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Sample records for thiol redox status

  1. Integration of the thiol redox status with cytokine response to physical training in professional basketball players.

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    Zembron-Lacny, A; Slowinska-Lisowska, M; Ziemba, A

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the plasma markers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity and cytokines, and their relationship with thiol redox status of basketball players during training. Sixteen professional players of the Polish Basketball Extraleague participated in the study. The study was performed during the preparatory period and the play-off round. Markers of ROS activity (lipid peroxidation TBARS, protein carbonylation PC) and reduced glutathione (GSH) demonstrated regularity over time, i.e. TBARS, PC and GSH were elevated at the beginning and decreased at the end of training periods. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) was not affected by exercise training. Thiol redox status (GSH(total)-2GSSG/GSSG) correlated with TBARS and PC in both training periods. The level of interleukin-6 (IL-6) was increased and positively correlated with thiol redox (r=0.423) in the preparatory period, whereas tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) was increased and inversely correlated with thiol redox (r= 0.509) in the play-off round. The present study showed significant shifts in markers of ROS activity, thiol redox status and inflammatory mediators (IL-6, TNFalpha) following professional sport training as well as correlation between changes in thiol redox and cytokine response.

  2. Differential regulation of tissue thiol-disulfide redox status in a murine model of peritonitis

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    Benton Shana M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutathione (GSH/glutathione disulfide (GSSG and cysteine (Cys/cystine (CySS are major redox pools with important roles in cytoprotection. We determined the impact of septic peritonitis on thiol-disulfide redox status in mice. Methods FVB/N mice (6–12 week old; 8/group underwent laparotomy with cecal ligation and puncture (CLP or laparotomy alone (control. Sections of ileum, colon, lung and liver were obtained and GSH, GSSG, Cys and CySS concentrations determined by HPLC 24 h after laparotomy. Redox potential [Eh in millivolts (mV] of the GSH/GSSG and Cys/CySS pools was calculated using the Nernst equation. Data were analyzed by ANOVA (mean ± SE. Results GSH/GSSG Eh in ileum, colon, and liver was significantly oxidized in septic mice versus control mice (ileum: septic −202±4 versus control −228±2 mV; colon: -195±8 versus −214±1 mV; and liver: -194±3 vs. -210±1 mV, all Ph was unchanged with CLP, while liver and lung Cys/CySS Eh became significantly more reducing (liver: septic = −103±3 versus control −90±2 mV; lung: -101±5 versus −81±1 mV, each P Conclusions Septic peritonitis induced by CLP oxidizes ileal and colonic GSH/GSSG redox but Cys/CySS Eh remains unchanged in these intestinal tissues. In liver, CLP oxidizes the GSH/GSSG redox pool and CyS/CySS Eh becomes more reducing; in lung, CLP does not alter GSH/GSSG Eh, and Cys/CySS Eh is less oxidized. CLP-induced infection/inflammation differentially regulates major thiol-disulfide redox pools in this murine model.

  3. Changes of muscle-derived cytokines in relation to thiol redox status and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

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    Zembron-Lacny, A; Naczk, M; Gajewski, M; Ostapiuk-Karolczuk, J; Dziewiecka, H; Kasperska, A; Szyszka, K

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the levels of the plasma muscle-derived cytokines (myokines) and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) after muscle damage triggered by different exercises, and to demonstrate the relationships between RONS, thiol redox status and myokines. Sixteen young men participated in a 90-min run at 65% VO2max (Ex.1) or 90-min run at 65% VO2max finished with a 15-min eccentric phase (Ex.2, downhill running). Plasma samples were collected before and at 20 min, 24 h and 48 h after exercise. The exercise trials significantly elevated the concentrations of plasma hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and 8-isoprostane at 20 min rest. Myokines IL-6 and IL-10 increased at 20 min rest while IL-1β and TNFα increased at 24 h rest following both running. Ex.2 caused a significant increase in nitric oxide (NO), IL-6, IL-10 and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels. Thiol redox status (GSH(total)-2GSSG/GSSG) decreased by about 30% after Ex.2 as compared to Ex.1. H2O2) and NO directly correlated with IL-6, IL-10, IL-1β, TNFα and glutathione. These results show that eccentric work is an important factor that enhances the production of RONS and muscle-derived cytokines, and that there is a possible participation of thiol redox status in the release of myokines to blood.

  4. Quantifying the global cellular thiol-disulfide status

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    Hansen, Rosa E; Roth, Doris; Winther, Jakob R

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the redox status of protein thiols is of central importance to protein structure and folding and that glutathione is an important low-molecular-mass redox regulator. However, the total cellular pools of thiols and disulfides and their relative abundance have never been...... cell types. However, when cells are exposed to a sublethal dose of the thiol-specific oxidant diamide, PSSG levels increase to >15% of all protein cysteine. Glutathione is typically characterized as the "cellular redox buffer"; nevertheless, our data show that protein thiols represent a larger active...

  5. In vivo oxidative stress alters thiol redox status of peroxiredoxin 1 and 6 and impairs rat sperm quality

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    Liu, Yannan; O’Flaherty, Cristian

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress, the imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant activity is a major culprit of male infertility. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) are major antioxidant enzymes of mammalian spermatozoa and are thiol oxidized and inactivated by ROS in a dose-dependent manner. Their deficiency and/or inactivation have been associated with men infertility. The aim of this study was to elucidate the impact of oxidative stress, generated by the in vivo tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tert-BHP) treatment on rat epididymal spermatozoa during their maturation process. Adult Sprague-Dawley males were treated with μmoles tert-BHP/kg or saline (control) per day intraperitoneal for 15 days. Lipid peroxidation (2-thibarbituric acid reactive substances assay), total amount and thiol oxidation of PRDXs along with the total amount of superoxide dismutase (SOD), motility and DNA oxidation (8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine) were determined in epididymal spermatozoa. Total amount of PRDXs and catalase and thiol oxidation of PRDXs were determined in caput and cauda epididymis. While animals were not affected by treatment, their epididymal spermatozoa have decreased motility, increased levels of DNA oxidation and lipid peroxidation along with increased PRDXs (and not SOD) amounts. Moreover, sperm PRDXs were highly thiol oxidized. There was a differential regulation in the expression of PRDX1 and PRDX6 in the epididymis that suggests a segment-specific role for PRDXs. In conclusion, PRDXs are increased in epididymal spermatozoa in an attempt to fight against the oxidative stress generated by tert-BHP in the epididymis. These findings highlight the role of PRDXs in the protection of sperm function and DNA integrity during epididymal maturation. PMID:26823067

  6. A robust and versatile mass spectrometry platform for comprehensive assessment of the thiol redox metabolome

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    T.R. Sutton

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Several diseases are associated with perturbations in redox signaling and aberrant hydrogen sulfide metabolism, and numerous analytical methods exist for the measurement of the sulfur-containing species affected. However, uncertainty remains about their concentrations and speciation in cells/biofluids, perhaps in part due to differences in sample processing and detection principles. Using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography in combination with electrospray-ionization tandem mass spectrometry we here outline a specific and sensitive platform for the simultaneous measurement of 12 analytes, including total and free thiols, their disulfides and sulfide in complex biological matrices such as blood, saliva and urine. Total assay run time is < 10 min, enabling high-throughput analysis. Enhanced sensitivity and avoidance of artifactual thiol oxidation is achieved by taking advantage of the rapid reaction of sulfhydryl groups with N-ethylmaleimide. We optimized the analytical procedure for detection and separation conditions, linearity and precision including three stable isotope labelled standards. Its versatility for future more comprehensive coverage of the thiol redox metabolome was demonstrated by implementing additional analytes such as methanethiol, N-acetylcysteine, and coenzyme A. Apparent plasma sulfide concentrations were found to vary substantially with sample pretreatment and nature of the alkylating agent. In addition to protein binding in the form of mixed disulfides (S-thiolation a significant fraction of aminothiols and sulfide appears to be also non-covalently associated with proteins. Methodological accuracy was tested by comparing the plasma redox status of 10 healthy human volunteers to a well-established protocol optimized for reduced/oxidized glutathione. In a proof-of-principle study a deeper analysis of the thiol redox metabolome including free reduced/oxidized as well as bound thiols and sulfide was performed

  7. Are free radicals involved in thiol-based redox signaling?

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    Winterbourn, Christine C

    2015-03-01

    Cells respond to many stimuli by transmitting signals through redox-regulated pathways. It is generally accepted that in many instances signal transduction is via reversible oxidation of thiol proteins, although there is uncertainty about the specific redox transformations involved. The prevailing view is that thiol oxidation occurs by a two electron mechanism, most commonly involving hydrogen peroxide. Free radicals, on the other hand, are considered as damaging species and not generally regarded as important in cell signaling. This paper examines whether it is justified to dismiss radicals or whether they could have a signaling role. Although there is no direct evidence that radicals are involved in transmitting thiol-based redox signals, evidence is presented that they are generated in cells when these signaling pathways are activated. Radicals produce the same thiol oxidation products as two electron oxidants, although by a different mechanism, and at this point radical-mediated pathways should not be dismissed. There are unresolved issues about how radical mechanisms could achieve sufficient selectivity, but this could be possible through colocalization of radical-generating and signal-transducing proteins. Colocalization is also likely to be important for nonradical signaling mechanisms and identification of such associations should be a priority for advancing the field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. New iodo-acetamido cyanines for labeling cysteine thiol residues. A strategy for evaluating plasma proteins and their oxido-redox status.

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    Bruschi, Maurizio; Grilli, Stefano; Candiano, Giovanni; Fabbroni, Serena; Della Ciana, Leopoldo; Petretto, Andrea; Santucci, Laura; Urbani, Andrea; Gusmano, Rosanna; Scolari, Francesco; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2009-01-01

    Two new iodoacetamide-substituted cyanines, C3NIASO3 and C5NIASO3, were synthesized starting from hemicyanine and were utilized for labeling plasma proteins. Specificity, sensitivity and feasibility for SH residues was tested utilizing an equimolar mixture of standard proteins and with normal plasma. Oxidized plasma proteins following H(2)O(2 )exposure and plasma from patients with focal glomerulosclerosis were analyzed as models of altered protein oxido-redox status. Following optimization of the assay (dye/protein ratio, pH), C3NIASO3 and C5NIASO3 gave a sensitivity slightly better than N-hydroxysuccinimidyl dyes for plasma proteins and were successfully employed for differential display electrophoresis (DIGE). Twenty-nine proteins were detected in normal plasma after 2-DE while less proteins were detected in plasma of patients with glomerulosclerosis. Following massive 'in vitro' oxidation with H(2)O(2), C3NIASO3 and C5NIASO3 failed to detect any residual SH, implicating massive oxidation. In conclusion, this study describes the synthesis of two new iodoacetamide cyanines that can be utilized for the analysis of plasma proteins with 2-DE and DIGE. They are also indicated for the definition of the oxido-redox status of proteins and were successfully utilized to extend the analysis of oxidation damage in patients with glomerulosclerosis.

  9. Redox regulation of Rac1 by thiol oxidation

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    Hobbs, G. Aaron; Mitchell, Lauren E.; Arrington, Megan E.; Gunawardena, Harsha P.; DeCristo, Molly J.; Loeser, Richard F.; Chen, Xian; Cox, Adrienne D.; Campbell, Sharon L.

    2016-01-01

    The Rac1 GTPase is an essential and ubiquitous protein that signals through numerous pathways to control critical cellular processes, including cell growth, morphology, and motility. Rac1 deletion is embryonic lethal, and its dysregulation or mutation can promote cancer, arthritis, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders. Rac1 activity is highly regulated by modulatory proteins and posttranslational modifications. Whereas much attention has been devoted to guanine nucleotide exchange factors that act on Rac1 to promote GTP loading and Rac1 activation, cellular oxidants may also regulate Rac1 activation by promoting guanine nucleotide exchange. Herein, we show that Rac1 contains a redox-sensitive cysteine (Cys18) that can be selectively oxidized at physiological pH because of its lowered pKa. Consistent with these observations, we show that Rac1 is glutathiolated in primary chondrocytes. Oxidation of Cys18 by glutathione greatly perturbs Rac1 guanine nucleotide binding and promotes nucleotide exchange. As aspartate substitutions have been previously used to mimic cysteine oxidation, we characterized the biochemical properties of Rac1C18D. We also evaluated Rac1C18S as a redox-insensitive variant and found that it retains structural and biochemical properties similar to those of Rac1WT but is resistant to thiol oxidation. In addition, Rac1C18D, but not Rac1C18S, shows greatly enhanced nucleotide exchange, similar to that observed for Rac1 oxidation by glutathione. We employed Rac1C18D in cell-based studies to assess whether this fast-cycling variant, which mimics Rac1 oxidation by glutathione, affects Rac1 activity and function. Expression of Rac1C18D in Swiss 3T3 cells showed greatly enhanced GTP-bound Rac1 relative to Rac1WT and the redox-insensitive Rac1C18S variant. Moreover, expression of Rac1C18D in HEK-293T cells greatly promoted lamellipodia formation. Our results suggest that Rac1 oxidation at Cys18 is a novel posttranslational modification that

  10. Characterization of plasma thiol redox potential in a common marmoset model of aging

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    James R. Roede

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to its short lifespan, ease of use and age-related pathologies that mirror those observed in humans, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus is poised to become a standard nonhuman primate model of aging. Blood and extracellular fluid possess two major thiol-dependent redox nodes involving cysteine (Cys, cystine (CySS, glutathione (GSH and glutathione disulfide (GSSG. Alteration in these plasma redox nodes significantly affects cellular physiology, and oxidation of the plasma Cys/CySS redox potential (EhCySS is associated with aging and disease risk in humans. The purpose of this study was to determine age-related changes in plasma redox metabolites and corresponding redox potentials (Eh to further validate the marmoset as a nonhuman primate model of aging. We measured plasma thiol redox states in marmosets and used existing human data with multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS to model the relationships between age and redox metabolites. A classification accuracy of 70.2% and an AUC of 0.703 were achieved using the MARS model built from the marmoset redox data to classify the human samples as young or old. These results show that common marmosets provide a useful model for thiol redox biology of aging.

  11. Redox regulation of mitochondrial proteins and proteomes by cysteine thiol switches.

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    Nietzel, Thomas; Mostertz, Jörg; Hochgräfe, Falko; Schwarzländer, Markus

    2017-03-01

    Mitochondria are hotspots of cellular redox biochemistry. Respiration as a defining mitochondrial function is made up of a series of electron transfers that are ultimately coupled to maintaining the proton motive force, ATP production and cellular energy supply. The individual reaction steps involved require tight control and flexible regulation to maintain energy and redox balance in the cell under fluctuating demands. Redox regulation by thiol switching has been a long-standing candidate mechanism to support rapid adjustment of mitochondrial protein function at the posttranslational level. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of cysteine thiol switches in the mitochondrial proteome with a focus on their operation in vivo. We assess the conceptual basis for thiol switching in mitochondria and discuss to what extent insights gained from in vitro studies may be valid in vivo, considering thermodynamic, kinetic and structural constraints. We compare functional proteomic approaches that have been used to assess mitochondrial protein thiol switches, including thioredoxin trapping, redox difference gel electrophoresis (redoxDIGE), isotope-coded affinity tag (OxICAT) and iodoacetyl tandem mass tag (iodoTMT) labelling strategies. We discuss conditions that may favour active thiol switching in mitochondrial proteomes in vivo, and appraise recent advances in dissecting their impact using combinations of in vivo redox sensing and quantitative redox proteomics. Finally we focus on four central facets of mitochondrial biology, aging, carbon metabolism, energy coupling and electron transport, exemplifying the current emergence of a mechanistic understanding of mitochondrial regulation by thiol switching in living plants and animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Cooperative functions of manganese and thiol redox system against oxidative stress in human spermatozoa

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    Amrit Kaur Bansal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: In this study, the effects of 0.1 mM Mn 2+ on thiol components (total thiols [TSH], glutathione reduced [GSH], glutathione oxidized [GSSG] and redox ratio [GSH/ GSSG] have been determined in human spermatozoa. Settings and Design: The subjects of the study were healthy males having more than 75% motility and 80 x 10 6 sperms/mL. Materials and Methods: Fresh semen was suspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS (pH 7.2 and this suspension was divided into eight equal fractions. All fractions, control (containing PBS and experimental (treated/untreated with [ferrous ascorbate, FeAA - 200 FeSO 4 μM, 1000 μM ascorbic acid, nicotine (0.5 mM and FeAA + nicotine], supplemented/unsupplemented with Mn 2+ [0.1 mM], were incubated for 2 h at 378C. These fractions were assessed for determining the thiol components. Statistical Analysis: The data were statistically analyzed by Students " t" test. Results and Conclusions: Ferrous ascorbate, nicotine and ferrous ascorbate + nicotine induced oxidative stress and decreased GSH and redox ratio (GSH/GSSG ratio but increased the TSH and GSSG levels. Mn 2+ supplementation improved TSH, GSH and redox ratio (GSH/GSSG but decreased the GSSG level under normal and oxidative stress conditions. Thiol groups serve as defense mechanisms of sperm cells to fight against oxidative stress induced by stress inducers such as ferrous ascorbate, nicotine and their combination (ferrous ascorbate + nicotine. In addition, Mn 2+ supplementation maintains the thiol level by reducing oxidative stress.

  13. Direct determination of the redox status of cysteine residues in proteins in vivo

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    Hara, Satoshi [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta 4259-R1-8, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Tatenaka, Yuki; Ohuchi, Yuya [Dojindo Laboratories, 2025-5 Tabaru, Mashiki-machi, Kumamoto 861-2202 (Japan); Hisabori, Toru, E-mail: thisabor@res.titech.ac.jp [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta 4259-R1-8, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • A new DNA-maleimide which is cleaved by UV irradiation, DNA-PCMal, was developed. • DNA-PCMal can be used like DNA-Mal to analyze the redox state of cysteine residues. • It is useful for detecting the thiol redox status of a protein in vivo by Western blotting method. • Thus, DNA-PCMal can be a powerful tool for redox proteomics analysis. - Abstract: The redox states of proteins in cells are key factors in many cellular processes. To determine the redox status of cysteinyl thiol groups in proteins in vivo, we developed a new maleimide reagent, a photocleavable maleimide-conjugated single stranded DNA (DNA-PCMal). The DNA moiety of DNA-PCMal is easily removed by UV-irradiation, allowing DNA-PCMal to be used in Western blotting applications. Thereby the state of thiol groups in intracellular proteins can be directly evaluated. This new maleimide compound can provide information concerning redox proteins in vivo, which is important for our understanding of redox networks in the cell.

  14. Species-Specific Thiol-Disulfide Equilibrium Constant: A Tool To Characterize Redox Transitions of Biological Importance.

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    Mirzahosseini, Arash; Somlyay, Máté; Noszál, Béla

    2015-08-13

    Microscopic redox equilibrium constants, a new species-specific type of physicochemical parameters, were introduced and determined to quantify thiol-disulfide equilibria of biological significance. The thiol-disulfide redox equilibria of glutathione with cysteamine, cysteine, and homocysteine were approached from both sides, and the equilibrium mixtures were analyzed by quantitative NMR methods to characterize the highly composite, co-dependent acid-base and redox equilibria. The directly obtained, pH-dependent, conditional constants were then decomposed by a new evaluation method, resulting in pH-independent, microscopic redox equilibrium constants for the first time. The 80 different, microscopic redox equilibrium constant values show close correlation with the respective thiolate basicities and provide sound means for the development of potent agents against oxidative stress.

  15. Thiol-based redox regulation in sexual plant reproduction: new insights and perspectives

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    Jose A Traverso

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The success of sexual reproduction in plants involves (i the proper formation of the plant gametophytes (pollen and embryo sac containing the gametes, (ii the accomplishment of specific interactions between pollen grains and the stigma, which subsequently lead to (iii the fusion of the gametes and eventually to (iv the seed setting. Owing to the lack of mobility, plants have developed specific regulatory mechanisms to control all developmental events underlying the sexual plant reproduction according to environmental challenges. Over the last decade, redox regulation and signaling have come into sight as crucial mechanisms able to manage critical stages during sexual plant reproduction. This regulation involves a complex redox network which includes reactive oxygen species (ROS, reactive nitrogen species (RNS, glutathione and other classic buffer molecules or antioxidant proteins, and some thiol/disulphide-containing proteins belonging to the thioredoxin superfamily, like glutaredoxins (GRXs or thioredoxins (TRXs. These proteins participate as critical elements not only in the switch between the mitotic to the meiotic cycle but also at further developmental stages of microsporogenesis. They are also implicated in the regulation of pollen rejection as the result of self incompatibility. In addition, they display precise space-temporal patterns of expression and are present in specific localizations like the stigmatic papillae or the mature pollen, although their functions and subcellular localizations are not clear yet. In this review we summarize insights and perspectives about the presence of thiol/disulphide-containing proteins in plant reproduction, taking into account the general context of the cell redox network.

  16. Thiol-based redox signaling in the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis

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    Pierre eFrendo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In nitrogen poor soils legumes establish a symbiotic interaction with rhizobia that results in the formation of root nodules. These are unique plant organs where bacteria differentiate into bacteroids, which express the nitrogenase enzyme complex that reduces atmospheric N2 to ammonia. Nodule metabolism requires a tight control of the concentrations of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS so that they can perform useful signaling roles while avoiding nitro-oxidative damage. In nodules a thiol-dependent regulatory network that senses, transmits and responds to redox changes is starting to be elucidated. A combination of enzymatic, immunological, pharmacological and molecular analyses has allowed to conclude that glutathione and its legume-specific homolog, homoglutathione, are abundant in meristematic and infected cells, their spatio-temporally distribution is correlated with the corresponding (homoglutathione synthetase activities, and are crucial for nodule development and function. Glutathione is at high concentrations in the bacteroids and at moderate amounts in the mitochondria, cytosol and nuclei. Less information is available on other components of the network. The expression of multiple isoforms of glutathione peroxidases, peroxiredoxins, thioredoxins, glutaredoxins and NADPH-thioredoxin reductases has been detected in nodule cells using antibodies and proteomics. Peroxiredoxins and thioredoxins are essential to regulate and in some cases to detoxify RONS in nodules. Further research is necessary to clarify the regulation of the expression and activity of thiol redox-active proteins in response to abiotic, biotic and developmental cues, their interactions with downstream targets by disulfide-exchange reactions, and their participation in signaling cascades. The availability of mutants and transgenic lines will be crucial to facilitate systematic investigations into the function of the various proteins in the legume

  17. The redox status of cystinotic fibroblasts.

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    Vitvitsky, Victor; Witcher, Marc; Banerjee, Ruma; Thoene, Jess

    2010-04-01

    A key unresolved question in the pathogenesis of phenotype development in nephropathic cystinosis is whether intralysosomal cystine, the hallmark of this lethal inborn error of metabolism, alters cytoplasmic redox potential. Variable findings on this issue have been reported. This study of fetal and non-fetal skin and lung-derived cystinotic fibroblasts compared to origin and age-matched normal control fibroblasts reveals that cystinotic cells do not exhibit redox perturbations. We find that the steady-state redox status as assessed by the [GSH]/[GSSG] ratio, an indicator of the intracellular redox poise, is unchanged in cystinotic cells. Furthermore, the dependence of the intracellular GSH and cysteine pool sizes and the [GSH]/[GSSG] ratio are similarly dependent on the two major sources of cysteine, i.e. the transsulfuration pathway and the plasma membrane cystine transporter, xc(-), in both cystinotic and control cells, and the presence of lysosomal cystine has no measurable effect on the redox status of these cells. Hence, mechanisms other than cytosolic redox perturbations are involved in the etiology of nephropathic cystinosis. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Location of the redox-active thiols of ribonucleotide reductase: sequences similarity between the Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus leichmannii enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, A.N.I.; Ashley, G.W.; Stubbe, J.

    1987-01-01

    The redox-active thiols of Escherichia coli ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase and of Lactobacillus leichmannii ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase have been located by a procedure involving (1) prereduction of enzyme with dithiothreitol, (2) specific oxidation of the redox-active thiols by treatment with substrate in the absence of exogenous reductant, (3) alkylation of other thiols with iodoacetamide, and (4) reduction of the disulfides with dithiothreitol and alkylation with [1- 14 C]iodoacetamide. The dithiothreitol-reduce E. coli B1 subunit is able to convert 3 equiv of CDP to dCDP and is labeled with 5.4 equiv of 14 C. Sequencing of tryptic peptides shows that 2.8 equiv of 14 C is on cysteines-752 and -757 at the C-terminus of B1, while 1.0-1.5 equiv of 14 C is on cysteines-222 and -227. It thus appears that two sets of redox-active dithiols are involved in substrate reduction. The L. leichmannii reductase is able to convert 1.1 equiv of CTP to dCTP and is labeled with 2.1 equiv of 14 C. Sequencing of tryptic peptides shows that 1.4 equiv of 14 C is located on the two cysteines of C-E-G-G-A-C-P-I-K. This peptide shows remarkable and unexpected similarity to the thiol-containing region of the C-terminal peptide of E. coli B1, C-E-S-G-A-C-K-I

  19. Thiol-redox antioxidants protect against lung vascular endothelial cytoskeletal alterations caused by pulmonary fibrosis inducer, bleomycin: comparison between classical thiol-protectant, N-acetyl-l-cysteine, and novel thiol antioxidant, N,N′-bis-2-mercaptoethyl isophthalamide

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    Patel, Rishi B.; Kotha, Sainath R.; Sauers, Lynn A.; Malireddy, Smitha; Gurney, Travis O.; Gupta, Niladri N.; Elton, Terry S.; Magalang, Ulysses J.; Marsh, Clay B.; Haley, Boyd E.; Parinandi, Narasimham L.

    2012-01-01

    Lung vascular alterations and pulmonary hypertension associated with oxidative stress have been reported to be involved in idiopathic lung fibrosis (ILF). Therefore, here, we hypothesize that the widely used lung fibrosis inducer, bleomycin, would cause cytoskeletal rearrangement through thiol-redox alterations in the cultured lung vascular endothelial cell (EC) monolayers. We exposed the monolayers of primary bovine pulmonary artery ECs to bleomycin (10 µg) and studied the cytotoxicity, cytoskeletal rearrangements, and the macromolecule (fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran, 70,000 mol. wt.) paracellular transport in the absence and presence of two thiol-redox protectants, the classic water-soluble N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) and the novel hydrophobic N,N′-bis-2-mercaptoethyl isophthalamide (NBMI). Our results revealed that bleomycin induced cytotoxicity (lactate dehydrogenase leak), morphological alterations (rounding of cells and filipodia formation), and cytoskeletal rearrangement (actin stress fiber formation and alterations of tight junction proteins, ZO-1 and occludin) in a dose-dependent fashion. Furthermore, our study demonstrated the formation of reactive oxygen species, loss of thiols (glutathione, GSH), EC barrier dysfunction (decrease of transendothelial electrical resistance), and enhanced paracellular transport (leak) of macromolecules. The observed bleomycin-induced EC alterations were attenuated by both NAC and NBMI, revealing that the novel hydrophobic thiol-protectant, NBMI, was more effective at µM concentrations as compared to the water-soluble NAC that was effective at mM concentrations in offering protection against the bleomycin-induced EC alterations. Overall, the results of the current study suggested the central role of thiol-redox in vascular EC dysfunction associated with ILF. PMID:22409285

  20. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Aspects of Cellular Thiol-Disulfide Redox Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristine Steen; Hansen, Rosa Erritzøe; Winther, Jakob R

    2009-01-01

    that affect the rate of thiol-disulfide exchange and stability of disulfide bonds are discussed within the framework of the underlying chemical foundations. This includes the effect of thiol acidity (pKa), the local electrostatic environment, molecular strain and entropy. Even though a thiol...

  1. Thiol Redox Sensitivity of Two Key Enzymes of Heme Biosynthesis and Pentose Phosphate Pathways: Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase and Transketolase

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    Brian McDonagh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (Hem12p and transketolase (Tkl1p are key mediators of two critical processes within the cell, heme biosynthesis, and the nonoxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP. The redox properties of both Hem12p and Tkl1p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated using proteomic techniques (SRM and label-free quantification and biochemical assays in cell extracts and in vitro with recombinant proteins. The in vivo analysis revealed an increase in oxidized Cys-peptides in the absence of Grx2p, and also after treatment with H2O2 in the case of Tkl1p, without corresponding changes in total protein, demonstrating a true redox response. Out of three detectable Cys residues in Hem12p, only the conserved residue Cys52 could be modified by glutathione and efficiently deglutathionylated by Grx2p, suggesting a possible redox control mechanism for heme biosynthesis. On the other hand, Tkl1p activity was sensitive to thiol redox modification and although Cys622 could be glutathionylated to a limited extent, it was not a natural substrate of Grx2p. The human orthologues of both enzymes have been involved in certain cancers and possess Cys residues equivalent to those identified as redox sensitive in yeast. The possible implication for redox regulation in the context of tumour progression is put forward.

  2. Redox regulation of peroxiredoxin and proteinases by ascorbate and thiols during pea root nodule senescence.

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    Groten, Karin; Dutilleul, Christelle; van Heerden, Philippus D R; Vanacker, Hélène; Bernard, Stéphanie; Finkemeier, Iris; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Foyer, Christine H

    2006-02-20

    Redox factors contributing to nodule senescence were studied in pea. The abundance of the nodule cytosolic peroxiredoxin but not the mitochondrial peroxiredoxin protein was modulated by ascorbate. In contrast to redox-active antioxidants such as ascorbate and cytosolic peroxiredoxin that decreased during nodule development, maximal extractable nodule proteinase activity increased progressively as the nodules aged. Cathepsin-like activities were constant throughout development but serine and cysteine proteinase activities increased during senescence. Senescence-induced cysteine proteinase activity was inhibited by cysteine, dithiotreitol, or E-64. Senescence-dependent decreases in redox-active factors, particularly ascorbate and peroxiredoxin favour decreased redox-mediated inactivation of cysteine proteinases.

  3. Interplay between redox status and inflammasome activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubartelli, A.; Gattorno, M.; Netea, M.G.; Dinarello, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Several inflammation-related processes, including inflammasome activation and interleukin (IL)-1beta secretion, are dependent on redox signaling. However, the type of redox response involved as well as the relevant role of pro-oxidant and antioxidant events are matters of intense debate. By

  4. Salt stress affects the redox status of Arabidopsis root meristems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keni eJiang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the redox status (profiles for specific populations of cells that comprise the Arabidopsis root tip. For recently germinated, 3-5-day-old seedlings we show that the region of the root tip with the most reduced redox status includes the root cap initials, the quiescent center and the most distal portion of the proximal meristem, and coincides with (overlays the region of the auxin maximum. As one moves basally, further into the proximal meristem, and depending on the growth conditions, the redox status becomes more oxidized, with a 5-10 mV difference in redox potential between the two borders delimiting the proximal meristem. At the point on the root axis at which cells of the proximal meristem cease division and enter the transition zone, the redox potential levels off and remains more or less unchanged throughout the transition zone. As cells leave the transition zone and enter the zone of elongation the redox potentials become more oxidized. Treating roots with salt (50, 100 and 150 mM NaCl results in marked changes in root meristem structure and development, and is preceded by changes in the redox profile, which flattens, and initially becomes more oxidized, with pronounced changes in the redox potentials of the root cap, the root cap initials and the quiescent center. Roots exposed to relatively mild levels of salt (< 100 mM are able to re-establish a normal, pre-salt treatment redox profile 3-6 days after exposure to salt. Coincident with the salt-associated changes in redox profiles are changes in the distribution of auxin transporters (AUX1, PIN1/2, which become more diffuse in their localization. We conclude that salt stress affects root meristem maintenance, in part, through changes in redox and auxin transport.

  5. EFFECT OF THIOPROPANOL ON AMINO ACID TURNOVER AND REDOX STATUS IN ALLOXAN DIABETIC RAT LIVER

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    Vickram

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Decreased cellular thiol levels seen in diabetes mellitus (DM may be in part attributed to increased free radical generation. The free radical mediated oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of DM and its complications. The relative deficiency or non-availability of insulin in DM affects the metabolism of biomolecules, specifically the carbohydrate metabolism. The insulin-mimicking actions of various thiols have been studied. In our previous study, we have documented that 3-mercapto- 1-propanol (Thiopropanol, a low molecular weight thiol, at the dosage employed has increased glucose utilisation in alloxandiabetic rat liver tissue probably by favouring utilisation of glucose through glycolysis and HMP pathway. It is known that insulin inhibits gluconeogenesis by inhibiting the key enzymes of the same and by controlling the channelling of amino acids for the glucose biosynthesis through gluconeogenic pathway. A study was undertaken to assess the effects of thiopropanol (TP on amino acid turnover and the redox status in alloxan diabetic rat liver. METHODS Male albino rats weighing 150-250 g were used. Diabetes was induced using alloxan monohydrate. Rats were divided into normal and diabetic groups. Levels of amino acid nitrogen (AAN, alanine, total thiol (-SH groups, TBARS (Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and activities of alanine transaminase (ALT and aspartate transaminase (AST were estimated in liver specimens of normal, control-alloxan diabetic and TP-exposed-alloxan-diabetic rats. RESULTS The results showed a significant increase (p<0.001 in AAN levels, alanine levels, and total -SH groups concentration; and a significant decrease (p<0.001 in TBARS levels, ALT and AST activities in TP-exposed-alloxan diabetic liver slices as compared to control-alloxan diabetic liver slices. CONCLUSIONS Hence, it may be concluded that TP, at the concentration employed, inhibits gluconeogenesis from amino acids probably by

  6. Quantifying changes in the cellular thiol-disulfide status during differentiation of B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rosa Rebecca Erritzøe; Otsu, Mieko; Braakman, Ineke

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cells produce and secrete massive amounts of disulfide-containing antibodies. To accommodate this load on the secretory machinery, the differentiation of resting B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells is accompanied by a preferential expansion of the secretory compartments of the cells...... and by an up-regulation of enzymes involved in redox regulation and protein folding. We have quantified the absolute levels of protein thiols, protein disulfides, and glutathionylated proteins in whole cells. The results show that while the global thiol-disulfide state is affected to some extent...... by the differentiation, steady-state levels of glutathionylated protein thiols are less than 0.3% of the total protein cysteines, even in fully differentiated cells, and the overall protein redox state is not affected until late in differentiation, when large-scale IgM production is ongoing. A general expansion...

  7. Thiol Starvation induces redox-mediated dysregulation ofEscherichia colibiofilm components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufnagel, David A; Price, Janet E; Stephenson, Rachel E; Kelley, Jesse; Benoit, Matthew F; Chapman, Matthew R

    2017-10-16

    A hallmark of bacterial biofilms is the production of an e xtra c ellular m atrix (ECM) that encases and protects the community from environmental stressors. Biofilm formation is an integral portion of the u ro p athogenic E scherichia c oli (UPEC) lifecycle. Approximately 2% of UPEC are cysteine auxotrophs. Here, we investigated how cysteine homeostasis impacted UPEC UTI89 strain biofilm formation and, specifically, the production of the ECM components curli and cellulose. Cysteine auxotrophs produced less cellulose and slightly more curli compared to wildtype (WT) strains, and cysteine auxotrophs formed smooth, non-rugose colonies. Cellulose production was restored in cysteine auxotrophs when YfiR was inactivated. YfiR is a redox-sensitive regulator of the diguanylate cyclase, YfiN. Curli production, a temperature-regulated appendage, was independent of temperature in UTI89 cysteine auxotrophs. In a screen of UPEC isolates, we found that ∼60% of UPEC cysteine auxotrophs produced curli at 37°C, but only ∼2% of cysteine prototrophic UPEC produced curli at 37°C. Interestingly, sub-lethal concentrations of mecillinam and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole inhibited curli production, whereas strains auxotrophic for cysteine continued to produce curli even in the presence of mecillinam and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The dysregulation of ECM components and resistance to mecillinam in cysteine auxotrophs may be linked to hyper-oxidation, since the addition of exogenous cysteine or glutathione restored WT biofilm phenotypes to strains unable to produce cysteine and glutathione. Importance Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are the predominant causative agent of urinary tract infections (UTIs). UTIs account for billions of dollars of financial burden to the healthcare industry in the United States annually. Biofilms are an important aspect of the UPEC pathogenesis cascade and for the establishment of chronic infections. Approximately 2% of UPEC strains isolated

  8. THE THIOREDOXIN SYSTEM IN REGULATING MCF-7 CELL PROLIFERATION UNDER REDOX STATUS MODULATION

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    E. A. Stepovaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Despite the available data on tumor cell functioning under the conditions of free radical-mediated oxidation, the mechanisms of redox regulation, cell proliferation management and apoptosis avoidance remain understudied.The objective of the study was to identify the role of the thioredoxin system in regulating MCF-7 breast cancer cell proliferation under redox status modulation with 1.4-dithioerythritol.Material and methods. The studies were conducted on the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line, grown in adherent cell culture. Cell redox status was modulated with5 mM N-ethylmaleimide – an SH group and peptide inhibitor and5 mM 1.4-dithioerythritol – a thiol group protector. The cell cycle was evaluated by flow cytometry, the same technique was used to measure the reactive oxygen species concentration. The levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione and the activity of thioredoxin reductase were identified by spectrophotometry. The intracellular concentrations of thioredoxin, cyclin E and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 were determined by Western blot analysis.Results and discussion. The essential role of the thioredoxin system in regulating MCF-7 breast cancer cell proliferation was exhibited. S-phase arrest under the effect of N-ethylmaleimide and G0/G1-phase arrest under the effect of 1.4-dithioerythritol are associated with the changes in the activity of redox-sensitive protein complexes (cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that regulate cell proliferation.Conclusion. Redoxdependent modulation of proliferation regulating intracellular protein activity occurs due to the thioredoxin system. This is a promising research area for seeking molecular targets of breast cell malignization. 

  9. A fluorescent probe which allows highly specific thiol labeling at low pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jonas W.; Jensen, Kristine Steen; Hansen, Rosa E.

    2012-01-01

    Determination of the thiol-disulfide status in biological systems is challenging as redox pools are easily perturbed during sample preparation. This is particularly pertinent under neutral to mildly alkaline conditions typically required for alkylation of thiols. Here we describe the synthesis an...

  10. Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial redox status in diabetic nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putt, David A.; Zhong, Qing; Lash, Lawrence H.

    2012-01-01

    Nephropathy is a serious and common complication of diabetes. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of diabetes, nephropathy does not typically develop until 30 to 45 days post-injection, although hyperglycemia occurs within 24 h. We tested the hypothesis that chronic hyperglycemia results in a modest degree of oxidative stress that is accompanied by compensatory changes in certain antioxidants and mitochondrial redox status. We propose that as kidneys progress to a state of diabetic nephropathy, further adaptations occur in mitochondrial redox status. Basic parameters of renal function in vivo and several parameters of mitochondrial function and glutathione (GSH) and redox status in isolated renal cortical mitochondria from STZ-treated and age-matched control rats were examined at 30 days and 90 days post-injection. While there was no effect of diabetes on blood urea nitrogen, measurement of other, more sensitive parameters, such as urinary albumin and protein, and histopathology showed significant and progressive worsening in diabetic rats. Thus, renal function is compromised even prior to the onset of frank nephropathy. Changes in mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities indicated existence of a hypermetabolic state. Higher mitochondrial GSH content and rates of GSH transport into mitochondria in kidneys from diabetic rats were only partially due to changes in expression of mitochondrial GSH carriers and were mostly due to higher substrate supply. Although there are few clear indicators of oxidative stress, there are several redox changes that occur early and change further as nephropathy progresses, highlighting the complexity of the disease. Highlights: ►Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial and redox status in diabetic rats. ►Modest renal dysfunction even prior to onset of nephropathy. ►Elevated concentrations of mitochondrial GSH in diabetic kidneys. ►Change in GSH due partly to increased protein expression of transporter.

  11. Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial redox status in diabetic nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putt, David A.; Zhong, Qing; Lash, Lawrence H., E-mail: l.h.lash@wayne.edu

    2012-01-15

    Nephropathy is a serious and common complication of diabetes. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of diabetes, nephropathy does not typically develop until 30 to 45 days post-injection, although hyperglycemia occurs within 24 h. We tested the hypothesis that chronic hyperglycemia results in a modest degree of oxidative stress that is accompanied by compensatory changes in certain antioxidants and mitochondrial redox status. We propose that as kidneys progress to a state of diabetic nephropathy, further adaptations occur in mitochondrial redox status. Basic parameters of renal function in vivo and several parameters of mitochondrial function and glutathione (GSH) and redox status in isolated renal cortical mitochondria from STZ-treated and age-matched control rats were examined at 30 days and 90 days post-injection. While there was no effect of diabetes on blood urea nitrogen, measurement of other, more sensitive parameters, such as urinary albumin and protein, and histopathology showed significant and progressive worsening in diabetic rats. Thus, renal function is compromised even prior to the onset of frank nephropathy. Changes in mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities indicated existence of a hypermetabolic state. Higher mitochondrial GSH content and rates of GSH transport into mitochondria in kidneys from diabetic rats were only partially due to changes in expression of mitochondrial GSH carriers and were mostly due to higher substrate supply. Although there are few clear indicators of oxidative stress, there are several redox changes that occur early and change further as nephropathy progresses, highlighting the complexity of the disease. Highlights: ►Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial and redox status in diabetic rats. ►Modest renal dysfunction even prior to onset of nephropathy. ►Elevated concentrations of mitochondrial GSH in diabetic kidneys. ►Change in GSH due partly to increased protein expression of transporter.

  12. Role of Redox Status in Development of Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Ramiro, Aleli; Ramírez-Ortega, Daniela; Pérez de la Cruz, Verónica; Hérnandez-Pedro, Norma Y.; González-Esquivel, Dinora Fabiola; Sotelo, Julio; Pineda, Benjamín

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive neoplasia, prognosis remains dismal, and current therapy is mostly palliative. There are no known risk factors associated with gliomagenesis; however, it is well established that chronic inflammation in brain tissue induces oxidative stress in astrocytes and microglia. High quantities of reactive species of oxygen into the cells can react with several macromolecules, including chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA, leading to damage and malfunction of DNA repair enzymes. These changes bring genetic instability and abnormal metabolic processes, favoring oxidative environment and increase rate of cell proliferation. In GBM, a high metabolic rate and increased basal levels of reactive oxygen species play an important role as chemical mediators in the regulation of signal transduction, protecting malignant cells from apoptosis, thus creating an immunosuppressive environment. New redox therapeutics could reduce oxidative stress preventing cellular damage and high mutation rate accompanied by chromosomal instability, reducing the immunosuppressive environment. In addition, therapies directed to modulate redox rate reduce resistance and moderate the high rate of cell proliferation, favoring apoptosis of tumoral cells. This review describes the redox status in GBM, and how this imbalance could promote gliomagenesis through genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, inducing the pro-oxidant and proinflammatory environment involved in tumor cell proliferation, resistance, and immune escape. In addition, some therapeutic agents that modulate redox status and might be advantageous in therapy against GBM are described. PMID:27199982

  13. Role of redox status in development of glioblastoma

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    Aleli eSalazar-Ramiro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is a highly aggressive neoplasia, prognosis remains dismal and current therapy is mostly palliative. There are no known risk factors associated with gliomagenesis; however, it is well established that chronic inflammation in brain tissue induces oxidative stress in astrocytes and microglia. High quantities of reactive species of oxygen into the cells can react with several macromolecules, including chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA, leading to damage and malfunction of DNA repair enzymes. These changes bring genetic instability and abnormal metabolic processes favoring oxidative environment and increase rate of cell proliferation. In GBM, a high metabolic rate and increased basal levels of ROS play an important role as chemical mediators in the regulation of signal transduction, protecting malignant cells from apoptosis, thus creating an immunosuppressive environment. New redox therapeutics could reduce oxidative stress preventing cellular damage and high mutation rate accompanied by chromosomal instability, reducing the immunosuppressive environment. In addition, therapies directed to modulate redox rate reduce resistance and moderate the high rate of cell proliferation, favoring apoptosis of tumoral cells. This review describes the redox status in GBM and how this imbalance could promote gliomagenesis through genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, inducing the pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory environment involved in tumor cell proliferation, resistance and immune scape. In addition, are described some therapeutic agents that modulate redox status and might be advantageous in therapy against GBM.

  14. Phenylarsine Oxide Binding Reveals Redox-Active and Potential Regulatory Vicinal Thiols on the Catalytic Subunit of Protein Phosphatase 2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melideo, Scott L.; Healey, Adriana E.; Lucas, Eugene J.; Koval, Jason A.

    2011-01-01

    Our earlier finding that the activity of protein phosphatase 2A from rat brain is inhibited by micromolar concentrations of the dithiol cross-linking reagent phenylarsine oxide (PAO) has encouraged the hypothesis that the catalytic subunit (PP2Ac) of PP2A contains one or more pairs of closely-spaced (vicinal) thiol pairs that may contribute to regulation of the enzyme. The results of the present study demonstrate using immobilized PAO-affinity chromatography that PP2Ac from rat brain formed stable DTT-sensitive adducts with PAO with or without associated regulatory subunits. In addition, a subset of the PAO-binding vicinal thiols of PP2Ac was readily oxidized to disulfide bonds in vitro. Importantly, a small fraction of PP2Ac was still found to contain disulfide bonds after applying stringent conditions designed to prevent protein disulfide bond formation during homogenization and fractionation of the brains. These findings establish the presence of potentially regulatory and redox-active PAO-binding vicinal thiols on the catalytic subunit of PP2A and suggest that a population of PP2Ac may contain disulfide bonds in vivo. PMID:21080067

  15. Glutathione S-Transferase activity and total thiol status in chronic alcohol abusers before and 30 days after alcohol abstinence

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    Manjunatha S Muttigi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glutathione S Transferase (GST has been involved in detoxification process in the liver and its activity has been shown to be increased in alcohol abusers. In the current work we measured the GST activity, total thiol status, AST, ALT, and direct bilirubin in chronic alcohol abusers before and 30 days after alcohol abstinence and lifestyle modification. Methods: Serum and urine GST activity and total thiol status were determined using spectrophotometric methods and serum transaminases were determined using clinical chemistry analyzer. Results: We found,significant increase in serum and urine GST (p<0.001, AST (p<0.001, ALT (p<0.001, and decrease in total thiol status (p<0.001 in chronic alcohol abusers. GST activity significantly decreased (p<0.001 and total thiol status were improved significantly (p<0.001 30 days after alcohol abstinence and lifestyle modification. Conclusion: This study provides preliminary data to suggest the role of GST as prognostic indicator of alcohol abstinence with possible trend towards an improvement in liver function.

  16. Redox-Triggered Bonding-Induced Emission of Thiol-Functionalized Gold Nanoclusters for Luminescence Turn-On Detection of Molecular Oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Hang; Feng, Hui; Zhao, Mengting; Zhao, Meizhi; Chen, Jianrong; Qian, Zhaosheng

    2017-11-22

    Most optical sensors for molecular oxygen were developed based on the quenching effect of the luminescence of oxygen-sensitive probes; however, the signal turn-off mode of these probes is undesirable to quantify and visualize molecular oxygen. Herein, we report a novel luminescence turn-on detection strategy for molecular oxygen via the specific oxygen-triggered bonding-induced emission of thiol-functionalized gold nanoclusters. Thiol-functionalized gold nanoclusters were prepared by a facile one-step synthesis, and as-prepared gold nanoclusters possess significant aggregation-induced emission (AIE) property. It is the first time to discover the oxygen-triggered bonding-induced emission (BIE) behavior of gold nanoclusters, which results in disulfide-linked covalent bonding assemblies with intensely red luminescence. This specific redox-triggered BIE is capable of quantitatively detecting dissolved oxygen in aqueous solution in a light-up manner, and trace amount of dissolved oxygen at ppb level is achieved based on this detection method. A facile and convenient test strip for oxygen detection was also developed to monitor molecular oxygen in a gas matrix. Covalent bonding-induced emission is proven to be a more efficient way to attain high brightness of AIEgens than a physical aggregation-induced emission process, and provides a more convenient and desirable detection method for molecular oxygen than the previous sensors.

  17. Different effects of two cyclic chalcone analogues on redox status of Jurkat T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozmer, Zsuzsanna; Berki, Tímea; Maász, Gábor; Perjési, Pál

    2014-12-01

    Chalcones are intermediary compounds of the biosynthetic pathway of the naturally flavonoids. Previous studies have demonstrated that chalcones and their conformationally rigid cyclic analogues have tumour cell cytotoxic and chemopreventive effects. It has been shown that equitoxic doses of the two cyclic chalcone analogues (E)-2-(4'-methoxybenzylidene)-(2) and (E)-2-(4'-methylbenzylidene)-1-benzosuberone (3) have different effect on cell cycle progress of the investigated Jurkat cells. It was also found that the compounds affect the cellular thiol status of the treated cells and show intrinsic (non-enzyme-catalyzed) reactivity towards GSH under cell-free conditions. In order to gain new insights into the cytotoxic mechanism of the compounds, effects on the redox status and glutathione level of Jurkat cells were investigated. Detection of intracellular ROS level in Jurkat cells exposed to 2 and 3 was performed using the dichlorofluorescein-assay. Compound 2 did not influence ROS activity either on 1 or 4h exposure; in contrast, chalcone 3 showed to reduce ROS level at both timepoints. The two compounds had different effects on cellular glutathione status as well. Compound 2 significantly increased the oxidized glutathione (GSSG) level showing an interference with the cellular antioxidant defence. On the contrary, chalcone 3 enhanced the reduced glutathione level, indicating enhanced cellular antioxidant activity. To investigate the chalcone-GSH conjugation reactions under cellular conditions, a combination of a RP-HPLC method with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was performed. Chalcone-GSH adducts could not be observed either in the cell supernatant or the cell sediment after deproteinization. The investigations provide further details of dual - cytotoxic and chemopreventive - effects of the cyclic chalcone analogues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of redox-sensitive cysteines in the arabidopsis proteome using OxiTRAQ, a quantitative redox proteomics method

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Pei

    2014-01-28

    Cellular redox status plays a key role in mediating various physiological and developmental processes often through modulating activities of redox-sensitive proteins. Various stresses trigger over-production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species which lead to oxidative modifications of redox-sensitive proteins. Identification and characterization of redox-sensitive proteins are important steps toward understanding molecular mechanisms of stress responses. Here, we report a high-throughput quantitative proteomic approach termed OxiTRAQ for identifying proteins whose thiols undergo reversible oxidative modifications in Arabidopsis cells subjected to oxidative stress. In this approach, a biotinylated thiol-reactive reagent is used for differential labeling of reduced and oxidized thiols. The biotin-tagged peptides are affinity purified, labeled with iTRAQ reagents, and analyzed using a paralleled HCD-CID fragmentation mode in an LTQ-Orbitrap. With this approach, we identified 195 cysteine-containing peptides from 179 proteins whose thiols underwent oxidative modifications in Arabidopsis cells following the treatment with hydrogen peroxide. A majority of those redox-sensitive proteins, including several transcription factors, were not identified by previous redox proteomics studies. This approach allows identification of the specific redox-regulated cysteine residues, and offers an effective tool for elucidation of redox proteomes. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Involvement of thiol-based mechanisms in plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhier, Nicolas; Cerveau, Delphine; Couturier, Jérémy; Reichheld, Jean-Philippe; Rey, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    Increasing knowledge has been recently gained regarding the redox regulation of plant developmental stages. The current state of knowledge concerning the involvement of glutathione, glutaredoxins and thioredoxins in plant development is reviewed. The control of the thiol redox status is mainly ensured by glutathione (GSH), a cysteine-containing tripeptide and by reductases sharing redox-active cysteines, glutaredoxins (GRXs) and thioredoxins (TRXs). Indeed, thiol groups present in many regulatory proteins and metabolic enzymes are prone to oxidation, ultimately leading to post-translational modifications such as disulfide bond formation or glutathionylation. This review focuses on the involvement of GSH, GRXs and TRXs in plant development. Recent studies showed that the proper functioning of root and shoot apical meristems depends on glutathione content and redox status, which regulate, among others, cell cycle and hormone-related processes. A critical role of GRXs in the formation of floral organs has been uncovered, likely through the redox regulation of TGA transcription factor activity. TRXs fulfill many functions in plant development via the regulation of embryo formation, the control of cell-to-cell communication, the mobilization of seed reserves, the biogenesis of chloroplastic structures, the metabolism of carbon and the maintenance of cell redox homeostasis. This review also highlights the tight relationships between thiols, hormones and carbon metabolism, allowing a proper development of plants in relation with the varying environment and the energy availability. GSH, GRXs and TRXs play key roles during the whole plant developmental cycle via their antioxidant functions and the redox-regulation of signaling pathways. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Redox regulation of differentiation and de-differentiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Redox biology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv: protein-protein interaction between GlgB and WhiB1 involves exchange of thiol-disulfide

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    Kishan KV Radha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an intracellular pathogen encounters redox stress throughout its life inside the host. In order to protect itself from the redox onslaughts of host immune system, M. tuberculosis appears to have developed accessory thioredoxin-like proteins which are represented by ORFs encoding WhiB-like proteins. We have earlier reported that WhiB1/Rv3219 is a thioredoxin like protein of M. tuberculosis and functions as a protein disulfide reductase. Generally thioredoxins have many substrate proteins. The current study aims to identify the substrate protein(s of M. tuberculosis WhiB1. Results Using yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified alpha (1,4-glucan branching enzyme (GlgB of M. tuberculosis as a interaction partner of WhiB1. In vitro GST pull down assay confirmed the direct physical interaction between GlgB and WhiB1. Both mass spectrometry data of tryptic digests and in vitro labeling of cysteine residues with 4-acetamido-4' maleimidyl-stilbene-2, 2'-disulfonic acid showed that in GlgB, C95 and C658 are free but C193 and C617 form an intra-molecular disulfide bond. WhiB1 has a C37XXC40 motif thus a C40S mutation renders C37 to exist as a free thiol to form a hetero-disulfide bond with the cysteine residue of substrate protein. A disulfide mediated binary complex formation between GlgB and WhiB1C40S was shown by both in-solution protein-protein interaction and thioredoxin affinity chromatography. Finally, transfer of reducing equivalent from WhiB1 to GlgB disulfide was confirmed by 4-acetamido-4' maleimidyl-stilbene-2, 2'-disulfonic acid trapping by the reduced disulfide of GlgB. Two different thioredoxins, TrxB/Rv1471 and TrxC/Rv3914 of M. tuberculosis could not perform this reaction suggesting that the reduction of GlgB by WhiB1 is specific. Conclusion We conclude that M. tuberculosis GlgB has one intra-molecular disulfide bond which is formed between C193 and C617. WhiB1, a thioredoxin like protein

  1. Zinc and the modulation of redox homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteiza, Patricia I.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc, a redox inactive metal, has been long viewed as a component of the antioxidant network, and growing evidence points to its involvement in redox-regulated signaling. These actions are exerted through several mechanisms based on the unique chemical and functional properties of zinc. Overall, zinc contributes to maintain the cell redox balance through different mechanisms including: i) the regulation of oxidant production and metal-induced oxidative damage; ii) the dynamic association of zinc with sulfur in protein cysteine clusters, from which the metal can be released by nitric oxide, peroxides, oxidized glutathione and other thiol oxidant species; iii) zinc-mediated induction of the zinc-binding protein metallothionein, which releases the metal under oxidative conditions and act per se scavenging oxidants; iv) the involvement of zinc in the regulation of glutathione metabolism and of the overall protein thiol redox status; and v) a direct or indirect regulation of redox signaling. Findings of oxidative stress, altered redox signaling, and associated cell/tissue disfunction in cell and animal models of zinc deficiency, stress the relevant role of zinc in the preservation of cell redox homeostasis. However, while the participation of zinc in antioxidant protection, redox sensing, and redox-regulated signaling is accepted, the involved molecules, targets and mechanisms are still partially known and the subject of active research. PMID:22960578

  2. N-Acetyl Cysteine Protects against Methamphetamine-Induced Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration via Modulation of Redox Status and Autophagy in Dopaminergic Cells

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    Prashanth Chandramani Shivalingappa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine- (MA- induced neurotoxicity is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and enhanced oxidative stress. Our previous study demonstrated that MA induces autophagy in a dopaminergic neuronal cell model (N27 cells. The cellular mechanisms underlying MA-induced autophagy and apoptosis remain poorly characterized. In the present study we sought to investigate the importance of GSH redox status in MA-induced neurotoxicity using a thiol antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC. Morphological and biochemical analysis revealed that MA-induced autophagy in N27 dopaminergic cells was associated with pronounced depletion of GSH levels. Moreover, pretreatment with NAC reduced MA-induced GSH depletion and autophagy, while depletion of GSH using L-buthionine sulfoximine (L-BSO enhanced autophagy. Furthermore, treatment with NAC significantly attenuated MA-induced apoptotic cell death as well as oxidative stress markers, namely, 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE. Together, these results suggest that NAC exhibits significant protective effects against MA-induced dopaminergic cell death, presumably via modulation of the GSH level and autophagy. Collectively, our data provide mechanistic insights into the role of cellular GSH redox status in MA-induced autophagy and apoptotic cell death, and additional studies are needed to determine the therapeutic effectiveness of cellular redox modifiers in attenuating dopaminergic neurodegeneration in vivo.

  3. Investigation of a redox-sensitive predictive model of mouse embryonic stem cells differentiation using quantitative nuclease protection assays and glutathione redox status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigation of a redox-sensitive predictive model of mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation via quantitative nuclease protection assays and glutathione redox status Chandler KJ,Hansen JM, Knudsen T,and Hunter ES 1. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangl...

  4. Inflammatory cytokines and plasma redox status responses in hypertensive subjects after heat exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Fonseca

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is characterized by a pro-inflammatory status, including redox imbalance and increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which may be exacerbated after heat exposure. However, the effects of heat exposure, specifically in individuals with inflammatory chronic diseases such as hypertension, are complex and not well understood. This study compared the effects of heat exposure on plasma cytokine levels and redox status parameters in 8 hypertensive (H and 8 normotensive (N subjects (age: 46.5±1.3 and 45.6±1.4 years old, body mass index: 25.8±0.8 and 25.6±0.6 kg/m2, mean arterial pressure: 98.0±2.8 and 86.0±2.3 mmHg, respectively. They remained at rest in a sitting position for 10 min in a thermoneutral environment (22°C followed by 30 min in a heated environmental chamber (38°C and 60% relative humidity. Blood samples were collected before and after heat exposure. Plasma cytokine levels were measured using sandwich ELISA kits. Plasma redox status was determined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS levels and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP. Hypertensive subjects showed higher plasma levels of IL-10 at baseline (P<0.05, although levels of this cytokine were similar between groups after heat exposure. Moreover, after heat exposure, hypertensive individuals showed higher plasma levels of soluble TNF receptor (sTNFR1 and lower TBARS (P<0.01 and FRAP (P<0.05 levels. Controlled hypertensive subjects, who use angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE inhibitors, present an anti-inflammatory status and balanced redox status. Nevertheless, exposure to a heat stress condition seems to cause an imbalance in the redox status and an unregulated inflammatory response.

  5. Optical redox ratio differentiates breast cancer cell lines based on estrogen receptor status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrander, Julie Hanson; McMahon, Christine M; Lem, Siya; Millon, Stacy R; Brown, J Quincy; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2010-06-01

    Autofluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful imaging technique that exploits endogenous fluorophores. The endogenous fluorophores NADH and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are two of the principal electron donors and acceptors in cellular metabolism, respectively. The optical oxidation-reduction (redox) ratio is a measure of cellular metabolism and can be determined by the ratio of NADH/FAD. We hypothesized that there would be a significant difference in the optical redox ratio of normal mammary epithelial cells compared with breast tumor cell lines and that estrogen receptor (ER)-positive cells would have a higher redox ratio than ER-negative cells. To test our hypothesis, the optical redox ratio was determined by collecting the fluorescence emission for NADH and FAD via confocal microscopy. We observed a statistically significant increase in the optical redox ratio of cancer compared with normal cell lines (P < 0.05). Additionally, we observed a statistically significant increase in the optical redox ratio of ER(+) breast cancer cell lines. The level of ESR1 expression, determined by real-time PCR, directly correlated with the optical redox ratio (Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.8122, P = 0.0024). Furthermore, treatment with tamoxifen and ICI 182,870 statistically decreased the optical redox ratio of only ER(+) breast cancer cell lines. The results of this study raise the important possibility that fluorescence spectroscopy can be used to identify subtypes of breast cancer based on receptor status, monitor response to therapy, or potentially predict response to therapy. This source of optical contrast could be a potentially useful tool for drug screening in preclinical models. Copyright 2010 AACR.

  6. Cytosolic Redox Status of Wine Yeast (Saccharomyces Cerevisiae under Hyperosmotic Stress during Icewine Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid is undesired in Icewine. It is unclear whether its production by fermenting yeast is linked to the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+/NADH system or the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+/NADPH system. To answer this question, the redox status of yeast cytosolic NAD(H and NADP(H were analyzed along with yeast metabolites to determine how redox status differs under Icewine versus table wine fermentation. Icewine juice and dilute Icewine juice were inoculated with commercial wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae K1-V1116. Acetic acid was 14.3-fold higher in Icewine fermentation than the dilute juice condition. The ratio of NAD+ to total NAD(H was 24-fold higher in cells in Icewine fermentation than the ratio from the dilute juice condition. Conversely, the ratio of NADP+ to total NADP(H from the dilute fermentation was 2.9-fold higher than that in the Icewine condition. These results support the hypothesis that in Icewine, increased NAD+ triggered the catalysis of NAD+-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase(s (Aldp(s, which led to the elevated level of acetic acid in Icewine, whereas, in the dilute condition, NADP+ triggered NADP+-dependent Aldp(s, resulting in a lower level of acetic acid. This work, for the first time, analyzed the yeast cytosolic redox status and its correlation to acetic acid production, providing a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of acetic acid production in Icewine.

  7. Urinary protein thiols in different grades of proteinuria

    OpenAIRE

    Prakash, Mungli; Shetty, Jeevan K.; Dash, Sambit; Barik, Bijay K.; Sarkar, Abhirup; Awanti, Sharanabasappa M.; Prabhu, Ravindra

    2008-01-01

    Total thiol status of plasma, especially thiol groups over protein contributes maximum to the plasma antioxidant status of the body. Serum protein thiols were found to be decreased in various disease conditions including chronic renal failure patients. Only few studies determined the levels of urinary protein thiols in disease conditions. The current study was designed to know the levels of urinary protein thiols in patients with different grades of proteinuria. The study was conducted on uri...

  8. Phenylarsine Oxide Binding Reveals Redox-Active and Potential Regulatory Vicinal Thiols on the Catalytic Subunit of Protein Phosphatase 2A

    OpenAIRE

    Foley, Timothy D.; Melideo, Scott L.; Healey, Adriana E.; Lucas, Eugene J.; Koval, Jason A.

    2010-01-01

    Our earlier finding that the activity of protein phosphatase 2A from rat brain is inhibited by micromolar concentrations of the dithiol cross-linking reagent phenylarsine oxide (PAO) has encouraged the hypothesis that the catalytic subunit (PP2Ac) of PP2A contains one or more pairs of closely-spaced (vicinal) thiol pairs that may contribute to regulation of the enzyme. The results of the present study demonstrate using immobilized PAO-affinity chromatography that PP2Ac from rat brain formed s...

  9. A Regulatory Role of NAD Redox Status on Flavin Cofactor Homeostasis in S. cerevisiae Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Anna Giancaspero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD are two redox cofactors of pivotal importance for mitochondrial functionality and cellular redox balance. Despite their relevance, the mechanism by which intramitochondrial NAD(H and FAD levels are maintained remains quite unclear in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We investigated here the ability of isolated mitochondria to degrade externally added FAD and NAD (in both its reduced and oxidized forms. A set of kinetic experiments demonstrated that mitochondrial FAD and NAD(H destroying enzymes are different from each other and from the already characterized NUDIX hydrolases. We studied here, in some detail, FAD pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.18, which is inhibited by NAD+ and NADH according to a noncompetitive inhibition, with Ki values that differ from each other by an order of magnitude. These findings, together with the ability of mitochondrial FAD pyrophosphatase to metabolize endogenous FAD, presumably deriving from mitochondrial holoflavoproteins destined to degradation, allow for proposing a novel possible role of mitochondrial NAD redox status in regulating FAD homeostasis and/or flavoprotein degradation in S. cerevisiae.

  10. Overview of the Role of Vanillin on Redox Status and Cancer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Daniel Pereira; Soares, Anne Karine Nascimento

    2016-01-01

    Bioactive natural products play critical roles in modern drug development, especially anticancer agents. It has been widely reported that various pharmacological activities of such compounds are related to their antioxidant properties. Vanillin is a natural substance widely found in many plant species and often used in beverages, foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical products. Antioxidant and anticancer potential have been described for this compound. Considering the importance of vanillin in the area of human health and food and pharmaceuticals sectors, in this review, we discuss the role of vanillin on redox status and its potential contribution to the prevention and the treatment of cancer. PMID:28077989

  11. Overview of the Role of Vanillin on Redox Status and Cancer Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pereira Bezerra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive natural products play critical roles in modern drug development, especially anticancer agents. It has been widely reported that various pharmacological activities of such compounds are related to their antioxidant properties. Vanillin is a natural substance widely found in many plant species and often used in beverages, foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical products. Antioxidant and anticancer potential have been described for this compound. Considering the importance of vanillin in the area of human health and food and pharmaceuticals sectors, in this review, we discuss the role of vanillin on redox status and its potential contribution to the prevention and the treatment of cancer.

  12. Proliferation and differentiation of Trypanosoma cruzi inside its vector have a new trigger: redox status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália P Nogueira

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi proliferate and differentiate inside different compartments of triatomines gut that is the first environment encountered by T. cruzi. Due to its complex life cycle, the parasite is constantly exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS. We tested the influence of the pro-oxidant molecules H2O2 and the superoxide generator, Paraquat, as well as, metabolism products of the vector, with distinct redox status, in the proliferation and metacyclogenesis. These molecules are heme, hemozoin and urate. We also tested the antioxidants NAC and GSH. Heme induced the proliferation of epimastigotes and impaired the metacyclogenesis. β-hematin, did not affect epimastigote proliferation but decreased parasite differentiation. Conversely, we show that urate, GSH and NAC dramatically impaired epimastigote proliferation and during metacyclogenesis, NAC and urate induced a significant increment of trypomastigotes and decreased the percentage of epimastigotes. We also quantified the parasite loads in the anterior and posterior midguts and in the rectum of the vector by qPCR. The treatment with the antioxidants increased the parasite loads in all midgut sections analyzed. In vivo, the group of vectors fed with reduced molecules showed an increment of trypomastigotes and decreased epimastigotes when analyzed by differential counting. Heme stimulated proliferation by increasing the cell number in the S and G2/M phases, whereas NAC arrested epimastigotes in G1 phase. NAC greatly increased the percentage of trypomastigotes. Taken together, these data show a shift in the triatomine gut microenvironment caused by the redox status may also influence T. cruzi biology inside the vector. In this scenario, oxidants act to turn on epimastigote proliferation while antioxidants seem to switch the cycle towards metacyclogenesis. This is a new insight that defines a key role for redox metabolism in governing the parasitic life cycle.

  13. The Redox Status of Cancer Cells Supports Mechanisms behind the Warburg Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorgelindo da Veiga Moreira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the energetic status of proliferating cells, we have measured the intracellular pH (pHi and concentrations of key metabolites, such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP in normal and cancer cells, extracted from fresh human colon tissues. Cells were sorted by elutriation and segregated in different phases of the cell cycle (G0/G1/S/G2/M in order to study their redox (NAD, NADP and bioenergetic (ATP, pHi status. Our results show that the average ATP concentration over the cell cycle is higher and the pHi is globally more acidic in normal proliferating cells. The NAD+/NADH and NADP+/NADPH redox ratios are, respectively, five times and ten times higher in cancer cells compared to the normal cell population. These energetic differences in normal and cancer cells may explain the well-described mechanisms behind the Warburg effect. Oscillations in ATP concentration, pHi, NAD+/NADH, and NADP+/NADPH ratios over one cell cycle are reported and the hypothesis addressed. We also investigated the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP of human and mice normal and cancer cell lines. A drastic decrease of the MMP is reported in cancer cell lines compared to their normal counterparts. Altogether, these results strongly support the high throughput aerobic glycolysis, or Warburg effect, observed in cancer cells.

  14. Analyzing Thiol-Dependent Redox Networks in the Presence of Methylene Blue and Other Antimalarial Agents with RT-PCR-Supported in silico Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, J.; Cecil, A.; Schäfer, F.; Rahlfs, S.; Ouedraogo, A.; Xiao, K.; Sawadogo, S.; Coulibaly, B.; Becker, K.; Dandekar, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background In the face of growing resistance in malaria parasites to drugs, pharmacological combination therapies are important. There is accumulating evidence that methylene blue (MB) is an effective drug against malaria. Here we explore the biological effects of both MB alone and in combination therapy using modeling and experimental data. Results We built a model of the central metabolic pathways in P. falciparum. Metabolic flux modes and their changes under MB were calculated by integrating experimental data (RT-PCR data on mRNAs for redox enzymes) as constraints and results from the YANA software package for metabolic pathway calculations. Several different lines of MB attack on Plasmodium redox defense were identified by analysis of the network effects. Next, chloroquine resistance based on pfmdr/and pfcrt transporters, as well as pyrimethamine/sulfadoxine resistance (by mutations in DHF/DHPS), were modeled in silico. Further modeling shows that MB has a favorable synergism on antimalarial network effects with these commonly used antimalarial drugs. Conclusions Theoretical and experimental results support that methylene blue should, because of its resistance-breaking potential, be further tested as a key component in drug combination therapy efforts in holoendemic areas. PMID:23236254

  15. Redox Status, Procoagulant Activity, and Metabolome of Fresh Frozen Plasma in Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilis L. Tzounakas

    2018-02-01

    toward a different redox, lipid metabolism, and EV profile in the G6PD− FFP units. Certain FFP-needed patients may be at greatest benefit of receiving FFP intrinsically endowed by both procoagulant and antioxidant activities. However, the clinical outcome of G6PD− FFP transfusion would likely be affected by various other factors, including the signaling potential of the differentially expressed metabolites and EVs, the degree of G6PD−, the redox status in the recipient, the amount of FFP units transfused, and probably, the storage interval of the FFP, which deserve further investigation by future studies.

  16. Radical Scavenging Efficacy of Thiol Capped Silver Nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    OH) ... nents involved in redox homeostasis. Nature of bonding ..... study provides valuable and fundamental information about the scavenging behavior of thiol capped AgNPs in biological system. Supplementary Information. All additional ...

  17. Reversal of an aluminium induced alteration in redox status in different regions of rat brain by administration of centrophenoxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehru, Bimla; Bhalla, Punita

    2006-10-01

    Aluminium is one of the most studied neurotoxin, and its effects on nervous system are both structural and functional, involving various regions of brain. Aluminium toxicity is known to have multiple mechanisms of action in the central nervous system. Affinity of aluminium for thiol substrates is considered a possible molecular mechanism involved in aluminium neurotoxicity. The reduced glutathione (GSH) is especially important for cellular defence against aluminium toxicity. This study pertains to the modulatory action of centrophenoxine on GSH status in aluminium exposed different brain regions of the female rats. Aluminium was administered orally at a dose of 40 mg/Kg x b x wt x /day for a period of eight weeks whereas, centrophenoxine was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 100 mg/Kg x b x wt x /day for a period of six weeks. The study was carried out in different regions of brain namely cerebrum, cerebellum, medulla oblongata and hypothalamus. Animals exposed to aluminum, registered a significant decrease in the levels of reduced glutathione, and oxidized glutathione as well as in the activity of glutathione reductase in all the different regions studied when compared to normal control animals. Post-treatment with centrophenoxine, showed a significant improvement in the thiol levels in different regions. Centrophenoxine when administered alone also had a profound effect on the levels of reduced glutathione as well as on the activity of glutathione reductase. From the present results, it can be stated that centrophenoxine administration, as a thiol-antioxidant, arrests the aluminium induced cellular damage by improving the thiol status in brain regions.

  18. Effects of Dental Methacrylates on Oxygen Consumption and Redox Status of Human Pulp Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Nocca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have already demonstrated that the incomplete polymerization of resin-based dental materials causes the release of monomers which might affect cell metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, 1,4-butanediol dimethacrylate, urethane dimethacrylate, and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate on (1 cellular energy metabolism, evaluating oxygen consumption rate, glucose consumption, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, and lactate production, and (2 cellular redox status, through the evaluation of glutathione concentration and of the activities of enzymes regulating glutathione metabolism. Methods. Human pulp cells were used and oxygen consumption was measured by means of a Clark electrode. Moreover, reactive oxygen species production was quantified. Enzymatic activity and glucose and lactate concentrations were determined through a specific kit. Results. Triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, 1,4-butanediol dimethacrylate, and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate induced a decrease in oxygen consumption rate, an enhancement of glucose consumption, and lactate production, whilst glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase activity were not significantly modified. Moreover, the monomers induced an increase of reactive oxygen species production with a consequent increase of superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymatic activities. A depletion of both reduced and total glutathione was also observed. Conclusion. The obtained results indicate that dental monomers might alter energy metabolism and glutathione redox balance in human pulp cells.

  19. Redox status affects the catalytic activity of glutamyl-tRNA synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katz, Assaf; Banerjee, Rajat; de Armas, Merly

    2010-01-01

    Glutamyl-tRNA synthetases (GluRS) provide Glu-tRNA for different processes including protein synthesis, glutamine transamidation and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. Many organisms contain multiple GluRSs, but whether these duplications solely broaden tRNA specificity or also play additional roles...... in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis is not known. Previous studies have shown that GluRS1, one of two GluRSs from the extremophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, is inactivated when intracellular heme is elevated suggesting a specific role for GluRS1 in the regulation of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. We now show that...... inactivation by hemin plus hydrogen peroxide. The sensitivity to oxidation of A. ferrooxidans GluRS1 might provide a means to regulate tetrapyrrole and protein biosynthesis in response to extreme changes in both the redox and heme status of the cell via a single enzyme....

  20. [Glutathione redox system, immune status, antioxidant enzymes and metabolism of purine nucleotides in hypothyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapbergenov, S O; Sovetov, B S; Bekbosynova, R B; Bolysbekova, S M

    2015-01-01

    The immune status, components of the glutathione redox system, the activity of antioxidant enzymes and metabolism of purine nucleotides have been investigated in animals with experimental hypothyroidism. On day 8 after an increase in the number of leukocytes, lymphocytes, T-helpers and T-suppressors as well as increased number of B-lymphocytes was found in blood of thyroidectomized rats. This was accompanied by decreased activity of adenosine deaminase (AD), AMP-deaminase (AMPD), and 5'-nucleotidase (5'N) in blood, but the ratio of enzyme activity AD/AMPD increased. These changes in the activity of enzymes, involved in purine catabolism can be regarded as increased functional relationships between T and B lymphocytes in hypothyroidism. The functional changes of immune system cells were accompanied by increased activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), a decrease in the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR) and the ratio GH/GPx. Thyroidectomized rats had increased amounts of total, oxidized (GSSG) and reduced glutathione (GSH), but the ratio GSH/GSSG decerased as compared with control animals. In the liver, hypothyroidism resulted in activation of SOD, GPx, decreased activity of GR and decreased ratio GR/GPx. At the same time, the levels of total, oxidized, and reduced glutathione increased, but the ratio GSH/GSSG as well as activities of enzymes involved in purine nucleotide metabolism ratio (and their ratio 5'N/AD + AMPD) decreased. All these data suggest a functional relationship of the glutathione redox system not only with antioxidant enzymes, but also activity of enzymes involved purine nucleotide metabolism and immune status.

  1. Factors that affect leaf extracellular ascorbic acid content and redox status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkey, K.O.; Fiscus, E.L. [North Carolina State Univ., United States dept. og Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service and Dept. of Crop Science, Raleigh, NC (United States); Eason, G. [North Carolina, State Univ., United States Dept. of Plant Pathology, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Leaf ascorbic acid content and redox status were compared in ozone-tolerant (Provider) and ozone-sensitive (S156) genotypes of snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Plants were grown in pots for 24 days under charcoal-filtered air (CF) conditions in open-top field chambers and then maintained as CF controls (29 nmol mol{sup 1} ozone) or exposed to elevated ozone (71 nmol mol{sup 1} ozone). Following a 10-day treatment, mature leaves of the same age were harvested early in the morning (06:00-08:00 h) or in the afternoon (13:00-15:00 h) for analysis of ascorbic acid (AA) and dehydroascorbic acid (DHA). Vacuum infiltration methods were used to separate leaf AA into apoplast and symplast fractions. The total ascorbate content [AA + DHA] of leaf tissue averaged 28% higher in Provider relative to S156, and Provider exhibited a greater capacity to maintain [AA + DHA] content under ozone stress. Apoplast [AA + DHA] content was 2-fold higher in tolerant Provider (360 nmol g{sup 1} FW maximum) relative to sensitive S156 (160 nmol g1 FW maximum) regardless of sampling period or treatment, supporting the hypothesis that extracellular AA is a factor in ozone tolerance. Apoplast [AA + DHA] levels were significantly higher in the afternoon than early morning for both genotypes, evidence for short-term regulation of extracellular ascorbate content. Total leaf ascorbate was primarily reduced with AA/[AA + DHA] ratios of 0.81-0.90. In contrast, apoplast AA/[AA + DHA] ratios were 0.01-0.60 and depended on genotype and ozone treatment. Provider exhibited a greater capacity to maintain extracellular AA/[AA + DHA] ratios under ozone stress, suggesting that ozone tolerance is associated with apoplast ascorbate redox status. (au)

  2. Redox biology response in germinating Phaseolus vulgaris seeds exposed to copper: Evidence for differential redox buffering in seedlings and cotyledon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmous, Inès; Trevisan, Rafael; El Ferjani, Ezzeddine; Chaoui, Abdelilah; Sheehan, David

    2017-01-01

    In agriculture, heavy metal contamination of soil interferes with processes associated with plant growth, development and productivity. Here, we describe oxidative and redox changes, and deleterious injury within cotyledons and seedlings caused by exposure of germinating (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. soisson nain hâtif) seeds to copper (Cu). Cu induced a marked delay in seedling growth, and was associated with biochemical disturbances in terms of intracellular oxidative status, redox regulation and energy metabolism. In response to these alterations, modulation of activities of antioxidant proteins (thioredoxin and glutathione reductase, peroxiredoxin) occurred, thus preventing oxidative damage. In addition, oxidative modification of proteins was detected in both cotyledons and seedlings by one- and two-dimensional electrophoresis. These modified proteins may play roles in redox buffering. The changes in activities of redox proteins underline their fundamental roles in controlling redox homeostasis. However, observed differential redox responses in cotyledon and seedling tissues showed a major capacity of the seedlings' redox systems to protect the reduced status of protein thiols, thus suggesting quantitatively greater antioxidant protection of proteins in seedlings compared to cotyledon. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive redox biology investigation of the effect of Cu on seed germination.

  3. Lipid profile and redox status in high performance rhythmic female teenagers gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, A; Rego, C; Laires, M J; Castro, E M; Silva, D; Monteiro, C; Silva, Z; Lebre, E; Bicho, M

    2001-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the lipid profile and some parameters of oxi-redox status in a group of teenage female athletes. All gymnasts of the Portuguese National Team of Rhythmic (n=20) were included in the study. A group of untrained healthy female adolescents, matched for age, was also included (n=28). Auxology, nutritional status and body composition were evaluated as well as biological parameters, dietary and training habits. Statistics included descriptive analysis, t-Student and Mann-Whitney for comparative study, and Pearson and Spearman correlations, according to variable distribution. Chronological age was 14.3+/-1.7 and 14.6+/-1,7 years, respectively for gymnasts and untrained adolescents. Gymnasts showed lower body mass index (pgymnasts, compared to untrained. Red blood cell's enzymes studied were higher for transmembrane NADH reductase of ferricyanide (TMR), (pgymnasts (76.3+/-20.3 microM/l versus 35+/-21.7 microM/l), (pgymnasts and untrained, between LDL-TBARS and LDL-cholesterol (r=0.674, pgymnasts. The authors conclude that the practice of intense physical exercise in rhythmic gymnasts induces a compromise of nutritional status and unbalanced food habits. The intensive exercise also induces not only a protective lipid profile, but also a higher lipid peroxidation. Further prospective studies are important to evaluate the influence of intensive training on atherosclerosis development.

  4. Fasting, but Not Aging, Dramatically Alters the Redox Status of Cysteine Residues on Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja E. Menger

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Altering the redox state of cysteine residues on protein surfaces is an important response to environmental challenges. Although aging and fasting alter many redox processes, the role of cysteine residues is uncertain. To address this, we used a redox proteomic technique, oxidative isotope-coded affinity tags (OxICAT, to assess cysteine-residue redox changes in Drosophila melanogaster during aging and fasting. This approach enabled us to simultaneously identify and quantify the redox state of several hundred cysteine residues in vivo. Cysteine residues within young flies had a bimodal distribution with peaks at ∼10% and ∼85% reversibly oxidized. Surprisingly, these cysteine residues did not become more oxidized with age. In contrast, 24 hr of fasting dramatically oxidized cysteine residues that were reduced under fed conditions while also reducing cysteine residues that were initially oxidized. We conclude that fasting, but not aging, dramatically alters cysteine-residue redox status in D. melanogaster.

  5. Fasting, but Not Aging, Dramatically Alters the Redox Status of Cysteine Residues on Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, Katja E.; James, Andrew M.; Cochemé, Helena M.; Harbour, Michael E.; Chouchani, Edward T.; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M.; Partridge, Linda; Murphy, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Altering the redox state of cysteine residues on protein surfaces is an important response to environmental challenges. Although aging and fasting alter many redox processes, the role of cysteine residues is uncertain. To address this, we used a redox proteomic technique, oxidative isotope-coded affinity tags (OxICAT), to assess cysteine-residue redox changes in Drosophila melanogaster during aging and fasting. This approach enabled us to simultaneously identify and quantify the redox state of several hundred cysteine residues in vivo. Cysteine residues within young flies had a bimodal distribution with peaks at ∼10% and ∼85% reversibly oxidized. Surprisingly, these cysteine residues did not become more oxidized with age. In contrast, 24 hr of fasting dramatically oxidized cysteine residues that were reduced under fed conditions while also reducing cysteine residues that were initially oxidized. We conclude that fasting, but not aging, dramatically alters cysteine-residue redox status in D. melanogaster. PMID:26095360

  6. In vivo evaluation of different alterations of redox status by studying pharmacokinetics of nitroxides using magnetic resonance techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bačić, Goran; Pavićević, Aleksandra; Peyrot, Fabienne

    2016-08-01

    Free radicals, particularly reactive oxygen species (ROS), are involved in various pathologies, injuries related to radiation, ischemia-reperfusion or ageing. Unfortunately, it is virtually impossible to directly detect free radicals in vivo, but the redox status of the whole organism or particular organ can be studied in vivo by using magnetic resonance techniques (EPR and MRI) and paramagnetic stable free radicals - nitroxides. Here we review results obtained in vivo following the pharmacokinetics of nitroxides on experimental animals (and a few in humans) under various conditions. The focus was on conditions where the redox status has been altered by induced diseases or harmful agents, clearly demonstrating that various EPR/MRI/nitroxide combinations can reliably detect metabolically induced changes in the redox status of organs. These findings can improve our understanding of oxidative stress and provide a basis for studying the effectiveness of interventions aimed to modulate oxidative stress. Also, we anticipate that the in vivo EPR/MRI approach in studying the redox status can play a vital role in the clinical management of various pathologies in the years to come providing the development of adequate equipment and probes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In vivo evaluation of different alterations of redox status by studying pharmacokinetics of nitroxides using magnetic resonance techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Bačić

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals, particularly reactive oxygen species (ROS, are involved in various pathologies, injuries related to radiation, ischemia-reperfusion or ageing. Unfortunately, it is virtually impossible to directly detect free radicals in vivo, but the redox status of the whole organism or particular organ can be studied in vivo by using magnetic resonance techniques (EPR and MRI and paramagnetic stable free radicals – nitroxides. Here we review results obtained in vivo following the pharmacokinetics of nitroxides on experimental animals (and a few in humans under various conditions. The focus was on conditions where the redox status has been altered by induced diseases or harmful agents, clearly demonstrating that various EPR/MRI/nitroxide combinations can reliably detect metabolically induced changes in the redox status of organs. These findings can improve our understanding of oxidative stress and provide a basis for studying the effectiveness of interventions aimed to modulate oxidative stress. Also, we anticipate that the in vivo EPR/MRI approach in studying the redox status can play a vital role in the clinical management of various pathologies in the years to come providing the development of adequate equipment and probes.

  8. The changes in redox status of ascorbate in stem tissue cells during Scots pine tree growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. Antonova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The contents of ascorbate (AsA and dehydroascorbate (DHA and their ratio, showing cellular redox state of AsA, were studied in the cells of the separate tissues at different levels of Pinus sylvestris L. stem during early- and latewood formation. Morphological status of the cells in the tissues and the content of soluble carbohydrates were also estimated. The cellular redox potential of AsA has been found to depend on the type of tissue, cell development degree, the level of stem and the type of forming wood. The content of AsA and AsA/DHA ratio in the cells of non-conducting phloem along the stem were higher than in mature xylem and less during earlywood than latewood formation. The cells of conducting phloem and forming xylem, as the principal tissues taking part in annual ring wood formation, differed in the content of acids in the course of early and late xylem formation. Along the stem, the content of AsA decreased in conducting phloem cells and increased in the cells of forming xylem during both early- and latewood formation. The AsA/DHA of conducting phloem during earlywood formation was greatest below the stem and diminished to the top of the tree, while in the course of latewood development it was similar at all levels. In forming xylem AsA/DHA increased to the top of tree during the early xylem formation and decreased in late xylem that indicates the differences in oxidation-reduction reactions into the cells of two type of forming wood. The data are discussed according to morphological development of cells and the content of carbohydrates.

  9. Ovotoxicants 4-vinylcyclohexene 1,2-monoepoxide and 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide disrupt redox status and modify different electrophile sensitive target enzymes and genes in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amos O. Abolaji

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The compounds 4-vinylcyclohexene 1,2-monoepoxide (VCM and 4-Vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD are the two downstream metabolites of 4-vinylcyclohexene (VCH, an ovotoxic agent in mammals. In addition, VCM and VCD may be found as by-products of VCH oxidation in the environment. Recently, we reported the involvement of oxidative stress in the toxicity of VCH in Drosophila melanogaster. However, it was not possible to determine the individual contributions of VCM and VCD in VCH toxicity. Hence, we investigated the toxicity of VCM and VCD (10–1000 µM in flies after 5 days of exposure via the diet. Our results indicated impairments in climbing behaviour and disruptions in antioxidant balance and redox status evidenced by an increase in DCFH oxidation, decreases in total thiol content and glutathione-S-transferase (GST activity in the flies exposed to VCM and VCD (p<0.05. These effects were accompanied by disruptions in the transcription of the genes encoding the proteins superoxide dismutase (SOD1, kelch-like erythroid-derived cap-n-collar (CNC homology (ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap-1, mitogen activated protein kinase 2 (MAPK-2, catalase, Cyp18a1, JAFRAC 1 (thioredoxin peroxidase 1 and thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR-1 (p<0.05. VCM and VCD inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE and delta aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (δ-ALA D activities in the flies (p<0.05. Indeed, here, we demonstrated that different target enzymes and genes were modified by the electrophiles VCM and VCD in the flies. Thus, D. melanogaster has provided further lessons on the toxicity of VCM and VCD which suggest that the reported toxicity of VCH may be mediated by its transformation to VCM and VCD.

  10. Short-term sleep deprivation leads to decreased systemic redox metabolites and altered epigenetic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Malav S; Holger, Dana; Bui, Anh Tuyet; Craddock, Travis J A; Tartar, Jaime L

    2017-01-01

    Sleep is critical for repair as well as the rejuvenation processes in the body and many of these functions are regulated via underlying cellular metabolic homeostasis. Changes in sleep pattern are reported to alter such metabolic function resulting in altered disease susceptibility or behavior. Here, we measured the extent to which overnight total sleep deprivation (SD) in young adult humans can influence systemic (plasma-derived) redox-metabolism including the major antioxidant, glutathione as well as DNA methylation levels. Nineteen participants (n = 19, μ age = 21, SD = 3.09) underwent morning testing before and after overnight total SD. Biochemical measures before and after SD revealed that glutathione, ATP, cysteine, and homocysteine levels were significantly reduced following one night of sleep deprivation (all p's sleep deprivation (maintaining wakefulness) uses up metabolic reserves, we observed that morning cortisol levels were blunted after sleep deprivation. There were no significant correlations between self-reported or actigraphy-measured sleep and the biochemical measurements, strongly indicating that prior sleep behavior did not have any direct influence on the biochemical measures taken at baseline or after sleep deprivation. Results from the current investigation supports the previous literature implicating the induction of oxidative stress and ATP depletion with sleep deprivation. Furthermore, such altered antioxidant status can also induce downstream epigenetic changes. Although we did not measure the specific genes that were altered under the influence of such sleep deprivation, such epigenetic changes could potentially contribute towards disease predisposition.

  11. Gsk3 Signalling and Redox Status in Bipolar Disorder: Evidence from Lithium Efficacy

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    Antonina Luca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To discuss the link between glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3 and the main biological alterations demonstrated in bipolar disorder (BD, with special attention to the redox status and the evidence supporting the efficacy of lithium (a GSK3 inhibitor in the treatment of BD. Methods. A literature research on the discussed topics, using Pubmed and Google Scholar, has been conducted. Moreover, a manual selection of interesting references from the identified articles has been performed. Results. The main biological alterations of BD, pertaining to inflammation, oxidative stress, membrane ion channels, and circadian system, seem to be intertwined. The dysfunction of the GSK3 signalling pathway is involved in all the aforementioned “biological causes” of BD. In a complex scenario, it can be seen as the common denominator linking them all. Lithium inhibition of GSK3 could, at least in part, explain its positive effect on these biological dysfunctions and its superiority in terms of clinical efficacy. Conclusions. Deepening the knowledge on the molecular bases of BD is fundamental to identifying the biochemical pathways that must be targeted in order to provide patients with increasingly effective therapeutic tools against an invalidating disorder such as BD.

  12. Efficacy of methylcobalamin and folinic acid treatment on glutathione redox status in children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S Jill; Melnyk, Stepan; Fuchs, George; Reid, Tyra; Jernigan, Stefanie; Pavliv, Oleksandra; Hubanks, Amanda; Gaylor, David W

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic abnormalities and targeted treatment trials have been reported for several neurobehavioral disorders but are relatively understudied in autism. The objective of this study was to determine whether or not treatment with the metabolic precursors, methylcobalamin and folinic acid, would improve plasma concentrations of transmethylation/transsulfuration metabolites and glutathione redox status in autistic children. In an open-label trial, 40 autistic children were treated with 75 microg/kg methylcobalamin (2 times/wk) and 400 microg folinic acid (2 times/d) for 3 mo. Metabolites in the transmethylation/transsulfuration pathway were measured before and after treatment and compared with values measured in age-matched control children. The results indicated that pretreatment metabolite concentrations in autistic children were significantly different from values in the control children. The 3-mo intervention resulted in significant increases in cysteine, cysteinylglycine, and glutathione concentrations (P nutritional intervention with methylcobalamin and folinic acid may be of clinical benefit in some children who have autism. This trial was registered at (clinicaltrials.gov) as NCT00692315.

  13. Efficacy of methylcobalamin and folinic acid treatment on glutathione redox status in children with autism123

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S Jill; Melnyk, Stepan; Fuchs, George; Reid, Tyra; Jernigan, Stefanie; Pavliv, Oleksandra; Hubanks, Amanda; Gaylor, David W

    2009-01-01

    Background: Metabolic abnormalities and targeted treatment trials have been reported for several neurobehavioral disorders but are relatively understudied in autism. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether or not treatment with the metabolic precursors, methylcobalamin and folinic acid, would improve plasma concentrations of transmethylation/transsulfuration metabolites and glutathione redox status in autistic children. Design: In an open-label trial, 40 autistic children were treated with 75 μg/kg methylcobalamin (2 times/wk) and 400 μg folinic acid (2 times/d) for 3 mo. Metabolites in the transmethylation/transsulfuration pathway were measured before and after treatment and compared with values measured in age-matched control children. Results: The results indicated that pretreatment metabolite concentrations in autistic children were significantly different from values in the control children. The 3-mo intervention resulted in significant increases in cysteine, cysteinylglycine, and glutathione concentrations (P nutritional intervention with methylcobalamin and folinic acid may be of clinical benefit in some children who have autism. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00692315. PMID:19056591

  14. Redox Status of β2GPI in Different Stages of Diabetic Angiopathy

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    Jun Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We explored the redox status of beta 2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI in different stages of diabetic angiopathy. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM had a significantly lower proportion of reduced β2GPI as compared to healthy controls (p0.05. The mild-A-stenosis group and mild-diabetic retinopathy (DR groups had higher proportion of reduced β2GPI than their severely affected counterparts. The mild-slow nerve conduction velocity (NCVS group had higher proportion of reduced β2GPI than normal nerve conduction velocity (NCVN group and severe-NCVS groups. The proportion of reduced β2GPI was in positive correlation with 24 h urine microalbumin and total urine protein, and the proportion of reduced β2GPI was in negative correlation with serum and skin advanced glycation end products (AGEs. Taken together, our data implicate that the proportion of reduced β2GPI increased in the early stage of angiopathy and decreased with the aggravation of angiopathy.

  15. Developing a Redox-Sensitive Red Fluorescent Protein Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koon, N.; Yei, S.M.; Risenmay, A.J.; Kallio, K.; Remington, S.J.; Magpiong, I.

    2011-01-01

    Redox environments are of particular interest, especially in the mitochondria with its highly reducing environment and its role as the central processing unit of apoptosis. Monitoring of mitochondrial redox environments is crucial to the study of apoptotic disorders. Reporting of the thiol/disulfide status in live cells was made possible with the development of redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein (roGFP). We aim to develop a red version redox-sensitive fluorescent protein (roRFP). Expanding the array of redox-sensitive proteins with a red version will enable simultaneous visualization of multiple reducing intracellular compartments. mKeima is a monomeric red fluorescent protein that absorbs light maximally at 440nm and emits red light at 620nm. This large Stokes shift is dramatically decreased in acidic environments. By following protocol similar to that used in the development of roGFP, surface residues at key positions were changed to cysteines and random mutagenesis was performed on varying excitation species of mKeima. Mutants were screened and a ratiometric variant of mKeima was identified (roRFP2) which exhibits changes in its spectral properties as a result of changes in the thiol/disulfide equilibrium. Preliminary fluorescence spectroscopy measurements of roRFP2 indicate a highly reducing redox potential of −330mV indicating it may be a useful probe in reducing subcellular compartments such as mitochondria or in the cytoplasm. By employing vector recombination of shuttle vector PYX142, we successfully targeted roRFP2 in vivo to the mitochondria and cytoplasm of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression of roRFP2 was visualized using fluorescence microscopy. Thus, through mutagenesis and residue substitution we successfully created a red version redox sensitive biosensor that tested effectively as a ratiometric indicator and expressed in the mitochondria and cytoplasm of S. cerevisiae. Moreover, the redox potential of roRFP2 is significantly more negative

  16. Cytotoxicity of Cerastes cerastes snake venom: Involvement of imbalanced redox status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebir-Chelghoum, Hayet; Laraba-Djebari, Fatima

    2017-09-01

    Envenomation caused by Cerastes cerastes snake venom is characterized by a local and a systemic tissue damage due to myonecrosis, hemorrhage, edema and acute muscle damage. The present study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the pro/anti-oxidants status and the cytotoxicity of C. cerastes snake venom. The in vivo cytotoxicity analysis was undertaken by the injection of C. cerastes venom (48μg/20g body weight) by i.p. route, mice were then sacrificed at 3, 24 and 48h post injection, organs were collected for further analysis. In vitro cytotoxicity analysis was investigated on cultured PBMC, hepatocytes and isolated liver. The obtained results showed a significant cell infiltration characterized by a significant increase of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinoperoxidase (EPO) activities. These results showed also a potent oxidative activity of C. cerastes venom characterized by increased levels of residual nitrites and lipid peroxidation associated with a significant decrease of glutathione and catalase activity in sera and tissues (heart, lungs, liver and kidneys). The in vitro cytotoxicity of C. cerastes venom on PBMC seems to be dose-dependent (IC50 of 21μg/ml/10 6 cells) and correlated with an imbalanced redox status at high doses of venom. However, in the case of cultured hepatocytes, the LDH release and oxidative stress were observed only at high doses of the venom. The obtained results of in vivo study were confirmed by the culture of isolated liver. Therefore, these results suggest that the venom induces a direct cytotoxic effect which alters the membrane integrity causing a leakage of the cellular contents. This cytotoxic effect can lead indirectly to inflammatory response and oxidative stress. These data suggest that an early anti-inflammatory and antioxidant treatment could be useful in the management of envenomed victims. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  18. The effect of pre-exercise ingestion of corinthian currant on endurance performance and blood redox status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deli, Chariklia K; Poulios, Athanasios; Georgakouli, Kalliopi; Papanikolaou, Konstantinos; Papoutsis, Alexandros; Selemekou, Maria; Karathanos, Vaios T; Draganidis, Dimitris; Tsiokanos, Athanasios; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Fatouros, Ioannis G; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z

    2018-02-22

    The present study investigated the effect of Corinthian currant pre-exercise supplementation on metabolism, performance and blood redox status during, and after prolonged exercise. Eleven healthy participants (21-45y) performed a 90-min constant-intensity (60-70% VO 2max ) submaximal-trial, plus a time-trial (TT) to exhaustion (95% VO 2max ) after consuming an isocaloric (1.5g CHO/kg BM) amount of randomly assigned Corinthian currant or glucose-drink, or water (control). Blood was drawn at baseline, pre-exercise, 30min, 60min, 90min of submaximal-trial, post-TT, and 1h post-TT. Post-ingestion blood glucose (GLU) under Corinthian currant was higher compared with water, and similar compared with glucose-drink throughout the study. Respiratory quotient under Corinthian currant was similar with glucose-drink and higher than water throughout the submaximal trial. Accordingly, higher CHO and lower fat oxidation were observed under Corinthian currant compared with water. The TT performance was similar between Corinthian currant, glucose-drink and water. Redox status were similar under all three conditions. Reduced glutathione (GSH) declined while total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and uric acid increased during exercise. GSH and TAC returned to baseline, while uric acid remained increased the following 1h. Corinthian currant, although did not alter exercise-mediated redox status changes and performance, was equally effective to a glucose-drink in maintaining GLU levels during prolonged cycling.

  19. Beneficial effects of tibolone on blood pressure and liver redox status in ovariectomized rats with renovascular hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilglioni, Eduardo Hideo; Campos, Lilian Brites; Oliveira, Monique Cristine; Garcia, Rosângela Fernandes; Ambiel, Célia Regina; Buzzo, Ana Julia dos Reis; Ishii-Iwamoto, Emy Luzia; Salgueiro-Pagadigorria, Clairce Luzia

    2013-05-01

    Estrogen deficiency is associated with aging and increases the incidence of metabolic syndrome and hypertension. In this study, the effects of tibolone, a synthetic steroid, on the cardiovascular system, liver lipid metabolism, and redox status were evaluated, in ovariectomized (OVX) rats with renovascular hypertension (two-kidneys, one-clip, OVX + 2K1C). This study encompassed direct measurements of mean arterial pressure , plasma biochemical analysis, liver lipid contents, and assessments of the mitochondrial and peroxisomal β-oxidation capacities. Additionally, the liver redox status was assayed. Tibolone significantly reduced the mean arterial pressure of OVX + 2K1C rats, albeit reducing total and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels. In the liver, although exerting an undesirable inhibition of mitochondrial and peroxisomal β-oxidation, tibolone reversed steatosis. Tibolone also improved the liver redox status: the reduced glutathione contents and the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were restored by this compound, which also reduced the levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. So, tibolone reversed the main alterations caused by hypertension and estrogen deficiency.

  20. Labelling of living mammalian spermatozoa with the fluorescent thiol alkylating agent, monobromobimane (MB): immobilization upon exposure to ultraviolet light and analysis of acrosomal status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummins, J.M.; Fleming, A.D.; Crozet, N.; Kuehl, T.J.; Kosower, N.S.; Yanagimachi, R.

    1986-03-01

    Living spermatozoa of seven mammalian species were treated with the thiol-alkylating fluorescent labelling compound, monobromobimane (MBBR). MB-labelling alone had no effect on sperm motility, nor on the time course or ability of golden hamster spermatozoa to undergo the acrosome reaction when capacitated in vitro. Exposure of MB-labelled spermatozoa to ultraviolet (UV) light and excitation of the MB fluorochrome resulted in virtually immediate immobilization of the spermatozoa without affecting acrosomal status. UV exposure of unlabelled spermatozoa for up to 30 sec had no effect upon motility. Immobilization of MB-labelled spermatozoa depended on the midpiece being irradiated, as irradiation of the head alone, or of the more distal parts of the principal piece, had little or no effect upon motility. Labelling with MB followed by immobilization of individually selected spermatozoa was most useful for detailing the course and site of occurrence of the acrosome reaction during penetration of the cumulus oophorus by golden hamster spermatozoa in vitro. In these often hyperactivated spermatozoa, precise determination of the acrosomal status could not often otherwise be made due to the difficulty in visualizing the acrosomal region of a vigorously thrashing, hyperactivated spermatozoon. This technique should prove valuable in a variety of studies on sperm motility, capacitation and fertilization, and could also be extended to other cell systems.

  1. The Influence of Different Types of Physical Activity on The Redox Status of Scuba Divers

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    Radojevic-Popovic Radmila

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of scuba diving on ROS production and oxidative stress compared to that of other recreational activities is still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of different types of physical activity on the redox status of scuba divers by testing the pro- and anti-oxidative parameters immediately before and after different types of physical load. The prevalence study included 10 professional police divers. All examinees were male, 32 ± 5.1 years of age, well-trained, and with a minimum of five to a maximum of 20 years of diving experience. The study was divided into three experimental protocols: 1 an exercise test (at atmospheric pressure, 2 an at sea dive (30 meters for 30 minutes, and 3 a dive into river current (10 meters for 30 minutes. Immediately before and after the load test of the divers at atmospheric pressure and immediately before and after the dive, blood samples were taken to determine the values of the following pro-oxidant markers: O2−, H2O2, NO2− and TBARS, as well as antioxidant enzymes (SOD and CAT. A comparison of the results before and after physical activity for all three protocols revealed a significant increase in values for NO2−, O2−, H2O2 and CAT after physical activity. It can be concluded that the values of all oxidative stress markers depend on the season of the year in which the research is conducted or on the frequency of dives and degree of physical exertion during this period of the year.

  2. Thiol-reducing agents prevent sulforaphane-induced growth inhibition in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Cheol; Choi, Boyun; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2017-01-01

    The inhibitory potential of sulforaphane against cancer has been suggested for different types of cancer, including ovarian cancer. We examined whether this effect is mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), important signaling molecules related to cell survival and proliferation, in ovarian cancer cells. Sulforaphane at a concentration of 10 μM effectively inhibited the growth of cancer cells. Use of specific inhibitors revealed that activation of MAPK pathways by sulforaphane is unlikely to mediate sulforaphane-induced growth inhibition. Sulforaphane did not generate significant levels of intracellular ROS. Pretreatment with thiol reducers, but not ROS scavengers, prevented sulforaphane-induced growth inhibition. Furthermore, diamide, a thiol-oxidizing agent, enhanced both growth inhibition and cell death induced by sulforaphane, suggesting that the effect of sulforaphane on cell growth may be related to oxidation of protein thiols or change in cellular redox status. Our data indicate that supplementation with thiol-reducing agents should be avoided when sulforaphane is used to treat cancer.

  3. Total Thiols: Biomedical Importance And Their Alteration In Various Disorders

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    Mungli Prakash

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Thiols are the organic compounds that contain a sulphydryl group. Among all the antioxidants that are available in the body, thiols constitute the major portion of the total body antioxidants and they play a significant role in defense against reactive oxygen species. Total thiols composed of both intracellular and extracellular thiols either in the free form as oxidized or reduced glutathione, or thiols bound to proteins. Among the thiols that are bound to proteins, albumin makes the major portion of the protein bound thiols, which binds to sufhydryl group at its cysteine-34 portion. Apart from their role in defense against free radicals, thiols share significant role in detoxification, signal transduction, apoptosis and various other functions at molecular level. The thiol status in the body can be assessed easily by determining the serum levels of thiols. Decreased levels of thiols has been noted in various medical disorders including chronic renal failure and other disorders related to kidney, cardiovascular disorders, stroke and other neurological disorders, diabetes mellitus, alcoholic cirrhosis and various other disorders. Therapy using thiols has been under investigation for certain disorders.

  4. In Vivo Detection of Reactive Oxygen Species and Redox Status in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolders, Arne; Back, Patricia; De Henau, Sasha

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Due to its large families of redox-active enzymes, genetic amenability, and complete transparency, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has the potential to become an important model for the in vivo study of redox biology. Recent Advances: The recent development of several genetically encoded ratiometric reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox sensors has revolutionized the quantification and precise localization of ROS and redox signals in living organisms. Only few exploratory studies have applied these sensors in C. elegans and undoubtedly much remains to be discovered in this model. As a follow-up to our recent findings that the C. elegans somatic gonad uses superoxide and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) signals to communicate with the germline, we here analyze the patterns of H2O2 inside the C. elegans germline. Critical Issues: Despite the advantages of genetically encoded ROS and redox sensors over classic chemical sensors, still several general as well as C. elegans-specific issues need to be addressed. The major concerns for the application of these sensors in C. elegans are (i) decreased vitality of some reporter strains, (ii) interference of autofluorescent compartments with the sensor signal, and (iii) the use of immobilization methods that do not influence the worm's redox physiology. Future Directions: We propose that several of the current issues may be solved by designing reporter strains carrying single copies of codon-optimized sensors. Preferably, these sensors should have their emission wavelengths in the red region, where autofluorescence is absent. Worm analysis could be optimized using four-dimensional ratiometric fluorescence microscopy of worms immobilized in microfluidic chips. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 577–592. PMID:27306519

  5. Redox-based Epigenetic status in Drug Addiction: Potential mediator of drug-induced gene priming phenomenon and use of metabolic intervention for symptomatic treatment in drug addiction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malav Suchin Trivedi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol and other drugs of abuse, including psychostimulants and opioids, can induce epigenetic changes: a contributing factor for drug addiction, tolerance and associated withdrawal symptoms. DNA methylation is the major epigenetic mechanism and it is one of more than 200 methylation reactions supported by methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM. The levels of SAM are controlled by cellular redox status via the folate and vitamin B12-dependent enzyme methionine synthase (MS, for example; under oxidative conditions MS is inhibited, diverting its substrate homocysteine (HCY to the transsulfuration pathway. Alcohol, dopamine and morphine, can alter intracellular levels of glutathione (GSH-based cellular redox status, subsequently affecting S-adenosylmethionine (SAM levels and DNA methylation status. In this discussion, we compile this and other existing evidence in a coherent manner to present a novel hypothesis implicating the involvement of redox-based epigenetic changes in drug addiction. Next, we also discuss how gene priming phenomenon can contribute to maintenance of redox and methylation status homeostasis under various stimuli including drugs of abuse. Lastly, based on our hypothesis and some preliminary evidence, we discuss a mechanistic explanation for use of metabolic interventions / redox-replenishers as symptomatic treatment of alcohol addiction and associated withdrawal symptoms. Hence, the current review article strengthens the hypothesis that neuronal metabolism has a critical bidirectional coupling with epigenetic changes in drug addiction and we support this claim via exemplifying the link between redox-based metabolic changes and resultant epigenetic consequences under the effect of drugs of abuse.

  6. Urinary protein thiols in different grades of proteinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Mungli; Shetty, Jeevan K; Dash, Sambit; Barik, Bijay K; Sarkar, Abhirup; Awanti, Sharanabasappa M; Prabhu, Ravindra

    2008-10-01

    Total thiol status of plasma, especially thiol groups over protein contributes maximum to the plasma antioxidant status of the body. Serum protein thiols were found to be decreased in various disease conditions including chronic renal failure patients. Only few studies determined the levels of urinary protein thiols in disease conditions. The current study was designed to know the levels of urinary protein thiols in patients with different grades of proteinuria. The study was conducted on urine of 40 healthy controls and 61 cases with proteinuria. Based on proteinuria cases were further divided into two groups; group I - microproteinuria (150-300 mg protein/d), 32 cases, group II - frank proteinuria (>300 mg protein/d), 29 cases. Urinary thiol levels were determined by spectrophotometric method using dithionitrobenzoic acid. A significant decrease (pproteinuria.

  7. Effect of Multicomponent Training on Blood Pressure, Nitric Oxide, Redox Status, and Physical Fitness in Older Adult Women: Influence of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS3 Haplotypes

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    Atila Alexandre Trapé

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to verify the influence of the genotype or haplotype (interaction of the NOS3 polymorphisms [-786T>C, 894G>T (Glu298Asp, and intron 4b/a] on the response to multicomponent training (various capacities and motor skills on blood pressure (BP, nitrite concentration, redox status, and physical fitness in older adult women. The sample consisted of 52 participants, who underwent body mass index and BP assessments. Physical fitness was evaluated by six-minute walk, elbow flexion, and sit and stand up tests. Plasma/blood samples were used to evaluate redox status, nitrite concentration, and genotyping. Associations were observed between isolated polymorphisms and the response of decreased systolic and diastolic BP and increased nitrite concentration and antioxidant activity. In the haplotype analysis, the group composed of ancestral alleles (H1 was the only one to present improvement in all variables studied (decrease in systolic and diastolic BP, improvement in nitrite concentration, redox status, and physical fitness, while the group composed of variant alleles (H8 only demonstrated improvement in some variables of redox status and physical fitness. These findings suggest that NOS3 polymorphisms and physical training are important interacting variables to consider in evaluating redox status, nitric oxide availability and production, and BP control.

  8. Altered cellular redox status, sirtuin abundance and clock gene expression in a mouse model of developmentally primed NASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Kimberley D; Szczepankiewicz, Dawid; Sihota, Kiran K; Ravindraanandan, Manoj; Thomas, Hugh; Lillycrop, Karen A; Burdge, Graham C; Hanson, Mark A; Byrne, Christopher D; Cagampang, Felino R

    2016-07-01

    We have previously shown that high fat (HF) feeding during pregnancy primes the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatits (NASH) in the adult offspring. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Since the endogenous molecular clock can regulate hepatic lipid metabolism, we investigated whether exposure to a HF diet during development could alter hepatic clock gene expression and contribute to NASH onset in later life. Female mice were fed either a control (C, 7%kcal fat) or HF (45%kcal fat) diet. Offspring were fed either a C or HF diet resulting in four offspring groups: C/C, C/HF, HF/C and HF/HF. NAFLD progression, cellular redox status, sirtuin expression (Sirt1, Sirt3), and the expression of core clock genes (Clock, Bmal1, Per2, Cry2) and clock-controlled genes involved in lipid metabolism (Rev-Erbα, Rev-Erbβ, RORα, and Srebp1c) were measured in offspring livers. Offspring fed a HF diet developed NAFLD. However HF fed offspring of mothers fed a HF diet developed NASH, coupled with significantly reduced NAD(+)/NADH (pNASH in adulthood, involving altered cellular redox status, reduced sirtuin abundance, and desynchronized clock gene expression. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Thiol biochemistry of prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    The present studies have shown that GSH metabolism arose in the purple bacteria and cyanobacteria where it functions to protect against oxygen toxicity. Evidence was obtained indicating that GSH metabolism was incorporated into eucaryotes via the endosymbiosis giving rise to mitochrondria and chloroplasts. Aerobic bacteria lacking GSH utilize other thiols for apparently similar functions, the thiol being coenzyme A in Gram positive bacteria and chi-glutamylcysteine in the halobacteria. The thiol biochemistry of prokaryotes is thus seen to be much more highly diversified than that of eucaryotes and much remains to be learned about this subject.

  10. Soybean and green tea polyphenols improve immune function and redox status in very old ovariectomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza, Isabel; De Castro, Nuria M; Arranz, Lorena; De la Fuente, Mónica

    2010-12-01

    In previous work we have observed that ovariectomy in rodents, a good model of mimicking human ovarian hormone loss, causes premature aging of the immune system. The prooxidative and inflammatory state that underlies the aging process is the base of that premature immunosenescence. It has been found that nutritional interventions with polyphenolic antioxidants constitute a good alternative to rejuvenate age-affected immune functions. In this study, we administered a diet supplemented with polyphenols (coming from soybean isoflavones and green tea) to sham-operated and ovariectomized mature mice for 15 weeks, until they reached a very old age. We have studied the effect of this supplementation on a broad range of parameters of immune function (in macrophages and lymphocytes) and oxidative stress (enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant defences, oxidant compounds, and lipid peroxidation damage) in peritoneal leukocytes. The results showed that ovariectomy accelerates the age-related impairment of immune functions in very old mice as well as the oxidative and proinflammatory imbalance, and that the administration of soybean isoflavones and green tea improve the immune and redox state in these animals. Because the immune system is a good marker of health and a predictor of longevity, we suggest that an adequate nutritional treatment with polyphenols could be a highly recommended tool to fight against the detrimental effects of the lack of female sex hormones, through an improvement of the immune cell functions and redox state.

  11. Effects of commonly consumed fruit juices and carbohydrates on redox status and anticancer biomarkers in female rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinholt, Vibeke M.; Nielsen, Salka E.; Knuthsen, Pia

    2003-01-01

    Administration of apple juice, black currant juice, ora 1:1 combination of the two juices significantly decreased the level of the lipid peroxidation biomarker malondialdehyde in plasma of female rats, whereas the protein oxidation biomarker 2-amino-adipic semialdehyde, was significantly increased....../kg of diet. However, no effects were observed on hepatic glutathione S-transferase or quinone reductase activities, plasma redox status, or the activity of red blood cell antioxidant enzymes. Overall, the results of the present study suggest that commonly consumed fruit juices can alter lipid and protein...... oxidation biomarkers in the blood as well as hepatic quinone reductase activity, and that quercetin may not be the major active principle. The observation that natural carbohydrates are capable of mediating oxidative stress in vivo warrants further studies due to the central role refined and unrefined...

  12. Effects of Spirulina on the functions and redox status of auditory system in senescence-accelerated prone-8 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Ching Chan

    Full Text Available To our knowledge, the effects of Spirulina platensis water extract (SP on hearing function have not yet been reported. This study investigated the effects of SP on the function and redox status of the auditory system. Auditory brainstem responses and redox status were compared between two groups of 3-month-old senescence-accelerated prone-8 (SAMP8 mice: the control group was fed a normal diet, and the experimental group was fed a normal diet with oral supplementation of SP for 6 weeks. Compared with the control group, the experimental group had significantly lower hearing thresholds according to auditory brainstem responses measured using click sounds and 8-kHz tone burst sound stimulation at the end of this study. The experimental group had a shorter I-III interval of auditory brainstem responses with 16-kHz tone burst stimulation than the control group that was of borderline significance. Additionally, the experimental group had significantly higher mRNA expression of the superoxide dismutase and catalase genes in the cochlea and brainstem and significantly higher mRNA expression of the glutathione peroxidase gene in the cochlea. Further, the experimental group had significantly lower malondialdehyde levels in the cochlea and brainstem than the control group. However, tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA expression was not significantly different between the control and experimental groups. SP could decrease hearing degeneration in senescence-accelerated prone-8 mice possibly by increasing superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase gene expression and decreasing damage from oxidative stress in the cochlea and brainstem.

  13. Asada-Halliwell pathway maintains redox status in Dioscorea alata tuber which helps in germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shruti; Sehrawat, Ankita; Deswal, Renu

    2016-09-01

    Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) are important regulatory molecules governing physiological processes. In the present study a biochemical and proteome level comparison of two contrasting growth stages of Dioscorea alata tuber namely germinating and mature tuber was performed in order to understand the tuber physiology and biochemistry. Existence of all the component enzymes [APx (ascorbate peroxidase), GR (glutathione reductase), DHAR (dehydroascorbate reductase), MDHAR (mono-dehydroascorbate reductase)] and major products [ascorbate (ASC) and glutathione (GSH)] of the cycle showed an operational Asada-Halliwell cycle in the tuber. A 2.65 fold increase in ASC content & a 3.8 fold increase in GR activity fortified the redox milieu during germination. In contrast a 5 fold higher H2O2 content (due to 3.08 fold lower APx activity) and accumulation of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as nitric oxide (NO, 2.4-fold) and S-nitrosothiol (SNO, 2.08 fold) contributed to overall oxidative conditions in the mature tuber. The carbonic anhydrase (CA, 7.5 fold), DHAR (5.31 fold) and MDHAR (7 fold) activities were higher in the germinating tuber in comparison with the mature tuber. GSNO negatively regulated the CA (3.6 & 3.95 fold), MDHAR (7.5 & 1.5 fold) and APx (2.3 & 1.81 fold) while another NO donor, CysNO negatively regulated the DHAR (2.24 & 1.32 fold) activity in the mature and germinating stages respectively indicating again that the lesser inhibition by NO (via nitrosylation) may be because of overall reducing environment in the germinating tuber. Increased SNO leading to S-nitrosylation of dioscorin was confirmed by Biotin switch assay. This is the first report showing dioscorin nitrosylation. The present analysis showed differential redox regulation and also suggests the physiological relevance of CA, DHAR, MDHAR, APx & GR in tuber germination for the first time. These enzymes may be used as potential markers of tuber germination in future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  14. A deficit in zinc availability can cause alterations in tubulin thiol redox status in cultured neurons and in the developing fetal rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Gerardo G; Salvador, Gabriela A; Romero, Carolina; Keen, Carl L; Oteiza, Patricia I

    2011-07-15

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency during early development can result in multiple brain abnormalities and altered neuronal functions. In rats, a gestational deficit of Zn can affect the fetal brain cytoskeleton and signaling cascades involved in cellular processes that are central to brain development. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that oxidative stress is involved in Zn deficiency-induced altered tubulin dynamics and the associated dysregulation of transcription factor NF-κB. For this purpose, we used two cell culture models (rat cortical neurons, human IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells) and an animal model of Zn deficiency. A low rate of in vitro tubulin polymerization, an increase in tubulin oligomers, and a higher protein cysteine oxidation were observed in the Zn-deficient neuronal cells and in gestation day 19 fetal brains obtained from dams fed marginal-Zn diets throughout pregnancy. These alterations could be prevented by treating the Zn-deficient cells with the reducing agent tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine or by the presence of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and α-lipoic acid (LA). Consistent with the above, Zn deficiency-induced tubulin-mediated alterations in transcription factor NF-κB nuclear translocation were prevented by treating IMR-32 cells with LA and NAC. Binding of the NF-κB protein p50, dynein, and karyopherin α (components of the NF-κB transport complex) to β-tubulin as well as the expression of NF-κB-dependent genes (Bcl-2, cyclin D1, and c-myc) was also restored by the addition of LA and NAC to Zn-deficient cells. In conclusion, a deficit in Zn viability could affect early brain development through: (1) an induction of oxidative stress, (2) tubulin oxidation, (3) altered tubulin dynamics, and (4) deregulation of signals (e.g., NF-κB) involved in critical developmental events. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Maternal diet-induced obesity alters mitochondrial activity and redox status in mouse oocytes and zygotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Igosheva

    Full Text Available The negative impact of obesity on reproductive success is well documented but the stages at which development of the conceptus is compromised and the mechanisms responsible for the developmental failure still remain unclear. Recent findings suggest that mitochondria may be a contributing factor. However to date no studies have directly addressed the consequences of maternal obesity on mitochondria in early embryogenesis.Using an established murine model of maternal diet induced obesity and a live cell dynamic fluorescence imaging techniques coupled with molecular biology we have investigated the underlying mechanisms of obesity-induced reduced fertility. Our study is the first to show that maternal obesity prior to conception is associated with altered mitochondria in mouse oocytes and zygotes. Specifically, maternal diet-induced obesity in mice led to an increase in mitochondrial potential, mitochondrial DNA content and biogenesis. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS was raised while glutathione was depleted and the redox state became more oxidised, suggestive of oxidative stress. These altered mitochondrial properties were associated with significant developmental impairment as shown by the increased number of obese mothers who failed to support blastocyst formation compared to lean dams. We propose that compromised oocyte and early embryo mitochondrial metabolism, resulting from excessive nutrient exposure prior to and during conception, may underlie poor reproductive outcomes frequently reported in obese women.

  16. Influence of the PDE5 inhibitor tadalafil on redox status and antioxidant defense system in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duranti, Guglielmo; Ceci, Roberta; Sgrò, Paolo; Sabatini, Stefania; Di Luigi, Luigi

    2017-05-01

    Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5Is), widely known for their beneficial effects onto male erectile dysfunction, seem to exert favorable effects onto metabolism as well. Tadalafil exposure increases oxidative metabolism of C2C12 skeletal muscle cells. A rise in fatty acid (FA) metabolism, requiring more oxygen, could induce a larger reactive oxygen species (ROS) release as a byproduct thus leading to a redox imbalance. The aim of this study was to determine how PDE5I tadalafil influences redox status in skeletal muscle cells to match the increasing oxidative metabolism. To this purpose, differentiated C2C12 skeletal muscle cells were treated with tadalafil and analyzed for total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and glutathione levels as marker of redox status; enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) engaged in antioxidant defense; and lipid peroxidation (TBARS) and protein carbonyls (PrCar) as markers of oxidative damage. Tadalafil increased total intracellular glutathione (tGSH), CAT, SOD, and GPx enzymatic activities while no changes were found in TAC. A perturbation of redox status, as showed by the decrease in the ratio between reduced/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG), was observed. Nevertheless, it did not cause any change in TBARS and PrCar levels probably due to the enhancement in the antioxidant enzymatic network. Taken together, these data indicate that tadalafil, besides improving oxidative metabolism, may be beneficial to skeletal muscle cells by enhancing the enzymatic antioxidant system capacity.

  17. Analysis of the oxido-redox status of plasma proteins. Technology advances for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Candiano, Giovanni; Della Ciana, Leopoldo; Petretto, Andrea; Santucci, Laura; Prunotto, Marco; Camilla, Roberta; Coppo, Rosanna; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2011-05-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are potentially implicated in renal pathology. Direct evidence is available for animal models of glomerulonephritis but the demonstration of ROS implication in human diseases is only circumstantial and requires further experimental support. One problem limiting any evolution is the brief life of ROS (in terms of milliseconds) that makes it difficult their direct detection 'in vivo'. An alternative is to look at the products of oxidation of proteins that remain in blood as a signature of ROS activity. Recent data have shown the presence of oxidation products of albumin (sulfonic (34)Cys albumin) in serum of patients with focal-glomerulosclerosis, that is a primary glomerular diseases causing nephrotic syndrome. Structural studies based on spectroscopy and calorimetry strengthened the relevance of oxidation of the unique free SH groups of (34)Cys for conformation of albumin, in analogy with what already reported for other proteins. In this review, we present new developments on technologies for the detection of the oxido-redox potential of proteins that are based on the concept that oxidation is inversely correlated with their free content of sulphydryl groups. We describe, in particular, two new iodoacetamide-substituted cyanines that have been developed for labelling sulphydryl groups and can be utilized as stable dyes prior mono- and bi-dimensional electrophoresis. Proteins with low binding with iodoacetamide-cyanines may be considered as surrogate biomarkers of ROS activity. Standardization of these techniques and their acquisition in more laboratories would enable clinicians to plan screening studies on ROS in human diseases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Chloroplast Redox Poise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steccanella, Verdiana

    The redox state of the chloroplast is maintained by a delicate balance between energy production and consumption and is affected by the need to avoid increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Redox power and ROS generated in the chloroplast are essential for maintaining physiological...... the redox status of the plastoquinone pool and chlorophyll biosynthesis. Furthermore, in the plant cell, the equilibrium between redox reactions and ROS signals is also maintained by various balancing mechanisms among which the thioredoxin reductase-thioredoxin system (TR-Trx) stands out as a mediator...

  19. Redox balance influences differentiation status of neuroblastoma in the presence of all-trans retinoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Silvis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor in childhood; and patients in stage IV of the disease have a high propensity for tumor recurrence. Retinoid therapy has been utilized as a means to induce differentiation of tumor cells and to inhibit relapse. In this study, the expression of a common neuronal differentiation marker [neurofilament M (NF-M] in human SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells treated with 10 μM all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA showed significantly increased expression in accordance with reduced cell number. This was accompanied by an increase in MitoSOX and DCFH2 oxidation that could be indicative of increased steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS such as O2•− and H2O2, which correlated with increased levels of MnSOD activity and immuno-reactive protein. Furthermore PEG-catalase inhibited the DCFH2 oxidation signal to a greater extent in the ATRA-treated cells (relative to controls at 96 h indicating that as the cells became more differentiated, steady-state levels of H2O2 increased in the absence of increases in peroxide-scavenging antioxidants (i.e., glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase. In addition, ATRA-induced stimulation of NF-M at 48 and 72 h was enhanced by decreasing SOD activity using siRNA directed at MnSOD. Finally, treatment with ATRA for 96 h in the presence of MnSOD siRNA or PEG-catalase inhibited ATRA induced increases in NF-M expression. These results provide strong support for the hypothesis that changes in steady-state levels of O2•− and H2O2 significantly contribute to the process of ATRA-induced differentiation in neuroblastoma, and suggest that retinoid therapy for neuroblastoma could potentially be enhanced by redox-based manipulations of superoxide metabolism to improve patient outcome.

  20. Designed Chemical Intervention with Thiols for Prophylactic Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Monika; Kumar, Lokesh; Jain, Ashish; Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Kushwaha, Bhavana; Lal, Nand; Kumar, Lalit; Rawat, Tara; Dwivedi, Anil K; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Sharma, Vishnu L; Gupta, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Unlike somatic cells, sperm have several-fold more available-thiols that are susceptible to redox-active agents. The present study explains the mechanism behind the instant sperm-immobilizing and trichomonacidal activities of pyrrolidinium pyrrolidine-1-carbodithioate (PPC), a novel thiol agent rationally created for prophylactic contraception by minor chemical modifications of some known thiol drugs. PPC, and its three derivatives (with potential active-site blocked by alkylation), were synthesized and evaluated against live human sperm and metronidazole-susceptible and resistant Trichomonas vaginalis, in vitro. Sperm hexokinase activity was evaluated by coupled enzyme assay. PPC irreversibly immobilized 100% human sperm in ∼30 seconds and totally eliminated Trichomonas vaginalis more efficiently than nonoxynol-9 and metronidazole. It significantly inhibited (Pspermicidal and microbicidal activities (in vitro), and contraceptive efficacy in rabbits. PPC remained fully active in quick-dissolving, mucoadhesive vaginal-film formulation, and these PPC-films significantly reduced pregnancy and fertility rates in rabbits. The films released ∼90% of PPC in simulated vaginal fluid (pH 4.2) at 37°C in 5 minutes, in vitro. We have thus discovered a common target (reactive thiols) on chiefly-anaerobic, redox-sensitive cells like sperm and Trichomonas, which is susceptible to designed chemical interference for prophylactic contraception. The active thiol in PPC inactivates sperm and Trichomonas via interference with crucial sulfhydryl-disulfide based reactions, e.g. hexokinase activation in human sperm. In comparison to non-specific surfactant action of OTC spermicide nonoxynol-9, the action of thiol-active PPC is apparently much more specific, potent and safe. PPC presents a proof-of-concept for prophylactic contraception via manipulation of thiols in vagina for selective targeting of sperm and Trichomonas, and qualifies as a promising lead for the development of dually

  1. Effectiveness of Methylcobalamin and Folinic Acid Treatment on Adaptive Behavior in Children with Autistic Disorder Is Related to Glutathione Redox Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Frye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatments targeting metabolic abnormalities in children with autism are limited. Previously we reported that a nutritional treatment significantly improved glutathione metabolism in children with autistic disorder. In this study we evaluated changes in adaptive behaviors in this cohort and determined whether such changes are related to changes in glutathione metabolism. Thirty-seven children diagnosed with autistic disorder and abnormal glutathione and methylation metabolism were treated with twice weekly 75 µg/Kg methylcobalamin and twice daily 400 µg folinic acid for 3 months in an open-label fashion. The Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS and glutathione redox metabolites were measured at baseline and at the end of the treatment period. Over the treatment period, all VABS subscales significantly improved with an average effect size of 0.59, and an average improvement in skills of 7.7 months. A greater improvement in glutathione redox status was associated with a greater improvement in expressive communication, personal and domestic daily living skills, and interpersonal, play-leisure, and coping social skills. Age, gender, and history of regression did not influence treatment response. The significant behavioral improvements observed and the relationship between these improvements to glutathione redox status suggest that nutritional interventions targeting redox metabolism may benefit some children with autism.

  2. Effectiveness of methylcobalamin and folinic Acid treatment on adaptive behavior in children with autistic disorder is related to glutathione redox status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Richard E; Melnyk, Stepan; Fuchs, George; Reid, Tyra; Jernigan, Stefanie; Pavliv, Oleksandra; Hubanks, Amanda; Gaylor, David W; Walters, Laura; James, S Jill

    2013-01-01

    Treatments targeting metabolic abnormalities in children with autism are limited. Previously we reported that a nutritional treatment significantly improved glutathione metabolism in children with autistic disorder. In this study we evaluated changes in adaptive behaviors in this cohort and determined whether such changes are related to changes in glutathione metabolism. Thirty-seven children diagnosed with autistic disorder and abnormal glutathione and methylation metabolism were treated with twice weekly 75 µg/Kg methylcobalamin and twice daily 400 µg folinic acid for 3 months in an open-label fashion. The Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS) and glutathione redox metabolites were measured at baseline and at the end of the treatment period. Over the treatment period, all VABS subscales significantly improved with an average effect size of 0.59, and an average improvement in skills of 7.7 months. A greater improvement in glutathione redox status was associated with a greater improvement in expressive communication, personal and domestic daily living skills, and interpersonal, play-leisure, and coping social skills. Age, gender, and history of regression did not influence treatment response. The significant behavioral improvements observed and the relationship between these improvements to glutathione redox status suggest that nutritional interventions targeting redox metabolism may benefit some children with autism.

  3. Chemistry and Redox Biology of Mycothiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Aníbal M; Pedre, Brandán; De Armas, María Inés; Tossounian, Maria-Armineh; Radi, Rafael; Messens, Joris; Trujillo, Madia

    2018-02-20

    Mycothiol (MSH, AcCys-GlcN-Ins) is the main low-molecular weight (LMW) thiol of most Actinomycetes, including the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis that affects millions of people worldwide. Strains with decreased MSH content show increased susceptibilities to hydroperoxides and electrophilic compounds. In M. tuberculosis, MSH modulates the response to several antituberculosis drugs. Enzymatic routes involving MSH could provide clues for specific drug design. Recent Advances: Physicochemical data argue against a rapid, nonenzymatic reaction of MSH with oxidants, disulfides, or electrophiles. Moreover, exposure of the bacteria to high concentrations of two-electron oxidants resulted in protein mycothiolation. The recently described glutaredoxin-like protein mycoredoxin-1 (Mrx-1) provides a route for catalytic reduction of mycothiolated proteins, protecting critical cysteines from irreversible oxidation. The description of MSH/Mrx-1-dependent activities of peroxidases helped to explain the higher susceptibility to oxidants observed in Actinomycetes lacking MSH. Moreover, the first mycothiol-S-transferase, member of the DinB superfamily of proteins, was described. In Corynebacterium, both the MSH/Mrx-1 and the thioredoxin pathways reduce methionine sulfoxide reductase A. A novel tool for in vivo imaging of the MSH/mycothiol disulfide (MSSM) status allows following changes in the mycothiol redox state during macrophage infection and its relationship with antibiotic sensitivity. Redundancy of MSH with other LMW thiols is starting to be unraveled and could help to rationalize the differences in the reported importance of MSH synthesis observed in vitro versus in animal infection models. Future work should be directed to establish the structural bases of the specificity of MSH-dependent enzymes, thus facilitating drug developments. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 487-504.

  4. Quantifying Reversible Oxidation of Protein Thiols in Photosynthetic Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, William O.; Werth, Emily G.; McConnell, Evan W.; Alvarez, Sophie; Hicks, Leslie M.

    2015-04-01

    Photosynthetic organisms use dynamic post-translational modifications to survive and adapt, which include reversible oxidative modifications of protein thiols that regulate protein structure, function, and activity. Efforts to quantify thiol modifications on a global scale have relied upon peptide derivatization, typically using isobaric tags such as TMT, ICAT, or iTRAQ that are more expensive, less accurate, and provide less proteome coverage than label-free approaches—suggesting the need for improved experimental designs for studies requiring maximal coverage and precision. Herein, we present the coverage and precision of resin-assisted thiol enrichment coupled to label-free quantitation for the characterization of reversible oxidative modifications on protein thiols. Using C. reinhardtii and Arabidopsis as model systems for algae and plants, we quantified 3662 and 1641 unique cysteinyl peptides, respectively, with median coefficient of variation (CV) of 13% and 16%. Further, our method is extendable for the detection of protein abundance changes and stoichiometries of cysteine oxidation. Finally, we demonstrate proof-of-principle for our method, and reveal that exogenous hydrogen peroxide treatment regulates the C. reinhardtii redox proteome by increasing or decreasing the level of oxidation of 501 or 67 peptides, respectively. As protein activity and function is controlled by oxidative modifications on protein thiols, resin-assisted thiol enrichment coupled to label-free quantitation can reveal how intracellular and environmental stimuli affect plant survival and fitness through oxidative stress.

  5. Differential alkylation-based redox proteomics – Lessons learnt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine is one of the most reactive amino acids. This is due to the electronegativity of sulphur atom in the side chain of thiolate group. It results in cysteine being present in several distinct redox forms inside the cell. Amongst these, reversible oxidations, S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation are crucial mediators of intracellular redox signalling, with known associations to health and disease. Study of their functionalities has intensified thanks to the development of various analytical strategies, with particular contribution from differential alkylation-based proteomics methods. Presented here is a critical evaluation of differential alkylation-based strategies for the analysis of S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation. The aim is to assess the current status and to provide insights for future directions in the dynamically evolving field of redox proteomics. To achieve that we collected 35 original research articles published since 2010 and analysed them considering the following parameters, (i) resolution of modification site, (ii) quantitative information, including correction of modification levels by protein abundance changes and determination of modification site occupancy, (iii) throughput, including the amount of starting material required for analysis. The results of this meta-analysis are the core of this review, complemented by issues related to biological models and sample preparation in redox proteomics, including conditions for free thiol blocking and labelling of target cysteine oxoforms. PMID:26282677

  6. Differential alkylation-based redox proteomics--Lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2015-12-01

    Cysteine is one of the most reactive amino acids. This is due to the electronegativity of sulphur atom in the side chain of thiolate group. It results in cysteine being present in several distinct redox forms inside the cell. Amongst these, reversible oxidations, S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation are crucial mediators of intracellular redox signalling, with known associations to health and disease. Study of their functionalities has intensified thanks to the development of various analytical strategies, with particular contribution from differential alkylation-based proteomics methods. Presented here is a critical evaluation of differential alkylation-based strategies for the analysis of S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation. The aim is to assess the current status and to provide insights for future directions in the dynamically evolving field of redox proteomics. To achieve that we collected 35 original research articles published since 2010 and analysed them considering the following parameters, (i) resolution of modification site, (ii) quantitative information, including correction of modification levels by protein abundance changes and determination of modification site occupancy, (iii) throughput, including the amount of starting material required for analysis. The results of this meta-analysis are the core of this review, complemented by issues related to biological models and sample preparation in redox proteomics, including conditions for free thiol blocking and labelling of target cysteine oxoforms. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Novel feed including bioactive compounds from winery wastes improved broilers' redox status in blood and tissues of vital organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makri, Sotiria; Kafantaris, Ioannis; Stagos, Dimitrios; Chamokeridou, Theodora; Petrotos, Konstantinos; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Mpesios, Anastasios; Goutzourelas, Nikolaos; Kokkas, Stylianos; Goulas, Panagiotis; Komiotis, Dimitrios; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2017-04-01

    Currently, there is a great interest in the production of animal feed with antioxidant activity. The aim of this study was to examine the potential antioxidant effects of a feed supplemented with grape pomace (GP), a winery by-product with high environmental load, in chickens. Broilers of 15 days post birth were separated into two groups fed either with standard diet or with diet supplemented with GP for 35 days. Blood and tissues collections were performed after feeding for 15 and 35 days with the experimental diet (i.e. at 30 and 50 days post birth). Free radical toxicity markers, namely thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, protein carbonyls, total antioxidant capacity, reduced glutathione, catalase activity and rate of H 2 O 2 decomposition were determined in blood and tissues of vital organs. The results indicated that feed supplemented with GP decreased oxidative stress-induced toxic effects and improved chickens' redox status, and so it may also improve their wellness and productivity. On the other hand, this exploitation of GP may solve problems of environmental pollution in areas with wineries. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Organophosphate pesticides-induced changes in the redox status of rat tissues and protective effects of antioxidant vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vibhuti; Srivastava, Nalini

    2015-04-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) pesticides are among the most toxic synthetic chemicals purposefully added in the environment. The common use of OP insecticides in public health and agriculture results in an environmental pollution and a number of acute and chronic poisoning events. Present study was aimed to evaluate the potential of monocrotophos and quinalphos to effect the redox status and glutathione (GSH) homeostasis in rat tissues and find out whether antioxidant vitamins have some protection on the pesticide-induced alterations. The results showed that these pesticides alone or in combination, caused decrease in the levels of GSH and the corresponding increase in the levels of GSSG, decreasing the GSH/GSSG ratio. The results also showed that NADPH/NADP(+) and NADH/NAD(+) ratios were decreased in the liver and brain of rats on exposure with mococrotophos, quinalphos, and their mixture. These pesticides, alone or in combination, caused alterations in the activities of GSH reductase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the rat tissues. However, the expression of the GSH recycling enzymes did not show significant alterations as compared to control. From the results, it can be concluded that these pesticides generate oxidative stress but their effects were not synergistic when given together and prior feeding of antioxidant vitamins tend to reduce the toxicities of these pesticides. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Thiol/disulfide homeostasis in untreated schizophrenia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcuoglu, Canan; Bakirhan, Abdurrahim; Yilmaz, Fatma Meric; Neselioglu, Salim; Erel, Ozcan; Sahiner, Safak Yalcin

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate dynamic thiol/disulfide (SH/SS) homeostasis in untreated schizophrenia. Blood thiol/disulfide homeostasis status, which reflects native thiol-disulfide exchanges, was investigated in 87 untreated patients (52 males, 35 females), and the obtained results were compared with 86 healthy controls. Blood serum native thiol and total thiol (ToSH) concentrations were measured in a paired test. The half value of the difference between native thiol and ToSH concentrations was calculated as the disulfide bond amount. SH and ToSH concentrations were found to be significantly lower (pschizophrenia compared with the control group, whereas disulfide levels were significantly higher (pSchizophrenia patients had significantly higher SS/ToSH and SS/SH ratios and a significantly lower SH/ToSH ratio compared to those of healthy individuals. SH and ToSH amounts were found to be insufficient in untreated schizophrenia patients. Additionally, according to the results of the study, thiol/disulfide homeostasis was also disturbed by a shift to the disulfide bond formation side. This might affect the neurotransmission processes, which are known to be related with many symptoms observed in schizophrenia. The replacement of the thiol gap and the reduction of excess SS amounts might have a positive effect in supporting therapy for schizophrenia patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Oriented Immobilization of His-Tagged Protein on a Redox Active Thiol Derivative of DPTA-Cu(II Layer Deposited on a Gold Electrode—The Base of Electrochemical Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Radecka

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns the development of an electrochemical biosensor for the determination of Aβ16–23' and Aβ1–40 peptides. The His-tagged V and VC1 domains of Receptor for Advanced Glycation end Products (RAGE immobilized on a gold electrode surface were used as analytically active molecules. The immobilization of His6–RAGE domains consists of: (i formation of a mixed layer of N-acetylcysteamine (NAC and the thiol derivative of pentetic acid (DPTA; (ii complexation of Cu(II by DPTA; (iii oriented immobilization of His6–RAGE domains via coordination bonds between Cu(II sites from DPTA–Cu(II complex and imidazole nitrogen atoms of a histidine tag. Each modification step was controlled by cyclic voltammetry (CV, Osteryoung square-wave voltammetry (OSWV, and atomic force microscopy (AFM. The applicability of the proposed biosensor was tested in the presence of human plasma, which had no influence on its performance. The detection limits for Aβ1–40 determination were 1.06 nM and 0.80 nM, in the presence of buffer and human plasma, respectively. These values reach the concentration level of Aβ1–40 which is relevant for determination of its soluble form in human plasma, as well as in brain. This indicates the promising future application of biosensor presented for early diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Redox Pioneer: Professor Joseph Loscalzo

    OpenAIRE

    Leopold, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    Dr. Joseph Loscalzo (M.D., 1978; Ph.D., 1977) is recognized here as a Redox Pioneer because he has published two articles in the field of antioxidant/redox biology that have been cited more than 1,000 times and 22 articles that have been cited more than 100 times. Dr. Loscalzo is known for his seminal contributions to our understanding of the vascular biology of nitric oxide. His initial discovery that the antiplatelet effects of organic nitrates are potentiated by thiols through a mechanism ...

  12. The Effects of an Olive Fruit Polyphenol-Enriched Yogurt on Body Composition, Blood Redox Status, Physiological and Metabolic Parameters and Yogurt Microflora

    OpenAIRE

    Kalliopi Georgakouli; Anastasios Mpesios; Demetrios Kouretas; Konstantinos Petrotos; Chrysanthi Mitsagga; Ioannis Giavasis; Athanasios Z. Jamurtas

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we investigated the effects of an olive polyphenol-enriched yogurt on yogurt microflora, as well as hematological, physiological and metabolic parameters, blood redox status and body composition. In a randomized double-blind, crossover design, 16 (6 men, 10 women) nonsmoking volunteers with non-declared pathology consumed either 400 g of olive fruit polyphenol-enriched yogurt with 50 mg of encapsulated olive polyphenols (experimental condition—EC) or 400 g of plain yogurt...

  13. Investigation of redox status in chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-induced neurodegeneration in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Saxena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aging related reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF has been linked with neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Experimentally, a condition of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion due to reduced CBF can be induced by permanent bilateral occlusion of common carotid arteries (2-vessel occlusion, 2VO in rats. Since oxidative stress, leading to neuronal apoptosis and death, is one of the mechanisms, which is thought to play a significant role in chronic degenerative neurological disorders, the present study was planned to assess the ROS status by measuring the levels of anti-oxidant enzymes that might occur during chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Antioxidant enzymes namely glutathione peroxidase (GPx, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase were measured in the brain tissue at eight weeks of 2VO induction in rats. Results show significantly elevated levels of GPx, SOD, and catalase enzymes as compared with the control group. It is possible that compensatory rise in antioxidant enzymes occurs in response to increased oxidative stress following ischemic insult.

  14. Moderate ethanol ingestion, redox status, and cardiovascular system in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Carmen Gonzalez; Agapito, Victoria Vega; Obeso, Ana; Prieto-Lloret, Jesus; Bustamante, Rosa; Castañeda, Javier; Agapito, Teresa; Gonzalez, Constancio

    2011-06-01

    Moderate intake of alcoholic beverages decreases the incidence of cardiovascular pathologies, but it is in dispute if cardioprotective effects are due to ethanol, to polyphenolic compounds present in beverages or to a combination of both. In humans, effects of high, moderate, and low doses of alcoholic beverages are widely studied, but effects of pure alcohol remain unclear. On the other hand, experiments with laboratory animals are centered on high toxicological doses of ethanol but not on low doses. In the present study, we have aimed to mimic in the rat the pattern of alcohol intake in Mediterranean population. Alcohol ingestion is spread along the day and not always related to solid food consumption. We tried to define the beneficial and harmful effects of pure ethanol ingestion without polyphenol's influence. Experimental rats were given 1% ethanol in their drinking water for 30 days, resulting in a daily ingestion of 0.27 mL of ethanol/rat/d. Ethanol ingestion did not cause deleterious effects on the general status of the animals, but it decreased cholesterol, triglycerides, and catecholamine stores' rate of utilization in peripheral sympathetic system. Moreover, ethanol lowered pulmonary arterial pressure and did not alter systemic arterial pressure. In the liver, the reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio was augmented and lipid peroxide, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase activities were decreased. However, catalase activity was unaltered. Liver cytochrome P4502E1 distribution and protein level and activity were unchanged by ethanol ingestion. Data indicate a lack of harmful effects and underscore a set of potentially beneficial effects of this dose of ethanol. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cysteine-functional polymers via thiol-ene conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Matthias; Reimann, Oliver; Hackenberger, Christian P R; Groll, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    A thiofunctional thiazolidine is introduced as a new low-molar-mass building block for the introduction of cysteine residues via a thiol-ene reaction. Allyl-functional polyglycidol (PG) is used as a model polymer to demonstrate polymer-analogue functionalization through reaction with the unsaturated side-chains. A modified trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBSA) assay is used for the redox-insensitive quantification and a precise final cysteine content can be predetermined at the polymerization stage. Native chemical ligation at cysteine-functional PG is performed as a model reaction for a chemoselective peptide modification of this polymer. The three-step synthesis of the thiofunctional thiazolidine reactant, together with the standard thiol-ene coupling and the robust quantification assay, broadens the toolbox for thiol-ene chemistry and offers a generic and straightforward approach to cysteine-functional materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Perturbation of human coronary artery endothelial cell redox state and NADPH generation by methylglyoxal.

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    Philip E Morgan

    Full Text Available Diabetes is associated with elevated plasma glucose, increased reactive aldehyde formation, oxidative damage, and glycation/glycoxidation of biomolecules. Cellular detoxification of, or protection against, such modifications commonly requires NADPH-dependent reducing equivalents (e.g. GSH. We hypothesised that reactive aldehydes may modulate cellular redox status via the inhibition of NADPH-generating enzymes, resulting in decreased thiol and NADPH levels. Primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC were incubated with high glucose (25 mM, 24 h, 37°C, or methylglyoxal (MGO, glyoxal, or glycolaldehyde (100-500 µM, 1 h, 37°C, before quantification of intracellular thiols and NADPH-generating enzyme activities. Exposure to MGO, but not the other species examined, significantly (P<0.05 decreased total thiols (∼35%, further experiments with MGO showed significant losses of GSH (∼40% and NADPH (∼10%; these changes did not result in an immediate loss of cell viability. Significantly decreased (∼10% NADPH-producing enzyme activity was observed for HCAEC when glucose-6-phosphate or 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate were used as substrates. Cell lysate experiments showed significant MGO-dose dependent inhibition of glucose-6-phosphate-dependent enzymes and isocitrate dehydrogenase, but not malic enzyme. Analysis of intact cell or lysate proteins showed that arginine-derived hydroimidazolones were the predominant advanced glycation end-product (AGE formed; lower levels of N(ε-(carboxyethyllysine (CEL and N(ε-(carboxymethyllysine (CML were also detected. These data support a novel mechanism by which MGO exposure results in changes in redox status in human coronary artery endothelial cells, via inhibition of NADPH-generating enzymes, with resultant changes in reduced protein thiol and GSH levels. These changes may contribute to the endothelial cell dysfunction observed in diabetes-associated atherosclerosis.

  17. In vivo EPR pharmacokinetic evaluation of the redox status and the blood brain barrier permeability in the SOD1G93A ALS rat model.

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    Stamenković, Stefan; Pavićević, Aleksandra; Mojović, Miloš; Popović-Bijelić, Ana; Selaković, Vesna; Andjus, Pavle; Bačić, Goran

    2017-07-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder affecting the motor pathways of the central nervous system. Although a number of pathophysiological mechanisms have been described in the disease, post mortem and animal model studies indicate blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and elevated production of reactive oxygen species as major contributors to disease pathology. In this study, the BBB permeability and the brain tissue redox status of the SOD1 G93A ALS rat model in the presymptomatic (preALS) and symptomatic (ALS) stages of the disease were investigated by in vivo EPR spectroscopy using three aminoxyl radicals with different cell membrane and BBB permeabilities, Tempol, 3-carbamoyl proxyl (3CP), and 3-carboxy proxyl (3CxP). Additionally, the redox status of the two brain regions previously implicated in disease pathology, brainstem and hippocampus, was investigated by spectrophotometric biochemical assays. The EPR results indicated that among the three spin probes, 3CP is the most suitable for reporting the intracellular redox status changes, as Tempol was reduced in vivo within minutes (t 1/2 =2.0±0.5min), thus preventing reliable kinetic modeling, whereas 3CxP reduction kinetics gave divergent conclusions, most probably due to its membrane impermeability. It was observed that the reduction kinetics of 3CP in vivo, in the head of preALS and ALS SOD1 G93A rats was altered compared to the controls. Pharmacokinetic modeling of 3CP reduction in vivo, revealed elevated tissue distribution and tissue reduction rate constants indicating an altered brain tissue redox status, and possibly BBB disruption in these animals. The preALS and ALS brain tissue homogenates also showed increased nitrilation, superoxide production, lipid peroxidation and manganese superoxide dismutase activity, and a decreased copper-zinc superoxide dismutase activity. The present study highlights in vivo EPR spectroscopy as a reliable tool for the investigation of

  18. Cisplatin Induces a Mitochondrial-ROS Response That Contributes to Cytotoxicity Depending on Mitochondrial Redox Status and Bioenergetic Functions

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    Marullo, Rossella; Werner, Erica; Degtyareva, Natalya; Moore, Bryn; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Doetsch, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most effective and widely used anticancer agents for the treatment of several types of tumors. The cytotoxic effect of cisplatin is thought to be mediated primarily by the generation of nuclear DNA adducts, which, if not repaired, cause cell death as a consequence of DNA replication and transcription blockage. However, the ability of cisplatin to induce nuclear DNA (nDNA) damage per se is not sufficient to explain its high degree of effectiveness nor the toxic effects exerted on normal, post-mitotic tissues. Oxidative damage has been observed in vivo following exposure to cisplatin in several tissues, suggesting a role for oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced dose-limiting toxicities. However, the mechanism of cisplatin-induced generation of ROS and their contribution to cisplatin cytotoxicity in normal and cancer cells is still poorly understood. By employing a panel of normal and cancer cell lines and the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as model system, we show that exposure to cisplatin induces a mitochondrial-dependent ROS response that significantly enhances the cytotoxic effect caused by nDNA damage. ROS generation is independent of the amount of cisplatin-induced nDNA damage and occurs in mitochondria as a consequence of protein synthesis impairment. The contribution of cisplatin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in determining its cytotoxic effect varies among cells and depends on mitochondrial redox status, mitochondrial DNA integrity and bioenergetic function. Thus, by manipulating these cellular parameters, we were able to enhance cisplatin cytotoxicity in cancer cells. This study provides a new mechanistic insight into cisplatin-induced cell killing and may lead to the design of novel therapeutic strategies to improve anticancer drug efficacy. PMID:24260552

  19. Reversible inactivation of CO dehydrogenase with thiol compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreß, Oliver [Department of Microbiology, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Gnida, Manuel [Department of Chemistry, University of Paderborn, 33098 Paderborn (Germany); Pelzmann, Astrid M. [Department of Microbiology, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Marx, Christian [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Friedrich-Schiller-University of Jena, 07745 Jena (Germany); Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram [Department of Chemistry, University of Paderborn, 33098 Paderborn (Germany); Meyer, Ortwin, E-mail: Ortwin.Meyer@uni-bayreuth.de [Department of Microbiology, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Rather large thiols (e.g. coenzyme A) can reach the active site of CO dehydrogenase. • CO- and H{sub 2}-oxidizing activity of CO dehydrogenase is inhibited by thiols. • Inhibition by thiols was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. • Thiols coordinate the Cu ion in the [CuSMo(=O)OH] active site as a third ligand. - Abstract: Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CO dehydrogenase) from Oligotropha carboxidovorans is a structurally characterized member of the molybdenum hydroxylase enzyme family. It catalyzes the oxidation of CO (CO + H{sub 2}O → CO{sub 2} + 2e{sup −} + 2H{sup +}) which proceeds at a unique [CuSMo(=O)OH] metal cluster. Because of changing activities of CO dehydrogenase, particularly in subcellular fractions, we speculated whether the enzyme would be subject to regulation by thiols (RSH). Here we establish inhibition of CO dehydrogenase by thiols and report the corresponding K{sub i}-values (mM): L-cysteine (5.2), D-cysteine (9.7), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (8.2), D,L-homocysteine (25.8), L-cysteine–glycine (2.0), dithiothreitol (4.1), coenzyme A (8.3), and 2-mercaptoethanol (9.3). Inhibition of the enzyme was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of thiol-inhibited CO dehydrogenase revealed a bimetallic site in which the RSH coordinates to the Cu-ion as a third ligand ([Mo{sup VI}(=O)OH{sub (2)}SCu{sup I}(SR)S-Cys]) leaving the redox state of the Cu(I) and the Mo(VI) unchanged. Collectively, our findings establish a regulation of CO dehydrogenase activity by thiols in vitro. They also corroborate the hypothesis that CO interacts with the Cu-ion first. The result that thiol compounds much larger than CO can freely travel through the substrate channel leading to the bimetallic cluster challenges previous concepts involving chaperone function and is of importance for an understanding how the sulfuration step in

  20. Novel thiols of prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, R C

    2001-01-01

    Glutathione metabolism is associated with oxygenic cyanobacteria and the oxygen-utilizing purple bacteria, but is absent in many other prokaryotes. This review focuses on novel thiols found in those bacteria lacking glutathione. Included are glutathione amide and its perthiol, produced by phototrophic purple sulfur bacteria and apparently involved in their sulfide metabolism. Among archaebacteria, coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid) and coenzyme B (7-mercaptoheptanoylthreonine phosphate) play central roles in the anaerobic production of CH4 and associated energy conversion by methanogens, whereas the major thiol in the aerobic phototrophic halobacteria is gamma-glutamylcysteine. The highly aerobic actinomycetes produce mycothiol, a conjugate of N-acetylcysteine with a pseudodisaccharide of glucosamine and myo-inositol, AcCys-GlcNalpha(1 --> 1)Ins, which appears to play an antioxidant role similar to glutathione. Ergothioneine, also produced by actinomycetes, remains a mystery despite many years of study. Available data on the biosynthesis and metabolism of these and other novel thiols is summarized and key areas for additional study are identified.

  1. Designed Chemical Intervention with Thiols for Prophylactic Contraception.

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    Monika Sharma

    Full Text Available Unlike somatic cells, sperm have several-fold more available-thiols that are susceptible to redox-active agents. The present study explains the mechanism behind the instant sperm-immobilizing and trichomonacidal activities of pyrrolidinium pyrrolidine-1-carbodithioate (PPC, a novel thiol agent rationally created for prophylactic contraception by minor chemical modifications of some known thiol drugs. PPC, and its three derivatives (with potential active-site blocked by alkylation, were synthesized and evaluated against live human sperm and metronidazole-susceptible and resistant Trichomonas vaginalis, in vitro. Sperm hexokinase activity was evaluated by coupled enzyme assay. PPC irreversibly immobilized 100% human sperm in ∼30 seconds and totally eliminated Trichomonas vaginalis more efficiently than nonoxynol-9 and metronidazole. It significantly inhibited (P<0.001 thiol-sensitive sperm hexokinase. However, the molecule completely lost all its biological activities once its thiol group was blocked by alkylation. PPC was subsequently formulated into a mucoadhesive vaginal film using GRaS excipients and evaluated for spermicidal and microbicidal activities (in vitro, and contraceptive efficacy in rabbits. PPC remained fully active in quick-dissolving, mucoadhesive vaginal-film formulation, and these PPC-films significantly reduced pregnancy and fertility rates in rabbits. The films released ∼90% of PPC in simulated vaginal fluid (pH 4.2 at 37°C in 5 minutes, in vitro. We have thus discovered a common target (reactive thiols on chiefly-anaerobic, redox-sensitive cells like sperm and Trichomonas, which is susceptible to designed chemical interference for prophylactic contraception. The active thiol in PPC inactivates sperm and Trichomonas via interference with crucial sulfhydryl-disulfide based reactions, e.g. hexokinase activation in human sperm. In comparison to non-specific surfactant action of OTC spermicide nonoxynol-9, the action of

  2. Evidence of a Redox-Dependent Regulation of Immune Responses to Exercise-Induced Inflammation

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    Alexandra Sakelliou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We used thiol-based antioxidant supplementation (n-acetylcysteine, NAC to determine whether immune mobilisation following skeletal muscle microtrauma induced by exercise is redox-sensitive in healthy humans. According to a two-trial, double-blind, crossover, repeated measures design, 10 young men received either placebo or NAC (20 mg/kg/day immediately after a muscle-damaging exercise protocol (300 eccentric contractions and for eight consecutive days. Blood sampling and performance assessments were performed before exercise, after exercise, and daily throughout recovery. NAC reduced the decline of reduced glutathione in erythrocytes and the increase of plasma protein carbonyls, serum TAC and erythrocyte oxidized glutathione, and TBARS and catalase activity during recovery thereby altering postexercise redox status. The rise of muscle damage and inflammatory markers (muscle strength, creatine kinase activity, CRP, proinflammatory cytokines, and adhesion molecules was less pronounced in NAC during the first phase of recovery. The rise of leukocyte and neutrophil count was decreased by NAC after exercise. Results on immune cell subpopulations obtained by flow cytometry indicated that NAC ingestion reduced the exercise-induced rise of total macrophages, HLA+ macrophages, and 11B+ macrophages and abolished the exercise-induced upregulation of B lymphocytes. Natural killer cells declined only in PLA immediately after exercise. These results indicate that thiol-based antioxidant supplementation blunts immune cell mobilisation in response to exercise-induced inflammation suggesting that leukocyte mobilization may be under redox-dependent regulation.

  3. Impact of uranium (U) on the cellular glutathione pool and resultant consequences for the redox status of U.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viehweger, Katrin; Geipel, Gerhard; Bernhard, Gert

    2011-12-01

    Uranium (U) as a redox-active heavy metal can cause various redox imbalances in plant cells. Measurements of the cellular glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) by HPLC after cellular U contact revealed an interference with this essential redox couple. The GSH content remained unaffected by 10 μM U whereas the GSSG level immediately increased. In contrast, higher U concentrations (50 μM) drastically raised both forms. Using the Nernst equation, it was possible to calculate the half-cell reduction potential of 2GSH/GSSG. In case of lower U contents the cellular redox environment shifted towards more oxidizing conditions whereas the opposite effect was obtained by higher U contents. This indicates that U contact causes a consumption of reduced redox equivalents. Artificial depletion of GSH by chlorodinitrobenzene and measuring the cellular reducing capacity by tetrazolium salt reduction underlined the strong requirement of reduced redox equivalents. An additional element of cellular U detoxification mechanisms is the complex formation between the heavy metal and carboxylic functionalities of GSH. Because two GSH molecules catalyze electron transfers each with one electron forming a dimer (GSSG) two UO(2) (2+) are reduced to each UO(2) (+) by unbound redox sensitive sulfhydryl moieties. UO(2) (+) subsequently disproportionates to UO(2) (2+) and U(4+). This explains that in vitro experiments revealed a reduction to U(IV) of only around 33% of initial U(VI). Cellular U(IV) was transiently detected with the highest level after 2 h of U contact. Hence, it can be proposed that these reducing processes are an important element of defense reactions induced by this heavy metal.

  4. Fluorescent sensors for selective detection of thiols: expanding the intramolecular displacement based mechanism to new chromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Li-Ya; Zheng, Hai-Rong; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tung, Chen-Ho; Yang, Qing-Zheng

    2014-03-21

    Biological thiols, including cysteine (Cys), homocystein (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH), play crucial roles in maintaining the appropriate redox status of biological systems. An abnormal level of biothiols is associated with different diseases, therefore, the discrimination between them is of great importance. Herein, we present two fluorescent sensors for selective detection of biothiols based on our recently reported intramolecular displacement mechanism. We expanded this mechanism to commercially available chromophores, 4-chloro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-Cl) and heptamethine cyanine dye IR-780. The sensors operate by undergoing displacement of chloride by thiolate. The amino groups of Cys/Hcy further replace the thiolate to form amino-substituted products, which exhibit dramatically different photophysical properties compared to sulfur-substituted products from the reaction with GSH. NBD-Cl is highly selective towards Cys/Hcy and exhibits significant fluorescence enhancement. IR-780 showed a variation in its fluorescence ratio towards Cys over other thiols. Both of the sensors can be used for live-cell imaging of Cys. The wide applicability of the mechanism may provide a powerful tool for developing novel fluorescent sensors for selective detection of biothiols.

  5. Evaluation of Dynamic Disulphide/Thiol Homeostasis in Silica Exposed Workers

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    Meşide Gündüzöz

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxidative stress is implicated as one of the main molecular mechanism underlying silicosis. Aims: In this study, our aim was to asses the redox status in occupationally silica-exposed workers, by evaluating the dynamic thiol-disulphide homeostasis. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: Thirty-six male workers occupationally exposed to silica particles and 30 healthy volunteers, working as office workers were included to the study. Posteroanterior chest radiographs and pulmonary function tests of both groups were evaluated. Also serum thiol disulphide levels were measured using the spectrophotometric method described by Erel and Neşelioğlu. Results: Among the 36 workers that underwent pulmonary function tests 6 (17% had obstructive, 7 (19% had restrictive, 6 (17% had obstructive and restrictive signs whereas 17 (47% had no signs. The mean PFTs results of silica-exposed workers were significantly lower than control subjects. The serum disulphide levels of silica-exposed workers were significantly higher than control subjects (23.84±5.89 μmol/L and 21.18±3.44 μmol/L, respectively p=0.02. Conclusion: The serum disulphide levels, a biomarker of oxidative stress, are found to be higher in silica-exposed workers

  6. In Vivo EPR Assessment of pH, pO2, Redox Status, and Concentrations of Phosphate and Glutathione in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobko, Andrey A; Eubank, Timothy D; Driesschaert, Benoit; Khramtsov, Valery V

    2018-03-16

    This protocol demonstrates the capability of low-field electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-based techniques in combination with functional paramagnetic probes to provide quantitative information on the chemical tumor microenvironment (TME), including pO2, pH, redox status, concentrations of interstitial inorganic phosphate (Pi), and intracellular glutathione (GSH). In particular, an application of a recently developed soluble multifunctional trityl probe provides unsurpassed opportunity for in vivo concurrent measurements of pH, pO2 and Pi in Extracellular space (HOPE probe). The measurements of three parameters using a single probe allow for their correlation analyses independent of probe distribution and time of the measurements.

  7. Dissecting Redox Biology Using Fluorescent Protein Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzländer, Markus; Dick, Tobias P; Meyer, Andreas J; Morgan, Bruce

    2016-05-01

    Fluorescent protein sensors have revitalized the field of redox biology by revolutionizing the study of redox processes in living cells and organisms. Within one decade, a set of fundamental new insights has been gained, driven by the rapid technical development of in vivo redox sensing. Redox-sensitive yellow and green fluorescent protein variants (rxYFP and roGFPs) have been the central players. Although widely used as an established standard tool, important questions remain surrounding their meaningful use in vivo. We review the growing range of thiol redox sensor variants and their application in different cells, tissues, and organisms. We highlight five key findings where in vivo sensing has been instrumental in changing our understanding of redox biology, critically assess the interpretation of in vivo redox data, and discuss technical and biological limitations of current redox sensors and sensing approaches. We explore how novel sensor variants may further add to the current momentum toward a novel mechanistic and integrated understanding of redox biology in vivo. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 680-712.

  8. Idh2 Deficiency Exacerbates Acrolein-Induced Lung Injury through Mitochondrial Redox Environment Deterioration

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    Jung Hyun Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acrolein is known to be involved in acute lung injury and other pulmonary diseases. A number of studies have suggested that acrolein-induced toxic effects are associated with depletion of antioxidants, such as reduced glutathione and protein thiols, and production of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrial NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (idh2 regulates mitochondrial redox balance and reduces oxidative stress-induced cell injury via generation of NADPH. Therefore, we evaluated the role of idh2 in acrolein-induced lung injury using idh2 short hairpin RNA- (shRNA- transfected Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC cells and idh2-deficient (idh2−/− mice. Downregulation of idh2 expression increased susceptibility to acrolein via induction of apoptotic cell death due to elevated mitochondrial oxidative stress. Idh2 deficiency also promoted acrolein-induced lung injury in idh2 knockout mice through the disruption of mitochondrial redox status. In addition, acrolein-induced toxicity in idh2 shRNA-transfected LLC cells and in idh2 knockout mice was ameliorated by the antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine, through attenuation of oxidative stress resulting from idh2 deficiency. In conclusion, idh2 deficiency leads to mitochondrial redox environment deterioration, which causes acrolein-mediated apoptosis of LLC cells and acrolein-induced lung injury in idh2−/− mice. The present study supports the central role of idh2 deficiency in inducing oxidative stress resulting from acrolein-induced disruption of mitochondrial redox status in the lung.

  9. Idh2 Deficiency Exacerbates Acrolein-Induced Lung Injury through Mitochondrial Redox Environment Deterioration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Hyun; Ku, Hyeong Jun; Lee, Jin Hyup; Park, Jeen-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Acrolein is known to be involved in acute lung injury and other pulmonary diseases. A number of studies have suggested that acrolein-induced toxic effects are associated with depletion of antioxidants, such as reduced glutathione and protein thiols, and production of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrial NADP + -dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase ( idh2 ) regulates mitochondrial redox balance and reduces oxidative stress-induced cell injury via generation of NADPH. Therefore, we evaluated the role of idh2 in acrolein-induced lung injury using idh2 short hairpin RNA- (shRNA-) transfected Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells and idh2 -deficient ( idh2 -/- ) mice. Downregulation of idh2 expression increased susceptibility to acrolein via induction of apoptotic cell death due to elevated mitochondrial oxidative stress. Idh2 deficiency also promoted acrolein-induced lung injury in idh2 knockout mice through the disruption of mitochondrial redox status. In addition, acrolein-induced toxicity in idh2 shRNA-transfected LLC cells and in idh2 knockout mice was ameliorated by the antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine, through attenuation of oxidative stress resulting from idh2 deficiency. In conclusion, idh2 deficiency leads to mitochondrial redox environment deterioration, which causes acrolein-mediated apoptosis of LLC cells and acrolein-induced lung injury in idh2 -/- mice. The present study supports the central role of idh2 deficiency in inducing oxidative stress resulting from acrolein-induced disruption of mitochondrial redox status in the lung.

  10. Resin-assisted enrichment of thiols as a general strategy for proteomic profiling of cysteine-based reversible modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jia [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gaffrey, Matthew J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Su, Dian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Genentech Inc., South San Francisco, CA (United States); Liu, Tao [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Camp, David G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Richard D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qian, Weijun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-12-12

    Reversible modifications on cysteine thiols play a significant role in redox signaling and regulation. A number of reversible redox modifications, including disulfide formation, S-nitrosylation, and S-glutathionylation, have been recognized for their significance in various physiological and pathological processes. Here we describe in detail a resin-assisted thiol-affinity enrichment protocol for both biochemical and proteomics applications. This protocol serves as a general approach for specific isolation of thiol-containing proteins or peptides derived from reversible redox-modified proteins. This approach utilizes thiol-affinity resins to directly capture thiol-containing proteins or peptides through a disulfide exchange reaction followed by on-resin protein digestion and on-resin multiplexed isobaric labeling to facilitate LC-MS/MS based quantitative site-specific analysis of redox modifications. The overall approach requires a much simpler workflow with increased specificity compared to the commonly used biotin switch technique. By coupling different selective reduction strategies, the resin-assisted approach provides the researcher with a useful tool capable of enriching different types of reversible modifications on protein thiols. Procedures for selective enrichment and analyses of S-nitrosylation and total reversible cysteine oxidation are presented to demonstrate the utility of this general strategy.

  11. Silymarin protects PBMC against B(a)P induced toxicity by replenishing redox status and modulating glutathione metabolizing enzymes-An in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiruthiga, P.V.; Pandian, S. Karutha; Devi, K. Pandima

    2010-01-01

    PAHs are a ubiquitous class of environmental contaminants that have a large number of hazardous consequences on human health. An important prototype of PAHs, B(a)P, is notable for being the first chemical carcinogen to be discovered and the one classified by EPA as a probable human carcinogen. It undergoes metabolic activation to QD, which generate ROS by redox cycling system in the body and oxidatively damage the macromolecules. Hence, a variety of antioxidants have been tested as possible protectors against B(a)P toxicity. Silymarin is one such compound, which has high human acceptance, used clinically and consumed as dietary supplement around the world for its strong anti-oxidant efficacy. Silymarin was employed as an alternative approach for treating B(a)P induced damage and oxidative stress in PBMC, with an emphasis to provide the molecular basis for the effect of silymarin against B(a)P induced toxicity. PBMC cells exposed to either benzopyrene (1 μM) or silymarin (2.4 mg/ml) or both was monitored for toxicity by assessing LPO, PO, redox status (GSH/GSSG ratio), glutathione metabolizing enzymes GR and GPx and antioxidant enzymes CAT and SOD. This study also investigated the protective effect of silymarin against B(a)P induced biochemical alteration at the molecular level by FT-IR spectroscopy. Our findings were quite striking that silymarin possesses substantial protective effect against B(a)P induced oxidative stress and biochemical changes by restoring redox status, modulating glutathione metabolizing enzymes, hindering the formation of protein oxidation products, inhibiting LPO and further reducing ROS mediated damages by changing the level of antioxidant enzymes. The results suggest that silymarin exhibits multiple protections and it should be considered as a potential protective agent for environmental contaminant induced immunotoxicity.

  12. Oligo-Carrageenan Kappa-Induced Reducing Redox Status and Increase in TRR/TRX Activities Promote Activation and Reprogramming of Terpenoid Metabolism in Eucalyptus Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto González

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze whether the reducing redox status and activation of thioredoxin reductase (TRR/thioredoxin(TRX system induced by oligo-carrageenan (OC kappa in Eucalyptus globulus activate secondary metabolism increasing terpenoid synthesis, trees were sprayed on the leaves with water, with OC kappa, or with inhibitors of NAD(PH, ascorbate (ASC and (GSH synthesis and TRR activity, CHS-828, lycorine, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO and auranofine, respectively, and with OC kappa and cultivated for four months. The main terpenoids in control Eucalyptus trees were eucalyptol (76%, α-pinene (7.4%, aromadendrene (3.6%, silvestrene (2.8%, sabinene (2% and α-terpineol (0.9%. Treated trees showed a 22% increase in total essential oils as well as a decrease in eucalyptol (65% and sabinene (0.8% and an increase in aromadendrene (5%, silvestrene (7.8% and other ten terpenoids. In addition, treated Eucalyptus showed seven de novo synthesized terpenoids corresponding to carene, α-terpinene, α-fenchene, γ-maaliene, spathulenol and α-camphenolic aldehyde. Most increased and de novo synthesized terpenoids have potential insecticidal and antimicrobial activities. Trees treated with CHS-828, lycorine, BSO and auranofine and with OC kappa showed an inhibition of increased and de novo synthesized terpenoids. Thus, OC kappa-induced reducing redox status and activation of TRR/TRX system enhance secondary metabolism increasing the synthesis of terpenoids and reprogramming of terpenoid metabolism in Eucalyptus trees.

  13. Effects of cisplatin on lipid peroxidation and the glutathione redox status in the liver of male rats: The protective role of selenium

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    Trbojević Ivana S.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of oxidative stress in cisplatin (CP toxicity and its prevention by pretreatment with selenium (Se was investigated. Male Wistar albino rats were injected with a single dose of cisplatin (7.5 mg CP/kg b.m., i.p. and selenium (6 mg Se/kg b.m, as Na2SeO3, i.p. alone or in combination. The results suggest that CP intoxication induces oxidative stress and alters the glutathione redox status: reduced glutathione (GSH, oxidized glutathione (GSSG and the GSH/GSSG ratio (GSH RI, resulting in increased lipid peroxidation (LPO in rat liver. The pretreatment with selenium prior to CP treatment showed a protective effect against the toxic influence of CP on peroxidation of the membrane lipids and an altering of the glutathione redox status in the liver of rats. From our results we conclude that selenium functions as a potent antioxidant and suggest that it can control CP-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

  14. Monocyte activation drives preservation of membrane thiols by promoting release of oxidised membrane moieties via extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó-Taylor, K É; Tóth, E Á; Balogh, A M; Sódar, B W; Kádár, L; Pálóczi, K; Fekete, N; Németh, A; Osteikoetxea, X; Vukman, K V; Holub, M; Pállinger, É; Nagy, Gy; Winyard, P G; Buzás, E I

    2017-07-01

    The redox state of cellular exofacial molecules is reflected by the amount of available thiols. Furthermore, surface thiols can be considered as indicators of immune cell activation. One group of thiol containing proteins, peroxiredoxins, in particular, have been associated with inflammation. In this study, we assessed surface thiols of the U937 and Thp1 monocyte cell lines and primary monocytes in vitro upon inflammatory stimulation by irreversibly labelling the cells with a fluorescent derivative of maleimide. We also investigated exofacial thiols on circulating blood mononuclear cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy controls. When analysing extracellular vesicles, we combined thiol labelling with the use of antibodies to specific CD markers to exclude extracellular vesicle mimicking signals from thiol containing protein aggregates. Furthermore, differential detergent lysis was applied to confirm the vesicular nature of the detected extracellular events in blood plasma. We found an increase in exofacial thiols on monocytes upon in vitro stimulation by LPS or TNF, both in primary monocytes and monocytic cell lines (pextracellular vesicles showed a decrease in their exofacial thiols compared with those from unstimulated cells (pextracellular vesicles of isolated CD14 + cells from rheumatoid arthritis patients had decreased thiol levels compared with healthy subjects (pextracellular vesicles was increased in rheumatoid arthritis blood plasma (pextracellular vesicle-enriched preparations from blood plasma. Our data show that cell surface thiols play a protective role and reflect oxidative stress resistance state in activated immune cells. Furthermore, they support a role of extracellular vesicles in the redox regulation of human monocytes, possibly representing an antioxidant mechanism. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Responses of Monolayer Membrances of Thiol-Containing Lipids to Odor Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yoshio; Hayashi, Kenshi; Toko, Kiyoshi; Yamafuji, Kaoru; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    1992-05-01

    It is known that thiol-containing compounds form monolayer membranes on a gold surface via chemisorption from organic solvents in terms of a strong connection ability between thiol and the metal. Here we prepared different kinds of thiol-containing lipids and fabricated monolayer membranes on the gold disk electrode whose surface structures were similar to biological membranes. Responses of this lipid-coated electrode to odor substances were examined by an electrochemical method of a cyclic voltammetry. Blocking ability for the redox reaction of Fe(CN)63- was found to change upon adsorption of odor substances into monolayer membranes. The order of threshold values to detect the odorants was β-iononeamyl acetate; this order was the same as that in the human olfactory sense. The present study indicates that the monolayer membrane of thiol-containing lipids can be useful as a transducer of an odor sensor.

  16. Effect of antihypertensive treatment with candesartan or amlodipine on glutathione and its redox status, homocysteine and vitamin concentrations in patients with essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muda, Piibe; Kampus, Priit; Zilmer, Mihkel; Ristimäe, Tiina; Fischer, Krista; Zilmer, Kersti; Kairane, Ceslava; Teesalu, Rein

    2005-01-01

    To compare the effect of candesartan or amlodipine on concentrations of cellular markers of oxidative stress, plasma homocysteine and vitamins in hypertensive patients. Forty-nine middle-aged patients with untreated stage I-II essential hypertension were recruited in a randomized double-blind double-dummy study to receive a daily dose either of 8 mg candesartan (n = 25) or 5 mg amlodipine (n = 24) for 16 weeks. Blood pressure, reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG), glutathione redox ratio (GSSG : GSH) in red blood cells, plasma homocysteine, vitamin B12 and folic acid status were measured at baseline, at week 2 and at week 16. The same parameters were measured in 32 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. An increase in homocysteine of at least 2 micromol/l was considered significant. Hypertensive patients had significantly greater oxidative stress and homocysteine concentrations than controls. In addition to a significant decrease in blood pressure, in both treatment groups GSSG decreased (P < 0.03), GSSG : GSH had a tendency to decrease (P = 0.054), but homocysteine did not change. An increase in homocysteine concentration of at least 2 micromol/l was found in 12 patients (five in the candesartan group, seven in the amlodipine group), with a significant decrease in folic acid concentration and no changes in cellular oxidative stress. In patients with no increase in homocysteine concentration, both GSSG (P < 0.02) and GSSG : GSH (P = 0.051) decreased. GSH and vitamin B12 did not change in any of the groups studied. Untreated hypertension is associated with disturbed glutathione redox status and increased plasma homocysteine concentrations. Both candesartan and amlodipine had favourable effects on cellular oxidative stress, but the oxidative stress status did not decrease in patients with adverse changes in homocysteine.

  17. Late-onset running biphasically improves redox balance, energy- and methylglyoxal-related status, as well as SIRT1 expression in mouse hippocampus.

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    Stefano Falone

    Full Text Available Despite the active research in this field, molecular mechanisms underlying exercise-induced beneficial effects on brain physiology and functions are still matter of debate, especially with regard to biological processes activated by regular exercise affecting the onset and progression of hippocampal aging in individuals unfamiliar with habitual physical activity. Since such responses seem to be mediated by changes in antioxidative, antiglycative and metabolic status, a possible exercise-induced coordinated response involving redox, methylglyoxal- and sirtuin-related molecular networks may be hypothesized. In this study, hippocampi of CD1 mice undergoing the transition from mature to middle age were analyzed for redox-related profile, oxidative and methylglyoxal-dependent damage patterns, energy metabolism, sirtuin1 and glyoxalase1 expression after a 2- or 4-mo treadmill running program. Our findings suggested that the 4-mo regular running lowered the chance of dicarbonyl and oxidative stress, activated mitochondrial catabolism and preserved sirtuin1-related neuroprotection. Surprisingly, the same cellular pathways were negatively affected by the first 2 months of exercise, thus showing an interesting biphasic response. In conclusion, the duration of exercise caused a profound shift in the response to regular running within the rodent hippocampus in a time-dependent fashion. This research revealed important details of the interaction between exercise and mammal hippocampus during the transition from mature to middle age, and this might help to develop non-pharmacological approaches aimed at retarding brain senescence, even in individuals unfamiliar with habitual exercise.

  18. Redox homeostasis and reactive oxygen species scavengers shift during ontogenetic phase changes in apple.

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    Du, Zhen; Jia, Xiao Lin; Wang, Yi; Wu, Ting; Han, Zhen Hai; Zhang, Xin Zhong

    2015-07-01

    The change from juvenile to adult phase is a universal phenomenon in perennial plants such as apple. To validate the changes in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels and scavenging during ontogenesis in apple seedlings, the H2O2 contents, its scavenging capacity, and the expression of related genes, as well as miR156 levels, were measured in leaf samples from different nodes in seedlings of 'Zisai Pearl' (Malus asiatica)×'Red Fuji' (M. domestica). Then in vitro shoots were treated with redox modulating chemicals to verify the response of miR156 to redox alteration. The expression of miR156 decreased gradually during ontogenesis, indicating a progressive loss of juvenility. During the phase changes, H2O2 and ascorbate contents, the ratio of ascorbate to dehydroascorbate, the ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase activities, and the expressions of some MdGR and MdAPX gene family members increased remarkably. However, the glutathione content and glutathione to glutathione disulfide ratio declined. In chemicals treated in vitro shoots, the changes in miR156 levels were coordinated with GSH contents and GSH/GSSG ratio but not H2O2 contents. Conclusively, the relative reductive thiol redox status is critical for the maintenance of juvenility and the reductive ascorbate redox environment was elevated and sustained during the reproductive phase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cisplatin impairs rat liver mitochondrial functions by inducing changes on membrane ion permeability: Prevention by thiol group protecting agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Custodio, Jose B.A.; Cardoso, Carla M.P.; Santos, Maria S.; Almeida, Leonor M.; Vicente, Joaquim A.F.; Fernandes, Maria A.S.

    2009-01-01

    H + ; (3) does not significantly affect H 2 O 2 generation by mitochondria; (4) its mitochondrial damaging effects are protected by thiol group protecting agents. Based on these conclusions, it is possible to hypothesise that small changes on the redox-status of thiol groups, affecting membrane permeability to cations (Ca 2+ and H + ) underlie CisPt-induced liver mitochondrial damage, putatively responsible for its hepatotoxicity. Therefore, we propose that CisPt-induced mitochondrial damage and consequent hepatotoxicity could be prevented by using thiol group protecting agents as therapeutic adjuvants.

  20. Maintenance of Macrophage Redox Status by ChREBP Limits Inflammation and Apoptosis and Protects against Advanced Atherosclerotic Lesion Formation

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    Vincent Sarrazy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced glucose utilization can be visualized in atherosclerotic lesions and may reflect a high glycolytic rate in lesional macrophages, but its causative role in plaque progression remains unclear. We observe that the activity of the carbohydrate-responsive element binding protein ChREBP is rapidly downregulated upon TLR4 activation in macrophages. ChREBP inactivation refocuses cellular metabolism to a high redox state favoring enhanced inflammatory responses after TLR4 activation and increased cell death after TLR4 activation or oxidized LDL loading. Targeted deletion of ChREBP in bone marrow cells resulted in accelerated atherosclerosis progression in Ldlr−/− mice with increased monocytosis, lesional macrophage accumulation, and plaque necrosis. Thus, ChREBP-dependent macrophage metabolic reprogramming hinders plaque progression and establishes a causative role for leukocyte glucose metabolism in atherosclerosis.

  1. CELLULAR STRESS RESPONSE, REDOX STATUS AND VITAGENES IN GLAUCOMA: A SYSTEMIC OXIDANT DISORDER LINKED TO ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

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    Vittorio eCalabrese

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid deposits, constituted of amyloid beta (A aggregates, are a characteristic feature of several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, mild cognitive impairment and Parkinson’s disease. They also have been recently implicated in the pathogenesis of retinal damage, as well as age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy characterized by gradual degeneration of neuronal tissue due to retinal ganglion cell loss, associated to visual field loss over time resulting in irreversible blindness. Accumulation of Aβ characterizes glaucoma as a protein misfolding disease, suggesting a pathogenic role for oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of retinal degenerative damage associated to glaucoma. There is a growing body of evidence demonstrating a link between Alzheimer’s disease and glaucoma. Further, several Hsps members have been implicated both in neurodegenerative diseases and glaucomatous apoptosis. To maintain redox homeostasis vitagenes, as integrated mechanisms, operate actively to preserve cell survival under condition of stress. Vitagenes encode for sirtuin, thioredoxin and heat shock proteins. The present study was designed to investigate cellular stress response mechanisms in the blood of patients with glaucoma, compared to control subjects. Levels of vitagenes Hsp72, HO-1, as well as F2-isoprostanes were significantly higher in the blood of patients with glaucoma than in controls. Furthermore, in the same experimental group increased expression of Trx and sirtuin 1 were measured. Our results sustain the importance of redox homeostasis disruption in the pathogenesis of glaucoma and highlights the opportunity that new therapies that prevents neurodegeneration through non-immunomodulatory mechanisms might be synergistically associated with current glaucoma therapies, thus unravelling important targets for novel cytoprotective strategies.

  2. Barium chloride induces redox status unbalance, upregulates cytokine genes expression and confers hepatotoxicity in rats-alleviation by pomegranate peel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwej, Awatef; Grojja, Yousri; Ghorbel, Imen; Boudawara, Ons; Jarraya, Raoudha; Boudawara, Tahia; Zeghal, Najiba

    2016-04-01

    The present study was performed to establish the therapeutic efficacy of pomegranate peel against barium chloride induced liver injury. Adult rats were divided into four groups of six animals each: group I, serving as controls, received distilled water; group II received by their drinking water 67 ppm of BaCl2; group III received both 67 ppm of BaCl2 by the same way than group II and 5 % of pomegranate peel (PP) via diet; group IV received 5 % of PP. Analysis by HPLC/MS of PP showed its rich composition in flavonoids such as gallic acid, castalin, hyperin, quercitrin, syringic acid, and quercetin. The protective effects of pomegranate peel against hepatotoxicity induced by barium chloride were assessed using biochemical parameters and histological studies. Exposure of rats to barium caused oxidative stress in the liver as evidenced by an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA), lipid hydroperoxides (LOOHs), H2O2 and advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP) levels, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), alanine aminotransferase (AST) and aspartate aminotransferase (ALT) activities, a decrease in catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities, glutathion (GSH), non-protein thiol (NPSH), vitamin C levels, and Mn-SOD gene expression. Liver total MT levels, MT-1, and MT-2 and pro-inflammatory cytokine genes expression like TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 were increased. Pomegranate peel, supplemented in the diet of barium-treated rats, showed an improvement of all the parameters indicated above.The present work provided ethnopharmacological relevance of pomegranate peel against the toxic effects of barium, suggesting its beneficial role as a potential antioxidant.

  3. Reduced glucose-induced insulin secretion in low-protein-fed rats is associated with altered pancreatic islets redox status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, Ana Paula G; Zoppi, Claudio C; Silveira, Leonardo R; Batista, Thiago M; Paula, Flávia M; da Silva, Priscilla M R; Rafacho, Alex; Barbosa-Sampaio, Helena C; Boschero, Antonio C; Carneiro, Everardo M

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the relationship between early life protein malnutrition-induced redox imbalance, and reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. After weaning, male Wistar rats were submitted to a normal-protein-diet (17%-protein, NP) or to a low-protein-diet (6%-protein, LP) for 60 days. Pancreatic islets were isolated and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), oxidized (GSSG) and reduced (GSH) glutathione content, CuZn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1), glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) and catalase (CAT) gene expression, as well as enzymatic antioxidant activities were quantified. Islets that were pre-incubated with H 2 O 2 and/or N-acetylcysteine, were subsequently incubated with glucose for insulin secretion measurement. Protein malnutrition increased CAT mRNA content by 100%. LP group SOD1 and CAT activities were 50% increased and reduced, respectively. H 2 O 2 production was more than 50% increased whereas GSH/GSSG ratio was near 60% lower in LP group. Insulin secretion was, in most conditions, approximately 50% lower in LP rat islets. When islets were pre-incubated with H 2 O 2 (100 μM), and incubated with glucose (33 mM), LP rats showed significant decrease of insulin secretion. This effect was attenuated when LP islets were exposed to N-acetylcysteine. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Integrated Haematological Profiles of Redox Status, Lipid, and Inflammatory Protein Biomarkers in Benign Obesity and Unhealthy Obesity with Metabolic Syndrome

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    Carla Lubrano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of obesity (OB and metabolic syndrome (MetS implies free radical-, oxidized lipid- (LOOH-, and inflammatory cytokine-mediated altered pathways in target organs. Key elements of the transition from benign OB to unhealthy OB+MetS remain unclear. Here, we measured a panel of redox, antioxidant, and inflammation markers in the groups of OB patients (67 with, 45 without MetS and 90 controls. Both OB groups displayed elevated levels of adipokines and heavy oxidative stress (OS evidenced by reduced levels of glutathione, downregulated glutathione-S-transferase, increased 4-hydroxynonenal-protein adducts, reactive oxygen species, and membrane-bound monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA. Exclusively in OB+MetS, higher-than-normal glutathione peroxidase activity, tumor necrosis factor-α, and other proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines/growth factors were observed; a combination of high adipokine plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and MUFA was consistent with increased cardiovascular risk. The uncomplicated OB group showed features of adaptation to OS such as decreased levels of vitamin E, activated superoxide dismutase, and inhibited catalase, suggesting H2O2 hyperproduction. Proinflammatory cytokine pattern was normal, except few markers like RANTES, a suitable candidate for therapeutic approaches to prevent a setting of MetS by inhibition of LOOH-primed leukocyte chemotaxis/recruitment to target tissues.

  5. Wolfram Syndrome protein, Miner1, regulates sulphydryl redox status, the unfolded protein response, and Ca2+ homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Sandra E; Andreyev, Alexander Y; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Karisch, Robert; Perkins, Guy; Wall, Estelle A; van der Geer, Peter; Chen, Yi-Fan; Tsai, Ting-Fen; Simon, Melvin I; Neel, Benjamin G; Dixon, Jack E; Murphy, Anne N

    2013-06-01

    Miner1 is a redox-active 2Fe2S cluster protein. Mutations in Miner1 result in Wolfram Syndrome, a metabolic disease associated with diabetes, blindness, deafness, and a shortened lifespan. Embryonic fibroblasts from Miner1(-/-) mice displayed ER stress and showed hallmarks of the unfolded protein response. In addition, loss of Miner1 caused a depletion of ER Ca(2+) stores, a dramatic increase in mitochondrial Ca(2+) load, increased reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, an increase in the GSSG/GSH and NAD(+)/NADH ratios, and an increase in the ADP/ATP ratio consistent with enhanced ATP utilization. Furthermore, mitochondria in fibroblasts lacking Miner1 displayed ultrastructural alterations, such as increased cristae density and punctate morphology, and an increase in O2 consumption. Treatment with the sulphydryl anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine reversed the abnormalities in the Miner1 deficient cells, suggesting that sulphydryl reducing agents should be explored as a treatment for this rare genetic disease. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by John Wiley and Sons, Ltd on behalf of EMBO.

  6. Detoxification of Atrazine by Low Molecular Weight Thiols in Alfalfa (Medicago sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing Jing; Xu, Jiang Yan; Lu, Feng Fan; Jin, She Feng; Yang, Hong

    2017-10-16

    Low molecular weight (LMW) thiols in higher plants are a group of sulfur-rich nonprotein compounds and play primary and multiple roles in cellular redox homeostasis, enzyme activities, and xenobiotics detoxification. This study focused on identifying thiols-related protein genes from the legume alfalfa exposed to the herbicide atrazine (ATZ) residues in environment. Using high-throughput RNA-sequencing, a set of ATZ-responsive thiols-related protein genes highly up-regulated and differentially expressed in alfalfa was identified. Most of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were involved in regulation of biotic and abiotic stress responses. By analyzing the genes involved in thiols-mediated redox homeostasis, we found that many of them were thiols-synthetic enzymes such as γ-glutamylcysteine synthase (γECS), homoglutathione synthetase (hGSHS), and glutathione synthetase (GSHS). Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we further characterized a group of ATZ-thiols conjugates, which are the detoxified forms of ATZ in plants. Cysteine S-conjugate ATZ-HCl+Cys was the most important metabolite detected by MS. Several other ATZ-conjugates were also examined as ATZ-detoxified metabolites. Such results were validated by characterizing their analogs in rice. Our data showed that some conjugates under ATZ stress were detected in both plants, indicating that some detoxified mechanisms and pathways can be shared by the two plant species. Overall, these results indicate that LMW thiols play critical roles in detoxification of ATZ in the plants.

  7. Severe exercise and exercise training exert opposite effects on human neutrophil apoptosis via altering the redox status.

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    Guan-Da Syu

    Full Text Available Neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis, a process crucial for immune regulation, is mainly controlled by alterations in reactive oxygen species (ROS and mitochondria integrity. Exercise has been proposed to be a physiological way to modulate immunity; while acute severe exercise (ASE usually impedes immunity, chronic moderate exercise (CME improves it. This study aimed to investigate whether and how ASE and CME oppositely regulate human neutrophil apoptosis. Thirteen sedentary young males underwent an initial ASE and were subsequently divided into exercise and control groups. The exercise group (n = 8 underwent 2 months of CME followed by 2 months of detraining. Additional ASE paradigms were performed at the end of each month. Neutrophils were isolated from blood specimens drawn at rest and immediately after each ASE for assaying neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis (annexin-V binding on the outer surface along with redox-related parameters and mitochondria-related parameters. Our results showed that i the initial ASE immediately increased the oxidative stress (cytosolic ROS and glutathione oxidation, and sequentially accelerated the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential, the surface binding of annexin-V, and the generation of mitochondrial ROS; ii CME upregulated glutathione level, retarded spontaneous apoptosis and delayed mitochondria deterioration; iii most effects of CME were unchanged after detraining; and iv CME blocked ASE effects and this capability remained intact even after detraining. Furthermore, the ASE effects on neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis were mimicked by adding exogenous H(2O(2, but not by suppressing mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, while ASE induced an oxidative state and resulted in acceleration of human neutrophil apoptosis, CME delayed neutrophil apoptosis by maintaining a reduced state for long periods of time even after detraining.

  8. RED BLOOD CELL AND WHOLE BLOOD GLUTATHIONE REDOX STATUS IN ENDURANCE-TRAINED MEN FOLLOWING A SKI MARATHON

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    Eve Unt

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the changes in glutathione redox ratio (GSSG·GSH-1 in red blood cells (RBCs and whole blood in well-trained men following a ski marathon. 16 male subjects (27.0 ± 4.7 yrs, 1.81 ± 0.06 m, 77.6 ± 9.6 kg, VO2max 66.2 ± 5.7 ml·kg-1·min-1 were examined before the competition (pre- COMP, after the competition (post-COMP and during an 18-hour recovery period (RECOV. There was a slight decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH in blood and in RBCs in post-COMP. During RECOV, the GSH level in blood was reduced, the GSH level in RBCs was significantly elevated (a statistically significant difference as compared to the pre-COMP level. The post-COMP GSSG·GSH-1 in full blood did not increase significantly, but its increase was statistically significant during the 18-hour recovery period. During the post-COMP and RECOV, the GSSG·GSH-1 in RBCs slightly decreased in comparison with the pre-COMP. Vitamin C concentration in serum increased in post-COMP (49% vs. pre- COMP and decreased to the baseline level during RECOV. In conclusion, our data show that acute exercise slightly increases the GSSG·GSH-1 in whole blood, while GSSG·GSH-1 in RBCs significantly decreases. Thus, exercise-related changes in the non-enzymatic components of the glutathione system (GSSG and GSH in whole blood and RBCs are not identical

  9. Effects of consuming diets containing Agave tequilana dietary fibre and jamaica calyces on body weight gain and redox status in hypercholesterolemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáyago-Ayerdi, Sonia G; Mateos, Raquel; Ortiz-Basurto, Rosa I; Largo, Carlota; Serrano, José; Granado-Serrano, Ana Belén; Sarriá, Beatriz; Bravo, Laura; Tabernero, María

    2014-04-01

    Dietary fibre (DF) obtained from Agave tequilana, which is rich in fructans and insoluble DF, and jamaica calyces (Hibiscus sabdariffa), which is rich in DF and phenolic compounds, were assessed as new potential functional ingredients using the hypercholesterolemic animal model. Wistar rats (200-250 g) were divided into 3 groups (n=8) and fed with cholesterol-rich diets supplemented with cellulose (CC, control), agave DF (ADF) or ADF with jamaica calyces (ADF-JC). After consuming the test diets for 5 weeks, weight gain in the ADF-JC group was significantly lower than in the other groups. The ADF and ADF-JC groups had a reduced concentration of cholesterol transporters in the caecum tissue, although no changes were observed in the plasma lipid profile. Both treatments improved the redox status by reducing the malondialdehyde serum levels and protein oxidative damage, compared to the CC group. DF from A. tequilana alone, or in combination with jamaica calyces, shows promising potential as a bioactive ingredient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Oral administration of a nephrotoxic dose of potassium bromate, a food additive, alters renal redox and metabolic status and inhibits brush border membrane enzymes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mir Kaisar; Naqshbandi, Ashreeb; Fareed, Mohd; Mahmood, Riaz

    2012-09-15

    The time dependent effect of orally administered KBrO(3) on redox status and enzymes of brush border membrane (BBM) and carbohydrate metabolism has been studied in rat kidney. Animals were given a single oral dose of KBrO(3) (100mg/kg body weight) and sacrificed at different times after this treatment; control animals were not given KBrO(3). The administration of KBrO(3) resulted in nephrotoxicity, a decline in the specific activities of several BBM marker enzymes and also induced oxidative stress in kidney. The specific activities of enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism were also altered and suggest a shift in energy metabolism from the aerobic to anaerobic mode. The renal effects of single oral dose of KBrO(3) appeared to be reversible; maximum changes in all the parameters were 48 h after administration of KBrO(3) after which recovery took place, in many cases almost to control values, after 168 h. These results suggest that the administration of a single nephrotoxic dose of KBrO(3) inhibits brush border membrane enzymes, induces oxidative stress and alters energy metabolism of the renal system in a reversible manner. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Effects of an Olive Fruit Polyphenol-Enriched Yogurt on Body Composition, Blood Redox Status, Physiological and Metabolic Parameters and Yogurt Microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakouli, Kalliopi; Mpesios, Anastasios; Kouretas, Demetrios; Petrotos, Konstantinos; Mitsagga, Chrysanthi; Giavasis, Ioannis; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z

    2016-06-03

    In the present study we investigated the effects of an olive polyphenol-enriched yogurt on yogurt microflora, as well as hematological, physiological and metabolic parameters, blood redox status and body composition. In a randomized double-blind, crossover design, 16 (6 men, 10 women) nonsmoking volunteers with non-declared pathology consumed either 400 g of olive fruit polyphenol-enriched yogurt with 50 mg of encapsulated olive polyphenols (experimental condition-EC) or 400 g of plain yogurt (control condition-CC) every day for two weeks. Physiological measurements and blood collection were performed before and after two weeks of each condition. The results showed that body weight, body mass index, hip circumference and systolic blood pressure decreased significantly (p yogurt regardless of condition. A tendency towards significance for decreased levels of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (p = 0.06) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (p yogurt consumption was observed. The population of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and production of lactate in yogurt were significantly enhanced after addition of olive polyphenols, contrary to the population of yeasts and molds. The results indicate that consumption of the polyphenol-enriched yogurt may help individuals with non-declared pathology reduce body weight, blood pressure, LDL cholesterol levels and lipid peroxidation, and promote growth of beneficial LAB.

  12. The Effects of an Olive Fruit Polyphenol-Enriched Yogurt on Body Composition, Blood Redox Status, Physiological and Metabolic Parameters and Yogurt Microflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalliopi Georgakouli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigated the effects of an olive polyphenol-enriched yogurt on yogurt microflora, as well as hematological, physiological and metabolic parameters, blood redox status and body composition. In a randomized double-blind, crossover design, 16 (6 men, 10 women nonsmoking volunteers with non-declared pathology consumed either 400 g of olive fruit polyphenol-enriched yogurt with 50 mg of encapsulated olive polyphenols (experimental condition—EC or 400 g of plain yogurt (control condition—CC every day for two weeks. Physiological measurements and blood collection were performed before and after two weeks of each condition. The results showed that body weight, body mass index, hip circumference and systolic blood pressure decreased significantly (p < 0.05 following the two-week consumption of yogurt regardless of condition. A tendency towards significance for decreased levels of low density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol (p = 0.06 and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (p < 0.05 following two weeks of polyphenol-enriched yogurt consumption was observed. The population of lactic acid bacteria (LAB and production of lactate in yogurt were significantly enhanced after addition of olive polyphenols, contrary to the population of yeasts and molds. The results indicate that consumption of the polyphenol-enriched yogurt may help individuals with non-declared pathology reduce body weight, blood pressure, LDL cholesterol levels and lipid peroxidation, and promote growth of beneficial LAB.

  13. Oxidative stress index (OSi) as a new tool to assess redox status in dairy cattle during the transition period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, A; Hernández, J; Benedito, J L; Castillo, C

    2013-08-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) plays a key role in the initiation or progression of numerous diseases, and dairy cows undergo OS at the transition period. However, discrepancies between methodologies make it difficult to make comparisons between studies, and therefore research on this topic may not be implemented in farms. This study aims to test under field conditions the use of an oxidative stress index (OSi) as a combined measurement through a ratio between pro-oxidants and antioxidants throughout the transition period in dairy farms. Serum samples of high-yielding dairy cows were taken, and markers of oxidative damage and antioxidant capacity were measured in four different production stages: (i) late lactation (LL; -2 to -1 months); (ii) prepartum (PrP; -1 month until parturition); (iii) postpartum (PsP; delivery to +1 month); and (iv) peak of lactation (PkL; +1 to +2.5 months). Values were compared between production stages and against a metabolic baseline status (CTR, 4th to 5th month of gestation). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature that discusses the values of these oxidative stress biomarkers (and the OS index) for cows with low metabolic demands, as to date most research in this area has focused on the transition period. With the joint evaluation through the OSi, differences were found that were not present with the separate evaluation of pro-oxidants or antioxidants, thus supporting our hypothesis that the OSi indicates more accurately the oxidative status of the animals. It was also confirmed that dairy cows undergo OS after parturition, and that antioxidant supplementation from 1 month before parturition until the peak of lactation may be needed to reduce the risk of OS.

  14. Mechanisms of activation of the transcription factor Nrf2 by redox stressors, nutrient cues, and energy status and the pathways through which it attenuates degenerative disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebay, Lauren E.; Robertson, Holly; Durant, Stephen T.; Vitale, Steven R.; Penning, Trevor M.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Hayes, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates the basal and stress-inducible expression of a battery of genes encoding key components of the glutathione-based and thioredoxin-based anti-oxidant systems, as well as aldo-keto reductase, glutathione S-transferase, and NAD(P)H:quinone oxi-doreductase-1 drug-metabolizing isoenzymes along with multidrug-resistance-associated efflux pumps. It therefore plays a pivotal role in both intrinsic resistance and cellular adaptation to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and xenobiotics. Activation of Nrf2 can, however, serve as a double-edged sword because some of the genes it induces may contribute to chemical carcinogenesis by promoting futile redox cycling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolites or confer resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs by increasing the expression of efflux pumps, suggesting its cytoprotective effects will vary in a context-specific fashion. In addition to cytoprotection, Nrf2 also controls genes involved in intermediary metabolism, positively regulating those involved in NADPH generation, purine biosynthesis, and the β-oxidation of fatty acids, while suppressing those involved in lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis. Nrf2 is subject to regulation at multiple levels. Its ability to orchestrate adaptation to oxidants and electrophiles is due principally to stress-stimulated modification of thiols within one of its repressors, the Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), which is present in the cullin-3 RING ubiquitin ligase (CRL) complex CRLKeap1. Thus modification of Cys residues in Keap1 blocks CRLKeap1 activity, allowing newly translated Nrf2 to accumulate rapidly and induce its target genes. The ability of Keap1 to repress Nrf2 can be attenuated by p62/sequestosome-1 in a mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-depen-dent manner, thereby allowing refeeding after fasting to increase Nrf2-target gene expression. In parallel with repression by Keap1, Nrf2 is also repressed

  15. Redox regulation of mammalian sperm capacitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian O′Flaherty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Capacitation is a series of morphological and metabolic changes necessary for the spermatozoon to achieve fertilizing ability. One of the earlier happenings during mammalian sperm capacitation is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS that will trigger and regulate a series of events including protein phosphorylation, in a time-dependent fashion. The identity of the sperm oxidase responsible for the production of ROS involved in capacitation is still elusive, and several candidates are discussed in this review. Interestingly, ROS-induced ROS formation has been described during human sperm capacitation. Redox signaling during capacitation is associated with changes in thiol groups of proteins located on the plasma membrane and subcellular compartments of the spermatozoon. Both, oxidation of thiols forming disulfide bridges and the increase on thiol content are necessary to regulate different sperm proteins associated with capacitation. Reducing equivalents such as NADH and NADPH are necessary to support capacitation in many species including humans. Lactate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phospohate dehydrogenase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase are responsible in supplying NAD (P H for sperm capacitation. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs are newly described enzymes with antioxidant properties that can protect mammalian spermatozoa; however, they are also candidates for assuring the regulation of redox signaling required for sperm capacitation. The dysregulation of PRDXs and of enzymes needed for their reactivation such as thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system and glutathione-S-transferases impairs sperm motility, capacitation, and promotes DNA damage in spermatozoa leading to male infertility.

  16. Redox regulation of mammalian sperm capacitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Flaherty, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Capacitation is a series of morphological and metabolic changes necessary for the spermatozoon to achieve fertilizing ability. One of the earlier happenings during mammalian sperm capacitation is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that will trigger and regulate a series of events including protein phosphorylation, in a time-dependent fashion. The identity of the sperm oxidase responsible for the production of ROS involved in capacitation is still elusive, and several candidates are discussed in this review. Interestingly, ROS-induced ROS formation has been described during human sperm capacitation. Redox signaling during capacitation is associated with changes in thiol groups of proteins located on the plasma membrane and subcellular compartments of the spermatozoon. Both, oxidation of thiols forming disulfide bridges and the increase on thiol content are necessary to regulate different sperm proteins associated with capacitation. Reducing equivalents such as NADH and NADPH are necessary to support capacitation in many species including humans. Lactate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phospohate dehydrogenase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase are responsible in supplying NAD (P) H for sperm capacitation. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) are newly described enzymes with antioxidant properties that can protect mammalian spermatozoa; however, they are also candidates for assuring the regulation of redox signaling required for sperm capacitation. The dysregulation of PRDXs and of enzymes needed for their reactivation such as thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system and glutathione-S-transferases impairs sperm motility, capacitation, and promotes DNA damage in spermatozoa leading to male infertility. PMID:25926608

  17. Effect of Omega-3 and Vitamins E + C Supplements on the Concentration of Serum B-Vitamins and Plasma Redox Aminothiol Antioxidant Status in Elderly Men after Strength Training for Three Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stea, Tonje Holte; Stølevik, Solvor B; Berntsen, Sveinung; Ezzathkah Bastani, Nasser; Paulsen, Gøran; Lohne Seiler, Hilde; Hetlelid, Ken J; Blomhoff, Rune; Mansoor, Mohammad Azam

    2016-01-01

    Data on redox plasma aminothiol status in individuals on strength training are very limited. Therefore, we studied the effect of omega-3 and vitamins E + C supplementation on the concentration of B-vitamins and redox aminothiol status in elderly men after strength training for 3 months. Healthy men, age 60 ± 6 (mean ± SD) were randomly divided into 3 groups: group I received placebo (n = 17), group II consumed omega-3 (700 mg, n = 17), and group III consumed vitamins E + C (235 mg +1 g, n = 16) daily for 3 months. All participants completed a strength training program for the same period. The concentration of serum vitamin B12 decreased and the concentration of serum folate increased in group I after the intervention (p = 0.01, p = 0.009). The concentration of plasma 5-pyridoxal phosphate decreased in groups II and III (p = 0.03 and p = 0.01), whereas the concentration of serum uric acid decreased only in group II (p = 0.02). We detected an increase in the concentration of reduced form of aminothiols in all groups (p vitamins E + C supplementation affect the concentrations of serum B-vitamins and redox plasma aminothiol status in healthy elderly men on strength training. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Physical and functional sensitivity of zinc finger transcription factors to redox change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X; Bishopric, N H; Discher, D J; Murphy, B J; Webster, K A

    1996-01-01

    Redox regulation of DNA-binding proteins through the reversible oxidation of key cysteine sulfhydryl groups has been demonstrated to occur in vitro for a range of transcription factors. The direct redox regulation of DNA binding has not been described in vivo, possibly because most protein thiol groups are strongly buffered against oxidation by the highly reduced intracellular environment mediated by glutathione, thioredoxin, and associated pathways. For this reason, only accessible protein thiol groups with high thiol-disulfide oxidation potentials are likely to be responsive to intracellular redox changes. In this article, we demonstrate that zinc finger DNA-binding proteins, in particular members of the Sp-1 family, appear to contain such redox-sensitive -SH groups. These proteins displayed a higher sensitivity to redox regulation than other redox-responsive factors both in vitro and in vivo. This effect was reflected in the hyperoxidative repression of transcription from promoters with essential Sp-1 binding sites, including the simian virus 40 early region, glycolytic enzyme, and dihydrofolate reductase genes. Promoter analyses implicated the Sp-1 sites in this repression. Non-Sp-1-dependent redox-regulated genes including metallothionein and heme oxygenase were induced by the same hyperoxic stress. The studies demonstrate that cellular redox changes can directly regulate gene expression in vivo by determining the level of occupancy of strategically positioned GC-binding sites. PMID:8622648

  19. Synthesis and characterization of thiol-ene functionalized siloxanes and evaluation of their polymerization kinetics, network properties, and dental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Megan A.

    We explored formation-structure-property relationships in thiol-ene functionalized oligosiloxanes to create crosslinked networks. Specifically, nine oligomers were synthesized, three with thiol-functional silane repeats and three with allyl-functional silane repeats. Structural variations in each oligomer were systematically induced through the incorporation of non-reactive repeats bearing either diphenyl or di-n-octyl moieties, and the oligomer molecular weight was limited by the presence of monofunctional silane condensation species. The molecular weights and chain compositions of all oligomers were ascertained and subsequently used in the evaluation of network properties formed upon photopolymerization of thiol- and ene-functional reactants. Polymerization kinetics of the thiol-ene functionalized siloxanes were also investigated using photoinitiation owing to the spatial and temporal control afforded by this technique. In particular, the effects of the viscosity of the ene-functionalized oligomer and the degree of thiol functionalization on the observed polymerization rate were determined. Results showed that the speed of polymerization varied with changes to the rate-limiting step, which was heavily influenced by neighboring non-reactive functionalities. Moreover, the thiol-ene reaction was found to exhibity unimolecular termination exclusively in siloxane-based systems. Proposed use of the thiol-ene functionalized siloxane system as a dental impression material necessitated the development of a redox initiation scheme. Evaluation of the benzoylperoxide/dimethyl-p-toluidine redox pair in traditional systems showed bulk thiol-ene polymerizations comparable to photoinitiation with the added advantage of uninhibited depth control, as also demonstrated in small molecule thiol-ene coupling reactions initiated by this same redox system. Application of the redox pair to the siloxane system allowed for the viscoelastic properties as well as the feature replication

  20. Hypochlorite-induced oxidation of thiols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan; Hawkins, C L

    2000-01-01

    -, thermal- or UV light-catalysed decomposition of sulfenyl or sulfonyl chlorides which are postulated intermediates in thiol oxidation. In this study we show that thiyl radicals are generated on reaction of a number of low-molecular-weight thiols with HOCl. With sub-stoichiometric amounts of HOCl, relative...... to the thiol, thiyl radicals are the major species detected by EPR spin trapping. When the HOCl is present in excess over the thiol, additional radicals are detected with compounds which contain amine functions; these additional radicals are assigned to nitrogen-centered species. Evidence is presented...

  1. Polyalthia longifolia Methanolic Leaf Extracts (PLME) induce apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial potential depolarization by possibly modulating the redox status in hela cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayarathna, Soundararajan; Oon, Chern Ein; Chen, Yeng; Kanwar, Jagat R; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2017-05-01

    Medicinal plants have been accepted as a gold mine, with respect to the diversity of their phytochemicals. Many medicinal plants extracts are potential anticancer agents. Polyalthia longifolia var. angustifolia Thw. (Annonaceae) is one of the most significant native medicinal plants and is found throughout Malaysia. Hence, the present study was intended to assess the anticancer properties of P. longifolia leaf methanolic extract (PLME) and its underlying mechanisms. The Annexin V/PI flow cytometry analysis showed that PLME induces apoptosis in HeLa cells in dose-dependent manner whereas the PI flow cytometric analysis for cell cycle demonstrated the accumulation of cells at sub G0/G1, G0/G1 and G2/M phases. Investigation with JC-1 flow cytometry analysis indicated increase in mitochondria membrane potential depolarisation corresponding to increase in PLME concentrations. PLME was also shown to influence intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by exerting anti-oxidant (half IC 50 ) and pro-oxidant (IC 50 and double IC 50 ) affect against HeLa cells. PLME treatment also displayed DNA damage in HeLa cells in concentration depended fashion. The proteomic profiling array exposed the expression of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins upon PLME treatment at IC 50 concentration in HeLa cells. Pro-apoptotic proteins; BAX, BAD, cytochrome c, caspase-3, p21, p27 and p53 were found to be significantly up-regulated while anti-apoptotic proteins; BCL-2 and BCL-w were found to be significantly down-regulated. This investigation postulated the role of p53 into mediating apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial potential depolarisation by modulating the redox status of HeLa cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of macro-micro element accumulation capabilities of Elodea nuttallii under gradient redox statuses with elevated NH4-N concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Zaman, Tanjeena; Asaeda, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic plants often encounter various redox conditions in their natural environment. Elodea nuttallii (Planch.), a submerged aquatic macrophyte, has a flexile ability to use different nutrient sources from various environments. In the present study, Elodea nuttallii was subjected to various redox conditions (+400 mV to –180 mV) at both normal (2.5 ppm) and high (10 ppm) ammonium concentrations and evaluated for macro and micro element accumulation. A reduced environment was prepared by addin...

  3. Antifibrotic effect of xanthohumol in combination with praziquantel is associated with altered redox status and reduced iron accumulation during liver fluke-associated cholangiocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamnongkan, Wassana; Thanee, Malinee; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Loilome, Watcharin; Thanan, Raynoo; Kimawaha, Phongsaran; Boonmars, Tidarat; Silakit, Runglawan; Namwat, Nisana; Techasen, Anchalee

    2018-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) caused by infection of the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini , (Ov) is the major public health problem in northeast Thailand. Following Ov infection the subsequent molecular changes can be associated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced chronic inflammation, advanced periductal fibrosis, and cholangiocarcinogenesis. Notably, resistance to an activation of cell death in prolonged oxidative stress conditions can occur but some damaged/mutated cells could survive and enable clonal expansion. Our study used a natural product, xanthohumol (XN), which is an anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory compound, to examine whether it could prevent Ov-associated CCA carcinogenesis. We measured the effect of XN with or without praziquantel (PZ), an anti-helminthic treatment, on DNA damage, redox status change including iron accumulation and periductal fibrosis during CCA genesis induced by administration of Ov and N -dinitrosomethylamine (NDMA) in hamsters. Animals were randomly divided into four groups: group I, Ov infection and NDMA administration (ON); group II, Ov infection and NDMA administration and PZ treatment (ONP); the latter 2 groups were similar to group I and II, but group III received additional XN (XON) and group IV received XN plus PZ (XONP). The results showed that high 8-oxodG (a marker of DNA damage) was observed throughout cholangiocarcinogenesis. Moreover, increased expression of CD44v8-10 (a cell surface in regulation of the ROS defense system), whereas decreased expression of phospho-p38 MAPK (a major ROS target), was found during the progression of the bile duct cell transformation. In addition, high accumulation of iron and expression of transferrin receptor-1 (TfR-1) in both malignant bile ducts and inflammatory cells were detected. Furthermore, fibrosis also increased with the highest level being on day 180. On the other hand, the groups of XN with or without PZ supplementations showed an effective reduction in all the markers

  4. Antifibrotic effect of xanthohumol in combination with praziquantel is associated with altered redox status and reduced iron accumulation during liver fluke-associated cholangiocarcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wassana Jamnongkan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA caused by infection of the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini, (Ov is the major public health problem in northeast Thailand. Following Ov infection the subsequent molecular changes can be associated by reactive oxygen species (ROS induced chronic inflammation, advanced periductal fibrosis, and cholangiocarcinogenesis. Notably, resistance to an activation of cell death in prolonged oxidative stress conditions can occur but some damaged/mutated cells could survive and enable clonal expansion. Our study used a natural product, xanthohumol (XN, which is an anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory compound, to examine whether it could prevent Ov-associated CCA carcinogenesis. We measured the effect of XN with or without praziquantel (PZ, an anti-helminthic treatment, on DNA damage, redox status change including iron accumulation and periductal fibrosis during CCA genesis induced by administration of Ov and N-dinitrosomethylamine (NDMA in hamsters. Animals were randomly divided into four groups: group I, Ov infection and NDMA administration (ON; group II, Ov infection and NDMA administration and PZ treatment (ONP; the latter 2 groups were similar to group I and II, but group III received additional XN (XON and group IV received XN plus PZ (XONP. The results showed that high 8-oxodG (a marker of DNA damage was observed throughout cholangiocarcinogenesis. Moreover, increased expression of CD44v8-10 (a cell surface in regulation of the ROS defense system, whereas decreased expression of phospho-p38MAPK (a major ROS target, was found during the progression of the bile duct cell transformation. In addition, high accumulation of iron and expression of transferrin receptor-1 (TfR-1 in both malignant bile ducts and inflammatory cells were detected. Furthermore, fibrosis also increased with the highest level being on day 180. On the other hand, the groups of XN with or without PZ supplementations showed an effective reduction in all the

  5. Quantitative proteomic characterization of redox-dependent post-translational modifications on protein cysteines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Jicheng; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Protein cysteine thiols play a crucial role in redox signaling, regulation of enzymatic activity and protein function, and maintaining redox homeostasis in living systems. The unique chemical reactivity of thiol groups makes cysteine susceptible to oxidative modifications by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species to form a broad array of reversible and irreversible protein post-translational modifications (PTMs). The reversible modifications in particular are one of the major components of redox signaling and are involved in regulation of various cellular processes under physiological and pathological conditions. The biological significance of these redox PTMs in health and diseases has been increasingly recognized. Herein, we review the recent advances of quantitative proteomic approaches for investigating redox PTMs in complex biological systems, including the general considerations of sample processing, various chemical or affinity enrichment strategies, and quantitative approaches. We also highlight a number of redox proteomic approaches that enable effective profiling of redox PTMs for addressing specific biological questions. Although some technological limitations remain, redox proteomics is paving the way towards a better understanding of redox signaling and regulation in human health and diseases.

  6. Detection of Cysteine Redox States in Mitochondrial Proteins in Intact Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habich, Markus; Riemer, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Import, folding, and activity regulation of mitochondrial proteins are important for mitochondrial function. Cysteine residues play crucial roles in these processes as their thiol groups can undergo (reversible) oxidation reactions. For example, during import of many intermembrane space (IMS) proteins, cysteine oxidation drives protein folding and translocation over the outer membrane. Mature mitochondrial proteins can undergo changes in the redox state of specific cysteine residues, for example, as part of their enzymatic reaction cycle or as adaptations to changes of the local redox environment which might influence their activity. Here we describe methods to study changes in cysteine residue redox states in intact cells. These approaches allow to monitor oxidation-driven protein import as well as changes of cysteine redox states in mature proteins during oxidative stress or during the reaction cycle of thiol-dependent enzymes like oxidoreductases.

  7. Redox Signaling Regulated by Cysteine Persulfide and Protein Polysulfidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasamatsu, Shingo; Nishimura, Akira; Morita, Masanobu; Matsunaga, Tetsuro; Abdul Hamid, Hisyam; Akaike, Takaaki

    2016-12-15

    For decades, reactive persulfide species including cysteine persulfide (CysSSH) have been known to exist endogenously in organisms. However, the physiological significance of endogenous persulfides remains poorly understood. That cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase produced CysSSH from cystine was recently demonstrated. An endogenous sulfur transfer system involving CysSSH evidently generates glutathione persulfide (GSSH) that exists at concentrations greater than 100 μM in vivo. Because reactive persulfide species such as CysSSH and GSSH have higher nucleophilicity than parental cysteine (Cys) and glutathione do, these reactive species exhibit strong scavenging activities against oxidants, e.g., hydrogen peroxide, and electrophiles, which contributes to redox signaling regulation. Also, several papers indicated that various proteins and enzymes have Cys polysulfides including CysSSH at their specific Cys residues, which is called protein polysulfidation. Apart from the redox signaling regulatory mechanism, another plausible function of protein polysulfidation is providing protection for protein thiol residues against irreversible chemical modification caused by oxidants and electrophiles. Elucidation of the redox signaling regulatory mechanism of reactive persulfide species including small thiol molecules and thiol-containing proteins should lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies and drug discoveries for oxidative and electrophilic stress-related diseases.

  8. Glutathione S-transferase P influences redox and migration pathways in bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available To interrogate why redox homeostasis and glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP are important in regulating bone marrow cell proliferation and migration, we isolated crude bone marrow, lineage negative and bone marrow derived-dendritic cells (BMDDCs from both wild type (WT and knockout (Gstp1/p2(-/- mice. Comparison of the two strains showed distinct thiol expression patterns. WT had higher baseline and reactive oxygen species-induced levels of S-glutathionylated proteins, some of which (sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2(+-ATPase regulate Ca(2+ fluxes and subsequently influence proliferation and migration. Redox status is also a crucial determinant in the regulation of the chemokine system. CXCL12 chemotactic response was stronger in WT cells, with commensurate alterations in plasma membrane polarization/permeability and intracellular calcium fluxes; activities of the downstream kinases, ERK and Akt were also higher in WT. In addition, expression levels of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its associated phosphatase, SHP-2, were higher in WT. Inhibition of CXCR4 or SHP2 decreased the extent of CXCL12-induced migration in WT BMDDCs. The differential surface densities of CXCR4, SHP-2 and inositol trisphosphate receptor in WT and Gstp1/p2(-/- cells correlated with the differential CXCR4 functional activities, as measured by the extent of chemokine-induced directional migration and differences in intracellular signaling. These observed differences contribute to our understanding of how genetic ablation of GSTP causes different levels of myeloproliferation and migration [corrected

  9. Thimerosal Exposure and the Role of Sulfation Chemistry and Thiol Availability in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Geier

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a neurological disorder in which a significant number of the children experience a developmental regression characterized by a loss of previously acquired skills and abilities. Typically reported are losses of verbal, nonverbal, and social abilities. Several recent studies suggest that children diagnosed with an ASD have abnormal sulfation chemistry, limited thiol availability, and decreased glutathione (GSH reserve capacity, resulting in a compromised oxidation/reduction (redox and detoxification capacity. Research indicates that the availability of thiols, particularly GSH, can influence the effects of thimerosal (TM and other mercury (Hg compounds. TM is an organomercurial compound (49.55% Hg by weight that has been, and continues to be, used as a preservative in many childhood vaccines, particularly in developing countries. Thiol-modulating mechanisms affecting the cytotoxicity of TM have been identified. Importantly, the emergence of ASD symptoms post-6 months of age temporally follows the administration of many childhood vaccines. The purpose of the present critical review is provide mechanistic insight regarding how limited thiol availability, abnormal sulfation chemistry, and decreased GSH reserve capacity in children with an ASD could make them more susceptible to the toxic effects of TM routinely administered as part of mandated childhood immunization schedules.

  10. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkoxycyanobiphenyl thiols on gold--a study of electron transfer reaction using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, V; Pal, Santanu Kumar; Kumar, Sandeep; Lakshminarayanan, V

    2006-04-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of liquid crystalline thiol-terminated alkoxycyanobiphenyl molecules with different alkyl chain lengths on Au surface have been studied for the first time using electrochemical techniques such as cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The barrier property of the SAM-modified surfaces was evaluated using two different redox probes, namely potassium ferro/ferri cyanide and hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride. It was found that for short-length alkyl chain thiol (C5) the electron transfer reaction of hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride takes place through tunneling mechanism. In contrast, redox reaction of potassium ferro/ferri cyanide is almost completely blocked by the SAM-modified Au surface. From the impedance data, a surface coverage value of >99.9% was calculated for all the thiol molecules.

  11. Antioxidative Mechanisms of Sulfite and Protein-Derived Thiols during Early Stages of Metal Induced Oxidative Reactions in Beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Marianne N; Krämer, Anna C; Andersen, Mogens L

    2015-09-23

    The radical-mediated reactions occurring during the early stages of beer storage were studied by following the rate of oxygen consumption, radical formation as detected by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, and concentrations of the antioxidant compounds sulfite and thiols. Addition of either Fe(III) or Fe(II) had similar effects, indicating that a fast redox equilibrium is obtained between the two species in beer. Addition of iron in combination with hydrogen peroxide gave the most pronounced levels of oxidation due to a direct initiation of ethanol oxidation through generation of hydroxyl radicals by the Fenton reaction. The concentration of sulfite decreased more than the thiol concentration, suggesting that thiols play a secondary role as antioxidants by mainly quenching 1-hydroxyethyl radicals that are intermediates in the oxidation of ethanol. Increasing the temperature had a minor effect on the rate of oxygen consumption.

  12. Evaluation and Control of Thiol-ene/Thiol-epoxy Hybrid Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Carioscia, Jacquelyn A.; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2007-01-01

    The development of thiol-ene/thiol-epoxy hybrid networks offers the advantage of tailorable polymerization kinetics while producing a highly crosslinked, high Tg polymer that has significantly reduced shrinkage stress. Stoichiometric mixtures of pentaerythritol tetra(3-mercaptopropionate) (PETMP)/triallyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-trione (TATATO) (thiol-ene, mixture 1) and PETMP/bisphenol a diglycidyl ether (BADGE) (thiol-epoxy, mixture 2) were prepared and hybrid mixtures of 75/25, 50/50, 25/75, ...

  13. Role of thiols in cellular response to radiation and drugs. Symposium: thiols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaglow, J.E.; Varnes, M.E.; Clark, E.P.; Epp, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    Cellular nonprotein thiols (NPSH) consist of glutathione (GSH) and other low molecular weight species such as cysteine, cysteamine, and coenzyme. A GSH is usually less than the total cellular NPSH, and with thiol reactive agents, such as diethyl maleate (DEM), its rate of depletion is in part dependent upon the cellular capacity for its resynthesis. If resynthesis is blocked by buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine(BSO), the NPSH, including GSH, is depleted more rapidly, Cellular thiol depletion by diamide, N-ethylmaleimide, and BSO may render oxygenated cells more sensitive to radiation. These cells may or may not show a reduction in the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER). Human A549 lung carcinoma cells depleted of their NPSH either by prolonged culture or by BSO treatment do not show a reduced OER but do show increased aerobic responses to radiation. Other nitrocompounds, such as misonidazole, are activated under hypoxic conditions to radical intermediates. When cellular thiols are depleted peroxide is formed. Under hypoxic conditions thiols are depleted because metabolically reduced intermediates react with GSH instead of oxygen. Thiol depletion, under hypoxic conditions, may be the reason that misonidazole and other nitrocompounds show an extra enhancement ratio with hypoxic cells. Thiol depletion by DEM or BSO alters the radiation response of hypoxic cells to misonidazole. In conclusion, we propose an altered thiol model which includes a mechanism for thiol involvement in the aerobic radiation response of cells

  14. Role of thiols in cellular response to radiation and drugs. Symposium: thiols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biaglow, J.E. (Case Western Reserve Univ. Medical School, Cleveland, OH); Varnes, M.E.; Clark, E.P.; Epp, E.R.

    1983-09-01

    Cellular nonprotein thiols (NPSH) consist of glutathione (GSH) and other low molecular weight species such as cysteine, cysteamine, and coenzyme. A GSH is usually less than the total cellular NPSH, and with thiol reactive agents, such as diethyl maleate (DEM), its rate of depletion is in part dependent upon the cellular capacity for its resynthesis. If resynthesis is blocked by buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine(BSO), the NPSH, including GSH, is depleted more rapidly, Cellular thiol depletion by diamide, N-ethylmaleimide, and BSO may render oxygenated cells more sensitive to radiation. These cells may or may not show a reduction in the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER). Human A549 lung carcinoma cells depleted of their NPSH either by prolonged culture or by BSO treatment do not show a reduced OER but do show increased aerobic responses to radiation. Other nitrocompounds, such as misonidazole, are activated under hypoxic conditions to radical intermediates. When cellular thiols are depleted peroxide is formed. Under hypoxic conditions thiols are depleted because metabolically reduced intermediates react with GSH instead of oxygen. Thiol depletion, under hypoxic conditions, may be the reason that misonidazole and other nitrocompounds show an extra enhancement ratio with hypoxic cells. Thiol depletion by DEM or BSO alters the radiation response of hypoxic cells to misonidazole. In conclusion, we propose an altered thiol model which includes a mechanism for thiol involvement in the aerobic radiation response of cells.

  15. Hypochlorite-induced oxidation of thiols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan; Hawkins, C L

    2000-01-01

    -molecular-weight thiols such as reduced glutathione (GSH), and sulfur-containing amino acids in proteins, are major targets for HOCl. Radicals have not generally been implicated as intermediates in thiol oxidation by HOCl, though there is considerable literature evidence for the involvement of radicals in the metal ion......-, thermal- or UV light-catalysed decomposition of sulfenyl or sulfonyl chlorides which are postulated intermediates in thiol oxidation. In this study we show that thiyl radicals are generated on reaction of a number of low-molecular-weight thiols with HOCl. With sub-stoichiometric amounts of HOCl, relative...... for the involvement of sulfenyl chlorides (RSCl) in the formation of these radicals, and studies with an authentic sulfenyl chloride have demonstrated that this compound readily decomposes in thermal-, metal-ion- or light-catalysed reactions to give thiyl radicals. The formation of thiyl radicals on oxidation...

  16. Thiol/disulfide homeostasis in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, V; Kurdoglu, Z; Alisik, M; Turgut, E; Sezgın, O O; Korkmaz, H; Ergun, Y; Erel, O

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of postmenopausal osteoporosis on thiol/disulfide homeostasis. A total of 75 participants were divided into two groups: Group 1 (n = 40) was composed of healthy postmenopausal women, and group 2 (n = 35) was composed of women with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Clinical findings and thiol/disulfide homeostasis were compared between the two groups. The disulfide/native thiol ratio was 8.6% ± 3.6 in group 1 and 12.7% ± 8.4 in group 2 (p = 0.04). The disulfide/native thiol percent ratio was significantly higher in group 2 after adjustment for the years since menopause and age (p menopause and age (p menopause in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  17. Oligo-carrageenan kappa-induced reducing redox status and activation of TRR/TRX system increase the level of indole-3-acetic acid, gibberellin A3 and trans-zeatin in Eucalyptus globulus trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Alberto; Contreras, Rodrigo A; Zúiga, Gustavo; Moenne, Alejandra

    2014-08-20

    Eucalyptus globulus trees treated with oligo-carrageenan (OC) kappa showed an increase in NADPH, ascorbate and glutathione levels and activation of the thioredoxin reductase (TRR)/thioredoxin (TRX) system which enhance photosynthesis, basal metabolism and growth. In order to analyze whether the reducing redox status and the activation of thioredoxin reductase (TRR)/thioredoxin (TRX) increased the level of growth-promoting hormones, trees were treated with water (control), with OC kappa, or with inhibitors of ascorbate synthesis, lycorine, glutathione synthesis, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), NADPH synthesis, CHS-828, and thioredoxin reductase activity, auranofine, and with OC kappa, and cultivated for four additional months. Eucalyptus trees treated with OC kappa showed an increase in the levels of the auxin indole 3-acetic acid (IAA), gibberellin A3 (GA3) and the cytokinin trans-zeatin (t-Z) as well as a decrease in the level of the brassinosteroid epi-brassinolide (EB). In addition, treatment with lycorine, BSO, CHS-828 and auranofine inhibited the increase in IAA, GA3 and t-Z as well as the decrease in EB levels. Thus, the reducing redox status and the activation of TRR/TRX system induced by OC kappa increased the levels of IAA, GA3 and t-Z levels determining, at least in part, the stimulation of growth in Eucalyptus trees.

  18. On the Reactions of Thiols, Sulfenic Acids, and Sulfinic Acids with Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, Jean-Philippe R; Pratt, Derek A

    2017-05-22

    The reaction of thiols with H 2 O 2 is central to many processes essential to life, from protein folding to redox signaling. The initial products are assumed to be sulfenic acids, but their observation, and the kinetic and mechanistic characterization of their subsequent reactions, has proven challenging. The introduction of a 9-fluorotriptycene substituent enabled the use of 19 F NMR to directly monitor the reaction of a thiol with H 2 O 2 to yield a sulfenic acid, and its subsequent oxidation to sulfinic and sulfonic acids. The oxidations are specific base catalyzed, as revealed by the lack of isotope effects and the dependence of the kinetics on pH but not buffer concentration. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Application of genetically encoded redox biosensors to measure dynamic changes in the glutathione, bacillithiol and mycothiol redox potentials in pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Quach Ngoc; Linzner, Nico; Loi, Vu Van; Antelmann, Haike

    2018-02-15

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize glutathione (GSH) as their major LMW thiol. However, most Gram-positive bacteria do not encode enzymes for GSH biosynthesis and produce instead alternative LMW thiols, such as bacillithiol (BSH) and mycothiol (MSH). BSH is utilized by Firmicutes and MSH is the major LMW thiol of Actinomycetes. LMW thiols are required to maintain the reduced state of the cytoplasm, but are also involved in virulence mechanisms in human pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica subsp. Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes. Infection conditions often cause perturbations of the intrabacterial redox balance in pathogens, which is further affected under antibiotics treatments. During the last years, novel glutaredoxin-fused roGFP2 biosensors have been engineered in many eukaryotic organisms, including parasites, yeast, plants and human cells for dynamic live-imaging of the GSH redox potential in different compartments. Likewise bacterial roGFP2-based biosensors are now available to measure the dynamic changes in the GSH, BSH and MSH redox potentials in model and pathogenic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. In this review, we present an overview of novel functions of the bacterial LMW thiols GSH, MSH and BSH in pathogenic bacteria in virulence regulation. Moreover, recent results about the application of genetically encoded redox biosensors are summarized to study the mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions, persistence and antibiotics resistance. In particularly, we highlight recent biosensor results on the redox changes in the intracellular food-borne pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium as well as in the Gram-positive pathogens S. aureus and M. tuberculosis during infection conditions and under antibiotics treatments. These studies established a link between ROS and antibiotics resistance with the intracellular LMW thiol-redox potential. Future applications should be directed

  20. Investigations of thiol-modified phenol derivatives for the use in thiol-ene photopolymerizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinelt, Sebastian; Tabatabai, Monir; Fischer, Urs Karl; Moszner, Norbert; Utterodt, Andreas; Ritter, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Thiol-ene photopolymerizations gain a growing interest in academic research. Coatings and dental restoratives are interesting applications for thiol-ene photopolymerizations due to their unique features. In most studies the relative flexible and hydrophilic ester derivative, namely pentaerythritoltetra(3-mercaptopropionate) (PETMP), is investigated as the thiol component. Thus, in the present study we are encouraged to investigate the performance of more hydrophobic ester-free thiol-modified bis- and trisphenol derivatives in thiol-ene photopolymerizations. For this, six different thiol-modified bis- and trisphenol derivatives exhibiting four to six thiol groups are synthesized via the radical addition of thioacetic acid to suitable allyl-modified precursors and subsequent hydrolysis. Compared to PETMP better flexural strength and modulus of elasticity are achievable in thiol-ene photopolymerizations employing 1,3,5-triallyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-trione (TATATO) as the ene derivative. Especially, after storage in water, the flexural strength and modulus of elasticity is twice as high compared to the PETMP reference system.

  1. Evaluation and Control of Thiol-ene/Thiol-epoxy Hybrid Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carioscia, Jacquelyn A; Stansbury, Jeffrey W; Bowman, Christopher N

    2007-03-08

    The development of thiol-ene/thiol-epoxy hybrid networks offers the advantage of tailorable polymerization kinetics while producing a highly crosslinked, high T(g) polymer that has significantly reduced shrinkage stress. Stoichiometric mixtures of pentaerythritol tetra(3-mercaptopropionate) (PETMP)/triallyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-trione (TATATO) (thiol-ene, mixture 1) and PETMP/bisphenol a diglycidyl ether (BADGE) (thiol-epoxy, mixture 2) were prepared and hybrid mixtures of 75/25, 50/50, 25/75, and 10/90 w/w of mixtures 1 and 2 were polymerized using a combination of both radical and anionic initiation. The light exposure timing and the relative initiation conditions of the two types were used to control the order and relative rates of the radical and anionic polymerizations. The 50/50 w/w thiol-ene/thiol-epoxy hybrid material exhibited a final stress of only 0.2 MPa, which is 90 % lower than the stress developed in a control dimethacrylate resin. Kinetic analysis indicates composition affects network development in thiol-ene/thiol-epoxy hybrid networks and produces materials with robust mechanical properties.

  2. The Synthesis of a Coumarin Carbohydrazide Dinuclear Copper Complex Based Fluorescence Probe and Its Detection of Thiols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjie He

    Full Text Available Small-molecule thiols, such as cysteine (CYS and glutathione (GSH, are essential for maintaining the cellular redox environment and play important roles in regulating various cellular physiological functions. A fluorescence probe (compound 1-Cu2+ for thiols based on coumarin carbohydrazide dinuclear copper complex was developed. Compound 1 was synthesized from the reaction of 7-(diethylamino-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carbohydrazide with 4-tert-butyl-2,6- diformylphenol. Accordingly, the copper complex (compound 1-Cu2+ was prepared by mixing compound 1 with 2 equivalents copper ions. Compound 1 had strong fluorescence while compound 1-Cu2+ hardly possessed fluorescence owing to the quenching nature of paramagnetism Cu2+ to the fluorescence molecule excited state. However, the fluorescence intensity of compound 1-Cu2+ was increased dramatically after the addition of thiol-containing amino acids, but not the other non-sulfhydryl amino acids. UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectra indicated that compound 1-Cu2+ had good selectivity and sensitivity for thiols such as glutathione in CH3CN:H2O (3:2, v/v PBS solution. The fluorescence imaging experiments implied that compound 1-Cu2+ has potential application in thiol-containing amino acids detection in living cells.

  3. The efficacy of donepezil administration on acetylcholinesterase activity and altered redox homeostasis in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atukeren, Pinar; Cengiz, Mahir; Yavuzer, Hakan; Gelisgen, Remise; Altunoglu, Esma; Oner, Sena; Erdenen, Fusun; Yuceakın, Damla; Derici, Himmet; Cakatay, Ufuk; Uzun, Hafize

    2017-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a serious multifactorial disorder with progressive neurodegenerative outcomes related with impaired redox homeostasis. Inhibition of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE), as one of the major therapeutic strategies, is considered to be offering only symptomatic relief and moderate disease modifying effect. We intended to investigate the effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibition via donepezil on protein carbonyl (PCO), advanced protein oxidation products (AOPP) and ischemia modified albumin (IMA) as protein oxidation markers and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), prooxidant-antioxidant balance (PAB), total thiol (T-SH), protein thiol (P-SH) as antioxidant status markers and also kynurenine (KYN), N-formyl kynurenine (N-FKYN) and protein bound dityrosine (DT) levels all in one demonstrating the redox homeostasis in Alzheimer patients also correlated with AChE activity. The AChE activity and PCO, KYN, N-FKYN and DT levels were found to be significantly higher in the AD group than the control group. The FRAP, T-SH and P-SH levels were significantly lower in the AD group than in the control group. The AChE activity was significantly higher both in donepezil treated and untreated groups when compared with the control group. PCO levels were significantly higher in Alzheimer's untreated group than the healthy control and donepezil treated groups. AChE activity was positively correlated with PCO, IMA, PAB, KYN and N-FKYN levels and negatively correlated with FRAP, T-SH and P-SH levels in all participants. Our data showed that treatment with donepezil had ameliorating effects on redox homeostasis in Alzheimer patients. AChE inhibition seems to be exhibiting a potent antioxidant role and may inhibit protein oxidation by decreasing AChE activity in AD, thus medicinal natural substances exhibiting the similar mechanism of action with their antioxidant behaviours can be recommended for the emphasis on new drug new drug development. Further

  4. “Oxygen sensing” by Na,K-ATPase: these miraculous thiols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bogdanova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Control over the Na,K-ATPase function plays a central role in adaptation of the organisms to hypoxic and anoxic conditions. As the enzyme itself does not possess O2 binding sites its oxygen-sensitivity is mediated by a variety of redox-sensitive modifications including S-glutathionylation, S-nitrosylation and redox-sensitive phosphorylation. This is an overview of the current knowledge on the plethora of molecular mechanisms tuning the activity of the ATP-consuming Na,K-ATPase to the cellular metabolic activity. Recent findings suggest that oxygen-derived free radicals and H2O2, NO, and oxidised glutathione are the signalling messengers that make the Na,K-ATPase oxygen-sensitive. This very ancient signalling pathway targeting thiols of all three subunits of the Na,K-ATPase as well as redox-sensitive kinases sustains the enzyme activity at the optimal level avoiding terminal ATP depletion and maintaining the transmembrane ion gradients in cells of anoxia-tolerant species. We acknowledge the complexity of the underlying processes as we characterise the sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production in hypoxic cells, and identify their targets, the reactive thiol groups which, upon modification, impact the enzyme activity. Structured accordingly, this review presents a summery on (i the sources of free radical production in hypoxic cells, (ii localisation of regulatory thiols within the Na,K-ATPase and the role reversible thiol modifications play in responses of the enzymes to a variety of stimuli (hypoxia, receptors’ activation control of the enzyme activity (iii redox-sensitive regulatory phosphorylation, and (iv the role of fine modulation of the Na,K-ATPase function in survival success under hypoxic conditions. The co-authors attempted to cover all the contradictions and standing hypotheses in the field and propose the possible future developments in this dynamic area of research, the importance of which is hard to overestimate

  5. 1,4-Naphthoquinone, a pro-oxidant, ameliorated radiation induced gastro-intestinal injury through perturbation of cellular redox and activation of Nrf2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Lokesh

    Detrimental effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are observed at the doses above 1 Gy. Treatment modalities are available up to doses of 6 Gy including bonemarrow transplantation and administration of antibiotics. However, exposure to IR doses above 8 Gy results in gastro-intestinal (GI) syndrome characterised by denudated villi, apoptosis of crypt cells and elevated inflammatory responses. Multiple strategies have been employed to investigate novel agents to protect against IR induced injury. Since cellular redox homeostasis plays a pivotal role in deciding the cell fate, present study was undertaken to explore the potential of 1,4-naphthoquinone (NQ), a pro-oxidant, to ameliorate IR induced GI syndrome. NQ protected INT 407 cells against IR induced cell death of intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. NQ induced perturbation in cellular redox status and induced the activation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway. Thiol antioxidant and inhibitors of Nrf2 pathway abrogated the radioprotection offered by NQ. Further, knocking down Nrf2 rescind the NQ mediated protection against IR induced cell death. In conclusion, NQ protects against IR radiation induced GI syndrome in vitro by perturbing cellular redox and activating Nrf2 pathway. This is the first report highlighting the potential of a pro-oxidant to ameliorate IR induced GI injury.

  6. Plant redox proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navrot, Nicolas; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte

    2011-01-01

    In common with other aerobic organisms, plants are exposed to reactive oxygen species resulting in formation of post-translational modifications related to protein oxidoreduction (redox PTMs) that may inflict oxidative protein damage. Accumulating evidence also underscores the importance of redox...... PTMs in regulating enzymatic activities and controlling biological processes in plants. Notably, proteins controlling the cellular redox state, e.g. thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, appear to play dual roles to maintain oxidative stress resistance and regulate signal transduction pathways via redox PTMs....... To get a comprehensive overview of these types of redox-regulated pathways there is therefore an emerging interest to monitor changes in redox PTMs on a proteome scale. Compared to some other PTMs, e.g. protein phosphorylation, redox PTMs have received less attention in plant proteome analysis, possibly...

  7. Biological Chemistry and Functionality of Protein Sulfenic Acids and Related Thiol Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarie-Baez, Nelmi O.; Silva Lopez, Elsa I.; Furdui, Cristina M.

    2016-01-01

    Selective modification of proteins at cysteine residues by reactive oxygen, nitrogen or sulfur species formed under physiological and pathological states is emerging as a critical regulator of protein activity impacting cellular function. This review focuses primarily on protein sulfenylation (-SOH), a metastable reversible modification connecting reduced cysteine thiols to many products of cysteine oxidation. An overview is first provided on the chemistry principles underlining synthesis, stability and reactivity of sulfenic acids in model compounds and proteins, followed by a brief description of analytical methods currently employed to characterize these oxidative species. The following chapters present a selection of redox-regulated proteins for which the -SOH formation was experimentally confirmed and linked to protein function. These chapters are organized based on the participation of these proteins in the regulation of signaling, metabolism and epigenetics. The last chapter discusses the therapeutic implications of altered redox microenvironment and protein oxidation in disease. PMID:26340608

  8. Novel thermal curing of cycloaliphatic resins by thiol-epoxy click process with several multifunctional thiols

    OpenAIRE

    Guzman, Dailyn; Mateu, Blai; Fernández Francos, Xavier; Ramis Juan, Xavier; Serra Albet, Àngels

    2017-01-01

    Novel thermosets were prepared by the base-catalysed reaction between a cycloaliphatic resin (ECC) and various thiol crosslinkers. 4-(N,N-Dimethylaminopyridine) (DMAP) was used as base catalyst for the thiol–epoxy reaction. A commercial tetrathiol (PETMP) and three different thiols synthesized by us, 6SH-SQ, 3SH-EU and 3SH-ISO, were tested. 6SH-SQ and 3SH-EU were prepared from vinyl or allyl compounds from renewable resources such as squalene and eugenol, respectively. Thiol 3SH-ISO was prepa...

  9. Modification of nanoelectrode ensembles by thiols and disulfides to prevent non specific adsorption of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestrini, M.; Schiavuta, P.; Scopece, P.; Pecchielan, G.; Moretto, L.M.; Ugo, P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Complex nanostructures are built on the gold surface of ensembles of nanoelectrodes. → Gold surface of nanoelectrodes was functionalized with SAM of organic sulphurs. → The polycarbonate surrounding nanoelectrodes was functionalized with proteins. → SAMs protect the nanoelectrodes from undesired proteins adsorption. - Abstract: The possibility to functionalize selectively with thiols or disulfides the surface of the gold nanoelectrodes of polycarbonate templated nanoelectrode ensembles (NEEs) is studied. It is shown that the Au nanoelectrodes can be coated by a self assembled monolayer (SAM) of thioctic acid (TA) or 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic (MES) acid. The study of the electrochemical behavior of SAM-modified NEEs by cyclic voltammetry (CV) at different solution pH, using ferrocenecarboxylate as an anionic redox probe (FcCOO - ) and (ferrocenylmethyl)trimethylammonium (FA + ) as a cationic redox probe, demonstrate that the SAM-modified nanoelectrodes are permselective, in that only cationic or neutral probes can access the SAM-coated nanoelectrode surface. CV, AFM and FTIR-ATR data indicate that proteins such as casein or bovine serum albumin, which are polyanionic at pH 7, adsorb on the surface of NEEs untreated with thiols, tending to block the electron transfer of the ferrocenyl redox probes. On the contrary, the pre-treatment of the NEE with an anionic SAM protects the nanoelectrodes from protein fouling, allowing the detection of well shaped voltammetric patterns for the redox probe. Experimental results indicate that, in the case of MES treated NEEs, the protein is bound only onto the polycarbonate surface which surrounds the nanoelectrodes, while the tips of the gold nanoelectrodes remain protein free.

  10. Modification of nanoelectrode ensembles by thiols and disulfides to prevent non specific adsorption of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvestrini, M. [Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, University Ca' Foscari of Venice, Santa Marta 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Schiavuta, P.; Scopece, P. [Associazione CIVEN, via delle Industrie 5, 30175 Marghera - Venice (Italy); Pecchielan, G.; Moretto, L.M. [Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, University Ca' Foscari of Venice, Santa Marta 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Ugo, P., E-mail: ugo@unive.it [Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, University Ca' Foscari of Venice, Santa Marta 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy)

    2011-09-01

    Highlights: > Complex nanostructures are built on the gold surface of ensembles of nanoelectrodes. > Gold surface of nanoelectrodes was functionalized with SAM of organic sulphurs. > The polycarbonate surrounding nanoelectrodes was functionalized with proteins. > SAMs protect the nanoelectrodes from undesired proteins adsorption. - Abstract: The possibility to functionalize selectively with thiols or disulfides the surface of the gold nanoelectrodes of polycarbonate templated nanoelectrode ensembles (NEEs) is studied. It is shown that the Au nanoelectrodes can be coated by a self assembled monolayer (SAM) of thioctic acid (TA) or 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic (MES) acid. The study of the electrochemical behavior of SAM-modified NEEs by cyclic voltammetry (CV) at different solution pH, using ferrocenecarboxylate as an anionic redox probe (FcCOO{sup -}) and (ferrocenylmethyl)trimethylammonium (FA{sup +}) as a cationic redox probe, demonstrate that the SAM-modified nanoelectrodes are permselective, in that only cationic or neutral probes can access the SAM-coated nanoelectrode surface. CV, AFM and FTIR-ATR data indicate that proteins such as casein or bovine serum albumin, which are polyanionic at pH 7, adsorb on the surface of NEEs untreated with thiols, tending to block the electron transfer of the ferrocenyl redox probes. On the contrary, the pre-treatment of the NEE with an anionic SAM protects the nanoelectrodes from protein fouling, allowing the detection of well shaped voltammetric patterns for the redox probe. Experimental results indicate that, in the case of MES treated NEEs, the protein is bound only onto the polycarbonate surface which surrounds the nanoelectrodes, while the tips of the gold nanoelectrodes remain protein free.

  11. Rab7-a novel redox target that modulates inflammatory pain processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenborn-Gerhardt, Wiebke; Möser, Christine V; Lorenz, Jana E; Steger, Mirco; Heidler, Juliana; Scheving, Reynir; Petersen, Jonas; Kennel, Lea; Flauaus, Cathrin; Lu, Ruirui; Edinger, Aimee L; Tegeder, Irmgard; Geisslinger, Gerd; Heide, Heinrich; Wittig, Ilka; Schmidtko, Achim

    2017-07-01

    Chronic pain is accompanied by production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in various cells that are important for nociceptive processing. Recent data indicate that ROS can trigger specific redox-dependent signaling processes, but the molecular targets of ROS signaling in the nociceptive system remain largely elusive. Here, we performed a proteome screen for pain-dependent redox regulation using an OxICAT approach, thereby identifying the small GTPase Rab7 as a redox-modified target during inflammatory pain in mice. Prevention of Rab7 oxidation by replacement of the redox-sensing thiols modulates its GTPase activity. Immunofluorescence studies revealed Rab7 expression to be enriched in central terminals of sensory neurons. Knockout mice lacking Rab7 in sensory neurons showed normal responses to noxious thermal and mechanical stimuli; however, their pain behavior during inflammatory pain and in response to ROS donors was reduced. The data suggest that redox-dependent changes in Rab7 activity modulate inflammatory pain sensitivity.

  12. Redox Modulations, Antioxidants, and Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraunberger, Erik A.; Laliberté, Victoria L. M.; Duong, Angela; Andreazza, Ana C.

    2016-01-01

    Although antioxidants, redox modulations, and neuropsychiatric disorders have been widely studied for many years, the field would benefit from an integrative and corroborative review. Our primary objective is to delineate the biological significance of compounds that modulate our redox status (i.e., reactive species and antioxidants) as well as outline their current role in brain health and the impact of redox modulations on the severity of illnesses. Therefore, this review will not enter into the debate regarding the perceived medical legitimacy of antioxidants but rather seek to clarify their abilities and limitations. With this in mind, antioxidants may be interpreted as natural products with significant pharmacological actions in the body. A renewed understanding of these often overlooked compounds will allow us to critically appraise the current literature and provide an informed, novel perspective on an important healthcare issue. In this review, we will introduce the complex topics of redox modulations and their role in the development of select neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26640614

  13. Fabrication and bonding of thiol-ene-based microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sikanen, Tiina M; Lafleur, Josiane P.; Moilanen, Maria-Elisa

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the bonding strength of microchips fabricated by thiol-ene free-radical polymerization was characterized in detail by varying the monomeric thiol/allyl composition from the stoichiometric ratio (1:1) up to 100% excess of thiol (2:1) or allyl (1:2) functional groups. Four different...

  14. Redox Homeostasis of Albumin in Relation to Alpha-Lipoic Acid and Dihydrolipoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Atukeren

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Albumin represents the predominant circulating antioxidant agent in plasma exposed to continuous oxidative stress and a change in serum albumin structure accounts for its antioxidant properties. Alterations in the redox status of albumin may result in impairments of its biological properties. Alpha-lipoic acid (LA, a naturally occurring thiol compound found in virtually all species, is a potent antioxidant with high efficacy which is also involved in the chelation of metal ions, regeneration of antioxidants, and repair of oxidatively damaged proteins. In human body LA is rapidly reduced to dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA after intake into the cell. Both, LA and DHLA are amphipathic molecules which act as antioxidants both in hydrophilic and lipophilic environments. The present study aimed to investigate the antioxidant/pro-oxidant effects of LA and DHLA due to their concentrations in metal-catalyzed protein oxidation (MCO of human serum albumin (HSA. Progressive oxidative modification of albumin was found in MCO system by an increased content of protein hydroperoxides (POOH, protein carbonyl groups (PCO which is the former's major breakdown product, and other protein oxidation markers such as advanced oxidized protein products (AOPP and protein thiol groups (P-SH. The possible antioxidant protective effects of LA and DHLA were observed with 25 µM and 50 µM; DHLA being more influential. Protein oxidation parameters were found to be lower and P-SH levels seemed higher. However, prooxidant effects of both LA and DHLA came on the scene with increased concentrations of 75 µM and 100 µM where the latter seemed the most hazardous with contradicted results. It is clear that the loss of biological activity of human serum albumin by MCO system appears of medical relevance and if LA exerts similar effects seen in the present study, it is possible that cellular prooxidant activity can also result consuming this unique antioxidant in certain doses.

  15. A Search for Interstellar Monohydric Thiols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorai, Prasanta; Das, Ankan; Das, Amaresh; Chakrabarti, Sandip K. [Indian Centre for Space Physics, 43 Chalantika, Garia Station Rd., Kolkata, 700084 (India); Sivaraman, Bhalamurugan [Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, 380009 (India); Etim, Emmanuel E., E-mail: ankan.das@gmail.com [Indian Institute of Science Bangalore, 560012 (India)

    2017-02-10

    It has been pointed out by various astronomers that a very interesting relationship exists between interstellar alcohols and the corresponding thiols (sulfur analog of alcohols) as far as the spectroscopic properties and chemical abundances are concerned. Monohydric alcohols such as methanol and ethanol are widely observed and 1-propanol was recently claimed to have been seen in Orion KL. Among the monohydric thiols, methanethiol (chemical analog of methanol) has been firmly detected in Orion KL and Sgr B2(N2) and ethanethiol (chemical analog of ethanol) has been observed in Sgr B2(N2), though the confirmation of this detection is yet to come. It is very likely that higher order thiols could be observed in these regions. In this paper, we study the formation of monohydric alcohols and their thiol analogs. Based on our quantum chemical calculation and chemical modeling, we find that the Tg conformer of 1-propanethiol is a good candidate of astronomical interest. We present various spectroscopically relevant parameters of this molecule to assist in its future detection in the interstellar medium.

  16. Differential Thiol-Based Switches Jump-Start Vibrio cholerae Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens utilize gene expression versatility to adapt to environmental changes. Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, encounters redox-potential changes when it transitions from oxygen-rich aquatic reservoirs to the oxygen-limiting human gastrointestinal tract. We previously showed that the virulence regulator AphB uses thiol-based switches to sense the anoxic host environment and transcriptionally activate the key virulence activator tcpP. Here, by performing a high-throughput transposon sequencing screen in vivo, we identified OhrR as another regulator that enables V. cholerae rapid anoxic adaptation. Like AphB, reduced OhrR binds to and regulates the tcpP promoter. OhrR and AphB displayed differential dynamics in response to redox-potential changes: OhrR is reduced more rapidly than AphB. Furthermore, OhrR thiol modification is required for rapid activation of virulence and successful colonization. This reveals a mechanism whereby bacterial pathogens employ posttranslational modifications of multiple transcription factors to sense and adapt to dynamic environmental changes.

  17. Cysteine-based redox regulation and signalling in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy eCouturier

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms are subjected to oxidative stress conditions which are characterized by the production of reactive oxygen (ROS, nitrogen (RNS and sulfur (RSS species. In plants as in other organisms, many of these compounds have a dual function as they damage different types of macromolecules but they also likely fulfil an important role as secondary messengers. Owing to the reactivity of their thiol groups, some protein cysteine residues are particularly prone to oxidation by these molecules. In the past years, besides their recognized catalytic and regulatory functions, the modification of cysteine thiol group was increasingly viewed as either protective or redox signalling mechanisms. The most physiologically relevant reversible redox post-translational modifications (PTMs are disulfide bonds, sulfenic acids, S-glutathionylated adducts, S-nitrosothiols and to a lesser extent S-sulfenylamides, thiosulfinates and S-persulfides. These redox PTMs are mostly controlled by two oxidoreductase families, thioredoxins and glutaredoxins. This review focuses on recent advances highlighting the variety and physiological roles of these PTMs and the proteomic strategies used for their detection.

  18. The effects of chromium(VI) on the thioredoxin system: Implications for redox regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are highly redox active and have long been recognized as potent cytotoxins and carcinogens. The intracellular reduction of Cr(VI) generates reactive Cr intermediates, which are themselves strong oxidants, as well as superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical. These probably contribute to the oxidative damage and effects on redox-sensitive transcription factors that have been reported. However, the identification of events that initiate these signaling changes has been elusive. More recent studies show that Cr(VI) causes irreversible inhibition of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and oxidation of thioredoxin (Trx) and peroxiredoxin (Prx). Mitochondrial Trx2/Prx3 are more sensitive to Cr(VI) treatment than cytosolic Trx1/Prx1, although both compartments show thiol oxidation with higher doses or longer treatments. Thiol redox proteomics demonstrate that Trx2, Prx3, and Trx1 are among the most sensitive proteins in cells to Cr(VI) treatment. Their oxidation could therefore represent initiating events that have widespread implications for protein thiol redox control and for multiple aspects of redox signaling. This review summarizes the effects of Cr(VI) on the TrxR/Trx system and how these events could influence a number of downstream redox signaling systems that are influenced by Cr(VI) exposure. Some of the signaling events discussed include the activation of apoptosis signal regulating kinase and MAP kinases (p38 and JNK) and the modulation of a number of redox-sensitive transcription factors including AP-1, NF-κB, p53, and Nrf2. PMID:22542445

  19. Iron and thiols as two major players in carcinogenesis: friends or foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    Iron is the most abundant metal in the human body and mainly works as a cofactor for proteins such as hemoglobin and various enzymes. No independent life forms on earth can survive without iron. However, excess iron is intimately associated with carcinogenesis by increasing oxidative stress via its catalytic activity to generate hydroxyl radicals. Biomolecules with redox-active sulfhydryl function(s) (thiol compounds) are necessary for the maintenance of mildly reductive cellular environments to counteract oxidative stress, and for the execution of redox reactions for metabolism and detoxification. Involvement of glutathione S-transferase and thioredoxin has long attracted the attention of cancer researchers. Here, I update recent findings on the involvement of iron and thiol compounds during carcinogenesis and in cancer cells. It is now recognized that the cystine/glutamate transporter (antiporter) is intimately associated with ferroptosis, an iron-dependent, non-apoptotic form of cell death, observed in cancer cells, and also with cancer stem cells; the former with transporter blockage but the latter with its stabilization. Excess iron in the presence of oxygen appears the most common known mutagen. Ironically, the persistent activation of antioxidant systems via genetic alterations in Nrf2 and Keap1 also contributes to carcinogenesis. Therefore, it is difficult to conclude the role of iron and thiol compounds as friends or foes, which depends on the quantity/distribution and induction/flexibility, respectively. Avoiding further mutation would be the most helpful strategy for cancer prevention, and myriad of efforts are being made to sort out the weaknesses of cancer cells.

  20. Live-cell imaging of biothiols via thiol/disulfide exchange to trigger the photoinduced electron transfer of gold-nanodot sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ching-Ping; Wu, Te-Haw; Liu, Chia-Yeh; Lin, Shu-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The ultrasmall size, PAMAM dendrimer-entrapped Au 8 -clusters were synthesized. • Thiol/disulfide exchange with biothiols to release 2-PyT resulted in quenching. • The sensing platform can detect both low and high molecular weight thiols. • Capable of imaging biothiols including protein thiols in living cells. - Abstract: Biothiols have been reported to involve in intracellular redox-homeostasis against oxidative stress. In this study, a highly selective and sensitive fluorescent probe for sensing biothiols is explored by using an ultrasmall gold nanodot (AuND), the dendrimer-entrapped Au 8 -cluster. This strategy relies upon a thiol/disulfide exchange to trigger the fluorescence change through a photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process between the Au 8 -cluster (as an electron donor) and 2-pyridinethiol (2-PyT) (as an electron acceptor) for sensing biothiols. When 2-PyT is released via the cleavage of disulfide bonds by biothiols, the PET process from the Au 8 -cluster to 2-PyT is initiated, resulting in fluorescence quenching. The fluorescence intensity was found to decrease linearly with glutathione (GSH) concentration (0–1500 μM) at physiological relevant levels and the limit of detection for GSH was 15.4 μM. Compared to most nanoparticle-based fluorescent probes that are limited to detect low molecular weight thiols (LMWTs; i.e., GSH and cysteine), the ultrasmall Au 8 -cluster-based probe exhibited less steric hindrance and can be directly applied in selectively and sensitively detecting both LMWTs and high molecular weight thiols (HMWTs; i.e., protein thiols). Based on such sensing platform, the surface-functionalized Au 8 -cluster has significant promise for use as an efficient nanoprobe for intracellular fluorescence imaging of biothiols including protein thiols in living cells whereas other nanoparticle-based fluorescent probes cannot

  1. Live-cell imaging of biothiols via thiol/disulfide exchange to trigger the photoinduced electron transfer of gold-nanodot sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ching-Ping; Wu, Te-Haw; Liu, Chia-Yeh; Lin, Shu-Yi, E-mail: shuyi@nhri.org.tw

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • The ultrasmall size, PAMAM dendrimer-entrapped Au{sub 8}-clusters were synthesized. • Thiol/disulfide exchange with biothiols to release 2-PyT resulted in quenching. • The sensing platform can detect both low and high molecular weight thiols. • Capable of imaging biothiols including protein thiols in living cells. - Abstract: Biothiols have been reported to involve in intracellular redox-homeostasis against oxidative stress. In this study, a highly selective and sensitive fluorescent probe for sensing biothiols is explored by using an ultrasmall gold nanodot (AuND), the dendrimer-entrapped Au{sub 8}-cluster. This strategy relies upon a thiol/disulfide exchange to trigger the fluorescence change through a photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process between the Au{sub 8}-cluster (as an electron donor) and 2-pyridinethiol (2-PyT) (as an electron acceptor) for sensing biothiols. When 2-PyT is released via the cleavage of disulfide bonds by biothiols, the PET process from the Au{sub 8}-cluster to 2-PyT is initiated, resulting in fluorescence quenching. The fluorescence intensity was found to decrease linearly with glutathione (GSH) concentration (0–1500 μM) at physiological relevant levels and the limit of detection for GSH was 15.4 μM. Compared to most nanoparticle-based fluorescent probes that are limited to detect low molecular weight thiols (LMWTs; i.e., GSH and cysteine), the ultrasmall Au{sub 8}-cluster-based probe exhibited less steric hindrance and can be directly applied in selectively and sensitively detecting both LMWTs and high molecular weight thiols (HMWTs; i.e., protein thiols). Based on such sensing platform, the surface-functionalized Au{sub 8}-cluster has significant promise for use as an efficient nanoprobe for intracellular fluorescence imaging of biothiols including protein thiols in living cells whereas other nanoparticle-based fluorescent probes cannot.

  2. An evaluation of heat on protein oxidation of soy protein isolate or soy protein isolate mixed with soybean oil and its consequences on redox status of broilers at early age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianglun Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of heat treatment and soybean oil inclusion on protein oxidation of soy protein isolate (SPI and of oxidized protein on redox status of broilers at an early age. Methods SPI mixed with soybean oil (SPIO heated at 100°C for 8 h was used to evaluate protein oxidation of SPI. A total of two hundred and sixteen 1-day-old Arbor Acres chicks were divided into 3 groups with 6 replicates of 12 birds, receiving basal diet (CON, heat-oxidized SPI diet (HSPI or mixture of SPI and 2% soybean oil diet (HSPIO for 21 d, respectively. Results Increased protein carbonyl, decreased protein sulfhydryl of SPI were observed as heating time increased in all treatments (p<0.05. Addition of 2% soybean oil increased protein carbonyl of SPI at 8 h heating (p<0.05. Dietary HSPI and HSPIO decreased the average daily gain of broilers as compared with the CON (p<0.05. Broilers fed HSPI and HSPIO exhibited decreased glutathione (GSH in serum, catalase activity and total sulfhydryl in liver and increased malondialdehyde (MDA and protein carbonyl in serum, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs in liver and protein carbonyl in jejunal mucosa as compared with that of the CON (p<0.05. Additionally, broilers receiving HSPIO showed decreased glutathione peroxidase activity (GSH-Px in serum, GSH and hydroxyl radical scavenging capacity in liver, GSH-Px activity in duodenal mucosa, GSH-Px activity and superoxide anion radical scavenging capacity in jejunal mucosa and increased AOPPs in serum, MDA and protein carbonyl in liver, MDA and AOPPs in jejunal mucosa (p<0.05. Conclusion Protein oxidation of SPI can be induced by heat and soybean oil and oxidized protein resulted in redox imbalance in broilers at an early age.

  3. An evaluation of heat on protein oxidation of soy protein isolate or soy protein isolate mixed with soybean oilin vitroand its consequences on redox status of broilers at early age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianglun; Lu, Peng; Xue, Wenyue; Wu, Dawei; Wen, Chao; Zhou, Yanmin

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of heat treatment and soybean oil inclusion on protein oxidation of soy protein isolate (SPI) and of oxidized protein on redox status of broilers at an early age. SPI mixed with soybean oil (SPIO) heated at 100°C for 8 h was used to evaluate protein oxidation of SPI. A total of two hundred and sixteen 1-day-old Arbor Acres chicks were divided into 3 groups with 6 replicates of 12 birds, receiving basal diet (CON), heat-oxidized SPI diet (HSPI) or mixture of SPI and 2% soybean oil diet (HSPIO) for 21 d, respectively. Increased protein carbonyl, decreased protein sulfhydryl of SPI were observed as heating time increased in all treatments (p<0.05). Addition of 2% soybean oil increased protein carbonyl of SPI at 8 h heating (p<0.05). Dietary HSPI and HSPIO decreased the average daily gain of broilers as compared with the CON (p<0.05). Broilers fed HSPI and HSPIO exhibited decreased glutathione (GSH) in serum, catalase activity and total sulfhydryl in liver and increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyl in serum, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) in liver and protein carbonyl in jejunal mucosa as compared with that of the CON (p<0.05). Additionally, broilers receiving HSPIO showed decreased glutathione peroxidase activity (GSH-Px) in serum, GSH and hydroxyl radical scavenging capacity in liver, GSH-Px activity in duodenal mucosa, GSH-Px activity and superoxide anion radical scavenging capacity in jejunal mucosa and increased AOPPs in serum, MDA and protein carbonyl in liver, MDA and AOPPs in jejunal mucosa (p<0.05). Protein oxidation of SPI can be induced by heat and soybean oil and oxidized protein resulted in redox imbalance in broilers at an early age.

  4. Redox signaling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Noctor, Graham

    2013-06-01

    Our aim is to deliver an authoritative and challenging perspective of current concepts in plant redox signaling, focusing particularly on the complex interface between the redox and hormone-signaling pathways that allow precise control of plant growth and defense in response to metabolic triggers and environmental constraints and cues. Plants produce significant amounts of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a result of photosynthetic electron transport and metabolism. Such pathways contribute to the compartment-specific redox-regulated signaling systems in plant cells that convey information to the nucleus to regulate gene expression. Like the chloroplasts and mitochondria, the apoplast-cell wall compartment makes a significant contribution to the redox signaling network, but unlike these organelles, the apoplast has a low antioxidant-buffering capacity. The respective roles of ROS, low-molecular antioxidants, redox-active proteins, and antioxidant enzymes are considered in relation to the functions of plant hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and auxin, in the composite control of plant growth and defense. Regulation of redox gradients between key compartments in plant cells such as those across the plasma membrane facilitates flexible and multiple faceted opportunities for redox signaling that spans the intracellular and extracellular environments. In conclusion, plants are recognized as masters of the art of redox regulation that use oxidants and antioxidants as flexible integrators of signals from metabolism and the environment.

  5. Cadmium affects the mitochondrial viability and the acid soluble thiols concentration in liver, kidney, heart and gills of Ancistrus brevifilis (Eigenmann, 1920)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez-Vottelerd, P.; Anton, Y.; Salazar-Lugo, R.

    2015-01-01

    The freshwater fish Ancistrus brevifilis, which is found in Venezuelan rivers, is considered a potential sentinel fish in ecotoxicological studies. The cadmium (Cd) effect on the mitochondrial viability (MV) and acid soluble thiols levels (AST) in A. brevifilis tissues (liver, kidney, heart, and gill) was evaluated. Forty-two fish with similar sizes and weights were randomly selected, of which 7 fish (with their respective replicate) were exposed for 7 and 30 days to a Cd sublethal concentration (0.1 mg.l-1). We determined the MV through a Janus Green B colorimetric assay and we obtained the concentration of AST by Ellman’s method. Mitochondrial viability decreased in fish exposed to Cd for 30 days with the liver being the most affected tissue. We also detected a significant decrease in AST levels was in fishes exposed to Cd for 7 days in liver and kidney tissues; these results suggests that AST levels are elevated in some tissues may act as cytoprotective and adaptive alternative mechanism related to the ROS detoxification, maintenance redox status and mitochondrial viability. Organ-specifics variations were observed in both assays. We conclude that the Cd exposure effect on AST levels and MV, vary across fish tissues and is related to the exposure duration, the molecule dynamics in different tissues, the organism and environmental conditions. PMID:26623384

  6. Cadmium affects the mitochondrial viability and the acid soluble thiols concentration in liver, kidney, heart and gills of Ancistrus brevifilis (Eigenmann, 1920

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Velasquez-Vottelerd

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The freshwater fish Ancistrus brevifilis, which is found in Venezuelan rivers, is considered a potential sentinel fish in ecotoxicological studies. The cadmium (Cd effect on the mitochondrial viability (MV and acid soluble thiols levels (AST in A. brevifilis tissues (liver, kidney, heart, and gill was evaluated. Forty-two fish with similar sizes and weights were randomly selected, of which 7 fish (with their respective replicate were exposed for 7 and 30 days to a Cd sublethal concentration (0.1 mg.l-1. We determined the MV through a Janus Green B colorimetric assay and we obtained the concentration of AST by Ellman’s method. Mitochondrial viability decreased in fish exposed to Cd for 30 days with the liver being the most affected tissue. We also detected a significant decrease in AST levels was in fishes exposed to Cd for 7 days in liver and kidney tissues; these results suggests that AST levels are elevated in some tissues may act as cytoprotective and adaptive alternative mechanism related to the ROS detoxification, maintenance redox status and mitochondrial viability. Organ-specifics variations were observed in both assays. We conclude that the Cd exposure effect on AST levels and MV, vary across fish tissues and is related to the exposure duration, the molecule dynamics in different tissues, the organism and environmental conditions.

  7. Involvement of histone H3 phosphorylation via the activation of p38 MAPK pathway and intracellular redox status in cytotoxicity of HL-60 cells induced by Vitex agnus-castus fruit extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Hidetomo; Yuan, Bo; Yuhara, Eisuke; Imai, Masahiko; Furutani, Ryota; Fukushima, Shin; Hazama, Shingo; Hirobe, Chieko; Ohyama, Kunio; Takagi, Norio; Toyoda, Hiroo

    2014-08-01

    We have demonstrated that an extract from the ripe fruit of Vitex angus-castus (Vitex), might be a promising anticancer candidate. In order to further provide a molecular rationale for clinical development in anticancer therapy, a detailed mechanism underlying the efficacy of Vitex against HL-60 cells was investigated. Vitex induced a dose- and time-dependent decrease in cell viability associated with induction of apoptosis and G(2)/M cell cycle arrest, both of which were suppressed by the addition of SB203580, an inhibitor for p38 MAPK. Furthermore, SB203580 significantly suppressed Vitex-induced phosphorylation of histone H3, a downstream molecule of p38 MAPK known to be involved in apoptosis induction in tumor cells. Notably, Vitex induced upregulation of intracellular ATP, known to bind its binding pocket inside activated p38 MAPK and to be required for the activation of p38 MAPK pathway. These results, thus, suggest that upregulation of intracellular ATP and phosphorylation of histone H3 are closely associated with the activation of p38 MAPK pathway, consequently contributing to Vitex-mediated cytotoxicity. Intriguingly, a significant decrease of intracellular ROS levels and downregulation of expression level of gp91(phox), an important component of NADPH oxidase, were observed in Vitex-treated cells. A greater decline in ROS levels along with enhanced apoptosis was observed after treatment with Vitex in combination with SnPP, an inhibitor specific for HO-1. Since NADPH oxidase and HO-1 are closely correlated to redox status associated with intracellular ROS levels, the two enzymes are suggested to be implicated in Vitex-mediated cytotoxicity in HL-60 cells by regulating ROS generation. We also suggest that activation of the p38 MAPK pathway may be dependent on the alterations of intracellular ATP levels, rather than that of intracellular ROS levels. These results may have important implications for appropriate clinical uses of Vitex and provide novel insights

  8. An unexplored role for Peroxiredoxin in exercise-induced redox signalling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex J. Wadley

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Peroxiredoxin (PRDX is a ubiquitous oxidoreductase protein with a conserved ionised thiol that permits catalysis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 up to a million times faster than any thiol-containing signalling protein. The increased production of H2O2 within active tissues during exercise is thought to oxidise conserved cysteine thiols, which may in turn facilitate a wide variety of physiological adaptations. The precise mechanisms linking H2O2 with the oxidation of signalling thiol proteins (phosphates, kinases and transcription factors are unclear due to these proteins' low reactivity with H2O2 relative to abundant thiol peroxidases such as PRDX. Recent work has shown that following exposure to H2O2 in vitro, the sulfenic acid of the PRDX cysteine can form mixed disulphides with transcription factors associated with cell survival. This implicates PRDX as an ‘active’ redox relay in transmitting the oxidising equivalent of H2O2 to downstream proteins. Furthermore, under oxidative stress, PRDX can form stable oxidised dimers that can be secreted into the extracellular space, potentially acting as an extracellular ‘stress’ signal. There is extensive literature assessing non-specific markers of oxidative stress in response to exercise, however the PRDX catalytic cycle may offer a more robust approach for measuring changes in redox balance following exercise. This review discusses studies assessing PRDX-mediated cellular signalling and integrates the recent advances in redox biology with investigations that have examined the role of PRDX during exercise in humans and animals. Future studies should explore the role of PRDX as a key regulator of peroxide mediated-signal transduction during exercise in humans.

  9. Thiol Oxidation by Diamide Leads to Dopaminergic Degeneration and Parkinsonism Phenotype in Mice: A Model for Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Ajit; Kambali, Maltesh; Ravindranath, Vijayalakshmi

    2016-08-10

    This study investigates the role of thiol homeostasis disruption in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis using a novel animal model. A single unilateral administration of the thiol oxidant, diamide (1.45 μmol) into substantia nigra (SN) of mice leads to locomotor deficits and degeneration of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in SN pars compacta (SNpc). Diamide-injected mice showed hemiparkinsonian behavior, measured as spontaneous contralateral body rotations, poor grip strength, and impaired locomotion on a rotarod. We observed a significant loss of DA neurons in ipsilateral but not contralateral SNpc and their striatal fibers. This was accompanied by increased Fluoro-Jade C-positive cells and a loss of NeuN-positive neurons, indicative of neurodegeneration. Importantly, diamide injection led to α-synuclein aggregation in ipsilateral SNpc, a hallmark of PD pathology not often seen in animal models of PD. On investigating putative mechanism(s) involved, we observed a loss of glutathione, which is essential for maintaining protein thiol homeostasis (PTH). Concomitantly, the redox-sensitive ASK1-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) death signaling pathway was activated in the ipsilateral but not contralateral ventral midbrain through dissociation of ASK1-Trx1 complex. In Neuro-2a cells, diamide activated ASK1-p38 cascade through Trx1 oxidation, leading to cell death, which was abolished by ASK1 knockdown. Since diamide selectively disrupts PTH, DA neurons appear to be vulnerable to such perturbations and even a single insult with a thiol oxidant can result in long-lasting degeneration. Identification of the role of PTH dysregulation in neurodegeneration, especially in early PD, not only facilitates an understanding of novel regulatory features of molecular signaling cascades but also may aid in developing disease-modifying strategies for PD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 252-267.

  10. Glutathione in Cellular Redox Homeostasis: Association with the Excitatory Amino Acid Carrier 1 (EAAC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Aoyama

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are by-products of the cellular metabolism of oxygen consumption, produced mainly in the mitochondria. ROS are known to be highly reactive ions or free radicals containing oxygen that impair redox homeostasis and cellular functions, leading to cell death. Under physiological conditions, a variety of antioxidant systems scavenge ROS to maintain the intracellular redox homeostasis and normal cellular functions. This review focuses on the antioxidant system’s roles in maintaining redox homeostasis. Especially, glutathione (GSH is the most important thiol-containing molecule, as it functions as a redox buffer, antioxidant, and enzyme cofactor against oxidative stress. In the brain, dysfunction of GSH synthesis leading to GSH depletion exacerbates oxidative stress, which is linked to a pathogenesis of aging-related neurodegenerative diseases. Excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1 plays a pivotal role in neuronal GSH synthesis. The regulatory mechanism of EAAC1 is also discussed.

  11. Redox enzymes in the plant plasma membrane and their possible roles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berczi, A.; Møller, I.M.

    2000-01-01

    Purified plasma membrane (PM) vesicles from higher plants contain redox proteins with low-molecular-mass prosthetic groups such as flavins (both FMN and FAD), hemes, metals (Cu, Fe and Mn), thiol groups and possibly naphthoquinone (vitamin K-1), all of which are likely to participate in redox...... protein which has been partially purified from plant PM so far is a high-potential and ascorbate-reducible b-type cytochrome. In co-operation with vitamin K-1 and an NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase, it may participate in trans-PM electron transport....

  12. Idh2 Deficiency Exacerbates Acrolein-Induced Lung Injury through Mitochondrial Redox Environment Deterioration

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jung Hyun; Ku, Hyeong Jun; Lee, Jin Hyup; Park, Jeen-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Acrolein is known to be involved in acute lung injury and other pulmonary diseases. A number of studies have suggested that acrolein-induced toxic effects are associated with depletion of antioxidants, such as reduced glutathione and protein thiols, and production of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrial NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (idh2) regulates mitochondrial redox balance and reduces oxidative stress-induced cell injury via generation of NADPH. Therefore, we evaluated the ro...

  13. Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Thiol-ene-Based Photopolymerized Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Schreck, Kathleen M.; Leung, Diana; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2011-01-01

    The thiol-ene reaction serves as a more oxygen tolerant alternative to traditional (meth)acrylate chemistry for forming photopolymerized networks with numerous desirable attributes including energy absorption, optical clarity, and reduced shrinkage stress. However, when utilizing commercially available monomers, many thiol-ene networks also exhibit decreases in properties such as glass transition temperature (Tg) and crosslink density. In this study, hybrid organic/inorganic thiol-ene resins ...

  14. Bucillamine, a thiol antioxidant, prevents transplantation-associated reperfusion injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amersi, Farin; Nelson, Sally K.; Shen, Xiu Da; Kato, Hirohisa; Melinek, Judy; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W.; Horwitz, Lawrence D.; Busuttil, Ronald W.; Horwitz, Marcus A.

    2002-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a serious potential threat to outcomes in organ transplantation and other clinical arenas in which there is temporary interruption of blood flow. I/R is a frequent cause of primary failure in organ transplantation. We hypothesized that the antioxidant bucillamine, a potent sulfhydryl donor, would protect against I/R injury in high-risk organ transplants. Because livers subjected to prolonged ischemia and very fatty livers are highly susceptible to severe I/R injury, we studied the effect of bucillamine in three animal models of liver transplantation: two ex vivo models of isolated perfused livers, either normal or fatty rat livers, and an in vivo model of syngenic orthotopic liver transplants in rats. In all models, livers were deprived of oxygen for 24 h before either ex vivo reperfusion or transplantation. In the ex vivo models, bucillamine treatment significantly improved portal vein blood flow and bile production, preserved normal liver architecture, and significantly reduced liver enzyme release and indices of oxidative stress. Moreover, bucillamine treatment significantly increased levels of reduced glutathione in the liver and lowered levels of oxidized glutathione in both liver and blood. In rats subjected to liver transplants, bucillamine significantly enhanced survival and protected against hepatic injury. Possible mechanisms of this protection include prevention of excessive accumulation of toxic oxygen species, interruption of redox signaling in hepatocytes, and inhibition of macrophage activation. This study demonstrates the potential utility of bucillamine or other cysteine-derived thiol donors for improving outcomes in organ transplantation and other clinical settings involving I/R injury. PMID:12084933

  15. Oral-Fluid Thiol-Detection Test Identifies Underlying Active Periodontal Disease Not Detected by the Visual Awake Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queck, Katherine E; Chapman, Angela; Herzog, Leslie J; Shell-Martin, Tamara; Burgess-Cassler, Anthony; McClure, George David

    2018-03-20

    Periodontal disease in dogs is highly prevalent but can only be accurately diagnosed by performing an anesthetized oral examination with periodontal probing and dental radiography. In this study, 114 dogs had a visual awake examination of the oral cavity and were administered an oral-fluid thiol-detection test prior to undergoing a a full-mouth anesthetized oral examination and digital dental radiographs. The results show the visual awake examination underestimated the presence and severity of active periodontal disease. The thiol-detection test was superior to the visual awake examination at detecting the presence and severity of active periodontal disease and was an indicator of progression toward alveolar bone loss. The thiol-detection test detected active periodontal disease at early stages of development, before any visual cues were present, indicating the need for intervention to prevent periodontal bone loss. Early detection is important because without intervention, dogs with gingivitis (active periodontal disease) progress to irreversible periodontal bone loss (stage 2+). As suggested in the current AAHA guidelines, a thiol-detection test administered in conjunction with the visual awake examination during routine wellness examinations facilitates veterinarian-client communication and mitigates under-diagnosis of periodontal disease and underutilization of dental services. The thiol-detection test can be used to monitor the periodontal health status of the conscious patient during follow-up examinations based on disease severity.

  16. Redox environment is an intracellular factor to operate distinct pathways for aggregation of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki eFurukawa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Dominant mutations in Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1 cause a familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS. Misfolding and aggregation of mutant SOD1 proteins are a pathological hallmark of SOD1-related fALS cases; however, the molecular mechanism of SOD1 aggregation remains controversial. Here, I have used E. coli as a model organism and shown multiple distinct pathways of SOD1 aggregation that are dependent upon its thiol-disulfide status. Overexpression of fALS-mutant SOD1s in the cytoplasm of E. coli BL21 and SHuffleTM, where redox environment is reducing and oxidizing, respectively, resulted in the formation of insoluble aggregates with notable differences; a disulfide bond of SOD1 was completely reduced in BL21 or abnormally formed between SOD1 molecules in SHuffleTM. Depending upon intracellular redox environment, therefore, mutant SOD1 is considered to misfold/aggregate through distinct pathways, which would be relevant in description of the pathological heterogeneity of SOD1-related fALS cases.

  17. Redox regulation of insulin degradation by insulin-degrading enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal M Cordes

    Full Text Available Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE is a thiol sensitive peptidase that degrades insulin and amyloid β, and has been linked to type 2 diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease. We examined the thiol sensitivity of IDE using S-nitrosoglutathione, reduced glutathione, and oxidized glutathione to distinguish the effects of nitric oxide from that of the redox state. The in vitro activity of IDE was studied using either partially purified cytosolic enzyme from male Sprague-Dawley rats, or purified rat recombinant enzyme. We confirm that nitric oxide inhibits the degrading activity of IDE, and that it affects proteasome activity through this interaction with IDE, but does not affect the proteasome directly. Oxidized glutathione inhibits IDE through glutathionylation, which was reversible by dithiothreitol but not by ascorbic acid. Reduced glutathione had no effect on IDE, but reacted with partially degraded insulin to disrupt its disulfide bonds and accelerate its breakdown to trichloroacetic acid soluble fragments. Our results demonstrate the sensitivity of insulin degradation by IDE to the redox environment and suggest another mechanism by which the cell's oxidation state may contribute to the development of, and the link between, type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Oral thymoquinone administration ameliorates: the effect of cisplatin on brush border membrane enzymes, energy metabolism, and redox status in rat kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Zeba; Shahid, Faaiza; Abidi, Subuhi; Parwez, Iqbal; Khan, Farah

    2017-12-01

    Therapeutic use of cisplatin (CP), an effective anticancer drug, is limited by dose dependent nephrotoxicity. Thymoquinone (TQ), the major Nigella sativa seed oil constituent has been shown to prevent progression of various renal disorders. The present study investigates the protective effect of TQ on CP-induced nephrotoxicity. Rats were divided into six groups viz. control, CP, CPTQ 1 , CPTQ 2 , CPTQ 3 , and TQ alone group. Animals in CP and TQ combination groups were administered TQ (0.5, 1.5, and 3 mg/kg bwt, orally) with single intraperitoneal dose of CP (6 mg/kg bwt). The effect of TQ administration was determined on CP-induced alterations in various serum/urine parameters and on the enzymes of brush border membrane enzyme (BBM), carbohydrate metabolism, and antioxidant defense system in renal cortex and medulla. Oral administration of TQ in all the three doses prior to and following a single dose CP treatment caused significant recovery of serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels; however, maximum recovery was seen in CPTQ 2 group. TQ administration averted CP-induced decline in BBM activities, both in the cortical and medullary homogenates and in isolated BBM vesicles. TQ administration also ameliorated CP-induced impairments in renal metabolic and antioxidant status. Histopathological studies supported these biochemical findings. TQ ameliorates CP-induced oxidative damage owing to its intrinsic antioxidant properties.

  19. Oxidative stress and antioxidant status in primary bone and soft tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathan, Fatima M; Singh, Vivek A; Dhanoa, Amreeta; Palanisamy, Uma D

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is characterised by an increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that disrupts the intracellular reduction-oxidation (redox) balance and has been implicated in various diseases including cancer. Malignant tumors of connective tissue or sarcomas account for approximately 1% of all cancer diagnoses in adults and around 15% of paediatric malignancies per annum. There exists no information on the alterations of oxidant/antioxidant status of sarcoma patients in literature. This study was aimed to determine the levels of oxidative stress and antioxidant defence in patients with primary bone and soft tissue sarcoma and to investigate if there exists any significant differences in these levels between both the sarcomas. The study cohort consisted of 94 subjects; 20 soft tissue sarcoma, 27 primary bone sarcoma and 47 healthy controls. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyls were determined to assess their oxidative stress levels while antioxidant status was evaluated using catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), thiols and trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC). Sarcoma patients showed significant increase in plasma and urinary MDA and serum protein carbonyl levels (p < 0.05) while significant decreases were noted in TEAC, thiols, CAT and SOD levels (p < 0.05). No significant difference in oxidative damage was noted between both the sarcomas (p > 0.05). In conclusion, an increase in oxidative stress and decrease in antioxidant status is observed in both primary bone and soft tissue sarcomas with a similar extent of damage. This study offers the basis for further work on whether the manipulation of redox balance in patients with sarcoma represents a useful approach in the design of future therapies for bone disease

  20. Redox Species of Redox Flow Batteries: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feng; Wang, Qing

    2015-11-18

    Due to the capricious nature of renewable energy resources, such as wind and solar, large-scale energy storage devices are increasingly required to make the best use of the renewable power. The redox flow battery is considered suitable for large-scale applications due to its modular design, good scalability and flexible operation. The biggest challenge of the redox flow battery is the low energy density. The redox active species is the most important component in redox flow batteries, and the redox potential and solubility of redox species dictate the system energy density. This review is focused on the recent development of redox species. Different categories of redox species, including simple inorganic ions, metal complexes, metal-free organic compounds, polysulfide/sulfur and lithium storage active materials, are reviewed. The future development of redox species towards higher energy density is also suggested.

  1. Role of endogenous thiols in protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, O.

    Aminothiols represent the most important group of radioprotective compounds. The most effective compounds administered at an optimal dose and time before irradiation are able to provide a protection in mice with a dose reduction factor (DRF) of about 2-2.5. The working mechanism can partly be explained as a scavenging process of radicals induced in water and partly as a chemical repair process of injured DNA. The endogenous aminothiol which has far-out the highest intracellular concentration is glutathione (GSH). The importance of intracellular GSH in determining cellular radiosensitivity has been shown by irradiating cells that had very low GSH levels. Such cells appear to have a high radiosensitivity, especially in hypoxic conditions. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that induction of a high GSH level (100-200% above the normal level) provides only a small protection. In vitro experiments with DNA indicate that thiols with a high positive charge condense in the vicinity of DNA and are effective protectors, whereas thiols with a negative charge are kep away from it and are poor protectors. In comparison with the most effective exogenous aminothiols like cysteamine and WR1065, GSH is not an effective radioprotector. Putative explanations for this relatively poor protective ability of GSH are presented.

  2. Photoinduced formation of thiols in human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorkova, M V; Brandt, N N; Chikishev, A Yu; Smolina, N V; Balabushevich, N G; Gusev, S A; Lipatova, V A; Botchey, V M; Dobretsov, G E; Mikhalchik, E V

    2016-11-01

    Raman, scanning electron, and optical microscopy of hair and spectrophotometry of soluble hair proteins are used to study the effect of UV-vis radiation on white hair. The samples of a healthy subject are irradiated using a mercury lamp and compared with non-irradiated (control) hair. The cuticle damage with partial exfoliation is revealed with the aid of SEM and optical microscopy of semifine sections. Gel filtration chromatography shows that the molecular weight of soluble proteins ranges from 5 to 7kDa. Absorption spectroscopy proves an increase in amount of thiols in a heavier fraction of the soluble proteins of irradiated samples under study. Raman data indicate a decrease in the amount of SS and CS bonds in cystines and an increase in the amount of SH bonds due to irradiation. Such changes are more pronounced in peripheral regions of hair. Conformational changes of hair keratins presumably related to the cleavage of disulfide bonds, follow from variations in amide I and low-frequency Raman bands. An increase in the content of thiols in proteins revealed by both photometric data on soluble proteins and Raman microspectroscopy of hair cuts can be used to develop a protocol of the analysis of photoinduced hair modification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Redox Buffer Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Levie, Robert

    1999-04-01

    The proper functioning of enzymes in bodily fluids requires that the pH be maintained within rather narrow limits. The first line of defense against large pH fluctuations in such fluids is the passive control provided by the presence of pH buffers. The ability of pH buffers to stabilize the pH is indicated by the buffer value b introduced in 1922 by van Slyke. It is equally important for many enzymes that the redox potential is kept within a narrow range. In that case, stability of the potential is most readily achieved with a redox buffer. In this communication we define the redox buffer strength by analogy with acid-base buffer strength.

  4. Effect of astaxanthin supplementation on paraoxonase 1 activities and oxidative stress status in young soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baralic, Ivana; Djordjevic, Brizita; Dikic, Nenad; Kotur-Stevuljevic, Jelena; Spasic, Slavica; Jelic-Ivanovic, Zorana; Radivojevic, Nenad; Andjelkovic, Marija; Pejic, Snezana

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of astaxanthin (Asx) on paraoxonase (PON1) activities and oxidative stress status in soccer players. Forty soccer players were randomly assigned in a double-blind fashion to Asx and placebo (P) group. Blood samples were obtained before, 45 and 90 days after supplementation. PON1 activity was assessed by using two substrates: paraoxon and diazoxon. The oxidative stress biomarkers were also examined: total sulphydryl group content (-SH groups), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), advanced oxidation protein products and redox balance. The significant interaction effect of supplementation and training (p Asx group after 90 days (p Asx group (supplementation and training, p Asx supplementation might increase total SH groups content and improve PON1 activity through protection of free thiol groups against oxidative modification. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Redox Flow Batteries, a Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoxville, U. Tennessee; U. Texas Austin; U, McGill; Weber, Adam Z.; Mench, Matthew M.; Meyers, Jeremy P.; Ross, Philip N.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Qinghua

    2011-07-15

    Redox flow batteries are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of redox flow batteries with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

  6. Dynamic thiol-disulfide homeostasis in hyperemesis gravidarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergin, M; Cendek, B D; Neselioglu, S; Avsar, A F; Erel, O

    2015-10-01

    To determine serum thiol-disulfide homeostasis in hyperemesis gravidarum. Twenty-six pregnant women with hyperemesis gravidarum and 37 healthy pregnant women were included in the study. Native thiol, disulfide and total thiol concentrations were measured with a novel automated method. Serum disulfide levels were 15.68±4.41 μmol l(-1) in the hyperemesis gravidarum group and 13.49±2.81 μmol l(-1) in the healthy group (P=0.031). Native thiol levels were 213.86±26.29 μmol l(-1) in the hyperemesis gravidarum group and 232.18±19.21 μmol l(-1) in healthy group (P=0.004), and total thiol levels were 245.23±28.58 μmol l(-1) in the hyperemesis gravidarum group and 259.17±19.94 μmol l(-1) in the healthy group (P=0.038). Native and total thiol were deficient in the hyperemesis gravidarum group and this deficiency was correlated with the severity of the disease. The thiol-disulfide balance has shifted to the oxidative side. This metabolic disturbance may have a role in the pathogenesis of hyperemesis gravidarum.

  7. Photopolymerized Thiol-Ene Systems as Shape Memory Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Devatha P.; Cramer, Neil B.; Scott, Timothy F.; Bowman, Christopher N.; Shandas, Robin

    2010-01-01

    In this study we introduce the use of thiol-ene photopolymers as shape memory polymer systems. The thiol-ene polymer networks are compared to a commonly utilized acrylic shape memory polymer and shown to have significantly improved properties for two different thiol-ene based polymer formulations. Using thermomechanical and mechanical analysis, we demonstrate that thiol-ene based shape memory polymer systems have comparable thermomechanical properties while also exhibiting a number of advantageous properties due to the thiol-ene polymerization mechanism which results in the formation of a homogenous polymer network with low shrinkage stress and negligible oxygen inhibition. The resulting thiol-ene shape memory polymer systems are tough and flexible as compared to the acrylic counterparts. The polymers evaluated in this study were engineered to have a glass transition temperature between 30 and 40 °C, exhibited free strain recovery of greater than 96% and constrained stress recovery of 100%. The thiol-ene polymers exhibited excellent shape fixity and a rapid and distinct shape memory actuation response. PMID:21072253

  8. Impaired Thiol-Disulfide Balance in Acute Brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolgelier, Servet; Ergin, Merve; Demir, Lutfi Saltuk; Inkaya, Ahmet Cagkan; Aktug Demir, Nazlim; Alisik, Murat; Erel, Ozcan

    2017-05-24

    The objective of this study was to examine a novel profile: thiol-disulfide homeostasis in acute brucellosis. The study included 90 patients with acute brucellosis, and 27 healthy controls. Thiol-disulfide profile tests were analyzed by a recently developed method, and ceruloplasmin levels were determined. Native thiol levels were 256.72 ± 48.20 μmol/L in the acute brucellosis group and 461.13 ± 45.37 μmol/L in the healthy group, and total thiol levels were 298.58 ± 51.78 μmol/L in the acute brucellosis group and 504.83 ± 51.05 μmol/L in the healthy group (p brucellosis than in the healthy controls (p brucellosis. The strong associations between thiol-disulfide parameters and a positive acute-phase reactant reflected the disruption of the balance between the antioxidant and oxidant systems. Since thiol groups act as anti-inflammatory mediators, the alteration in the thiol-disulfide homeostasis may be involved in brucellosis.

  9. Real-Time Imaging of the Bacillithiol Redox Potential in the Human Pathogen Staphylococcus aureus Using a Genetically Encoded Bacilliredoxin-Fused Redox Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Vu Van; Harms, Manuela; Müller, Marret; Huyen, Nguyen Thi Thu; Hamilton, Chris J; Hochgräfe, Falko; Pané-Farré, Jan; Antelmann, Haike

    2017-05-20

    Bacillithiol (BSH) is utilized as a major thiol-redox buffer in the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Under oxidative stress, BSH forms mixed disulfides with proteins, termed as S-bacillithiolation, which can be reversed by bacilliredoxins (Brx). In eukaryotes, glutaredoxin-fused roGFP2 biosensors have been applied for dynamic live imaging of the glutathione redox potential. Here, we have constructed a genetically encoded bacilliredoxin-fused redox biosensor (Brx-roGFP2) to monitor dynamic changes in the BSH redox potential in S. aureus. The Brx-roGFP2 biosensor showed a specific and rapid response to low levels of bacillithiol disulfide (BSSB) in vitro that required the active-site Cys of Brx. Dynamic live imaging in two methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) USA300 and COL strains revealed fast and dynamic responses of the Brx-roGFP2 biosensor under hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) stress and constitutive oxidation of the probe in different BSH-deficient mutants. Furthermore, we found that the Brx-roGFP2 expression level and the dynamic range are higher in S. aureus COL compared with the USA300 strain. In phagocytosis assays with THP-1 macrophages, the biosensor was 87% oxidized in S. aureus COL. However, no changes in the BSH redox potential were measured after treatment with different antibiotics classes, indicating that antibiotics do not cause oxidative stress in S. aureus. Conclusion and Innovation: This Brx-roGFP2 biosensor catalyzes specific equilibration between the BSH and roGFP2 redox couples and can be applied for dynamic live imaging of redox changes in S. aureus and other BSH-producing Firmicutes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 835-848.

  10. Thiol changes during epididymal maturation: a link to flagellar angulation in mouse spermatozoa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijiri, T W; Vadnais, M L; Huang, A P; Lin, A M; Levin, L R; Buck, J; Gerton, G L

    2014-01-01

    Caput epididymal wild-type spermatozoa and cauda epididymal spermatozoa from mice null for the adenylyl cyclase Adcy10 gene are immotile unless stimulated by a membrane-permeant cyclic AMP analogue. Both types of spermatozoa exhibit flagellar angulation where the head folds back under these conditions. As sperm proteins undergo oxidation of sulfhydryl groups and the flagellum becomes more stable to external forces during epididymal transit, we hypothesized that ADCY10 is involved in a mechanism regulating flagellar stabilization. Although no differences were observed in global sulfhydryl status between caput and cauda epididymal spermatozoa from wild-type or Adcy10-null mice, two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis was performed to identify specific mouse sperm proteins containing sulfhydryl groups that became oxidized during epididymal maturation. A-kinase anchor protein 4, fatty acid-binding protein 9 (FABP9), glutathione S-transferase mu 5 and voltage-dependent anion channel 2 exhibited changes in thiol status between caput and cauda epididymal spermatozoa. The level and thiol status of each of these proteins were quantified in wild-type and Adcy10-null cauda epididymal spermatozoa. No differences in the abundance of any protein were observed; however, FABP9 in Adcy10-null cauda epididymal spermatozoa contained fewer disulfide bonds than wild-type sperm cells. In caput epididymal spermatozoa, FABP9 was detected in the cytoplasmic droplet, principal piece, midpiece, and non-acrosomal area of the head. However, in cauda epididymal spermatozoa, this protein localized to the perforatorium, post-acrosomal region and principal piece. Together, these results suggest that thiol changes during epididymal maturation have a role in the stabilization of the sperm flagellum. PMID:24254994

  11. Thiol changes during epididymal maturation: a link to flagellar angulation in mouse spermatozoa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijiri, T W; Vadnais, M L; Huang, A P; Lin, A M; Levin, L R; Buck, J; Gerton, G L

    2014-01-01

    Caput epididymal wild-type spermatozoa and cauda epididymal spermatozoa from mice null for the adenylyl cyclase Adcy10 gene are immotile unless stimulated by a membrane-permeant cyclic AMP analogue. Both types of spermatozoa exhibit flagellar angulation where the head folds back under these conditions. As sperm proteins undergo oxidation of sulfhydryl groups and the flagellum becomes more stable to external forces during epididymal transit, we hypothesized that ADCY10 is involved in a mechanism regulating flagellar stabilization. Although no differences were observed in global sulfhydryl status between caput and cauda epididymal spermatozoa from wild-type or Adcy10-null mice, two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis was performed to identify specific mouse sperm proteins containing sulfhydryl groups that became oxidized during epididymal maturation. A-kinase anchor protein 4, fatty acid-binding protein 9 (FABP9), glutathione S-transferase mu 5 and voltage-dependent anion channel 2 exhibited changes in thiol status between caput and cauda epididymal spermatozoa. The level and thiol status of each of these proteins were quantified in wild-type and Adcy10-null cauda epididymal spermatozoa. No differences in the abundance of any protein were observed; however, FABP9 in Adcy10-null cauda epididymal spermatozoa contained fewer disulfide bonds than wild-type sperm cells. In caput epididymal spermatozoa, FABP9 was detected in the cytoplasmic droplet, principal piece, midpiece, and non-acrosomal area of the head. However, in cauda epididymal spermatozoa, this protein localized to the perforatorium, post-acrosomal region and principal piece. Together, these results suggest that thiol changes during epididymal maturation have a role in the stabilization of the sperm flagellum. © 2013 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  12. Thiol/disulphide homeostasis as a novel indicator of oxidative stress in sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinc, M E; Ulusoy, S; Is, A; Ayan, N N; Avincsal, M O; Bicer, C; Erel, O

    2016-05-01

    To investigate a novel oxidative stress marker, thiol/disulphide literature homeostasis, in patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss, and to compare the results with healthy controls for the first time. Thirty-two patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss and 30 healthy individuals were included in the study. Serum native thiol, total thiol and disulphide levels were measured, and disulphide/native thiol and disulphide/total thiol ratios were determined in all subjects. Serum native thiol and total thiol levels were significantly lower in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss compared with controls (p sudden sensorineural hearing loss in those patients.

  13. Redox-capacitor to connect electrochemistry to redox-biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Leverage, W Taylor; Liu, Yi; White, Ian M; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2014-01-07

    It is well-established that redox-reactions are integral to biology for energy harvesting (oxidative phosphorylation), immune defense (oxidative burst) and drug metabolism (phase I reactions), yet there is emerging evidence that redox may play broader roles in biology (e.g., redox signaling). A critical challenge is the need for tools that can probe biologically-relevant redox interactions simply, rapidly and without the need for a comprehensive suite of analytical methods. We propose that electrochemistry may provide such a tool. In this tutorial review, we describe recent studies with a redox-capacitor film that can serve as a bio-electrode interface that can accept, store and donate electrons from mediators commonly used in electrochemistry and also in biology. Specifically, we (i) describe the fabrication of this redox-capacitor from catechols and the polysaccharide chitosan, (ii) discuss the mechanistic basis for electron exchange, (iii) illustrate the properties of this redox-capacitor and its capabilities for promoting redox-communication between biology and electrodes, and (iv) suggest the potential for enlisting signal processing strategies to "extract" redox information. We believe these initial studies indicate broad possibilities for enlisting electrochemistry and signal processing to acquire "systems level" redox information from biology.

  14. Facially amphiphilic thiol capped gold and silver nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A series of bile acid-derived facially amphiphilic thiols have been used to cap sliver and gold nanoparticles. The self-assembling properties of these steroid-capped nanoparticles have been investigated and reported in this article.

  15. Intracellular thiols: involvement in drug metabolism and radiation response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astor, M.

    1983-01-01

    Nitro compunds are activated by coupled enzyme reactions to oxygen reactive intermediates leading to the formation of peroxide, under aerobic conditions, and to the depletion of thiols, under anaerobic conditions. Some nitro compounds as substrates for glutathione-S-transferase, show peroxide production without prior thiol removal. Other drugs reacting spontaneouly with glutathione also produce peroxide. Glutathione plays an important role in the metabolism of the nitrocompounds either by directly reacting with them or their reduced intermediates such as the nitroso, nitro and hydroxyl radical. In the case of misonidazole, protection against their cytotoxic effects can be achieved by the addition of exogenous thiols such as glutathione or cysteamine. Results indicate that oxygen and peroxide electrodes provide convenient means for measuring the products of metabolic activation of nitro compounds. Mechanisms are proposed whereby protein, nonprotein and glutathione thiols can interact with drug radicals or with DNA radicals. 60 references, 14 figures, 5 tables

  16. Ediacaran Redox Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, S. K.; Jiang, G.; Planavsky, N. J.; Kendall, B.; Owens, J. D.; Anbar, A. D.; Lyons, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence for pervasive oxic conditions, and likely even deep ocean oxygenation has been documented at three intervals in the lower (ca. 632 Ma), middle (ca. 580 Ma) and upper (ca. 551 Ma) Ediacaran. The Doushantuo Formation in South China hosts large enrichments of redox-sensitive trace element (e.g., molybdenum, vanadium and uranium) in anoxic shales, which are indicative of a globally oxic ocean-atmosphere system. However, ocean redox conditions between these periods continue to be a topic of debate and remain elusive. We have found evidence for widespread anoxic conditions through much of the Ediacaran in the deep-water Wuhe section in South China. During most of the Ediacaran-early Cambrian in basinal sections is characterized by Fe speciation data and pyrite morphologies that indicate deposition under euxinic conditions with near-crustal enrichments of redox-sensitive element and positive pyrite-sulfur isotope values, which suggest low levels of marine sulfate and widespread euxinia. Our work reinforces an emerging view that the early Earth, including the Ediacaran, underwent numerous rises and falls in surface oxidation state, rather than a unidirectional rise as originally imagined. The Ediacaran ocean thus experienced repetitive expansion and contraction of marine chalcophilic trace-metal levels that may have had fundamental impact on the slow evolution of early animals and ecosystems. Further, this framework forces us to re-examine the relationship between Neoproterozoic oxygenation and metazoan diversification. Varying redox conditions through the Cryogenian and Ediacaran may help explain molecular clock and biomarker evidence for an early appearance and initial diversification of metazoans but with a delay in the appearance of most major metazoan crown groups until close to Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary.

  17. Protein Thiols as an Indication of Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Rezaei Chianeh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Thiol is an organic compound that contain sulphhydryl group that have a critical role in preventing any involvement of oxidative stress in the cell. These defensive functions are generally considered to be carried out by the low molecular weight thiol glutathione and by cysteine residues in the active sites of proteins such as thioredoxin and peroxiredoxin. In addition, there are thiols exposed on protein surfaces that are not directly involved with protein function, although they can interact with the intracellular environment.The process of protection of the cell against an oxidative damage occur by thiol and cystein residue that has a low molecular weight. These residue are present in the active sites of a protein like, peroxiredoxin and thioredoxin. Apart from intracellular antioxidant defense mechanism by protein thiol, there are presence of thiol in outer surface of protein that are not involved with the function of protein, even though they can interact with intracellular part of the cell. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(3.000: 443-456

  18. Metallophilic interactions in polymeric group 11 thiols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolari, Kalle; Sahamies, Joona; Kalenius, Elina; Novikov, Alexander S.; Kukushkin, Vadim Yu.; Haukka, Matti

    2016-10-01

    Three polymeric group 11 transition metal polymers featuring metallophilic interactions were obtained directly via self-assembly of metal ions and 4-pyridinethiol ligands. In the cationic [Cu2(S-pyH)4]n2+ with [ZnCl4]n2- counterion (1) and in the neutral [Ag(S-py) (S-pyH)]n (2) 4-pyridinethiol (S-pyH) and its deprotonated form (S-py) are coordinated through the sulfur atom. Both ligands are acting as bridging ligands linking the metal centers together. In the solid state, the gold(I) polymer [Au(S-pyH)2]Cl (3) consists of the repeating cationic [Au(S-pyH)2]+ units held together by aurophilic interactions. Compound 1 is a zig-zag chain, whereas the metal chains in the structures of 2 and 3 are linear. The protonation level of the thiol ligand had an impact on the crystallization of polymers. Both nature of the metal center and reaction conditions affected the polymerization. QTAIM analysis confirmed direct metal-metal contacts only in polymers 1 and 3. In polymer 2, no theoretical evidence of argentophilic contacts was obtained even though the AgṡṡṡAg distance was found to be less than sum of the Bondi's van der Waals radius of silver.

  19. Thiol-yne/thiol-epoxy hybrid crosslinked materials based on propargyl modified hyperbranched poly(ethyleneimine) and diglycidylether of bisphenol A resins

    OpenAIRE

    Acebo Gorostiza, Cristina; Fernández Francos, Xavier; Ramis Juan, Xavier; Serra Albet, Àngels

    2016-01-01

    A novel curing methodology based on the combination of thiol-yne and thiol-epoxy click reactions has been developed. The curing process consists of a first photoinitiated thiol-yne reaction, followed by a thermal thiol-epoxy process. As alkyne substrate a new propargyl terminated hyperbranched poly(ethyleneimine) (PEIyne) has been synthesized from the reaction of commercial poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) and glycidyl propargyl ether. The evolution of the curing of different mixtures of PEIyne and d...

  20. The roles of protein disulphide isomerase family A, member 3 (ERp57) and surface thiol/disulphide exchange in human spermatozoa-zona pellucida binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chi-Wai; Lam, Kevin K W; Lee, Cheuk-Lun; Yeung, William S B; Zhao, Wei E; Ho, Pak-Chung; Ou, Jian-Ping; Chiu, Philip C N

    2017-04-01

    Are multimeric sperm plasma membrane protein complexes, ERp57 and sperm surface thiol content involved in human spermatozoa-zona pellucida (ZP) interaction? ERp57 is a component of a multimeric spermatozoa-ZP receptor complex involved in regulation of human spermatozoa-ZP binding via up-regulation of sperm surface thiol content. A spermatozoon acquires its fertilization capacity within the female reproductive tract by capacitation. Spermatozoa-ZP receptor is suggested to be a composite structure that is assembled into a functional complex during capacitation. Sperm surface thiol content is elevated during capacitation. ERp57 is a protein disulphide isomerase that modulates the thiol-disulphide status of proteins. The binding ability and components of protein complexes in extracted membrane protein fractions of spermatozoa were studied. The roles of capacitation, thiol-disulphide reagent treatments and ERp57 on sperm functions and sperm surface thiol content were assessed. Spermatozoa were obtained from semen samples from normozoospermic men. Human oocytes were obtained from an assisted reproduction programme. Blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, western ligand blotting and mass spectrometry were used to identify the components of solubilized ZP/ZP3-binding complexes. The localization and expression of sperm surface thiol and ERp57 were studied by immunostaining and sperm surface protein biotinylation followed by western blotting. Sperm functions were assessed by standard assays. Several ZP-binding complexes were isolated from the cell membrane of capacitated spermatozoa. ERp57 was a component of one of these complexes. Capacitation significantly increased the sperm surface thiol content, acrosomal thiol distribution and ERp57 expression on sperm surface. Sperm surface thiol and ERp57 immunoreactivity were localized to the acrosomal region of spermatozoa, a region responsible for ZP-binding. Up-regulation of the surface thiol content or ERp57 surface

  1. Systemic Redox Imbalance in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina P. Poulianiti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD experience imbalance between oxygen reactive species (ROS production and antioxidant defenses leading to cell and tissue damage. However, it remains unclear at which stage of renal insufficiency the redox imbalance becomes more profound. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an update on recent advances in our understanding of how the redox status changes in the progression of renal disease from predialysis stages 1 to 4 to end stage 5 and whether the various treatments and dialysis modalities influence the redox balance. A systematic review was conducted searching PubMed and Scopus by using the Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. In total, thirty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Even from an early stage, imbalance in redox status is evident and as the kidney function worsens it becomes more profound. Hemodialysis therapy per se seems to negatively influence the redox status by the elevation of lipid peroxidation markers, protein carbonylation, and impairing erythrocyte antioxidant defense. However, other dialysis modalities do not so far appear to confer advantages. Supplementation with antioxidants might assist and should be considered as an early intervention to halt premature atherogenesis development at an early stage of CKD.

  2. Polymer surface engineering via thiol-mediated reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensarling, Ryan Matthew

    Synthesis of polymer brushes to decorate a surface with desired functionality typically involves surface-initiated polymerization (SIP) of functional, but non-reactive monomers. This approach suffers major drawbacks associated with synthesizing sufficiently thick polymer brushes containing surface-attached polymer chains of high molecular weight at high grafting density (i.e. cost, synthetic effort and functional group intolerance during polymerization). The research herein seeks to circumvent these limitations by the decoration of surfaces with polymer chains bearing specific pendent functional groups amenable to post-polymerization modification (PPM). In particular, this dissertation leverages PPM via a specific class of click reactions - thiol-click - that 1) enables the rapid generation of a diverse library of functional surfaces from a single substrates precursor, 2) utilizes a structurally diverse range of commercially available or easily attainable reagents, 3) proceeds rapidly to quantitative conversions under mild conditions and 4) opens the door to orthogonal and site-selective functionalization. In the first two studies, radical-mediated thiol-yne and base-catalyzed thiol-isocyanate reactions are demonstrated as modular platforms for the rapid and practical fabrication of highly functional, multicomponent surfaces under ambient conditions. Brush surfaces expressing a three-dimensional configuration of alkyne or isocyanate functionalities were modified with high efficiency and short reaction times using a library of commercially available thiols. In the third study, two routes to multifunctional brush surfaces were demonstrated utilizing orthogonal thiol-click reactions. In the first approach, alkyne-functionalized homopolymer brushes were modified with multiple thiols via a statistical, radical-mediated thiol-yne co-click reaction; and in the second approach, statistical copolymer brushes carrying two distinctly-addressable reactive moieties were

  3. Redox Energy and Sulfur Chemistry in Prebiotic Polymer Synthesis and Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1997-01-01

    In the past year we have made significant progress in three research areas: (1) Most importantly, we discovered a new pathway of prebiotic amino acid synthesis in which formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde (substrates of the formose reaction) react with ammonia yielding alanine and homoserine in the presence of thiol catalysts. This thiol-dependent synthesis of amino acids undoubtedly occurs via amino acid thioester intermediates capable of forming peptides. This 'one-pot' reaction system operates under mild aqueous conditions, and like modern amino acid biosynthesis, uses sugar intermediates which are converted to amino acids by energy-yielding redox disproportionation. (2) Finally, in preparation for the analysis of Martian meteorite samples, we upgraded our HPLC system and developed an improved method capable of detecting a I femtomole of amino acid enantiomers. (3) We completed our analysis of the energetics of metabolism that revealed that life depends on biosynthetic processes driven by chemical energy made available by the redox disproportionation of carbon groups of sugars. We established that the favorable energy of redox disproportionation is based on the universal reduction potentials of carbon groups. We concluded that it is hard to imagine any other organic molecule besides sugars (formaldehyde oligomers) having the energy and reactivity needed to drive either modem biosynthesis or the chemical processes behind its origin.

  4. Recapitulating the Structural Evolution of Redox Regulation in Adenosine 5'-Phosphosulfate Kinase from Cyanobacteria to Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Jonathan; Nathin, David; Lee, Soon Goo; Sun, Tony; Jez, Joseph M

    2015-10-09

    In plants, adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) kinase (APSK) is required for reproductive viability and the production of 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) as a sulfur donor in specialized metabolism. Previous studies of the APSK from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtAPSK) identified a regulatory disulfide bond formed between the N-terminal domain (NTD) and a cysteine on the core scaffold. This thiol switch is unique to mosses, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. To understand the structural evolution of redox control of APSK, we investigated the redox-insensitive APSK from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (SynAPSK). Crystallographic analysis of SynAPSK in complex with either APS and a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog or APS and sulfate revealed the overall structure of the enzyme, which lacks the NTD found in homologs from mosses and plants. A series of engineered SynAPSK variants reconstructed the structural evolution of the plant APSK. Biochemical analyses of SynAPSK, SynAPSK H23C mutant, SynAPSK fused to the AtAPSK NTD, and the fusion protein with the H23C mutation showed that the addition of the NTD and cysteines recapitulated thiol-based regulation. These results reveal the molecular basis for structural changes leading to the evolution of redox control of APSK in the green lineage from cyanobacteria to plants. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Deciphering the interplay between cysteine synthase and thiol cascade proteins in modulating Amphotericin B resistance and survival of Leishmania donovani under oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuljit Singh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania donovani is the causative organism of the neglected human disease known as visceral leishmaniasis which is often fatal, if left untreated. The cysteine biosynthesis pathway of Leishmania may serve as a potential drug target because it is different from human host and regulates downstream components of redox metabolism of the parasites; essential for their survival, pathogenicity and drug resistance. However, despite the apparent dependency of redox metabolism of cysteine biosynthesis pathway, the role of L. donovani cysteine synthase (LdCS in drug resistance and redox homeostasis has been unexplored. Herein, we report that over-expression of LdCS in Amphotericin B (Amp B sensitive strain (S1-OE modulates resistance towards oxidative stress and drug pressure. We observed that antioxidant enzyme activities were up-regulated in S1-OE parasites and these parasites alleviate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS efficiently by maintaining the reduced thiol pool. In contrast to S1-OE parasites, Amp B sensitive strain (S1 showed higher levels of ROS which was positively correlated with the protein carbonylation levels and negatively correlated with cell viability. Moreover, further investigations showed that LdCS over-expression also augments the ROS-primed induction of LdCS-GFP as well as endogenous LdCS and thiol pathway proteins (LdTryS, LdTryR and LdcTXN in L. donovani parasites; which probably aids in stress tolerance and drug resistance. In addition, the expression of LdCS was found to be up-regulated in Amp B resistant isolates and during infective stationary stages of growth and consistent with these observations, our ex vivo infectivity studies confirmed that LdCS over-expression enhances the infectivity of L. donovani parasites. Our results reveal a novel crosstalk between LdCS and thiol metabolic pathway proteins and demonstrate the crucial role of LdCS in drug resistance and redox homeostasis of Leishmania. Keywords

  6. Protection by thiols against poisoning by radiomimetic agents. Chapter 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacq, Z.M.

    1975-01-01

    A review is presented of reports of studies aimed at detecting a protective effect of thiols against radiomimetic alkylating agents such as those used in cancer therapy (nitrogen mustards (HN2), sarcolysine, busulfan, etc.). Protection by thiols against alkylating agents has been observed in mammals, plant cells, bacteria, isolated mammalian cells and in model systems. The lack of correlation between the protective power of various thiols against radiomimetic agents and ionizing radiations indicates that different mechanisms are involved. Studies have been made of the toxicity of the protector and the competition factor, increased excretion of detoxication products of alkylating agents, decreased alkylation of DNA and RNA both in vivo and in vitro, the protection of hematopoietic tissues, tumours and the adrenal cortex, and the modification of the effects of nitrosoalkylamines, carbon tetrachloride and fungistatics by thiols. The restriction of DNA alkylation by the competitive removal of radiomimetic agents is thought to account for the protective effect of thiols against radiomimetic agents. (U.K.)

  7. A glutathione redox effect on photosynthetic membrane expression in Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carius, Anke Berit; Henkel, Marius; Grammel, Hartmut

    2011-04-01

    The formation of intracytoplasmic photosynthetic membranes by facultative anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria has become a prime example for exploring redox control of gene expression in response to oxygen and light. Although a number of redox-responsive sensor proteins and transcription factors have been characterized in several species during the last several years in some detail, the overall understanding of the metabolic events that determine the cellular redox environment and initiate redox signaling is still poor. In the present study we demonstrate that in Rhodospirillum rubrum, the amount of photosynthetic membranes can be drastically elevated by external supplementation of the growth medium with the low-molecular-weight thiol glutathione. Neither the widely used reductant dithiothreitol nor oxidized glutathione caused the same response, suggesting that the effect was specific for reduced glutathione. By determination of the extracellular and intracellular glutathione levels, we correlate the GSH/GSSG redox potential to the expression level of photosynthetic membranes. Possible regulatory interactions with periplasmic, membrane, and cytosolic proteins are discussed. Furthermore, we found that R. rubrum cultures excrete substantial amounts of glutathione to the environment.

  8. A Glutathione Redox Effect on Photosynthetic Membrane Expression in Rhodospirillum rubrum▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carius, Anke Berit; Henkel, Marius; Grammel, Hartmut

    2011-01-01

    The formation of intracytoplasmic photosynthetic membranes by facultative anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria has become a prime example for exploring redox control of gene expression in response to oxygen and light. Although a number of redox-responsive sensor proteins and transcription factors have been characterized in several species during the last several years in some detail, the overall understanding of the metabolic events that determine the cellular redox environment and initiate redox signaling is still poor. In the present study we demonstrate that in Rhodospirillum rubrum, the amount of photosynthetic membranes can be drastically elevated by external supplementation of the growth medium with the low-molecular-weight thiol glutathione. Neither the widely used reductant dithiothreitol nor oxidized glutathione caused the same response, suggesting that the effect was specific for reduced glutathione. By determination of the extracellular and intracellular glutathione levels, we correlate the GSH/GSSG redox potential to the expression level of photosynthetic membranes. Possible regulatory interactions with periplasmic, membrane, and cytosolic proteins are discussed. Furthermore, we found that R. rubrum cultures excrete substantial amounts of glutathione to the environment. PMID:21317329

  9. Redox Status and Neuro Inflammation Indexes in Cerebellum and Motor Cortex of Wistar Rats Supplemented with Natural Sources of Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Astaxanthin: Fish Oil, Krill Oil, and Algal Biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polotow, Tatiana G; Poppe, Sandra C; Vardaris, Cristina V; Ganini, Douglas; Guariroba, Maísa; Mattei, Rita; Hatanaka, Elaine; Martins, Maria F; Bondan, Eduardo F; Barros, Marcelo P

    2015-09-28

    Health authorities worldwide have consistently recommended the regular consumption of marine fishes and seafood to preserve memory, sustain cognitive functions, and prevent neurodegenerative processes in humans. Shrimp, crabs, lobster, and salmon are of particular interest in the human diet due to their substantial provision of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3/PUFAs) and the antioxidant carotenoid astaxanthin (ASTA). However, the optimal ratio between these nutraceuticals in natural sources is apparently the key factor for maximum protection against most neuro-motor disorders. Therefore, we aimed here to investigate the effects of a long-term supplementation with (n-3)/PUFAs-rich fish oil, ASTA-rich algal biomass, the combination of them, or krill oil (a natural combination of both nutrients) on baseline redox balance and neuro-inflammation indexes in cerebellum and motor cortex of Wistar rats. Significant changes in redox metabolism were only observed upon ASTA supplementation, which reinforce its antioxidant properties with a putative mitochondrial-centered action in rat brain. Krill oil imposed mild astrocyte activation in motor cortex of Wistar rats, although no redox or inflammatory index was concomitantly altered. In summary, there is no experimental evidence that krill oil, fish oil, oralgal biomass (minor variation), drastically change the baseline oxidative conditions or the neuro-inflammatory scenario in neuromotor-associated rat brain regions.

  10. Redox Status and Neuro Inflammation Indexes in Cerebellum and Motor Cortex of Wistar Rats Supplemented with Natural Sources of Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Astaxanthin: Fish Oil, Krill Oil, and Algal Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana G. Polotow

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Health authorities worldwide have consistently recommended the regular consumption of marine fishes and seafood to preserve memory, sustain cognitive functions, and prevent neurodegenerative processes in humans. Shrimp, crabs, lobster, and salmon are of particular interest in the human diet due to their substantial provision of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3/PUFAs and the antioxidant carotenoid astaxanthin (ASTA. However, the optimal ratio between these nutraceuticals in natural sources is apparently the key factor for maximum protection against most neuro-motor disorders. Therefore, we aimed here to investigate the effects of a long-term supplementation with (n-3/PUFAs-rich fish oil, ASTA-rich algal biomass, the combination of them, or krill oil (a natural combination of both nutrients on baseline redox balance and neuro-inflammation indexes in cerebellum and motor cortex of Wistar rats. Significant changes in redox metabolism were only observed upon ASTA supplementation, which reinforce its antioxidant properties with a putative mitochondrial-centered action in rat brain. Krill oil imposed mild astrocyte activation in motor cortex of Wistar rats, although no redox or inflammatory index was concomitantly altered. In summary, there is no experimental evidence that krill oil, fish oil, oralgal biomass (minor variation, drastically change the baseline oxidative conditions or the neuro-inflammatory scenario in neuromotor-associated rat brain regions.

  11. Direct electrochemistry of redox proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heering, H.A.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of the project was to obtain more detailed insight in interactions between redox proteins and solid electrodes and the mechanisms of electron transfer. In addition to this, the influence of the protein environment on the redox properties of the active site and the possible

  12. Pattern-­oriented Agent-­based Monte Carlo simulation of Cellular Redox Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Jiaowei

    Research suggests that cellular redox environment could affect the phenotype and function of cells through a complex reaction network[1]. In cells, redox status is mainly regulated by several redox couples, such as Glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG), Cysteine/ Cystine (CYS/CYSS) and mit......Research suggests that cellular redox environment could affect the phenotype and function of cells through a complex reaction network[1]. In cells, redox status is mainly regulated by several redox couples, such as Glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG), Cysteine/ Cystine (CYS......, that there is a connection between extracellular and intracellular redox [2], whereas others oppose this view [3]. In general however, these experiments lack insight into the dynamics, complex network of reactions and transportation through cell membrane of redox. Therefore, current experimental results reveal......' that can be run in parallel with MPI on computer cluster, will be used to implement modeling [9]. In the future, studies will be performed simulating how cellular redox state could affect phenotype of a population of cells, and hereby the tissue and organ if dynamics between intracellular and extracellular...

  13. Redox Modulation by Amaranth Oil in Human Lung Fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semen, K.O.; den Hartog, G.J.M.; Kaminsky, D.V.; Sirota, T.V.; Maij, N.G.A.A.; Yelisyeyeva, O.P.; Bast, A.

    2013-01-01

    Amaranth oil has several health benefits. It has lipid lowering, anti-diabetic, immune modulatory and cytoprotective properties, activates the function of mitochondria and improves heart rate variability. It has been suggested that the effect of amaranth oil on redox status is involved in this

  14. Effect of Oral Zinc Supplementation on the Thiol Oxido-Reductive Index and Thiol-Related Enzymes in Seminal Plasma and Spermatozoa of Iraqi Asthenospermic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsalman, Abdul Razzaq S; Almashhedy, Lamia A; Hadwan, Mahmoud Hussein

    2017-12-08

    A thiol group plays an essential role in sperm metabolism and the antioxidative defense state. Zinc is the second most abundant element in the human body, following iron. The present study was conducted to study the effect of zinc supplementation on the characteristics of semen along with thiol and thiol-related enzymes in semen of asthenospermic patients. Semen samples were obtained from 60 fertile and 60 asthenospermic men, from couples who had consulted the infertility clinic of Babil Hospital (Hillah city, Iraq). The subfertile group was treated with zinc; every participant took two 220 mg capsules of zinc sulfate per day for 3 months. Semen samples were obtained (before and after zinc supplementation). The levels of reduced thiol, oxidized thiol, thiol oxido-reductive index, and thiol-related enzymes activities were determined in spermatozoa and seminal plasma of patients and healthy groups. Oxidized thiol levels were significantly higher in the infertile patients compared to that in the fertile group. Conversely, reduced thiol level, sulfhydryl oxidase activity, and glutathione peroxidase activity significantly decreased in the infertile patients compared to that in the fertile group. Oxidized thiol levels, reduced thiol levels, and thiol-related enzymes activities of the infertile patients were restored to normal values after treatment with zinc. However, reduced and oxidized thiol levels in spermatozoa did not change significantly in the group treated with zinc. The quantitative values for RSH/RSSR and thiol-related enzymes may provide useful means to qualitatively express the oxidant/antioxidant balance in clinical and epidemiologic studies. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02985905.

  15. Highly tailorable thiol-ene based emulsion-templated monoliths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafleur, J. P.; Kutter, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    The attractive surface properties of thiol-ene polymers combined with their ease of processing make them ideal substrates in many bioanalytical applications. We report the synthesis of highly tailorable emulsion-templated porous polymers and beads in microfluidic devices based on off-stoichiometr......The attractive surface properties of thiol-ene polymers combined with their ease of processing make them ideal substrates in many bioanalytical applications. We report the synthesis of highly tailorable emulsion-templated porous polymers and beads in microfluidic devices based on off......-stoichiometry thiolene chemistry. The method allows monolith synthesis and anchoring inside thiol-ene microchannels in a single step. Variations in the monomer stoichiometric ratios and/or amount of porogen used allow for the creation of extremely varied polymer morphologies, from foam-like materials to dense networks...

  16. Resistivity of thiol-modified gold thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa-Puerta, Jonathan; Del Campo, Valeria; Henríquez, Ricardo; Häberle, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we study the effect of thiol self assembled monolayers on the electrical resistivity of metallic thin films. The analysis is based on the Fuchs–Sondheimer–Lucas theory and on electrical transport measurements. We determined resistivity change due to dodecanethiol adsorption on gold thin films. For this purpose, we controlled the deposition and annealing temperatures of the films to change the surface topography and to diminish the effect of electron grain boundary scattering. Results show that the electrical response to the absorption of thiols strongly depends on the initial topography of the surface. - Highlights: • We study the effect of self assembled monolayers on the resistivity of thin films. • Fuchs–Sondheimer theory reproduces the resistivity increase due to thiol deposition. • We determined resistivity change due to dodecanethiol deposition on gold thin films. • The electrical response strongly depends on the substrate surface topography

  17. Redox- and non-redox-metal-induced formation of free radicals and their role in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valko, Marian; Jomova, Klaudia; Rhodes, Christopher J; Kuča, Kamil; Musílek, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Transition metal ions are key elements of various biological processes ranging from oxygen formation to hypoxia sensing, and therefore, their homeostasis is maintained within strict limits through tightly regulated mechanisms of uptake, storage and secretion. The breakdown of metal ion homeostasis can lead to an uncontrolled formation of reactive oxygen species, ROS (via the Fenton reaction, which produces hydroxyl radicals), and reactive nitrogen species, RNS, which may cause oxidative damage to biological macromolecules such as DNA, proteins and lipids. An imbalance between the formation of free radicals and their elimination by antioxidant defense systems is termed oxidative stress. Most vulnerable to free radical attack is the cell membrane which may undergo enhanced lipid peroxidation, finally producing mutagenic and carcinogenic malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal and other exocyclic DNA adducts. While redox-active iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) undergo redox-cycling reactions, for a second group of redox-inactive metals such as arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd), the primary route for their toxicity is depletion of glutathione and bonding to sulfhydryl groups of proteins. While arsenic is known to bind directly to critical thiols, other mechanisms, involving formation of hydrogen peroxide under physiological conditions, have been proposed. Redox-inert zinc (Zn) is the most abundant metal in the brain and an essential component of numerous proteins involved in biological defense mechanisms against oxidative stress. The depletion of zinc may enhance DNA damage by impairing DNA repair mechanisms. Intoxication of an organism by arsenic and cadmium may lead to metabolic disturbances of redox-active copper and iron, with the occurrence of oxidative stress induced by the enhanced formation of ROS/RNS. Oxidative stress occurs when excessive formation of ROS overwhelms the antioxidant defense system, as is maintained by antioxidants such as ascorbic acid, alpha

  18. ROS-related redox regulation and signaling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noctor, Graham; Reichheld, Jean-Philippe; Foyer, Christine H

    2017-07-18

    As sessile oxygenic organisms with a plastic developmental programme, plants are uniquely positioned to exploit reactive oxygen species (ROS) as powerful signals. Plants harbor numerous ROS-generating pathways, and these oxidants and related redox-active compounds have become tightly embedded into plant function and development during the course of evolution. One dominant view of ROS-removing systems sees them as beneficial antioxidants battling to keep damaging ROS below dangerous levels. However, it is now established that ROS are a necessary part of subcellular and intercellular communication in plants and that some of their signaling functions require ROS-metabolizing systems. For these reasons, it is suggested that "ROS processing systems" would be a more accurate term than "antioxidative systems" to describe cellular components that are most likely to interact with ROS and, in doing so, transmit oxidative signals. Within this framework, our update provides an overview of the complexity and compartmentation of ROS production and removal. We place particular emphasis on the importance of ROS-interacting systems such as the complex cellular thiol network in the redox regulation of phytohormone signaling pathways that are crucial for plant development and defense against external threats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolossov, Vladimir L.; Beaudoin, Jessica N.; Hanafin, William P.; DiLiberto, Stephen J.; Kenis, Paul J.A.; Rex Gaskins, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition

  20. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolossov, Vladimir L., E-mail: viadimer@illinois.edu [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Beaudoin, Jessica N. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hanafin, William P. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); DiLiberto, Stephen J. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Kenis, Paul J.A. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rex Gaskins, H. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 S. Lincoln Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition.

  1. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Thiol–Disulfide Exchange Covering Direct Substitution and Thiol Oxidation-Mediated Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Disulfides are important building blocks in the secondary and tertiary structures of proteins, serving as inter- and intra-subunit cross links. Disulfides are also the major products of thiol oxidation, a process that has primary roles in defense mechanisms against oxidative stress and in redox regulation of cell signaling. Although disulfides are relatively stable, their reduction, isomerisation, and interconversion as well as their production reactions are catalyzed by delicate enzyme machineries, providing a dynamic system in biology. Redox homeostasis, a thermodynamic parameter that determines which reactions can occur in cellular compartments, is also balanced by the thiol–disulfide pool. However, it is the kinetic properties of the reactions that best represent cell dynamics, because the partitioning of the possible reactions depends on kinetic parameters. Critical Issues: This review is focused on the kinetics and mechanisms of thiol–disulfide substitution and redox reactions. It summarizes the challenges and advances that are associated with kinetic investigations in small molecular and enzymatic systems from a rigorous chemical perspective using biological examples. The most important parameters that influence reaction rates are discussed in detail. Recent Advances and Future Directions: Kinetic studies of proteins are more challenging than small molecules, and quite often investigators are forced to sacrifice the rigor of the experimental approach to obtain the important kinetic and mechanistic information. However, recent technological advances allow a more comprehensive analysis of enzymatic systems via using the systematic kinetics apparatus that was developed for small molecule reactions, which is expected to provide further insight into the cell's machinery. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1623–1641. PMID:23075118

  2. 5-Furan-2yl[1,3,4]oxadiazole-2-thiol, 5-Furan-2yl-4H [1,2,4] triazole-3-thiol and Their Thiol-Thione Tautomerism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cansız

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available 5-Furan-2-yl[1,3,4]oxadiazole-2-thiol (Ia and 5-furan-2-yl-4H-[1,2,4]-triazole-3-thiol (Ib were synthesized from furan-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide. Mannich basesand methyl derivatives were then prepared. The structures of the synthesized compoundswere confirmed by elemental analyses, IR and 1H-NMR spectra. Their thiol-thione tautomericequilibrium is described.

  3. Differential alkylation-based redox proteomics - Lessons learnt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2015-01-01

    -sulfenylation are crucial mediators of intracellular redox signalling, with known associations to health and disease. Study of their functionalities has intensified thanks to the development of various analytical strategies, with particular contribution from differential alkylation-based proteomics methods. Presented here...... is a critical evaluation of differential alkylation-based strategies for the analysis of S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation. The aim is to assess the current status and to provide insights for future directions in the dynamically evolving field of redox proteomics. To achieve that we collected 35 original...

  4. Redox environment in stem and differentiated cells: A quantitative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.G. Lyublinskaya

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are believed to maintain a specific intracellular redox status through a combination of enhanced removal capacity and limited production of ROS. In the present study, we challenge this assumption by developing a quantitative approach for the analysis of the pro- and antioxidant ability of human embryonic stem cells in comparison with their differentiated descendants, as well as adult stem and non-stem cells. Our measurements showed that embryonic stem cells are characterized by low ROS level, low rate of extracellular hydrogen peroxide removal and low threshold for peroxide-induced cytotoxicity. However, biochemical normalization of these parameters to cell volume/protein leads to matching of normalized values in stem and differentiated cells and shows that tested in the present study cells (human embryonic stem cells and their fibroblast-like progenies, adult mesenchymal stem cells, lymphocytes, HeLa maintain similar intracellular redox status. Based on these observations, we propose to use ROS concentration averaged over the cell volume instead of ROS level as a measure of intracellular redox balance. We show that attempts to use ROS level for comparative analysis of redox status of morphologically different cells could lead to false conclusions. Methods for the assessment of ROS concentration based on flow cytometry analysis with the use of H2DCFDA dye and HyPer, genetically encoded probe for hydrogen peroxide, are discussed.

  5. Selenium redox biochemistry of zinc–sulfur coordination sites in proteins and enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Claus; Maret, Wolfgang; Vallee, Bert L.

    1999-01-01

    Selenium has been increasingly recognized as an essential element in biology and medicine. Its biochemistry resembles that of sulfur, yet differs from it by virtue of both redox potentials and stabilities of its oxidation states. Selenium can substitute for the more ubiquitous sulfur of cysteine and as such plays an important role in more than a dozen selenoproteins. We have chosen to examine zinc–sulfur centers as possible targets of selenium redox biochemistry. Selenium compounds release zinc from zinc/thiolate-coordination environments, thereby affecting the cellular thiol redox state and the distribution of zinc and likely of other metal ions. Aromatic selenium compounds are excellent spectroscopic probes of the otherwise relatively unstable functional selenium groups. Zinc-coordinated thiolates, e.g., metallothionein (MT), and uncoordinated thiolates, e.g., glutathione, react with benzeneseleninic acid (oxidation state +2), benzeneselenenyl chloride (oxidation state 0) and selenocystamine (oxidation state −1). Benzeneseleninic acid and benzeneselenenyl chloride react very rapidly with MT and titrate substoichiometrically and with a 1:1 stoichiometry, respectively. Selenium compounds also catalyze the release of zinc from MT in peroxidation and thiol/disulfide-interchange reactions. The selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase catalytically oxidizes MT and releases zinc in the presence of t-butyl hydroperoxide, suggesting that this type of redox chemistry may be employed in biology for the control of metal metabolism. Moreover, selenium compounds are likely targets for zinc/thiolate coordination centers in vivo, because the reactions are only partially suppressed by excess glutathione. This specificity and the potential to undergo catalytic reactions at low concentrations suggests that zinc release is a significant aspect of the therapeutic antioxidant actions of selenium compounds in antiinflammatory and anticarcinogenic agents. PMID:10051568

  6. Mapping the diatom redox-sensitive proteome provides insight into response to nitrogen stress in the marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenwasser, Shilo; Graff van Creveld, Shiri; Schatz, Daniella; Malitsky, Sergey; Tzfadia, Oren; Aharoni, Asaph; Levin, Yishai; Gabashvili, Alexandra; Feldmesser, Ester; Vardi, Assaf

    2014-02-18

    Diatoms are ubiquitous marine photosynthetic eukaryotes responsible for approximately 20% of global photosynthesis. Little is known about the redox-based mechanisms that mediate diatom sensing and acclimation to environmental stress. Here we used a quantitative mass spectrometry-based approach to elucidate the redox-sensitive signaling network (redoxome) mediating the response of diatoms to oxidative stress. We quantified the degree of oxidation of 3,845 cysteines in the Phaeodactylum tricornutum proteome and identified approximately 300 redox-sensitive proteins. Intriguingly, we found redox-sensitive thiols in numerous enzymes composing the nitrogen assimilation pathway and the recently discovered diatom urea cycle. In agreement with this finding, the flux from nitrate into glutamine and glutamate, measured by the incorporation of (15)N, was strongly inhibited under oxidative stress conditions. Furthermore, by targeting the redox-sensitive GFP sensor to various subcellular localizations, we mapped organelle-specific oxidation patterns in response to variations in nitrogen quota and quality. We propose that redox regulation of nitrogen metabolism allows rapid metabolic plasticity to ensure cellular homeostasis, and thus is essential for the ecological success of diatoms in the marine ecosystem.

  7. Redox and acid-base coupling in ultrathin polyelectrolyte films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Calvo, Ernesto J; Szleifer, Igal

    2008-03-18

    A single layer of poly(allylamine) with a covalently attached osmium pyridine-bipyridine complex adsorbed onto a Au surface modified by mercaptopropanesulfonate has been studied theoretically with a molecular approach and experimentally by cyclic voltammetry. These investigations have been carried out at different pHs and ionic strengths of the electrolyte solution in contact with the redox polyelectrolyte modified electrode. The theory predicts strong coupling between the acid-base and redox equilibria, particularly for low ionic strength, pH close to the pKa, and high concentration of redox sites. The coupling leads to a decrease in the peak potential at pH values above the apparent pKa of the weak polyelectrolyte, in good agreement with the experimental pH dependence at 4 mM NaNO3. Theoretical calculations suggest that the inflection point in the peak position versus pH curves can be used to estimate the apparent pKa of the amino groups in the polymer. Comparison of the apparent pKa for PAH-Os in the film with that of poly(allylamine) reported in the literature shows that the underlying charged thiol strongly influences charge regulation in the film. A systematic study of the film thickness and the degree of protonation in sulfonate and amino groups for solutions of different pH and ionic strength shows the coupling between the different interactions. It is found that the variation of the film properties has a non-monotonic dependence on bulk pH and salt concentration. For example, the film thickness shows a maximum with electrolyte ionic strength, whose origin is attributed to the balance between electrostatic amino-amino repulsions and amino-sulfonate attractions.

  8. Metal-free oxidative coupling of thiols to disulfides using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Efficient combination of nitro urea or guanidinium nitrate and silica sulfuric acid (SiO2OSO3H) as a new oxidizing system is able to oxidize a variety of aliphatic or aromatic thiols to the corresponding disulfides. The process reported here is operationally simple, environmentally benign and reactions have been ...

  9. Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Thiol-ene-Based Photopolymerized Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreck, Kathleen M; Leung, Diana; Bowman, Christopher N

    2011-09-15

    The thiol-ene reaction serves as a more oxygen tolerant alternative to traditional (meth)acrylate chemistry for forming photopolymerized networks with numerous desirable attributes including energy absorption, optical clarity, and reduced shrinkage stress. However, when utilizing commercially available monomers, many thiol-ene networks also exhibit decreases in properties such as glass transition temperature (T(g)) and crosslink density. In this study, hybrid organic/inorganic thiol-ene resins incorporating silsesquioxane (SSQ) species into the photopolymerized networks were investigated as a route to improve these properties. Thiol- and ene-functionalized SSQs (SH-SSQ and allyl-SSQ, respectively) were synthesized via alkoxysilane hydrolysis/condensation chemistry, using a photopolymerizable monomer [either pentaerythriol tetrakis(3-mercaptopropionate) (PETMP) or 1,3,5-triallyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (TATATO)] as the reaction solvent. The resulting SSQ-containing solutions (SSQ-PETMP and SSQ-TATATO) were characterized, and their incorporation into photopolymerized networks was evaluated.

  10. Facially amphiphilic thiol capped gold and silver nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research,. Bangalore 560 064. Facially amphiphilic thiol capped gold and silver nanoparticles. †. SHREEDHAR BHAT a and UDAY MAITRA*. Department of Organic Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 a. Current address: ISM, University of Bordeaux, ...

  11. Capillary electrophoresis in the analysis of biologically important thiols

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lačná, J.; Kubáň, Petr; Foret, František

    Roč. 38, č. 1 ( 2017 ), s. 203-222 ISSN 0173-0835 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : biological thiols * capillary electrophoresis * clinical applications Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 2.744, year: 2016

  12. Facially amphiphilic thiol capped gold and silver nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    *For correspondence. Also at the Chemical Biology Unit,. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research,. Bangalore 560 064. Facially amphiphilic thiol capped gold and silver nanoparticles. †. SHREEDHAR BHAT a and UDAY MAITRA*. Department of Organic Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore ...

  13. Metal-free oxidative coupling of thiols to disulfides using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 123; Issue 4. Metal-free oxidative coupling of thiols to disulfides using guanidinium nitrate or nitro urea in the presence of silica sulfuric acid. Arash Ghorbani-Choghamarani Mohsen Nikoorazm Hamid Goudarziafshar Alireza Shokr Hosein Almasi. Volume 123 Issue 4 ...

  14. Capillary electrophoresis in the analysis of biologically important thiols

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lačná, J.; Kubáň, Petr; Foret, František

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 1 (2017), s. 203-222 ISSN 0173-0835 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : biological thiols * capillary electrophoresis * clinical applications Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 2.744, year: 2016

  15. Radical Scavenging Efficacy of Thiol Capped Silver Nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. Chem. Sci. Vol. 127, No. 12, December 2015, pp. 2183–2191. c Indian Academy of Sciences. DOI 10.1007/s12039-015-0968-x. Radical Scavenging Efficacy of Thiol ... aSchool of Studies in Chemistry, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur 492 010, India ..... Authors are thankful to sophisticated analytical instru-.

  16. Effect of thione–thiol tautomerism on the inhibition of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Abstract. The keto-enol type tautomerism in anti-thyroid drugs and their selenium analogues are de- scribed. The commonly used anti-thyroid drug methimazole exists predominantly in its thione form, whereas its selenium analogue exists in a zwitterionic form. To understand the effect of thione/thiol and selone/selenol ...

  17. Thiol-containing polymeric embedding materials for nanoskiving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mays, Robin L.; Pourhossein, Parisa; Savithri, Dhanalekshmi; Genzer, Jan; Chiechi, Ryan C.; Dickey, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the characterization of new embedding resins for nanoskiving (ultramicrotomy) that contain thiols. Nanoskiving is a technique to produce nanoscale structures using an ultramicrotome to section thin films of materials (e. g., gold) embedded in polymer. Epoxies are used typically

  18. Supplementation of Adult Rats with Moderate Amounts of β-Carotene Modulates the Redox Status in Plasma without Exerting Pro-Oxidant Effects in the Brain: A Safer Alternative to Food Fortification with Vitamin A?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnorr, Carlos Eduardo; Morrone, Maurilio da Silva; Simões-Pires, André; Bittencourt, Leonardo da Silva; Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2014-01-01

    Despite the antioxidant potential of vitamin A, recent studies reported that chronic retinol ester supplementation can also exert pro-oxidant effects and neurotoxicity in vivo and raises the mortality rates among healthy subjects. Our aim was to find evidence for a safer (i.e., less toxic) molecule with provitamin A activity. Therefore, we investigated whether chronic supplementation of healthy Wistar rats with β-carotene (0.6, 3, and 6 mg/kg/day) would demonstrate antioxidant characteristics without leading to pro-oxidant side effects in the brain. Total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP), thiobarbituric reactive species level (TBARS), and total reduced thiol content (SH) were evaluated in plasma. TBARS and SH were additionally evaluated in selected brain regions together with superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity. In the present study, we show that β-carotene is able to exert antioxidant activity in plasma without triggering pro-oxidant events in the brain, providing evidence that may justify its further evaluation as a safer nutritional supplement with provitamin A activity. PMID:25470379

  19. A new metabolomic assay to examine inflammation and redox pathways following LPS challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suh Jung H

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shifts in intracellular arginine (Arg and sulfur amino acid (SAA redox metabolism modulate macrophage activation, polarization and phenotype. Despite their importance in inflammation and redox regulatory pathways, comprehensive analysis of these metabolic networks was not previously possible with existing analytical methods. Methods The Arg/thiol redox LC-MS/MS metabolomics assay permits simultaneous assessment of amino acids and derivative products generated from Arg and SAA metabolism. Using this assay, LPS-induced changes in macrophage amino acid metabolism were monitored to identify pathway shifts during activation and their linkage to cellular redox regulation. Results Metabolite concentrations most significantly changed after treatment of a macrophage-like cell line (RAW with LPS for 24 hrs were citrulline (Cit (48-fold increase, ornithine (Orn (8.5-fold increase, arginine (Arg (66% decrease, and aspartic acid (Asp (73% decrease. The ratio Cit + Orn/Arg + Asp (CO/AA was more sensitive to LPS stimulation than other amino acid ratios commonly used to measure LPS-dependent inflammation (e.g., SAM/SAH, GSH/GSSG and total media NOx. The CO/AA ratio was also the first ratio to change significantly after LPS treatment (4 hrs. Changes in the overall metabolomic profile over time indicated that metabolic pathways shifted from Arg catabolism to thiol oxidation. Conclusions Simultaneous quantification of Arg and SAA metabolic pathway shifts following LPS challenge of macrophage indicate that, in this system, the Arg-Citrulline/NO cycle and arginase pathways are the amino acid metabolic pathways most sensitive to LPS-challenge. The cellular (Cit + Orn/(Arg + Asp ratio, which summarizes this pathway, was more responsive to lower concentrations of LPS and responded earlier than other metabolic biomarkers of macrophage activation including GSH redox. It is suggested that the CO/AA ratio is a redox- independent early biomarker of

  20. Redox Properties of Free Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neta, P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes pulse radiolysis as a useful means in studing one-electron redox potentials. This method allows the production of radicals and the determination of their concentration and rates of reaction. (CS)

  1. Redox meets protein trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bölter, Bettina; Soll, Jürgen; Schwenkert, Serena

    2015-09-01

    After the engulfment of two prokaryotic organisms, the thus emerged eukaryotic cell needed to establish means of communication and signaling to properly integrate the acquired organelles into its metabolism. Regulatory mechanisms had to evolve to ensure that chloroplasts and mitochondria smoothly function in accordance with all other cellular processes. One essential process is the post-translational import of nuclear encoded organellar proteins, which needs to be adapted according to the requirements of the plant. The demand for protein import is constantly changing depending on varying environmental conditions, as well as external and internal stimuli or different developmental stages. Apart from long-term regulatory mechanisms such as transcriptional/translation control, possibilities for short-term acclimation are mandatory. To this end, protein import is integrated into the cellular redox network, utilizing the recognition of signals from within the organelles and modifying the efficiency of the translocon complexes. Thereby, cellular requirements can be communicated throughout the whole organism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Redox regulation of protein damage in plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen R. Griffiths

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we focus on redox regulatory control of those enzymes and processes which control protein maturation during synthesis, produce reactive species, repair and remove damaged plasma proteins. We have highlighted the potential for alterations in the extracellular redox compartment to regulate intracellular redox state and, conversely, for intracellular oxidative stress to alter the cellular secretome and composition of extracellular vesicles. Through secreted, redox-active regulatory molecules, changes in redox state may be transmitted to distant sites.

  3. Surface functionalized thiol-ene waveguides for fluorescence biosensing in microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft; Lafleur, Josiane P.; Jensen, Thomas Glasdam

    2013-01-01

    -ene materials vary considerably with variations in stoichiometric composition, their optical properties remain mostly unchanged with an average refractive index value of 1.566 ± 0.008 for thiol-ene substrates encompassing a range from 150% excess ene to 90% excess thiol. Microfluidic chips featuring thiol......Thiol-ene polymers possess physical, optical, and chemical characteristics thatmake them ideal substrates for the fabrication of optofluidic devices. In this work, thiol-ene polymers are used to simultaneously create microfluidic channels and optical waveguides in one simple moulding step...

  4. Redox-responsive theranostic nanoplatforms based on inorganic nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lu; Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Yu-Long; Li, Xi; Yang, Xiao-Hong; Huang, Min; Hu, Kun; Li, Lu-Hai; Wei, Yen

    2017-08-10

    Spurred on by advances in materials chemistry and nanotechnology, scientists have developed many novel nanopreparations for cancer diagnosis and therapy. To treat complex malignant tumors effectively, multifunctional nanomedicines with targeting ability, imaging properties and controlled drug release behavior should be designed and exploited. The therapeutic efficiency of loaded drugs can be dramatically improved using redox-responsive nanoplatforms which can sense the differences in the redox status of tumor tissues and healthy ones. Redox-sensitive nanocarriers can be constructed from both organic and inorganic nanomaterials; however, at present, drug delivery nanovectors progressively lean towards inorganic nanomaterials because of their facile synthesis/modification and their unique physicochemical properties. In this review, we focus specifically on the preparation and application of redox-sensitive nanosystems based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), carbon nanomaterials, magnetic nanoparticles, gold nanomaterials and other inorganic nanomaterials. We discuss relevant examples of redox-sensitive nanosystems in each category. Finally, we discuss current challenges and future strategies from the aspect of material design and practical application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Potential Role of Amino Acid/Protein Nutrition and Exercise in Serum Albumin Redox State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuaki Wada

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Albumin is the major protein in the serum of mammals. It is synthesized exclusively in the liver, before being secreted into the circulation. Similar to skeletal muscle protein, albumin synthesis is stimulated by dietary amino acids and proteins as well as exercise. Albumin has three isoforms based on the redox states of the free cysteine residue at position 34. The redox state of serum albumin has long been extensively investigated in terms of oxidative stress-related chronic diseases, with the redox state of serum albumin having been regarded as a marker of systemic oxidative stress. However, according to recent animal studies, the redox state of serum albumin is modulated by albumin turnover and may also reflect amino acid/protein nutritional status. Furthermore, as the redox state of serum albumin is modulated by exercise training, measuring the pre- and post-exercise redox states of serum albumin in athletes may be useful in assessing amino acid/protein nutritional status and exercise-induced oxidative stress, which are closely associated with skeletal muscle adaptive responses. This article extensively reviews serum albumin and the redox state of albumin in the context of amino acid/protein nutritional status and exercise training.

  6. S-Nitrosylation-Mediated Redox Transcriptional Switch Modulates Neurogenesis and Neuronal Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-ichi Okamoto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Redox-mediated posttranslational modifications represent a molecular switch that controls major mechanisms of cell function. Nitric oxide (NO can mediate redox reactions via S-nitrosylation, representing transfer of an NO group to a critical protein thiol. NO is known to modulate neurogenesis and neuronal survival in various brain regions in disparate neurodegenerative conditions. However, a unifying molecular mechanism linking these phenomena remains unknown. Here, we report that S-nitrosylation of myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2 transcription factors acts as a redox switch to inhibit both neurogenesis and neuronal survival. Structure-based analysis reveals that MEF2 dimerization creates a pocket, facilitating S-nitrosylation at an evolutionally conserved cysteine residue in the DNA binding domain. S-Nitrosylation disrupts MEF2-DNA binding and transcriptional activity, leading to impaired neurogenesis and survival in vitro and in vivo. Our data define a molecular switch whereby redox-mediated posttranslational modification controls both neurogenesis and neurodegeneration via a single transcriptional signaling cascade.

  7. The Effects of Acrolein on the Thioredoxin System: Implications for Redox-Sensitive Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Charles R.; Myers, Judith M.; Kufahl, Timothy D.; Forbes, Rachel; Szadkowski, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The reactive aldehyde acrolein is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant and is also generated endogenously. It is a strong electrophile and reacts rapidly with nucleophiles including thiolates. This review focuses on the effects of acrolein on thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and thioredoxin (Trx), which are major regulators of intracellular protein thiol redox balance. Acrolein causes irreversible effects on TrxR and Trx, which are consistent with the formation of covalent adducts to selenocysteine and cysteine residues that are key to their activity. TrxR and Trx are more sensitive than some other redox-sensitive proteins, and their prolonged inhibition could disrupt a number of redox-sensitive functions in cells. Among these effects are the oxidation of peroxiredoxins and the activation of apoptosis signal regulating kinase (ASK1). ASK1 promotes MAP kinase activation, and p38 activation contributes to apoptosis and a number of other acrolein-induced stress responses. Overall, the disruption of the TrxR/Trx system by acrolein could be significant early and prolonged events that affects many aspects of redox-sensitive signaling and oxidant stress. PMID:21812108

  8. Structural characteristics of the redox-sensing coiled coil in the voltage-gated H+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Takeshita, Kohei; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Okamura, Yasushi

    2013-06-21

    Oxidation is an important biochemical defense mechanism, but it also elicits toxicity; therefore, oxidation must be under strict control. In phagocytotic events in neutrophils, the voltage-gated H(+) (Hv) channel is a key regulator of the production of reactive oxygen species against invading bacteria. The cytoplasmic domain of the Hv channel forms a dimeric coiled coil underpinning a dimerized functional unit. Importantly, in the alignment of the coiled-coil core, a conserved cysteine residue forms a potential intersubunit disulfide bond. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of the coiled-coil domain in reduced, oxidized, and mutated (Cys → Ser) states. The crystal structures indicate that a pair of Cys residues forms an intersubunit disulfide bond dependent on the redox conditions. CD spectroscopy revealed that the disulfide bond increases the thermal stability of the coiled-coil protein. We also reveal that two thiol modifier molecules are able to bind to Cys in a redox-dependent manner without disruption of the dimeric coiled-coil assembly. Thus, the biochemical properties of the cytoplasmic coiled-coil domain in the Hv channel depend on the redox condition, which may play a role in redox sensing in the phagosome.

  9. Recapitulating the Structural Evolution of Redox Regulation in Adenosine 5′-Phosphosulfate Kinase from Cyanobacteria to Plants*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Jonathan; Nathin, David; Lee, Soon Goo; Sun, Tony; Jez, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    In plants, adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate (APS) kinase (APSK) is required for reproductive viability and the production of 3′-phosphoadenosine 5′-phosphosulfate (PAPS) as a sulfur donor in specialized metabolism. Previous studies of the APSK from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtAPSK) identified a regulatory disulfide bond formed between the N-terminal domain (NTD) and a cysteine on the core scaffold. This thiol switch is unique to mosses, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. To understand the structural evolution of redox control of APSK, we investigated the redox-insensitive APSK from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (SynAPSK). Crystallographic analysis of SynAPSK in complex with either APS and a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog or APS and sulfate revealed the overall structure of the enzyme, which lacks the NTD found in homologs from mosses and plants. A series of engineered SynAPSK variants reconstructed the structural evolution of the plant APSK. Biochemical analyses of SynAPSK, SynAPSK H23C mutant, SynAPSK fused to the AtAPSK NTD, and the fusion protein with the H23C mutation showed that the addition of the NTD and cysteines recapitulated thiol-based regulation. These results reveal the molecular basis for structural changes leading to the evolution of redox control of APSK in the green lineage from cyanobacteria to plants. PMID:26294763

  10. NTRC-dependent redox balance of 2-Cys peroxiredoxins is needed for optimal function of the photosynthetic apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Naranjo, Belén; Ojeda, Valle; Guinea, Manuel; Cejudo, Francisco Javier

    2017-11-07

    Thiol-dependent redox regulation allows the rapid adaptation of chloroplast function to unpredictable changes in light intensity. Traditionally, it has been considered that chloroplast redox regulation relies on photosynthetically reduced ferredoxin (Fd), thioredoxins (Trxs), and an Fd-dependent Trx reductase (FTR), the Fd-FTR-Trxs system, which links redox regulation to light. More recently, a plastid-localized NADPH-dependent Trx reductase (NTR) with a joint Trx domain, termed NTRC, was identified. NTRC efficiently reduces 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (Prxs), thus having antioxidant function, but also participates in redox regulation of metabolic pathways previously established to be regulated by Trxs. Thus, the NTRC, 2-Cys Prxs, and Fd-FTR-Trxs redox systems may act concertedly, but the nature of the relationship between them is unknown. Here we show that decreased levels of 2-Cys Prxs suppress the phenotype of the Arabidopsis thaliana ntrc KO mutant. The excess of oxidized 2-Cys Prxs in NTRC-deficient plants drains reducing power from chloroplast Trxs, which results in low efficiency of light energy utilization and impaired redox regulation of Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes. Moreover, the dramatic phenotype of the ntrc-trxf1f2 triple mutant, lacking NTRC and f -type Trxs, was also suppressed by decreased 2-Cys Prxs contents, as the ntrc-trxf1f2-Δ2cp mutant partially recovered the efficiency of light energy utilization and exhibited WT rate of CO 2 fixation and growth phenotype. The suppressor phenotype was not caused by compensatory effects of additional chloroplast antioxidant systems. It is proposed that the Fd-FTR-Trx and NTRC redox systems are linked by the redox balance of 2-Cys Prxs, which is crucial for chloroplast function. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  11. Redox regulation of plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considine, Michael J; Foyer, Christine H

    2014-09-20

    We provide a conceptual framework for the interactions between the cellular redox signaling hub and the phytohormone signaling network that controls plant growth and development to maximize plant productivity under stress-free situations, while limiting growth and altering development on exposure to stress. Enhanced cellular oxidation plays a key role in the regulation of plant growth and stress responses. Oxidative signals or cycles of oxidation and reduction are crucial for the alleviation of dormancy and quiescence, activating the cell cycle and triggering genetic and epigenetic control that underpin growth and differentiation responses to changing environmental conditions. The redox signaling hub interfaces directly with the phytohormone network in the synergistic control of growth and its modulation in response to environmental stress, but a few components have been identified. Accumulating evidence points to a complex interplay of phytohormone and redox controls that operate at multiple levels. For simplicity, we focus here on redox-dependent processes that control root growth and development and bud burst. The multiple roles of reactive oxygen species in the control of plant growth and development have been identified, but increasing emphasis should now be placed on the functions of redox-regulated proteins, along with the central roles of reductants such as NAD(P)H, thioredoxins, glutathione, glutaredoxins, peroxiredoxins, ascorbate, and reduced ferredoxin in the regulation of the genetic and epigenetic factors that modulate the growth and vigor of crop plants, particularly within an agricultural context.

  12. The Association between Diabetic Retinopathy and Levels of Ischemia-Modified Albumin, Total Thiol, Total Antioxidant Capacity, and Total Oxidative Stress in Serum and Aqueous Humor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Kirboga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the oxidant and antioxidant status of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (DRP. Methods. Forty-four patients who had cataract surgery were enrolled in the study. We included 22 patients with DRP in one group and 22 patients in the control group. Samples of aqueous humor and serum were taken from all patients. Serum and aqueous ischemia-modified albumin (IMA, total thiol, total antioxidant capacity (TAC, and total oxidative stress (TOS levels were compared in two groups. Results. Median serum IMA levels were 44.80 absorbance units in the DRP group and 40.15 absorbance units in the control group (P=0.031. Median serum total thiol levels in the DRP group were significantly less than those in the control group (3051.13 and 3910.12, resp., P=0.004. Mean TOS levels in the serum were 2.93 ± 0.19 in the DRP group and 2.61 ± 0.26 in the control group (P=0.039. The differences in mean total thiol, TAC, and TOS levels in the aqueous humor and mean TAC levels in the serum were not statistically significant. Conclusion. IMA, total thiol, and TOS levels in the serum might be useful markers in monitoring the risk of DRP development.

  13. Functional Conducting Polymers via Thiol-ene Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Kathleen E.; Martin, David C.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate here that thiol-ene chemistry can be used to provide side-chain functionalized monomers based on 3,4-propylenedioxythiophene (ProDOT) containing ionic, neutral, hydrophobic, and hydrophilic side chains. All reactions gave high yields and purification could generally be accomplished through precipitation. These monomers were polymerized either chemically or electro-chemically to give soluble materials or conductive films, respectively. This strategy provides for facile tuning of...

  14. Investigation of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticle sensors for gas analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Jared S.

    Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air and exhaled breath by sensor array is a very useful testing technique. It can provide non-invasive, fast, inexpensive testing for many diseases. Breath analysis has been very successful in identifying cancer and other diseases by using a chemiresistor sensor or array with gold nanoparticles to detect biomarkers. Acetone is a biomarker for diabetes and having a portable testing device could help to monitor diabetic and therapeutic progress. An advantage to this testing method is it is conducted at room temperature instead of 200 degrees Celsius. 3. The objective of this research is to determine the effect of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticles based on sensor(s) detection of VOCs. The VOCs to be tested are acetone, ethanol, and a mixture of acetone and ethanol. Each chip is tested under all three VOCs and three concentration levels (0.1, 1, and 5.0 ppm). VOC samples are used to test the sensors' ability to detect and differentiate VOCs. Sensors (also referred to as a chip) are prepared using several types of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticles. The factors are: thiol compound and molar volume loading of the thiol in synthesis. The average resistance results are used to determine the VOC selectivity of the sensors tested. The results show a trend of increasing resistance as VOC concentration is increased relative to dry air; which is used as baseline for VOCs. Several sensors show a high selectivity to one or more VOCs. Overall the 57 micromoles of 4-methoxy-toluenethiol sensor shows the strongest selectivity for VOCs tested. 3. Gerfen, Kurt. 2012. Detection of Acetone in Air Using Silver Ion Exchanged ZSM-5 and Zinc Oxide Sensing Films. Master of Science thesis, University of Louisville.

  15. Simple preparation of thiol-ene particles in glycerol and surface functionalization by thiol-ene chemistry (TEC) and surface chain transfer free radical polymerization (SCT-FRP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Christian; Chiaula, Valeria; Pinelo, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    functionalization of excess thiol groups via photochemical thiol-ene chemistry (TEC) resulting in a functional monolayer. In addition, surface chain transfer free radical polymerization (SCT-FRP) was used for the first time to introduce a thicker polymer layer on the particle surface. The application potential...

  16. Redox reactions in food fermentations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Egon Bech

    2018-01-01

    Food fermentations are typically performed without actively supplying air. Except for possible surface microorganisms, oxygen will only be transiently available and the redox reactions during the fermentation need to be in balance. Production of ATP from fermentation of carbohydrates typically in...... of the redox properties of strains used to compose food cultures.......Food fermentations are typically performed without actively supplying air. Except for possible surface microorganisms, oxygen will only be transiently available and the redox reactions during the fermentation need to be in balance. Production of ATP from fermentation of carbohydrates typically...... involves oxidative steps in the early part of the pathways whereas a multitude of different reactions are used as compensating reductions. Much of the diversity seen between food fermentations arise from the different routes and the different electron acceptors used by microorganisms to counterbalance...

  17. Investigation and Demonstration of Catalyst/Initiator-Driven Selectivity in Thiol-Michael Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayne, Stephen H; Murthy, Raghavendra R; Northrop, Brian H

    2017-08-04

    Thiol-Michael "click" reactions are essential synthetic tools in the preparation of various materials including polymers, dendrimers, and other macromolecules. Despite increasing efforts to apply thiol-Michael chemistry in a controlled fashion, the selectivity of base- or nucleophile-promoted thiol-Michael reactions in complex mixtures of multiple thiols and/or acceptors remains largely unknown. Herein, we report a thorough fundamental study of the selectivity of thiol-Michael reactions through a series of 270 ternary reactions using 1 H NMR spectroscopy to quantify product selectivity. The varying influences of different catalysts/initiators are explored using ternary reactions between two Michael acceptors and a single thiol or between a single Michael acceptor and two thiols using three different catalysts/initiators (triethylamine, DBU, and dimethylphenylphosphine) in chloroform. The results from the ternary reactions provide a platform from which sequential quaternary, one-pot quaternary, and sequential senary thiol-Michael reactions were designed and their selectivities quantified. These results provide insights into the design of selective thiol-Michael reactions that can be used for the synthesis and functionalization of multicomponent polymers and further informs how catalyst/initiator choice influences the reactivity between a given thiol and Michael acceptor.

  18. Organized thiol functional groups in mesoporous core shell colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchena, Martin H. [Gerencia Quimica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Avda. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Granada, Mara [Centro Atomico Bariloche-CNEA, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Instituto Balseiro-Centro Atomico Bariloche-CNEA, San Carlos de Bariloche 8400 (Argentina); Bordoni, Andrea V. [Gerencia Quimica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Avda. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Joselevich, Maria [Asociacion Civil Expedicion Ciencia, Cabrera 4948, C1414BGP Buenos Aires (Argentina); Troiani, Horacio [Centro Atomico Bariloche-CNEA, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Instituto Balseiro-Centro Atomico Bariloche-CNEA, San Carlos de Bariloche 8400 (Argentina); Williams, Federico J. [DQIAQyF-INQUIMAE FCEN, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon II, C1428EHA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Wolosiuk, Alejandro, E-mail: wolosiuk@cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia Quimica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Avda. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-03-15

    The co-condensation in situ of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a template results in the synthesis of multilayered mesoporous structured SiO{sub 2} colloids with 'onion-like' chemical environments. Thiol groups were anchored to an inner selected SiO{sub 2} porous layer in a bilayered core shell particle producing different chemical regions inside the colloidal layered structure. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) shows a preferential anchoring of the -SH groups in the double layer shell system, while porosimetry and simple chemical modifications confirm that pores are accessible. We can envision the synthesis of interesting colloidal objects with defined chemical environments with highly controlled properties. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous core shell SiO{sub 2} colloids with organized thiol groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Double shell mesoporous silica colloids templated with CTAB. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sequential deposition of mesoporous SiO{sub 2} layers with different chemistries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XPS shows the selective functionalization of mesoporous layers with thiol groups.

  19. The Measurement of Reversible Redox Dependent Post-translational Modifications and Their Regulation of Mitochondrial and Skeletal Muscle Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Philip A.; Duan, Jicheng; Qian, Wei-Jun; Marcinek, David J.

    2015-11-25

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress is a common feature of skeletal myopathies across multiple conditions; however, the mechanism by which it contributes to skeletal muscle dysfunction remains controversial. Oxidative damage to proteins, lipids, and DNA has received the most attention, yet an important role for reversible redox post-translational modifications (PTMs) in pathophysiology is emerging. The possibility that these PTMs can exert dynamic control of muscle function implicates them as a mechanism contributing to skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic disease. Herein, we discuss the significance of thiol-based redox dependent modifications to mitochondrial, myofibrillar and excitation-contraction (EC) coupling proteins with an emphasis on how these changes could alter skeletal muscle performance under chronically stressed conditions. A major barrier to a better mechanistic understanding of the role of reversible redox PTMs in muscle function is the technical challenges associated with accurately measuring the changes of site-specific redox PTMs. Here we will critically review current approaches with an emphasis on sample preparation artifacts, quantitation, and specificity. Despite these challenges, the ability to accurately quantify reversible redox PTMs is critical to understanding the mechanisms by which mitochondrial oxidative stress contributes to skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic diseases.

  20. The measurement of reversible redox dependent post-translational modifications and their regulation of mitochondrial and skeletal muscle function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A Kramer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial oxidative stress is a common feature of skeletal myopathies across multiple conditions; however, the mechanism by which it contributes to skeletal muscle dysfunction remains controversial. Oxidative damage to proteins, lipids, and DNA has received the most attention, yet an important role for reversible redox post-translational modifications (PTMs in pathophysiology is emerging. The possibility that these PTMs can exert dynamic control of muscle function implicates them as a mechanism contributing to skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic disease. Herein, we discuss the significance of thiol-based redox dependent modifications to mitochondrial, myofibrillar and excitation-contraction (EC coupling proteins with an emphasis on how these changes could alter skeletal muscle performance under chronically stressed conditions. A major barrier to a better mechanistic understanding of the role of reversible redox PTMs in muscle function is the technical challenges associated with accurately measuring the changes of site-specific redox PTMs. Here we will critically review current approaches with an emphasis on sample preparation artifacts, quantitation, and specificity. Despite these challenges, the ability to accurately quantify reversible redox PTMs is critical to understanding the mechanisms by which mitochondrial oxidative stress contributes to skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic diseases.

  1. Kinetics of deuterium isotope exchange between 2-methylpropane-2-thiol and propane-2-thiol in aprotic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wawer, A.

    1986-01-01

    The rate constants for bimolecular deuterium isotope exchange between 2-methylpropane-2-thiol and propane-2-thiol in C 6 D1 2 , CCl 4 , (CD 3 ) 2 CO, HCON(CH 3 ) 2 , (CD 2 ) 4 O, and (CH 3 ) 2 SO solutions were determined by use of H n.m.r. analysis. The rate constants, k, and activation enthalpy, ΔH decrease, and entropy, -ΔS, increases, with increase in ability of the solvents to form hydrogen bonds with alkanethiols. The rate constant of concerted hydrogen transfer inside the cyclic dimer of alkanethiols with two H-bonds, k 3 , increases with increasing dielectric constant of the solvent. (author)

  2. Inhibition of the Vacuolar-like ATPase from Halobacterium saccharovorum by Thiol Reagents: Evidence for Different Functional Thiols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Stanlotter, H.; Emrich, E.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM) inhibited the vacuolar-like ATPase from Halobacterium saccharovorum (K(sub i) approximately 1 mM) by modifying one or more of the thiols located on the largest of the subunit. ATP protected against inhibition and coincidentally prevented NEM binding which suggested that NEM acts at or near the catalytic site. p-Chloromercuriphenylsulfonate (PCMS) also inhibited this ATPase (K(sub i) approximately 90 microM). ATP did not protect against PCMS inhibition. Dithiothreitol (DTT) partially reversed PCMS inhibition and restored approximately half of the initial activity of 90% inhibited enzyme. DTT did not restore activity of the NEM-inhibited enzyme or the PCMS-inhibited enzyme when it was subsequently incubated with NEM. The failure of ATP to protect against PCMS inhibition and the inability of DTT to restore activity of enzyme incubated in the presence of PCMS and NEM suggests these reagents react with different thiols and that the PCMS-sensitive thiol may have a structural role.

  3. Peripheral HMGB1-induced hyperalgesia in mice: Redox state-dependent distinct roles of RAGE and TLR4

    OpenAIRE

    Yamasoba, Daichi; Tsubota, Maho; Domoto, Risa; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Liu, Keyue; Nishibori, Masahiro; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Taga, Atsushi; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear HMGB1 that contains 3 cysteine residues is acetylated and secreted to the extracellular space, promoting inflammation via multiple molecules such as RAGE and TLR4. We thus evaluated and characterized the redox state-dependent effects of peripheral HMGB1 on nociception. Intraplantar (i.pl.) administration of bovine thymus-derived HMGB1 (bt-HMGB1), all-thiol HMGB1 (at-HMGB1) or disulfide HMGB1 (ds-HMGB1) caused long-lasting mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. The hyperalgesia following i.p...

  4. Simulation studies on structural and thermal properties of alkane thiol capped gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, J Meena

    2017-06-01

    The structural and thermal properties of the passivated gold nanoparticles were explored employing molecular dynamics simulation for the different surface coverage densities of the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of alkane thiol. The structural properties of the monolayer protected gold nanoparticles such us overall shape, organization and conformation of the capping alkane thiol chains were found to be influenced by the capping density. The structural order of the thiol capped gold nanoparticles enhances with the increase in the surface coverage density. The specific heat capacity of the alkane thiol capped gold nanoparticles was found to increase linearly with the thiol coverage density. This may be attributed to the enhancement in the lattice vibrational energy. The present simulation results suggest, that the structural and thermal properties of the alkane thiol capped gold nanoparticles may be modified by the suitable selection of the SAM coverage density. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ester-free Thiol-X Resins: New Materials with Enhanced Mechanical Behavior and Solvent Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Podgórski, Maciej; Becka, Eftalda; Chatani, Shunsuke; Claudino, Mauro; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2015-01-01

    A series of thiol-Michael and radical thiol-ene network polymers were successfully prepared from ester-free as well as ester-containing monomer formulations. Polymerization reaction rates, dynamic mechanical analysis, and solvent resistance experiments were performed and compared between compositions with varied ester loading. The incorporation of ester-free alkyl thiol, vinyl sulfone and allylic monomers significantly improved the mechanical properties when compared with commercial, mercapto...

  6. Quantification of protein-derived thiols during atmosphere-controlled brewing in laboratory scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murmann, Anne Nordmark; Andersen, Preben; Mauch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    An atmosphere-controlled brewing system was built to study thiol oxidation during brewing in laboratory scale under conditions with limited oxygen exposure. Quantification of free and total thiols and protein showed that thiols were lost during wort boiling possibly owing to protein precipitation...... was more pronounced at longer incubation times. However, the reduction of the pool of oxidized thiols by sulfite was inefficient for sulfite concentrations typically found in beer, and the reaction was found to be relatively slow compared with reduction by tris(carboxyethyl)phosphine....

  7. Elastomeric and degradable polyanhydride network polymers by step-growth thiol-ene photopolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipp, Devon A; McQuinn, Christopher W; Rutherglen, Broden G; McBath, Ryan A

    2009-11-14

    Linear and crosslinked polyanhydrides can be made using photoinitiated thiol-ene chemistry, a simple and effective method of making crosslinked structures that have surface degradation characteristics.

  8. Distinct redox regulation in sub-cellular compartments in response to various stress conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Ayer

    Full Text Available Responses to many growth and stress conditions are assumed to act via changes to the cellular redox status. However, direct measurement of pH-adjusted redox state during growth and stress has never been carried out. Organellar redox state (E GSH was measured using the fluorescent probes roGFP2 and pHluorin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In particular, we investigated changes in organellar redox state in response to various growth and stress conditions to better understand the relationship between redox-, oxidative- and environmental stress response systems. E GSH values of the cytosol, mitochondrial matrix and peroxisome were determined in exponential and stationary phase in various media. These values (-340 to -350 mV were more reducing than previously reported. Interestingly, sub-cellular redox state remained unchanged when cells were challenged with stresses previously reported to affect redox homeostasis. Only hydrogen peroxide and heat stress significantly altered organellar redox state. Hydrogen peroxide stress altered the redox state of the glutathione disulfide/glutathione couple (GSSG, 2H(+/2GSH and pH. Recovery from moderate hydrogen peroxide stress was most rapid in the cytosol, followed by the mitochondrial matrix, with the peroxisome the least able to recover. Conversely, the bulk of the redox shift observed during heat stress resulted from alterations in pH and not the GSSG, 2H(+/2GSH couple. This study presents the first direct measurement of pH-adjusted redox state in sub-cellular compartments during growth and stress conditions. Redox state is distinctly regulated in organelles and data presented challenge the notion that perturbation of redox state is central in the response to many stress conditions.

  9. Distinct redox regulation in sub-cellular compartments in response to various stress conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayer, Anita; Sanwald, Julia; Pillay, Bethany A; Meyer, Andreas J; Perrone, Gabriel G; Dawes, Ian W

    2013-01-01

    Responses to many growth and stress conditions are assumed to act via changes to the cellular redox status. However, direct measurement of pH-adjusted redox state during growth and stress has never been carried out. Organellar redox state (E GSH) was measured using the fluorescent probes roGFP2 and pHluorin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In particular, we investigated changes in organellar redox state in response to various growth and stress conditions to better understand the relationship between redox-, oxidative- and environmental stress response systems. E GSH values of the cytosol, mitochondrial matrix and peroxisome were determined in exponential and stationary phase in various media. These values (-340 to -350 mV) were more reducing than previously reported. Interestingly, sub-cellular redox state remained unchanged when cells were challenged with stresses previously reported to affect redox homeostasis. Only hydrogen peroxide and heat stress significantly altered organellar redox state. Hydrogen peroxide stress altered the redox state of the glutathione disulfide/glutathione couple (GSSG, 2H(+)/2GSH) and pH. Recovery from moderate hydrogen peroxide stress was most rapid in the cytosol, followed by the mitochondrial matrix, with the peroxisome the least able to recover. Conversely, the bulk of the redox shift observed during heat stress resulted from alterations in pH and not the GSSG, 2H(+)/2GSH couple. This study presents the first direct measurement of pH-adjusted redox state in sub-cellular compartments during growth and stress conditions. Redox state is distinctly regulated in organelles and data presented challenge the notion that perturbation of redox state is central in the response to many stress conditions.

  10. Peripheral HMGB1-induced hyperalgesia in mice: Redox state-dependent distinct roles of RAGE and TLR4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daichi Yamasoba

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear HMGB1 that contains 3 cysteine residues is acetylated and secreted to the extracellular space, promoting inflammation via multiple molecules such as RAGE and TLR4. We thus evaluated and characterized the redox state-dependent effects of peripheral HMGB1 on nociception. Intraplantar (i.pl. administration of bovine thymus-derived HMGB1 (bt-HMGB1, all-thiol HMGB1 (at-HMGB1 or disulfide HMGB1 (ds-HMGB1 caused long-lasting mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. The hyperalgesia following i.pl. bt-HMGB1 or at-HMGB1 was attenuated by RAGE inhibitors, while the ds-HMGB1-induced hyperalgesia was abolished by a TLR4 antagonist. Thus, nociceptive processing by peripheral HMGB1 is considered dependent on its redox states.

  11. Peripheral HMGB1-induced hyperalgesia in mice: Redox state-dependent distinct roles of RAGE and TLR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasoba, Daichi; Tsubota, Maho; Domoto, Risa; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Liu, Keyue; Nishibori, Masahiro; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Taga, Atsushi; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear HMGB1 that contains 3 cysteine residues is acetylated and secreted to the extracellular space, promoting inflammation via multiple molecules such as RAGE and TLR4. We thus evaluated and characterized the redox state-dependent effects of peripheral HMGB1 on nociception. Intraplantar (i.pl.) administration of bovine thymus-derived HMGB1 (bt-HMGB1), all-thiol HMGB1 (at-HMGB1) or disulfide HMGB1 (ds-HMGB1) caused long-lasting mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. The hyperalgesia following i.pl. bt-HMGB1 or at-HMGB1 was attenuated by RAGE inhibitors, while the ds-HMGB1-induced hyperalgesia was abolished by a TLR4 antagonist. Thus, nociceptive processing by peripheral HMGB1 is considered dependent on its redox states. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Pharmacological Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Peroxiredoxin post-translational modifications by redox messengers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Riquier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxiredoxins (Prxs are a family of thiol peroxidases that participate in hydroperoxide detoxification and regulates H2O2 signaling. In mammals, the four typical 2-Cys Prxs (Prxs 1, 2, 3 and 4 are known to regulate H2O2-mediated intracellular signaling. The 2 catalytic cysteines of 2-Cys Prxs, the so-called peroxidatic and resolving cysteines, are regulatory switches that are prone to react with redox signaling molecules. We investigated the respective modifications induced by H2O2, NO and H2S in the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 by mass spectrometry and immunoblotting after separating 2-Cys Prxs by one-dimensional or two-dimensional PAGE. We found that H2S, unlike NO, does not prevent H2O2-mediated sulfinylation of 2-Cys Prxs and that Prx2 is more sensitive to NO-mediated protection against sulfinylation by peroxides. We also observed that cells exposed to exogenous NO, released by Cys-SNO or DETA-NO, or producing NO upon stimulation by IFN-γ and LPS, present an acidic form of Prx1 whose modification is consistent with S-homocysteinylation of its peroxidatic cysteine.

  13. Transsulfuration pathway thiols and methylated arginines: the Hunter Community Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arduino A Mangoni

    Full Text Available Serum homocysteine, when studied singly, has been reported to be positively associated both with the endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine [ADMA, via inhibition of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH activity] and with symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA. We investigated combined associations between transsulfuration pathway thiols, including homocysteine, and serum ADMA and SDMA concentrations at population level.Data on clinical and demographic characteristics, medication exposure, C-reactive protein, serum ADMA and SDMA (LC-MS/MS, and thiols (homocysteine, cysteine, taurine, glutamylcysteine, total glutathione, and cysteinylglycine; capillary electrophoresis were collected from a sample of the Hunter Community Study on human ageing [n = 498, median age (IQR = 64 (60-70 years].REGRESSION ANALYSIS SHOWED THAT: a age (P = 0.001, gender (P = 0.03, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, P = 0.08, body mass index (P = 0.008, treatment with beta-blockers (P = 0.03, homocysteine (P = 0.02, and glutamylcysteine (P = 0.003 were independently associated with higher ADMA concentrations; and b age (P = 0.001, absence of diabetes (P = 0.001, lower body mass index (P = 0.01, lower eGFR (P<0.001, cysteine (P = 0.007, and glutamylcysteine (P < 0.001 were independently associated with higher SDMA concentrations. No significant associations were observed between methylated arginines and either glutathione or taurine concentrations.After adjusting for clinical, demographic, biochemical, and pharmacological confounders the combined assessment of transsulfuration pathway thiols shows that glutamylcysteine has the strongest and positive independent associations with ADMA and SDMA. Whether this reflects a direct effect of glutamylcysteine on DDAH activity (for ADMA and/or cationic amino acid transport requires further investigations.

  14. Fractionation and purification of the thiol proteinases from papaya latex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekeyser, P M; De Smedt, S; Demeester, J; Lauwers, A

    1994-06-03

    Three cysteine proteinases, i.e. chymopapain, papaya proteinase IV and proteinase III, were purified to homogeneity from papaya latex using a combination of ion-exchange chromatography and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. During the purification procedure, the thiol-groups of the active center were reversibly blocked as mixed disulfides with 2-thiopyridone. Homogeneity was proved electrophoretically by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-PAGE and rechromatography on a Mono S 5/5 column at pH 5.0.

  15. Rapid Access to Phospholipid Analogs Using Thiol-yne Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-19

    7–8 min 100% Phase B to 50% Phase B in Phase A (Phase A: H2O with 0.1% formic acid , Phase B: MeOH with 0.1% formic acid ). Anisotropy Measurements...1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (HPTS) in H2O, pH ¼ 7.4) was added to 100 mL of lipid solution. Themixture was icked to form an emulsion. The emulsion was...discussion The mechanism of thiol-yne click chemistry has been previ- ously elucidated.52 The addition of a thiyl radical to an alkyne results in a carbon

  16. Chiral liquid crystalline thiols for preparation of polybutadiene diols

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubnov, Alexej; Kašpar, Miroslav; Sedláková, Zdeňka; Ilavský, Michal

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 5 (2008), s. 653-660 ISSN 0267-8292 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/0431; GA MŠk OC 175; GA AV ČR IAA4112401; GA AV ČR IAA100100710 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : monomers * liquid crystal * polybutadiene s * chiral thiol Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.132, year: 2008

  17. Protein and low molecular mass thiols as targets and inhibitors of glycation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jingmin; Davies, Michael J

    2006-12-01

    Protein glycation has been implicated in the aging process as well as the complications of diabetes (retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy, and atherosclerosis). The nitrogen substituents of Lys, Arg, and His residues and the N-terminus of proteins are known to be readily glycated. As the thiol group of Cys is a powerful nucleophile, we hypothesized that Cys residues should also be targets of glycation and that low molecular mass thiols may act as protective agents. In this study the role of thiol glycation, induced by dicarbonyls, in protein cross-link formation and damage prevention is examined. It is shown that incubation of creatine kinase with glyoxal results in protein cross-link formation, with this occurring concurrently with loss of thiol groups, enzyme inactivation, and formation of S-carboxymethylcysteine, a product of glyoxal adduction to Cys residues. Cross-links have also been detected between N-acetylcysteine and the Lys-rich protein histone H1, demonstrating the formation of thiol-glyoxal-amine cross-links. Mass spectrometry has been used to characterize some of these cross-links as 2-(alkylthio)acetamides. A range of low molecular mass thiols have been shown to inhibit dicarbonyl adduction to, and cross-linking of, the thiol-free protein lysozyme, consistent with these thiols being alternative (sacrificial) targets of glycation. Some of these thiols are more efficient modulators of glycation than established glycation inhibitors such as aminoguanidine. These data demonstrate that thiols are facile targets of glycation and that low molecular mass thiols are potent glycation inhibitors. These data may aid the design of therapeutic agents for the treatment of the complications of diabetes.

  18. The role of thiols in cellular response to radiation and drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biaglow, J E; Varnes, M E; Clark, E P; Epp, E R

    1983-09-01

    Cellular nonprotein thiols (NPSH) consist of glutathione (GSH) and other low molecular weight species such as cysteine, cysteamine, and coenzyme A. GSH is usually less than the total cellular NPSH, and with thiol reactive agents, such as diethyl maleate (DEM), its rate of depletion is in part dependent upon the cellular capacity for its resynthesis. If resynthesis is blocked by buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine(BSO), the NPSH, including GSH, is depleted more rapidly, Cellular thiol depletion by diamide, N-ethylmaleimide, and BSO may render oxygenated cells more sensitive to radiation. These cells may or may not show a reduction in the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER). Human A549 lung carcinoma cells depleted of their NPSH either by prolonged culture or by BSO treatment do not show a reduced OER but do show increased aerobic responses to radiation. Some nitroheterocyclic radiosensitizing drugs also deplete cellular thiols under aerobic conditions. Such reactivity may be the reason that they show anomalous radiation sensitization (i.e., better than predicted on the basis of electron affinity). Other nitrocompounds, such as misonidazole, are activated under hypoxic conditions to radical intermediates. When cellular thiols are depleted peroxide is formed. Under hypoxic conditions thiols are depleted because metabolically reduced intermediates react with GSH instead of oxygen. Thiol depletion, under hypoxic conditions, may be the reason that misonidazole and other nitrocompounds show an extra enhancement ratio with hypoxic cells. Thiol depletion by DEM or BSO alters the radiation response of hypoxic cells to misonidazole. In conclusion, we propose an altered thiol model which includes a mechanism for thiol involvement in the aerobic radiation response of cells. This mechanism involves both thiol-linked hydrogen donation to oxygen radical adducts to produce hydroperoxides followed by a GSH peroxidase-catalyzed reduction of the hydroperoxides to intermediates entering into

  19. Non-protein thiol imaging and quantification in live cells with a novel benzofurazan sulfide triphenylphosphonium fluorogenic compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Guan, Xiangming

    2017-05-01

    Thiols (-SH) play various roles in biological systems. They are divided into protein thiols (PSH) and non-protein thiols (NPSH). Due to the significant roles thiols play in various physiological/pathological functions, numerous analytical methods have been developed for thiol assays. Most of these methods are developed for glutathione, the major form of NPSH. Majority of these methods require tissue/cell homogenization before analysis. Due to a lack of effective thiol-specific fluorescent/fluorogenic reagents, methods for imaging and quantifying thiols in live cells are limited. Determination of an analyte in live cells can reveal information that cannot be revealed by analysis of cell homogenates. Previously, we reported a thiol-specific thiol-sulfide exchange reaction. Based on this reaction, a benzofurazan sulfide thiol-specific fluorogenic reagent was developed. The reagent was able to effectively image and quantify total thiols (PSH+NPSH) in live cells through fluorescence microscopy. The reagent was later named as GUALY's reagent. Here we would like to report an extension of the work by synthesizing a novel benzofurazan sulfide triphenylphosphonium derivative [(((7,7'-thiobis(benzo[c][1,2,5]oxadiazole-4,4'-sulfonyl))bis(methylazanediyl))bis(butane-4,1-diyl))bis(triphenylphosphonium) (TBOP)]. Like GUALY's reagent, TBOP is a thiol-specific fluorogenic agent that is non-fluorescent but forms fluorescent thiol adducts in a thiol-specific fashion. Different than GUALY's reagent, TBOP reacts only with NPSH but not with PSH. TBOP was effectively used to image and quantify NPSH in live cells using fluorescence microscopy. TBOP is a complementary reagent to GUALY's reagent in determining the roles of PSH, NPSH, and total thiols in thiol-related physiological/pathological functions in live cells through fluorescence microscopy. Graphical Abstract Live cell imaging and quantification of non-protein thiols by TBOP.

  20. Acupuncture Mechanism and Redox Equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Hong Zeng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress participates in the pathological process of various diseases. Acupuncture is a component of the health care system in China that can be traced back for at least 3000 years. Recently, increased evidences indicate that acupuncture stimulation could reduce oxidative damage in organisms under pathological state, but the exact mechanism remains unclear. This review focuses on the emerging links between acupuncture and redox modulation in various disorders, such as vascular dementia, Parkinson’s disease, and hypertension, ranging from redox system, antioxidant system, anti-inflammatory system, and nervous system to signaling pathway. Although the molecular and cellular pathways studies of acupuncture effect on oxidative stress are preliminary, they represent an important step forward in the research of acupuncture antioxidative effect.

  1. Modulation of Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane Redox System Activity by Curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma membrane redox system (PMRS is an electron transport chain system ubiquitously present throughout all cell types. It transfers electron from intracellular substrates to extracellular acceptors for regulation of redox status. Curcumin, isolated from Curcuma longa, has modulatory effects on cellular physiology due to its membrane interaction ability and antioxidant potential. The present study investigates the effect of curcumin on PMRS activity of erythrocytes isolated from Wistar rats in vitro and in vivo and validated through an in silico docking simulation study using Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD. Effects of curcumin were also evaluated on level of glutathione (GSH and the oxidant potential of plasma measured in terms of plasma ferric equivalent oxidative potentials (PFEOP. Results show that curcumin significantly (p<0.01 downregulated the PMRS activity in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular docking results suggest that curcumin interacts with amino acids at the active site cavity of cytochrome b5 reductase, a key constituent of PMRS. Curcumin also increased the GSH level in erythrocytes and plasma while simultaneously decreasing the oxidant potential (PFEOP of plasma. Altered PMRS activity and redox status are associated with the pathophysiology of several health complications including aging and diabetes; hence, the above finding may explain part of the role of curcumin in health beneficial effects.

  2. Stoichiometry of mercury-thiol complexes on bacterial cell envelopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Bhoopesh; Shoenfelt, Elizabeth; Yu, Qiang; Yee, Nathan; Fein, Jeremy B.; Myneni, Satish C. B.

    2017-08-01

    We have examined the speciation of Hg(II) complexed with intact cell suspensions (1013 cells L- 1) of Bacillus subtilis, a common gram-positive soil bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a facultative gram-negative aquatic organism, and Geobacter sulfurreducens, a gram-negative anaerobic bacterium capable of Hg-methylation at Hg(II) loadings spanning four orders of magnitude (120 nM to 350 μM) at pH 5.5 (± 0.2). The coordination environments of Hg on bacterial cells were analyzed using synchrotron based X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy at the Hg LIII edge. The abundance of thiols on intact cells was determined by a fluorescence-spectroscopy based method using a soluble bromobimane, monobromo(trimethylammonio)bimane (qBBr) to block thiol sites, and potentiometric titrations of biomass with and without qBBr treatment. The chemical forms of S on intact bacterial cells were determined using S k-edge XANES spectroscopy.

  3. Novel Thiol-Ene Hybrid Coating for Metal Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Taghavikish

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel hybrid anticorrosion coating with dual network of inorganic (Si–O–Si and organic bonds (C–S–C was prepared on metal through an in situ sol-gel and thiol-ene click reaction. This novel interfacial thin film coating incorporates (3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane (MPTS and 1,4-di(vinylimidazolium butane bisbromide based polymerizable ionic liquid (PIL to form a thiol-ene based photo-polymerized film, which on subsequent sol-gel reaction forms a thin hybrid interfacial layer on metal surface. On top of this PIL hybrid film, a self-assembled nanophase particle (SNAP coating was employed to prepare a multilayer thin film coating for better corrosion protection and barrier performance. The novel PIL hybrid film was characterised for structure and properties using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The corrosion protection performance of the multilayer coating was examined using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. The results reveal that this novel double layer coating on metal offers excellent protection against corrosion and has remarkably improved the barrier effect of the coating.

  4. Impairment of thiol-disulfide homeostasis in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Vakkas; Kurdoglu, Zehra; Alisik, Murat; Cetin, Orkun; Korkmaz, Hilal; Surer, Hatice; Erel, Ozcan

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the effects of severity of preeclampsia on thiol-disulfide homeostasis (TDH). A total of 108 participants were divided into three groups: Group 1 was composed of pregnant women with no obstetric complications, Group 2 included pregnant women with mild preeclampsia, and Group 3 consisted of pregnant women with severe preeclampsia. TDH parameters were determined, and comparisons of clinical and routine laboratory test findings were made in all groups. The serum native thiol level was 347.9 ± 27.4 in the control group, 237.2 ± 44.2 in the mild preeclampsia group, and 227.9 ± 53.1 in the severe preeclampsia group (p preeclampsia group, and 248.3 ± 57.4 in the severe preeclampsia group (p preeclampsia group, and 10.2 ± 4.8 in the severe preeclampsia group (p = 0.001). A significant correlation between impairment in degree of TDH and severity of preeclampsia was observed. TDH was impaired in women with preeclampsia, and this impairment increased with disease severity. Therefore, impaired TDH may have a role in the etiopathogenesis of the disease.

  5. Surfactant-free coating of thiols on gold nanoparticles using sonochemistry: a study of competing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallipurath, Anuradha; Nicoletti, Olivia; Skelton, Jonathan M; Mahajan, Sumeet; Midgley, Paul A; Elliott, Stephen R

    2014-09-01

    A method for the surfactant-free coating of gold nanoparticles with thiols using sonochemistry is presented. The gold nanoparticles were prepared by a modified Zsigmondy method, affording good control over the particle-size distribution, and the thiol coating was performed by the sonication of a biphasic system consisting of a nanoparticle suspension in water and thiols in toluene. The effects of two important reaction parameters on the particle morphology, viz. sonication time and thiol concentration, were investigated in detail using transmission electron microscopy. The effect of the thiol chain length was also studied. We show that the morphology of the coated particles is determined through a competition between two opposing effects: particle fusion, due to the sonication conditions, and digestive ripening, due to the action of the thiols. Additionally, we illustrate the utility of our technique for various applications, including surface-enhanced Raman scattering from bound molecules, and further functionalization using a thiol-exchange reaction. Our technique paves the way for an efficient synthesis of thiol-coated AuNPs of different shapes and sizes, suitable for a range of diverse applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Orented immobilization of farnesylated proteins by the thiol-ene reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinrich, Dirk; Lin, Po-Chiao; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Nguyen, Uyen T.T.; Schröder, Hendrik; Niemeyer, Christof M.; Alexandrov, Kirill; Goody, Roger; Waldmann, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    Anchoring the protein: Proteins were immobilized rapidly under mild conditions by thiol-ene photocoupling between S-farnesyl groups attached to a genetically encodable “CAAX-box” tetrapeptide sequence (A is aliphatic) at the C terminus of the protein and surface-exposed thiols (see scheme). This

  7. EFFECTS OF ATMOSPHERIC H2S ON THIOL COMPOSITION OF CROP PLANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUWALDA, F; DE KOK, LJ; Stulen, I.

    Exposure of crop plants to H2S resulted in an increase in thiol level and a change in the composition of the thiol pool. Non-leguminous species accumulated cysteine and glutathione in the light, whereas in the dark, substantial amounts of gamma-glutamyl-cysteine were also detected. In leguminous

  8. Rapid photochemical surface patterning of proteins in thiol-ene based microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafleur, Josiane P.; Kwapiszewski, Radoslaw; Jensen, Thomas Glasdam

    2012-01-01

    ” and “ene” monomers present in the microfluidic chip bulk material provides a simple and efficient way of tuning the chip’s surface chemistry. Here, thiol-ene chips displaying an excess of functional thiol groups at their surfaces are functionalized with biotin and streptavidin in a controlled fashion using...

  9. Determination of thiol groups and disulphide bonds in wheat flour and dough

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graveland, A.; Bosveld, P.; Marseille, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    A study was made of the conditions for determining all thiol (SH) groups and disulphide (S—S) bonds in wheat flour and dough. Thiol groups were determined by amperometric titration with Ag2SO4, the flour or dough which contains proteins and peptides being suspended in a solution of 6 m urea and 10−4

  10. The role of thiols in cellular response to radiation and drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaglow, J.E.; Varnes, M.E.; Clark, E.P.; Epp, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    Cellular nonprotein thiols (NPSH) consist of glutathione (GSH) and other low molecular weight species such as cysteine, cysteamine, and coenzyme A. GSH is usually less than the total cellular NPSH, and with thiol reactive agents, such as diethyl maleate (DEM), its rate of depletion is in part dependent upon the cellular capacity for its resynthesis. If resynthesis is blocked by buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine(BSO), the NPSH, including GSH, is depleted more rapidly, Cellular thiol depletion by diamide, N-ethylmaleimide, and BSO may render oxygenated cells more sensitive to radiation. These cells may or may not show a reduction in the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER). Human A549 lung carcinoma cells depleted of their NPSH either by prolonged culture or by BSO treatment do not show a reduced OER but do show increased aerobic responses to radiation. Some nitroheterocyclic radiosensitizing drugs also deplete cellular thiols under aerobic conditions. Such reactivity may be the reason that they show anomalous radiation sensitization (i.e., better than predicted on the basis of electron affinity). Other nitrocompounds, such as misonidazole, are activated under hypoxic conditions to radical intermediates. When cellular thiols are depleted peroxide is formed. Under hypoxic conditions thiols are depleted because metabolically reduced intermediates react with GSH instead of oxygen. Thiol depletion, under hypoxic conditions, may be the reason that misonidazole and other nitrocompounds show an extra enhancement ratio with hypoxic cells. Thiol depletion by DEM or BSO alters the radiation response of hypoxic cells to misonidazole

  11. The role of thiols in cellular response to radiation and drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biaglow, J.E.; Varnes, M.E.; Clark, E.P.; Epp, E.R.

    1983-09-01

    Cellular nonprotein thiols (NPSH) consist of glutathione (GSH) and other low molecular weight species such as cysteine, cysteamine, and coenzyme A. GSH is usually less than the total cellular NPSH, and with thiol reactive agents, such as diethyl maleate (DEM), its rate of depletion is in part dependent upon the cellular capacity for its resynthesis. If resynthesis is blocked by buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine(BSO), the NPSH, including GSH, is depleted more rapidly, Cellular thiol depletion by diamide, N-ethylmaleimide, and BSO may render oxygenated cells more sensitive to radiation. These cells may or may not show a reduction in the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER). Human A549 lung carcinoma cells depleted of their NPSH either by prolonged culture or by BSO treatment do not show a reduced OER but do show increased aerobic responses to radiation. Some nitroheterocyclic radiosensitizing drugs also deplete cellular thiols under aerobic conditions. Such reactivity may be the reason that they show anomalous radiation sensitization (i.e., better than predicted on the basis of electron affinity). Other nitrocompounds, such as misonidazole, are activated under hypoxic conditions to radical intermediates. When cellular thiols are depleted peroxide is formed. Under hypoxic conditions thiols are depleted because metabolically reduced intermediates react with GSH instead of oxygen. Thiol depletion, under hypoxic conditions, may be the reason that misonidazole and other nitrocompounds show an extra enhancement ratio with hypoxic cells. Thiol depletion by DEM or BSO alters the radiation response of hypoxic cells to misonidazole.

  12. Equilibrium mercury isotope fractionation between dissolved Hg(II) species and thiol-bound Hg

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiederhold, Jan G.; Cramer, Christopher J.; Daniel, Kelly; Infante, Ivan; Bourdon, Bernard; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    Stable Hg isotope ratios provide a new tool to trace environmental Hg cycling. Thiols (-SH) are the dominant Hg-binding groups in natural organic matter. Here, we report experimental and computational results on equilibrium Hg isotope fractionation between dissolved Hg(II) species and thiol-bound

  13. A method for site-specific labeling of multiple protein thiols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Johanna M.; Pluta, Radek; Huibers, Wim H. C.; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Geertsma, Eric R.; Poolman, Bert

    We present a generic method for the site-specific and differential labeling of multiple cysteine residues in one protein. Phenyl arsenic oxide has been employed as a protecting group of two closely spaced thiols, allowing first labeling of a single thiol. Subsequently, the protecting group is

  14. Preparation and Preliminary Dielectric Characterization of Structured C60-Thiol-Ene Polymer Nanocomposites Assembled Using the Thiol-Ene Click Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Hanaa M.; Windham, Amber D.; Al-Ejji, Maryam M.; Al-Qahtani, Noora H.; Hassan, Mohammad K.; Mauritz, Kenneth A.; Buchanan, Randy K.; Buchanan, J. Paige

    2015-01-01

    Fullerene-containing materials have the ability to store and release electrical energy. Therefore, fullerenes may ultimately find use in high-voltage equipment devices or as super capacitors for high electric energy storage due to this ease of manipulating their excellent dielectric properties and their high volume resistivity. A series of structured fullerene (C60) polymer nanocomposites were assembled using the thiol-ene click reaction, between alkyl thiols and allyl functionalized C60 deri...

  15. ?Grafting to? of RAFTed Responsive Polymers to Glass Substrates by Thiol?Ene and Critical Comparison to Thiol?Gold Coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Biggs, Caroline I.; Walker, Marc; Gibson, Matthew I.

    2016-01-01

    Surface-grafted polymers have been widely applied to modulate biological interfaces and introduce additional functionality. Polymers derived from reversible addition?fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization have a masked thiol at the ?-chain end providing an anchor point for conjugation and in particular displays high affinity for gold surfaces (both flat and particulate). In this work, we report the direct grafting of RAFTed polymers by a ?thiol?ene click? (Michael addition) onto glass s...

  16. Quantitation Method for Polyfunctional Thiols in Hops (Humulus lupulus L.) and Beer Using Specific Extraction of Thiols and Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takazumi, Koji; Takoi, Kiyoshi; Koie, Koichiro; Tuchiya, Youichi

    2017-11-07

    A method for the quantitation of six polyfunctional thiols, 4-methyl-4-sulfanylpentan-2-one (4MSP), 3-sulfanyl-4-methylpentan-1-ol (3S4MP), 3-sulfanyl-4-methylpentyl acetate (3S4MPA), 3-sulfanyl-3-methylbutan-1-ol (3S3MB), 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol (3SH), and 3-sulfanylhexyl acetate (3SHA), in hops and beer without organic mercury compounds was developed. The method employed specific extraction of thiols using a silver ion solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). For all thiols analyzed, good linearity was achieved by adding thioglycerol as an analyte protectant. Recoveries for both hops (74-100%) and beer (79-113%) were acceptable, and the repeatability for both was also good (relative standard deviations of 2.8-8.4%). The limits of detection for the six polyfunctional thiols were below their odor thresholds in beer. The method was applied to quantitation of hops and beer flavored with thiol-containing hop varieties. Due to their detected levels and level variations in different beers, 4MSP and 3S4MP are thought to be important polyfunctional thiols for the characteristic flavor of hop varieties.

  17. Ester-free Thiol-X Resins: New Materials with Enhanced Mechanical Behavior and Solvent Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgórski, Maciej; Becka, Eftalda; Chatani, Shunsuke; Claudino, Mauro; Bowman, Christopher N

    A series of thiol-Michael and radical thiol-ene network polymers were successfully prepared from ester-free as well as ester-containing monomer formulations. Polymerization reaction rates, dynamic mechanical analysis, and solvent resistance experiments were performed and compared between compositions with varied ester loading. The incorporation of ester-free alkyl thiol, vinyl sulfone and allylic monomers significantly improved the mechanical properties when compared with commercial, mercaptopropionate-based thiol-ene or thiol-Michael networks. For polymers with no hydrolytically degradable esters, glass transition temperatures (T g 's) as high as 100 °C were achieved. Importantly, solvent resistance tests demonstrated enhanced stability of ester-free formulations over PETMP-based polymers, especially in concentrated basic solutions. Kinetic analysis showed that glassy step-growth polymers are readily formed at ambient conditions with conversions reaching 80% and higher.

  18. Thiol-ene click chemistry: a biocompatible way for orthogonal bioconjugation of colloidal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Hou, Weijia; Sun, Hao; Cui, Cheng; Zhang, Liqin; Jiang, Ying; Wu, Yongxiang; Wang, Yanyue; Li, Juan; Sumerlin, Brent S; Liu, Qiaoling; Tan, Weihong

    2017-09-01

    Bioconjugation based on crosslinking primary amines to carboxylic acid groups has found broad applications in protein modification, drug development, and nanomaterial functionalization. However, proteins, which are made up of amino acids, typically give nonselective bioconjugation when using primary amine-based crosslinking. In order to control protein orientation and activity after conjugation, selective bioconjugation is desirable. We herein report an efficient and cysteine-selective thiol-ene click reaction-based bioconjugation strategy using colloidal nanoparticles. The resulting thiol-ene based aptamer and enzyme nanoconjugates demonstrated excellent target binding ability and enzymatic activity, respectively. Thus, thiol-ene click chemistry can provide a stable and robust crosslinker in a biocompatible manner for bioconjugation of any thiol-containing biomolecule with nanomaterials. This will open more opportunities for applications of thiol-ene reactions and functional colloidal nanoparticles in chemical biology.

  19. Oxidant-redox regulation of pulmonary vascular responses to hypoxia and nitric oxide-cGMP signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolin, Michael S; Gupte, Sachin A; Neo, Boon Hwa; Gao, Qun; Ahmad, Mansoor

    2010-01-01

    Most current theories for the mechanism of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) include a role for reactive oxygen species and/or changes in redox regulation, but extreme controversy exists regarding which systems and redox changes mediate the HPV response. Nitric oxide (NO) appears to help to maintain low pulmonary arterial pressure, suppress HPV, and prevent the development of pulmonary hypertension. Our studies have found a key role for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in bovine pulmonary arterial smooth muscle functioning to maintain elevated levels of cytosolic NADPH which fuels the generation of vasodilator levels of hydrogen peroxide. HPV results from hypoxia removing vasodilation by peroxide. Decreased superoxide generation by Nox4 oxidase and its conversion to peroxide by Cu,Zn-SOD appear to be potential factors in sensing hypoxia, and decreased cGMP-associated vasodilation and removal of redox controlled vasodilator mechanisms by increased cytosolic NADPH may be key coordinators of the HPV response. Oxidant generation associated with vascular disease processes, including the removal of NO by superoxide, and attenuation of its ability to stimulate cGMP production by oxidation of the heme and thiols of soluble guanylate cyclase attenuate potential beneficial actions of NO on pulmonary arterial function. While pulmonary hypertension appears to have multiple poorly understood effects on redox-associated processes, potentially influencing responses to hypoxia and NO-cGMP signaling, much remains to be elucidated regarding how these processes may be important factors in the progression, expression and therapeutic treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  20. The anabolic androgenic steroid nandrolone decanoate disrupts redox homeostasis in liver, heart and kidney of male Wistar rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan P Frankenfeld

    Full Text Available The abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS may cause side effects in several tissues. Oxidative stress is linked to the pathophysiology of most of these alterations, being involved in fibrosis, cellular proliferation, tumorigenesis, amongst others. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the impact of supraphysiological doses of nandrolone decanoate (DECA on the redox balance of liver, heart and kidney. Wistar male rats were treated with intramuscular injections of vehicle or DECA (1 mg.100 g(-1 body weight once a week for 8 weeks. The activity and mRNA levels of NADPH Oxidase (NOX, and the activity of catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx and total superoxide dismutase (SOD, as well as the reduced thiol and carbonyl residue proteins, were measured in liver, heart and kidney. DECA treatment increased NOX activity in heart and liver, but NOX2 mRNA levels were only increased in heart. Liver catalase and SOD activities were decreased in the DECA-treated group, but only catalase activity was decreased in the kidney. No differences were detected in GPx activity. Thiol residues were decreased in the liver and kidney of treated animals in comparison to the control group, while carbonyl residues were increased in the kidney after the treatment. Taken together, our results show that chronically administered DECA is able to disrupt the cellular redox balance, leading to an oxidative stress state.

  1. Amplified and in situ detection of redox-active metabolite using a biobased redox capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Gordonov, Tanya; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2013-02-19

    Redox cycling provides a mechanism to amplify electrochemical signals for analyte detection. Previous studies have shown that diverse mediators/shuttles can engage in redox-cycling reactions with a biobased redox capacitor that is fabricated by grafting redox-active catechols onto a chitosan film. Here, we report that redox cycling with this catechol-chitosan redox capacitor can amplify electrochemical signals for detecting a redox-active bacterial metabolite. Specifically, we studied the redox-active bacterial metabolite pyocyanin that is reported to be a virulence factor and signaling molecule for the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa. We demonstrate that redox cycling can amplify outputs from various electrochemical methods (cyclic voltammetry, chronocoulometry, and differential pulse voltammetry) and can lower the detection limit of pyocyanin to 50 nM. Further, the compatibility of this biobased redox capacitor allows the in situ monitoring of the production of redox-active metabolites (e.g., pyocyanin) during the course of P. aeruginosa cultivation. We anticipate that the amplified output of redox-active virulence factors should permit an earlier detection of life-threatening infections by the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa while the "bio-compatibility" of this measurement approach should facilitate in situ study of the spatiotemporal dynamics of bacterial redox signaling.

  2. The Role of Follicular Fluid Thiol/Disulphide Homeostasis in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tola, Esra Nur; Köroğlu, Nadiye; Ergin, Merve; Oral, Hilmi Baha; Turgut, Abdülkadir; Erel, Özcan

    2018-04-04

    Oxidative stress is suggested as a potential triggering factor in the etiopathogenesis of Polycystic ovary syndrome related infertility. Thiol/disulphide homeostasis, a recently oxidative stress marker, is one of the antioxidant mechanism in human which have critical roles in folliculogenesis and ovulation. The aim of our study is to investigate follicular fluid thiol/disulphide homeostasis in the etiopathogenesis of Polycystic ovary syndrome and to determine its' association with in vitro fertilization outcome. The study procedures were approved by local ethic committee. Cross sectional design Methods: Follicular fluid of twenty-two Polycystic ovary syndrome women and twenty ovulatory controls undergoing in vitro fertilization treatment were recruited. Thiol/disulphide homeostasis was analyzed via a novel spectrophotometric method. Follicular native thiol levels were found to be lower in Polycystic ovary syndrome group than non- Polycystic ovary syndrome group (p=0.041) as well as native thiol/total thiol ratio (pPolycystic ovary syndrome group (pPolycystic ovary syndrome patients was found. A positive predictive effect of native thiol on fertilization rate among Polycystic ovary syndrome group was also found (p=0.03, β=0.45, 95% CI=0.031-0.643). Deterioration in thiol/disulphide homeostasis, especially elevated disulphide levels could be one of the etiopathogenetic mechanism in Polycystic ovary syndrome. Increased native thiol levels is related to fertilization rate among Polycystic ovary syndrome patients and also positive predictor marker of fertilization rate among Polycystic ovary syndrome patients. Improvement of thiol/disulphide homeostasis could be of importance in the treatment of Polycystic ovary syndrome to increase in vitro fertilization success in Polycystic ovary syndrome.

  3. Engineering redox balance through cofactor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiulai; Li, Shubo; Liu, Liming

    2014-06-01

    Redox balance plays an important role in the production of enzymes, pharmaceuticals, and chemicals. To meet the demands of industrial production, it is desirable that microbes maintain a maximal carbon flux towards target metabolites with no fluctuations in redox. This requires functional cofactor systems that support dynamic homeostasis between different redox states or functional stability in a given redox state. Redox balance can be achieved by improving the self-balance of a cofactor system, regulating the substrate balance of a cofactor system, and engineering the synthetic balance of a cofactor system. This review summarizes how cofactor systems can be manipulated to improve redox balance in microbes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. MexT functions as a redox-responsive regulator modulating disulfide stress resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargier, Emilie; Mac Aogáin, Micheál; Mooij, Marlies J; Woods, David F; Morrissey, John P; Dobson, Alan D W; Adams, Claire; O'Gara, Fergal

    2012-07-01

    MexT is a global LysR transcriptional regulator known to modulate antibiotic resistance and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, a novel role for MexT in mediating intrinsic disulfide stress resistance was demonstrated, representing the first identified phenotype associated with inactivation of this regulator in wild-type cells. Disruption of mexT resulted in increased susceptibility to the disulfide stress elicitor diamide [diazenedicarboxylic acid bis(N,N,-di-methylamide)]. This compound is known to elicit a specific stress response via depletion of reduced glutathione and alteration of the cellular redox environment, implicating MexT in redox control. In support of this, MexT-regulated targets, including the MexEF-OprN multidrug efflux system, were induced by subinhibitory concentrations of diamide. A mexF insertion mutant also exhibited increased diamide susceptibility, implicating the MexEF-OprN efflux system in MexT-associated disulfide stress resistance. Purified MexT protein was observed to form an oligomeric complex in the presence of oxidized glutathione, with a calculated redox potential of -189 mV. This value far exceeds the thiol-disulfide redox potential of the bacterial cytoplasm, ensuring that MexT remains reduced under normal physiological conditions. MexT is activated by mutational disruption of the predicted quinone oxidoreductase encoded by mexS. Alterations in the cellular redox state were observed in a mexS mutant (PA14nfxC), supporting a model whereby the perception of MexS-associated redox signals by MexT leads to the induction of the MexEF-OprN efflux system, which, in turn, may mediate disulfide stress resistance via efflux of electrophilic compounds.

  5. Redox-Mediated and Ionizing-Radiation-Induced Inflammatory Mediators in Prostate Cancer Development and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Lu; Holley, Aaron K.; Zhao, Yanming; St. Clair, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Radiation therapy is widely used for treatment of prostate cancer. Radiation can directly damage biologically important molecules; however, most effects of radiation-mediated cell killing are derived from the generated free radicals that alter cellular redox status. Multiple proinflammatory mediators can also influence redox status in irradiated cells and the surrounding microenvironment, thereby affecting prostate cancer progression and radiotherapy efficiency. Recent Advances: Ionizing radiation (IR)–generated oxidative stress can regulate and be regulated by the production of proinflammatory mediators. Depending on the type and stage of the prostate cancer cells, these proinflammatory mediators may lead to different biological consequences ranging from cell death to development of radioresistance. Critical Issues: Tumors are heterogeneous and dynamic communication occurs between stromal and prostate cancer cells, and complicated redox-regulated mechanisms exist in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory strategies should be carefully evaluated for each patient at different stages of the disease to maximize therapeutic benefits while minimizing unintended side effects. Future Directions: Compared with normal cells, tumor cells are usually under higher oxidative stress and secrete more proinflammatory mediators. Thus, redox status is often less adaptive in tumor cells than in their normal counterparts. This difference can be exploited in a search for new cancer therapeutics and treatment regimes that selectively activate cell death pathways in tumor cells with minimal unintended consequences in terms of chemo- and radio-resistance in tumor cells and toxicity in normal tissues. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1481–1500. PMID:24093432

  6. Characterization of redox proteins using electrochemical methods

    OpenAIRE

    Verhagen, M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of electrochemical techniques in combination with proteins started approximately a decade ago and has since then developed into a powerfull technique for the study of small redox proteins. In addition to the determination of redox potentials, electrochemistry can be used to obtain information about the kinetics of electron transfer between proteins and about the dynamic behaviour of redox cofactors in proteins. This thesis describes the results of a study, initiated to get a ...

  7. Radii of Redox Components from Absolute Redox Potentials Compared with Covalent and Aqueous Ionic Radii

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heyrovská, Raji

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 9 (2010), s. 903-907 ISSN 1040-0397 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Electrochemistry * Absolute redox potentials * Radii of redox components Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.721, year: 2010

  8. Redox proteomics uncovers peroxynitrite-sensitive proteins that help Escherichia coli to overcome nitrosative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Claudia; Lupilova, Nataliya; Müller, Alexandra; Warscheid, Bettina; Meyer, Helmut E; Kuhlmann, Katja; Eisenacher, Martin; Leichert, Lars I

    2013-07-05

    Peroxynitrite is a highly reactive chemical species with antibacterial properties that are synthesized in immune cells. In a proteomic approach, we identified specific target proteins of peroxynitrite-induced modifications in Escherichia coli. Although peroxynitrite caused a fairly indiscriminate nitration of tyrosine residues, reversible modifications of protein thiols were highly specific. We used a quantitative redox proteomic method based on isotope-coded affinity tag chemistry and identified four proteins consistently thiol-modified in cells treated with peroxynitrite as follows: AsnB, FrmA, MaeB, and RidA. All four were required for peroxynitrite stress tolerance in vivo. Three of the identified proteins were modified at highly conserved cysteines, and MaeB and FrmA are known to be directly involved in the oxidative and nitrosative stress response in E. coli. In in vitro studies, we could show that the activity of RidA, a recently discovered enamine/imine deaminase, is regulated in a specific manner by the modification of its single conserved cysteine. Mutation of this cysteine 107 to serine generated a constitutively active protein that was not susceptible to peroxynitrite.

  9. Redox Proteomics Uncovers Peroxynitrite-sensitive Proteins That Help Escherichia coli to Overcome Nitrosative Stress*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Claudia; Lupilova, Nataliya; Müller, Alexandra; Warscheid, Bettina; Meyer, Helmut E.; Kuhlmann, Katja; Eisenacher, Martin; Leichert, Lars I.

    2013-01-01

    Peroxynitrite is a highly reactive chemical species with antibacterial properties that are synthesized in immune cells. In a proteomic approach, we identified specific target proteins of peroxynitrite-induced modifications in Escherichia coli. Although peroxynitrite caused a fairly indiscriminate nitration of tyrosine residues, reversible modifications of protein thiols were highly specific. We used a quantitative redox proteomic method based on isotope-coded affinity tag chemistry and identified four proteins consistently thiol-modified in cells treated with peroxynitrite as follows: AsnB, FrmA, MaeB, and RidA. All four were required for peroxynitrite stress tolerance in vivo. Three of the identified proteins were modified at highly conserved cysteines, and MaeB and FrmA are known to be directly involved in the oxidative and nitrosative stress response in E. coli. In in vitro studies, we could show that the activity of RidA, a recently discovered enamine/imine deaminase, is regulated in a specific manner by the modification of its single conserved cysteine. Mutation of this cysteine 107 to serine generated a constitutively active protein that was not susceptible to peroxynitrite. PMID:23696645

  10. Brassinosteroid-induced CO{sub 2} assimilation is associated with increased stability of redox-sensitive photosynthetic enzymes in the chloroplasts in cucumber plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yu Ping; Cheng, Fei; Zhou, Yan Hong; Xia, Xiao Jian; Mao, Wei Hua; Shi, Kai [Department of Horticulture, Zijingang Campus, Zhejiang University, Yuhangtang Road 866, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Chen, Zhi Xiang [Department of Horticulture, Zijingang Campus, Zhejiang University, Yuhangtang Road 866, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054 (United States); Yu, Jing Quan, E-mail: jqyu@zju.edu.cn [Department of Horticulture, Zijingang Campus, Zhejiang University, Yuhangtang Road 866, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Key Laboratory of Horticultural Plants Growth, Development and Quality Improvement, Ministry of Agriculture of China, Yuhangtang Road 866, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activity of certain Calvin cycle enzymes and CO{sub 2} assimilation are induced by BRs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BRs upregulate the activity of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in the chloroplasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BRs increase the chloroplast thiol reduction state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A BR-induced reducing environment increases the stability of photosynthetic enzymes. -- Abstract: Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles in plant growth, development, photosynthesis and stress tolerance; however, the mechanism underlying BR-enhanced photosynthesis is currently unclear. Here, we provide evidence that an increase in the BR level increased the quantum yield of PSII, activities of Rubisco activase (RCA) and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), and CO{sub 2} assimilation. BRs upregulated the transcript levels of genes and activity of enzymes involved in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in the chloroplasts, leading to an increased ratio of reduced (GSH) to oxidized (GSSG) glutathione in the chloroplasts. An increased GSH/GSSG ratio protected RCA from proteolytic digestion and increased the stability of redox-sensitive enzymes in the chloroplasts. These results strongly suggest that BRs are capable of regulating the glutathione redox state in the chloroplasts through the activation of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle. The resulting increase in the chloroplast thiol reduction state promotes CO{sub 2} assimilation, at least in part, by enhancing the stability and activity of redox-sensitive photosynthetic enzymes through post-translational modifications.

  11. Thiol-Disulfide Exchange between Glutaredoxin and Glutathione

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Rasmus; Andersen, Peter Anders; Jensen, Kristine Steen

    2010-01-01

    Glutaredoxins are ubiquitous thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases which catalyze the reduction of glutathione-protein mixed disulfides. Belonging to the thioredoxin family, they contain a conserved active site CXXC motif. The N-proximal active site cysteine can form a mixed disulfide with glutathione ...... has been replaced with serine. The exchange reaction between the reduced protein and oxidized glutathione leading to formation of the mixed disulfide could readily be monitored by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) due to the enthalpic contributions from the noncovalent interactions...... and the protonation of glutathione thiolate. An algorithm for the analysis of this type of reaction by ITC was developed and showed that the interaction is enthalpy driven with a large entropy penalty. The applicability of the method was verified by a mass spectrometry-based approach, which gave a standard reduction...

  12. Mercury Binding Sites in Thiol-Functionalized Mesostructured Silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billinge, Simon J.L.; McKimmey, Emily J.; Shatnawi, Mouath; Kim, HyunJeong; Petkov, Valeri; Wermeille, Didier; Pinnavaia, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Thiol-functionalized mesostructured silica with anhydrous compositions of (SiO 2 ) 1-x (LSiO 1.5 ) x , where L is a mercaptopropyl group and x is the fraction of functionalized framework silicon centers, are effective trapping agents for the removal of mercuric(II) ions from water. In the present work, we investigate the mercury-binding mechanism for representative thiol-functionalized mesostructures by atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data and by Raman spectroscopy. The mesostructures with wormhole framework structures and compositions corresponding to x = 0.30 and 0.50 were prepared by direct assembly methods in the presence of a structure-directing amine porogen. PDF analyses of five mercury-loaded compositions with Hg/S ratios of 0.50-1.30 provided evidence for the bridging of thiolate sulfur atoms to two metal ion centers and the formation of chain structures on the pore surfaces. We find no evidence for Hg-O bonds and can rule out oxygen coordination of the mercury at greater than the 10% level. The relative intensities of the PDF peaks corresponding to Hg-S and Hg-Hg atomic pairs indicate that the mercury centers cluster on the functionalized surfaces by virtue of thiolate bridging, regardless of the overall mercury loading. However, the Raman results indicate that the complexation of mercury centers by thiolate depends on the mercury loading. At low mercury loadings (Hg/S (le) 0.5), the dominant species is an electrically neutral complex in which mercury most likely is tetrahedrally coordinated to bridging thiolate ligands, as in Hg(SBu t ) 2 . At higher loadings (Hg/S 1.0-1.3), mercury complex cations predominate, as evidenced by the presence of charge-balancing anions (nitrate) on the surface. This cationic form of bound mercury is assigned a linear coordination to two bridging thiolate ligands.

  13. Redox pioneer: professor Barry Halliwell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervaiz, Shazib

    2011-05-01

    Professor Barry Halliwell is recognized as a Redox Pioneer because he has published eight articles on redox biology that have been each cited more than 1000 times, and 158 articles that have been each cited more than 100 times. His contributions go back as far as 1976, when he was involved in elucidation of the Foyer-Halliwell-Asada cycle, an efficient mechanism for preventing oxidative damage to chloroplasts. His subsequent work established the important role of iron and zinc in free radical reactions and their relevance to human pathologies. Professor Halliwell is also a leader in developing novel methodology for detecting free radical intermediates in vivo, and his contributions to our knowledge of reactive nitrogen species are highly significant. His sustained excellence won him the top-cited scientist award in the United Kingdom in biomedical sciences in 1999, and in 2003 he was recognized as a highly cited scientist by Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) for work on plant antioxidants, and the same year ranked 28 out of 5494 biochemists/biologists for scientific impact. Two pieces of his scholarly work have been listed as Citation Classics by ISI, and in 2007 his laboratory was ranked number 1 worldwide based on highest citation score in research on free radicals.

  14. Information processing through a bio-based redox capacitor: signatures for redox-cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Kim, Eunkyoung; White, Ian M; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2014-08-01

    Redox-cycling compounds can significantly impact biological systems and can be responsible for activities that range from pathogen virulence and contaminant toxicities, to therapeutic drug mechanisms. Current methods to identify redox-cycling activities rely on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and employ enzymatic or chemical methods to detect ROS. Here, we couple the speed and sensitivity of electrochemistry with the molecular-electronic properties of a bio-based redox-capacitor to generate signatures of redox-cycling. The redox capacitor film is electrochemically-fabricated at the electrode surface and is composed of a polysaccharide hydrogel with grafted catechol moieties. This capacitor film is redox-active but non-conducting and can engage diffusible compounds in either oxidative or reductive redox-cycling. Using standard electrochemical mediators ferrocene dimethanol (Fc) and Ru(NH3)6Cl3 (Ru(3+)) as model redox-cyclers, we observed signal amplifications and rectifications that serve as signatures of redox-cycling. Three bio-relevant compounds were then probed for these signatures: (i) ascorbate, a redox-active compound that does not redox-cycle; (ii) pyocyanin, a virulence factor well-known for its reductive redox-cycling; and (iii) acetaminophen, an analgesic that oxidatively redox-cycles but also undergoes conjugation reactions. These studies demonstrate that the redox-capacitor can enlist the capabilities of electrochemistry to generate rapid and sensitive signatures of biologically-relevant chemical activities (i.e., redox-cycling). Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Advanced Redox Flow Batteries for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Xia, Guanguang; Wang, Wei; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-03-19

    This report describes the status of the advanced redox flow battery research being performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 1 of FY2012 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails completion of evaluation and optimization of single cell components for the two advanced redox flow battery electrolyte chemistries recently developed at the lab, the all vanadium (V) mixed acid and V-Fe mixed acid solutions. All the single cell components to be used in future kW-scale stacks have been identified and optimized in this quarter, which include solution electrolyte, membrane or separator; carbon felt electrode and bi-polar plate. Varied electrochemical, chemical and physical evaluations were carried out to assist the component screening and optimization. The mechanisms of the battery capacity fading behavior for the all vanadium redox flow and the Fe/V battery were discovered, which allowed us to optimize the related cell operation parameters and continuously operate the system for more than three months without any capacity decay.

  16. Glutathione Redox System in β-Thalassemia/Hb E Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchaneekorn W. Kalpravidh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available β-thalassemia/Hb E is known to cause oxidative stress induced by iron overload. The glutathione system is the major endogenous antioxidant that protects animal cells from oxidative damage. This study aimed to determine the effect of disease state and splenectomy on redox status expressed by whole blood glutathione (GSH/glutathione disulfide (GSSG and also to evaluate glutathione-related responses to oxidation in β-thalassemia/Hb E patients. Twenty-seven normal subjects and 25 β-thalassemia/Hb E patients were recruited and blood was collected. The GSH/GSSG ratio, activities of glutathione-related enzymes, hematological parameters, and serum ferritin levels were determined in individuals. Patients had high iron-induced oxidative stress, shown as significantly increased serum ferritin, a decreased GSH/GSSG ratio, and increased activities of glutathione-related enzymes. Splenectomy increased serum ferritin levels and decreased GSH levels concomitant with unchanged glutathione-related enzyme activities. The redox ratio had a positive correlation with hemoglobin levels and negative correlation with levels of serum ferritin. The glutathione system may be the body’s first-line defense used against oxidative stress and to maintain redox homeostasis in thalassemic patients based on the significant correlations between the GSH/GSSH ratio and degree of anemia or body iron stores.

  17. Endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in inhibited by in vivo depletion of vascular thiol levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, J B; Boesgaard, S; Trautner, S

    2001-01-01

    Thiols like glutathione may serve as reducing cofactors in the production of nitric oxide (NO) and protect NO from inactivation by radical oxygen species. Depletion of thiol compounds reduces NO-mediated vascular effects in vitro and in vivo. The mechanisms underlying these actions are not clear...... superoxide anion (O2.-) production in conscious chronically catheterized rats. Thiol depletion induced by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, 1 g i.p. within 24 h) decreased the hypotensive effect of Ach by 30% (MAP reduction before BSO 27 +/- 3 mmHg, 19 +/- 3 mmHg after BSO, (mean +/- SEM), p

  18. Preparation and Characterization of Fluorinated Hydrophobic UV-Crosslinkable Thiol-Ene Polyurethane Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Xia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The polyurethane prepolymer terminated with a double bond was synthesized using isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI, hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB, 1,4-butanediol (BDO, and 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA. Then, a series of innovative UV-curable polyurethane coatings were prepared by blending ene-terminated polyurethane, fluoroacrylate monomer, and multifunctional thiol crosslinker upon UV exposure. The incorporation of fluoroacrylate monomer and multifunctional thiols into polyurethane coatings significantly enhanced the hydrophobic property, mechanical property, pencil hardness, and glossiness of the polyurethane coatings. This method of preparing UV crosslinkable, hydrophobic polyurethane coatings based on thiol-ene chemistry exhibited numerous advantages over other UV photocuring systems.

  19. Quinoline-2-thiol Derivatives as Fluorescent Sensors for Metals, pH and HNO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naphtali A. O’Connor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A tautomeric equilibrium exists for quinoline-2-thiol and quinoline-2(1H-thione. Quantum mechanical calculations predict the thione is the major tautomer and this is confirmed by the absorption spectra. The utility of quinolone-2-thiol/quinoline-2(1H-thione as a chromophore for developing fluorescent sensors is explored. No fluorescence is observed when excited at absorption maxima, however a fluorescence increase is observed when exposed to HNO, a molecule of import as a cardiovascular therapeutic. Alkylated quinoline-2-thiol derivatives are found to be fluorescent and show a reduction in fluorescence when exposed to metals and changes in pH.

  20. Characterization of redox proteins using electrochemical methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of electrochemical techniques in combination with proteins started approximately a decade ago and has since then developed into a powerfull technique for the study of small redox proteins. In addition to the determination of redox potentials, electrochemistry can be used to obtain

  1. Characterization of redox conditions in pollution plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwart, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Evalution of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...

  2. Intermittent fasting results in tissue-specific changes in bioenergetics and redox state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chausse, Bruno; Vieira-Lara, Marcel A; Sanchez, Angélica B; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF) is a dietary intervention often used as an alternative to caloric restriction (CR) and characterized by 24 hour cycles alternating ad libitum feeding and fasting. Although the consequences of CR are well studied, the effects of IF on redox status are not. Here, we address the effects of IF on redox state markers in different tissues in order to uncover how changes in feeding frequency alter redox balance in rats. IF rats displayed lower body mass due to decreased energy conversion efficiency. Livers in IF rats presented increased mitochondrial respiratory capacity and enhanced levels of protein carbonyls. Surprisingly, IF animals also presented an increase in oxidative damage in the brain that was not related to changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics. Conversely, IF promoted a substantial protection against oxidative damage in the heart. No difference in mitochondrial bioenergetics or redox homeostasis was observed in skeletal muscles of IF animals. Overall, IF affects redox balance in a tissue-specific manner, leading to redox imbalance in the liver and brain and protection against oxidative damage in the heart.

  3. Intermittent fasting results in tissue-specific changes in bioenergetics and redox state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Chausse

    Full Text Available Intermittent fasting (IF is a dietary intervention often used as an alternative to caloric restriction (CR and characterized by 24 hour cycles alternating ad libitum feeding and fasting. Although the consequences of CR are well studied, the effects of IF on redox status are not. Here, we address the effects of IF on redox state markers in different tissues in order to uncover how changes in feeding frequency alter redox balance in rats. IF rats displayed lower body mass due to decreased energy conversion efficiency. Livers in IF rats presented increased mitochondrial respiratory capacity and enhanced levels of protein carbonyls. Surprisingly, IF animals also presented an increase in oxidative damage in the brain that was not related to changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics. Conversely, IF promoted a substantial protection against oxidative damage in the heart. No difference in mitochondrial bioenergetics or redox homeostasis was observed in skeletal muscles of IF animals. Overall, IF affects redox balance in a tissue-specific manner, leading to redox imbalance in the liver and brain and protection against oxidative damage in the heart.

  4. Preparation and Preliminary Dielectric Characterization of Structured C60-Thiol-Ene Polymer Nanocomposites Assembled Using the Thiol-Ene Click Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hanaa M; Windham, Amber D; Al-Ejji, Maryam M; Al-Qahtani, Noora H; Hassan, Mohammad K; Mauritz, Kenneth A; Buchanan, Randy K; Buchanan, J Paige

    2015-11-18

    Fullerene-containing materials have the ability to store and release electrical energy. Therefore, fullerenes may ultimately find use in high-voltage equipment devices or as super capacitors for high electric energy storage due to this ease of manipulating their excellent dielectric properties and their high volume resistivity. A series of structured fullerene (C 60 ) polymer nanocomposites were assembled using the thiol-ene click reaction, between alkyl thiols and allyl functionalized C 60 derivatives. The resulting high-density C 60 -urethane-thiol-ene (C 60 -Thiol-Ene) networks possessed excellent mechanical properties. These novel networks were characterized using standard techniques, including infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The dielectric spectra for the prepared samples were determined over a broad frequency range at room temperature using a broadband dielectric spectrometer and a semiconductor characterization system. The changes in thermo-mechanical and electrical properties of these novel fullerene-thiol-ene composite films were measured as a function of the C 60 content, and samples characterized by high dielectric permittivity and low dielectric loss were produced. In this process, variations in chemical composition of the networks were correlated to performance characteristics.

  5. Preparation and Preliminary Dielectric Characterization of Structured C60-Thiol-Ene Polymer Nanocomposites Assembled Using the Thiol-Ene Click Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanaa M. Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fullerene-containing materials have the ability to store and release electrical energy. Therefore, fullerenes may ultimately find use in high-voltage equipment devices or as super capacitors for high electric energy storage due to this ease of manipulating their excellent dielectric properties and their high volume resistivity. A series of structured fullerene (C60 polymer nanocomposites were assembled using the thiol-ene click reaction, between alkyl thiols and allyl functionalized C60 derivatives. The resulting high-density C60-urethane-thiol-ene (C60-Thiol-Ene networks possessed excellent mechanical properties. These novel networks were characterized using standard techniques, including infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA. The dielectric spectra for the prepared samples were determined over a broad frequency range at room temperature using a broadband dielectric spectrometer and a semiconductor characterization system. The changes in thermo-mechanical and electrical properties of these novel fullerene-thiol-ene composite films were measured as a function of the C60 content, and samples characterized by high dielectric permittivity and low dielectric loss were produced. In this process, variations in chemical composition of the networks were correlated to performance characteristics.

  6. Redox activity of naphthalene secondary organic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhinney, R. D.; Zhou, S.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2013-04-01

    Chamber secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from low-NOx photooxidation of naphthalene by hydroxyl radical was examined with respect to its redox cycling behaviour using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Naphthalene SOA was highly redox active, consuming DTT at an average rate of 118 ± 14 pmol per minute per μg of SOA material. Measured particle-phase masses of the major previously identified redox active products, 1,2- and 1,4-naphthoquinone, accounted for only 21 ± 3% of the observed redox cycling activity. The redox-active 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone was identified as a new minor product of naphthalene oxidation, and including this species in redox activity predictions increased the predicted DTT reactivity to 30 ± 5% of observations. Similar attempts to predict redox behaviour of oxidised two-stroke engine exhaust particles by measuring 1,2-naphthoquinone, 1,4-naphthoquinone and 9,10-phenanthrenequinone predicted DTT decay rates only 4.9 ± 2.5% of those observed. Together, these results suggest that there are substantial unidentified redox-active SOA constituents beyond the small quinones that may be important toxic components of these particles. A gas-to-SOA particle partitioning coefficient was calculated to be (7.0 ± 2.5) × 10-4 m3 μg-1 for 1,4-naphthoquinone at 25 °C. This value suggests that under typical warm conditions, 1,4-naphthoquinone is unlikely to contribute strongly to redox behaviour of ambient particles, although further work is needed to determine the potential impact under conditions such as low temperatures where partitioning to the particle is more favourable. As well, higher order oxidation products that likely account for a substantial fraction of the redox cycling capability of the naphthalene SOA are likely to partition much more strongly to the particle phase.

  7. Engineered Proteins: Redox Properties and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhulkar, Shradha; Tian, Hui; Wang, Xiaotang; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Oxidoreductases and metalloproteins, representing more than one third of all known proteins, serve as significant catalysts for numerous biological processes that involve electron transfers such as photosynthesis, respiration, metabolism, and molecular signaling. The functional properties of the oxidoreductases/metalloproteins are determined by the nature of their redox centers. Protein engineering is a powerful approach that is used to incorporate biological and abiological redox cofactors as well as novel enzymes and redox proteins with predictable structures and desirable functions for important biological and chemical applications. The methods of protein engineering, mainly rational design, directed evolution, protein surface modifications, and domain shuffling, have allowed the creation and study of a number of redox proteins. This review presents a selection of engineered redox proteins achieved through these methods, resulting in a manipulation in redox potentials, an increase in electron-transfer efficiency, and an expansion of native proteins by de novo design. Such engineered/modified redox proteins with desired properties have led to a broad spectrum of practical applications, ranging from biosensors, biofuel cells, to pharmaceuticals and hybrid catalysis. Glucose biosensors are one of the most successful products in enzyme electrochemistry, with reconstituted glucose oxidase achieving effective electrical communication with the sensor electrode; direct electron-transfer-type biofuel cells are developed to avoid thermodynamic loss and mediator leakage; and fusion proteins of P450s and redox partners make the biocatalytic generation of drug metabolites possible. In summary, this review includes the properties and applications of the engineered redox proteins as well as their significance and great potential in the exploration of bioelectrochemical sensing devices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1796–1822. PMID:22435347

  8. Mass Spectrometry in Studies of Protein Thiol Chemistry and Signaling: Opportunities and Caveats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarie Baez, Nelmi O.; Reisz, Julie A.; Furdui, Cristina M.

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful and widely utilized tool in the investigation of protein thiol chemistry, biochemistry, and biology. Very early biochemical studies of metabolic enzymes have brought to light the broad spectrum of reactivity profiles that distinguish cysteine thiols with functions in catalysis and protein stability from other cysteine residues in proteins. The development of MS methods for the analysis of proteins using electrospray ionization (ESI) or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) coupled with the emergence of high-resolution mass analyzers have been instrumental in advancing studies of thiol modifications, both in single proteins and within the cellular context. This article reviews MS instrumentation and methods of analysis employed in investigations of thiols and their reactivity toward a range of small biomolecules. A selected number of studies are detailed to highlight the advantages brought about by the MS technologies along with the caveats associated with these analyses. PMID:25261734

  9. Epidithiodiketopiperazines: Strain-Promoted Thiol-Mediated Cellular Uptake at the Highest Tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Lili; Bartolami, Eline; Abegg, Daniel; Adibekian, Alexander; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2017-05-24

    The disulfide dihedral angle in epidithiodiketopiperazines (ETPs) is near 0°. Application of this highest possible ring tension to strain-promoted thiol-mediated uptake results in efficient delivery to the cytosol and nucleus. Compared to the previous best asparagusic acid (AspA), ring-opening disulfide exchange with ETPs occurs more efficiently even with nonactivated thiols, and the resulting thiols exchange rapidly with nonactivated disulfides. ETP-mediated cellular uptake is more than 20 times more efficient compared to AspA, occurs without endosomal capture, depends on temperature, and is "unstoppable" by inhibitors of endocytosis and conventional thiol-mediated uptake, including siRNA against the transferrin receptor. These results suggest that ETP-mediated uptake not only maximizes delivery to the cytosol and nucleus but also opens the door to a new multitarget hopping mode of action.

  10. AFM-assisted fabrication of thiol SAM pattern with alternating quantified surface potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simons Janet

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs are widely used in many nano- and bio-technology applications. We report a new approach to create and characterize a thiol SAMs micropattern with alternating charges on a flat gold-coated substrate using atomic force microscopy (AFM and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM. We produced SAMs-patterns made of alternating positively charged, negatively charged, and hydrophobic-terminated thiols by an automated AFM-assisted manipulation, or nanografting. We show that these thiol patterns possess only small topographical differences as revealed by AFM, and distinguished differences in surface potential (20-50 mV, revealed by KPFM. The pattern can be helpful in the development of biosensor technologies, specifically for selective binding of biomolecules based on charge and hydrophobicity, and serve as a model for creating surfaces with quantified alternating surface potential distribution.

  11. Redox regulation of ischemic limb neovascularization – What we have learned from animal studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiko Matsui

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mouse hindlimb ischemia has been widely used as a model to study peripheral artery disease. Genetic modulation of the enzymatic source of oxidants or components of the antioxidant system reveal that physiological levels of oxidants are essential to promote the process of arteriogenesis and angiogenesis after femoral artery occlusion, although mice with diabetes or atherosclerosis may have higher deleterious levels of oxidants. Therefore, fine control of oxidants is required to stimulate vascularization in the limb muscle. Oxidants transduce cellular signaling through oxidative modifications of redox sensitive cysteine thiols. Of particular importance, the reversible modification with abundant glutathione, called S-glutathionylation (or GSH adducts, is relatively stable and alters protein function including signaling, transcription, and cytoskeletal arrangement. Glutaredoxin-1 (Glrx is an enzyme which catalyzes reversal of GSH adducts, and does not scavenge oxidants itself. Glrx may control redox signaling under fluctuation of oxidants levels. In ischemic muscle increased GSH adducts through Glrx deletion improves in vivo limb revascularization, indicating endogenous Glrx has anti-angiogenic roles. In accordance, Glrx overexpression attenuates VEGF signaling in vitro and ischemic vascularization in vivo. There are several Glrx targets including HIF-1α which may contribute to inhibition of vascularization by reducing GSH adducts. These animal studies provide a caution that excess antioxidants may be counter-productive for treatment of ischemic limbs, and highlights Glrx as a potential therapeutic target to improve ischemic limb vascularization. Keywords: Ischemic limb, Angiogenesis, Oxidants, GSH adducts, Glutaredoxin

  12. Investigations of thiol-modified phenol derivatives for the use in thiol–ene photopolymerizations

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian Reinelt; Monir Tabatabai; Urs Karl Fischer; Norbert Moszner; Andreas Utterodt; Helmut Ritter

    2014-01-01

    Summary Thiol–ene photopolymerizations gain a growing interest in academic research. Coatings and dental restoratives are interesting applications for thiol–ene photopolymerizations due to their unique features. In most studies the relative flexible and hydrophilic ester derivative, namely pentaerythritoltetra(3-mercaptopropionate) (PETMP), is investigated as the thiol component. Thus, in the present study we are encouraged to investigate the performance of more hydrophobic ester-free thiol-m...

  13. Content of endogenous thiols and radioresistance of gemmating cells of Saccharomyces ellipsoideus and Saccharomyces cerevisiale yeasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonyan, N.V.; Avakyan, Ts.M.; Dzhanpoladyan, N.L.; Stepanyan, L.G.

    1983-01-01

    It has been shown that gemmating cells of ''wild type'' yeasts are more radioresistant and contain more endogenous thiols, than resting cells. Gemmating cells of Saccharomyces cerevisial yeasts, carrying the mutation rad 51, as to radioresistance and content of SH groups do not differ from resting cells. The results obtained testify to a connec-- tion between increased radioresistance of the yeast gemmating cells and increased content of endogenous thiols in them

  14. Controls on the redox potential of rainwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, Joan D; Mullaugh, Katherine M; Kieber, Robert J; Avery, G Brooks; Mead, Ralph N

    2012-12-18

    Hydrogen peroxide acting as a reductant affects the redox potential of rainwater collected at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series Station, the South Island of New Zealand, the contiguous USA, and the primary study site in Wilmington, NC. Analytical measurements of both halves of redox couples for dissolved iron, mercury, and the nitrate-nitrite-ammonium system can predict the rainwater redox potential measured directly by a platinum electrode. Measurements of these redox couples along with the pH in rain yields pe⁻ between 8 and 11; the half reaction for hydrogen peroxide acting as a reductant using typical rainwater conditions of 15 μM H₂O₂ at pH 4.7 gives pe⁻ = 9.12, where pe⁻ = negative log of the activity of hydrated electrons. Of the six rainwater redox systems investigated, only manganese speciation appeared to be controlled by molecular oxygen (pe⁻ = 15.90). Copper redox speciation was consistent with superoxide acting as a reductant (pe⁻ = 2.7). The concentration of H₂O₂ in precipitation has more than doubled over the preceding decade due to a decrease in SO₂ emissions, which suggests the redox chemistry of rainwater is dynamic and changing, potentially altering the speciation of many organic compounds and trace metals in atmospheric waters.

  15. Glutathione-S-Transferase and Thiol Stress in patients with acute renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mungli Prakash

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tubular damage is common finding in acute renal failure (ARF. Various etiologies have been put forth to explain the tubular damage in ARF, one important mechanism among them is oxidative damage to renal tubules. Several biomolecules including low-molecular weight peptides and enzymes in urine have been proposed as early markers of renal failure. Current study has been undertaken to study the thiol stress and glutathione-S-transferase (GST levels in ARF patients. Method: 58 ARF patients and 55 healthy controls were selected based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Serum thiols, GST, malanoldehyde (MDA and urine thiols were determined by spectrophotometer based methods. Results: Serum thiols and urine thiols were significantly decreased (p<0.0001, and serum GST and MDA levels were significantly increased (p<0.0001 in ARF patients compared to healthy controls. Serum GST and MDA correlated positively in ARF cases (r2 = 0.6938, p<0.0001. Conclusion: There is significant thiol stress and increased lipid peroxidation in ARF patients which leads to tubular cell membrane damage and release of GST into blood stream and into urine. This may be possible mechanism for the increased presence of GST in urine (enzymuria found in other studies.

  16. Electrical resistivity of nanoporous gold modified with thiol self-assembled monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakamada, Masataka; Kato, Naoki; Mabuchi, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanoporous gold is modified with thiol-containing self-assembled monolayers. • The electrical resistivity of the thiol-modified nanoporous gold increases. • The electrical resistivity increases with increasing thiol concentration. • Monolayer tail groups enhance the atmosphere dependence of electrical resistivity. - Abstract: The electrical resistivity of nanoporous gold (NPG) modified with thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) has been measured at 298 K using a four-probe method. We found that the adsorption of thiol SAMs increases the electrical resistivity of NPG by up to 22.2%. Dependence of the electrical resistivity on the atmosphere (air or water) was also observed in SAMs-modified NPG, suggesting that the electronic states of the tail groups affect the electrons of the binding sulfur and adjacent surface gold atoms. The present results suggest that adsorption of thiol molecules can influence the behavior of the conducting electrons in NPG and that modification of NPG with SAMs may be useful for environmental sensing.

  17. Electrical resistivity of nanoporous gold modified with thiol self-assembled monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakamada, Masataka, E-mail: hakamada.masataka.3x@kyoto-u.ac.jp; Kato, Naoki, E-mail: katou.naoki.75w@st.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Mabuchi, Mamoru, E-mail: mabuchi@energy.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Nanoporous gold is modified with thiol-containing self-assembled monolayers. • The electrical resistivity of the thiol-modified nanoporous gold increases. • The electrical resistivity increases with increasing thiol concentration. • Monolayer tail groups enhance the atmosphere dependence of electrical resistivity. - Abstract: The electrical resistivity of nanoporous gold (NPG) modified with thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) has been measured at 298 K using a four-probe method. We found that the adsorption of thiol SAMs increases the electrical resistivity of NPG by up to 22.2%. Dependence of the electrical resistivity on the atmosphere (air or water) was also observed in SAMs-modified NPG, suggesting that the electronic states of the tail groups affect the electrons of the binding sulfur and adjacent surface gold atoms. The present results suggest that adsorption of thiol molecules can influence the behavior of the conducting electrons in NPG and that modification of NPG with SAMs may be useful for environmental sensing.

  18. Thiol/disulphide homeostasis in Bell's palsy as a novel pathogenetic marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babademez, M A; Gul, F; Kale, H; Muderris, T; Bayazit, Y; Ergin, M; Erel, O; Kiris, M

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between Bell's palsy and a novel oxidative stress parameter, thiol/disulphide homeostasis. A prospective study evaluating oxidative stress in Bell's palsy. This research took place in the department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ataturk Training and Research Hospital. Totally, 77 patients with Bell's palsy and 38 healthy controls were included in this study. The blood levels of total and native thiol and disulphide activity were assessed, and their levels were compared in the patients and controls. There were statistically significant differences between the patients and controls regarding thiol/disulphide parameters. The mean native thiol and total thiol were significantly lower and disulphide levels were higher in the Bell's palsy than controls. On binary logistic regression analysis, the created model showed 45.3% variation. The cut-off value was 18.95 for disulphides. Native and total thiol levels were low in the Bell's palsy. This metabolic disturbance may have a role in the pathogenesis of Bell's palsy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Immediate stabilization of human blood for delayed quantification of endogenous thiols and disulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustarini, Daniela; Galvagni, Federico; Orlandini, Maurizio; Fanti, Paolo; Rossi, Ranieri

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous thiols undergo rapid and reversible oxidation to disulfides when exposed to oxidants and are, therefore, suitable biomarkers of oxidative stress. However, accurate analysis of thiols in blood is frequently compromised by their artifactual oxidation during sample manipulation, which spuriously elevates the disulfide levels. Here, we describe a validated pre-analytical procedure that prevents both artifactual oxidation of thiols during sample manipulation and their oxidative decay for months in biosamples that are stored at −80°C. Addition of N-ethylmaleimide to blood samples from healthy donors was used to stabilize whole blood, red blood cells, platelets and plasma disulfides, whereas addition of citrate buffer followed by dilution of plasma with H2O was used to stabilize plasma thiols. The concentrations of thiols and disulfides were stable in all biosamples for at least 6 months when analyzed by UV/Vis HPLC at regular intervals. Only 3 ml of blood were needed to perform the analyses of thiols and disulfides in the different blood fractions. This pre-analytical procedure is reliable for use in both animal and human prospective studies. Its ease of implementation makes the method suitable for application to multicenter studies where blood samples are collected by different sites and personnel and are shipped to specific specialized laboratories. PMID:26896310

  20. Adlayers of dimannoside thiols on gold: surface chemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Paul M; Horlacher, Tim; Girard-Lauriault, Pierre-Luc; Gross, Thomas; Lippitz, Andreas; Min, Hyegeun; Wirth, Thomas; Castelli, Riccardo; Seeberger, Peter H; Unger, Wolfgang E S

    2011-04-19

    Carbohydrate films on gold based on dimannoside thiols (DMT) were prepared, and a complementary surface chemical analysis was performed in detail by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), FT-IR, and contact angle measurements in order to verify formation of ω-carbohydrate-functionalized alkylthiol films. XPS (C 1s, O 1s, and S 2p) reveals information on carbohydrate specific alkoxy (C-O) and acetal moieties (O-C-O) as well as thiolate species attached to gold. Angle-resolved synchrotron XPS was used for chemical speciation at ultimate surface sensitivity. Angle-resolved XPS analysis suggests the presence of an excess top layer composed of unbound sulfur components combined with alkyl moieties. Further support for DMT attachment on Au is given by ToF-SIMS and FT-IR analysis. Carbon and oxygen K-edge NEXAFS spectra were interpreted by applying the building block model supported by comparison to data of 1-undecanethiol, poly(vinyl alcohol), and polyoxymethylene. No linear dichroism effect was observed in the angle-resolved C K-edge NEXAFS. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  1. Thiol-linked alkylation of RNA to assess expression dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Veronika A; Reichholf, Brian; Neumann, Tobias; Rescheneder, Philipp; Bhat, Pooja; Burkard, Thomas R; Wlotzka, Wiebke; von Haeseler, Arndt; Zuber, Johannes; Ameres, Stefan L

    2017-12-01

    Gene expression profiling by high-throughput sequencing reveals qualitative and quantitative changes in RNA species at steady state but obscures the intracellular dynamics of RNA transcription, processing and decay. We developed thiol(SH)-linked alkylation for the metabolic sequencing of RNA (SLAM seq), an orthogonal-chemistry-based RNA sequencing technology that detects 4-thiouridine (s 4 U) incorporation in RNA species at single-nucleotide resolution. In combination with well-established metabolic RNA labeling protocols and coupled to standard, low-input, high-throughput RNA sequencing methods, SLAM seq enabled rapid access to RNA-polymerase-II-dependent gene expression dynamics in the context of total RNA. We validated the method in mouse embryonic stem cells by showing that the RNA-polymerase-II-dependent transcriptional output scaled with Oct4/Sox2/Nanog-defined enhancer activity, and we provide quantitative and mechanistic evidence for transcript-specific RNA turnover mediated by post-transcriptional gene regulatory pathways initiated by microRNAs and N 6 -methyladenosine. SLAM seq facilitates the dissection of fundamental mechanisms that control gene expression in an accessible, cost-effective and scalable manner.

  2. Thiol passivation of MWIR type II superlattice photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihoglu, O.; Muti, A.; Aydinli, A.

    2013-06-01

    Poor passivation on photodetectors can result in catastrophic failure of the device. Abrupt termination of mesa side walls during pixel definition generates dangling bonds that lead to inversion layers and surface traps leading to surface leakage currents that short circuit diode action. Good passivation, therefore, is critical in the fabrication of high performance devices. Silicondioxide has been the main stay of passivation for commercial photodetectors, deposited at high temperatures and high RF powers using plasma deposition techniques. In photodetectors based on III-V compounds, sulphur passivation has been shown to replace oxygen and saturate the dangling bonds. Despite its effectiveness, it degrades over time. More effort is required to create passivation layers which eliminate surface leakage current. In this work, we propose the use of sulphur based octadecanethiol (ODT), CH3(CH2)17SH, as a passivation layer for the InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetectors that acts as a self assembled monolayer (SAM). ODT SAMs consist of a chain of 18 carbon atoms with a sulphur atom at its head. ODT Thiol coating is a simple process that consist of dipping the sample into the solution for a prescribed time. Excellent electrical performance of diodes tested confirm the effectiveness of the sulphur head stabilized by the intermolecular interaction due to van der Walls forces between the long chains of ODT SAM which results in highly stable ultrathin hydrocarbon layers without long term degradation.

  3. Surface Eroding, Semicrystalline Polyanhydrides via Thiol-Ene "Click" Photopolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poetz, Katie L; Mohammed, Halimatu S; Shipp, Devon A

    2015-05-11

    Surface eroding and semicrystalline polyanhydrides, with tunable erosion times and drug delivery pharmacokinetics largely dictated by erosion, are produced easily with thiol-ene "click" polymerization. This strategy yields both linear and cross-linked network polyanhydrides that are readily and fully cured within minutes using photoinitiation, can contain up to 60% crystallinity, and have tensile moduli up to 25 MPa for the compositions studied. Since they readily undergo hydrolysis and exhibit the oft-preferred surface erosion mechanism, they may be particularly useful in drug delivery applications. The polyanhydrides were degraded under pseudophysiological conditions and cylindrical samples (10 mm diameter × 5 mm height) were completely degraded within ∼10 days, with the mass-time profile being linear for much of this time after a ∼24 h induction period. Drug release studies, using lidocaine as a model, showed pharmacokinetics that displayed a muted burst release in the early stages of erosion, but then a delayed release profile that is closely correlated to the erosion kinetics. Furthermore, cytotoxicity studies of the linear and cross-linked semicrystalline polyanhydrides, and degradation products, against fibroblast cells indicate that the materials have good cytocompatibility. Overall, cells treated with up to 2500 mg/L of the semicrystalline polyanhydrides and degradation products show >90% human dermal fibroblast adult (HDFa) cell viability indicative of good cytocompatibility.

  4. Redox activity of naphthalene secondary organic aerosol

    OpenAIRE

    R. D. McWhinney; S. Zhou; J. P. D. Abbatt

    2013-01-01

    Chamber secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from low-NOx photooxidation of naphthalene by hydroxyl radical was examined with respect to its redox cycling behaviour using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Naphthalene SOA was highly redox active, consuming DTT at an average rate of 118 ± 14 pmol per minute per μg of SOA material. Measured particle-phase masses of the major previously identified redox active products, 1,2- and 1,4-naphthoquinone, accounted for only 21 ± 3% of the obse...

  5. Preprotein import into chloroplasts via the Toc and Tic complexes is regulated by redox signals in Pisum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Anna; Benz, J Philipp; Buchanan, Bob B; Soll, Jürgen; Bölter, Bettina

    2009-11-01

    The import of nuclear-encoded preproteins is necessary to maintain chloroplast function. The recognition and transfer of most precursor proteins across the chloroplast envelopes are facilitated by two membrane-inserted protein complexes, the translocons of the chloroplast outer and inner envelope (Toc and Tic complexes, respectively). Several signals have been invoked to regulate the import of preproteins. In our study, we were interested in redox-based import regulation mediated by two signals: regulation based on thiols and on the metabolic NADP+/NADPH ratio. We sought to identify the proteins participating in the regulation of these transport pathways and to characterize the preprotein subgroups whose import is redox-dependent. Our results provide evidence that the formation and reduction of disulfide bridges in the Toc receptors and Toc translocation channel have a strong influence on import yield of all tested preproteins that depend on the Toc complex for translocation. Furthermore, the metabolic NADP+/NADPH ratio influences not only the composition of the Tic complex, but also the import efficiency of most, but not all, preproteins tested. Thus, several Tic subcomplexes appear to participate in the translocation of different preprotein subgroups, and the redox-active components of these complexes likely play a role in regulating transport.

  6. Redox regulation of cell proliferation: Bioinformatics and redox proteomics approaches to identify redox-sensitive cell cycle regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Wilson, Michael H; Wright, Megan H

    2018-03-29

    Plant stem cells are the foundation of plant growth and development. The balance of quiescence and division is highly regulated, while ensuring that proliferating cells are protected from the adverse effects of environment fluctuations that may damage the genome. Redox regulation is important in both the activation of proliferation and arrest of the cell cycle upon perception of environmental stress. Within this context, reactive oxygen species serve as 'pro-life' signals with positive roles in the regulation of the cell cycle and survival. However, very little is known about the metabolic mechanisms and redox-sensitive proteins that influence cell cycle progression. We have identified cysteine residues on known cell cycle regulators in Arabidopsis that are potentially accessible, and could play a role in redox regulation, based on secondary structure and solvent accessibility likelihoods for each protein. We propose that redox regulation may function alongside other known posttranslational modifications to control the functions of core cell cycle regulators such as the retinoblastoma protein. Since our current understanding of how redox regulation is involved in cell cycle control is hindered by a lack of knowledge regarding both which residues are important and how modification of those residues alters protein function, we discuss how critical redox modifications can be mapped at the molecular level. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mitochondrial redox biology and homeostasis in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noctor, Graham; De Paepe, Rosine; Foyer, Christine H

    2007-03-01

    Mitochondria are key players in plant cell redox homeostasis and signalling. Earlier concepts that regarded mitochondria as secondary to chloroplasts as the powerhouses of photosynthetic cells, with roles in cell proliferation, death and ageing described largely by analogy to animal paradigms, have been replaced by the new philosophy of integrated cellular energy and redox metabolism involving mitochondria and chloroplasts. Thanks to oxygenic photosynthesis, plant mitochondria often operate in an oxygen- and carbohydrate-rich environment. This rather unique environment necessitates extensive flexibility in electron transport pathways and associated NAD(P)-linked enzymes. In this review, mitochondrial redox metabolism is discussed in relation to the integrated cellular energy and redox function that controls plant cell biology and fate.

  8. Symproportionation versus Disproportionation in Bromine Redox Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toporek, Marcin; Michałowska-Kaczmarczyk, Anna M.; Michałowski, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: • The disproportionation and symproportionation of bromine in different media is presented. • All the redox systems are elaborated according to the principles of the generalized approach to electrolytic redox systems (GATES/GEB). • All physicochemical knowledge is involved in the algorithm applied for this purpose. • The graphical representation of the systems is the basis of gaining the detailed physicochemical knowledge on the systems in question. -- Abstract: The paper refers to dynamic (titration) redox systems where symproportionation or disproportionation of bromine species occur. The related systems are modeled according to principles assumed in the Generalized Approach to Electrolytic Redox Systems (GATES), with Generalized Electron Balance (GEB) concept involved in the GATES/GEB software. The results obtained from calculations made with use of iterative computer programs prepared according to MATLAB computational software, are presented graphically, as 2D and 3D graphs

  9. Polyarene mediators for mediated redox flow battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delnick, Frank M.; Ingersoll, David; Liang, Chengdu

    2018-01-02

    The fundamental charge storage mechanisms in a number of currently studied high energy redox couples are based on intercalation, conversion, or displacement reactions. With exception to certain metal-air chemistries, most often the active redox materials are stored physically in the electrochemical cell stack thereby lowering the practical gravimetric and volumetric energy density as a tradeoff to achieve reasonable power density. In a general embodiment, a mediated redox flow battery includes a series of secondary organic molecules that form highly reduced anionic radicals as reaction mediator pairs for the reduction and oxidation of primary high capacity redox species ex situ from the electrochemical cell stack. Arenes are reduced to stable anionic radicals that in turn reduce a primary anode to the charged state. The primary anode is then discharged using a second lower potential (more positive) arene. Compatible separators and solvents are also disclosed herein.

  10. Redox Behavior of Fe2+/Fe3+ Redox Couple by Absorption Spectroscopy and Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, J. Y.; Park, S.; Yun, J. I.

    2010-01-01

    Redox behavior has influences on speciation and other geochemical reactions of radionuclides such as sorption, solubility, and colloid formation, etc. It is one of the factors for evaluation of long-term safety assessment under high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal conditions. Accordingly, redox potential (Eh) measurement in aquatic system is important to investigate the redox conditions. Eh is usually measured with redox active electrodes (Pt, Au, glassy carbon, etc.). Nevertheless, Eh measurements by general methods using electrodes provide low accuracy and high uncertainty problem. Therefore, Eh calculated from the concentration of redox active elements with a proper complexing reagent by using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy is progressed. Iron exists mostly as spent nuclear waste container material and in hydro-geologic minerals. In this system, iron controls the redox condition in near-field area and influences chemical behavior and speciation of radionuclides including redox sensitive actinides such as U, Np, and Pu. In the present work, we present the investigation on redox phenomena of iron in aquatic system by a combination of absorption spectroscopy and redox potential measurements

  11. Thiol-ene immobilisation of carbohydrates onto glass slides as a simple alternative to gold-thiol monolayers, amines or lipid binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Caroline I; Edmondson, Steve; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate arrays are a vital tool in studying infection, probing the mechanisms of bacterial, viral and toxin adhesion and the development of new treatments, by mimicking the structure of the glycocalyx. Current methods rely on the formation of monolayers of carbohydrates that have been chemically modified with a linker to enable interaction with a functionalised surface. This includes amines, biotin, lipids or thiols. Thiol-addition to gold to form self-assembled monolayers is perhaps the simplest method for immobilisation as thiolated glycans are readily accessible from reducing carbohydrates in a single step, but are limited to gold surfaces. Here we have developed a quick and versatile methodology which enables the use of thiolated carbohydrates to be immobilised as monolayers directly onto acrylate-functional glass slides via a 'thiol-ene'/Michael-type reaction. By combining the ease of thiol chemistry with glass slides, which are compatible with microarray scanners this offers a cost effective, but also useful method to assemble arrays.

  12. A Study of Functional Polymer Colloids Prepared Using Thiol-Ene/Yne Click Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Olivia Z.

    This project demonstrates the first instance of thiol-ene chemistry as the polymerization method for the production of polymer colloids in two-phase heterogeneous suspensions, miniemulsions, and emulsions. This work was also expanded to thiol-yne chemistry for the production of polymer particles containing increased crosslinking density. The utility of thiol-ene and thiol-yne chemistries for polymerization and polymer modification is well established in bulk systems. These reactions are considered 'click' reactions, which can be defined as processes that are both facile and simple, offering high yields with nearly 100% conversion, no side products, easy product separation, compatibility with a diverse variety of commercially available starting materials, and orthogonality with other chemistries. In addition, thiol-ene and thiol-yne chemistry follow a step-growth mechanism for the development of highly uniform polymer networks, where polymer growth is dependent on the coupling of functional groups. These step-growth polymerization systems are in stark contrast to the chain-growth mechanisms of acrylic and styrenic monomers that have dominated the field of conventional heterogeneous polymerizations. Preliminary studies evaluated the mechanism of particle production in suspension and miniemulsion systems. Monomer droplets were compared to the final polymer particles to confirm that particle growth occurred through the polymerization of monomer droplets. Additional parameters examined include homogenization energy (mechanical mixing), diluent species and concentration, and monomer content. These reactions were conducted using photoinitiation to yield particles in a matter of minutes with diameters in the size range of several microns to hundreds of microns in suspensions or submicron particles in miniemulsions. Improved control over the particle size and size distribution was examined through variation of reaction parameters. In addition, a method of seeded suspension

  13. Protein cysteine oxidation in redox signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forman, Henry Jay; Davies, Michael J; Krämer, Anna C

    2017-01-01

    Oxidation of critical signaling protein cysteines regulated by H2O2 has been considered to involve sulfenic acid (RSOH) formation. RSOH may subsequently form either a sulfenyl amide (RSNHR') with a neighboring amide, or a mixed disulfide (RSSR') with another protein cysteine or glutathione...... of the species previously identified as the "sulfenome" - the cellular complement of reversibly-oxidized thiol proteins generated via sulfenic acids....

  14. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention. PMID:24958177

  15. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Skyllas-Kazacos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention.

  16. Electrochemistry behavior of endogenous thiols on fluorine doped tin oxide electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas, Luciana; Molero, Leonard; Tapia, Ricardo A.; Rio, Rodrigo del; Valle, M. Angelica del; Antilen, Monica [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Casilla 306, Correo 22, Macul, Santiago (Chile); Armijo, Francisco, E-mail: jarmijom@uc.cl [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Casilla 306, Correo 22, Macul, Santiago (Chile)

    2011-10-01

    Highlights: > The first time that fluorine doped tin oxide electrodes are used for the electrooxidation of endogenous thiols. > Low potentials of electrooxidation were obtained for the different thiols. > The electrochemical behavior of thiols depends on the pH and the ionic electroactive species, the electrooxidation proceeds for a process of adsorption of electroactive species on FTO and high values the heterogeneous electron tranfer rate constant of the reaction were obtained. - Abstract: In this work the electrochemical behavior of different thiols on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) electrodes is reported. To this end, the mechanism of electrochemical oxidation of glutathione (GSH), cysteine (Cys), homocysteine (HCys) and acetyl-cysteine (ACys) at different pH was investigated. FTO showed electroactivity for the oxidation of the first three thiols at pH between 2.0 and 4.0, but under these conditions no acetyl-cysteine oxidation was observed on FTO. Voltammetric studies of the electro-oxidation of GSH, Cys and HCys showed peaks at about 0.35, 0.29, and 0.28 V at optimum pH 2.4, 2.8 and 3.4, respectively. In addition, this study demonstrated that GSH, Cys and HCys oxidation occurs when the zwitterion is the electro-active species that interact by adsorption on FTO electrodes. The overall reaction involves 4e{sup -}/4H{sup +} and 2e{sup -}/2H{sup +}, respectively, for HCys and for GSH and Cys and high heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants. Besides, the use of FTO for the determination of different thiols was evaluated. Experimental square wave voltammetry shows a linear current vs. concentrations response between 0.1 and 1.0 mM was found for HCys and GSH, indicating that these FTO electrodes are promising candidates for the efficient electrochemical determination of these endogenous thiols.

  17. A Silsesquioxane Organically Modified with 4-Amino-5-(4-pyridyl-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol: Thermal Behavior and Its Electrochemical Detection of Sulfhydryl Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Do Carmo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The octakis(3-chloropropylsilsesquioxane (SS was organofunctionalized with 4-amino-5-4(pyridyl-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol. The product formed (SA was undergo another reactions in two steps, first with copper and so hexacyanoferrate (III to form CuHSA. The organofunctionalized silsesquioxane was characterized by the following techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR in solid state, and thermogravimetric analysis in air and nitrogen atmosphere. The composite CuHSA was incorporated into a graphite paste electrode and the electrochemical behavior studies were conducted with cyclic voltammetry. The cyclic voltammogram of the modified graphite paste electrode with CuHSA showed one redox couple with formal potential Eθ′=0.75 V versus Ag/AgCl(sat (KCl 1.0 mol L−1; v = 20 mV s−1 attributed to the redox process Fe(II(CN6/Fe(III(CN6 of the binuclear complex formed. The redox couple presents an electrocatalytic response of sulfhydryl compounds such as n-acetylcysteine and l-cysteine. For determination of n-acetylcysteine and l-cysteine the modified graphite paste electrode showed a linear region in the concentration range of 2 to 20 mmol L−1. The modified electrode was chemically and electrochemically stable and showed good reproducibility.

  18. Protein-Thiol Oxidation and Cell Death: Regulatory Role of Glutaredoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Erin M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Glutaredoxin (Grx) is the primary enzyme responsible for catalysis of deglutathionylation of protein-mixed disulfides with glutathione (GSH) (protein-SSG). This reversible post-translational modification alters the activity and function of many proteins important in regulation of critical cellular processes. Aberrant regulation of protein glutathionylation/deglutathionylation reactions due to changes in Grx activity can disrupt both apoptotic and survival signaling pathways. Recent Advances: Grx is known to regulate the activity of many proteins through reversible glutathionylation, such as Ras, Fas, ASK1, NFκB, and procaspase-3, all of which play important roles in control of apoptosis. Reactive oxygen species and/or reactive nitrogen species mediate oxidative modifications of critical Cys residues on these apoptotic mediators, facilitating protein-SSG formation and thereby altering protein function and apoptotic signaling. Critical Issues: Much of what is known about the regulation of apoptotic mediators by Grx and reversible glutathionylation has been gleaned from in vitro studies of discrete apoptotic pathways. To relate these results to events in vivo it is important to examine changes in protein-SSG status in situ under natural cellular conditions, maintaining relevant GSH:GSSG ratios and using appropriate inducers of apoptosis. Future Directions: Apoptosis is a highly complex, tightly regulated process involving many different checks and balances. The influence of Grx activity on the interconnectivity among these various pathways remains unknown. Knowledge of the effects of Grx is essential for developing novel therapeutic approaches for treating diseases involving dysregulated apoptosis, such as cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases, where alterations in redox homeostasis are hallmarks for pathogenesis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1748–1763. PMID:22530666

  19. Rapid and simple preparation of thiol-ene emulsion-templated monoliths and their application as enzymatic microreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafleur, Josiane P; Senkbeil, Silja; Novotny, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    A novel, rapid and simple method for the preparation of emulsion-templated monoliths in microfluidic channels based on thiol-ene chemistry is presented. The method allows monolith synthesis and anchoring inside thiol-ene microchannels in a single photoinitiated step. Characterization by scanning...... electron microscopy showed that the methanol-based emulsion templating process resulted in a network of highly interconnected and regular thiol-ene beads anchored solidly inside thiol-ene microchannels. Surface area measurements indicate that the monoliths are macroporous, with no or little micro...

  20. Visualizing and quantifying oxidized protein thiols in tissue sections: a comparison of dystrophic mdx and normal skeletal mouse muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Tomohito; Terrill, Jessica; Shavlakadze, Tea; Grounds, Miranda D; Arthur, Peter G

    2013-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are not only a cause of oxidative stress in a range of disease conditions but are also important regulators of physiological pathways in vivo. One mechanism whereby ROS can regulate cell function is by modification of proteins through the reversible oxidation of their thiol groups. An experimental challenge has been the relative lack of techniques to probe the biological significance of protein thiol oxidation in complex multicellular tissues and organs. We have developed a sensitive and quantitative fluorescence labeling technique to detect and localize protein thiol oxidation in histological tissue sections. In our technique, reduced and oxidized protein thiols are visualized and quantified on two consecutive tissue sections and the extent of protein thiol oxidation is expressed as a percentage of total protein thiols (reduced plus oxidized). We tested the application of this new technique using muscles of dystrophic (mdx) and wild-type C57Bl/10Scsn (C57) mice. In mdx myofibers, protein thiols were consistently more oxidized (19 ± 3%) compared with healthy myofibers (10 ± 1%) in C57 mice. A striking observation was the localization of intensive protein thiol oxidation (70 ± 9%) within myofibers associated with necrotic damage. Oxidative stress is an area of active investigation in many fields of research, and this technique provides a useful tool for locating and further understanding protein thiol oxidation in normal, damaged, and diseased tissues. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Low molecular weight thiols and thioredoxins are important players in Hg(II) resistance in Thermus thermophilus HB27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norambuena, J; Wang, Y; Hanson, T; Boyd, J M; Barkay, T

    2017-11-17

    Mercury (Hg), one of the most toxic and widely distributed heavy metals, has a high affinity for thiol groups. Thiol groups reduce and sequester Hg. Therefore, low molecular weight and protein thiols may be important cell components used in Hg resistance. To date, the role of low molecular weight thiols in Hg-detoxification remains understudied. The mercury resistance ( mer ) operon of Thermus thermophilus suggests an evolutionary link between Hg(II) resistance and low molecular weight thiol metabolism. This mer operon encodes for an enzyme involved in methionine biosynthesis, Oah. Challenge with Hg(II) resulted in increased expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis of multiple low molecular weight thiols (cysteine, homocysteine, and bacillithiol), as well as the thioredoxin system. Phenotypic analysis of gene replacement mutants indicated that Oah contributes to Hg resistance under sulfur limiting conditions, and strains lacking bacillithiol and/or thioredoxins are more sensitive to Hg(II) than the wild type. Growth in presence of either a thiol oxidizing agent or a thiol alkylating agent increased sensitivity to Hg(II). Furthermore, exposure to 3 μM Hg(II) consumed all intracellular reduced bacillithiol and cysteine. Database searches indicate that oah2 is present in all Thermus spp. mer operons. The presence of a thiol related gene was also detected in some alphaprotobacterial mer operons, in which a glutathione reductase gene was present, supporting the role of thiols in Hg(II) detoxification. These results have led to a working model in which LMW thiols act as Hg(II) buffering agents while Hg is reduced by MerA. Importance The survival of microorganisms in presence of toxic metals is central to life's sustainability. The affinity of thiol groups to toxic heavy metals drives microbe-metal interactions and modulate metal toxicity. Mercury detoxification ( mer ) genes likely originated early in microbial evolution among geothermal environments. Little is

  2. CLL2-1, a chemical derivative of orchid 1,4-phenanthrenequinones, inhibits human platelet aggregation through thiol modification of calcium-diacylglycerol guanine nucleotide exchange factor-I (CalDAG-GEFI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chieh-Yu; Lee, Chia-Lin; Wang, Hui-Chun; Liang, Shih-Shin; Kung, Po-Hsiung; Wu, Yang-Chang; Chang, Fang-Rong; Wu, Chin-Chung

    2015-01-01

    CalDAG-GEFI is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, which actives small GTPase Rap1 and plays an important role in platelet aggregation. Our previous study has shown that CalDAG-GEFI contains redox-sensitive thiols, and its function can be inhibited by thiol modification. In the present study, the effect of CLL2-1, a 1,4-phenanthrenequinone, on CalDAG-GEFI and platelet functions was investigated. In human platelets, CLL2-1 prevented platelet aggregation caused by various stimulators. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that CLL2-1 inhibited GPIIb/IIIa activation and P-selectin secretion. Moreover, CLL2-1 prevented Rap1 activation caused by thrombin, the Ca(2+) ionophore A23187, and the diacylglycerol mimetic phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, while only slightly inhibited thrombin-induced increases in [Ca(2+)]i and did not inhibit protein kinase C activation. Western blots after reducing SDS-PAGE showed that treatment of either platelets or platelet lysates with CLL2-1 led to a decrease of monomeric CalDAG-GEFI and appearance of cross-linked oligomers of CalDAG-GEFI, and these effects were inhibited by pretreatment of platelets or lysates with thiol reducing agents prior to the addition of CLL2-1, indicating thiol modification of CalDAG-GEFI by CLL2-1. Furthermore, the thiol reducing agents also prevented the inhibitory effect of CLL2-1 on Rap1 activation, GPIIb/IIIa activation, and platelet aggregation. In CalDAG-GEFI-overexpressing human embryonic kidney 293T cells, CLL2-1 also inhibited CalDAG-GEFI-mediated Rap1 activation. Taken together, our results suggest that the antiplatelet effect of CLL2-1 is due to, at least in part, inhibition of CalDAG-GEFI-mediated Rap1 activation, and provide the basis for development of novel antiplatelet drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Thiol groups controls on arsenite binding by organic matter: new experimental and modeling evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catrouillet, Charlotte; Davranche, Mélanie; Dia, Aline; Bouhnik-Le Coz, Martine; Pédrot, Mathieu; Marsac, Rémi; Gruau, Gérard

    2015-12-15

    Although it has been suggested that several mechanisms can describe the direct binding of As(III) to organic matter (OM), more recently, the thiol functional group of humic acid (HA) was shown to be an important potential binding site for As(III). Isotherm experiments on As(III) sorption to HAs, that have either been grafted with thiol or not, were thus conducted to investigate the preferential As(III) binding sites. There was a low level of binding of As(III) to HA, which was strongly dependent on the abundance of the thiols. Experimental datasets were used to develop a new model (the modified PHREEQC-Model VI), which defines HA as a group of discrete carboxylic, phenolic and thiol sites. Protonation/deprotonation constants were determined for each group of sites (pKA=4.28±0.03; ΔpKA=2.13±0.10; pKB=7.11±0.26; ΔpKB=3.52±0.49; pKS=5.82±0.052; ΔpKS=6.12±0.12 for the carboxylic, phenolic and thiols sites, respectively) from HAs that were either grafted with thiol or not. The pKS value corresponds to that of single thiol-containing organic ligands. Two binding models were tested: the Mono model, which considered that As(III) is bound to the HA thiol site as monodentate complexes, and the Tri model, which considered that As(III) is bound as tridentate complexes. A simulation of the available literature datasets was used to validate the Mono model, with logKMS=2.91±0.04, i.e. the monodentate hypothesis. This study highlighted the importance of thiol groups in OM reactivity and, notably, determined the As(III) concentration bound to OM (considering that Fe is lacking or at least negligible) and was used to develop a model that is able to determine the As(III) concentrations bound to OM. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Heavy metal ion removal by thiol functionalized aluminum oxide hydroxide nanowhiskers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhiyong; Baird, Lance; Zimmerman, Natasha; Yeager, Matthew

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we developed a cost effective method of using thiol functionalized γ-aluminum oxide hydroxide (γ-AlOOH) filters for removing three key heavy metals from water: mercury, lead, and cadmium under non-concomitant conditions. Compared to non-thiol treated γ-AlOOH filters, the introduction of thiol functional groups greatly improved the heavy metal removal efficiency under both static and dynamic filtration conditions. The adsorption kinetics of thiol functionalized γ-AlOOH were investigated using the Lagergren first order and pseudo-second order kinetics models; whereas the isothermal adsorption behavior of these membranes was revealed through the Langmuir and Freundlich models. Heavy metal concentration was quantified by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy, and the thiol level on γ-AlOOH surface was measured by a colorimetric assay using Ellman's reagent. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to further address the surface sulfur state on the membranes after heavy metal exposure. Mechanisms for heavy metal adsorption were also discussed.

  5. The synthesis of novel hybrid thiol-functionalized nano-structured SBA-15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, Van Duc; Dang, Tuyet Phuong; Dinh, Quang Khieu; Vu, Anh Tuan; Nguyen, Huu Phu

    2010-01-01

    Mesoporous thiol-functionalized SBA-15 has been directly synthesized by co-condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) with triblock copolymer P123 as-structure-directing agent under hydrothermal conditions. Surfactant removal was performed by Soxhlet ethanol extraction. These materials have been characterized by powder x-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption/desorption (BET model), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy (IR) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The main parameters, such as the initial molar ratio of MPTMS to TEOS, the time of adding MPTMS to synthesized gel and the Soxhlet ethanol extraction on the thiol functionalized SBA-15 with high thiol content and highly ordered hexagonal mesostructure, were investigated and evaluated. The adsorption capacity of the thiol-functionalized and non-functionalized SBA-15 materials for Pb 2+ ion from aqueous solution was tested. It was found that the Pb 2+ adsorption capacity of the thiol functionalized SBA-15 is three times higher than that of non-functionalized SBA-15

  6. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy of Diamondoid Thiol Monolayers on Gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willey, T M; Fabbri, J; Lee, J I; Schreiner, P; Fokin, A A; Tkachenko, B A; Fokina, N A; Dahl, J; Carlson, B; Vance, A L; Yang, W; Terminello, L J; van Buuren, T; Melosh, N

    2007-11-27

    Diamondoids, hydrocarbon molecules with cubic-diamond-cage structures, have unique properties with potential value for nanotechnology. The availability and ability to selectively functionalize this special class of nanodiamond materials opens new possibilities for surface-modification, for high-efficiency field emitters in molecular electronics, as seed crystals for diamond growth, or as robust mechanical coatings. The properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of diamondoids are thus of fundamental interest for a variety of emerging applications. This paper presents the effects of thiol substitution position and polymantane order on diamondoid SAMs on gold using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A framework to determine both molecular tilt and twist through NEXAFS is presented and reveals highly ordered diamondoid SAMs, with the molecular orientation controlled by the thiol location. C 1s and S 2p binding energies are lower in adamantane thiol than alkane thiols on gold by 0.67 {+-} 0.05 eV and 0.16 {+-} 0.04 eV respectively. These binding energies vary with diamondoid monolayer structure and thiol substitution position, consistent with different amounts of steric strain and electronic interaction with the substrate. This work demonstrates control over the assembly, in particular the orientational and electronic structure, providing a flexible design of surface properties with this exciting new class of diamond clusters.

  7. The Reducing Capacity of Thioredoxin on Oxidized Thiols in Boiled Wort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murmann, Anne N.; Hägglund, Per; Svensson, Birte

    2017-01-01

    Free thiol-containing proteins are suggested to work as antioxidants in beer, but the majority of thiols in wort are present in their oxidized form as disulfides and are therefore not active as antioxidants. Thioredoxin, a disulfide-reducing protein, is released into the wort from some yeast...... and fluorescence detection of thiol-derivatives. When boiled wort was incubated with all components of the thioredoxin system at pH 7.0 and 25 °C for 60 min under anaerobic conditions, the free thiol concentration increased from 25 to 224 μM. At pH values similar to wort (pH 5.7) and beer (pH 4.5), the thioredoxin...... system was also capable of increasing the free thiol concentration, although with lower efficiency to 187 and 170 μM, respectively. The presence of sulfite, an important antioxidant in beer secreted by the yeast during fermentation, was found to inactivate thioredoxin by sulfitolysis. Reduction...

  8. Self-Healing Photocurable Epoxy/thiol-ene Systems Using an Aromatic Epoxy Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Acosta Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid and efficient method to obtain self-healing epoxy resins is discussed. This method is based on the use of a thiol-disulfide oligomer obtained by partial oxidation of a multifunctional thiol using a hypervalent iodine (III compound as oxidant. The oligomer was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, and gel permeation chromatography (GPC. The oligomer was a joint component of the thiol-ene system along with a tetra-allyl-functionalized curing agent. The kinetics of the photopolymerization of diglycidylether of bisphenol A (DGEBA revealed that conversions of the epoxy groups as high as 80% were achieved in only 15 minutes by increasing the concentration of the thiol-ene system in the formulation. The disulfide bonds introduced in the copolymer using the thiol-disulfide oligomer allowed the repairing of the test specimens in as little as 10 minutes when the specimens were heated at 80°C or for 500 minutes at room temperature. The analysis of the mechanical properties using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA showed that the specimens displayed a healing efficiency up to 111% compared with the unhealed specimens, depending on the amount of polythioethers present in the copolymer.

  9. Study of the effect of thiols on the vasodilatory potency of S-nitrosothiols by using a modified aortic ring assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giustarini, Daniela; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Rossi, Ranieri

    2011-01-01

    Both low-molecular-mass thiols (LMM-SH) and protein thiols (P-SH) can modulate the biological activity of S-nitrosothiols (RSNO) via S-transnitrosation reactions. It has been difficult to evaluate the entity of this effect in blood circulation by in vitro assays with isolated aorta rings so far, because media rich in proteins cannot be used due to the foaming as a consequence of the needed gas bubbling. We have modified the original apparatus for organ bioassay in order to minimize foaming and to increase analytical performance. By using this modified bioassay we investigated the vasodilatory potency of various endogenous RSNOs in the presence of physiologically relevant concentrations of albumin and LMM-SH. Our results show that the sulfhydryl group of the cysteine moiety of albumin and LMM-SH has a dramatic effect on the vasodilatory potency of RSNO. Considering the equilibrium constants for S-transnitrosation reactions and the concentration of P-SH and LMM-SH we measured in healthy humans (aged 18-85 years), we infer that the age-dependency of hematic levels of LMM-SH may have a considerable impact in RSNO-mediated vasodilation. S-Nitrosoproteins such as S-nitrosoalbumin may constitute a relatively silent and constant amount of circulating RSNO. On the other hand, LMM-SH may mediate and control the biological actions of S-nitrosoproteins via S-transnitrosation reactions, by forming more potent nitric oxide-releasing LMM-S-nitrosothiols. Lifestyle habits, status of health and individual age are proven factors that, in turn, may influence the concentration of these compounds. These aspects should be taken into consideration when testing the vasodilatory effects of RSNO in pre-clinical studies. - Highlights: → A modification of the organ chamber apparatus for aortic ring bioassays is proposed. → The new apparatus can work in the presence of albumin at physiological concentrations. → Potency of RSNOs was studied in the presence of albumin and low molecular

  10. The redox biology network in cancer pathophysiology and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Manda

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The review pinpoints operational concepts related to the redox biology network applied to the pathophysiology and therapeutics of solid tumors. A sophisticated network of intrinsic and extrinsic cues, integrated in the tumor niche, drives tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Critical mutations and distorted redox signaling pathways orchestrate pathologic events inside cancer cells, resulting in resistance to stress and death signals, aberrant proliferation and efficient repair mechanisms. Additionally, the complex inter-cellular crosstalk within the tumor niche, mediated by cytokines, redox-sensitive danger signals (HMGB1 and exosomes, under the pressure of multiple stresses (oxidative, inflammatory, metabolic, greatly contributes to the malignant phenotype. The tumor-associated inflammatory stress and its suppressive action on the anti-tumor immune response are highlighted. We further emphasize that ROS may act either as supporter or enemy of cancer cells, depending on the context. Oxidative stress-based therapies, such as radiotherapy and photodynamic therapy, take advantage of the cytotoxic face of ROS for killing tumor cells by a non-physiologically sudden, localized and intense oxidative burst. The type of tumor cell death elicited by these therapies is discussed. Therapy outcome depends on the differential sensitivity to oxidative stress of particular tumor cells, such as cancer stem cells, and therefore co-therapies that transiently down-regulate their intrinsic antioxidant system hold great promise. We draw attention on the consequences of the damage signals delivered by oxidative stress-injured cells to neighboring and distant cells, and emphasize the benefits of therapeutically triggered immunologic cell death in metastatic cancer. An integrative approach should be applied when designing therapeutic strategies in cancer, taking into consideration the mutational, metabolic, inflammatory and oxidative status of tumor cells, cellular

  11. Redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celien eLismont

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reduction-oxidation or ‘redox’ reactions are an integral part of a broad range of cellular processes such as gene expression, energy metabolism, protein import and folding, and autophagy. As many of these processes are intimately linked with cell fate decisions, transient or chronic changes in cellular redox equilibrium are likely to contribute to the initiation and progression of a plethora of human diseases. Since a long time, it is known that mitochondria are major players in redox regulation and signaling. More recently, it has become clear that also peroxisomes have the capacity to impact redox-linked physiological processes. To serve this function, peroxisomes cooperate with other organelles, including mitochondria. This review provides a comprehensive picture of what is currently known about the redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes in mammals. We first outline the pro- and antioxidant systems of both organelles and how they may function as redox signaling nodes. Next, we critically review and discuss emerging evidence that peroxisomes and mitochondria share an intricate redox-sensitive relationship and cooperate in cell fate decisions. Key issues include possible physiological roles, messengers, and mechanisms. We also provide examples of how data mining of publicly-available datasets from ‘omics’ technologies can be a powerful means to gain additional insights into potential redox signaling pathways between peroxisomes and mitochondria. Finally, we highlight the need for more studies that seek to clarify the mechanisms of how mitochondria may act as dynamic receivers, integrators, and transmitters of peroxisome-derived mediators of oxidative stress. The outcome of such studies may open up exciting new avenues for the community of researchers working on cellular responses to organelle-derived oxidative stress, a research field in which the role of peroxisomes is currently highly underestimated and an issue of

  12. Protein S-thiolation by Glutathionylspermidine (Gsp): the role of Escherichia coli Gsp synthetASE/amidase in redox regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Bing-Yu; Chen, Tzu-Chieh; Pai, Chien-Hua; Chou, Chi-Chi; Chen, Hsuan-He; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Chang, Chun-Yang; Wu, Whei-Fen; Wang, Andrew H-J; Lin, Chun-Hung

    2010-08-13

    Certain bacteria synthesize glutathionylspermidine (Gsp), from GSH and spermidine. Escherichia coli Gsp synthetase/amidase (GspSA) catalyzes both the synthesis and hydrolysis of Gsp. Prior to the work reported herein, the physiological role(s) of Gsp or how the two opposing GspSA activities are regulated had not been elucidated. We report that Gsp-modified proteins from E. coli contain mixed disulfides of Gsp and protein thiols, representing a new type of post-translational modification formerly undocumented. The level of these proteins is increased by oxidative stress. We attribute the accumulation of such proteins to the selective inactivation of GspSA amidase activity. X-ray crystallography and a chemical modification study indicated that the catalytic cysteine thiol of the GspSA amidase domain is transiently inactivated by H(2)O(2) oxidation to sulfenic acid, which is stabilized by a very short hydrogen bond with a water molecule. We propose a set of reactions that explains how the levels of Gsp and Gsp S-thiolated proteins are modulated in response to oxidative stress. The hypersensitivities of GspSA and GspSA/glutaredoxin null mutants to H(2)O(2) support the idea that GspSA and glutaredoxin act synergistically to regulate the redox environment of E. coli.

  13. Integration between anticipatory blocking and redox signaling by the peroxiredoxin/thioredoxin/thioredoxin-reductase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaggio, Gianluca; Coelho, Pedro M B M; Salvador, Armindo

    2014-10-01

    Cells are occasionally exposed to high H2O2 concentrations, often preceding exposure to other electrophylic compounds. Both H2O2 and these compounds can irreversibly modify protein thiols, with deleterious consequences. Induction of enzymatic defenses against those agents is too slow to avoid significant damage. Cells may solve this conundrum by reversibly "blocking" the thiols once H2O2 concentrations begin to increase. We term this mechanism "anticipatory blocking" because it acts in anticipation of irreversible damage upon detection of early signs of stress. Here we examine the design requirements for the Peroxiredoxin/Thioredoxin/Thioredoxin-Reductase/Protein-Dithiol System (PTTRDS) to effectively integrate H2O2 signaling and anticipatory blocking of protein dithiols as disulfides, and we compared them to the designs found in cells. To that effect, we developed a minimal model of the PTTRDS, and we defined a set of quantitative performance criteria that embody the requirements for (a) efficient scavenging capacity, (b) low NADPH consumption, (c) effective signal propagation, and (d) effective anticipatory blocking. We then sought the design principles (relationships among rate constants and species concentrations) that warrant fulfillment of all these criteria. Experimental data indicates that the design of the PTTRDS in human erythrocytes fulfills these principles and thus accomplishes effective integration between anticipatory blocking, antioxidant protection and redox signaling. A more general analysis suggests that the same principles hold in a wide variety of cell types and organisms. We acknowledge grants PEst-C/SAU/LA0001/2013-2014, PEst-OE/QUI/UI0612/2013, FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-020978 (PTDC/QUI-BIQ/119657/2010) financed by FEDER through the "Programa Operacional Factores de Competitividade, COMPETE" and by national funds through "FCT, Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia". Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Redox proteomics changes in the fungal pathogen Trichosporon asahii on arsenic exposure: identification of protein responses to metal-induced oxidative stress in an environmentally-sampled isolate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidra Ilyas

    Full Text Available Trichosporon asahii is a yeast pathogen implicated in opportunistic infections. Cultures of an isolate collected from industrial wastewater were exposed for 2 days to 100 mg/L sodium arsenite (NaAsO2 and cadmium (CdCl2. Both metals reduced glutathione transferase (GST activity but had no effect on superoxide dismutase or catalase. NaAsO2 exposure increased glutathione reductase activity while CdCl2 had no effect. Protein thiols were labeled with 5-iodoacetamido fluorescein followed by one dimensional electrophoresis which revealed extensive protein thiol oxidation in response to CdCl2 treatment but thiol reduction in response to NaAsO2. Two dimensional electrophoresis analyses showed that the intensity of some protein spots was enhanced on treatment as judged by SameSpots image analysis software. In addition, some spots showed decreased IAF fluorescence suggesting thiol oxidation. Selected spots were excised and tryptic digested for identification by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Twenty unique T. asahii proteins were identified of which the following proteins were up-regulated in response to NaAsO2: 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase, phospholipase B, alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase, ATP synthase alpha chain, 20S proteasome beta-type subunit Pre3p and the hypothetical proteins A1Q1_08001, A1Q2_03020, A1Q1_06950, A1Q1_06913. In addition, the following showed decreased thiol-associated fluorescence consistent with thiol oxidation; aconitase; aldehyde reductase I; phosphoglycerate kinase; translation elongation factor 2; heat shock protein 70 and hypothetical protein A1Q2_04745. Some proteins showed both increase in abundance coupled with decrease in IAF fluorescence; 3-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA hydrolase; homoserine dehydrogenase Hom6 and hypothetical proteins A1Q2_03020 and A1Q1_00754. Targets implicated in redox response included 10 unique metabolic enzymes, heat shock proteins, a component of the 20S proteasome and translation elongation factor 2. These data

  15. De Novo Construction of Redox Active Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, C C; Sheehan, M M; Ennist, N M; Kodali, G; Bialas, C; Englander, M T; Discher, B M; Dutton, P L

    2016-01-01

    Relatively simple principles can be used to plan and construct de novo proteins that bind redox cofactors and participate in a range of electron-transfer reactions analogous to those seen in natural oxidoreductase proteins. These designed redox proteins are called maquettes. Hydrophobic/hydrophilic binary patterning of heptad repeats of amino acids linked together in a single-chain self-assemble into 4-alpha-helix bundles. These bundles form a robust and adaptable frame for uncovering the default properties of protein embedded cofactors independent of the complexities introduced by generations of natural selection and allow us to better understand what factors can be exploited by man or nature to manipulate the physical chemical properties of these cofactors. Anchoring of redox cofactors such as hemes, light active tetrapyrroles, FeS clusters, and flavins by His and Cys residues allow cofactors to be placed at positions in which electron-tunneling rates between cofactors within or between proteins can be predicted in advance. The modularity of heptad repeat designs facilitates the construction of electron-transfer chains and novel combinations of redox cofactors and new redox cofactor assisted functions. Developing de novo designs that can support cofactor incorporation upon expression in a cell is needed to support a synthetic biology advance that integrates with natural bioenergetic pathways. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Compartmentation of redox metabolism in malaria parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Kehr

    Full Text Available Malaria, caused by the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium, still represents a major threat to human health and welfare and leads to about one million human deaths annually. Plasmodium is a rapidly multiplying unicellular organism undergoing a complex developmental cycle in man and mosquito - a life style that requires rapid adaptation to various environments. In order to deal with high fluxes of reactive oxygen species and maintain redox regulatory processes and pathogenicity, Plasmodium depends upon an adequate redox balance. By systematically studying the subcellular localization of the major antioxidant and redox regulatory proteins, we obtained the first complete map of redox compartmentation in Plasmodium falciparum. We demonstrate the targeting of two plasmodial peroxiredoxins and a putative glyoxalase system to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic plastid. We furthermore obtained a complete picture of the compartmentation of thioredoxin- and glutaredoxin-like proteins. Notably, for the two major antioxidant redox-enzymes--glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase--Plasmodium makes use of alternative-translation-initiation (ATI to achieve differential targeting. Dual localization of proteins effected by ATI is likely to occur also in other Apicomplexa and might open new avenues for therapeutic intervention.

  17. Enzymatic Continuous Flow Synthesis of Thiol-Terminated Poly(δ-Valerolactone) and Block Copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ning; Huang, Weijun; Hu, Xin; Liu, Yihuan; Fang, Zheng; Guo, Kai

    2018-04-01

    Thiol-terminated poly(δ-valerolactone) is directly synthesized via enzymatic 6-mercapto-1-hexanol initiated ring-opening polymerization in both batch and microreactor. By using Candida antartica Lipase B immobilized tubular reactor, narrowly dispersed poly(δ-valerolactone) with higher thiol fidelity is more efficiently prepared in contrast to the batch reactor. Moreover, the integrated enzyme packed tubular reactor system is established to perform the chain extension experiments. Thiol-terminated poly(δ-valerolactone)-block-poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(ε-caprolactone)-block-poly(δ-valerolactone) are easily prepared by modulating the monomer introduction sequence. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Diamond surface functionalization with biomimicry – Amine surface tether and thiol moiety for electrochemical sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sund, James B., E-mail: jim@jamessund.com [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Causey, Corey P. [Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Wolter, Scott D. [Department of Physics, Elon University, Elon, NC 27244 (United States); Parker, Charles B., E-mail: charles.parker@duke.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Stoner, Brian R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Toone, Eric J. [Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Glass, Jeffrey T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Diamond surfaces were functionalized with organic molecules using a novel approach. • Used biomimicry to select a molecule to bind NO, similar to the human body. • Molecular orbital theory predicted the molecule-analyte oxidation behavior. • A thiol moiety was attached to an amine surface tether on the diamond surface. • XPS analysis verified each surface functionalization step. - Abstract: The surface of conducting diamond was functionalized with a terminal thiol group that is capable of binding and detecting nitrogen–oxygen species. The functionalization process employed multiple steps starting with doped diamond films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition followed by hydrogen termination and photochemical attachment of a chemically protected amine alkene. The surface tether was deprotected to reveal the amine functionality, which enabled the tether to be extended with surface chemistry to add a terminal thiol moiety for electrochemical sensing applications. Each step of the process was validated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis.

  19. Preparation of photochromic silk fabrics based on thiol-halogen click chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ji; Wang, Wei; Yu, Dan

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we have synthesized a photochromic compound 9‧-(2-bromo-2-methylethoxycarbonyl)-1,3,3-trimethyl-spiro[2H-indole-2,3‧-[3H]naphtha[2,1-b] [1,4]oxazine] and applied it to the silk fabric to acquire photochromic properties. First, tris (2-carboxyethyl) phosphine (TCEP) was used as a reducing agent to produce thiol groups on the surface of silk fabric. Then, these thiol groups will react with -Br groups of the spirooxazine via thiol-halogen click chemistry. The spirooxazine was characterized by FTIR and UV. And the color change properties of the as-prepared silk fabrics were evaluated by the color measurement methods. The results indicated that treated silk fabric has excellent photochromic properties.

  20. Thiol peptides induction in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum (Banks ex Koenig) in response to cadmium exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Legorreta, Teresa [Departamento de Recursos del Mar, CINVESTAV-IPN, Unidad Merida, Apdo. Postal 73-Cordemex, Merida, Yucatan 97310 (Mexico); Mendoza-Cozatl, David; Moreno-Sanchez, Rafael [Departamento de Bioquimica, Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia, Mexico D.F. 14080 (Mexico); Gold-Bouchot, Gerardo [Departamento de Recursos del Mar, CINVESTAV-IPN, Unidad Merida, Apdo. Postal 73-Cordemex, Merida, Yucatan 97310 (Mexico)], E-mail: gold@mda.cinvestav.mx

    2008-01-20

    Trace metal accumulation and thiol compounds synthesis as induced by cadmium exposure was studied in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum. Shoots were exposed for 24, 48, 96 and 144 h to several CdCl{sub 2} concentrations (0, 30, 50 and 70 {mu}M). Levels of cadmium, cysteine, glutathione (GSH), {gamma}-glutamylcysteine ({gamma}-EC), and phytochelatin-like peptides were determined in green blades, live sheaths and root/rhizomes tissues. Metal accumulation was dependent on Cd concentration and type of tissue, with green blades showing the highest content followed by live sheaths and root/rhizomes. All tissues experienced an increase in thiol-containing compounds as a response to cadmium exposure. Live sheaths showed the highest levels of cysteine, GSH and {gamma}-EC. This is the first report of induction of thiol peptides, presumably phytochelatins, by a trace metal in a sea grass species.

  1. Protein Thiol Oxidation in Murine Airway Epithelial Cells in Response to Naphthalene or Diethyl Maleate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiess, Page C.; Morin, Dexter; Williams, Chase R.; Buckpitt, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Naphthalene (NA) is a semivolatile aromatic hydrocarbon to which humans are exposed from a variety of sources. NA results in acute cytotoxicity to respiratory epithelium in rodents. Cytochrome P450-dependent metabolic activation to form reactive intermediates and loss of soluble cellular thiols (glutathione) are critical steps in NA toxicity, but the precise mechanisms by which this chemical results in cellular injury remain unclear. Protein thiols are likely targets of reactive NA metabolites. Loss of these, through adduction or thiol oxidation mechanisms, may be important underlying mechanisms for NA toxicity. To address the hypothesis that loss of thiols on specific cellular proteins is critical to NA-induced cytotoxicity, we compared reduced to oxidized thiol ratios in airway epithelial cell proteins isolated from lungs of mice treated with NA or the nontoxic glutathione depletor, diethyl maleate (DEM). At 300 mg/kg doses, NA administration resulted in a greater than 85% loss of glutathione levels in the airway epithelium, which is similar to the loss observed after DEM treatment. Using differential fluorescent maleimide labeling followed by 2DE separation of proteins, we identified more than 35 unique proteins that have treatment-specific differential sulfhydryl oxidation. At doses of NA and DEM that produce similar levels of glutathione depletion, Cy3/Cy5 labeling ratios were statistically different for 16 nonredundant proteins in airway epithelium. Proteins identified include a zinc finger protein, several aldehyde dehydrogenase variants, β-actin, and several other structural proteins. These studies show distinct patterns of protein thiol alterations with the noncytotoxic DEM and the cytotoxic NA. PMID:19843705

  2. Coordination chemistry controls the thiol oxidase activity of the B12-trafficking protein CblC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhu; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Ruetz, Markus; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Lesniak, Nicholas A; Kräutler, Bernhard; Brunold, Thomas C; Koutmos, Markos; Banerjee, Ruma

    2017-06-09

    The cobalamin or B 12 cofactor supports sulfur and one-carbon metabolism and the catabolism of odd-chain fatty acids, branched-chain amino acids, and cholesterol. CblC is a B 12 -processing enzyme involved in an early cytoplasmic step in the cofactor-trafficking pathway. It catalyzes the glutathione (GSH)-dependent dealkylation of alkylcobalamins and the reductive decyanation of cyanocobalamin. CblC from Caenorhabditis elegans ( ce CblC) also exhibits a robust thiol oxidase activity, converting reduced GSH to oxidized GSSG with concomitant scrubbing of ambient dissolved O 2 The mechanism of thiol oxidation catalyzed by ce CblC is not known. In this study, we demonstrate that novel coordination chemistry accessible to ce CblC-bound cobalamin supports its thiol oxidase activity via a glutathionyl-cobalamin intermediate. Deglutathionylation of glutathionyl-cobalamin by a second molecule of GSH yields GSSG. The crystal structure of ce CblC provides insights into how architectural differences at the α- and β-faces of cobalamin promote the thiol oxidase activity of ce CblC but mute it in wild-type human CblC. The R161G and R161Q mutations in human CblC unmask its latent thiol oxidase activity and are correlated with increased cellular oxidative stress disease. In summary, we have uncovered key architectural features in the cobalamin-binding pocket that support unusual cob(II)alamin coordination chemistry and enable the thiol oxidase activity of ce CblC. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Surface modification of cyclomatrix polyphosphazene microsphere by thiol-ene chemistry and lectin recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chen; Zhu, Xue-yan; Gao, Qiao-ling; Fang, Fei; Huang, Xiao-jun, E-mail: hxjzxh@zju.edu.cn

    2016-11-30

    Graphical abstract: A new synthetic route leading to polyphosphazene cyclomatrix microsphere with various functional groups has achieved via thiol-ene click modification. Herein, hexacholorocyclophosphazene (HCCP) crosslinked with bisphenol-S and 4,4′-diallyl bisphenol-S to generate broadly dispersed microspheres. Thiol-ene modification under UV irradiation not only presented high efficiency and flexibility for post-functionalization, but also imposed no harm on global morphology and crosslinked skeleton of such microspheres. - Highlights: • Functional polyphosphazene microspheres with high chemical flexibility were synthesized by thiol-ene modification. • Polyphosphazene microspheres possessed high thermal stability. • Glycosylated polyphosphazene microspheres showed affinity to lectin Con-A, which inferred potential application in biomedicine. - Abstract: A new synthetic route leading to functional polyphosphazene cyclomatrix microsphere has been developed via thiol-ene click modification. Hexacholorocyclophosphazene (HCCP) was crosslinked with both bisphenol-S and 4,4′-diallyl bisphenol-S to obtain vinyl polyphosphazene microspheres (VPZM) in order to ensure high crosslinking degree and introduce vinyl moieties. Compared to the microspheres obtained by HCCP and bisphenol-S, the size of VPZM was broadly dispersed from 400 nm to 1.40 μm. Thiol-ene click reactions were carried out to attach functional groups, such as glucosyl, carboxyl, ester and dodecyl groups onto polyphosphazene microspheres, which demonstrated no change in morphology and size after modification. Solid state NMR (SSNMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectoscopy (FT-IR) results showed that the vinyl moieties were introduced in the period of crosslinking and functionalization was also successful via click reactions. Moreover, the microspheres presented a little difference in thermal properties after modification. Concanavalin A (Con-A) fluorescent adsorption was also observed for

  4. Protein thiol oxidation in murine airway epithelial cells in response to naphthalene or diethyl maleate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiess, Page C; Morin, Dexter; Williams, Chase R; Buckpitt, Alan R

    2010-09-01

    Naphthalene (NA) is a semivolatile aromatic hydrocarbon to which humans are exposed from a variety of sources. NA results in acute cytotoxicity to respiratory epithelium in rodents. Cytochrome P450-dependent metabolic activation to form reactive intermediates and loss of soluble cellular thiols (glutathione) are critical steps in NA toxicity, but the precise mechanisms by which this chemical results in cellular injury remain unclear. Protein thiols are likely targets of reactive NA metabolites. Loss of these, through adduction or thiol oxidation mechanisms, may be important underlying mechanisms for NA toxicity. To address the hypothesis that loss of thiols on specific cellular proteins is critical to NA-induced cytotoxicity, we compared reduced to oxidized thiol ratios in airway epithelial cell proteins isolated from lungs of mice treated with NA or the nontoxic glutathione depletor, diethyl maleate (DEM). At 300 mg/kg doses, NA administration resulted in a greater than 85% loss of glutathione levels in the airway epithelium, which is similar to the loss observed after DEM treatment. Using differential fluorescent maleimide labeling followed by 2DE separation of proteins, we identified more than 35 unique proteins that have treatment-specific differential sulfhydryl oxidation. At doses of NA and DEM that produce similar levels of glutathione depletion, Cy3/Cy5 labeling ratios were statistically different for 16 nonredundant proteins in airway epithelium. Proteins identified include a zinc finger protein, several aldehyde dehydrogenase variants, beta-actin, and several other structural proteins. These studies show distinct patterns of protein thiol alterations with the noncytotoxic DEM and the cytotoxic NA.

  5. Stretching of BDT-gold molecular junctions: Thiol or thiolate termination?

    KAUST Repository

    Souza, Amaury De Melo

    2014-01-01

    It is often assumed that the hydrogen atoms in the thiol groups of a benzene-1,4-dithiol dissociate when Au-benzene-1,4-dithiol-Au junctions are formed. We demonstrate, by stability and transport property calculations, that this assumption cannot be made. We show that the dissociative adsorption of methanethiol and benzene-1,4-dithiol molecules on a flat Au(111) surface is energetically unfavorable and that the activation barrier for this reaction is as high as 1 eV. For the molecule in the junction, our results show, for all electrode geometries studied, that the thiol junctions are energetically more stable than their thiolate counterparts. Due to the fact that density functional theory (DFT) within the local density approximation (LDA) underestimates the energy difference between the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital and the highest occupied molecular orbital by several electron-volts, and that it does not capture the renormalization of the energy levels due to the image charge effect, the conductance of the Au-benzene-1,4-dithiol-Au junctions is overestimated. After taking into account corrections due to image charge effects by means of constrained-DFT calculations and electrostatic classical models, we apply a scissor operator to correct the DFT energy level positions, and calculate the transport properties of the thiol and thiolate molecular junctions as a function of the electrode separation. For the thiol junctions, we show that the conductance decreases as the electrode separation increases, whereas the opposite trend is found for the thiolate junctions. Both behaviors have been observed in experiments, therefore pointing to the possible coexistence of both thiol and thiolate junctions. Moreover, the corrected conductance values, for both thiol and thiolate, are up to two orders of magnitude smaller than those calculated with DFT-LDA. This brings the theoretical results in quantitatively good agreement with experimental data.

  6. Bioenergetics and redox adaptations of astrocytes to neuronal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolaños, Juan P

    2016-10-01

    Neuronal activity is a high-energy demanding process recruiting all neural cells that adapt their metabolism to sustain the energy and redox balance of neurons. During neurotransmission, synaptic cleft glutamate activates its receptors in neurons and in astrocytes, before being taken up by astrocytes through energy costly transporters. In astrocytes, the energy requirement for glutamate influx is likely to be met by glycolysis. To enable this, astrocytes are constitutively glycolytic, robustly expressing 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase-3 (PFKFB3), an enzyme that is negligibly present in neurons by continuous degradation because of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway via anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC)-Cdh1. Additional factors contributing to the glycolytic frame of astrocytes may include 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), pyruvate kinase muscle isoform-2 (PKM2), pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK4), lactate dehydrogenase-B, or monocarboxylate transporter-4 (MCT4). Neurotransmission-associated messengers, such as nitric oxide or ammonium, stimulate lactate release from astrocytes. Astrocyte-derived glycolytic lactate thus sustains the energy needs of neurons, which in contrast to astrocytes mainly rely on oxidative phosphorylation. Neuronal activity unavoidably triggers reactive oxygen species, but the antioxidant defense of neurons is weak; hence, they use glucose for oxidation through the pentose-phosphate pathway to preserve the redox status. Furthermore, neural activity is coupled with erythroid-derived erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2) mediated transcriptional activation of antioxidant genes in astrocytes, which boost the de novo glutathione biosynthesis in neighbor neurons. Thus, the bioenergetics and redox programs of astrocytes are adapted to sustain neuronal activity and survival. Developing therapeutic strategies to interfere with these pathways may be useful to combat neurological

  7. Preparation of new biobased coatings from a triglycidyl eugenol derivative through thiol-epoxy click reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Guzman, Dailyn; Ramis Juan, Xavier; Fernández Francos, Xavier; de la Flor1 López, Sílvia; Serra Albet, Àngels

    2018-01-01

    © 2017 Elsevier B.V. A new triglycidyl eugenol derivative (3EPO-EU) was synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic techniques, and used as starting monomer in the preparation of novel bio-based thiol-epoxy thermosets. As thiols, commercially available tetrathiol derived from pentaerythritol (PETMP), a trithiol derived from eugenol (3SH-EU) and the hexathiol derived from squalene (6SH-SQ) were used in the presence of 4-(N,N-dimethylamino)pyridine as the basic catalyst. A flexible diglycidy...

  8. On the reaction of thiols with primary radiation lesions in bacteriophage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korystov, Yu.N.; Veksler, A.M.; Ehjdus, L.Kh.

    1982-01-01

    In order to answer the question in which form, RSH of RS-, thiols react with the target responsible for reproductive cell death a study was made of the pH dependence (4.7-8.2) of the radioprotective effect of mercaptoethanol and cysteamine on the bacteriophage T 4 under the anoxic conditions. It was shown that the protective effect does not depend upon pH. Since the concentration of RSH, within the studied range of pH values, remains virtually invariable, and RS - concentration sharply changes, the obtained results indicate that the RSH is the form in which thiols react with primary radiation damages to the phage [ru

  9. Diamond surface functionalization with biomimicry - Amine surface tether and thiol moiety for electrochemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sund, James B.; Causey, Corey P.; Wolter, Scott D.; Parker, Charles B.; Stoner, Brian R.; Toone, Eric J.; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2014-05-01

    The surface of conducting diamond was functionalized with a terminal thiol group that is capable of binding and detecting nitrogen-oxygen species. The functionalization process employed multiple steps starting with doped diamond films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition followed by hydrogen termination and photochemical attachment of a chemically protected amine alkene. The surface tether was deprotected to reveal the amine functionality, which enabled the tether to be extended with surface chemistry to add a terminal thiol moiety for electrochemical sensing applications. Each step of the process was validated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis.

  10. Thiol-catalyzed formation of lactate and glycerate from glyceraldehyde. [significance in molecular evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    The rate of lactate formation from glyceraldehyde, catalyzed by N-acetyl-cysteine at ambient temperature in aqueous sodium phosphate (pH 7.0), is more rapid at higher sodium phosphate concentrations and remains essentially the same in the presence and absence of oxygen. The dramatic increase in the rate of glycerate formation that is brought about by this thiol, N-acetylcysteine, is accompanied by commensurate decreases in the rates of glycolate and formate production. It is suggested that the thiol-dependent formation of lactate and glycerate occurs by way of their respective thioesters. Attention is given to the significance of these reactions in the context of molecular evolution.

  11. XAFS study on structural order in highly monodispersed thiol-stabilized Au nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Y; Liu, W; Yang, L; Huang, T; Jiang, Y; Yao, T; Wei, S

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the influence of thiol on nanoparticle size and structure is essential for the fundamental and applied researches. Here, using x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, we investigate the structural order of Au nanoparticles (NPs) in the protection of thiol ligands with different contents. We found that besides protecting Au NPs against aggregation and growth, thiolates can effectively eliminate the dangling bonds of unsaturated Au atoms, and thus increase the structural order. This work enriches our knowledge of Au-S interface interaction and guides the way towards preparing size-controllable nanoparticles with specific physical/chemical properties. (paper)

  12. Multifunctional monomers based on vinyl sulfonates and vinyl sulfonamides for crosslinking thiol-Michael polymerizations: monomer reactivity and mechanical behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Jasmine; Podgórski, Maciej; Huang, Sijia; Bowman, Christopher N

    2018-03-25

    Multifunctional vinyl sulfonates and vinyl sulfonamides were conveniently synthesized and assessed in thiol-Michael crosslinking polymerizations. The monomer reactivities, mechanical behavior and hydrolytic properties were analyzed and compared with those of analogous thiol-acrylate polymerizations. Materials with a broad range of mechanical properties and diverse hydrolytic stabilities were obtained.

  13. Formation of Underbrushes on thiolated Poly (ethylene glycol) PEG monolayers by Oligoethylene glycol (OEG) terminated Alkane Thiols on Gold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lokanathan, Arcot R.

    2011-01-01

    of the molecule in superior resistance towards protein adsorption. The surfaces with underbrushes were imaged using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to detect any changes in mechanical properties of PEG thiol covered surfaces upon addition of OEG thiol. References: 1. Katsumi Uchida, Yuki Hoshino, Atsushi Tamura...

  14. Molybdate:sulfate ratio affects redox metabolism and viability of the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, M.P., E-mail: marcelo.barros@cruzeirodosul.edu.br [Postgraduate Program in Health Science (Environmental Chemistry), CBS, Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, 08060070 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hollnagel, H.C. [Pós-Graduação, Faculdade Mario Schenberg, 06710500 Cotia, SP (Brazil); Glavina, A.B. [Postgraduate Program in Health Science (Environmental Chemistry), CBS, Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, 08060070 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Soares, C.O. [Postgraduate Program in Health Science (Environmental Chemistry), CBS, Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, 08060070 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Department of Biochemistry, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo (IQ-USP), São Paulo (Brazil); Ganini, D. [Postgraduate Program in Health Science (Environmental Chemistry), CBS, Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, 08060070 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Free Radical Metabolism Group, Laboratory of Toxicology and Pharmacology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Dagenais-Bellefeuille, S.; Morse, D. [Departement de Sciences Biologiques, Institut de Recherche en Biologie Végétale, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC H1X 2B2 (Canada); Colepicolo, P. [Department of Biochemistry, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo (IQ-USP), São Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Molybdenum (Mo) is a key micronutrient for nitrogen and redox metabolism in many microalgae. •Molybdate and (more abundant) sulfate anions compete for uptake, although proper mechanism is still obscure. •Higher concentrations of molybdate in culture medium diminish sulfur content in L. polyedrum. •Mo toxicity was monitored as a function of [Mo]:[sulfate] ratios in L. polyedrum and was linked to oxidative stress. •Induction of xanthine oxidase activity and/or depletion of thiol-dependent antioxidants are suggested as plausible mechanisms to explain Mo toxicity in dinoflagellates. -- Abstract: Molybdenum is a transition metal used primarily (90% or more) as an additive to steel and corrosion-resistant alloys in metallurgical industries and its release into the environment is a growing problem. As a catalytic center of some redox enzymes, molybdenum is an essential element for inorganic nitrogen assimilation/fixation, phytohormone synthesis, and free radical metabolism in photosynthesizing species. In oceanic and estuarine waters, microalgae absorb molybdenum as the water-soluble molybdate anion (MoO{sub 4}{sup 2−}), although MoO{sub 4}{sup 2−} uptake is thought to compete with uptake of the much more abundant sulfate anion (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}, approximately 25 mM in seawater). Thus, those aspects of microalgal biology impacted by molybdenum would be better explained by considering both MoO{sub 4}{sup 2−} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} concentrations in the aquatic milieu. This work examines toxicological, physiological and redox imbalances in the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum that have been induced by changes in the molybdate:sulfate ratios. We prepared cultures of Lingulodinium polyedrum grown in artificial seawater containing eight different MoO{sub 4}{sup 2−} concentrations (from 0 to 200 μM) and three different SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} concentrations (3.5 mM, 9.6 mM and 25 mM). We measured sulfur content in cells, the activities of

  15. Structural Basis for Redox Regulation of Cytoplasmic and Chloroplastic Triosephosphate Isomerases from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Margarita López-Castillo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In plants triosephosphate isomerase (TPI interconverts glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (G3P and dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP during glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the Calvin-Benson cycle. The nuclear genome of land plants encodes two tpi genes, one gene product is located in the cytoplasm and the other is imported into the chloroplast. Herein we report the crystal structures of the TPIs from the vascular plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AtTPIs and address their enzymatic modulation by redox agents. Cytoplasmic TPI (cTPI and chloroplast TPI (pdTPI share more than 60% amino acid identity and assemble as (β-α8 dimers with high structural homology. cTPI and pdTPI harbor two and one accessible thiol groups per monomer respectively. cTPI and pdTPI present a cysteine at an equivalent structural position (C13 and C15 respectively and cTPI also contains a specific solvent accessible cysteine at residue 218 (cTPI-C218. Site directed mutagenesis of residues pdTPI-C15, cTPI-C13 and cTPI-C218 to serine substantially decreases enzymatic activity, indicating that the structural integrity of these cysteines is necessary for catalysis. AtTPIs exhibit differential responses to oxidative agents, cTPI is susceptible to oxidative agents such as diamide and H2O2, whereas pdTPI is resistant to inhibition. Incubation of AtTPIs with the sulfhydryl conjugating reagents methylmethane thiosulfonate (MMTS and glutathione inhibits enzymatic activity. However, the concentration necessary to inhibit pdTPI is at least two orders of magnitude higher than the concentration needed to inhibit cTPI. Western-blot analysis indicates that residues cTPI-C13, cTPI-C218, and pdTPI-C15 conjugate with glutathione. In summary, our data indicate that AtTPIs could be redox regulated by the derivatization of specific AtTPI cysteines (cTPI-C13 and pdTPI-C15 and cTPI-C218. Since AtTPIs have evolved by gene duplication, the higher resistance of pdTPI to redox agents may be an adaptive consequence to

  16. Redox conversions of methemoglobin during redox cycling of quinones and aromatic nitrocompounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cénas, N; Ollinger, K

    1994-11-15

    The study focused on the effects on various redox states of hemoglobin during NADPH: cytochrome P-450 reductase-catalyzed redox cycling of quinones and nitrocompounds. The following reactions involving quinone/semiquinone and methemoglobin/oxyhemoglobin redox couples were observed: (i) the direct oxidation of oxyhemoglobin by quinones, (ii) the reduction of methemoglobin by quinones, (ii) the reduction of methemoglobin during redox cycling of quinones and nitrocompounds was partially inhibited by superoxide dismutase, and (iii) the reoxidation of oxyhemoglobin by hydrogen peroxide, formed during redox cycling was accompanied by the formation of choleglobin. Hydrogen peroxide was produced during redox cycling, and upon depletion of hydrogen peroxide by catalase, the reduction of methemoglobin significantly prevailed over oxidation of oxyhemoglobin. Furthermore, the reduction of ferrylhemoglobin to oxyhemoglobin during redox cycling was about twice as slow as the reduction of methemoglobin. For a series of compounds possessing a single-electron reduction potential (E1(7)) between 0.01 and -0.355 V, the rate constants for methemoglobin reduction by their corresponding radicals was estimated to range from 4.1 x 10(5) to 7.6 x 10(7) M-1 S-1. Radicals of the nitrocompounds were approximately 10 times less reactive as compared to quinones possessing similar E1(7) values.

  17. "Grafting to" of RAFTed Responsive Polymers to Glass Substrates by Thiol-Ene and Critical Comparison to Thiol-Gold Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Caroline I; Walker, Marc; Gibson, Matthew I

    2016-08-08

    Surface-grafted polymers have been widely applied to modulate biological interfaces and introduce additional functionality. Polymers derived from reversible addition-fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization have a masked thiol at the ω-chain end providing an anchor point for conjugation and in particular displays high affinity for gold surfaces (both flat and particulate). In this work, we report the direct grafting of RAFTed polymers by a "thiol-ene click" (Michael addition) onto glass substrates rather than gold, which provides a more versatile surface for subsequent array-based applications but retains the simplicity. The immobilization of two thermoresponsive polymers are studied here, poly[oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate] (pOEGMA) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM). Using a range of surface analysis techniques the grafting efficiency was compared to thiol-gold and was quantitatively compared to the gold alternative using quartz crystal microbalance. It is shown that this method gives easy access to grafted polymer surfaces with pNIPAM resulting in significantly increased surface coverage compared to pOEGMA. The nonfouling (protein resistance) character of these surfaces is also demonstrated.

  18. Simple Preparation of Thiol-Ene Particles in Glycerol and Surface Functionalization by Thiol-Ene Chemistry (TEC) and Surface Chain Transfer Free Radical Polymerization (SCT-FRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Christian; Chiaula, Valeria; Yu, Liyun; Pinelo, Manuel; Woodley, John M; Daugaard, Anders E

    2018-01-01

    Thiol-ene (TE)-based polymer particles are traditionally prepared via emulsion polymerization in water (using surfactants, stabilizers, and cosolvents). Here, a green and simple alternative is presented with excellent control over particle size, while avoiding the addition of stabilizers. Glycerol is applied as a dispersing medium for the preparation of off-stoichiometric TE microparticles, where sizes in the range of 40-400 µm are obtained solely by changing the mixing speed of the emulsions prior to crosslinking. Control over surface chemistry is achieved by surface functionalization of excess thiol groups via photochemical thiol-ene chemistry resulting in a functional monolayer. In addition, surface chain transfer free radical polymerization is used for the first time to introduce a thicker polymer layer on the particle surface. The application potential of the system is demonstrated by using functional particles as adsorbent for metal ions and as a support for immobilized enzymes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. The Role of Cysteine Residues in Redox Regulation and Protein Stability of Arabidopsis thaliana Starch Synthase 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsiaryna Skryhan

    Full Text Available Starch biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is strictly regulated. In leaf extracts, starch synthase 1 (AtSS1 responds to the redox potential within a physiologically relevant range. This study presents data testing two main hypotheses: 1 that specific thiol-disulfide exchange in AtSS1 influences its catalytic function 2 that each conserved Cys residue has an impact on AtSS1 catalysis. Recombinant AtSS1 versions carrying combinations of cysteine-to-serine substitutions were generated and characterized in vitro. The results demonstrate that AtSS1 is activated and deactivated by the physiological redox transmitters thioredoxin f1 (Trxf1, thioredoxin m4 (Trxm4 and the bifunctional NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC. AtSS1 displayed an activity change within the physiologically relevant redox range, with a midpoint potential equal to -306 mV, suggesting that AtSS1 is in the reduced and active form during the day with active photosynthesis. Cys164 and Cys545 were the key cysteine residues involved in regulatory disulfide formation upon oxidation. A C164S_C545S double mutant had considerably decreased redox sensitivity as compared to wild type AtSS1 (30% vs 77%. Michaelis-Menten kinetics and molecular modeling suggest that both cysteines play important roles in enzyme catalysis, namely, Cys545 is involved in ADP-glucose binding and Cys164 is involved in acceptor binding. All the other single mutants had essentially complete redox sensitivity (98-99%. In addition of being part of a redox directed activity "light switch", reactivation tests and low heterologous expression levels indicate that specific cysteine residues might play additional roles. Specifically, Cys265 in combination with Cys164 can be involved in proper protein folding or/and stabilization of translated protein prior to its transport into the plastid. Cys442 can play an important role in enzyme stability upon oxidation. The physiological and phylogenetic relevance of these

  20. The Role of Cysteine Residues in Redox Regulation and Protein Stability of Arabidopsis thaliana Starch Synthase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A; Nielsen, Morten M; Marri, Lucia; Mellor, Silas B; Glaring, Mikkel A; Jensen, Poul E; Palcic, Monica M; Blennow, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Starch biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is strictly regulated. In leaf extracts, starch synthase 1 (AtSS1) responds to the redox potential within a physiologically relevant range. This study presents data testing two main hypotheses: 1) that specific thiol-disulfide exchange in AtSS1 influences its catalytic function 2) that each conserved Cys residue has an impact on AtSS1 catalysis. Recombinant AtSS1 versions carrying combinations of cysteine-to-serine substitutions were generated and characterized in vitro. The results demonstrate that AtSS1 is activated and deactivated by the physiological redox transmitters thioredoxin f1 (Trxf1), thioredoxin m4 (Trxm4) and the bifunctional NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC). AtSS1 displayed an activity change within the physiologically relevant redox range, with a midpoint potential equal to -306 mV, suggesting that AtSS1 is in the reduced and active form during the day with active photosynthesis. Cys164 and Cys545 were the key cysteine residues involved in regulatory disulfide formation upon oxidation. A C164S_C545S double mutant had considerably decreased redox sensitivity as compared to wild type AtSS1 (30% vs 77%). Michaelis-Menten kinetics and molecular modeling suggest that both cysteines play important roles in enzyme catalysis, namely, Cys545 is involved in ADP-glucose binding and Cys164 is involved in acceptor binding. All the other single mutants had essentially complete redox sensitivity (98-99%). In addition of being part of a redox directed activity "light switch", reactivation tests and low heterologous expression levels indicate that specific cysteine residues might play additional roles. Specifically, Cys265 in combination with Cys164 can be involved in proper protein folding or/and stabilization of translated protein prior to its transport into the plastid. Cys442 can play an important role in enzyme stability upon oxidation. The physiological and phylogenetic relevance of these findings is

  1. TEMPOL increases NAD+ and improves redox imbalance in obese mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yamato, Mayumi; Kawano, Kimika; Yamanaka, Yuki; Saiga, Misako; Yamada, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Continuous energy conversion is controlled by reduction–oxidation (redox) processes. NAD+ and NADH represent an important redox couple in energy metabolism. 4-Hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPOL) is a redox-cycling nitroxide that promotes the scavenging of several reactive oxygen species (ROS) and is reduced to hydroxylamine by NADH. TEMPOL is also involved in NAD+ production in the ascorbic acid–glutathione redox cycle. We utilized the chemical properties of TEMPOL to invest...

  2. Redox-active nanomaterials for nanomedicine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Christopher M; Hanna, Shannon K; Heller, Daniel A; Horoszko, Christopher P; Johnson, Monique E; Montoro Bustos, Antonio R; Reipa, Vytas; Riley, Kathryn R; Nelson, Bryant C

    2017-10-19

    Nanomedicine utilizes the remarkable properties of nanomaterials for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease. Many of these nanomaterials have been shown to have robust antioxidative properties, potentially functioning as strong scavengers of reactive oxygen species. Conversely, several nanomaterials have also been shown to promote the generation of reactive oxygen species, which may precipitate the onset of oxidative stress, a state that is thought to contribute to the development of a variety of adverse conditions. As such, the impacts of nanomaterials on biological entities are often associated with and influenced by their specific redox properties. In this review, we overview several classes of nanomaterials that have been or projected to be used across a wide range of biomedical applications, with discussion focusing on their unique redox properties. Nanomaterials examined include iron, cerium, and titanium metal oxide nanoparticles, gold, silver, and selenium nanoparticles, and various nanoscale carbon allotropes such as graphene, carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, and their derivatives/variations. Principal topics of discussion include the chemical mechanisms by which the nanomaterials directly interact with biological entities and the biological cascades that are thus indirectly impacted. Selected case studies highlighting the redox properties of nanomaterials and how they affect biological responses are used to exemplify the biologically-relevant redox mechanisms for each of the described nanomaterials.

  3. Redox characteristics of the eukaryotic cytosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Mirabal, H Reynaldo; Winther, Jakob R

    2007-01-01

    organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where the combination of genetic and biochemical approaches has brought us furthest in understanding the mechanisms underlying cellular redox regulation. It has been shown in yeast that, in addition to the enzyme glutathione reductase, other mechanisms may exist...

  4. Investigating improvements on redox flow batteries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Swartbooi, AM

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available storage devices coupled to most of their applications. Lead-acid batteries have long been used as the most economical option to store electricity in many small scale applications, but lately more interest have been shown in redox flow batteries. The low...

  5. Methods for using redox liposome biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Quan; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and compositions for detecting the presence of biologically-important analytes by using redox liposome biosensors. In particular, the present invention provides liposome/sol-gel electrodes suitable for the detection of a wide variety of organic molecules, including but not limited to bacterial toxins.

  6. Redox regulation in cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS-dependent (redox regulation) signaling pathways and transcriptional activities are thought to be critical in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation during growth and organogenesis. Aberrant ROS burst and dysregulation of those ROS-dependent cellular processe...

  7. Redox Control of Skeletal Muscle Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moal, Emmeran; Pialoux, Vincent; Juban, Gaëtan; Groussard, Carole; Zouhal, Hassane; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Mounier, Rémi

    2017-08-10

    Skeletal muscle shows high plasticity in response to external demand. Moreover, adult skeletal muscle is capable of complete regeneration after injury, due to the properties of muscle stem cells (MuSCs), the satellite cells, which follow a tightly regulated myogenic program to generate both new myofibers and new MuSCs for further needs. Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) have long been associated with skeletal muscle physiology, their implication in the cell and molecular processes at work during muscle regeneration is more recent. This review focuses on redox regulation during skeletal muscle regeneration. An overview of the basics of ROS/RNS and antioxidant chemistry and biology occurring in skeletal muscle is first provided. Then, the comprehensive knowledge on redox regulation of MuSCs and their surrounding cell partners (macrophages, endothelial cells) during skeletal muscle regeneration is presented in normal muscle and in specific physiological (exercise-induced muscle damage, aging) and pathological (muscular dystrophies) contexts. Recent advances in the comprehension of these processes has led to the development of therapeutic assays using antioxidant supplementation, which result in inconsistent efficiency, underlying the need for new tools that are aimed at precisely deciphering and targeting ROS networks. This review should provide an overall insight of the redox regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration while highlighting the limits of the use of nonspecific antioxidants to improve muscle function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 276-310.

  8. Redox flow cell energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    NASA-Redox systems are electrochemical storage devices that use two fully soluble Redox couples, anode and cathode fluids, as active electrode materials separated by a highly selective ion exchange membrane. The reactants are contained in large storage tanks and pumped through a stack of Redox flow cells where the electrochemical reactions (reduction and oxidation) take place at porous carbon felt electrodes. A string or stack of these power producing cells is connected in series in a bipolar manner. Redox energy storage systems promise to be inexpensive and possess many features that provide for flexible design, long life, high reliability and minimal operation and maintenance costs. These features include independent sizing of power and storage capacity requirements and inclusion within the cell stack of a cell that monitors the state of charge of the system as a whole, and a rebalance cell which permits continuous correction to be made for minor side reactions that would tend to result in the anode fluid and cathode fluids becoming electrochemically out of balance. These system features are described and discussed.

  9. Multiple shape memory polymers based on laminates formed from thiol-click chemistry based polymerizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgórski, M; Wang, C; Bowman, C N

    2015-09-14

    This investigation details the formation of polymer network trilayer laminates formed by thiol-X click chemistries, and their subsequent implementation and evaluation for quadruple shape memory behavior. Thiol-Michael addition and thiol-isocyanate-based crosslinking reactions were employed to fabricate each of the laminate's layers with independent control of the chemistry and properties of each layer and outstanding interlayer adhesion and stability. The characteristic features of step-growth thiol-X reactions, such as excellent network uniformity and narrow thermal transitions as well as their stoichiometric nature, enabled fabrication of trilayer laminates with three distinctly different glass transition temperatures grouped within a narrow range of 100 °C. Through variations in the layer thicknesses, a step-wise modulus drop as a function of temperature was achieved. This behavior allowed multi-step programming and the demonstration and quantification of quadruple shape memory performance. As is critical for this performance, the interface connecting the layers was evaluated in stoichiometric as well as off-stoichiometric systems. It was shown that the laminated structures exhibit strong interfacial binding and hardly suffer any delamination during cyclic material testing and deformation.

  10. Thiol-ene reaction as tool for crosslinking of polynorbornene micelles in the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Barbara; Bauer, Thomas; Slugovc, Christian

    2009-08-01

    The thiol-ene reaction is a established photoreaction of multifunctional thiols and enes. Virtually any type of ene will participate in a free radical polymerisation process with a thiol. An advantage over many other photochemical reactions is that the reaction proceeds almost as rapidly in ambient conditions as in inert atmosphere. In this work we introduce the UV-crosslinking of polynorbornenes made by ring opening metathesis polymerization making use of the residual double bond in the polymer backbone. The crosslinking experiments were done in thin films and were followed by FTIR measurements, to proof the accessibility of double-bonds in the polymers for the addition of the thiols. As a result of these pre-experiments we created flexible and light transmitting films. To further increase the scope of this reaction, amphiphilic block copolymers were prepared and used to form block copolymer micelles in a selective solvent, which were subsequently crosslinked with pentaerythritol tetra(3-mercaptopropionate) (PETMP). FT-IR, DLS and SEM-measurements were used to prove the successful crosslinking and thus nanoparticle formation.

  11. Investigations of thiol-modified phenol derivatives for the use in thiol–ene photopolymerizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinelt, Sebastian; Tabatabai, Monir; Fischer, Urs Karl; Moszner, Norbert; Utterodt, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Thiol–ene photopolymerizations gain a growing interest in academic research. Coatings and dental restoratives are interesting applications for thiol–ene photopolymerizations due to their unique features. In most studies the relative flexible and hydrophilic ester derivative, namely pentaerythritoltetra(3-mercaptopropionate) (PETMP), is investigated as the thiol component. Thus, in the present study we are encouraged to investigate the performance of more hydrophobic ester-free thiol-modified bis- and trisphenol derivatives in thiol–ene photopolymerizations. For this, six different thiol-modified bis- and trisphenol derivatives exhibiting four to six thiol groups are synthesized via the radical addition of thioacetic acid to suitable allyl-modified precursors and subsequent hydrolysis. Compared to PETMP better flexural strength and modulus of elasticity are achievable in thiol–ene photopolymerizations employing 1,3,5-triallyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-trione (TATATO) as the ene derivative. Especially, after storage in water, the flexural strength and modulus of elasticity is twice as high compared to the PETMP reference system. PMID:25161731

  12. Investigations of thiol-modified phenol derivatives for the use in thiol–ene photopolymerizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Reinelt

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Thiol–ene photopolymerizations gain a growing interest in academic research. Coatings and dental restoratives are interesting applications for thiol–ene photopolymerizations due to their unique features. In most studies the relative flexible and hydrophilic ester derivative, namely pentaerythritoltetra(3-mercaptopropionate (PETMP, is investigated as the thiol component. Thus, in the present study we are encouraged to investigate the performance of more hydrophobic ester-free thiol-modified bis- and trisphenol derivatives in thiol–ene photopolymerizations. For this, six different thiol-modified bis- and trisphenol derivatives exhibiting four to six thiol groups are synthesized via the radical addition of thioacetic acid to suitable allyl-modified precursors and subsequent hydrolysis. Compared to PETMP better flexural strength and modulus of elasticity are achievable in thiol–ene photopolymerizations employing 1,3,5-triallyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-trione (TATATO as the ene derivative. Especially, after storage in water, the flexural strength and modulus of elasticity is twice as high compared to the PETMP reference system.

  13. Sytematic Study of the Adsorption of Thiol Molecules on Noble-Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, H.; Hidalgo, F.; Fernandez-Seivane, L.; Noguez, C.; Lopez-Lozano, X.

    2012-03-01

    The study of the interaction between nanoparticles and different types of ligands has been intensively investigated in the last years due to the potential contribution of their properties to the nanotechnology device design. These properties have opened new research fields like plasmonics, with interesting applications in optics, electronics, biophysics, medicine, pharmacology and materials science. Self-assembly monolayers have been thoroughly studied at experimental and theoretical level on extended (111) gold and silver surfaces. However, nanoparticle and molecule properties after the adsorption are still not well understood due to the different factors involved in this process such as the adsorption sites, size and element type of the nanoparticle. In this work we have performed a systematic study of the adsorption of methyl-thiol molecules on Au55 and Ag55 clusters through density functional theory calculations with the SIESTA code. Different adsorption modes of the methyl-thiol molecule on Au55 and Ag55 were considered. In general, for both type of nanoparticles, the methyl-thiol molecule prefers to be adsorbed on the Bridge sites. These results provide valuable information of the structural and electronic properties of methyl-thiol passivated Au and Ag nanoparticles.

  14. Factors influencing the oxidation of cysteamine and other thiols: implications for hyperthermic sensitization and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaglow, J.E.; Issels, R.W.; Gerweck, L.E.; Varnes, M.E.; Jacobson, B.; Mittchell, J.B.; Russo, A.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the factors influencing the oxygen uptake and peroxide formation for cysteamine (MEA) and other thiols in serum-supplemented modified McCoy's 5A, a well-known medium used to cultivate a variety of cells in vitro, have been studied. The oxidation of MEA and cysteine in modified McCoy's 5A has been compared with that in Ham's F-12, MEM, and phosphate-buffered saline. The ability to produce peroxide is dependent upon the temperature, the concentration of thiol, the presence of copper ions, and pH of the medium. Catalase also reduces the oxygen uptake for all thiols. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) was found to stimulate the oxygen uptake in the case of MEA and cysteine, but had little or no effect with DTT and glutathione. The combined presence of SOD and catalase resulted in less inhibition of oxygen uptake than that obtained by catalase alone. Alkaline pH was found to enhance the oxidation of cysteine and MEA. The results indicate that many problems may arise when thiols are added to various media. A major consideration is concerned with the production of peroxide, superoxide, and reduced trace metal intermediates. The presence of these intermediates may result in the production of hydroxyl radical intermediates as well as the eventual oxygen depletion from the medium

  15. Chemical groups and structural characterization of lignin via thiol-mediated demethylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihong Hu; Hui Pan; Yonghong Zhou; Chung-Yun Hse; Chengguo Liu; Baofang Zhang; Bin Xu

    2014-01-01

    A new approach to increase the reactivity of lignin by thiol-mediated demethylation was investigated in this study. Demethylated lignin was characterized by the changes in its hydroxyl and methoxyl groups, molecular weight, and other properties using titration and spectroscopy methods including FT-IR, 1H NMR, UV,and GPC. The total...

  16. NitroxylFluor: A Thiol-Based Fluorescent Probe for Live-Cell Imaging of Nitroxyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, Nicholas W; Davis, Jerome; Yu, Zhengxin; Chan, Jefferson

    2017-12-27

    Detection of nitroxyl (HNO), the transient one-electron reduced form of nitric oxide, is a significant challenge owing to its high reactivity with biological thiols (with rate constants as high as 10 9  M -1 s -1 ). To address this, we report a new thiol-based HNO-responsive trigger that can compete against reactive thiols for HNO. This process forms a common N-hydroxysulfenamide intermediate that cyclizes to release a masked fluorophore leading to fluorescence enhancement. To ensure that the cyclization step is rapid, our design capitalizes on two established physical organic phenomena; the alpha-effect and the Thorpe-Ingold effect. Using this new trigger, we developed NitroxylFluor, a selective HNO-responsive fluorescent probe. Treatment of NitroxylFluor with an HNO donor results in a 16-fold turn-on. This probe also exhibits excellent selectivity over various reactive nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur species and efficacy in the presence of thiols (e.g., glutathione in mM concentrations). Lastly, we successfully performed live cell imaging of HNO using NitroxylFluor.

  17. Heat- and light-induced thiol-ene oligomerization of soybean oil-based polymercaptan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polymercaptanized soybean oil (PMSO), the product of a thiol-ene reaction between soybean oil and hydrogen sulfide, is a material of interest as a lubricant additive and polymer precursor. We investigated with gel permeation chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance (one-dimensional and two-dimensi...

  18. Gold Nanoparticles Protected with Thiol-Derivatized Amphiphilic Poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-b-poly(acrylic acid)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javakhishvili, Irakli; Hvilsted, Søren

    2009-01-01

    ) of tent-butyl acrylate (tBA) in a controlled fashion by use of NiBr2(PPh3)(2) catalyst to produce Prot-PCL-b-PtBA with narrow polydispersities (1.17-1.39). Subsequent mild deprotection protocols provided HS-PCL-b-PAA. Reduction of a gold salt in the presence of this macroligand under thiol...

  19. Gold Nanoparticles Protected with Thiol-Derivatized Amphiphilic Poly( -caprolactone)-b-poly(acrylic acid)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javakhishvili, Irakli; Hvilsted, Søren

    2008-01-01

    distribution (1.09). The hydroxy chain end of Br-PCL-OR was modified by reacting with a-(2,4-dinitrophenylthio)acetic acid or a-(4methoxytritylthio) acetic acid resulting in heterotelechelic PCL incorporating protected thiol and bromoester functionalities. It was then employed as macroinitiator in NiBr2(PPh3...

  20. Effect of thione-thiol tautomerism on the inhibition of lactoperoxidase ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The keto-enol type tautomerism in anti-thyroid drugs and their selenium analogues are described. The commonly used anti-thyroid drug methimazole exists predominantly in its thione form, whereas its selenium analogue exists in a zwitterionic form. To understand the effect of thione/thiol and selone/selenol tautomerism on ...

  1. Quantitative interpretation of the transition voltages in gold-poly(phenylene) thiol-gold molecular junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Kunlin

    2013-01-01

    The transition voltage of three different asymmetric Au/poly(phenylene) thiol/Au molecular junctions in which the central molecule is either benzene thiol, biphenyl thiol, or terphenyl thiol is investigated by first-principles quantum transport simulations. For all the junctions, the calculated transition voltage at positive polarity is in quantitative agreement with the experimental values and shows weak dependence on alterations of the Au-phenyl contact. When compared to the strong coupling at the Au-S contact, which dominates the alignment of various molecular orbitals with respect to the electrode Fermi level, the coupling at the Au-phenyl contact produces only a weak perturbation. Therefore, variations of the Au-phenyl contact can only have a minor influence on the transition voltage. These findings not only provide an explanation to the uniformity in the transition voltages found for π-conjugated molecules measured with different experimental methods, but also demonstrate the advantage of transition voltage spectroscopy as a tool for determining the positions of molecular levels in molecular devices. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  2. Aroma extraction dilution analysis of Sauternes wines. Key role of polyfunctional thiols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Sabine; Jerkovic, Vesna; Marchand-Brynaert, Jacqueline; Collin, Sonia

    2006-09-20

    The aim of the present work was to investigate Sauternes wine aromas. In all wine extracts, polyfunctional thiols were revealed to have a huge impact. A very strong bacon-petroleum odor emerged at RI = 845 from a CP-Sil5-CB column. Two thiols proved to participate in this perception: 3-methyl-3-sulfanylbutanal and 2-methylfuran-3-thiol. A strong synergetic effect was evidenced between the two compounds. The former, never mentioned before in wines, and not found in the musts of this study, is most probably synthesized during fermentation. 3-Methylbut-2-ene-1-thiol, 3-sulfanylpropyl acetate, 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol, and 3-sulfanylheptanal also contribute to the global aromas of Sauternes wines. Among other key odorants, the presence of a varietal aroma (alpha-terpineol), sotolon, fermentation alcohols (3-methylbutan-1-ol and 2-phenylethanol) and esters (ethyl butyrate, ethyl hexanoate, and ethyl isovalerate), carbonyls (trans-non-2-enal and beta-damascenone), and wood flavors (guaiacol, vanillin, eugenol, beta-methyl-gamma-octalactone, and Furaneol) is worth stressing.

  3. The reaction of cinnamaldehyde and cinnam(oyl derivatives with thiols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Autelitano

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Spurred by the alleged relevance of the thia-Michael reaction in the bioactivity of various classes of cinnam(oyl natural products and by the development of a quick NMR assay to study this reaction, we have carried out a systematic study of the “native” reactivity of these compounds with dodecanethiol and cysteamine as models, respectively, of simple thiols and reactive protein thiols that can benefit from iminium ion catalysis in Michael reactions. Cinnamoyl esters and amides, as well as cinnamyl ketones and oximes, did not show any reactivity with the two probe thiols, while cinnamaldehyde (1a reacted with cysteamine to afford a mixture of a thiazoline derivative and compounds of multiple addition, and with aliphatic thiols to give a single bis-dithioacetal (6. Chalchones and their vinylogous C5-curcuminoid derivatives were the only cinnamoyl derivatives that gave a thia-Michael reaction. From a mechanistic standpoint, loss of conjugation in the adduct might underlie the lack of a native Michael reactivity. This property is restored by the presence of another conjugating group on the carbonyl, as in chalcones and C5-curcuminoids. A critical mechanistic revision of the chemical and biomedical literature on cinnamaldehyde and related compounds seems therefore required.

  4. Thiol-functionalized silica colloids, grains, and membranes for irreversible adsorption of metal(oxide) nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claesson, E.M.; Philipse, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Thiol-functionalization is described for silica surfaces from diverging origin, including commercial silica nanoparticles and St¨ober silica as well as silica structures provided by porous glasses and novel polymer-templated silica membranes. The functionalization allows in all cases for the

  5. Monitoring of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell proliferation on thiol-modified planar gold microelectrodes using impedance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Arto; Spegel, Christer F; Kostesha, Natalie

    2008-01-01

    An impedance spectroscopic study of the interaction between thiol-modified Au electrodes and Saccharomyces cerevisiae of strain EBY44 revealed that the cells formed an integral part of the interface, modulating the capacitive properties until a complete monolayer was obtained, whereas the charge ...

  6. Bimetallic redox synergy in oxidative palladium catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, David C; Ritter, Tobias

    2012-06-19

    Polynuclear transition metal complexes, which are embedded in the active sites of many metalloenzymes, are responsible for effecting a diverse array of oxidation reactions in nature. The range of chemical transformations remains unparalleled in the laboratory. With few noteworthy exceptions, chemists have primarily focused on mononuclear transition metal complexes in developing homogeneous catalysis. Our group is interested in the development of carbon-heteroatom bond-forming reactions, with a particular focus on identifying reactions that can be applied to the synthesis of complex molecules. In this context, we have hypothesized that bimetallic redox chemistry, in which two metals participate synergistically, may lower the activation barriers to redox transformations relevant to catalysis. In this Account, we discuss redox chemistry of binuclear Pd complexes and examine the role of binuclear intermediates in Pd-catalyzed oxidation reactions. Stoichiometric organometallic studies of the oxidation of binuclear Pd(II) complexes to binuclear Pd(III) complexes and subsequent C-X reductive elimination from the resulting binuclear Pd(III) complexes have confirmed the viability of C-X bond-forming reactions mediated by binuclear Pd(III) complexes. Metal-metal bond formation, which proceeds concurrently with oxidation of binuclear Pd(II) complexes, can lower the activation barrier for oxidation. We also discuss experimental and theoretical work that suggests that C-X reductive elimination is also facilitated by redox cooperation of both metals during reductive elimination. The effect of ligand modification on the structure and reactivity of binuclear Pd(III) complexes will be presented in light of the impact that ligand structure can exert on the structure and reactivity of binuclear Pd(III) complexes. Historically, oxidation reactions similar to those discussed here have been proposed to proceed via mononuclear Pd(IV) intermediates, and the hypothesis of mononuclear Pd

  7. Plastidic type I signal peptidase 1 is a redox-dependent thylakoidal processing peptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midorikawa, Takafumi; Endow, Joshua K; Dufour, Jeremy; Zhu, Jieping; Inoue, Kentaro

    2014-11-01

    Thylakoids are the photosynthetic membranes in chloroplasts and cyanobacteria. The aqueous phase inside the thylakoid known as the thylakoid lumen plays an essential role in the photosynthetic electron transport. The presence and significance of thiol-disulfide exchange in this compartment have been recognized but remain poorly understood. All proteins found free in the thylakoid lumen and some proteins associated to the thylakoid membrane require an N-terminal targeting signal, which is removed in the lumen by a membrane-bound serine protease called thylakoidal processing peptidase (TPP). TPP is homologous to Escherichia coli type I signal peptidase (SPI) called LepB. Genetic data indicate that plastidic SPI 1 (Plsp1) is the main TPP in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) although biochemical evidence had been lacking. Here we demonstrate catalytic activity of bacterially produced Arabidopsis Plsp1. Recombinant Plsp1 showed processing activity against various TPP substrates at a level comparable to that of LepB. Plsp1 and LepB were also similar in the pH optima, sensitivity to arylomycin variants and a preference for the residue at -3 to the cleavage site within a substrate. Plsp1 orthologs found in angiosperms contain two unique Cys residues located in the lumen. Results of processing assays suggested that these residues were redox active and formation of a disulfide bond between them was necessary for the activity of recombinant Arabidopsis Plsp1. Furthermore, Plsp1 in Arabidopsis and pea thylakoids migrated faster under non-reducing conditions than under reducing conditions on SDS-PAGE. These results underpin the notion that Plsp1 is a redox-dependent signal peptidase in the thylakoid lumen. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Using a redox-sensitive phosphorescent probe for optical evaluation of an intracellular redox environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shujuan; Zhou, Na; Chen, Zejing; Wei, Huanjie; Zhu, Yana; Guo, Song; Zhao, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    A reducing intracellular environment is necessary for living cells. Here a redox-sensitive phosphorescent probe Ir-NO has been developed for evaluating the redox environment in living cells. Upon addition of reducing molecules, such as glutathione and ascorbic acid, the phosphorescent intensity of the probe is turned on, and the emission lifetime is elongated evidently. Furthermore, this probe has been used for optical imaging of the intracellular reducing environment by utilizing confocal laser scanning microscopy and phosphorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

  9. Radical Decisions in Cancer: Redox Control of Cell Growth and Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Mayo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals play a key role in many physiological decisions in cells. Since free radicals are toxic to cellular components, it is known that they cause DNA damage, contribute to DNA instability and mutation and thus favor carcinogenesis. However, nowadays it is assumed that free radicals play a further complex role in cancer. Low levels of free radicals and steady state levels of antioxidant enzymes are responsible for the fine tuning of redox status inside cells. A change in redox state is a way to modify the physiological status of the cell, in fact, a more reduced status is found in resting cells while a more oxidative status is associated with proliferative cells. The mechanisms by which redox status can change the proliferative activity of cancer cells are related to transcriptional and posttranscriptional modifications of proteins that play a critical role in cell cycle control. Since cancer cells show higher levels of free radicals compared with their normal counterparts, it is believed that the anti-oxidative stress mechanism is also increased in cancer cells. In fact, the levels of some of the most important antioxidant enzymes are elevated in advanced status of some types of tumors. Anti-cancer treatment is compromised by survival mechanisms in cancer cells and collateral damage in normal non-pathological tissues. Though some resistance mechanisms have been described, they do not yet explain why treatment of cancer fails in several tumors. Given that some antitumoral treatments are based on the generation of free radicals, we will discuss in this review the possible role of antioxidant enzymes in the survival mechanism in cancer cells and then, its participation in the failure of cancer treatments.

  10. Redox metabolism abnormalities in autistic children associated with mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, R E; Delatorre, R; Taylor, H; Slattery, J; Melnyk, S; Chowdhury, N; James, S J

    2013-06-18

    Research studies have uncovered several metabolic abnormalities associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including mitochondrial disease (MD) and abnormal redox metabolism. Despite the close connection between mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, the relation between MD and oxidative stress in children with ASD has not been studied. Plasma markers of oxidative stress and measures of cognitive and language development and ASD behavior were obtained from 18 children diagnosed with ASD who met criteria for probable or definite MD per the Morava et al. criteria (ASD/MD) and 18 age and gender-matched ASD children without any biological markers or symptoms of MD (ASD/NoMD). Plasma measures of redox metabolism included reduced free glutathione (fGSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), the fGSH/GSSG ratio and 3-nitrotyrosine (3NT). In addition, a plasma measure of chronic immune activation, 3-chlorotyrosine (3CT), was also measured. Language was measured using the preschool language scale or the expressive one-word vocabulary test (depending on the age), adaptive behaviour was measured using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS) and core autism symptoms were measured using the Autism Symptoms Questionnaire and the Social Responsiveness Scale. Children with ASD/MD were found to have lower scores on the communication and daily living skill subscales of the VABS despite having similar language and ASD symptoms. Children with ASD/MD demonstrated significantly higher levels of fGSH/GSSG and lower levels of GSSG as compared with children with ASD/NoMD, suggesting an overall more favourable glutathione redox status in the ASD/MD group. However, compare with controls, both ASD groups demonstrated lower fGSH and fGSH/GSSG, demonstrating that both groups suffer from redox abnormalities. Younger ASD/MD children had higher levels of 3CT than younger ASD/NoMD children because of an age-related effect in the ASD/MD group. Both ASD groups demonstrated significantly

  11. Attenuation of LDHA expression in cancer cells leads to redox-dependent alterations in cytoskeletal structure and cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arseneault, Robert; Chien, Andrew; Newington, Jordan T; Rappon, Tim; Harris, Richard; Cumming, Robert C

    2013-09-28

    Aerobic glycolysis, the preferential use of glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen to meet cellular metabolic demands, is a near universal feature of cancer. This unique type of metabolism is thought to protect cancer cells from damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the mitochondria. Using the cancer cell line MDA-MB-435 it is shown that shRNA mediated knockdown of lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), a key mediator of aerobic glycolysis, results in elevated mitochondrial ROS production and a concomitant decrease in cell proliferation and motility. Redox-sensitive proteins affected by oxidative stress associated with LDHA knockdown were identified by Redox 2D-PAGE and mass spectrometry. In particular, tropomyosin (Tm) isoforms Tm4, Tm5NM1 and Tm5NM5, proteins involved in cell migration and cytoskeletal dynamics, exhibited changes in disulfide bonding and co-localized with peri-nuclear actin aggregates in LDHA knockdown cells. In contrast, treatment with the thiol-based antioxidant N-acetylcysteine promoted the relocalization of Tms to cortical actin microfilaments and partially rescued the migration defects associated with attenuated LDHA expression. These results suggest that aerobic glycolysis and reduced mitochondrial ROS production create an environment conducive to cytoskeletal remodeling; key events linked to the high cell motility associated with cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Redox models in chemistry :  A depiction of the conceptions held by secondary school students of redox reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Österlund, Lise-Lotte

    2010-01-01

    According to previous research, students show difficulties in learning redox reactions. By the historical development different redox models exist to explain redox reactions, the oxygen model, the hydrogen model, the electron model and the oxidation number model. This thesis reports about three studies concerning conceptions held by secondary school students of redox reactions. A textbook analysis is also included in the thesis. The first study was an investigation of the students’ use of red...

  13. The Comparison of One-Session Intensive Aerobic Exercise Effects on Glutathione Redox State of Red Blood Cells in Professional, Recreational Athletes and Nonathletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Seifi-Skishahr

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The “redox” state represents the oxidation/reduction potential within the cell in a way that more “redox” is the marker of health, while the more oxidized reflects predisposition to diseases. Different types of exercise training may change the thiol/disulfide ratio of redox couples such as glutathione and represent a shift in redox balance. This study was assessed the influence of high-intensity aerobic exercise on glutathione redox state in red blood cells in professional, recreational athletes and nonathletes.   Methods: Ten voluntary well trained (WT, moderately trained (MT and untrained men subjectswere randomly selected for this semi-experimental study (mean ages of 21.10±1.72 21.70±1.88 and 20.10±1.44, respectively. Blood samples were collected before, immediately, 10 min and 30 min after acute aerobic exercise with 75%VO2max. The levels of reduced glutathione (GSH, oxidized glutathione (GSSG and (GSH/GSSG in red blood cells (RBCs as well as serum levels of cortisol and creatine kinase (CK were measured.   Results: The results showed reduction, elevation and no changes in RBCs GSH/GSSG ratio in UT, MT and WT groups, respectively. The lowest levels of GSH/GSSG ratio in RBCs and the highest one were detected in the WT and MT groups, respectively. The serum levels of cortisol and creatine kinase were increased following the exercise in three groups.   Conclusion: It is concluded that acute aerobic exercise with high intensity does not change redox balance in well trained subjects, however it is capable to shift redox balance towards more reducing environment in moderately trained subjects and also to more oxidizing one in untrained subjects.

  14. Redox Regulation in Cancer: A Double-edged Sword with Therapeutic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Acharya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress, implicated in the etiology of cancer, results from an imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and cell’s own antioxidant defenses. ROS deregulate the redox homeostasis and promote tumor formation by initiating an aberrant induction of signaling networks that cause tumorigenesis. Ultraviolet (UV exposures, γ-radiation and other environmental carcinogens generate ROS in the cells, which can exert apoptosis in the tumors, thereby killing the malignant cells or induce the progression of the cancer growth by blocking cellular defense system. Cancer stem cells take the advantage of the aberrant redox system and spontaneously proliferate. Oxidative stress and gene-environment interactions play a significant role in the development of breast, prostate, pancreatic and colon cancer. Prolonged lifetime exposure to estrogen is associated with several kinds of DNA damage. Oxidative stress and estrogen receptor-associated proliferative changes are suggested to play important roles in estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis. BRCA1, a tumor suppressor against hormone responsive cancers such as breast and prostate cancer, plays a significant role in inhibiting ROS and estrogen mediated DNA damage; thereby regulate the redox homeostasis of the cells. Several transcription factors and tumor suppressors are involved during stress response such as Nrf2, NFκB and BRCA1. A promising strategy for targeting redox status of the cells is to use readily available natural substances from vegetables, fruits, herbs and spices. Many of the phytochemicals have already been identified to have chemopreventive potential, capable of intervening in carcinogenesis.

  15. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ryan Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP, decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231 breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24 h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10 µM of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC protein levels, although other protein levels were

  16. Effect of Redox Modulating NRF2 Activators on Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-hyun Choi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is featured by a progressive decline of kidney function and is mainly caused by chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension. CKD is a complex disease due to cardiovascular complications and high morbidity; however, there is no single treatment to improve kidney function in CKD patients. Since biological markers representing oxidative stress are significantly elevated in CKD patients, oxidative stress is receiving attention as a contributing factor to CKD pathology. Nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (NRF2 is a predominant transcription factor that regulates the expression of a wide array of genes encoding antioxidant proteins, thiol molecules and their generating enzymes, detoxifying enzymes, and stress response proteins, all of which can counteract inflammatory and oxidative damages. There is considerable experimental evidence suggesting that NRF2 signaling plays a protective role in renal injuries that are caused by various pathologic conditions. In addition, impaired NRF2 activity and consequent target gene repression have been observed in CKD animals. Therefore, a pharmacological intervention activating NRF2 signaling can be beneficial in protecting against kidney dysfunction in CKD. This review article provides an overview of the role of NRF2 in experimental CKD models and describes current findings on the renoprotective effects of naturally occurring NRF2 activators, including sulforaphane, resveratrol, curcumin, and cinnamic aldehyde. These experimental results, coupled with recent clinical experiences with a synthetic triterpenoid, bardoxolone methyl, have brought a light of hope for ameliorating CKD progression by preventing oxidative stress and maintaining cellular redox homeostasis.

  17. Diverse redox-active molecules bearing O-, S-, or Se-terminated tethers for attachment to silicon in studies of molecular information storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, Arumugham; Lysenko, Andrey B; Carcel, Carole; Malinovskii, Vladimir L; Gryko, Daniel T; Schweikart, Karl-Heinz; Loewe, Robert S; Yasseri, Amir A; Liu, Zhiming; Bocian, David F; Lindsey, Jonathan S

    2004-03-05

    A molecular approach to information storage employs redox-active molecules tethered to an electroactive surface. Attachment of the molecules to electroactive surfaces requires control over the nature of the tether (linker and surface attachment group). We have synthesized a collection of redox-active molecules bearing different linkers and surface anchor groups in free or protected form (hydroxy, mercapto, S-acetylthio, and Se-acetylseleno) for attachment to surfaces such as silicon, germanium, and gold. The molecules exhibit a number of cationic oxidation states, including one (ferrocene), two [zinc(II)porphyrin], three [cobalt(II)porphyrin], or four (lanthanide triple-decker sandwich compound). Electrochemical studies of monolayers of a variety of the redox-active molecules attached to Si(100) electrodes indicate that molecules exhibit a regular mode of attachment (via a Si-X bond, X = O, S, or Se), relatively homogeneous surface organization, and robust reversible electrochemical behavior. The acetyl protecting group undergoes cleavage during the surface deposition process, enabling attachment to silicon via thio or seleno groups without handling free thiols or selenols.

  18. The role of cysteine residues in redox regulation and protein stability of Arabidopsis thaliana starch synthase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna; Cu