 power law is supported by a direct numerical simulation of particle-laden turbulence.

  11. Comparison of turbulent particle dispersion models in turbulent shear flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Laín

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This work compares the performance of two Lagrangian turbulent particle dispersion models: the standard model (e.g., that presented in Sommerfeld et al. (1993, in which the fluctuating fluid velocity experienced by the particle is composed of two components, one correlated with the previous time step and a second one randomly sampled from a Wiener process, and the model proposed by Minier and Peirano (2001, which is based on the PDF approach and performs closure at the level of acceleration of the fluid experienced by the particle. Formulation of a Langevin equation model for the increments of fluid velocity seen by the particle allows capturing some underlying physics of particle dispersion in general turbulent flows while keeping the mathematical manipulation of the stochastic model simple, thereby avoiding some pitfalls and simplifying the derivation of macroscopic relations. The performance of both dispersion models is tested in the configurations of grid-generated turbulence (Wells and Stock (1983 experiments, simple shear flow (Hyland et al., 1999 and confined axisymmetric jet flow laden with solids (Hishida and Maeda (1987 experiments.

  12. Models for turbulent flows with variable density and combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, W.P.

    1980-01-01

    Models for transport processes and combustion in turbulent flows are outlined with emphasis on the situation where the fuel and air are injected separately. Attention is restricted to relatively simple flames. The flows investigated are high Reynolds number, single-phase, turbulent high-temperature flames in which radiative heat transfer can be considered negligible. Attention is given to the lower order closure models, algebraic stress and flux models, the k-epsilon turbulence model, the diffusion flame approximation, and finite rate reaction mechanisms

  13. Large Eddy Simulation of Spatially Developing Turbulent Reacting Shear Layers with the One-Dimensional Turbulence Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffie, Andreas Frank

    Large eddy simulation (LES) combined with the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model is used to simulate spatially developing turbulent reacting shear layers with high heat release and high Reynolds numbers. The LES-ODT results are compared to results from direct numerical simulations (DNS), for model development and validation purposes. The LES-ODT approach is based on LES solutions for momentum and pressure on a coarse grid and solutions for momentum and reactive scalars on a fine, one-dimensional, but three-dimensionally coupled ODT subgrid, which is embedded into the LES computational domain. Although one-dimensional, all three velocity components are transported along the ODT domain. The low-dimensional spatial and temporal resolution of the subgrid scales describe a new modeling paradigm, referred to as autonomous microstructure evolution (AME) models, which resolve the multiscale nature of turbulence down to the Kolmogorv scales. While this new concept aims to mimic the turbulent cascade and to reduce the number of input parameters, AME enables also regime-independent combustion modeling, capable to simulate multiphysics problems simultaneously. The LES as well as the one-dimensional transport equations are solved using an incompressible, low Mach number approximation, however the effects of heat release are accounted for through variable density computed by the ideal gas equation of state, based on temperature variations. The computations are carried out on a three-dimensional structured mesh, which is stretched in the transverse direction. While the LES momentum equation is integrated with a third-order Runge-Kutta time-integration, the time integration at the ODT level is accomplished with an explicit Forward-Euler method. Spatial finite-difference schemes of third (LES) and first (ODT) order are utilized and a fully consistent fractional-step method at the LES level is used. Turbulence closure at the LES level is achieved by utilizing the Smagorinsky

  14. Graphic Turbulence Guidance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Forecast turbulence hazards identified by the Graphical Turbulence Guidance algorithm. The Graphical Turbulence Guidance product depicts mid-level and upper-level...

  15. Graphical Turbulence Guidance - Composite

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Forecast turbulence hazards identified by the Graphical Turbulence Guidance algorithm. The Graphical Turbulence Guidance product depicts mid-level and upper-level...

  16. Spectrum evolution of primordial cosmic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futamase, T.; Matsuda, T.

    1980-01-01

    The evolution of primordial cosmic turbulence prior to the epoch of plasma recombination is investigated numerically using the Wiener-Hermite expansion technique which gives reasonable results for laboratory turbulence. It is found that the Kolmogorov spectrum is established only within a narrow range of wavenumber space for reasonable parameter sets, because the expansion of the Universe has a tendency to suppress an energy cascade from larger eddies to smaller ones. The present result does not agree with that obtained by Kurskov and Ozernoi, who computed the decay of turbulence in a fictitious non-expanding frame using the Heisenberg closure hypothesis, while it was done in a physical frame in the present work. (author)

  17. Functional calculus in strong plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadi, G.; Hirose, A.

    1980-01-01

    The theory of electrostatic plasma turbulence is considered. The basic equations for the dynamics of the hierarchy of the moment equations are derived and the difficulty of the closure problem for strong plasma turbulence is discussed. The characteristic functional in phase space is introduced and its relations to the correlation functions are described. The Hopf functional equation for dynamics of the characteristic functional is derived, and its equivalence to the hierarchy of the moment equations is established. Similar formulations were carried out in velocity-wave vector space. The cross-spectral moments and the characteristic functional are considered and their relationships are studied. An approximate solution for Hopf's equation for the nearly normal turbulence is obtained which is shown to predict diffusion of the mean distribution function in velocity space. (author)

  18. Kinetic features of interchange turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarazin, Y; Grandgirard, V; Fleurence, E; Garbet, X; Ghendrih, Ph; Bertrand, P; Depret, G

    2005-01-01

    Non-linear gyrokinetic simulations of the interchange instability are discussed. The semi-Lagrangian numerical scheme allows one to address two critical points achieved with simulations lasting several confinement times: an accurate statistical analysis of the fluctuations and the back reaction of the turbulence on equilibrium profiles. Zonal flows are found to quench a 2D + 1D interchange turbulence when one of the species has a vanishing response to zonal modes. Conversely, when streamers dominate, the equilibrium profiles are found to be stiff. In the non-linear regime and steady-state turbulence, the distribution function exhibits a significant departure from a Maxwellian distribution. This property is characterized by an expansion on generalized Laguerre functions with a slow decay of the series of moments. This justifies the use of gyrokinetic simulations since a standard fluid approach, based on a limited number of moments, would certainly require a complex closure so as to take into account the impact of these non-vanishing high order moments

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence theory is modeled on neutral fluid (Navier-Stokes) turbulence theory, but with some important differences. There have been essentially no repeatable laboratory MHD experiments wherein the boundary conditions could be controlled or varied and a full set of diagnostics implemented. The equations of MHD are convincingly derivable only in the limit of small ratio of collision mean-free-paths to macroscopic length scales, an inequality that often goes the other way for magnetofluids of interest. Finally, accurate information on the MHD transport coefficients-and thus, the Reynolds-like numbers that order magnetofluid behavior-is largely lacking; indeed, the algebraic expressions used for such ingredients as the viscous stress tensor are often little more than wishful borrowing from fluid mechanics. The one accurate thing that has been done extensively and well is to solve the (strongly nonlinear) MHD equations numerically, usually in the presence of rectangular periodic boundary conditions, and then hope for the best when drawing inferences from the computations for those astrophysical and geophysical MHD systems for which some indisputably turbulent detailed data are available, such as the solar wind or solar prominences. This has led to what is perhaps the first field of physics for which computer simulations are regarded as more central to validating conclusions than is any kind of measurement. Things have evolved in this way due to a mixture of the inevitable and the bureaucratic, but that is the way it is, and those of us who want to work on the subject have to live with it. It is the only game in town, and theories that have promised more-often on the basis of some alleged ``instability''-have turned out to be illusory.

  20. THOR: A New Higher-Order Closure Assumed PDF Subgrid-Scale Parameterization; Evaluation and Application to Low Cloud Feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firl, G. J.; Randall, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    The so-called "assumed probability density function (PDF)" approach to subgrid-scale (SGS) parameterization has shown to be a promising method for more accurately representing boundary layer cloudiness under a wide range of conditions. A new parameterization has been developed, named the Two-and-a-Half ORder closure (THOR), that combines this approach with a higher-order turbulence closure. THOR predicts the time evolution of the turbulence kinetic energy components, the variance of ice-liquid water potential temperature (θil) and total non-precipitating water mixing ratio (qt) and the covariance between the two, and the vertical fluxes of horizontal momentum, θil, and qt. Ten corresponding third-order moments in addition to the skewnesses of θil and qt are calculated using diagnostic functions assuming negligible time tendencies. The statistical moments are used to define a trivariate double Gaussian PDF among vertical velocity, θil, and qt. The first three statistical moments of each variable are used to estimate the two Gaussian plume means, variances, and weights. Unlike previous similar models, plume variances are not assumed to be equal or zero. Instead, they are parameterized using the idea that the less dominant Gaussian plume (typically representing the updraft-containing portion of a grid cell) has greater variance than the dominant plume (typically representing the "environmental" or slowly subsiding portion of a grid cell). Correlations among the three variables are calculated using the appropriate covariance moments, and both plume correlations are assumed to be equal. The diagnosed PDF in each grid cell is used to calculate SGS condensation, SGS fluxes of cloud water species, SGS buoyancy terms, and to inform other physical parameterizations about SGS variability. SGS condensation is extended from previous similar models to include condensation over both liquid and ice substrates, dependent on the grid cell temperature. Implementations have been

  1. Statistical theory of resistive drift-wave turbulence and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, G.; Krommes, J.A.; Bowman, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Resistive drift-wave turbulence in a slab geometry is studied by statistical closure methods and direct numerical simulations. The two-field Hasegawa endash Wakatani (HW) fluid model, which evolves the electrostatic potential and plasma density self-consistently, is a paradigm for understanding the generic nonlinear behavior of multiple-field plasma turbulence. A gyrokinetic derivation of the HW model is sketched. The recently developed Realizable Markovian Closure (RMC) is applied to the HW model; spectral properties, nonlinear energy transfers, and turbulent transport calculations are discussed. The closure results are also compared to direct numerical simulation results; excellent agreement is found. The transport scaling with the adiabaticity parameter, which measures the strength of the parallel electron resistivity, is analytically derived and understood through weak- and strong-turbulence analyses. No evidence is found to support previous suggestions that coherent structures cause a large depression of saturated transport from its quasilinear value in the hydrodynamic regime of the HW model. Instead, the depression of transport is well explained by the spectral balance equation of the (second-order) statistical closure when account is taken of incoherent noise. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  2. Boundary-layer turbulence as a kangaroo process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, H.; Leeuw, G. de; Maassen van den Brink, A.

    1995-01-01

    A nonlocal mixing-length theory of turbulence transport by finite size eddies is developed by means of a novel evaluation of the Reynolds stress. The analysis involves the contruct of a sample path space and a stochastic closure hypothesis. The simplifying property of exhange (strong eddies) is

  3. Statistical Mechanics of Turbulent Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambon, C

    2004-01-01

    This is a handbook for a computational approach to reacting flows, including background material on statistical mechanics. In this sense, the title is somewhat misleading with respect to other books dedicated to the statistical theory of turbulence (e.g. Monin and Yaglom). In the present book, emphasis is placed on modelling (engineering closures) for computational fluid dynamics. The probabilistic (pdf) approach is applied to the local scalar field, motivated first by the nonlinearity of chemical source terms which appear in the transport equations of reacting species. The probabilistic and stochastic approaches are also used for the velocity field and particle position; nevertheless they are essentially limited to Lagrangian models for a local vector, with only single-point statistics, as for the scalar. Accordingly, conventional techniques, such as single-point closures for RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes) and subgrid-scale models for LES (large-eddy simulations), are described and in some cases reformulated using underlying Langevin models and filtered pdfs. Even if the theoretical approach to turbulence is not discussed in general, the essentials of probabilistic and stochastic-processes methods are described, with a useful reminder concerning statistics at the molecular level. The book comprises 7 chapters. Chapter 1 briefly states the goals and contents, with a very clear synoptic scheme on page 2. Chapter 2 presents definitions and examples of pdfs and related statistical moments. Chapter 3 deals with stochastic processes, pdf transport equations, from Kramer-Moyal to Fokker-Planck (for Markov processes), and moments equations. Stochastic differential equations are introduced and their relationship to pdfs described. This chapter ends with a discussion of stochastic modelling. The equations of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics are addressed in chapter 4. Classical conservation equations (mass, velocity, internal energy) are derived from their

  4. Synthesis, growth, structure and characterization of 1-Ethyl-2-(2-p-tolyl-vinyl)-pyridinium iodide (TASI) – An efficient material for third-order nonlinear optical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nivetha, K. [Centre for Crystal Growth, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore 632 014 (India); Kalainathan, S., E-mail: kalainathan@yahoo.com [Centre for Crystal Growth, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore 632 014 (India); Yamada, M. [Research Center for Engineering Science, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Akita University, 1-1 Tegatagakuen-machi, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Kondo, Y. [Department of Life Science, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Akita University, 1-1 Tegatagakuen-machi, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Hamada, F. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Akita University, 1-1 Tegatagakuen-machi, Akita 010-8502 (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    A new organic stilbazolium derivative, 1-Ethyl-2-(2-p-tolyl-vinyl)-pyridinium iodide (TASI), was grown from methanol:acetonitrile (1:3) mixed solvent by slow evaporation technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that TASI crystallizes in triclinic system with a centrosymmetric space group P-1. The molecular structure and the presence of expected functional groups of TASI were confirmed by {sup 1}H NMR and FT-IR spectroscopic studies. The HOMO and LUMO energies influence the charge transfer takes place within the molecule. The grown crystal was thermally stable up to 210 °C as determined by TG/DTA analysis. UV-Vis-NIR spectral study showed that the grown crystal was transparent in the wavelength range of 438–1100 nm. Mechanical behaviour and surface laser damage threshold were studied to find the suitability of the grown crystal for device fabrication. Studies of its third-order nonlinear optical properties using a Z-scan technique demonstrates that TASI crystal is capable of exhibiting reverse saturable absorption and self-focusing performance with the second-order molecular hyperpolarizability (γ) 4.983 × 10{sup −34} esu. The third-order nonlinear susceptibility of TASI was found to be 8.931 × 10{sup −6} esu, which is higher than a few other stilbazolium derivative crystals. - Highlights: • TASI is a new organic stilbazolium derivative and was grown by slow evaporation technique. • HOMO-LUMO analysis helps to explain charge transfer interaction within the molecule. • The grown crystal has 80% transmittance in the visible and near-IR spectral range. • Thermally, electrically and mechanically efficient for NLO applications. • Z-scan measurements reveal the aptness of the grown crystal for third order NLO applications.

  5. Summer season | Cafeteria closures

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Please note the following cafeteria closures over the summer season: Bldg. 54 closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 13: closed from 13/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Restaurant No. 2, table service (brasserie and restaurant): closed from 01/08/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 864: closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 865: closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013.

  6. RELAP-7 Closure Correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Ling [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Berry, R. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Martineau, R. C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Andrs, D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hansel, J. E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sharpe, J. P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Johns, Russell C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL’s modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5’s and TRACE’s capabilities and extends their analysis capabilities for all reactor system simulation scenarios. The RELAP-7 code utilizes the well-posed 7-equation two-phase flow model for compressible two-phase flow. Closure models used in the TRACE code has been reviewed and selected to reflect the progress made during the past decades and provide a basis for the colure correlations implemented in the RELAP-7 code. This document provides a summary on the closure correlations that are currently implemented in the RELAP-7 code. The closure correlations include sub-grid models that describe interactions between the fluids and the flow channel, and interactions between the two phases.

  7. Urethrovaginal fistula closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Marisa M; Goldman, Howard B

    2017-01-01

    In the developed world, urethrovaginal fistulas are most the likely the result of iatrogenic injury. These fistulas are quite rare. Proper surgical repair requires careful dissection and tension-free closure. The objective of this video is to demonstrate the identification and surgical correction of an urethrovaginal fistula. The case presented is of a 59-year-old woman with a history of pelvic organ prolapse and symptomatic stress urinary incontinence who underwent vaginal hysterectomy, anterior colporrhaphy, posterior colporrhaphy, and synthetic sling placement. Postoperatively, she developed a mesh extrusion and underwent sling excision. After removal of her synthetic sling, she began to experience continuous urinary incontinence. Physical examination and cystourethroscopy demonstrated an urethrovaginal fistula at the midurethra. Options were discussed and the patient wished to undergo transvaginal fistula repair. The urethrovaginal fistula was intubated with a Foley catheter. The fistula tract was isolated and removed. The urethra was then closed with multiple tension-free layers. This video demonstrates several techniques for identifying and subsequently repairing an urethrovaginal fistula. Additionally, it demonstrates the importance of tension-free closure. Urethrovaginal fistulas are rare. They should be repaired with careful dissection and tension-free closure.

  8. Modeling variable density turbulence in the wake of an air-entraining transom stern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Kelli; Yue, Dick

    2015-11-01

    This work presents a priori testing of closure models for the incompressible highly-variable density turbulent (IHVDT) flows in the near wake region of a transom stern. This three-dimensional flow is comprised of convergent corner waves that originate from the body and collide on the ship center plane forming the ``rooster tail'' that then widens to form the divergent wave train. These violent free-surface flows and breaking waves are characterized by significant turbulent mass flux (TMF) at Atwood number At = (ρ2 -ρ1) / (ρ2 +ρ1) ~ 1 for which there is little guidance in turbulence closure modeling for the momentum and scalar transport along the wake. To whit, this work utilizes high-resolution simulations of the near wake of a canonical three-dimensional transom stern using conservative Volume-of-Fluid (cVOF), implicit Large Eddy Simulation (iLES), and Boundary Data Immersion Method (BDIM) to capture the turbulence and large scale air entrainment. Analysis of the simulation results across and along the wake for the TMF budget and turbulent anisotropy provide the physical basis of the development of multiphase turbulence closure models. Performance of isotropic and anisotropic turbulent mass flux closure models will be presented. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research.

  9. Modelling of structural effects on chemical reactions in turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammelsaeter, H.R.

    1997-12-31

    Turbulence-chemistry interactions are analysed using algebraic moment closure for the chemical reaction term. The coupling between turbulence and chemical length and time scales generate a complex interaction process. This interaction process is called structural effects in this work. The structural effects are shown to take place on all scales between the largest scale of turbulence and the scales of the molecular motions. The set of equations describing turbulent correlations involved in turbulent reacting flows are derived. Interactions are shown schematically using interaction charts. Algebraic equations for the turbulent correlations in the reaction rate are given using the interaction charts to include the most significant couplings. In the frame of fundamental combustion physics, the structural effects appearing on the small scales of turbulence are proposed modelled using a discrete spectrum of turbulent scales. The well-known problem of averaging the Arrhenius law, the specific reaction rate, is proposed solved using a presumed single variable probability density function and a sub scale model for the reaction volume. Although some uncertainties are expected, the principles are addressed. Fast chemistry modelling is shown to be consistent in the frame of algebraic moment closure when the turbulence-chemistry interaction is accounted for in the turbulent diffusion. The modelling proposed in this thesis is compared with experimental data for an laboratory methane flame and advanced probability density function modelling. The results show promising features. Finally it is shown a comparison with full scale measurements for an industrial burner. All features of the burner are captured with the model. 41 refs., 33 figs.

  10. Third Order Susceptibility of Platinum Sulfide Sol

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LaiHing, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    .... Experimentally this is determined using degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM). Pure sulfur sol was prepared by dissolving the solid sulfur in hydrazine, followed by addition of distilled water with vigorous stirring...

  11. PROTRUSION OF THE DEVICE - A COMPLICATION OF CATHETER CLOSURE OF PATENT DUCTUS-ARTERIOSUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OTTENKAMP, J; HESS, J; TALSMA, MD; BUISLIEM, TN

    Objective-To assess the medium term results of percutaneous transvenous closure of patent ductus arteriosus, in particular with regard to protrusion of the device with or without turbulence of the bloodflow. Design-Clinical examination and echocardiographic study (cross sectional Doppler, and colour

  12. Nevada Test Site closure program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenk, D.P.

    1994-08-01

    This report is a summary of the history, design and development, procurement, fabrication, installation and operation of the closures used as containment devices on underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. It also addresses the closure program mothball and start-up procedures. The Closure Program Document Index and equipment inventories, included as appendices, serve as location directories for future document reference and equipment use

  13. MNC Subsidiary Closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Faria, Pedro; Sofka, Wolfgang; Torres Preto, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the consequences of MNC subsidiary closures for employees who lose their jobs. We ask to what degree the foreign knowledge that they were exposed to is valued in their new job. We argue theoretically that this foreign knowledge is both valuable and not readily available in the host...... country but is also distant and therefore difficult to absorb. We predict an inverse u-shaped relationship between the exposure to foreign knowledge and the salary in the new job. We empirically support our predictions for a sample of almost 140,000 affected employees in Portugal from 2002 to 2009....

  14. Chernobyl: closure by 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Discussions on the future of the Chernobyl nuclear plant between the Ukrainian government, the Group of Seven Industrial nations (GT) and the European Union (EU) are summarized. At the G7 meeting, a timetable for the closure of the entire station by 2000 was presented by Ukrainian officials. The timetable depends on financial commitments from Western governments. Without these, the project would take 10 to 15 years. Following this meeting, which took place on 16-17th May 1995. EU finance ministers authorized release of a ECU 85 million loan. On 23 May, the European Parliament's Committee on Research, Technology and Energy held a public hearing on the Chernobyl station. The primary topic was a feasibility study on the clean-up of Chernobyl 4 and plans for the sarcophagus. Other matters discussed included the effect of the delays and indecision in settling the plants's future. Safety improvements being made to other RBMKs were not being carried out at Chernobyl because of the expected closure. The replacement of the power now supplied to the Ukraine by the Chernobyl reactors is also an issue. The solution favoured by the Ukraine is to being on-line three VVER-1000s that are currently close to completion. Western governments find this solution difficult to accept, however. (UK)

  15. Flame Speed and Self-Similar Propagation of Expanding Turbulent Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Wu, Fujia; Zhu, Delin; Law, Chung K.

    2012-01-01

    In this Letter we present turbulent flame speeds and their scaling from experimental measurements on constant-pressure, unity Lewis number expanding turbulent flames, propagating in nearly homogeneous isotropic turbulence in a dual-chamber, fan-stirred vessel. It is found that the normalized turbulent flame speed as a function of the average radius scales as a turbulent Reynolds number to the one-half power, where the average radius is the length scale and the thermal diffusivity is the transport property, thus showing self-similar propagation. Utilizing this dependence it is found that the turbulent flame speeds from the present expanding flames and those from the Bunsen geometry in the literature can be unified by a turbulent Reynolds number based on flame length scales using recent theoretical results obtained by spectral closure of the transformed G equation.

  16. Tight closure and vanishing theorems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.E.

    2001-01-01

    Tight closure has become a thriving branch of commutative algebra since it was first introduced by Mel Hochster and Craig Huneke in 1986. Over the past few years, it has become increasingly clear that tight closure has deep connections with complex algebraic geometry as well, especially with those areas of algebraic geometry where vanishing theorems play a starring role. The purpose of these lectures is to introduce tight closure and to explain some of these connections with algebraic geometry. Tight closure is basically a technique for harnessing the power of the Frobenius map. The use of the Frobenius map to prove theorems about complex algebraic varieties is a familiar technique in algebraic geometry, so it should perhaps come as no surprise that tight closure is applicable to algebraic geometry. On the other hand, it seems that so far we are only seeing the tip of a large and very beautiful iceberg in terms of tight closure's interpretation and applications to algebraic geometry. Interestingly, although tight closure is a 'characteristic p' tool, many of the problems where tight closure has proved useful have also yielded to analytic (L2) techniques. Despite some striking parallels, there had been no specific result directly linking tight closure and L∼ techniques. Recently, however, the equivalence of an ideal central to the theory of tight closure was shown to be equivalent to a certain 'multiplier ideal' first defined using L2 methods. Presumably, deeper connections will continue to emerge. There are two main types of problems for which tight closure has been helpful: in identifying nice structure and in establishing uniform behavior. The original algebraic applications of tight closure include, for example, a quick proof of the Hochster-Roberts theorem on the Cohen-Macaulayness of rings of invariants, and also a refined version of the Brianqon-Skoda theorem on the uniform behaviour of integral closures of powers of ideals. More recent, geometric

  17. Philosophies and fallacies in turbulence modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalart, Philippe R.

    2015-04-01

    We present a set of positions, likely to be controversial, on turbulence modeling for the Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) equations. The paper has three themes. First is what we call the "fundamental paradox" of turbulence modeling, between the local character of the Partial Differential Equations strongly favored by CFD methods and the nonlocal physical nature of turbulence. Second, we oppose two philosophies. The "Systematic" philosophy attempts to model the exact transport equations for the Reynolds stresses or possibly higher moments term by term, gradually relegating the Closure Problem to higher moments and invoking the "Principle of Receding Influence" (although rarely formulating it). In contrast, the "Openly Empirical" philosophy produces models which satisfy strict constraints such as Galilean invariance, but lack an explicit connection with terms in the exact turbulence equations. The prime example is the eddy-viscosity assumption. Third, we explain a series of what we perceive as fallacies, many of them widely held and by senior observers, in turbulence knowledge, leading to turbulence models. We divide them into "hard" fallacies for which a short mathematical argument demonstrates that a particular statement is wrong or meaningless, and "soft" fallacies for which approximate physical arguments can be opposed, but we contend that a clear debate is overdue and wishful thinking has been involved. Some fallacies appear to be "intermediate." An example in the hard class is the supposed isotropy of the diagonal Reynolds stresses. Examples in the soft class are the need to match the decay rate of isotropic turbulence, and the value of realizability in a model. Our hope is to help the direct effort in this field away from simplistic and hopeless lines of work, and to foster debates.

  18. Special course on modern theoretical and experimental approaches to turbulent flow structure and its modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-08-01

    The large eddy concept in turbulent modeling and techniques for direct simulation are discussed. A review of turbulence modeling is presented along with physical and numerical aspects and applications. A closure model for turbulent flows is presented and routes to chaos by quasi-periodicity are discussed. Theoretical aspects of transition to turbulence by space/time intermittency are covered. The application to interpretation of experimental results of fractal dimensions and connection of spatial temporal chaos are reviewed. Simulation of hydrodynamic flow by using cellular automata is discussed.

  19. Radial distribution of power starting from the reactivity using nodal schemes of second and third order; Distribucion radial de potencia a partir de la reactividad usando esquemas nodales de segundo y tercer orden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delfin L, A.; Alonso V, G. [ININ, Km. 36.5 Carretera Mexico-Toluca, 52045 Ocoyocac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Valle G, E. del [IPN-ESFM, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: adl@nuclear.inin.mx

    2003-07-01

    In this work two nodal schemes of finite element are presented, one of second and the other of third order of accurate that allow to determine the radial distribution of power starting from the corresponding reactivities.The schemes here developed were obtained taking as starting point the equation developed by Driscoll et al, the one which is based on the diffusion approach of 1-1/2 energy groups. This equation relates the power fraction of an assemble with their reactivity and with the power fractions and reactivities of the assemblies that its surround it. Driscoll and collaborators they solve in form approximate such equation supposing that the reactivity of each assemble it is but a lineal function of the burnt one of the fuel. The spatial approach carries out it with the classic technique of finite differences centered in mesh. Nevertheless that the algebraic system to which its arrive it can be solved without more considerations introduce some additional suppositions and adjustment parameters that it allows them to predict results comparable to those contributed by three dimensions analysis and this way to reduce the one obtained error when its compare their results with those of a production code like CASMO. Also in the two schemes that here are presented the same approaches of Driscoll were used being obtained errors of the one 10% and of 5% for the second schemes and third order respectively for a test case that it was built starting from data of the Cycle 1 of the Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric plant. These errors its were obtained when comparing with a computer program based on the matrix response method. It is sought to have this way a quick and efficient tool for the multicycle analysis in the fuel management. However, this model presents problems in the appropriate prediction of the average burnt of the nucleus and of the burnt one by lot. (Author)

  20. Análise da transição entre dias secos e chuvosos por meio da cadeia de Markov de terceira ordem Analysis of the transition between dry and wet days through third-order Markov chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thadeu Keller Filho

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar se as ocorrências de dias secos e chuvosos são condicionalmente dependentes da seqüência dos três dias secos e chuvosos anteriores, numa zona pluviometricamente homogênea, por meio da cadeia não-homogênea de Markov de terceira ordem. Os resultados mostraram que as probabilidades diárias de transição podem ser adequadamente estimadas, com base em dados agregados bimestralmente, seguidas de interpolação por meio de funções sinusoidais. Além disso, evidenciou-se que, naquela zona, as ocorrências diárias de chuva são condicionalmente dependentes da seqüência de dias secos e chuvosos nos três dias anteriores. A cadeia não-homogênea de Markov de terceira ordem é um importante instrumento para a análise da dependência entre as seqüências de dias secos e chuvosos em determinadas regiões.The aim of this work was to verify if the occurrence of dry and wet days are conditionally dependent on the sequences of the dry and wet three preceding days, in a rainfall homogeneous area, using the nonhomogeneous third-order Markov chains. The results showed that daily transition probabilities can be properly estimated from two-month aggregate data, and then adjusted by means of sinusoidal functions. Besides, it was evidenced that everyday rain events in that area are conditionally dependent on the sequences of the dry and wet three days previous to occurrences. The third-order nonhomogeneous Markov chains are an important instrument for the analysis of the dependence between sequences of dry and wet days in certain areas.

  1. Development and application of a third order scheme of finite differences centered in mesh; Desarrollo y aplicacion de un esquema de tercer orden de diferencias finitas centradas en malla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delfin L, A.; Alonso V, G. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Valle G, E. del [IPN-ESFM, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: adl@nuclear.inin.mx

    2003-07-01

    In this work the development of a third order scheme of finite differences centered in mesh is presented and it is applied in the numerical solution of those diffusion equations in multi groups in stationary state and X Y geometry. Originally this scheme was developed by Hennart and del Valle for the monoenergetic diffusion equation with a well-known source and they show that the one scheme is of third order when comparing the numerical solution with the analytical solution of a model problem using several mesh refinements and boundary conditions. The scheme by them developed it also introduces the application of numeric quadratures to evaluate the rigidity matrices and of mass that its appear when making use of the finite elements method of Galerkin. One of the used quadratures is the open quadrature of 4 points, no-standard, of Newton-Cotes to evaluate in approximate form the elements of the rigidity matrices. The other quadrature is that of 3 points of Radau that it is used to evaluate the elements of all the mass matrices. One of the objectives of these quadratures are to eliminate the couplings among the Legendre moments 0 and 1 associated to the left and right faces as those associated to the inferior and superior faces of each cell of the discretization. The other objective is to satisfy the particles balance in weighed form in each cell. In this work it expands such development to multiplicative means considering several energy groups. There are described diverse details inherent to the technique, particularly those that refer to the simplification of the algebraic systems that appear due to the space discretization. Numerical results for several test problems are presented and are compared with those obtained with other nodal techniques. (Author)

  2. Turbulence modeling of natural convection in enclosures: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seok Ki; Kim, Seong O

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a review of recent developments of turbulence models for natural convection in enclosures is presented. The emphasis is placed on the effect of the treatments of Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux on the stability and accuracy of the solution for natural convection in enclosures. The turbulence models considered in the preset study are the two-layer k -ε model, the shear stress transport (SST) model, the elliptic-relaxation (V2-f) model and the elliptic-blending second-moment closure (EBM). Three different treatments of the turbulent heat flux are the generalized gradient diffusion hypothesis (GGDH), the algebraic flux model (AFM) and the differential flux model (DFM). The mathematical formulation of the above turbulence models and their solution method are presented. Evaluation of turbulence models are performed for turbulent natural convection in a 1:5 rectangular cavity ( Ra = 4.3x10 10 ) and in a square cavity with conducting top and bottom walls ( Ra =1.58x10 9 ) and the Rayleigh-Benard convection ( Ra = 2x10 6 ∼ Ra =10 9 ). The relative performances of turbulence models are examined and their successes and shortcomings are addressed

  3. Tubular closure mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalen, D.D.; Mitchem, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for closing the bore of a tube and releasably securing articles within the tube under longitudinal load. A latching member has a cylindrical section and several circumferentially-spaced elongated latches hanging down from one end of the cylinder. An elongated actuator has integral cam and spline and is partly located within the latch with the cam radially contacting the latches and the spline projecting into the circumferential spaces between the latches. The actuator is axially movable between a position in which the latches are locked to the tube walls and a position in which the latches are secured from contact with the tube walls. Means are provided for axially moving the actuator such that the cam positions the latches; and means are also provided for engaging the articles within the tube. The closure is particularly applicable to tubular irradiation surveillance specimen assembly holders used in reactors

  4. Airport Movement Area Closure Planner, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR research develops an automation tool improving temporary and permanent runway closure management. The Movement Area Closure Planner (MACP) provides airport...

  5. Flapping model of scalar mixing in turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerstein, A.R.

    1991-01-01

    Motivated by the fluctuating plume model of turbulent mixing downstream of a point source, a flapping model is formulated for application to other configurations. For the scalar mixing layer, simple expressions for single-point scalar fluctuation statistics are obtained that agree with measurements. For a spatially homogeneous scalar mixing field, the family of probability density functions previously derived using mapping closure is reproduced. It is inferred that single-point scalar statistics may depend primarily on large-scale flapping motions in many cases of interest, and thus that multipoint statistics may be the principal indicators of finer-scale mixing effects

  6. High Reynolds Number Turbulence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smits, Alexander J

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of the grant were to provide a systematic study to fill the gap between existing research on low Reynolds number turbulent flows to the kinds of turbulent flows encountered on full-scale vehicles...

  7. Turbulence and wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Arno J.; Peinke, Joachim; Mann, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The nature of turbulent flow towards, near and behind a wind turbine, the effect of turbulence on the electricity production and the mechanical loading of individual and clustered wind turbines, and some future issues are discussed.......The nature of turbulent flow towards, near and behind a wind turbine, the effect of turbulence on the electricity production and the mechanical loading of individual and clustered wind turbines, and some future issues are discussed....

  8. Closure report for N Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report has been prepared to satisfy Section 3156(b) of Public Law 101-189 (Reports in Connection with Permanent Closures of Department of Energy Defense Nuclear Facilities), which requires submittal of a Closure Report to Congress by the Secretary of Energy upon the permanent cessation of production operations at a US Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facility (Watkins 1991). This closure report provides: (1) A complete survey of the environmental problems at the facility; (2) Budget quality data indicating the cost of environmental restoration and other remediation and cleanup efforts at the facility; (3) A proposed cleanup schedule

  9. Closure report for N Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    This report has been prepared to satisfy Section 3156(b) of Public Law 101-189 (Reports in Connection with Permanent Closures of Department of Energy Defense Nuclear Facilities), which requires submittal of a Closure Report to Congress by the Secretary of Energy upon the permanent cessation of production operations at a US Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facility (Watkins 1991). This closure report provides: (1) A complete survey of the environmental problems at the facility; (2) Budget quality data indicating the cost of environmental restoration and other remediation and cleanup efforts at the facility; (3) A proposed cleanup schedule.

  10. Group-kinetic theory of turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    The two phases are governed by two coupled systems of Navier-Stokes equations. The couplings are nonlinear. These equations describe the microdynamical state of turbulence, and are transformed into a master equation. By scaling, a kinetic hierarchy is generated in the form of groups, representing the spectral evolution, the diffusivity and the relaxation. The loss of memory in formulating the relaxation yields the closure. The network of sub-distributions that participates in the relaxation is simulated by a self-consistent porous medium, so that the average effect on the diffusivity is to make it approach equilibrium. The kinetic equation of turbulence is derived. The method of moments reverts it to the continuum. The equation of spectral evolution is obtained and the transport properties are calculated. In inertia turbulence, the Kolmogoroff law for weak coupling and the spectrum for the strong coupling are found. As the fluid analog, the nonlinear Schrodinger equation has a driving force in the form of emission of solitons by velocity fluctuations, and is used to describe the microdynamical state of turbulence. In order for the emission together with the modulation to participate in the transport processes, the non-homogeneous Schrodinger equation is transformed into a homogeneous master equation. By group-scaling, the master equation is decomposed into a system of transport equations, replacing the Bogoliubov system of equations of many-particle distributions. It is in the relaxation that the memory is lost when the ensemble of higher-order distributions is simulated by an effective porous medium. The closure is thus found. The kinetic equation is derived and transformed into the equation of spectral flow.

  11. Strong Langmuir turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, M.V.

    1984-01-01

    After a brief discussion of beam-excited Langmuir turbulence in the solar wind, we explain the criteria for wave-particle, three-wave and strong turbulence interactions. We then present the results of a numerical integration of the Zakharov equations, which describe the strong turbulence saturation of a weak (low-density) high energy, bump-on-tail beam instability. (author)

  12. Symposium on Turbulent Shear Flows, 7th, Stanford University, CA, Aug. 21-23, 1989, Proceedings. Volumes 1 ampersand 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Papers on turbulent shear flows are presented, covering topics such as the structure of pressure fluctuations, fossil two-dimensional turbulence in the ocean, turbulence production and eddy structure in wall turbulence, bypass transition in a heated boundary layer, a turbulent spot in plane Poiseuille flow, the evolution of an axisymmetric jet, plane mixing layer development, vortex models of a pseudoturbulent shear flow, numerical techniques for turbulence studies, Reynolds stress in the wall region of turbulent pipe flow, the turbulent structure of a momentumless wake, the near field of the transverse jet. Additional topics include a turbulent boundary layer disturbed by a cylinder, evolving mixing layers, flow analysis in a vortex flowmeter, ejections and bursts in pulsatile turbulent wall flow measurements, a flat plate oscillating in pitch, turbulent buoyant flows, isothermal lobed mixer flows, flow distortion on a turbulent scalar field, two phase flows. In addition, papers on the applications of turbulent shear flow studies are given, including air pollutant deposition, closures, oceanography, instrumentation, heat transfer, rotating flows, combustion, coherent structures, turbulence control, and scalar transport modeling

  13. Statistical theory of turbulent incompressible multimaterial flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwa, B.

    1987-10-01

    Interpenetrating motion of incompressible materials is considered. ''Turbulence'' is defined as any deviation from the mean motion. Accordingly a nominally stationary fluid will exhibit turbulent fluctuations due to a single, slowly moving sphere. Mean conservation equations for interpenetrating materials in arbitrary proportions are derived using an ensemble averaging procedure, beginning with the exact equations of motion. The result is a set of conservation equations for the mean mass, momentum and fluctuational kinetic energy of each material. The equation system is at first unclosed due to integral terms involving unknown one-point and two-point probability distribution functions. In the mean momentum equation, the unclosed terms are clearly identified as representing two physical processes. One is transport of momentum by multimaterial Reynolds stresses, and the other is momentum exchange due to pressure fluctuations and viscous stress at material interfaces. Closure is approached by combining careful examination of multipoint statistical correlations with the traditional physical technique of κ-ε modeling for single-material turbulence. This involves representing the multimaterial Reynolds stress for each material as a turbulent viscosity times the rate of strain based on the mean velocity of that material. The multimaterial turbulent viscosity is related to the fluctuational kinetic energy κ, and the rate of fluctuational energy dissipation ε, for each material. Hence a set of κ and ε equations must be solved, together with mean mass and momentum conservation equations, for each material. Both κ and the turbulent viscosities enter into the momentum exchange force. The theory is applied to (a) calculation of the drag force on a sphere fixed in a uniform flow, (b) calculation of the settling rate in a suspension and (c) calculation of velocity profiles in the pneumatic transport of solid particles in a pipe

  14. Interferometric Imaging Directly with Closure Phases and Closure Amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chael, Andrew A.; Johnson, Michael D.; Bouman, Katherine L.; Blackburn, Lindy L.; Akiyama, Kazunori; Narayan, Ramesh

    2018-04-01

    Interferometric imaging now achieves angular resolutions as fine as ∼10 μas, probing scales that are inaccessible to single telescopes. Traditional synthesis imaging methods require calibrated visibilities; however, interferometric calibration is challenging, especially at high frequencies. Nevertheless, most studies present only a single image of their data after a process of “self-calibration,” an iterative procedure where the initial image and calibration assumptions can significantly influence the final image. We present a method for efficient interferometric imaging directly using only closure amplitudes and closure phases, which are immune to station-based calibration errors. Closure-only imaging provides results that are as noncommittal as possible and allows for reconstructing an image independently from separate amplitude and phase self-calibration. While closure-only imaging eliminates some image information (e.g., the total image flux density and the image centroid), this information can be recovered through a small number of additional constraints. We demonstrate that closure-only imaging can produce high-fidelity results, even for sparse arrays such as the Event Horizon Telescope, and that the resulting images are independent of the level of systematic amplitude error. We apply closure imaging to VLBA and ALMA data and show that it is capable of matching or exceeding the performance of traditional self-calibration and CLEAN for these data sets.

  15. Comparison of simulations and theory of low-frequency plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LoDestro, L L; Cohen, B I; Cohen, R H; Dimits, A M; Matsuda, Y; Nevins, W M; Newcomb, W A; Williams, T J; Koniges, A E; Dannevik, W P; Crotinger, J A; Amala, P A.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA); Sydora, R D; Dawson, J M; Ma, S; Decyk, V K [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA). Dept. of Physics; Lee, W W; Hahm, T S [Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.; Naitou, H

    1990-08-15

    We use a combination of computational and analytic methods to study low-frequency turbulence and turbulent transport in a strongly magnetized plasma. We describe two major computational efforts, one based on gyrokinetic-particle simulation and the second on numerical solution of closure approximations to fluid equations. These codes are used to study instabilities on the drift timescale, and to assess the validity of qualitative predictions of energy-transport scalings based on dimensional analysis and on analytic versions of closure approximations. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Finite-Reynolds-number effects in turbulence using logarithmic expansions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenivasan, K.R.; Bershadskii, A.

    2006-12-01

    Experimental or numerical data in turbulence are invariably obtained at finite Reynolds numbers whereas theories of turbulence correspond to infinitely large Reynolds numbers. A proper merger of the two approaches is possible only if corrections for finite Reynolds numbers can be quantified. This paper heuristically considers examples in two classes of finite-Reynolds-number effects. Expansions in terms of logarithms of appropriate variables are shown to yield results in agreement with experimental and numerical data in the following instances: the third-order structure function in isotropic turbulence, the mixed-order structure function for the passive scalar and the Reynolds shear stress around its maximum point. Results suggestive of expansions in terms of the inverse logarithm of the Reynolds number, also motivated by experimental data, concern the tendency for turbulent structures to cluster along a line of observation and (more speculatively) for the longitudinal velocity derivative to become singular at some finite Reynolds number. We suggest an elementary hydrodynamical process that may provide a physical basis for the expansions considered here, but note that the formal justification remains tantalizingly unclear. (author)

  17. Exact result in strong wave turbulence of thin elastic plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düring, Gustavo; Krstulovic, Giorgio

    2018-02-01

    An exact result concerning the energy transfers between nonlinear waves of a thin elastic plate is derived. Following Kolmogorov's original ideas in hydrodynamical turbulence, but applied to the Föppl-von Kármán equation for thin plates, the corresponding Kármán-Howarth-Monin relation and an equivalent of the 4/5 -Kolmogorov's law is derived. A third-order structure function involving increments of the amplitude, velocity, and the Airy stress function of a plate, is proven to be equal to -ɛ ℓ , where ℓ is a length scale in the inertial range at which the increments are evaluated and ɛ the energy dissipation rate. Numerical data confirm this law. In addition, a useful definition of the energy fluxes in Fourier space is introduced and proven numerically to be flat in the inertial range. The exact results derived in this Rapid Communication are valid for both weak and strong wave turbulence. They could be used as a theoretical benchmark of new wave-turbulence theories and to develop further analogies with hydrodynamical turbulence.

  18. Borehole closure in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuenkajorn, K.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1988-12-01

    Constitutive law parameters are determined from salt behavior characterization experiments. The results are applied to predict creep (time-dependent) closure of boreholes in salt specimens subjected to various loading configurations. Rheological models (linear and nonlinear viscoelastic and viscoplastic models), empirical models, and physical theory models have been formulated from the results of uniaxial creep tests, strain and stress rate controlled uniaxial tests, constant strain rate triaxial tests, cyclic loading tests, and seismic velocity measurements. Analytical solutions for a thick-walled cylinder subjected to internal and external pressures and for a circular hole in an infinite plate subjected to a biaxial or uniaxial stressfield have been derived from each of the linear viscoelastic models and from one of the empirical laws. The experimental results indicate that the salt samples behave as an elastic-viscoplastic material. The elastic behavior tends to be linear and time-independent. The plastic deformation is time-dependent. The stress increment to strain rate increment ratio gradually decreases as the stress level increases. The transient potential creep law seems to give the simplest satisfactory governing equation describing the viscoplastic behavior of salt during the transient phase. 204 refs., 27 figs., 29 tabs

  19. Closure and Sealing Design Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. Lahnalampi; J. Case

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the ''Closure and Sealing Design Calculation'' is to illustrate closure and sealing methods for sealing shafts, ramps, and identify boreholes that require sealing in order to limit the potential of water infiltration. In addition, this calculation will provide a description of the magma that can reduce the consequences of an igneous event intersecting the repository. This calculation will also include a listing of the project requirements related to closure and sealing. The scope of this calculation is to: summarize applicable project requirements and codes relating to backfilling nonemplacement openings, removal of uncommitted materials from the subsurface, installation of drip shields, and erecting monuments; compile an inventory of boreholes that are found in the area of the subsurface repository; describe the magma bulkhead feature and location; and include figures for the proposed shaft and ramp seals. The objective of this calculation is to: categorize the boreholes for sealing by depth and proximity to the subsurface repository; develop drawing figures which show the location and geometry for the magma bulkhead; include the shaft seal figures and a proposed construction sequence; and include the ramp seal figure and a proposed construction sequence. The intent of this closure and sealing calculation is to support the License Application by providing a description of the closure and sealing methods for the Safety Analysis Report. The closure and sealing calculation will also provide input for Post Closure Activities by describing the location of the magma bulkhead. This calculation is limited to describing the final configuration of the sealing and backfill systems for the underground area. The methods and procedures used to place the backfill and remove uncommitted materials (such as concrete) from the repository and detailed design of the magma bulkhead will be the subject of separate analyses or calculations. Post-closure monitoring will not

  20. Turbulence Statistics in a Two-Dimensional Vortex Condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frishman, Anna; Herbert, Corentin

    2018-05-01

    Disentangling the evolution of a coherent mean-flow and turbulent fluctuations, interacting through the nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations, is a central issue in fluid mechanics. It affects a wide range of flows, such as planetary atmospheres, plasmas, or wall-bounded flows, and hampers turbulence models. We consider the special case of a two-dimensional flow in a periodic box, for which the mean flow, a pair of box-size vortices called "condensate," emerges from turbulence. As was recently shown, a perturbative closure describes correctly the condensate when turbulence is excited at small scales. In this context, we obtain explicit results for the statistics of turbulence, encoded in the Reynolds stress tensor. We demonstrate that the two components of the Reynolds stress, the momentum flux and the turbulent energy, are determined by different mechanisms. It was suggested previously that the momentum flux is fixed by a balance between forcing and mean-flow advection: using unprecedently long numerical simulations, we provide the first direct evidence supporting this prediction. By contrast, combining analytical computations with numerical simulations, we show that the turbulent energy is determined only by mean-flow advection and obtain for the first time a formula describing its profile in the vortex.

  1. Extension of the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding method: third-order expansion of the density functional theory total energy and introduction of a modified effective coulomb interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Yu, Haibo; York, Darrin; Cui, Qiang; Elstner, Marcus

    2007-10-25

    The standard self-consistent-charge density-functional-tight-binding (SCC-DFTB) method (Phys. Rev. B 1998, 58, 7260) is derived by a second-order expansion of the density functional theory total energy expression, followed by an approximation of the charge density fluctuations by charge monopoles and an effective damped Coulomb interaction between the atomic net charges. The central assumptions behind this effective charge-charge interaction are the inverse relation of atomic size and chemical hardness and the use of a fixed chemical hardness parameter independent of the atomic charge state. While these approximations seem to be unproblematic for many covalently bound systems, they are quantitatively insufficient for hydrogen-bonding interactions and (anionic) molecules with localized net charges. Here, we present an extension of the SCC-DFTB method to incorporate third-order terms in the charge density fluctuations, leading to chemical hardness parameters that are dependent on the atomic charge state and a modification of the Coulomb scaling to improve the electrostatic treatment within the second-order terms. These modifications lead to a significant improvement in the description of hydrogen-bonding interactions and proton affinities of biologically relevant molecules.

  2. Homogeneous turbulence dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sagaut, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    This book provides state-of-the-art results and theories in homogeneous turbulence, including anisotropy and compressibility effects with extension to quantum turbulence, magneto-hydodynamic turbulence  and turbulence in non-newtonian fluids. Each chapter is devoted to a given type of interaction (strain, rotation, shear, etc.), and presents and compares experimental data, numerical results, analysis of the Reynolds stress budget equations and advanced multipoint spectral theories. The role of both linear and non-linear mechanisms is emphasized. The link between the statistical properties and the dynamics of coherent structures is also addressed. Despite its restriction to homogeneous turbulence, the book is of interest to all people working in turbulence, since the basic physical mechanisms which are present in all turbulent flows are explained. The reader will find a unified presentation of the results and a clear presentation of existing controversies. Special attention is given to bridge the results obta...

  3. Airfoils in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse

    of resolved inflow turbulence on airfoil simulations in CFD. The detached-eddy simulation technique is used because it can resolve the inflow turbulence without becoming too computationally expensive due to its limited requirements for mesh resolution in the boundary layer. It cannot resolve the turbulence......Wind turbines operate in inflow turbulence whether it originates from the shear in the atmospheric boundary layer or from the wake of other wind turbines. Consequently, the airfoils of the wings experience turbulence in the inflow. The main topic of this thesis is to investigate the effect...... that is formed in attached boundary layers, but the freestream turbulence can penetrate the boundary layer. The idea is that the resolved turbulence from the freestream should mix high momentum flow into the boundary layer and thereby increase the resistance against separation and increase the maximum lift...

  4. Direct numerical simulation of free convection in a vertical channel: a tool for second moment closure modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maupu, V.; Laurence, D.; Boudjemadi, R.; Le Quere, P.

    1996-03-01

    Natural turbulent convection in a differentially heated infinite vertical slot is computed with a mixed finite differences/Fourier code. At a Rayleigh number of 10 5 , periodic perturbations from the laminar solution develop and transition to a fully turbulent flow occurs. From then on, a database of high order correlations is constituted and used for testing a second moment closure based on the LRR model and elliptic relaxation near wall effects. Counter gradient turbulent transport, found in the central part of the channel, requires an algebraic model for the triple correlations instead of the standard DH or HL, gradient diffusion models. (authors). 18 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  5. Fundamental Statistical Descriptions of Plasma Turbulence in Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krommes, John A.

    2001-01-01

    A pedagogical review of the historical development and current status (as of early 2000) of systematic statistical theories of plasma turbulence is undertaken. Emphasis is on conceptual foundations and methodology, not practical applications. Particular attention is paid to equations and formalism appropriate to strongly magnetized, fully ionized plasmas. Extensive reference to the literature on neutral-fluid turbulence is made, but the unique properties and problems of plasmas are emphasized throughout. Discussions are given of quasilinear theory, weak-turbulence theory, resonance-broadening theory, and the clump algorithm. Those are developed independently, then shown to be special cases of the direct-interaction approximation (DIA), which provides a central focus for the article. Various methods of renormalized perturbation theory are described, then unified with the aid of the generating-functional formalism of Martin, Siggia, and Rose. A general expression for the renormalized dielectric function is deduced and discussed in detail. Modern approaches such as decimation and PDF methods are described. Derivations of DIA-based Markovian closures are discussed. The eddy-damped quasinormal Markovian closure is shown to be nonrealizable in the presence of waves, and a new realizable Markovian closure is presented. The test-field model and a realizable modification thereof are also summarized. Numerical solutions of various closures for some plasma-physics paradigms are reviewed. The variational approach to bounds on transport is developed. Miscellaneous topics include Onsager symmetries for turbulence, the interpretation of entropy balances for both kinetic and fluid descriptions, self-organized criticality, statistical interactions between disparate scales, and the roles of both mean and random shear. Appendices are provided on Fourier transform conventions, dimensional and scaling analysis, the derivations of nonlinear gyrokinetic and gyrofluid equations

  6. Fundamental Statistical Descriptions of Plasma Turbulence in Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John A. Krommes

    2001-02-16

    A pedagogical review of the historical development and current status (as of early 2000) of systematic statistical theories of plasma turbulence is undertaken. Emphasis is on conceptual foundations and methodology, not practical applications. Particular attention is paid to equations and formalism appropriate to strongly magnetized, fully ionized plasmas. Extensive reference to the literature on neutral-fluid turbulence is made, but the unique properties and problems of plasmas are emphasized throughout. Discussions are given of quasilinear theory, weak-turbulence theory, resonance-broadening theory, and the clump algorithm. Those are developed independently, then shown to be special cases of the direct-interaction approximation (DIA), which provides a central focus for the article. Various methods of renormalized perturbation theory are described, then unified with the aid of the generating-functional formalism of Martin, Siggia, and Rose. A general expression for the renormalized dielectric function is deduced and discussed in detail. Modern approaches such as decimation and PDF methods are described. Derivations of DIA-based Markovian closures are discussed. The eddy-damped quasinormal Markovian closure is shown to be nonrealizable in the presence of waves, and a new realizable Markovian closure is presented. The test-field model and a realizable modification thereof are also summarized. Numerical solutions of various closures for some plasma-physics paradigms are reviewed. The variational approach to bounds on transport is developed. Miscellaneous topics include Onsager symmetries for turbulence, the interpretation of entropy balances for both kinetic and fluid descriptions, self-organized criticality, statistical interactions between disparate scales, and the roles of both mean and random shear. Appendices are provided on Fourier transform conventions, dimensional and scaling analysis, the derivations of nonlinear gyrokinetic and gyrofluid equations

  7. On the factors governing water vapor turbulence mixing in the convective boundary layer over land: Concept and data analysis technique using ground-based lidar measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Sandip

    2016-01-01

    The convective boundary layer (CBL) turbulence is the key process for exchanging heat, momentum, moisture and trace gases between the earth's surface and the lower part of the troposphere. The turbulence parameterization of the CBL is a challenging but important component in numerical models. In particular, correct estimation of CBL turbulence features, parameterization, and the determination of the contribution of eddy diffusivity are important for simulating convection initiation, and the dispersion of health hazardous air pollutants and Greenhouse gases. In general, measurements of higher-order moments of water vapor mixing ratio (q) variability yield unique estimates of turbulence in the CBL. Using the high-resolution lidar-derived profiles of q variance, third-order moment, and skewness and analyzing concurrent profiles of vertical velocity, potential temperature, horizontal wind and time series of near-surface measurements of surface flux and meteorological parameters, a conceptual framework based on bottom up approach is proposed here for the first time for a robust characterization of the turbulent structure of CBL over land so that our understanding on the processes governing CBL q turbulence could be improved. Finally, principal component analyses will be applied on the lidar-derived long-term data sets of q turbulence statistics to identify the meteorological factors and the dominant physical mechanisms governing the CBL turbulence features. - Highlights: • Lidar based study for CBL turbulence features • Water vapor and aerosol turbulence profiles • Processes governing boundary layer turbulence profiles using lidars

  8. On the factors governing water vapor turbulence mixing in the convective boundary layer over land: Concept and data analysis technique using ground-based lidar measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Sandip, E-mail: sup252@PSU.EDU

    2016-06-01

    The convective boundary layer (CBL) turbulence is the key process for exchanging heat, momentum, moisture and trace gases between the earth's surface and the lower part of the troposphere. The turbulence parameterization of the CBL is a challenging but important component in numerical models. In particular, correct estimation of CBL turbulence features, parameterization, and the determination of the contribution of eddy diffusivity are important for simulating convection initiation, and the dispersion of health hazardous air pollutants and Greenhouse gases. In general, measurements of higher-order moments of water vapor mixing ratio (q) variability yield unique estimates of turbulence in the CBL. Using the high-resolution lidar-derived profiles of q variance, third-order moment, and skewness and analyzing concurrent profiles of vertical velocity, potential temperature, horizontal wind and time series of near-surface measurements of surface flux and meteorological parameters, a conceptual framework based on bottom up approach is proposed here for the first time for a robust characterization of the turbulent structure of CBL over land so that our understanding on the processes governing CBL q turbulence could be improved. Finally, principal component analyses will be applied on the lidar-derived long-term data sets of q turbulence statistics to identify the meteorological factors and the dominant physical mechanisms governing the CBL turbulence features. - Highlights: • Lidar based study for CBL turbulence features • Water vapor and aerosol turbulence profiles • Processes governing boundary layer turbulence profiles using lidars.

  9. A statistical state dynamics approach to wall turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, B F; Gayme, D F; Ioannou, P J

    2017-03-13

    This paper reviews results obtained using statistical state dynamics (SSD) that demonstrate the benefits of adopting this perspective for understanding turbulence in wall-bounded shear flows. The SSD approach used in this work employs a second-order closure that retains only the interaction between the streamwise mean flow and the streamwise mean perturbation covariance. This closure restricts nonlinearity in the SSD to that explicitly retained in the streamwise constant mean flow together with nonlinear interactions between the mean flow and the perturbation covariance. This dynamical restriction, in which explicit perturbation-perturbation nonlinearity is removed from the perturbation equation, results in a simplified dynamics referred to as the restricted nonlinear (RNL) dynamics. RNL systems, in which a finite ensemble of realizations of the perturbation equation share the same mean flow, provide tractable approximations to the SSD, which is equivalent to an infinite ensemble RNL system. This infinite ensemble system, referred to as the stochastic structural stability theory system, introduces new analysis tools for studying turbulence. RNL systems provide computationally efficient means to approximate the SSD and produce self-sustaining turbulence exhibiting qualitative features similar to those observed in direct numerical simulations despite greatly simplified dynamics. The results presented show that RNL turbulence can be supported by as few as a single streamwise varying component interacting with the streamwise constant mean flow and that judicious selection of this truncated support or 'band-limiting' can be used to improve quantitative accuracy of RNL turbulence. These results suggest that the SSD approach provides new analytical and computational tools that allow new insights into wall turbulence.This article is part of the themed issue 'Toward the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. Predictions of flow and heat transfer in multiple impinging jets with an elliptic-blending second-moment closure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thielen, L.; Hanjalić, K.; Jonker, H.; Manceau, R.

    2005-01-01

    We present numerical computations of flow and heat transfer in multiple jets impinging normally on a flat heated surface, obtained with a new second-moment turbulence closure combined with an elliptic blending model of non-viscous wall blocking effect. This model provides the mean velocity and

  11. New phenomena in variable-density Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livescu, D; Ristorcelli, J R; Petersen, M R; Gore, R A, E-mail: livescu@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    This paper presents several issues related to mixing and turbulence structure in buoyancy-driven turbulence at low to moderate Atwood numbers, A, found from direct numerical simulations in two configurations: classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability and an idealized triply periodic Rayleigh-Taylor flow. Simulations at A up to 0.5 are used to examine the turbulence characteristics and contrast them with those obtained close to the Boussinesq approximation. The data sets used represent the largest simulations to date in each configuration. One of the more remarkable issues explored, first reported in (Livescu and Ristorcelli 2008 J. Fluid Mech. 605 145-80), is the marked difference in mixing between different density fluids as opposed to the mixing that occurs between fluids of commensurate densities, corresponding to the Boussinesq approximation. Thus, in the triply periodic configuration and the non-Boussinesq case, an initially symmetric density probability density function becomes skewed, showing that the mixing is asymmetric, with pure heavy fluid mixing more slowly than pure light fluid. A mechanism producing the mixing asymmetry is proposed and the consequences for the classical Rayleigh-Taylor configuration are discussed. In addition, it is shown that anomalous small-scale anisotropy found in the homogeneous configuration (Livescu and Ristorcelli 2008 J. Fluid Mech. 605 145-80) and Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence at A=0.5 (Livescu et al 2008 J. Turbul. 10 1-32) also occurs near the Boussinesq limit. Results pertaining to the moment closure modelling of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence are also presented. Although the Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer width reaches self-similar growth relatively fast, the lower-order terms in the self-similar expressions for turbulence moments have long-lasting effects and derived quantities, such as the turbulent Reynolds number, are slow to follow the self-similar predictions. Since eddy diffusivity in the popular gradient transport hypothesis

  12. Investigation on the growth, spectral, lifetime, mechanical analysis and third-order nonlinear optical studies of L-methionine admixtured D-mandelic acid single crystal: A promising material for nonlinear optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, P.; Sangeetha, P.; Kumari, C. Rathika Thaya; Caroline, M. Lydia

    2017-08-01

    A nonlinear optical bulk single crystal of L-methionine admixtured D-mandelic acid (LMDMA) has been grown by slow solvent evaporation technique using water as solvent at ambient temperature. The crystallized LMDMA single crystal subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction study confirmed monoclinic system with the acentric space group P21. The FTIR analysis gives information about the modes of vibration in the various functional groups present in LMDMA. The UV-visible spectral analysis assessed the optical quality and linear optical properties such as extinction coefficient, reflectance, refractive index and from which optical conductivity and electric susceptibility were also evaluated. The frequency doubling efficiency was observed using Kurtz Perry powder technique. A multiple shot laser was utilized to evaluate the laser damage threshold energy of the crystal. Discrete thermodynamic properties were carried out by TG-DTA studies. The hardness, Meyer's index, yield strength, elastic stiffness constant, Knoop hardness, fracture toughness and brittleness index were analyzed using Vickers microhardness tester. Layer growth pattern and the surface defect were examined by chemical etching studies using optical microscope. Fluorescence emission spectrum was recorded and lifetime was also studied. The electric field response of crystal was investigated from the dielectric studies at various temperatures at different frequencies. The third-order nonlinear optical response in LMDMA has been investigated using Z-scan technique with He-Ne laser at 632.8 nm and nonlinear parameters such as refractive index (n2), absorption coefficient (β) and susceptibility (χ3) investigated extensively for they are in optical phase conjucation, high-speed optical switches and optical dielectric devices.

  13. Investigation on the behavioral difference in third order nonlinearity and optical limiting of Mn0.55Cu0.45Fe2O4 nanoparticles annealed at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuvaraj, S.; Manikandan, N.; Vinitha, G.

    2017-11-01

    Mn0.55Cu0.45Fe2O4 nanoparticles were synthesized by wet chemical co-precipitation method. The obtained samples were annealed at different temperatures (500 °C to 1250 °C). All annealed samples were characterized for their structural, magnetic, linear and non-linear optical properties. XRD results confirm single phase cubic spinel structure only for samples annealed at 800 °C and 1250 °C. The average crystallite sizes of the samples are in the range of 11-37 nm. HR-SEM image of the sample annealed at 800 °C exposed spherical morphology. The quantitative analysis of EDX results is close to the expected values. Bandgaps were evaluated from UV-DRS. The FTIR spectrum showing the essential peaks around 452.1 and 567.2 cm-1 prove the formation of spinel nanoparticles. In PL spectrum, a broad emission peak is attained in visible region at 485 nm. The saturation magnetization (M s), coercivity (H c) and remanence magnetization (M r) are obtained from the hysteresis curve. Nonlinear absorption coefficients (10-4 cm W-1), nonlinear indices of refraction (10-8 cm2 W-1) and the third order nonlinear susceptibilities (10-6 esu) are determined using Z-scan experiment. CW laser beam is utilized to study the optical limiting characteristics and the results prove these materials to be a potential candidate for device applications like optical switches and power limiters.

  14. Thermodynamic and Turbulence Characteristics of the Southern Great Plains Nocturnal Boundary Layer Under Differing Turbulent Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Timothy A.; Blumberg, William G.; Klein, Petra M.; Chilson, Phillip B.

    2015-12-01

    The nocturnal stable boundary layer (SBL) can generally be classified into the weakly stable boundary layer (wSBL) and very stable boundary layer (vSBL). Within the wSBL, turbulence is relatively continuous, whereas in the vSBL, turbulence is intermittent and not well characterized. Differentiating characteristics of each type of SBL are still unknown. Herein, thermodynamic and kinematic data collected by a suite of instruments in north central Oklahoma in autumn 2012 are analyzed to better understand both SBL regimes and their differentiating characteristics. Many low-level jets were observed during the experiment, as it took place near a climatological maximum. A threshold wind speed, above which bulk shear-generated turbulence develops, is found to exist up to 300 m. The threshold wind speed must also be exceeded at lower heights (down to the surface) in order for strong turbulence to develop. Composite profiles, which are normalized using low-level jet scaling, of potential temperature, wind speed, vertical velocity variance, and the third-order moment of vertical velocity (overline{w'^3}) are produced for weak and moderate/strong turbulence regimes, which exhibit features of the vSBL and wSBL, respectively. Within the wSBL, turbulence is generated at the surface and transported upward. In the vSBL, values of vertical velocity variance are small throughout the entire boundary layer, likely due to the fact that a strong surface inversion typically forms after sunset. The temperature profile tends to be approximately isothermal in the lowest portions of the wSBL, and it did not substantially change over the night. Within both types of SBL, stability in the residual layer tends to increase as the night progresses. It is thought that this stability increase is due to differential warm air advection, which frequently occurs in the southern Great Plains when southerly low-level jets and a typical north-south temperature gradient are present. Differential radiative

  15. Turbulence generation by waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaftori, D.; Nan, X.S.; Banerjee, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The interaction between two-dimensional mechanically generated waves, and a turbulent stream was investigated experimentally in a horizontal channel, using a 3-D LDA synchronized with a surface position measuring device and a micro-bubble tracers flow visualization with high speed video. Results show that although the wave induced orbital motion reached all the way to the wall, the characteristics of the turbulence wall structures and the turbulence intensity close to the wall were not altered. Nor was the streaky nature of the wall layer. On the other hand, the mean velocity profile became more uniform and the mean friction velocity was increased. Close to the free surface, the turbulence intensity was substantially increased as well. Even in predominantly laminar flows, the introduction of 2-D waves causes three dimensional turbulence. The turbulence enhancement is found to be proportional to the wave strength.

  16. Fuel channel closure and adapter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashen, W.S.

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides a mechanical closure/actuating ram combination particularly suited for use in sealing the ends of the pressure tubes when a CANDU-type reactor is refueled. It provides a cluster that may be inserted into a fuel channel end fitting to provide at least partial closing off of a pressure tube while permitting the disengagement of the fueling machine and its withdrawal from the closure for other purposes. The invention also provides a ram/closure combination wherein the application of loading force to a deformable sealing disk is regulated by a massive load bar component forming part of the fueling machine and being therefore accessible for maintenance or replacement

  17. Plasma Turbulence General Topics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadomtsev, B. B. [Nuclear Energy Institute, Academy of Sciences of the USSR, Moscow, USSR (Russian Federation)

    1965-06-15

    It is known that under experimental conditions plasma often shows chaotic motion. Such motion, when many degrees of freedom are excited to levels considerably above the thermal level, will be called turbulent. The properties of turbulent plasma in many respects differ from the properties of laminar plasma. It can be said that the appearance of various anomalies in plasma behaviour indicates the presence of turbulence in plasma. In order to verify directly the presence of turbulent motion in plasma we must, however, measure the fluctuation of some microscopic parameters in plasma.

  18. RANS-based simulation of turbulent wave boundary layer and sheet-flow sediment transport processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Schløer, Signe; Sterner, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    A numerical model coupling the horizontal component of the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equationswith two-equation k−ω turbulence closure is presented and used to simulate a variety of turbulent wave boundary layer processes. The hydrodynamic model is additionally coupled...... with bed and suspended load descriptions, the latter based on an unsteady turbulent-diffusion equation, for simulation of sheet-flow sediment transport processes. In addition to standard features common within such RANS-based approaches, the present model includes: (1) hindered settling velocities at high...

  19. Introduction to the theory of fluid and magnetofluid turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, D.

    1984-03-01

    This set of notes was transcribed from the tape recording of three lectures given at the Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University, in June, 1983. The lectures were intended to provide an introduction to the theory of magnetofluid turbulence which is a relatively new branch of plasma physics. It is related more closely to classic fluid dynamics than to the nonlinear theory of plasma oscillation. For this reason, fluid turbulence theory was reviewed as the background of the subject. The first lecture is on the origins of fluid and magnetofluid turbulence. The universal transition to turbulence takes place at sufficiently high Reynolds number, well above the critical threshold. The second lecture is on closures, attempt on dynamical theories. The Navier-Stokes case is discussed, and the attempt to reduce the number of the degrees of freedom, the importance of helicity in MHD, the direct interaction approximation (DIA) and others are explained. The third lecture is on the cascade and inverse cascade in fluid and magnetofluid. The idea of cascade was introduced into the theory of Navier-Stokes turbulence around 1941. The calculation of a form for inertial range energy spectra, the relation with dissipation rate, the tendency of migrating to long wavelength, the simulation of decaying turbulence, the numbers characterizing MHD and others are discussed. (Kako, I.)

  20. 40 CFR 265.280 - Closure and post-closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... contaminants caused by wind erosion; and (4) Compliance with § 265.276 concerning the growth of food-chain... and post-closure care objectives of paragraph (a) of this section: (1) Type and amount of hazardous..., including amount, frequency, and pH of precipitation; (5) Geological and soil profiles and surface and...

  1. Turbulent flow computation in a circular U-Bend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloud Abdelkrim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent flows through a circular 180° curved bend with a curvature ratio of 3.375, defined as the the bend mean radius to pipe diameter is investigated numerically for a Reynolds number of 4.45×104. The computation is performed for a U-Bend with full long pipes at the entrance and at the exit. The commercial ANSYS FLUENT is used to solve the steady Reynolds–Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS equations. The performances of standard k-ε and the second moment closure RSM models are evaluated by comparing their numerical results against experimental data and testing their capabilities to capture the formation and extend this turbulence driven vortex. It is found that the secondary flows occur in the cross-stream half-plane of such configurations and primarily induced by high anisotropy of the cross-stream turbulent normal stresses near the outer bend.

  2. Turbulent flow computation in a circular U-Bend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloud, Abdelkrim; Aounallah, Mohammed; Belkadi, Mustapha; Adjlout, Lahouari; Imine, Omar; Imine, Bachir

    2014-03-01

    Turbulent flows through a circular 180° curved bend with a curvature ratio of 3.375, defined as the the bend mean radius to pipe diameter is investigated numerically for a Reynolds number of 4.45×104. The computation is performed for a U-Bend with full long pipes at the entrance and at the exit. The commercial ANSYS FLUENT is used to solve the steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The performances of standard k-ɛ and the second moment closure RSM models are evaluated by comparing their numerical results against experimental data and testing their capabilities to capture the formation and extend this turbulence driven vortex. It is found that the secondary flows occur in the cross-stream half-plane of such configurations and primarily induced by high anisotropy of the cross-stream turbulent normal stresses near the outer bend.

  3. Higher-order turbulence statistics of wave–current flow over a submerged hemisphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barman, Krishnendu; Debnath, Koustuv; Mazumder, Bijoy S, E-mail: debnath_koustuv@yahoo.com [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah 711103, West Bengal (India)

    2017-04-15

    Higher-order turbulence characteristics such as turbulence production, turbulence kinetic energy flux, third order moments and velocity spectra associated with turbulent bursting events due to the influence of a submerged hemisphere under wave–current interactions are presented. The velocity components were measured using three dimensional (3D) 16 MHz micro-acoustic Doppler velocimetry (Micro-ADV). In the wave–current interactions, the contributions of turbulent bursting events such as ejections and sweeps significantly reduce in comparison to the current-only case. The distributions of the mean time intervals of ejection and sweeping events are found to alter due to the superposition of surface waves. Results also depict that the turbulence production in the wake region of the hemisphere reduces remarkably, due to the superposition of surface waves on the current. Further, spectral and co-spectral analysis demonstrates that there is a significant reduction of power spectral peak for both longitudinal and bottom-normal velocities upon superposition of surface waves, which signifies a remarkable change in energy distribution between different frequencies of waves. (paper)

  4. Closure technique after carotid endarterectomy influences local hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Gareth J; How, Thien V; Poole, Robert J; Brennan, John A; Naik, Jagjeeth B; Vallabhaneni, S Rao; Fisher, Robert K

    2014-08-01

    Meta-analysis supports patch angioplasty after carotid endarterectomy (CEA); however, studies indicate considerable variation in practice. The hemodynamic effect of a patch is unclear and this study attempted to elucidate this and guide patch width selection. Four groups were selected: healthy volunteers and patients undergoing CEA with primary closure, trimmed patch (5 mm), or 8-mm patch angioplasty. Computer-generated three-dimensional models of carotid bifurcations were produced from transverse ultrasound images recorded at 1-mm intervals. Rapid prototyping generated models for flow visualization studies. Computational fluid dynamic studies were performed for each model and validated by flow visualization. Mean wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI) maps were created for each model using pulsatile inflow at 300 mL/min. WSS of OSI >0.3 were considered pathological, predisposing to accretion of intimal hyperplasia. The resultant WSS and OSI maps were compared. The four groups comprised 8 normal carotid arteries, 6 primary closures, 6 trimmed patches, and seven 8-mm patches. Flow visualization identified flow separation and recirculation at the bifurcation increased with a patch and was related to the patch width. Computational fluid dynamic identified that primary closure had the fewest areas of low WSS or elevated OSI but did have mild common carotid artery stenoses at the proximal arteriotomy that caused turbulence. Trimmed patches had more regions of abnormal WSS and OSI at the bifurcation, but 8-mm patches had the largest areas of deleteriously low WSS and high OSI. Qualitative comparison among the four groups confirmed that incorporation of a patch increased areas of low WSS and high OSI at the bifurcation and that this was related to patch width. Closure technique after CEA influences the hemodynamic profile. Patching does not appear to generate favorable flow dynamics. However, a trimmed 5-mm patch may offer hemodynamic benefits over an 8

  5. Growth, spectral, optical, laser damage threshold and DFT investigations on 2-amino 4-methyl pyridinium 4-methoxy benzoate (2A4MP4MB): A potential organic third order nonlinear optical material for optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, M.; Karthick, S.; Thirupugalmani, K.; Babu, B.; Vinitha, G.

    2018-05-01

    In present investigation, single crystals of organic charge transfer complex, 2-amino-4-methyl pyridinium-4-methoxy benzoate (2A4MP4MB) was grown by controlled slow evaporation solution growth technique using methanol as a solvent at room temperature. Single crystal XRD analysis confirmed the crystal system and lattice parameters of 2A4MP4MB. The crystalline nature, presence of various vibrational modes and other chemical bonds in the compound have been recognized and confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction, FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopic techniques respectively. The presence of various proton and carbon positions in title compound was confirmed using 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectral studies. The wide optical operating window and cut-off wavelength were identified and band gap value of the title compound was calculated using UV-vis-NIR study. The specific heat capacity (cp) values of the title compound, 1.712 J g-1·K-1 at 300 K and 13.6 J g-1 K-1 at 433 K (melting point) were measured using Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimetric studies (MDSC). From Z-scan study, nonlinear refractive index (n2), nonlinear absorption (β) and third order nonlinear susceptibility (χ(3)) values were determined. The self-defocusing effect and saturable absorption behavior of the material were utilized to exhibit the optical limiting action at λ = 532 nm by employing the same continuous wave (cw) Nd: YAG laser source. The laser damage threshold (LDT) study of title compound was carried out using Nd: YAG laser of 532 nm wavelength. The Vickers' micro hardness test was carried out at room temperature and obtained results were investigated using classical Meyer's law. In addition, DFT calculations were carried out for the first time for this compound. These characterization studies performed on the title compound planned to probe the valuable and safe region of optical, thermal and mechanical properties to improve efficacy of 2A4MP4MB single crystals in optoelectronic device

  6. Comparison between kinetic and fluid simulations of slab ion temperature gradient driven turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, H.; Watanabe, T.-H. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Horton, W. [University of Texas at Austin, Institute for Fusion Studies, Austin, Texas (United States)

    2002-10-01

    A detailed comparison between kinetic and fluid simulations of collisionless slab ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence is made. The nondissipative closure model (NCM) for linearly unstable modes, which is presented by Sugama, Watanabe, and Horton [Phys. Plasmas 8, 2617 (2001)], and the dissipative closure model by Hammett and Perkins (HP) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 3019 (1990)] are used in separate fluid simulations. The validity of these closure models for quantitative prediction of the turbulent thermal transport is examined by comparing nonlinear results of the fluid simulations with those of the collisionless kinetic simulation of high accuracy. Simulation results show that, in the saturated turbulent state, the turbulent thermal diffusivity {chi} obtained from the HP model is significantly larger than the {chi} given by the NCM which is closer to {chi} measured in the kinetic simulation. Contrary to the dissipative form of the parallel heat flux closure relation assumed in the HP model, the NCM describes well the exact kinetic simulation, in which for some unstable wave numbers k, the imaginary part of the ratio of the parallel heat flux q{sub k} to the temperature fluctuation T{sub k} is a oscillatory function of time and sometimes takes positive values. The positive values of Im(q{sub k}/T{sub k}), imply the negative parallel heat diffusivity, correlate with the occasional inward heat flux occurring for the wave numbers k, and reduce the total {chi}. (author)

  7. Nonlocal stochastic mixing-length theory and the velocity profile in the turbulent boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, H.; Leeuw, G. de; Maassen van den Brink, A.

    1995-01-01

    Turbulence mixing by finite size eddies will be treated by means of a novel formulation of nonlocal K-theory, involving sample paths and a stochastic closure hypothesis, which implies a well defined recipe for the calculation of sampling and transition rates. The connection with the general theory

  8. Comparison between kinetic and fluid simulations of slab ion temperature gradient driven turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugama, H.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Horton, W.

    2002-10-01

    A detailed comparison between kinetic and fluid simulations of collisionless slab ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence is made. The nondissipative closure model (NCM) for linearly unstable modes, which is presented by Sugama, Watanabe, and Horton [Phys. Plasmas 8, 2617 (2001)], and the dissipative closure model by Hammett and Perkins (HP) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 3019 (1990)] are used in separate fluid simulations. The validity of these closure models for quantitative prediction of the turbulent thermal transport is examined by comparing nonlinear results of the fluid simulations with those of the collisionless kinetic simulation of high accuracy. Simulation results show that, in the saturated turbulent state, the turbulent thermal diffusivity χ obtained from the HP model is significantly larger than the χ given by the NCM which is closer to χ measured in the kinetic simulation. Contrary to the dissipative form of the parallel heat flux closure relation assumed in the HP model, the NCM describes well the exact kinetic simulation, in which for some unstable wave numbers k, the imaginary part of the ratio of the parallel heat flux q k to the temperature fluctuation T k is a oscillatory function of time and sometimes takes positive values. The positive values of Im(q k /T k ), imply the negative parallel heat diffusivity, correlate with the occasional inward heat flux occurring for the wave numbers k, and reduce the total χ. (author)

  9. Bed slope effects on turbulent wave boundary layers: 1. Model validation and quantification of rough-turbulent results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    measurements for steady streaming induced by a skewed free stream velocity signal is also provided. We then simulate a series of experiments involving oscillatory flow in a convergent-divergent smooth tunnel, and a good match with respect to bed shear stresses and streaming velocities is achieved......A numerical model solving incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, combined with a two-equation k-omega turbulence closure, is used to study converging-diverging effects from a sloping bed on turbulent (oscillatory) wave boundary layers. Bed shear stresses from the numerical model....... The streaming is conceptually explained using analogies from steady converging and diffuser flows. A parametric study is undertaken to assess both the peak and time-averaged bed shear stresses in converging and diverging half periods under rough-turbulent conditions. The results are presented as friction factor...

  10. New developments in isotropic turbulent models for FENE-P fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, P. R.; Cavadas, A. S.

    2018-04-01

    The evolution of viscoelastic turbulent models, in the last years, has been significant due to the direct numeric simulation (DNS) advances, which allowed us to capture in detail the evolution of the viscoelastic effects and the development of viscoelastic closures. New viscoelastic closures are proposed for viscoelastic fluids described by the finitely extensible nonlinear elastic-Peterlin constitutive model. One of the viscoelastic closure developed in the context of isotropic turbulent models, consists in a modification of the turbulent viscosity to include an elastic effect, capable of predicting, with good accuracy, the behaviour for different drag reductions. Another viscoelastic closure essential to predict drag reduction relates the viscoelastic term involving velocity and the tensor conformation fluctuations. The DNS data show the high impact of this term to predict correctly the drag reduction, and for this reason is proposed a simpler closure capable of predicting the viscoelastic behaviour with good performance. In addition, a new relation is developed to predict the drag reduction, quantity based on the trace of the tensor conformation at the wall, eliminating the need of the typically parameters of Weissenberg and Reynolds numbers, which depend on the friction velocity. This allows future developments for complex geometries.

  11. Application of PDF methods to compressible turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delarue, B. J.; Pope, S. B.

    1997-09-01

    A particle method applying the probability density function (PDF) approach to turbulent compressible flows is presented. The method is applied to several turbulent flows, including the compressible mixing layer, and good agreement is obtained with experimental data. The PDF equation is solved using a Lagrangian/Monte Carlo method. To accurately account for the effects of compressibility on the flow, the velocity PDF formulation is extended to include thermodynamic variables such as the pressure and the internal energy. The mean pressure, the determination of which has been the object of active research over the last few years, is obtained directly from the particle properties. It is therefore not necessary to link the PDF solver with a finite-volume type solver. The stochastic differential equations (SDE) which model the evolution of particle properties are based on existing second-order closures for compressible turbulence, limited in application to low turbulent Mach number flows. Tests are conducted in decaying isotropic turbulence to compare the performances of the PDF method with the Reynolds-stress closures from which it is derived, and in homogeneous shear flows, at which stage comparison with direct numerical simulation (DNS) data is conducted. The model is then applied to the plane compressible mixing layer, reproducing the well-known decrease in the spreading rate with increasing compressibility. It must be emphasized that the goal of this paper is not as much to assess the performance of models of compressibility effects, as it is to present an innovative and consistent PDF formulation designed for turbulent inhomogeneous compressible flows, with the aim of extending it further to deal with supersonic reacting flows.

  12. BOOK REVIEW: Statistical Mechanics of Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambon, C.

    2004-10-01

    This is a handbook for a computational approach to reacting flows, including background material on statistical mechanics. In this sense, the title is somewhat misleading with respect to other books dedicated to the statistical theory of turbulence (e.g. Monin and Yaglom). In the present book, emphasis is placed on modelling (engineering closures) for computational fluid dynamics. The probabilistic (pdf) approach is applied to the local scalar field, motivated first by the nonlinearity of chemical source terms which appear in the transport equations of reacting species. The probabilistic and stochastic approaches are also used for the velocity field and particle position; nevertheless they are essentially limited to Lagrangian models for a local vector, with only single-point statistics, as for the scalar. Accordingly, conventional techniques, such as single-point closures for RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes) and subgrid-scale models for LES (large-eddy simulations), are described and in some cases reformulated using underlying Langevin models and filtered pdfs. Even if the theoretical approach to turbulence is not discussed in general, the essentials of probabilistic and stochastic-processes methods are described, with a useful reminder concerning statistics at the molecular level. The book comprises 7 chapters. Chapter 1 briefly states the goals and contents, with a very clear synoptic scheme on page 2. Chapter 2 presents definitions and examples of pdfs and related statistical moments. Chapter 3 deals with stochastic processes, pdf transport equations, from Kramer-Moyal to Fokker-Planck (for Markov processes), and moments equations. Stochastic differential equations are introduced and their relationship to pdfs described. This chapter ends with a discussion of stochastic modelling. The equations of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics are addressed in chapter 4. Classical conservation equations (mass, velocity, internal energy) are derived from their

  13. PDF Modeling of Turbulent Combustion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pope, Stephen B

    2006-01-01

    .... The PDF approach to turbulent combustion has the advantages of fully representing the turbulent fluctuations of species and temperature, and of allowing realistic combustion chemistry to be implemented...

  14. 50 CFR 648.161 - Closures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Bluefish Fishery § 648.161 Closures. (a) EEZ closure. NMFS shall close the EEZ to fishing for bluefish by... dealer permit holders that no commercial quota is available for landing bluefish in that state. ...

  15. Moment Closure for the Stochastic Logistic Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singh, Abhyudai; Hespanha, Joao P

    2006-01-01

    ..., which we refer to as the moment closure function. In this paper, a systematic procedure for constructing moment closure functions of arbitrary order is presented for the stochastic logistic model...

  16. A nonlinear structural subgrid-scale closure for compressible MHD. I. Derivation and energy dissipation properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlaykov, Dimitar G., E-mail: Dimitar.Vlaykov@ds.mpg.de [Institut für Astrophysik, Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Dynamik und Selbstorganisation, Am Faßberg 17, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Grete, Philipp [Institut für Astrophysik, Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Schmidt, Wolfram [Hamburger Sternwarte, Universität Hamburg, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany); Schleicher, Dominik R. G. [Departamento de Astronomía, Facultad Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Concepción, Av. Esteban Iturra s/n Barrio Universitario, Casilla 160-C (Chile)

    2016-06-15

    Compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is ubiquitous in astrophysical phenomena ranging from the intergalactic to the stellar scales. In studying them, numerical simulations are nearly inescapable, due to the large degree of nonlinearity involved. However, the dynamical ranges of these phenomena are much larger than what is computationally accessible. In large eddy simulations (LESs), the resulting limited resolution effects are addressed explicitly by introducing to the equations of motion additional terms associated with the unresolved, subgrid-scale dynamics. This renders the system unclosed. We derive a set of nonlinear structural closures for the ideal MHD LES equations with particular emphasis on the effects of compressibility. The closures are based on a gradient expansion of the finite-resolution operator [W. K. Yeo (CUP, 1993)] and require no assumptions about the nature of the flow or magnetic field. Thus, the scope of their applicability ranges from the sub- to the hyper-sonic and -Alfvénic regimes. The closures support spectral energy cascades both up and down-scale, as well as direct transfer between kinetic and magnetic resolved and unresolved energy budgets. They implicitly take into account the local geometry, and in particular, the anisotropy of the flow. Their properties are a priori validated in Paper II [P. Grete et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 062317 (2016)] against alternative closures available in the literature with respect to a wide range of simulation data of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence.

  17. Turbulence modelling; Modelisation de la turbulence isotherme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, D. [Electricite de France (EDF), Direction des Etudes et Recherches, 92 - Clamart (France)

    1997-12-31

    This paper is an introduction course in modelling turbulent thermohydraulics, aimed at computational fluid dynamics users. No specific knowledge other than the Navier Stokes equations is required beforehand. Chapter I (which those who are not beginners can skip) provides basic ideas on turbulence physics and is taken up in a textbook prepared by the teaching team of the ENPC (Benque, Viollet). Chapter II describes turbulent viscosity type modelling and the 2k-{epsilon} two equations model. It provides details of the channel flow case and the boundary conditions. Chapter III describes the `standard` (R{sub ij}-{epsilon}) Reynolds tensions transport model and introduces more recent models called `feasible`. A second paper deals with heat transfer and the effects of gravity, and returns to the Reynolds stress transport model. (author). 37 refs.

  18. Light particles in turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagendra Prakash, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with the broad topic of particles in turbulence, which has applications in a diverse number of fields. A vast majority of fluid flows found in nature and in the industry are turbulent and contain dispersed elements. In this thesis, I have focused on light particles (air bubbles in

  19. Dynamic paradigm of turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhamedov, Alfred M.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a dynamic paradigm of turbulence is proposed. The basic idea consists in the novel definition of chaotic structure given with the help of Pfaff system of PDE associated with the turbulent dynamics. A methodological analysis of the new and the former paradigm is produced

  20. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reekers, Jim A.; Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zeleňák, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. Methods: The CIRSE registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug started in January 2009 and ended in August 2009. A total of 1,107 patients were included in the registry. Results: Deployment success was 97.2%. Deployment failure specified to access type was 8.8% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 5.0–14.5] for antegrade access and 1.8% (95% CI 1.1–2.9) for retrograde access (P = 0.001). There was no difference in deployment failure related to local PVD at the access site. Calcification was a reason for deployment failure in only 5.9 cm, and two vessel occlusions. Conclusion: The conclusion of this registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug is that the use of this device in interventional radiology procedures is safe, with a low incidence of serious access site complications. There seems to be no difference in complications between antegrade and retrograde access and other parameters.

  1. 304 Concretion facility closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials. The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. Recyclable scrap uranium Zircaloy-2 and copper silicon alloy, uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/Zircaloy-2 alloy, and Zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets in the 304 Concretion Facility, located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/Zircaloy-2 alloy and Zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as low-level radioactive mixed waste (LLRMW) with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 304 Concretion Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of materials and wastes managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 304 Concretion Facility (304 Facility). Clean closure of the 304 Facility is the proposed method for closure of the facility. Justification for this proposal is presented. 15 refs., 22 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Telephone switchboard closure | 19 December

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Exceptionally, the telephone switchboard will close at 4 p.m. on Friday, 19 December, instead of the usual time of 6 p.m., to allow time for closing all systems properly before the annual closure. Therefore, switchboard operator assistance to transfer calls from/to external lines will stop. All other phone services will run as usual.

  3. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zeleňák, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. Methods The CIRSE registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug started in January 2009 and ended in August 2009. A total of 1,107 patients were included in the registry. Results Deployment success was 97.2%. Deployment failure specified to access type was 8.8% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 5.0–14.5] for antegrade access and 1.8% (95% CI 1.1–2.9) for retrograde access (P = 0.001). There was no difference in deployment failure related to local PVD at the access site. Calcification was a reason for deployment failure in only 5.9 cm, and two vessel occlusions. Conclusion The conclusion of this registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug is that the use of this device in interventional radiology procedures is safe, with a low incidence of serious access site complications. There seems to be no difference in complications between antegrade and retrograde access and other parameters. PMID:20981425

  4. 75 FR 29322 - Base Closure and Realignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Base Closure and Realignment AGENCY: Office of...)(ii) of the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Act of 1990. It provides a partial list of military installations closing or realigning pursuant to the 2005 Base Closure and Realignment (BRAC) Report. It also...

  5. New Models for Velocity/Pressure-Gradient Correlations in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poroseva, Svetlana; Murman, Scott

    2014-11-01

    To improve the performance of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models, one has to improve the accuracy of models for three physical processes: turbulent diffusion, interaction of turbulent pressure and velocity fluctuation fields, and dissipative processes. The accuracy of modeling the turbulent diffusion depends on the order of a statistical closure chosen as a basis for a RANS model. When the Gram-Charlier series expansions for the velocity correlations are used to close the set of RANS equations, no assumption on Gaussian turbulence is invoked and no unknown model coefficients are introduced into the modeled equations. In such a way, this closure procedure reduces the modeling uncertainty of fourth-order RANS (FORANS) closures. Experimental and direct numerical simulation data confirmed the validity of using the Gram-Charlier series expansions in various flows including boundary layers. We will address modeling the velocity/pressure-gradient correlations. New linear models will be introduced for the second- and higher-order correlations applicable to two-dimensional incompressible wall-bounded flows. Results of models' validation with DNS data in a channel flow and in a zero-pressure gradient boundary layer over a flat plate will be demonstrated. A part of the material is based upon work supported by NASA under award NNX12AJ61A.

  6. Wind-Wave Effects on Vertical Mixing in Chesapeake Bay, USA: comparing observations to second-moment closure predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, A. W.; Sanford, L. P.; Scully, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    Coherent wave-driven turbulence generated through wave breaking or nonlinear wave-current interactions, e.g. Langmuir turbulence (LT), can significantly enhance the downward transfer of momentum, kinetic energy, and dissolved gases in the oceanic surface layer. There are few observations of these processes in the estuarine or coastal environments, where wind-driven mixing may co-occur with energetic tidal mixing and strong density stratification. This presents a major challenge for evaluating vertical mixing parameterizations used in modeling estuarine and coastal dynamics. We carried out a large, multi-investigator study of wind-driven estuarine dynamics in the middle reaches of Chesapeake Bay, USA, during 2012-2013. The center of the observational array was an instrumented turbulence tower with both atmospheric and marine turbulence sensors as well as rapidly sampled temperature and conductivity sensors. For this paper, we examined the impacts of surface gravity waves on vertical profiles of turbulent mixing and compared our results to second-moment turbulence closure predictions. Wave and turbulence measurements collected from the vertical array of Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) provided direct estimates of the dominant terms in the TKE budget and the surface wave field. Observed dissipation rates, TKE levels, and turbulent length scales are compared to published scaling relations and used in the calculation of second-moment nonequilibrium stability functions. Results indicate that in the surface layer of the estuary, where elevated dissipation is balanced by vertical divergence in TKE flux, existing nonequilibrium stability functions underpredict observed eddy viscosities. The influences of wave breaking and coherent wave-driven turbulence on modeled and observed stability functions will be discussed further in the context of turbulent length scales, TKE and dissipation profiles, and the depth at which the wave-dominated turbulent transport layer

  7. Behaviour of turbulence models near a turbulent/non-turbulent interface revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrey, P.; Aupoix, B.

    2006-01-01

    The behaviour of turbulence models near a turbulent/non-turbulent interface is investigated. The analysis holds as well for two-equation as for Reynolds stress turbulence models using Daly and Harlow diffusion model. The behaviour near the interface is shown not to be a power law, as usually considered, but a more complex parametric solution. Why previous works seemed to numerically confirm the power law solution is explained. Constraints for turbulence modelling, i.e., for ensuring that models have a good behaviour near a turbulent/non-turbulent interface so that the solution is not sensitive to small turbulence levels imposed in the irrotational flow, are drawn

  8. Turbulent current drive mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Christopher J.; Tang, Xian-Zhu; Guo, Zehua

    2017-08-01

    Mechanisms through which plasma microturbulence can drive a mean electron plasma current are derived. The efficiency through which these turbulent contributions can drive deviations from neoclassical predictions of the electron current profile is computed by employing a linearized Coulomb collision operator. It is found that a non-diffusive contribution to the electron momentum flux as well as an anomalous electron-ion momentum exchange term provide the most efficient means through which turbulence can modify the mean electron current for the cases considered. Such turbulent contributions appear as an effective EMF within Ohm's law and hence provide an ideal means for driving deviations from neoclassical predictions.

  9. Turbulence new approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Belotserkovskii, OM; Chechetkin, VM

    2005-01-01

    The authors present the results of numerical experiments carried out to examine the problem of development of turbulence and convection. On the basis of the results, they propose a physical model of the development of turbulence. Numerical algorithms and difference schema for carrying out numerical experiments in hydrodynamics, are proposed. Original algorithms, suitable for calculation of the development of the processes of turbulence and convection in different conditions, even on astrophysical objects, are presented. The results of numerical modelling of several important phenomena having both fundamental and applied importance are described.

  10. Non-gaussian turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejstrup, J [NEG Micon Project Development A/S, Randers (Denmark); Hansen, K S [Denmarks Technical Univ., Dept. of Energy Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark); Pedersen, B J [VESTAS Wind Systems A/S, Lem (Denmark); Nielsen, M [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics, Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The pdf`s of atmospheric turbulence have somewhat wider tails than a Gaussian, especially regarding accelerations, whereas velocities are close to Gaussian. This behaviour is being investigated using data from a large WEB-database in order to quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity. Models for non-Gaussian turbulence have been developed, by which artificial turbulence can be generated with specified distributions, spectra and cross-correlations. The artificial time series will then be used in load models and the resulting loads in the Gaussian and the non-Gaussian cases will be compared. (au)

  11. Aviation turbulence processes, detection, prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Lane, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Anyone who has experienced turbulence in flight knows that it is usually not pleasant, and may wonder why this is so difficult to avoid. The book includes papers by various aviation turbulence researchers and provides background into the nature and causes of atmospheric turbulence that affect aircraft motion, and contains surveys of the latest techniques for remote and in situ sensing and forecasting of the turbulence phenomenon. It provides updates on the state-of-the-art research since earlier studies in the 1960s on clear-air turbulence, explains recent new understanding into turbulence generation by thunderstorms, and summarizes future challenges in turbulence prediction and avoidance.

  12. Revisiting the Landau fluid closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunana, P.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.; Adhikari, L.

    2017-12-01

    Advanced fluid models that are much closer to the full kinetic description than the usual magnetohydrodynamic description are a very useful tool for studying astrophysical plasmas and for interpreting solar wind observational data. The development of advanced fluid models that contain certain kinetic effects is complicated and has attracted much attention over the past years. Here we focus on fluid models that incorporate the simplest possible forms of Landau damping, derived from linear kinetic theory expanded about a leading-order (gyrotropic) bi-Maxwellian distribution function f_0, under the approximation that the perturbed distribution function f_1 is gyrotropic as well. Specifically, we focus on various Pade approximants to the usual plasma response function (and to the plasma dispersion function) and examine possibilities that lead to a closure of the linear kinetic hierarchy of fluid moments. We present re-examination of the simplest Landau fluid closures.

  13. Observations on early and delayed colostomy closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tade, A O; Salami, B A; Ayoade, B A

    2011-06-01

    Traditional treatment of a variety of colorectal pathologies had included a diverting colostomy that was closed eight or more weeks later during a readmission. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the outcomes of early colostomy closure and delayed colostomy closure in patients with temporary colostomies following traumatic and non-traumatic colorectal pathologies. In this study early colostomy closure was the closure of a colostomy within three weeks of its construction, while delayed colostomy closure referred to closure after 3 weeks. Complete records of the 37 adult patients who had temporary colostomy constructed and closed between Jan. 1997 December 2003 for various colorectal pathologies were studied. Fourteen patients had early colostomy closure while 23 had delayed closure. In the early colostomy closure group there were 10 men and 4 women. The mean age of the patients was 28yr with a range of 18-65yr. Colostomies were closed 9-18 days after initial colostomy construction. There was no mortality. Morbidity rate 28.6% (4 out of 14). There were two faecal fistulas (14.3%). Twenty-three patients had delayed colostomy closure 8 weeks to 18 months after initial colostomy construction. These were patients unfit for early surgery after initial colostomy construction because of carcinoma, significant weight loss, or sepsis. There was no mortality. Morbidity rate was 26.1%. There were 3 faecal fistulas (13.2%). Outcomes following early colostomy closure and delayed closure were comparable. Patients fit for surgery should have early closure whilst patients who may have compromised health should have delayed closure.

  14. A minimal model of self-sustaining turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Vaughan L.; Gayme, Dennice F.; Farrell, Brian F.; Ioannou, Petros J.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we examine the turbulence maintained in a Restricted Nonlinear (RNL) model of plane Couette flow. This model is a computationally efficient approximation of the second order statistical state dynamics obtained by partitioning the flow into a streamwise averaged mean flow and perturbations about that mean, a closure referred to herein as the RNL ∞ model. The RNL model investigated here employs a single member of the infinite ensemble that comprises the covariance of the RNL ∞ dynamics. The RNL system has previously been shown to support self-sustaining turbulence with a mean flow and structural features that are consistent with direct numerical simulations (DNS). Regardless of the number of streamwise Fourier components used in the simulation, the RNL system’s self-sustaining turbulent state is supported by a small number of streamwise varying modes. Remarkably, further truncation of the RNL system’s support to as few as one streamwise varying mode can suffice to sustain the turbulent state. The close correspondence between RNL simulations and DNS that has been previously demonstrated along with the results presented here suggest that the fundamental mechanisms underlying wall-turbulence can be analyzed using these highly simplified RNL systems

  15. 304 Concretion Facility Closure Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials. The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. Recyclable scrap uranium with Zircaloy-2 and copper silicon allo , uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/Zircaloy-2 alloy, and Zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets (7.5-gal containers) in the 304 Concretion Facility (304 Facility), located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/Zircaloy-2 alloy and Zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as low-level radioactive mixed waste (LLRMW) with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 304 Concretion Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Dangerous Waste Regulations, WAC 173-303-040 (Ecology 1991). This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of materials and wastes managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 304 Facility. The strategy for closure of the 304 Facility is presented in Section 6.0

  16. Repository Closure and Sealing Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A.T. Watkins

    2000-01-01

    The scope of this analysis will be to develop the conceptual design of the closure seals and their locations in the Subsurface Facilities. The design will be based on the recently established program requirements for transitioning to the Site Recommendation (SR) design as outlined by ''Approach to Implementing the Site Recommendation Baseline'' (Stroupe 2000) and the ''Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document'' (CRWMS M andO 1999b). The objective of this analysis will be to assist in providing a description for the Subsurface Facilities System Description Document, Section 2 and finally to document any conclusions reached in order to contribute and provide support to the SR. This analysis is at a conceptual level and is considered adequate to support the SR design. The final closure barriers and seals for the ventilation shafts, and the north and south ramps will require these openings to be permanently sealed to limit excessive air and water inflows and prevent human intrusion. The major tasks identified with closure in this analysis are: (1) Developing the overall subsurface seal layout and identifying design and operational interfaces for the Subsurface Facilities. (2) Summarizing the general site conditions and general rock characteristic with respect to seal location and describing the seal selected. (3) Identify seal construction materials, methodology of construction and strategic locations including design of the seal and plugs. (4) Discussing methods to prevent human intrusion

  17. Turbulent buoyant jets and plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Rodi, Wolfgang

    The Science & Applications of Heat and Mass Transfer: Reports, Reviews, & Computer Programs, Volume 6: Turbulent Buoyant Jets and Plumes focuses on the formation, properties, characteristics, and reactions of turbulent jets and plumes. The selection first offers information on the mechanics of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes and turbulent buoyant jets in shallow fluid layers. Discussions focus on submerged buoyant jets into shallow fluid, horizontal surface or interface jets into shallow layers, fundamental considerations, and turbulent buoyant jets (forced plumes). The manuscript then exami

  18. Containerless Ripple Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putterman, Seth; Wright, William; Duval, Walter; Panzarella, Charles

    2002-11-01

    One of the longest standing unsolved problems in physics relates to the behavior of fluids that are driven far from equilibrium such as occurs when they become turbulent due to fast flow through a grid or tidal motions. In turbulent flows the distribution of vortex energy as a function of the inverse length scale [or wavenumber 'k'] of motion is proportional to 1/k5/3 which is the celebrated law of Kolmogorov. Although this law gives a good description of the average motion, fluctuations around the average are huge. This stands in contrast with thermally activated motion where large fluctuations around thermal equilibrium are highly unfavorable. The problem of turbulence is the problem of understanding why large fluctuations are so prevalent which is also called the problem of 'intermittency'. Turbulence is a remarkable problem in that its solution sits simultaneously at the forefront of physics, mathematics, engineering and computer science. A recent conference [March 2002] on 'Statistical Hydrodynamics' organized by the Los Alamos Laboratory Center for Nonlinear Studies brought together researchers in all of these fields. Although turbulence is generally thought to be described by the Navier-Stokes Equations of fluid mechanics the solution as well as its existence has eluded researchers for over 100 years. In fact proof of the existence of such a solution qualifies for a 1 M millennium prize. As part of our NASA funded research we have proposed building a bridge between vortex turbulence and wave turbulence. The latter occurs when high amplitude waves of various wavelengths are allowed to mutually interact in a fluid. In particular we have proposed measuring the interaction of ripples [capillary waves] that run around on the surface of a fluid sphere suspended in a microgravity environment. The problem of ripple turbulence poses similar mathematical challenges to the problem of vortex turbulence. The waves can have a high amplitude and a strong nonlinear

  19. Inflow Turbulence Generation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohua

    2017-01-01

    Research activities on inflow turbulence generation methods have been vigorous over the past quarter century, accompanying advances in eddy-resolving computations of spatially developing turbulent flows with direct numerical simulation, large-eddy simulation (LES), and hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes-LES. The weak recycling method, rooted in scaling arguments on the canonical incompressible boundary layer, has been applied to supersonic boundary layer, rough surface boundary layer, and microscale urban canopy LES coupled with mesoscale numerical weather forecasting. Synthetic methods, originating from analytical approximation to homogeneous isotropic turbulence, have branched out into several robust methods, including the synthetic random Fourier method, synthetic digital filtering method, synthetic coherent eddy method, and synthetic volume forcing method. This article reviews major progress in inflow turbulence generation methods with an emphasis on fundamental ideas, key milestones, representative applications, and critical issues. Directions for future research in the field are also highlighted.

  20. Containerless Ripple Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putterman, Seth; Wright, William; Duval, Walter; Panzarella, Charles

    2002-01-01

    One of the longest standing unsolved problems in physics relates to the behavior of fluids that are driven far from equilibrium such as occurs when they become turbulent due to fast flow through a grid or tidal motions. In turbulent flows the distribution of vortex energy as a function of the inverse length scale [or wavenumber 'k'] of motion is proportional to 1/k(sup 5/3) which is the celebrated law of Kolmogorov. Although this law gives a good description of the average motion, fluctuations around the average are huge. This stands in contrast with thermally activated motion where large fluctuations around thermal equilibrium are highly unfavorable. The problem of turbulence is the problem of understanding why large fluctuations are so prevalent which is also called the problem of 'intermittency'. Turbulence is a remarkable problem in that its solution sits simultaneously at the forefront of physics, mathematics, engineering and computer science. A recent conference [March 2002] on 'Statistical Hydrodynamics' organized by the Los Alamos Laboratory Center for Nonlinear Studies brought together researchers in all of these fields. Although turbulence is generally thought to be described by the Navier-Stokes Equations of fluid mechanics the solution as well as its existence has eluded researchers for over 100 years. In fact proof of the existence of such a solution qualifies for a 1 M$ millennium prize. As part of our NASA funded research we have proposed building a bridge between vortex turbulence and wave turbulence. The latter occurs when high amplitude waves of various wavelengths are allowed to mutually interact in a fluid. In particular we have proposed measuring the interaction of ripples [capillary waves] that run around on the surface of a fluid sphere suspended in a microgravity environment. The problem of ripple turbulence poses similar mathematical challenges to the problem of vortex turbulence. The waves can have a high amplitude and a strong nonlinear

  1. A pseudo-sound constitutive relationship for the dilatational covariances in compressible turbulence: An analytical theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristorcelli, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    The mathematical consequences of a few simple scaling assumptions about the effects of compressibility are explored using a simple singular perturbation idea and the methods of statistical fluid mechanics. Representations for the pressure-dilation and dilatational dissipation covariances appearing in single-point moment closures for compressible turbulence are obtained. While the results are expressed in the context of a second-order statistical closure they provide some interesting and very clear physical metaphors for the effects of compressibility that have not been seen using more traditional linear stability methods. In the limit of homogeneous turbulence with quasi-normal large-scales the expressions derived are - in the low turbulent Mach number limit - asymptotically exact. The expressions obtained are functions of the rate of change of the turbulence energy, its correlation length scale, and the relative time scale of the cascade rate. The expressions for the dilatational covariances contain constants which have a precise and definite physical significance; they are related to various integrals of the longitudinal velocity correlation. The pressure-dilation covariance is found to be a nonequilibrium phenomena related to the time rate of change of the internal energy and the kinetic energy of the turbulence. Also of interest is the fact that the representation for the dilatational dissipation in turbulence, with or without shear, features a dependence on the Reynolds number. This article is a documentation of an analytical investigation of the implications of a pseudo-sound theory for the effects of compressibility.

  2. Turbulence Generation in Combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-22

    flame length . This work is summarized in this section. I1.1 Model for Turbulent Burning Velocity For a range of turbulence conditions including...Variable density effects have been added in an approximation, and an expression for the length of jet flames has been developed. The flame length expression...of jet mixing and jet flame length data using fractals, College of Engineering, Energy Report E-86-02, Comell University, Ithaca, NY, 1986. Results

  3. Stochastic tools in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lumey, John L

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic Tools in Turbulence discusses the available mathematical tools to describe stochastic vector fields to solve problems related to these fields. The book deals with the needs of turbulence in relation to stochastic vector fields, particularly, on three-dimensional aspects, linear problems, and stochastic model building. The text describes probability distributions and densities, including Lebesgue integration, conditional probabilities, conditional expectations, statistical independence, lack of correlation. The book also explains the significance of the moments, the properties of the

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldreich, P.; Sridhar, S.

    1997-01-01

    In 1965, Kraichnan proposed that MHD turbulence occurs as a result of collisions between oppositely directed Alfvacute en wave packets. Recent work has generated some controversy over the nature of nonlinear couplings between colliding Alfvacute en waves. We find that the resolution to much of the confusion lies in the existence of a new type of turbulence, intermediate turbulence, in which the cascade of energy in the inertial range exhibits properties intermediate between those of weak and strong turbulent cascades. Some properties of intermediate MHD turbulence are the following: (1) in common with weak turbulent cascades, wave packets belonging to the inertial range are long-lived; (2) however, components of the strain tensor are so large that, similar to the situation in strong turbulence, perturbation theory is not applicable; (3) the breakdown of perturbation theory results from the divergence of neighboring field lines due to wave packets whose perturbations in velocity and magnetic fields are localized, but whose perturbations in displacement are not; (4) three-wave interactions dominate individual collisions between wave packets, but interactions of all orders n≥3 make comparable contributions to the intermediate turbulent energy cascade; (5) successive collisions are correlated since wave packets are distorted as they follow diverging field lines; (6) in common with the weak MHD cascade, there is no parallel cascade of energy, and the cascade to small perpendicular scales strengthens as it reaches higher wavenumbers; (7) for an appropriate weak excitation, there is a natural progression from a weak, through an intermediate, to a strong cascade. copyright 1997 The American Astronomical Society

  5. MULTIFLUID MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENT DECAY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downes, T. P.; O'Sullivan, S.

    2011-01-01

    It is generally believed that turbulence has a significant impact on the dynamics and evolution of molecular clouds and the star formation that occurs within them. Non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects are known to influence the nature of this turbulence. We present the results of a suite of 512 3 resolution simulations of the decay of initially super-Alfvenic and supersonic fully multifluid MHD turbulence. We find that ambipolar diffusion increases the rate of decay of the turbulence while the Hall effect has virtually no impact. The decay of the kinetic energy can be fitted as a power law in time and the exponent is found to be -1.34 for fully multifluid MHD turbulence. The power spectra of density, velocity, and magnetic field are all steepened significantly by the inclusion of non-ideal terms. The dominant reason for this steepening is ambipolar diffusion with the Hall effect again playing a minimal role except at short length scales where it creates extra structure in the magnetic field. Interestingly we find that, at least at these resolutions, the majority of the physics of multifluid turbulence can be captured by simply introducing fixed (in time and space) resistive terms into the induction equation without the need for a full multifluid MHD treatment. The velocity dispersion is also examined and, in common with previously published results, it is found not to be power law in nature.

  6. Storage shaft definitive closure plug and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dardaine, M.

    1992-01-01

    A definitive closure plug system for radioactive waste storage at any deepness, is presented. The inherent weight of the closure materials is used to set in the plug: these materials display an inclined sliding surface in such a way that when the closure material rests on a stable surface of the shaft storage materials, the relative sliding of the different materials tends to spread them towards the shaft internal wall so as to completely occlude the shaft

  7. On the factors governing water vapor turbulence mixing in the convective boundary layer over land: Concept and data analysis technique using ground-based lidar measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sandip

    2016-06-01

    The convective boundary layer (CBL) turbulence is the key process for exchanging heat, momentum, moisture and trace gases between the earth's surface and the lower part of the troposphere. The turbulence parameterization of the CBL is a challenging but important component in numerical models. In particular, correct estimation of CBL turbulence features, parameterization, and the determination of the contribution of eddy diffusivity are important for simulating convection initiation, and the dispersion of health hazardous air pollutants and Greenhouse gases. In general, measurements of higher-order moments of water vapor mixing ratio (q) variability yield unique estimates of turbulence in the CBL. Using the high-resolution lidar-derived profiles of q variance, third-order moment, and skewness and analyzing concurrent profiles of vertical velocity, potential temperature, horizontal wind and time series of near-surface measurements of surface flux and meteorological parameters, a conceptual framework based on bottom up approach is proposed here for the first time for a robust characterization of the turbulent structure of CBL over land so that our understanding on the processes governing CBL q turbulence could be improved. Finally, principal component analyses will be applied on the lidar-derived long-term data sets of q turbulence statistics to identify the meteorological factors and the dominant physical mechanisms governing the CBL turbulence features. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Turbulent transport across invariant canonical flux surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, J.B.; Callen, J.D.

    1994-07-01

    Net transport due to a combination of Coulomb collisions and turbulence effects in a plasma is investigated using a fluid moment description that allows for kinetic and nonlinear effects via closure relations. The model considered allows for ''ideal'' turbulent fluctuations that distort but preserve the topology of species-dependent canonical flux surfaces ψ number-sign,s triple-bond ∫ dF · B number-sign,s triple-bond ∇ x [A + (m s /q s )u s ] in which u s is the flow velocity of the fluid species. Equations for the net transport relative to these surfaces due to ''nonideal'' dissipative processes are found for the total number of particles and total entropy enclosed by a moving canonical flux surface. The corresponding particle transport flux is calculated using a toroidal axisymmetry approximation of the ideal surfaces. The resulting Lagrangian transport flux includes classical, neoclassical-like, and anomalous contributions and shows for the first time how these various contributions should be summed to obtain the total particle transport flux

  9. 100-D Ponds closure plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, S.W.

    1997-09-01

    The 100-D Ponds is a Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) unit on the Hanford Facility that received both dangerous and nonregulated waste. This Closure Plan (Rev. 1) for the 100-D Ponds TSD unit consists of a RCRA Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application (Rev. 3), a RCRA Closure Plan, and supporting information contained in the appendices to the plan. The closure plan consists of eight chapters containing facility description, process information, waste characteristics, and groundwater monitoring data. There are also chapters containing the closure strategy and performance standards. The strategy for the closure of the 100-D Ponds TSD unit is clean closure. Appendices A and B of the closure plan demonstrate that soil and groundwater beneath 100-D Ponds are below cleanup limits. All dangerous wastes or dangerous waste constituents or residues associated with the operation of the ponds have been removed, therefore, human health and the environment are protected. Discharges to the 100-D Ponds, which are located in the 100-DR-1 operable unit, were discontinued in June 1994. Contaminated sediment was removed from the ponds in August 1996. Subsequent sampling and analysis demonstrated that there is no contamination remaining in the ponds, therefore, this closure plan is a demonstration of clean closure

  10. Closure Welding of Plutonium Bearing Storage Containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannell, G.R.

    2002-01-01

    A key element in the Department of Energy (DOE) strategy for the stabilization, packaging and storage of plutonium-bearing materials involves closure welding of DOE-STD-3013 Outer Containers (3013 container). The 3013 container provides the primary barrier and pressure boundary preventing release of plutonium-bearing materials to the environment. The final closure (closure weld) of the 3013 container must be leaktight, structurally sound and meet DOE STD 3013 specified criteria. This paper focuses on the development, qualification and demonstration of the welding process for the closure welding of Hanford PFP 3013 outer containers

  11. Tearing instabilities in turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizawa, A.; Nakajima, N.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Effects of micro-turbulence on tearing instabilities are investigated by numerically solving a reduced set of two-fluid equations. Micro-turbulence excites both large-scale and small-scale Fourier modes through energy transfer due to nonlinear mode coupling. The energy transfer to large scale mode does not directly excite tearing instability but it gives an initiation of tearing instability. When tearing instability starts to grow, the excited small scale mode plays an important role. The mixing of magnetic flux by micro-turbulence is the dominant factor of non-ideal MHD effect at the resonant surface and it gives rise to magnetic reconnection which causes tearing instability. Tearing instabilities were investigated against static equilibrium or flowing equilibrium so far. On the other hand, the recent progress of computer power allows us to investigate interactions between turbulence and coherent modes such as tearing instabilities in magnetically confined plasmas by means of direct numerical simulations. In order to investigate effects of turbulence on tearing instabilities we consider a situation that tearing mode is destabilized in a quasi-equilibrium including micro-turbulence. We choose an initial equilibrium that is unstable against kinetic ballooning modes and tearing instabilities. Tearing instabilities are current driven modes and thus they are unstable for large scale Fourier modes. On the other hand kinetic ballooning modes are unstable for poloidal Fourier modes that are characterized by ion Larmor radius. The energy of kinetic ballooning modes spreads over wave number space through nonlinear Fourier mode coupling. We present that micro-turbulence affects tearing instabilities in two different ways by three-dimensional numerical simulation of a reduced set of two-fluid equations. One is caused by energy transfer to large scale modes, the other is caused by energy transfer to small scale modes. The former is the excitation of initial

  12. Near-Wall Turbulence Modelling of Rotating and Curved Shear Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Bjoern Anders

    1997-12-31

    This thesis deals with verification and refinement of turbulence models within the framework of the Reynolds-averaged approach. It pays special attention to modelling the near-wall region, where the turbulence is strongly non-homogeneous and anisotropic. It also studies in detail the effects associated with an imposed rotation of the reference frame or streamline curvature. The objective with near-wall turbulence closure modelling is to formulate a set of equations governing single point turbulence statistics, which can be solved in the region of the flow which extends to the wall. This is in contrast to the commonly adopted wall-function approach in which the wall-boundary conditions are replaced by matching conditions in the logarithmic region. The near-wall models allow more flexibility by not requiring any such universal behaviour. Assessment of the novel elliptic relaxation approach to model the proximity of a solid boundary reveals an encouraging potential used in conjunction with second-moment and eddy-viscosity closures. The most natural level of closure modelling to predict flows affected by streamline curvatures or an imposed rotation of the reference frame is at the second-moment closure (SMC) level. Although SMCs naturally accounts for the effects of system rotation, the usual application of a scalar dissipation rate equation is shown to require ad hoc corrections in some cases in order to give good results. The elliptic relaxation approach is also used in conjunction with non-linear pressure-strain models and very encouraging results are obtained for rotating flows. Rotational induced secondary motions are vital to predicting the effects of system rotation. Some severe weaknesses of non-linear pressure-strain models are also indicated. Finally, a modelling methodology for anisotropic dissipation in nearly homogeneous turbulence are proposed. 84 refs., 56 figs., 16 tabs.

  13. Closure for spent-fuel transport and storage containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahner, S.; Knackstedt, H.G.; Srostlik, P.

    1980-01-01

    The container has a transport closure and a shielding closure. This shielding closure consists of two pieces (double closure system), which can be fartened to one another like a bayonet fixing. A central motion of rotation is enough to open the closure. It can be done remote-controlled as well as manually. (DG) [de

  14. Statistically accurate low-order models for uncertainty quantification in turbulent dynamical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapsis, Themistoklis P; Majda, Andrew J

    2013-08-20

    A framework for low-order predictive statistical modeling and uncertainty quantification in turbulent dynamical systems is developed here. These reduced-order, modified quasilinear Gaussian (ROMQG) algorithms apply to turbulent dynamical systems in which there is significant linear instability or linear nonnormal dynamics in the unperturbed system and energy-conserving nonlinear interactions that transfer energy from the unstable modes to the stable modes where dissipation occurs, resulting in a statistical steady state; such turbulent dynamical systems are ubiquitous in geophysical and engineering turbulence. The ROMQG method involves constructing a low-order, nonlinear, dynamical system for the mean and covariance statistics in the reduced subspace that has the unperturbed statistics as a stable fixed point and optimally incorporates the indirect effect of non-Gaussian third-order statistics for the unperturbed system in a systematic calibration stage. This calibration procedure is achieved through information involving only the mean and covariance statistics for the unperturbed equilibrium. The performance of the ROMQG algorithm is assessed on two stringent test cases: the 40-mode Lorenz 96 model mimicking midlatitude atmospheric turbulence and two-layer baroclinic models for high-latitude ocean turbulence with over 125,000 degrees of freedom. In the Lorenz 96 model, the ROMQG algorithm with just a single mode captures the transient response to random or deterministic forcing. For the baroclinic ocean turbulence models, the inexpensive ROMQG algorithm with 252 modes, less than 0.2% of the total, captures the nonlinear response of the energy, the heat flux, and even the one-dimensional energy and heat flux spectra.

  15. High-Resolution Global Modeling of the Effects of Subgrid-Scale Clouds and Turbulence on Precipitating Cloud Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogenschutz, Peter [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Moeng, Chin-Hoh [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-10-13

    The PI’s at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Chin-Hoh Moeng and Peter Bogenschutz, have primarily focused their time on the implementation of the Simplified-Higher Order Turbulence Closure (SHOC; Bogenschutz and Krueger 2013) to the Multi-scale Modeling Framework (MMF) global model and testing of SHOC on deep convective cloud regimes.

  16. Implications of Navier-Stokes turbulence theory for plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, David

    1977-01-01

    A brief discussion of Navier-Stokes turbulence theory is given with particular reference to the two dimensional case. The MHD turbulence is introduced with possible applications of techniques developed in Navier-Stokes theory. Turbulence in Vlasov plasma is also discussed from the point of view of the ''direct interaction approximation'' (DIA). (A.K.)

  17. A mathematical model of turbulence for turbulent boundary layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira Filho, H.D.V.

    1977-01-01

    Equations to the so called Reynolds stress-tensor (kinetic turbulent energy) and dissipation rate are developed and a turbulence flux approximation used. Our ideia here is to use those equations in order to develop an economical and fast numeircal procedure for computation of turbulent boundary layer. (author) [pt

  18. Transitional nuclei near shell closures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, G. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Pai, H. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064, India and Present Address: Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-08-14

    High spin states in Bismuth and Thallium nuclei near the Z = 82 shell closure and Cesium nuclei near the N = 82 shell closure in A = 190 and A = 130 regions, respectively, have been experimentally investigated using heavy-ion fusion evaporation reaction and by detecting the gamma rays using the Indian National Gamma Array (INGA). Interesting shape properties in these transitional nuclei have been observed. The results were compared with the neighboring nuclei in these two regions. The total Routhian surface (TRS) calculations have been performed for a better understanding of the observed properties. In mass region A = 190, a change in shape from spherical to deformed has been observd around neutron number N = 112 for the Bi (Z = 83) isotopes with proton number above the magic gap Z = 82, whereas, the shape of Tl (Z = 81) isotopes with proton number below the magic gap Z = 82 remains stable as a function of neutron number. An important transition from aplanar to planar configuration of angular momentum vectors leading to the occurance of nuclar chirality and magnetic rotation, respectively, has been proposed for the unique parity πh{sub 11/2}⊗νh{sub 11/2} configuration in Cs isotopes in the mass region A ∼ 130 around neutron number N = 79. These results are in commensurate with the TRS calculations.

  19. Criticality assessment of LLRWDF closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrack, A.G.; Weber, J.H.; Woody, N.D.

    1992-01-01

    During the operation of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF), large amounts (greater than 100 kg) of enriched uranium (EU) were buried. This EU came primarily from the closing and decontamination of the Naval Fuels Facility in the time period from 1987--1989. Waste Management Operations (WMO) procedures were used to keep the EU boxes separated to prevent possible criticality during normal operation. Closure of the LLRWDF is currently being planned, and waste stabilization by Dynamic Compaction (DC) is proposed. Dynamic compaction will crush the containers in the LLRWDF and result in changes in their geometry. Research of the LLRWDF operations and record keeping practices have shown that the EU contents of trenches are known, but details of the arrangement of the contents cannot be proven. Reviews of the trench contents, combined with analysis of potential critical configurations, revealed that some portions of the LLRWDF can be expected to be free of criticality concerns while other sections have credible probabilities for the assembly of a critical mass, even in the uncompacted configuration. This will have an impact on the closure options and which trenches can be compacted

  20. Turbulent black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-27

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability-which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold-akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies-a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2+1)-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids.